WorldWideScience

Sample records for laser induced photoelectron

  1. Advancements in time-resolved x-ray laser induced time-of-flight photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, A J; Dunn, J; Widmann, K; Ao, T; Ping, Y; Hunter, J; Ng, A

    2005-07-28

    Time-resolved soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to probe the non-steady-state evolution of the valence band electronic structure of laser heated ultra-thin (50 nm) metal foils and bulk semiconductors. Single-shot soft x-ray laser induced time-of-flight photoelectron spectroscopy with picosecond time resolution was used in combination with optical measurements of the disassembly dynamics that have shown the existence of a metastable liquid phase in fs-laser heated metal foils persisting 4-5 ps. This metastable phase is studied using a 527 nm wavelength 400 fs laser pulse containing 0.3-2.5 mJ laser energy focused in a large 500 x 700 {micro}m{sup 2} spot to create heated conditions of 0.2-1.8 x 10{sup 12} W cm{sup -2} intensity. The unique LLNL COMET compact tabletop soft x-ray laser source provided the necessary high photon flux, highly monoenergetic, picosecond pulse duration, and coherence for observing the evolution of changes in the valence band electronic structure of laser heated metals and semiconductors with picosecond time resolution. This work demonstrates the continuing development of a powerful new technique for probing reaction dynamics and changes of local order on surfaces on their fundamental timescales including phenomena such as non-thermal melting, chemical bond formation, intermediate reaction steps, and the existence of transient reaction products.

  2. Crystallographic orientation and induced potential effects in photoelectron emission from metal surfaces by ultrashort laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Rubiano, C A Rios; Mitnik, D M; Silkin, V M; Gravielle, M S

    2016-01-01

    The influence of the crystallographic orientation of a typical metal surface, like aluminum, on electron emission spectra produced by grazing incidence of ultrashort laser pulses is investigated by using the band-structure-based-Volkov (BSB-V) approximation. The present version of the BSB-V approach includes not only a realistic description of the surface interaction, accounting for band structure effects, but also effects due to the induced potential that originates from the collective response of valence-band electrons to the external electromagnetic field. The model is applied to evaluate differential electron emission probabilities from the valence band of Al(100) and Al(111). For both crystallographic orientations, the contribution of partially occupied surface electronic states and the influence of the induced potential are separately analyzed as a function of the laser carrier frequency. We found that the induced potential strongly affects photoelectron emission distributions, opening a window to scrut...

  3. Laser-Induced Electron Diffraction: Inversion of Photoelectron Spectra for Molecular Orbital Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Puthumpally-Joseph, R; Peters, M; Nguyen-Dang, T T; Atabek, O; Charron, E

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the possibility of imaging molecular orbitals from photoelectron spectra obtained via Laser Induced Electron Diffraction (LIED) in linear molecules. This is an extension of our work published recently in Physical Review A \\textbf{94}, 023421 (2016) to the case of the HOMO-1 orbital of the carbon dioxide molecule. We show that such an imaging technique has the potential to image molecular orbitals at different internuclear distances in a sub-femtosecond time scale and with a resolution of a fraction of an Angstr\\"om.

  4. X-Ray Laser Induced Photoelectron Spectroscopy for Single-State Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, A J; Dunn, J; van Buuren, T; Hunter, J

    2004-07-14

    We demonstrate single-shot x-ray laser induced time-of-flight photoelectron spectroscopy on metal and semiconductor surfaces with picosecond time resolution. The LLNL COMET compact tabletop x-ray laser source provides the necessary high photon flux (>10{sup 12}/pulse), monochromaticity, picosecond pulse duration, and coherence for probing ultrafast changes in the chemical and electronic structure of these materials. Static valence band and shallow core-level photoemission spectra are presented for ambient temperature polycrystalline Cu foils and Ge(100). Surface contamination was removed by UV ozone cleaning prior to analysis. The ultrafast nature of this technique lends itself to true single-state measurements of shocked and heated materials.

  5. Velocity map imaging of femtosecond laser induced photoelectron emission from metal nanotips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, A. R.; Bryan, W. A.

    2014-10-01

    A novel application of velocity-map imaging (VMI) is demonstrated, whereby the momentum distribution of photoelectrons ejected from a tungsten nanoscale metal tip (VMI instrument are optimized through finite element modelling, taking into account a physically realistic geometry including all conductive elements in the vicinity of the electron trajectories. The instrument is calibrated by observing above threshold ionization in krypton gas, and simultaneous electron emission from this gas and a tungsten nanotip is presented, illustrating that the velocity mapping condition is maintained. Realizing photoelectron VMI for femtosecond laser illuminated nanoscale objects will have a significant impact on the emerging field of ultrafast nanoplasmonics and will influence the development of such devices as a source of coherent pulses of electrons with applications in time-resolved microscopy, holography and diffractive imaging.

  6. Pump laser-induced space-charge effects in HHG-driven time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oloff, L.-P.; Hanff, K.; Stange, A.; Rohde, G.; Diekmann, F.; Bauer, M.; Rossnagel, K.

    2016-06-01

    With the advent of ultrashort-pulsed extreme ultraviolet sources, such as free-electron lasers or high-harmonic-generation (HHG) sources, a new research field for photoelectron spectroscopy has opened up in terms of femtosecond time-resolved pump-probe experiments. The impact of the high peak brilliance of these novel sources on photoemission spectra, so-called vacuum space-charge effects caused by the Coulomb interaction among the photoemitted probe electrons, has been studied extensively. However, possible distortions of the energy and momentum distributions of the probe photoelectrons caused by the low photon energy pump pulse due to the nonlinear emission of electrons have not been studied in detail yet. Here, we systematically investigate these pump laser-induced space-charge effects in a HHG-based experiment for the test case of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. Specifically, we determine how the key parameters of the pump pulse—the excitation density, wavelength, spot size, and emitted electron energy distribution—affect the measured time-dependent energy and momentum distributions of the probe photoelectrons. The results are well reproduced by a simple mean-field model, which could open a path for the correction of pump laser-induced space-charge effects and thus toward probing ultrafast electron dynamics in strongly excited materials.

  7. Laser induced threshold photoemission magnetic circular dichroism and its application to photoelectron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, Takeshi, E-mail: nakagawa@ims.ac.jp [Institute for Molecular Science, Myodaiji-cho, Okazaki, 444-8585 (Japan); The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (Sokendai), Myodaiji-cho, Okazaki, 444-8585 (Japan); Yokoyama, Toshihiko, E-mail: yokoyama@ims.ac.jp [Institute for Molecular Science, Myodaiji-cho, Okazaki, 444-8585 (Japan); The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (Sokendai), Myodaiji-cho, Okazaki, 444-8585 (Japan)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Threshold photoemission magnetic circular dichroism results are presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The enhanced MCD contrast is used to observe magnetic domains by PEEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetization axis, probing depth and angle dependence of MCD are described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Laser based measurements in this method expand the possibility of PEEM. -- Abstract: This work enlightens the threshold photoemission magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) and its adaption on photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) using lasers. MCD is a simple and efficient way to investigate magnetic properties since it does not need any spin analyzers with low efficiency, and thus the MCD related techniques have developed to observe magnetic domains. Usually, MCD in a total yield measurement in the valence band with weak spin-orbit coupling (SOC) excited by low photon energy (h{nu}{<=} 6 eV) does not compete with the X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) with strong SOC. XMCD PEEM observation of magnetic domains has been successfully established while MCD PEEM derived from valence bands has not been. However, using angle and energy resolved photoelectron, valence band MCD provides large asymmetry similar to that by XMCD. Threshold measurement of photoelectron in a total electron yield procedure can take advantage of the measurement of photoelectrons with a limited angle and energy mode. This restriction of the photoelectron makes the threshold MCD technique an efficient way to get magnetic information and gives more than 10% asymmetry for Ni/Cu(0 0 1), which is comparable to that obtained by angle resolved photoemission. Thus the threshold MCD technique is a suitable method to observe magnetic domains by PEEM. For threshold MCD, incident angle dependence and high sensitivity to out-of-plane magnetized films compared with in-plane ones are discussed. Ultrashort pulse lasers make it feasible to measure two photon

  8. Single-State Electronic Structure Measurements Using Time-Resolved X-Ray Laser Induced Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, A J; Dunn, J; van Buuren, T; Hunter, J

    2004-11-11

    We demonstrate single-shot x-ray laser induced time-of-flight photoelectron spectroscopy on semiconductor and metal surfaces with picosecond time resolution. The LLNL COMET compact tabletop x-ray laser source provides the necessary high photon flux (>10{sup 12}/pulse), monochromaticity, picosecond pulse duration, and coherence for probing ultrafast changes in the city, chemical and electronic structure of these materials. Static valence band and shallow core-level photoemission spectra are presented for ambient temperature Ge(100) and polycrystalline Cu foils. Surface contamination was removed by UV ozone cleaning prior to analysis. In addition, the ultrafast nature of this technique lends itself to true single-state measurements of shocked and heated materials. Time-resolved electron time-of-flight photoemission results for ultra-thin Cu will be presented.

  9. Photo-electron momentum distribution and electron localization studies from laser-induced atomic and molecular dissociations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Dipanwita

    The broad objective of ultrafast strong-field studies is to be able to measure and control atomic and molecular dynamics on a femtosecond timescale. This thesis work has two major themes: (1) Study of high-energy photoelectron distributions from atomic targets. (2) Electron localization control in atomic and molecular reactions using shaped laser pulses. The first section focuses on the study of photoelectron diffraction patterns of simple atomic targets to understand the target structure. We measure the full vector momentum spectra of high energy photoelectrons from atomic targets (Xe, Ar and Kr) generated by intense laser pulses. The target dependence of the angular distribution of the highest energy photoelectrons as predicted by Quantitative Rescattering Theory (QRS) is explored. More recent developments show target structure information can be retrieved from photoelectrons over a range of energies, from 4Up up to 10Up, independent of the peak intensity at which the photoelectron spectra have been measured. Controlling the fragmentation pathways by manipulating the pulse shape is another major theme of ultrafast science today. In the second section we study the asymmetry of electron (and ion) emission from atoms (and molecules) by interaction with asymmetric pulses formed by the superposition of two colors (800 & 400 nm). Xe electron momentum spectra obtained as a function of the two-color phase exhibit a pronounced asymmetry. Using QRS theory we can analyze this asymmetric yield of the high energy photoelectrons to determine accurately the laser peak intensity and the absolute phase of the two-color electric field. This can be used as a standard pulse calibration method for all two-color studies. Experiments showing strong left-right asymmetry in D+ ion yield from D2 molecules using two-color pulses is also investigated. The asymmetry effect is found to be very ion-energy dependent.

  10. Photoelectron sidebands induced by a chirped laser field for shot-by-shot temporal characterization of FEL pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chien-Nan; Morishita, Toru; Fushitani, Mizuho; Hishikawa, Akiyoshi

    2016-02-01

    We theoretically investigate the laser-assisted photoionization of He by an extreme ultra violet (XUV) pulse in the presence of a linearly chirped intense laser pulse by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation within the single-active-electron approximation. Analysis based on the time-dependent perturbation theory is also carried out to provide more physical insights. A new scheme is shown to be capable of extracting the arrival time of an XUV free-electron laser (FEL) pulse relative to an external laser pulse as well as the XUV pulse duration from the photoelectron sidebands resulting from XUV ionization in the presence of a chirped laser pulse. This scheme is independent of the energy fluctuation and the timing jittering of the FEL pulse. Therefore it can be implemented in a non-invasive way to characterize FEL pulses on a shot-by-shot basis in time-resolved spectroscopy.

  11. Laser photoelectron spectroscopy of ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellison, G.B. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder (United States)

    1993-12-01

    During the last year the author has (a) completed a review article that critically contrasts three methods to measure R-H bond energies, (b) finished a spectroscopic study of the phenylnitrene anion, and (c) successfully completed an overhaul of the light source of the photodetachment spectrometer. The new light source is based on an Ar III laser that provides approximately 100 W of 3.531 eV photons.

  12. Elemental content of enamel and dentin after bleaching of teeth (a comparative study between laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imam, H. [National Institute of Laser Enhanced Sciences, NILES, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt); Ahmed, Doaa [Department of Restorative Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, Alexandria University, Alexandria (Egypt); Eldakrouri, Ashraf [National Institute of Laser Enhanced Sciences, NILES, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt); Department of Optometry and Vision Science, College of Applied Medical Science, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-06-21

    The elemental content of the superficial and inner enamel as well as that of dentin was analyzed using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of bleached and unbleached tooth specimens. It is thus clear from the spectral analysis using both the LIBS and XPS technique that elemental changes (though insignificant within the scopes of this study) of variable intensities do occur on the surface of the enamel and extend deeper to reach dentin. The results of the LIBS revealed a slight reduction in the calcium levels in the bleached compared to the control specimens in all the different bleaching groups and in both enamel and dentin. The good correlation found between the LIBS and XPS results demonstrates the possibility of LIBS technique for detection of minor loss in calcium and phosphorus in enamel and dentin.

  13. Extraction of electron–ion differential scattering cross sections for C2H4 by laser-induced rescattering photoelectron spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, C.; Okunishi, M.; Lucchese, R. R.;

    2012-01-01

    We have measured angle-resolved rescattering electron momentum distributions for C2H4 generated by intense infrared laser pulses and extracted large-angle elastic differential cross sections (DCSs) for electrons scattering from C2H4+. The angle-dependent ionization rate describing the initial...

  14. Long-Range Coulomb Effect in Intense Laser-Driven Photoelectron Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Wei; Hao, Xiaolei; Chen, Yongju; Yu, Shaogang; Xu, Songpo; Wang, Yanlan; Sun, Renping; Lai, Xuanyang; Wu, Chengyin; Gong, Qihuang; He, Xiantu; Liu, Xiaojun; Chen, Jing

    2016-06-01

    In strong field atomic physics community, long-range Coulomb interaction has for a long time been overlooked and its significant role in intense laser-driven photoelectron dynamics eluded experimental observations. Here we report an experimental investigation of the effect of long-range Coulomb potential on the dynamics of near-zero-momentum photoelectrons produced in photo-ionization process of noble gas atoms in intense midinfrared laser pulses. By exploring the dependence of photoelectron distributions near zero momentum on laser intensity and wavelength, we unambiguously demonstrate that the long-range tail of the Coulomb potential (i.e., up to several hundreds atomic units) plays an important role in determining the photoelectron dynamics after the pulse ends.

  15. Use of photoelectron laser phase determination method for attosecond measurements with quantum-mechanical calculations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ge Yu-Cheng

    2008-01-01

    This paper calculates quantum-mechanically the photoelectron energy spectra excited by attosecond x-rays in the presence of a few-cycle laser. A photoelectron laser phase determination method is used for precise measurements of the pulse natural properties of x-ray intensity and the instantaneous frequency profiles. As a direct procedure without any previous pulse profile assumptions and time-resolved measurements as well as data fitting analysis, this method can be used to improve the time resolutions of attosecond timing and measurements with metrological precision. The measurement range is half of a laser optical cycle.

  16. Photoelectron angular distributions from photodetachment of negative ions in strong laser fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai Lihua; Liu Yuheng; Cui Tingting; Wang Yan; Zhang Huifang; Deng Dongmei [Department of Physics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Ren Xianghe, E-mail: lhbai@163.com [Institute of Advance Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto, 611-0011 (Japan)

    2011-02-01

    Using a nonperturbative scattering theory, the photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) of negative ions irradiated by intense laser fields are studied. Various PADs are obtained. Similar to that of atoms, PADs of negative ions show main lobes and jet-like structures. Here, the main lobe means the formation of the detached photoelectrons around the direction of laser polarization, while the jet-like structure means a peaked-out formation of photoelectrons emitted from the waist between the two main lobes. For a set of above-threshold-detachment peaks, with one-more-photon absorption, the number of the jet-like structures is not always increased by one, which verifies that the jet-like structures are irrelevant to photoelectron angular momentum.

  17. A laser-generated plasma as a source of VUV continuum radiation for photoelectronic spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Heckenkamp, Ch.; Heinzmann, Ulrich; Schönhense, G.; BURGESS.D.D; Thorne, A. P.; Wheaton, J. E. G.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of using laser-generated plasmas as VUV continuum sources for photoelectron spectroscopy has been demonstrated by measuring the spectral intensity distribution of the VUV continuum in the wavelength region from 79 to 43 nm by energy analysis of the photoelectrons ejected from argon atoms. The maximum photon flux obtained after reflection at a gold-coated spherical mirror was of the order of 10(11) photons nm(-1) per pulse at 50 nm for a laser energy of 830 mJ. The results show...

  18. Single-order laser high harmonics in XUV for ultrafast photoelectron spectroscopy of molecular wavepacket dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizuho Fushitani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We present applications of extreme ultraviolet (XUV single-order laser harmonics to gas-phase ultrafast photoelectron spectroscopy. Ultrashort XUV pulses at 80 nm are obtained as the 5th order harmonics of the fundamental laser at 400 nm by using Xe or Kr as the nonlinear medium and separated from other harmonic orders by using an indium foil. The single-order laser harmonics is applied for real-time probing of vibrational wavepacket dynamics of I2 molecules in the bound and dissociating low-lying electronic states and electronic-vibrational wavepacket dynamics of highly excited Rydberg N2 molecules.

  19. Autler- Townes Splitting in Photoelectron Spectrum of Three-Level Li2 Molecule in Ultrashort Pulse Laser Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Wen-Hui; YUAN Kai-Jun; HAN Yong-Chang; Shu Chuang-Cun; CONG Shu-Lin

    2007-01-01

    The Autler-Townes (AT) splitting in femtosecond photoelectron spectrum of three-level Lii molecules is theoretically investigated using time-dependent quantum wave packet method. With proper femtosecond laser pulses, three peaks of the AT splitting can be observed in the photoelectron spectrum. The AT splitting stems from rapid Rabi oscillation caused by intense ultrashort laser pluses. The effects of laser parameters on the molecular ionization dynamics are also discussed.

  20. Photoelectron momentum distributions of the hydrogen molecular ion driven by multicycle near-infrared laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Mitsuko; Chu, Shih-I.

    2016-10-01

    The photoelectron momentum distributions (PMDs) of the hydrogen molecular ion H2+ driven by strong near-infrared laser pulses are studied based on the ab initio numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation and the Volkov wave propagation. Both linear and circular polarization are considered, in accordance with the recent experiment by M. Odenweller et al. [Phys. Rev. A 89, 013424 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevA.89.013424]. We will discuss the difference between the molecular (diatomic) and the atomic PMDs and the effect of molecular potential to the photoelectron energy. In particular, we demonstrate that the above-threshold ionization spectra of H2+ could upshift their energy when driven by a linearly polarized laser field parallel to the molecular axis.

  1. Longitudinal photoelectron momentum shifts induced by absorbing a single XUV photon in diatomic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Lao, Di; He, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The photoelectron momentum shifts along the laser propagation are investigated by the time-dependent perturbation theory for diatomic molecules, such as H$_2^+$, N$_2$ and O$_2$. Such longitudinal momentum shifts characterize the photon momentum sharing in atoms and molecules, and oscillate with respect to photon energies, presenting the double-slit interference structure. The atomic and molecular contributions are disentangled analytically, which gives intuitive picture how the double-slit interference structure is formed. Calculation results show the longitudinal photoelectron momentum distribution depends on the internuclear distance, molecular orientation and photon energy. The current laser technology is ready to approve these theoretical predictions.

  2. Ultrafast Internal Conversion of Aromatic Molecules Studied by Photoelectron Spectroscopy using Sub-20 fs Laser Pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshinori Suzuki

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This article describes our recent experimental studies on internal conversion via a conical intersection using photoelectron spectroscopy. Ultrafast S2(ππ*–S1(nπ* internal conversion in pyrazine is observed in real time using sub-20 fs deep ultraviolet pulses (264 and 198 nm. While the photoelectron kinetic energy distribution does not exhibit a clear signature of internal conversion, the photoelectron angular anisotropy unambiguously reveals the sudden change of electron configuration upon internal conversion. An explanation is presented as to why these two observables have different sensitivities to internal conversion. The 198 nm probe photon energy is insufficient for covering the entire Franck-Condon envelopes upon photoionization from S2/S1 to D1/D0. A vacuum ultraviolet free electron laser (SCSS producing 161 nm radiation is employed to solve this problem, while its pulse-to-pulse timing jitter limits the time resolution to about 1 ps. The S2–S1 internal conversion is revisited using the sub-20 fs 159 nm pulse created by filamentation four-wave mixing. Conical intersections between D1(π−1 and D0(n−1 and also between the Rydberg state with a D1 ion core and that with a D0 ion core of pyrazine are studied by He(I photoelectron spectroscopy, pulsed field ionization photoelectron spectroscopy and one-color resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy. Finally, ultrafast S2(ππ*–S1(ππ* internal conversion in benzene and toluene are compared with pyrazine.

  3. A Scaling Law of Photoelectron Angular Distributions in One-Cycle Laser Pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Li-Hua; ZHANG Jing-Tao; XU Zhi-Zhan

    2005-01-01

    @@ The photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) from above-threshold ionization of atoms irradiated by one-cycle laser pulses satisfy a scaling law.The scaling law denotes that the main features of the PADs are determined by four dimensionless parameters: (1) the ponderomotive number up = Up/hω, the ponderomotive energy Up in units of laser photon energy; (2) the binding number εb = Eb/hω, the atomic binding energy Eb in units of laser photon energy; (3) the number of absorbed photons q; (4) the carrier-envelope phase Φ0, the phase of the carrier wave with respect to the envelope.We verify the scaling law by theoretical analysis and numerical calculation,compared to that in long-pulse case.A possible experimental test to verify the scaling law is suggested.

  4. Photoelectron detection from transient species in organic semiconducting thin films by dual laser pulse irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokai, Takuya; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Furube, Akihiro; Nakamura, Ken

    2017-02-01

    An Nd3+:YAG pulsed laser was employed as a light source for two-photon photoemission from organic semiconducting thin films in low vacuum and air. Photoionization by the two-photon process was confirmed in both the environments by measuring photoemission current. By constructing a pump-probe system, photoemissions from transient species formed by the pump light irradiation were detected by probe light irradiation as a result of a linear increase in the photocurrent with the pump power via a one-photon process. Thus, we propose a novel method called two-photon photoelectron yield spectroscopy to determine the excited-state energy levels in ambient environments.

  5. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of excimer laser treated alumina films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, D. G.; Kolev, K.; Laude, L. D.; Mednikarov, B.; Starbov, N.

    1998-01-01

    Amorphous alumina layers are deposited on a single crystal Si substrate by a e-gun evaporation technique. These films are then thermally annealed in oxygen to be crystallized and, further, irradiated with an excimer laser beam. At each stage of the film preparation, an x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis is performed at the film surface and in depth, upon ion beam grinding. Results give evidence for the formation of an aluminosilicate upon thermal annealing of the film in oxygen. At the surface itself, this compound is observed to decompose upon excimer laser irradiation at energy densities exceeding 1.75 J/cm2, giving rise to free Si atoms and SiO2, however with complete disappearance of Al atoms. Model photochemical reactions are proposed to explain such transformations.

  6. Laser induced nuclear reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledingham, Ken; McCanny, Tom; Graham, Paul; Fang, Xiao; Singhal, Ravi; Magill, Joe; Creswell, Alan; Sanderson, David; Allott, Ric; Neely, David; Norreys, Peter; Santala, Marko; Zepf, Matthew; Watts, Ian; Clark, Eugene; Krushelnick, Karl; Tatarakis, Michael; Dangor, Bucker; Machecek, Antonin; Wark, Justin

    1998-12-01

    Dramatic improvements in laser technology since 1984 have revolutionised high power laser technology. Application of chirped-pulse amplification techniques has resulted in laser intensities in excess of 1019W/cm2. In the mid to late eighties, C. K. Rhodes and K. Boyer discussed the possibility of shining laser light of this intensity onto solid surfaces and to cause nuclear transitions. In particular, irradiation of a uranium target could induce electro- and photofission in the focal region of the laser. In this paper it is shown that μCi of 62Cu can be generated via the (γ,n) reaction by a laser with an intensity of about 1019Wcm-2.

  7. High-resolution threshold photoelectron study of the propargyl radical by the vacuum ultraviolet laser velocity-map imaging method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hong; Xu, Yuntao; Yang, Lei; Lam, Chow-Shing; Wang, Hailing; Zhou, Jingang; Ng, C. Y.

    2011-12-01

    By employing the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser velocity-map imaging (VMI) photoelectron scheme to discriminate energetic photoelectrons, we have measured the VUV-VMI-threshold photoelectrons (VUV-VMI-TPE) spectra of propargyl radical [C3H3({tilde X}{}^2B_1)] near its ionization threshold at photoelectron energy bandwidths of 3 and 7 cm-1 (full-width at half-maximum, FWHM). The simulation of the VUV-VMI-TPE spectra thus obtained, along with the Stark shift correction, has allowed the determination of a precise value 70 156 ± 4 cm-1 (8.6982 ± 0.0005 eV) for the ionization energy (IE) of C3H3. In the present VMI-TPE experiment, the Stark shift correction is determined by comparing the VUV-VMI-TPE and VUV laser pulsed field ionization-photoelectron (VUV-PFI-PE) spectra for the origin band of the photoelectron spectrum of the {tilde X}^ + {- tilde X} transition of chlorobenzene. The fact that the FWHMs for this origin band observed using the VUV-VMI-TPE and VUV-PFI-PE methods are nearly the same indicates that the energy resolutions achieved in the VUV-VMI-TPE and VUV-PFI-PE measurements are comparable. The IE(C3H3) value obtained based on the VUV-VMI-TPE measurement is consistent with the value determined by the VUV laser PIE spectrum of supersonically cooled C3H3({tilde X}{}^2B_1) radicals, which is also reported in this article.

  8. X-ray-induced photoemission yield for surface studies of solids beyond the photoelectron escape depth

    CERN Document Server

    Stoupin, Stanislav; Zhernenkov, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    X-ray-induced photoemission in materials research is commonly acknowledged as a method with a probing depth limited by the escape depth of the photoelectrons. This general statement should be complemented with exceptions arising from the distribution of the X-ray wavefield in the material. Here we show that the integral hard-X-ray-induced photoemission yield is modulated by the Fresnel reflectivity of a multilayer structure with the signal originating well below the photoelectron escape depth. A simple electric self-detection of the integral photoemission yield and Fourier data analysis permit extraction of thicknesses of individual layers. The approach does not require detection of the reflected radiation and can be considered as a framework for non-invasive evaluation of buried layers with hard X-rays under grazing incidence.

  9. Laser-Induced Continuum Structure of NO Molecules in Two-Colour Femtosecond Pulsed Laser Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Sen-Ming; YUAN Kai-Jun; CONG Shu-Lin

    2006-01-01

    The method of quantum wave packet dynamics is used to study the multiphoton ionization of NO molecules via a two-photon Raman coupling and a laser-induced continuum structure (LICS) state in two-colour strong femtosecond pulsed laser fields.Time-and energy-resolved photoelectron energy spectra are calculated for describing three photoionization channels.The population transfers through the LICS and the Raman coupling passages and discussed.

  10. Wavelength dependent photoelectron circular dichroism of limonene studied by femtosecond multiphoton laser ionization and electron-ion coincidence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiee Fanood, Mohammad M.; Janssen, Maurice H. M.; Powis, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    Enantiomers of the monoterpene limonene have been investigated by (2 + 1) resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization and photoelectron circular dichroism employing tuneable, circularly polarized femtosecond laser pulses. Electron imaging detection provides 3D momentum measurement while electron-ion coincidence detection can be used to mass-tag individual electrons. Additional filtering, by accepting only parent ion tagged electrons, can be then used to provide discrimination against higher energy dissociative ionization mechanisms where more than three photons are absorbed to better delineate the two photon resonant, one photon ionization pathway. The promotion of different vibrational levels and, tentatively, different electronic ion core configurations in the intermediate Rydberg states can be achieved with different laser excitation wavelengths (420 nm, 412 nm, and 392 nm), in turn producing different state distributions in the resulting cations. Strong chiral asymmetries in the lab frame photoelectron angular distributions are quantified, and a comparison made with a single photon (synchrotron radiation) measurement at an equivalent photon energy.

  11. A High-resolution Vacuum Ultraviolet Laser Photoionization and Photoelectron Study of the Co Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huang; Wang, Hailing; Luo, Zhihong; Shi, Xiaoyu; Chang, Yih-Chung; Ng, C. Y.

    2016-12-01

    We have measured the vacuum ultraviolet-photoionization efficiency (VUV-PIE) spectrum of Co in the energy range of 63,500-67,000 cm-1, which covers the photoionization transitions of Co(3d74s2 4F9/2) \\to Co+(3d8 3F4), Co(3d74s2 4F7/2) \\to Co+(3d8 3F3), Co(3d74s2 4F9/2) \\to Co+(3d8 3F3), Co(3d74s2 4F9/2) \\to Co+(3d8 3F2), and Co(3d74s2 4F9/2) \\to Co+(3d74s1 5F5). We have also recorded the pulsed field ionization photoelectron spectrum of Co in the same energy range, allowing accurate determinations of ionization energies (IEs) for the photoionization transitions from the Co(3d74s2 4F9/2) ground neutral state to the Co+(3F J ) (J = 4 and 3) and Co+(5F5) ionic states, as well as from the Co(3d74s2 4F7/2) excited neural state to the Co+(3d8 3F3) ionic state. The high-resolution nature of the VUV laser used has allowed the observation of many well-resolved autoionizing resonances in the VUV-PIE spectrum, among which an autoionizing Rydberg series, 3d74s1(5F5)np (n = 19-38), converging to the Co+(3d74s1 5F5) ionic state from the Co(3d74s2 4F9/2) ground neutral state is identified. The fact that no discernible step-like structures are present at these ionization thresholds in the VUV-PIE spectrum indicates that direct photoionization of Co is minor compared to autoionization in this energy range. The IE values, the autoionizing Rydberg series, and the photoionization cross sections obtained in this experiment are valuable for understanding the VUV opacity and abundance measurement of the Co atom in stars and solar atmospheres, as well as for benchmarking the theoretical results calculated in the Opacity Project and the IRON Project, and thus are of relevance to astrophysics.

  12. Counterintuitive angular shifts in the photoelectron momentum distribution for atoms in strong few-cycle circularly polarized laser pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martiny, Christian; Abu-Samha, Mahmoud; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2009-01-01

    We solve the three-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation for a three-cycle circularly polarized laser pulse interacting with an atom. The photoelectron momentum distributions show counterintuitive shifts, similar to those observed in a recent experiment (Eckle et al 2008 Science 322 1525......). The physical origin of the shifts is examined by a detailed investigation of the wave packet after the pulse. We show that the shifts arise as a consequence of an intimate interplay between the external field and the binding potential, and that the shifts occur also at lower intensities than used...

  13. Visible and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy of fullerenes using femtosecond laser pulses

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell E. E. B.; Henderson G. G.; Johansson J. O.

    2013-01-01

    Photoelectron spectra are presented for C60 excited with fs pulses of wavelengths 532 and 267 nm. The spectra indicate a quick redistribution of the excitation energy. Excitation of SAMO states is observed with 532 nm excitation, but due to the relatively large photon energy of the 267 nm pulses, these orbitals are not populated for this wavelength.

  14. Coulomb effect on the left–right asymmetry in photoelectron emission with few-cycle laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, YongJu; Yu, ShaoGang [State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Lai, XuanYang, E-mail: xylai@wipm.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Quan, Wei [State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Liu, XiaoJun, E-mail: xjliu@wipm.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2016-05-27

    We theoretically study the strong-field ionization of hydrogen atom in few-cycle laser pulses with the Coulomb–Volkov distorted-wave approximation (CVA) theory and focus on the role of the Coulomb potential in the left–right asymmetry of the photoelectron yields along the laser polarization direction, by comparing the CVA results with strong-field approximation (SFA) simulations. Our simulations show that the carrier-envelope phase (CEP) dependent asymmetry in CVA deviates from the SFA simulation and more interestingly, there is a phase shift of the asymmetry curve as a function of CEP when the laser intensity increases, contrary to what is expected in the SFA simulations. In terms of the simple man's model, the deviation of the asymmetry curves in CVA from the SFA simulations is attributed to the significant influence of the Coulomb potential on the forward rescattering electron which will get close to the core again after tunneling ionization. Furthermore, the laser-intensity dependence of the phase shift of the asymmetry curves in CVA is elucidated. - Highlights: • The asymmetry in electron emission by few-cycle pulse is studied with CVA theory. • The asymmetry in CVA deviates from the SFA simulation. • The asymmetry curve in CVA has a phase shift as the laser intensity increases. • The Coulomb effect on the asymmetry in electron emission is revealed.

  15. Laser induced structural vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koss, L. L.; Tobin, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    A technique is described for exciting structural vibration by using a focussed laser beam to vaporize material from a target attached to the structure. The rapid ejection of material results in an impulsive reaction to the target which is transmitted to the structure. The method has been studied with a Nd: glass laser, operated in the long pulse mode, in combination with a bismuth target attached in turn to a ballistic pendulum and cantilever beam. The specific mechanical energy was found to be proportional to the laser pulse energy raised to a power in the range 2.5-2.9. The highest efficiency of energy transfer achieved for the first vibrational mode of the cantilever was about 2 millipercent for the maximum laser pulse energy used, 1.5 J, the signal to noise ratio then being about 40 dB.

  16. Light-induced atom desorption from glass surfaces characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Ryo; Hatakeyama, Atsushi

    2016-07-01

    We analyzed the surfaces of vitreous silica (quartz) and borosilicate glass (Pyrex) substrates exposed to rubidium (Rb) vapor by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to understand the surface conditions of alkali metal vapor cells. XPS spectra indicated that Rb atoms adopted different bonding states in quartz and Pyrex. Furthermore, Rb atoms in quartz remained in the near-surface region, while they diffused into the bulk in Pyrex. For these characterized surfaces, we measured light-induced atom desorption (LIAD) of Rb atoms. Clear differences in time evolution, photon energy dependence, and substrate temperature dependence were found; the decay of LIAD by continuous ultraviolet irradiation for quartz was faster than that for Pyrex, a monotonic increase in LIAD with increasing photon energy from 1.8 to 4.3 eV was more prominent for quartz, and LIAD from quartz was more efficient at higher temperatures in the range from 300 to 580 K, while that from Pyrex was almost independent of temperature.

  17. Communication: A vibrational study of propargyl cation using the vacuum ultraviolet laser velocity-map imaging photoelectron method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hong; Lu, Zhou; Yang, Lei; Zhou, Jingang; Ng, C Y

    2012-10-28

    By employing the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser velocity-map imaging photoelectron (VUV-VMI-PE) method, we have obtained a vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectrum of gaseous propargyl radical [C(3)H(3)(X(2)B(1))] in the energy range of 0-4600 cm(-1) above its ionization energy. The cold C(3)H(3) radicals were produced from a supersonically cooled radical beam source based on 193 nm ArF photodissociation of C(3)H(3)Cl. The VUV-VMI-PE spectrum of C(3)H(3) thus obtained reveals a Franck-Condon factor (FCF) pattern with a highly dominant origin band along with weak vibrational progressions associated with excitations of the C-C ν(5)(+)(a(1)) and C≡C ν(3)(+)(a(1)) symmetric stretching modes and the CCH ν(7)(+)(b(1)) out-of-plane bending mode of C(3)H(3)(+)(X(1)A(1)). The ν(5)(+)(a(1)) vibrational frequency of 1120 cm(-1) determined in the present study is lower than the value deduced from the recent Ar-tagged infrared photodissociation study by 102 cm(-1), confirming the highly accurate vibrational frequency predictions obtained by the most recent state-of-the-art ab initio quantum calculations. The observation of the FCF disallowed ν(7)(+)(b(1)) mode is indicative of vibronic interactions. The discrepancy observed between the FCF pattern determined in the present study and that predicted by a recent high-level quantum theoretical investigation can be taken as evidence that the potential energy surfaces used in the latter theoretical study are in need of improvement in order to provide a reliable FCF prediction for the C(3)H(3)/C(3)H(3)(+) photoionization system.

  18. Development of a high resolution laser based angle-resolving time-of-flight photoelectron spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Berntsen, M H; Tjernberg, O

    2011-01-01

    We present the design and performance of a novel Laser-based Angle-Resolving Time-of-Flight (LARTOF) system for photoemission from solids in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) energy range. A pulsed laser provides photons which through a third harmonic generation (THG) process performed in a xenon filled gas cell generates VUV photons of energy 10.5 eV. The time-of-flight analyzer is able to collect all electrons that are emitted from the sample within a circular cone of up to +/-15 degrees. By simultaneously measuring the energy and emission angle along two spatial directions for the electrons the analyzer provides three-dimensional detection capability. Data from a test measurement performed on the Au(111) surface state is presented along with some more advanced measurements of the Fermi surface of the high-temperature superconductor Bi2212.

  19. Above-threshold ionization and photoelectron spectra in atomic systems driven by strong laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Suárez, Noslen; Ciappina, Marcelo; Biegert, Jens; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    Above-threshold ionization (ATI) results from strong field laser-matter interaction and it is one of the fundamental processes that may be used to extract electron structural and dynamical information about the atomic or molecular target. Moreover, it can also be used to characterize the laser field itself. Here, we develop an analytical description of ATI, which extends the theoretical Strong Field Approximation (SFA), for both the direct and re-scattering transition amplitudes in atoms. From a non-local, but separable potential, the bound-free dipole and the re-scattering transition matrix elements are analytically computed. In comparison with the standard approaches to the ATI process, our analytical derivation of the re-scattering matrix elements allows us to study directly how the re-scattering process depends on the atomic target and laser pulse features -we can turn on and off contributions having different physical origins or corresponding to different physical mechanisms. We compare SFA results with ...

  20. Laser-induced electron emission from a tungsten nanotip: identifying above threshold photoemission using energy-resolved laser power dependencies

    CERN Document Server

    Bionta, M R; Champeaux, J P; Faure, S; Masseboeuf, A; Moretto-Capelle, P; Chatel, B

    2013-01-01

    We present an experiment studying the interaction of a strongly focused 25 fs laser pulse with a tungsten nanotip, investigating the different regimes of laser-induced electron emission. We study the dependence of the electron yield with respect to the static electric field applied to the tip. Photoelectron spectra are recorded using a retarding field spectrometer and peaks separated by the photon energy are observed with a 45 % contrast. They are a clear signature of above threshold photoemission (ATP), and are confirmed by extensive spectrally resolved studies of the laser power dependence. Understanding these mechanisms opens the route to control experiment in the strong-field regime on nanoscale objects.

  1. Treatment of Laser-Induced Retinal Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-29

    Distribution List (enclosed) bI’TF rruIoN STATEMEN A Approved for publi reljaso Disatbunon Unlimited TREATMENT OF LASER-INDUCED RETINAL INJURIES FINAL...suprathreshold retinal laser lesions II. Subthreshold retinal laser lesions III. Effect of steroid treatment on laser-induced retinal injury Discussion and...In the present study we investigated the effect of corticosteroid treatment of argon laser-induced retinal injury on vitreal accumulation of both

  2. [Application of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to microdetection of Au film machining].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Dong-qing; Zhou, Ming; Shen, Jian; Ren, Nai-fei; Cai, Lan

    2008-10-01

    Film micro-machining is a core in micro- and nano- technology, micro-electro-mechanical systems and photoelectron field. However, it is difficult to control the quality of machining in processing film. In the present paper the authors propose a method to solve this problem by using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The authors investigated the relation between excitation condition and the quantity of plasma in the process of micro-machining by pulse laser. At low frequency (machining become true.

  3. A vacuum-ultraviolet laser pulsed field ionization-photoelectron study of sulfur monoxide (SO) and its cation (SO+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Chow-Shing; Wang, Hailing; Xu, Yuntao; Lau, Kai-Chung; Ng, C Y

    2011-04-14

    Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser pulsed field ionization-photoelectron (PFI-PE) spectroscopy has been applied to the study of the sulfur monoxide radical (SO) prepared by using a supersonically cooled radical beam source based on the 193 nm excimer laser photodissociation of SO(2). The vibronic VUV-PFI-PE bands for the photoionization transitions SO(+)(X(2)Π(1∕2); v(+) = 0) ← SO(X(3)Σ(-); v = 0); and SO(+)((2)Π(3∕2); v(+) = 0) ← SO(X(3)Σ(-); v = 0) have been recorded. On the basis of the semiempirical simulation of rotational branch contours observed in these PFI-PE bands, we have obtained highly precise ionization energies (IEs) of 83,034.2 ± 1.7 cm(-1) (10.2949 ± 0.0002 eV) and 83,400.4 ± 1.7 cm(-1) (10.3403 ± 0.0002 eV) for the formation of SO(+)(X(2)Π(1∕2); v(+) = 0) and SO(+)((2)Π(3∕2); v(+) = 0), respectively. The present VUV-PFI-PE measurement has enabled the direct determination of the spin-orbit coupling constant (A(0)) for SO(+)(X(2)Π(1∕2,3∕2)) to be 365.36 ± 0.12 cm(-1). We have also performed high-level ab initio quantum chemical calculations at the coupled-cluster level up to full quadruple excitations and complete basis set (CBS) extrapolation. The zero-point vibrational energy correction, the core-valence electronic correction, the spin-orbit coupling, and the high-level correction are included in the calculation. The IE[SO(+)(X(2)Π(1∕2,3∕2))] and A(0) predictions thus obtained are found to be in remarkable agreement with the experimental determinations.

  4. Communication: A vibrational study of propargyl cation using the vacuum ultraviolet laser velocity-map imaging photoelectron method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao Hong; Lu Zhou; Yang Lei; Zhou Jingang; Ng, C. Y. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States)

    2012-10-28

    By employing the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser velocity-map imaging photoelectron (VUV-VMI-PE) method, we have obtained a vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectrum of gaseous propargyl radical [C{sub 3}H{sub 3}(X{sup 2}B{sub 1})] in the energy range of 0-4600 cm{sup -1} above its ionization energy. The cold C{sub 3}H{sub 3} radicals were produced from a supersonically cooled radical beam source based on 193 nm ArF photodissociation of C{sub 3}H{sub 3}Cl. The VUV-VMI-PE spectrum of C{sub 3}H{sub 3} thus obtained reveals a Franck-Condon factor (FCF) pattern with a highly dominant origin band along with weak vibrational progressions associated with excitations of the C-C {nu}{sub 5}{sup +}(a{sub 1}) and C{identical_to}C {nu}{sub 3}{sup +}(a{sub 1}) symmetric stretching modes and the CCH {nu}{sub 7}{sup +}(b{sub 1}) out-of-plane bending mode of C{sub 3}H{sub 3}{sup +}(X{sup 1}A{sub 1}). The {nu}{sub 5}{sup +}(a{sub 1}) vibrational frequency of 1120 cm{sup -1} determined in the present study is lower than the value deduced from the recent Ar-tagged infrared photodissociation study by 102 cm{sup -1}, confirming the highly accurate vibrational frequency predictions obtained by the most recent state-of-the-art ab initio quantum calculations. The observation of the FCF disallowed {nu}{sub 7}{sup +}(b{sub 1}) mode is indicative of vibronic interactions. The discrepancy observed between the FCF pattern determined in the present study and that predicted by a recent high-level quantum theoretical investigation can be taken as evidence that the potential energy surfaces used in the latter theoretical study are in need of improvement in order to provide a reliable FCF prediction for the C{sub 3}H{sub 3}/C{sub 3}H{sub 3}{sup +} photoionization system.

  5. Synthesis, structural, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies and IR induced anisotropy of Tl{sub 4}HgI{sub 6} single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parasyuk, O.V. [Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Lesya Ukrainka Eastern European National University, Voli Ave. 13, Lutsk, 43025 (Ukraine); Khyzhun, O.Y. [Frantsevych Institute for Problems of Materials Science, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 3 Krzhyzhanivsky St., 03142, Kyiv (Ukraine); Piasecki, M. [Institute of Physics, J. Dlugosz University Częstochowa, Armii Krajowej 13/15, Częstochowa (Poland); Kityk, I.V., E-mail: iwank74@gmail.com [Electrical Engineering Department, Czestochowa University Technology, Armii Krajowej 17, PL-42-217, Czestochowa (Poland); Lakshminarayana, G. [Wireless and Photonic Networks Research Centre, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400, Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Luzhnyi, I. [Frantsevych Institute for Problems of Materials Science, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 3 Krzhyzhanivsky St., 03142, Kyiv (Ukraine); Fochuk, P.M. [Yuriy Fed’kovych Chernivtsi National University, 2 Kotziubynskoho Str., 58012, Chernivtsi (Ukraine); Fedorchuk, A.O. [Department of Inorganic and Organic Chemistry, Lviv National University of Veterinary Medicine and Biotechnologies, Pekarska Street 50, 79010, Lviv (Ukraine); Levkovets, S.I.; Yurchenko, O.M.; Piskach, L.V. [Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Lesya Ukrainka Eastern European National University, Voli Ave. 13, Lutsk, 43025 (Ukraine)

    2017-02-01

    In the present work, we report on the synthesis and structural properties including X-ray protoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of Tl{sub 4}HgI{sub 6} crystals that were grown by Bridgman-Stockbarger method up to 80 mm in length and 18 mm in diameter. The existence of the ternary compound Tl{sub 4}HgI{sub 6} that melts incongruently at 641 K was confirmed. Phase equilibria and structural properties for the TlI–HgI{sub 2} system were investigated by differential thermal analysis (DTA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods. X-ray photoelectron spectra were measured for both pristine and Ar{sup +} ion-bombarded Tl{sub 4}HgI{sub 6} single crystal surfaces. The data reveal that the Tl{sub 4}HgI{sub 6} single crystal is sensitive with respect to Ar{sup +} ion-bombardment as 3.0 keV Ar{sup +} irradiation over 5 min at an ion current density 14 μA/cm{sup 2} induces changes to the elemental stoichiometry of the Tl{sub 4}HgI{sub 6} surface, leading to a decrease of the mercury content in the topmost surface layers. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements indicate very low hygroscopic nature of the Tl{sub 4}HgI{sub 6} single crystal surface. The IR coherent bicolor laser treatment at wavelengths 10.6/5.3 μm has shown an occurrence of anisotropy at wavelengths 1540 nm of Er:glass laser. This may open the applications of Tl{sub 4}HgI{sub 6} as a material for IR laser triggering. - Highlights: • Phase diagram of the HgI{sub 2}–TlI system was built. • Tl{sub 4}HgI{sub 6} single crystals were grown by Bridgman Stockbarger method. • XRD, XPS analysis was done. • Ir induced anisotropy was established. • The compounds may be proposed as Ir laser operated polarizers.

  6. Emission statistics of X-ray induced photoelectrons and its comparison with electron- and ion-induced electron emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohya, K. [Institute of Technology and Science, University of Tokushima, Tokushima 770-8506 (Japan)], E-mail: ohya@ee.tokushima-u.ac.jp; Inai, K. [Graduate School of Advanced Technology and Science, University of Tokushima, Tokushima 770-8506 (Japan); Nisawa, A. [RIKEN Harima Institute, RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Itoh, A. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2008-02-15

    The emission statistics of secondary electrons from a gold metal surface induced by monochromatic X-rays is studied by Monte Carlo simulations. The number distributions of emitted electrons n and their mean values {gamma} are calculated systematically for incident photon energies from 1 to 100 keV. The results are compared with recent experimental results measured at the SPring-8 X-ray beam facility (BL15XU). We found that both theoretical and experimental results of the statistical number distributions of secondary electrons can be reproduced fairly well by Polya-type functions, showing small probabilities for one-electron emission (n = 1) and broad distributions for high-n emission. In contrast, these features can never be reproduced by Poisson statistics. Furthermore, calculated emission yields {gamma} are found to depend rather weakly on the incident X-ray energy. These results indicate clearly that fast photoelectrons produced by high-energy X-rays are responsible for high-n emission although the photoionization cross sections are considerably smaller at higher X-ray energies. Simulations are also extended to electron and ion bombardments, and a comprehensive comparison between X-rays and charged particle impacts is given for the emission statistics of electrons from a metal surface.

  7. Laser-induced tobacco protoplast fusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李银妹; 关力劼; 楼立人; 崔国强; 姚湲; 王浩威; 操传顺; 鲁润龙; 陈曦

    1999-01-01

    Laser tweezers can manipulate small particles, such as cells and organdies. When coupling them with laser microbeam selective fusion of two tobacco protoplasts containing some chloroplast was achieved. Physical and biological variables that affect laser trapping and laser-induced fusion were also discussed. The results show that the effect of chloroplast content and distribution on the yield of cell fusion is remarkable.

  8. Laser induced electron diffraction: a tool for molecular orbital imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Michel; Charron, Eric; Keller, Arne; Atabek, Osman

    2012-01-01

    We explore the laser-induced ionization dynamics of N2 and CO2 molecules subjected to a few-cycle, linearly polarized, 800\\,nm laser pulse using effective two-dimensional single active electron time-dependent quantum simulations. We show that the electron recollision process taking place after an initial tunnel ionization stage results in quantum interference patterns in the energy resolved photo-electron signals. If the molecule is initially aligned perpendicular to the field polarization, the position and relative heights of the associated fringes can be related to the molecular geometrical and orbital structure, using a simple inversion algorithm which takes into account the symmetry of the initial molecular orbital from which the ionized electron is produced. We show that it is possible to extract inter-atomic distances in the molecule from an averaged photon-electron signal with an accuracy of a few percents.

  9. Laser-induced damage in optical materials

    CERN Document Server

    Ristau, Detlev

    2014-01-01

    Dedicated to users and developers of high-powered systems, Laser-Induced Damage in Optical Materials focuses on the research field of laser-induced damage and explores the significant and steady growth of applications for high-power lasers in the academic, industrial, and military arenas. Written by renowned experts in the field, this book concentrates on the major topics of laser-induced damage in optical materials and most specifically addresses research in laser damage that occurs in the bulk and on the surface or the coating of optical components. It considers key issues in the field of hi

  10. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of irradiation-induced amorphizaton of Gd2Ti2O7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; Lian, J.; Wang, L. M.; Ewing, R. C.; Boatner, L. A.

    2001-09-01

    The radiation-induced evolution of the microstructure of Gd2Ti2O7, an important pyrochlore phase in radioactive waste disposal ceramics and a potential solid electrolyte and oxygen gas sensor, has been characterized using transmission electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Following the irradiation of a Gd2Ti2O7 single crystal with 1.5 MeV Xe+ ions at a fluence of 1.7×1014Xe+/cm2, cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy revealed a 300-nm-thick amorphous layer at the specimen surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the Ti 2p and O 1s electron binding energy shifts of Gd2Ti2O7 before and after amorphization showed that the main results of ion-irradiation-induced disorder are a decrease in the coordination number of titanium and a transformation of the Gd-O bond. These features resemble those occurring in titanate glass formation, and they have implications for the chemical stability and electronic properties of pyrochlores subjected to displacive radiation damage.

  11. Femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy with a vacuum-ultraviolet photon source based on laser high-order harmonic generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernet, Philippe; Gaudin, Jérôme; Godehusen, Kai; Schwarzkopf, Olaf; Eberhardt, Wolfgang

    2011-06-01

    A laser-based tabletop approach to femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy with photons in the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) energy range is described. The femtosecond VUV pulses are produced by high-order harmonic generation (HHG) of an amplified femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser system. Two generations of the same setup and results from photoelectron spectroscopy in the gas phase are discussed. In both generations, a toroidal grating monochromator was used to select one harmonic in the photon energy range of 20-30 eV. The first generation of the setup was used to perform photoelectron spectroscopy in the gas phase to determine the bandwidth of the source. We find that our HHG source has a bandwidth of 140 ± 40 meV. The second and current generation is optimized for femtosecond pump-probe photoelectron spectroscopy with high flux and a small spot size at the sample of the femtosecond probe pulses. The VUV radiation is focused into the interaction region with a toroidal mirror to a spot smaller than 100 × 100 μm(2) and the flux amounts to 10(10) photons/s at the sample at a repetition rate of 1 kHz. The duration of the monochromatized VUV pulses is determined to be 120 fs resulting in an overall pump-probe time resolution of 135 ± 5 fs. We show how this setup can be used to map the transient valence electronic structure in molecular dissociation. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  12. Light-induced changes in an alkali metal atomic vapor cell coating studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hibberd, A. M.; Bernasek, S. L. [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Seltzer, S. J. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Balabas, M. V. [Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Morse, M. [Department of Materials Science Engineering, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho 83725 (United States); Budker, D. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-7300 (United States); Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2013-09-07

    The light-induced desorption of Rb atoms from a paraffin coating is studied with depth-profiling X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) using tunable synchrotron radiation. Following Rb exposure, shifts of the C1s signal to higher binding energies, as well as the appearance of lower binding energy components in the O1s region, were observed. These effects were diminished after irradiation with desorbing light. Additionally, following desorbing-light irradiation, changes in the depth-dependent concentration of carbon were observed. These observations offer an insight into the microscopic changes that occur during light-induced atomic desorption and demonstrate the utility of XPS in understanding atom-coating interactions.

  13. Two-pathway interferences in photoelectron angular distributions induced by circularly polarized femtosecond pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douguet, Nicolas; Venzke, Joel; Bartschat, Klaus; Grum-Grzhimailo, Alexei N.; Gryzlova, Elena; Staroselskaya, Ekaterina

    2016-05-01

    Following up on earlier work using linearly polarized radiation, we analyze the characteristics of atomic ionization produced by circularly polarized two-color femtosecond pulses. Two-pathway interferences between nonresonant one-photon and resonant two-photon ionization in the vicinity of an intermediate resonance are considered in detail for atomic hydrogen. Using circularly polarized radiation significantly increases the complexity of the problem, while opening up a rich field of possible further investigations. The principal properties of the photoelectron angular distribution (PAD) are obtained by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation and employing a second-order nonstationary perturbative approach. The dependence of the PAD on the intensities, helicities of the harmonics, pulse lengths, and carrier envelope phases is considered in detail. Supported by the NSF under PHY-1430245 and XSEDE PHY-090031.

  14. Modeling of laser induced periodic surface structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skolski, J.Z.P.; Römer, G.R.B.E.; Huis in 't Veld, A.J.; Mitko, V.S.; Obona, J.V.; Ocelik, V.; Hosson, J.T.M. de

    2010-01-01

    In surfaces irradiated by short laser pulses, Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS) have been observed on all kind of materials for over forty years. These LIPSS, also referred to as ripples, consist of wavy surfaces with periodicity equal or smaller than the wavelength of the laser radi

  15. Irradiation-induced degradation of PTB7 investigated by valence band and S 2p photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlatt, Erik; Muhsin, Burhan; Roesch, Roland; Lupulescu, Cosmin; Roth, Friedrich; Kolbe, Michael; Gottwald, Alexander; Hoppe, Harald; Richter, Mathias

    2016-08-01

    Monochromatic radiation with known absolute radiant power from an undulator at the electron storage ring Metrology Light Source (MLS) was used to irradiate PTB7 (a thieno[3, 4-b]thiophene-alt-benzodithiophene polymer) thin films at wavelengths (photon energies) of 185 nm (6.70 eV), 220 nm (5.64 eV), 300 nm (4.13 eV), 320 nm (3.88 eV), 356 nm (3.48 eV) and 675 nm (1.84 eV) under ultra-high vacuum conditions for the investigation of radiation-induced degradation effects. The characterization of the thin films is focused at ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) of valence bands and is complemented by S 2p x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (S 2p XPS) before and after the irradiation procedure. The radiant exposure was determined for each irradiation by means of photodiodes traceably calibrated to the international system of units SI. The valence band spectra show the strongest changes for the shortest wavelengths and no degradation effect at 356 nm and 675 nm even with the highest radiant exposure applied. In the spectral range where the Sun appears bright on the Earth’s surface, no degradation effects are observed.

  16. Photoelectron Emission from Metal Surfaces Induced by VUV-emission of Filament Driven Hydrogen Arc Discharge Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Laulainen, J; Koivisto, H; Komppula, J; Tarvainen, O

    2015-01-01

    Photoelectron emission measurements have been performed using a filament-driven multi-cusp arc discharge volume production H^- ion source (LIISA). It has been found that photoelectron currents obtained with Al, Cu, Mo, Ta and stainless steel (SAE 304) are on the same order of magnitude. The photoelectron currents depend linearly on the discharge power. It is shown experimentally that photoelectron emission is significant only in the short wavelength range of hydrogen spectrum due to the energy dependence of the quantum efficiency. It is estimated from the measured data that the maximum photoelectron flux from plasma chamber walls is on the order of 1 A per kW of discharge power.

  17. Photoelectron emission from metal surfaces induced by VUV-emission of filament driven hydrogen arc discharge plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulainen, J.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Komppula, J.; Tarvainen, O.

    2015-04-01

    Photoelectron emission measurements have been performed using a filament-driven multi-cusp arc discharge volume production H- ion source (LIISA). It has been found that photoelectron currents obtained with Al, Cu, Mo, Ta and stainless steel (SAE 304) are on the same order of magnitude. The photoelectron currents depend linearly on the discharge power. It is shown experimentally that photoelectron emission is significant only in the short wavelength range of hydrogen spectrum due to the energy dependence of the quantum efficiency. It is estimated from the measured data that the maximum photoelectron flux from plasma chamber walls is on the order of 1 A per kW of discharge power.

  18. Surgical Treatment of Laser Induced Eye Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-05

    AD-A234 849 CONTRACT NO.: DAMD17-89-C-9026 TITLE: SURGICAL TREATMENT OF LASER INDUCED EYE INJURIES AUTHORS: Leonard M. Hjelmeland, Maurice B. Landers...62787A 62787A878 BA JDA318205 11. TITLE (Include Secirity Classification) (U) Surgical Treatment of Laser Induced Eye Injuries 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S...TERMS (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP RA 3; Lasers; Eye injury ; Surgery 09 03 06 04 19. ABSTRACT

  19. Laser-Induced Energy Transfer in Solids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morsink, J.B.W.; Rullmann, Johan; Wiersma, Douwe

    1981-01-01

    Laser-induced energy transfer was observed and studied in the system pentacene doped into naphthalene. The transfer spectrum shows a remarkable correspondence with the host density of states function. The rate for laser-induced energy transfer is given and it is concluded that most likely, intermole

  20. Verification of a characterization method of the laser-induced selective activation based on industrial lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yang; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Tang, Peter T.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, laser-induced selective activation (LISA) for subsequent autocatalytic copper plating is performed by several types of industrial scale lasers, including a Nd:YAG laser, a UV laser, a fiber laser, a green laser, and a short pulsed laser. Based on analysis of all the laser-machine...

  1. Photoelectron Emission from Metal Surfaces Induced by Radiation Emitted by a 14 GHz Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source

    CERN Document Server

    Laulainen, Janne; Koivisto, Hannu; Komppula, Jani; Kronholm, Risto; Tarvainen, Olli

    2015-01-01

    Photoelectron emission measurements have been performed using a room-temperature 14 GHz ECR ion source. It is shown that the photoelectron emission from Al, Cu, and stainless steel (SAE 304) surfaces, which are common plasma chamber materials, is predominantly caused by radiation emitted from plasma with energies between 8 eV and 1 keV. Characteristic X-ray emission and bremsstrahlung from plasma have a negligible contribution to the photoelectron emission. It is estimated from the measured data that the maximum conceivable photoelectron flux from plasma chamber walls is on the order of 10 % of the estimated total electron losses from the plasma.

  2. Photoelectron emission from metal surfaces induced by radiation emitted by a 14 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulainen, Janne; Kalvas, Taneli; Koivisto, Hannu; Komppula, Jani; Kronholm, Risto; Tarvainen, Olli

    2016-02-01

    Photoelectron emission measurements have been performed using a room-temperature 14 GHz ECR ion source. It is shown that the photoelectron emission from Al, Cu, and stainless steel (SAE 304) surfaces, which are common plasma chamber materials, is predominantly caused by radiation emitted from plasma with energies between 8 eV and 1 keV. Characteristic X-ray emission and bremsstrahlung from plasma have a negligible contribution to the photoelectron emission. It is estimated from the measured data that the maximum conceivable photoelectron flux from plasma chamber walls is on the order of 10% of the estimated total electron losses from the plasma.

  3. Photoelectron emission from metal surfaces induced by radiation emitted by a 14 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laulainen, Janne, E-mail: janne.p.laulainen@student.jyu.fi; Kalvas, Taneli; Koivisto, Hannu; Komppula, Jani; Kronholm, Risto; Tarvainen, Olli [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaskyla, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 Jyvaskyla (Finland)

    2016-02-15

    Photoelectron emission measurements have been performed using a room-temperature 14 GHz ECR ion source. It is shown that the photoelectron emission from Al, Cu, and stainless steel (SAE 304) surfaces, which are common plasma chamber materials, is predominantly caused by radiation emitted from plasma with energies between 8 eV and 1 keV. Characteristic X-ray emission and bremsstrahlung from plasma have a negligible contribution to the photoelectron emission. It is estimated from the measured data that the maximum conceivable photoelectron flux from plasma chamber walls is on the order of 10% of the estimated total electron losses from the plasma.

  4. Field enhancement induced laser ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiutowski, Jacek; Maibohm, Christian; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob

    Sub-diffraction spatially resolved, quantitative mapping of strongly localized field intensity enhancement on gold nanostructures via laser ablation of polymer thin films is reported. Illumination using a femtosecond laser scanning microscope excites surface plasmons in the nanostructures...

  5. Biotic stress induced demolition of thylakoid structure and loss in photoelectron transport of chloroplasts in papaya leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Rashmi Madhumita; Biswal, Basanti

    2008-04-01

    Papaya mosaic virus (PMV) causes severe mosaic symptoms in the papaya (Carica papaya L.) leaves. The PMV-induced alterations in photosystem II (PS II) structure and photochemical functions were probed. An increase in chlorophyll a (Chl a) fluorescence polarization suggests pathogen-induced transformation of thylakoid membrane to a gel phase. This transformation in physical state of thylakoid membrane may result in alteration in topology of pigments on pigment-binding proteins as reflected in pathogen-induced loss in the efficiency of energy transfer from carotenoids to chlorophylls. The fast Chl a fluorescence induction kinetics of healthy and PMV-infected plants by F(O)-F(J)-F(I)-F(P) transients revealed pathogen-induced perturbation on PS II acceptor side electron transfer equilibrium between Q(A) and Q(B) and in the pool size of electron transport acceptors. Pathogen-induced loss in photosynthetic pigments, changes in thylakoid structure and decrease in the ratio of F(V)/F(M) (photochemical potential of PS II) further correlate with the loss in photoelectron transport of PS II as probed by 2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol (DCPIP)-Hill reaction. Restoration of the loss by 1,5-diphenyl carbazide (DPC), an exogenous electron donor, that donates electron directly to reaction centre II bypassing the oxygen evolving system (OES), leads towards the conclusion that OES is one of the major targets of biotic stress. Further, the data suggest that chlorophyll fluorescence could be used as a non-invasive handy tool to assess the loss in photosynthetic efficiency and symptom severity in infected green tissues vis-a-vis the healthy ones.

  6. Photoelectron emission from metal surfaces induced by VUV-emission of filament driven hydrogen arc discharge plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laulainen, J.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Komppula, J.; Tarvainen, O. [University of Jyväskylä, Department of Physics (Finland)

    2015-04-08

    Photoelectron emission measurements have been performed using a filament-driven multi-cusp arc discharge volume production H{sup −} ion source (LIISA). It has been found that photoelectron currents obtained with Al, Cu, Mo, Ta and stainless steel (SAE 304) are on the same order of magnitude. The photoelectron currents depend linearly on the discharge power. It is shown experimentally that photoelectron emission is significant only in the short wavelength range of hydrogen spectrum due to the energy dependence of the quantum efficiency. It is estimated from the measured data that the maximum photoelectron flux from plasma chamber walls is on the order of 1 A per kW of discharge power.

  7. Carrier-Envelop Phase-Dependent Effect on Photoelectron Angular Distribution in Single-Cycle Laser Pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jie; ZHANG Jing-Tao; SUN Zhen-Rong; XU Zhi-Zhan

    2004-01-01

    @@ Using a nonperturbative scattering theory, we study the photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) of Kr atoms irradiated by an infinite sequence of intense single-cycle pulses of circular polarization. We demonstrate the inversion asymmetry of PADs and the dependence of PADs on the carrier-envelop phase of the single-cycle pulses. The inversion asymmetry is caused by the interference between transition channels where the different channels are characterized by different combinations of absorbed-photon numbers in the ionization process. Our results provide a possible method to determine the value of carrier-envelop phase by the detected PADs.

  8. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Counterintuitive angular shifts in the photoelectron momentum distribution for atoms in strong few-cycle circularly polarized laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martiny, C. P. J.; Abu-samha, M.; Madsen, L. B.

    2009-08-01

    We solve the three-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation for a three-cycle circularly polarized laser pulse interacting with an atom. The photoelectron momentum distributions show counterintuitive shifts, similar to those observed in a recent experiment (Eckle et al 2008 Science 322 1525). The physical origin of the shifts is examined by a detailed investigation of the wave packet after the pulse. We show that the shifts arise as a consequence of an intimate interplay between the external field and the binding potential, and that the shifts occur also at lower intensities than used in the experiment, corresponding to the multiphoton regime. In contrast to the recent experiment we do not invoke the concept of a tunnelling time in our explanation of the shifts.

  9. In situ investigations of laser and thermally modified As{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanolayers: Synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondrat, O., E-mail: o.b.kondrat@gmail.com; Holomb, R.; Popovich, N.; Mitsa, V. [Institute of Solid State Physics and Chemistry, Uzhhorod National University, Pidhirna Str., 46, 88000 Uzhhorod (Ukraine); Veres, M. [Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 1121 Budapest (Hungary); Csik, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-4001 Debrecen (Hungary); Feher, A. [Pavol Jozef Šafárik University in Košice, Park Angelinum 9, Košice (Slovakia); Tsud, N.; Matolín, V. [Department of Surface and Plasma Science, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holešovičkách 2, 18000 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Vondráček, M. [Institute of Physics, Academy of Science of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, CZ-182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Prince, K. C. [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Strada Statale 14, km 163.5, in Area Science Park, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Istituto Officina dei Materiali, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy)

    2015-12-14

    As-deposited, annealed, and in situ As{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanolayers, illuminated by blue (405 nm) and red (650 nm) laser light, were studied using synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy and DFT electronic structure calculations. Changes in composition and local atomic coordination occurring in the irradiated region of As{sub 2}S{sub 3} films were monitored by analysis of As 3d and S 2p core levels. These studies show that both the thermal treatment and the red laser illumination of As{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanolayers decrease the concentration of homopolar (As-As and S-S) bonds. From the other hand, an increasing concentration of As-rich structural units (s.u.) with a homopolar As-As bond was observed under in situ blue laser illumination of As{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanolayers. Molecular orbital energies were calculated for different As- and S-centered s.u. and used for the interpretation of the core levels and valence band spectra. The surface local structure of the As{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanolayers and its photoinduced transformation are discussed in detail.

  10. Laser induced white lighting of graphene foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strek, Wieslaw; Tomala, Robert; Lukaszewicz, Mikolaj; Cichy, Bartlomiej; Gerasymchuk, Yuriy; Gluchowski, Pawel; Marciniak, Lukasz; Bednarkiewicz, Artur; Hreniak, Dariusz

    2017-01-01

    Laser induced white light emission was observed from porous graphene foam irradiated with a focused continuous wave beam of the infrared laser diode. It was found that the intensity of the emission increases exponentially with increasing laser power density, having a saturation level at ca. 1.5 W and being characterized by stable emission conditions. It was also observed that the white light emission is spatially confined to the focal point dimensions of the illuminating laser light. Several other features of the laser induced white light emission were also discussed. It was observed that the white light emission is highly dependent on the electric field intensity, allowing one to modulate the emission intensity. The electric field intensity ca. 0.5 V/μm was able to decrease the white light intensity by half. Origins of the laser-induced white light emission along with its characteristic features were discussed in terms of avalanche multiphoton ionization, inter-valence charge transfer and possible plasma build-up processes. It is shown that the laser-induced white light emission may be well utilized in new types of white light sources.

  11. Laser induced white lighting of graphene foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strek, Wieslaw; Tomala, Robert; Lukaszewicz, Mikolaj; Cichy, Bartlomiej; Gerasymchuk, Yuriy; Gluchowski, Pawel; Marciniak, Lukasz; Bednarkiewicz, Artur; Hreniak, Dariusz

    2017-01-01

    Laser induced white light emission was observed from porous graphene foam irradiated with a focused continuous wave beam of the infrared laser diode. It was found that the intensity of the emission increases exponentially with increasing laser power density, having a saturation level at ca. 1.5 W and being characterized by stable emission conditions. It was also observed that the white light emission is spatially confined to the focal point dimensions of the illuminating laser light. Several other features of the laser induced white light emission were also discussed. It was observed that the white light emission is highly dependent on the electric field intensity, allowing one to modulate the emission intensity. The electric field intensity ca. 0.5 V/μm was able to decrease the white light intensity by half. Origins of the laser-induced white light emission along with its characteristic features were discussed in terms of avalanche multiphoton ionization, inter-valence charge transfer and possible plasma build-up processes. It is shown that the laser-induced white light emission may be well utilized in new types of white light sources. PMID:28112254

  12. Laser-Induced Incandescence: Excitation Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Wal, Randall L.; Jensen, Kirk A.

    1998-03-01

    Assumptions of theoretical laser-induced incandescence (LII) models along with possible effects of high-intensity laser light on soot aggregates and the constituent primary particles are discussed in relation to selection of excitation laser fluence. Ex situ visualization of laser-heated soot by use of transmission electron microscopy reveals significant morphological changes (graphitization) induced by pulsed laser heating. Pulsed laser transmission measurements within a premixed laminar sooting flame suggest that soot vaporization occurs for laser fluences greater than 0.5 J cm 2 at 1064 nm. Radial LII intensity profiles at different axial heights in a laminar ethylene gas jet diffusion flame reveal a wide range of signal levels depending on the laser fluence that is varied over an eight fold range. Results of double-pulse excitation experiments in which a second laser pulse heats in situ the same soot that was heated by a prior laser pulse are detailed. These two-pulse measurements suggest varying degrees of soot structural change for fluences below and above a vaporization threshold of 0.5 J cm 2 at 1064 nm. Normalization of the radial-resolved LII signals based on integrated intensities, however, yields self-similar profiles. The self-similarity suggests robustness of LII for accurate relative measurement of soot volume fraction despite the morphological changes induced in the soot, variations in soot aggregate and primary particle size, and local gas temperature. Comparison of LII intensity profiles with soot volume fractions ( f v ) derived by light extinction validates LII for quantitative determination of f v upon calibration for laser fluences ranging from 0.09 to 0.73 J cm 2 .

  13. Core level photoelectron spectroscopy on the lanthanide-induced hydrolysis of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigekawa, Hidemi; Ikawa, Hiroyuki; Yoshizaki, Ryozo; Iijima, Yoshitoki; Sumaoka, Jun; Komiyama, Makoto

    1996-03-01

    The electronic structures of the complexes of diphenyl phosphate (DPP), a model compound of DNA, with lanthanide ions have been investigated to shed light on the mechanism of the cerium (IV)-induced nonenzymatic hydrolysis of DNA. Binding energies of the P 2p core level of DPP were 134.2 eV for the complexes with La(III), Eu(III), and Lu(III), and was 134.4 eV for the Ce(IV) complex, when the metal/DPP molar ratio was 1:1. When the molar ratio was increased, only Ce(IV), the most active metal ion for DNA hydrolysis, showed a chemical shift of ˜0.5 eV toward the higher binding energy region. The chemical shift of ˜0.5 eV toward the higher binding energy region. The chemical shift was due to the systematic increase in the intensity of the higher binding energy component. The observed change in the electronic structure of the DPP-Ce(IV) complex may be related to the superb ability of Ce(IV) for the hydrolysis of DNA.

  14. Photoelectron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Paul Lawrence

    1992-01-01

    This thesis describes the theory and first operations of a novel synchrotron-based imaging system allowing photoemission spectroscopy (XPS or ESCA) to be performed at lateral resolutions better than 10 microns. Originally developed in David Turner's group at Oxford, the MicroESCA^ {rm TM} relies on the diverging magnetic field from a 7 Tesla superconducting solenoid to project photoemitted electrons from a sample to an imaging detector located 1.5 meters away. The diverging magnetic field converts off-axis momentum to forward momentum and electrons form a magnified image at the detector while moving nearly parallel to one another. Because of this "parallelization", a planar gridded retarding field analyzer achieves excellent energy resolution with only minor impact on image quality. The thesis begins with an overview of the various techniques by which high lateral resolution photoelectron spectroscopy can be achieved. This is followed by a theoretical treatment of magnetic projection leading to predictions of lateral and energy resolution. Chapter 3 documents resolution tests and known deviations from ideality. Image forming capabilities and energy resolution of the retarding field analyzer are demonstrated at near-theoretical limits. Practical limitations of the microscope are recognized in the form of poor signal to noise ratios of core level images which originate from a combination of the narrow dynamic range of the imaging detector and the large backgrounds inherent in retarding field spectroscopy of solids. Chapter 4 describes an interactive image processing and interpretation scheme that relies on scatter plots and principal component analysis to reduce the dimensionality of retarding field image sets and improve image signal to noise. This procedure is generally applicable to all imaging spectroscopies and an example from SEM-based energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) is included. In a final results section, variations in the surface Fermi levels on cleaved

  15. Extracting conformational structure information of benzene molecules via laser-induced electron diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuta Ito

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We have measured the angular distributions of high energy photoelectrons of benzene molecules generated by intense infrared femtosecond laser pulses. These electrons arise from the elastic collisions between the benzene ions with the previously tunnel-ionized electrons that have been driven back by the laser field. Theory shows that laser-free elastic differential cross sections (DCSs can be extracted from these photoelectrons, and the DCS can be used to retrieve the bond lengths of gas-phase molecules similar to the conventional electron diffraction method. From our experimental results, we have obtained the C-C and C-H bond lengths of benzene with a spatial resolution of about 10 pm. Our results demonstrate that laser induced electron diffraction (LIED experiments can be carried out with the present-day ultrafast intense lasers already. Looking ahead, with aligned or oriented molecules, more complete spatial information of the molecule can be obtained from LIED, and applying LIED to probe photo-excited molecules, a “molecular movie” of the dynamic system may be created with sub-Ångström spatial and few-ten femtosecond temporal resolutions.

  16. Development of a single-shot CCD-based data acquisition system for time-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy at an X-ray free-electron laser facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oura, Masaki; Wagai, Tatsuya; Chainani, Ashish; Miyawaki, Jun; Sato, Hiromi; Matsunami, Masaharu; Eguchi, Ritsuko; Kiss, Takayuki; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Nakatani, Yasuhiro; Togashi, Tadashi; Katayama, Tetsuo; Ogawa, Kanade; Yabashi, Makina; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Tamasaku, Kenji; Shin, Shik; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    In order to utilize high-brilliance photon sources, such as X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), for advanced time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TR-PES), a single-shot CCD-based data acquisition system combined with a high-resolution hemispherical electron energy analyzer has been developed. The system's design enables it to be controlled by an external trigger signal for single-shot pump-probe-type TR-PES. The basic performance of the system is demonstrated with an offline test, followed by online core-level photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy in 'single-shot image', 'shot-to-shot image (image-to-image storage or block storage)' and `shot-to-shot sweep' modes at soft X-ray undulator beamline BL17SU of SPring-8. In the offline test the typical repetition rate for image-to-image storage mode has been confirmed to be about 15 Hz using a conventional pulse-generator. The function for correcting the shot-to-shot intensity fluctuations of the exciting photon beam, an important requirement for the TR-PES experiments at FEL sources, has been successfully tested at BL17SU by measuring Au 4f photoelectrons with intentionally controlled photon flux. The system has also been applied to hard X-ray PES (HAXPES) in `ordinary sweep' mode as well as shot-to-shot image mode at the 27 m-long undulator beamline BL19LXU of SPring-8 and also at the SACLA XFEL facility. The XFEL-induced Ti 1s core-level spectrum of La-doped SrTiO3 is reported as a function of incident power density. The Ti 1s core-level spectrum obtained at low power density is consistent with the spectrum obtained using the synchrotron source. At high power densities the Ti 1s core-level spectra show space-charge effects which are analysed using a known mean-field model for ultrafast electron packet propagation. The results successfully confirm the capability of the present data acquisition system for carrying out the core-level HAXPES studies of condensed matter induced by the XFEL.

  17. Metal surface nitriding by laser induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomann, A. L.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Andreazza-Vignolle, C.; Andreazza, P.; Hermann, J.; Blondiaux, G.

    1996-10-01

    We study a nitriding technique of metals by means of laser induced plasma. The synthesized layers are composed of a nitrogen concentration gradient over several μm depth, and are expected to be useful for tribological applications with no adhesion problem. The nitriding method is tested on the synthesis of titanium nitride which is a well-known compound, obtained at present by many deposition and diffusion techniques. In the method of interest, a laser beam is focused on a titanium target in a nitrogen atmosphere, leading to the creation of a plasma over the metal surface. In order to understand the layer formation, it is necessary to characterize the plasma as well as the surface that it has been in contact with. Progressive nitrogen incorporation in the titanium lattice and TiN synthesis are studied by characterizing samples prepared with increasing laser shot number (100-4000). The role of the laser wavelength is also inspected by comparing layers obtained with two kinds of pulsed lasers: a transversal-excited-atmospheric-pressure-CO2 laser (λ=10.6 μm) and a XeCl excimer laser (λ=308 nm). Simulations of the target temperature rise under laser irradiation are performed, which evidence differences in the initial laser/material interaction (material heated thickness, heating time duration, etc.) depending on the laser features (wavelength and pulse time duration). Results from plasma characterization also point out that the plasma composition and propagation mode depend on the laser wavelength. Correlation of these results with those obtained from layer analyses shows at first the important role played by the plasma in the nitrogen incorporation. Its presence is necessary and allows N2 dissociation and a better energy coupling with the target. Second, it appears that the nitrogen diffusion governs the nitriding process. The study of the metal nitriding efficiency, depending on the laser used, allows us to explain the differences observed in the layer features

  18. Heat pump processes induced by laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbuny, M.; Henningsen, T.

    1980-01-01

    A carbon dioxide laser system was constructed for the demonstration of heat pump processes induced by laser radiation. The system consisted of a frequency doubling stage, a gas reaction cell with its vacuum and high purity gas supply system, and provisions to measure the temperature changes by pressure, or alternatively, by density changes. The theoretical considerations for the choice of designs and components are dicussed.

  19. Electronic structure and spectroscopy of nucleic acid bases: Ionization energies, ionization-induced structural changes, and photoelectron spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravaya, Ksenia B.; Kostko, Oleg; Dolgikh, Stanislav; Landau, Arie; Ahmed, Musahid; Krylov, Anna I.

    2010-08-02

    We report high-level ab initio calculations and single-photon ionization mass spectrometry study of ionization of adenine (A), thymine (T), cytosine (C) and guanine (G). For thymine and adenine, only the lowest-energy tautomers were considered, whereas for cytosine and guanine we characterized five lowest-energy tautomeric forms. The first adiabatic and several vertical ionization energies were computed using equation-of-motion coupled-cluster method for ionization potentials with single and double substitutions. Equilibrium structures of the cationic ground states were characterized by DFT with the {omega}B97X-D functional. The ionization-induced geometry changes of the bases are consistent with the shapes of the corresponding molecular orbitals. For the lowest-energy tautomers, the magnitude of the structural relaxation decreases in the following series G > C > A > T, the respective relaxation energies being 0.41, 0.32, 0.25 and 0.20 eV. The computed adiabatic ionization energies (8.13, 8.89, 8.51-8.67 and 7.75-7.87 eV for A,T,C and G, respectively) agree well with the onsets of the photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves (8.20 {+-} 0.05, 8.95 {+-} 0.05, 8.60 {+-} 0.05 and 7.75 {+-} 0.05 eV). Vibrational progressions for the S{sub 0}-D{sub 0} vibronic bands computed within double-harmonic approximation with Duschinsky rotations are compared with previously reported experimental photoelectron spectra.

  20. Coherent Control of Photoelectron Wavepacket Angular Interferograms

    OpenAIRE

    Hockett, Paul; Wollenhaupt, Matthias; Baumert, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Coherent control over photoelectron wavepackets, via the use of polarization-shaped laser pulses, can be understood as a time and polarization-multiplexed process. In this work, we investigate this multiplexing via computation of the observable photoelectron angular interferograms resulting from multi-photon atomic ionization with polarization-shaped laser pulses. We consider the polarization sensitivity of both the instantaneous and cumulative continuum wavefunction; the nature of the cohere...

  1. Coherent Control of Photoelectron Wavepacket Angular Interferograms

    OpenAIRE

    Hockett, Paul; Wollenhaupt, Matthias; Baumert, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Coherent control over photoelectron wavepackets, via the use of polarization-shaped laser pulses, can be understood as a time and polarization-multiplexed process. In this work, we investigate this multiplexing via computation of the observable photoelectron angular interferograms resulting from multi-photon atomic ionization with polarization-shaped laser pulses. We consider the polarization sensitivity of both the instantaneous and cumulative continuum wavefunction; the nature of the cohere...

  2. Treatment of Laser Induced Retinal Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-04-02

    END 1.0 1.18 Yl(-ROCOPY Ri yjTuION If ’,! (HART !. UIH; iLruud @ N TREATMENT OF LASER INDUCED RETINAL INJURIES (ANNUAL REPORT 00 DTIC Michael Belkin...NO. CCESSION NO _______________________________61102A I102BS1O0 CF 1i. 446 TITLE (Indude S*.curny Claifkaion) TREATMENT OF LASER INDUCED RETINAL... INJURIES PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) M. BELKIN N. NAVEH a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REPORT (Year, Mont. D y) S. PAGE COUNT FROM Xaj& TO l 2Ann

  3. Photoelectron spectroscopy at a free-electron laser. Investigation of space-charge effects in angle-resolved and core-level spectroscopy and realizaton of a time-resolved core-level photoemission experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marczynski-Buehlow, Martin

    2012-01-30

    The free-electron laser (FEL) in Hamburg (FLASH) is a very interesting light source with which to perform photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) experiments. Its special characteristics include highly intense photon pulses (up to 100 J/pulse), a photon energy range of 30 eV to 1500 eV, transverse coherence as well as pulse durations of some ten femtoseconds. Especially in terms of time-resolved PES (TRPES), the deeper lying core levels can be reached with photon energies up to 1500 eV with acceptable intensity now and, therefore, element-specific, time-resolved core-level PES (XPS) is feasible at FLASH. During the work of this thesis various experimental setups were constructed in order to realize angle-resolved (ARPES), core-level (XPS) as well as time-resolved PES experiments at the plane grating monochromator beamline PG2 at FLASH. Existing as well as newly developed systems for online monitoring of FEL pulse intensities and generating spatial and temporal overlap of FEL and optical laser pulses for time-resolved experiments are successfully integrated into the experimental setup for PES. In order to understand space-charge effects (SCEs) in PES and, therefore, being able to handle those effects in future experiments using highly intense and pulsed photon sources, the origin of energetic broadenings and shifts in photoelectron spectra are studied by means of a molecular dynamic N-body simulation using a modified Treecode Algorithm for sufficiently fast and accurate calculations. It turned out that the most influencing parameter is the ''linear electron density'' - the ratio of the number of photoelectrons to the diameter of the illuminated spot on the sample. Furthermore, the simulations could reproduce the observations described in the literature fairly well. Some rules of thumb for XPS and ARPES measurements could be deduced from the simulations. Experimentally, SCEs are investigated by means of ARPES as well as XPS measurements as a function of

  4. Free electron laser induced two-photon photoconductivity in Hg1-xCdxTe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The Beijing free electron laser (BFEL) has been employed for the first time to study the nonlinear photoconductivity characteristics of the typical infrared photoelectronic material Hg1-xCdxTe. Taking advantage of the high photon flux density of BFEL, we have investigated the photoconductivity characteristics in Hg1-xCdxTe induced by two-photon absorption by means of the photoconductivity technique, observed the photoconductivity signals saturation, and studied the two-photon photoconductivity characteristics on different bias voltages across the sample.

  5. UV Laser-Induced DNA Photochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-13

    nicking of DNA) can be described by a Poisson distribution (Armitage, 1971; Kroeber and LaForge, 1980). Such a distribution can be used to determine...specificity of the alkali-sensitive lesions induced in DNA by high intensity ultraviolet laser radiation", Photochem. Photohiol. 52:509-517 Kroeber , D.W

  6. Laser-Induced Fluorescence in Gaseous [I[subscript]2] Excited with a Green Laser Pointer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2007-01-01

    A green laser pointer could be used in a flashy demonstration of laser-induced fluorescence in the gas phase by directing the beam of the laser through a cell containing [I[subscript]2] at its room temperature vapor pressure. The experiment could be used to provide valuable insight into the requirements for laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and the…

  7. Laser-induced axion photoproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, S. J.; Mottola, E.; Muzinich, I. J.; Soldate, M.

    1986-01-01

    Axion photoproduction is suggested as a systematic technique for investigating the coupling of new elementary pseudoscalar or scalar particles in the megaelectronvolt mass range to leptons, photons, and hadronic matter. The experiments involve a configuration where a low-energy photon collides with a relativistic electron beam. Threshold production energies of 300 GeV can be accomplished with an optical laser, and those of 14.5-50 GeV can be achieved with wigglers directed onto an electron beam. With this scheme, at least 10 to the -7th of the electrons can be converted to axions, providing a 1-100 thousand/s relativistic beam of axions.

  8. Laser-induced lipolysis on adipose cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solarte, Efrain; Gutierrez, O.; Neira, Rodrigo; Arroyave, J.; Isaza, Carolina; Ramirez, Hugo; Rebolledo, Aldo F.; Criollo, Willian; Ortiz, C.

    2004-10-01

    Recently, a new liposuction technique, using a low-level laser (LLL) device and Ultrawet solution prior to the procedure, demonstrated the movement of fat from the inside to the outside of the adipocyte (Neira et al., 2002). To determine the mechanisms involved, we have performed Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy studies; Light transmittance measurements on adipocyte dilutions; and a study of laser light propagation in adipose tissue. This studies show: 1. Cellular membrane alterations. 2. LLL is capable to reach the deep adipose tissue layer, and 3. The tumescence solution enhances the light propagation by clearing the tissue. MRI studies demonstrated the appearance of fat on laser treated abdominal tissue. Besides, adipocytes were cultivated and irradiated to observe the effects on isolated cells. These last studies show: 1. 635 nm-laser alone is capable of mobilizing cholesterol from the cell membrane; this action is enhanced by the presence of adrenaline and lidocaine. 2. Intracellular fat is released from adipocytes by co joint action of adrenaline, aminophyline and 635 nm-laser. Results are consistent with a laser induced cellular process, which causes fat release from the adipocytes into the intercellular space, besides the modification of the cellular membranes.

  9. Laser induced ponderomotive convection in water

    CERN Document Server

    Shneider, M N

    2015-01-01

    A new mechanism for inducing convection during IR laser interaction with water or any absorbing polar liquid is described theoretically. The numerical simulations performed using the developed model show that the ponderomotive force produces water flow in the direction of the laser beam propagation. In the later stage of interaction, when water temperature rises, the Archimedes force becomes first comparable and then dominant producing convection directed against the vector of gravitational acceleration (upward). The theoretical estimates and the numerical simulations predict fluid dynamics that is similar to the observed in the previous experiments.

  10. Laser induced forward transfer of soft materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla-Papavlu, A.; Dinca, V.; Luculescu, C.; Shaw-Stewart, J.; Nagel, M.; Lippert, T.; Dinescu, M.

    2010-12-01

    A strong research effort is presently aimed at patterning methodologies for obtaining controlled defined micrometric polymeric structures for a wide range of applications, including electronics, optoelectronics, sensors, medicine etc. Lasers have been identified as appropriate tools for processing of different materials, such as ceramics and metals, but also for soft, easily damageable materials (biological compounds and polymers). In this work we study the dynamics of laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) with a gap between the donor and the receiver substrates, which is the basis for possible applications that require multilayer depositions with high spatial resolution.

  11. Laser induced fluorescence technique for environmental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utkin, Andrei B.; Felizardo, Rui; Gameiro, Carla; Matos, Ana R.; Cartaxana, Paulo

    2014-08-01

    We discuss the development of laser induced fluorescence sensors and their application in the evaluation of water pollution and physiological status of higher plants and algae. The sensors were built on the basis of reliable and robust solid-state Nd:YAG lasers. They demonstrated good efficiency in: i) detecting and characterizing oil spills and dissolved organic matter; ii) evaluating the impact of stress on higher plants (cork oak, maritime pine, and genetically modified Arabidopsis); iii) tracking biomass changes in intertidal microphytobenthos; and iv) mapping macroalgal communities in the Tagus Estuary.

  12. Photoelectronic characterization of heterointerfaces.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brumbach, Michael Todd

    2012-02-01

    In many devices such as solar cells, light emitting diodes, transistors, etc., the performance relies on the electronic structure at interfaces between materials within the device. The objective of this work was to perform robust characterization of hybrid (organic/inorganic) interfaces by tailoring the interfacial region for photoelectron spectroscopy. Self-assembled monolayers (SAM) were utilized to induce dipoles of various magnitudes at the interface. Additionally, SAMs of molecules with varying dipolar characteristics were mixed into spatially organized structures to systematically vary the apparent work function. Polymer thin films were characterized by depositing films of varying thicknesses on numerous substrates with and without interfacial modifications. Hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) was performed to evaluate a buried interface between indium tin oxide (ITO), treated under various conditions, and poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). Conducting polymer films were found to be sufficiently conducting such that no significant charge redistribution in the polymer films was observed. Consequently, a further departure from uniform substrates was taken whereby electrically disconnected regions of the substrate presented ideally insulating interfacial contacts. In order to accomplish this novel strategy, interdigitated electrodes were used as the substrate. Conducting fingers of one half of the electrodes were electrically grounded while the other set of electrodes were electronically floating. This allowed for the evaluation of substrate charging on photoelectron spectra (SCOPES) in the presence of overlying semiconducting thin films. Such an experiment has never before been reported. This concept was developed out of the previous experiments on interfacial modification and thin film depositions and presents new opportunities for understanding chemical and electronic changes in a multitude of materials and interfaces.

  13. Identification of Laser-induced Lamb waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro C, M.; Lopez, J.A. [Physics Department, U. 1: El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Osegueda, R. [FAST Center, Burgess Hall, U. 1: El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States)

    2007-07-01

    We studied experimentally the ultrasonic propagating modes produced by a laser pulse of 532 nm while impinging on an aluminum plate. The beam, shaped as a line, induced various Lamb modes whose relative power varied with the laser line length. Identification of their mode was performed by detecting the ultrasonic modes with piezoelectric detectors along a propagation direction orthogonal to the line, and using two dimensional fast Fourier transform. Good agreement is observed between theoretical and experimental dispersion curves for the first fundamental symmetric and anti-symmetric modes. Results are shown for 12 and 24 mm laser line-length at 13.6 and 16.8 ns pulse-width. (Author)

  14. DNA deposition through laser induced forward transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colina, M; Serra, P; Fernández-Pradas, J M; Sevilla, L; Morenza, J L

    2005-02-15

    Laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a laser direct write technique that appears to be specially adequate for the production of biosensors, since it permits to deposit patterns of biomolecules with high spatial resolution. In the LIFT technique, a laser pulse is focused on a thin film of the material to be transferred through a transparent support, and under the action of the laser pulse, a small fraction of the film is transferred to a receptor substrate that is placed parallel to the film-support system. In the case of biomolecules transfer, the thin film consists in a liquid solution containing the biomolecules. In this work, microarrays of two different cDNAs have been both spotted by LIFT and pin microspotting onto a poly-L-lysine treated glass slide. Once transferred, all the microarrays have been submitted to hybridization with the complementary strands of the spotted cDNAs, each one tagged with a different fluorochrome. Comparative fluorescence scanner analyses have revealed that the microarrays transferred through LIFT are equivalent to those transferred through pin microspotting in terms of signal intensity and gene discrimination capacity, and that the action of the laser pulse does not result in significant damage of the transferred DNA.

  15. Laser-induced incandescence from laser-heated silicon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menser, Jan; Daun, Kyle; Dreier, Thomas; Schulz, Christof

    2016-11-01

    This work describes the application of temporally and spectrally resolved laser-induced incandescence to silicon nanoparticles synthesized in a microwave plasma reactor. Optical properties for bulk silicon presented in the literature were extended for nanostructured particles analyzed in this paper. Uncertainties of parameters in the evaporation submodel, as well as measurement noise, are incorporated into the inference process by Bayesian statistics. The inferred nanoparticle sizes agree with results from transmission electron microscopy, and the determined accommodation coefficient matches the values of the preceding study.

  16. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Kasem

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS, known also as laser-induced plasma spectroscopy (LIPS, is a well-known spectrochemical elemental analysis technique. The field of LIBS has been rapidly matured as a consequence of growing interest in real-time analysis across a broad spectrum of applied sciences and recent development of commercial LIBS analytical systems. In this brief review, we introduce the contributions of the research groups in the African continent in the field of the fundamentals and applications of LIBS. As it will be shown, the fast development of LIBS in Africa during the last decade was mainly due to the broad environmental, industrial, archaeological, and biomedical applications of this technique.

  17. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy on meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Giacomo, A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Bari (Italy); MIP-CNR sec Bari (Italy)], E-mail: alessandro.degiacomo@ba.imip.cnr.it; Dell' Aglio, M.; De Pascale, O. [MIP-CNR sec Bari (Italy); Longo, S.; Capitelli, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Bari (Italy); MIP-CNR sec Bari (Italy)

    2007-12-15

    The classification of meteorites when geological analysis is unfeasible is generally made by the spectral line emission ratio of some characteristic elements. Indeed when a meteorite impacts Earth's atmosphere, hot plasma is generated, as a consequence of the braking effect of air, with the consequent ablation of the falling body. Usually, by the plasma emission spectrum, the meteorite composition is determined, assuming the Boltzmann equilibrium. The plasma generated during Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) experiment shows similar characteristics and allows one to verify the mentioned method with higher accuracy. On the other hand the study of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy on meteorite can be useful for both improving meteorite classification methods and developing on-flight techniques for asteroid investigation. In this paper certified meteorites belonging to different typologies have been investigated by LIBS: Dofhar 461 (lunar meteorite), Chondrite L6 (stony meteorite), Dofhar 019 (Mars meteorite) and Sikhote Alin (irony meteorite)

  18. Laser-Induced Breakdown in Liquid Helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirisky, S.; Yang, Y.; Wei, W.; Maris, H. J.

    2017-10-01

    We report on experiments in which focused laser light is used to induce optical breakdown in liquid helium-4. The threshold intensity has been measured over the temperature range from 1.1 to 2.8 K with light of wavelength 1064 nm. In addition to the measurement of the threshold, we have performed experiments to study how the breakdown from one pulse modifies the probability that a subsequent pulse will result in breakdown.

  19. Laser induced nuclear waste transmutation

    CERN Document Server

    Hirlimann, Charles

    2016-01-01

    When producing electricity that collects the mass energy that is available at the time of the induced disintegration of radioactive elements, other unstable elements are produced with half-life span durations ranging from less than one second to hundreds of thousands of years and which are considered as waste. Managing nuclear waste with a half-life of less than 30 years is an easy task, as our societies clearly know how to keep buildings safe for more than a century, the time it takes for the activity to be divided by a factor of 8. High-activity, long-lasting waste that can last for thousands of years or even longer, up to geological time laps, cannot be taken care of for such long durations. Therefore, these types of waste are socially unacceptable; nobody wants to leave a polluted planet to descendants.

  20. Laser-induced torques in metallic ferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freimuth, Frank; Blügel, Stefan; Mokrousov, Yuriy

    2016-10-01

    We study laser-induced torques in bcc Fe, hcp Co, and L 10 FePt based on first-principles electronic structure calculations and the Keldysh nonequilibrium formalism. We find that the torques have two contributions, one from the inverse Faraday effect (IFE) and one from the optical spin-transfer torque (OSTT). Depending on the ferromagnet at hand and on the quasiparticle broadening the two contributions may be of similar magnitude, or one contribution may dominate over the other. Additionally, we determine the nonequilibrium spin polarization in order to investigate its relation to the torque. We find the torques and the perpendicular component of the nonequilibrium spin polarization to be odd in the helicity of the laser light, while the spin polarization that is induced parallel to the magnetization is helicity independent. The parallel component of the nonequilibrium spin polarization is orders of magnitude larger than the perpendicular component. In the case of hcp Co we find good agreement between the calculated laser-induced torque and a recent experiment.

  1. Pulsed laser-induced formation of silica nanogrids

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ihlemann, Jürgen; Weichenhain-Schriever, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    ... ) coating through the transparent substrate. A polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) superstrate (cover layer) coated on top of the SiO x film prior to laser exposure serves as confinement for controlled laser-induced structure formation...

  2. Laser-induced mobilization of dust produced during fusion reactors operation; Mise en suspension par laser de poussieres generees lors du fonctionnement des reacteurs de fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vatry, A.

    2010-11-16

    During tokamak operation, plasma-wall interactions lead to material erosion process and dusts production. These dusts are mainly composed by carbon and tungsten, with sizes ranging from 10 nm to 100 {mu}m. For safety reasons and to guarantee an optimum reactor functioning, the dusts have to be kept in reasonable quantity. The dusts mobilization is a first step to collect them, and the laser is a promising technique for this application. To optimize the cleaning, physical mechanisms responsible for dust ejection induced by laser have been identified. Some particles, such as aggregates, are directly ablated by the laser. The metal droplets are ejected intact by an electrostatic force, induced by the photoelectrons. We also characterized the particles ejection to choose an appropriate collection device. (author) [French] Lors du fonctionnement d'une machine de fusion, les interactions plasma-parois conduisent a des processus d'erosion des materiaux et a la production de particules. Ces poussieres sont principalement composees de carbone et de tungstene. Pour des raisons de surete et afin de garantir un fonctionnement optimum du reacteur, il est important de garder en quantite raisonnable les poussieres dont la taille varie entre 10 nm et 100 {mu}m. La mise en suspension de ces poussieres est une etape preliminaire a leur recuperation, et le laser est une technique prometteuse pour cette application. Afin d'optimiser le nettoyage, les mecanismes physiques a l'origine de l'ejection induite par laser de ces poussieres ont ete identifies. Les agregats sont directement ablates par le laser et les gouttelettes metalliques sont ejectees intactes par une force electrostatique induite par les photoelectrons. Nous avons egalement caracterise l'ejection des particules pour choisir un systeme de recuperation adapte

  3. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging of bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Peter J.

    1998-12-01

    This paper outlines a method for optically detecting bacteria on various backgrounds, such as meat, by imaging their laser induced auto-fluorescence response. This method can potentially operate in real-time, which is many times faster than current bacterial detection methods, which require culturing of bacterial samples. This paper describes the imaging technique employed whereby a laser spot is scanned across an object while capturing, filtering, and digitizing the returned light. Preliminary results of the bacterial auto-fluorescence are reported and plans for future research are discussed. The results to date are encouraging with six of the eight bacterial strains investigated exhibiting auto-fluorescence when excited at 488 nm. Discrimination of these bacterial strains against red meat is shown and techniques for reducing background fluorescence discussed.

  4. Laser induced fluorescence of dental caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albin, S.; Byvik, C. E.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1988-01-01

    Significant differences between the optical spectra taken from sound regions of teeth and carious regions have been observed. These differences appear both in absorption and in laser induced fluorescence spectra. Excitation by the 488 nm line of an argon ion laser beam showed a peak in the emission intensity around 553 nm for the sound dental material while the emission peak from the carious region was red-shifted by approximately 40 nm. The relative absorption of carious region was significantly higher at 488 nm; however its fluorescence intensity peak was lower by an order of magnitude compared to the sound tooth. Implications of these results for a safe, reliable and early detection of dental caries are discussed.

  5. Nanodot formation induced by femtosecond laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abere, M. J.; Kang, M.; Goldman, R. S.; Yalisove, S. M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Chen, C. [Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Rittman, D. R. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Phillips, J. D. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Torralva, B. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-10-20

    The femtosecond laser generation of ZnSe nanoscale features on ZnSe surfaces was studied. Irradiation with multiple exposures produces 10–100 nm agglomerations of nanocrystalline ZnSe while retaining the original single crystal structure of the underlying material. The structure of these nanodots was verified using a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The nanodots continue to grow hours after irradiation through a combination of bulk and surface diffusion. We suggest that in nanodot formation the result of ultrafast laser induced point defect formation is more than an order of magnitude below the ZnSe ultrafast melt threshold fluence. This unique mechanism of point defect injection will be discussed.

  6. Laser induced fluorescence of dental caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albin, S.; Byvik, C. E.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1988-01-01

    Significant differences between the optical spectra taken from sound regions of teeth and carious regions have been observed. These differences appear both in absorption and in laser induced fluorescence spectra. Excitation by the 488 nm line of an argon ion laser beam showed a peak in the emission intensity around 553 nm for the sound dental material while the emission peak from the carious region was red-shifted by approximately 40 nm. The relative absorption of carious region was significantly higher at 488 nm; however its fluorescence intensity peak was lower by an order of magnitude compared to the sound tooth. Implications of these results for a safe, reliable and early detection of dental caries are discussed.

  7. Laser induced single spot oxidation of titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jwad, Tahseen, E-mail: taj355@bham.ac.uk; Deng, Sunan; Butt, Haider; Dimov, S.

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • A new high resolution laser induced oxidation (colouring) method is proposed (single spot oxidation). • The method is applied to control oxide films thicknesses and hence colours on titanium substrates in micro-scale. • The method enable imprinting high resolution coloured image on Ti substrate. • Optical and morphological periodic surface structures are also produced by an array of oxide spots using the proposed method. • Colour coding of two colours into one field is presented. - Abstract: Titanium oxides have a wide range of applications in industry, and they can be formed on pure titanium using different methods. Laser-induced oxidation is one of the most reliable methods due to its controllability and selectivity. Colour marking is one of the main applications of the oxidation process. However, the colourizing process based on laser scanning strategies is limited by the relative large processing area in comparison to the beam size. Single spot oxidation of titanium substrates is proposed in this research in order to increase the resolution of the processed area and also to address the requirements of potential new applications. The method is applied to produce oxide films with different thicknesses and hence colours on titanium substrates. High resolution colour image is imprinted on a sheet of pure titanium by converting its pixels’ colours into laser parameter settings. Optical and morphological periodic surface structures are also produced by an array of oxide spots and then analysed. Two colours have been coded into one field and the dependencies of the reflected colours on incident and azimuthal angles of the light are discussed. The findings are of interest to a range of application areas, as they can be used to imprint optical devices such as diffusers and Fresnel lenses on metallic surfaces as well as for colour marking.

  8. Laser-Induced Incandescence in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderWal, Randy L.

    1997-01-01

    Knowledge of soot concentration is important due to its presence and impact upon a wide range of combustion processes ranging from diffusion to premixed flames, laminar to turbulent processes and homogeneous to heterogeneous combustion. Measurement of soot volume fraction (f(sub v)) is essential to discerning its formation and growth. The presence of soot also affects other physical and chemical properties of combustion thereby affecting studies not directly concerned with either its formation or growth, such as radiative heat transfer, CO oxidation and fuel vaporization or pyrolysis rates. Microgravity offers unique opportunities for studying both soot growth and the effect of soot radiation upon flame structure and spread. Spatial scales and residence time scales are greatly extended in 0-g facilitating soot growth studies. With the varied geometries, short duration microgravity test times and time-varying processes there is a demand for measurement of f(sub v) with high spatial and temporal resolution. Laser-induced incandescence (LII) has advanced f(sub v) measurements in many 1-g combustion processes. To create laser-induced incandescence, a pulsed high intensity laser heats soot to incandescence temperatures. Using appropriate spectral and temporal detection conditions, the resulting incandescence can be selectively detected apart from the non-laser-heated soot and flame gases. Theoretical modelling and experiments have shown that the resulting incandescence is representative of f(sub v). Using an intensified array camera and a laser sheet for excitation, one- and two-dimensionally resolved LII images of f(sub v) have been obtained in 1-g. LII has been characterized and developed at NASA-Lewis for soot volume fraction determination in a wide range of 1-g combustion applications. Broadly grouped, the characterization work has included studies of excitation intensity, excitation wavelength and the optimum temporal and spectral detection conditions to enable an

  9. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy: Capabilities and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    sample preparation. 14 6. References 1. Cremers D.A.; Radziemski, L. J. Handbook of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy; West Sussex, England...30 (21), 2882–2884. 17. Salle, B.; Lacour, J. L.; Vors, E.; Fichet, P.; Maurice, S.; Cremers , D. A.; et al. Laser- Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy...90. Martin , M. Z.; Labbe, N.; Andre, N.; Harris, R.; Ebinger, M.; Wullschleger, S. D.; et al. High Resolution Applications of Laser-Induced

  10. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen-Zhen; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Zhang, Zhen-Zhen; Wang, Zhe; Zeng, Xiao-Yan; Yan, Jun-Jie

    2016-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an analytical detection technique based on atomic emission spectroscopy to measure the elemental composition. LIBS has been extensively studied and developed due to the non-contact, fast response, high sensitivity, real-time and multi-elemental detection features. The development and applications of LIBS technique in Asia are summarized and discussed in this review paper. The researchers in Asia work on different aspects of the LIBS study in fundamentals, data processing and modeling, applications and instrumentations. According to the current research status, the challenges, opportunities and further development of LIBS technique in Asia are also evaluated to promote LIBS research and its applications.

  11. Laser induced single spot oxidation of titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jwad, Tahseen; Deng, Sunan; Butt, Haider; Dimov, S.

    2016-11-01

    Titanium oxides have a wide range of applications in industry, and they can be formed on pure titanium using different methods. Laser-induced oxidation is one of the most reliable methods due to its controllability and selectivity. Colour marking is one of the main applications of the oxidation process. However, the colourizing process based on laser scanning strategies is limited by the relative large processing area in comparison to the beam size. Single spot oxidation of titanium substrates is proposed in this research in order to increase the resolution of the processed area and also to address the requirements of potential new applications. The method is applied to produce oxide films with different thicknesses and hence colours on titanium substrates. High resolution colour image is imprinted on a sheet of pure titanium by converting its pixels' colours into laser parameter settings. Optical and morphological periodic surface structures are also produced by an array of oxide spots and then analysed. Two colours have been coded into one field and the dependencies of the reflected colours on incident and azimuthal angles of the light are discussed. The findings are of interest to a range of application areas, as they can be used to imprint optical devices such as diffusers and Fresnel lenses on metallic surfaces as well as for colour marking.

  12. Electron rescattering at metal nanotips induced by ultrashort laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Wachter, Georg; Burgdörfer, Joachim; Schenk, Markus; Krüger, Michael; Hommelhoff, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We report on the first investigation of plateau and cut-off structures in photoelectron spectra from nano-scale metal tips interacting with few-cycle near-infrared laser pulses. These hallmarks of electron rescattering, well-known from atom-laser interaction in the strong-field regime, appear at remarkably low laser intensities with nominal Keldysh parameters of the order of $\\gtrsim 10$. Quantum and quasi-classical simulations reveal that a large field enhancement near the tip and the increased backscattering probability at a solid-state target play a key role. Plateau electrons are by an order of magnitude more abundant than in comparable atomic spectra, reflecting the high density of target atoms at the surface. The position of the cut-off serves as an in-situ probe for the locally enhanced electric field at the tip apex.

  13. Argon laser induced changes to the carbonate content of enamel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziglo, M.J. [Orthodontic Graduate Program, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Private Practice, Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada); Nelson, A.E., E-mail: aenelson@dow.com [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Alberta (Canada); Heo, G.; Major, P.W. [Orthodontic Graduate Program, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta (Canada)

    2009-05-15

    Argon laser irradiation can be used to cure orthodontic brackets onto teeth in significantly less time than conventional curing lights. In addition, it has been shown that the argon laser seems to impart a demineralization resistance to the enamel. The purpose of this study was to use surface science techniques to ascertain if this demineralization resistance is possibly a result of a decrease in the carbonate content of enamel. Eleven mandibular third molars previously scheduled for extraction were collected and used in the present study. The teeth were sectioned in two and randomly assigned to either the argon laser (457-502 nm; 250 mW cm{sup -2}) or the control (no treatment) group. The sections assigned to the argon laser group were cured for 10 s and analyzed. To exaggerate any potential changes the experimental sections were then exposed to a further 110 s of argon laser irradiation. Surface analysis was performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). The results showed no statistically significant change in the carbonate content of enamel after argon laser irradiation (p > 0.05). Thus, it is suggested that any demineralization resistance imparted to the enamel surface by argon laser irradiation is not due to alterations in carbonate content.

  14. Imaging molecular structure with photoelectron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boll, Rebecca

    2014-07-02

    The possibility to study the structure of polyatomic gas-phase molecules by photoelectron diffraction is investigated with the goal of developing a method capable of imaging ultrafast photochemical reactions with femtosecond temporal and sub-Angstroem spatial resolution. The fluorine 1s-level of adiabatically laser-aligned 1-ethynyl-4-fluorobenzene (C{sub 8}H{sub 5}F) molecules was ionized by X-ray pulses from the Linac Coherent Light Source Free-Electron Laser, and the angular distributions of photoelectrons with kinetic energies between 30 and 60 eV were recorded by velocity map imaging. Comparison with density functional theory calculations allows relating the measured distributions to the molecular structure. The results of an IR-pump, X-ray-probe experiment on aligned 1,4-dibromobenzene (C{sub 6}H{sub 4}Br{sub 2})molecules are presented to explore the potential of photoelectron diffraction for time-resolved imaging. The influence of the alignment laser pulse on the pumping and probing step is discussed. Laser-alignment is contrasted with determination of the molecular orientation by photoelectron-photoion coincidences for an exemplary data set on 1-ethynyl-4-fluorobenzene molecules recorded at the PETRA III synchrotron. Both methods are evaluated with respect to their applicability to record time-dependent snapshots of molecular structure. The results obtained in this work indicate possible future avenues for investigating ultrafast molecular dynamics using X-ray Free-Electron Lasers.

  15. Femtosecond laser induced microripple on PDMS surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Xie; Changhe Zhou; Wei Wang; Tengfei Wu

    2009-01-01

    laser pulses and the subsequent cool-down solidification of the melting PDMS along with the movement of the femtosecond laser spot. This result will be helpful to understand the interaction between the femtosecond laser and the polymer.

  16. Minimally invasive non-thermal laser technology using laser-induced optical breakdown for skin rejuvenation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habbema, L.; Verhagen, R.; Van Hal, R.; Liu, Y.; Varghese, B.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a novel, minimally invasive laser technology for skin rejuvenation by creating isolated microscopic lesions within tissue below the epidermis using laser induced optical breakdown. Using an in-house built prototype device, tightly focused near-infrared laser pulses are used to create opt

  17. Minimally invasive non-thermal laser technology using laser-induced optical breakdown for skin rejuvenation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habbema, L.; Verhagen, R.; Van Hal, R.; Liu, Y.; Varghese, B.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a novel, minimally invasive laser technology for skin rejuvenation by creating isolated microscopic lesions within tissue below the epidermis using laser induced optical breakdown. Using an in-house built prototype device, tightly focused near-infrared laser pulses are used to create

  18. Laser induced phase locking of hydrogen plasma striations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glab, W.; Nayfeh, M.H.

    1982-04-01

    Laser induced transient striations of a hydrogen discharge plasma are studied as a function of the ''detuning'' of the discharge parameters from the steady-state oscillatory response conditions. We observed laser induced phase locking of the steady-state striations.

  19. Laser Induced Selective Activation For Subsequent Autocatalytic Electroless Plating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yang

    The subject of this PhD thesis is “Laser induced selective activation for subsequent autocatalytic electroless plating.” The objective of the project is to investigate the process chains for micro structuring of polymer surfaces for selective micro metallization. Laser induced selective activation...

  20. Surface modification induced by UV nanosecond Nd:YVO4 laser structuring on biometals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorucci, M. Paula; López, Ana J.; Ramil, Alberto

    2014-08-01

    Laser surface texturing is a promising tool for improving metallic biomaterials performance in dental and orthopedic bone-replacing applications. Laser ablation modifies the topography of bulk material and might alter surface properties that govern the interactions with the surrounding tissue. This paper presents a preliminary evaluation of surface modifications in two biometals, stainless steel 316L and titanium alloy Ti6Al4V by UV nanosecond Nd:YVO4. Scanning electron microscopy of the surface textured by parallel micro-grooves reveals a thin layer of remelted material along the grooves topography. Furthermore, X-ray diffraction allowed us to appreciate a grain refinement of original crystal structure and consequently induced residual strain. Changes in the surface chemistry were determined by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy; in this sense, generalized surface oxidation was observed and characterization of the oxides and other compounds such hydroxyl groups was reported. In case of titanium alloy, oxide layer mainly composed by TiO2 which is a highly biocompatible compound was identified. Furthermore, laser treatment produces an increase in oxide thickness that could improve the corrosion behavior of the metal. Otherwise, laser treatment led to the formation of secondary phases which might be detrimental to physical and biocompatibility properties of the material.

  1. Femtosecond laser-induced surface wettability modification of polystyrene surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Wang, XinCai; Zheng, HongYu; Lam, YeeCheong

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we demonstrated a simple method to create either a hydrophilic or hydrophobic surface. With femtosecond laser irradiation at different laser parameters, the water contact angle (WCA) on polystyrene's surface can be modified to either 12.7° or 156.2° from its original WCA of 88.2°. With properly spaced micro-pits created, the surface became hydrophilic probably due to the spread of the water droplets into the micro-pits. While with properly spaced micro-grooves created, the surface became rough and more hydrophobic. We investigated the effect of laser parameters on WCAs and analyzed the laser-treated surface roughness, profiles and chemical bonds by surface profilometer, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). For the laser-treated surface with low roughness, the polar (such as C—O, C=O, and O—C=O bonds) and non-polar (such as C—C or C—H bonds) groups were found to be responsible for the wettability changes. While for a rough surface, the surface roughness or the surface topography structure played a more significant role in the changes of the surface WCA. The mechanisms involved in the laser surface wettability modification process were discussed.

  2. Coherent control of photoelectron wavepacket angular interferograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockett, P.; Wollenhaupt, M.; Baumert, T.

    2015-11-01

    Coherent control over photoelectron wavepackets, via the use of polarization-shaped laser pulses, can be understood as a time and polarization-multiplexed process, where the final (time-integrated) observable coherently samples all instantaneous states of the light-matter interaction. In this work, we investigate this multiplexing via computation of the observable photoelectron angular interferograms resulting from multi-photon atomic ionization with polarization-shaped laser pulses. We consider the polarization sensitivity of both the instantaneous and cumulative continuum wavefunction; the nature of the coherent control over the resultant photoelectron interferogram is thus explored in detail. Based on this understanding, the use of coherent control with polarization-shaped pulses as a methodology for a highly multiplexed coherent quantum metrology is also investigated, and defined in terms of the information content of the observable.

  3. Coherent Control of Photoelectron Wavepacket Angular Interferograms

    CERN Document Server

    Hockett, Paul; Baumert, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Coherent control over photoelectron wavepackets, via the use of polarization-shaped laser pulses, can be understood as a time and polarization-multiplexed process. In this work, we investigate this multiplexing via computation of the observable photoelectron angular interferograms resulting from multi-photon atomic ionization with polarization-shaped laser pulses. We consider the polarization sensitivity of both the instantaneous and cumulative continuum wavefunction; the nature of the coherent control over the resultant photoelectron interferogram is thus explored in detail. Based on this understanding, the use of coherent control with polarization-shaped pulses as a methodology for a highly multiplexed coherent quantum metrology is also investigated, and defined in terms of the information content of the observable.

  4. Laser-induced damage of 1064-nm narrow-band interference filters under different laser modes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weidong Gao(高卫东); Hongbo He(贺洪波); Jianda Shao(邵建达); Zhengxiu Fan(范正修)

    2004-01-01

    The laser-induced damage behavior of narrow-band interference filters was investigated with a Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm under single-pulse mode and free-running laser mode.The absorption measurement of such coatings has been performed by surface thermal lensing(STL)technique.The relationship between damage morphology and absorption under the two different laser modes was studied in detail.The explanation was given by the standing-wave distribution theory.

  5. Laser filament-induced aerosol formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Saathoff

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Using the aerosol and cloud simulation chamber AIDA, we investigated the laser filament induced particle formation in ambient air, humid synthetic air, humid nitrogen, argon–oxygen mixture, and pure argon in order to simulate the particle formation under realistic atmospheric conditions as well as to investigate the influence of typical gas-phase atmospheric constituents on the particle formation. Terawatt laser plasma filaments generated new particles in the size range 3 to 130 nm with particle production rates ranging from 1 × 107 to 5 × 109 cm−3 plasma s−1 for the given experimental conditions. In all cases the particle formation rates increased exponentially with the water content of the gas mixture. Furthermore, the presence of a few ppb of trace gases like SO2 and α-pinene clearly enhanced the particle yield by number, the latter also by mass. Our findings suggest that new particle formation is efficiently supported by oxidized species like acids generated by the photoionization of both major and minor components of the air, including N2, NH3, SO2 and organics.

  6. Laser filament-induced aerosol formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Saathoff

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Using the aerosol and cloud simulation chamber AIDA we investigated the laser filament induced particle formation in ambient air, humid synthetic air, humid nitrogen, argon-oxygen mixture, and pure argon in order to simulate the particle formation under realistic atmospheric conditions as well as to investigate the influence of typical gas-phase atmospheric constituents on the particle formation. Terawatt laser plasma filaments generated new particles in the size range 3 to 130 nm with particle production rates ranging from 1 × 107 to 5 × 109 cm−3 plasma s−1. In all cases the particle formation rates increased exponentially with the water content of the gas mixture. Furthermore, the presence of a few ppb of trace gases like SO2 and α-pinene clearly enhanced the particle yield by number, the latter also by mass. Our findings suggest that new particle formation is efficiently supported by acids generated by the photo-ionization of both major and minor components of the air, including N2, NH3, SO2 and organics.

  7. Photoion-pair formation and photoelectron-induced dissociative attachment in C sub 2 H sub 2 : D sub 0 (HCC--H)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruscic, B.; Berkowitz, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (USA))

    1990-10-15

    The formation of C{sub 2}H{sup {minus}} is observed in two broad resonance bands when C{sub 2}H{sub 2} is irradiated with vuv light. The higher-energy band has partially resolved structure, approximately linear pressure dependence, and a threshold at 16.33{sub 5}{plus minus}0.02{sub 1} eV. It is attributed to photoion-pair formation (C{sub 2}H{sup {minus}}+H{sup +}) consequent upon predissociation of one or more Rydberg states. This threshold, together with IP(H) and EA(C{sub 2}H), gives D{sub 0}(HCC--H){le}5.70{sub 6}{plus minus}0.02{sub 2} eV{equivalent to}131.6{plus minus}0.5 kcal/mol, or {Delta}{ital H}{sup 0}{sub {ital f}0} (C{sub 2}H){le}134.5{plus minus}0.5 kcal/mol. The lower-energy band has an approximately quadratic pressure dependence and curved step-like structure. It is attributed to photoelectron-induced dissociative attachment mediated by a {pi}{sub {ital g}} shape resonance. The threshold, at 878.5{plus minus}2.0 A, corresponds to a photoelectron energy of 2.71{sub 5}{plus minus}0.03{sub 2} eV. This threshold combined with EA(C{sub 2}H)=2.969{plus minus}0.010 eV, yields {ital D}{sub 0}(HCC--H){le}5.68{sub 4}{plus minus}0.03{sub 3} eV{equivalent to}131.1{plus minus}0.7 kcal/mol, or {Delta}{ital H}{sup 0}{sub {ital f}0} (C{sub 2}H)=134.0{plus minus}0.7 kcal/mol.

  8. Effect of native defects and laser-induced defects on multi-shot laser-induced damage in multilayer mirrors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Wang; Yuanan Zhao; Tanda Shao; Zhengxiu Fan

    2011-01-01

    The roles of laser-induced defects and native defects in multilayer mirrors under multi-shot irradiation condition are investigated. The HfO2/SiO2 dielectric mirrors are deposited by electron beam evaporation (EBE). Laser damage testing is carried out on both the 1-on-l and S-on-1 regimes using 355-nm pulsed laser at a duration of 8 ns. It is found that the single-shot laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) is much higher than the multi-shot LIDT. In the multi-shot mode, the main factor influencing LIDT is the accumulation of irreversible laser-induced defects and native defects. The surface morphologies of the samples are observed by optical microscopy. Moreover, the number of laser-induced defects affects the damage probability of the samples. A correlative model based on critical conduction band (CB) electron density (ED) is presented to simulate the multi-shot damage behavior.%@@ The roles of laser-induced defects and native defects in multilayer mirrors under multi-shot irradiation condition are investigated.The Hf02/SiO2 dielectric mirrors are deposited by electron beam evaporation (EBE).Laser damage testing is carried out on both the 1-on-1 and S-on-1 regimes using 355-nn pulsed laser at a duration of 8 us.It is found that the single-shot laser-induced damage threshold(LIDT)is much higher than the multi-shot LIDT.In the multi-shot mode,the main factor influencing LIDT is the accumulation of irreversible laser-induced defects and native defects.The surface morphologies of the samples are observed by optical microscopy.Moreover,the number of laser-induced defects affects the damage probability of the samples.A correlative model based on critical conduction band(CB)electron density(ED)is presented to simulate the multi-shot damage behavior.

  9. High-power, narrow-band, high-repetition-rate, 5.9 eV coherent light source using passive optical cavity for laser-based angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omachi, J; Yoshioka, K; Kuwata-Gonokami, M

    2012-10-08

    We demonstrate a scheme for efficient generation of a 5.9 eV coherent light source with an average power of 23 mW, 0.34 meV linewidth, and 73 MHz repetition rate from a Ti: sapphire picosecond mode-locked laser with an output power of 1 W. Second-harmonic light is generated in a passive optical cavity by a BiB(3)O(6) crystal with a conversion efficiency as high as 67%. By focusing the second-harmonic light transmitted from the cavity into a β-BaB(2)O(4) crystal, we obtain fourth-harmonic light at 5.9 eV. This light source offers stable operation for at least a week. We discuss the suitability of the laser light source for high-resolution angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy by comparing it with other sources (synchrotron radiation facilities and gas discharge lamp).

  10. Laser-induced periodic surface structuring of biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Susana; Rebollar, Esther; Oujja, Mohamed; Martín, Margarita; Castillejo, Marta

    2013-03-01

    We report here on a systematic study about the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on biopolymers. Self-standing films of the biopolymers chitosan, starch and the blend of chitosan with the synthetic polymer poly (vinyl pyrrolidone), PVP, were irradiated in air with linearly polarized laser beams at 193, 213 and 266 nm, with pulse durations in the range of 6-17 ns. The laser-induced periodic surface structures were topographically characterized by atomic force microscopy and the chemical modifications induced by laser irradiation were inspected via Raman spectroscopy. Formation of LIPSS parallel to the laser polarization direction, with periods similar to the laser wavelength, was observed at efficiently absorbed wavelengths in the case of the amorphous biopolymer chitosan and its blend with PVP, while formation of LIPSS is prevented in the crystalline starch biopolymer.

  11. Carrier-envelope phase mapping in laser-induced electron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiseler, Henning; Ishii, Nobuhisa; Kaneshima, Keisuke; Geier, Florian; Kanai, Teruto; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.; Morishita, Toru; Itatani, Jiro

    2016-09-01

    We present laser-induced electron diffraction measurements of elastic differential scattering cross sections (DCSs) of a photoelectron on the parent ion for argon, krypton, and xenon, using waveform-controlled few-cycle pulses. Considering only cutoff electrons and employing the adiabatic theory for the analysis enables us to eliminate ambiguities in extracting the DCSs from experimental spectra. Contrary to previous works, which mainly focused on the angular dependence of the DCS, our method allows us to extract also its dependence on the scattering momentum. In the case of xenon, we demonstrate how this method can be used to obtain the complete angular and momentum dependence of the DCS in a range of these variables determined by the pulse. The obtained results are compared to theoretical calculations based on the single-active-electron approximation, which shows a high level of agreement. Further investigations may provide opportunities to study multielectron effects when more advanced theoretical models become available.

  12. Laser induced periodic surface structure formation in germanium above laser damage fluence by mid IR femtosecond laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafka, Kyle; Austin, Drake; Cheng, Jian; Trendafilov, Simeon; Shvets, Gennady; Li, Hui; Yi, Allen; Blaga, Cosmin I.; DiMauro, L. F.; Chowdhury, Enam

    2014-11-01

    Laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) were generated via interaction of multiple 90 femtosecond 1900 - 3600 nm mid IR laser pulses (3 -10,000) on single crystal Ge targets. For specific laser parameters, both low and high frequency LIPSS are found together, which are oriented perpendicular to each other. Study of polarization dependence of LIPSS revealed that orientation and symmetry of interaction could be controlled by rotating polarization of laser pulses. Low frequency LIPSS formation was consistent with surface plasmon coupling of laser pulses with excited Ge.

  13. Tissue tearing caused by pulsed laser-induced ablation pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, J P; Walsh, J T

    1993-02-01

    Pressure induced by ablative pulses of laser radiation is shown to correlate with the mechanical disruption of tissue. The ablation pressure induced during Er:YSGG laser irradiation of skin, liver, and aorta was calculated from a ballistic pendulum-based measurement of recoil momentum. The ejected material and ablation crater were examined grossly and microscopically after ablation. A gas-dynamic model of laser-induced vaporization was used to understand the measured pressures. The results show that mechanical disruption of tissue occurs when the ablation pressure exceeds the strength of the irradiated tissue at sites of intrinsic weakness.

  14. [The Spectral Analysis of Laser-Induced Plasma in Laser Welding with Various Protecting Conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiao; Yang, Li-jun; Liu, Tong; Jiao, Jiao; Wang, Hui-chao

    2016-01-01

    The shielding gas plays an important role in the laser welding process and the variation of the protecting conditions has an obvious effect on the welding quality. This paper studied the influence of the change of protecting conditions on the parameters of laser-induced plasma such as electron temperature and electron density during the laser welding process by designing some experiments of reducing the shielding gas flow rate step by step and simulating the adverse conditions possibly occurring in the actual Nd : YAG laser welding process. The laser-induced plasma was detected by a fiber spectrometer to get the spectral data. So the electron temperature of laser-induced plasma was calculated by using the method of relative spectral intensity and the electron density by the Stark Broadening. The results indicated that the variation of protecting conditions had an important effect on the electron temperature and the electron density in the laser welding. When the protecting conditions were changed, the average electron temperature and the average electron density of the laser-induced plasma would change, so did their fluctuation range. When the weld was in a good protecting condition, the electron temperature, the electron density and their fluctuation were all low. Otherwise, the values would be high. These characteristics would have contribution to monitoring the process of laser welding.

  15. Picosecond laser-induced water condensation in a cloud chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haiyi; Liu, Yonghong; Ju, Jingjing; Tian, Ye; Bai, Yafeng; Liu, Yaoxiang; Du, Shengzhe; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Tiejun; Liu, Jiansheng; Chin, See Leang; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-09-05

    We investigated water condensation in a laboratory cloud chamber induced by picosecond (ps) laser pulses at ~350 ps (800 nm/1-1000 Hz) with a maximum peak power of ~25 MW. The peak power was much lower than the critical power for self-focusing in air (~3-10 GW depending on the pulse duration). Sparks, airflow and snow formation were observed under different laser energies or repetition rates. It was found that weaker ps laser pulses can also induce water condensation by exploding and breaking down ice crystals and/or water droplets into tiny particles although there was no formation of laser filament. These tiny particles would grow until precipitation in a super-saturation zone due to laser-induced airflow in a cold region with a large temperature gradient.

  16. Picosecond laser induced periodic surface structure on copper thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huynh, Thi Trang Dai; Petit, Agnès; Semmar, Nadjib, E-mail: nadjib.semmar@univ-orleans.fr

    2014-05-01

    LIPSS (Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structure) formation on copper thin films induced by a picosecond laser beam (Nd:YAG laser at 266 nm, 42 ps and 10 Hz) was studied experimentally. Copper thin films were deposited on glass and silicon substrates by magnetron sputtering. The surface modifications of irradiated zones were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Two distinct types of LIPSS were identified with respect to the laser fluence (F), number of laser shots (N) and substrate material. Namely, with a number of laser shots (1000 < N < 10,000) and a fluence of (200 mJ/cm{sup 2} < F < 500 mJ/cm{sup 2}), Low Spatial Frequency LIPSS (LSFL with a spatial period of Λ ∼ 260 nm and an orientation perpendicular to polarization) and High Spatial Frequency LIPSS (HSFL with a spatial period of Λ ∼ 130 nm and an orientation parallel to the polarization) were observed. The regime of regular spikes formation was determined for N ≥ 1000. Moreover, the 2D-map of the relationship among LIPSS formation, laser fluence and number of laser shots on copper thin film with two different substrates was established. A physics interpretation of regular spikes and LIPSS formation on copper thin film induced by ps laser with overlapping multi-shots is proposed based on experimental data and the theory of Plateau-Rayleigh instability.

  17. Picosecond laser induced periodic surface structure on copper thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Thi Trang Dai; Petit, Agnès; Semmar, Nadjib

    2014-05-01

    LIPSS (Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structure) formation on copper thin films induced by a picosecond laser beam (Nd:YAG laser at 266 nm, 42 ps and 10 Hz) was studied experimentally. Copper thin films were deposited on glass and silicon substrates by magnetron sputtering. The surface modifications of irradiated zones were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Two distinct types of LIPSS were identified with respect to the laser fluence (F), number of laser shots (N) and substrate material. Namely, with a number of laser shots (1000 LIPSS (LSFL with a spatial period of Λ ∼ 260 nm and an orientation perpendicular to polarization) and High Spatial Frequency LIPSS (HSFL with a spatial period of Λ ∼ 130 nm and an orientation parallel to the polarization) were observed. The regime of regular spikes formation was determined for N ≥ 1000. Moreover, the 2D-map of the relationship among LIPSS formation, laser fluence and number of laser shots on copper thin film with two different substrates was established. A physics interpretation of regular spikes and LIPSS formation on copper thin film induced by ps laser with overlapping multi-shots is proposed based on experimental data and the theory of Plateau-Rayleigh instability.

  18. Gas permeation and temperature effects in laser-induced delamination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fedorov, Alexander; Vellinga, Willem-Pier; De Hosson, Jeff

    Laser-induced delamination (LID) is a technique aimed at measuring the work of adhesion of thin polymer coatings on metal substrates. A laser Pulse is used to create a blister that initiates delamination of the film under pressure. The stress fields in the blister wall and the work of adhesion of

  19. Adhesion of polymer coatings studied by laser-induced delamination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fedorov, A; De Hosson, JTM

    2005-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the laser-induced delamination technique, aimed at measuring the practical work of adhesion of thin polymer coatings on metal substrates. In this technique an infrared laser-pulsed beam is used to create an initial blister. Upon increasing the pulse intensity, the size of

  20. Robust authentication through stochastic femtosecond laser filament induced scattering surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haisu; Tzortzakis, Stelios

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a reliable authentication method by femtosecond laser filament induced scattering surfaces. The stochastic nonlinear laser fabrication nature results in unique authentication robust properties. This work provides a simple and viable solution for practical applications in product authentication, while also opens the way for incorporating such elements in transparent media and coupling those in integrated optical circuits.

  1. Towards Friction Control using laser-induced periodic Surface Structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eichstädt, J.; Römer, G.R.B.E.; Huis in 't Veld, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims at contributing to the study of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) and the description of their tribological properties in order to facilitate the knowledge for contact mechanical applications. To obtain laser parameters for LIPSS formation, we propose to execute two D

  2. Medical Applications of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, A. K.; Rai, N. K.; Singh, Ankita; Rai, A. K.; Rai, Pradeep K.; Rai, Pramod K.

    2014-11-01

    Sedentary lifestyle of human beings has resulted in various diseases and in turn we require a potential tool that can be used to address various issues related to human health. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is one such potential optical analytical tool that has become quite popular because of its distinctive features that include applicability to any type/phase of samples with almost no sample preparation. Several reports are available that discusses the capabilities of LIBS, suitable for various applications in different branches of science which cannot be addressed by traditional analytical methods but only few reports are available for the medical applications of LIBS. In the present work, LIBS has been implemented to understand the role of various elements in the formation of gallstones (formed under the empyema and mucocele state of gallbladder) samples along with patient history that were collected from Purvancal region of Uttar Pradesh, India. The occurrence statistics of gallstones under the present study reveal higher occurrence of gallstones in female patients. The gallstone occurrence was found more prevalent for those male patients who were having the habit of either tobacco chewing, smoking or drinking alcohols. This work further reports in-situ LIBS study of deciduous tooth and in-vivo LIBS study of human nail.

  3. Maximum information photoelectron metrology

    CERN Document Server

    Hockett, P; Wollenhaupt, M; Baumert, T

    2015-01-01

    Photoelectron interferograms, manifested in photoelectron angular distributions (PADs), are a high-information, coherent observable. In order to obtain the maximum information from angle-resolved photoionization experiments it is desirable to record the full, 3D, photoelectron momentum distribution. Here we apply tomographic reconstruction techniques to obtain such 3D distributions from multiphoton ionization of potassium atoms, and fully analyse the energy and angular content of the 3D data. The PADs obtained as a function of energy indicate good agreement with previous 2D data and detailed analysis [Hockett et. al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 223001 (2014)] over the main spectral features, but also indicate unexpected symmetry-breaking in certain regions of momentum space, thus revealing additional continuum interferences which cannot otherwise be observed. These observations reflect the presence of additional ionization pathways and, most generally, illustrate the power of maximum information measurements of th...

  4. Compact High Sensitive Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Instrument Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a versatile tool for in situ substance characterization. Existing LIBS instruments are not compact enough for space...

  5. Laser-induced dry-fabrication of bibenzyl molecular layers on the silicon surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yong Ping, E-mail: zhangyyping@yahoo.com [Faculty of Materials and Energy, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Chen, Zhi Qian [Faculty of Materials and Energy, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Dong, Dong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwest Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Xu, Guo Qin, E-mail: chmxugq@nus.edu.sg [Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117543 (Singapore)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: Schematic illustration of photoinduced polymerization of 4-bromostyrene molecules on the Si(1 1 1)-(7 × 7) surface. - Highlights: • Laser-induced fabrication of molecular layer. • XPS and HREELS experimental evidence for the reaction. • DFT explanation of photochemical reaction. - Abstract: The covalently attached organic monolayer has great effects on the structures of the organic semiconductor thin films and their electronic transport properties in the fabrication of molecular electronic devices. A laser-induced dry-fabrication method has been developed to form bibenzyl-like molecular layers by photoinduced reaction of 4-bromostyrene molecules on silicon surface in the vacuum environment. The radical site produced via the C–Br bond cleavage concurrently reacts with the C=C vinyl group of the physisorbed 4-bromostyrene molecule above to form the –CH{sub 2}–CHBr– covalent linkage. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) experimental results and density functional theory (DFT) calculations confirm the formation of covalently bonded bibenzyl-like (Phi–CH{sub 2}–CHBr–Phi) molecular layers on the silicon surface.

  6. Thermal desorption from surfaces with laser-induced defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabelski, Pawel; Panczyk, Tomasz; Rudzinski, Wladyslaw

    2002-12-30

    Monte Carlo simulation method was used to mimic surface damage development caused by short laser pulses. The influence of pulsed laser irradiation on the creation of defect concentration was examined in the case of a model surface. In particular, the dependence of the intact surface area on a number of laser scans was studied and compared with the experimental results obtained for Rh(1 1 1) crystal face. Changes in the adsorptivoperties of the surface produced by laser irradiation are explained with the help of a simple geometric model connecting the laser intensity and the disordered area generated by a single laser shot. It was demonstrated that exponential decay of the Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) signal with the number of laser scans, which is observed experimentally, may result directly from the overlapping of the laser spots created on the surface. This effect becomes enhanced when the laser intensity, hence the spot size, increases. The importance of laser-induced defects in the kinetics of catalytic/separation processes was examined in the case of temperature programmed desorption (TPD) spectra from surfaces subjected to a different number of laser shots. The spectra were simulated by employing the Monte Carlo method as well as by application of the absolute rate theory (ART) coupled with the mean field approximation. The results obtained with both methods were in a good agreement even when weak lateral interactions in the adsorbed phase were allowed.

  7. Electron momentum distributions and photoelectron spectra of atoms driven by intense spatially inhomogeneous field

    CERN Document Server

    Ciappina, M F; Shaaran, T; Roso, L; Lewenstein, M

    2013-01-01

    We use three dimensional time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation (3D--TDSE) to calculate angular electron momentum distributions and photoelectron spectra of atoms driven by spatially inhomogeneous fields. An example for such inhomogeneous fields is the locally enhanced field induced by resonant plasmons, appearing at surfaces of metallic nanoparticles, nanotips and gold bow-tie shape nanostructures. Our studies show that the inhomogeneity of the laser electric field plays an important role in the above threshold ionization process in the tunneling regime, causing significant modifications to the electron momentum distributions and photoelectron spectra, while its effects in the multiphoton regime appear to be negligible. Indeed, through tunneling ATI process, one can obtain higher energy electrons as well as high degree of asymmetry in the momentum space map. In this study we consider near infrared laser fields with intensities in the mid-$10^{14}$ W/cm$^{2}$ range and we use linear approximation to describe t...

  8. Dynamical behavior of laser-induced nanoparticles during remote processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Tobias; Dickmann, Klaus; Ostendorf, Andreas

    2014-02-01

    Laser remote processing is used in a wide field of industrial applications. Among other things, it is characterized by flexible beam guidance in combination with high processing velocities. But in most cases process gas support in the interaction zone is omitted. Consequently, interaction mechanism between the vapor plume and the incident laser radiation can dynamically affect the process stability. Referring to remote welding with high brilliant laser sources having a wavelength around 1 μm, the interaction between the incident laser radiation and formed particles plays an important role. The presented work shows results of the investigation of the laser-induced particle formation during the laser welding of stainless steel with a 2 kW fiber laser under remote conditions. It is therefore concentrated on the dynamical behavior of the laser-induced particle formation and the dependence of the particle formation on the laser beam power. TEM images of formed particles were analyzed. In addition, the radiation of a LED was directed through the vapor plume. On the one hand, the dynamic of the attenuation was considered. On the other hand, the Rayleigh approximation was used in order to evaluate the detected signals.

  9. Experimental investigations on the influence of the photocathode laser pulse parameters on the electron bunch quality in an RF-photoelectron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haenel, Marc

    2010-07-15

    Free Electron Lasers based on the SASE principle like the European XFEL require electron bunches having peak currents of several kiloamperes as well as very low transverse emittance. While high peak currents can be generated using longitudinal bunch compression techniques, the transverse emittance must have values as low as 1mmmrad already at the source. The development of electron sources fulfilling these demanding specifications is the goal of the Photo Injector Test Facility (PITZ) in DESY, Zeuthen site. The key component of a photoinjector is the electron gun cavity where the electrons bunches are generated and immediately accelerated. The extraction of the electrons is based on the photoelectric effect of the cathode which requires a laser system having special capabilities. In the first part of the thesis, measurements are presented which were performed to investigate whether the laser and the laser transport system fulfill these requirements. The second part of the thesis is dedicated to simulations as well as experimental studies on the impact of the temporal and spatial parameters of the laser pulses on the electron bunch quality. This influence is possible because the response time of the Cs{sub 2}Te photocathode is short compared to the laser pulse duration. Based on these investigations, suggestions for improvements are given and tolerances for the laser pulse properties are defined. (orig.)

  10. Inexpensive laser-induced surface modification in bismuth thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras, A. Reyes [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Carretera Toluca, Ixtlahuaca Kilómetro 15.5, C.P. 50200 Edo. de México (Mexico); Hautefeuille, M., E-mail: mathieu_h@ciencias.unam.mx [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Avenida Universidad 3000, Circuito Exterior S/N, Coyoacán, Ciudad Universitaria, C.P. 04510 D.F. Mexico (Mexico); García, A. Esparza [Fotofísica y Películas Delgadas, Departamento de Tecnociencias, CCADET-UNAM, Circuito exterior s/n C.P. 04510 Cd. Universitaria, D.F. Mexico (Mexico); Mejia, O. Olea [Centro Conjunto de Investigación en Química Sustentable UAEM-UNAM, Carretera Toluca-Atlacomulco, Km 14.5, Unidad El Rosedal, 50200 San Cayetano, Estado de México (Mexico); López, M.A. Camacho [Facultad de Química, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Tollocan s/n, esq. Paseo Colón, Toluca, Estado de México 50110 (Mexico)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Laser-induced microbumps were formed on bismuth films using a simple, low-cost, laser setup. • The patterns, similar to those typically obtained with high-power lasers, were characterized. • Control of laser ablation conditions is critical in the fabrication of surface microbumps. - Abstract: In this work, we present results on texturing a 500 nm thick bismuth film, deposited by sputtering onto a glass slide using a low-cost homemade, near-infrared pulsed laser platform. A 785 nm laser diode of a CD–DVD pickup head was precisely focused on the sample mounted on a motorized two-axis translation stage to generate localized surface microbumps on the bismuth films. This simple method successfully transferred desired micropatterns on the films in a computer-numerical control fashion. Irradiated zones were characterized by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. It was observed that final results are strongly dependent on irradiation parameters.

  11. Research on laser induced acoustic source based underwater communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Lihua; Zhou, Ju; Zhang, Lei; Wan, Xiaoyun

    2016-10-01

    Acoustic transducers are traditionally used to generate underwater acoustical energy with the device physically immersed in water. Novel methods are required for communicating from an in-air platform or surface vessel to a submerged vessel. One possible noncontact downlink communication system involves the use of laser induced acoustic source. The most common mechanisms of opto-acoustic energy conversion are, by order of increasing laser energy density and efficiency, thermal expansion, surface evaporation and optical breakdown. The laser induced acoustic source inherently bears the obvious advantage of not requiring any physical transducer in the medium. At the same time, acoustic energy propagation is efficient in water, whereas optical energy propagate well in air, leading to a more efficiency opto-acoustic communication method. In this paper, an opto-acoustic underwater Communication system is described, aiming to study and analysis whether laser induced sound could achieve good performance for effective communication in practical application.

  12. Characterization of hard coatings produced by laser cladding using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varela, J.A.; Amado, J.M.; Tobar, M.J.; Mateo, M.P.; Yañez, A.; Nicolas, G., E-mail: gines@udc.es

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Chemical mapping and profiling by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of coatings produced by laser cladding. • Production of laser clads using tungsten carbide (WC) and nickel based matrix (NiCrBSi) powders. • Calibration by LIBS of hardfacing alloys with different WC concentrations. - Abstract: Protective coatings with a high abrasive wear resistance can be obtained from powders by laser cladding technique, in order to extend the service life of some industrial components. In this work, laser clad layers of self-fluxing NiCrBSi alloy powder mixed with WC powder have been produced on stainless steel substrates of austenitic type (AISI 304) in a first step and then chemically characterized by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. With the suitable laser processing parameters (mainly output power, beam scan speed and flow rate) and powders mixture proportions between WC ceramics and NiCrBSi alloys, dense pore free layers have been obtained on single tracks and on large areas with overlapped tracks. The results achieved by LIBS technique and applied for the first time to the analysis of laser clads provided the chemical composition of the tungsten carbides in metal alloy matrix. Different measurement modes (multiple point analyses, depth profiles and chemical maps) have been employed, demonstrating the usefulness of LIBS technique for the characterization of laser clads based on hardfacing alloys. The behavior of hardness can be explained by LIBS maps which evidenced the partial dilution of some WC spheres in the coating.

  13. Development And Optical Absorption Properties Of A Laser Induced Plasma During CO2-Laser Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, E.; Bakowsky, L.; Loosen, P.; Poprawe, R.; Herziger, G.

    1984-03-01

    Laser material processing is accompanied by a laser induced plasma in front of the target surface as soon as the laser radiation exceeds a certain critical intensity. For cw CO2-laser machining of metal targets the threshold for plasma onset is about 106 W/cm2. Critical condition for plasma generation at this intensity level is to reach evaporation temperature at the target's surface. At intensity levels exceeding 106 W/cm2 the laser light is interacting with the laser induced plasma and then the plasma in turn interacts with the target. The absorptivity is no longer constant, but increases with increasing intensity of the incident radiation, so that the total amount of power coupled to the target is increasing. This holds up to intensity levels of 2'10 Wicm2. Then the plasma begins to withdraw from the target surface, thus interrupting plasma-target interaction so that the laser power is no longer coupled into the target completely. The results of laser welding (welding depth) in the intensity level of 106 W/cm2 are governed by the product of incident intensity times focus radius, so that welding results are a measure to determine focus radius and laser intensity.

  14. Influence of absorption induced thermal initiation pathway on irradiance threshold for laser induced breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Babu; Bonito, Valentina; Jurna, Martin; Palero, Jonathan; Verhagen, Margaret Hortonand Rieko

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the influence of thermal initiation pathway on the irradiance threshold for laser induced breakdown in transparent, absorbing and scattering phantoms. We observed a transition from laser-induced optical breakdown to laser-induced thermal breakdown as the absorption coefficient of the medium is increased. We found that the irradiance threshold after correction for the path length dependent absorption and scattering losses in the medium is lower due to the thermal pathway for the generation of seed electrons compared to the laser-induced optical breakdown. Furthermore, irradiance threshold gradually decreases with the increase in the absorption properties of the medium. Creating breakdown with lower irradiance threshold that is specific at the target chromophore can provide intrinsic target selectivity and improve safety and efficacy of skin treatment methods that use laser induced breakdown. PMID:25909007

  15. Innovative Drug Injection via Laser Induced Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tae-hee; Yoh, Jack J.

    2010-10-01

    A laser based needle-free liquid drug injection device has been developed. A laser beam is focused inside the liquid contained in the rubber chamber of micro scale. The focused laser beam causes explosive bubble growth and the sudden volume increase in a sealed chamber drives a microjet of liquid drug through the micronozzle. The exit diameter of the nozzle is 125 um and the injected microjet reaches an average velocity of 264 m/s. This device adds the time-varying feature of microjet to the current state of liquid injection for drug delivery.

  16. Laser-induced quantum pumping in graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    San-Jose, Pablo [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia (IEM-CSIC), Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Prada, Elsa; Kohler, Sigmund [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Schomerus, Henning [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-08

    We investigate non-adiabatic electron pumping in graphene generated by laser irradiation with linear polarization parallel or perpendicular to the transport direction. Transport is dominated by the spatially asymmetric excitation of electrons from evanescent into propagating modes. For a laser with parallel polarization, the pumping response exhibits a subharmonic resonant enhancement which directly probes the Fermi energy; no such enhancement occurs for perpendicular polarization. The resonance mechanism relies on the chirality of charge carriers in graphene.

  17. Nondipole effects in attosecond photoelectron streaking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiewanowski, Maciek; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2012-01-01

    The influence of nondipole terms on the time delay in photoionization by an extreme-ultraviolet attosecond pulse in the presence of a near-infrared femtosecond laser pulse from 1s, 2s, and 2p states in hydrogen is investigated. In this attosecond photoelectron streaking process, the relative...... to nondipole terms is found. The numerical calculations are supported by a theoretical analysis of the time delay....

  18. Photoelectronic properties of semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Bube, Richard H

    1992-01-01

    The interaction between light and electrons in semiconductors forms the basis for many interesting and practically significant properties. This book examines the fundamental physics underlying this rich complexity of photoelectronic properties of semiconductors, and will familiarise the reader with the relatively simple models that are useful in describing these fundamentals. The basic physics is also illustrated with typical recent examples of experimental data and observations. Following introductory material on the basic concepts, the book moves on to consider a wide range of phenomena, including photoconductivity, recombination effects, photoelectronic methods of defect analysis, photoeffects at grain boundaries, amorphous semiconductors, photovoltaic effects and photoeffects in quantum wells and superlattices. The author is Professor of Materials Science and Electrical Engineering at Stanford University, and has taught this material for many years. He is an experienced author, his earlier books having fo...

  19. Detection of early caries by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasazawa, Shuhei; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2015-07-01

    To improve sensitivity of dental caries detection by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis, it is proposed to utilize emission peaks in the ultraviolet. We newly focused on zinc whose emission peaks exist in ultraviolet because zinc exists at high concentration in the outer layer of enamel. It was shown that by using ratios between heights of an emission peak of Zn and that of Ca, the detection sensitivity and stability are largely improved. It was also shown that early caries are differentiated from healthy part by properly setting a threshold in the detected ratios. The proposed caries detection system can be applied to dental laser systems such as ones based on Er:YAG-lasers. When ablating early caries part by laser light, the system notices the dentist that the ablation of caries part is finished. We also show the intensity of emission peaks of zinc decreased with ablation with Er:YAG laser light.

  20. Optofluidic lens actuated by laser-induced solutocapillary forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyuk, A. Yu.; Ivanova, N. A.

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate an adaptive liquid lens controlled by laser-induced solutocapillary forces. The liquid droplet serving as a lens is formed in a thin layer of binary liquid mixture by surface tension driven flows caused by the thermal action of laser irradiation. The shape of droplet, its aperture and the focal length are reversibly changed without hysteresis by varying the intensity of the laser beam. The focal length variation range of the droplet-lens lies in between infinity (a flat layer) to 15 mm (a curved interface). The droplet-lens is capable to adjust the in-plane lateral position in response to a displacement of the laser beam. The proposed laser controlled droplet-lens will enable to develop smart liquid optical devices, which can imitate the accommodation reflex and pupillary light reflex of the eye.

  1. Image Analysis of Plasma Induced by Focused IR Pulsed Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Hadi Ali

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Plasma induced by focused laser beam is very essential especially in laser material interaction. Preliminary study leading to this research has been carried out. A Q-switch Nd:YAG laser was employed as a source of energy. The laser was focused using a wide-angle camera lens. The formation of plasma at the focal region was visualized perpendicularly using a CCD video camera interfaced to an image processing system. The dynamic expansion of the laser plasma was grabbed in conjunction with a high-speed photographic system. The observation results show that the plasma was formed in an ellipsoidal shape. The lateral width and the length of the plasma were found gradually increased

  2. Laser-induced break-up of water jet waveguide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couty, P.; Hoffmann, P. [EPFL/STI/IOA/Advanced Photonics Laboratory, Lausanne BM, 1015, Lausanne (Switzerland); Spiegel, A.; Vago, N. [Department of Atomic Physics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budafoki ut 8, 1111, Budapest (Hungary); Ugurtas, B.I. [EPFL/STI/IMHEF/Laboratory Fluid Mechanics, Lausanne, 1015, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2004-06-01

    In this article, an optical method to control the break-up of high-speed liquid jets is proposed. The method consists of focusing the light of a pulsed laser source into the jet behaving as a waveguide. Experiments were performed with the help of a Q-switched frequency doubled Nd:Yag laser ({lambda}=532 nm). The jet diameter was 48 {mu}m and jet velocities from 100 to 200 m/s. To study the laser-induced water jet break-up, observations of the jet coupled with the high power laser were performed for variable coupling and jet velocity conditions. Experimentally determined wavelength and growth rate of the laser-generated disturbance were also compared with the ones predicted by linear stability theory of free jets. (orig.)

  3. Compositional Analysis of Drugs by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beldjilali, S. A.; Axente, E.; Belasri, A.; Baba-Hamed, T.; Hermann, J.

    2017-07-01

    The feasibility of the compositional analysis of drugs by calibration-free laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was investigated using multivitamin tablets as a sample material. The plasma was produced by a frequencyquadrupled Nd:YAG laser delivering UV pulses with a duration of 5 ns and an energy of 12 mJ, operated at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The relative fractions of the elements composing the multivitamin drug were determined by comparing the emission spectrum of the laser-produced plume with the spectral radiance computed for a plasma in a local thermodynamic equilibrium. Fair agreement of the measured fractions with those given by the manufacturer was observed for all elements mentioned in the leafl et of the drug. Additional elements such as Ca, Na, Sr, Al, Li, K, and Si were detected and quantifi ed. The present investigations demonstrate that laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is a viable technique for the quality control of drugs.

  4. Time-resolved laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of aluminum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xian-yun; ZHANG Wei-jun; WANG Zhen-ya; HAO Li-qing; HUANG Ming-qiang; ZHAO Wen-wu; LONG Bo; Zhao Wei

    2008-01-01

    We develop a system to measure the elemental composition of unprepared samples using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in our laboratory, which can be used for the determination of elements in solids, liquids and aerosols. A description of the instrumentation, including laser, sample chamber and detection, is followed by a brief discussion. The time-resolved LIBS of aluminum at atmospheric pressure is presented. At the end, the possibilities and later uses of this technique are briefly discussed.

  5. Towards Friction Control using laser-induced periodic Surface Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Eichstädt, J.; Römer, G.R.B.E.; Huis in 't Veld, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims at contributing to the study of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) and the description of their tribological properties in order to facilitate the knowledge for contact mechanical applications. To obtain laser parameters for LIPSS formation, we propose to execute two D2-Experiments. For the transfer of results from static experiments to areas of LIPSS we propose the discrete accumulation of fluences. Areas covered by homogeneously distributed LIPSS were machined...

  6. Dependence of Electromagnetically Induced Transparency on Laser Linewidth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭瑞民; 肖峰; 刘成; 张宇; 陈徐宗

    2003-01-01

    The influence of the linewidth of coupling laser on the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) spectral width is theoretically investigated. The model to describe the EIT spectral width is based on the standard semi-classical theory. The result shows that the effect of the linewidth of coupling laser is equivalent to an additional relaxation between two ground states in the A-type configuration. A broadening linewidth of coupling laser implies the increasing relaxation between the two ground states, which will make the wider EIT spectral linewidth.

  7. Femtosecond laser induced porosity in poly-methyl methacrylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baset, Farhana, E-mail: fbaset@gmail.com; Villafranca, Ana, E-mail: avillafr@uottawa.ca; Guay, Jean-Michel, E-mail: guay_jeanmichel@hotmail.com; Bhardwaj, Ravi, E-mail: ravi.bhardwaj@uottawa.ca

    2013-10-01

    We show that femtosecond laser ablation of poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) induces porosity within the ablation crater that increases with pulse energy/fluence and number of laser shots. For deeper craters the porosity evolves into 3D honeycomb like structure on the sidewalls. Using imaging technique, we show that the porous area fraction decreases with pulse energy while the pore size distribution peaks at a pore area of 0.037 μm{sup 2} at higher energies. In line ablation, the pore size increases with the speed at which the laser focus is moved.

  8. Trace metal mapping by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, Jozef [ORNL; Novotny, Dr. Karel [Masaryk University; Hrdlicka, A [Brno University of Technology, Czech Republic; Malina, R [Brno University of Technology, Czech Republic; Hartl, M [Brno University of Technology, Czech Republic; Kizek, R [Mendel University of Brno; Adam, V [Mendel University of Brno

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a sensitive optical technique capable of fast multi-elemental analysis of solid, gaseous and liquid samples. The potential applications of lasers for spectrochemical analysis were developed shortly after its invention; however the massive development of LIBS is connected with the availability of powerful pulsed laser sources. Since the late 80s of 20th century LIBS dominated the analytical atomic spectroscopy scene and its application are developed continuously. Here we review the utilization of LIBS for trace elements mapping in different matrices. The main emphasis is on trace metal mapping in biological samples.

  9. Computer simulations of laser-induced melting of aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hong; Bai, Mingze; Dou, Yusheng; Ran, Qi; Lo, Glenn V.

    2013-04-01

    Laser-induced solid-to-liquid phase transitions in 100 nm aluminum film were simulated using a hybrid model that combines molecular dynamics (MD) with a continuum description of the laser excitation and a two-temperature method (TTM) to model the relaxation of conduction band electrons. When the laser fluence provides more energy than needed for a complete melting of the film, the phase transition is characterized by an ultrafast collapse of the crystal structure within 2-3 ps. Otherwise, the transition involves a homogeneous nucleation and growth of liquid zones inside the crystal and a heterogeneous propagation of transition fronts from the external surfaces or nucleated liquid zones.

  10. Laser induced damage in optical materials: 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, H. E.; Chase, L. L.; Guenther, A. H.; Newnam, B. E.; Soileau, M. J.

    1990-10-01

    The 21st Annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers was divided into sessions concerning Materials and Measurements, Mirrors and Surfaces, Thin Films, and, finally, Fundamental Mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for high power apparatus. The wavelength range of the prime interest included surface characterization, thin film substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scalling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength was discussed in detail.

  11. Determination of flame temperature using laser induced fluorescence (LIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Lina Augusta Martins Ramos da [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA/DCTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Barreta, Gilberto; Carinhana Junior, Dermeval; Toledo, Antonio Osny de [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv/DCTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: Laser Induced Fluorescence, LIF, is one of the most used techniques in combustion diagnostics. The excitation method is based on the spontaneous spectrum from atoms or molecules that were excited by laser radiation. In general, intermediated combustion species, as OH and CH radicals, are used as temperature probes. Usually, several rotational levels are used by tuning the laser afterwards across the corresponding absorption transitions. The emission spectrum is detected in a convenient spectral range. The accuracy of measurements depends on the laser linewidth, the delay between the laser excitation and spectra detection and, mainly, the spectral interval of laser excitation. In this work, OH LIF spectra from stoichiometric LPG (Liquefied Petroleum Gas) flames were obtained using a tuned laser with a spectral range set from 282 nm up to 283 nm. This corresponds to the rotation levels of the 0-1 vibration band of OH radical. The laser energy was ca. 0.2 mJ. The emission spectrum was collected in the spectral range of the 305-310 nm, which corresponds to the region of the 0-0 band. The temperature was determined by the Boltzmann method. This is based on the measurement of the relative peak intensities of the emission spectrum. A plot of natural logarithm of line intensities versus energy level returns a straight line, whose slope is the inverse of the rotational temperature. The flame temperature was ca. 2300 K. This value is consistent with previous results obtained in our laboratory. (author)

  12. Ultraviolet Laser-induced ignition of RDX single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhonghua; Zhang, Chuanchao; Liu, Wei; Li, Jinshan; Huang, Ming; Wang, Xuming; Zhou, Guorui; Tan, Bisheng; Yang, Zongwei; Li, Zhijie; Li, Li; Yan, Hongwei; Yuan, Xiaodong; Zu, Xiaotao

    2016-02-01

    The RDX single crystals are ignited by ultraviolet laser (355 nm, 6.4 ns) pulses. The laser-induced damage morphology consisted of two distinct regions: a core region of layered fracture and a peripheral region of stripped material surrounding the core. As laser fluence increases, the area of the whole crack region increases all the way, while both the area and depth of the core region increase firstly, and then stay stable over the laser fluence of 12 J/cm2. The experimental details indicate the dynamics during laser ignition process. Plasma fireball of high temperature and pressure occurs firstly, followed by the micro-explosions on the (210) surface, and finally shock waves propagate through the materials to further strip materials outside and yield in-depth cracks in larger surrounding region. The plasma fireball evolves from isotropic to anisotropic under higher laser fluence resulting in the damage expansion only in lateral direction while maintaining the fixed depth. The primary insights into the interaction dynamics between laser and energetic materials can help developing the superior laser ignition technique.

  13. Self-induced white-light seeding laser in a femtosecond laser filament

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, Wei; Xie, Hongqiang; Ni, Jielei; Yao, Jinping; Zeng, Bin; Zhang, Haisu; Jing, Chenrui; Xu, Huailiang; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhizhan

    2013-01-01

    We report, for what we believe to be the first time, on the generation of remote self-seeding laser amplification by using only one 800 nm Ti:Sapphire femtosecond laser pulse. The laser pulse (~ 40 fs) is first used to generate a filament either in pure nitrogen or in ambient air in which population inversion between ground and excited states of nitrogen molecular ions is realized. Self-induced white light inside the filament is then serving as the seed to be amplified. The self-induced narrow-band laser at 428 nm has a pulse duration of ~2.6 ps with perfect linear polarization property. This finding opens new possibilities for remote detection in the atmosphere.

  14. Laser-induced pattern formation from homogeneous polyisoprene solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Dian-Yang; Li Ming; Wang Shu-Jie; Lü Zhi-Wei

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports that the pattern formation in homogeneous solutions of polyisoprene in toluene saturated with C60 induced by a continuous-wave visible laser is observed experimentally. The transmitted beam patterns change with the increase of the laser irradiation time. In the initial phase, the patterns with concentric ring-shaped structure are formed. In the end, the patterns become speckle-shaped. The incubation time of the transmitted beam widening is inversely proportional to the laser power density and solution concentration. The pattern formation results from the optical-field-induced refractive index changes in the solutions, but the mechanism of optical-field-induced refractive index changes in the polymer solutions needs to be further studied.

  15. Research on laser induced particle acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raab, Natascha; Buescher, Markus [Institut fuer Kernphysik (IKP), Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Juelich Center for Hadron Physics (JCHP), Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Willi, Oswald; Jung, Ralph [Institut fuer Laser-Plasma Physik (ILPP), Heinrich Heine Universitaet Duesseldorf (Germany); Seltmann, Michael [Institut fuer Kernphysik (IKP), Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); FH Aachen (Germany); Juelich Center for Hadron Physics (JCHP), Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    By directing a high-power, ultrashort laser pulse onto a thin foil, it is now possible to produce electron, proton and ion beams. However, for realizing reliable laser-driven accelerators one must still overcome fundamental and technological limitations. One current challenge is to continuously provide mass-limited targets into the laser focus in which its energy can be effectively converted into kinetic energy of the accelerated ions. IKP and ILPP have initiated a corresponding joint project based on a worldwide unique frozen pellet target that can provide a regular flux of frozen spheres of e.g. H2, N2, Ar and Xe, and the 100-TW laser system PULSAR at ILPP. As a first step measurements are carried out with conventional gas and foil targets. These measurements include detector developement for fast particle detection and magnetic focusing of the particle beam as well as optical probing of the plasma itself, in order to better understand the ion-acceleration mechanisms. The talk outlines the status of the research and the results of the first measurements.

  16. Ultrasound induced by CW laser cavitation bubbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korneev, N; Montero, P Rodriguez; Ramos-Garcia, R; Ramirez-San-Juan, J C; Padilla-Martinez, J P, E-mail: korneev@inaoep.mx [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica, Apt. Postal 51 y 216 CP72000, Puebla, Pue. (Mexico)

    2011-01-01

    The generation of ultrasound by a collapsing single cavitation bubble in a strongly absorbing liquid illuminated with a moderate power CW laser is described. The ultrasound shock wave is detected with hydrophone and interferometric device. To obtain a stronger pulse it is necessary to adjust a liquid absorption and a beam diameter. Their influence can be qualitatively understood with a simple model.

  17. Imaging Molecular Structure through Femtosecond Photoelectron Diffraction on Aligned and Oriented Gas-Phase Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boll, Rebecca; Rouzee, Arnaud; Adolph, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This paper gives an account of our progress towards performing femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron diffraction on gas-phase molecules in a pump-probe setup combining optical lasers and an X-ray Free-Electron Laser. We present results of two experiments aimed at measuring photoelectron angular...

  18. A Mouse Model for Laser-induced Choroidal Neovascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ronil S; Soetikno, Brian T; Lajko, Michelle; Fawzi, Amani A

    2015-12-27

    The mouse laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) model has been a crucial mainstay model for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) research. By administering targeted laser injury to the RPE and Bruch's membrane, the procedure induces angiogenesis, modeling the hallmark pathology observed in neovascular AMD. First developed in non-human primates, the laser-induced CNV model has come to be implemented into many other species, the most recent of which being the mouse. Mouse experiments are advantageously more cost-effective, experiments can be executed on a much faster timeline, and they allow the use of various transgenic models. The miniature size of the mouse eye, however, poses a particular challenge when performing the procedure. Manipulation of the eye to visualize the retina requires practice of fine dexterity skills as well as simultaneous hand-eye-foot coordination to operate the laser. However, once mastered, the model can be applied to study many aspects of neovascular AMD such as molecular mechanisms, the effect of genetic manipulations, and drug treatment effects. The laser-induced CNV model, though useful, is not a perfect model of the disease. The wild-type mouse eye is otherwise healthy, and the chorio-retinal environment does not mimic the pathologic changes in human AMD. Furthermore, injury-induced angiogenesis does not reflect the same pathways as angiogenesis occurring in an age-related and chronic disease state as in AMD. Despite its shortcomings, the laser-induced CNV model is one of the best methods currently available to study the debilitating pathology of neovascular AMD. Its implementation has led to a deeper understanding of the pathogenesis of AMD, as well as contributing to the development of many of the AMD therapies currently available.

  19. Surface phase defects induced downstream laser intensity modulation in high-power laser facility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Zhang; Wei Zhou; Wanjun Dai; Dongxia Hu; Xuewei Deng; Wanqing Huang; Lidan Zhou; Qiang Yuan; Xiaoxia Huang; De’en Wang; Ying Yang

    2016-01-01

    Optics surface phase defects induced intensity modulation in high-power laser facility for inertial confinement fusion research is studied. Calculations and experiments reveal an exact mapping of the modulation patterns and the optics damage spot distributions from the surface phase defects. Origins are discussed during the processes of optics manufacturing and diagnostics, revealing potential improvements for future optics manufacturing techniques and diagnostic index, which is meaningful for fusion level laser facility construction and its operation safety.

  20. Laser-induced narrowband coherent synchrotron radiation: Efficiency versus frequency and laser power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Evain

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the narrowband terahertz emission process occurring from electron bunches passing in a bending magnet, after a laser-induced sinusoidal modulation has been performed. In particular, we focus on experimental tunability curves, and power scalings with current and laser power. Theoretically, we simplify the problem formulation using the slowly varying envelope approximation. At low powers, the scaling with laser power appears to be quadratic, and analytical expressions for the tuning curves are obtained. Emission at first passage in the bending magnet, and after one full turn in the storage ring, are considered both experimentally and theoretically. The experiments are performed on the UVSOR-II storage ring.

  1. The effect of laser pulse width on laser-induced damage at K9 and UBK7 components surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xinda; Ba, Rongsheng; Zheng, Yinbo; Yuan, Jing; Li, Wenhong; Chen, Bo

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we investigated the effects of laser pulse width on laser-induced damage. We measured the damage threshold of K9 glass and UBK7 glass optical components at different pulse width, then analysis pulse-width dependence of damage threshold. It is shown that damage threshold at different pulse width conforms to thermal restriction mechanism, Because of cm size laser beam, defect on the optical component surface leads to laser-induced threshold decreased.

  2. Ultrafast Molecular Imaging by Laser Induced Electron Diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Michel; Cornaggia, Christian; Saugout, Sébastien; Charron, Eric; Keller, Arne; Atabek, Osman

    2010-01-01

    We address the feasibility of imaging geometric and orbital structure of a polyatomic molecule on an attosecond time-scale using the Laser Induced Electron Diffraction, LIED, technique [T. Zuo \\textit{et al.}, Chem. Phys. Lett. \\textbf{259}, 313 (1996)]. We present numerical results obtained for the CO$_2$ molecule using a single active electron model. The molecular geometry (bond-lengths) is determined within 3% of accuracy from a diffraction pattern which also reflects the nodal properties of the initial molecular orbital. Robustness of the structure determination is discussed with respect to vibrational and rotational motions with a complete interpretation of the laser-induced mechanisms.

  3. Absorption tomography of laser induced plasmas with a large aperture

    CERN Document Server

    Shabanov, Sergei V

    2010-01-01

    An emission tomography of laser-induced plasmas employed in the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) requires long signal integration times during which the plasma cannot be considered stationary. To reduce the integration time, it is proposed to measure a plasma absorption in parallel rays with an aperture that collects light coming from large fractions of the plasma plume at each aperture position. The needed spatial resolution is achieved by a special numerical data processing. Another advantage of the proposed procedure is that inexpensive linear CCD or non-discrete (PMT, photodiode) detectors can be used instead of costly 2-dimensional detectors.

  4. Laser-induced grating in ZnO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Jesper N.

    1992-01-01

    A simple approach for the calculation of self-diffraction in a thin combined phase and amplitude grating is presented. The third order nonlinearity, the electron-hole recombination time, and the ambipolar diffusion coefficient in a ZnO crystal are measured by means of laser-induced self-diffracti......A simple approach for the calculation of self-diffraction in a thin combined phase and amplitude grating is presented. The third order nonlinearity, the electron-hole recombination time, and the ambipolar diffusion coefficient in a ZnO crystal are measured by means of laser-induced self...

  5. Laser-induced selective copper plating of polypropylene surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratautas, K.; Gedvilas, M.; Stankevičiene, I.; JagminienÄ--, A.; Norkus, E.; Li Pira, N.; Sinopoli, S.; Emanuele, U.; Račiukaitis, G.

    2016-03-01

    Laser writing for selective plating of electro-conductive lines for electronics has several significant advantages, compared to conventional printed circuit board technology. Firstly, this method is faster and cheaper at the prototyping stage. Secondly, material consumption is reduced, because it works selectively. However, the biggest merit of this method is potentiality to produce moulded interconnect device, enabling to create electronics on complex 3D surfaces, thus saving space, materials and cost of production. There are two basic techniques of laser writing for selective plating on plastics: the laser-induced selective activation (LISA) and laser direct structuring (LDS). In the LISA method, pure plastics without any dopant (filler) can be used. In the LDS method, special fillers are mixed in the polymer matrix. These fillers are activated during laser writing process, and, in the next processing step, the laser modified area can be selectively plated with metals. In this work, both methods of the laser writing for the selective plating of polymers were investigated and compared. For LDS approach, new material: polypropylene with carbon-based additives was tested using picosecond and nanosecond laser pulses. Different laser processing parameters (laser pulse energy, scanning speed, the number of scans, pulse durations, wavelength and overlapping of scanned lines) were applied in order to find out the optimal regime of activation. Areal selectivity tests showed a high plating resolution. The narrowest width of a copper-plated line was less than 23 μm. Finally, our material was applied to the prototype of the electronic circuit board on a 2D surface.

  6. Vector potential photoelectron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, R

    2011-10-01

    A new class of electron microscope has been developed for the chemical microanalysis of a wide range of real world samples using photoelectron spectroscopy. Highly structured, three-dimensional samples, such as fiber mats and fracture surfaces can be imaged, as well as insulators and magnetic materials. The new microscope uses the vector potential field from a solenoid magnet as a spatial reference for imaging. A prototype instrument has demonstrated imaging of uncoated silk, magnetic steel wool, and micron-sized single strand tungsten wires.

  7. Comedones induced by vascular laser therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulsen Tukenmez Demirci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 21-year-old female presented with acne-like blackheads on brownish areas located on the cheek. She had been treated with neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd-YAG laser (1071 nm, 160 j/cm 2 , three months ago for erythema and telangiectasia of her face. Afterwards, she developed atrophic, slightly depressed, hyperpigmented, 3-4 mm scars with superimposed tiny comedones within the treated areas. Topical treatment with tretinoin 0.05% cream on alternate days, and Sun Protection Factor (SPF 50 sunscreen daily were commenced. After 2 months, comedones and hyperpigmentation mostly resolved but mild superficial atrophy persisted. According to our knowledge, this is the first case of atrophic scars studded with open comedones, developing shortly after laser therapy used for facial telangiectasia.

  8. Laser-induced thermal desorption of aniline from silica surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voumard, Pierre; Zenobi, Renato

    1995-10-01

    A complete study on the energy partitioning upon laser-induced thermal desorption of aniline from silica surfaces was undertaken. The measurements include characterization of the aniline-quartz adsorption system using temperature-programmed desorption, the extrapolation of quasiequilibrium desorption temperatures to the regime of laser heating rates on the order of 109-1010 K/s by computational means, measurement of the kinetic energy distributions of desorbing aniline using a pump-probe method, and the determination of internal energies with resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy. The measurements are compared to calculations of the surface temperature rise and the resulting desorption rates, based on a finite-difference mathematical description of pulsed laser heating. While the surface temperature of laser-heated silica reaches about 600-700 K at the time of desorption, the translational temperature of laser-desorbed aniline was measured to be Tkin=420±60 K, Tvib was 360±60 K, and Trot was 350±100 K. These results are discussed using different models for laser-induced thermal desorption from surfaces.

  9. Laser induced mortality of Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Matthew D.; Leahy, David J.; Norton, Bryan J.; Johanson, Threeric; Mullen, Emma R.; Marvit, Maclen; Makagon, Arty

    2016-02-01

    Small, flying insects continue to pose great risks to both human health and agricultural production throughout the world, so there remains a compelling need to develop new vector and pest control approaches. Here, we examined the use of short (mosquitoes, which were chosen as a representative species. The mortality of mosquitoes exposed to laser pulses of various wavelength, power, pulse duration, and spot size combinations was assessed 24 hours after exposure. For otherwise comparable conditions, green and far-infrared wavelengths were found to be more effective than near- and mid-infrared wavelengths. Pulses with larger laser spot sizes required lower lethal energy densities, or fluence, but more pulse energy than for smaller spot sizes with greater fluence. Pulse duration had to be reduced by several orders of magnitude to significantly lower the lethal pulse energy or fluence required. These results identified the most promising candidates for the lethal laser component in a system being designed to identify, track, and shoot down flying insects in the wild.

  10. Microstructuring of fused silica by laser-induced backside wet etching using picosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrhardt, M. [Leibniz-Institute of Surface Modification, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Raciukaitis, G.; Gecys, P. [Laboratory for Applied Research, Institute of Physics, Savanoriu Ave. 231, LT-02300 Vilnius (Lithuania); Zimmer, K., E-mail: martin.ehrhardt@iom-leipzig.de [Leibniz-Institute of Surface Modification, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    The laser-induced backside wet etching (LIBWE) is an advanced laser processing method used for structuring transparent materials. LIBWE with nanosecond laser pulses has been successfully demonstrated for various materials, e.g. oxides (fused silica, sapphire) or fluorides (CaF{sub 2}, MgF{sub 2}), and applied for the fabrication of microstructures. In the present study, LIBWE of fused silica with mode-locked picosecond (t{sub p} = 10 ps) lasers at UV wavelengths ({lambda}{sub 1} = 355 nm and {lambda}{sub 2} = 266 nm) using a (pyrene) toluene solution was demonstrated for the first time. The influence of the experimental parameters, such as laser fluence, pulse number, and absorbing liquid, on the etch rate and the resulting surface morphology were investigated. The etch rate grew linearly with the laser fluence in the low and in the high fluence range with different slopes. Incubation at low pulse numbers as well as a nearly constant etch rate after a specific pulse number for example were observed. Additionally, the etch rate depended on the absorbing liquid used; whereas the higher absorption of the admixture of pyrene in the used toluene enhances the etch rate and decreases the threshold fluence. With a {lambda}{sub 1} = 266 nm laser set-up, an exceptionally smooth surface in the etch pits was achieved. For both wavelengths ({lambda}{sub 1} = 266 nm and {lambda}{sub 2} = 355 nm), LIPSS (laser-induced periodic surface structures) formation was observed, especially at laser fluences near the thresholds of 170 and 120 mJ/cm{sup 2}, respectively.

  11. Laser-induced backside wet cleaning technique for glass substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Tsu-Shien; Tsai, Chwan-Huei

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the laser-induced backside wet cleaning techniques for glass substrates. Two kinds of laser cleaning techniques are proposed in this study. The first involves applying an Nd:YAG laser to the backside of the substrate which is submerged in water. A metal plate is placed below the glass substrate. Most of the laser energy will be absorbed by the metal plate. The metal then vaporizes the water and generates a turbulent bubble flow. The bubble flow removes the alumina particles from the surface of the glass substrate. The second involves using a CO2 laser to generate turbulent bubble flow to remove the particles. Both methods were successfully demonstrated for the removal of submicron particles of 0.5 μm in size. The phenomena of bubble generation and diffusion are presented in the paper. Because the laser is applied to the backside of the substrate, the damage due to the laser heat can be significantly reduced. The quality and efficient of the backside processing is better than those of the front side processing. The proposed techniques have great potential to provide an improved solution for glass cleaning.

  12. Curing of Epoxy Resin Induced by Femtosecond Laser Pulse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yubin; ZHANG Zuoguang

    2005-01-01

    The possibility of curing of epoxy resin induced by femtosecond laser beam was explored through choosing different initiators . Absorption spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy (IR), stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were applied to analyze the structure of epoxy resin systems after irradiation with a femtosecond laser beam. The experimental results show that the epoxy resin systems containing diaryliodonium salts can be cured by irradiation of Jemtosecond laser pulse, while the systems containing benzoin can not be cured. It is found that diaryliodonium salts decompose under the irradiation of femtosecond laser pulse through multi ( two ) -photon absorption, initiating the ring-opening polymerization of epoxy resin. And the appearance of cured area has a sheet structure consisting of many tiny lamellar structures.

  13. Laser transfer of diamond nanopowder induced by metal film blistering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kononenko, T. V.; Alloncle, P.; Konov, V. I.; Sentis, M.

    2009-03-01

    Blister-based laser induced forward transfer (BB-LIFT) is a promising technique to produce surface microstructures of various advanced materials including inorganic and organic micro/nanopowders, suspensions and biological micro-objects embedded in life sustaining medium. The transferred material is spread over a thin metal film irradiated from the far side by single laser pulses through a transparent support. Interaction of the laser pulse with the metal-support interface under optimized conditions causes formation of a quickly expanding blister. Fast movement of the free metal surface provides efficient material transfer, which has been investigated for the case of diamond nanopowder and diamond-containing suspension. The unique features of the given technique are universality, simplicity and efficient isolation of the transferred material from the ablation products and laser heating.

  14. Apparatus, system, and method for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effenberger, Jr., Andrew J; Scott, Jill R; McJunkin, Timothy R

    2014-11-18

    In laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), an apparatus includes a pulsed laser configured to generate a pulsed laser signal toward a sample, a constructive interference object and an optical element, each located in a path of light from the sample. The constructive interference object is configured to generate constructive interference patterns of the light. The optical element is configured to disperse the light. A LIBS system includes a first and a second optical element, and a data acquisition module. The data acquisition module is configured to determine an isotope measurement based, at least in part, on light received by an image sensor from the first and second optical elements. A method for performing LIBS includes generating a pulsed laser on a sample to generate light from a plasma, generating constructive interference patterns of the light, and dispersing the light into a plurality of wavelengths.

  15. Femtosecond laser induced phenomena in transparent solid materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, D.Z.; Sharafudeen, K.N.; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of intense femtosecond laser pulses with transparent materials is a topic that has caused great interest of scientists over the past two decades. It will continue to be a fascinating field in the coming years. This is because many challenging fundamental problems have not been...... solved, especially concerning the interaction of strong, ultra-short electromagnetic pulses with matter, and also because potential advanced technologies will emerge due to the impressive capability of the intense femtosecond laser to create new material structures and hence functionalities. When......–matter interaction, and fabricate various integrated micro-devices. In recent years we have witnessed exciting development in understanding and applying femtosecond laser induced phenomena in transparent materials. The interaction of femtosecond laser pulses with transparent materials relies on non...

  16. CO2 laser induced refractive index changes in optical polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Chiang, Kin Seng; Reekie, Laurence; Chow, Yuk Tak

    2012-01-01

    We study the infrared photosensitivity properties of two optical polymer materials, benzocyclobutene (BCB) and epoxy OPTOCAST 3505, with a 10.6 μm CO2 laser. We discover that the CO2 laser radiation can lower the refractive index of BCB by as much as 5.5 × 10(-3), while inducing no measurable index change in the epoxy. As confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, the observed index change in BCB can be attributed to photothermal modification of chemical bonds in the material by the CO2 laser radiation. Our findings open up a new possibility of processing polymer materials with a CO2 laser, which could be further developed for application in the areas of post-processing and direct-writing of polymer waveguide devices.

  17. Sub-Doppler Laser Cooling using Electromagnetically Induced Transparency

    CERN Document Server

    He, Peiru; Anderson, Dana Z; Rey, Ana Maria; Holland, Murray

    2016-01-01

    We propose a sub-Doppler laser cooling mechanism that takes advantage of the unique spectral features and extreme dispersion generated by the phenomenon of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). EIT is a destructive quantum interference phenomenon experienced by atoms with multiple internal quantum states when illuminated by laser fields with appropriate frequencies. By detuning the lasers slightly from the "dark resonance", we observe that, within the transparency window, atoms can be subject to a strong viscous force, while being only slightly heated by the diffusion caused by spontaneous photon scattering. In contrast to other laser cooling schemes, such as polarization gradient cooling or EIT-sideband cooling, no external magnetic field or strong external confining potential is required. Using a semiclassical approximation, we derive analytically quantitative expressions for the steady-state temperature, which is confirmed by full quantum mechanical numerical simulations. We find that the lowest ...

  18. Nanocrystalline silicon films prepared by laser-induced crystallization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅广生; 于威; 李社强; 侯海虹; 彭英才; 韩理

    2003-01-01

    The excimer laser-induced crystallization technique has been used to investigate the preparation of nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) from amorphous silicon (α-Si) thin films on silicon or glass substrates. The α-Si films without hydrogen grown by pulsed-laser deposition are chosen as precursor to avoid the problem of hydrogen effluence during annealing.Analyses have been performed by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Raman scattering spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission-electron microscopy. Experimental results show that silicon nanocrystals can be formed through laser annealing. The growth characters of nc-Si are strongly dependent on the laser energy density. It is shown that the volume of the molten silicon predominates essentially the grain size of nc-Si, and the surface tension of the crystallized silicon is responsible for the mechanism of nc-Si growth.

  19. Laser-induced thermoelastic effects can evoke tactile sensations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Jae-Hoon; Park, Jong-Rak; Kim, Sung-Phil; Min Bae, Young; Park, Jang-Yeon; Kim, Hyung-Sik; Choi, Seungmoon; Jung, Sung Jun; Hwa Park, Seung; Yeom, Dong-Il; Jung, Gu-In; Kim, Ji-Sun; Chung, Soon-Cheol

    2015-06-01

    Humans process a plethora of sensory information that is provided by various entities in the surrounding environment. Among the five major senses, technology for touch, haptics, is relatively young and has relatively limited applications largely due to its need for physical contact. In this article, we suggest a new way for non-contact haptic stimulation that uses laser, which has potential advantages such as mid-air stimulation, high spatial precision, and long working distance. We demonstrate such tactile stimulation can be enabled by laser-induced thermoelastic effects by means of physical and perceptual studies, as well as simulations. In the physical study, the mechanical effect of laser on a human skin sample is detected using low-power radiation in accordance with safety guidelines. Limited increases (reports of the non-nociceptive sensation of laser stimuli.

  20. Laser Mode-Dependent Size of Plasma Zones Induced by Femtosecond Laser Pulses in Fused Silica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Shan-Chun; JIANG Hong-Bing; LIU Yi; GONG Qi-Huang

    2008-01-01

    We carry out the numerical simulations of #emtosecond laser propagation with TEM00 mode, TEM10 mode and a beam combining both the modes in fused silica. It is found that the transverse size of plasma zones induced by laser pulses with the TEM10 mode is smaller than that induced by the TEMoo mode, while the longitudinal size is almost the same, and the saturated plasma density is higher. The transverse size, the longitudinal size and the ratio of the longitudinal to transverse size, for the beam combining both the modes, all could be reduced at the same time in comparison with the TEMoo mode under the same focusing conditions.

  1. Femtosecond laser pulse induced desorption: A molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lončarić, Ivor, E-mail: ivor.loncaric@gmail.com [Centro de Física de Materiales CFM/MPC (CSIC-UPV/EHU), P. Manuel de Lardizabal 5, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Alducin, Maite [Centro de Física de Materiales CFM/MPC (CSIC-UPV/EHU), P. Manuel de Lardizabal 5, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Donostia International Physics Center DIPC, P. Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Saalfrank, Peter [Institut für Chemie, Universität Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Strasse 24-25, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany); Donostia International Physics Center DIPC, P. Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Juaristi, J. Iñaki [Departamento de Física de Materiales, Facultad de Químicas, Universidad del País Vasco (UPV/EHU), Apartado 1072, 20080 San Sebastián (Spain); Centro de Física de Materiales CFM/MPC (CSIC-UPV/EHU), P. Manuel de Lardizabal 5, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Donostia International Physics Center DIPC, P. Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain)

    2016-09-01

    In recent simulations of femtosecond laser induced desorption of molecular oxygen from the Ag(110) surface, it has been shown that depending on the properties (depth and electronic environment) of the well in which O{sub 2} is adsorbed, the desorption can be either induced dominantly by hot electrons or via excitations of phonons. In this work we explore whether the ratios between the desorption yields from different adsorption wells can be tuned by changing initial surface temperature and laser pulse properties. We show that the initial surface temperature is an important parameter, and that by using low initial surface temperatures the electronically mediated process can be favored. In contrast, laser properties seem to have only a modest influence on the results.

  2. Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of IrN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. F. Pang; A. S. C. Cheung

    2009-01-01

    High resolution laser induced fluorescence spectra of IrN in the spectral region between 394and 520 nm were recorded using laser vaporization/reaction free jet expansion and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Seven new vibronic transition bands were observed and analyzed. TwoΩ=1 and five Ω=0 new states were identified. Least squares fit of rotationally resolved transition lines yielded accurate molecular constants for the upper states. Spectra of isotopic molecules were observed, which provided confirmation for the vibrational assignment. Comparison of the observed electronic states of IrB, IrC, and IrN provides a good understanding of the chemical bonding of this group of molecules.

  3. Supersonic laser-induced jetting of aluminum micro-droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zenou, M. [Racah Institute of Physics and the Harvey M. Kruger Family Center for Nano-science and Nanotechnology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 91904 Jerusalem (Israel); Additive Manufacturing Lab, Orbotech Ltd., P.O. Box 215, 81101 Yavne (Israel); Sa' ar, A. [Racah Institute of Physics and the Harvey M. Kruger Family Center for Nano-science and Nanotechnology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 91904 Jerusalem (Israel); Kotler, Z. [Additive Manufacturing Lab, Orbotech Ltd., P.O. Box 215, 81101 Yavne (Israel)

    2015-05-04

    The droplet velocity and the incubation time of pure aluminum micro-droplets, printed using the method of sub-nanosecond laser induced forward transfer, have been measured indicating the formation of supersonic laser-induced jetting. The incubation time and the droplet velocity were extracted by measuring a transient electrical signal associated with droplet landing on the surface of the acceptor substrate. This technique has been exploited for studying small volume droplets, in the range of 10–100 femto-litters for which supersonic velocities were measured. The results suggest elastic propagation of the droplets across the donor-to-acceptor gap, a nonlinear deposition dynamics on the surface of the acceptor and overall efficient energy transfer from the laser beam to the droplets.

  4. Laser-induced phase separation of silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Insung; Jeong, Hu Young; Shin, Hyeyoung; Kang, Gyeongwon; Byun, Myunghwan; Kim, Hyungjun; Chitu, Adrian M.; Im, James S.; Ruoff, Rodney S.; Choi, Sung-Yool; Lee, Keon Jae

    2016-11-01

    Understanding the phase separation mechanism of solid-state binary compounds induced by laser-material interaction is a challenge because of the complexity of the compound materials and short processing times. Here we present xenon chloride excimer laser-induced melt-mediated phase separation and surface reconstruction of single-crystal silicon carbide and study this process by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and a time-resolved reflectance method. A single-pulse laser irradiation triggers melting of the silicon carbide surface, resulting in a phase separation into a disordered carbon layer with partially graphitic domains (~2.5 nm) and polycrystalline silicon (~5 nm). Additional pulse irradiations cause sublimation of only the separated silicon element and subsequent transformation of the disordered carbon layer into multilayer graphene. The results demonstrate viability of synthesizing ultra-thin nanomaterials by the decomposition of a binary system.

  5. Controllable Femtosecond Laser-Induced Dewetting for Plasmonic Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Makarov, Sergey V; Mukhin, Ivan S; Shishkin, Ivan I; Zuev, Dmitriy A; Mozharov, Alexey M; Krasnok, Alexander E; Belov, Pavel A

    2015-01-01

    Dewetting of thin metal films is one of the most widespread method for functional plasmonic nanostructures fabrication. However, simple thermal-induced dewetting does not allow to control degree of nanostructures order without additional lithographic process steps. Here we propose a novel method for lithography-free and large-scale fabrication of plasmonic nanostructures via controllable femtosecond laser-induced dewetting. The method is based on femtosecond laser surface pattering of a thin film followed by a nanoscale hydrodynamical instability, which is found to be very controllable under specific irradiation conditions. We achieve control over degree of nanostructures order by changing laser irradiation parametrs and film thickness. This allowed us to exploit the method for the broad range of applications: resonant light absorbtion and scattering, sensing, and potential improving of thin-film solar cells.

  6. Laser-induced incandescence calibration via gravimetric sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, M. Y.; Vander Wal, R. L.; Zhou, Z.

    1996-01-01

    Absolute calibration of laser-induced incandescence (LII) is demonstrated via comparison of LII signal intensities with gravimetrically determined soot volume fractions. This calibration technique does not rely upon calculated or measured optical characteristics of soot. The variation of the LII signal with gravimetrically measured soot volume fractions ranging from 0.078 to 1.1 ppm established the linearly of the calibration. With the high spatial and temporal resolution capabilities of laser-induced incandescence (LII), the spatial and temporal fluctuations of the soot field within a gravimetric chimney were characterized. Radial uniformity of the soot volume fraction, f(sub v) was demonstrated with sufficient averaging of the single laser-shot LII images of the soot field thus confirming the validity of the calibration method for imaging applications. As illustration, instantaneous soot volume fractions within a Re = 5000 ethylene/air diffusion flame measured via planar LII were established quantitatively with this calibration.

  7. Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures induced by surface plasmons coupled via roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, E. L.; Gurevich, S. V.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper the formation mechanisms of the femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are discussed. One of the most frequently used theories explains the structures by interference between the incident laser beam and surface plasmon-polariton waves. The latter is most commonly attributed to the coupling of the incident laser light to the surface roughness. We demonstrate that this excitation of surface plasmons contradicts the results of laser-ablation experiments. As an alternative approach to the excitation of LIPSS we analyse development of hydrodynamic instabilities in the melt layer.

  8. Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures induced by surface plasmons coupled via roughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurevich, E.L., E-mail: gurevich@lat.rub.de [Chair of Applied Laser Technology, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universitätsstraße 150, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Gurevich, S.V., E-mail: gurevics@uni-muenster.de [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Münster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Straße 9, 48149 Münster (Germany)

    2014-05-01

    In this paper the formation mechanisms of the femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are discussed. One of the most frequently used theories explains the structures by interference between the incident laser beam and surface plasmon-polariton waves. The latter is most commonly attributed to the coupling of the incident laser light to the surface roughness. We demonstrate that this excitation of surface plasmons contradicts the results of laser-ablation experiments. As an alternative approach to the excitation of LIPSS we analyse development of hydrodynamic instabilities in the melt layer.

  9. The fluence threshold of femtosecond laser blackening of metals: The effect of laser-induced ripples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Zhigui; Huang, Min; Zhao, Fuli

    2016-05-01

    With the primary controlling factor of the laser fluence, we have investigated femtosecond laser blackening of stainless steel, brass, and aluminum in visible light range. In general, low reflectance about 5% can be achieved in appropriate ranges of laser fluences for all the treated metal surfaces. Significantly, towards stainless steel and brass a fluence threshold of blackening emerges unusually: a dramatic reflectance decline occurs in a specific, narrow fluence range. In contrast, towards aluminum the reflectance declines steadily over a wide fluence range instead of the threshold-like behavior from steel and brass. The morphological characteristics and corresponding reflectance spectra of the treated surfaces indicates that the blackening threshold of stainless steel and brass corresponds to the fluence threshold of laser-induced subwavelength ripples. Such periodic ripples growing rapidly near ablation threshold absorb visible light efficiently through grating coupling and cavity trapping promoted by surface plasmon polaritons. Whereas, for aluminum, with fluence increasing the looming ripples are greatly suppressed by re-deposited nanoparticle aggregates that present intrinsic colors other than black, and until the formation of large scale "ravines" provided with strong light-trapping, sufficient blackening is achieved. In short, there are different fluence dependencies for femtosecond laser blackening of metals, and the specific blackening fluence threshold for certain metals in the visible range originates in the definite fluence threshold of femtosecond laser-induced ripples.

  10. Measurement of gas flow velocities by laser-induced gratings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemmerling, B.; Stampanoni-Panariello, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Kozlov, A.D.N. [General Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1999-08-01

    Time resolved light scattering from laser-induced electrostrictive gratings was used for the determination of flow velocities in air at room temperature. By measuring the velocity profile across the width of a slit nozzle we demonstrated the high spatial resolution (about 200 mm) of this novel technique. (author) 3 figs., 1 ref.

  11. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Chlorophyll a Flourescence Transients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenvang, Jens

    of a sufficient quality; something that remains a problem for many in-situ methods. In my PhD, I present my work with two such in-situ methods, Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and OJIP transients, the rising part of chlorophyll a fluorescence transients from dark-adapted leaves....

  12. Laser-induced fluorescence of oral mucosa cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaliashvili, Z. V.; Medoidze, T. D.; Melikishvili, Z. G.; Gogilashvili, K. T.

    2017-10-01

    The laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra have been measured for cancer-infused and control mice mucosa tissues. It was established that there is quite a difference between their LIF spectral shapes. These spectral shapes are used to express the diagnostic of different states of tissues: from normal to cancer.

  13. Laser-induced vibrational dynamics of ozone in solid argon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Amstrup, B.; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1997-01-01

    We consider the vibrational dynamics, induced by an intense infrared laser pulse, in an ozone molecule with isotopic substitution, that is, (OOO)-O-16-O-16-O-18 and compare the dynamics in the gas phase and in solid ar on. not perturbed by argon on a time-scale of a few picoseconds and selective...

  14. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Chlorophyll a Flourescence Transients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenvang, Jens

    of a sufficient quality; something that remains a problem for many in-situ methods. In my PhD, I present my work with two such in-situ methods, Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and OJIP transients, the rising part of chlorophyll a fluorescence transients from dark-adapted leaves....

  15. Impulsive Laser Induced Alignment of Molecules Dissolved in Helium Nanodroplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pentlehner, Dominik; H. Nielsen, Jens; Slenczka, Alkwin

    2013-01-01

    We show that a 450 fs nonresonant, moderately intense, linearly polarized laser pulse can induce field-free molecular axis alignment of methyliodide (CH3I) molecules dissolved in a helium nanodroplet. Time-resolved measurements reveal rotational dynamics much slower than that of isolated molecule...

  16. Laser-Induced Rotation of Iodine Molecules in Helium Nanodroplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shepperson, Benjamin; Sondergaard, Anders A.; Christiansen, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Rotation of molecules embedded in helium nanodroplets is explored by a combination of fs laser-induced alignment experiments and angulon quasiparticle theory. We demonstrate that at low fluence of the fs alignment pulse, the molecule and its solvation shell can be set into coherent collective...... its helium shell. Our results open novel opportunities for studying nonequilibrium solute-solvent dynamics and quantum thermalization....

  17. Laser-induced incandescence : recent trends and current questions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulz, C.; Kock, B.F.; Hofmann, M.; Michelsen, H.; Will, S.; Bougie, B.; Suntz, R.; Smallwood, G.

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of a workshop focused on fundamental experimental and theoretical aspects of soot measurements by laser-induced incandescence (LII). This workshop was held in Duisburg, Germany in September 2005. The goal of the workshop was to review the current understanding of the

  18. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Trace Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Stephen (Technical Monitor); VanderWal, Randall L.; Ticich, Thomas M.; West, Joseph R., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    An alternative approach for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) determination of trace metal determination in liquids is demonstrated. The limits of detection (LOD) for the technique ranged from 10 ppb to 10 ppm for 15 metals metals (Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Hg, Pb) tested.

  19. Laser-induced incandescence : recent trends and current questions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulz, C.; Kock, B.F.; Hofmann, M.; Michelsen, H.; Will, S.; Bougie, B.; Suntz, R.; Smallwood, G.

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of a workshop focused on fundamental experimental and theoretical aspects of soot measurements by laser-induced incandescence (LII). This workshop was held in Duisburg, Germany in September 2005. The goal of the workshop was to review the current understanding of the

  20. Additive interconnect fabrication by picosecond Laser Induced Forward Transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhuis, G.; Veld, B.H. in 't; Ebberink, G.; Del Cerro, D.A.; Eijnden, E. van den; Chall, P.; Zon, B. van der

    2010-01-01

    Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) is a single step, dry deposition process which shows great potential for interconnect fabrication. TNO, in cooperation with ALSI and University of Twente have studied the feature size and resistivity of copper structures deposited using picosecond (ps) LIFT. Sma

  1. Impulsive Laser Induced Alignment of Molecules Dissolved in Helium Nanodroplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pentlehner, Dominik; H. Nielsen, Jens; Slenczka, Alkwin

    2013-01-01

    We show that a 450 fs nonresonant, moderately intense, linearly polarized laser pulse can induce field-free molecular axis alignment of methyliodide (CH3I) molecules dissolved in a helium nanodroplet. Time-resolved measurements reveal rotational dynamics much slower than that of isolated molecule...

  2. Additive interconnect fabrication by picosecond Laser Induced Forward Transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhuis, G.; Veld, B.H. in 't; Ebberink, G.; Del Cerro, D.A.; Eijnden, E. van den; Chall, P.; Zon, B. van der

    2010-01-01

    Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) is a single step, dry deposition process which shows great potential for interconnect fabrication. TNO, in cooperation with ALSI and University of Twente have studied the feature size and resistivity of copper structures deposited using picosecond (ps) LIFT. Sma

  3. Laser-induced collisional autoionization in europium and strontium atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffa, R

    1995-01-15

    An experiment that involves laser-induced collisional autoionization in europium and strontium atoms is proposed and the spectral line shape of the cross section is calculated on the basis of data available in the literature. The feasibility of the experiment both in oven cells and in a crossed-atomic-beam geometry is discussed.

  4. Laser-induced onset of electrospinning

    KAUST Repository

    Sahay, R.

    2010-03-09

    We present a method to start electrospinning from a polymeric drop. This method uses a pulsed laser which is focused inside the drop close to the liquid surface. The pulse cavitates the liquid and produces a protrusion from the tip of the drop. The protrusion narrows by drainage and vertical stretching, thus concentrating the electric field and increasing the charge density until it overcomes the surface tension and produces the electrified jet. This approach can reduce the required value of applied electric field to half of its value required to start convectional electrospinning from a stationary drop.

  5. Imaging plasmonic fields near gold nanospheres in attosecond time-resolved streaked photoelectron spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianxiong; Thumm, Uwe

    2016-05-01

    To study time-resolved photoemission from gold nanospheres, we introduce a quantum-mechanical approach, including the plasmonic near-field-enhancement of the streaking field at the surface of the nanosphere. We use Mie theory to calculate the plasmonically enhanced fields near 10 to 200 nm gold nanospheres, driven by incident near infrared (NIR) or visible laser pulses. We model the gold conduction band in terms of a spherical square well potential. Our simulated streaked photoelectron spectra reveal a plasmonic amplitude enhancement and phase shift related to calculations that exclude the induced plasmonic field. The phase shift is due to the plasma resonance. This suggests the use of streaked photoelectron spectroscopy for imaging the dielectric response and plasmonic field near nanoparticles. Supported by the NSD-EPSCoR program, NSF, and the USDoE.

  6. Laser fluence dependence on emission dynamics of ultrafast laser induced copper plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anoop, K. K.; Harilal, S. S.; Philip, Reji; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S.

    2016-11-14

    The characteristic emission features of a laser-produced plasma strongly depend strongly on the laser fluence. We investigated the spatial and temporal dynamics of neutrals and ions in femtosecond laser (800 nm, ≈ 40 fs, Ti:Sapphire) induced copper plasma in vacuum using both optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and spectrally resolved two-dimensional (2D) imaging methods over a wide fluence range of 0.5 J/cm2-77.5 J/cm2. 2D fast gated monochromatic images showed distinct plume splitting between the neutral and ions especially at moderate to higher fluence ranges. OES studies at low to moderate laser fluence regime confirm intense neutral line emission over the ion emission whereas this trend changes at higher laser fluence with dominance of the latter. This evidences a clear change in the physical processes involved in femtosecond laser matter interaction at high input laser intensity. The obtained ion dynamics resulting from the OES, and spectrally resolved 2D imaging are compared with charged particle measurement employing Faraday cup and Langmuir probe and results showed good correlation.

  7. Imaging molecular structure through femtosecond photoelectron diffraction on aligned and oriented gas-phase molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Boll, Rebecca; Rouzée, Arnaud; Christensen, Lauge; Coffee, Ryan; Coppola, Niccola; Sankar,; Decleva, Piero; Epp, Sascha W.; Erk, Benjamin; Filsinger, Frank; Foucar, Lutz; Gorkhover, Tais; Adolph, Marcus; Gumprecht, Lars; Hömke, André

    2014-01-01

    This paper gives an account of our progress towards performing femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron diffraction on gas-phase molecules in a pump–probe setup combining optical lasers and an X-ray free-electron laser. We present results of two experiments aimed at measuring photoelectron angular distributions of laser-aligned 1-ethynyl-4-fluorobenzene (C8H5F) and dissociating, laser-aligned 1,4-dibromobenzene (C6H4Br2) molecules and discuss them in the larger context of photoelectron diffrac...

  8. Laser-induced plasmonic colours on metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay, Jean-Michel; Calà Lesina, Antonino; Côté, Guillaume; Charron, Martin; Poitras, Daniel; Ramunno, Lora; Berini, Pierre; Weck, Arnaud

    2017-07-01

    Plasmonic resonances in metallic nanoparticles have been used since antiquity to colour glasses. The use of metal nanostructures for surface colourization has attracted considerable interest following recent developments in plasmonics. However, current top-down colourization methods are not ideally suited to large-scale industrial applications. Here we use a bottom-up approach where picosecond laser pulses can produce a full palette of non-iridescent colours on silver, gold, copper and aluminium. We demonstrate the process on silver coins weighing up to 5 kg and bearing large topographic variations (~1.5 cm). We find that colours are related to a single parameter, the total accumulated fluence, making the process suitable for high-throughput industrial applications. Statistical image analyses of laser-irradiated surfaces reveal various nanoparticle size distributions. Large-scale finite-difference time-domain computations based on these nanoparticle distributions reproduce trends seen in reflectance measurements, and demonstrate the key role of plasmonic resonances in colour formation.

  9. Theoretical modeling on the laser induced effect of liquid crystal optical phased beam steering

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoxian; Wang, Xiangru; Wu, Liang; Tan, Qinggui; Li, Man; Shang, Jiyang; Wu, Shuanghong; Huang, Ziqiang

    2017-01-01

    Non-mechanical laser beam steering has been reported previously in liquid crystal array devices. To be one of the most promising candidates to be practical non-mechanical laser deflector, its laser induced effect still has few theoretical model. In this paper, we propose a theoretical model to analyze this laser induced effect of LC-OPA to evaluate the deterioration on phased beam steering. The model has three parts: laser induced thermal distribution; temperature dependence of material parameters and beam steering deterioration. After these three steps, the far field of laser beam is obtained to demonstrate the steering performance with the respect to the incident laser beam power and beam waist.

  10. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy with picosecond pulse train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lednev, Vasily N.; Pershin, Sergey M.; Sdvizhenskii, Pavel A.; Grishin, Mikhail Ya; Davydov, Mikhail A.; Stavertiy, Anton Ya; Tretyakov, Roman S.

    2017-02-01

    Picosecond pulse train and nanosecond pulse were compared for laser ablation and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) measurements. A detailed study revealed that the picosecond pulse train ablation improved the quality of laser craters (symmetric crater walls and the absence of large redeposited droplets), which was explained by a smaller heat affected zone and suppression of melt splash. Greater plasma dimensions and brighter plasma emission were observed by gated imaging for picosecond pulse train compared to nanosecond pulse ablation. Increased intensity of atomic and ionic lines in gated and time integrated spectra provided better signal-to-noise ratio for picosecond pulse train sampling. Higher temperature and electron density were detected during first microsecond for the plasma induced by the picosecond pulse train. Improved shot-to-shot reproducibility for atomic/ionic line intensity in the case of picosecond pulse train LIBS was explained by more effective atomization of target material in plasma and better quality of laser craters. Improved precision and limits of detections were determined for picosecond pulse train LIBS due to better reproducibility of laser sampling and increased signal-to-noise ratio.

  11. Microscale nanosecond laser-induced optical breakdown in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryashov, Sergey I; Zvorykin, Vladimir D

    2008-09-01

    Microscale optical breakdown induced in bulk pure water by high-power nanosecond KrF laser pulses was studied using optical transmission and contact broadband photoacoustic techniques. The breakdown has been identified as a sharp transmission drop coinciding with the appearance of unipolar compressive acoustic pulses, both indicating a thresholdlike rise of local intrinsic absorption in the micrometer-scale laser focal volume. The acoustic pulses, which are much broader than the exciting laser pulse and show a strongly reduced far-field diffraction effect, result from breakdown-induced millimeter-sized steam bubbles. The acoustic pulse amplitudes exhibit a sub-linear ( proportional, variantI(3/4)) pressure dependence on the laser intensity I characteristic of subcritical electron-ion plasma and demonstrating the avalanche enhancement of two-photon ionization above the breakdown threshold until the appearance of the critical plasma. In the critical plasma regime, where the transmission and the acoustic signals slowly vary as a function of laser intensity, the main acoustic pulse is preceded by nanosecond and sub- micros prepulses, where the first one represents a GPa-level plasma-driven shock wave and the second one adjacent to the main pulse appears due to weak submillimeter-long heating of water surrounding the hot plasma by its bremsstrahlung radiation, indicating significant dissociation of water molecules in the plasma.

  12. Laser frequency locking based on Rydberg electromagnetically induced transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuechun, Jiao; Jingkui, Li; Limei, Wang; Hao, Zhang; Linjie, Zhang; Jianming, Zhao; Suotang, Jia

    2016-05-01

    We present a laser frequency locking to Rydberg transition with electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) spectra in a room-temperature cesium vapor cell. Cesium levels 6S1/2, 6P3/2, and the nD5/2 state, compose a cascade three-level system, where a coupling laser drives Rydberg transition, and probe laser detects the EIT signal. The error signal, obtained by demodulating the EIT signal, is used to lock the coupling laser frequency to Rydberg transition. The laser frequency fluctuation, ˜0.7 MHz, is obtained after locking on, with the minimum Allan variance to be 8.9 × 10-11. This kind of locking method can be used to stabilize the laser frequency to the excited transition. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB921603), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 11274209, 61475090, 61378039, and 61378013), and the Research Project Supported by Shanxi Scholarship Council of China (Grant No. 2014-009).

  13. Laser induced damage studies in mercury cadmium telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Amit; Kapoor, Avinashi; Tripathi, K. N.; Bansal, S. K.

    2007-10-01

    We have investigated laser induced damage at 1.06 μm laser wavelength in diamond paste polished (mirror finish) and carborundum polished Hg0.8Cd0.2Te (MCT) samples with increasing fluence as well as number of pulses. Evolution of damage morphology in two types of samples is quite different. In case of diamond paste polished samples, evolution of damage morphological features is consistent with Hg evaporation with transport of Cd/Te globules towards the periphery of the molten region. Cd/Te globules get accumulated with successive laser pulses at the periphery indicating an accumulation effect. Real time reflectivity (RTR) measurement has been done to understand melt pool dynamics. RTR measurements along with the thermal profile of the melt pool are in good agreement with thermal melting model of laser irradiated MCT samples. In case of carborundum polished samples, laser damage threshold is significantly reduced. Damage morphological features are significantly influenced by surface microstructural condition. From comparison of the morphological features in the two cases, it can be inferred that laser processing of MCT for device applications depends significantly on surface preparation conditions.

  14. Femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures on silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoehm, S.; Rosenfeld, A. [Max-Born-Institut fuer Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie (MBI), Max-Born-Strasse 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Krueger, J.; Bonse, J. [BAM Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und-pruefung, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    The formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on two different silica polymorphs (single-crystalline synthetic quartz and commercial fused silica glass) upon irradiation in air with multiple linearly polarized single- and double-fs-laser pulse sequences ({tau} = 150 fs pulse duration, {lambda} = 800 nm center wavelength, temporal pulse separation {Delta}t < 40 ps) is studied experimentally and theoretically. Two distinct types of fs-LIPSS [so-called low-spatial-frequency LIPSS (LSFL) and high-spatial-frequency LIPSS (HSFL)] with different spatial periods and orientations were identified. Their appearance was characterized with respect to the experimental parameters peak laser fluence and number of laser pulses per spot. Additionally, the 'dynamics' of the LIPSS formation was addressed in complementary double-fs-pulse experiments with varying delays, revealing a characteristic change of the LSFL periods. The experimental results are interpreted on the basis of a Sipe-Drude model considering the carrier dependence of the optical properties of fs-laser excited silica. This new approach provides an explanation of the LSFL orientation parallel to the laser beam polarisation in silica - as opposed to the behaviour of most other materials.

  15. Regular subwavelength surface structures induced by femtosecond laser pulses on stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Litao; Nishii, Kazuhiro; Namba, Yoshiharu

    2009-06-15

    In this research, we studied the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures on the stainless steel surface using femtosecond laser pulses. A 780 nm wavelength femtosecond laser, through a 0.2 mm pinhole aperture for truncating fluence distribution, was focused onto the stainless steel surface. Under different experimental condition, low-spatial-frequency laser-induced periodic surface structures with a period of 526 nm and high-spatial-frequency laser-induced periodic surface structures with a period of 310 nm were obtained. The mechanism of the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures on the stainless steel surface is discussed.

  16. Laser-induced primate glaucoma. II. Histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radius, R L; Pederson, J E

    1984-11-01

    A sustained, moderate pressure elevation was produced in 15 nonhuman primate eyes by application of laser energy to the trabecular meshwork. By light and electron microscopy, the trabecular beams were blunted, and scattered synechiae were present. Backward bowing of the lamina cribrosa, partial loss of the myelin sheath surrounding axonal segments just posterior to the lamina, and diffuse axonal loss involving the entire nerve cross section were noted. A quantitative analysis of this axonal loss revealed that eyes with moderate nerve head damage (cup-disc ratio, 0.6 to 0.8) had only 38% to 69% of the expected normal axonal count. The eyes with nearly total cupping (cup-disc ratio, 0.9 to 1.0) maintained between 10% and 36% of the normal axonal count. The disc changes in these experimental eyes are similar to those previously described in human eyes with glaucoma.

  17. Laser-induced recombination of D{sup +}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asp, S. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Atomic Phys.; Schuch, R. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Atomic Phys.; DeWitt, D.R. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Atomic Phys.; Biedermann, C. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Atomic Phys.; Gao, H. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Atomic Phys.; Zong, W. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Atomic Phys.; Andler, G. [Manne Siegbahn Laboratory, Stockholm University, S-104 05 Stockholm (Sweden); Justiniano, E. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Atomic Phys.

    1996-08-01

    Laser induced recombination into the L shell (n=2) of deuterium was investigated at the heavy-ion cooler storage ring CRYRING for two values of the electron density. The data shows the expected enhancement of radiative recombination, induced by the intense laser field applied, over the spontaneous case. Like in previous measurements, a strong intensity below the photoionization threshold was observed. Qualitatively, this gain is described by an average field induced threshold shift model. However, when reducing the electron density by roughly a factor of two, the effective field increased by an order of magnitude. This surprising result indicates that the precise origin of the observed fields is not simply related to the known field sources. (orig.).

  18. Ultrafast laser-collision-induced fluorescence in atmospheric pressure plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnat, E. V.; Fierro, A.

    2017-04-01

    The implementation and demonstration of laser-collision-induced fluorescence (LCIF) generated in atmospheric pressure helium environments is presented in this communication. As collision times are observed to be fast (~10 ns), ultrashort pulse laser excitation (<100 fs) of the 23S to 33P (388.9 nm) is utilized to initiate the LCIF process. Both neutral-induced and electron-induced components of the LCIF are observed in the helium afterglow plasma as the reduced electric field (E/N) is tuned from  <0.1 Td to over 5 Td. Under the discharge conditions presented in this study (640 Torr He), the lower limit of electron density detection is ~1012 e cm‑3. The spatial profiles of the 23S helium metastable and electrons are presented as functions of E/N to demonstrate the spatial resolving capabilities of the LCIF method.

  19. Dynamics of laser-induced electroconvection pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebink, N C; Johnson, E R; Saucedo, S R; Miles, E W; Vardanyan, K K; Spiegel, D R; Allen, C C

    2004-06-01

    We first report that, for planar nematic 4-methoxy-benzilidene-4-butylaniline (MBBA), the electroconvection threshold voltage has a nonmonotonic temperature dependence, with a well-defined minimum, and a slope of about -0.12 V/degrees C near room temperature at 70 Hz. Motivated by this observation, we have designed an experiment in which a weak continuous-wave absorbed laser beam with a diameter comparable to the pattern wavelength generates a locally supercritical region, or pulse, in dye-doped MBBA. Working 10-20 % below the laser-free threshold voltage, we observe a steady-state pulse shaped as an ellipse with the semimajor axis oriented parallel to the nematic director, with a typical size of several wavelengths. The pulse is robust, persisting even when spatially extended rolls develop in the surrounding region, and displays rolls that counterpropagate along the director at frequencies of tenths of Hz, with the rolls on the left (right) side of the ellipse moving to the right (left). Systematic measurements of the sample-voltage dependence of the pulse amplitude, spatial extent, and frequency show a saturation or decrease when the control parameter (evaluated at the center of the pulse) approaches approximately 0.3. We propose that the model for these pulses should be based on the theory of control-parameter ramps, supplemented with new terms to account for the advection of heat away from the pulse when the surrounding state becomes linearly unstable. The advection creates a negative feedback between the pulse size and the efficiency of heat transport, which we argue is responsible for the attenuation of the pulse at larger control-parameter values.

  20. Correlation between Charge State of Insulating NaCl Surfaces and Ionic Mobility Induced by Water Adsorption: A Combined Ambient Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Scanning Force Microscopy Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdaguer, Albert; Jose Segura, Juan; Fraxedas, Jordi; Bluhm, Hendrik; Salmeron, Miquel

    2008-09-03

    In situ ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APPES) and scanning force microscopy were used to characterize the surface discharge induced by water layers grown on (001) surfaces of sodium chloride single crystals. The APPES studies show that both kinetic energy (KE) and full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the Na 2s and Cl 2p core level peaks, monitored as a function of relative humidity (RH), mimic surface conductivity curves measured using scanning force microscopy. The KE position and FWHM of the core level peaks therefore are directly related to the solvation and diffusion of ions at the NaCl(100) surface upon adsorption of water.

  1. Damage induced by femtosecond laser in optical dielectric films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Caihua Huang; Yiyu Xue; Zhilin Xia; Yuanan Zhao; Fangfang Yang; Peitao Guo

    2009-01-01

    Both the nature of avalanche ionization (AI) and the role of multi-photon ionization (MPI) in the studies of laser-induced damage have remained controversial up to now. According to the model proposed by Stuart et al., we study the role of MPI and AI in laser-induced damage in two dielectric films, fused silica (FS) and barium aluminum borosilicate (BBS), irradiated by 780-nm laser pulse with the pulse width range of 0.01 鈥? 5 ps. The effects of MPI and initial electron density on seed electron generation are numerically analyzed. For FS, laser-induced damage is dominated by AI for the entire pulse width regime due to the wider band-gap. While for BBS, MPI becomes the leading power in damage for the pulse width r less than about 0.03 ps. MPI may result in a sharp rise of threshold fluence Fth on 蟿, and AI may lead to a mild increase or even a constant value of Fth on 蟿. MPI serves the production of seed electrons for AI when the electron density for AI is approached or exceeded before the end of MPI. This also means that the effect of initial electron can be neglected when MPI dominates the seed electron generation. The threshold fluence Fth decreases with the increasing initial electron density when the latter exceeds a certain critical value.

  2. Laser-induced back-ablation of aluminum thin films using picosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BULLOCK, A B

    1999-05-26

    Experiments were performed to understand laser-induced back-ablation of Al film targets with picosecond laser pulses. Al films deposited on the back surface of BK-7 substrates are ablated by picosecond laser pulses propagating into the Al film through the substrate. The ablated Al plume is transversely probed by a time-delayed, two-color sub-picoseond (500 fs) pulse, and this probe is then used to produce self-referencing interferograms and shadowgraphs of the Al plume in flight. Optical emission from the Al target due to LIBA is directed into a time-integrated grating spectrometer, and a time-integrating CCD camera records images of the Al plume emission. Ablated Al plumes are also redeposited on to receiving substrates. A post-experimental study of the Al target and recollected deposit characteristics was also done using optical microscopy, interferometry, and profilometry. In this high laser intensity regime, laser-induced substrate ionization and damage strongly limits transmitted laser fluence through the substrate above a threshold fluence. The threshold fluence for this ionization-based transmission limit in the substrate is dependent on the duration of the incident pulse. The substrate ionization can be used as a dynamic control of both transmitted spatial pulse profile and ablated Al plume shape. The efficiency of laser energy transfer between the laser pulse incident on the Al film and the ablated Al plume is estimated to be of order 5% and is a weak function of laser pulsewidth. The Al plume is highly directed. Low plume divergence ({theta}{sub divergence} < 5{sup o}) shows the ablated plume temperature to be very low at long time delays ( T << 0.5 eV at delays of 255 ns). Spectroscopic observations and calculations indicate that, in early time (t < 100 ps), the Al film region near the substrate/metal interface is at temperatures of order 0.5 eV. Interferograms of Al plumes produced with 0.1 {micro}m films show these plumes to be of high neutral atom

  3. Comparative investigation of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in bulk water using 532- and 1064-nm lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ye; Xue, Boyang; Song, Jiaojian; Lu, Yuan; Li, Ying; Zheng, Ronger

    2017-07-01

    The influence of laser wavelength on the characteristics of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in bulk water was investigated by using 532- and 1064-nm lasers. We demonstrated that higher laser energy does not lead to higher LIBS signals because of the strong plasma shielding occurring at high laser energies, as shown by the spectroscopic and fast imaging results in this work. At threshold energies of 100% breakdown probability, the 1064 nm beam could induce a plasma with higher electron density and temperature than the 532 nm beam, which leads to higher signal-to-noise ratios and longer lifetimes of the emission lines.

  4. Laser-induced fluorescence in high pressure solid propellant flames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, T; Weaver, D P; Campbell, D H

    1987-09-01

    The application of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) to the study of high pressure solid propellant flames is described. The distribution of the OH and CN radicals was determined in several solid propellant flames at pressures up to 3.5 MPa. The greatest difficulty in these measurements was the separation of the desired LIF signals from the large scattering at the laser wavelength from the very optically thick propellant flames. Raman experiments using 308-nm excitation were also attempted in the propellant flames but were unsuccessful due to LIF interferences from OH and NH.

  5. Plasma temperature clamping in filamentation laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Yeak, J.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2015-10-19

    Ultrafast laser filament induced breakdown spectroscopy is a very promising method for remote material detection. We present characteristics of plasmas generated in a metal target by laser filaments in air. Our measurements show that the temperature of the ablation plasma is clamped along the filamentation channel due to intensity clamping in a filament. Nevertheless, significant changes in radiation intensity are noticeable, and this is essentially due to variation in the number density of emitting atoms. The present results also partly explains the reason for the occurrence of atomic plume during fs LIBS in air compared to long-pulse ns LIBS.

  6. Progress in fieldable laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miziolek, Andrzej W.

    2012-06-01

    In recent years there has been great progress in the Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technology field. Significant advances have been made both in fundamental and applied research as well as in data processing/chemometrics. Improvements in components, most notably lasers/optics and spectrometers are enabling the development of new devices that are suitable for field use. These new commercial devices recently released to the marketplace, as well as ones currently under development, are bringing the potential of LIBS for CBRNE threat analysis into real-world applications.

  7. Imaging molecular structure through femtosecond photoelectron diffraction on aligned and oriented gas-phase molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boll, Rebecca; Rouzée, Arnaud; Adolph, Marcus; Anielski, Denis; Aquila, Andrew; Bari, Sadia; Bomme, Cédric; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D; Chapman, Henry N; Christensen, Lauge; Coffee, Ryan; Coppola, Niccola; De, Sankar; Decleva, Piero; Epp, Sascha W; Erk, Benjamin; Filsinger, Frank; Foucar, Lutz; Gorkhover, Tais; Gumprecht, Lars; Hömke, André; Holmegaard, Lotte; Johnsson, Per; Kienitz, Jens S; Kierspel, Thomas; Krasniqi, Faton; Kühnel, Kai-Uwe; Maurer, Jochen; Messerschmidt, Marc; Moshammer, Robert; Müller, Nele L M; Rudek, Benedikt; Savelyev, Evgeny; Schlichting, Ilme; Schmidt, Carlo; Scholz, Frank; Schorb, Sebastian; Schulz, Joachim; Seltmann, Jörn; Stener, Mauro; Stern, Stephan; Techert, Simone; Thøgersen, Jan; Trippel, Sebastian; Viefhaus, Jens; Vrakking, Marc; Stapelfeldt, Henrik; Küpper, Jochen; Ullrich, Joachim; Rudenko, Artem; Rolles, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    This paper gives an account of our progress towards performing femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron diffraction on gas-phase molecules in a pump-probe setup combining optical lasers and an X-ray free-electron laser. We present results of two experiments aimed at measuring photoelectron angular distributions of laser-aligned 1-ethynyl-4-fluorobenzene (C(8)H(5)F) and dissociating, laser-aligned 1,4-dibromobenzene (C(6)H(4)Br(2)) molecules and discuss them in the larger context of photoelectron diffraction on gas-phase molecules. We also show how the strong nanosecond laser pulse used for adiabatically laser-aligning the molecules influences the measured electron and ion spectra and angular distributions, and discuss how this may affect the outcome of future time-resolved photoelectron diffraction experiments.

  8. UV laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and laser Doppler flowmetry in the diagnostics of alopecia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skomorokha, Diana P.; Pigoreva, Yulia N.; Salmin, Vladimir V.

    2016-04-01

    Development of optical biopsy methods has a great interest for medical diagnostics. In clinical and experimental studies it is very important to analyze blood circulation quickly and accurately, thereby laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is widely used. UV laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (UV LIFS) is express highly sensitive and widely-spread method with no destructive impact, high excitation selectivity and the possibility to use in highly scattering media. The goal of this work was to assess a correlation of UV laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and laser Doppler flowmetry parameters, and a possibility to identify or to differentiate various types of pathological changes in tissues according to their autofluorescence spectra. Three groups of patients with diffuse (symptomatic) alopecia, androgenic alopecia, and focal alopecia have been tested. Each groups consisted of not less than 20 persons. The measurements have been done in the parietal and occipital regions of the sculls. We used the original automated spectrofluorimeter to record autofluorescence spectra, and standard laser Doppler flowmeter BLF-21 (Transonic Systems, Inc., USA) to analyze the basal levels of blood circulation. Our results show that UV LIFS accurately distinguishes the zones with different types of alopecia. We found high correlation of the basal levels of blood circulation and the integrated intensity of autofluorescence in the affected tissue.

  9. Optical properties change in laser-induced Te/As2Se3 chalcogenide thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Mukta; Naik, Ramakanta

    2016-10-01

    In the present work, we report the change in optical parameters due to the deposition and photo-induced diffusion of Te layer into the chalcogenide As2Se3 film. The photo-diffusion creates a solid solution of As-Se-Te which has potential application in optical devices. The Te/As2Se3 bilayer films prepared by thermal evaporation technique were studied by various experimental techniques. The photo-diffusion of Te into As2Se3 matrix was done by 532-nm laser irradiation. The structure of the As2Se3, as-prepared and irradiated Te/As2Se3 films was studied by X-ray diffraction which were amorphous in nature. The presence of all the elements was checked by energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, and the optical transmission spectra were recorded by Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The optical band gap is reduced by the deposition and diffusion of Te into As2Se3 film which is due to the increase in density of defect states in the gap region. The transmission is decreased, whereas the absorption efficiency is increased with the increase in disorderness. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy carried out on these films gives information about the bonding change due to the photo-diffusion process. Therefore, this is an important result which will open up new directions for the application of this material in semiconducting devices.

  10. Nanosecond laser-induced phase transitions in pulsed laser deposition-deposited GeTe films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xinxing, E-mail: xinxing.sun@iom-leipzig.de; Thelander, Erik; Lorenz, Pierre; Gerlach, Jürgen W.; Decker, Ulrich; Rauschenbach, Bernd [Leibniz Institute of Surface Modification, Permoserstr. 15, D-04318, Leipzig (Germany)

    2014-10-07

    Phase transformations between amorphous and crystalline states induced by irradiation of pulsed laser deposition grown GeTe thin films with nanosecond laser pulses at 248 nm and pulse duration of 20 ns are studied. Structural and optical properties of the Ge-Te phase-change films were studied by X-ray diffraction and optical reflectivity measurements as a function of the number of laser pulses between 0 and 30 pulses and of the laser fluence up to 195 mJ/cm². A reversible phase transition by using pulse numbers ≥ 5 at a fluence above the threshold fluence between 11 and 14 mJ/cm² for crystallization and single pulses at a fluence between 162 and 182 mJ/cm² for amorphization could be proved. For laser fluences from 36 up to 130 mJ/cm², a high optical contrast of 14.7% between the amorphous and crystalline state is measured. A simple model is used that allows the discussion on the distribution of temperature in dependency on the laser fluence.

  11. A compact field-portable double-pulse laser system to enhance laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuo; Liu, Lei; Yan, Aidong; Huang, Sheng; Huang, Xi; Chen, Rongzhang; Lu, Yongfeng; Chen, Kevin

    2017-02-01

    This paper reports the development of a compact double-pulse laser system to enhance laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for field applications. Pumped by high-power vertical-surface emitting lasers, the laser system that produces 16 ns pulse at 12 mJ/pulse with total weight less than 10 kg is developed. The inter-pulse delay can be adjusted from 0 μ s with 0.5 μ s increment. Several LIBS experiments were carried out on NIST standard aluminum alloy samples. Comparing with the single-pulse LIBS, up to 9 times enhancement in atomic emission line was achieved with continuum background emission reduced by 70%. This has led to up to 10 times improvement in the limit of detection. Signal stability was also improved by 128% indicating that a more robust and accurate LIBS measurement can be achieved using a compact double-pulse laser system. This paper presents a viable and field deployable laser tool to dramatically improve the sensitivity and applicability of LIBS for a wide array of applications.

  12. Testing relativity again, laser, laser, laser, laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Einstein, A.

    2015-01-01

    laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser,

  13. Photoelectron spectroscopy bulk and surface electronic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Suga, Shigemasa

    2014-01-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy is now becoming more and more required to investigate electronic structures of various solid materials in the bulk, on surfaces as well as at buried interfaces. The energy resolution was much improved in the last decade down to 1 meV in the low photon energy region. Now this technique is available from a few eV up to 10 keV by use of lasers, electron cyclotron resonance lamps in addition to synchrotron radiation and X-ray tubes. High resolution angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) is now widely applied to band mapping of materials. It attracts a wide attention from both fundamental science and material engineering. Studies of the dynamics of excited states are feasible by time of flight spectroscopy with fully utilizing the pulse structures of synchrotron radiation as well as lasers including the free electron lasers (FEL). Spin resolved studies also made dramatic progress by using higher efficiency spin detectors and two dimensional spin detectors. Polarization depend...

  14. Focused laser lithographic system with sub-wavelength resolution based on vortex laser induced opacity of photochromic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhen; Bai, Jian; Xu, Jianfeng; Wang, Chen; Yao, Yuan; Hu, Neibin; Liang, Yiyong; Wang, Kaiwei; Yang, Guoguang

    2014-12-01

    A focused laser lithographic system combines with vortex laser induced opacity of photochromic layer to write patterns with linewidth below wavelength. A photochromic layer is formed by coating the mixture of metanil yellow and aqueous PVA solution on the photoresist layer. In our system, the center of a lithographic laser with a 405 nm wavelength coincides with the center of vortex laser with a 532 nm wavelength. When a photochromic layer is illuminated by both lasers simultaneously, the absorbance for the lithographic laser decreases at the hollow region of the vortex laser but increases at its annular region, so that a transparent aperture for the lithographic laser is created and its size could be tuned by changing the power of vortex laser; therefore, the linewidth of written patterns is variable. Experimentally, using a 20× lens (NA = 0.4), this system condenses the linewidth of written patterns from 6614 to 350 nm.

  15. Containerless study of metal evaporation by laser induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Robert A.; Nordine, Paul C.

    1987-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) detection of atomic vapors was used to study evaporation from electromagnetically levitated and CW CO2 laser-heated molybdenum spheres and resistively-heated tungsten filaments. Electromagnetic (EM) levitation in combination with laser heating of tungsten, zirconium, and aluminum specimens was also investigated. LIF intensity vs temperature data were obtained for molybdenum atoms and six electronic states of atomic tungsten, at temperatures up to the melting point of each metal. The detected fraction of the emitted radiation was reduced by self-absorption effects at the higher experimental temperatures. Vaporization enthalpies derived from data for which less than half the LIF intensity was self-absorbed were -636 + or - 24 kJ/g-mol for Mo and 831 + or - 32 kJ/g-mol for W. Space-based applications of EM levitation in combination with radiative heating are discussed.

  16. Microfabrication of Fresnel zone plates by laser induced solid ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Vanessa R. M.; Thomas, John; Santhosh, Chidangil; Ramachandran, Hema; Mathur, Deepak

    2016-07-01

    A novel and simple single-step method of inscribing optical elements on metal-coated transparent substrates is demonstrated. Laser induced solid ablation (LISA) demands very low laser energies (nJ), as can be amply provided by a femtosecond laser oscillator. Here, LISA is used to write Fresnel zone plates on indium and tungsten coated glass. With up to 100 zones, remarkable agreement is obtained between measured and expected values of the focal length. LISA has enabled attainment of focal spot sizes that are 38% smaller than what would be obtained using conventional lenses of the same numerical aperture. The simplicity with which a high degree of automation can readily be achieved using LISA makes this cost-effective method amenable to a wide variety of applications related to microfabrication of optical elements.

  17. Femtosecond laser-induced blazed periodic grooves on metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Taek Yong; Guo, Chunlei

    2011-07-01

    In this Letter, we generate laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSSs) on platinum following femtosecond laser pulse irradiation. For the first time to our knowledge, we study the morphological profile of LIPSSs over a broad incident angular range, and find that the morphological profile of LIPSSs depends significantly on the incident angle of the laser beam. We show that LIPSS grooves become more asymmetric at a larger incident angle, and the morphological profile of LIPSSs formed at an incident angle over 55° eventually resembles that of a blazed grating. Our study suggests that the formation of the blazed groove structures is attributed to the selective ablation of grooves through the asymmetric periodic surface heating following femtosecond pulse irradiation. The blazed grooves are useful for controlling the diffraction efficiency of LIPSSs.

  18. Laser-induced atomic adsorption: a mechanism for nanofilm formation

    CERN Document Server

    Martins, Weliton S; Oriá, Marcos; Chevrollier, Martine

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate and interpret a technique of laser-induced formation of thin metallic films using alkali atoms on the window of a dense-vapour cell. We show that this intriguing photo-stimulated process originates from the adsorption of Cs atoms via the neutralisation of Cs$^+$ ions by substrate electrons. The Cs$^+$ ions are produced via two-photon absorption by excited Cs atoms very close to the surface, which enables the transfer of the laser spatial intensity profile to the film thickness. An initial decrease of the surface work function is required to guarantee Cs$^+$ neutralisation and results in a threshold in the vapour density. This understanding of the film growth mechanism may facilitate the development of new techniques of laser-controlled lithography, starting from thermal vapours.

  19. Dielectric breakdown induced by picosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W. L.; Bechtel, J. H.; Bloembergen, N.

    1976-01-01

    The damage thresholds of transparent optical materials were investigated. Single picosecond pulses at 1.06 microns, 0.53 microns and 0.35 microns were obtained from a mode locked Nd-YAG oscillator-amplifier-frequency multiplier system. The pulses were Gaussian in space and time and permitted the determination of breakdown thresholds with a reproducibility of 15%. It was shown that the breakdown thresholds are characteristic of the bulk material, which included nine alkali halides, five different laser host materials, KDP, quartz, sapphire and calcium fluoride. The extension of the damage data to the ultraviolet is significant, because some indication was obtained that two- and three-photon absorption processes begin to play a role in determining the threshold. Throughout the visible region of the spectrum the threshold is still an increasing function of frequency, indicating that avalanche ionization is the dominant factor in determining the breakdown threshold. This was confirmed by a detailed study of the damage morphology with a high resolution microscope just above the threshold. The influence of self focusing is discussed, and evidence for beam distortion below the power threshold for complete self focusing is presented, confirming the theory of Marburger.

  20. Laser ablation of powdered samples and analysis by means of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ctvrtnickova, T.; Cabalin, L.; Laserna, J.; Kanicky, V.; Nicolas, G.

    2009-03-01

    The presented work proves the capacities of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as a fast, universal, and versatile technique for analysis of complex materials as ceramics. This paper reports on the analysis of ceramic raw materials (brick clays and kaolin) submitted to laser ablation in the form of pressed pellets. Spectrographic study was provided by standard single-pulse LIBS technique and orthogonal reheating double-pulse LIBS. It was found that both methods are comparable in terms of analytical performance, if adequate experimental parameters and signal detection systems are used.

  1. Composite ceramic powders obtained by laser induced reactions of silane and amines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borsella, E.; Botti, S.; Fantoni, R.; Alescandrescu, R.; Morjan, I.; Dikonimos-Makris, T.; Giorgi, R.; Enzo, S.

    1991-06-01

    Ultrafine, ternary (Si/C/N) ceramic powders were produced after C0/sub 2/ laser initiated reactions between silane and mono- or di-methylamine. Several chemical and spectroscopic diagnostics (mass spectrometry, chemical analysis, IR spectrophotometry, X-Ray photo-electron spectroscopy, X-Ray diffraction analysis) were employed to correlate the parameters relevant to gas phase reactions and the final composition of the powder.

  2. Recrystallization of InSb Surfaces Induced by Pulsed Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Černý

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed laser processing of InSb wafers for the application in designing high speed infrared detectors is studied both theoretically and experimentally. The recrystallization of InSb surfaces resulting in restoration of the implanted region to a single crystal state is presented as a reasonable alternative to the conventional thermal heating. In the theoretical part, thermal equilibrium and nonequilibrium models of melting, recrystallization and evaporation are formulated to describe transport phenomena in the material induced by laser irradiation. In the experimental part, InSb samples irradiated by the ruby (694 nm, 80ns FWHM, and ArF (193 nm, 10 ns FWHM lasers are studied using time resolved reflectivity, Auger electron spectroscopy and low energy electron diffraction methods to analyze surface modifications. A comparison of the experimental data with the numerical predictions shows that while for the ruby laser a reasonable agreement in surface melt duration is achieved, the results for the ArF laser differ quite a lot. As a main reason for these differences, the amorphization of the surface is identified.

  3. Dynamics of laser induced micro bubble clusters on tissue phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Andreas; Zegelin, Andrea; Ptaszynski, Lars; Birngruber, Reginald; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2011-03-01

    Selective retina treatment (SRT) is a laser based method to treat retinal diseases associated with disorders of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) while preserving photoreceptors and choroid. Applying microsecond laser pulses to the 100- 200 strongly absorbing melanin granules inside the RPE cells induces transient micro bubbles which disrupt the cells. Aim of this work is to understand bubble dynamics in clusters with respect to the influence of the adjacent retina. Bubble dynamics were investigated in vitro on porcine RPE. An about 200 μm thick layer of agarose gel was applied to the RPE layer in order to simulate the mechanical properties of retina. Different laser pulse durations from 1 ns (532 nm, Nd:YAG) to 1.7 μs (527 nm, Nd:YLF) were used. The bubbles were investigated interferometrically (fiber interferometer @ 830 nm) and with fast flash photography (25 ns flash duration). Bubble lifetimes were measured. The results show that with retina phantoms the bubble formation threshold was reached at 2.5 times higher irradiation than without retina phantom for 1.7 μs laser pulses. The microbubbles generated with 1 ns laser pulses were almost not influenced by the agarose layer. Irradiation twofold over bubble formation threshold resulted in 3.5 times longer bubble lifetimes for μs and 2 times longer for ns pulse durations, respectively.

  4. Cluster-jet targets for laser induced ion acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grieser, S.; Bonaventura, D.; Hergemoeller, A.K.; Koehler, E.; Taeschner, A.; Khoukaz, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster (Germany); Buescher, M.; Schlueter, F. [Peter Gruenberg Institut (PGI), FZ Juelich (Germany); Engin, I. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, (IKP), FZ Juelich (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The directed ion acceleration induced by high-energy laser pulses is a strongly increasing research field. In such experiments ultra-short laser pulses focussed on a target create a plasma, in which strong secondary electric fields can accelerate protons and ions to multi-MeV energies. A major drawback of the commonly used targets, like gas-jets or foils, is their low density or the need to be replaced after each laser pulse. An innovative perspective for high-flux and high-repetition-rate experiments is the application of a cluster-jet source, which continuously produces a flux of cryogenic solid clusters by the expansion of pre-cooled gases within fine Laval nozzles. Therefore, a cluster-jet target was built up and set successfully into operation at the University of Muenster and will be used for experiments on laser and plasma physics at the University of Duesseldorf. Systematic measurements were done to determine the target beam thickness, possible beam structures, the stability, and the position within the scattering chamber to ensure the ideal requirements for the experiments. For this purpose, the cluster beam was illuminated by a diode laser 33 cm behind the Laval nozzle and observed by a CCD camera. The results on the cluster beam properties are presented and discussed.

  5. Single cell isolation process with laser induced forward transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yu; Renaud, Philippe; Guo, Zhongning; Huang, Zhigang; Chen, Ying

    2017-01-01

    A viable single cell is crucial for studies of single cell biology. In this paper, laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) was used to isolate individual cell with a closed chamber designed to avoid contamination and maintain humidity. Hela cells were used to study the impact of laser pulse energy, laser spot size, sacrificed layer thickness and working distance. The size distribution, number and proliferation ratio of separated cells were statistically evaluated. Glycerol was used to increase the viscosity of the medium and alginate were introduced to soften the landing process. The role of laser pulse energy, the spot size and the thickness of titanium in energy absorption in LIFT process was theoretically analyzed with Lambert-Beer and a thermal conductive model. After comprehensive analysis, mechanical damage was found to be the dominant factor affecting the size and proliferation ratio of the isolated cells. An orthogonal experiment was conducted, and the optimal conditions were determined as: laser pulse energy, 9 μJ; spot size, 60 μm; thickness of titanium, 12 nm; working distance, 700 μm;, glycerol, 2% and alginate depth, greater than 1 μm. With these conditions, along with continuous incubation, a single cell could be transferred by the LIFT with one shot, with limited effect on cell size and viability. LIFT conducted in a closed chamber under optimized condition is a promising method for reliably isolating single cells.

  6. Liquid explosions induced by X-ray laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan, Claudiu; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond; McQueen, Trevor; Milathianaki, Despina; Koglin, Jason; Lane, Thomas; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth; Hayes, Matt; Guillet, Serge; Botha, Sabine; Nass, Karol; Schlichting, Ilme; Shoeman, Robert; Stone, Howard; Boutet, Sébastien

    2015-11-01

    Sudden generation and release of enough energy to vaporize matter are encountered in systems that range from supernovae explosions and asteroid impacts to applications in fusion energy generation, materials processing, and laser surgery. Understanding these strong explosions is important to both fundamental science and technical applications. We studied a new type of microexplosion, induced by absorption of X-ray pulses from a free-electron laser in micron-sized drops and jets of water. These explosions are related to, but different from, those observed in experiments performed with optical lasers. Unlike explosions caused by optical lasers, X-ray laser explosions produce symmetric expansion patterns that are simpler to rationalize. The release of energy initially concentrated in a small region inside drops and jets leads to ballistic vapor flow and inertial liquid flow. The kinematics of these flows indicates that the conversion of the energy deposited by X-rays into flow has a scaling that is similar to the one encountered in shock waves.

  7. Refining femtosecond laser induced periodical surface structures with liquid assist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, L.S. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, College of Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore (Singapore); Ng, E.Y.K., E-mail: mykng@ntu.edu.sg [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, College of Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore (Singapore); Zheng, H.Y. [Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, 71 Nanyang Drive, 638075 Singapore (Singapore)

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LIPSS on silicon wafer was made in air and in ethanol environment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ethanol environment produce cleaner surface ripples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ethanol environment decrease spatial wavelength of the LIPSS by 30%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer More number of pulses produce smaller spatial wavelength in air. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Number of pulses do not influence spatial wavelength in ethanol environment. - Abstract: Laser induced periodic surface structures were generated on silicon wafer using femtosecond laser. The medium used in this study is both air and ethanol. The laser process parameters such as wavelength, number of pulse, laser fluence were kept constant for both the mediums. The focus of the study is to analyze spatial wavelength. When generating surface structures with air as a medium and same process parameter of the laser, spatial wavelength results showed a 30% increase compared to ethanol. The cleanliness of the surface generated using ethanol showed considerably less debris than in air. The results observed from the above investigation showed that the medium plays a predominant role in the generation of surface structures.

  8. Nuclear Fusion Effects Induced in Intense Laser-Generated Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Torrisi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Deutered polyethylene (CD2n thin and thick targets were irradiated in high vacuum by infrared laser pulses at 1015W/cm2 intensity. The high laser energy transferred to the polymer generates plasma, expanding in vacuum at supersonic velocity, accelerating hydrogen and carbon ions. Deuterium ions at kinetic energies above 4 MeV have been measured by using ion collectors and SiC detectors in time-of-flight configuration. At these energies the deuterium–deuterium collisions may induce over threshold fusion effects, in agreement with the high D-D cross-section valuesaround 3 MeV energy. At the first instants of the plasma generation, during which high temperature, density and ionacceleration occur, the D-D fusions occur as confirmed by the detection of mono-energetic protonsand neutrons with a kinetic energy of 3.0 MeV and 2.5 MeV, respectively, produced by the nuclear reaction. The number of fusion events depends strongly on the experimental set-up, i.e. on the laser parameters (intensity, wavelength, focal spot dimension, target conditions (thickness, chemical composition, absorption coefficient, presence of secondary targets and used geometry (incidence angle, laser spot, secondary target positions.A number of D-D fusion events of the order of 106÷7 per laser shot has been measured.

  9. Particle Generation by Pulsed Excimer Laser Ablation in Liquid: Hollow Structures and Laser-Induced Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zijie

    2011-12-01

    Pulsed laser ablation of solid targets in liquid media is a powerful method to fabricate micro-/nanoparticles, which has attracted much interest in the past decade. It represents a combinatorial library of constituents and interactions, and one can explore disparate regions of parameter space with outcomes that are impossible to envision a priori. In this work, a pulsed excimer laser (wavelength 248 nm, pulse width 30 ns) has been used to ablate targets in liquid media with varying laser fluences, frequencies, ablation times and surfactants. It is observed that hollow particles could be fabricated by excimer laser ablation of Al, Pt, Zn, Mg, Ag, Si, TiO2, and Nb2O5 in water or aqueous solutions. The hollow particles, with sizes from tens of nanometers to micrometers, may have smooth and continuous shells or have morphologies demonstrating that they were assembled from nanoparticles. A new mechanism has been proposed to explain the formation of these novel particle geometries. They were formed on laser-produced bubbles through bubble interface pinning by laser-produced solid species. Considering the bubble dynamics, thermodynamic and kinetic requirements have been discussed in the mechanism that can explain some phenomena associated with the formation of hollow particles, especially (1) larger particles are more likely to be hollow particles; (2) Mg and Al targets have stronger tendency to generate hollow particles; and (3) the 248 nm excimer laser is more beneficial to fabricate hollow particles in water than other lasers with longer wavelengths. The work has also demonstrated the possiblities to fabricate novel nanostructures through laser-induced reactions. Zn(OH)2/dodecyl sulfate flower-like nanostructures, AgCl cubes, and Ag2O cubes, pyramids, triangular plates, pentagonal rods and bars have been obtained via reactions between laser-produced species with water, electrolyes, or surfactant molecules. The underlying mechanisms of forming these structures have been

  10. Laser-Induced Damage Initiation and Growth of Optical Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxia Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The lifetime of optical components is determined by the combination of laser-induced damage initiation probability and damage propagation rate during subsequent laser shots. This paper reviews both theoretical and experimental investigations on laser-induced damage initiation and growth at the surface of optics. The damage mechanism is generally considered as thermal absorption and electron avalanche, which play dominant roles for the different laser pulse durations. The typical damage morphology in the surface of components observed in experiments is also closely related to the damage mechanism. The damage crater in thermal absorption process, which can be estimated by thermal diffusion model, is typical distortion, melting, and ablation debris often with an elevated rim caused by melted material flow and resolidification. However, damage initiated by electron avalanche is often accompanied by generation of plasma, crush, and fracture, which can be explained by thermal explosion model. Damage growth at rear surface of components is extremely severe which can be explained by several models, such as fireball growth, impact crater, brittle fracture, and electric field enhancement. All the physical effects are not independent but mutually coupling. Developing theoretical models of multiphysics coupling are an important trend for future theoretical research. Meanwhile, more attention should be paid to integrated analysis both in theory and experiment.

  11. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of tantalum plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Sidra; Bashir, Shazia; Hayat, Asma; Khaleeq-ur-Rahman, M.; Faizan–ul-Haq [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, GC University, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2013-07-15

    Laser Induced Breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of Tantalum (Ta) plasma has been investigated. For this purpose Q-switched Nd: YAG laser pulses (λ∼ 1064 nm, τ∼ 10 ns) of maximum pulse energy of 100 mJ have been employed as an ablation source. Ta targets were exposed under the ambient environment of various gases of Ar, mixture (CO{sub 2}: N{sub 2}: He), O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and He under various filling pressure. The emission spectrum of Ta is observed by using LIBS spectrometer. The emission intensity, excitation temperature, and electron number density of Ta plasma have been evaluated as a function of pressure for various gases. Our experimental results reveal that the optical emission intensity, the electron temperature and density are strongly dependent upon the nature and pressure of ambient environment. The SEM analysis of the ablated Ta target has also been carried out to explore the effect of ambient environment on the laser induced grown structures. The growth of grain like structures in case of molecular gases and cone-formation in case of inert gases is observed. The evaluated plasma parameters by LIBS analysis such as electron temperature and the electron density are well correlated with the surface modification of laser irradiated Ta revealed by SEM analysis.

  12. Analysis of Pulverized Coal by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used to detect atomic species in various environments. The quantitative analysis (C, H, O, N and S) of representative coal samples are being carried out with LIBS, and the effects of particle size are analyzed.A powerful pulse Nd:YAG laser is focused on the coal sample at atmosphere pressure, and the emission spectra from laser-induced plasmas are measured by time-resolved spectroscopy, and the intensity of analyzed spectral lines is obtained through observing the laser plasma with a delay time of 0.4μs. The experimental results show that the slope of calibration curve is nearly 1 when the concentration of the analyzed element is relatively low, and the slope of curve is nearly 0.5 when the concentration of C is higher than other elements. In addition, using the calibration-free model without self-absorption effect, the results show that the decreasing of particle size leads to an increase of the plasma temperature.

  13. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy Diagnostic of Laser-Induced Optical Breakdown

    OpenAIRE

    Parigger, Christian G.; Hornkohl, James O.; László Nemes

    2010-01-01

    Transient laser plasma is generated in laser-induced optical breakdown (LIOB). Here we report experiments conducted with 10.6-micron CO2 laser radiation, and with 1.064-micron fundamental, 0.532-micron frequency-doubled, 0.355-micron frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser radiation. Characterization of laser induced plasma utilizes laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) techniques. Atomic hydrogen Balmer series emissions show electron number density of 1017 cm−3 measured approximately 10 μs and ...

  14. Applications of laser-induced gratings to spectroscopy and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohlfing, E.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This program has traditionally emphasized two principal areas of research. The first is the spectroscopic characterization of large-amplitude motion on the ground-state potential surface of small, transient molecules. The second is the reactivity of carbonaceous clusters and its relevance to soot and fullerene formation in combustion. Motivated initially by the desire to find improved methods of obtaining stimulated emission pumping (SEP) spectra of transients, most of our recent work has centered on the use of laser-induced gratings or resonant four-wave mixing in free-jet expansions. These techniques show great promise for several chemical applications, including molecular spectroscopy and photodissociation dynamics. The author describes recent applications of two-color laser-induced grating spectroscopy (LIGS) to obtain background-free SEP spectra of transients and double resonance spectra of nonfluorescing species, and the use of photofragment transient gratings to probe photodissociation dynamics.

  15. Laser induced structural transformation in chalcogenide based superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zallo, Eugenio; Wang, Ruining; Bragaglia, Valeria; Calarco, Raffaella

    2016-05-01

    Superlattices made of alternating layers of nominal GeTe and Sb2Te3 have been studied by micro-Raman spectroscopy. A structural irreversible transformation into ordered GeSbTe alloy is induced by high power laser light exposure. The intensity ratio of anti-Stokes and Stokes scattering under laser illumination gives a maximum average temperature in the sample of 177 °C. The latter is lower than the growth temperature and of 400 °C necessary by annealing to transform the structure in a GeSbTe alloy. The absence of this configuration after in situ annealing even up to 300 °C evidences an electronic excitation induced-transition which brings the system into a different and stable crystalline state.

  16. Low-reflectance laser-induced surface nanostructures created with a picosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarbada, Shashank; Huang, Zhifeng; Shin, Yung C.; Ruan, Xiulin

    2016-04-01

    Using high-speed picosecond laser pulse irradiation, low-reflectance laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) have been created on polycrystalline silicon. The effects of laser fluence, scan speed, overlapping ratio and polarization angle on the formation of LIPSS are reported. The anti-reflective properties of periodic structures are discussed, and the ideal LIPSS for low surface reflectance is presented. A decrease of 35.7 % in average reflectance of the silicon wafer was achieved over the wavelength range of 400-860 nm when it was textured with LIPSS at high scan speeds of 4000 mm/s. Experimental results of broadband reflectance of silicon wafers textured with LIPSS have been compared with finite difference time domain simulations and are in good agreement, showing high predictability in reflectance values for different structures. The effects of changing the LIPSS profile, fill factor and valley depth on the surface reflectance were also analyzed through simulations.

  17. UV laser ablation of parylene films from gold substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O. R. Musaev, P. Scott, J. M. Wrobel, and M. B. Kruger

    2009-11-19

    Parylene films, coating gold substrates, were removed by laser ablation using 248 nm light from an excimer laser. Each sample was processed by a different number of pulses in one of three different environments: air at atmospheric pressure, nitrogen at atmospheric pressure, and vacuum. The laser-induced craters were analyzed by optical microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Multi-pulse ablation thresholds of gold and parylene were estimated.

  18. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy: Fundamentals, Applications, and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Anabitarte, F.; Cobo, A.; J. M. Lopez-Higuera

    2012-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a technique that provides an accurate in situ quantitative chemical analysis and, thanks to the developments in new spectral processing algorithms in the last decade, has achieved a promising performance as a quantitative chemical analyzer at the atomic level. These possibilities along with the fact that little or no sample preparation is necessary have expanded the application fields of LIBS. In this paper, we review the state of the ar...

  19. Double-pulse laser ablation coupled to laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaus, Reto, E-mail: reglaus@ufl.edu; Hahn, David W.

    2014-08-01

    Laser ablation coupled to laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LA-LIBS) is an analytical method, which minimizes sample matrix effects typically found in quantitative LIBS-based direct solid analyses. This paper reports the application of double-pulse laser ablation (DP-LA) to improve the analyte response and the achievable precisions of LA-LIBS. Two coaxial laser beams were applied at the ablation site and the analytical signals were then collected from a second free-standing LIBS plasma downstream of the ablation site. Signal improvements of up to one order of magnitude were observed compared to single-pulse LA-LIBS. The effect of the interpulse delay on the observed signal-to-noise ratios was studied and the quantification capabilities of the optimized DP-LA-LIBS setup were investigated for manganese and iron in a broad range of different alloy types. A linear response was observed for manganese across the different matrices, allowing for nonmatrix-matched calibrations. Matrix effects were observed when analyzing aluminum samples, which, however, could be compensated for by applying iron as internal standard. Size distributions of the ablated material and electron density measurements provide additional insight into the double-pulse process, with additional future work suggested. - Highlights: • Double-pulse laser ablation was coupled to laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. • Nonmatrix-matched calibration of manganese in various alloys was performed. • Improved sensitivities and precisions compared to single-pulse LA were demonstrated. • Remaining matrix effects and internal standardization are discussed.

  20. All-SPEEK flexible supercapacitor exploiting laser-induced graphenization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberti, A.; Serrapede, M.; Ferraro, G.; Fontana, M.; Perrucci, F.; Bianco, S.; Chiolerio, A.; Bocchini, S.

    2017-09-01

    Flexible supercapacitors have emerged as one of the more promising and efficient space-saving energy storage system for portable and wearable electronics. Laser-induced graphenization has been recently proposed as a powerful and scalable method to directly convert a polymeric substrate into a 3D network of few layer graphene as high-performance supercapacitor electrode. Unfortunately this outstanding process has been reported to be feasible only for few thermoplastic polymers, strongly limiting its future developments. Here we show that laser induced graphenization of sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) can be obtained and the mechanism of this novel process is proposed. The resulting material can act at the same time as binder-free electrode and current collector. Moreover SPEEK is also used both as separator and polymeric electrolyte allowing the assembling of an all-SPEEK flexible supercapacitor. Chemico-physical characterization provides deep understanding of the laser-induced graphenization process, reported on this polymer for the first time, while the device performance studied by cyclic voltammetry, charging-discharging, and impedance spectroscopy prove the enormous potential of the proposed approach.

  1. Formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures on niobium by femtosecond laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, A.; Dias, A.; Gomez-Aranzadi, M.; Olaizola, S. M.; Rodriguez, A.

    2014-05-01

    The surface morphology of a Niobium sample, irradiated in air by a femtosecond laser with a wavelength of 800 nm and pulse duration of 100 fs, was examined. The period of the micro/nanostructures, parallel and perpendicularly oriented to the linearly polarized fs-laser beam, was studied by means of 2D Fast Fourier Transform analysis. The observed Laser-Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS) were classified as Low Spatial Frequency LIPSS (periods about 600 nm) and High Spatial Frequency LIPSS, showing a periodicity around 300 nm, both of them perpendicularly oriented to the polarization of the incident laser wave. Moreover, parallel high spatial frequency LIPSS were observed with periods around 100 nm located at the peripheral areas of the laser fingerprint and overwritten on the perpendicular periodic gratings. The results indicate that this method of micro/nanostructuring allows controlling the Niobium grating period by the number of pulses applied, so the scan speed and not the fluence is the key parameter of control. A discussion on the mechanism of the surface topology evolution was also introduced.

  2. Formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures on niobium by femtosecond laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, A.; Dias, A.; Gomez-Aranzadi, M.; Olaizola, S. M. [CIC microGUNE, Goiru Kalea 9 Polo Innovación Garaia, 20500 Arrasate-Mondragón (Spain); CEIT-IK4 and Tecnun, University of Navarra, Manuel Lardizábal 15, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Rodriguez, A. [CIC microGUNE, Goiru Kalea 9 Polo Innovación Garaia, 20500 Arrasate-Mondragón (Spain)

    2014-05-07

    The surface morphology of a Niobium sample, irradiated in air by a femtosecond laser with a wavelength of 800 nm and pulse duration of 100 fs, was examined. The period of the micro/nanostructures, parallel and perpendicularly oriented to the linearly polarized fs-laser beam, was studied by means of 2D Fast Fourier Transform analysis. The observed Laser-Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS) were classified as Low Spatial Frequency LIPSS (periods about 600 nm) and High Spatial Frequency LIPSS, showing a periodicity around 300 nm, both of them perpendicularly oriented to the polarization of the incident laser wave. Moreover, parallel high spatial frequency LIPSS were observed with periods around 100 nm located at the peripheral areas of the laser fingerprint and overwritten on the perpendicular periodic gratings. The results indicate that this method of micro/nanostructuring allows controlling the Niobium grating period by the number of pulses applied, so the scan speed and not the fluence is the key parameter of control. A discussion on the mechanism of the surface topology evolution was also introduced.

  3. Imaging Molecular Structure through Femtosecond Photoelectron Diffraction on Aligned and Oriented Gas-Phase Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Boll, R; Adolph, M; Anielski, D; Aquila, A; Bari, S; Bomme, C; Bostedt, C; Bozek, J D; Chapman, H N; Christensen, L; Coffee, R; Coppola, N; De, S; Decleva, P; Epp, S W; Erk, B; Filsinger, F; Foucar, L; Gorkhover, T; Gumprecht, L; Hoemke, A; Holmegaard, L; Johnsson, P; Kienitz, J S; Kierspel, T; Krasniqi, F; Kuehnel, K -U; Maurer, J; Messerschmidt, M; Moshammer, R; Mueller, Nele L M; Rudek, B; Savelyev, E; Schlichting, I; Schmidt, C; Scholz, F; Schorb, S; Schulz, J; Seltmann, J; Stener, M; Stern, S; Techert, S; Thogersen, J; Trippel, S; Viefhaus, J; Vrakking, M; Stapelfeldt, H; Kuepper, J; Ullrich, J; Rudenko, A; Rolles, D

    2014-01-01

    This paper gives an account of our progress towards performing femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron diffraction on gas-phase molecules in a pump-probe setup combining optical lasers and an X-ray Free-Electron Laser. We present results of two experiments aimed at measuring photoelectron angular distributions of laser-aligned 1-ethynyl-4-fluorobenzene (C8H5F) and dissociating, laseraligned 1,4-dibromobenzene (C6H4Br2) molecules and discuss them in the larger context of photoelectron diffraction on gas-phase molecules. We also show how the strong nanosecond laser pulse used for adiabatically laser-aligning the molecules influences the measured electron and ion spectra and angular distributions, and discuss how this may affect the outcome of future time-resolved photoelectron diffraction experiments.

  4. Effect of laser-induced temperature field on the characteristics of laser-sintered silver nanoparticle ink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D G; Kim, D K; Moon, Y J; Moon, S-J

    2013-07-05

    Laser sintering of metal nanoparticles is a key technology for high-performance printed electronics fabricated on heat-sensitive substrates such as glass or plastic. Although laser-sintered electronic devices have been successfully fabricated, the role of the induced temperature field in the laser sintering process has not been reported thus far. In this work, the effect of temperature on the laser sintering process is described for the first time using a two-dimensional transient heat conduction equation for inkjet-printed silver nanoparticle ink. The in situ electrical resistance was measured to estimate the transient thermal conductivity and hence the temperature of the sintered ink during the laser sintering process. To verify the estimated laser sintering temperature, the morphology of furnace-sintered silver nanoparticle ink was compared with that of laser-sintered ink. The electrical characteristics and surface morphology of laser-sintered ink are found to be related to the process temperature.

  5. A study of reversible gamma-induced structural transformations in vitreous Ge23.5Sb11.8S64.7 by high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalskiy, Andriy; Jain, Himanshu; Miller, Alfred C; Golovchak, Roman Ya; Shpotyuk, Oleh I

    2006-11-16

    The structural origin of reversible gamma-induced effects in vitreous Ge(23.5)Sb(11.8)S(64.7) has been investigated by high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The changes in valence band spectrum from gamma-irradiation suggest a decrease of sulfur lone pair electron concentration accompanied by changes in bonding states of S and Ge. The appearance of additional doublets in the core-level XPS spectra of Ge, Sb, and S atoms for gamma-irradiated sample is described by the formation of over- and under-coordinated charged defect pairs (Ge(3)(-)-S(3)(+)) as a result of radiation treatment. The results verify the switching of Ge-S covalent bonds into S-S bonds as the main microstructural mechanism for gamma-induced optical effects in this glass.

  6. Laser-induced fluorescence in diagnosis of dental caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakaki, Eleni A.; Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Khabbaz, Maruan; Serafetinides, Alexandros A.

    2003-09-01

    laser induces better discrimination in deep caries diagnosis.

  7. Laser-induced growth of nanocrystals embedded in porous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capoen, Bruno; Chahadih, Abdallah; El Hamzaoui, Hicham; Cristini, Odile; Bouazaoui, Mohamed

    2013-06-01

    Space localization of the linear and nonlinear optical properties in a transparent medium at the submicron scale is still a challenge to yield the future generation of photonic devices. Laser irradiation techniques have always been thought to structure the matter at the nanometer scale, but combining them with doping methods made it possible to generate local growth of several types of nanocrystals in different kinds of silicate matrices. This paper summarizes the most recent works developed in our group, where the investigated nanoparticles are either made of metal (gold) or chalcogenide semiconductors (CdS, PbS), grown in precursor-impregnated porous xerogels under different laser irradiations. This review is associated to new results on silver nanocrystals in the same kind of matrices. It is shown that, depending on the employed laser, the particles can be formed near the sample surface or deep inside the silica matrix. Photothermal and/or photochemical mechanisms may be invoked to explain the nanoparticle growth, depending on the laser, precursor, and matrix. One striking result is that metal salt reduction, necessary to the production of the corresponding nanoparticles, can efficiently occur due to the thermal wrenching of electrons from the matrix itself or due to multiphoton absorption of the laser light by a reducer additive in femtosecond regime. Very localized semiconductor quantum dots could also be generated using ultrashort pulses, but while PbS nanoparticles grow faster than CdS particles due to one-photon absorption, this better efficiency is counterbalanced by a sensitivity to oxidation. In most cases where the reaction efficiency is high, particles larger than the pores have been obtained, showing that a fast diffusion of the species through the interconnected porosity can modify the matrix itself. Based on our experience in these techniques, we compare several examples of laser-induced nanocrystal growth in porous silica xerogels, which allows

  8. Endoscopic laser ablation of clival chordoma with magnetic resonance-guided laser induced thermal therapy

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chordomas are rare malignant tumors that are difficult to treat and have high recurrence rates despite aggressive therapy. Objectives: We present the first case of a patient with a clival chordoma in which complete tumor ablation was achieved using Magnetic Resonance guided Laser Induced Thermal Therapy (LITT) delivered via an endoscopic endonasal approach. We analyzed the safety and feasibility of this approach and quantified the response of this pathology to thermal energy. T...

  9. Photoelectron spectroscopy investigation of the temperature-induced deprotonation and substrate-mediated hydrogen transfer in a hydroxyphenyl-substituted porphyrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smykalla, Lars, E-mail: lars.smykalla@physik.tu-chemnitz.de [Technische Universität Chemnitz, Institute of Physics, Solid Surfaces Analysis Group, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Shukrynau, Pavel [Technische Universität Chemnitz, Institute of Physics, Solid Surfaces Analysis Group, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Mende, Carola; Lang, Heinrich [Technische Universität Chemnitz, Institute of Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Knupfer, Martin [Electronic and Optical Properties Department, IFW Dresden, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Hietschold, Michael [Technische Universität Chemnitz, Institute of Physics, Solid Surfaces Analysis Group, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    Highlights: • Photoelectron spectroscopy of tetra(p-hydroxyphenyl)porphyrin on Au(1 1 1) and Ag(1 1 0). • Ratio of amount of −NH− to −N= in the molecule on Au(1 1 1) decreases after annealing. • Dissociation of −OH groups and transfer of hydrogen atoms to −N= on Ag(1 1 0). • Cleavage of C−H bonds of porphyrin macro-cycle at high temperature. • Changes of the valence band of the molecule in dependance of annealing temperature. - Abstract: The temperature dependent stepwise deprotonation of 5,10,15,20-tetra(p-hydroxyphenyl)-porphyrin is investigated using photoelectron spectroscopy. An abundance of pyrrolic relative to iminic nitrogen and a decrease in the ratio of the amount of −NH− to −N= with increasing annealing temperature is found. In contrast to the molecules adsorbed on Au(1 1 1), on the more reactive Ag(1 1 0) surface, partial dissociation of the hydroxyl groups and subsequent diffusion and rebonding of hydrogen to the central nitrogen atoms resulting in a zwitterionic molecule was clearly observed. Moreover, partial C−H bond cleavage and the formation of new covalent bonds with adjacent molecules or the surface starts at a relatively high annealing temperature of 300 °C. This reaction is identified to occur at the carbon atoms of the pyrrole rings, which leads also to a shift in the N 1s signal and changes in the valence band of the molecules. Our results show that annealing can significantly alter the molecules which were deposited depending on the maximum temperature and the catalytic properties of the specific substrate. The thermal stability should be considered if a molecular monolayer is prepared from a multilayer by desorption, or if annealing is applied to enhance the self-assembly of molecular structures.

  10. Co/Mo2C mirror as studied by x-ray fluorescence and photoelectron spectroscopies induced by x-ray standing waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonnard, P.; Le Guen, K.; Yuan, Y. Y.; André, J.-M.; Mukherjee, S.; Giglia, A.; Nannarone, S.; Mahne, N.; Wang, Z.-S.; Li, H.-C.; Zhu, J.-T.

    2012-12-01

    We study a periodic Co/Mo2C multilayer prepared by magnetron sputtering. The period is 4.1 nm and the sample is designed to work around 778 eV, i.e. close to the Co 2p3/2 threshold, at a glancing angle of 11°. In this condition, strong x-ray standing waves set up within the sample. In order to probe different depths within the stack, particularly the interfaces, the glancing angle is moved along the first Bragg peak, while, the B 1s, C 1s, Mo 3d or O 1s photoelectron spectra, the Co Lα x-ray spectrum as well as the drain current of the sample are measured. Boron is present in the 3.5 nm B4C capping layer and oxygen is from surface contamination. The photoelectrons bring information from the superficial zone, i.e. the 5 first nm, while the characteristic x-rays probe the whole stack. Clear modulations of the intensity of the studied signals as well as core level shifts are observed when going through the Bragg peak. In order to understand what happens in the multilayer calculations of depth distributions of the electric field and the energy loss by the radiation are made with the IMD and OPAL codes, respectively. The combination of experimental results and theoretical simulations will enable us to determine from which place originate the various signals and to know if some interaction exists between the Co and Mo2C layers.

  11. Compositional and micro-scratch analyses of laser induced colored surface of titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, Erhan; Cerkezoglu, Ecem

    2016-09-01

    Laser marking of metallic surface is a very important application for industry. It is revealed that controlled oxide layer generation above the treated surface leads to colored appearance of metals with interference effect. The oxide layer control is provided with laser and process parameters. In this study, different colors of the Grade 2 titanium samples have been obtained by varying the laser scanning speed. Chromaticity coordinates of the different color surface have been calculated from the reflectance spectrum of the samples. Compositional analyses have been performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction methods. To examine the mechanical properties of the surface, micro-scratch test has been applied to all the colored surfaces. Although delamination has been observed between two laser scanning speed as 950 mm/s and 450 mm/s, it can be said that the adhesion between the titanium substrate and the oxide coating is good.

  12. Laser ablation laser induced fluorescence for sensitive detection of heavy metals in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godwal, Yogesh

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy LIBS is a fast non-contact technique for the analysis of the elemental composition using spectral information of the emission from a laser-induced plasma. For the LIBS studies in this thesis the focus has been in using very low energy, microjoule pulses in order to give high spatial resolution and minimize the laser system requirements. This is a regime that we refer to as microLIBS. Under such conditions it is important to maximize the signal detected to give the lowest limit of detection LOD possible. One technique to improve the signal to noise ratios is by coupling LIBS with Laser Induced Fluorescence. This is a technique where the first pulse creates a vapor plume and the second pulse tuned to a resonant absorption line of the species of interest re-excites the plume. We term this technique as Laser ablation Laser Induced Fluorescence LA-LIF. We have been investigating the performance of LA-LIF at low pulse energies (≤ 1 mJ for both pulses) for the detection of elemental contaminants in water. This technique allows reasonable performance compared to high energy single-pulse LIBS, but at a much reduced total energy expenditure. This allows LODs in the parts per billion range ppb range which typically cannot be obtained with low energy single pulse probing of the systems. This approach or exceeds the sensitivities which can be obtained with many shots using much larger energy systems. In this thesis we investigated the performance of LIBS at low pulse energies for the detection of Pb as a contaminant in water. An LOD of 70 ppb was obtained for an accumulation of 100 shots with the ablation laser pulse energy of 250 muJ and an excitation laser pulse energy of 8 muJ. A systematic study of the detector conditions was made for the system for the detection of Pb. Scaling laws for the LOD in terms of the pump and probe energies were measured and also the effect of detector gain, the gate delay and the gate width were studied. In

  13. Liquid explosions induced by X-ray laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan, Claudiu A.; Milathianaki, Despina; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G.; McQueen, Trevor A.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth J.; Koglin, Jason E.; Lane, Thomas J.; Hayes, Matt J.; Guillet, Serge A. H.; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew L.; Willmott, Philip R.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Gumerlock, Karl L.; Botha, Sabine; Nass, Karol; Schlichting, Ilme; Shoeman, Robert L.; Stone, Howard A.; Boutet, Sébastien

    2016-10-01

    Explosions are spectacular and intriguing phenomena that expose the dynamics of matter under extreme conditions. We investigated, using time-resolved imaging, explosions induced by ultraintense X-ray laser pulses in water drops and jets. Our observations revealed an explosive vaporization followed by high-velocity interacting flows of liquid and vapour, and by the generation of shock trains in the liquid jets. These flows are different from those previously observed in laser ablation, owing to a simpler spatial pattern of X-ray absorption. We show that the explosion dynamics in our experiments is consistent with a redistribution of absorbed energy, mediated by a pressure or shock wave in the liquid, and we model the effects of explosions, including their adverse impact on X-ray laser experiments. X-ray laser explosions have predictable dynamics that may prove useful for controlling the state of pure liquids over broad energy scales and timescales, and for triggering pressure-sensitive molecular dynamics in solutions.

  14. Measurement of Irradiated Pyroprocessing Samples via Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phongikaroon, Supathorn [Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond, VA (United States)

    2016-10-31

    The primary objective of this research is to develop an applied technology and provide an assessment to remotely measure and analyze the real time or near real time concentrations of used nuclear fuel (UNF) dissolute in electrorefiners. Here, Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), in UNF pyroprocessing facilities will be investigated. LIBS is an elemental analysis method, which is based on the emission from plasma generated by focusing a laser beam into the medium. This technology has been reported to be applicable in the media of solids, liquids (includes molten metals), and gases for detecting elements of special nuclear materials. The advantages of applying the technology for pyroprocessing facilities are: (i) Rapid real-time elemental analysis|one measurement/laser pulse, or average spectra from multiple laser pulses for greater accuracy in < 2 minutes; (ii) Direct detection of elements and impurities in the system with low detection limits|element specific, ranging from 2-1000 ppm for most elements; and (iii) Near non-destructive elemental analysis method (about 1 g material). One important challenge to overcome is achieving high-resolution spectral analysis to quantitatively analyze all important fission products and actinides. Another important challenge is related to accessibility of molten salt, which is heated in a heavily insulated, remotely operated furnace in a high radiation environment with an argon atmosphere.

  15. Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) of congruent voxels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piqué, Alberto; Kim, Heungsoo; Auyeung, Raymond C. Y.; Beniam, Iyoel; Breckenfeld, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) of functional materials offers unique advantages and capabilities for the rapid prototyping of electronic, optical and sensor elements. The use of LIFT for printing high viscosity metallic nano-inks and nano-pastes can be optimized for the transfer of voxels congruent with the shape of the laser pulse, forming thin film-like structures non-lithographically. These processes are capable of printing patterns with excellent lateral resolution and thickness uniformity typically found in 3-dimensional stacked assemblies, MEMS-like structures and free-standing interconnects. However, in order to achieve congruent voxel transfer with LIFT, the particle size and viscosity of the ink or paste suspensions must be adjusted to minimize variations due to wetting and drying effects. When LIFT is carried out with high-viscosity nano-suspensions, the printed voxel size and shape become controllable parameters, allowing the printing of thin-film like structures whose shape is determined by the spatial distribution of the laser pulse. The result is a new level of parallelization beyond current serial direct-write processes whereby the geometry of each printed voxel can be optimized according to the pattern design. This work shows how LIFT of congruent voxels can be applied to the fabrication of 2D and 3D microstructures by adjusting the viscosity of the nano-suspension and laser transfer parameters.

  16. Production of miniaturized biosensors through laser-induced forward transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Pradas, J. M.; Duocastella, M.; Colina, M.; Serra, P.; Morenza, J. L.

    2007-05-01

    Lasers are adequate tools for the production of patterns with high spatial resolution owing to the high focusing power of their radiation. Laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a direct-writing technique allowing the deposition of tiny amounts of material from a donor thin film through the action of a pulsed laser beam. A laser pulse is focused onto the donor thin film through a transparent support, what results in the transference of a small area of the film onto a receptor substrate that is placed parallel to the film-support system. Although LIFT was originally developed to operate with solid films, it has been demonstrated that deposition is also viable from liquid films. In this case, a small amount of liquid is directly ejected from the film onto the receptor substrate, where it rests deposited in the form of a microdroplet. This makes LIFT adequate for biosensors preparation, since biological solutions can be transferred onto solid substrates to produce micrometric patterns of biomolecules. In this case, the liquid solvent acts as transport vector of the biomolecules. The viability of the technique has been demonstrated through the preparation of functional miniaturized biosensors showing similar performances and higher scales of integration than those prepared through more conventional techniques.

  17. Dust Removal on Mars Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, T. G.; Morris, R. V.; Clegg, S. M.; Wiens, R. C.; Anderson, R. B.

    2011-01-01

    Dust coatings on the surface of Mars complicate and, if sufficiently thick, mask the spectral characteristics and compositional determination of underlying material from in situ and remote sensing instrumentation. The Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) portion of the Chemistry & Camera (ChemCam) instrument, aboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover, will be the first active remote sensing technique deployed on Mars able to remove dust. ChemCam utilizes a 5 ns pulsed 1067 nm high-powered laser focused to less than 400 m diameter on targets at distances up to 7 m [1,2]. With multiple laser pulses, dust and weathering coatings can be remotely analyzed and potentially removed using this technique [2,3]. A typical LIBS measurement during MSL surface operations is planned to consist of 50 laser pulses at 14 mJ, with the first 5 to 10 pulses used to analyze as well as remove any surface coating. Additionally, ChemCam's Remote Micro-Imager (RMI) is capable of resolving 200 m details at a distance of 2 m, or 1 mm at 10 m [1,4]. In this study, we report on initial laboratory experiments conducted to characterize the removal of dust coatings using similar LIBS parameters as ChemCam under Mars-like conditions. These experiments serve to better understand the removal of surface dust using LIBS and to facilitate the analysis of ChemCam LIBS spectral data and RMI images.

  18. Sub-Doppler laser cooling using electromagnetically induced transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Peiru; Tengdin, Phoebe M.; Anderson, Dana Z.; Rey, Ana Maria; Holland, Murray

    2017-05-01

    We propose a sub-Doppler laser-cooling mechanism that takes advantage of the unique spectral features and extreme dispersion generated by the phenomenon of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). EIT is a destructive quantum interference phenomenon experienced by atoms with multiple internal quantum states when illuminated by laser fields with appropriate frequencies. By detuning the lasers slightly from the "dark resonance," we observe that, within the transparency window, atoms can be subject to a strong viscous force, while being only slightly heated by the diffusion caused by spontaneous photon scattering. In contrast to other laser-cooling schemes, such as polarization gradient cooling or EIT-sideband cooling, no external magnetic field or strong external confining potential is required. Using a semiclassical approximation, we derive analytically quantitative expressions for the steady-state temperature, which is confirmed by full quantum mechanical numerical simulations. We find that the lowest achievable temperatures approach the single-photon recoil energy. In addition to dissipative forces, the atoms are subject to a stationary conservative potential, leading to the possibility of spatial confinement. We find that under typical experimental parameters, this effect is weak and stable trapping is not possible.

  19. Laser-induced scleral shrinkage for refractive surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Qiushi; Simon, Gabriel; Parel, Jean-Marie A.; Shen, Jin-Hui

    1994-06-01

    We investigate the laser refractive scleroplasty (LRS) as a potential minimal-invasive method for correcting post-operative astigmatism. The scleral shrinkage near limbus was induced on 6 cadaver eyes using a 200 micrometers fiber optic probe coupled to a pulsed Ho:YAG laser. The diameter of the treatment spot was 0.8 mm. The output energy measured at tip was 60.2+/- 0.6 mJ. The treatments consisted of multiple sector patterns placed along the major axis of astigmatism parallel to the limbus, and round patterns placed along the limbus. Three treatment spots were applied on each side of the sector. The separation among sectors and limbus is 1 mm. Keratometry and topography of the cornea were measured after each sector or round pattern treatment. Effect of 5 and 10 pulses at each treatment spot were compared. Histology was performed to evaluate laser tissue damage. The major axis of astigmatism was shifted 90 degrees after the sector pattern treatment and amount of dioptric change increased when adding a new treatment or using more treatment pulses. However, the spherical equivalent of the eyes was essentially unchanged. The keratometry of the corneas remained the same after the round pattern treatment. Laser refractive scleroplasty may be applied for the correction of post-operative astigmatism.

  20. Laser-induced fluorescence detection of stomach cancer using hypericin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dets, Sergiy M.; Buryi, Alexander N.; Melnik, Ivan S.; Joffe, Alexander Y.; Rusina, Tatyana V.

    1996-12-01

    Natural photodynamic pigment hypericin having intrinsic antitumor properties was applied for fluorescence detection of cancer. Clinical investigation of hypericin was performed to ensure high tumor/normal fluorescence contrast in digestion organs. Laser-induced autofluorescence and exogenous fluorescence analysis of normal tissue and stomach adenocarcinoma was performed using helium-cadmium laser (8 mW, 442 nm). Twenty-one patients have undergone procedure of fluorescence detection of tumors before and after photosensitization. For sensitization of patients we used five or seven capsules containing hypericin in amount of 1 mg which have been administered orally. Strong yellow-red fluorescence of hypericin in tissue with maximum at 603 nm and autofluorescence peak at 535 nm gives an intensity ratio I(603 nm)/I(535 nm) of 2 - 2.5 from cancerous tissue and provides 85% specificity. Preliminary in vivo results of auto- and fluorescence analysis using hypericin photosensitization from one patient with esophageal cancer and eleven patients with stomach cancer proven histologically are encouraging and indicate the high reliability of laser-induced fluorescence technique with hypericin in detection of early stage malignant lesions.

  1. Photoelectron spectroscopy principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hüfner, Stefan

    1995-01-01

    Photoelectron Spectroscopy presents an up-to-date introduction to the field by treating comprehensively the electronic structures of atoms, molecules, solids and surfaces Brief descriptions are given of inverse photoemission, spin-polarized photoemission and photoelectron diffraction Experimental aspects are considered throughout the book, and the results are carefully interpreted by theory A wealth of measured data is presented in the form of tables for easy use by experimentalists

  2. Laser-induced incandescence: Towards quantitative soot volume fraction measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzannis, A.P.; Wienbeucker, F.; Beaud, P.; Frey, H.-M.; Gerber, T.; Mischler, B.; Radi, P.P. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    Laser-Induced Incandescence has recently emerged as a versatile tool for measuring soot volume fraction in a wide range of combustion systems. In this work we investigate the essential features of the method. LII is based on the acquisition of the incandescence of soot when heated through a high power laser pulse. Initial experiments have been performed on a model laboratory flame. The behaviour of the LII signal is studied experimentally. By applying numerical calculations we investigate the possibility to obtain two-dimensional soot volume fraction distributions. For this purpose a combination of LII with other techniques is required. This part is discussed in some extent and the future work is outlined. (author) 4 figs., 3 refs.

  3. Laser-induced vibration of a thin soap film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emile, Olivier; Emile, Janine

    2014-09-21

    We report on the vibration of a thin soap film based on the optical radiation pressure force. The modulated low power laser induces a counter gravity flow in a vertical free-standing draining film. The thickness of the soap film is then higher in the upper region than in the lower region of the film. Moreover, the lifetime of the film is dramatically increased by a factor of 2. Since the laser beam only acts mechanically on the film interfaces, such a film can be employed in an optofluidic diaphragm pump, the interfaces behaving like a vibrating membrane and the liquid in-between being the fluid to be pumped. Such a pump could then be used in delicate micro-equipment, in chips where temperature variations are detrimental and even in biological systems.

  4. Plasma induced by pulsed laser and fabrication of silicon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Wei-Qi; Dong, Tai-Ge; Wang, Gang; Liu, Liu Shi-Rong; Huang, Zhong-Mei; Miao, Xin-Jian; Lv, Quan; Qin, Chao-Jian

    2015-08-01

    It is interesting that in preparing process of nanosilicon by pulsed laser, the periodic diffraction pattern from plasmonic lattice structure in the Purcell cavity due to interaction between plasmons and photons is observed. This kind of plasmonic lattice structure confined in the cavity may be similar to the Wigner crystal structure. Emission manipulation on Si nanostructures fabricated by the plasmonic wave induced from pulsed laser is studied by using photoluminescence spectroscopy. The electronic localized states and surface bonding are characterized by several emission bands peaked near 600 nm and 700 nm on samples prepared in oxygen or nitrogen environment. The electroluminescence wavelength is measured in the telecom window on silicon film coated by ytterbium. The enhanced emission originates from surface localized states in band gap due to broken symmetry from some bonds on surface bulges produced by plasmonic wave in the cavity. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11264007 and 61465003).

  5. Laser-induced micro-jetting from armored droplets

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, J. O.

    2015-06-23

    We present findings from an experimental study of laser-induced cavitation within a liquid drop coated with a granular material, commonly referred to as “armored droplets” or “liquid marbles.” The cavitation event follows the formation of plasma after a nanosecond laser pulse. Using ultra-high-speed imaging up to 320,610 fps, we investigate the extremely rapid dynamics following the cavitation, which manifests itself in the form of a plethora of micro-jets emanating simultaneously from the spaces between particles on the surface of the drop. These fine jets break up into droplets with a relatively narrow diameter range, on the order of 10 μm. © 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  6. Surface modification of ceramic matrix composites induced by laser treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costil, S.; Lukat, S.; Langlade, C.; Coddet, C.

    2008-12-01

    Ceramics or ceramic composites present many advantages (hardness, chemical resistance, low density, etc.) which induce some more and more important applications particularly from the industrial point of view. The evolution of technology can also be beneficial to enlarge their global application areas. This is particularly the aim of this work which consists in applying a laser beam on the ceramic in order to clean its surface. A Nd:YAG laser has been used to study the basic mechanism roughening the surface of silicon carbide composite (ceramic matrix composite (CMC)). Investigations on different surfaces (two chemical compositions) show a strong influence of the nature of the material on the development of a characteristic conic structure. Microscopic studies (SEM) and elementary analyses (EDS and RMS) demonstrated the formation of a regular cone-like structure with a kinetic and a chemical modification specific to each material.

  7. Printing biological solutions through laser-induced forward transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duocastella, M.; Fernández-Pradas, J. M.; Domínguez, J.; Serra, P.; Morenza, J. L.

    2008-12-01

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a direct-writing technique adequate for the high-resolution printing of a wide range of materials, including biological molecules. In this article, the preparation through LIFT of microarrays of droplets from a solution containing rabbit antibody immunoglobulin G (IgG) is presented. The microarrays were prepared at different laser pulse energy conditions, obtaining microdroplets with a circular and well-defined contour. The transfer process has a double threshold: a minimum energy density required to generate an impulsion on the liquid film, and a minimum pulse energy, which corresponds to the onset for material ejection. In addition, it was demonstrated that the transfer process can be correctly described through a simple model which relates the energy density threshold with the amount of released material. Finally, a fluorescence assay was carried out in which the preservation of the activity of the transferred biomolecules was demonstrated.

  8. Spectrum standardization for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zhe; West, Logan; Li, Zheng; Ni, Weidou

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a spectra normalization method for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) measurements by converting the recorded characteristic line intensity at varying conditions to the intensity under a standard condition with standard plasma temperature, degree of ionization, and total number density of the interested species to reduce the measurement uncertainty. The characteristic line intensities of the interested species are first converted to the intensity at a fixed temperature and standard degree of ionization but varying total number density for each laser pulse analysis. Under this state, if the influence of the variation of plasma morphology is neglected, the sum of multiple spectral line intensities for the measured element can be regarded proportional to the total number density of the specific element, and the fluctuation of the total number density, or the variation of ablation mass, was compensated for by the application of this relationship. In the experiments with 29 brass alloy...

  9. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Perini, Umberto

    2014-01-01

    This book deals with the Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), a widely used atomic emission spectroscopy technique for elemental analysis of materials. It is based on the use of a high-power, short pulse laser excitation. The book is divided into two main sections: the first one concerning theoretical aspects of the technique, the second one describing the state of the art in applications of the technique in different scientific/technological areas. Numerous examples of state of the art applications provide the readers an almost complete scenario of the LIBS technique. The LIBS theoretical aspects are reviewed. The book helps the readers who are less familiar with the technique to understand the basic principles. Numerous examples of state of the art applications give an almost complete scenario of the LIBS technique potentiality. These examples of applications may have a strong impact on future industrial utilization. The authors made important contributions to the development of this field.

  10. Microfabrication of polystyrene microbead arrays by laser induced forward transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla-Papavlu, Alexandra; Dinca, Valentina; Paraico, Iurie; Moldovan, Antoniu; Shaw-Stewart, James; Schneider, Christof W.; Kovacs, Eugenia; Lippert, Thomas; Dinescu, Maria

    2010-08-01

    In this study we describe a simple method to fabricate microarrays of polystyrene microbeads (PS-μbeads) on Thermanox coverslip surfaces using laser induced forward transfer (LIFT). A triazene polymer layer which acts as a dynamic release layer and propels the closely packed microspheres on the receiving substrate was used for this approach. The deposited features were characterized by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. Ultrasonication was used to test the adherence of the transferred beads. In addition, the laser ejection of the PS-μbead pixels was investigated by time resolved shadowgraphy. It was found that stable PS-μbeads micropatterns without any specific immobilization process could be realized by LIFT. These results highlight the increasing role of LIFT in the development of biomaterials, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  11. Analysis of fresco by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caneve, L., E-mail: luisa.caneve@enea.i [ENEA, CR Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Diamanti, A. [Universita ' Tor Vergata' , Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Grimaldi, F. [ENEA, CR Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Palleschi, G. [Universita ' Tor Vergata' , Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Spizzichino, V. [ENEA, CR Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Valentini, F. [Universita ' Tor Vergata' , Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy)

    2010-08-15

    The laser-based techniques have been shown to be a very powerful tool for artworks characterization and are used in the field of cultural heritage for the offered advantages of minimum invasiveness, in situ applicability and high sensitivity. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, in particular, has been applied in this field to many different kinds of ancient materials with successful results. In this work, a fragment of a Roman wall painting from the archaeological area of Pompeii has been investigated by LIBS. The sample elemental composition resulting from LIBS measurements suggested the presence of certain pigments. The ratio of the intensities of different lines related to some characteristic elements is proposed as an indicator for pigment recognition. The depth profiling permitted to put in evidence the presence of successive paint layers with different compositions. A comparison with the results obtained by the microscopy inspection of the sample has been done.

  12. Analysis of fresco by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caneve, L.; Diamanti, A.; Grimaldi, F.; Palleschi, G.; Spizzichino, V.; Valentini, F.

    2010-08-01

    The laser-based techniques have been shown to be a very powerful tool for artworks characterization and are used in the field of cultural heritage for the offered advantages of minimum invasiveness, in situ applicability and high sensitivity. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, in particular, has been applied in this field to many different kinds of ancient materials with successful results. In this work, a fragment of a Roman wall painting from the archaeological area of Pompeii has been investigated by LIBS. The sample elemental composition resulting from LIBS measurements suggested the presence of certain pigments. The ratio of the intensities of different lines related to some characteristic elements is proposed as an indicator for pigment recognition. The depth profiling permitted to put in evidence the presence of successive paint layers with different compositions. A comparison with the results obtained by the microscopy inspection of the sample has been done.

  13. Multiphoton processes in KrF-laser induced gas breakdown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poprawe, R.; Herziger, G.

    1986-05-01

    Ionization by multiphoton processes is the dominant generation mechanism of first electrons in the UV-laser-induced gas breakdown. A strongly simplified analytical model for the ion generation rate is used to give an estimate of the threshold intensity I/sub TH/. The result is compared to descriptions by Keldish and Bebb to check its limits of applicability. Solving the kinetic conservation equations for the focus volume gives an estimation of the breakdown intensity where the Debye criterion has been used in the sense of a plasma definition. As an example, breakdown experiments with a KrF-escimer laser have been carried out at different pressures in an argon atmosphere. The pressure dependency of the breakdown threshold intensity and its order of magnitude are predicted by the model.

  14. Femtosecond laser-induced surface structures on carbon fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajzew, Roman; Schröder, Jan; Kunz, Clemens; Engel, Sebastian; Müller, Frank A; Gräf, Stephan

    2015-12-15

    The influence of different polarization states during the generation of periodic nanostructures on the surface of carbon fibers was investigated using a femtosecond laser with a pulse duration τ=300  fs, a wavelength λ=1025  nm, and a peak fluence F=4  J/cm². It was shown that linear polarization results in a well-aligned periodic pattern with different orders of magnitude concerning their period and an alignment parallel and perpendicular to fiber direction, respectively. For circular polarization, both types of uniform laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) patterns appear simultaneously with different dominance in dependence on the position at the fiber surface. Their orientation was explained by the polarization-dependent absorptivity and the geometrical anisotropy of the carbon fibers.

  15. Heterogeneous atoms in laser-induced synthesis of carbon black

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovici, E.; Gavrila Florescu, L.; Soare, I.; Scarisoreanu, M.; Sandu, I.; Prodan, G.; Fleaca, C. T.; Morjan, I.; Voicu, I.

    2009-03-01

    Based on a high temperature hydrocarbon/heterogeneous atoms system of well-established composition, the formation of carbon nanostructures by laser-induced pyrolysis is related to the presence of heteroatoms in the reactants. In this paper, the goal is to underline the influence of some heteroatoms on the morphology and functionalizing nanostructured carbon materials by changing both gas composition and experimental parameters, with the focus to drive these materials into a regime where they can naturally interface with the surrounding matter. To investigate, in the versatile laser pyrolysis method, how to in situ modulate - through the presence of heterogeneous atoms - the characteristics of carbon nanopowders claimed by specific application is a challenge. Some preliminary results confirm experimentally their particular behavior during interaction with polymer matrices of some nanocomposites.

  16. Theory of laser-induced demagnetization at high temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Manchon, Aurelien

    2012-02-17

    Laser-induced demagnetization is theoretically studied by explicitly taking into account interactions among electrons, spins, and lattice. Assuming that the demagnetization processes take place during the thermalization of the subsystems, the temperature dynamics is given by the energy transfer between the thermalized interacting baths. These energy transfers are accounted for explicitly through electron-magnon and electron-phonon interactions, which govern the demagnetization time scale. By properly treating the spin system in a self-consistent random phase approximation, we derive magnetization dynamic equations for a broad range of temperature. The dependence of demagnetization on the temperature and pumping laser intensity is calculated in detail. In particular, we show several salient features for understanding magnetization dynamics near the Curie temperature. While the critical slowdown in dynamics occurs, we find that an external magnetic field can restore the fast dynamics. We discuss the implication of the fast dynamics in the application of heat-assisted magnetic recording.

  17. Laser-induced propagation and destruction of amyloid beta fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Hisashi; Ozawa, Daisaku; Sakurai, Kazumasa; Kawakami, Toru; Kuyama, Hiroki; Nishimura, Osamu; Shimanouchi, Toshinori; Kuboi, Ryoichi; Naiki, Hironobu; Goto, Yuji

    2010-06-18

    The amyloid deposition of amyloid beta (Abeta) peptides is a critical pathological event in Alzheimer disease (AD). Preventing the formation of amyloid deposits and removing preformed fibrils in tissues are important therapeutic strategies against AD. Previously, we reported the destruction of amyloid fibrils of beta(2)-microglobulin K3 fragments by laser irradiation coupled with the binding of amyloid-specific thioflavin T. Here, we studied the effects of a laser beam on Abeta fibrils. As was the case for K3 fibrils, extensive irradiation destroyed the preformed Abeta fibrils. However, irradiation during spontaneous fibril formation resulted in only the partial destruction of growing fibrils and a subsequent explosive propagation of fibrils. The explosive propagation was caused by an increase in the number of active ends due to breakage. The results not only reveal a case of fragmentation-induced propagation of fibrils but also provide insights into therapeutic strategies for AD.

  18. Laser cutting sandwich structure glass-silicon-glass wafer with laser induced thermal-crack propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yecheng; Wang, Maolu; Zhang, Hongzhi; Yang, Lijun; Fu, Xihong; Wang, Yang

    2017-08-01

    Silicon-glass devices are widely used in IC industry, MEMS and solar energy system because of their reliability and simplicity of the manufacturing process. With the trend toward the wafer level chip scale package (WLCSP) technology, the suitable dicing method of silicon-glass bonded structure wafer has become necessary. In this paper, a combined experimental and computational approach is undertaken to investigate the feasibility of cutting the sandwich structure glass-silicon-glass (SGS) wafer with laser induced thermal-crack propagation (LITP) method. A 1064 nm semiconductor laser cutting system with double laser beams which could simultaneously irradiate on the top and bottom of the sandwich structure wafer has been designed. A mathematical model for describing the physical process of the interaction between laser and SGS wafer, which consists of two surface heating sources and two volumetric heating sources, has been established. The temperature stress distribution are simulated by using finite element method (FEM) analysis software ABAQUS. The crack propagation process is analyzed by using the J-integral method. In the FEM model, a stationary planar crack is embedded in the wafer and the J-integral values around the crack front edge are determined using the FEM. A verification experiment under typical parameters is conducted and the crack propagation profile on the fracture surface is examined by the optical microscope and explained from the stress distribution and J-integral value.

  19. Single shot thermometry using laser induced thermal grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Pubo; Guan, Xiaowei; Zhang, Zhenrong; Wang, Sheng; Li, Guohua; Ye, Jingfeng; Hu, Zhiyun

    2015-05-01

    With the concern of environmental protection and reducing the fossil fuel consumption, combustion processes need to be more efficient and less contaminable. Therefore, the ability to obtain important thermophysical parameters is crucial to combustion research and combustor design. Traditional surveying techniques were difficult to apply in a confined space, especially the physically intrusions of detectors can alter the combustion processes. Laser-based diagnostic techniques, like CARS, SVRS, PLIF and TDLAS, allow the in situ, non-intrusive, spatially and temporally resolved measurements of combustion parameters in hostile environments. We report here a new non-intrusive optical diagnostic technique, based on laser-induced thermal grating. Thermal gratings generated in NO2/N2 binary mixtures, arise from the nonlinear interaction between the medium and the light radiation from the interference of two pulsed, frequency-doubled Nd:YAG lasers (532 nm). This leads to the formation of a dynamic grating through the resonant absorption and the subsequent collisional relaxation. By the temporally resolved detection of a continuous wave, frequency-doubled Nd:YVO4 probe laser beam (671 nm) diffracted by LITG. The temporal behavior of the signal is a function of the local temperature and other properties of gas, various parameters of the target gas can be extracted by analyzing the signal. The accurate singleshot temperature measurements were carried out at different test conditions using a stainless steel pressurized cell, data averaged on 100 laser shots were compared with simultaneously recorded thermocouple data, and the results were consistent with each other. The LITG signal is shown to grow with increasing the gas pressure and is spatially coherent, which makes the LITG thermometry technique a promising candidate in high pressure environments.

  20. Laser induced heat source distribution in bio-tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoxia; Fan, Shifu; Zhao, Youquan

    2006-09-01

    During numerical simulation of laser and tissue thermal interaction, the light fluence rate distribution should be formularized and constituted to the source term in the heat transfer equation. Usually the solution of light irradiative transport equation is given in extreme conditions such as full absorption (Lambert-Beer Law), full scattering (Lubelka-Munk theory), most scattering (Diffusion Approximation) et al. But in specific conditions, these solutions will induce different errors. The usually used Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) is more universal and exact but has difficulty to deal with dynamic parameter and fast simulation. Its area partition pattern has limits when applying FEM (finite element method) to solve the bio-heat transfer partial differential coefficient equation. Laser heat source plots of above methods showed much difference with MCS. In order to solve this problem, through analyzing different optical actions such as reflection, scattering and absorption on the laser induced heat generation in bio-tissue, a new attempt was made out which combined the modified beam broaden model and the diffusion approximation model. First the scattering coefficient was replaced by reduced scattering coefficient in the beam broaden model, which is more reasonable when scattering was treated as anisotropic scattering. Secondly the attenuation coefficient was replaced by effective attenuation coefficient in scattering dominating turbid bio-tissue. The computation results of the modified method were compared with Monte Carlo simulation and showed the model provided reasonable predictions of heat source term distribution than past methods. Such a research is useful for explaining the physical characteristics of heat source in the heat transfer equation, establishing effective photo-thermal model, and providing theory contrast for related laser medicine experiments.

  1. Laser-induced forward transfer of hybrid carbon nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palla-Papavlu, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, General Energy Research Department, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); National Institute for Lasers, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, Lasers Department, Atomistilor 409, 077125 Magurele (Romania); University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, 405 Atomistilor Street, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Filipescu, M., E-mail: mihaela.filipescu@inflpr.ro [Paul Scherrer Institut, General Energy Research Department, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); National Institute for Lasers, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, Lasers Department, Atomistilor 409, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Vizireanu, S. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, Lasers Department, Atomistilor 409, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Vogt, L. [Paul Scherrer Institut, General Energy Research Department, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Antohe, S. [University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, 405 Atomistilor Street, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Academy of Romanian Scientists, Splaiul Independentei 54, 050094 Bucharest (Romania); Dinescu, M. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, Lasers Department, Atomistilor 409, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Wokaun, A.; Lippert, T. [Paul Scherrer Institut, General Energy Research Department, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • Rapid prototyping of carbon nanowalls (CNW) and functionalized CNWs is described. • CNW and CNW:SnO{sub 2} pixels are successfully printed by laser-induced forward transfer. • Flexible (polyimide) and rigid (glass) supports are used as substrates. • 4 μm thick CNW and CNW:SnO{sub 2} pixels maintain their morphology and structure after LIFT. - Abstract: Chemically functionalized carbon nanowalls (CNWs) are promising materials for a wide range of applications, i.e. gas sensors, membranes for fuel cells, or as supports for catalysts. However, the difficulty of manipulation of these materials hinders their integration into devices. In this manuscript a procedure for rapid prototyping of CNWs and functionalized CNWs (i.e. decorated with SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles) is described. This procedure enables the use of laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) as a powerful technique for printing CNWs and CNW:SnO{sub 2} pixels onto rigid and flexible substrates. A morphological study shows that for a large range of laser fluences i.e. 500–700 mJ/cm{sup 2} it is possible to transfer thick (4 μm) CNW and CNW:SnO{sub 2} pixels. Micro-Raman investigation of the transferred pixels reveals that the chemical composition of the CNWs and functionalized CNWs does not change as a result of the laser transfer. Following these results one can envision that CNWs and CNW:SnO{sub 2} pixels obtained by LIFT can be ultimately applied in technological applications.

  2. Evidence of liquid phase during laser-induced periodic surface structures formation induced by accumulative ultraviolet picosecond laser beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huynh, T. T. D.; Petit, A.; Semmar, N., E-mail: nadjib.semmar@univ-orleans.fr [GREMI, UMR7344, CNRS/University of Orleans, 14 rue d' Issoudun, BP6744, 45067 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Vayer, M. [ICMN, UMR 7374, CNRS/University of Orleans, 1b rue de la Ferollerie, CS 40059, 45071 Orleans Cedex (France); Sauldubois, A. [CME, UFR Sciences, University of Orleans, 1 Rue de Chartres, BP 6759, 45067 Orleans Cedex 2 (France)

    2015-11-09

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) were formed on Cu/Si or Cu/glass thin films using Nd:YAG laser beam (40 ps, 10 Hz, and 30 mJ/cm{sup 2}). The study of ablation threshold is always achieved over melting when the variation of the number of pulses increases from 1 to 1000. But the incubation effect is leading to reduce the threshold of melting as increasing the number of laser pulse. Also, real time reflectivity signals exhibit typical behavior to stress the formation of a liquid phase during the laser-processing regime and helps to determine the threshold of soft ablation. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analyses have shown the topology of the micro-crater containing regular spikes with different height. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) allows finally to show three distinguished zones in the close region of isolated protrusions. The central zone is a typical crystallized area of few nanometers surrounded by a mixed poly-crystalline and amorphous area. Finally, in the region far from the protrusion zone, Cu film shows an amorphous structure. The real time reflectivity, AFM, and HR-TEM analyses evidence the formation of a liquid phase during the LIPSS formation in the picosecond regime.

  3. Evidence of liquid phase during laser-induced periodic surface structures formation induced by accumulative ultraviolet picosecond laser beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, T. T. D.; Vayer, M.; Sauldubois, A.; Petit, A.; Semmar, N.

    2015-11-01

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) were formed on Cu/Si or Cu/glass thin films using Nd:YAG laser beam (40 ps, 10 Hz, and 30 mJ/cm2). The study of ablation threshold is always achieved over melting when the variation of the number of pulses increases from 1 to 1000. But the incubation effect is leading to reduce the threshold of melting as increasing the number of laser pulse. Also, real time reflectivity signals exhibit typical behavior to stress the formation of a liquid phase during the laser-processing regime and helps to determine the threshold of soft ablation. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analyses have shown the topology of the micro-crater containing regular spikes with different height. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) allows finally to show three distinguished zones in the close region of isolated protrusions. The central zone is a typical crystallized area of few nanometers surrounded by a mixed poly-crystalline and amorphous area. Finally, in the region far from the protrusion zone, Cu film shows an amorphous structure. The real time reflectivity, AFM, and HR-TEM analyses evidence the formation of a liquid phase during the LIPSS formation in the picosecond regime.

  4. Investigation of stress induced by CO2 laser processing of fused silica optics for laser damage growth mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallais, Laurent; Cormont, Philippe; Rullier, Jean-Luc

    2009-12-21

    Laser damage mitigation' is a process developed to prevent the growth of nanosecond laser-initiated damage sites under successive irradiation. It consists of re-fusing the damage area with a CO2 laser. In this paper we investigate the stress field created around mitigated sites which could have an influence on the efficiency of the process. A numerical model of CO2 laser interaction with fused silica is developed. It takes into account laser energy absorption, heat transfer, thermally induced stress and birefringence. Residual stress near mitigated sites in fused silica samples is characterized with specific photoelastic methods and theoretical data are compared to experiments. The stress distribution and quantitative values of stress levels are obtained for sites treated with the CO2 laser in various conditions of energy deposition (beam size, pulse duration, incident power). The results provided evidence that the presence of birefringence/residual stress around the mitigated sites has an effect on their laser damage resistance.

  5. Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) of congruent voxels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piqué, Alberto, E-mail: pique@nrl.navy.mil [Materials Science and Technology Division, Code 6364, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Kim, Heungsoo; Auyeung, Raymond C.Y.; Beniam, Iyoel [Materials Science and Technology Division, Code 6364, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Breckenfeld, Eric [National Research Council Fellow at the Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is demonstrated with high viscosity Ag nanopaste. • Under the right conditions (viscosity and fluence) the transfer of congruent voxels was achieved. • For viscosities under 100 Pa s, congruent voxel transfer of silver nano-suspensions is only possible under a very narrow range of conditions. • For viscosities over 100 Pa s, congruent voxel transfer of silver nano-pastes works over a wider range of fluences, donor substrate thickness, gap distances and voxel areas. • The laser transfer of congruent voxels can be used for printing electronic patterns in particular interconnects. - Abstract: Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) of functional materials offers unique advantages and capabilities for the rapid prototyping of electronic, optical and sensor elements. The use of LIFT for printing high viscosity metallic nano-inks and nano-pastes can be optimized for the transfer of voxels congruent with the shape of the laser pulse, forming thin film-like structures non-lithographically. These processes are capable of printing patterns with excellent lateral resolution and thickness uniformity typically found in 3-dimensional stacked assemblies, MEMS-like structures and free-standing interconnects. However, in order to achieve congruent voxel transfer with LIFT, the particle size and viscosity of the ink or paste suspensions must be adjusted to minimize variations due to wetting and drying effects. When LIFT is carried out with high-viscosity nano-suspensions, the printed voxel size and shape become controllable parameters, allowing the printing of thin-film like structures whose shape is determined by the spatial distribution of the laser pulse. The result is a new level of parallelization beyond current serial direct-write processes whereby the geometry of each printed voxel can be optimized according to the pattern design. This work shows how LIFT of congruent voxels can be applied to the fabrication of 2D

  6. Laser optics in space failure risk due to laser induced contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkinos, D.; Schroeder, H.; Fleury-Frenette, K.; Georges, M. P.; Riede, W.; Tzeremes, G.; Rochus, P.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, a study of the evolution and morphology of UV laser-induced contamination (LIC) on optical surfaces due to hydrocarbons will be presented. LIC is a major hazard for lasers that operate in vacuum conditions. Recent studies have shown that the manufacturing method and cleaning of optical components can significantly mitigate LIC growth but never stop it completely. To better understand and model the evolution of LIC the deposition rate and transmission decay were observed via a CCD camera that measured laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and energy detectors, respectively. The affected sites were observed using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Phase Shift Interferometry (PSI). The LIC affected area diameters obtained by different experimental conditions were then compared with the theoretical prediction derived by the model. Very good agreement between this empirical model and the experimental results was found for the relevant parameter regimes under investigation. A novel methodology to determine the possibility of permanent optical damage due to LIC produced thermal effects is also discussed.

  7. Photoelectron spectroscopy investigation of the temperature-induced deprotonation and substrate-mediated hydrogen transfer in a hydroxyphenyl-substituted porphyrin

    CERN Document Server

    Smykalla, Lars; Mende, Carola; Lang, Heinrich; Knupfer, Martin; Hietschold, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The temperature dependent stepwise deprotonation of 5,10,15,20-tetra(p-hydroxyphenyl)porphyrin is investigated using photoelectron spectroscopy. An abundance of pyrrolic relative to iminic nitrogen and a decrease in the ratio of the amount of -NH- to -N= with increasing annealing temperature is found. In contrast to the molecules adsorbed on Au(111), on the more reactive Ag(110) surface, partial dissociation of the hydroxyl groups and subsequent diffusion and rebonding of hydrogen to the central nitrogen atoms resulting in a zwitterionic molecule was clearly observed. Moreover, partial C-H bond cleavage and the formation of new covalent bonds with adjacent molecules or the surface starts at a relatively high annealing temperature of 300{\\deg}C. This reaction is identified to occur at the carbon atoms of the pyrrole rings, which leads also to a shift in the N 1s signal and changes in the valence band of the molecules. Our results show that annealing can significantly alter the molecules which were deposited de...

  8. Laser ablation-laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for the measurement of total elemental concentration in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Jhon; López, Sebastian; Jaramillo, Daniel; Hahn, David W; Molina, Alejandro

    2013-04-10

    The performances of traditional laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser ablation-LIBS (LA-LIBS) were compared by quantifying the total elemental concentration of potassium in highly heterogeneous solid samples, namely soils. Calibration curves for a set of fifteen samples with a wide range of potassium concentrations were generated. The LA-LIBS approach produced a superior linear response different than the traditional LIBS scheme. The analytical response of LA-LIBS was tested with a large set of different soil samples for the quantification of the total concentration of Fe, Mn, Mg, Ca, Na, and K. Results showed an acceptable linear response for Ca, Fe, Mg, and K while poor signal responses were found for Na and Mn. Signs of remaining matrix effects for the LA-LIBS approach in the case of soil analysis were found and discussed. Finally, some improvements and possibilities for future studies toward quantitative soil analysis with the LA-LIBS technique are suggested.

  9. Multiple structure of a laser-induced underwater shock wave

    CERN Document Server

    Tagawa, Yoshiyuki; Hayasaka, Keisuke; Kameda, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    The structure of a laser-induced underwater shock wave is examined. Plasma formation, shock-wave expansion, and temporal evolution of shock pressure are observed simultaneously using a combined measurement system that obtains high-resolution nanosecond-order image sequences. In contrast to a well-known spherical-shock model, these detailed measurements reveal a non-spherically-symmteric distribution of pressure peak for a wide range of experimental parameters. The structure is determined to be a collection of multiple spherical shocks originated from elongated plasmas.

  10. Biomedical and environmental applications of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V K Unnikrishnan; K S Choudhari; Suresh D Kulkarni; Rajesh Nayak; V B Kartha; C Santhosh; B M Suri

    2014-02-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an emerging analytical technique with numerous advantages such as rapidity, multi-elemental analysis, minimal sample preparation, minimal destruction, low cost and versatility of being applied to a wide range of materials. In this paper, we report the preliminary observations we obtained using LIBS for clinical and environmental samples. Elemental analysis has been done qualitatively in human teeth samples which show encouraging results. It has also been demonstrated in this paper that LIBS can be very well utilized in field applications such as plastic waste sorting and recycling.

  11. Capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence: environmental applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddick, Lee; Brumley, William C

    2008-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE), especially free-zone CE, offers a relatively simple separation with moderate selectivity based on the mobility of ions in solution. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection, an extremely sensitive technique, can be coupled with a variety of separation conditions to achieve sensitive and quantitative results. When these techniques are combined, CE/LIF provides the sensitivity and increased selectivity that makes trace level environmental analysis of fluorescent compounds possible at or below levels typical for gas chromatography (GC)/mass spectrometry (MS). We offer a panoramic review of the role of these tools in solving environmental and related analytical problems before providing a detailed experimental protocol.

  12. Laser beam shaping for studying thermally induced damage

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masina, BN

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available for studying thermally induced damage Bathusile N. Masinaa, Richard Bodkinc, Bonex Mwakikungad and Andrew Forbesa,b?, aCSIR National Laser Centre, P. O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001, South Africa bSchool of Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X... from the blackbody at each wavelength, it is possible to determine the temperature of the blackbody or of the object by fitting the blackbody spectrum to the measured light. The advantage of using the blackbody emission is that there is no physical...

  13. Controlled calibration method for laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wang; Chijian Zhang; Yuan Feng

    2008-01-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a potential technique for rapid analysis of samples present in solids, gases and liquids. In the last two decades it was an object of extensive studies. Controlled calibration method used to analysis the LIBS spectra is investigated. Compared with the inner calibration and calibration-free (CF) methods, this new method overcomes "matrix effect", and demonstrates a better ability to cope with the spectra. It is used to analyze natural soil, and errors of the concentration are decreased about 5%. The result shows that the new method is feasible and accurate.

  14. Laser light scattering in a laser-induced argon plasma: Investigations of the shock wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokrzywka, B. [Obserwatorium Astronomiczne na Suhorze, Uniwersytet Pedagogiczny, ulica Podchorazych 2, 30-084 Krakow (Poland); Mendys, A., E-mail: agata.mendys@uj.edu.pl [Instytut Fizyki im. M. Smoluchowskiego, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, ulica Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Dzierzega, K.; Grabiec, M. [Instytut Fizyki im. M. Smoluchowskiego, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, ulica Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Pellerin, S. [GREMI, site de Bourges, Universite d' Orleans, CNRS, rue Gaston Berger BP 4043, 18028 Bourges (France)

    2012-08-15

    Shock wave produced by a laser induced spark in argon at atmospheric pressure was examined using Rayleigh and Thomson scattering. The spark was generated by focusing a laser pulse from the second harmonic ({lambda} = 532 nm) of a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser using an 80 mm focal length lens, with a fluence of 2 kJ{center_dot}cm{sup -2}. Images of the spark emission were recorded for times between 30 ns and 100 {mu}s after the laser pulse in order to characterize its spatial evolution. The position of the shock wave at several instants of its evolution and for several plasma regions was determined from the Rayleigh-scattered light of another nanosecond Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 40 J{center_dot}cm{sup -2} fluence). Simultaneously, Thomson scattering technique was applied to determine the electron density and temperature in the hot plasma core. Attempts were made to describe the temporal evolution of the shock wave within a self-similar model, both by the simple Sedov-Taylor formula as well as its extension deduced by de Izarra. The temporal radial evolution of the shock position is similar to that obtained within theory taking into account the counter pressure of the ambient gas. Density profiles just behind the shock front are in qualitative agreement with those obtained by numerically solving the Euler equations for instantaneous explosion at a point with counter pressure. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated shock wave evolution by Rayleigh scattering method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 2D map of shockwave position for several times after plasma generation is presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Shock wave evolution is not satisfactorily described within self-similar models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evolution of shock position similar to theory taking into account counter pressure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Density profile behind the shock similar to numerical solution of Euler equations.

  15. Enhancing the analytical performance of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremers, D.A.; Chinni, R.C.; Pichahchy, A.E.; Thornquist, H.K.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this work is to enhance the analytical capabilities of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). LIBS is a method of elemental analysis in which powerful laser pulses are focused on a sample to form a microplasma. LIBS is perhaps the most versatile elemental analysis method, applicable to a variety of different real-world analysis problems. Therefore, it is important to enhance the capabilities of the method as much as possible. Accomplishments include: (1) demonstration of signal enhancements of 5--30 times from soils and metals using a double pulse method; (2) development of a model of the observed enhancement obtained using double pulses; (3) demonstration that the analytical performance achievable using low laser-pulse energies (10 and 25 mJ) can match that achievable using an energy of 100 mJ; and (4) demonstration that time-gated detection is not necessary with LIBS.

  16. Unraveling shock-induced chemistry using ultrafast lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The exquisite time synchronicity between shock and diagnostics needed to unravel chemical events occurring in picoseconds has been achieved using a shaped ultrafast laser pulse to both drive the shocks and interrogate the sample via a multiplicity of optical diagnostics. The shaped laser drive pulse can produce well-controlled shock states of sub-ns duration with sub-10 ps risetimes, sufficient for investigation of fast reactions or phase transformations in a thin layer with picosecond time resolution. The shock state is characterized using ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry (UDE) in either planar or Gaussian spatial geometries, the latter allowing measurements of the equation of state of materials at a range of stresses in a single laser pulse. Time-resolved processes in materials are being interrogated using UDE, ultrafast infrared absorption, ultrafast UV/visible absorption, and femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy. Using these tools we showed that chemistry in an energetic thin film starts only after an induction time of a few tens of ps, an observation that allows differentiation between proposed shock-induced reaction mechanisms. These tools are presently being applied to a variety of energetic and reactive sample systems, from nitromethane and carbon disulfide, to micro-engineered interfaces in tunable energetic mixtures.

  17. Laser-induced jetting and controlled droplet formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascu, Mihail Lucian; Andrei, Ionut Relu; Delville, Jean-Pierre

    2016-12-01

    The article reports, in the general context of developing techniques to generate microjets, nanojets and even individual nanodroplets, a new method to obtain such formations by interaction of a single laser pulse at 532 nm with an individual/single mother droplet in pendant position in open air. The beam energy per pulse is varied between 0.25 and 1 mJ, the focus diameter is 90 μm, and the droplet's volumes are either 3 μl or 3.5 μl. Droplet's shape evolution and jet emission at impact with laser pulse was visualised with a high speed camera working at 10 kfps. Reproducible jets and/or separated microdroplets and nanodroplets are obtained which shows potential for applications in particular in jet printing. It is demonstrated that it becomes possible to play with the geometrical symmetry of both laser excitation and liquid in order to manage the number and the orientation of an induced microjet and consequently to actuate the orientation and the production of nanodroplets by light.

  18. The LILIA (laser induced light ions acceleration) experiment at LNF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agosteo, S. [Energy Department, Polytechnic of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Anania, M.P. [INFN LNF Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Caresana, M. [Energy Department, Polytechnic of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P. [INFN LNS Catania, Catania (Italy); De Martinis, C. [Physics Department, University of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Delle Side, D. [LEAS, University of Salento and INFN, Lecce (Italy); Fazzi, A. [Energy Department, Polytechnic of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Gatti, G. [INFN LNF Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Giove, D. [Physics Department, University of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Giulietti, D. [Physics Department, University of Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Gizzi, L.A.; Labate, L. [INO-CNR and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Londrillo, P. [Physics Department, University of Bologna and INFN, Bologna (Italy); Maggiore, M. [INFN LNL, Legnaro (Italy); Nassisi, V., E-mail: vincenzo.nassisi@le.infn.it [LEAS, University of Salento and INFN, Lecce (Italy); Sinigardi, S. [Physics Department, University of Bologna and INFN, Bologna (Italy); Tramontana, A.; Schillaci, F. [INFN LNS Catania, Catania (Italy); Scuderi, V. [INFN LNS Catania, Catania (Italy); Institute of Physics of the ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Turchetti, G. [Physics Department, University of Bologna and INFN, Bologna (Italy); and others

    2014-07-15

    Laser-matter interaction at relativistic intensities opens up new research fields in the particle acceleration and related secondary sources, with immediate applications in medical diagnostics, biophysics, material science, inertial confinement fusion, up to laboratory astrophysics. In particular laser-driven ion acceleration is very promising for hadron therapy once the ion energy will attain a few hundred MeV. The limited value of the energy up to now obtained for the accelerated ions is the drawback of such innovative technique to the real applications. LILIA (laser induced light ions acceleration) is an experiment now running at LNF (Frascati) with the goal of producing a real proton beam able to be driven for significant distances (50–75 cm) away from the interaction point and which will act as a source for further accelerating structure. In this paper the description of the experimental setup, the preliminary results of solid target irradiation and start to end simulation for a post-accelerated beam up to 60 MeV are given.

  19. Laser-induced forward transfer of hybrid carbon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla-Papavlu, A.; Filipescu, M.; Vizireanu, S.; Vogt, L.; Antohe, S.; Dinescu, M.; Wokaun, A.; Lippert, T.

    2016-06-01

    Chemically functionalized carbon nanowalls (CNWs) are promising materials for a wide range of applications, i.e. gas sensors, membranes for fuel cells, or as supports for catalysts. However, the difficulty of manipulation of these materials hinders their integration into devices. In this manuscript a procedure for rapid prototyping of CNWs and functionalized CNWs (i.e. decorated with SnO2 nanoparticles) is described. This procedure enables the use of laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) as a powerful technique for printing CNWs and CNW:SnO2 pixels onto rigid and flexible substrates. A morphological study shows that for a large range of laser fluences i.e. 500-700 mJ/cm2 it is possible to transfer thick (4 μm) CNW and CNW:SnO2 pixels. Micro-Raman investigation of the transferred pixels reveals that the chemical composition of the CNWs and functionalized CNWs does not change as a result of the laser transfer. Following these results one can envision that CNWs and CNW:SnO2 pixels obtained by LIFT can be ultimately applied in technological applications.

  20. Coherence in ultrafast laser-induced periodic surface structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Colombier, Jean-Philippe; Li, Chen; Faure, Nicolas; Cheng, Guanghua; Stoian, Razvan

    2015-11-01

    Ultrafast laser irradiation can trigger anisotropically structured nanoscaled gratinglike arrangements of matter, the laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSSs). We demonstrate here that the formation of LIPSS is intrinsically related to the coherence of the laser field. Employing several test materials that allow large optical excursions, we observe the effect of randomizing spatial phase in generating finite domains of ripples. Using three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain methods, we evaluate energy deposition patterns below a material's rough surface and show that modulated pattern, i.e., a spatially ordered electromagnetic solution, results from the coherent superposition of waves. By separating the field scattered from a surface rough topography from the total field, the inhomogeneous energy absorption problem is reduced to a simple interference equation. We further distinguish the contribution of the scattered near field and scattered far field on various types of inhomogeneous energy absorption features. It is found that the inhomogeneous energy absorption which could trigger the low-spatial-frequency LIPSSs (LSFLs) and high-spatial-frequency LIPSSs (HSFLs) of periodicity Λ >λ /Re(n ˜) are due to coherent superposition between the scattered far field (propagation) and the refracted field, while HSFLs of Λ λ ) related to a feedback-driven topography evolution. Those results strongly suggest the electromagnetic interpretation of LIPSSs in interplay with an evolving surface topography.

  1. The LILIA (laser induced light ions acceleration) experiment at LNF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosteo, S.; Anania, M. P.; Caresana, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; De Martinis, C.; Delle Side, D.; Fazzi, A.; Gatti, G.; Giove, D.; Giulietti, D.; Gizzi, L. A.; Labate, L.; Londrillo, P.; Maggiore, M.; Nassisi, V.; Sinigardi, S.; Tramontana, A.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Turchetti, G.; Varoli, V.; Velardi, L.

    2014-07-01

    Laser-matter interaction at relativistic intensities opens up new research fields in the particle acceleration and related secondary sources, with immediate applications in medical diagnostics, biophysics, material science, inertial confinement fusion, up to laboratory astrophysics. In particular laser-driven ion acceleration is very promising for hadron therapy once the ion energy will attain a few hundred MeV. The limited value of the energy up to now obtained for the accelerated ions is the drawback of such innovative technique to the real applications. LILIA (laser induced light ions acceleration) is an experiment now running at LNF (Frascati) with the goal of producing a real proton beam able to be driven for significant distances (50-75 cm) away from the interaction point and which will act as a source for further accelerating structure. In this paper the description of the experimental setup, the preliminary results of solid target irradiation and start to end simulation for a post-accelerated beam up to 60 MeV are given.

  2. Laser-induced breakdown plasma-based sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Steven T.

    2010-04-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is dependent on the interaction between the initiating Laser sequence, the sampled material and the intermediate plasma states. Pulse shaping and timing have been empirically demonstrated to have significant impact on the signal available for active/passive detection and identification. The transient nature of empirical LIBS work makes data collection for optimization an expensive process. Guidance from effective computer simulation represents an alternative. This computational method for CBRNE sensing applications models the Laser, material and plasma interaction for the purpose of performance prediction and enhancement. This paper emphasizes the aspects of light, plasma, and material interaction relevant to portable sensor development for LIBS. The modeling structure emphasizes energy balances and empirical fit descriptions with limited detailed-balance and finite element approaches where required. Dusty plasma from partially decomposed material sample interaction with pulse dynamics is considered. This heuristic is used to reduce run times and computer loads. Computer simulations and some data for validation are presented. A new University of Memphis HPC/super-computer (~15 TFLOPS) is used to enhance simulation. Results coordinated with related effort at Arkansas State University. Implications for ongoing empirical work are presented with special attention paid to the application of compressive sensing for signal processing, feature extraction, and classification.

  3. Validating Laser-Induced Birefringence Theory with Plasma Interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Cecilia [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2015-09-02

    Intense laser beams crossing paths in plasma is theorized to induce birefringence in the medium, resulting from density and refractive index modulations that affect the polarization of incoming light. The goal of the associated experiment, conducted on Janus at Lawrence Livermore’s Jupiter Laser Facility, was to create a tunable laser-plasma waveplate to verify the relationship between dephasing angle and beam intensity, plasma density, plasma temperature, and interaction length. Interferometry analysis of the plasma channel was performed to obtain a density map and to constrain temperature measured from Thomson scattering. Various analysis techniques, including Fast Fourier transform (FFT) and two variations of fringe-counting, were tried because interferograms captured in this experiment contained unusual features such as fringe discontinuity at channel edges, saddle points, and islands. The chosen method is flexible, semi-automated, and uses a fringe tracking algorithm on a reduced image of pre-traced synthetic fringes. Ultimately, a maximum dephasing angle of 49.6° was achieved using a 1200 μm interaction length, and the experimental results appear to agree with predictions.

  4. Pulse mode of laser photodynamic treatment induced cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimenko, Vladimir V; Knyazev, Nickolay A; Moiseenko, Fedor V; Rusanov, Anatoliy A; Bogdanov, Alexey A; Dubina, Michael V

    2016-03-01

    One of the factors limiting photodynamic therapy (PDT) is hypoxia in tumor cells during photodynamic action. PDT with pulse mode irradiation and appropriate irradiation parameters could be more effective in the singlet oxygen generation and tissue re-oxygenation than continuous wave (CW) mode. We theoretically demonstrate differences between the cumulative singlet oxygen concentration in PDT using pulse mode and CW mode of laser irradiation. In vitro experimental results show that photodynamic treatment with pulse mode irradiation has similar cytotoxicity to CW mode and induces mainly cell apoptosis, whereas CW mode induces necrotic cell death. We assume that the cumulative singlet oxygen concentration and the temporal distribution of singlet oxygen are important in photodynamic cytotoxicity and apoptosis initiation. We expect our research may improve irradiation protocols and photodynamic therapy efficiency.

  5. Optimization study of the femtosecond laser-induced forward-transfer process with thin aluminum films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Sudipta; Sabbah, A J; Yarbrough, J M; Allen, C G; Winters, Beau; Durfee, Charles G; Squier, Jeff A

    2007-07-20

    The parameters for an effective laser-induced forward-transfer (LIFT) process of aluminum thin films using a femtosecond laser are studied. Deposited feature size as a function of laser fluence, donor film thickness, quality of focus, and the pulse duration are varied, providing a metric of the most desirable conditions for femtosecond LIFT with thin aluminum films.

  6. Reconstruction of two-dimensional molecular structure with laser-induced electron diffraction from laser-aligned polyatomic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chao; Wei, Hui; Wang, Xu; Le, Anh-Thu; Lu, Ruifeng; Lin, C. D.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging the transient process of molecules has been a basic way to investigate photochemical reactions and dynamics. Based on laser-induced electron diffraction and partial one-dimensional molecular alignment, here we provide two effective methods for reconstructing two-dimensional structure of polyatomic molecules. We demonstrate that electron diffraction images in both scattering angles and broadband energy can be utilized to retrieve complementary structure information, including positions of light atoms. With picometre spatial resolution and the inherent femtosecond temporal resolution of lasers, laser-induced electron diffraction method offers significant opportunities for probing atomic motion in a large molecule in a typical pump-probe measurement. PMID:26503116

  7. Liquid Jet Formation in Laser-Induced Forward Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasz, C. Frederik

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a direct-write technique capable of printing precise patterns of a wide variety of materials. In this process, a laser pulse is focused through a transparent support and absorbed in a thin donor film, propelling material onto an adjacent acceptor substrate. For fluid materials, this transfer occurs through the formation of a narrow liquid jet, which eventually pinches off due to surface tension. This thesis examines in detail the fluid mechanics of the jet formation process occurring in LIFT. The main focus is on a variant of LIFT known as blister-actuated LIFT (BA-LIFT), in which the laser pulse is absorbed in an ink-coated polymer layer, rapidly deforming it locally into a blister to induce liquid jet formation. The early-time response of a fluid layer to a deforming boundary is analyzed with a domain perturbation method and potential-flow simulations, revealing scalings for energy and momentum transfer to the fluid and providing physical insight on how and why a jet forms in BA-LIFT. The remaining chapters explore more complex applications and modifications of LIFT. One is the possibility of high-repetition rate printing and limits on time delay and separation between pulses imposed by a tilting effect found for adjacent jets. Another examines a focusing effect achieved by perturbing the interface with ring-shaped disturbances. The third contains an experimental study of LIFT using a silver paste as the donor material instead of a Newtonian liquid. The transfer mechanism is significantly different, although with repeated pulses at one location, a focusing effect is again observed. All three of these chapters investigate how perturbations to the interface can strongly influence the jet formation process.

  8. Quantum Hooke's law to classify pulse laser induced ultrafast melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hao; Ding, Hepeng; Liu, Feng

    2015-02-03

    Ultrafast crystal-to-liquid phase transition induced by femtosecond pulse laser excitation is an interesting material's behavior manifesting the complexity of light-matter interaction. There exist two types of such phase transitions: one occurs at a time scale shorter than a picosecond via a nonthermal process mediated by electron-hole plasma formation; the other at a longer time scale via a thermal melting process mediated by electron-phonon interaction. However, it remains unclear what material would undergo which process and why? Here, by exploiting the property of quantum electronic stress (QES) governed by quantum Hooke's law, we classify the transitions by two distinct classes of materials: the faster nonthermal process can only occur in materials like ice having an anomalous phase diagram characterized with dTm/dP melting temperature and P is pressure, above a high threshold laser fluence; while the slower thermal process may occur in all materials. Especially, the nonthermal transition is shown to be induced by the QES, acting like a negative internal pressure, which drives the crystal into a "super pressing" state to spontaneously transform into a higher-density liquid phase. Our findings significantly advance fundamental understanding of ultrafast crystal-to-liquid phase transitions, enabling quantitative a priori predictions.

  9. Direct probing of chromatography columns by laser-induced fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuffin, V.L.

    1992-12-07

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments of this research project from September 1, 1989 to February 28, 1993. During this period, we have accomplished all of the primary scientific objectives of the research proposal: (1) constructed and evaluated a laser-induced fluorescence detection system that allows direct examination of the chromatographic column, (2) examined nonequilibrium processes that occur upon solute injection and elution, (3) examined solute retention in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, (4) examined solute zone dispersion in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, and (5) developed appropriate theoretical models to describe these phenomena. In each of these studies, substantial knowledge has been gained of the fundamental processes that are responsible for chromatographic separations. In addition to these primary research objectives, we have made significant progress in three related areas: (1) examined pyrene as a fluorescent polarity probe insupercritical fluids and liquids as a function of temperature and pressure, (2) developed methods for the class-selective identification of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in coal-derived fluids by microcolumn liquid chromatography with fluorescence quenching detection, and (3) developed methods for the determination of saturated and unsaturated (including omega-3) fatty acids in fish oil extracts by microcolumn liquid chromatography with laser-induced fluorescence detection. In these studies, the advanced separation and detection techniques developed in our laboratory are applied to practical problems of environmental and biomedical significance.

  10. Direct probing of chromatography columns by laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuffin, V. L.

    1992-12-01

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments of this research project from 1 Sep. 1989 to 28 Feb. 1993. During this period, we have accomplished all of the primary scientific objectives of the research proposal: (1) constructed and evaluated a laser-induced fluorescence detection system that allows direct examination of the chromatographic column, (2) examined nonequilibrium processes that occur upon solute injection and elution, (3) examined solute retention in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, (4) examined solute zone dispersion in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, and (5) developed appropriate theoretical models to describe these phenomena. In each of these studies, substantial knowledge has been gained of the fundamental processes that are responsible for chromatographic separations. In addition to these primary research objectives, we have made significant progress in three related areas: (1) examined pyrene as a fluorescent polarity probe in supercritical fluids and liquids as a function of temperature and pressure, (2) developed methods for the class-selective identification of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in coal-derived fluids by microcolumn liquid chromatography with fluorescence quenching detection, and (3) developed methods for the determination of saturated and unsaturated (including omega-3) fatty acids in fish oil extracts by microcolumn liquid chromatography with laser-induced fluorescence detection. In these studies, the advanced separation and detection techniques developed in our laboratory are applied to practical problems of environmental and biomedical significance.

  11. Photoelectron circular dichroism of isopropanolamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catone, D.; Turchini, S.; Contini, G.; Prosperi, T.; Stener, M.; Decleva, P.; Zema, N.

    2017-01-01

    Spectroscopies based on circular polarized light are sensitive to the electronic and structural properties of chiral molecules. Photoelectron circular dichroism (PECD) is a powerful technique that combines the chiral sensitivity of the circular polarized light and the electronic information obtained by photoelectron spectroscopy. An experimental and theoretical PECD study of the outer valence and C 1s core states of 1-amino-2-propanol in the gas phase is presented. The experimental dichroic dispersions in the photoelectron kinetic energy are compared with theoretical calculations employing a multicentric basis set of B-spline functions and a Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian. In order to understand analogies and differences in the dichroism of structural isomers bearing the same functional groups, a comparison with previous PECD study of valence band of 2-amino-1-propanol is carried out.

  12. Laser cutting silicon-glass double layer wafer with laser induced thermal-crack propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yecheng; Yang, Lijun; Zhang, Hongzhi; Wang, Yang

    2016-07-01

    This study was aimed at introducing the laser induced thermal-crack propagation (LITP) technology to solve the silicon-glass double layer wafer dicing problems in the packaging procedure of silicon-glass device packaged by WLCSP technology, investigating the feasibility of this idea, and studying the crack propagation process of LITP cutting double layer wafer. In this paper, the physical process of the 1064 nm laser beam interact with the double layer wafer during the cutting process was studied theoretically. A mathematical model consists the volumetric heating source and the surface heating source has been established. The temperature and stress distribution was simulated by using finite element method (FEM) analysis software ABAQUS. The extended finite element method (XFEM) was added to the simulation as the supplementary features to simulate the crack propagation process and the crack propagation profile. The silicon-glass double layer wafer cutting verification experiment under typical parameters was conducted by using the 1064 nm semiconductor laser. The crack propagation profile on the fracture surface was examined by optical microscope and explained from the stress distribution and XFEM status. It was concluded that the quality of the finished fracture surface has been greatly improved, and the experiment results were well supported by the numerical simulation results.

  13. Study of the laser-induced forward transfer of liquids for laser bioprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duocastella, M.; Colina, M.; Fernández-Pradas, J. M.; Serra, P.; Morenza, J. L.

    2007-07-01

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a direct-writing technique that allows printing patterns of diverse materials with a high degree of spatial resolution. In conventional LIFT a small fraction of a solid thin film is vaporized by means of a laser pulse focused on the film through its transparent holder, and the resulting material recondenses on the receptor substrate. It has been recently shown that LIFT can also be used to transfer materials from liquid films. This widened its field of application to biosensors manufacturing, where small amounts of biomolecules-containing solutions have to be deposited with high precision on the sensing elements. However, there is still little knowledge on the physical processes and parameters determining the characteristics of the transfers. In this work, different parameters and their effects upon the transferred material were studied. It was found that the deposited material corresponds to liquid droplets which volume depends linearly on the laser pulse energy, and that a minimum threshold energy has to be overcome for transfer to occur. The liquid film thickness was varied and droplets as small as 10 μm in diameter were obtained. Finally, the effects of the variation of the film to substrate distance were also studied and it was found that there exists a wide range of distances where the morphology of the transferred droplets is independent of this parameter, what provides LIFT with a high degree of flexibility.

  14. LASER INDUCED SELECTIVE ACTIVATION UTILIZING AUTO-CATALYTIC ELECTROLESS PLATING ON POLYMER SURFACE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yang; Nielsen, Jakob Skov; Tang, Peter Torben

    2009-01-01

    . Characterization of the deposited copper layer was used to select and improve laser parameters. Several types of polymers with different melting points were used as substrate. Using the above mentioned laser treatment, standard grades of thermoplastic materials such as ABS, SAN, PE, PC and others have been......This paper presents a new method for selective micro metallization of polymers induced by laser. An Nd: YAG laser was employed to draw patterns on polymer surfaces using a special set-up. After subsequent activation and auto-catalytic electroless plating, copper only deposited on the laser tracks....... Induced by the laser, porous and rough structures are formed on the surface, which favours the palladium attachment during the activation step prior to the metallization. Laser focus detection, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and other instruments were used to analyze the topography of the laser track...

  15. Photoelectron photoion molecular beam spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trevor, D.J.

    1980-12-01

    The use of supersonic molecular beams in photoionization mass spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy to assist in the understanding of photoexcitation in the vacuum ultraviolet is described. Rotational relaxation and condensation due to supersonic expansion were shown to offer new possibilities for molecular photoionization studies. Molecular beam photoionization mass spectroscopy has been extended above 21 eV photon energy by the use of Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) facilities. Design considerations are discussed that have advanced the state-of-the-art in high resolution vuv photoelectron spectroscopy. To extend gas-phase studies to 160 eV photon energy, a windowless vuv-xuv beam line design is proposed.

  16. High resolution laser beam induced current images under trichromatic laser radiation: approximation to the solar irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas, F J; Alcántara, R; Fernández-Lorenzo, C; Martín-Calleja, J

    2010-03-01

    A laser beam induced current (LBIC) map of a photoactive surface is a very useful tool when it is necessary to study the spatial variability of properties such as photoconverter efficiency or factors connected with the recombination of carriers. Obtaining high spatial resolution LBIC maps involves irradiating the photoactive surface with a photonic beam with Gaussian power distribution and with a low dispersion coefficient. Laser emission fulfils these characteristics, but against it is the fact that it is highly monochromatic and therefore has a spectral distribution different to solar emissions. This work presents an instrumental system and procedure to obtain high spatial resolution LBIC maps in conditions approximating solar irradiation. The methodology developed consists of a trichromatic irradiation system based on three sources of laser excitation with emission in the red, green, and blue zones of the electromagnetic spectrum. The relative irradiation powers are determined by either solar spectrum distribution or Planck's emission formula which provides information approximate to the behavior of the system if it were under solar irradiation. In turn, an algorithm and a procedure have been developed to be able to form images based on the scans performed by the three lasers, providing information about the photoconverter efficiency of photovoltaic devices under the irradiation conditions used. This system has been checked with three photosensitive devices based on three different technologies: a commercial silicon photodiode, a commercial photoresistor, and a dye-sensitized solar cell. These devices make it possible to check how the superficial quantum efficiency has areas dependent upon the excitation wavelength while it has been possible to measure global incident photon-to-current efficiency values approximating those that would be obtained under irradiation conditions with sunlight.

  17. Pulse temporal compression by two-stage stimulated Brillouin scattering and laser-induced breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaohong; Wang, Yulei; Wang, Hongli; Bai, Zhenxu; Li, Sensen; Zhang, Hengkang; Wang, Yirui; He, Weiming; Lin, Dianyang; Lu, Zhiwei

    2017-06-01

    A laser pulse temporal compression technique combining stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and laser-induced breakdown (LIB) is proposed in which the leading edge of the laser pulse is compressed using SBS, and the low intensity trailing edge of the laser pulse is truncated by LIB. The feasibility of the proposed scheme is demonstrated by experiments in which a pulse duration of 8 ns is compressed to 170 ps. Higher compression ratios and higher efficiency are expected under optimal experimental conditions.

  18. Theoretical analysis for temperature dependence of laser- induced damage threshold of optical thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, K.; Motokoshi, S.; Somekawa, T.; Jitsuno, T.; Fujita, M.; Tanaka, KA; Azechi, H.

    2016-03-01

    The temperature dependence of the laser-induced damage threshold on optical coatings was studied in detail for laser pulses from 123 K to 473 K at different temperatures. The laser-induced damage threshold increased with decreasing temperatures when we tested long pulses (200 ps and 4 ns). The temperature dependence, however, was reversed for pulses shorter than a few picoseconds (100 fs testing). We propose a scaling model with a flowchart that includes three separate processes: free-electron generation, electron multiplication, and electron heating. Furthermore, we calculated the temperature dependence of laser-induced damage thresholds at different temperatures. Our calculation results agreed well with the experimental results.

  19. Optimally enhanced optical emission in laser-induced air plasma by femtosecond double-pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Anmin [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Institute of Theoretical Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Li, Suyu; Li, Shuchang; Jiang, Yuanfei; Ding, Dajun [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Shao, Junfeng; Wang, Tingfeng [State Key Laboratory of Laser Interaction with Matter, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China); Huang, Xuri [Institute of Theoretical Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Jin, Mingxing [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); State Key Laboratory of Laser Interaction with Matter, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China)

    2013-10-15

    In laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, a femtosecond double-pulse laser was used to induce air plasma. The plasma spectroscopy was observed to lead to significant increase of the intensity and reproducibility of the optical emission signal compared to femtosecond single-pulse laser. In particular, the optical emission intensity can be optimized by adjusting the delay time of femtosecond double-pulse. An appropriate pulse-to-pulse delay was selected, that was typically about 50 ps. This effect can be especially advantageous in the context of femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, plasma channel, and so on.

  20. Effect of Vacuum on the Laser-Induced Damage of Anti-Reflection Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LING Xiu-Lan; ZHAO Yuan-An; LI Da-Wei; ZHOU Ming; SHAO Jian-Da; FAN Zheng-Xiu

    2009-01-01

    In the comparison of damage modifications, absorption measurement and energy dispersive x-ray analysis, the effect of vacuum on the laser-induced damage of anti-reflection coatings is analyzed. It is found that vacuum decreases the laser-induced damage threshold of the films. The low laser-induced damage threshold in vacuum environments as opposed to air environments is attributed to water absorption and the formation of the O/Si,O/Zr sub-stoichiometry in the course of laser irradiation.

  1. Model of Laser-Induced Temperature Changes in Solid-State Optical Refrigerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    and amplifiers. Light-induced heating also plays a key role in laser ablation,10 photothermal therapy ,11–13 laser-induced damage of tissue, and... reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of

  2. Photoelectron Spectroscopy Study of Quinonimides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, Ekram; Deng, Shihu; Gozem, Samer; Krylov, Anna; Wang, Xue-Bin; Wenthold, Paul G.

    2017-08-16

    Structures and energetics of o-, m- and p-quinonimide anions (OC6H4N) and quinoniminyl radicals have been investigated by using negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy. Modeling of the photoelectron spectrum of the ortho isomer shows that the ground state of the anion is a triplet, while the quinoniminyl radical has a doublet ground state with a doublet-quartet splitting of 35.5 kcal/mol. The para radical has doublet ground state, but a band for a quartet state is missing from the photoelectron spectrum indicating that the anion has a singlet ground state, in contrast to previously reported calculations. The theoretical modeling is revisited here, and it is shown that accurate predictions for the electronic structure of the para quinonimide anion require both an accurate account of electron correlation and a sufficiently diffuse basis set. Electron affinities of o- and p-quinoniminyl radicals are measured to be 1.715 ± 0.010 and 1.675 ± 0.010 eV, respectively. The photoelectron spectrum of the m-quinonimide anion shows that the ion undergoes several different rearrangements, including a rearrangement to the energetically favorable para isomer. Such rearrangements preclude a meaningful analysis of the experimental spectrum.

  3. Polarization effects in femtosecond laser induced amorphization of monocrystalline silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Feng; Li, Hong-Jin; Huang, Yuan-Yuan; Fan, Wen-Zhong; Pan, Huai-Hai; Wang, Zhuo; Wang, Cheng-Wei; Qian, Jing; Li, Yang-Bo; Zhao, Quan-Zhong

    2016-10-01

    We have used femtosecond laser pulses to ablate monocrystalline silicon wafer. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis of ablation surface indicates horizontally polarized laser beam shows an enhancement in amorphization efficiency by a factor of 1.6-1.7 over the circularly polarized laser ablation. This demonstrates that one can tune the amorphization efficiency through the polarization of irradiation laser.

  4. Fast analysis of wood preservers using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhl, A.; Loebe, K.; Kreuchwig, L.

    2001-06-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is used for the investigation of wood preservers in timber and in furniture. Both experiments in laboratory and practical applications in recycling facilities and on a building site prove the new possibilities for the fast detection of harmful agents in wood. A commercial system was developed for mobile laser-plasma-analysis as well as for industrial use in sorting plants. The universal measuring principle in combination with an Echelle optics permits real simultaneous multi-element-analysis in the range of 200-780 nm with a resolution of a few picometers. It enables the user to detect main and trace elements in wood within a few seconds, nearly independent of the matrix, knowing that different kinds of wood show an equal elemental composition. Sample preparation is not required. The quantitative analysis of inorganic wood preservers (containing, e.g. Cu, Cr, B, As, Pb, Hg) has been performed exactly using carbon as reference element. It can be shown that the detection limits for heavy metals in wood are in the ppm-range. Additional information is given concerning the quantitative analysis. Statistical data, e.g. the standard deviation (S.D.), were determined and calibration curves were used for each particular element. A comparison between ICP-AES and LIBS is given using depth profile correction factors regarding the different penetration depths with respect to the different volumes in wood analyzed by both analytical methods.

  5. Theory of terahertz emission from femtosecond-laser-induced microplasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, I.; Nuter, R.; Bousquet, B.; Tikhonchuk, V.; Skupin, S.; Davoine, X.; Gremillet, L.; Bergé, L.

    2016-12-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of terahertz (THz) generation in laser-induced gas plasmas. The work is strongly motivated by recent experimental results on microplasmas, but our general findings are not limited to such a configuration. The electrons and ions are created by tunnel ionization of neutral atoms, and the resulting plasma is heated by collisions. Electrons are driven by electromagnetic, convective, and diffusive sources and produce a macroscopic current which is responsible for THz emission. The model naturally includes both ionization current and transition-Cherenkov mechanisms for THz emission, which are usually investigated separately in the literature. The latter mechanism is shown to dominate for single-color multicycle laser pulses, where the observed THz radiation originates from longitudinal electron currents. However, we find that the often discussed oscillations at the plasma frequency do not contribute to the THz emission spectrum. In order to predict the scaling of the conversion efficiency with pulse energy and focusing conditions, we propose a simplified description that is in excellent agreement with rigorous particle-in-cell simulations.

  6. Temporal behavior of laser induced elastic plate resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Laurent, Jérôme; Prada, Claire

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the dependence on Poisson's ratio of local plate resonances in low attenuating materials. In our experiments, these resonances are generated by a pulse laser source and detected with a heterodyne interferometer measuring surface displacement normal to the plate. The laser impact induces a set of resonances that are dominated by Zero Group Velocity (ZGV) Lamb modes. For some Poisson's ratio, thickness-shear resonances are also detected. These experiments confirm that the temporal decay of ZGV modes follows a $t^{-0.5}$ law and show that the temporal decay of the thickness resonances is much faster. Similar decays are obtained by numerical simulations achieved with a finite difference code. A simple model is proposed to describe the thickness resonances. It predicts that a thickness mode decays as $t^{-1.5}$ for large times and that the resonance amplitude is proportional to $D^{-1.5}$ where $D$ is the curvature of the dispersion curve $\\omega(k)$ at $k=0$. This curvature depends on the ...

  7. Liquids microprinting through laser-induced forward transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra, P. [Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: pserra@ub.edu; Duocastella, M.; Fernandez-Pradas, J.M.; Morenza, J.L. [Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-03-01

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a direct-writing technique which allows the deposition of tiny amounts of material from a donor thin film onto a receptor substrate. When LIFT is applied to liquid donor films, the laser radiation affects only a localized fraction of the liquid, thereby impelling the unaffected portion towards the receptor substrate. Thus, transfer takes place with no melting or vaporization of the deposited fraction and, in this way, LIFT can be used to successfully print complex materials like inorganic inks and pastes, biomolecules in solution, and even living cells and microorganisms. In addition, and for a wide range of liquid rheologies, the material can be deposited in the form of circular microdroplets; this provides LIFT with a high degree of spatial resolution leading to feature sizes below 10 {mu}m, and making it competitive in front of conventional printing techniques. In this work, a revision of the main achievements of the LIFT of liquids is carried out, correlating the morphological characteristics of the generated features with the results of the study of the transfer process. Special emphasis is put on the characterization of the dynamics of liquid ejection, which has provided valuable information for the understanding of microdroplets deposition. Thus, new time-resolved imaging analyses have shown a material release behavior which contrasts with most of the previously made assumptions, and that allows clarifying some of the questions open during the study of the LIFT technique.

  8. Liquids microprinting through laser-induced forward transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, P.; Duocastella, M.; Fernández-Pradas, J. M.; Morenza, J. L.

    2009-03-01

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a direct-writing technique which allows the deposition of tiny amounts of material from a donor thin film onto a receptor substrate. When LIFT is applied to liquid donor films, the laser radiation affects only a localized fraction of the liquid, thereby impelling the unaffected portion towards the receptor substrate. Thus, transfer takes place with no melting or vaporization of the deposited fraction and, in this way, LIFT can be used to successfully print complex materials like inorganic inks and pastes, biomolecules in solution, and even living cells and microorganisms. In addition, and for a wide range of liquid rheologies, the material can be deposited in the form of circular microdroplets; this provides LIFT with a high degree of spatial resolution leading to feature sizes below 10 μm, and making it competitive in front of conventional printing techniques. In this work, a revision of the main achievements of the LIFT of liquids is carried out, correlating the morphological characteristics of the generated features with the results of the study of the transfer process. Special emphasis is put on the characterization of the dynamics of liquid ejection, which has provided valuable information for the understanding of microdroplets deposition. Thus, new time-resolved imaging analyses have shown a material release behavior which contrasts with most of the previously made assumptions, and that allows clarifying some of the questions open during the study of the LIFT technique.

  9. Analysis of human nails by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinimakarem, Zahra; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan

    2011-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is applied to analyze human fingernails using nanosecond laser pulses. Measurements on 45 nail samples are carried out and 14 key species are identified. The elements detected with the present system are: Al, C, Ca, Fe, H, K, Mg, N, Na, O, Si, Sr, Ti as well as CN molecule. Sixty three emission lines have been identified in the spectrum that are dominated by calcium lines. A discriminant function analysis is used to discriminate among different genders and age groups. This analysis demonstrates efficient discrimination among these groups. The mean concentration of each element is compared between different groups. Correlation between concentrations of elements in fingernails is calculated. A strong correlation is found between sodium and potassium while calcium and magnesium levels are inversely correlated. A case report on high levels of sodium and potassium in patients with hyperthyroidism is presented. It is shown that LIBS could be a promising technique for the analysis of nails and therefore identification of health problems.

  10. Laser-induced Forward Transfer of Ag Nanopaste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breckenfeld, Eric; Kim, Heungsoo; Auyeung, Raymond C Y; Piqué, Alberto

    2016-03-31

    Over the past decade, there has been much development of non-lithographic methods(1-3) for printing metallic inks or other functional materials. Many of these processes such as inkjet(3) and laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT)(4) have become increasingly popular as interest in printable electronics and maskless patterning has grown. These additive manufacturing processes are inexpensive, environmentally friendly, and well suited for rapid prototyping, when compared to more traditional semiconductor processing techniques. While most direct-write processes are confined to two-dimensional structures and cannot handle materials with high viscosity (particularly inkjet), LIFT can transcend both constraints if performed properly. Congruent transfer of three dimensional pixels (called voxels), also referred to as laser decal transfer (LDT)(5-9), has recently been demonstrated with the LIFT technique using highly viscous Ag nanopastes to fabricate freestanding interconnects, complex voxel shapes, and high-aspect-ratio structures. In this paper, we demonstrate a simple yet versatile process for fabricating a variety of micro- and macroscale Ag structures. Structures include simple shapes for patterning electrical contacts, bridging and cantilever structures, high-aspect-ratio structures, and single-shot, large area transfers using a commercial digital micromirror device (DMD) chip.

  11. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for polymer identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grégoire, Sylvain; Boudinet, Marjorie; Pelascini, Frédéric; Surma, Fabrice; Detalle, Vincent; Holl, Yves

    2011-07-01

    This study aims at differentiating several organic materials, particularly polymers, by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. The goal is to apply this technique to the fields of polymer recycling and cultural heritage conservation. We worked with some usual polymers families: polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), polyoxymethylene, (POM), poly(vinyl chloride), polytetrafluoroethylene, polyoxyethylene (POE), and polyamide for the aliphatic ones, and poly(butylene terephthalate), acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene, polystyrene, and polycarbonate for the aromatic ones. The fourth harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser (266 nm) in ambient air at atmospheric pressure was used. A careful analysis of the C(2) Swan system (0,0) band in polymers containing no C-C (POM), few C-C (POE), or aromatic C-C linkages led us to the conclusion that the C(2) signal might be native, i.e., the result of direct ablation from the sample. With use of these results, aliphatic and aromatic polymers could be differentiated. Further data treatments, such as properly chosen line ratios, principal component analysis, and partial least squares regression, were evaluated. It was shown that many polymers could be separated, including PE and PP, despite their similar chemical structures.

  12. Unsupervised verification of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy dataset clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcik, Michał R.; Zdunek, Rafał; Antończak, Arkadiusz J.

    2016-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is a versatile, optical technique used in a wide range of qualitative and quantitative analyses conducted with the use of various chemometric techniques. The aim of this research is to demonstrate the possibility of unsupervised clustering of an unknown dataset using K-means clustering algorithm, and verifying its input parameters through investigating generalized eigenvalues derived with linear discriminant analysis. In all the cases, principal component analyses have been applied to reduce data dimensionality and shorten computation time of the whole operation. The experiment was conducted on a dataset collected from twenty four different materials divided into six groups: metals, semiconductors, ceramics, rocks, metal alloys and others with the use of a three-channel spectrometer (298.02-628.73nm overall spectral range) and a UV (248nm) excimer laser. Additionally, two more complex groups containing all specimens and all specimens excluding rocks were created. The resulting spaces of eigenvalues were calculated for every group and three different distances in the multidimensional space (cosine, square Euclidean and L1). As expected, the correct numbers of specimens within groups with small deviations were obtained, and the validity of the unsupervised method has thus been proven.

  13. Discrimination of forensic trace evidence using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Candice Mae

    Elemental analysis in forensic laboratories can be tedious and many trace evidence items are not analyzed to determine their elemental composition. Presently, scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) is the primary analytical tool for determining the elemental composition of trace evidence items. However, due to the time it takes to obtain the required vacuum and the limited number of samples that can be analyzed at any one time, SEM-EDS can be impractical for a high volume of evidence items. An alternative instrument that can be used for this type of analysis is laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). While LA-ICP-MS is a very precise and quantitative analytical method that determines elemental composition based on isotopic mass measurements; however, the instrumentation is relatively expensive and therefore is budgetarily prohibitive for many forensic laboratories. It is the purpose of this research to evaluate an inexpensive instrument that can potentially provide rapid elemental analysis for many forensic laboratories. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an analytical method that meets these requirements and offers information about the elemental composition based on ionic, atomic and diatomic molecular emissions.

  14. Characteristics of Ions Emitted from Laser-Induced Silver Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. S. RAFIQUE; M. KHALEEQ-UR-RAHMAN; Shakoor MUNAZZA; K. A. BHATTI

    2008-01-01

    In this work, study of laser-induced ions is presented. The plasma was produced by focusing a Nd:YAG laser, with a wavelength of 1064 nm, a pulsed width of 9~14 ns, a power of 1.1 MW and energy of 10 mJ, on silver target in vacuum (10'-3> Torr = 1.3332 Pa). The charac-teristics of ion streams were investigated by CR-39 detectors located at angles of 0°, 30°, 60° and 90° with respect to normal of the target. The distance between the silver target and each detector was 11 cm. The energy of silver ions was found ranging from 1.5 eV to 1.06E4 eV. There was a high concentration of ions with low energy as compared to those with high energy, showing the energy distribution amongst the ions. The flux of ions was maximum in the axial direction which was decreasing with the angle increase with respect to normal of the target, and finally became minimum in the radial direction. Hence the silver ions have shown anisotropic behaviour.

  15. Hyperspectral laser-induced autofluorescence imaging of dental caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürmen, Miran; Fidler, Aleš; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2012-01-01

    Dental caries is a disease characterized by demineralization of enamel crystals leading to the penetration of bacteria into the dentine and pulp. Early detection of enamel demineralization resulting in increased enamel porosity, commonly known as white spots, is a difficult diagnostic task. Laser induced autofluorescence was shown to be a useful method for early detection of demineralization. The existing studies involved either a single point spectroscopic measurements or imaging at a single spectral band. In the case of spectroscopic measurements, very little or no spatial information is acquired and the measured autofluorescence signal strongly depends on the position and orientation of the probe. On the other hand, single-band spectral imaging can be substantially affected by local spectral artefacts. Such effects can significantly interfere with automated methods for detection of early caries lesions. In contrast, hyperspectral imaging effectively combines the spatial information of imaging methods with the spectral information of spectroscopic methods providing excellent basis for development of robust and reliable algorithms for automated classification and analysis of hard dental tissues. In this paper, we employ 405 nm laser excitation of natural caries lesions. The fluorescence signal is acquired by a state-of-the-art hyperspectral imaging system consisting of a high-resolution acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) and a highly sensitive Scientific CMOS camera in the spectral range from 550 nm to 800 nm. The results are compared to the contrast obtained by near-infrared hyperspectral imaging technique employed in the existing studies on early detection of dental caries.

  16. Optimization of an Image-Guided Laser-Induced Choroidal Neovascularization Model in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Gong

    Full Text Available The mouse model of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV has been used in studies of the exudative form of age-related macular degeneration using both the conventional slit lamp and a new image-guided laser system. A standardized protocol is needed for consistent results using this model, which has been lacking. We optimized details of laser-induced CNV using the image-guided laser photocoagulation system. Four lesions with similar size were consistently applied per eye at approximately double the disc diameter away from the optic nerve, using different laser power levels, and mice of various ages and genders. After 7 days, the mice were sacrificed and retinal pigment epithelium/choroid/sclera was flat-mounted, stained with Isolectin B4, and imaged. Quantification of the area of the laser-induced lesions was performed using an established and constant threshold. Exclusion criteria are described that were necessary for reliable data analysis of the laser-induced CNV lesions. The CNV lesion area was proportional to the laser power levels. Mice at 12-16 weeks of age developed more severe CNV than those at 6-8 weeks of age, and the gender difference was only significant in mice at 12-16 weeks of age, but not in those at 6-8 weeks of age. Dietary intake of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid reduced laser-induced CNV in mice. Taken together, laser-induced CNV lesions can be easily and consistently applied using the image-guided laser platform. Mice at 6-8 weeks of age are ideal for the laser-induced CNV model.

  17. Prediction of absorption coefficients by pulsed laser induced photoacoustic measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priya, Mallika; Satish Rao, B S; Ray, Satadru; Mahato, K K

    2014-06-05

    In the current study, a pulsed laser induced photoacoustic spectroscopy setup was designed and developed, aiming its application in clinical diagnostics. The setup was optimized with carbon black samples in water and with various tryptophan concentrations at 281nm excitations. The sensitivity of the setup was estimated by determining minimum detectable concentration of tryptophan in water at the same excitation, and was found to be 0.035mM. The photoacoustic experiments were also performed with various tryptophan concentrations at 281nm excitation for predicting optical absorption coefficients in them and for comparing the outcomes with the spectrophotometrically-determined absorption coefficients for the same samples. Absorption coefficients for a few serum samples, obtained from some healthy female volunteers, were also determined through photoacoustic and spectrophotometric measurements at the same excitations, which showed good agreement between them, indicating its clinical implications.

  18. A Spectral Analysis of Laser Induced Fluorescence of Iodine

    CERN Document Server

    Bayram, S B

    2015-01-01

    When optically excited, iodine absorbs in the 490- to 650-nm visible region of the spectrum and, after radiative relaxation, it displays an emission spectrum of discrete vibrational bands at moderate resolution. This makes laser-induced fuorescence spectrum of molecular iodine especially suitable to study the energy structure of homonuclear diatomic molecules at room temperature. In this spirit, we present a rather straightforward and inexpensive experimental setup and the associated spectral analysis which provides an excellent exercise of applied quantum mechanics fit for advanced laboratory courses. The students would be required to assign spectral lines, fill a Deslandres table, process the data to estimate the harmonic and anharmonic characteristics of the ground vibronic state involved in the radiative transitions, and thenceforth calculate a set of molecular constants and discuss a model of molecular vibrator.

  19. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Noll, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive source of the fundamentals, process parameters, instrumental components and applications of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The effect of multiple pulses on material ablation, plasma dynamics and plasma emission is presented. A heuristic plasma modeling allows to simulate complex experimental plasma spectra. These methods and findings form the basis for a variety of applications to perform quantitative multi-element analysis with LIBS. These application potentials of LIBS have really boosted in the last years ranging from bulk analysis of metallic alloys and non-conducting materials, via spatially resolved analysis and depth profiling covering measuring objects in all physical states: gaseous, liquid and solid. Dedicated chapters present LIBS investigations for these tasks with special emphasis on the methodical and instrumental concepts as well as the optimization strategies for a quantitative analysis. Requirements, concepts, design and characteristic features of LI...

  20. Quantitative analysis of gallstones using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vivek K; Singh, Vinita; Rai, Awadhesh K; Thakur, Surya N; Rai, Pradeep K; Singh, Jagdish P

    2008-11-01

    The utility of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for categorizing different types of gallbladder stone has been demonstrated by analyzing their major and minor constituents. LIBS spectra of three types of gallstone have been recorded in the 200-900 nm spectral region. Calcium is found to be the major element in all types of gallbladder stone. The spectrophotometric method has been used to classify the stones. A calibration-free LIBS method has been used for the quantitative analysis of metal elements, and the results have been compared with those obtained from inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) measurements. The single-shot LIBS spectra from different points on the cross section (in steps of 0.5 mm from one end to the other) of gallstones have also been recorded to study the variation of constituents from the center to the surface. The presence of different metal elements and their possible role in gallstone formation is discussed.

  1. Elemental Analysis of Soils by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondal, Mohammed Ashraf; Dastageer, Mohamed A.

    The chemical and elemental composition of soil is very complex as it contains many constituents like minerals, organic matters, living organisms, fossils, air and water. Considering the diversity of soil contents, quality and usability, a systematic scientific study on the elemental and chemical composition of soil is very important. In order to study the chemical composition of soil, Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied recently. The important features of LIBS system and its applications for the measurement of nutrients in green house soil, on-line monitoring of remediation process of chromium polluted soil, determination of trace elements in volcanic erupted soil samples collected from ancient cenozoic lava eruption sites and detection of toxic metals in Gulf war oil spill contaminated soil using LIBS are described in this chapter.

  2. Dynamic response of shear thickening fluid under laser induced shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xianqian; Zhong, Fachun; Yin, Qiuyun; Huang, Chenguang

    2015-02-01

    The dynamic response of the 57 vol./vol. % dense spherical silica particle-polyethylene glycol suspension at high pressure was investigated through short pulsed laser induced shock experiments. The measured back free surface velocities by a photonic Doppler velocimetry showed that the shock and the particle velocities decreased while the shock wave transmitted in the shear thickening fluid (STF), from which an equation of state for the STF was obtained. In addition, the peak stress decreased and the absorbed energy increased rapidly with increasing the thickness for a thin layer of the STF, which should be attributed to the impact-jammed behavior through compression of particle matrix, the deformation or crack of the hard-sphere particles, and the volume compression of the particles and the polyethylene glycol.

  3. Thomson scattering from laser induced plasma in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzierzega, K; Mendys, A [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, ul. Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Pellerin, S; Thouin, E [GREMI - site de Bourges, Universite d' Orleans, rue Gaston Berger BP 4043, 18028 Bourges (France); Travaille, G; Bousquet, B; Canioni, L [Centre de Physique Moleculaire Optique et Hertzienne, Universite Bordeaux I, 351 Cours de la Liberation, 33405 Talence CEDEX (France); Pokrzywka, B, E-mail: krzysztof.dzierzega@uj.edu.p [Mt. Suhora Observatory, Pedagogical University of Cracow, ul. Podchorazych 2, 30-084 Krakow (Poland)

    2010-05-01

    The laser induced plasma in air produced by 6 ns, 532 nm Nd:YAG pulses with 25 mJ energy was studied using the Thomson scattering method and plasma imaging techniques. Plasma images and Thomson scattered spectra were registered at delay times ranging from 150 ns to 1 {mu}s after the breakdown pulses. The electron density and temperature, as determined in the core of the plasma plume, were found to decrease from 7.4 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} to about 1.03 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} and from 100 900 K to 22 700 K. The highly elevated electron temperatures are the result of plasma heating by the second, probe pulse in the Thomson scattering experiments.

  4. Analytical study of seashell using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, LI; Yanhong, GU; Ying, Zhang; Yuandong, LI; Yuan, LU

    2017-02-01

    Seashell has been applied as an indicator for ocean research and element analysis of the seashell is used to track biological or environmental evolution. In this work, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was applied for elementary analysis of an ezo scallop-shell, and a graphite enrichment method was used as the assistance. It was found that LIBS signal intensity of Ca fluctuated less than 5%, in spite of the sampling positions, and Sr/Ca was related to the shell growth. A similar variation was also found when using a direct LIBS analysis on the shell surface, and it might be more practicable to track shell growth by investigating Sr/Ca ratio with Sr ionic line at 421.6 nm. The obtained results prove that calcium (Ca) is qualified as an internal reference for shell analysis, and LIBS is a potential analytical method for seashell study.

  5. Novel Applications of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Amy J Ray; Buckley, Steven G

    2017-04-01

    The goal of this review article is to provide a description of recent and novel laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) applications and developments, especially those discussed during the NASLIBS Conference, held during SciX in Providence, RI, in September 2015. This topic was selected in view of the numerous recent overall review papers that have successfully given a broad view of the current understanding of laser-material interactions and plasma development and have also discussed the wide landscape of analytical applications of LIBS. This paper is divided into sections that focus on a few of the many applications under development in the LIBS community. We provide a summary of updates to calibration-free LIBS (CF-LIBS) and associated developments using plasma characteristics to improve quantification in LIBS output, both in a dedicated section and as applications are discussed. We have also described the most recent publications studying the sources, generation, and use of molecular features in LIBS, including those naturally present in the spectra of organic materials, and those induced with the addition of salts to enable the measurement of halogens, not typically present in LIBS signals. In terms of development of applications of LIBS, we focused on the use of LIBS for indirect measurements such as pH and degree of humification in soil and heating value in coal. We also reviewed the extant literature on LIBS analysis of agricultural materials, coal, minerals, and metals. Finally, we discuss the nascent developments of spatially heterodyne spectroscopy, a method that seeks to circumnavigate a serious drawback of most spectrometers - very small optical throughput - through the use of interferometers.

  6. Diode-Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of an Optically Thick Plasma in Combination with Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nomura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Distortion of laser-induced fluorescence profiles attributable to optical absorption and saturation broadening was corrected in combination with laser absorption spectroscopy in argon plasma flow. At high probe-laser intensity, saturated absorption profiles were measured to correct probe-laser absorption. At low laser intensity, nonsaturated absorption profiles were measured to correct fluorescence reabsorption. Saturation broadening at the measurement point was corrected using a ratio of saturated to non-saturated broadening. Observed LIF broadening and corresponding translational temperature without correction were, respectively, 2.20±0.05 GHz and 2510±100 K and corrected broadening and temperature were, respectively, 1.96±0.07 GHz and 1990±150 K. Although this correction is applicable only at the center of symmetry, the deduced temperature agreed well with that obtained by LAS with Abel inversion.

  7. Model system for investigating laser-induced subcellular microeffects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huettmann, Gereon; Serbin, Jesper; Radt, Benno; Lange, Bjoern I.; Birngruber, Reginald

    2001-07-01

    Background: Laser induced protein denaturation is of fundamental interest for understanding the mechanisms of laser tissue interaction. Conjugates of nanoabsorbers coupled to proteins are presented as a model system for investigating ultrafast protein denaturation. Irradiation of the conjugates using repetitive picosecond laser pulses, which are only absorbed by the nanoabsorbers, could result in effects with a spatial confinement of less than 100 nm. Materials and Methods: Experiments were done with bovine intestinal alkaline phosphates (aP) coupled to 15 nm colloidal gold. This complex was irradiated at 527 nm wavelength and 35 ps pulse width with a varying number of pulses ranging form one up to 104. The radiant exposure per pulse was varied form 2 mJ/cm2 to 50 mJ/cm2. Denaturation was detected as a loss of protein function with the help of the fluorescence substrate 4MUP. Results and discussion: Irradiation did result in a steady decrease of the aP activity with increasing radiant exposures and increasing number of pulses. A maximal inactivation of 80% was reached with 104 pulses and 50 mJ/cm2 per pulse. The temperature in the particles and the surrounding water was calculated using Mie's formulas for the absorption of the nanometer gold particles and ana analytical solution of the equations for heat diffusion. With 50 mJ/cm2, the particles are heated above the melting point of gold. Since the temperature calculations strongly depend on changes in the state of matter of the particles and water, a very sophisticated thermal model is necessary to calculate exact temperatures. It is difficult to identify one of the possible mechanisms, thermal denaturation, photochemical denaturation or formation of micro bubbles from the dependance of the inactivation on pulse energy and number of applied pulses. Therefore, experiments are needed to further elucidate the damage mechanisms. In conclusion, denaturing proteins irreversibly via nanoabsorbers using picosecond laser

  8. Laser induced x-ray `RADAR' particle physics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockley, D.; Deas, R.; Moss, R.; Wilson, L. A.; Rusby, D.; Neely, D.

    2016-05-01

    The technique of high-power laser-induced plasma acceleration can be used to generate a variety of diverse effects including the emission of X-rays, electrons, neutrons, protons and radio-frequency radiation. A compact variable source of this nature could support a wide range of potential applications including single-sided through-barrier imaging, cargo and vehicle screening, infrastructure inspection, oncology and structural failure analysis. This paper presents a verified particle physics simulation which replicates recent results from experiments conducted at the Central Laser Facility at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), Didcot, UK. The RAL experiment demonstrated the generation of backscattered X-rays from test objects via the bremsstrahlung of an incident electron beam, the electron beam itself being produced by Laser Wakefield Acceleration. A key initial objective of the computer simulation was to inform the experimental planning phase on the predicted magnitude of the backscattered X-rays likely from the test objects. This objective was achieved and the computer simulation was used to show the viability of the proposed concept (Laser-induced X-ray `RADAR'). At the more advanced stages of the experimental planning phase, the simulation was used to gain critical knowledge of where it would be technically feasible to locate key diagnostic equipment within the experiment. The experiment successfully demonstrated the concept of X-ray `RADAR' imaging, achieved by using the accurate timing information of the backscattered X-rays relative to the ultra-short laser pulse used to generate the electron beam. By using fast response X-ray detectors it was possible to derive range information for the test objects being scanned. An X-ray radar `image' (equivalent to a RADAR B-scan slice) was produced by combining individual X-ray temporal profiles collected at different points along a horizontal distance line scan. The same image formation process was used to generate

  9. Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Alex M; Wittrig, Ashley R; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2012-01-01

    Large thermally labile molecules were not amenable to mass spectrometric analysis until the development of atmospheric pressure evaporation/ionization methods, such as electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI), since attempts to evaporate these molecules by heating induces degradation of the sample. While ESI and MALDI are relatively soft desorption/ionization techniques, they are both limited to preferential ionization of acidic and basic analytes. This limitation has been the driving force for the development of other soft desorption/ionization techniques. One such method employs laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) to evaporate neutral sample molecules into mass spectrometers. LIAD utilizes acoustic waves generated by a laser pulse in a thin metal foil. The acoustic waves travel through the foil and cause desorption of neutral molecules that have been deposited on the opposite side of the foil. One of the advantages of LIAD is that it desorbs low-energy molecules that can be ionized by a variety of methods, thus allowing the analysis of large molecules that are not amenable to ESI and MALDI. This review covers the generation of acoustic waves in foils via a laser pulse, the parameters affecting the generation of acoustic waves, possible mechanisms for desorption of neutral molecules, as well as the various uses of LIAD by mass spectrometrists. The conditions used to generate acoustic or stress waves in solid materials consist of three regimes: thermal, ablative, and constrained. Each regime is discussed, in addition to the mechanisms that lead to the ablation of the metal from the foil and generation of acoustic waves for two of the regimes. Previously proposed desorption mechanisms for LIAD are presented along with the flaws associated with some of them. Various experimental parameters, such as the exact characteristics of the laser pulse and foil used, are discussed. The internal and kinetic energy of the neutral

  10. Investigation of the Periodic Microstructure Induced by a 355 nm UV Polarized Laser on a Polyimide Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李梅; 路庆华; 印杰; 罗售余; 王宗光

    2002-01-01

    We investigate a periodic microstructure induced by a 355 nm ultraviolet polarized laser on a polyimide surface and the dependence of the structures on laser parameters. Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) of sub-micrometre size were generated on three kinds of polyimide films by a polarized Nd:YAG laser of 355nm within a wide range of laser fluence. The chemical structure of the polyimide, the film-making process, the number of laser pulses and the laser fluence greatly influenced the formation of LIPSS. The periodicity of LIPSS was decided by the wavelength, the incidence angle of the laser beam and the apparent refractive index of the material.

  11. Laser induced forward transfer of metals by temporally shaped femtosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klini, A; Loukakos, P A; Gray, D; Manousaki, A; Fotakis, C

    2008-07-21

    Temporally shaped, femtosecond laser pulses have been used for controlling the size and the morphology of micron-sized metallic structures obtained by using the Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) technique. We report the effect of pulse shaping on the size and morphology of the deposited structures of Au, Zn, Cr on a function of the pulse separation time ??t (from 0 to 10 ps) of double pulses of variable intensities generated by using a liquid crystal spatial light modulator (SLM). The observed differences in size and morphology are correlated with the outcome of pump-probe experiments for the study of electron-phonon scattering dynamics and subsequent energy transfer processes to the bulk in the different metals employed. We propose that in metals with weak electron-lattice coupling, the electron ballistic motion and the resulting fast electron scattering at the film surface, as well as the internal electron thermalization process are crucial to the morphology and size of the transferred material. Therefore, temporal shaping within the corresponding time scales of these processes may be used for tailoring the features of the metallic structures obtained by LIFT.

  12. High fluence laser irradiation induces reactive oxygen species generation in human lung adenocarcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Xing, Da; Chen, Tong-Sheng

    2006-09-01

    Low-power laser irradiation (LPLI) has been used for therapies such as curing spinal cord injury, healing wound et al. Yet, the mechanism of LPLI remains unclear. Our previous study showed that low fluences laser irradiation induces human lung adenocarcinoma cells (ASTC-a-1) proliferation, but high fluences induced apoptosis and caspase-3 activation. In order to study the mechanism of apoptosis induced by high fluences LPLI further, we have measured the dynamics of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) using H IIDCFDA fluorescence probes during this process. ASTC-a-1 cells apoptosis was induced by He-Ne laser irradiation at high fluence of 120J/cm2. A confocal laser scanning microscope was used to perform fluorescence imaging. The results demonstrated that high fluence LPLI induced the increase of mitochondria ROS. Our studies contribute to clarify the biological mechanism of high fluence LPLI-induced cell apoptosis.

  13. Ionization Induced Scattering of Femtosecond Intense Laser Pulses in Cluster Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xiangxin; Wang Cheng; Liu Jiansheng; Li Shaohui; Ni Guoquan

    2005-01-01

    The 45° scattering of a femtosecond (60 fs) intense laser pulse with a 20 nm FWHM (the full width at half maximum) spectrum centered at 790 nm has been studied experimentally while focused in argon clusters at intensity ~ 1016 W/cra2. Scattering spectra under different backing pressures and laser-plasma interaction lengths were obtained, which showed spectral blueshifting, beam refraction and complex modulation. These ionization-induced effects reveal the modulation of laser pulses propagating in plasmas and the existing obstacle in laser cluster interaction at high laser intensity and high electron density.

  14. Topological evolution of self-induced silicon nanogratings during prolonged femtosecond laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golosov, E.V.; Kolobov, Y.R. [Belgorod State University, Belgorod (Russian Federation); Ionin, A.A.; Kudryashov, S.I.; Novoselov, Y.N.; Seleznev, L.V.; Sinitsyn, D.V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ligachev, A.E. [A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Makarov, S.V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University, MEPHI, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-08-15

    Gradual evolution of self-induced silicon surface topology from one-dimensional ridge-like to two-dimensional spike-like nanogratings and then to isotropic sets of micro-columns was observed by evenly increasing IR and UV femtosecond laser irradiation dose. This topological evolution exhibits clear indications of consequent melting and vaporization processes being set up during the prolonged laser irradiation. Monotonously decreasing cumulative IR and UV femtosecond laser-nanostructuring thresholds may indicate an increase of optical absorbance of the laser-nanostructured silicon surfaces versus the increasing laser dose, consistent with the consequent onset of the abovementioned thermal modification processes. (orig.)

  15. Ripple polystyrene nano-pattern induced by KrF laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Slepicka

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The study of excimer laser treatment of polystyrene surface was performed. The influence of laser fluence and number of laser pulses on surface chemistry and morphology was determined. The surface morphology and roughness were studied with atomic force microscopy. Surface wettability and aging studies were characterized by the water contact angle measurements. Surface oxygen concentration and chemistry were evaluated from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and zeta potential measurements. The optimal polystyrene treatment parameters for the most regular pattern were determined. The foils with optimal ripple pattern were subsequently sputtered with gold nano-layers of 100 nm thickness. It was found that the surface roughness of PS strongly depends on number of pulses. The aging study revealed that the higher contact angle achieve the samples treated with higher laser fluence. The deposition of gold nano-layer increases the surface roughness of nano-patterned surface. It was proved that the oxygen concentration is significantly influenced by the KrF laser exposure.

  16. Laser-induced synthesis and decay of Tritium under exposure of solid targets in heavy water

    CERN Document Server

    Barmina, E V; Timashev, S F; Shafeev, G A

    2013-01-01

    The processes of laser-assisted synthesis of Tritium nuclei and their laser-induced decay in cold plasma in the vicinity of solid targets (Au, Ti, Se, etc.) immersed into heavy water are experimentally realized at peak laser intensity of 10E10-10E13 Watts per square centimeter. Initial stages of Tritium synthesis and their laser-induced beta-decay are interpreted on the basis of non-elastic interaction of plasma electrons having kinetic energy of 5-10 eV with nuclei of Deuterium and Tritium, respectively.

  17. Enhanced acceleration of injected electrons in a laser-beat-wave-induced plasma channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochitsky, S Ya; Narang, R; Filip, C V; Musumeci, P; Clayton, C E; Yoder, R B; Marsh, K A; Rosenzweig, J B; Pellegrini, C; Joshi, C

    2004-03-05

    Enhanced energy gain of externally injected electrons by a approximately 3 cm long, high-gradient relativistic plasma wave (RPW) is demonstrated. Using a CO2 laser beat wave of duration longer than the ion motion time across the laser spot size, a laser self-guiding process is initiated in a plasma channel. Guiding compensates for ionization-induced defocusing (IID) creating a longer plasma, which extends the interaction length between electrons and the RPW. In contrast to a maximum energy gain of 10 MeV when IID is dominant, the electrons gain up to 38 MeV energy in a laser-beat-wave-induced plasma channel.

  18. Fabrication of laser induced periodic surface structure for geometrical engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsutsumi, Naoto [Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Matsugasaki, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)], E-mail: tsutsumi@kit.jp; Fujihara, Arata; Nagata, Kazuya [Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Matsugasaki, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)

    2008-12-31

    The paper presents the highly ordered geometrical structures of laser induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) in azobenzene urethane polymer (DR19 polymer) from 4-(N,N-dihydroxyethylamino)-4'-nitroazobenzene (Disperse red 19) with tolylene-2,4-diisocyanate (TDI). One or two regulated striped LIPSS was formed in confined spaces between surface relief gratings (SRG) induced by the s-polarized interfered beams. The pitch of LIPSS was one-half or one-third of SRG pitch. Standing wave with some selected mode between SRG in the surface waveguide is responsible for the formation of the regulated striped LIPSS. The crossed illumination of the interfered beams showed the waffle-like structure for s-polarization beam and the egg crate-like (ECL) structure for p-polarized beam. Photoinduced microscopic molecular ordering was also investigated. The linear polarized beam gave the large optical anisotropy in the polymer and the circularly polarized beam produced the chiral structure. The circular dichroism spectra showed the sharp peak due to the circular Bragg reflection from which the chiral pitch was evaluated.

  19. Externally induced continuous variable entanglement in a correlated emission laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesfa, Sintayehu [Physics Department, Addis Ababa University, PO Box 1176, Addis Ababa (Ethiopia)], E-mail: sint_tesfa@yahoo.com

    2008-07-28

    Analysis of the externally induced quantum features of the cavity radiation of the two-photon correlated emission laser is presented. It turns out that the pumping process induces atomic coherence accountable for observing entanglement in the cavity radiation as well as the nonclassical photon number correlation despite the arising vacuum fluctuations. Even though a significant continuous variable entanglement is obtained near threshold in the strong driving limit, increasing the amplitude of the driving radiation more than required for a fixed value of the linear gain coefficient is found to degrade the degree of entanglement. The two-mode squeezing of the superimposed radiation, entanglement of the cavity radiation and mean number of photon pairs increase with the rate at which the atoms are injected into the cavity, but the nonclassical photon number correlation decreases. Moreover, the mean photon number corresponding to the transition from the upper energy level to the intermediate is found to be greater than the transition from the intermediate to the lower. With conceivable practical challenges, it is in principle possible to generate an intense continuous variable entanglement and quantify it via photon count measurements.

  20. Laser-noise-induced correlations and anti-correlations in Electromagnetically Induced Transparency

    CERN Document Server

    Cruz, L S; Gómez, J G A; Lezama, A; Martinelliinst1, M; Nussenzveig, P; Valente, P

    2006-01-01

    High degrees of intensity correlation between two independent lasers were observed after propagation through a rubidium vapor cell in which they generate Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT). As the optical field intensities are increased, the correlation changes sign (becoming anti-correlation). The experiment was performed in a room temperature rubidium cell, using two diode lasers tuned to the $^{85}$Rb $D_2$ line ($\\lambda = 780$nm). The cross-correlation spectral function for the pump and probe fields is numerically obtained by modeling the temporal dynamics of both field phases as diffusing processes. We explored the dependence of the atomic response on the atom-field Rabi frequencies, optical detuning and Doppler width. The results show that resonant phase-noise to amplitude-noise conversion is at the origin of the observed signal and the change in sign for the correlation coefficient can be explained as a consequence of the competition between EIT and Raman resonance processes.

  1. Criteria for the observation of strong-field photoelectron holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchenko, T. [UPMC Universite Paris 06, CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matiere et Rayonnement, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, F-75005 Paris (France); Huismans, Y. [FOM-Institute AMOLF, Science Park 113, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schafer, K. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 (United States); Vrakking, M. J. J. [FOM-Institute AMOLF, Science Park 113, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Max-Born-Institut, Max Born Strasse 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    Photoelectron holography is studied experimentally and computationally using the ionization of ground-state xenon atoms by intense near-infrared radiation. A strong dependence of the occurrence of the holographic pattern on the laser wavelength and intensity is observed, and it is shown that the observation of the hologram requires that the ponderomotive energy U{sub p} is substantially larger than the photon energy. The holographic interference is therefore favored by longer wavelengths and higher laser intensities. Our results indicate that the tunneling regime is not a necessary condition for the observation of the holographic pattern, which can be observed under the conditions formally attributed to the multiphoton regime.

  2. Ultrafast dynamics of o-fluorophenol studied with femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron and photoion spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The ultrafast dynamics of o-fluorophenol via the excited states has been studied by femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron imaging. The photoion and photoelectron spectra taken with a time delay between 267 nm pump laser and 800 nm probe laser provide a longer-lived S1 electronic state of about ns timescale. In comparison,the spectra obtained by exciting the S2 state with femtosecond laser pulses at 400 nm and ionizing with pulses at 800 nm suggest that the S2 state has an ultrashort lifetime about 102 fs and reflects the internal conversion dynamics of the S2 state to the S1 state.

  3. Molecular-Frame 3D Photoelectron Momentum Distributions by Tomographic Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maurer, Jochen; Dimitrovski, Darko; Christensen, Lauge

    2012-01-01

    Naphthalene molecules are fixed in space by a laser field and rotated, in 2° steps, over 180°. For each orientation, they are ionized by an intense, circularly polarized femtosecond laser pulse, and the 2D projection of the photoelectron momentum distribution is recorded. The molecular-frame 3D m...

  4. Application of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy under Polar Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, J. L.; Hark, R.; Bol'shakov, A.; Plumer, J.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade our research team has evaluated the use of commercial-off-the-shelf laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for chemical analysis of snow and ice samples under polar conditions. One avenue of research explored LIBS suitability as a detector of paleo-climate proxy indicators (Ca, K, Mg, and Na) in ice as it relates to atmospheric circulation. LIBS results revealed detection of peaks for C and N, consistent with the presence of organic material, as well as major ions (Ca, K, Mg, and Na) and trace metals (Al, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ti). The detection of Ca, K, Mg, and Na confirmed that LIBS has sufficient sensitivity to be used as a tool for characterization of paleo-climate proxy indicators in ice-core samples. Techniques were developed for direct analysis of ice as well as indirect measurements of ice via melting and filtering. Pitfalls and issues of direct ice analysis using several cooling techniques to maintain ice integrity will be discussed. In addition, a new technique, laser ablation molecular isotopic spectroscopy (LAMIS) was applied to detection of hydrogen and oxygen isotopes in ice as isotopic analysis of ice is the main tool in paleoclimatology and glaciology studies. Our results demonstrated that spectra of hydroxyl isotopologues 16OH, 18OH, and 16OD can be recorded with a compact spectrograph to determine hydrogen and oxygen isotopes simultaneously. Quantitative isotopic calibration for ice analysis can be accomplished using multivariate chemometric regression as previously realized for water vapor. Analysis with LIBS and LAMIS required no special sample preparation and was about ten times faster than analysis using ICP-MS. Combination of the two techniques in one portable instrument for in-field analysis appears possible and would eliminate the logistical and cost issues associated with ice core management.

  5. Characterization Of High Explosives Detonations Via Laser-Induced Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villa-Aleman, E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-08

    One objective of the Department of Energy’s National Security Administration is to develop technologies that can help the United States government to detect foreign nuclear weapons development activities. The realm of high explosive (HE) experiments is one of the key areas to assess the nuclear ambitions of a country. SRNL has participated in the collection of particulates from HE experiments and characterized the material with the purpose to correlate particulate matter with HE. Since these field campaigns are expensive, on-demand simulated laboratory-scale explosion experiments are needed to further our knowledge of the chemistry and particle formation in the process. Our goal is to develop an experimental test bed in the laboratory to test measurement concepts and correlate particle formation processes with the observables from the detonation fireball. The final objective is to use this knowledge to tailor our experimental setups in future field campaigns. The test bed uses pulsed laser-induced plasmas to simulate micro-explosions, with the intent to study the temporal behavior of the fireball observed in field tests. During FY15, a plan was prepared and executed which assembled two laser ablation systems, procured materials for study, and tested a Step-Scan Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (SS-FTIR). Designs for a shadowgraph system for shock wave analysis, design for a micro-particulate collector from ablated pulse were accomplished. A novel spectroscopic system was conceived and a prototype system built for acquisition of spectral/temporal characterization of a high speed event such as from a high explosive detonation. Experiments and analyses will continue into FY16.

  6. Lanthanide-based laser-induced phosphorescence for spray diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voort, D. D. van der, E-mail: d.d.v.d.voort@tue.nl; Water, W. van de; Kunnen, R. P. J.; Clercx, H. J. H.; Heijst, G. J. F. van [Applied Physics Department, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5612 AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Maes, N. C. J.; Sweep, A. M.; Dam, N. J. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5612 AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Lamberts, T. [Institute of Theoretical Chemistry, University of Stuttgart, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Laser-induced phosphorescence (LIP) is a relatively recent and versatile development for studying flow dynamics. This work investigates certain lanthanide-based molecular complexes for their use in LIP for high-speed sprays. Lanthanide complexes in solutions have been shown to possess long phosphorescence lifetimes (∼1-2 ms) and to emit light in the visible wavelength range. In particular, europium and terbium complexes are investigated using fluorescence/phosphorescence spectrometry, showing that europium-thenoyltrifluoracetone-trioctylphosphineoxide (Eu-TTA-TOPO) can be easily and efficiently excited using a standard frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser. The emitted spectrum, with maximum intensity at a wavelength of 614 nm, is shown not to vary strongly with temperature (293-383 K). The decay constant of the phosphorescence, while independent of ambient pressure, decreases by approximately 12 μs/K between 323 and 373 K, with the base level of the decay constant dependent on the used solvent. The complex does not luminesce in the gas or solid state, meaning only the liquid phase is visualized, even in an evaporating spray. By using an internally excited spray containing the phosphorescent complex, the effect of vaporization is shown through the decrease in measured intensity over the length of the spray, together with droplet size measurements using interferometric particle imaging. This study shows that LIP, using the Eu-TTA-TOPO complex, can be used with different solvents, including diesel surrogates. Furthermore, it can be easily handled and used in sprays to investigate spray breakup and evaporation.

  7. Spatiotemporal steering of photoelectron emission in multiphoton above-threshold ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Xiaochun; Liu, Mingming; Song, Qiying; Lin, Kang; Ji, Qinying; Zhang, Wenbin; Ma, Junyang; Lu, Peifen; Liu, Yunquan; He, Feng; Zeng, Heping; Yang, Weifeng; Wu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate spatiotemporal steering of photoelectron emission in multiphoton above-threshold single ionization of atoms exposed to a phase-controlled orthogonally polarized two-color (OTC) laser pulse. Spatial and energy resolved photoelectron angular distributions are measured as a function of the laser phase, allowing us to look into the fine structures and emission dynamics. The slow and fast photoelectrons, distinguished by the energy larger or smaller than 2Up with Up being the ponderomotive energy of a free electron in the laser field, have distinct spatiotemporal dependences of the laser waveform. The phase-of-phase of the slow electron oscillates as functions of both the energy and emission direction, however, the fast electron present rather flat phase structure which merely depends on its emission direction. Three-dimensional generalized quantum trajectory Monte Carlo simulations are performed to explore the sub-cycle dynamics of the electron emission in the phase-controlled OTC pu...

  8. Electron structure of excited configurations in Ca2V2O7 studied by electron-induced core-ionization loss spectroscopy, appearance-potential spectroscopy, and x-ray-photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curelaru, I. M.; Strid, K.-G.; Suoninen, E.; Minni, E.; Rönnhult, T.

    1981-04-01

    We have measured the electron-induced core-ionization loss (CILS) spectra, the appearance-potential (APS) spectra, and the x-ray-photoelectron (XPS) spectra of Ca2V2O7, that is a prototype for a series of luminescent materials with general formula M2V2O7(M=Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Zn, Cd, Hg). From the analysis of the data provided by the edge spectroscopies (CILS and APS) and their comparison with the XPS binding energies, we deduced the electronic structure of the outer orbitals (occupied and empty) involved in these processes. Our data illustrate the strong many-body effects that occur in the excitation and decay of localized atomiclike configurations within the big ionic cluster V2O4-7. Excitation of core levels in calcium, outside the V2O4-7 ion, seems to involve more extended orbitals, since the screening is more efficient. Usefulness of complementary studies by x-ray emission and Auger electron spectroscopy is anticipated.

  9. Laser-induced fluorescence applied to laser welding of austenitic stainless steel for dilute alloying element detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonds, Brian J.; Sowards, Jeffrey W.; Williams, Paul A.

    2017-08-01

    Optical spectral analysis of the laser weld plume is a common technique for non-contact, in situ weld plume analysis. However, the low sensitivity of optical emission spectroscopy limits the available information during 1070 nm wavelength laser welding, which is becoming the standard in many industrial operations. Here we demonstrate an improved sensitivity of optical spectroscopy by applying laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) for probing the hot gas plume induced during fiber laser welding of 304L austenitic stainless steel. As a proof-of-principle, we show that LIF is capable of resolving a spectral signal from silicon being emitted during welding. Optical detection of such a low concentration alloying element has not previously been reported and shows the capability of LIF for increased sensitivity. Silicon atoms in the weld plume were excited in the ultraviolet at 221.09 nm and detected at 221.64 nm. We demonstrate the detection of silicon LIF down to laser welding powers of 600 W (210 kW cm-2) making this technique applicable even in low-power laser welding or additive manufacturing scenarios.

  10. Microstructure and properties of plastic deformed martensite induced by laser shock processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jichang Yang(杨继昌); Yinqun Hua(花银群); Ruifang Chen(陈瑞芳); Lan Cai(蔡兰); Yongkang Zhang(张永康); Hong Yan(颜红)

    2004-01-01

    Firstly, 45# steel was quenched by the NEL-2500A rapidly axial flow CO2 laser. The experimental parameters were the laser power of 750 W, the laser beam diameter of 4 mm, the scanning velocity of 7 mm/s.The thickness of coating layer was 0.1 mm and the width was 8 mm. Secondly, the martensite induced by laser quench was shocked by Nd:YAG laser. The parameters of laser shock processing were the wavelength of 1.06 μm, the pulse duration of 23 ns, and the output energy of 16-20 J. The laser was focused on a spot of φ7 mm. K9 optical glass was used as confinement. The sample was coated with black paint 86-1 (the thickness is about 0.025 mm). By testing and analysis of samples which were treated by laser quench and laser quench+shock with transmission electron microscope (TEM), it was discovered that the surface layer of martensite was deformed plastically by laser shock processing. In the secondary hardened zones,there were a lot of slender secondary twin crystal martensites, dislocation tangles, and cellular dislocations.Compared with that of the hardened zones through laser quench only, the residual stress and mechanical properties of the secondary hardened zones were improved and increased through laser compound method.

  11. Laser-induced damage threshold of silicon under combined millisecond and nanosecond laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xueming; Pan, Yunxiang; Jia, Zhichao; Li, Zewen; Zhang, Hongchao; Ni, Xiaowu

    2017-03-01

    The laser-silicon interaction process was investigated with the superposed radiation of two pulsed Nd:YAG lasers. A pulse duration of 1 millisecond (ms) was superposed by 7 nanosecond (ns) pulses, creating a combined pulse laser (CPL). The time-resolved surface temperature of silicon was measured by an infrared radiation pyrometer. The melting thresholds of silicon were attained for a single ms laser and a CPL by infrared radiometry and time-resolved reflectance. The concept of threshold boundary was proposed, and a fitted curve of threshold boundary was obtained. An axisymmetric model was established for laser heating of silicon. The transient temperature fields were obtained for single ms laser and CPL irradiation using finite element analysis. The numerical results were validated experimentally, and an obvious decrease in melting threshold was found under CPL irradiation. That is attributed to pre-heating by the ms laser and the surface damage caused by the ns laser.

  12. Pilot study of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for tissue differentiation by monitoring the plume created during laser surgery — An approach on a feedback Laser control mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanawade, Rajesh, E-mail: Rajesh.Kanawade@aot.uni-erlangen.de [Clinical Photonics Lab, Erlangen Graduate School in Advanced Optical Technologies (SAOT), Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Paul-Gordan-Str. 6, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Institute of Photonics Technologies, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Paul-Gordan-Str. 3, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Mehari, Fanuel [Master Programme in Advanced Optical Technologies (MAOT), Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Paul-Gordan-Str. 6, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Knipfer, Christian; Rohde, Maximilian [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Glueckstrasse 11, 91054 Erlangen (Germany); Tangermann-Gerk, Katja [Bayerisches Laserzentrum GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Strasse 2-6, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Schmidt, Michael [Clinical Photonics Lab, Erlangen Graduate School in Advanced Optical Technologies (SAOT), Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Paul-Gordan-Str. 6, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Institute of Photonics Technologies, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Paul-Gordan-Str. 3, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Bayerisches Laserzentrum GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Strasse 2-6, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); and others

    2013-09-01

    This study focuses on tissue differentiation using ‘Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy’ (LIBS) by monitoring the plasma plume created during laser surgery processes. This technique is aimed at controlling a laser surgery feedback system in real time. An Excimer laser (Ar-F 193 nm) was used for the ablation of tissue samples. Fat, muscle, nerve and skin tissue samples of bisected ex-vivo pig heads were prepared as test objects for the ablation procedure. A single fiber was used to collect emissions and deliver them to a spectrometer. The obtained LIBS spectra in the measured emissions were analyzed to determine each tissue type according to their chemical composition. The elements found in the samples and their emission spectra were in agreement with those described in literature. The collected LIBS spectra were analyzed to differentiate the tissues using statistical data analysis: Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) and Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC). The obtained preliminary results suggest a successful differentiation of the target tissues with high sensitivity and specificity. The main goal of this study was to qualitatively identify tissue types during laser ablation, which will provide a real time feedback mechanism for clinical Laser surgery applications to significantly improve the accuracy and safety of laser surgery procedures. - Graphical abstract: Skin, fat, muscle and nerve tissue differentiation. - Highlights: • Methods to differentiate tissues for the application in a laser surgery feedback control system • Successful differentiation of the target tissues with high sensitivity and specificity for laser surgery application • Real time feedback mechanism for clinical Laser surgery applications • Laser surgery requirements • Biomedical applications of LIBS.

  13. Wavelength Dependence of Picosecond Laser-Induced Periodic Surface Structures on Copper

    OpenAIRE

    Maragkaki, Stella; Derrien, Thibault J. -Y.; Levy, Yoann; Bulgakova, Nadezhda M.; Ostendorf, Andreas; Gurevich, Evgeny L.

    2017-01-01

    The physical mechanisms of the laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) formation are studied in this paper for single-pulse irradiation regimes. The change in the LIPSS period with wavelength of incident laser radiation is investigated experimentally, using a picosecond laser system, which provides 7-ps pulses in near-IR, visible, and UV spectral ranges. The experimental results are compared with predictions made under the assumption that the surface-scattered waves are involved in ...

  14. Assessment of Femtosecond Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures on Polymer Films

    OpenAIRE

    Rebollar, Esther; Vázquez De Aldana, Javier R.; Martín-Fabiani, Ignacio; Hernández, Margarita; Rueda, Daniel R.; Ezquerra, Tiberio A.; Domingo, Concepción; Moreno, Pablo; Castillejo, Marta

    2013-01-01

    In this work we present the formation of laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on spin-coated thin films of several model aromatic polymers including poly(ethylene terephthalate), poly(trimethylene terephthalate) and poly carbonate bis-phenol A upon irradiation with femtosecond pulses of 795 and 265 nm at fluences well below the ablation threshold. LIPSS are formed with period lengths similar to the laser wavelength and parallel to the direction of the laser polarization vector. F...

  15. Circularly polarized laser emission induced in isotropic and achiral dye systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdán, Luis; García-Moreno, Sara; Costela, Angel; García-Moreno, Inmaculada; de La Moya, Santiago

    2016-06-01

    The production of efficient, tunable, and switchable circularly polarized laser emission would have far reaching implications in optical communications or biophotonics. In this work, it is demonstrated the direct generation of circularly polarized (CP) laser emission in achiral and isotropic dye laser systems without the use of extracavity polarizing elements, and without resorting to chiral dyes, chiral liquid crystal matrices, or interferometric methods. The origin of this ellipticity arises from the dynamic birefringence induced by the strong and polarized laser pumping and the subsequent orientation anisotropy of the excited molecular dipoles. A complete polarimetric characterization of the polarization state of conventional dye laser oscillators as a function of different experimental parameters is performed and it is shown that the generated light always possesses a certain level of circularity that changes in a distinctive way with pump energy and polarization. These results demonstrate that it is possible to generate and modulate CP laser light from efficient and photostable conventional laser dyes.

  16. Laser-induced spectra change in nanocrystalline GdYO{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Huangqing, E-mail: kele1110@hnu.edu.cn; Zhai, Xiang; Wang, Lingling; Xiao, Shifang; Zhou, Jun

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, we report the laser-induced spectra change in nanocrystalline GdYO{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+}. The intensity of CTB and {sup 5}D{sub 0}–{sup 7}F{sub 2} transition changed after laser. The intensity change of the {sup 5}D{sub 0}–{sup 7}F{sub 2} transition under CTB excitation is relative with that of CTB after laser irradiation, which is attributed to change of local environments surrounding the Eu{sup 3+} ions under laser irradiation. - Highlights: Intensity of CTB changed and CTB positions were almost unchanged after laser irradiation. The possibility of energy transfer between Gd{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+} ions is irrelative with laser irradiation. Intensity change of the {sup 5}D{sub 0}–{sup 7}F{sub 2} transition under CTB excitation is inversely proportional to that of CTB after laser irradiation.

  17. Formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on tool steel by multiple picosecond laser pulses of different polarizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorčič, Peter; Sedlaček, Marko; Podgornik, Bojan; Reif, Jürgen

    2016-11-01

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are produced on cold work tool steel by irradiation with a low number of picosecond laser pulses. As expected, the ripples, with a period of about 90% of the laser wavelength, are oriented perpendicular to the laser polarization. Subsequent irradiation with the polarization rotated by 45° or 90° results in a corresponding rotation of the ripples. This is visible already with the first pulse and becomes almost complete - erasing the previous orientation - after as few as three pulses. The phenomenon is not only observed for single-spot irradiation but also for writing long coherent traces. The experimental results strongly defy the role of surface plasmon-polaritons as the predominant key to LIPSS formation.

  18. Morphology control of laser-induced periodic surface structure on the surface of nickel by femtosecond laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fantong Meng; Jie Hu; Weina Han; Penjun Liu; Qingsong Wang

    2015-01-01

    An interesting transition between low spatial frequency laser-induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) and high spatial frequency LIPSS (HSFL) on the surface of nickel is revealed by changing the scanning speed and the laser fluence.The experimental results show the proportion of HSFL area in the overall LIPSS (i.e.,K) presents a quasi-parabola function trend with the polarization orientation under a femtosecond (fs) laser single-pulse train.Moreover,an obvious fluctuation dependence of K on the pulse delay is observed under a fs laser dual-pulse train.The peak value of the fluctuation is found to be determined by the polarization orientation of the dual-pulse train.

  19. Measurement of OH reactivity by laser flash photolysis coupled with laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Daniel; Whalley, Lisa K.; Ingham, Trevor; Edwards, Peter M.; Cryer, Danny R.; Brumby, Charlotte A.; Seakins, Paul W.; Heard, Dwayne E.

    2016-07-01

    OH reactivity (k'OH) is the total pseudo-first-order loss rate coefficient describing the removal of OH radicals to all sinks in the atmosphere, and is the inverse of the chemical lifetime of OH. Measurements of ambient OH reactivity can be used to discover the extent to which measured OH sinks contribute to the total OH loss rate. Thus, OH reactivity measurements enable determination of the comprehensiveness of measurements used in models to predict air quality and ozone production, and, in conjunction with measurements of OH radical concentrations, to assess our understanding of OH production rates. In this work, we describe the design and characterisation of an instrument to measure OH reactivity using laser flash photolysis coupled to laser-induced fluorescence (LFP-LIF) spectroscopy. The LFP-LIF technique produces OH radicals in isolation, and thus minimises potential interferences in OH reactivity measurements owing to the reaction of HO2 with NO which can occur if HO2 is co-produced with OH in the instrument. Capabilities of the instrument for ambient OH reactivity measurements are illustrated by data collected during field campaigns in London, UK, and York, UK. The instrumental limit of detection for k'OH was determined to be 1.0 s-1 for the campaign in London and 0.4 s-1 for the campaign in York. The precision, determined by laboratory experiment, is typically < 1 s-1 for most ambient measurements of OH reactivity. Total uncertainty in ambient measurements of OH reactivity is ˜ 6 %. We also present the coupling and characterisation of the LFP-LIF instrument to an atmospheric chamber for measurements of OH reactivity during simulated experiments, and provide suggestions for future improvements to OH reactivity LFP-LIF instruments.

  20. Laser induced photoconductivity in sol–gel derived Al doped ZnO thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eskandari, F.; Ranjbar, M., E-mail: ranjbar@cc.iut.ac.ir; Kameli, P.; Salamati, H.

    2015-11-15

    In this paper Al doped ZnO (AZO) thin films with 0, 3, 6 and 12 at. % Al concentration were prepared by sol–gel method on glass substrates. The deposited films were annealed at different temperatures of 300, 350, 400, 450 and 500 °C for 1 h in air. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed wurtzite crystalline structure for the films annealed above 400 °C. The films were subsequently irradiated by beams of excimer (KrF, λ = 248 nm) laser. The evolution of crystal structure, surface morphology and optical properties were studied using XRD, filed emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and UV–Vis spectrophotometer, respectively. Real-time measurement of electrical conductivity during laser irradiation showed a transient or persistent photoconductivity effect. The effect of laser energy on this photoconductivity was also investigated. Based on the observed photoluminescence (PL) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), the observed photoconductivity effect was described. - Highlights: • AZO (0–12 at. % Al) films were prepared by sol–gel method and annealed at different temperatures. • Excimer laser (λ = 248 nm) irradiation leads to improvement of crystalline structure. • Average optical transmission doesn't change and optical gap decreases by irradiation. • Photoconductivity was investigated by real-time measurement of electrical resistance. • Sample of 6% Al annealed at 450–500 °C showed the best photoconductivity effect.

  1. Effects of thermo-plasmonics on laser-induced backside wet etching of silicate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvetkov, M. Yu; Yusupov, V. I.; Minaev, N. V.; Timashev, P. S.; Golant, K. M.; Bagratashvili, V. N.

    2016-10-01

    The thermo-plasmonic effect (heat deposition via absorption of laser light by metal nanoparticles) is applied to substantially enhance the effectiveness and controllability of the microstructure formation by laser-induced backside wet etching (LIBWE). Experiments were carried out with silicate glass plates using a pulsed 527 nm wavelength laser and an aqueous solution of AgNO3 as a precursor of the Ag nanoparticles. Mechanisms of such thermo-plasmonic LIBWE (TP-LIBWE) versions are considered. They involve: laser-induced photo-thermal reducing of silver (Ag) and self-assembling of Ag nanoparticles in water and the water/glass interface; fast laser-induced overheating of a water and glass surface through the thermo-plasmonic effect; formation of highly reactive supercritical water that causes glass etching and crater formation; generation of steam-gas bubbles in a liquid. It is significant that the emergence of the Marangoni convection results in bubble retention in the focal point at the interface and the accumulation of nanoparticles on the surface of the laser-induced crater, as this facilitates the movement of the bubbles with captured Ag particles from the fluid volume in the crater region, and accelerates the formation of the area of strong ‘surface absorption’ of laser energy. All these mechanisms provide a highly efficient and reproducible process for laser microstructure formation on the surface of glass using a novel TP-LIBWE technique.

  2. Femtosecond laser-induced microstructures in glasses and applications in micro-optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jianrong

    2004-01-01

    Femtosecond laser has been widely used in microscopic modifications to materials due to its ultra-short laser pulse and ultrahigh light intensity. When a transparent material e.g. glass is irradiated by a tightly focused femtosecond laser, the photo-induced reaction is expected to occur only near the focused part of the laser beam inside the glass due to the multiphoton processes. We observed various induced structures e.g. color center defects, refractive index change, micro-void and micro-crack, in glasses after the femtosecond laser irradiation. In this paper, we review the femtosecond laser induced phenomena and discuss the mechanisms of the observed phenomena. We also introduce the fabrication of various micro-optical components, e.g. optical waveguide, micro-grating, micro-lens, fiber attenuator, 3-dimensional optical memory by using the femtosecond laser-induced structures. The femtosecond laser will open new possibilities in the fabrication of micro-optical components with various optical functions.

  3. Two-temperature model for pulsed-laser-induced subsurface modifications in Si

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verburg, P.C.; Römer, G.R.B.E.; Huis In 'T Veld, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the laser-material interaction during the production of laser-induced subsurface modifications in silicon with a numerical model. Such modifications are of interest for subsurface wafer dicing. To predict the shape of these modifications, a two-temperature model and an optical model

  4. Theory Analysis of Wavelength Dependence of Laser-Induced Phase Explosion of Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    and P. Martin , Appl. Phys. A: Mater. Sci. Process. 79, 1695 2004. 2R. E. Russo, X. Mao, and S. S. Mao, Anal. Chem. 74, 70A 2002. 3Laser Ablation...J. Radziemski and D. A. Cremers , Laser-Induced Plasmas and Appli- cation Dekker, New York, 1989. 13J. R. Ho, C. P. Grigoropoulos, and J. A

  5. Top down fabrication of organic nanocrystals by femtosecond laser induced transfer method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fang, Hong-Hua; Yang, Jie; Ding, Ran; Feng, Jing; Chen, Qi-Dai; Sun, Hong-Bo; Fang, Honghua

    2012-01-01

    We present the preparation of nanometer-size organic crystals using femtosecond laser induced forward transfer (Fs-LIFT) method. 1,4-Bis(4-methylstyryl)benzene (BSB-Me) nanocrystals are directly deposited on the substrate to form a nanocrystal film. Size and morphology as functions of applied laser

  6. Modelling nanoparticles formation in the plasma plume induced by nanosecond pulsed lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girault, M. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne (ICB), UMR 6303 CNRS-Universite de Bourgogne, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications (CELIA), Universite de Bordeaux 1, 43 rue Pierre Noailles, Talence (France); Hallo, L., E-mail: hallo@celia.u-bordeaux1.fr [CEA CESTA, 15 Avenue des Sablieres CS 60001, 33116 Le Barp Cedex (France); Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications (CELIA), Universite de Bordeaux 1, 43 rue Pierre Noailles, Talence (France); Lavisse, L.; Lucas, M.C. Marco de [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne (ICB), UMR 6303 CNRS-Universite de Bourgogne, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Hebert, D. [CEA CESTA, 15 Avenue des Sablieres CS 60001, 33116 Le Barp Cedex (France); Potin, V.; Jouvard, J.-M. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne (ICB), UMR 6303 CNRS-Universite de Bourgogne, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoparticles spatial localization in the plume induced by a pulsed laser. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Plasma plume obtained by laser irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Particles and debris formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Powder generation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conditions of formation. - Abstract: Nanoparticles formation in a laser-induced plasma plume in the ambient air has been investigated by using numerical simulations and physical models. For high irradiances, or for ultrashort laser pulses, nanoparticles are formed by condensation, as fine powders, in the expanding plasma for very high pairs of temperature and pressure. At lower irradiances, or nanosecond laser pulses, another thermodynamic paths are possible, which cross the liquid-gas transition curve while laser is still heating the target and the induced plasma. In this work, we explore the growth of nanoparticles in the plasma plume induced by nanosecond pulsed lasers as a function of the laser irradiance. Moreover, the influence of the ambient gas has also been investigated.

  7. Work of adhesion in laser-induced delamination along polymer-metal interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fedorov, A.; van Tijum, R.; Vellinga, W. P.; de Hosson, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Laser-induced delamination is a recent technique aimed at characterizing adhesive strength of thin polymer coatings on metal substrates. A laser pulse is used to create a blister that initiates further delamination of the film under pressure. To process the experimental data a simple elastic model w

  8. Top down fabrication of organic nanocrystals by femtosecond laser induced transfer method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fang, Hong-Hua; Yang, Jie; Ding, Ran; Feng, Jing; Chen, Qi-Dai; Sun, Hong-Bo; Fang, Honghua

    2012-01-01

    We present the preparation of nanometer-size organic crystals using femtosecond laser induced forward transfer (Fs-LIFT) method. 1,4-Bis(4-methylstyryl)benzene (BSB-Me) nanocrystals are directly deposited on the substrate to form a nanocrystal film. Size and morphology as functions of applied laser

  9. Determination of irradiation parameters for laser-induced periodic surface structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eichstädt, J.; Römer, G.R.B.E.; Huis in 't Veld, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    The spatial emergence of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on single-crystalline silicon, upon irradiation with linearly polarized picosecond laser pulses (wavelength λ = 1030 nm, pulse duration τ = 6.7 ps, pulse repetition frequency fp = 1 kHz) was studied theoretically and experime

  10. Velocity Diagnosis of Critical Surface at Microwave Band in Laser-Induced Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ying; WANG Junyan; BAI Shunbo; CHEN Jianping; CHU Ran; YUN Xiaohua; NI Xiaowu

    2008-01-01

    The velocity of critical surface at microwave band in laser-induced plasma was mea-sured and the results are presented. The results indicate that the velocity of critical surface with low electron density is larger than that with the high one; and the velocity of critical surface increases with the laser power density.

  11. Quantitative laser-induced fluorescence measurements of nitric oxide in a heavy-duty Diesel engine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbiezen, K.; Klein-Douwel, R. J. H.; van Viet, A. P.; Donkerbroek, A. J.; Meerts, W. L.; Dam, N. J.; ter Meulen, J. J.

    2007-01-01

    We present quantitative, in-cylinder, UV-laser-induced fluorescence measurements of nitric oxide in a heavy-duty Diesel engine. Processing of the raw fluorescence signals includes a detailed correction, based on additional measurements, for the effect of laser beam and fluorescence attenuation, and

  12. Application of Ansys Program in Laser-induced Interstitial Thermotherapy (LITT)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The influence of heat source by laser irradiating on tissue temperature was simulated with the Ansys program, and the distribution of tissue temperature under the heat source was shown. Compared with others, the simulation method with ansys program is more intuitionistic and can offer very good reference for Laser- induced interstitial thernotherapy.

  13. High contrast laser marking of alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penide, J. [Applied Physics Department, University of Vigo, EEI, Lagoas-Marcosende, 9, Vigo 36310 (Spain); Quintero, F., E-mail: fquintero@uvigo.es [Applied Physics Department, University of Vigo, EEI, Lagoas-Marcosende, 9, Vigo 36310 (Spain); Riveiro, A. [Applied Physics Department, University of Vigo, EEI, Lagoas-Marcosende, 9, Vigo 36310 (Spain); Fernández, A. [Department of Engineering Design, University of Vigo, Escuela de Ingeniería Industrial, Campus Universitario, Vigo E-36310 (Spain); Val, J. del [Applied Physics Department, University of Vigo, EEI, Lagoas-Marcosende, 9, Vigo 36310 (Spain); Comesaña, R. [Materials Engineering, Applied Mechanics and Construction Department, University of Vigo, EEI, Lagoas-Marcosende, Vigo E-36310 (Spain); Lusquiños, F.; Pou, J. [Applied Physics Department, University of Vigo, EEI, Lagoas-Marcosende, 9, Vigo 36310 (Spain)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Laser marking of alumina using near infrared (NIR) lasers was experimentally analyzed. • Color change produced by NIR lasers is due to thermally induced oxygen vacancies. • Laser marking results obtained using NIR lasers and green laser are compared. • High contrast marks on alumina were achieved. - Abstract: Alumina serves as raw material for a broad range of advanced ceramic products. These elements should usually be identified by some characters or symbols printed directly on them. In this sense, laser marking is an efficient, reliable and widely implemented process in industry. However, laser marking of alumina still leads to poor results since the process is not able to produce a dark mark, yielding bad contrast. In this paper, we present an experimental study on the process of marking alumina by three different lasers working in two wavelengths: 1064 nm (Near-infrared) and 532 nm (visible, green radiation). A colorimetric analysis has been carried out in order to compare the resulting marks and its contrast. The most suitable laser operating conditions were also defined and are reported here. Moreover, the physical process of marking by NIR lasers is discussed in detail. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy were also employed to analyze the results. Finally, we propose an explanation for the differences of the coloration induced under different atmospheres and laser parameters. We concluded that the atmosphere is the key parameter, being the inert one the best choice to produce the darkest marks.

  14. Disentangling Multichannel Photodissociation Dynamics in Acetone by Time-Resolved Photoelectron-Photoion Coincidence Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maierhofer, Paul; Bainschab, Markus; Thaler, Bernhard; Heim, Pascal; Ernst, Wolfgang E; Koch, Markus

    2016-08-18

    For the investigation of photoinduced dynamics in molecules with time-resolved pump-probe photoionization spectroscopy, it is essential to obtain unequivocal information about the fragmentation behavior induced by the laser pulses. We present time-resolved photoelectron-photoion coincidence (PEPICO) experiments to investigate the excited-state dynamics of isolated acetone molecules triggered by two-photon (269 nm) excitation. In the complex situation of different relaxation pathways, we unambiguously identify three distinct pump-probe ionization channels. The high selectivity of PEPICO detection allows us to observe the fragmentation behavior and to follow the time evolution of each channel separately. For channels leading to fragment ions, we quantitatively obtain the fragment-to-parent branching ratio and are able to determine experimentally whether dissociation occurs in the neutral molecule or in the parent ion. These results highlight the importance of coincidence detection for the interpretation of time-resolved photochemical relaxation and dissociation studies if multiple pathways are present.

  15. Independent component analysis classification of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forni, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.forni@irap.omp.eu [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysiqe et Planétologie, Toulouse (France); CNRS, IRAP, 9, av. Colonel Roche, BP 44346, F-31028 Cedex 4, Toulouse (France); Maurice, Sylvestre, E-mail: sylvestre.maurice@irap.omp.eu [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysiqe et Planétologie, Toulouse (France); CNRS, IRAP, 9, av. Colonel Roche, BP 44346, F-31028 Cedex 4, Toulouse (France); Gasnault, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.gasnault@irap.omp.eu [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysiqe et Planétologie, Toulouse (France); CNRS, IRAP, 9, av. Colonel Roche, BP 44346, F-31028 Cedex 4, Toulouse (France); Wiens, Roger C., E-mail: rwiens@lanl.gov [Space Remote Sensing, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Cousin, Agnès, E-mail: acousin@lanl.gov [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysiqe et Planétologie, Toulouse (France); CNRS, IRAP, 9, av. Colonel Roche, BP 44346, F-31028 Cedex 4, Toulouse (France); Chemical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Clegg, Samuel M., E-mail: sclegg@lanl.gov [Chemical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Sirven, Jean-Baptiste, E-mail: jean-baptiste.sirven@cea.f [CEA Saclay, DEN/DPC/SCP, 91191 Cedex, Gif sur Yvette (France); Lasue, Jérémie, E-mail: jeremie.lasue@irap.omp.eu [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysiqe et Planétologie, Toulouse (France); CNRS, IRAP, 9, av. Colonel Roche, BP 44346, F-31028 Cedex 4, Toulouse (France)

    2013-08-01

    The ChemCam instrument on board Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover uses the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique to remotely analyze Martian rocks. It retrieves spectra up to a distance of seven meters to quantify and to quantitatively analyze the sampled rocks. Like any field application, on-site measurements by LIBS are altered by diverse matrix effects which induce signal variations that are specific to the nature of the sample. Qualitative aspects remain to be studied, particularly LIBS sample identification to determine which samples are of interest for further analysis by ChemCam and other rover instruments. This can be performed with the help of different chemometric methods that model the spectra variance in order to identify a the rock from its spectrum. In this paper we test independent components analysis (ICA) rock classification by remote LIBS. We show that using measures of distance in ICA space, namely the Manhattan and the Mahalanobis distance, we can efficiently classify spectra of an unknown rock. The Mahalanobis distance gives overall better performances and is easier to manage than the Manhattan distance for which the determination of the cut-off distance is not easy. However these two techniques are complementary and their analytical performances will improve with time during MSL operations as the quantity of available Martian spectra will grow. The analysis accuracy and performances will benefit from a combination of the two approaches. - Highlights: • We use a novel independent component analysis method to classify LIBS spectra. • We demonstrate the usefulness of ICA. • We report the performances of the ICA classification. • We compare it to other classical classification schemes.

  16. Evaluation of immunoglobulins in bovine colostrum using laser induced fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Salam, Z; Abdel Ghany, Sh; Harith, M A

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to exploit laser induced fluorescence (LIF) as a spectrochemical analytical technique for evaluation of immunoglobulin (IgG) in bovine colostrum. Colostrum samples were collected from different American Holstein cows at different times after calving. Four samples were gathered from each cow; the first three samples were obtained from the first three milkings (colostrum) and the fourth sample (milk) was obtained a week after calving. It has been demonstrated that LIF can be used as a simple, fast, sensitive and less costly spectrochemical analytical technique for qualitative estimation of IgG in colostrum. LIF results have been confirmed via the quantitative evaluation of IgG in the same samples adopting the single radial immunodiffusion conventional technique and a very good agreement has been obtained. Through LIF it was possible to evaluate bovine colostrum after different milking times and to differentiate qualitatively between colostrum from different animals which may reflect their general health status. A fluorescence linear calibration curve for IgG concentrations from 0 up to 120 g L(-1) has been obtained. In addition, it is feasible to adopt this technique for in situ measurements, i.e. in dairy cattle farms as a simple and fast method for evaluation of IgG in bovine colostrum instead of using lengthy and complicated conventional techniques in laboratories.

  17. ULTRASOUND INDUCED AND LASER ENHANCED COLD FUSION CHEMISTRY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T.V.Prevenslik

    1995-01-01

    The standard model of sonoluminescence suggests that the coulomb barrer to deuterium fusion may be overcome by high bubble gas temperatures caused by compression heating if the bubble diameter remains spherical during bubble collapse.However,in the more likely collapse geometry of a pancake shape,the temperature rise in the bubbles is negligible.But the collapsing pancake bubble is fund to significantly increase the frequency of the infrared energy available in the vibrational state of the water molecules at ambient temperature.For a collapse to liquied density,ultraviolet radiation at about 10eV is fund.Although the ultraviolet radiation is of a low intensity,higher intensities may be possible if the bubble collapse is enhanced by visible and infrared lases.Neither hot nor cold fusion is predicted in bubble collapse but the ultraviolet energy at about 10eV developed in the bubble is sufficient to provide the basis for a new field of chemistry called ultrasound induced and laser enhanced cold fusion chemistry.

  18. Analysis of bakery products by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilge, Gonca; Boyacı, İsmail Hakkı; Eseller, Kemal Efe; Tamer, Uğur; Çakır, Serhat

    2015-08-15

    In this study, we focused on the detection of Na in bakery products by using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as a quick and simple method. LIBS experiments were performed to examine the Na at 589 nm to quantify NaCl. A series of standard bread sample pellets containing various concentrations of NaCl (0.025-3.5%) were used to construct the calibration curves and to determine the detection limits of the measurements. Calibration graphs were drawn to indicate functions of NaCl and Na concentrations, which showed good linearity in the range of 0.025-3.5% NaCl and 0.01-1.4% Na concentrations with correlation coefficients (R(2)) values greater than 0.98 and 0.96. The obtained detection limits for NaCl and Na were 175 and 69 ppm, respectively. Performed experimental studies showed that LIBS is a convenient method for commercial bakery products to quantify NaCl concentrations as a rapid and in situ technique.

  19. Study of Bacterial Samples Using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    W, A. Farooq; M, Atif; W, Tawfik; M, S. Alsalhi; Z, A. Alahmed; M, Sarfraz; J, P. Singh

    2014-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique has been applied to investigate two different types of bacteria, Escherichia coli (B1) and Micrococcus luteus (B2) deposited on glass slides using Spectrolaser 7000. LIBS spectra were analyzed using spectrolaser software. LIBS spectrum of glass substrate was compared with bacteria spectra. Ca, Mg, Na, K, P, S, Cl, Fe, Al, Mn, Cu, C, H and CN-band appeared in bacterial samples in air. Two carbon lines at 193.02 nm, 247.88 nm and one hydrogen line at 656.28 nm with intensity ratios of 1.9, 1.83 and 1.53 appeared in bacterial samples B1 and B2 respectively. Carbon and hydrogen are the important components of the bio-samples like bacteria and other cancer cells. Investigation on LIBS spectra of the samples in He and Ar atmospheres is also presented. Ni lines appeared only in B2 sample in Ar atmosphere. From the present experimental results we are able to show that LIBS technique has a potential in the identification and discrimination of different types of bacteria.

  20. Photoelectron spectroscopy of phthalocyanine vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkowitz, J.

    1979-01-01

    The He(I) photoelectron spectra of several metal phthalocyanines and metal-free phthalocyanine vapor shows that: a sharp peak at 4.99 eV is an artifact due to ionization of atomic He by He(II) radiation; the first phthalocyanine peak (metal-containing or metal-free) occurs at 6.4 eV; and the metal-like d orbitals lie at least 1 to 2 eV deeper, except in the case of Fe. (DLC)

  1. Ultra-short-pulsed laser-machined nanogratings of laser-induced periodic surface structures on thin molybdenum layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scorticati, D.; Römer, G.W.; Lange, D.F. de; Huis In 't Veld, B.

    2012-01-01

    Large areas of regular diffraction nanogratings were produced consisting of so-called laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on thin molybdenum layers (<400 nm) deposited on a borosilicate glass substrate. The aim was to produce these structures without ablating nor cracking the molybdenu

  2. Impact of environmental contamination on laser induced damage of silica optics in Laser MegaJoule; Impact de l'environnement sur l'endommagement laser des optiques de silice du Laser MegaJoule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bien-Aime, K.

    2009-11-15

    Laser induced damage impact of molecular contamination on fused polished silica samples in a context of high power laser fusion facility, such as Laser MegaJoule (LMJ) has been studied. One of the possible causes of laser induced degradation of optical component is the adsorption of molecular or particular contamination on optical surfaces. In the peculiar case of LMJ, laser irradiation conditions are a fluence of 10 J/cm{sup 2}, a wavelength of 351 nm, a pulse duration of 3 ns for a single shot/days frequency. Critical compounds have been identified thanks to environmental measurements, analysis of material outgassing, and identification of surface contamination in the critical environments. Experiments of controlled contamination involving these compounds have been conducted in order to understand and model mechanisms of laser damage. Various hypotheses are proposed to explain the damage mechanism. (author)

  3. Laser-Induced Emissions Sensor for Soot Mass in Rocket Plumes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A method is proposed to measure soot mass concentration non-intrusively from a distance in a rocket engine exhaust stream during ground tests using laser-induced...

  4. Acoustic Diagnostics of Plasma Channels Induced by Intense Femtosecond Laser Pulses in Air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Zuo-Qiang; WEI Zhi-Yi; YU Jin; ZHANG Jie; LI Yu-Tong; YUAN Xiao-Hui; ZHENG Zhi-Yuan; WANG Peng; WANG Zhao-Hua; LING Wei-Jun

    2005-01-01

    @@ Long plasma channels induced by femtosecond laser pulses in air are diagnosed using the sonographic method. By detecting the sound signals along the channels, the length and the electron density of the channels are measured.

  5. 3D Imaging of Nanoparticle Distribution in Biological Tissue by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gimenez, Y; Busser, B; Trichard, F; Kulesza, A; Laurent, J M; Zaun, V; Lux, F; Benoit, J M; Panczer, G; Dugourd, P; Tillement, O; Pelascini, F; Sancey, L; Motto-Ros, V

    2016-01-01

    .... The technology used is known as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and possesses several advantages such as speed of operation, ease of use and full compatibility with optical microscopy...

  6. Flexible Patterning of Functional Microdot by Laser-Induced Dot Transfer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aiko Narazaki; Ryozo Kurosaki; Tadatake Sato; Hiroyuki Niino

    2014-01-01

      Laser-induced dot transfer (LIDT) is one of promising additive manufacturing techniques because it can realize flexible patterning of micron and submicron-sized dots even at atmospheric room-temperature conditions...

  7. Mechanism of laser-induced plasma shock wave evolution in air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Rui; Liang Zhong-Cheng; Han Bing; Zhang Hong-Chao; Xu Rong-Qing; Lu Jian; Ni Xiao-Wu

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical model is proposed to describe the mechanism of laser-induced plasma shock wave evolution in air. To verify the validity of the theoretical model, an optical beam deflection technique is employed to track the plasma shock wave evolution process. The theoretical model and the experimental signals are found to be in good agreement with each other. It is shown that the laser-induced plasma shock wave undergoes formation, increase and decay processes; the increase and the decay processes of the laser-induced plasma shock wave result from the overlapping of the compression wave and the rarefaction wave, respectively. In addition, the laser-induced plasma shock wave speed and pressure distributions, both a function of distance, are presented.

  8. Laser-induced multi-point ignition for enabling high-performance engines

    KAUST Repository

    Chung, Suk-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Various multi-point laser-induced ignition techniques were reviewed, which adopted conical cavity and prechamber configurations. Up to five-point ignitions have been achieved with significant reduction in combustion duration, demonstrating potential increase in combustion system efficiency.

  9. Laser-induced quadrupole-quadrupole collisional energy transfer in Xe-Kr

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Zhen-Zhong; Chen De-Ying; Fan Rong-Wei; Xia Yuan-Qin

    2011-01-01

    By considering the relative velocity distribution function and multipole expansion interaction Hamiltonian, a three-state model for calculating the cross section of laser-induced quadrupole-quadrupole collisional energy transfer is presented. Calculated results in Xe-Kr system show that in the present system, the laser-induced collision process occurs for ~4 ps, which is much shorter than the dipole-dipole laser-induced collisional energy transfer (LICET) process.The spectrum of laser-induced quadrupole-quadrupole collisional energy transfer in Xe-Kr system has wider tunable range in an order of magnitude than the dipole-dipole LICET spectra. The peak cross section decreases and moves to the quasi-static wing with increasing temperature and the full width at half peak of the profile becomes larger as the system temperature increases.

  10. Ion beam induced chemical and morphological changes in TiO{sub 2} films deposited on Si(1 1 1) surface by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanta, R.R. [Department of Chemistry, Krupajal Engineering College, Bhubaneswar 751002 (India); Medicherla, V.R.R., E-mail: mvramarao1@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Institute of Technical Education and Research, Siksha ‘O’ Anusandhan University, Bhubaneswar 751030 (India); Mohanta, K.L. [Department of Physics, Institute of Technical Education and Research, Siksha ‘O’ Anusandhan University, Bhubaneswar 751030 (India); Nayak, Nimai C. [Department of Chemistry, Institute of Technical Education and Research, Siksha ‘O’ Anusandhan University, Bhubaneswar 751030 (India); Majumder, S.; Solanki, V.; Varma, Shikha [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Bapna, Komal; Phase, D.M.; Sathe, V. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452017 (India)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Pulsed laser deposition of TiO{sub 2} films on Si(1 1 1) surface. • XPS and AFM study of TiO{sub 2} surface. • Ion beam treatment induced morphology. • Chemical reduction of TiO{sub 2} on the surface. • A-ray induced Auger transition of Ti LMM. - Abstract: We have investigated TiO{sub 2} films prepared by pulsed laser deposition method on Si(1 1 1) surface using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman Spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and ion beam sputtering techniques. Our XRD data along with Raman indicated that the deposited TiO{sub 2} is in anatase phase. The binding energy position of Ti 2p also supports the anatase phase formation. AFM topography of as deposited film indicates the formation of non uniform TiO{sub 2} growth with the formation of voids on Si(1 1 1) substrate. After sputtering with argon ion beam, surface erosion occurs and voids have disappeared. The Ti 2p core level of sputtered TiO{sub 2} exhibits the formation of Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO and pure Ti on the surface. High binding energy shoulder of O 1s peak becomes sharp after sputtering. Ti LMM Auger peaks become broader after sputtering but no shift in kinetic energy is observed.

  11. Investigation of Early Plasma Evolution Induced by Ultrashort Laser Pulses

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Wenqian; Shin, Yung C.; King, Galen B.

    2012-01-01

    Early plasma is generated owing to high intensity laser irradiation of target and the subsequent target material ionization. Its dynamics plays a significant role in laser-material interaction, especially in the air environment1-11. Early plasma evolution has been captured through pump-probe shadowgraphy1-3 and interferometry1,4-7. However, the studied time frames and applied laser parameter ranges are limited. For example, direct examinations of plasma front locations and electron number den...

  12. Laser-Induced Temperature Rise in a Composite Sandwich Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    by a scanning cw laser or electron beam, Journal of Applied Physics , 53 (1982), 4357-4363. [6] J. Calder and R. Sue, Modeling of cw laser annealing...of multilayer structures, Journal of Applied Physics , 53 (1982), 7545-7550. [7] H. Cline and T. Anthony, Heat treating and melting material with a...scanning laser or electron beam, Journal of Applied Physics , 48 (1977), 3895-3900. [8] F. John, .Partial Differential Equations, Springer, New York

  13. Laser Induced C60 Cage Opening Studied by Semiclassical Dynamics Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusheng Dou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser induced opening of the C60 cage is studied by a semiclassical electron-radiation-ion dynamics technique. The simulation results indicate that the C60 cage is abruptly opened immediately after laser excitation. The opening of the C60 cage induces a quick increase in kinetic energy and a sharp decrease in electronic energy, suggesting that the breaking of the C60 cage efficiently heats up the cluster and enhances the thermal fragmentation of C60 fullerene.

  14. Morphology of femtosecond laser-induced structural changes in KTP crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Yuhua [State Key Lab of Laser Technology and Wuhan National Lab for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074, Hubei (China); Lu Peixiang [State Key Lab of Laser Technology and Wuhan National Lab for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074, Hubei (China)]. E-mail: lupeixiang@mail.hust.edu.cn; Dai Nengli [State Key Lab of Laser Technology and Wuhan National Lab for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074, Hubei (China); Long Hua [State Key Lab of Laser Technology and Wuhan National Lab for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074, Hubei (China); Wang Ying [State Key Lab of Laser Technology and Wuhan National Lab for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074, Hubei (China); Yu Benhai [State Key Lab of Laser Technology and Wuhan National Lab for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074, Hubei (China)

    2006-11-30

    The morphology of structural changes in KTP crystal induced by single femtosecond laser pulse has been investigated by means of CCD camera, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atom force microscopy (AFM). The structurally changed region is depressed at energies close to the threshold for producing a structural change and melting ablation morphologies are observed as pulse energy is increased. Furthermore, periodic nanostructures are formed around the edge of the laser-induced spots.

  15. Laser induced surface emission of neutral species and its relationship to optical surface damage processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, L. L.; Smith, L. K.

    1988-03-01

    The laser-induced emission of neutral constituents and impurities from surfaces of several optical materials is shown to be correlated with optical surface damage thresholds. The characteristics of the emission can be utilized to investigate physical processes involved in the absorption of laser energy at the surface. Examples are given of neutral emission correlated with catastrophic surface heating, changes in surface stoichiometry, and thermally-induced cracking.

  16. Time-resolved measurement of single pulse femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structure formation

    OpenAIRE

    Kafka, K. R. P.; D. R. Austin; Li, H.; Yi, A; Cheng, J.; Chowdhury, E. A.

    2015-01-01

    Time-resolved diffraction microscopy technique has been used to observe the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) from the interaction of a single femtosecond laser pulse (pump) with a nano-scale groove mechanically formed on a single-crystal Cu substrate. The interaction dynamics (0-1200 ps) was captured by diffracting a time-delayed, frequency-doubled pulse from nascent LIPSS formation induced by the pump with an infinity-conjugate microscopy setup. The LIPSS ripple...

  17. LASER-INDUCED DECOMPOSITION OF METAL CARBONYLS FOR CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION OF MICROSTRUCTURES

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    Tungsten and nickel carbonyls were used to produce metal microstructures by laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on various substrates. The deposition rate of microstructures produced by thermodecomposition of W(CO)6 on Si substrates heated with a cw Ar+ laser beam was relatively low (10 to 30 nm/s) even at high temperatures (above 900°C). Ni microstructures were deposited on quartz substrates irradiated with a CO2 laser beam. Relatively high laser powers were needed to heat the Ni s...

  18. Initiation, Growth and Mitigation of UV Laser Induced Damage in Fused Silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubenchik, A M; Feit, M D

    2001-12-21

    Laser damage of large fused silica optics initiates at imperfections. Possible initiation mechanisms are considered. We demonstrate that a model based on nanoparticle explosions is consistent with the observed initiation craters. Possible mechanisms for growth upon subsequent laser irradiation, including material modification and laser intensification, are discussed. Large aperture experiments indicate an exponential increase in damage size with number of laser shots. Physical processes associated with this growth and a qualitative explanation of self-accelerated growth is presented. Rapid growth necessitates damage growth mitigation techniques. Several possible mitigation techniques are mentioned, with special emphasis on CO{sub 2} processing. Analysis of material evaporation, crack healing, and thermally induced stress are presented.

  19. Initiation, Growth and Mitigation of UV Laser Induced Damage in Fused Silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubenchik, A M; Feit, M D

    2003-06-10

    Laser damage of large fused silica optics initiates at imperfections. Possible initiation mechanisms are considered. We demonstrate that a model based on nanoparticle explosions is consistent with the observed initiation craters. Possible mechanisms for growth upon subsequent laser irradiation, including material modification and laser intensification, are discussed. Large aperture experiments indicate an exponential increase in damage size with number of laser shots. Physical processes associated with this growth and a qualitative explanation of self-accelerated growth is presented. Rapid growth necessitates damage growth mitigation techniques. Several possible mitigation techniques are mentioned, with special emphasis on CO{sub 2} processing. Analysis of material evaporation, crack healing, and thermally induced stress are presented.

  20. Optical-fiber-based laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for detection of early caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasazawa, Shuhei; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2015-06-01

    A laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system targeting for the in vivo analysis of tooth enamel is described. The system is planned to enable real-time analysis of teeth during laser dental treatment by utilizing a hollow optical fiber that transmits both Q-switched Nd:YAG laser light for LIBS and infrared Er:YAG laser light for tooth ablation. The sensitivity of caries detection was substantially improved by expanding the spectral region under analysis to ultraviolet (UV) light and by focusing on emission peaks of Zn in the UV region. Subsequently, early caries were distinguished from healthy teeth with accuracy rates above 80% in vitro.

  1. [Mathematical modeling of laser-induced selective destruction of labyrinthine vestibular receptors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonian, R G; Iakovlev, G V; Bakaliarov, A M; Garov, E V

    2006-01-01

    Basing on mathematical modeling, we tried to investigate in humans the ability of laser energy to suppress the function of the ampullar receptors of the semicircular canels and otolith receptors; to elicit mechanism of action of laser energy on labyrinthine receptors. Modeling has shown that in 1 mm thickness of the canal wall laser impact raises temperature of the liquid to 120 degrees C. Temperature higher than 100 degrees C stands in it up to 120 ms. This induces a distinct hydrodynamic shock which suppresses function of labyrinthine ampullar and otolith receptors. The heat factor of the laser impact causes destruction of the receptor sensory cells lasting for about a year.

  2. Optical-fiber-based laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for detection of early caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasazawa, Shuhei; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2015-06-01

    A laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system targeting for the in vivo analysis of tooth enamel is described. The system is planned to enable real-time analysis of teeth during laser dental treatment by utilizing a hollow optical fiber that transmits both Q-switched Nd:YAG laser light for LIBS and infrared Er:YAG laser light for tooth ablation. The sensitivity of caries detection was substantially improved by expanding the spectral region under analysis to ultraviolet (UV) light and by focusing on emission peaks of Zn in the UV region. Subsequently, early caries were distinguished from healthy teeth with accuracy rates above 80% in vitro.

  3. Production of 70-nm Cr dots by laser-induced forward transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sametoglu, Vahit; Sauer, Vincent T K; Tsui, Ying Y

    2013-07-29

    The effect of donor film thickness and laser beam fluence on the size of laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) spots is studied to achieve sub-100 nm features. A 130 fs, 800 nm laser is focused on ultrathin Cr films, and the transfer and ablation thresholds of these films at various thicknesses are determined. The minimum transfer spot size decreases with decreasing donor film thickness and incident laser fluence. Minimum LIFT spots of 70-450 nm diameter are obtained from films of 20-80 nm thickness, respectively. The 70 nm diameter transfer spots obtained from sputtered continuous films are the smallest to date.

  4. Two-photon-induced internal modification of silicon by erbium-doped fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verburg, P C; Römer, G R B E; Huis In 't Veld, A J

    2014-09-08

    Three-dimensional bulk modification of dielectric materials by multiphoton absorption of laser pulses is a well-established technology. The use of multiphoton absorption to machine bulk silicon has been investigated by a number of authors using femtosecond laser sources. However, no modifications confined in bulk silicon, induced by multiphoton absorption, have been reported so far. Based on results from numerical simulations, we employed an erbium-doped fiber laser operating at a relatively long pulse duration of 3.5 nanoseconds and a wavelength of 1549 nm for this process. We found that these laser parameters are suitable to produce modifications at various depths inside crystalline silicon.

  5. Pump-probe imaging of laser-induced periodic surface structures after ultrafast irradiation of Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Ryan D. [Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Torralva, Ben [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Adams, David P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Yalisove, Steven M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2013-09-30

    Ultrafast pump-probe microscopy has been used to investigate laser-induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) formation on polished Si surfaces. A crater forms on the surface after irradiation by a 150 fs laser pulse, and a second, subsequent pulse forms LIPSS within the crater. Sequentially delayed images show that LIPSS with a periodicity slightly less than the fundamental laser wavelength of 780 nm appear on Si surfaces ∼50 ps after arrival of the second pump laser pulse, well after the onset of melting. LIPSS are observed on the same timescale as material removal, suggesting that their formation involves material ejection.

  6. Pump-probe imaging of laser-induced periodic surface structures after ultrafast irradiation of Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Ryan D.; Torralva, Ben; Adams, David P.; Yalisove, Steven M.

    2013-09-01

    Ultrafast pump-probe microscopy has been used to investigate laser-induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) formation on polished Si surfaces. A crater forms on the surface after irradiation by a 150 fs laser pulse, and a second, subsequent pulse forms LIPSS within the crater. Sequentially delayed images show that LIPSS with a periodicity slightly less than the fundamental laser wavelength of 780 nm appear on Si surfaces ˜50 ps after arrival of the second pump laser pulse, well after the onset of melting. LIPSS are observed on the same timescale as material removal, suggesting that their formation involves material ejection.

  7. Subnanosecond-laser-induced periodic surface structures on prescratched silicon substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, Motoharu; Matsuo, Shigeki

    2016-06-01

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) were fabricated on a prescratched silicon surface by irradiation with subnanosecond laser pulses. Low-spatial-frequency LIPSS (LSFL) were observed in the central and peripheral regions; both had a period Λ close to the laser wavelength λ, and the wavevector orientation was parallel to the electric field of the laser beam. The LSFL in the peripheral region seemed to be growing, that is, expanding in length with increasing number of pulses, into the outer regions. In addition, high-spatial-frequency LIPSS, Λ ≲ λ /2, were found along the scratches, and their wavevector orientation was parallel to the scratches.

  8. Applications of ultra-short pulsed laser ablation: thin films deposition and fs/ns dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teghil, R; De Bonis, A; Galasso, A [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita della Basilicata, Via N. Sauro 85, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Santagata, A; Albano, G; Villani, P; Spera, D; Parisi, G P [CNR-IMIP, Unita di Potenza, Via S. Loja, 85050 Tito Scalo (Italy)], E-mail: roberto.teghil@unibas.it

    2008-10-15

    In this paper, we report a survey of two of the large number of possible practical applications of the laser ablation performed by an ultra-short pulse laser, namely pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and fs/ns dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS). These applications differ from those using just longer pulsed lasers as a consequence of the distinctive characteristics of the plasma produced by ultra-short laser beams. The most important feature of this plasma is the large presence of particles with nanometric size which plays a fundamental role in both applications.

  9. Pilot study of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for tissue differentiation by monitoring the plume created during laser surgery — An approach on a feedback Laser control mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanawade, Rajesh; Mehari, Fanuel; Knipfer, Christian; Rohde, Maximilian; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Schmidt, Michael; Stelzle, Florian

    2013-09-01

    This study focuses on tissue differentiation using 'Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy' (LIBS) by monitoring the plasma plume created during laser surgery processes. This technique is aimed at controlling a laser surgery feedback system in real time. An Excimer laser (Ar-F 193 nm) was used for the ablation of tissue samples. Fat, muscle, nerve and skin tissue samples of bisected ex-vivo pig heads were prepared as test objects for the ablation procedure. A single fiber was used to collect emissions and deliver them to a spectrometer. The obtained LIBS spectra in the measured emissions were analyzed to determine each tissue type according to their chemical composition. The elements found in the samples and their emission spectra were in agreement with those described in literature. The collected LIBS spectra were analyzed to differentiate the tissues using statistical data analysis: Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) and Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC). The obtained preliminary results suggest a successful differentiation of the target tissues with high sensitivity and specificity. The main goal of this study was to qualitatively identify tissue types during laser ablation, which will provide a real time feedback mechanism for clinical Laser surgery applications to significantly improve the accuracy and safety of laser surgery procedures.

  10. Multivariate Analysis of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Discrimination between Explosives and Plastics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qian-Qian; LIU Kai; ZHAO Hua

    2012-01-01

    A method to distinguish explosives from plastics using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is discussed. A model for classification with cross-validation theory is built based on the partial least-square discriminant analysis method. Seven types of plastics and one explosive are used as samples to test the model. The experimental results demonstrate that laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy has the capacity to discriminate explosives from plastics combined with chemometrics methods. The results could be useful for prospective research of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy on the differentiation of explosives and other materials.%A method to distinguish explosives from plastics using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is discussed.A model for classification with cross-validation theory is built based on the partial least-square discriminant analysis method.Seven types of plastics and one explosive are used as samples to test the model.The experimental results demonstrate that laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy has the capacity to discriminate explosives from plastics combined with chemometrics methods.The results could be useful for prospective research of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy on the differentiation of explosives and other materials.

  11. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy Diagnostic of Laser-Induced Optical Breakdown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian G. Parigger

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Transient laser plasma is generated in laser-induced optical breakdown (LIOB. Here we report experiments conducted with 10.6-micron CO2 laser radiation, and with 1.064-micron fundamental, 0.532-micron frequency-doubled, 0.355-micron frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser radiation. Characterization of laser induced plasma utilizes laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS techniques. Atomic hydrogen Balmer series emissions show electron number density of 1017 cm−3 measured approximately 10 μs and 1 μs after optical breakdown for CO2 and Nd:YAG laser radiation, respectively. Recorded molecular recombination emission spectra of CN and C2 Swan bands indicate an equilibrium temperature in excess of 7000 Kelvin, inferred for these diatomic molecules. Reported are also graphite ablation experiments where we use unfocused laser radiation that is favorable for observation of neutral C3 emission due to reduced C3 cation formation. Our analysis is based on computation of diatomic molecular spectra that includes accurate determination of rotational line strengths, or Hönl-London factors.

  12. Calculation of laser induced impulse based on the laser supported detonation wave model with dissociation, ionization and radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gan, Li, E-mail: ligan0001@gmail.com; Mousen, Cheng; Xiaokang, Li [College of Aerospace Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha (China)

    2014-03-15

    In the laser intensity range that the laser supported detonation (LSD) wave can be maintained, dissociation, ionization and radiation take a substantial part of the incidence laser energy. There is little treatment on the phenomenon in the existing models, which brings obvious discrepancies between their predictions and the experiment results. Taking into account the impact of dissociation, ionization and radiation in the conservations of mass, momentum and energy, a modified LSD wave model is developed which fits the experimental data more effectively rather than the existing models. Taking into consideration the pressure decay of the normal and the radial rarefaction, the laser induced impulse that is delivered to the target surface is calculated in the air; and the dependencies of impulse performance on laser intensity, pulse width, ambient pressure and spot size are indicated. The results confirm that the dissociation is the pivotal factor of the appearance of the momentum coupling coefficient extremum. This study focuses on a more thorough understanding of LSD and the interaction between laser and matter.

  13. Study on the influence of laser pulse duration in the long nanosecond regime on the laser induced plasma spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnasharty, I. Y.

    2016-10-01

    By using a high power pulsed fiber laser, this study reports the experimental investigation of the laser-induced plasma characteristics for the laser pulse duration range extended from 40 ns to 200 ns. The experiments were performed with keeping the laser fluence constant at 64 J/cm2. The measurements show that, for the early phase of plasma formation, the spectral line intensities and the continuum emissions as well as the plasma characteristics decay to a certain extent with the increase of the pulse duration. On the other hand, as the plasma evolves in post laser pulse regime, the electron density and the degree of ionization increase slightly for the longer pulses, while the plume temperature is more or less independent from the pulse duration. Furthermore, the ablation characteristics, such as the ablation rate, coincide with the results of plasma characteristics for the different pulse durations. Eventually, with keeping the laser fluence constant at 64 J/cm2, the analytical performance of Laser-Induced Plasma Spectroscopy (LIPS) for the corresponding pulse duration range is examined by using a temporal gating and non-gating analyses. The measurements show that, in the case of gating analysis, all pulse durations yield almost the same range of limits of detections LODs. On the other hand, for non-gating analysis, the longer pulse durations provide lower LODs (better) than the shorter ones by orders of magnitude. Moreover, the calculated absolute limit of detection (LODAbs) for the longest pulse duration (i.e. 200 ns) is lower by approximately factor 2 than that of the shortest one (i.e. 40 ns).

  14. Catastrophic nanosecond laser induced damage in the bulk of potassium titanyl phosphate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Frank R., E-mail: frank.wagner@fresnel.fr; Natoli, Jean-Yves; Akhouayri, Hassan; Commandré, Mireille [Institut Fresnel, CNRS, Aix-Marseille Université, Ecole Centrale Marseille, Campus de St Jérôme, 13013 Marseille (France); Duchateau, Guillaume [CELIA, UMR 5107 Université Bordeaux 1-CNRS-CEA, 351 Cours de la Libération, 33405 Talence Cedex (France)

    2014-06-28

    Due to its high effective nonlinearity and the possibility to produce periodically poled crystals, potassium titanyl phosphate (KTiOPO{sub 4}, KTP) is still one of the economically important nonlinear optical materials. In this overview article, we present a large study on catastrophic nanosecond laser induced damage in this material and the very similar RbTiOPO{sub 4} (RTP). Several different systematic studies are included: multiple pulse laser damage, multi-wavelength laser damage in KTP, damage resistance anisotropy, and variations of the laser damage thresholds for RTP crystals of different qualities. All measurements were carried out in comparable experimental conditions using a 1064 nm Q-switched laser and some were repeated at 532 nm. After summarizing the experimental results, we detail the proposed model for laser damage in this material and discuss the experimental results in this context. According to the model, nanosecond laser damage is caused by light-induced generation of transient laser-damage precursors which subsequently provide free electrons that are heated by the same nanosecond pulse. We also present a stimulated Raman scattering measurement and confront slightly different models to the experimental data. Finally, the physical nature of the transient damage precursors is discussed and similarities and differences to laser damage in other crystals are pointed out.

  15. Demarcation laser photocoagulation induced retinal necrosis and rupture resulting in large retinal tear formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quezada, Carlos; Pieramici, Dante J; Matsui, Rodrigo; Rabena, Melvin; Graue, Federico

    2015-06-01

    Retinal tears after laser photocoagulation are a rare complication that occurs after intense laser. It is talked about among retina specialist occurring particularly at the end of a surgical case while applying endophotocoagulation; to the best our knowledge, there are no reports in the literature of a large retinal tear induced after attempted in-office demarcation laser photocoagulation (DLP) that simulated a giant retinal tear. DLP has been employed in the management of selected cases of macula sparring rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD). Even though extension of the retinal detachment through the "laser barrier" is considered a failure of treatment, few complications have been described with the use of this less invasive retinal detachment repair technique. We describe a case of a high myopic woman who initially was treated with demarcation laser photocoagulation for an asymptomatic retinal detachment associated with a single horseshoe tear and a full thickness large retinal tear was created where the laser was placed. Intense laser photocoagulation resulted in abrupt laser induced retinal necrosis and rupture creating this large retinal break. Proper laser technique should reduce the risks associated with this procedure.

  16. MARTENSITE TRANSFORMATION MICROSTRUCTURE OF 40Cr STEEL COMPLEXLY INDUCED BY LASER SHOCK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ruifang; HUA Yinqun; CAI Lan

    2007-01-01

    40Cr steel is laser quenched by the NEL-2500A rapidly axial flow CO2 laser. Then the martensite induced by laser quenched is shocked by Nd:YAG laser again. Through comparing and analyzing the appearance and size ofmartensite, the dislocation density in microstructure between the treated zones by laser quenched and by laser quenched plus laser shock, the following results are shown: The second martensite obtained by laser compound treatment is more finer compared with those obtained by laser quenched; In the hardened zones obtained by compound treatment, a lot of slender second twin crystal martensites are induced; A lot of more high density dislocation tangles and cellular dislocations are generated. From the transmission electron microscope (TEM) micrograph after compound treatment, there are not only long lath and short nubbly martensites arranged in cross direction, but also massive nubbly and small short nubbly martensites arranged in longitudinal direction. Some martensites look like the broken blocks of quenched martensites. These new martensites are inserted transversely in the quenched martensites with large tangle. And they make quenched martensites break into pieces. Compared with the quenched martensites, the size of fresh martensites are smaller, about 0.3~0.5 μm.

  17. Online compositional analysis in coal gasification environment using laser-induced plasma technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Kung-Li; Wu, Juntao; Wang, Zhe; Lee, Boon; Guida, Renato

    2006-08-01

    Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants have great potential for future clean-coal power generation. Today, the quality of coal is measured by sampling coal using various offline methods, and the syn-gas composition is determined by taking samples downstream of the gasifier and measured by gas chromatograph (GC). Laser induced plasma technology has demonstrated high sensitivity for elementary detection. The capability of free space transmission and focusing of laser beam makes laser induced plasma a unique technology for online compositional analysis in coal gasification environment and optimization control.

  18. Non-gated laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in bulk water by position-selective detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Ye; Xue, Boyang; Song, Jiaojian; Lu, Yuan; Zheng, Ronger, E-mail: rzheng@ouc.edu.cn [Optics and Optoelectronics Laboratory, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China)

    2015-09-14

    Temporal and spatial evolutions of the laser-induced plasma in bulk water are investigated using fast imaging and emission spectroscopic techniques. By tightly focusing a single-pulse nanosecond Nd: YAG laser beam into the bulk water, we generate a strongly expanded plasma with high reproducibility. Such a strong expanding plasma enables us to obtain well-resolved spectral lines by means of position-selective detection; hence, the time-gated detector becomes abdicable. The present results suggest not only a possible non-gated approach for underwater laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy but also give an insight into the plasma generation and expansion in bulk water.

  19. Electromagnetically induced transparency in an asymmetric double quantum well under non-resonant, intense laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niculescu, E. C.

    2017-02-01

    Electromagnetically induced transparency in an asymmetric double quantum well subjected to a non-resonant, intense laser field is theoretically investigated. We found that the energy levels configuration could be switched between a Λ-type and a ladder-type scheme by varying the non-resonant radiation intensity. This effect is due to the laser-induced electron tunneling between the wells and it allows a substantial flexibility in the manipulation of the optical properties. The dependence of the susceptibilities on the control field Rabi frequency, intensity of the nonresonant laser, and the control field detuning for both configurations are discussed and compared.

  20. Pulsed laser irradiation-induced microstructures in the Mn ion implanted Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naito, Muneyuki, E-mail: naito22@center.konan-u.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Konan University, Okamoto, Higashi-Nada, Kobe, Hyogo 658-8501 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Yamada, Ryo; Machida, Nobuya [Department of Chemistry, Konan University, Okamoto, Higashi-Nada, Kobe, Hyogo 658-8501 (Japan); Koshiba, Yusuke; Sugimura, Akira; Aoki, Tamao; Umezu, Ikurou [Department of Physics, Konan University, Okamoto, Higashi-Nada, Kobe, Hyogo 658-8501 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    We have examined microstructures induced by pulsed-laser-melting for the Mn ion implanted Si using transmission electron microscopy. Single crystalline Si(0 0 1) wafers were irradiated with 65 keV and 120 keV Mn ions to a fluence of 1.0 × 10{sup 16}/cm{sup 2} at room temperature. The ion beam-induced amorphous layers in the as-implanted samples were melted and resolidified by pulsed YAG laser irradiation. After laser irradiation with appropriate laser fluence, the surface amorphous layers recrystallize into the single crystalline Si. The Mn concentration becomes higher in the near-surface region with increasing the number of laser shots. The migrated Mn atoms react with Si atoms and form the amorphous Mn–Si in the Si matrix.

  1. Effect of laser-induced photodissociation of oxyhemoglobin on biomedical processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asimov, Mustafo M.; Asimov, Rustam M.; Mirshahi, M.; Gisbrecht, Alexander

    2001-04-01

    In the present report we draw attention to the phenomenon of laser-induced photodissociation of oxyhemoglobin in cutaneous blood vessels as an important factor in biostimulating and therapeutic action of low energy laser radiation. Calculations of absorption efficiency of laser radiation both by oxyhemoglobin and carbon monoxide hemoglobin were carried out by a computer simulation using Kubelka-Munk model of tissue. It has been shown that the absorption of the oxyhemoglobin in the visible region corresponding to the Q-band of absorption spectra possesses a relatively high selectivity. The obtained results are discussed in terms of developing new methods for wound healing, as well as for carbon monoacid poisoning. Some aspects of the laser-induced photodissociation of oxyhemoglobin complexes are discussed in view of its practical use for developing new diagnostic methods. An attractive way to use this phenomenon is monitoring of local concentrations of oxygen by laser light irradiation.

  2. Photomechanical ablation of biological tissue induced by focused femtosecond laser and its application for acupuncture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokawa, Yoichiroh; Ohta, Mika; Ito, Akihiko; Takaoka, Yutaka

    2013-03-01

    Photomechanical laser ablation due to focused femtosecond laser irradiation was induced on the hind legs of living mice, and its clinical influence on muscle cell proliferation was investigated via histological examination and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis to examine the expression of the gene encoding myostatin, which is a growth repressor in muscle satellite cells. The histological examination suggested that damage of the tissue due to the femtosecond laser irradiation was localized on epidermis and dermis and hardly induced in the muscle tissue below. On the other hand, gene expression of the myostatin of muscle tissue after laser irradiation was suppressed. The suppression of myostatin expression facilitates the proliferation of muscle cells, because myostatin is a growth repressor in muscle satellite cells. On the basis of these results, we recognize the potential of the femtosecond laser as a tool for noncontact, high-throughput acupuncture in the treatment of muscle disease.

  3. Narrow titanium oxide nanowires induced by femtosecond laser pulses on a titanium surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Li, Xian-Feng; Zhang, Cheng-Yun; Tie, Shao-Long; Lan, Sheng

    2017-02-01

    The evolution of the nanostructure induced on a titanium (Ti) surface with increasing irradiation pulse number by using a 400-nm femtosecond laser was examined by using scanning electron microscopy. High spatial frequency periodic structures of TiO2 parallel to the laser polarization were initially observed because of the laser-induced oxidation of the Ti surface and the larger efficacy factor of TiO2 in this direction. Periodically aligned TiO2 nanowires with featured width as small as 20 nm were obtained. With increasing pulse number, however, low spatial frequency periodic structures of Ti perpendicular to the laser polarization became dominant because Ti possesses a larger efficacy factor in this direction. The competition between the high- and low-spatial frequency periodic structures is in good agreement with the prediction of the efficacy factor theory and it should also be observed in the femtosecond laser ablation of other metals which are easily oxidized in air.

  4. Femtosecond laser-induced subwavelength ripples formed by asymmetrical grating splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Pin; Jiang, Lan; Li, Xin; Zhang, Kaihu; Shi, Xuesong; Li, Bo; Lu, Yongfeng

    2016-05-01

    The formation process and mechanism of subwavelength ripples were studied upon irradiation of ZnO by a femtosecond laser (800 nm, 50 fs, 1 kHz). An abnormally asymmetrical grating-splitting phenomenon was discovered. At relatively high laser fluences (F = 0.51-0.63 J/cm2), near-wavelength ripples were split asymmetrically to create subwavelength laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) with dual gaps (˜230 nm and ˜430 nm) on the primary grooves. At relatively low laser fluences (F = 0.4-0.45 J/cm2), near-wavelength ripples were split symmetrically, leading to the formation of uniform subwavelength structures with a period of ˜340 nm. The splitting phenomena are related to the varying laser beam dose induced by the overlapping during line scanning. The two grating-splitting types further imply that the dominated mechanism for LIPSS formation may be changed under different processing conditions.

  5. Crystallo-optic diagnostics method of the soft laser-induced effects in biological fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skopinov, S. A.; Yakovleva, S. V.

    1991-05-01

    Presently, it is well known that individual cells"2 and higher organisms3'4 exhibit a marked response to soft laser irradiation in certain parts of the visible and near infrared spectral ranges. Broad clinical applications of laser therapy and slow progress in understanding of the physical, chemical and biological mechanisms of this phenomenon make the task to search new methods of objectivisation of laser-induces bioeffects very insistent. In this paper we give a short review of the methods of structural-optical diagnostics of the soft laser-induced effects in biofluids (blood and its fractions, saliva, juices, mucuses, exudations, etc.) and suggest their applications in experimental and clinical studies of the soft laser bioeffects.

  6. Laser-Bioplasma Interaction: The Blood Type Transmutation Induced by Multiple Ultrashort Wavelength Laser Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2015-11-01

    The interaction of ultrashort wavelength multi laser beams with the flowing blood thin films leads to the transmutation of the blood types A, B, and AB into O type. This is a novel mechanism of importance for the transfusion medicine. Laser radiation is in resonance with the eigen-frequency modes of the antigen proteins and forces the proteins to parametrically oscillate until they get kicked out from the surface. The stripping away of antigens is done by the scanning-multiple-lasers of a high repetition rate in the blue-purple frequency domain. The guiding-lasers are in the red-green frequency domain. The laser force, (parametric interaction with the antigen eigen-oscillation), upon the antigen protein molecule must exceed its weight. The scanning laser beam is partially reflected as long as the antigen(s) is not eliminated. The process of the protein detachment can last a few minutes. Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs., Stefan University.

  7. Emission Characteristics of Laser-Induced Plasma Using Collinear Long and Short Dual-Pulse Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenzhen; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Liu, Renwei; Ikutomo, Akihiro; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Chong, Daotong; Yan, Junjie; Liu, Jiping; Shiou, Fang-Jung

    2017-09-01

    Collinear long and short dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS) was employed to clarify the emission characteristics from laser-induced plasma. The plasma was sustained and became stable by the long pulse-width laser with the pulse width of 60 μs under free running (FR) conditions as an external energy source. Comparing the measurement results of stainless steel in air using single-pulse LIBS (SP-LIBS) and DP-LIBS, the emission intensity was markedly enhanced using DP-LIBS. The temperature of plasma induced by DP-LIBS was maintained at a higher temperature under different gate delay time and short pulse-width laser power conditions compared with those measured using short SP-LIBS. Moreover, the variation rates of plasma temperatures measured using DP-LIBS were also lower. The superior detection ability was verified by the measurement of aluminum sample in water. The spectra were clearly detected using DP-LIBS, whereas it cannot be identified using SP-LIBS of short and long pulse widths. The effects of gate delay time and short pulse-width laser power were also discussed. These results demonstrate the feasibility and enhanced detection ability of the proposed collinear long and short DP-LIBS method.

  8. Human-chromosome alterations induced by argon laser treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simi, S.; Colella, C. (Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pisa (Italy). Lab. di Mutagenesi e Differenziamento); Agati, G.; Fusi, F. (Florence Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Farmacologia); Corsi, M.F.; Pratesi, R. (Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Florence (Italy). Lab. di Elettronica Quantistica); Tocco, G.A. (Naples Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Istologia ed Embrilogia)

    1984-07-01

    The possible occurrence of genetic damage arising from exposure of human cells to visible laser light has been evaluated in PHA-stimulated human lymphocytes. Aneuploidy and chromosome aberrations have been observed after exposure to an argon laser. These findings appear of special interest in view of the possible role of these chromosome alterations in carcinogenesis.

  9. Ultrafast Laser Induced Magnetization Dynamics in High Magnetic Fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, J.J.

    2016-01-01

    In dit proefschrift combineer ik hoge magneetvelden tot 37.5 T met ultrakorte laser pulsen in een unieke opstelling, om de magnetische eigenschappen van nanometer-dunne lagen te onderzoeken. Ik laat zien, dat femtoseconde laser pulsen gebruikt kunnen worden om magnetisme in materialen voor de

  10. Optimal control of photoelectron emission by realistic waveforms

    CERN Document Server

    Solanpää, Janne; Räsänen, Esa

    2016-01-01

    Recent experimental techniques in multicolor waveform synthesis allow the temporal shaping of strong femtosecond laser pulses with applications in the control of quantum mechanical processes in atoms, molecules, and nanostructures. Prediction of the shapes of the optimal waveforms can be done computationally using quantum optimal control theory (QOCT). In this work we bring QOCT to experimental feasibility by providing an optimal control scheme with realistic pulse representation. We apply the technique to optimal control of above-threshold photoelectron emission from a one-dimensional hydrogen atom. By mixing different spectral channels and thus lowering the intensity requirements for individual channels, the resulting optimal pulses can extend the cutoff energies by at least up to 50% and bring up the electron yield by several orders of magnitude. Insights into the electron dynamics for optimized photoelectron emission are obtained with a semiclassical two-step model.

  11. Flip-chip bonding of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers using laser-induced forward transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, K. S., E-mail: Kaur.Kamalpreet@elis.ugent.be; Missinne, J.; Van Steenberge, G. [Centre for Microsystems Technology, imec/Ghent University, Technologiepark 914A, B-9052 Gent (Belgium)

    2014-02-10

    This letter reports the use of the Laser-Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) technique for the fabrication of indium micro-bumps for the flip-chip (FC) bonding of single vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser chips. The FC bonded chips were electrically and optically characterized, and the successful functioning of the devices post-bonding is demonstrated. The die shear and life-time tests carried out on the bonded chips confirmed the mechanical reliability of the LIFT-assisted FC bonded assemblies.

  12. Laser desorption ionization and peptide sequencing on laser induced silicon microcolumn arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertes, Akos [Reston, VA; Chen, Yong [San Diego, CA

    2011-12-27

    The present invention provides a method of producing a laser-patterned silicon surface, especially silicon wafers for use in laser desorption ionization (LDI-MS) (including MALDI-MS and SELDI-MS), devices containing the same, and methods of testing samples employing the same. The surface is prepared by subjecting a silicon substrate to multiple laser shots from a high-power picosecond or femtosecond laser while in a processing environment, e.g., underwater, and generates a remarkable homogenous microcolumn array capable of providing an improved substrate for LDI-MS.

  13. Laser-induced solid-solid phase transition in As under pressure: a theoretical prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zijlstra, Eeuwe S; Huntemann, Nils; Garcia, Martin E [Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Kassel, Heinrich-Plett-Strasse 40, 34132 Kassel (Germany)], E-mail: Zijlstra@physik.uni-kassel.de

    2008-03-15

    In arsenic, a pressure-induced solid-solid phase transition from the A7 into the simple cubic structure has been experimentally demonstrated (Beister et al 1990 Phys. Rev. B 41 5535). In this paper, we present calculations, which predict that this phase transition can also be induced by an ultrashort laser pulse in As under pressure. In addition, calculations for the pressure-induced phase transition are presented. Using density functional theory in the generalized gradient approximation, we found that the pressure-induced phase transition takes place at 26.3 GPa and is accompanied by a volume change {delta}V=0.5 a{sub 0}{sup 3} atom{sup -1}. The laser-induced phase transition is predicted for an applied pressure of 23.8 GPa and an absorbed laser energy of 2.8 mRy atom{sup -1}.

  14. Diamond detectors with laser induced surface graphite electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komlenok, M.; Bolshakov, A.; Ralchenko, V.; Konov, V.; Conte, G.; Girolami, M.; Oliva, P.; Salvatori, S.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the response of metal-less CVD polycrystalline-diamond pixel sensors under β-particles irradiation. A 21×21 array of 0.18×0.18 mm2 pixels was realized on one side of a 10.0×10.0×0.5 mm3 polycrystalline diamond substrate by means of laser induced surface graphitization. With the same technique, a large graphite contact, used for detector biasing, was fabricated on the opposite side. A coincidence detecting method was used with two other reference polycrystalline diamond detectors for triggering, instead of commonly used scintillators, positioned in the front and on the back of the sensor-array with respect to the impinging particles trajectory. The collected charge distribution at each pixel was analyzed as a function of the applied bias. No change in the pulse height distribution was recorded by inverting the bias voltage polarity, denoting contacts ohmicity and symmetry. A fairly good pixel response uniformity was obtained: the collected charge most probable value saturates for all the pixels at an electric field strength of about ±0.6 V/μm. Under saturation condition, the average collected charge was equal to =1.64±0.02 fC, implying a charge collection distance of about 285 μm. A similar result, within 2%, was also obtained for 400 MeV electrons at beam test facility at INFN Frascati National Laboratory. Experimental results highlighted that more than 84% of impinging particles involved only one pixel, with no significant observed cross-talk effects.

  15. Characterisation of estuarine intertidal macroalgae by laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gameiro, Carla; Utkin, Andrei B.; Cartaxana, Paulo

    2015-12-01

    The article reports the application of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) for the assessment of macroalgae communities of estuarine intertidal areas. The method was applied for the characterisation of fifteen intertidal macroalgae species of the Tagus estuary, Portugal, and adjacent coastal area. Three bands characterised the LIF spectra of red macroalgae with emission maxima in the ranges 577-583 nm, 621-642 nm and 705-731 nm. Green and brown macroalgae showed one emission maximum in the red region (687-690 nm) and/or one in the far-red region (726-732 nm). Characteristics of LIF emission spectra were determined by differences in the main fluorescing pigments: phycoerythrin, phycocyanin and chlorophyll a (Chl a). In the green and brown macroalgae groups, the relative significance of the two emission maxima seems to be related to the thickness of the photosynthetic layer. In thick macroalgae, like Codium tomentosum or Fucus vesiculosus, the contribution of the far-red emission fluorescence peak was more significant, most probably due to re-absorption of the emitted red Chl a fluorescence within the dense photosynthetic layer. Similarly, an increase in the number of layers of the thin-blade green macroalgae Ulva rigida caused a shift to longer wavelengths of the red emission maximum and the development of a fluorescence peak at the far-red region. Water loss from Ulva's algal tissue also led to a decrease in the red/far-red Chl fluorescence ratio (F685/F735), indicating an increase in the density of chloroplasts in the shrinking macroalgal tissue during low tide exposure.

  16. Spectrally resolved laser-induced fluorescence for bioaerosols standoff detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buteau, Sylvie; Stadnyk, Laurie; Rowsell, Susan; Simard, Jean-Robert; Ho, Jim; Déry, Bernard; McFee, John

    2007-09-01

    An efficient standoff biological warfare detection capability could become an important asset for both defence and security communities based on the increasing biological threat and the limits of the presently existing protection systems. Defence R&D Canada (DRDC) has developed, by the end of the 90s, a standoff bioaerosol sensor prototype based on intensified range-gated spectrometric detection of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF). This LIDAR system named SINBAHD monitors the spectrally resolved LIF originating from inelastic interactions with bioaerosols present in atmospheric cells customizable in size and in range. SINBAHD has demonstrated the capability of near real-time detection and classification of bioaerosolized threats at multi-kilometre ranges. In spring 2005, DRDC has initiated the BioSense demonstration project, which combines the SINBAHD technology with a geo-referenced Near InfraRed (NIR) LIDAR cloud mapper. SINBAHD is now being used to acquire more signatures to add in the spectral library and also to optimize and test the new BioSense algorithm strategy. In September 2006, SINBAHD has participated in a two-week trial held at DRDC-Suffield where different open-air wet releases of live and killed bioagent simulants, growth media and obscurants were performed. An autoclave killing procedure was performed on two biological materials (Bacillus subtilis var globigii or BG, and Bacillus thuringiensis or Bt) before being aerosolized, disseminated and spectrally characterized with SINBAHD. The obtained results showed no significant impact of this killing process on their normalised spectral signature in comparison with their live counterparts. Correlation between the detection signals from SINBAHD, an array of slit samplers and a FLuorescent Aerosol Particle Sensor (C-FLAPS) was obtained and SINBAHD's sensitivity could then be estimated. At the 2006 trial, a detection limit of a few tens of Agent Containing Particles per Liter of Air (ACPLA) was obtained

  17. In situ diagnosis of pulsed UV laser surface ablation of tungsten carbide hardmetal by using laser-induced optical emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tiejun; Lou, Qihong; Wei, Yunrong; Huang, Feng; Dong, Jingxing; Liu, Jingru

    2001-12-01

    Surface ablation of cobalt cemented tungsten carbide hardmetal with pulsed UV laser has been in situ diagnosed by using the technique of laser-induced optical emission spectroscopy. The dependence of emission intensity of cobalt lines on number of laser shots was investigated at laser fluence of 2.5 J/cm 2. As a comparison, the reliance of emission intensity of cobalt lines as a function of laser pulse number by using pure cobalt as ablation sample was also studied at the same laser condition. It was found that for surface ablation of tungsten carbide hardmetal at laser fluence of 2.5 J/cm 2, the intensities of cobalt lines fell off dramatically in the first 300 consecutive laser shots and then slowed down to a low stable level with even more shots. For surface ablation of pure cobalt at the same laser condition, the intensities of cobalt lines remained constant more or less even after 500 laser shots and then reduced very slowly with even more shots. It was concluded that selective evaporation of cobalt at this laser fluence should be responsible for the dramatic fall-off of cobalt lines with laser shots accumulation for surface ablation of tungsten carbide hardmetal. In contrast, for surface ablation of pure cobalt, the slow reduction of cobalt lines with pulse number accumulation should be due to the formation of laser-induced crater effect.

  18. Simultaneous laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and Pd-assisted methane decomposition at different pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyhani, A. [Phys. Dept., Faculty of Science, Imam Khomeini International University, Qazvin, 34149-16818 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mortazavi, S.Z. [Phys. Dept., Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Parvin, P., E-mail: parvin@aut.ac.ir [Phys. Dept., Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahmoudi, Z. [Phys. Dept., Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-08-15

    Methane decomposition is investigated during Pd-assisted laser induced plasma in the controlled chamber at various pressures using Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Real time LIBS monitoring is applied to reveal the involved mechanisms during methane decomposition by inspecting the plasma parameters at mano-metric pressures of 1 to 10 mbar. The dependence of electron density and plasma temperature with pressure is also studied. It is shown that the plasma recreates higher hydrocarbons during the decomposition of methane. In addition, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, gas chromatography, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy are applied to support the findings. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simultaneous laser induced breakdown spectroscopy Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pd-assisted methane decomposition Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanosecond pulsed laser decomposition of methane Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Generation of higher hydrocarbon Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dependence of electron density and temperature of induced plasma with pressure.

  19. Ab Initio Simulation of Electrical Currents Induced by Ultrafast Laser Excitation of Dielectric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, Georg; Lemell, Christoph; Burgdörfer, Joachim; Sato, Shunsuke A.; Tong, Xiao-Min; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    2014-08-01

    We theoretically investigate the generation of ultrafast currents in insulators induced by strong few-cycle laser pulses. Ab initio simulations based on time-dependent density functional theory give insight into the atomic-scale properties of the induced current signifying a femtosecond-scale insulator-metal transition. We observe the transition from nonlinear polarization currents during the laser pulse at low intensities to tunnelinglike excitation into the conduction band at higher laser intensities. At high intensities, the current persists after the conclusion of the laser pulse considered to be the precursor of the dielectric breakdown on the femtosecond scale. We show that the transferred charge sensitively depends on the orientation of the polarization axis relative to the crystal axis, suggesting that the induced charge separation reflects the anisotropic electronic structure. We find good agreement with very recent experimental data on the intensity and carrier-envelope phase dependence [A. Schiffrin et al., Nature (London) 493, 70 (2013)].

  20. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy detection of heavy metal in water based on graphite conch method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunlong; Liu, Jianguo; Zhao, Nanjing; Shi, Huan; Liu, Lituo; Ma, Mingjun; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Dong; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Yujun; Liu, Wenqing

    2012-10-01

    The laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy emission characteristics of trace heavy metal lead in water is studied based on graphite conch method, with a 1064nm wavelength Nd: YAG laser as excitation source, the echelle spectrometer and ICCD detector are used for spectral separation and high sensitive detection with high resolution and wide spectral range. The delay time 900ns and gate time 1600ns are determined in the experiment. The calibration curve of Pb is plotted based on the different concentration measurement results, and a limit of detection of 0.0138mg / L is obtained for Pb in water. Graphite conch method effectively overcomes the current problems on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy detection of heavy metal in water. The detection limits and stability are improved. The reference data is provided for further study on the fast measurement of trace heavy metals in water by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique.