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Sample records for laser induced nuclear

  1. Laser induced nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledingham, Ken; McCanny, Tom; Graham, Paul; Fang Xiao; Singhal, Ravi; Magill, Joe; Creswell, Alan; Sanderson, David; Allott, Ric; Neely, David; Norreys, Peter; Santala, Marko; Zepf, Matthew; Watts, Ian; Clark, Eugene; Krushelnick, Karl; Tatarakis, Michael; Dangor, Bucker; Machecek, Antonin; Wark, Justin

    1998-01-01

    Dramatic improvements in laser technology since 1984 have revolutionised high power laser technology. Application of chirped-pulse amplification techniques has resulted in laser intensities in excess of 10 19 W/cm 2 . In the mid to late eighties, C. K. Rhodes and K. Boyer discussed the possibility of shining laser light of this intensity onto solid surfaces and to cause nuclear transitions. In particular, irradiation of a uranium target could induce electro- and photofission in the focal region of the laser. In this paper it is shown that μCi of 62 Cu can be generated via the (γ,n) reaction by a laser with an intensity of about 10 19 Wcm -2

  2. Laser-induced nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jablon, Claude

    1977-01-01

    Research programs on laser-induced thermonuclear fusion in the United States, in Europe and in USSR are reviewed. The principle of the fusion reactions induced is explained, together with the theoretical effects of the following phenomena: power and type of laser beams, shape and size of the solid target, shock waves, and laser-hydrodynamics coupling problems [fr

  3. Laser induced nuclear orientation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, M.; Pappas, P.; Feld, M.S.; Murnick, D.E.

    1977-01-01

    Resonant laser radiation can orient metastable nuclei, resulting in spatially anisotropic emission of β or γ radiation. This technique can be used to obtain isomer shifts and nuclear moments and can lead to isomer separation. (Auth.)

  4. Laser induced nuclear orientation: intersection of laser and nuclear spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, M.; Pappas, P.; Field, M.S.

    1978-01-01

    The application of lasers to the study of hyperfine structure is reviewed with emphasis placed on the ability of the laser beam to align the nuclei in a sample. This aligning effect is especially useful if the nuclei are unstable as then the angular distribution of the subsequent nuclear radiation may be effected and information will by given about the nuclear parameters. (B.R.H.)

  5. Laser-induced nuclear physics and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledingham, K.W.D.; Singhal, R.P.; McKenna, P.; Spencer, I.

    2002-01-01

    With a 1 ps pulse laser at 1 μm wavelength, He gas is ionised at about 3.10 14 W.cm -2 . As the intensity increases, the inert gases become multiple ionised and between 10 18 and 10 19 W.cm -2 photon induced nuclear reactions are energetically possible. Close to 10 21 W.cm -2 pion production can take place. At the very high intensities of 10 28 W.cm -2 , it can be shown that electron-positron pairs can be created from the vacuum. The authors review the applications of high intensity focused laser beams in particle acceleration, laser-induced fission and laser production of protons and neutrons. Exciting new phenomena are expected at intensities higher than 10 22 W.cm -2 , -) the oscillating electric field can affect directly the protons in exactly the same way as the electrons in the plasma, -) fusion reactions by direct laser acceleration of ions. (A.C.)

  6. Laser-induced nuclear orientation and gamma anisotropy in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pappas, P.G.

    1980-12-01

    The use of laser optical pumping to induce nuclear orientation in several isotopes and one isomer of atomic sodium vapor is described. Essentially complete nuclear polarization, P > 90%, has been achieved in stable 23 Na when pumping with modest laser intensities (I approx. = 10 mW/cm 2 ). The volume of the sample cell was approximately 10 cc, and was filled with a sodium density of about 10'' atoms/cc. Complete coverage of the Doppler distribution was accomplished with the use of trace amounts (less than or equal to 1 torr) of argon buffer gas to induce velocity changing collisions. A theoretical model which accurately predicts the amount of polarization is developed. The orientation of nuclei which are unstable to gamma decay can manifest itself in anisotropic gamma ray emission. This anisotropy can be used to measure isotope and isomer shifts, from which nuclear properties can be derived. Gamma anisotropy was observed in two systems, 22 Na and /sup 24m/Na. From the observed anisotropy in /sup 24m/Na, a negative sign for the g factor is determined. Values are derived for the magnetic moment, μ = 2.56 +- 0.64 nm, and the isomer shift, deltaν/sub 24m/ = 288 +- 191 MHz (D1 line). A model is described which relates various laser and fubber gas parameters to the observed gamma anisotropy lineshape. This model facilitates the extraction of physical parameters from knowledge of the laser frequency at which the anisotropy is a maximum

  7. Nuclear reactivity control using laser induced polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, C.D.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes a control element for reactivity control of a fission source provides an atomic density of 3 He in a control volume which is effective to control criticality as the 3 He is spin-polarized. Spin-polarization of the 3 He affects the cross section of the control volume for fission neutrons and hence, the reactivity. An irradiation source is directed within the 3 He for spin-polarizing the 3 He. An alkali-metal vapor may be included with the 3 He where a laser spin-polarizes the alkali-metal atoms which in turn, spin-couple with 3 He to spin-polarize the 3 He atoms

  8. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for applications in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suri, B.M.

    2010-01-01

    There are several analytical techniques employing laser spectroscopy - each with its own distinctive potential. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is one such technique which is attractive in view of its relative compactness and simplicity (in configuration), remote and online analysis (with no sample handling requirement) and high spatial resolution allowing compositional map or homogeneity analysis. In this technique, a high power pulsed (mostly nanosecond) laser is employed to irradiate the sample causing spark emission, characteristics of the sample composition, which is collected using suitable optics and analysed spectroscopically. Remote and online capability is derived from long distance delivery of laser beams and collection of emitted light by fibres or conventional optics. Since laser can be focused sharply on the target, it can facilitate compositional mapping. Beam Technology Development Group at BARC had initiated work on LIBS of nuclear materials several years ago. Recently the challenge of online monitoring of radioactive waste vitrification plant in a hot cell has been taken up. The theoretical and experimental work done by the group related to instrument development, plasma characterization, quantitative compositional analysis of ternary alloys and uranium vitrified glass samples (comprising more than dozen elements) are described. The future plans for setting up online glass homogeneity monitoring facility are also described. This should fulfill an important demand for optimization of vitrification process. Various other demands of nuclear industry are also reviewed

  9. Nuclear Fusion Effects Induced in Intense Laser-Generated Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Torrisi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Deutered polyethylene (CD2n thin and thick targets were irradiated in high vacuum by infrared laser pulses at 1015W/cm2 intensity. The high laser energy transferred to the polymer generates plasma, expanding in vacuum at supersonic velocity, accelerating hydrogen and carbon ions. Deuterium ions at kinetic energies above 4 MeV have been measured by using ion collectors and SiC detectors in time-of-flight configuration. At these energies the deuterium–deuterium collisions may induce over threshold fusion effects, in agreement with the high D-D cross-section valuesaround 3 MeV energy. At the first instants of the plasma generation, during which high temperature, density and ionacceleration occur, the D-D fusions occur as confirmed by the detection of mono-energetic protonsand neutrons with a kinetic energy of 3.0 MeV and 2.5 MeV, respectively, produced by the nuclear reaction. The number of fusion events depends strongly on the experimental set-up, i.e. on the laser parameters (intensity, wavelength, focal spot dimension, target conditions (thickness, chemical composition, absorption coefficient, presence of secondary targets and used geometry (incidence angle, laser spot, secondary target positions.A number of D-D fusion events of the order of 106÷7 per laser shot has been measured.

  10. On the use of time resolved laser-induced spectrofluorometry in the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulin, C.; Decambox, P.; Mauchien, P.; Davin, T.; Pradel, B.

    1991-01-01

    Time Resolved Laser-Induced Spectrofluorometry (TRLIS) has been used for actinides trace analysis and complexation analysis in the nuclear fuel cycle. Results obtained in the different fields such as in geology, in the Purex process, in the environment, in the medical and in waste storage assessment are presented. 4 figs., 6 refs

  11. Temporal follow-up of plasma parameter in an nuclear grade aluminum laser induced plasma at different laser energies by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karki, Vijay; Singh, Manjeet; Sarkar, Arnab

    2015-07-01

    We report spectroscopic studies of laser induced plasma (LIP) produced by ns – 532 nm - Nd:YAG laser light pulses for different laser energies (35, 45 and 60 mJ) on an nuclear grade aluminum sample in air at atmospheric pressure. The temporal history of the plasma is obtained by recording the emission features at predetermined delays and at a fixed gate width (2.5 ì s). The temporal profiles of excitation temperature (T e ), ionization temperature (T ion ) and electron number density (N e ) were determined from Boltzmann plot, Saha-Boltzmann equation and Stark broadening method, respectively. T e , T ion and N e , shows a power law decay pattern with increasing acquisition time delay. T e has a positive correlation with laser energy, but the T ion and N e differ negligibly from one laser energy to another. Again the rate of decay of T e increases with increasing laser energy but that of T ion is much slower and independent of laser energy. The follow up of the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions were evaluated using both McWhirter criterion and T e /T ion ratio for different delays and different energies to determine the temporal range in which LTE is satisfied. Both the methods concluded very similar results except for very high energy and small delay conditions, where T e /T ion ratio deviates from unity indicating non-LTE condition. The relative transition probabilities of Al transition (3sp4s: 4 P 2/5 →3sp 2 : 4P 3/2,5/2 ) and (4s: 2 S 1/2 → 3p: 2 P 1/2,3/2 ) were estimated and are in excellent agreement with the Kurucz database. These investigations provide an insight to optimize various parameters during LIBS analysis of aluminum based matrices. (author)

  12. Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence in the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulin, C.; Decambox, P.; Mauchien, P.; Petit, A.

    1995-01-01

    Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence (TRLIF) is a very sensitive and selective method that has been used for actinides and lanthanides analysis in the nuclear fuel cycle. This technique has been used in different fields such as in geology, in the Purex process, in the environment, in the medical and in waste storage assessment. Spectroscopic data, limits of detection and results obtained in previously quoted fields are presented. (author)

  13. Measurement of changes in nuclear charge radii of 2r by laser-induced resonance fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangrskij, Yu.P.; Zemlyanoj, S.G.; Marinova, K.P.; Markov, B.N.; Khoang Tkhi Kim Khueh; Chan Kong Tam; Kul'dzhanov, B.K.

    1987-01-01

    The optical isotopic shifts of Zr stable isotopes have been measured in three atomic transitions of type 4d 2 5s 2 → 4d 2 5s5p using the technique of laser-induced resonance fluorescence. The changes of nuclear mean-square charge radius Δ 2 > have been determined. The extracted values of Δ 2 > are compared to predictions of the droplet model. It is shown that the droplet model calculations can be made to agree with the experimental results, if changes of nuclear dynamical octupole deformation and of surface diffuseness parameter are taken into account

  14. Development of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Technologies for Nuclear Safeguards and Forensic Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.; El-Jaby, A.; Doucet, F.; Bouchard, P.; Sabsabi, M.

    2015-01-01

    Under the IAEA Task A1855, the Canadian Safeguards Support Program (CSSP) undertook the development of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technologies for safeguards applications. Collaboration between the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC), the National Research Council Canada, and the IAEA has demonstrated that the LIBS technique combined with chemometrics can determine the origins of yellowcake, identify maraging steels, aluminium alloys, and magnesium alloys, among other materials involved in the nuclear industry; and determine heavy water content as well as the isotope ratios of other actinides. As part of the task, the CSSP has developed a portable LIBS system to enable inspectors to characterize specific nuclear and non-nuclear material during complementary access and inspections. This device was recently tested by the IAEA in both Vienna and Siebersdorf for various metals and uranium bearing materials. The laser source proved to be stable and the chemometrics software was able to identify various materials. The device is ready for further in-depth testing. The chemometrics algorithm that has been developed for LIBS can also be adapted to nuclear forensics for the querying database. Multi-stage pattern recognition algorithms can reliably identify unknown materials among database populations (e.g., identify origins of yellowcake). Further work in this field is being undertaken as part of the CNSC's National Nuclear Forensics Library (NNFL) development activities for the Canadian National Nuclear Forensics Capability Project (CNNFCP). The paper will provide an overview of the LIBS techniques being developed for safeguards and forensic applications, and of progress in integrating all components into a compact unit. (author)

  15. Exploring laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for nuclear materials analysis and in-situ applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Madhavi Z.; Allman, Steve; Brice, Deanne J.; Martin, Rodger C.; Andre, Nicolas O.

    2012-08-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used to determine the limits of detection of strontium (Sr) and cesium (Cs), common nuclear fission products. Additionally, detection limits were determined for cerium (Ce), often used as a surrogate for radioactive plutonium in laboratory studies. Results were obtained using a laboratory instrument with a Nd:YAG laser at fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm, frequency doubled to 532 nm with energy of 50 mJ/pulse. The data was compared for different concentrations of Sr and Ce dispersed in a CaCO3 (white) and carbon (black) matrix. We have addressed the sampling errors, limits of detection, reproducibility, and accuracy of measurements as they relate to multivariate analysis in pellets that were doped with the different elements at various concentrations. These results demonstrate that LIBS technique is inherently well suited for in situ analysis of nuclear materials in hot cells. Three key advantages are evident: (1) small samples (mg) can be evaluated; (2) nuclear materials can be analyzed with minimal sample preparation; and (3) samples can be remotely analyzed very rapidly (ms-seconds). Our studies also show that the methods can be made quantitative. Very robust multivariate models have been used to provide quantitative measurement and statistical evaluation of complex materials derived from our previous research on wood and soil samples.

  16. Determination of nuclear spins of short-lived isotopes by laser induced fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchinger, F.; Dabkiewicz, P.; Kremmling, H.; Kuehl, T.; Mueller, A.C.; Schuessler, H.A.

    1980-01-01

    The spins of several nuclear ground and isomeric states have been measured for a number of mercury isotopes. The fluorescent light from the 6s6p 3 P 1 state is observed at 2537 Angstroem after excitation with the frequency doubled output of a pulsed dye laser. Four different laser induced fluorescence techniques were tested for their applicability: double resonance, Hanle effect, time delayed integral Hanle beats, and time resolved quantum beats. The sensitivity and selectivity of these models are compared with emphasis on the determination of spins of nuclei far from beta-stability, where short half lives and low production yields restrict the number of available atoms. The experiments were carried out on-line with the ISOLDE isotope separator at CERN at densities as low as 10 6 atoms/cm 3 . Results for the very neutron deficient high spin mercury isomers with half lives of several seconds, but also for the ground states of the abundant low spin stable mercury isotopes, are given as examples. The test measurements determined the nuclear spins of the odd sup(185m-191m)Hg isomers to be I = 13/2. (orig.)

  17. Lasers in nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inamura, T.T.

    1988-01-01

    The hyperfine interaction has been reviewed from a point of view of nuclear physics. Recent progress of nuclear spectroscopy with lasers is presented as one of laser studies of fundamental physics currently pursued in Japan. Especially, the hyperfine anomaly is discussed in connection with the origin of nuclear magnetism. (author)

  18. Laser-induced time-resolved spectrofluorometry and thermal lensing: applications in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decambox, P.; Delorme, N.; Mauchien, P.; Moulin, C.

    1989-01-01

    Sensitive spectroscopic methods for the determination of actinides and lanthanides in various media are required in the nuclear industry. Laser-Induced Time-Resolved Spectrofluorometry (LITRS) for several actinides and lanthanides at very low levels and thermal lensing (TL) for oxidation state characterization allow these determinations. The set-up of LITRS is presented. Spectra, limit of detections and lifetimes obtained for U, Cm, Am, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ce, Sm, Tm are shown. Detection limit as low as 5.10 -12 M can be achieved. Examples of matrices encountered for the determination of uranium are given as well as comparison with mass spectrometry and alpha counting. The set-up of TL and performances obtained on plutonium as well as future developments are presented

  19. Exploring laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for nuclear materials analysis and in-situ applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Madhavi Z.; Allman, Steve; Brice, Deanne J.; Martin, Rodger C.; Andre, Nicolas O.

    2012-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used to determine the limits of detection of strontium (Sr) and cesium (Cs), common nuclear fission products. Additionally, detection limits were determined for cerium (Ce), often used as a surrogate for radioactive plutonium in laboratory studies. Results were obtained using a laboratory instrument with a Nd:YAG laser at fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm, frequency doubled to 532 nm with energy of 50 mJ/pulse. The data was compared for different concentrations of Sr and Ce dispersed in a CaCO 3 (white) and carbon (black) matrix. We have addressed the sampling errors, limits of detection, reproducibility, and accuracy of measurements as they relate to multivariate analysis in pellets that were doped with the different elements at various concentrations. These results demonstrate that LIBS technique is inherently well suited for in situ analysis of nuclear materials in hot cells. Three key advantages are evident: (1) small samples (mg) can be evaluated; (2) nuclear materials can be analyzed with minimal sample preparation; and (3) samples can be remotely analyzed very rapidly (ms-seconds). Our studies also show that the methods can be made quantitative. Very robust multivariate models have been used to provide quantitative measurement and statistical evaluation of complex materials derived from our previous research on wood and soil samples. - Highlights: ► Did the detection of strontium, cerium, and cesium in CaCO 3 and graphite matrices. ► The detection of these elements was performed in a systematic manner. ► Univariate calibration curves were used to determine strontium detection. ► Univariate and multivariate statistical analysis built improved statistical models. ► Limits of detection are comparable or better in case of cerium and cesium.

  20. Nuclear-pumped lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Prelas, Mark

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on Nuclear-Pumped Laser (NPL) technology and provides the reader with a fundamental understanding of NPLs, a review of research in the field, and exploration of large scale NPL system design and applications. Early chapters look at the fundamental properties of lasers, nuclear-pumping and nuclear reactions that may be used as drivers for nuclear-pumped lasers. The book goes on to explore the efficient transport of energy from the ionizing radiation to the laser medium and then the operational characteristics of existing nuclear-pumped lasers. Models based on Mathematica, explanations and a tutorial all assist the reader’s understanding of this technology. Later chapters consider the integration of the various systems involved in NPLs and the ways in which they can be used, including beyond the military agenda. As readers will discover, there are significant humanitarian applications for high energy/power lasers, such as deflecting asteroids, space propulsion, power transmission and mining....

  1. Transmutation prospect of long-lived nuclear waste induced by high-charge electron beam from laser plasma accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X. L.; Xu, Z. Y.; Luo, W.; Lu, H. Y.; Zhu, Z. C.; Yan, X. Q.

    2017-09-01

    Photo-transmutation of long-lived nuclear waste induced by a high-charge relativistic electron beam (e-beam) from a laser plasma accelerator is demonstrated. A collimated relativistic e-beam with a high charge of approximately 100 nC is produced from high-intensity laser interaction with near-critical-density (NCD) plasma. Such e-beam impinges on a high-Z convertor and then radiates energetic bremsstrahlung photons with flux approaching 1011 per laser shot. Taking a long-lived radionuclide 126Sn as an example, the resulting transmutation reaction yield is the order of 109 per laser shot, which is two orders of magnitude higher than obtained from previous studies. It is found that at lower densities, a tightly focused laser irradiating relatively longer NCD plasmas can effectively enhance the transmutation efficiency. Furthermore, the photo-transmutation is generalized by considering mixed-nuclide waste samples, which suggests that the laser-accelerated high-charge e-beam could be an efficient tool to transmute long-lived nuclear waste.

  2. D-D nuclear fusion processes induced in polyethylene foams by TW Laser-generated plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrisi L.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Deuterium-Deuterium fusion processes were generated by focusing the 3 TW PALS Laser on solid deuterated polyethylene targets placed in vacuum. Deuterium ion acceleration of the order of 4 MeV was obtained using laser irradiance Iλ2 ∼ 5 × 1016 W μm2/cm2 on the target. Thin and thick targets, at low and high density, were irradiated and plasma properties were monitored “on line” and “off line”. The ion emission from plasma was monitored with Thomson Parabola Spectrometer, track detectors and ion collectors. Fast semiconductor detectors based on SiC and fast plastic scintillators, both employed in time-of-flight configuration, have permitted to detect the characteristic 3.0 MeV protons and 2.45 MeV neutrons emission from the nuclear fusion reactions. From massive absorbent targets we have evaluated the neutron flux by varying from negligible values up to about 5 × 107 neutrons per laser shot in the case of foams targets, indicating a reaction rate of the order of 108 fusion events per laser shot using “advanced targets”.

  3. Boron-Proton Nuclear-Fusion Enhancement Induced in Boron-Doped Silicon Targets by Low-Contrast Pulsed Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Picciotto

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We show that a spatially well-defined layer of boron dopants in a hydrogen-enriched silicon target allows the production of a high yield of alpha particles of around 10^{9} per steradian using a nanosecond, low-contrast laser pulse with a nominal intensity of approximately 3×10^{16}  W cm^{−2}. This result can be ascribed to the nature of the long laser-pulse interaction with the target and with the expanding plasma, as well as to the optimal target geometry and composition. The possibility of an impact on future applications such as nuclear fusion without production of neutron-induced radioactivity and compact ion accelerators is anticipated.

  4. Laser-induced interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, W.R.

    1979-01-01

    This dissertation discusses some of the new ways that lasers can be used to control the energy flow in a medium. Experimental and theoretical considerations of the laser-induced collision are discussed. The laser-induced collision is a process in which a laser is used to selectively transfer energy from a state in one atomic or molecular species to another state in a different species. The first experimental demonstration of this process is described, along with later experiments in which lasers were used to create collisional cross sections as large as 10 - 13 cm 2 . Laser-induced collisions utilizing both a dipole-dipole interaction and dipole-quadrupole interaction have been experimentally demonstrated. The theoretical aspects of other related processes such as laser-induced spin-exchange, collision induced Raman emission, and laser-induced charge transfer are discussed. Experimental systems that could be used to demonstrate these various processes are presented. An experiment which produced an inversion of the resonance line of an ion by optical pumping of the neutral atom is described. This type of scheme has been proposed as a possible method for constructing VUV and x-ray lasers

  5. Role of aromatic amino acids in carbohydrate binding of plant lectins : Laser photo chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization study of hevein domain-containing lectins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siebert, HC; vonderLieth, CW; Kaptein, R; Beintema, JJ; Dijkstra, K; vanNuland, N; Soedjanaatmadja, UMS; Rice, A; Vliegenthart, JFG; Wright, CS; Gabius, HJ

    Carbohydrate recognition by lectins often involves the side chains of tyrosine, tryptophan, and histidine residues. These moieties are able to produce chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (CIDNP) signals after laser irradiation in the presence of a suitable radical pair-generating dye.

  6. On-line determination of iodine in nuclear fuel reprocessing off-gas streams by a combination of laser-induced fluorimetry and laser photoacoustic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuno, Yusuke; Sato, Souichi; Masui, Jinichi

    1992-01-01

    The on-line determination of molecular iodine and organic iodides in nuclear fuel reprocessing off-gas streams containing high concentrations of NO x gas was studied. Ultraviolet radiation is used to convert organic iodides into molecular iodine. The approximate concentration of iodine before and after the photochemical conversion in the presence of NO x gas was first determined by laser-induced fluorimetry. NO 2 was determined by photoacoustic spectroscopy, correcting the acoustic signal due to iodine by using the approximate iodine concentration. NO was determined from the concentrations of NO 2 before and after the photoirradiation based on the photochemical fraction changes of NO and NO 2 . The quenching of the fluorimetry due to NO and NO 2 was finally corrected with the NO and NO 2 concentrations obtained. The detection limit of the proposed method is 10 nl 1 -1 . 7 figs., 2 tabs., 11 refs

  7. Laser induced energy transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falcone, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    Two related methods of rapidly transferring stored energy from one excited chemical species to another are described. The first of these, called a laser induced collision, involves a reaction in which the energy balance is met by photons from an intense laser beam. A collision cross section of ca 10 - 17 cm 2 was induced in an experiment which demonstrated the predicted dependence of the cross section on wavelength and power density of the applied laser. A second type of laser induced energy transfer involves the inelastic scattering of laser radiation from energetically excited atoms, and subsequent absorption of the scattered light by a second species. The technique of producing the light, ''anti-Stokes Raman'' scattering of visible and infrared wavelength laser photons, is shown to be an efficient source of narrow bandwidth, high brightness, tunable radiation at vacuum ultraviolet wavelengths by using it to excite a rare gas transition at 583.7 A. In addition, this light source was used to make the first measurement of the isotopic shift of the helium metastable level at 601 A. Applications in laser controlled chemistry and spectroscopy, and proposals for new types of lasers using these two energy transfer methods are discussed

  8. Physico-chemical studies of laser-induced plasmas for quantitative analysis of materials in nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saad, Rawad

    2014-01-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a multi-elemental analysis technique very well suited for analysis in hostile environments particularly in the nuclear industry. Quantitative measurements are frequently performed on liquid or solid samples but in some cases, atypical signal behaviors were observed in the LIBS experiment. To avoid or minimize any impact on measurement accuracy, it is necessary to improve the understanding of these phenomena. In the framework of a three-year PhD thesis, the objective was to study the chemical reactions occurring within laser-generated plasma in a LIBS analysis. Experiments on a model material (pure aluminum sample) highlighted the dynamics of molecular recombination according to different ambient gas. The temporal evolution of Al I atomic emission lines and molecular bands of AlO and AlN were studied. A collisional excitation effect was identified for a peculiar electronic energy level of aluminum in the case of a nitrogen atmosphere. This effect disappeared in air. The aluminum plasma was also imaged during its expansion under the different atmospheres in order to localize the areas in which the molecular recombination process takes place. Spectacular particle projections have been highlighted. (author) [fr

  9. Deuterium–deuterium nuclear reaction induced by high intensity laser pulses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Torrisi, L.; Cavallaro, S.; Cutroneo, M.; Giuffrida, L.; Krása, Josef; Margarone, Daniele; Velyhan, Andriy; Kravarik, J.; Ullschmied, Jiří; Wolowski, J.; Szydlowski, A.; Rosinski, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 272, May (2013), s. 42-45 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0279; GA MŠk EE.2.3.20.0087; GA MŠk(CZ) LC528 Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061; OPVK 3 Laser Zdroj(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0279; OP VK 2 LaserGen(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0087; 7FP LASERLAB-EUROPE(XE) 228334 Program:EE; FP7 Keywords : D–D fusion * cross-section * laser-plasma Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.538, year: 2013

  10. Laser applications in nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murnick, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    A large fraction of the International Workshop on Hyperfine Interactions was devoted to various aspects of 'laser applications in nuclear physics'. This panel discussion took place before all of the relevant formal presentations on the subject were complete. Nevertheless, there had been sufficient discussions for the significance of this emerging area of hyperfine interaction research to be made clear. An attempt was made to identify critical and controversial aspects of the subject in order to critically evaluate past successes and indicate important future directions of research. Each of the panelists made a short statement on one phase of laser-nuclear physics research, which was followed by general discussions with the other panelists and the audience. In this report, a few areas which were not covered in the formal presentations are summarized: extensions of laser spectroscopy to shorter lifetimes; extension of laser techniques to nuclei far off stability; interpretation of laser spectroscopic data; sensitivity and spectral resolution; polarized beams and targets. (Auth.)

  11. Chromatin influence on the function and formation of the nuclear envelope shown by laser-induced psoralen photoreaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, S.P.; Berns, M.W.

    1978-01-01

    Potorous tridactylis (PTK 2 ) cells growing in culture were treated with psoralen derivatives and dividing cells were located by phase-contrast microscopy. Psoralens, light-sensitive DNA-photoadducting drugs, were reacted with mitotic chromosomes through exposure to 365-nm light from an argon laser micro-beam system. It was shown that following mitosis and photoreaction, cells without nuclear envelopes were produced when psoralen-treated cells received 60 light pulses over their entire chromosome complement. These 'non-nuclear membrane' cells were found to incorporate [ 3 H]uridine, and to a lesser extent, [ 3 H]thymidine by autoradiography. Reduction of the light exposure by half (30 near-u.v. pulses) over the entire chromosome complement in the presence of psoralen also produced non-nuclear-membrane cells as seen by light microscopy. Further examination of these cells (30 light pulses) by single-cell electron microscopy revealed that unlike the high light exposure (60 near-u.v. pulses), the low light dosage resulted in cells with membrane patches associated with their chromatin. Since neither actinomycin D nor cycloheximide impeded nuclear envelope reformation, the psoralen-DNA reaction is concluded to produce non-nuclear membrane by a mechanism other than transcription or translation inhibition. The association of Golgi with areas of nuclear membrane patches gives indirect evidence of a possible Golgi contribution to the reformation of the nuclear envelope after mitosis. It is concluded that DNA plays a role in envelope reformation. (author)

  12. Lasers in atomic, molecular and nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letokhov, V.S.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents papers on laser applications in atomic, molecular and nuclear physics. Specifically discussed are: laser isotope separation; laser spectroscopy of chlorophyll; laser spectroscopy of molecules and cell membranes; laser detection of atom-molecule collisions and lasers in astrophysics

  13. A Comparison of Laser-induced Bremsstrahlung and Laser Compton Scattering for (γ, n) Photo-transmutation of Hazardous Nuclear Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, Haseeb ur; Lee, Jiyoung; Kim, Yonghee

    2015-01-01

    This paper also presents sensitivity analysis to yield the maximum possible photo-transmutation rates. In general the possibility of radionuclide transmutation using photo-neutron reaction is evaluated in this work. In this paper a detailed methodology to calculate transmutation reaction rates using Laser Induced Bremsstrahlung (LIB) and Laser Compton Scattering (LCS) has been discussed. The methodology was validated by comparing the calculated reaction rates against published data in publically accessed literatures. In the second half of the paper, the authors present a novel concept to narrow down the LCS photon spectrum to an energy range that matches with the resonance region of a particular radionuclide. This is particularly useful considering hazardous waste is usually a mix of different isotopes. As such, being able to tune the LCS photon into any narrow energy range so as to selectively transmute any particular isotope of interest in the hazardous waste mixture would be very desirable. LCS spectrum is highly sensitive to the electron beam energy, laser power, laser luminosity and Compton backscattering angle. From the results it is quite evident that LCS is much better option for the radionuclide transmutation as reaction rates for the LCS is much higher than LIB method even for very small laser power. It can be seen even for the optimistic reaction rate calculations with Bremsstrahlung method reaction rate is much lower than LCS case for 10 Hz repetition rate. If repetition rate of laser 100 Hz then LIB reaction rate has the same order of the magnitude as the reaction rate via LCS. Higher Laser Powers can yield very high transmutation rates

  14. Laser measurements and nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leander, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    The nuclear states amenable to laser studies are reviewed with respect to their structure. Systematic predictions are made, e.g., for magnetic moments of parity-mixed intrinsic orbitals in the Ac isotopes and for the shape of the known high-spin isomers in the Pb region

  15. Metastability exchange optical pumping in 3He gas up to 30 mT. Efficiency measurements and evidence of laser-induced nuclear relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batz, Marion

    2011-01-01

    Advances in metastability exchange optical pumping (MEOP) of 3 He at high laser powers, with its various applications, but also at high gas pressures p 3 and high magnetic field strengths B, have provided strong motivation for revisiting the understanding and for investigating the limitations of this powerful technique. For this purpose, we present systematic experimental and theoretical studies of efficiency and of relaxation mechanisms in B≤30 mT and p 3 =0.63-2.45 mbar. 3 He nuclear polarisation is measured by light absorption in longitudinal configuration where weak light beams at 1083 nm parallel to magnetic field and cell axis with opposite circular polarisations are used to probe the distribution of populations in the metastable state. This method is systematically tested to evaluate potential systematic biases and is shown to be reliable for the study of OP dynamics despite the redistribution of populations by OP light. Nuclear polarisation loss associated to the emission of polarised light by the plasma discharge used for MEOP is found to decrease above 10 mT, as expected, due to hyperfine decoupling in highly excited states. However, this does not lead to improved MEOP efficiency at high laser power. We find clear evidence of additional laser-induced relaxation instead. The strong OP-enhanced polarisation losses, currently limiting MEOP performances, are quantitatively investigated using an angular momentum budget approach and a recently developed comprehensive model that describes the combined effects of OP, ME and relaxation, validated by comparison to experimental results.

  16. Status of Nuclear-Pumped Laser research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prelas, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    The field of Nuclear-Pumped lasers (NPLs) has progressed in many directions since the discovery of the first NPL in 1974. This paper discusses developments in the area of coupling nuclear energy to a laser media, kinetics, and the integration of nuclear reactors to a laser (or other types of energy conversion medium). Many questions about the process of nuclear-pumping have been examined since the discovery of the first NPL in 1974. During a period of time between 1974 and 1981, several types of lasers have been driven by nuclear reactions (ie rare gas lasers, impurity type lasers, molecular lasers, and an ion laser). Three of the lasers discovered, had demonstrated efficiencies of >1%. In addition, volume scaling of NPLs was demonstrated

  17. Laser applications in nuclear power plants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-01-09

    Jan 9, 2014 ... Keywords. Nd:YAG laser; fibre-optic beam delivery; laser cutting; laser welding; nuclear reactor. ... Author Affiliations. D N Sanyal1. Remote Tooling Section, Technology Development Group, Nuclear Power Corporation of India Ltd., Mumbai 400 094, India ...

  18. Laser induced pyrolysis techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanderborgh, N.E.

    1976-01-01

    The application of laser pyrolysis techniques to the problems of chemical analysis is discussed. The processes occurring during laser pyrolysis are first briefly reviewed. The problems encountered in laser pyrolysis gas chromatography are discussed using the analysis of phenanthrene and binary hydrocarbons. The application of this technique to the characterization of naturally occurring carbonaceous material such as oil shales and coal is illustrated

  19. Development of a fiber-coupled laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy instrument for analysis of underwater debris in a nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeki, Morihisa; Iwanade, Akio; Ohba, Hironori; Ito, Chikara; Wakaida, Ikuo; Thornton, Blair; Sakka, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    To inspect the post-accident nuclear core reactor of the TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (F1-NPP), a transportable fiber-coupled laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) instrument has been developed. The developed LIBS instrument was designed to analyze underwater samples in a high-radiation field by single-pulse breakdown with gas flow or double-pulse breakdown. To check the feasibility of the assembled fiber-coupled LIBS instrument for the analysis of debris material (mixture of the fuel core, fuel cladding, construction material and so on) in the F1-NPP, we investigated the influence of the radiation dose on the optical transmittance of the laser delivery fiber, compared data quality among various LIBS techniques for an underwater sample and studied the feasibility of the fiber-coupled LIBS system in an analysis of the underwater sample of the simulated debris in F1-NPP. In a feasible study conducted by using simulated debris, which was a mixture of CeO 2 (surrogate of UO 2 ), ZrO 2 and Fe, we selected atomic lines suitable for the analysis of materials, and prepared calibration curves for the component elements. The feasible study has guaranteed that the developed fiber-coupled LIBS system is applicable for analyzing the debris materials in the F1-NPP. (author)

  20. Metastability exchange optical pumping in {sup 3}He gas up to 30 mT. Efficiency measurements and evidence of laser-induced nuclear relaxation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batz, Marion

    2011-07-08

    Advances in metastability exchange optical pumping (MEOP) of {sup 3}He at high laser powers, with its various applications, but also at high gas pressures p{sub 3} and high magnetic field strengths B, have provided strong motivation for revisiting the understanding and for investigating the limitations of this powerful technique. For this purpose, we present systematic experimental and theoretical studies of efficiency and of relaxation mechanisms in B{<=}30 mT and p{sub 3}=0.63-2.45 mbar. {sup 3}He nuclear polarisation is measured by light absorption in longitudinal configuration where weak light beams at 1083 nm parallel to magnetic field and cell axis with opposite circular polarisations are used to probe the distribution of populations in the metastable state. This method is systematically tested to evaluate potential systematic biases and is shown to be reliable for the study of OP dynamics despite the redistribution of populations by OP light. Nuclear polarisation loss associated to the emission of polarised light by the plasma discharge used for MEOP is found to decrease above 10 mT, as expected, due to hyperfine decoupling in highly excited states. However, this does not lead to improved MEOP efficiency at high laser power. We find clear evidence of additional laser-induced relaxation instead. The strong OP-enhanced polarisation losses, currently limiting MEOP performances, are quantitatively investigated using an angular momentum budget approach and a recently developed comprehensive model that describes the combined effects of OP, ME and relaxation, validated by comparison to experimental results.

  1. Induced nuclear beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiss, H.R.

    1986-01-01

    Certain nuclear beta decay transitions normally inhibited by angular momentum or parity considerations can be induced to occur by the application of an electromagnetic field. Such decays can be useful in the controlled production of power, and in fission waste disposal

  2. Laser robot in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contre, M.

    1987-05-01

    Possibilities of power lasers for welding, cutting, drilling, plugging surface treatment and hard-facing are reviewed. CO 2 and Nd:YAG lasers only have adequate power for nuclear applications. Radiation effects on lasers and contamination problems are examined. Then examples of applications to nuclear industry are given: PWR fuel fabrication, oxide thickness measurement in Magnox reactors, laser cutting of a cylindrical piece of steel on the bottom of a fuel channel in a gas graphite reactor, nuclear plant dismantling and fuel reprocessing. 51 refs [fr

  3. Study on laser beam welding technology for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chida, Itaru; Shiihara, Katsunori; Fukuda, Takeshi; Kono, Wataru; Obata, Minoru; Morishima, Yasuo

    2012-01-01

    Laser beam welding is one of the jointing processes by irradiating laser beam on the material surface locally and widely used at various industrial fields. Toshiba has developed various laser-based maintenance and repair technologies and already applied them to several existing nuclear power plants. Laser cladding is a technique to weld the corrosion resistant metal onto a substrate surface by feeding filler wire to improve the corrosion resistance. Temper-bead welding is the heat input process to provide the desired microstructure properties of welded low alloy steels without post weld heat treatment, by inducing proper heat cycle during laser welding. Both laser welding technologies would be performed underwater by blowing the shielding gas for creating the local dry area. In this report, some evaluation results of material characteristics by temper-bead welding to target at Reactor Coolant System nozzle of PWR are presented. (author)

  4. Nuclear-driven flashlamp pumping of the atomic iodine laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, G.H.

    1992-03-01

    This report is a study of the atomic iodine laser pumped with nuclear- excited XeBr fluorescence. Preliminary experiments, conducted in the TRIGA reactor investigated the fluorescence of the excimer XeBr under nuclear pumping with 10 B and 3 He, for use as a flashlamp gas to stimulate the laser. These measurements included a determination of the fluorescence efficiency (light emitted in the wavelength region of interest, divided by energy deposited in the gas) of XeBr under nuclear pumping, with varying excimer mixtures. Maximum fluorescence efficiencies were approximately 1%. In order to better understand XeBr under nuclear excitation, a kinetics model of the system was prepared. The model generated the time-dependant concentrations of 20 reaction species for three pulse sizes, a TRIGA pulse, a fast burst reactor pulse, and an e-beam pulse. The modeling results predicted fluorescence efficiencies significantly higher (peak efficiencies of approximately 10%) than recorded in the fluorescence experiments. The cause of this discrepancy was not fully determined. A ray tracing computer model was also prepared to evaluate the efficiency with which nuclear-induced fluorescence generated in one cavity of a laser could be coupled into another cavity containing an iodine lasant. Finally, an experimental laser cell was constructed to verify that nuclear-induced XeBr fluorescence could be used to stimulate a laser. Lasing was achieved at 1.31 micron in the TRIGA using C 3 F 7 I, a common iodine lasant. Peak laser powers were approximately 20 mW. Measured flashlamp pump powers at threshold agreed well with literature values, as did lasant pressure dependency on laser operation

  5. Study of laser cladding nuclear valve parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Shihong; Wang Xinlin; Huang Guodong

    1998-12-01

    The mechanism of laser cladding is discussed by using heat transfer model of laser cladding, heat conduction model of laser cladding and convective transfer mass model of laser melt-pool. Subsequently the laser cladding speed limit and the influence of laser cladding parameters on cladding layer structure is analyzed. A 5 kW with CO 2 transverse flow is used in the research for cladding treatment of sealing surface of stop valve parts of nuclear power stations. The laser cladding layer is found to be 3.0 mm thick. The cladding surface is smooth and has no such defects as crack, gas pore, etc. A series of comparisons with plasma spurt welding and arc bead welding has been performed. The results show that there are higher grain grade and hardness, lower dilution and better performances of resistance to abrasion, wear and of anti-erosion in the laser cladding layer. The new technology of laser cladding can obviously improve the quality of nuclear valve parts. Consequently it is possible to lengthen the service life of nuclear valve and to raise the safety and reliability of the production system

  6. Laser induced fusion - theoretical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawande, S.V.; Gunye, M.R.

    1979-01-01

    The theoretical aspects of thermonuclear fusion induced by laser are discussed. After outlining the basic features and the energetics of laser fusion in the chapter 1, various non-linear mechanisms responsible for an enhanced absorption of laser energy into the plasma and the stimulated scattering processes which hinder the absorption are discussed in the second chapter on laser plasma interactions. The third chapter on gas dynamics and the shock phenomena presents the mathematical formulation of the compression to high densities of the core of the pellet for its implosion. A hydrodynamic model developed to stimulate the evolution of laser heated symmetric plasma is outlined in the chapter four on numerichigly relativistic noninteracting particles, regular bouncing states may occur at high densities, or at high temperatures. The latter case is considered in details for the collapse phase of a hot universe; lepton pair creation may completely decelerate the collapse of a hot hadronic plasma, provided the observational parameters, the Hubble constant Hsub(deg), the matter parameter Ωsub(deg) and the deceleration parameter qsub(deg) satisfy certain constraint conditions

  7. Laser-induced multiphoton transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenholm, S.

    1978-06-01

    Laser induced multiphoton processes are reviewed. The effects of strong fields on atoms are discussed. The perturbation treatment is presented and also its generalization to treat intermediate resonances. The influence of atomic coherence is discussed heuristically and the relation between quantal and classical descriptions of the field is elucidated by reference to the dressed atom description. Atomic ionization experiments are reviewed and the present understanding of multiphoton dissociation of molecules is explained. Finally some prospects for the future are discussed. (author)

  8. Boron-proton nuclear-fusion enhancement induced in boron-doped silicon targets by low-contrast pulsed laser

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Picciotto, A.; Margarone, Daniele; Velyhan, Andriy; Bellutti, P.; Krása, Josef; Szydlowsky, A.; Bertuccio, G.; Shi, Y.; Mangione, A.; Prokůpek, Jan; Malinowska, A.; Krouský, Eduard; Ullschmied, Jiří; Láska, Leoš; Kucharik, M.; Korn, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 3 (2014), , "031030-1"-"031030-8" ISSN 2160-3308 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14089; GA MŠk LM2010014 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 284464 - LASERLAB-EUROPE Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061; AVČR(CZ) M100101210 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389021 Keywords : thermonuclear fusion * fast ions * plasmas * energy * acceleration * hydrogen * detector Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders; BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics (UFP-V) Impact factor: 9.043, year: 2014

  9. Laser-induced damage in optical materials

    CERN Document Server

    Ristau, Detlev

    2014-01-01

    Dedicated to users and developers of high-powered systems, Laser-Induced Damage in Optical Materials focuses on the research field of laser-induced damage and explores the significant and steady growth of applications for high-power lasers in the academic, industrial, and military arenas. Written by renowned experts in the field, this book concentrates on the major topics of laser-induced damage in optical materials and most specifically addresses research in laser damage that occurs in the bulk and on the surface or the coating of optical components. It considers key issues in the field of hi

  10. Nuclear activated cw chemical laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, T.G.

    1982-01-01

    A cw chemical laser which uses processed radioactive waste to produce active atoms from a chemically inactive gas before being mixed with another molecule such as hydrogen or deuterium is disclosed. This laser uses no toxic or corrosive fuels and does not require any electrical or other type of auxiliary power supply. The energy released by the radioactive material is used to produce the active atoms such as fluorine. This is accomplished by using the radiation products from processed radioactive waste to dissociate the inert gas in the plenum of the laser. The radioactive material is held in the passageway walls of a device similar to a heat exchanger. The exchanger device may be located in the gas generator section of a chemical laser. The inactive gas is passed through the exchanger device and while passing through it the radiation from the radioactive material dissociates the gas, producing a concentration of free active atoms. This active atom generator then feeds the nozzle bank or mixing section of a laser to produce a lasing action

  11. Nuclear based diagnostics in high-power laser applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, Marc; Sonnabend, Kerstin; Harres, Knut; Otten, Anke; Roth, Markus [TU Darmstadt, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Darmstadt (Germany); Vogt, Karsten; Bagnoud, Vincent [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    High-power lasers allow focused intensities of >10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}. During the laser-solid interaction, an intense relativistic electron current is injected from the plasma into the target. One challenge is to characterize the electron dynamic close to the interaction region. Moreover, next generation high-power laser proton acceleration leads to high proton fluxes, which require novel, nuclear diagnostic techniques. We present an activation-based nuclear pyrometry for the investigation of electrons generated in relativistic laser-solid interactions. We use novel activation targets consisting of several isotopes with different photo-neutron disintegration thresholds. The electrons are decelerated inside the target via bremsstrahlung processes. The high-energy bremsstrahlung induces photo-nuclear reactions. In this energy range no disturbing low energy effects are important. Via the pyrometry the Reconstruction of the absolute yield, spectral and spatial distribution of the electrons is possible. For the characterization of proton beams we present a nuclear activation imaging spectroscopy (NAIS). The diagnostic is based on proton-neutron disintegration reactions of copper stacked in consecutive layers. An autoradiography of copper layers leads to spectrally and spatially reconstruction of the beam profile.

  12. Numerical simulation for nuclear pumped laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakasai, Kaoru [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-07-01

    To apply nuclear pumped laser of {sup 3}He-Ne-Ar gas to detect neutron, the optimum gas mixture was investigated by numerical simulation. When {sup 3}He-Ne-Ar mixture gas are irradiated by neutron, proton and triton with high velocity are produced by {sup 3}He(np)T and two charge particles ionized {sup 3}He, Ne and Ar which reacted each other and attained to 3p`(1/2){sub 0}-3S`(1/2). The calculation method is constructed by defining the rate equations of each ion and exited atom and the electron energy balance equation and by time integrating the simultaneous differential equations of the above two equations and the law of conservation of charge. Penning ionization and energy transport by elastic collision of neutral atom were considered in the transport process of electron energy direct ionization by secondary charge particle. Calculation time was 1 msec. The optimum component was shown 3 atm He, 24 Torr He and 8 Torr Ar by simulation. Laser oscilation was generated under the conditions 3.3 x 10{sup 14} (N/cm{sup 2}/5) thermal neutron flux at 50 cm laser cell length and 99% coefficient of reflection of mirror. After laser oscilation, laser output was proportional to neutron flux. These results showed nuclear pumped laser of {sup 3}He-Ne-Ar was able to detect optically neutron. (S.Y)

  13. Laser applications in nuclear power plants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-01-09

    Jan 9, 2014 ... we have used laser techniques to cut stainless steel sheets up to 14 mm thickness and stainless steel weld up to ... radioactive environment, reasons being easiness in tool handling, flexibility, non-contact nature ... in nuclear power plants of NPCIL, India, by invoking different innovative techniques. Figure 1.

  14. Progress of laser nuclear fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraga, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the principle and features of nuclear fusion using laser, as well as its basic concepts such as high-temperature / high-density implosion system and fast ignition of fuel. At present, researches aiming at nuclear fusion ignition have been developing. As the current state of researches, this paper reviews the situations of FIREX (Fast Ignition Realization Experiment) project of Japan focusing on direct irradiation implosion and fast ignition system, as well as NIF (National Ignition Facility) project of the U.S. aiming at ignition combustion based on indirect irradiation implosion and central ignition system. In collaboration with the National Institute for Fusion Science, Osaka University started FIREX-1 project in 2003. It built a heating laser LFEX of 10 kJ/1 to 10ps, and started an implosion/heating integration experiment in 2009. Currently, it is developing experiment to achieve heating to 5 keV. At NIF, the self-heating of central sparks via energy of α particles generated in the nuclear fusion reaction has been realized. This paper also overviews R and D issues surrounding the lasers for reactors for use in laser nuclear fusion power generators. (A.O.)

  15. Femtosecond laser-induced herringbone patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcell, Erik M.; Lam, Billy; Guo, Chunlei

    2018-06-01

    Femtosecond laser-induced herringbone patterns are formed on copper (Cu). These novel periodic structures are created following s-polarized, large incident angle, femtosecond laser pulses. Forming as slanted and axially symmetric laser-induced periodic surface structures along the side walls of ablated channels, the result is a series of v-shaped structures that resemble a herringbone pattern. Fluence mapping, incident angle studies, as well as polarization studies have been conducted and provide a clear understanding of this new structure.

  16. Laser induced damage threshold on metallic surfaces during laser cleaning

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Labuschagne, K

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available laser paint removal. Laser induced damage on 316L stainless steel was studied, with the target subjected to single and multiple pulse irradiations using a Q-switched Nd:YAG, with fluences between 0.15 and 11.8 J/cm2. Several different damage morphologies...

  17. Infrared laser-induced chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, Mikio

    1978-01-01

    The experimental means which clearly distinguishes between infrared ray-induced reactions and thermal reactions has been furnished for the first time when an intense monochromatic light source has been obtained by the development of infrared laser. Consequently, infrared laser-induced chemical reactions have started to develop as one field of chemical reaction researches. Researches of laser-induced chemical reactions have become new means for the researches of chemical reactions since they were highlighted as a new promising technique for isotope separation. Specifically, since the success has been reported in 235 U separation using laser in 1974, comparison of this method with conventional separation techniques from the economic point of view has been conducted, and it was estimated by some people that the laser isotope separation is cheaper. This report briefly describes on the excitation of oscillation and reaction rate, and introduces the chemical reactions induced by CW laser and TEA CO 2 laser. Dependence of reaction yield on laser power, measurement of the absorbed quantity of infrared ray and excitation mechanism are explained. Next, isomerizing reactions are reported, and finally, isotope separation is explained. It was found that infrared laser-induced chemical reactions have the selectivity for isotopes. Since it is evident that there are many examples different from thermal and photo-chemical reactions, future collection of the data is expected. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  18. Nuclear EMP induced chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dance, B

    1983-08-01

    In the event of nuclear war, the availability of first class communications facilities and of reliable electricity supplies would be of absolutely vital importance to any of the population surviving the first onslaught not only for their own welfare, but also for the preservation of their nation's retaliation deterrent capability. However, it is to be expected that a single nuclear explosion of adequate size on the outside of the atmosphere would generate a pulse of sufficient intensity to damage communications equipment (including telephones, radio transmitters and receivers) and to interrupt main supplies. The situation caused by electromagnetic pulses (EMP) is discussed.

  19. Laser Manipulation of Nuclear Transitions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kocharovskaya, Olga

    2008-01-01

    .... The main results are the following. 1. Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT) and all-optical writing and probing of quantum coherence in room temperature solids are demonstrated experimentally in the first time. 2...

  20. Nuclear-pumped lasers for large-scale applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.E.; Leonard, E.M.; Shea, R.F.; Berggren, R.R.

    1989-05-01

    Efficient initiation of large-volume chemical lasers may be achieved by neutron induced reactions which produce charged particles in the final state. When a burst mode nuclear reactor is used as the neutron source, both a sufficiently intense neutron flux and a sufficiently short initiation pulse may be possible. Proof-of-principle experiments are planned to demonstrate lasing in a direct nuclear-pumped large-volume system; to study the effects of various neutron absorbing materials on laser performance; to study the effects of long initiation pulse lengths; to demonstrate the performance of large-scale optics and the beam quality that may be obtained; and to assess the performance of alternative designs of burst systems that increase the neutron output and burst repetition rate. 21 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs

  1. Laser induced white lighting of tungsten filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strek, W.; Tomala, R.; Lukaszewicz, M.

    2018-04-01

    The sustained bright white light emission of thin tungsten filament was induced under irradiation with focused beam of CW infrared laser diode. The broadband emission centered at 600 nm has demonstrated the threshold behavior on excitation power. Its intensity increased non-linearly with excitation power. The emission occurred only from the spot of focused beam of excitation laser diode. The white lighting was accompanied by efficient photocurrent flow and photoelectron emission which both increased non-linearly with laser irradiation power.

  2. Nuclear transitions induced by atomic excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyer, P.; Bounds, J.A.; Haight, R.C.; Luk, T.S.

    1988-01-01

    In the two-step pumping scheme for a gamma-ray laser, an essential step is that of exciting the nucleus from a long-lived storage isomer to a nearby short- lived state that then decays to the upper lasing level. An experiment is in progress to induce this transfer by first exciting the atomic electrons with UV photons. The incident photons couple well to the electrons, which then couple via a virtual photon to the nucleus. As a test case, excitation of the 235 U nucleus is being sought, using a high- brightness UV laser. The excited nuclear state, having a 26- minute half-life, decays by internal conversion, resulting in emission of an atomic electron. A pulsed infrared laser produces an atomic beam of 235 U which is then bombarded by the UV laser beam. Ions are collected, and conversion electrons are detected by a channel electron multiplier. In preliminary experiments, an upper limit of 7 x 10 -5 has been obtained for the probability of exciting a 235 U atom in the UV beam for one picosecond at an intensity of about 10 15 W/cm 2 . Experiments with higher sensitivities and at higher UV beam intensities are underway

  3. Electromagnetically induced transparency with broadband laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavuz, D. D.

    2007-01-01

    We suggest a scheme to slow and stop broadband laser pulses inside an atomic medium using electromagnetically induced transparency. Extending the suggestion of Harris et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 552 (1993)], the key idea is to use matched Fourier components for the probe and coupling laser beams

  4. Laser peening applications for next generation of nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankin, J.; Truong, C.; Walter, M.; Chen, H.-L.; Hackel, L.

    2008-01-01

    Generation of electricity by nuclear power can assist in achieving goals of reduced greenhouse gas emissions. Increased safety and reliability are necessary attributes of any new nuclear power plants. High pressure, hot water and radiation contribute to operating environments where Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and hydrogen embrittlement can lead to potential component failures. Desire for improved steam conversion efficiency pushes the fatigue stress limits of turbine blades and other rotating equipment. For nuclear reactor facilities now being designed and built and for the next generations of designs, laser peening could be incorporated to provide significant performance life to critical subsystems and components making them less susceptible to fatigue, SCC and radiation induced embrittlement. These types of components include steam turbine blades, hubs and bearings as well as reactor components including cladding material, housings, welded assemblies, fittings, pipes, flanges, vessel penetrations, nuclear waste storage canisters. Laser peening has proven to be a commercial success in aerospace applications and has recently been put into use for gas and steam turbine generators and light water reactors. An expanded role for this technology for the broader nuclear power industry would be a beneficial extension. (author)

  5. Nuclear EMP induced chaos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dance, B.

    1983-01-01

    It is anticipated that a single nuclear explosion, of adequate size, on the outside of the atmosphere would generate a pulse of sufficient intensity to damage communications equipment (including telephones, radio transmitters and receivers), and to disrupt main power supplies. This damage could be done by a very intense, short duration electro-magnetic pulse (EMP). The article discusses the generation and history of EMP, the test facilities that are needed for EMP test, and techniques that can be used to harden equipment against EMP. It is also important to protect extensive systems against EMP. The article points out that fibre-optics are very useful, because they are EMP resistant and a single fibre can also carry a very high data rate

  6. Some actinide speciation using laser induced photoacoustic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollard, P.M.; McMillan, J.W.; Phillips, G.; Thomason, H.P.; Ewart, F.T.

    1988-01-01

    Laser induced photoacoustic spectroscopy is an attractive method for the speciation of actinides in solutions from nuclear disposal studies because it is essentially non-invasive and has a reasonably high sensitivity, down to ca 10 -8 M. A novel true dual beam system has been constructed and commissioned at Harwell with a performance at least equal to any others in existence. It is based on a XeCl excimer laser and a dye laser, beam splitter, two laser power monitors and photoacoustic cells. The wavelength scanning, data collection, and spectra processing and display are controlled by an Apricot computer. The sample and reference cells are housed in an inert atmosphere glove box. Early applications of the equipment described include measurements of Am and Np species under varying conditions of pH, Eh and carbonate concentration. The observations show some correlation with predictions made using the geochemical modelling code PHREEQE. (orig.)

  7. Study on two-color planar laser induced fluorescence thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shaodan; Tan Sichao; Gao Puzhen; Lin Yuansheng

    2014-01-01

    Many of the convection heat transfer process are involved in the research of nuclear reactor thermal hydraulics. To experimentally determine the variation of the temperature field in those processes is important for the design and safety operation of the nuclear reactor. The application of the two-color planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) in the measurements of fluid temperature distribution is discussed in the paper. The laser dyes used here is rhodamine B (RhB) with negative temperature coefficient and fluorescein 27 (F127) with positive temperature coefficient. The beam of the laser light is adjusted to laser sheet by using the lens group. The fluid with dyes is excited by this laser sheet in a specific plane and temperature dependent fluorescence is released. The temperature field of the plane can be determined through the intensity information. Some technical aspects encountered in the application of the two-laser PLIF are discussed in the paper, such as the spectra characteristic of the dyes and the separation of the spectra. The calibration temperature is higher than the water saturation temperature (at atmosphere pressure). (authors)

  8. Laser enhanced radioactive decay and selective transmutation of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saloman, R.; Aarnio, P.; Ala-Heikkila, J.; Hakola, A.; Santala, M.

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated narrow-band coherent laser radiation - ranging from visible to X- and to gamma-ray wave length region - and their interactions both directly with photon-nuclear couplings and indirectly through the photon-electron and electron-nucleus interactions. In particular we discuss various means of selective excitation of nuclear resonance states by narrowband lasers. During the relaxation process the active nucleus may return to its initial ground-state or find another final state. In the latter case the nucleus is transmuted into a state which may have beneficial properties for instance concerning radioactivity. One ideal case would be the destruction of long-lived nuclear waste isotopes into faster decaying ones. The essential presumption is that the excitation process is selective and efficient as regards background processes due to unwanted excitation channels of the primary isotope and due to other surrounding nuclides. The paper consists of 1) a short review of generating short-wave length coherent light sources, 2) a survey of potential photon-induced nuclear states and their decay channels, and 3) a determination of the selectivity of the transmutation process

  9. Applications of lasers in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raj, Rupam; Sanyal, D.N.; Sil, Jaydeb

    2013-01-01

    Applications of lasers in nuclear power plants: Bellow lip cutting and high pressure feeder coupling stud (HPFC) cutting during en-masse coolant channel replacement (EMCCR) campaign at Narora Atomic Power Station Reactor 1 in May 2006; cutting of pressure tubes from Madras Atomic Power Station 1 (MAPS-1) for easy storage in April 2005; In-situ cutting of selected coolant channel S-7 at Kakrapar Atomic Power Station (KAPS-2) (cutting of 12 mm thick end fitting and 4 mm thick liner tube of stainless steel from inside) in January 2005; Development of a miniature cutting mechanism for steam generator tubes (14 mm i.d.) from inside, In-situ bellow repair for secondary shutdown system; LASER welding may be deployed for End shield of MAPS-1 leak repair

  10. Field enhancement induced laser ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiutowski, Jacek; Maibohm, Christian; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob

    Sub-diffraction spatially resolved, quantitative mapping of strongly localized field intensity enhancement on gold nanostructures via laser ablation of polymer thin films is reported. Illumination using a femtosecond laser scanning microscope excites surface plasmons in the nanostructures....... The accompanying field enhancement substantially lowers the ablation threshold of the polymer film and thus creates local ablation spots and corresponding topographic modifications of the polymer film. Such modifications are quantified straightforwardly via scanning electron and atomic force microscopy. Thickness...

  11. Metal surface nitriding by laser induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomann, A. L.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Andreazza-Vignolle, C.; Andreazza, P.; Hermann, J.; Blondiaux, G.

    1996-10-01

    We study a nitriding technique of metals by means of laser induced plasma. The synthesized layers are composed of a nitrogen concentration gradient over several μm depth, and are expected to be useful for tribological applications with no adhesion problem. The nitriding method is tested on the synthesis of titanium nitride which is a well-known compound, obtained at present by many deposition and diffusion techniques. In the method of interest, a laser beam is focused on a titanium target in a nitrogen atmosphere, leading to the creation of a plasma over the metal surface. In order to understand the layer formation, it is necessary to characterize the plasma as well as the surface that it has been in contact with. Progressive nitrogen incorporation in the titanium lattice and TiN synthesis are studied by characterizing samples prepared with increasing laser shot number (100-4000). The role of the laser wavelength is also inspected by comparing layers obtained with two kinds of pulsed lasers: a transversal-excited-atmospheric-pressure-CO2 laser (λ=10.6 μm) and a XeCl excimer laser (λ=308 nm). Simulations of the target temperature rise under laser irradiation are performed, which evidence differences in the initial laser/material interaction (material heated thickness, heating time duration, etc.) depending on the laser features (wavelength and pulse time duration). Results from plasma characterization also point out that the plasma composition and propagation mode depend on the laser wavelength. Correlation of these results with those obtained from layer analyses shows at first the important role played by the plasma in the nitrogen incorporation. Its presence is necessary and allows N2 dissociation and a better energy coupling with the target. Second, it appears that the nitrogen diffusion governs the nitriding process. The study of the metal nitriding efficiency, depending on the laser used, allows us to explain the differences observed in the layer features

  12. Heat pump processes induced by laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbuny, M.; Henningsen, T.

    1980-01-01

    A carbon dioxide laser system was constructed for the demonstration of heat pump processes induced by laser radiation. The system consisted of a frequency doubling stage, a gas reaction cell with its vacuum and high purity gas supply system, and provisions to measure the temperature changes by pressure, or alternatively, by density changes. The theoretical considerations for the choice of designs and components are dicussed.

  13. Induced Current Characteristics Due to Laser Induced Plasma and Its Application to Laser Processing Monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madjid, Syahrun Nur; Idris, Nasrullah; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2011-01-01

    In laser processing, suitable conditions for laser and gas play important role in ensuring a high quality of processing. To determine suitable conditions, we employed the electromagnetic phenomena associated with laser plasma generation. An electrode circuit was utilised to detect induced current due to the fast electrons propelled from the material during laser material processing. The characteristics of induced current were examined by changing parameters such as supplied voltage, laser pulse energy, number of laser shots, and type of ambient gas. These characteristics were compared with the optical emission characteristics. It was shown that the induced current technique proposed in this study is much more sensitive than the optical method in monitoring laser processing, that is to determine the precise focusing condition, and to accurately determine the moment of completion of laser beam penetration. In this study it was also shown that the induced current technique induced by CW CO 2 laser can be applied in industrial material processing for monitoring the penetration completion in a stainless steel plate drilling process.

  14. Reactor operations for nuclear pumping of lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, G; Cooper, G [University of Illinois (United States)

    1974-07-01

    Experiments involving the measurement of gas parameters that are related to lasing, and lasing of various gas mixtures have comprised a major part of the utilization of the University of Illinois Advanced TRIGA Reactor since the upgrading of the facility was completed in 1969. A thru beam port, which was added during upgrading, has been the facility used for these measurements. The laser cell is placed in the port adjacent to the core. Alignment is then accomplished by using both ends of the port or by a mirror placed at the back side of the apparatus. The reactor has been operated in all modes (pulsing, square wave, and steady state) for the experiments although pulsing is the primary mode that is used. Laser enhancement has been obtained in several cases, but efforts toward direct pumping from the radiation alone have not as yet succeeded. Improved laser operation from direct pumping has been suggested with an emphasis on high-powered systems where the basic input energy is to be derived from a nuclear reactor.

  15. Use of laser ablation in nuclear decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moggia, Fabrice; Lecardonnel, Xavier; Damerval, Frederique

    2012-09-01

    The development and the use of clean decontamination process appear to be one of the main priorities for industries especially for nuclear industries. This is especially due to the fact of wastes minimization which is one of the principal commitments. One answer would be to use a photonic process such as the LASER process. The principle of this process is based on the absorption, by the contaminant, of the photon's energy. This energy then will propagate into the material and create some mechanical waves responsible of the interfaces embrittlement and de-cohesion. As we can see, this process so called LASER ablation does not use any chemicals and allows us to avoid any production of liquid waste. Since now a couple of years, the Clean-Up Business Unit of AREVA group (BE/CL) investigates this new decontamination technology. Many tests have been done in inactive conditions on various simulants such as paints, inks, resins, metallic oxides firstly in order to estimate its efficiency but also to fully qualify it. After that, we decided to move on hot tests to fully validate this new process and to show its interest for the nuclear industry. Those hot tests have been done on two kinds of contaminated material (on tank pieces covered with a thick metallic oxide layer and on metallic pieces covered with grease). Some information such as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-Ray scattering spectroscopy and decontamination factors (DF) will be provided in this paper. (authors)

  16. Development of YAG laser cutting system for decommissioning nuclear equipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Takeshi; Nitta, Kazuhiko; Hosoda, Hiroshi.

    1995-01-01

    Technology of remote controlled cutting and reduction of generative secondary products have been required to the cutting system for decommissioning nuclear equipments. At a point of view that laser cutting technology by use of a Nd:YAG laser is effective, we have developed the laser cutting machine and carried out cutting tests for several stainless steel plates. As a result, the stainless steel plate with a thickness of 22mm could be cut by using an optical fiber which can flexibly propagate laser power, and possibility of application of this laser cutting system to decommissioning nuclear equipments was verified. (author)

  17. Development of YAG laser cutting system for decommissioning nuclear equipments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasai, Takeshi [Fuji Electric Co. Research and Development Ltd., Yokosuka, Kanagawa (Japan); Nitta, Kazuhiko; Hosoda, Hiroshi

    1995-07-01

    Technology of remote controlled cutting and reduction of generative secondary products have been required to the cutting system for decommissioning nuclear equipments. At a point of view that laser cutting technology by use of a Nd:YAG laser is effective, we have developed the laser cutting machine and carried out cutting tests for several stainless steel plates. As a result, the stainless steel plate with a thickness of 22mm could be cut by using an optical fiber which can flexibly propagate laser power, and possibility of application of this laser cutting system to decommissioning nuclear equipments was verified. (author).

  18. Laser-induced mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polanyi, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    This invention provides a method for the spectroscopic analysis of gas. The gas molecules are internally excited by irradiation with laser light having a wavelength which is absorbed by the sample. The gas is then ionized and passed through a mass spectrometer and the amount of the ionized species in the irradiated and ionized sample is compared with that in a similar ionized but not irradiated sample

  19. ;Study of secondary hydriding at high temperature in zirconium based nuclear fuel cladding tubes by coupling information from neutron radiography/tomography, electron probe micro analysis, micro elastic recoil detection analysis and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brachet, Jean-Christophe; Hamon, Didier; Le Saux, Matthieu; Vandenberghe, Valérie; Toffolon-Masclet, Caroline; Rouesne, Elodie; Urvoy, Stéphane; Béchade, Jean-Luc; Raepsaet, Caroline; Lacour, Jean-Luc; Bayon, Guy; Ott, Frédéric

    2017-05-01

    This paper gives an overview of a multi-scale experimental study of the secondary hydriding phenomena that can occur in nuclear fuel cladding materials exposed to steam at high temperature (HT) after having burst (loss-of-coolant accident conditions). By coupling information from several facilities, including neutron radiography/tomography, electron probe micro analysis, micro elastic recoil detection analysis and micro laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, it was possible to map quantitatively, at different scales, the distribution of oxygen and hydrogen within M5™ clad segments having experienced ballooning and burst at HT followed by steam oxidation at 1100 and 1200 °C and final direct water quenching down to room temperature. The results were very reproducible and it was confirmed that internal oxidation and secondary hydriding at HT of a cladding after burst can lead to strong axial and azimuthal gradients of hydrogen and oxygen concentrations, reaching 3000-4000 wt ppm and 1.0-1.2 wt% respectively within the β phase layer for the investigated conditions. Consistent with thermodynamic and kinetics considerations, oxygen diffusion into the prior-β layer was enhanced in the regions highly enriched in hydrogen, where the α(O) phase layer is thinner and the prior-β layer thicker. Finally the induced post-quenching hardening of the prior-β layer was mainly related to the local oxygen enrichment. Hardening directly induced by hydrogen was much less significant.

  20. CR-39 track detector calibration for H, He, and C ions from 0.1-0.5 MeV up to 5 MeV for laser-induced nuclear fusion product identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccou, C; Yahia, V; Depierreux, S; Neuville, C; Goyon, C; Consoli, F; De Angelis, R; Ducret, J E; Boutoux, G; Rafelski, J; Labaune, C

    2015-08-01

    Laser-accelerated ion beams can be used in many applications and, especially, to initiate nuclear reactions out of thermal equilibrium. We have experimentally studied aneutronic fusion reactions induced by protons accelerated by the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration mechanism, colliding with a boron target. Such experiments require a rigorous method to identify the reaction products (alpha particles) collected in detectors among a few other ion species such as protons or carbon ions, for example. CR-39 track detectors are widely used because they are mostly sensitive to ions and their efficiency is near 100%. We present a complete calibration of CR-39 track detector for protons, alpha particles, and carbon ions. We give measurements of their track diameters for energy ranging from hundreds of keV to a few MeV and for etching times between 1 and 8 h. We used these results to identify alpha particles in our experiments on proton-boron fusion reactions initiated by laser-accelerated protons. We show that their number clearly increases when the boron fuel is preformed in a plasma state.

  1. Laser induced forward transfer of graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, E.C.P.; Walter, A.; Leeuw, D.M. de; Asadi, K.

    2017-01-01

    Transfer of graphene and other two-dimensional materials is still a technical challenge. The 2D-materials are typically patterned after transfer, which leads to a major loss of material. Here, we present laser induced forward transfer of chemical vapor deposition grown graphene layers with

  2. Effect of laser spot size on energy balance in laser induced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pant, H.C.; Sharma, S.; Bhawalkar, D.D.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of the laser spot size on laser light absorption in laser induced plasmas from solid targets was studied. It was found that at a constant laser intensity on the target, reduction in the laser spot size enhances the net laser energy absorption. It was also observed that the laser light reflection from the target becomes more diffused when the focal spot size is reduced

  3. Laser cutting of thick steel plates with 30 kW fiber laser for nuclear decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Koji

    2015-01-01

    Laser cutting technologies of the thick steel plates for the nuclear decommissioning were developed with a 30 kW fiber laser. Plates of stainless steel and carbon steel more than 100 mm thick were successfully cut, indicating that this technology is promising for the application to the nuclear decommissioning. (author)

  4. Measurement of Irradiated Pyroprocessing Samples via Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phongikaroon, Supathorn [Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond, VA (United States)

    2016-10-31

    The primary objective of this research is to develop an applied technology and provide an assessment to remotely measure and analyze the real time or near real time concentrations of used nuclear fuel (UNF) dissolute in electrorefiners. Here, Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), in UNF pyroprocessing facilities will be investigated. LIBS is an elemental analysis method, which is based on the emission from plasma generated by focusing a laser beam into the medium. This technology has been reported to be applicable in the media of solids, liquids (includes molten metals), and gases for detecting elements of special nuclear materials. The advantages of applying the technology for pyroprocessing facilities are: (i) Rapid real-time elemental analysis|one measurement/laser pulse, or average spectra from multiple laser pulses for greater accuracy in < 2 minutes; (ii) Direct detection of elements and impurities in the system with low detection limits|element specific, ranging from 2-1000 ppm for most elements; and (iii) Near non-destructive elemental analysis method (about 1 g material). One important challenge to overcome is achieving high-resolution spectral analysis to quantitatively analyze all important fission products and actinides. Another important challenge is related to accessibility of molten salt, which is heated in a heavily insulated, remotely operated furnace in a high radiation environment with an argon atmosphere.

  5. Self-sustaining nuclear pumped laser-fusion reactor experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boody, F.P.; Choi, C.K.; Miley, G.H.

    1977-01-01

    The features of a neutron feedback nuclear pumped (NFNP) laser-fusion reactor equipment were studied with the intention of establishing the feasibility of the concept. The NFNP laser-fusion concept is compared schematically to electrically pumped laser fusion. The study showed that, once a method of energy storage has been demonstrated, a self-sustaining fusion-fission hybrid reactor with a ''blanket multiplication'' of two would be feasible using nuclear pumped Xe F* excimer lasers having efficiencies of 1 to 2 percent and D-D-T pellets with gains of 50 to 100

  6. Laser induced photochemical and photophysical processes in fuel reprocessing: present scenario and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhowmick, G.K.; Sarkar, S.K.; Ramanujam, A.

    2001-01-01

    State-of-art lasers can meet the very stringent requirements of nuclear technology and hence find application in varied areas of nuclear fuel cycle. Here, we discuss two specific applications in nuclear fuel reprocessing namely (a) add-on photochemical modifications of PUREX process where photochemical reactors replace the chemical reactors, and (b) fast, matrix independent sensitive laser analytical techniques. The photochemical modifications based on laser induced valency adjustment offers efficient separation, easy maintenance and over all reduction in the volume of radioactive waste. The analytical technique of time resolved laser induced fluorescence (TRLIF) has several attractive features like excellent sensitivity, element selective, and capability of on line remote process monitoring. For optically opaque solutions, optical excitation is detected by its conversion into thermal energy by non-radiative relaxation processes using the photo-thermal spectroscopic techniques. (author)

  7. Study on laser beam welding technology for nuclear power plants title

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chida, Itaru; Shiihara, Katsunori; Fukuda, Takeshi; Kono, Wataru; Obata, Minoru; Morishima, Yasuo

    2011-01-01

    Laser beam welding is one of the jointing processes by irradiating laser beam on the material surface locally and widely used at various industrial fields. Toshiba has developed various laser-based maintenance and repair technologies and already applied them to several existing nuclear power plants. Laser cladding is a technique to weld the corrosion resistant metal onto a substrate surface by feeding filler wire to improve the corrosion resistance. Temper-bead welding is the heat input process to provide the desired microstructure properties of welded low alloy steels without post weld heat treatment, by inducing proper heat cycle during laser welding. Both laser welding technologies would be performed underwater by blowing the shielding gas for creating the local dry area. In this report, some evaluation results of material characteristics by temper-bead welding to target at Reactor Coolant System nozzle of PWR are presented. (author)

  8. Generation of laser-induced fast neutron and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Hyung Ki; Lee, S.; Kwon, D.; Nam, S.; Park, S.; Rhee, Y.; Jung, Y.; Lee, K.; Cha, Y.; Kwon, S.; Lim, C.; Han, J.; Park, S.; Chung, C.

    2012-04-01

    The supply of high-efficiency neutron source is still problematic even though a fast neutron source is being accepted increasingly for industrial applications. Radioisotopes and a neutron tube are typically being used, but their neutron flux, lifetime, and price are the limiting factors for more diverse applications. As ultra high power, short pulse laser technologies have been developed, a neutron source generated via laser induced nuclear reaction comes to the fore. The laser induced neutron source has a high peak flux in comparison to the traditional neutron source and is like a point source with its diameter less than 1 mm. These properties can be utilized effectively for the analysis of pulsed fast neutron activation or the studies of a fast neutron material damage and/or recover. The purpose of R and D here is to develop a robust neutron source with a yield of 107 neutrons/s during 1st R and D stage ('07 ∼ '09) and to construct a stable laser neutron source in longer operation and to demonstrate its usefulness for a neutron activation analysis of explosive materials and a neutron impact analysis of crystalline in the second R and D stage ('10 ∼ '11)

  9. Laser induced fluorescence of trapped molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grieman, F.J.

    1979-10-01

    An experimental apparatus for obtaining the optical spectra of molecular ions is described. The experimental technique includes the use of three dimensional ion trapping, laser induced fluorescence, and gated photon counting methods. The ions, which are produced by electron impact, are confined in a radio-frequency quadrupole ion trap of cylindrical design. Because the quadrupole ion trap allows mass selection of the molecular ion desired for study, the analysis of the spectra obtained is greatly simplified. The ion trap also confines the ions to a region easily probed by a laser beam. 18 references

  10. Laser induced fluorescence of trapped molecular ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grieman, F.J.

    1979-10-01

    An experimental apparatus for obtaining the optical spectra of molecular ions is described. The experimental technique includes the use of three dimensional ion trapping, laser induced fluorescence, and gated photon counting methods. The ions, which are produced by electron impact, are confined in a radio-frequency quadrupole ion trap of cylindrical design. Because the quadrupole ion trap allows mass selection of the molecular ion desired for study, the analysis of the spectra obtained is greatly simplified. The ion trap also confines the ions to a region easily probed by a laser beam. 18 references.

  11. Laser induced forward transfer of soft materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palla-Papavlu, A; Dinca, V; Luculescu, C; Dinescu, M; Shaw-Stewart, J; Lippert, T; Nagel, M

    2010-01-01

    A strong research effort is presently aimed at patterning methodologies for obtaining controlled defined micrometric polymeric structures for a wide range of applications, including electronics, optoelectronics, sensors, medicine etc. Lasers have been identified as appropriate tools for processing of different materials, such as ceramics and metals, but also for soft, easily damageable materials (biological compounds and polymers). In this work we study the dynamics of laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) with a gap between the donor and the receiver substrates, which is the basis for possible applications that require multilayer depositions with high spatial resolution

  12. Laser induced fluorescence of some plant leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmi, M.S.; Mohamed, M.M.; Amer, R.; Elshazly, O.; Elraey, M.

    1992-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) is successfully used as a technique for remote detection of spectral characteristics of some plants. A pulsed nitrogen laser at 337.1 nm is used to excite cotton, corn and rice leaves. The fluorescence spectrum is detected in the range from 340 nm to 820 nm. It is found that, these plant leaves have common fluorescence maxima at 440 nm, 685 nm and 740 nm. plant leaves are also found to be identifiable by the ratio of the fluorescence intensity at 440 nm to that at 685 nm. The present technique can be further used as a means of assessing, remotely, plant stresses. 5 fig

  13. Self-Induced Faraday Instability Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perego, A. M.; Smirnov, S. V.; Staliunas, K.; Churkin, D. V.; Wabnitz, S.

    2018-05-01

    We predict the onset of self-induced parametric or Faraday instabilities in a laser, spontaneously caused by the presence of pump depletion, which leads to a periodic gain landscape for light propagating in the cavity. As a result of the instability, continuous wave oscillation becomes unstable even in the normal dispersion regime of the cavity, and a periodic train of pulses with ultrahigh repetition rate is generated. Application to the case of Raman fiber lasers is described, in good quantitative agreement between our conceptual analysis and numerical modeling.

  14. DNA damages induced by Ar F laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapel, C.; Rose, S.; Chevrier, L.; Cordier, E.; Courant, D. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Dept. de Radiobiologie et de Radiopathologie

    2006-07-01

    The photo ablation process used in corneal refractive surgery by the Argon Fluoride (Ar F) laser emitting in ultraviolet C at 193 nm, exposes viable cells round the irradiated zone to sub ablative doses (< 400 joules.m -2). Despite that DNA absorption is higher at 193 nm than 254 nm, cytotoxicity of 193 nm laser radiation is lower than radiation emitted by 254 nm UV-C lamps. In situ, DNA could be protected of laser radiation by cellular components. Consequently, some authors consider that this radiation does not induce genotoxic effect whereas others suspect it to be mutagenic. These lasers are used for fifteen years but many questions remain concerning the long term effects on adjacent cells to irradiated area. The purpose of this study is to describe the effect of 193 nm laser radiation on DNA of stromal keratocytes which are responsible of the corneal structure. The 193 nm laser irradiation induces directly DNA breakage in keratocytes as it has been shown by the comet assay under alkaline conditions. Two hours post irradiation, damages caused by the highest exposure (150 J.m-2) are not repaired as it has been measured with the Olive Tail Moment (product of tail length and tail DNA content). They give partly evidence of induction of an apoptotic process in cells where DNA could be too damaged. In order to characterize specifically double strand breaks, a comparative analysis by immunofluorescence of the H2 Ax histone phosphorylation (H2 Ax) has been performed on irradiated keratocytes and unirradiated keratocytes. Results show a dose dependent increase of the number of H2 Ax positive cells. Consequences of unrepaired DNA lesions could be observed by the generation of micronuclei in cells. Results show again an increase of micronuclei in laser irradiated cells. Chromosomal aberrations have been pointed out by cytogenetic methods 30 mn after irradiation. These aberrations are dose dependent (from 10 to 150 J.m-2). The number of breakage decreases in the long run

  15. Development of the double-pulse technique to improve the analytical performance of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) on solids: Nuclear and geological applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautier, C.

    2005-10-01

    The double-pulse technique has been developed to improve the analytical performance of Laser Ablation coupled to Optical Emission Spectroscopy (LA/OES). This approach relies on the addition of a second time-resolved laser pulse to the classical LA/OES system. It has been studied on aluminium alloys according to different geometries of the two laser beams (orthogonal and collinear geometries) before being applied to different materials (synthetic glass, rock, steel, sodium chloride). The increase in emission intensity depends on the temporal parameters, on the excitation energy level of the emission line, on the concentration of the studied element and on the analyzed matrix. The double-pulse LA/OES technique can be particularly interesting to improve the sensitivity towards vitreous matrices containing elements emitting lines with high excitation energy levels. (author)

  16. Advanced Laser-Compton Gamma-Ray Sources for Nuclear Materials Detection, Assay and Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barty, C. P. J.

    2015-10-01

    Highly-collimated, polarized, mono-energetic beams of tunable gamma-rays may be created via the optimized Compton scattering of pulsed lasers off of ultra-bright, relativistic electron beams. Above 2 MeV, the peak brilliance of such sources can exceed that of the world's largest synchrotrons by more than 15 orders of magnitude and can enable for the first time the efficient pursuit of nuclear science and applications with photon beams, i.e. Nuclear Photonics. Potential applications are numerous and include isotope-specific nuclear materials management, element-specific medical radiography and radiology, non-destructive, isotope-specific, material assay and imaging, precision spectroscopy of nuclear resonances and photon-induced fission. This review covers activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory related to the design and optimization of mono-energetic, laser-Compton gamma-ray systems and introduces isotope-specific nuclear materials detection and assay applications enabled by them.

  17. Laser induced fluorescence of trapped molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winn, J.S.

    1980-10-01

    Laser induced fluoresence (LIF) spectra (laser excitation spectra) are conceptually among the most simple spectra to obtain. One need only confine a gaseous sample in a suitable container, direct a laser along one axis of the container, and monitor the sample's fluorescence at a right angle to the laser beam. As the laser wavelength is changed, the changes in fluorescence intensity map the absorption spectrum of the sample. (More precisely, only absorption to states which have a significant radiative decay component are monitored.) For ion spectroscopy, one could benefit in many ways by such an experiment. Most optical ion spectra have been observed by emission techniques, and, aside from the problems of spectral analysis, discharge emission methods often produce the spectra of many species, some of which may be unknown or uncertain. Implicit in the description of LIF given above is certainty as to the chemical identity of the carrier of the spectrum. This article describes a method by which the simplifying aspects of LIF can be extended to molecular ions

  18. Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy for FTU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, T.P.

    1995-07-01

    Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) is based on the absorption of a short pulse of tuned laser light by a group of atoms and the observation of the resulting fluorescence radiation from the excited state. Because the excitation is resonant it is very efficient, and the fluorescence can be many times brighter than the normal spontaneous emission, so low number densities of the selected atoms can be detected and measured. Good spatial resolution can be achieved by using a narrow laser beam. If the laser is sufficiently monochromatic, and it can be tuned over the absorption line profile of the selected atoms, information can also be obtained about the velocities of the atoms from the Doppler effect which can broaden and shift the line. In this report two topics are examined in detail. The first is the effect of high laser irradiance, which can cause 'power broadening' of the apparent absorption line profile. The second is the effect of the high magnetic field in FTU. Detailed calculations are given for LIFS of neutral iron and molybdenum atoms, including the Zeeman effect, and the implementation of LIFS for these atoms on FTU is discussed

  19. Cascade generation in Al laser induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagli, Lev; Gaft, Michael; Raichlin, Yosef; Gornushkin, Igor

    2018-05-01

    We found cascade IR generation in Al laser induced plasma. This generation includes doublet transitions 3s 25s 2S1/2 → 3s24p 2P1/2,3/2 → 3s24s 2S1/2; corresponding to strong lines at 2110 and 2117 nm, and much weaker lines at 1312-1315 nm. The 3s25s2S 1/2 starting IR generation level is directly pumped from the 3s23p 2P3/2 ground level. The starting level for UV generation at 396.2 nm (transitions 3s24s 2S1/2 → 4p 2P3/2) is populated due to the fast collisional processes in the plasma plume. These differences led to different time and special dependences on the lasing in the IR and UV spectral range within the aluminum laser induced plasma.

  20. Investigation of relativistic laser-plasmas using nuclear diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, Marc M.

    2011-01-01

    The present work explores with the development of a novel nuclear diagnostic method for the investigation of the electron dynamics in relativistic laser-plasma interactions. An additional aim of this work was the determination of the real laser peak intensity via the interaction of an intense laser short-pulse with a solid target. The nuclear diagnostics is based on a photo-neutron disintegration nuclear activation method. The main constituent of the nuclear diagnostic are novel pseudoalloic activation targets as a kind of calorimeter to measure the high-energy bremsstrahlung produced by relativistic electrons. The targets are composed of several stable isotopes with different (γ,xn)-reaction thresholds. The activated nuclides were identified via the characteristic gamma-ray decay spectrum by using high-resolution gamma spectroscopy after the laser irradiation. Via the gamma spectroscopy the (γ,xn)-reaction yields were determined. The high-energy bremsstrahlung spectrum has been deconvolved using a novel analysis method based on a modified Penfold-Leiss method. This facilitates the reconstruction of the spectrum of bremsstrahlung photons without any anticipated fit procedures. Furthermore, the characterization of the corresponding bremsstrahlung electrons in the interaction zone is accessible immediately. The consolidated findings about the properties of the relativistic electrons were used to determine the real peak intensity at the laser-plasma interaction zone. In the context of this work, experiments were performed at three different laser facilities. First Experiments were carried out at the 100 TW laser facility at Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intense (LULI) in France and supplementary at the Vulcan laser facility at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in United Kingdom. The main part of the activation experiments were performed at the PHELIX laser facility (Petawatt High Energy Laser for heavy Ion EXperiments) at GSI-Helmholtzzentrum fuer

  1. Laser pulse heating of nuclear fuels for simulation of reactor power

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Laser applications; nuclear fuel elements; nuclear safety. ... accident (LOCA) and reactivity initiated accident (RIA), a laser pulse heating system is under ... As a prelude to work on irradiated nuclear fuel specimens, pilot studies on unirradiated ...

  2. Dissociative photoionization of molecular hydrogen. A joint experimental and theoretical study of the electron-electron correlations induced by XUV photoionization and nuclear dynamics on IR-laser dressed transition states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Andreas

    2015-01-13

    In this thesis, the dissociative single-ionization of molecular hydrogen is investigated in a kinematically complete experiment by employing extreme ultraviolet attosecond pulse trains and infrared femtosecond laser pulses. Induced by the absorption of a single XUV photon, a pronounced energy-dependent asymmetry of the relative emission direction of the photoelectron and the ion is observed. The asymmetry pattern is explained in terms of an interference of two ionization pathways involving a doubly-excited state. This interpretation is validated by a semi-classical model which only takes the nuclear motion into account. Using this model and the observed asymmetry, it is furthermore possible to disentangle the two dissociation pathways which allows for the determination of the autoionization lifetime of the contributing doubly-excited state as a function of the internuclear distance. Moreover, using a pump-probe experiment the dissociation dynamics of molecular hydrogen is investigated. A time-delay dependent momentum distribution of the fragments is observed. With a combined quantum mechanical and semi-classical approach the mechanism giving rise to the observed time-dependence is identified in terms of an intuitive elevator mechanism.

  3. Confinement inertial fusion. Power reactors of nuclear fusion by lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velarde, G.; Ahnert, C.; Aragones, J.M.; Leira, G; Martinez-Val, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The energy crisis and the need of the nuclear fusion energy are analized. The nuclear processes in the laser interation with the ablator material are studied, as well as the thermohydrodinamic processes in the implossion, and the neutronics of the fusion. The fusion reactor components are described and the economic and social impact of its introduction in the future energetic strategies.(author)

  4. Generation of laser-induced fast neutron and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Hyung Ki; Kwon, D. H.; Nam, S. M.

    2010-04-01

    The supply of high-efficiency neutron source is still problematic even though a fast neutron source is being accepted increasingly for industrial applications. Radioisotopes and a neutron tube are typically being used, but their neutron flux, lifetime, and price are the limiting factors for more diverse applications. As ultra high power, short pulse laser technologies have been developed, a neutron source generated via laser induced nuclear reaction comes to the fore. The laser induced neutron source has a high peak flux in comparison to the traditional neutron source and is like a point source with its diameter less than 1 mm. These properties can be utilized effectively for the analysis of pulsed fast neutron activation or the studies of a fast neutron material damage and/or recover. The purpose of R and D here is to develop a robust neutron source with a yield of 10 7 neutrons/s, and to carry out a preliminary research for application study in the next research stage

  5. Advanced methods for nuclear reactor gas laser coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, G.H.; Verdeyen, J.T.

    1978-06-01

    Research is described that led to the discovery of three nuclear-pumped lasers (NPLs) using mixtures of Ne--N 2 , He--Hg, and He or Ne with CO or CO 2 . The Ne--N 2 NPL was the first laser obtained with modest neutron fluxes from a TRIGA reactor (vs fast burst reactors used elsewhere in such work), the He--Hg NPL was the first visible nuclear-pumped laser, while the Ne--CO and He--CO 2 lasers are the first to provide energy storage on a millisecond time scale. Important potential applications of NPLs include coupling and power transmission from remote power stations such as nuclear plants in satellites and neutron-feedback operation of inertial confinement fusion plants

  6. Study on process of laser cladded nuclear valve parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chunliang

    2000-01-01

    The microstructure and performances of the Co-base alloy coatings that are formed by laser cladding, plasma spurt welding and arc surfacing on the nuclear valve-sealing surface have been studied and compared. The combination costs of laser cladding, plasma spurt welding and arc, surfacing have been analyzed and compared. The results showed that the laser cladding processing has the advantages of high efficiency, low energy cost, a little machining allowance, high rate of finished products and low combination cost, compared with plasma spurt welding processing and arc surfacing processing. The laser cladding technology can improve the qualities of nuclear valve parts and increase their service life. Therefore, the laser cladding processing is a new technology with developing potential

  7. Laser-induced ionization of Na vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, R.C.Y.; Judge, D.L.; Roussel, F.; Carre, B.; Breger, P.; Spiess, G.

    1982-01-01

    The production of Na 2 + ions by off-resonant laser excitation in the 5800-6200A region mainly results from two-photon absorption by the Na 2 molecule to highly excited gerade states followed by (a) direct ionization by absorbing a third photon or (b) coupling to the molecular Na 2 D 1 PIμ Rydberg state which is subsequently ionized by absorbing a third photon. This mechanism, i.e., a two-photon resonance three photon ionization process, explains a recent experimental observation of Roussel et al. It is suggested that the very same mechanism is also responsible for a similar observation reported by Polak-Dingels et al in their work using two crossed Na beams. In the latter two studies the laser-induced associative ionization processes were reported to be responsible for producing the Na 2 + ion. From the ratio of molecular to atomic concentration in the crossed beam experiment of Polak-Dingels et al we estimate that the cross section for producing Na 2 + through laser-induced associative ionization is at least four orders of magnitude smaller than ionization through the two-photon resonance three photon ionization process in Na 2 molecules

  8. Laser induced fluorescence of dental caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albin, S.; Byvik, C. E.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1988-01-01

    Significant differences between the optical spectra taken from sound regions of teeth and carious regions have been observed. These differences appear both in absorption and in laser induced fluorescence spectra. Excitation by the 488 nm line of an argon ion laser beam showed a peak in the emission intensity around 553 nm for the sound dental material while the emission peak from the carious region was red-shifted by approximately 40 nm. The relative absorption of carious region was significantly higher at 488 nm; however its fluorescence intensity peak was lower by an order of magnitude compared to the sound tooth. Implications of these results for a safe, reliable and early detection of dental caries are discussed.

  9. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging of bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Peter J.

    1998-12-01

    This paper outlines a method for optically detecting bacteria on various backgrounds, such as meat, by imaging their laser induced auto-fluorescence response. This method can potentially operate in real-time, which is many times faster than current bacterial detection methods, which require culturing of bacterial samples. This paper describes the imaging technique employed whereby a laser spot is scanned across an object while capturing, filtering, and digitizing the returned light. Preliminary results of the bacterial auto-fluorescence are reported and plans for future research are discussed. The results to date are encouraging with six of the eight bacterial strains investigated exhibiting auto-fluorescence when excited at 488 nm. Discrimination of these bacterial strains against red meat is shown and techniques for reducing background fluorescence discussed.

  10. Development of portable laser peening systems for nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chida, Itaru; Uehara, Takuya; Yoda, Masaki; Miyasaka, Hiroyuki; Kato, Hiromi

    2009-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is the major factor to reduce the reliability of aged reactor components. Toshiba has developed various laser-based maintenance and repair technologies and applied them to existing nuclear power plants. Laser-based technology is considered to be the best tool for remote processing in nuclear power plants, and particularly so for the maintenance and repair of reactor core components. Accessibility could be drastically improved by a simple handling system owing to the absence of reactive force against laser irradiation and the flexible optical fiber. For the preventive maintenance, laser peening technology was developed and applied to reactor components in operating BWRs and PWRs. Laser peening is a novel process to improve residual stress from tensile to compressive on material surface layer by irradiating focused high-power laser pulses in water without any surface preparations. Laser peening systems, which deliver laser pulses with mirrors or through an optical fiber, were developed and have been applied to preventive maintenance against SCC in nuclear power reactors since 1999. Each system was composed of laser oscillators, a beam delivery system, a laser irradiation head, remote handling equipment and a monitor/control system. Beam delivery with mirrors was accomplished through alignment/tracking functions with sufficient accuracy. Reliable fiber-delivery was attained by the development of a novel input coupling optics and an irradiation head with auto-focusing. Recently, we have developed portable laser peening (PLP) system which could employ both mirror- and fiber- delivery technologies. Size and weight of the PLP system for BWR bottom was almost 1/25 compared to the previous system. PLP system would be the applicable to both BWRs and PWRs as one of the maintenance technologies. (author)

  11. Laser induced single spot oxidation of titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jwad, Tahseen, E-mail: taj355@bham.ac.uk; Deng, Sunan; Butt, Haider; Dimov, S.

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • A new high resolution laser induced oxidation (colouring) method is proposed (single spot oxidation). • The method is applied to control oxide films thicknesses and hence colours on titanium substrates in micro-scale. • The method enable imprinting high resolution coloured image on Ti substrate. • Optical and morphological periodic surface structures are also produced by an array of oxide spots using the proposed method. • Colour coding of two colours into one field is presented. - Abstract: Titanium oxides have a wide range of applications in industry, and they can be formed on pure titanium using different methods. Laser-induced oxidation is one of the most reliable methods due to its controllability and selectivity. Colour marking is one of the main applications of the oxidation process. However, the colourizing process based on laser scanning strategies is limited by the relative large processing area in comparison to the beam size. Single spot oxidation of titanium substrates is proposed in this research in order to increase the resolution of the processed area and also to address the requirements of potential new applications. The method is applied to produce oxide films with different thicknesses and hence colours on titanium substrates. High resolution colour image is imprinted on a sheet of pure titanium by converting its pixels’ colours into laser parameter settings. Optical and morphological periodic surface structures are also produced by an array of oxide spots and then analysed. Two colours have been coded into one field and the dependencies of the reflected colours on incident and azimuthal angles of the light are discussed. The findings are of interest to a range of application areas, as they can be used to imprint optical devices such as diffusers and Fresnel lenses on metallic surfaces as well as for colour marking.

  12. Laser induced single spot oxidation of titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jwad, Tahseen; Deng, Sunan; Butt, Haider; Dimov, S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new high resolution laser induced oxidation (colouring) method is proposed (single spot oxidation). • The method is applied to control oxide films thicknesses and hence colours on titanium substrates in micro-scale. • The method enable imprinting high resolution coloured image on Ti substrate. • Optical and morphological periodic surface structures are also produced by an array of oxide spots using the proposed method. • Colour coding of two colours into one field is presented. - Abstract: Titanium oxides have a wide range of applications in industry, and they can be formed on pure titanium using different methods. Laser-induced oxidation is one of the most reliable methods due to its controllability and selectivity. Colour marking is one of the main applications of the oxidation process. However, the colourizing process based on laser scanning strategies is limited by the relative large processing area in comparison to the beam size. Single spot oxidation of titanium substrates is proposed in this research in order to increase the resolution of the processed area and also to address the requirements of potential new applications. The method is applied to produce oxide films with different thicknesses and hence colours on titanium substrates. High resolution colour image is imprinted on a sheet of pure titanium by converting its pixels’ colours into laser parameter settings. Optical and morphological periodic surface structures are also produced by an array of oxide spots and then analysed. Two colours have been coded into one field and the dependencies of the reflected colours on incident and azimuthal angles of the light are discussed. The findings are of interest to a range of application areas, as they can be used to imprint optical devices such as diffusers and Fresnel lenses on metallic surfaces as well as for colour marking.

  13. Laser-Induced Damage with Femtosecond Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafka, Kyle R. P.

    The strong electric fields of focused femtosecond laser pulses lead to non-equilibrium dynamics in materials, which, beyond a threshold intensity, causes laser-induced damage (LID). Such a strongly non-linear and non-perturbative process renders important LID observables like fluence and intensity thresholds and damage morphology (crater) extremely difficult to predict quantitatively. However, femtosecond LID carries a high degree of precision, which has been exploited in various micro/nano-machining and surface engineering applications, such as human eye surgery and super-hydrophobic surfaces. This dissertation presents an array of experimental studies which have measured the damage behavior of various materials under femtosecond irradiation. Precision experiments were performed to produce extreme spatio-temporal confinement of the femtosecond laser-solid damage interaction on monocrystalline Cu, which made possible the first successful direct-benchmarking of LID simulation with realistic damage craters. A technique was developed to produce laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) in a single pulse (typically a multi-pulse phenomenon), and was used to perform a pump-probe study which revealed asynchronous LIPSS formation on copper. Combined with 1-D calculations, this new experimental result suggests more drastic electron heating than expected. Few-cycle pulses were used to study the LID performance and morphology of commercial ultra-broadband optics, which had not been systematically studied before. With extensive surface analysis, various morphologies were observed, including LIPSS, swelling (blisters), simple craters, and even ring-shaped structures, which varied depending on the coating design, number of pulses, and air/vacuum test environment. Mechanisms leading to these morphologies are discussed, many of which are ultrafast in nature. The applied damage behavior of multi-layer dielectric mirrors was measured and compared between long pulse (150 ps

  14. Effect of laser pulse energies in laser induced breakdown spectroscopy in double-pulse configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedetti, P.A.; Cristoforetti, G.; Legnaioli, S.; Palleschi, V.; Pardini, L.; Salvetti, A.; Tognoni, E.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of laser pulse energy on double-pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy signal is studied. In particular, the energy of the first pulse has been changed, while the second pulse energy is held fixed. A systematic study of the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy signal dependence on the interpulse delay is performed, and the results are compared with the ones obtained with a single laser pulse of energy corresponding to the sum of the two pulses. At the same time, the crater formed at the target surface is studied by video-confocal microscopy, and the variation in crater dimensions is correlated to the enhancement of the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy signal. The results obtained are consistent with the interpretation of the double-pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy signal enhancement in terms of the changes in ambient gas pressure produced by the shock wave induced by the first laser pulse

  15. Laser metrology applied to the nuclear maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrido Garcia, J.; Sarti Fernandez, F.

    2012-01-01

    The development of this paper focuses on providing an overview of the state of the art about laser metrology. This type of equipment combines the measurement philosophy of laser scanning with the great precision of the robotic equipment of auscultation. Getting micron.

  16. Verification of a characterization method of the laser-induced selective activation based on industrial lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yang; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Tang, Peter T.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, laser-induced selective activation (LISA) for subsequent autocatalytic copper plating is performed by several types of industrial scale lasers, including a Nd:YAG laser, a UV laser, a fiber laser, a green laser, and a short pulsed laser. Based on analysis of all the laser......-machined surfaces, normalized bearing area curves and parameters are used to characterize the surface quantitatively. The range of normalized bearing area curve parameters for plate-able surface is suggested. PBT/PET with 40 % glass fiber was used as the substrate material. For all of the studied lasers......, the parameters were varied in a relatively large range, and matrixes of the laser-machined surface were obtained. The topography of those laser-machined surfaces was examined by scanning electronic microscope (SEM). For each sample examined by SEM, there was an identical workpiece plated by for 90 min...

  17. Dynamical chaos and induced nuclear fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolotin, Yu L; Krivoshej, I V

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that the exponential instability of trajectories, which arises at negative curvature of the potential energy surface, leads to diffusion of the image point through the barrier and determines real time delays in induced nuclear fission.

  18. Towards abundant and pollution-free energy. Laser nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robieux, J.

    2008-01-01

    This book shows that it is now practically certain that by the year 2080 laser nuclear fusion will allow to produce an abundant and relatively cheap energy. Thanks to this energy, it will be possible to convert a mixture of CO 2 , H 2 and water into an automotive fuel or a food product. Laser nuclear fusion will use deuterium as fuel and thus oil and gas will become useless. Also, thanks to this new energy source, global warming and starvation will be overcome. The laser fusion concept was introduced by J. Robieux in 1962 just after the discovery of the laser. This idea was immediately accepted and sustained by the French President De Gaulle. The research on laser fusion was initially undertaken at the Marcoussis research centre from the Compagnie Generale d'Electricite (General Electricity Company - CGE). In 1967, the lasers built at Marcoussis were 30 times more powerful than any other laser in the rest of world. A cooperation with the USA started at that time and is still going on today. In 1969, the CEA centre of Limeil realized the world premiere experiments of laser fusion. This book presents the historical aspects and the state-of-the-art of this technology today. It is written in two parts, the first part does not require any scientific knowledge and is accessible to everybody, while the second part can be understood only by readers having a basic scientific background. (J.S.)

  19. DNA fragmentation and nuclear phenotype in tendons exposed to low-intensity infrared laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paoli, Flavia; Ramos Cerqueira, Larissa; Martins Ramos, Mayara; Campos, Vera M.; Ferreira-Machado, Samara C.; Geller, Mauro; de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson

    2015-03-01

    Clinical protocols are recommended in device guidelines outlined for treating many diseases on empirical basis. However, effects of low-intensity infrared lasers at fluences used in clinical protocols on DNA are controversial. Excitation of endogenous chromophores in tissues and free radicals generation could be described as a consequence of laser used. DNA lesions induced by free radicals cause changes in DNA structure, chromatin organization, ploidy degrees and cell death. In this work, we investigated whether low-intensity infrared laser therapy could alter the fibroblasts nuclei characteristics and induce DNA fragmentation. Tendons of Wistar rats were exposed to low-intensity infrared laser (830 nm), at different fluences (1, 5 and 10 J/cm2), in continuous wave (power output of 10mW, power density of 79.6 mW/cm2). Different frequencies were analyzed for the higher fluence (10 J/cm2), at pulsed emission mode (2.5, 250 and 2500 Hz), with the laser source at surface of skin. Geometric, densitometric and textural parameters obtained for Feulgen-stained nuclei by image analysis were used to define nuclear phenotypes. Significant differences were observed on the nuclear phenotype of tendons after exposure to laser, as well as, high cell death percentages was observed for all fluences and frequencies analyzed here, exception 1 J/cm2 fluence. Our results indicate that low-intensity infrared laser can alter geometric, densitometric and textural parameters in tendon fibroblasts nuclei. Laser can also induce DNA fragmentation, chromatin lost and consequently cell death, using fluences, frequencies and emission modes took out from clinical protocols.

  20. Laser-induced incandescence applied to dusty plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Wetering, F.M.J.H.; Oosterbeek, W.; Beckers, J.; Nijdam, S.; Kovacevic, E.; Berndt, J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the laser heating of nanoparticles (diameters ≤1 μm) confined in a reactive plasma by short (150 ps) and intense (~63 mJ) UV (355 nm) laser pulses (laser-induced incandescence, LII). Important parameters such as the particle temperature and radius follow from analysis of the

  1. “Study of secondary hydriding at high temperature in zirconium based nuclear fuel cladding tubes by coupling information from neutron radiography/tomography, electron probe micro analysis, micro elastic recoil detection analysis and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brachet, Jean-Christophe, E-mail: jean-christophe.brachet@cea.fr [DEN-Service de Recherches Métallurgiques Appliquées (SRMA), CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Hamon, Didier; Le Saux, Matthieu [DEN-Service de Recherches Métallurgiques Appliquées (SRMA), CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Vandenberghe, Valérie [DEN-Service de Recherches Métallurgiques Appliquées (SRMA), CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); DEN-Service d’Etudes Mécaniques et Thermiques (SEMT), CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Toffolon-Masclet, Caroline; Rouesne, Elodie; Urvoy, Stéphane [DEN-Service de Recherches Métallurgiques Appliquées (SRMA), CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Béchade, Jean-Luc [DEN-Service de Recherches Métallurgiques Appliquées (SRMA), CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); DEN-Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Physique (SRMP), CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Raepsaet, Caroline [LEEL, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); NIMBE, CEA, CNRS, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); and others

    2017-05-15

    This paper gives an overview of a multi-scale experimental study of the secondary hydriding phenomena that can occur in nuclear fuel cladding materials exposed to steam at high temperature (HT) after having burst (loss-of-coolant accident conditions). By coupling information from several facilities, including neutron radiography/tomography, electron probe micro analysis, micro elastic recoil detection analysis and micro laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, it was possible to map quantitatively, at different scales, the distribution of oxygen and hydrogen within M5™ clad segments having experienced ballooning and burst at HT followed by steam oxidation at 1100 and 1200 °C and final direct water quenching down to room temperature. The results were very reproducible and it was confirmed that internal oxidation and secondary hydriding at HT of a cladding after burst can lead to strong axial and azimuthal gradients of hydrogen and oxygen concentrations, reaching 3000–4000 wt ppm and 1.0–1.2 wt% respectively within the β phase layer for the investigated conditions. Consistent with thermodynamic and kinetics considerations, oxygen diffusion into the prior-β layer was enhanced in the regions highly enriched in hydrogen, where the α(O) phase layer is thinner and the prior-β layer thicker. Finally the induced post-quenching hardening of the prior-β layer was mainly related to the local oxygen enrichment. Hardening directly induced by hydrogen was much less significant. - Highlights: •More than 50% of the gaseous hydrogen produced by the inner clad oxidation absorbed and trapped into prior-β layer. •High hydrogen and oxygen local concentrations, up to 3000–4000 wt. ppm and 1.0–1.2 wt.% respectively, within the β phase. •Enhanced oxygen diffusion into hydrogen enriched prior-β layer, with locally thinner α(O) and thicker prior-β layers. •Post-quenching hardening of the prior-β structure mainly related to the (local) oxygen concentration.

  2. Physical aspects of laser applications to modern nuclear technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semerok, A.

    2001-11-01

    This report has been presented by the author to obtain his HDR (accreditation to supervise research). After a brief presentation of his domain of skills, of his education, of his professional experience, and his awards, the author gives an overview of his work performed in the field of laser applications to modern nuclear technologies. Notably, he reports experimental studies dealing with the following topics: radiation source for uranium isotope separation by MLIS method, laser isotope separation in atom vapour, laser plasma diagnostics in strong magnetic field, laser ablation-time of flight mass spectrometry for low uranium isotope ratio measurements, laser ablation-optical emission spectroscopy for surface analysis. The report is completed by many published scientific articles

  3. Applications of super - high intensity lasers in nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomaa, R.; Hakola, A.; Santala, M.

    2007-01-01

    Laser-plasma interactions arising when a super intense ultrashort laser pulse impinges a solid target creates intense partly collimated and energy resolved photons, high energy electron and protons and neutrons. In addition the plasma plume can generate huge magnetic and electric fields. Also ultra short X-ray pulses are created. We have participated in some of such experiments at Rutherford and Max-Planck Institute and assessed the applications of such kind as laser-driven accelerators. This paper discusses applications in nuclear engineering (neutron sources, isotope separation, fast ignition and transmutation, etc). In particular the potential for extreme time resolution and to partial energy resolution are assessed

  4. Nuclear fuel safety studies by laser pulse heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanadham, C.S.; Kumar, Santosh; Dey, G.K.; Kutty, T.R.G.; Khan, K.B.; Kumar, Arun; Jathar, V.P.; Sahoo, K.C.

    2009-01-01

    The behaviour of nuclear fuels under transient heating conditions is vital to nuclear safety. A laser pulse based heating system to simulate the transient heating conditions experienced by the fuel during reactor accidents like LOCA and RIA is under development at BARC, Mumbai. Some of the concepts used in this system are under testing in pilot studies. This paper describes the results of some pilot studies carried out on unirradiated UO 2 specimens by laser pulse heating, followed by metallography and X-ray diffraction measurements. (author)

  5. Minimally invasive non-thermal laser technology using laser-induced optical breakdown for skin rejuvenation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habbema, L.; Verhagen, R.; Van Hal, R.; Liu, Y.; Varghese, B.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a novel, minimally invasive laser technology for skin rejuvenation by creating isolated microscopic lesions within tissue below the epidermis using laser induced optical breakdown. Using an in-house built prototype device, tightly focused near-infrared laser pulses are used to create

  6. Applications of laser produced ion beams to nuclear analysis of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mima, K.; Azuma, H.; Fujita, K.; Yamazaki, A.; Okuda, C.; Ukyo, Y.; Kato, Y.; Arrabal, R. Gonzalez; Soldo, F.; Perlado, J. M.; Nishimura, H.; Nakai, S.

    2012-01-01

    Laser produced ion beams have unique characteristics which are ultra-short pulse, very low emittance, and variety of nuclear species. These characteristics could be used for analyzing various materials like low Z ion doped heavy metals or ceramics. Energies of laser produced ion beam extend from 0.1MeV to 100MeV. Therefore, various nuclear processes can be induced in the interactions of ion beams with samples. The ion beam driven nuclear analysis has been developed for many years by using various electrostatic accelerators. To explore the applicability of laser ion beam to the analysis of the Li ion battery, a proton beam with the diameter of ∼ 1.0 μm at Takasaki Ion Acceleration for Advanced Radiation Application (TIARA), JAEA was used. For the analysis, the PIGE (Particle-Induced Gamma Ray Emission) is used. The proton beam scans over Li battery electrode samples to diagnose Li density in the LiNi 0.85 Co 0.15 O 2 anode. As the results, PIGE images for Li area density distributions are obtained with the spatial resolution of better than 1.5μm FWHM. By the Li PIGE images, the depth dependence of de-intercalation levels of Li in the anode is obtained. By the POP experiments at TIARA, it is clarified that laser produced ion beam is appropriate for the Li ion battery analysis. 41.85.Lc, 41.75.Jv, 42.62.cf.

  7. Laser-induced shockwave propagation from ablation in a cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Xianzhong; Mao Xianglei; Mao, Samuel S.; Wen, S.-B.; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E.

    2006-01-01

    The propagation of laser-induced shockwaves from ablation inside of cavities was determined from time-resolved shadowgraph images. The temperature and electron number density of the laser-induced plasma was determined from spectroscopic measurements. These properties were compared to those for laser ablation on the flat surface under the same energy and background gas condition. A theoretical model was proposed to determine the amount of energy and vaporized mass stored in the vapor plume based on these measurements

  8. Nuclear structure considerations for gamma-ray lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strottman, D.; Arthur, E.D.; Madland, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    Presented are initial results in our investigation of the nuclear physics issues of gamma-ray lasers. These include the questions of what is known from existing experimental data, where does one optimally search for nuclei displaying simultaneously both closely lying levels and nuclear isomerism, and which theoretical models does one employ for systematic searches for candidate nuclei and for calculation of detailed candidate level properties

  9. Application of the nuclear microprobe to the study of organic and inorganic composition of teeth irradiated by a laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, F.; Engelmann, Ch.; Couble, Ml.; Magloire, H.; Bonnin, P.

    1986-01-01

    The nuclear microprobe uses both direct observation of nuclear reactions induced by deuterons and X ray emission induced by protons or deuterons. Thanks to these techniques, concentration profiles of the main elements (C, N, P, Ca...) contained in different parts of healthy teeth (enamel, dentine and cementum) are drawn in control zones and laser irradiated zones. The results obtained show that important perturbations appear during the irradiation by the laser beam; we observe successively, depleted zones in carbon and nitrogen which contain calcium and phosphorus and hypomineralized zones which contain organic material. 10 refs [fr

  10. Laser-induced fluorescence for medical diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson Engels, S.

    1989-12-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence as a tool for tissue diagnostics is discussed. Both spectrally and time-resolved fluorescence signals are studied to optimize the demarcation of diseased lesions from normal tissue. The presentation is focused on two fields of application: the identification of malignant tumours and atherosclerotic plaques. Tissue autofluorescence as well as fluorescence from administered drugs have been utilized in diseased tissue diagnosis. The fluorescence criterion for tissue diagnosis is, as far as possible, chosen to be independent of unknown fluorescence parameters, which are not correlated to the type of tissue investigated. Both a dependence on biological parameters, such as light absorption in blood, and instrumental characteristics, such as excitation pulse fluctuations and detection geometry, can be minimized. Several chemical compounds have been studied in animal experiments after intraveneous injection to verify their capacity as malignant tumour marking drugs under laser excitation and fluorescence detection. Another objective of these studies was to improve our understanding of the mechanism and chemistry behind the retention of the various drugs in tissue. The properties of a chemical which maximize its selective retention in tumours are discussed. In order to utilize this diagnostic modality, three different clinically adapted sets of instrumentation have been developed and are presented. Two of the systems are nitrogen-laser-based fluorosensors; one is a point-monitoring system with full spectral resolution and the other one is an imaging system with up to four simultaneously recorded images in different spectral bands. The third system is a low-cost point-monitoring mercury-lamp-based fluoroscence emission as well as reflection characteristics of tissue. (author)

  11. Sputtering of amorphous carbon layers studied by laser induced fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasch, E.

    1992-07-01

    In order to minimize the radiation losses, it is desirable to keep the plasmas in nuclear fusion devices free of high-Z-impurities. Therefore, the walls of TEXTOR and other tokamaks are covered with thin layers of amorphous carbon layers (a-C:H) or amorphous carbon/boron layers (a-C/B:H). The sputtering behaviour of these layers has been studied under bombardment by Ar + ions with energies of 1.5 keV and current densities of a few mA/cm 2 . Investigations of these coatings were carried out with the object to measure the velocity distribution of the sputtered atoms and the sputtered yields by laser induced fluorescence in the vacuum ultraviolet. (orig.)

  12. Laser filament-induced aerosol formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Saathoff

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Using the aerosol and cloud simulation chamber AIDA, we investigated the laser filament induced particle formation in ambient air, humid synthetic air, humid nitrogen, argon–oxygen mixture, and pure argon in order to simulate the particle formation under realistic atmospheric conditions as well as to investigate the influence of typical gas-phase atmospheric constituents on the particle formation. Terawatt laser plasma filaments generated new particles in the size range 3 to 130 nm with particle production rates ranging from 1 × 107 to 5 × 109 cm−3 plasma s−1 for the given experimental conditions. In all cases the particle formation rates increased exponentially with the water content of the gas mixture. Furthermore, the presence of a few ppb of trace gases like SO2 and α-pinene clearly enhanced the particle yield by number, the latter also by mass. Our findings suggest that new particle formation is efficiently supported by oxidized species like acids generated by the photoionization of both major and minor components of the air, including N2, NH3, SO2 and organics.

  13. Volume of a laser-induced microjet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Sennosuke; Hayasaka, Keisuke; Noguchi, Yuto; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki

    2015-11-01

    Needle-free injection systems are of great importance for medical treatments. In spite of their great potential, these systems are not commonly used. One of the common problems is strong pain caused by diffusion shape of the jet. To solve this problem, the usage of a high-speed highly-focused microjet as needle-free injection system is expected. It is thus crucial to control important indicators such as ejected volume of the jet for its safe application. We conduct experiments to reveal which parameter influences mostly the ejected volume. In the experiments, we use a glass tube of an inner diameter of 500 micro-meter, which is filled with the liquid. One end is connected to a syringe and the other end is opened. Radiating the pulse laser instantaneously vapors the liquid, followed by the generation of a shockwave. We find that the maximum volume of a laser-induced bubble is approximately proportional to the ejected volume. It is also found that the occurrence of cavitation does not affect the ejected volume while it changes the jet velocity.

  14. Laser induced fluorescence in atmospheric pressure discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dilecce, G; De Benedictis, S; Martini, L M; Tosi, P; Scotoni, M

    2015-01-01

    This paper offers an outline of laser induced fluorescence (LIF) diagnostics and practical recommendations for its use in atmospheric pressure discharges. LIF principles, technical requirements and rationalization of experimental outcomes by modelling are addressed. Important issues that are particularly relevant to small scale, spatially inhomogeneous discharges, like plasma-jets, are emphasized. For the first time, all collision processes and the spatial non-homogeneity of the laser beam are together accounted for in the LIF model. Saturation characteristics are discussed and used for the assessment of model parameters. A calibration procedure is discussed and implemented. Gas temperature measurements by LIF are also addressed. The whole description of the technique is given, without loss of generality, through the example of its application to the OH radical. Notes on other diatomic radicals, CH, NO and CN, are given along the paper. Some results in a RF plasma-jet are presented as an example of application in a discharge system where all the concepts developed in the paper are applied. (paper)

  15. Laser assisted decontamination of nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padma Nilaya, J.; Biswas, Dhruba J.; Kumar, Aniruddha

    2010-04-01

    Laser assisted removal of loosely bound fuel particulates from the clad surface following the process of pellet loading has decided advantages over conventional methods. It is a dry and noncontact process that generates very little secondary waste and can occur inside a glove box without any manual interference minimizing the possibility of exposure to personnel. The rapid rise of the substrate/ particulate temperature owing to the absorption of energy from the incident laser pulse results in a variety of processes that may lead to the expulsion of the particulates. As a precursor to the cleaning of the fuel elements, initial experiments were carried out on contamination simulated on commonly used clad surfaces to gain a first hand experience on the various laser parameters for which as efficient cleaning can be obtained without altering the properties of the clad surface. The cleaning of a dummy fuel element was subsequently achieved in the laboratory by integrating the laser with a work station that imparted simultaneous rotational and linear motion to the fuel element. (author)

  16. Characterization of nuclear graphite elastic properties using laser ultrasonic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fan W.; Han, Karen; Olasov, Lauren R.; Gallego, Nidia C.; Contescu, Cristian I.; Spicer, James B.

    2015-05-01

    Laser ultrasonic methods have been used to characterize the elastic behaviors of commercially-available and legacy nuclear graphites. Since ultrasonic techniques are sensitive to various aspects of graphite microstructure including preferred grain orientation, microcrack orientation and porosity, laser ultrasonics is a candidate technique for monitoring graphite degradation and structural integrity in environments expected in high-temperature, gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Aspects of materials texture can be assessed by studying ultrasonic wavespeeds as a function of propagation direction and polarization. Shear wave birefringence measurements, in particular, can be used to evaluate elastic anisotropy. In this work, laser ultrasonic measurements of graphite moduli have been made to provide insight into the relationship between the microstructures and the macroscopic stiffnesses of these materials. In particular, laser ultrasonic measurements have been made using laser line sources to produce shear waves with specific polarizations. By varying the line orientation relative to the sample, shear wave birefringence measurements have been recorded. Results from shear wave birefringence measurements show that an isostatically molded graphite, such as PCIB, behaves isotropically, while an extruded graphite, such as H-451, displays significant ultrasonic texture. Graphites have complicated microstructures that depend on the manufacturing processes used, and ultrasonic texture in these materials could originate from grain orientation and preferred microcrack alignment. Effects on material isotropy due to service related microstructural changes are possible and the ultimate aim of this work is to determine the degree to which these changes can be assessed nondestructively using laser ultrasonics measurements.

  17. Fiber-optic laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of zirconium metal in air: Special features of the plasma produced by a long-pulse laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Ayumu; Ohba, Hironori; Toshimitsu, Masaaki; Akaoka, Katsuaki; Ruas, Alexandre; Sakka, Tetsuo; Wakaida, Ikuo

    2018-04-01

    The decommissioning of the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant is an essential issue in nuclear R&D. Fiber-optic laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (Fiber-optic LIBS) could be used for in-situ elemental analysis of the inside of the damaged reactors. To improve the performances under difficult conditions, using a long-pulse laser can be an efficient alternative. In this work, the emission spectra of zirconium metal in air obtained for a normal-pulse laser (6 ns) and a long-pulse laser (100 ns) (wavelength: 1064 nm, pulse energy: 12.5 mJ, spot diameter: 0.35 mm) are compared to investigate the fundamental aspects of fiber-optic LIBS with the long-pulse laser. The spectral features are considerably different: when the long-pulse laser is used, the atomic and molecular emission is remarkably enhanced. The enhancement of the atomic emission at the near infrared (NIR) region would lead to the observation of emission lines with minimum overlapping. To understand the differences in the spectra induced respectively from the normal-pulse laser and the long-pulse laser, photodiode signals, time-resolved spectra, plasma parameters, emission from the ambient air, and emission regions are investigated, showing the particular characteristics of the plasma produced by the long-pulse laser.

  18. Advanced scheme for high-yield laser driven nuclear reactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Margarone, Daniele; Picciotto, A.; Velyhan, Andriy; Krása, Josef; Kucharik, M.; Mangione, A.; Szydlowsky, A.; Malinowska, A.; Bertuccio, G.; Shi, Y.; Crivellari, M.; Ullschmied, Jiří; Bellutti, P.; Korn, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 1 (2015), s. 014030 ISSN 0741-3335 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0279 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 284464 - LASERLAB-EUROPE Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061; LaserZdroj (OP VK 3)(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0279 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389021 Keywords : laser plasma * nuclear reaction * laser fusion Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics; BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers (UFP-V) Impact factor: 2.404, year: 2015

  19. Experimental tests of induced spatial incoherence using short laser wavelength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obenschain, S.P.; Grun, J.; Herbst, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have developed a laser beam smoothing technique called induced spatial incoherence (ISI), which can produce the highly uniform focal profiles required for direct-drive laser fusion. Uniform well-controlled focal profiles are required to obtain the highly symmetric pellet implosions needed for high-energy gain. In recent experiments, the authors' tested the effects of ISI on high-power laser-target interaction. With short laser wavelength, the coupling physics dramatically improved over that obtained with an ordinary laser beam

  20. Double pulse laser ablation and plasma: Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy signal enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babushok, V.I.; DeLucia, F.C.; Gottfried, J.L.; Munson, C.A.; Miziolek, A.W.

    2006-01-01

    A review of recent results of the studies of double laser pulse plasma and ablation for laser induced breakdown spectroscopy applications is presented. The double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy configuration was suggested with the aim of overcoming the sensitivity shortcomings of the conventional single pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique. Several configurations have been suggested for the realization of the double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique: collinear, orthogonal pre-spark, orthogonal pre-heating and dual pulse crossed beam modes. In addition, combinations of laser pulses with different wavelengths, different energies and durations were studied, thus providing flexibility in the choice of wavelength, pulse width, energy and pulse sequence. The double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy approach provides a significant enhancement in the intensity of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy emission lines up to two orders of magnitude greater than a conventional single pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. The double pulse technique leads to a better coupling of the laser beam with the plasma plume and target material, thus providing a more temporally effective energy delivery to the plasma and target. The experimental results demonstrate that the maximum effect is obtained at some optimum separation delay time between pulses. The optimum value of the interpulse delay depends on several factors, such as the target material, the energy level of excited states responsible for the emission, and the type of enhancement process considered. Depending on the specified parameter, the enhancement effects were observed on different time scales ranging from the picosecond time level (e.g., ion yield, ablation mass) up to the hundred microsecond level (e.g., increased emission intensity for laser induced breakdown spectroscopy of submerged metal target in water). Several suggestions have been proposed to explain

  1. Laser-induced stresses versus mechanical stress power measurements during laser ablation of solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shannon, M.A.; Russo, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    Laser-induced stresses resulting from high-power laser-material interactions have been studied extensively. However, the rate of change in mechanical energy, or stress power, due to laser-induced stresses has only recently been investigated. An unanswered question for monitoring laser-material interactions in the far-field is whether stress power differs from stresses measured, particularly with respect to laser-energy coupling to a solid target. This letter shows experimental acoustic data which demonstrate that stress power measured in the far field of the target shows changes in laser-energy coupling, whereas the stresses measured do not. For the ambient medium above the target, stress power and stress together reflect changes in laser-energy coupling. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  2. Remote metal analysis by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duckworth, A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a new technique by which the composition of irradiated or inaccessible reactor components can be determined remotely. The technique uses very short duration, high energy laser pulses at a wavelength which can be transmitted down an optical fibre to ablate a tiny plasma from the surface of a metal component. Light from the plasma is collected by a second fibre and returned to a spectrometer where it is split into the characteristic emission wavelengths of the elements in the sample. Comparison of the emission line amplitude for a particular element with that of a chosen calibration line can be used to deduce the concentration of the element in the sample. The technique has been used successfully to differentiate between different highly radioactive control rod batches at Sizewell ''A'' and Hinkley Point ''A'' Power Stations. The material analysis accuracy is comparable with that obtained from electron microphobe analysis and other direct spectroscopic methods. However, by analysing the mild steel control rod casing material remotely, difficult sample removal becomes unneccessary and the integrity of the component remains essentially unaltered. In addition, removal of deposits or surface corrosion is incorporated very neatly into the process. These factors make remote laser induced breakdown spectroscopy an ideal tool for material analysis in the nuclear environment. (UK)

  3. Remote metal analysis by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duckworth, A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a new technique by which the composition of irradiated or inaccessible reactor components can be determined remotely. The technique uses very short duration, high energy laser pulses at a wavelength which can be transmitted down an optical fibre to ablate a tiny plasma from the surface of a metal component. Light from the plasma is collected by a second fibre and returned to a spectrometer where it is split into the characteristic emission wavelengths of the elements in the sample. Comparison of the emission line amplitude for a particular element with that of a chosen calibrationline can be used to deduce the concentration of the element in the sample. The technique has been used successfully to differentiate between highly radioactive control rod batches at Sizewell 'A' and Hinkley Point 'A Power Stations. The material analysis accuracy is comparable with that obtained from electron microprobe analysis and other direct spectroscopic methods. However, by analysing the mild steel control rod casing material remotely, difficult sample removal becomes unnecessary and the integrity of the component remains essentially unaltered. In addition, removal of deposits or surface corrosion is incorporated very neatly into the process. These factors make remote laser induced breakdown spectroscopy an ideal tool for material analysis in the nuclear environment. (Author)

  4. The influence of laser-particle interaction in laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindner, Helmut; Loper, Kristofer H.; Hahn, David W.; Niemax, Kay

    2011-01-01

    Particles produced by previous laser shots may have significant influence on the analytical signal in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma (LA-ICP) spectrometry if they remain close to the position of laser sampling. The effects of these particles on the laser-induced breakdown event are demonstrated in several ways. LIBS-experiments were conducted in an ablation cell at atmospheric conditions in argon or air applying a dual-pulse arrangement with orthogonal pre-pulse, i.e., plasma breakdown in a gas generated by a focussed laser beam parallel and close to the sample surface followed by a delayed crossing laser pulse in orthogonal direction which actually ablates material from the sample and produces the LIBS plasma. The optical emission of the LIBS plasma as well as the absorption of the pre-pulse laser was measured. In the presence of particles in the focus of the pre-pulse laser, the plasma breakdown is affected and more energy of the pre-pulse laser is absorbed than without particles. As a result, the analyte line emission from the LIBS plasma of the second laser is enhanced. It is assumed that the enhancement is not only due to an increase of mass ablated by the second laser but also to better atomization and excitation conditions favored by a reduced gas density in the pre-pulse plasma. Higher laser pulse frequencies increase the probability of particle-laser interaction and, therefore, reduce the shot-to-shot line intensity variation as compared to lower particle loadings in the cell. Additional experiments using an aerosol chamber were performed to further quantify the laser absorption by the plasma in dependence on time both with and without the presence of particles. The overall implication of laser-particle interactions for LIBS and LA-ICP-MS/OES are discussed.

  5. The influence of laser-particle interaction in laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Helmut; Loper, Kristofer H.; Hahn, David W.; Niemax, Kay

    2011-02-01

    Particles produced by previous laser shots may have significant influence on the analytical signal in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma (LA-ICP) spectrometry if they remain close to the position of laser sampling. The effects of these particles on the laser-induced breakdown event are demonstrated in several ways. LIBS-experiments were conducted in an ablation cell at atmospheric conditions in argon or air applying a dual-pulse arrangement with orthogonal pre-pulse, i.e., plasma breakdown in a gas generated by a focussed laser beam parallel and close to the sample surface followed by a delayed crossing laser pulse in orthogonal direction which actually ablates material from the sample and produces the LIBS plasma. The optical emission of the LIBS plasma as well as the absorption of the pre-pulse laser was measured. In the presence of particles in the focus of the pre-pulse laser, the plasma breakdown is affected and more energy of the pre-pulse laser is absorbed than without particles. As a result, the analyte line emission from the LIBS plasma of the second laser is enhanced. It is assumed that the enhancement is not only due to an increase of mass ablated by the second laser but also to better atomization and excitation conditions favored by a reduced gas density in the pre-pulse plasma. Higher laser pulse frequencies increase the probability of particle-laser interaction and, therefore, reduce the shot-to-shot line intensity variation as compared to lower particle loadings in the cell. Additional experiments using an aerosol chamber were performed to further quantify the laser absorption by the plasma in dependence on time both with and without the presence of particles. The overall implication of laser-particle interactions for LIBS and LA-ICP-MS/OES are discussed.

  6. Railgun system using a laser-induced plasma armature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozuka, M.; Oda, Y.; Azuma, K.

    1996-01-01

    Development of an electromagnetic railgun system that utilizes a laser-induced plasma armature formation has been conducted to investigate the application of the railgun system for high-speed pellet injection into fusion plasmas. Using the laser-induced plasma formation technique, the required breakdown voltage was reduced by one-tenth compared with that for the spark-discharged plasma. The railgun system successfully accelerated the laser-induced plasma armature by an electromagnetic force that accelerated the pellet. The highest velocity of the solid hydrogen pellets, obtained so far, was 2.6 km/sec using a 2m-long railgun. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  7. Railgun system using a laser-induced plasma armature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, Masanori; Oda, Yasushi; Azuma, Kingo

    1996-05-01

    Development of an electromagnetic railgun system that utilizes a laser-induced plasma armature formation has been conducted to investigate the application of the railgun system for high-speed pellet injection into fusion plasmas. Using the laser-induced plasma formation technique, the required breakdown voltage was reduced by one-tenth compared with that for the spark-discharged plasma. The railgun system successfully accelerated the laser-induced plasma armature by an electromagnetic force that accelerated the pellet. The highest velocity of the solid hydrogen pellets, obtained so far, was 2.6 km/sec using a 2m-long railgun.

  8. Railgun system using a laser-induced plasma armature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onozuka, M.; Oda, Y.; Azuma, K. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., 3-3-1, Minatomirai, Nishi-ku, Yokohama 220-84 (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    Development of an electromagnetic railgun system that utilizes a laser-induced plasma armature formation has been conducted to investigate the application of the railgun system for high-speed pellet injection into fusion plasmas. Using the laser-induced plasma formation technique, the required breakdown voltage was reduced by one-tenth compared with that for the spark-discharged plasma. The railgun system successfully accelerated the laser-induced plasma armature by an electromagnetic force that accelerated the pellet. The highest velocity of the solid hydrogen pellets, obtained so far, was 2.6 km/sec using a 2m-long railgun. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Risks induced by laser radiation; Risques induits par le rayonnement laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courant, D [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Dept. de Radiobiologie et de Radiopathologie

    2001-07-01

    The use of lasers is often dangerous because of the emitted power, the wave length, the conduction system(optical fiber, wave guide, mirrors) and the use conditions. The safety notion involves the precise knowledge of materials, the biological effects in function of laser emission parameters, the knowledge of protection standards, the observance of use rules and the personnel training. This chapter treats the risks induced by the beam. It gives the different biological effects induced by the laser beam, at the eye and skin levels that are at the origin of exposure limits and the lasers classification recommended by the protection standards. (N.C.)

  10. Faraday cup measurements of a laser-induced plasma for a laser-proton acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seong Hee; Jeong, Young Uk; Lee, Ki Tae

    2006-01-01

    Experiments for the generation of laser-induced protons were performed in collaboration with Advanced Photonics Research Institute (APRI). An intensity of 3 X 10 18 W/cm 2 was delivered to a 17-μm Al target, and the Faraday Cup signals of the charged particles generated by the laser-plasma interaction were measured. In this paper, we discuss the first experimental results of laser-induced proton generation using the APRI laser and report on the feasibility of current measurement for charged-particles when using a Faraday cup.

  11. Characterization Of High Explosives Detonations Via Laser-Induced Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villa-Aleman, E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-08

    One objective of the Department of Energy’s National Security Administration is to develop technologies that can help the United States government to detect foreign nuclear weapons development activities. The realm of high explosive (HE) experiments is one of the key areas to assess the nuclear ambitions of a country. SRNL has participated in the collection of particulates from HE experiments and characterized the material with the purpose to correlate particulate matter with HE. Since these field campaigns are expensive, on-demand simulated laboratory-scale explosion experiments are needed to further our knowledge of the chemistry and particle formation in the process. Our goal is to develop an experimental test bed in the laboratory to test measurement concepts and correlate particle formation processes with the observables from the detonation fireball. The final objective is to use this knowledge to tailor our experimental setups in future field campaigns. The test bed uses pulsed laser-induced plasmas to simulate micro-explosions, with the intent to study the temporal behavior of the fireball observed in field tests. During FY15, a plan was prepared and executed which assembled two laser ablation systems, procured materials for study, and tested a Step-Scan Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (SS-FTIR). Designs for a shadowgraph system for shock wave analysis, design for a micro-particulate collector from ablated pulse were accomplished. A novel spectroscopic system was conceived and a prototype system built for acquisition of spectral/temporal characterization of a high speed event such as from a high explosive detonation. Experiments and analyses will continue into FY16.

  12. Induced-Fission Imaging of Nuclear Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausladen, Paul; Blackston, Matthew A.; Mullens, James Allen; McConchie, Seth M.; Mihalczo, John T.; Bingham, Philip R.; Ericson, Milton Nance; Fabris, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents initial results from development of the induced-fission imaging technique, which can be used for the purpose of measuring or verifying the distribution of fissionable material in an unopened container. The technique is based on stimulating fissions in nuclear material with 14 MeV neutrons from an associated-particle deuterium-tritium (D-T) generator and counting the subsequent induced fast fission neutrons with an array of fast organic scintillation detectors. For each source neutron incident on the container, the neutron creation time and initial trajectory are known from detection of the associated alpha particle of the d + t → α + n reaction. Many induced fissions will lie along (or near) the interrogating neutron path, allowing an image of the spatial distribution of prompt induced fissions, and thereby fissionable material, to be constructed. A variety of induced-fission imaging measurements have been performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with a portable, low-dose D-T generator, including single-view radiographic measurements and three-dimensional tomographic measurements. Results from these measurements will be presented along with the neutron transmission images that have been performed simultaneously. This new capability may have applications to a number of areas in which there may be a need to confirm the presence or configuration of nuclear materials, such as nuclear material control and accountability, quality assurance, treaty confirmation, or homeland security applications.

  13. Towards friction control using laser-induced periodic surface structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eichstädt, J.; Römer, Gerardus Richardus, Bernardus, Engelina; Huis in 't Veld, Bert; Schmidt, M.; Zaeh, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims at contributing to the study of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) and the description of their tribological properties in order to facilitate the knowledge for contact mechanical applications. To obtain laser parameters for LIPSS formation, we propose to execute two

  14. Overview of applications of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremers, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a method of performing elemental analyses of solids, liquids, and gases using the microplasma produced by a focused laser pulse. Because the microplasma is formed by optical radiation, LIBS has some important advantages compared to conventional laboratory based analytical methods. Three applications are discussed which use the LIBS method. 6 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Robust authentication through stochastic femtosecond laser filament induced scattering surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Haisu; Tzortzakis, Stelios

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a reliable authentication method by femtosecond laser filament induced scattering surfaces. The stochastic nonlinear laser fabrication nature results in unique authentication robust properties. This work provides a simple and viable solution for practical applications in product authentication, while also opens the way for incorporating such elements in transparent media and coupling those in integrated optical circuits.

  16. Robust authentication through stochastic femtosecond laser filament induced scattering surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Haisu [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas, Heraklion 71110 (Greece); Tzortzakis, Stelios, E-mail: stzortz@iesl.forth.gr [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas, Heraklion 71110 (Greece); Materials Science and Technology Department, University of Crete, 71003 Heraklion (Greece); Science Program, Texas A& M University at Qatar, P.O. Box 23874, Doha (Qatar)

    2016-05-23

    We demonstrate a reliable authentication method by femtosecond laser filament induced scattering surfaces. The stochastic nonlinear laser fabrication nature results in unique authentication robust properties. This work provides a simple and viable solution for practical applications in product authentication, while also opens the way for incorporating such elements in transparent media and coupling those in integrated optical circuits.

  17. Erratum to: Measurement of copper vapour laser-induced ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Erratum to: Measurement of copper vapour laser-induced deformation of dielectric-coated mirror surface by. Michelson interferometer. A WAHID. ∗. , S KUNDU, J S B SINGH, A K SINGH, A KHATTAR,. S K MAURYA, J S DHUMAL and K DASGUPTA. Laser & Plasma Technology Division, Beam Technology Development ...

  18. New photoionization lasers pumped by laser-induced plasma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hube, M.; Dieckmann, M.; Beigang, R.; Welling, H.; Wellegehausen, B.

    1988-01-01

    Innershell photoionization of atomic gases and vapors by soft x rays from a laser-produced plasma is a potential method for making lasers at short wavelengths. Normally, in such experiments only a single plasma spot or plasma line is created for the excitation. This gives high excitation rates but only a short excitation length. At high excitation rates detrimental influences, such as amplified spontaneous emission, optical saturation, or quenching processes, may decrease or even destroy a possible inversion. Therefore, it seems to be more favorable to use a number of separated plasma spots with smaller excitation rates and larger excitation lengths. As a test, a three-plasma spot device was constructed and used in the well-known Cd-photoionization laser at 442 nm. With a 600-mJ Nd:YAH laser (pulse length, 8 ns) for plasma production, output energies up to 300 μJ have been measured, which is more than a doubling of so far obtained data. On innershell excitation, levels may be populated that allow direct lasers as in the case of Cd or that are metastable and cannot be directly coupled to lower levels. In this case modifications in the excitation process are necessary. Such modifications may be an optical pump process in the atom prior to the innershell photoionization or an optical pump process (population transfer process) after the innershell ionization, leading to Raman or anti-Stokes Raman-type laser emissions. With these techniques and the developed multiplasma spot excitation device a variety of new laser emissions in K and Cs ions have been achieved which are indicated in the level schemes

  19. Robust optimization of the laser induced damage threshold of dielectric mirrors for high power lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorel, Marine; Lanternier, Thomas; Lavastre, Éric; Bonod, Nicolas; Bousquet, Bruno; Néauport, Jérôme

    2018-04-30

    We report on a numerical optimization of the laser induced damage threshold of multi-dielectric high reflection mirrors in the sub-picosecond regime. We highlight the interplay between the electric field distribution, refractive index and intrinsic laser induced damage threshold of the materials on the overall laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) of the multilayer. We describe an optimization method of the multilayer that minimizes the field enhancement in high refractive index materials while preserving a near perfect reflectivity. This method yields a significant improvement of the damage resistance since a maximum increase of 40% can be achieved on the overall LIDT of the multilayer.

  20. Peroxy Radical Measurements via Laser Induced Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trawny, Katrin; Tatum Ernest, Cheryl; Novelli, Anna; Elste, Thomas; Plaß-Dülmer, Christian; Rudolf, Markus; Martinez, Monica; Harder, Hartwig; Lelieveld, Jos

    2013-04-01

    We present a newly built Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) system to measure the sum of all peroxy radicals (RO2) utilizing chemical conversion to OH. This instrument operates in two different modes: the ROx mode (sum of OH, HO2, and RO2) and the HOx mode (sum of OH and HO2). The HOx mode is used to derive the RO2 data from the ROx measurements. A model approach was used during instrumental development to identify the key parameters needed for the conversion process in front of the detection area and to optimize sensitivity. The instrument was then carefully characterized in various lab experiments, where it could be shown that the wall losses for HO2 are negligible and that nearly all HO2 is converted to OH in front of the detection zone. The pressure and temperature dependencies were also analyzed and assured that the instrument does not show any photolytical interference. As the instrument is calibrated with only one kind of peroxy radicals it was very important that the differences in sensitivity for different peroxy radicals are acceptable. Lab experiments as well as first results from the HOPE 2012 intensive field campaign, which took place in summer 2012 at the Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) station of the German Weather Service, will be discussed.

  1. Medical Applications of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathak, A K; Rai, N K; Singh, Ankita; Rai, A K; Rai, Pradeep K; Rai, Pramod K

    2014-01-01

    Sedentary lifestyle of human beings has resulted in various diseases and in turn we require a potential tool that can be used to address various issues related to human health. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is one such potential optical analytical tool that has become quite popular because of its distinctive features that include applicability to any type/phase of samples with almost no sample preparation. Several reports are available that discusses the capabilities of LIBS, suitable for various applications in different branches of science which cannot be addressed by traditional analytical methods but only few reports are available for the medical applications of LIBS. In the present work, LIBS has been implemented to understand the role of various elements in the formation of gallstones (formed under the empyema and mucocele state of gallbladder) samples along with patient history that were collected from Purvancal region of Uttar Pradesh, India. The occurrence statistics of gallstones under the present study reveal higher occurrence of gallstones in female patients. The gallstone occurrence was found more prevalent for those male patients who were having the habit of either tobacco chewing, smoking or drinking alcohols. This work further reports in-situ LIBS study of deciduous tooth and in-vivo LIBS study of human nail

  2. Impact of environmental contamination on laser induced damage of silica optics in Laser MegaJoule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bien-Aime, K.

    2009-11-01

    Laser induced damage impact of molecular contamination on fused polished silica samples in a context of high power laser fusion facility, such as Laser MegaJoule (LMJ) has been studied. One of the possible causes of laser induced degradation of optical component is the adsorption of molecular or particular contamination on optical surfaces. In the peculiar case of LMJ, laser irradiation conditions are a fluence of 10 J/cm 2 , a wavelength of 351 nm, a pulse duration of 3 ns for a single shot/days frequency. Critical compounds have been identified thanks to environmental measurements, analysis of material outgassing, and identification of surface contamination in the critical environments. Experiments of controlled contamination involving these compounds have been conducted in order to understand and model mechanisms of laser damage. Various hypotheses are proposed to explain the damage mechanism. (author)

  3. Laser spectroscopy used in nuclear physics; La spectroscopie laser appliquee a la physique nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Blanc, F

    2001-04-05

    The study of nuclear shapes is a basic topic since it constitutes an excellent ground for testing and validating nuclear models. Measurements of the electron quadrupolar moment, of the nuclear charge radius and of the magnetic dipolar moment shed light on the nuclear deformation. Laser spectroscopy is a specific tool for such measurements, it is based on the interaction of the nucleus with the surrounding electron cloud (hyperfine structure), it is then an external approach of the shape of the nucleus whereas the classical nuclear spectroscopy ({alpha}, {beta} or {gamma}) gives information on the deformation from the inside of the nucleus. The author describes 2 techniques of laser spectroscopy: the colinear spectroscopy directly applied to a beam issued from an isotope separator and the resonant ionization spectroscopy linked with atom desorption that allows the study of particular nuclei. In order to illustrate both methods some effective measurements are presented: - the colinear spectroscopy has allowed the achievement of the complete description of the isomeric state (T = 31 years) of hafnium-178; - The experiment Complis has revealed an unexpected even-odd zigzag effect on very neutron-deficient platinum isotopes; and - the comparison of 2 isotopes of gold and platinum with their isomers has shown that the inversion of 2 levels of neutron, that was found out by nuclear spectroscopy, is in fact a consequence of a change in the nuclear shape. (A.C.)

  4. Flexible temperature and flow sensor from laser-induced graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Marengo, Marco; Marinaro, Giovanni; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2017-01-01

    Herein we present a flexible temperature sensor and a flow speed sensor based on laser-induced graphene. The main benefits arise from peculiar electrical, thermal and mechanical performances of the material thus obtained, along with a cheap

  5. Innovative applications of femtosecond laser induced self-organized nanostructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimotsuma, Yasuhiko; Miura, Kiyotaka; Sakakura, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    The nanostructure induced by the direct-writing of femtosecond-laser pulses can open a new opportunity to develop avant-garde devices such as a 5D optical storage, polarization imaging sensor, thermoelectric conversion elements. (author)

  6. Neuroprotective Treatment of Laser-Induced Retinal Injuries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rosner, Mordechai

    2001-01-01

    .... It is not possible to prevent all these injuries and there is no treatment. This study was designed to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of dextromethorphan, memantine and brimonidine in our rat model of laser- induced retinal-lesions Methods...

  7. Production and Characterization of Femtosecond-Laser-Induced Air Plasma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Armbruster, David R

    2008-01-01

    .... A beam expander was used to expand the beam to a diameter of approximately 6.5 mm, and the beam was focused through a 25 mm focal length achromatic lens to produce laser-induced plasma in ambient air...

  8. Nuclear diagnostics of high intensity laser plasma interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krushelnick, K.; Santala, M.I.K.; Beg, F.N.; Clark, E.L.; Dangor, A.E.; Tatarakis, M.; Watts, I.; Wei, M.S.; Zepf, M.; Ledingham, K.W.D.; McCanny, T.; Spencer, I.; Clarke, R.J.; Norreys, P.A.

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear activation has been observed in materials exposed to energetic protons and heavy ions generated from high intensity laser-solid interactions (at focused intensities up to 5x10 19 W/cm 2 ). The energy spectrum of the protons is determined through the use of these nuclear activation techniques and is found to be consistent with other ion diagnostics. Heavy ion fusion reactions and large neutron fluxes from the (p, n) reactions were also observed. The reduction of proton emission and increase in heavy ion energy using heated targets was also observed

  9. Para-hydrogen raman laser and its application to laser induced chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashiro, Hideo

    1988-01-01

    The report outlines the mechanism of the para-hydrogen Raman laser as a infrared light source, and its application to laser induced chemistry. The Stoke's wave number after a Raman shift is equal to the difference between the wave number of the CO 2 laser used for excitation and the rotation Raman wave number of the hydrogen molecule. A Raman laser can serve as an infrared source. CO 2 laser oscillation beam in the range of 9∼11 micrometers is selected and the frequency of infrared beam is varied by changing the wave number of the CO 2 laser beam. A problem with the Raman laser is that the Raman scatterring gain is small due to a large wavelength. In developing equipment, a special mechanism is required to solve this problem. A Raman laser comprises a CO 2 laser for excitation and multi-pulse Raman cells. The combination of a TEA oscillator and amplifiers gives CO 2 pulses with a peak power of about several tens of MW. Many heavy metal compounds including fluorides, carbonyl compounds and other organic compounds, absorb light with wavelengths in the same range as those of the Raman laser. Such compounds can be dissociated directly by applying Raman laser beams. The laser will be helpful for separation of isotopes, etc. (Nogami, K.)

  10. Laser metrology applied to the nuclear maintenance; Metrologia laser aplicada al mantenimiento nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrido Garcia, J.; Sarti Fernandez, F.

    2012-07-01

    The development of this paper focuses on providing an overview of the state of the art about laser metrology. This type of equipment combines the measurement philosophy of laser scanning with the great precision of the robotic equipment of auscultation. Getting micron.

  11. Filament-induced remote surface ablation for long range laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohwetter, Ph.; Stelmaszczyk, K.; Woeste, L.; Ackermann, R.; Mejean, G.; Salmon, E.; Kasparian, J.; Yu, J.; Wolf, J.-P.

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate laser induced ablation and plasma line emission from a metallic target at distances up to 180 m from the laser, using filaments (self-guided propagation structures ∼ 100 μm in diameter and ∼ 5 x 10 13 W/cm 2 in intensity) appearing as femtosecond and terawatt laser pulses propagating in air. The remarkable property of filaments to propagate over a long distance independently of the diffraction limit opens the frontier to long range operation of the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique. We call this special configuration of remote laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy 'remote filament-induced breakdown spectroscopy'. Our results show main features of filament-induced ablation on the surface of a metallic sample and associated plasma emission. Our experimental data allow us to estimate requirements for the detection system needed for kilometer-range remote filament-induced breakdown spectroscopy experiment

  12. Imaging femtosecond laser-induced electronic excitation in glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Xianglei; Mao, Samuel S.; Russo, Richard E.

    2003-01-01

    While substantial progress has been achieved in understanding laser ablation on the nanosecond and picosecond time scales, it remains a considerable challenge to elucidate the underlying mechanisms during femtosecond laser material interactions. We present experimental observations of electronic excitation inside a wide band gap glass during single femtosecond laser pulse (100 fs, 800 nm) irradiation. Using a femtosecond time-resolved imaging technique, we measured the evolution of a laser-induced electronic plasma inside the glass and calculated the electron number density to be on the order of 10 19 cm -3

  13. Induced isospin mixing in direct nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenske, H.

    1979-07-01

    The effect of charge-dependent interactions on nuclear reactions is investigated. First, a survey is given on the most important results concerning the charge dependence of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. The isospin symmetry and invariance principles are discussed. Violations of the isospin symmetry occuring in direct nuclear reactions are analysed using the soupled channel theory, the folding model and microscopic descriptions. Finally, induced isospin mixing in isospin-forbidden direct reactions is considered using the example of the inelastic scattering of deuterons on 12 C. (KBE)

  14. Laser resonant ionization spectroscopy and laser-induced resonant fluorescence spectra of samarium atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Changtai

    1995-01-01

    We have measured new high-lying levels of Sm atom by two-colour resonant photoionisation spectroscopy; we have observed the isotope shifts of Sm atom by laser-induced resonant fluorescence spectroscopy; the lifetime of eight low-lying levels of Sm atom were measured by using pulsed laser-Boxcar technique in atomic beam.

  15. Investigation on laser welding characteristics for appendage of bearing pads of nuclear fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. S.; Kim, W. K.; Park, C. H.; Ko, J. H.; Lee, J. W.; Yang, M. S.

    2001-01-01

    In CANDU nuclear fuel manufacturing the brazing technology has been adopted conventionally to attach the bearing pads of nuclear fuel elements. However, in order to meet good performance of nuclear fuel and improved working efficiency, we started developing the laser welding technology for attachments of the bearing pads. Since the YAG laser can be suitable for small parts and transmit the beam through the optical fiber, the process is corresponding to mass-production with working shops. Making the most of this feature, we have developed the laser welding for appendage of the bearing pads of nuclear fuel elements, and has studied on the laser welding characterisitcs of appendages for nuclear fuel element

  16. Ultrafast molecular imaging by laser-induced electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, M.; Nguyen-Dang, T. T.; Cornaggia, C.; Saugout, S.; Charron, E.; Keller, A.; Atabek, O.

    2011-01-01

    We address the feasibility of imaging geometric and orbital structures of a polyatomic molecule on an attosecond time scale using the laser-induced electron diffraction (LIED) technique. We present numerical results for the highest molecular orbitals of the CO 2 molecule excited by a near-infrared few-cycle laser pulse. The molecular geometry (bond lengths) is determined within 3% of accuracy from a diffraction pattern which also reflects the nodal properties of the initial molecular orbital. Robustness of the structure determination is discussed with respect to vibrational and rotational motions with a complete interpretation of the laser-induced mechanisms.

  17. Visualization of cavitation bubbles induced by a laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testud-Giovanneschi, P.; Dufresne, D.; Inglesakis, G.

    1987-01-01

    The I.M.F.M. researchers working on Laser-Matter Interaction are studying the effects induced on matter by a pulsed radiation energy deposit. In this research, the emphasis is on the laser liquids interaction field and more particularly the cavitation induced by a laser pulse or ''optical-cavitation'' as termed by W. Lauterborn (1). For bubbles investigations, the visualizations form a basic diagnostic. This paper presents the experimental apparatus of formation of bubbles, the visualization apparatus and different typical examples of photographic recordings

  18. Laser Induced Selective Activation For Subsequent Autocatalytic Electroless Plating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yang

    . The third hypothesis is that the activation and rinsing process can be described by diffusion. This hypothesis is proved using Fick’s diffusion laws combined with the short-time-plating experiment. The influence of laser parameters on the surface structure is investigated for Nd:YAG, UV, and fiber lasers......The subject of this PhD thesis is “Laser induced selective activation for subsequent autocatalytic electroless plating.” The objective of the project is to investigate the process chains for micro structuring of polymer surfaces for selective micro metallization. Laser induced selective activation...... (LISA) is introduced and studied as a new technique for producing 3D moulded interconnect devices (3D-MIDs). This technique enables the metallization of polymer surface modified by laser and subsequently activated by a PdCl2/SnCl2 system. Various technologies exist on an industrial level...

  19. Laser-induced gas plasma machining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elhadj, Selim; Bass, Isaac Louis; Guss, Gabriel Mark; Matthews, Manyalibo J.

    2017-10-17

    Techniques for removing material from a substrate are provided. A laser beam is focused at a distance from the surface to be treated. A gas is provided at the focus point. The gas is dissociated using the laser energy to generate gas plasma. The substrate is then brought in contact with the gas plasma to enable material removal.

  20. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy in water | Boudjemai ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sparks were generated in water by the focused beam of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser Na and Cu aqueous solutions exhibited fluorescence signal on the decaying edge of plasma emission at their respective characteristic resonance lines. Potential of the laser plasma spectroscopy for in-situ pollution monitoring in natural ...

  1. Inexpensive laser-induced surface modification in bismuth thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras, A. Reyes [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Carretera Toluca, Ixtlahuaca Kilómetro 15.5, C.P. 50200 Edo. de México (Mexico); Hautefeuille, M., E-mail: mathieu_h@ciencias.unam.mx [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Avenida Universidad 3000, Circuito Exterior S/N, Coyoacán, Ciudad Universitaria, C.P. 04510 D.F. Mexico (Mexico); García, A. Esparza [Fotofísica y Películas Delgadas, Departamento de Tecnociencias, CCADET-UNAM, Circuito exterior s/n C.P. 04510 Cd. Universitaria, D.F. Mexico (Mexico); Mejia, O. Olea [Centro Conjunto de Investigación en Química Sustentable UAEM-UNAM, Carretera Toluca-Atlacomulco, Km 14.5, Unidad El Rosedal, 50200 San Cayetano, Estado de México (Mexico); López, M.A. Camacho [Facultad de Química, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Tollocan s/n, esq. Paseo Colón, Toluca, Estado de México 50110 (Mexico)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Laser-induced microbumps were formed on bismuth films using a simple, low-cost, laser setup. • The patterns, similar to those typically obtained with high-power lasers, were characterized. • Control of laser ablation conditions is critical in the fabrication of surface microbumps. - Abstract: In this work, we present results on texturing a 500 nm thick bismuth film, deposited by sputtering onto a glass slide using a low-cost homemade, near-infrared pulsed laser platform. A 785 nm laser diode of a CD–DVD pickup head was precisely focused on the sample mounted on a motorized two-axis translation stage to generate localized surface microbumps on the bismuth films. This simple method successfully transferred desired micropatterns on the films in a computer-numerical control fashion. Irradiated zones were characterized by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. It was observed that final results are strongly dependent on irradiation parameters.

  2. Measurement of nuclear moments and radii by collinear laser spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Geithner, W R; Lievens, P; Kotrotsios, G; Silverans, R; Kappertz, S

    2002-01-01

    %IS304 %title\\\\ \\\\Collinear laser spectroscopy on a fast beam has proven to be a widely applicable and very efficient tool for measurements of changes in mean square nuclear charge radii, nuclear spins, magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments. Recent developments of extremely sensitive non-optical detection schemes enabled for some elements the extension of the measurements towards the very short-lived isotopes in the far wings of the ISOLDE production curves. The gain in sensitivity opens up new perspectives, particularly for measurements on lighter nuclei whose ground-state properties can be interpreted by large scale microscopic calculations instead of the more phenomenologic models used for heavier nuclei.\\\\ \\\\ For the sequence of argon isotopes $^{32-40}$Ar and $^{46}$Ar isotope shifts and nuclear moments were measured by optical pumping followed by state selective collisional ionization and detection of the $\\beta$-decay. Similarly, the low-background $\\alpha$-detection was used to extend earlie...

  3. Characterization of hard coatings produced by laser cladding using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varela, J.A.; Amado, J.M.; Tobar, M.J.; Mateo, M.P.; Yañez, A.; Nicolas, G., E-mail: gines@udc.es

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Chemical mapping and profiling by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of coatings produced by laser cladding. • Production of laser clads using tungsten carbide (WC) and nickel based matrix (NiCrBSi) powders. • Calibration by LIBS of hardfacing alloys with different WC concentrations. - Abstract: Protective coatings with a high abrasive wear resistance can be obtained from powders by laser cladding technique, in order to extend the service life of some industrial components. In this work, laser clad layers of self-fluxing NiCrBSi alloy powder mixed with WC powder have been produced on stainless steel substrates of austenitic type (AISI 304) in a first step and then chemically characterized by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. With the suitable laser processing parameters (mainly output power, beam scan speed and flow rate) and powders mixture proportions between WC ceramics and NiCrBSi alloys, dense pore free layers have been obtained on single tracks and on large areas with overlapped tracks. The results achieved by LIBS technique and applied for the first time to the analysis of laser clads provided the chemical composition of the tungsten carbides in metal alloy matrix. Different measurement modes (multiple point analyses, depth profiles and chemical maps) have been employed, demonstrating the usefulness of LIBS technique for the characterization of laser clads based on hardfacing alloys. The behavior of hardness can be explained by LIBS maps which evidenced the partial dilution of some WC spheres in the coating.

  4. Temporal Evolution Study of the Plasma Induced by CO2 Pulsed Laser on Targets of Titanium Oxides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Diaz, L.; Camacho, J.J.; Sanz, M.; Hernández, M.; Jandová, Věra; Castillejo, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 86, AUG 1 (2013), s. 88-93 ISSN 0584-8547 Grant - others:DGICYT(ES) CTQ2008-05393/BQU; DGICYT(ES) CTQ2010-15680/BQU; CAM(ES) Geomateriales S2009/ Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : laser induced breakdown spectroscopy * time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy * high-power IR CO2 pulsed laser Subject RIV: CH - Nuclear ; Quantum Chemistry Impact factor: 3.150, year: 2013

  5. Laser application for nuclear reaction product detecting system alignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grantsev, V.I.; Dryapachenko, I.P.; Kornilov, V.A.; Nemets, O.F.; Rudenko, B.A.; Sokolov, M.V.; Struzhko, B.G.; Gnatovskij, A.V.; Bojchuk, V.N.

    1982-01-01

    A method for optical alignment of nuclear particle detector system using a laser beam and hologram is described. The method permits to arrange detectors very precisely in accordance with any chosen space coordinate values. The results of modelling the geometry of an experiment based on using the suggested method on cyclotron beams are described. A gas helium-neon laser with wavelength of 0.63 μm radiation power of an order of 2 MW and angular beam divergence less than 10 angular minutes is used for modelling. It is concluded that the laser and hologram application provides large possibilities for the modelling the geometry of experiments on nuclear reaction investigation. When necessary it is possible to obtain small nonius scale of reference beams by means of multiplicating properties of the wave front modulator-hologram system. It is also possible to record holograms shaping the reference beams in two or several planes crossing along the central beam direction. Such holograms can be used for modelling the noncoplanar geometry of correlation experiments [ru

  6. Laser induced synthesis of nanoparticles in liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazakevich, P.V. [Wave Research Center, General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38 Vavilov street, 117942 Moscow (Russian Federation); Simakin, A.V. [Wave Research Center, General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38 Vavilov street, 117942 Moscow (Russian Federation); Voronov, V.V. [Wave Research Center, General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38 Vavilov street, 117942 Moscow (Russian Federation); Shafeev, G.A. [Wave Research Center, General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38 Vavilov street, 117942 Moscow (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: shafeev@kapella.gpi.ru

    2006-04-30

    The review of results on nanoparticles formation is presented under laser ablation of Ag, Au, and Cu-containing solid targets in liquid environments (H{sub 2}O, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}Cl{sub 2}, etc.). X-ray diffractometry (XRD), UV-vis optical transmission spectrometry, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) characterize the nanoparticles. The morphology of nanoparticles is studied as the function of both laser fluence and nature of the liquid. The possibility to control the shape of nanoparticles by ablation of an Au target by an interference pattern of two laser beams is demonstrated. Formation of alloyed Au-Ag and Ag-Cu nanoparticles is reported under laser exposure of a mixture of individual nanoparticles. The effect of internal segregation of brass nanoparticles is discussed due to their small lateral dimensions. The factors are discussed that determine the distribution function of particles size under laser ablation. The influence of laser parameters as well as the nature on the liquid on the properties of nanoparticles is elucidated.

  7. Laser-induced transfer of gel microdroplets for cell printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusupov, V. I.; Zhigar'kov, V. S.; Churbanova, E. S.; Chutko, E. A.; Evlashin, S. A.; Gorlenko, M. V.; Cheptsov, V. S.; Minaev, N. V.; Bagratashvili, V. N.

    2017-12-01

    We study thermal and transport processes involved in the transfer of gel microdroplets under the conditions of laser cell microprinting. The specific features of the interaction of pulsed laser radiation ( λ = 1.064 µm, pulse duration 4 - 200 ns, energy 2 µJ - 1 mJ) with the absorbing gold film deposited on the glass donor substrate are determined. The investigation of the dynamics of transport processes by means of fast optical video recording and optoacoustic methods makes it possible to determine the characteristics of the produced gel jets as functions of the laser operation regimes. The hydrodynamic process of interaction between the laser radiation and the gold coating with the hydrogel layer on it is considered and the temperature in the region of the laser pulse action is estimated. It is shown that in the mechanism of laser-induced transfer a significant role is played by the processes of explosive boiling of water (in gel) and gold. The amount of gold nanoparticles arriving at the acceptor plate in the process of the laser transfer is determined. For the laser pulse duration 8 ns and small energies (less than 10 µJ), the fraction of gold nanoparticles in the gel microdroplets is negligibly small, and their quantity linearly grows with increasing pulse energy. The performed studies offer a base for optimising the processes of laser transfer of gel microdroplets in the rapidly developing technologies of cell microprinting.

  8. Beam diagnostics for Laser-induced proton generation at KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Heun; Park, Seong Hee; Jeong, Young Uk; Lee, Ki Tae; Chan, Young Ho; Lee, Byung Cheol; Yoo, Byeong Duk

    2005-01-01

    With an advent of femto-second lasers, a laseraccelerated ion generation has been world-widely studied for medical and nuclear applications. It is known that protons with the energy from several tens MeV to a few hundreds MeV require for a cancer therapy and nuclear reaction. Even though, up to present, the maximum energy of laser-accelerated proton is about 60 MeV, it is expected that the energy of protons generated can be obtained at least up to 150 MeV. According to theoretical and experimental works, it turns out the energy distribution and the flux of ions strongly depends on the intensity of a fs laser at a target. However, physics on laser-plasma interaction is still not clear. The precise measurements of parameters of a fs laser and ions are important to figure out the physics and develop the theoretical interpretation. Typically, beam diagnostic system includes measurements and/or monitoring of the temporal and spatial profiles of lasers at the target as well as the energy spectrum and density profile of protons, which are critical for the analysis of mechanism and the characterization of protons generated. We fabricated and installed the target chamber for laser-accelerated proton generation and are now integrating beam diagnostic system. For laser diagnostics, beam monitoring and alignment system has been installed. For a charged particle, CR-39 detectors, Thomson parabola spectrometer, and Si charged particle detectors are installed for density profile and energy spectrum. In this paper, we discuss the laser beam monitoring and alignment system. We also estimates expected spectrum of protons from Thomson parabola spectrometer, depending on the parameters of protons

  9. Secondary emissions during fiber laser cutting of nuclear material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, A., E-mail: beatriz.mendes.lopez@gmail.com [IDMEC, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); Assunção, E. [IDMEC, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); European Federation for Welding, Joining and Cutting, Porto Salvo 2740-120 (Portugal); Pires, I. [IDMEC, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); Quintino, L. [IDMEC, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); European Federation for Welding, Joining and Cutting, Porto Salvo 2740-120 (Portugal)

    2017-04-15

    The laser process has been studied for dismantling work for more than 10 years, however there is almost no data available concerning secondary emissions generated during the process. These emissions are inevitable during the laser cutting process and can have detrimental effects in human health and in the equipment. In terms of safety, for nuclear decommissioning, is crucial to point out ways of controlling the emissions of the process. This paper gives indications about the parameters to be used in order to reduce these secondary emissions and about the influence of these parameters on the particles size distribution. In general, for producing minimal dross and fume emissions the beam focus should be placed on the surface of the material. The higher percentage of secondary emissions which present higher diameter, increases approximately linearly with the stand-off distance and with the use of low air pressure.

  10. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of asbestos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caneve, L.; Colao, F.; Fabbri, F.; Fantoni, R.; Spizzichino, V.; Striber, J.

    2005-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy was applied to test the possibility of detecting and identifying asbestos in different samples in view of the perspective at field operation without sample preparation which is peculiar to this technique. Several like-resin materials were first investigated by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, in order to find an asbestos container assuring safe laboratory operation during the material characterization aimed to identify indicators suitable for a quick identification on field. Successively, spectra of asbestos samples of both in serpentine and amphibole forms were measured and the variability in elemental composition was calculated from the emission spectra. Ratios of intensities of characteristic elements were tested as indicators for asbestos recognition. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy results were compared with those obtained by analyzing the same asbestos samples with a scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, a good correlation was found for Mg/Si and Fe/Si, thus showing the capability of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool for this category of materials. In particular, it was demonstrated that the method based on two indicators derived from laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy intensity ratios allows to discriminate between asbestos and cements in single shot measurements suitable to field operation

  11. Robust nanopatterning by laser-induced dewetting of metal nanofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favazza, Christopher; Kalyanaraman, Ramki; Sureshkumar, Radhakrishna

    2006-01-01

    We have observed nanopattern formation with robust and controllable spatial ordering by laser-induced dewetting in nanoscopic metal films. Pattern evolution in Co film of thickness 1≤h≤8 nm on SiO 2 was achieved under multiple pulse irradiation using a 9 ns pulse laser. Dewetting leads to the formation of cellular patterns which evolve into polygons that eventually break up into nanoparticles with unimodal size distribution and short range ordering in nearest neighbour spacing R. Spatial ordering was attributed to a hydrodynamic thin film instability and resulted in a predictable variation of R and particle diameter D with h. The length scales R and D were found to be independent of the laser energy. These results suggest that spatially ordered metal nanoparticles can be robustly assembled by laser-induced dewetting

  12. Robust nanopatterning by laser-induced dewetting of metal nanofilms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favazza, Christopher [Department of Physics, Washington University in St Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Kalyanaraman, Ramki [Department of Physics, Washington University in St Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Sureshkumar, Radhakrishna [Center for Materials Innovation, Washington University in St Louis, MO 63130 (United States)

    2006-08-28

    We have observed nanopattern formation with robust and controllable spatial ordering by laser-induced dewetting in nanoscopic metal films. Pattern evolution in Co film of thickness 1{<=}h{<=}8 nm on SiO{sub 2} was achieved under multiple pulse irradiation using a 9 ns pulse laser. Dewetting leads to the formation of cellular patterns which evolve into polygons that eventually break up into nanoparticles with unimodal size distribution and short range ordering in nearest neighbour spacing R. Spatial ordering was attributed to a hydrodynamic thin film instability and resulted in a predictable variation of R and particle diameter D with h. The length scales R and D were found to be independent of the laser energy. These results suggest that spatially ordered metal nanoparticles can be robustly assembled by laser-induced dewetting.

  13. Robust nanopatterning by laser-induced dewetting of metal nanofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favazza, Christopher; Kalyanaraman, Ramki; Sureshkumar, Radhakrishna

    2006-08-28

    We have observed nanopattern formation with robust and controllable spatial ordering by laser-induced dewetting in nanoscopic metal films. Pattern evolution in Co film of thickness 1≤h≤8 nm on SiO(2) was achieved under multiple pulse irradiation using a 9 ns pulse laser. Dewetting leads to the formation of cellular patterns which evolve into polygons that eventually break up into nanoparticles with unimodal size distribution and short range ordering in nearest neighbour spacing R. Spatial ordering was attributed to a hydrodynamic thin film instability and resulted in a predictable variation of R and particle diameter D with h. The length scales R and D were found to be independent of the laser energy. These results suggest that spatially ordered metal nanoparticles can be robustly assembled by laser-induced dewetting.

  14. Detection of early caries by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasazawa, Shuhei; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2015-07-01

    To improve sensitivity of dental caries detection by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis, it is proposed to utilize emission peaks in the ultraviolet. We newly focused on zinc whose emission peaks exist in ultraviolet because zinc exists at high concentration in the outer layer of enamel. It was shown that by using ratios between heights of an emission peak of Zn and that of Ca, the detection sensitivity and stability are largely improved. It was also shown that early caries are differentiated from healthy part by properly setting a threshold in the detected ratios. The proposed caries detection system can be applied to dental laser systems such as ones based on Er:YAG-lasers. When ablating early caries part by laser light, the system notices the dentist that the ablation of caries part is finished. We also show the intensity of emission peaks of zinc decreased with ablation with Er:YAG laser light.

  15. Optofluidic lens actuated by laser-induced solutocapillary forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyuk, A. Yu.; Ivanova, N. A.

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate an adaptive liquid lens controlled by laser-induced solutocapillary forces. The liquid droplet serving as a lens is formed in a thin layer of binary liquid mixture by surface tension driven flows caused by the thermal action of laser irradiation. The shape of droplet, its aperture and the focal length are reversibly changed without hysteresis by varying the intensity of the laser beam. The focal length variation range of the droplet-lens lies in between infinity (a flat layer) to 15 mm (a curved interface). The droplet-lens is capable to adjust the in-plane lateral position in response to a displacement of the laser beam. The proposed laser controlled droplet-lens will enable to develop smart liquid optical devices, which can imitate the accommodation reflex and pupillary light reflex of the eye.

  16. Nuclear fission induced by heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, J.O.

    1988-09-01

    Because the accelerators of the 50's and 60's mostly provided beams of light ions, well suited for studying individual quantum states of low angular momentum or reactions involving the transfer of one or two nucleons, the study of fission, being an example of large-scale collective motion, has until recently been outside of the mainstream of nuclear research. This situation has changed in recent years, due to the new generation of accelerators capable of producing beams of heavy ions with energies high enough to overcome the Coulomb barriers of all stable nuclei. These have made possible the study of new examples of large-scale collective motions, involving major rearrangements of nuclear matter, such as deep-inelastic collisions and heavy-ion fusion. Perhaps the most exciting development in the past few years is the discovery that dissipative effects (nuclear viscosity) play an important role in fission induced by heavy ions, contrary to earlier assumptions that the viscosity involved in fission was very weak and played only a minor role. This review will be mainly concerned with developments in heavy-ion induced fission during the last few years and have an emphasis on the very recent results on dissipative effects. Since heavy-ion bombardment usually results in compound systems with high excitation energies and angular momenta, shell effects might be expected to be small, and the subject of low energy fission, where they are important, will not be addressed. 285 refs., 58 figs

  17. Nuclear Material Detection by One-Short-Pulse-Laser-Driven Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favalli, Andrea; Aymond, F.; Bridgewater, Jon S.; Croft, Stephen; Deppert, O.; Devlin, Matthew James; Falk, Katerina; Fernandez, Juan Carlos; Gautier, Donald Cort; Gonzales, Manuel A.; Goodsell, Alison Victoria; Guler, Nevzat; Hamilton, Christopher Eric; Hegelich, Bjorn Manuel; Henzlova, Daniela; Ianakiev, Kiril Dimitrov; Iliev, Metodi; Johnson, Randall Philip; Jung, Daniel; Kleinschmidt, Annika; Koehler, Katrina Elizabeth; Pomerantz, Ishay; Roth, Markus; Santi, Peter Angelo; Shimada, Tsutomu; Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas; Taddeucci, Terry Nicholas; Wurden, Glen Anthony; Palaniyappan, Sasikumar; McCary, E.

    2015-01-01

    Covered in the PowerPoint presentation are the following areas: Motivation and requirements for active interrogation of nuclear material; laser-driven neutron source; neutron diagnostics; active interrogation of nuclear material; and, conclusions, remarks, and future works.

  18. Impurity monitoring by laser-induced fluorescence techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelbwachs, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy can provide a highly sensitive and selective means of detecting atomic and ionic impurities. Because the photodetector can be physically isolated from the laser-excited region, these techniques can be applied to monitoring in hostile environments. The basic concepts behind fluorescence detection are reviewed. Saturated optical excitation is shown to maximize impurity atom emission yield while mitigating effects of laser intensity fluctuations upon absolute density calibration. Monitoring in high- and low-pressure monitoring environments is compared. Methods to improve detection sensitivity by luminescence background suppression are presented

  19. Analysis of laser-induced heating in optical neuronal guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Christian L.; Bruus, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that it is possible to control the growth direction of neuronal growth cones by stimulation with weak laser light; an effect dubbed optical neuronal guidance. The effect exists for a broad range of laser wavelengths, spot sizes, spot intensities, optical intensity...... profiles and beam modulations, but it is unknown which biophysical mechanisms govern it. Based on thermodynamic modeling and simulation using published experimental parameters as input, we argue that the guidance is linked to heating. Until now, temperature effects due to laser-induced heating...

  20. Chemical consequences of laser-induced breakdown in molecular gases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Babánková, Dagmar; Civiš, Svatopluk; Juha, Libor

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 2-3 (2006), s. 75-88 ISSN 0079-6727 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/06/1278; GA MŠk LC510; GA MŠk LC528; GA MŠk 1P04LA235 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503; CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : laser spark * laser-induced dielectric breakdown * laser-plasma chemistry Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.500, year: 2006

  1. UV laser induced photochemistry of nitrobenzene and nitrotoluene isomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosmidis, C.; Clark, A.; Deas, R.M.; Ledingham, K.W.D.; Marshall, A.; Singhal, R.P.

    1995-01-01

    The photofragmentation of nitrobenzene and the isomers of nitrotoluene in the gas phase are studied in the wavelength region 210-270 nm using a pulsed UV laser in conjunction with a time of flight mass spectrometer. Laser induced mass spectra are analysed and compared with those produced by the electron impact (EI) technique. The generation of the observed fragment ions is explained by invoking different fragmentation pathways followed by these molecules. Observed differences in the mass spectra of the o-, m-, and p-nitrotoluene isomers are discussed as a possible way for a laser based method for their identification. (author)

  2. Instantaneous temperature field measurements using planar laser-induced fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitzman, J M; Kychakoff, G; Hanson, R K

    1985-09-01

    A single-pulse, laser-induced-fluorescence diagnostic for the measurement of two-dimensional temperature fields in combustion flows is described. The method uses sheet illumination from a tunable laser to excite planar laserinduced fluorescence in a stable tracer molecule, seeded at constant mole fraction into the flow field. The temporal resolution of this technique is determined by the laser pulse length. Experimental results are presented for a rodstabilized, premixed methane-air flame, using the Q(1) (22) line of the nitric oxide A(2) Sigma(+) (v = 0) ? X(2)II((1/2))(v = 0) transition (lambda approximately 225.6 nm).

  3. Laser-Ultrasonic Testing and its Applications to Nuclear Reactor Internals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, M.; Miura, T.; Yamamoto, S.

    2008-02-01

    A new nondestructive testing technique for surface-breaking microcracks in nuclear reactor components based on laser-ultrasonics is developed. Surface acoustic wave generated by Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and detected by frequency-stabilized long pulse laser coupled with confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer is used to detect and size the cracks. A frequency-domain signal processing is developed to realize accurate sizing capability. The laser-ultrasonic testing allows the detection of surface-breaking microcrack having a depth of less than 0.1 mm, and the measurement of their depth with an accuracy of 0.2 mm when the depth exceeds 0.5 mm including stress corrosion cracking. The laser-ultrasonic testing system combined with laser peening system, which is another laser-based maintenance technology to improve surface stress, for inner surface of small diameter tube is developed. The generation laser in the laser-ultrasonic testing system can be identical to the laser source of the laser peening. As an example operation of the system, the system firstly works as the laser-ultrasonic testing mode and tests the inner surface of the tube. If no cracks are detected, the system then changes its work mode to the laser peening and improves surface stress to prevent crack initiation. The first nuclear industrial application of the laser-ultrasonic testing system combined with the laser peening was completed in Japanese nuclear power plant in December 2004.

  4. Laser-induced chemical vapor deposition reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teslenko, V.V.

    1990-01-01

    The results of investigation of chemical reactions of deposition of different substances from the gas phase when using the energy of pulse quasicontinuous and continuous radiation of lasers in the wave length interval from 0.193 to 10.6 μm are generalized. Main attetion is paid to deposition of inorganic substances including nonmetals (C, Si, Ge and others), metals (Cu, Au, Zn, Cd, Al, Cr, Mo, W, Ni) and some simple compounds. Experimental data on the effect of laser radiation parameters and reagent nature (hydrides, halogenides, carbonyls, alkyl organometallic compounds and others) on the deposition rate and deposit composition are described in detail. Specific features of laser-chemical reactions of deposition and prospects of their application are considered

  5. Detection and evaluation of uranium in different minerals by gamma spectrometry and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergani, F.M.; Khedr, M.A.; Harith, M.A.; El Mongy, S.A.

    2004-01-01

    Analysis, detection and evaluation of source nuclear materials (e.g. uranium) in different minerals by sensitive techniques are a vital objective for uranium exploration, nuclear materials extraction, processing and verification. In this work, uranium in different geological formations was determined using gamma spectrometry and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The investigated samples were collected from different regions distributed all over Egypt. The samples were then prepared for non-destructive analysis. A hyper pure germanium detector was used to measure the emitted gamma rays of uranium and its daughters in the samples. The concentrations of uranium in ppm (μg/g) in the investigated samples are given and discussed in this work. The highest uranium concentration (4354.9 ppm) was found in uranophane samples of Gattar rocks. In Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique, plasma was formed by irradiating the rock surface with focused Q-switched Nd:Yag laser pulses of 7 ns pulse duration at the fundamental wavelength (1064 nm). Atoms and ions originating from the rock surface are excited and ionized in the laser produced hot plasma (∝10 000 K). The plasma emission spectral line is characteristic of the elements present in the plasma and allows identification of the uranium in the uranophane mineral. The strong atomic line at 424.2 nm is used for the qualitative identification of uranium. It can be mentioned that the elevated levels of uranium in some of the investigated uranophane samples are of great economic feasibility to be extracted. (orig.)

  6. Measurement of fuel corrosion products using planar laser-induced fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wantuck, P.J.; Sappey, A.D.; Butt, D.P.

    1993-01-01

    Characterizing the corrosion behavior of nuclear fuel material in a high-temperature hydrogen environment is critical for ascertaining the operational performance of proposed nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) concepts. In this paper, we describe an experimental study undertaken to develop and test non-intrusive, laser-based diagnostics for ultimately measuring the distribution of key gas-phase corrosion products expected to evolve during the exposure of NTP fuel to hydrogen. A laser ablation technique is used to produce high temperature, vapor plumes from uranium-free zirconium carbide (ZrC) and niobium carbide (NbC) forms for probing by various optical diagnostics including planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF). We discuss the laser ablation technique, results of plume emission measurements, and we describe both the actual and proposed planar LIF schemes for imaging constituents of the ablated ZrC and NbC plumes. Envisioned testing of the laser technique in rf-heated, high temperature gas streams is also discussed

  7. Laser ablation of liquid surface in air induced by laser irradiation through liquid medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsunomiya, Yuji; Kajiwara, Takashi; Nishiyama, Takashi; Nagayama, Kunihito; Kubota, Shiro; Nakahara, Motonao

    2010-10-01

    The pulse laser ablation of a liquid surface in air when induced by laser irradiation through a liquid medium has been experimentally investigated. A supersonic liquid jet is observed at the liquid-air interface. The liquid surface layer is driven by a plasma plume that is produced by laser ablation at the layer, resulting in a liquid jet. This phenomenon occurs only when an Nd:YAG laser pulse (wavelength: 1064 nm) is focused from the liquid onto air at a low fluence of 20 J/cm2. In this case, as Fresnel’s law shows, the incident and reflected electric fields near the liquid surface layer are superposed constructively. In contrast, when the incident laser is focused from air onto the liquid, a liquid jet is produced only at an extremely high fluence, several times larger than that in the former case. The similarities and differences in the liquid jets and atomization processes are studied for several liquid samples, including water, ethanol, and vacuum oil. The laser ablation of the liquid surface is found to depend on the incident laser energy and laser fluence. A pulse laser light source and high-resolution film are required to observe the detailed structure of a liquid jet.

  8. Laser Compton Scattering Gamma Ray Induced Photo-Trasmutation

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Dazhi

    2004-01-01

    High brightness beams of gamma rays produced with laser Compton scattering have the potential to realize photo-transmutation through (γ,n) reaction, implying an efficient method to dispose long-lived fission products. Preliminary investigations have been carried out in understanding the feasibility of development of a transmutation facility to repose nuclear waste. A laser Compton scattering experimental setup based on a storage ring started to generate gamma-ray beams for studying the coupling of gamma photons and nuclear giant resonance. This paper demonstrates the dependency of nuclear transmutation efficiency on target dimensions and gamma ray features. 197Au sample was adopted in our experiment, and experimental results correspond to the theoretical estimations.

  9. Spectroscopic analysis of femtosecond laser-induced gas breakdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, J.; Bruneau, S.; Sentis, M.

    2004-01-01

    The plasma generated by the interaction of a femtosecond laser pulse with gas has been analyzed using time- and space-resolved emission spectroscopy. The laser beam has been focused with a microscope objective into different gases (air, Ar, He) at pressures ranging from 10 2 to 10 5 Pa. From the analysis of spectral line emission from ions and neutral atoms, the plasma parameters and the plasma composition have been determined as a function of time and space. Furthermore, the generation of fast electrons and/or VUV radiation by the femtosecond laser interaction with the gas was brought to the fore. From the time- and space-evolution of the plasma parameters, a rough estimation of initial values of electron density and refraction index in the focal volume has been performed. These results are compared to analysis of the laser beam transmitted by the plasma. The latter show that only a small fraction of the laser energy is absorbed by the plasma while the spatial distribution of the transmitted laser beam is strongly perturbed by the plasma, which acts like a defocusing lens. However, in ambient helium, the plasma defocusing is weak due to the high ionization potential of helium. The understanding of femtosecond laser-induced gas breakdown is useful for process optimization in femtosecond laser applications like micromachining or surface microanalysis, etc

  10. Influence of laser beam profile on electromagnetically induced absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuk, S. M.; Radonjic, M.; Krmpot, A. J.; Nikolic, S. N.; Grujic, Z. D.; Jelenkovic, B. M.

    2010-01-01

    We compared, experimentally and theoretically, Hanle electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) obtained using Gaussian and Π-shaped laser beams 3 mm in diameter. The study was done by measuring the transmission of a laser locked to the F g =2→F e =3 transition at the D 2 line of 87 Rb in a vacuum cell. EIA linewidths obtained for the two laser profiles were significantly different in the range of laser intensities 1-4 mW/cm 2 . EIA with the Π-shaped laser beam has a broad intensity maximum and linewidths larger than those obtained with the Gaussian beam profile. We also studied Hanle EIA by measuring the transmission of selected segments of the entire laser beam by placing a small movable aperture in front of the detector. Waveforms so obtained in Hanle EIA resonances were strongly influenced both by the radial distance of the transmitted segment from the beam center and by the radial profile of the laser beam. We show that outer regions of Gaussian beam, and central regions of the Π-shaped beam generate the narrowest lines. The different behaviors of EIA owing to different beam profiles revealed by both theory and experiment indicate the importance of the radial profile of the laser beam for proper modeling of coherent effects in alkali metal vapors.

  11. Spectroscopy of beryllium-like nitrogen ions by laser-induced recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlenberg, G.

    1996-04-01

    The following topics were dealt with: Rydberg spectroscopy of beryllium-like nitrogen (N 3+ ) by laser-induced recombination, transition enrgies, Rydberg level shift, configuration interaction, laser intensity effect, laser band width

  12. Laser-induced plasmas and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radziemski, L.J.

    1989-01-01

    This book discusses optical science, engineering, and technology. Topics covered include the laser and its many commercial and industrial applications, the new optical materials, gradient index optics, electro- and acousto-optics, fiber optics and communications, optical computing and pattern recognition, optical data reading, recording and storage, biomedical instrumentation, industrial robotics, integrated optics, infrared and ultraviolet systems

  13. Laser-induced cavitation based micropump

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkink, R.J.; Ohl, C.D.

    2008-01-01

    Lab-on-a-chip devices are in strong demand as versatile and robust pumping techniques. Here, we present a cavitation based technique, which is able to pump a volume of 4000 m3 within 75 s against an estimated pressure head of 3 bar. The single cavitation event is created by focusing a laser pulse in

  14. Macroparticle acceleration by laser induced ablation pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, M.D.J.; Motz, H.; Rumsby, P.T.

    1976-01-01

    In this paper it is shown that the theoretical scaling of plasma pressure is very closely obeyed using ordinary Q-switched laser pulses, resulting in velocities of over 2 x 10 4 cm s -1 . The problems associated with increasing this velocity whilst still not rupturing the pellet have also been examined and an experiment to determine the results described. (orig.) [de

  15. Ultrasound induced by CW laser cavitation bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korneev, N; Montero, P Rodriguez; Ramos-Garcia, R; Ramirez-San-Juan, J C; Padilla-Martinez, J P

    2011-01-01

    The generation of ultrasound by a collapsing single cavitation bubble in a strongly absorbing liquid illuminated with a moderate power CW laser is described. The ultrasound shock wave is detected with hydrophone and interferometric device. To obtain a stronger pulse it is necessary to adjust a liquid absorption and a beam diameter. Their influence can be qualitatively understood with a simple model.

  16. Laser-induced grating in ZnO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Jesper N.

    1992-01-01

    A simple approach for the calculation of self-diffraction in a thin combined phase and amplitude grating is presented. The third order nonlinearity, the electron-hole recombination time, and the ambipolar diffusion coefficient in a ZnO crystal are measured by means of laser-induced self-diffracti......A simple approach for the calculation of self-diffraction in a thin combined phase and amplitude grating is presented. The third order nonlinearity, the electron-hole recombination time, and the ambipolar diffusion coefficient in a ZnO crystal are measured by means of laser-induced self...

  17. Nuclear fission fragment excitation of electronic transition laser media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorents, D.C.; McCusker, M.V.; Rhodes, C.K.

    1976-01-01

    The properties of high energy electronic transition lasers excited by fission fragments are expanded. Specific characteristics of the media including density, excitation rates, wavelength, kinetics, fissile material, scale size, and medium uniformity are assessed. The use of epithermal neutrons, homogeneously mixed fissile material, and special high cross section nuclear isotopes to optimize coupling of the energy to the medium are shown to be important considerations maximizing the scale size, energy deposition, and medium uniformity. A performance limit point of approximately 1000 J/l in approximately 100 μs pulses is established for a large class of systems operating in the near ultraviolet and visible spectral regions. It is demonstrated that e-beam excitation can be used to simulate nuclear pumping conditions to facilitate the search for candidate media. Experimental data for the kinetics of a XeF* laser operating in Ar/Xe/F 2 /UF 6 mixtures are given. These reactor-pumped systems are suitable for scaling to volumes on the order of (meters) 3

  18. Laser-induced selective copper plating of polypropylene surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratautas, K.; Gedvilas, M.; Stankevičiene, I.; JagminienÄ--, A.; Norkus, E.; Li Pira, N.; Sinopoli, S.; Emanuele, U.; Račiukaitis, G.

    2016-03-01

    Laser writing for selective plating of electro-conductive lines for electronics has several significant advantages, compared to conventional printed circuit board technology. Firstly, this method is faster and cheaper at the prototyping stage. Secondly, material consumption is reduced, because it works selectively. However, the biggest merit of this method is potentiality to produce moulded interconnect device, enabling to create electronics on complex 3D surfaces, thus saving space, materials and cost of production. There are two basic techniques of laser writing for selective plating on plastics: the laser-induced selective activation (LISA) and laser direct structuring (LDS). In the LISA method, pure plastics without any dopant (filler) can be used. In the LDS method, special fillers are mixed in the polymer matrix. These fillers are activated during laser writing process, and, in the next processing step, the laser modified area can be selectively plated with metals. In this work, both methods of the laser writing for the selective plating of polymers were investigated and compared. For LDS approach, new material: polypropylene with carbon-based additives was tested using picosecond and nanosecond laser pulses. Different laser processing parameters (laser pulse energy, scanning speed, the number of scans, pulse durations, wavelength and overlapping of scanned lines) were applied in order to find out the optimal regime of activation. Areal selectivity tests showed a high plating resolution. The narrowest width of a copper-plated line was less than 23 μm. Finally, our material was applied to the prototype of the electronic circuit board on a 2D surface.

  19. Detection of boron in simulated corrosion products by using a laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, K.; Yeon, J-W.; Jung, S-H.; Hwang, J.; Jung, E-C.

    2010-01-01

    In nuclear power plants, many methods for detection of coolant leakage have been developed and employed for the safe operation. However, these methods have many limitations for analyzing and dealing with the corrosion products due to the high radioactivity. LIBS (Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy) offer a remote and on-site elemental analysis including the boron in the corrosion products with no sample preparation. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of detecting boron and analyzing an elemental composition of boron-containing iron oxides with the LIBS, in order to develop a coolant leakage detection system. First, we prepared five different boron-containing iron oxides and the element ratios were determined by using ICP-AES (inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer). After this, the laser induced emission spectra of these iron oxides were obtained by using a 266 nm Nd:YAG laser. The B/Fe ratios of the oxides were determined by comparing the intensities of the B emission peak at 249.844 nm with those of the Fe peak at 250.217 nm as an internal reference. It was confirmed that the B contents in the oxides could be analyzed over 0.1 wt% by the laser induced breakdown spectroscopic technique. (author)

  20. Laser Induced Damage in Optical Materials: 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    conference organization. As many of you have experienced, the printed proceedings of these Laser Damage Symposia in our personal libraries are...responsible person or agency. I look forward to our continued relationship. Finally, let me thank the organizers of this Symposium. They have done a...the professional operation of the Symposium and Ms. Susie Rivera and Ms. Sheila Aaker for their part in the preparation and publication of the

  1. Aerosol core nuclear reactor for space-based high energy/power nuclear-pumped lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prelas, M.A.; Boody, F.P.; Zediker, M.S.

    1987-01-01

    An aerosol core reactor concept can overcome the efficiency and/or chemical activity problems of other fuel-reactant interface concepts. In the design of a laser using the nuclear energy for a photon-intermediate pumping scheme, several features of the aerosol core reactor concept are attractive. First, the photon-intermediate pumping concept coupled with photon concentration methods and the aerosol fuel can provide the high power densities required to drive high energy/power lasers efficiently (about 25 to 100 kW/cu cm). Secondly, the intermediate photons should have relatively large mean free paths in the aerosol fuel which will allow the concept to scale more favorably. Finally, the aerosol core reactor concept can use materials which should allow the system to operate at high temperatures. An excimer laser pumped by the photons created in the fluorescer driven by a self-critical aerosol core reactor would have reasonable dimensions (finite cylinder of height 245 cm and radius of 245 cm), reasonable laser energy (1 MJ in approximately a 1 millisecond pulse), and reasonable mass (21 kg uranium, 8280 kg moderator, 460 kg fluorescer, 450 kg laser medium, and 3233 kg reflector). 12 references

  2. Impact of mechanical stress induced in silica vacuum windows on laser-induced damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingreau, Clémence; Lanternier, Thomas; Lamaignère, Laurent; Donval, Thierry; Courchinoux, Roger; Leymarie, Christophe; Néauport, Jérôme

    2018-04-15

    At the interface between vacuum and air, optical windows must keep their optical properties, despite being subjected to mechanical stress. In this Letter, we investigate the impact of such stress on the laser-induced damage of fused silica windows at the wavelength of 351 nm in the nanosecond regime. Different stress values, from 1 to 30 MPa, both tensile and compressive, were applied. No effect of the stress on the laser-induced damage was evidenced.

  3. Femtosecond laser induced phenomena in transparent solid materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, D.Z.; Sharafudeen, K.N.; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2016-01-01

    solved, especially concerning the interaction of strong, ultra-short electromagnetic pulses with matter, and also because potential advanced technologies will emerge due to the impressive capability of the intense femtosecond laser to create new material structures and hence functionalities. When......The interaction of intense femtosecond laser pulses with transparent materials is a topic that has caused great interest of scientists over the past two decades. It will continue to be a fascinating field in the coming years. This is because many challenging fundamental problems have not been......–matter interaction, and fabricate various integrated micro-devices. In recent years we have witnessed exciting development in understanding and applying femtosecond laser induced phenomena in transparent materials. The interaction of femtosecond laser pulses with transparent materials relies on non...

  4. Laser induced uranium fluorescence as an analytical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krutman, I.

    1985-01-01

    A laser induced fluorescence system was developed to measure uranium trace level amounts in aqueous solution with reliable and simple materials and electronics. A nitrogen pulsed laser was built with the storage energy capacitor directly coupled to laser tube electrodes as a transmission line device. This laser operated at 3Hz repetition rate with peak intensity around 21 Kw and temporal width of 4.5 x 10 -9 s. A sample compartment made of rigid PVC and a photomultiplier housing of aluminium were constructed and assembled forming a single integrated device. As a result of this prototype system we made several analytical measurements with U dissolved in nitric acid to obtain a calibration curve. We obtained a straight line from a plot of U concentration versus fluorescence intensity fitted by a least square method that produced a regression coefficient of 0.994. The lower limit of U determination was 30 ppb -+ 3.5%. (Author) [pt

  5. Apparatus, system, and method for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effenberger, Jr., Andrew J; Scott, Jill R; McJunkin, Timothy R

    2014-11-18

    In laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), an apparatus includes a pulsed laser configured to generate a pulsed laser signal toward a sample, a constructive interference object and an optical element, each located in a path of light from the sample. The constructive interference object is configured to generate constructive interference patterns of the light. The optical element is configured to disperse the light. A LIBS system includes a first and a second optical element, and a data acquisition module. The data acquisition module is configured to determine an isotope measurement based, at least in part, on light received by an image sensor from the first and second optical elements. A method for performing LIBS includes generating a pulsed laser on a sample to generate light from a plasma, generating constructive interference patterns of the light, and dispersing the light into a plurality of wavelengths.

  6. Contributions to process monitoring by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusak, David Alexander

    1998-12-01

    When a pulsed laser of sufficient energy and pulse duration is brought to a focus, multi-photon ionization creates free electrons in the focal volume. These electrons are accelerated in a process known as inverse Bremsstrahlung and cause collisional ionization of species in the focal volume. More charge carriers are produced and the process continues for the duration of the laser pulse. The manifestation of this process is a visible spark or plasma which typically lasts for tens of microseconds. This laser-induced plasma can serve as a source in an atomic emission experiment. Because the composition of the plasma is determined in large part by the environment in which it forms, elements in the laser target can be determined spectroscopically. The goal of a laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) experiment is to establish a relationship between the concentration of an element of interest in the target and the intensity of light emitted from the laser-induced plasma at a wavelength characteristic of that element. Because LIBS requires only optical access to the sample and can perform elemental determinations in solids, liquids, or gases with little sample preparation, there is interest in using it as an on-line technique for process monitoring in a number of industrial applications. However, before the technique becomes useful in industrial applications, many issues regarding instrumentation and data analysis need to be addressed in the lab. The first two chapters of this dissertation provide, respectively, the basics of the atomic emission experiment and a background of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. The next two chapters examine the effect of target water content on the laser-induced plasma and the use of LIBS for analysis of aqueous samples. Chapter 5 describes construction of a fiber optic LIBS probe and its use to study temporal electron number density evolution in plasmas formed on different metals. Chapter 6 is a study of excitation, vibrational

  7. Study of a plasma created by an accelerated proton beam for the characterization of a nuclear pumped laser medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vialle, M.

    1985-04-01

    Processes leading to laser effect in nuclear induced plasmas can be studied with simulation experiments using charged particles beams. Such an experiment has been performed with a proton beam (2 MeV, 2 μA/cm 2 ) produced by a Van de Graaff accelerator. This beam is an excitation and ionisation source quite comparable to the laser medium source of a reactor experiment. The plasma created in a Ne target (about 100 torrs) containing N 2 impurities has been studied: - experimentally using R.F. diagnostics and spectroscopy; - theoretically by calculating the electronic distribution function in the low and medium energy region [fr

  8. Nuclear excitation via the motion of electrons in a strong laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, J.F.; Gogny, D.; Weiss, M.S.

    1987-12-01

    A method of switching from a nuclear isomeric state to a lasing state is examined. A semi-classical model of laser-electron-nuclear coupling is developed. In it the electrons are treated as free in the external field of the laser, but with initial conditions corresponding to their atomic orbits. Application is made to testing this model in 235 U and to the design criteria of a gamma-ray laser. 14 refs., 2 tabs

  9. Laser-enhanced chemical reactions and the liquid state. II. Possible applications to nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DePoorter, G.L.; Rofer-DePoorter, C.K.

    1976-01-01

    Laser photochemistry is surveyed as a possible improvement upon the Purex process for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel. Most of the components of spent nuclear fuel are photochemically active, and lasers can be used to selectively excite individual chemical species. The great variety of chemical species present and the degree of separation that must be achieved present difficulties in reprocessing. Lasers may be able to improve the necessary separations by photochemical reaction or effects on rates and equilibria of reactions

  10. Laser-induced damage study of polymer PMMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansour, N.

    2001-01-01

    This article presents the results of bulk laser-induced damage measurements in polymer PMMA at 532 nm and 1064 nm for nanosecond laser pulses. The damage thresholds were measured for focused spot sizes ranging over two orders of magnitude. In this work, self-focusing effects were verified to be absent by measurements of breakdown thresholds using both linearly and circularly polarized light. At both 1064 nm and 532 nm, the dependence of the breakdown field, E B , on the spot size, ω, was empirically determined to be E B = C/√ω, where C depends on the wavelength. The extracted value for C(λ) at 1064 nm is larger by a factor of 5 than at 532 nm. Possible reasons for this strong dispersion and mechanism for laser-induced damage in polymer materials will be discussed

  11. Analysis of organic vapors with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozari, Hadi; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan; Rezaei, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is utilized in the study of acetone, ethanol, methanol, cyclohexane, and nonane vapors. Carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen atomic emission spectra have been recorded following laser-induced breakdown of the organic vapors that are mixed with air inside a quartz chamber at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is generated with focused, Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation at the wavelength of 1064 nm. The effects of ignition and vapor pressure are discussed in view of the appearance of the emission spectra. The recorded spectra are proportional to the vapor pressure in air. The hydrogen and oxygen contributions diminish gradually with consecutive laser-plasma events without gas flow. The results show that LIBS can be used to characterize organic vapor

  12. Flexible temperature and flow sensor from laser-induced graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Marengo, Marco

    2017-12-25

    Herein we present a flexible temperature sensor and a flow speed sensor based on laser-induced graphene. The main benefits arise from peculiar electrical, thermal and mechanical performances of the material thus obtained, along with a cheap and simple fabrication process. The temperature sensor is a negative temperature coefficient thermistor with non-linear response typical of semi-metals. The thermistor shows a 4% decrease of the resistance in a temperature range of 20–60 °C. The flow sensor exploits the piezoresistive properties of laser-induced graphene and can be used both in gaseous and liquid media thanks to a protective polydimethylsiloxane coating. Main characteristics are ultra-fast response and versatility in design offered by the laser technology.

  13. Supersonic laser-induced jetting of aluminum micro-droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zenou, M. [Racah Institute of Physics and the Harvey M. Kruger Family Center for Nano-science and Nanotechnology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 91904 Jerusalem (Israel); Additive Manufacturing Lab, Orbotech Ltd., P.O. Box 215, 81101 Yavne (Israel); Sa' ar, A. [Racah Institute of Physics and the Harvey M. Kruger Family Center for Nano-science and Nanotechnology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 91904 Jerusalem (Israel); Kotler, Z. [Additive Manufacturing Lab, Orbotech Ltd., P.O. Box 215, 81101 Yavne (Israel)

    2015-05-04

    The droplet velocity and the incubation time of pure aluminum micro-droplets, printed using the method of sub-nanosecond laser induced forward transfer, have been measured indicating the formation of supersonic laser-induced jetting. The incubation time and the droplet velocity were extracted by measuring a transient electrical signal associated with droplet landing on the surface of the acceptor substrate. This technique has been exploited for studying small volume droplets, in the range of 10–100 femto-litters for which supersonic velocities were measured. The results suggest elastic propagation of the droplets across the donor-to-acceptor gap, a nonlinear deposition dynamics on the surface of the acceptor and overall efficient energy transfer from the laser beam to the droplets.

  14. Supersonic laser-induced jetting of aluminum micro-droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenou, M.; Sa'ar, A.; Kotler, Z.

    2015-01-01

    The droplet velocity and the incubation time of pure aluminum micro-droplets, printed using the method of sub-nanosecond laser induced forward transfer, have been measured indicating the formation of supersonic laser-induced jetting. The incubation time and the droplet velocity were extracted by measuring a transient electrical signal associated with droplet landing on the surface of the acceptor substrate. This technique has been exploited for studying small volume droplets, in the range of 10–100 femto-litters for which supersonic velocities were measured. The results suggest elastic propagation of the droplets across the donor-to-acceptor gap, a nonlinear deposition dynamics on the surface of the acceptor and overall efficient energy transfer from the laser beam to the droplets

  15. Nonequilibrium photochemical reactions induced by lasers. Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinfeld, J.I.

    1978-04-01

    Research has progressed in six principal subject areas of interest to DOE advanced (laser) isotope separation efforts. These are (1) Infrared double resonance spectroscopy of molecules excited by multiple infrared photon absorption, particularly SF 6 and vinyl chloride. (2) Infrared multiphoton excitation of metastable triplet-state molecules, e.g., biacetyl. (3) An Information Theory analysis of multiphoton excitation and collisional deactivation has been carried out. (4) The mechanism of infrared energy deposition and multiphoton-induced reactions in chlorinated ethylene derivatives; and RRKM (statistical) model accounts for all observed behavior of the system, and a deuterium-specific reaction pathway has been identified. (5) Diffusion-enhanced laser isotope separation in N 16 O/N 18 O. (6) A technical evaluation of laser-induced chemistry and isotope separation

  16. Analysis of organic vapors with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nozari, Hadi; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C, 1983963113 Evin, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rezaei, Fatemeh, E-mail: fatemehrezaei@kntu.ac.ir [Department of Physics, K. N. Toosi University of Technology, 15875-4416 Shariati, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is utilized in the study of acetone, ethanol, methanol, cyclohexane, and nonane vapors. Carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen atomic emission spectra have been recorded following laser-induced breakdown of the organic vapors that are mixed with air inside a quartz chamber at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is generated with focused, Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation at the wavelength of 1064 nm. The effects of ignition and vapor pressure are discussed in view of the appearance of the emission spectra. The recorded spectra are proportional to the vapor pressure in air. The hydrogen and oxygen contributions diminish gradually with consecutive laser-plasma events without gas flow. The results show that LIBS can be used to characterize organic vapor.

  17. Measurement of gas flow velocities by laser-induced gratings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemmerling, B; Stampanoni-Panariello, A [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Kozlov, A D.N. [General Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1999-08-01

    Time resolved light scattering from laser-induced electrostrictive gratings was used for the determination of flow velocities in air at room temperature. By measuring the velocity profile across the width of a slit nozzle we demonstrated the high spatial resolution (about 200 mm) of this novel technique. (author) 3 figs., 1 ref.

  18. Laser-induced fluorescence of oral mucosa cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaliashvili, Z. V.; Medoidze, T. D.; Melikishvili, Z. G.; Gogilashvili, K. T.

    2017-10-01

    The laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra have been measured for cancer-infused and control mice mucosa tissues. It was established that there is quite a difference between their LIF spectral shapes. These spectral shapes are used to express the diagnostic of different states of tissues: from normal to cancer.

  19. Calibration-free laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    journal of. August 2012 physics pp. 299–310. Calibration-free laser-induced ... for quantitative analysis of materials, illustrated by CF-LIBS applied to a ..... The authors are thankful to BRNS, DAE, Govt. of India for the financial support provided.

  20. Laser-induced stabilisation of the tympanic membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schacht, Sophie A. L.; Stahn, Patricia; Hinsberger, Marius; Hoetzer, Benjamin; Schick, Bernhard; Wenzel, Gentiana I.

    2017-07-01

    Repeated pathologies of the tympanic membrane (TM) decrease its tension inducing conductive hearing loss and adhesive processes up to cholesteatoma. Our results regarding the development of a laser based noninvasive procedure to strengthen the structure of the TM are herein presented.

  1. Laser-induced vibrational dynamics of ozone in solid argon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Amstrup, B.; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1997-01-01

    We consider the vibrational dynamics, induced by an intense infrared laser pulse, in an ozone molecule with isotopic substitution, that is, (OOO)-O-16-O-16-O-18 and compare the dynamics in the gas phase and in solid ar on. not perturbed by argon on a time-scale of a few picoseconds and selective...

  2. Impulsive Laser Induced Alignment of Molecules Dissolved in Helium Nanodroplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pentlehner, Dominik; H. Nielsen, Jens; Slenczka, Alkwin

    2013-01-01

    We show that a 450 fs nonresonant, moderately intense, linearly polarized laser pulse can induce field-free molecular axis alignment of methyliodide (CH3I) molecules dissolved in a helium nanodroplet. Time-resolved measurements reveal rotational dynamics much slower than that of isolated molecules...

  3. Laser-induced onset of electrospinning

    KAUST Repository

    Sahay, R.; Teo, C. J.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2010-01-01

    We present a method to start electrospinning from a polymeric drop. This method uses a pulsed laser which is focused inside the drop close to the liquid surface. The pulse cavitates the liquid and produces a protrusion from the tip of the drop. The protrusion narrows by drainage and vertical stretching, thus concentrating the electric field and increasing the charge density until it overcomes the surface tension and produces the electrified jet. This approach can reduce the required value of applied electric field to half of its value required to start convectional electrospinning from a stationary drop.

  4. Laser induced photonuclear and fusion-reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LoDato, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    The energy release from the fusion-fission pellets is demonstrated. It is shown that the coupling of the fusion-fission process is extremely efficient provided one can obtain the proper compression heating. The pellet of an outer core of (Li6D-Li6T) with an inner core of U238 is shown to be an efficient and practical fuel and can be ignited by the present generation of lasers to produce thermonuclear burn. The demonstration of the efficiency for photonuclear and photofission pellets is shown. However no suitable gamma ray source exists at present to initiate these processes. (orig.) [de

  5. Laser-induced onset of electrospinning

    KAUST Repository

    Sahay, R.

    2010-03-09

    We present a method to start electrospinning from a polymeric drop. This method uses a pulsed laser which is focused inside the drop close to the liquid surface. The pulse cavitates the liquid and produces a protrusion from the tip of the drop. The protrusion narrows by drainage and vertical stretching, thus concentrating the electric field and increasing the charge density until it overcomes the surface tension and produces the electrified jet. This approach can reduce the required value of applied electric field to half of its value required to start convectional electrospinning from a stationary drop.

  6. Application of laser processing for disassembly of nuclear power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, Gennady A.; Zinchenko, A. V.; Arutyunyan, R. B.

    1998-12-01

    Provision of safety and drop of ecological risk at salvaging of nuclear submarines (NSM) of Russia Navy Forces represents one of the most actual problems of nowadays. It is necessary to remove from services of Russian Navy Forces 170 - 180 nuclear submarines by 2000. At salvaging of Russian Navy Forces NSM it should be necessary to cut out reactor compartments with more than 150 thousand tons of gross weight and to fragment terminal carcasses of submarines with gross weight of 2 million tons. Taking into account overall dimensions of salvaging objects and Euro-standard requirement on the sizes of carcass fragments, for salvaging of one NSM it is necessary to execute more than 10 km of cuts. Using of conventional methods of gas and plasma cutting of ship constructions and equipment polluted with radioactive oxides and bedding of insulation and paint and varnish materials causes contamination of working zones and environment by a mix of radioactive substances and highly toxic combustion products, nomenclature of which includes up to 50 names. Calculations carried out in the Institute of industrial and Marine Medicine have shown that salvage of just one NSM with using of gas and plasma cutting are accompanied by discharge into an environment of up to 11.5 kg of chromium oxides, up to 22.5 kg of manganese oxides, up to 97 kg of carbon oxides and up to 650 kg of nitrogen oxides. Fragmentation of such equipment by a method of directional explosion or hydraulic jet is problematic because of complexity of treated constructions and necessity to create special protective facilities, which will accumulate a bulk of radioactive and toxic discharges, as a consequence of the explosion and spreaded by shock waves and water deluges. In a number of new technological processes the cutting with using of high-power industrial lasers radiation stands out. As compared with other technological processes, laser cutting has many advantages determined by such unique properties of laser

  7. Study on microstructure and high temperature wear resistance of laser cladded nuclear valve clack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chunliang; Chen Zichen

    2002-01-01

    Laser cladding of Co-base alloy on the nuclear valve-sealing surface are performed with a 5 kW CO 2 transverse flowing laser. The microstructure and the high temperature impact-slide wear resistance of the laser cladded coating and the plasma cladded coating are studied. The results show that the microstructure, the dilution rate and the high temperature impact-slide wear resistance of the laser cladded coating have obvious advantages over the spurt cladding processing

  8. Laser-induced plasmonic colours on metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay, Jean-Michel; Calà Lesina, Antonino; Côté, Guillaume; Charron, Martin; Poitras, Daniel; Ramunno, Lora; Berini, Pierre; Weck, Arnaud

    2017-07-01

    Plasmonic resonances in metallic nanoparticles have been used since antiquity to colour glasses. The use of metal nanostructures for surface colourization has attracted considerable interest following recent developments in plasmonics. However, current top-down colourization methods are not ideally suited to large-scale industrial applications. Here we use a bottom-up approach where picosecond laser pulses can produce a full palette of non-iridescent colours on silver, gold, copper and aluminium. We demonstrate the process on silver coins weighing up to 5 kg and bearing large topographic variations (~1.5 cm). We find that colours are related to a single parameter, the total accumulated fluence, making the process suitable for high-throughput industrial applications. Statistical image analyses of laser-irradiated surfaces reveal various nanoparticle size distributions. Large-scale finite-difference time-domain computations based on these nanoparticle distributions reproduce trends seen in reflectance measurements, and demonstrate the key role of plasmonic resonances in colour formation.

  9. Real-time control of ultrafast laser micromachining by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Tao; Li Jinggao; Longtin, Jon P.

    2004-01-01

    Ultrafast laser micromachining provides many advantages for precision micromachining. One challenging problem, however, particularly for multilayer and heterogeneous materials, is how to prevent a given material from being ablated, as ultrafast laser micromachining is generally material insensitive. We present a real-time feedback control system for an ultrafast laser micromachining system based on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The characteristics of ultrafast LIBS are reviewed and discussed so as to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique. Comparison methods to identify the material emission patterns are developed, and several of the resulting algorithms were implemented into a real-time computer control system. LIBS-controlled micromachining is demonstrated for the fabrication of microheater structures on thermal sprayed materials. Compared with a strictly passive machining process without any such feedback control, the LIBS-based system provides several advantages including less damage to the substrate layer, reduced machining time, and more-uniform machining features

  10. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements of uranium and thorium powders and uranium ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judge, Elizabeth J. [Chemistry Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Barefield, James E., E-mail: jbarefield@lanl.gov [Chemistry Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Berg, John M. [Manufacturing Engineering and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Clegg, Samuel M.; Havrilla, George J.; Montoya, Velma M.; Le, Loan A.; Lopez, Leon N. [Chemistry Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to analyze depleted uranium and thorium oxide powders and uranium ore as a potential rapid in situ analysis technique in nuclear production facilities, environmental sampling, and in-field forensic applications. Material such as pressed pellets and metals, has been extensively studied using LIBS due to the high density of the material and more stable laser-induced plasma formation. Powders, on the other hand, are difficult to analyze using LIBS since ejection and removal of the powder occur in the laser interaction region. The capability of analyzing powders is important in allowing for rapid analysis of suspicious materials, environmental samples, or trace contamination on surfaces since it most closely represents field samples (soil, small particles, debris etc.). The rapid, in situ analysis of samples, including nuclear materials, also reduces costs in sample collection, transportation, sample preparation, and analysis time. Here we demonstrate the detection of actinides in oxide powders and within a uranium ore sample as both pressed pellets and powders on carbon adhesive discs for spectral comparison. The acquired LIBS spectra for both forms of the samples differ in overall intensity but yield a similar distribution of atomic emission spectral lines. - Highlights: • LIBS analysis of mixed actinide samples: depleted uranium oxide and thorium oxide • LIBS analysis of actinide samples in powder form on carbon adhesive discs • Detection of uranium in a complex matrix (uranium ore) as a precursor to analyzing uranium in environmental samples.

  11. Local thermodynamic equilibrium considerations in powerchip laser-induced plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merten, Jonathan A., E-mail: jmerten@astate.edu; Smith, Benjamin W., E-mail: bwsmith@chem.ufl.edu; Omenetto, Nicoló, E-mail: omenetto@chem.ufl.edu

    2013-05-01

    Time-resolved emission experiments are reported in the fast-decaying transient plasma induced by a microchip laser on an aluminum target in three different cover gases, i.e., air, argon and helium. The laser operates at 532 nm, with a repetition frequency of 1 kHz and a pulse width of less than 0.5 ns. The overall persistence of plasma emission is of the order of 100 ns. We examine the existence of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) by evaluating the temporal criteria required (in addition to the McWhirter criterion), as recommended by Cristoforetti et al. (Spectrochim. Acta Part B 65, 2010, 86–95). The temporal criteria examine the evolution of temperature and electron number density and compare their rate of change to the rate at which electron collisions can thermalize the change. These considerations are used to determine time windows in which LTE may be present. Our results suggest that calibration-free LIBS measurements with these lasers may be possible for some elements at early times, especially under argon. - Highlights: ► Powerchip laser-induced plasma evolution is affected by cover gas. ► Plasma often out of LTE, despite fulfilling the McWhirter criterion ► Calibration-free LIBS may be possible with powerchip laser plasmas.

  12. Laser-induced filaments in the mid-infrared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheltikov, A M

    2017-01-01

    Laser-induced filamentation in the mid-infrared gives rise to unique regimes of nonlinear wave dynamics and reveals in many ways unusual nonlinear-optical properties of materials in this frequency range. The λ 2 scaling of the self-focusing threshold P cr , with radiation wavelength λ , allows the laser powers transmitted by single mid-IR filaments to be drastically increased without the loss of beam continuity and spatial coherence. When extended to the mid-infrared, laser filamentation enables new methods of pulse compression. Often working around the universal physical limitations, it helps generate few-cycle and subcycle field waveforms within an extraordinarily broad range of peak powers, from just a few up to hundreds of P cr . As a part of a bigger picture, laser-induced filamentation in the mid-infrared offers important physical insights into the general properties of the nonlinear-optical response of matter as a function of the wavelength. Unlike their near-infrared counterparts, which can be accurately described within the framework of perturbative nonlinear optics, mid-infrared filaments often entangle perturbative and nonperturbative nonlinear-optical effects, showing clear signatures of strong-field optical physics. With the role of nonperturbative nonlinear-optical phenomena growing, as a general tendency, with the field intensity and the driver wavelength, extension of laser filamentation to even longer driver wavelengths, toward the long-wavelength infrared, promises a hic sunt dracones land. (topical review)

  13. Local thermodynamic equilibrium considerations in powerchip laser-induced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merten, Jonathan A.; Smith, Benjamin W.; Omenetto, Nicoló

    2013-01-01

    Time-resolved emission experiments are reported in the fast-decaying transient plasma induced by a microchip laser on an aluminum target in three different cover gases, i.e., air, argon and helium. The laser operates at 532 nm, with a repetition frequency of 1 kHz and a pulse width of less than 0.5 ns. The overall persistence of plasma emission is of the order of 100 ns. We examine the existence of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) by evaluating the temporal criteria required (in addition to the McWhirter criterion), as recommended by Cristoforetti et al. (Spectrochim. Acta Part B 65, 2010, 86–95). The temporal criteria examine the evolution of temperature and electron number density and compare their rate of change to the rate at which electron collisions can thermalize the change. These considerations are used to determine time windows in which LTE may be present. Our results suggest that calibration-free LIBS measurements with these lasers may be possible for some elements at early times, especially under argon. - Highlights: ► Powerchip laser-induced plasma evolution is affected by cover gas. ► Plasma often out of LTE, despite fulfilling the McWhirter criterion ► Calibration-free LIBS may be possible with powerchip laser plasmas

  14. Lasers '89

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.G.; Shay, T.M.

    1990-01-01

    This book covers the following topics: XUV, X-Ray and Gamma-Ray Lasers, excimer lasers, chemical lasers, nuclear pumped lasers, high power gas lasers, solid state lasers, laser spectroscopy. The paper presented include: Development of KrF lasers for fusion and Nuclear driven solid-state lasers

  15. Laser-induced damage to thin film dielectric coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, T.W.

    1980-01-01

    The laser-induced damage thresholds of dielectric thin film coatings have been found to be more than an order of magnitude lower than the bulk material damage thresholds. Prior damage studies have been inconclusive in determining the damage mechanism which is operative in thin films. A program was conducted in which thin film damage thresholds were measured as a function of laser wavelength (1.06 μm, 0.53 μm, 0.35 μm and 0.26 μm), laser pulse length (5 and 15 nanoseconds), film materials and film thickness. The large matrix of data was compared to predictions given by avalanche ionization, multiphoton ionization and impurity theories of laser damage. When Mie absorption cross-sections and the exact thermal equations were included into the impurity theory excellent agreement with the data was found. The avalanche and multiphoton damage theories could not account for most parametric variations in the data. For example, the damage thresholds for most films increased as the film thickness decreased and only the impurity theory could account for this behavior. Other observed changes in damage threshold with changes in laser wavelength, pulse length and film material could only be adequately explained by the impurity theory. The conclusion which results from this study is that laser damage in thin film coatings results from absorbing impurities included during the deposition process

  16. Correlation between grade of pearlite spheroidization and laser induced spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shunchun; Dong, Meirong; Lu, Jidong; Li, Jun; Dong, Xuan

    2013-12-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) which is used traditionally as a spectrochemical analytical technique was employed to analyze the grade of pearlite spheroidization. Three 12Cr1MoV steel specimens with different grades of pearlite spheroidization were ablated to produce plasma by pulse laser at 266 nm. In order to determine the optimal temporal condition and plasma parameters for correlating the grade of pearlite spheroidization and laser induced spectra, a set of spectra at different delays were analyzed by the principal component analysis method. Then, the relationship between plasma temperature, intensity ratios of ionic to atomic lines and grade of pearlite spheroidization was studied. The analysis results show that the laser induced spectra of different grades of pearlite spheroidization can be readily identifiable by principal component analysis in the range of 271.941-289.672 nm with 1000 ns delay time. It is also found that a good agreement exists between the Fe ionic to atomic line ratios and the tensile strength, whereas there is no obvious difference in the plasma temperature. Therefore, LIBS may be applied not only as a spectrochemical analytical technique but also as a new way to estimate the grade of pearlite spheroidization.

  17. Correlation between grade of pearlite spheroidization and laser induced spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Shunchun; Dong, Meirong; Lu, Jidong; Li, Jun; Dong, Xuan

    2013-01-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) which is used traditionally as a spectrochemical analytical technique was employed to analyze the grade of pearlite spheroidization. Three 12Cr1MoV steel specimens with different grades of pearlite spheroidization were ablated to produce plasma by pulse laser at 266 nm. In order to determine the optimal temporal condition and plasma parameters for correlating the grade of pearlite spheroidization and laser induced spectra, a set of spectra at different delays were analyzed by the principal component analysis method. Then, the relationship between plasma temperature, intensity ratios of ionic to atomic lines and grade of pearlite spheroidization was studied. The analysis results show that the laser induced spectra of different grades of pearlite spheroidization can be readily identifiable by principal component analysis in the range of 271.941–289.672 nm with 1000 ns delay time. It is also found that a good agreement exists between the Fe ionic to atomic line ratios and the tensile strength, whereas there is no obvious difference in the plasma temperature. Therefore, LIBS may be applied not only as a spectrochemical analytical technique but also as a new way to estimate the grade of pearlite spheroidization. (paper)

  18. New laser-driven nuclear excitation studies. Concepts and proposals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drska, L.; Hanus, V.; Sinor, M.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. There has been a great interest in the processes of nuclear excitation and triggering in high-parameter laser-produced plasmas in recent years. A series of papers devoted to the theory of this event has been published. Several experiments have already been attempted to study the excitation of the lowest nuclear levels of medium / high-Z nuclides (Ta 181, U 235 etc.), all the same unsuccessful or inconclusive. In the first part of this paper, the situation will be overviewed and analysis of the reasons of this unsatisfactory state of affairs will be accomplished. Prospects of the possible solving of the problem by using novel / projected laser facilities (esp. LIL / PETAL, XFEL, ELI-Phase) will be outlined. Potential of the future ELI Beam Facility in the Czech Republic in this area will be stressed. In the second part, some proposals for the excitation and triggering studies using combined high-power and high-intensity LIL / PETAL system (2012) with multi-kilojoule and multi-petawatt parameters will be discussed. Results of preliminary simulations supporting the thinking about potential projects will be shown and conditions essential for meaningful effort in this area will be analyzed. Problems of realistic simulations of such experiments will be addressed. Completely novel chances for the excitation / triggering studies would be started by constructed / projected facilities XFEL (coherent X-rays ∼ 12 keV, 2014) and ELI (multi-petawatt Phase 1, 2015). Application of intense / coherent high-energy X-rays and / or intense electron / ion beams allows new experimental schemes, extends the range of nuclides to be studied and (maybe) will enable to test some new triggering methods. In the last part of the presentation some possibilities in point (esp. for ELI Beamlines), will be drawn up. Acknowledgements. This research has been supported by the Research Program no. 6840770022 of the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the

  19. Search for nuclear excitation by laser-driven electron motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bounds, J.A.; Dyer, P.

    1992-01-01

    It has been proposed that a nucleus may be excited by first exciting the atom's electrons with UV photons. The incident photons couple to the electrons, which would then couple via a virtual photon to the nucleus. As a test case, experiments with 235 U have been performed. A pulsed infrared laser produces an atomic vapor of 235 U which is then bombarded by a high-brightness UV laser beam. The resulting ions are collected. The first excited nuclear state of 235 U has a 26-min half-life and decays by internal conversion, resulting in emission of an atomic electron. These conversion electrons are detected by a channel electron multiplier. An upper limit of 4.0x10 -5 has been obtained for the probability of exciting the nucleus of a 235 U atom that is in the 248-nm UV beam for 700 fs at an irradiance in the range of 1.0x10 15 to 2.5x10 15 W/cm 2

  20. Laser induced fluorescence of biochemical for UV LIDAR application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, L; Sharma, R C; Razdan, A K; Maini, A K

    2014-05-01

    Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy in the ultraviolet regime has been used for the detection of biochemical through a fiber coupled CCD detector from a distance of 2 m. The effect of concentration and laser excitation energy on the fluorescence spectra of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) has been investigated. The signature fluorescence peak of NADH was centred about 460 nm. At lower concentration Raman peak centred at 405 nm was also observed. The origin of this peak has been discussed. Detection limit with the proposed set up is found to be 1 ppm.

  1. Standoff laser-induced thermal emission of explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán-Freyle, Nataly Y.; Pacheco-Londoño, Leonardo C.; Figueroa-Navedo, Amanda; Hernandez-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2013-05-01

    A laser mediated methodology for remote thermal excitation of analytes followed by standoff IR detection is proposed. The goal of this study was to determine the feasibility of using laser induced thermal emission (LITE) from vibrationally excited explosives residues deposited on surfaces to detect explosives remotely. Telescope based FT-IR spectral measurements were carried out to examine substrates containing trace amounts of threat compounds used in explosive devices. The highly energetic materials (HEM) used were PETN, TATP, RDX, TNT, DNT and ammonium nitrate with concentrations from 5 to 200 μg/cm2. Target substrates of various thicknesses were remotely heated using a high power CO2 laser, and their mid-infrared (MIR) thermally stimulated emission spectra were recorded. The telescope was configured from reflective optical elements in order to minimize emission losses in the MIR frequencies and to provide optimum overall performance. Spectral replicas were acquired at a distance of 4 m with an FT-IR interferometer at 4 cm- 1 resolution and 10 scans. Laser power was varied from 4-36 W at radiation exposure times of 10, 20, 30 and 60 s. CO2 laser powers were adjusted to improve the detection and identification of the HEM samples. The advantages of increasing the thermal emission were easily observed in the results. Signal intensities were proportional to the thickness of the coated surface (a function of the surface concentration), as well as the laser power and laser exposure time. For samples of RDX and PETN, varying the power and time of induction of the laser, the calculated low limit of detections were 2 and 1 μg/cm2, respectively.

  2. Laser-spectroscopic nuclear-structure studies on radioactive silver and indium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinger, U.

    1988-05-01

    Neutron-deficient silver and neutron-rich indium isotopes were studied by collinear laser spectroscopy. The neutron-deficient nuclei 101 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 105m , 106m Ag were produced as evaporation-residual nuclei in heavy-ion fusion reactions at the mass separator of the GSI in Darmstadt. The fourteen studied indium isotopes and isomers with even mass number in the range 112-126 In were produced by 600-MeV-proton induced fission of a uranium carbide target at the ISOLDE separator in Geneva. The mass-separated ion beam was subsequently deviated electrostatically, neutralized in a sodium vapor and superposed with a c w dye laser. A photon counting system detected the resonance fluorescence of the induced transitions. The hyperfine structure and the isotope shift of the 4d 9 5s 2 2 D 5/2 → 4d 10 6p 2 P 3/2 transition (λ=547.7 nm) in silver and the 5p 2 P 1/2,3/2 → 6s 2 s 1/2 transition (λ=410 respectively 451 nm) in indium were measured. While in indium for the analysis of the data earlier work could be referred to, in silver a detailed analysis of the isotope shift and hyperfine structure was performed by means of ab initio calculations and semi-empirical procedures. Thereby the configuration interactions were especially considered. The nuclear moments were discussed in the framework of existing nuclear models regarding nuclear-spectroscopic informations. (orig./HSI) [de

  3. UV laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and laser Doppler flowmetry in the diagnostics of alopecia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skomorokha, Diana P.; Pigoreva, Yulia N.; Salmin, Vladimir V.

    2016-04-01

    Development of optical biopsy methods has a great interest for medical diagnostics. In clinical and experimental studies it is very important to analyze blood circulation quickly and accurately, thereby laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is widely used. UV laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (UV LIFS) is express highly sensitive and widely-spread method with no destructive impact, high excitation selectivity and the possibility to use in highly scattering media. The goal of this work was to assess a correlation of UV laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and laser Doppler flowmetry parameters, and a possibility to identify or to differentiate various types of pathological changes in tissues according to their autofluorescence spectra. Three groups of patients with diffuse (symptomatic) alopecia, androgenic alopecia, and focal alopecia have been tested. Each groups consisted of not less than 20 persons. The measurements have been done in the parietal and occipital regions of the sculls. We used the original automated spectrofluorimeter to record autofluorescence spectra, and standard laser Doppler flowmeter BLF-21 (Transonic Systems, Inc., USA) to analyze the basal levels of blood circulation. Our results show that UV LIFS accurately distinguishes the zones with different types of alopecia. We found high correlation of the basal levels of blood circulation and the integrated intensity of autofluorescence in the affected tissue.

  4. Characterization of hard coatings produced by laser cladding using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, J. A.; Amado, J. M.; Tobar, M. J.; Mateo, M. P.; Yañez, A.; Nicolas, G.

    2015-05-01

    Protective coatings with a high abrasive wear resistance can be obtained from powders by laser cladding technique, in order to extend the service life of some industrial components. In this work, laser clad layers of self-fluxing NiCrBSi alloy powder mixed with WC powder have been produced on stainless steel substrates of austenitic type (AISI 304) in a first step and then chemically characterized by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. With the suitable laser processing parameters (mainly output power, beam scan speed and flow rate) and powders mixture proportions between WC ceramics and NiCrBSi alloys, dense pore free layers have been obtained on single tracks and on large areas with overlapped tracks. The results achieved by LIBS technique and applied for the first time to the analysis of laser clads provided the chemical composition of the tungsten carbides in metal alloy matrix. Different measurement modes (multiple point analyses, depth profiles and chemical maps) have been employed, demonstrating the usefulness of LIBS technique for the characterization of laser clads based on hardfacing alloys. The behavior of hardness can be explained by LIBS maps which evidenced the partial dilution of some WC spheres in the coating.

  5. Nuclear gamma-ray laser: the evolution of the idea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivlin, Lev A

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of the foreign and native search for solving the problem of a nuclear gamma-ray laser (NGL), which has been attracting attention for almost half a century despite the absence at present of any convincing data about its experimental solution, is considered. It is shown that the key conflict inherent in any conception of the NGL is the antagonism between the necessity to accumulate a sufficient amount of excited nuclei and the requirement to narrow down the emission gamma-ray line to its natural radiative width. The critical analysis of different approaches for solving this conflict (Moessbauer scheme, deeply cooled ensembles of free nuclei with the hidden inversion, nuclear inversionless amplification, two-quantum gamma emission in counterpropagating photon beams, hypothetical amplifying medium of long-lived isomers in a Bose-Einstein condensate) shows that this search is important not only due to the expected result, which could stimulate the development of quantum nucleonics as a new branch in physics, but also is of interest due to a variety of physical disciplines and experimental approaches used in this search. (invited paper)

  6. Laser-driven nuclear-polarized hydrogen internal gas target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seely, J.; Crawford, C.; Clasie, B.; Xu, W.; Dutta, D.; Gao, H.

    2006-01-01

    We report the performance of a laser-driven polarized internal hydrogen gas target (LDT) in a configuration similar to that used in scattering experiments. This target used the technique of spin-exchange optical pumping to produce nuclear spin polarized hydrogen gas that was fed into a cylindrical storage (target) cell. We present in this paper the performance of the target, methods that were tried to improve the figure-of-merit (FOM) of the target, and a Monte Carlo simulation of spin-exchange optical pumping. The dimensions of the apparatus were optimized using the simulation and the experimental results were in good agreement with the results from the simulation. The best experimental result achieved was at a hydrogen flow rate of 1.1x10 18 atoms/s, where the sample beam exiting the storage cell had 58.2% degree of dissociation and 50.5% polarization. Based on this measurement, the atomic fraction in the storage cell was 49.6% and the density averaged nuclear polarization was 25.0%. This represents the highest FOM for hydrogen from an LDT and is higher than the best FOM reported by atomic beam sources that used storage cells

  7. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS): a new spectrochemical technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radziemski, L.J.; Loree, T.R.; Cremers, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    We have used the breakdown spark from a focused laser beam to generate analytically useful emission spectra of minor constituents in air and other carrier gases. The medium was sampled directly. It was not necessary to reduce the sample to solution nor to introduce electrodes. The apparatus is particularly simple; a pulsed laser, spectrometer, and some method for time resolution. The latter is essential in laser-induced-breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) because of the strong early continuum. High temperatures in the spark result in vaporization of small particles, dissociation of molecules, and excitation of atomic and ionic spectra, including species which are normally difficult to detect. In one application, we have monitored beryllium in air at conventrations below 1 μg/m 3 , which is below 1 ppB (w/w). In another we have monitored chlorine and fluorine atoms in real time. LIBS has the potential for real-time direct sampling of contaminants in situ

  8. Laser-induced partial oxidation of cyclohexane in liquid phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Y.; Wu, X.W.; Koda, S.

    1995-01-01

    A laser-induced partial oxidation of cyclohexane was studied in the liquid phase. With KrF excimer laser (248 nm) irradiation to neat liquid cyclohexane in which O 2 was dissolved, cyclohexanol and cyclohexanone were obtained with very high selectivities, together with cyclohexane as a minor product. Radical recombination reactions to produce dicyclohexyl ether and bicyclohexyl also took place, while these products were not observed in the gas phase reaction. These experimental results were considered to be due not only to higher concentration of cyclohexane but to the cage effect in the liquid phase oxidation. To clarify the reaction progress including the photoabsorption process, the effects of laser intensity and O 2 pressure on product distribution were studied. (author)

  9. Electronic dynamics induced by laser in (D)KDP crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchateau, G.; Geoffroy, G.; Dyan, A.; Piombini, H.; Geoffroy, G.; Guizard, S.

    2011-01-01

    DKDP (KD 2 PO 4 ) and KDP (KH 2 PO 4 ) crystals that are used in frequency conversion systems have a damage threshold that limits the development of power lasers. It is assumed that laser-induced damage (LID) stems for a precursor defect present in the crystal or quickly generated by the laser-radiation. The Socrate bench has been useful for studying the evolution of LID but the understanding of the very beginning of the LID requires a new method. We have performed femtosecond interferometric measures to study the behaviour of charge carriers. We show that the valence electrons are excited through multi-photon absorption and their relaxation time depends on the isotope (hydrogen or deuterium). The various electron populations are computed through an adequate simulation and the comparison with experimental data has allowed us to get values for multi-photon absorption cross-sections and relaxation times

  10. Laser induced desorption as hydrogen retention diagnostic method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zlobinski, Miroslaw

    2016-07-15

    Laser Induced Desorption Spectroscopy (LIDS) is a diagnostic method to measure the hydrogen content in the surface of a material exposed to a hydrogen isotope (H,D,T) plasma. It is developed mainly to monitor hydrogen retention in the walls of magnetic fusion devices that have to limit the amount of their fuel tritium mainly due to safety reasons. The development of fusion increasingly focusses on plasma-wall interactions for which in situ diagnostics like LIDS are required that work during plasma operation and without tile removal. The method has first been developed for thin amorphous hydrocarbon (a-C:H < 500 nm) layers successfully and is studied in the present work on thick (15 μm) layers, carbon fibre composites (CFCs), bulk tungsten (W), W fuzz and mixed C/W materials. In LID a 3 ms Nd:YAG (1064 nm) laser pulse heats a spot of diameter 3 mm with 500 {sup MW}/{sub m{sup 2}} on W to 1800 K at the surface and thus above 1300 K within ca. 0.2 mm depth. On C materials (graphite, CFC, a-C:H) this temperature guarantees a nearly complete (>95%) desorption already within 1.5 ms pulse duration. The retained hydrogen atoms are desorbed locally, recombine to molecules and migrate promptly to the surface via internal channels like pores and grain boundaries. Whereas, in W the retained hydrogen atoms have to diffuse through the bulk material, which is a relatively slow process also directed into the depth. The desorbed hydrogen fraction can thus be strongly reduced to 18-91% as observed here. This fraction is measured by melting the central part of a previously heated spot ca. 40 μm deep with a diameter 2 mm, 3 ms laser pulse, releasing the remaining hydrogen. W samples exposed to different plasmas in TEXTOR, Pilot-PSI, PSI-2, PADOS and PlaQ show that the desorption fraction of LID mainly decreases due to higher sample temperature during plasma exposure. The heat causes deeper hydrogen diffusion and/or stronger hydrogen trapping due to creation of traps with higher

  11. Laser induced desorption as hydrogen retention diagnostic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zlobinski, Miroslaw

    2016-01-01

    Laser Induced Desorption Spectroscopy (LIDS) is a diagnostic method to measure the hydrogen content in the surface of a material exposed to a hydrogen isotope (H,D,T) plasma. It is developed mainly to monitor hydrogen retention in the walls of magnetic fusion devices that have to limit the amount of their fuel tritium mainly due to safety reasons. The development of fusion increasingly focusses on plasma-wall interactions for which in situ diagnostics like LIDS are required that work during plasma operation and without tile removal. The method has first been developed for thin amorphous hydrocarbon (a-C:H < 500 nm) layers successfully and is studied in the present work on thick (15 μm) layers, carbon fibre composites (CFCs), bulk tungsten (W), W fuzz and mixed C/W materials. In LID a 3 ms Nd:YAG (1064 nm) laser pulse heats a spot of diameter 3 mm with 500 MW / m 2 on W to 1800 K at the surface and thus above 1300 K within ca. 0.2 mm depth. On C materials (graphite, CFC, a-C:H) this temperature guarantees a nearly complete (>95%) desorption already within 1.5 ms pulse duration. The retained hydrogen atoms are desorbed locally, recombine to molecules and migrate promptly to the surface via internal channels like pores and grain boundaries. Whereas, in W the retained hydrogen atoms have to diffuse through the bulk material, which is a relatively slow process also directed into the depth. The desorbed hydrogen fraction can thus be strongly reduced to 18-91% as observed here. This fraction is measured by melting the central part of a previously heated spot ca. 40 μm deep with a diameter 2 mm, 3 ms laser pulse, releasing the remaining hydrogen. W samples exposed to different plasmas in TEXTOR, Pilot-PSI, PSI-2, PADOS and PlaQ show that the desorption fraction of LID mainly decreases due to higher sample temperature during plasma exposure. The heat causes deeper hydrogen diffusion and/or stronger hydrogen trapping due to creation of traps with higher binding energy

  12. Nuclear fission and neutron-induced fission cross-sections

    CERN Document Server

    James, G D; Michaudon, A; Michaudon, A; Cierjacks, S W; Chrien, R E

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear Fission and Neutron-Induced Fission Cross-Sections is the first volume in a series on Neutron Physics and Nuclear Data in Science and Technology. This volume serves the purpose of providing a thorough description of the many facets of neutron physics in different fields of nuclear applications. This book also attempts to bridge the communication gap between experts involved in the experimental and theoretical studies of nuclear properties and those involved in the technological applications of nuclear data. This publication will be invaluable to those interested in studying nuclear fis

  13. Laser-induced photochemical enrichment of boron isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freund, S.M.; Ritter, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    A boron trichloride starting material containing both boron-10 isotopes and boron-11 isotopes is selectively enriched in one or the other of these isotopes by a laser-induced photochemical method involving the reaction of laser-excited boron trichloride with either H 2 S or D 2 S. The method is carried out by subjecting a low pressure gaseous mixture of boron trichloride starting material and the sulfide to infrared radiation from a carbon dioxide TE laser. The wave length of the radiation is selected so as to selectively excite one or the other of boron-10 BCl 3 molecules or boron-11 BCl 3 molecules, thereby making them preferentially more reactive with the sulfide. The laser-induced reaction produces both a boron-containing solid phase reaction product and a gaseous phase containing mostly unreacted BCl 3 and small amounts of sulfhydroboranes. Pure boron trichloride selectively enriched in one of the isotopes is recovered as the primary product of the method from the gaseous phase by a multi-step recovery procedure. Pure boron trichloride enriched in the other isotope is recovered as a secondary product of the method by the subsequent chlorination of the solid phase reaction product followed by separation of BCl 3 from the mixture of gaseous products resulting from the chlorination

  14. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of tantalum plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Sidra; Bashir, Shazia; Hayat, Asma; Khaleeq-ur-Rahman, M.; Faizan–ul-Haq [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, GC University, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2013-07-15

    Laser Induced Breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of Tantalum (Ta) plasma has been investigated. For this purpose Q-switched Nd: YAG laser pulses (λ∼ 1064 nm, τ∼ 10 ns) of maximum pulse energy of 100 mJ have been employed as an ablation source. Ta targets were exposed under the ambient environment of various gases of Ar, mixture (CO{sub 2}: N{sub 2}: He), O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and He under various filling pressure. The emission spectrum of Ta is observed by using LIBS spectrometer. The emission intensity, excitation temperature, and electron number density of Ta plasma have been evaluated as a function of pressure for various gases. Our experimental results reveal that the optical emission intensity, the electron temperature and density are strongly dependent upon the nature and pressure of ambient environment. The SEM analysis of the ablated Ta target has also been carried out to explore the effect of ambient environment on the laser induced grown structures. The growth of grain like structures in case of molecular gases and cone-formation in case of inert gases is observed. The evaluated plasma parameters by LIBS analysis such as electron temperature and the electron density are well correlated with the surface modification of laser irradiated Ta revealed by SEM analysis.

  15. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of tantalum plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Sidra; Bashir, Shazia; Hayat, Asma; Khaleeq-ur-Rahman, M.; Faizan–ul-Haq

    2013-01-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of Tantalum (Ta) plasma has been investigated. For this purpose Q-switched Nd: YAG laser pulses (λ∼ 1064 nm, τ∼ 10 ns) of maximum pulse energy of 100 mJ have been employed as an ablation source. Ta targets were exposed under the ambient environment of various gases of Ar, mixture (CO 2 : N 2 : He), O 2 , N 2 , and He under various filling pressure. The emission spectrum of Ta is observed by using LIBS spectrometer. The emission intensity, excitation temperature, and electron number density of Ta plasma have been evaluated as a function of pressure for various gases. Our experimental results reveal that the optical emission intensity, the electron temperature and density are strongly dependent upon the nature and pressure of ambient environment. The SEM analysis of the ablated Ta target has also been carried out to explore the effect of ambient environment on the laser induced grown structures. The growth of grain like structures in case of molecular gases and cone-formation in case of inert gases is observed. The evaluated plasma parameters by LIBS analysis such as electron temperature and the electron density are well correlated with the surface modification of laser irradiated Ta revealed by SEM analysis

  16. Laser-induced forward transfer of hybrid carbon nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palla-Papavlu, A.; Filipescu, M.; Vizireanu, S.; Vogt, L.; Antohe, S.; Dinescu, M.; Wokaun, A.; Lippert, T.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Rapid prototyping of carbon nanowalls (CNW) and functionalized CNWs is described. • CNW and CNW:SnO_2 pixels are successfully printed by laser-induced forward transfer. • Flexible (polyimide) and rigid (glass) supports are used as substrates. • 4 μm thick CNW and CNW:SnO_2 pixels maintain their morphology and structure after LIFT. - Abstract: Chemically functionalized carbon nanowalls (CNWs) are promising materials for a wide range of applications, i.e. gas sensors, membranes for fuel cells, or as supports for catalysts. However, the difficulty of manipulation of these materials hinders their integration into devices. In this manuscript a procedure for rapid prototyping of CNWs and functionalized CNWs (i.e. decorated with SnO_2 nanoparticles) is described. This procedure enables the use of laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) as a powerful technique for printing CNWs and CNW:SnO_2 pixels onto rigid and flexible substrates. A morphological study shows that for a large range of laser fluences i.e. 500–700 mJ/cm"2 it is possible to transfer thick (4 μm) CNW and CNW:SnO_2 pixels. Micro-Raman investigation of the transferred pixels reveals that the chemical composition of the CNWs and functionalized CNWs does not change as a result of the laser transfer. Following these results one can envision that CNWs and CNW:SnO_2 pixels obtained by LIFT can be ultimately applied in technological applications.

  17. UV laser-induced cross-linking in peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Gabriella; Altucci, Carlo; Bourgoin-Voillard, Sandrine; Gravagnuolo, Alfredo M.; Esposito, Rosario; Marino, Gennaro; Costello, Catherine E.; Velotta, Raffaele; Birolo, Leila

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE The aim of this study was to demonstrate, and to characterize by high resolution mass spectrometry, that it is possible to preferentially induce covalent cross-links in peptides by using high energy femtosecond UV laser pulses. The cross-link is readily formed only when aromatic amino acids are present in the peptide sequence. METHODS Three peptides, xenopsin, angiotensin I, interleukin, individually or in combination, were exposed to high energy femtosecond UV laser pulses, either alone or in the presence of spin trapping molecules, the reaction products being characterized by high resolution mass spectrometry. RESULTS High resolution mass spectrometry and spin trapping strategies showed that cross-linking occurs readily, proceeds via a radical mechanism, and is the highly dominant reaction, proceeding without causing significant photo-damage in the investigated range of experimental parameters. CONCLUSIONS High energy femtosecond UV laser pulses can be used to induce covalent cross-links between aromatic amino acids in peptides, overcoming photo-oxidation processes, that predominate as the mean laser pulse intensity approaches illumination conditions achievable with conventional UV light sources. PMID:23754800

  18. Doping of silicon by laser-induced diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pretorius, R.; Allie, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    This report gives information on the doping of silicon by laser-induced diffusion, modelling and heat-flow calculation, doping from evaporated layers and silicon self-diffusion during pulsed laser irradiation. In order to tailor dopant profiles accurately a knowledge of the heat flow and the melt depths attained as a function of laser energy and material type is crucial. The heat flow calculations described can be used in conjuntion with most diffusion equations in order to predict the redistribution of the deposited dopant which occurs as a result of liquid phase diffusion during the melting period. Doping of Si was carried out by evaporating this films of Sb, In and Bi 10 to 300 A thick, onto the substrates. During pulsed laser irradiation the dopant film and underlying silicon substrate is melted and the dopant incorporated into the crystal lattice during recrystallization. Radioactive 31 Si(T1/2=2,62h) was used as a tracer to measure the self-diffusion of silicon in silicon during pulsed laser (pulsewidth = 30ns, wavelength = 694nm) irradiation

  19. Nanosecond-laser induced crosstalk of CMOS image sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Rongzhen; Wang, Yanbin; Chen, Qianrong; Zhou, Xuanfeng; Ren, Guangsen; Cui, Longfei; Li, Hua; Hao, Daoliang

    2018-02-01

    The CMOS Image Sensor (CIS) is photoelectricity image device which focused the photosensitive array, amplifier, A/D transfer, storage, DSP, computer interface circuit on the same silicon substrate[1]. It has low power consumption, high integration,low cost etc. With large scale integrated circuit technology progress, the noise suppression level of CIS is enhanced unceasingly, and its image quality is getting better and better. It has been in the security monitoring, biometrice, detection and imaging and even military reconnaissance and other field is widely used. CIS is easily disturbed and damaged while it is irradiated by laser. It is of great significance to study the effect of laser irradiation on optoelectronic countermeasure and device for the laser strengthening resistance is of great significance. There are some researchers have studied the laser induced disturbed and damaged of CIS. They focused on the saturation, supersaturated effects, and they observed different effects as for unsaturation, saturation, supersaturated, allsaturated and pixel flip etc. This paper research 1064nm laser interference effect in a typical before type CMOS, and observring the saturated crosstalk and half the crosstalk line. This paper extracted from cmos devices working principle and signal detection methods such as the Angle of the formation mechanism of the crosstalk line phenomenon are analyzed.

  20. Refining femtosecond laser induced periodical surface structures with liquid assist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao, L.S.; Ng, E.Y.K.; Zheng, H.Y.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► LIPSS on silicon wafer was made in air and in ethanol environment. ► Ethanol environment produce cleaner surface ripples. ► Ethanol environment decrease spatial wavelength of the LIPSS by 30%. ► More number of pulses produce smaller spatial wavelength in air. ► Number of pulses do not influence spatial wavelength in ethanol environment. - Abstract: Laser induced periodic surface structures were generated on silicon wafer using femtosecond laser. The medium used in this study is both air and ethanol. The laser process parameters such as wavelength, number of pulse, laser fluence were kept constant for both the mediums. The focus of the study is to analyze spatial wavelength. When generating surface structures with air as a medium and same process parameter of the laser, spatial wavelength results showed a 30% increase compared to ethanol. The cleanliness of the surface generated using ethanol showed considerably less debris than in air. The results observed from the above investigation showed that the medium plays a predominant role in the generation of surface structures.

  1. Interference of laser-induced resonances in the continuous structures of a helium atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magunov, A I; Strakhova, S I

    2003-01-01

    Coherent effects in the interference of overlapping laser-induced resonances in helium atoms are considered. The simultaneous action of single-mode radiation of the 294-nm second harmonic of a cw dye laser and a 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser on helium atoms provides the overlap of two resonances induced by transitions from the 1s2s 1 S and 1s4s 1 S helium levels. The shape of the overlapping laser-induced resonances in the rotating-wave approximation is described by analytic expressions, which depend on the laser radiation intensities and the ratio of laser frequencies. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  2. Laser induced structural transformation in chalcogenide based superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zallo, Eugenio; Wang, Ruining; Bragaglia, Valeria; Calarco, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Superlattices made of alternating layers of nominal GeTe and Sb 2 Te 3 have been studied by micro-Raman spectroscopy. A structural irreversible transformation into ordered GeSbTe alloy is induced by high power laser light exposure. The intensity ratio of anti-Stokes and Stokes scattering under laser illumination gives a maximum average temperature in the sample of 177 °C. The latter is lower than the growth temperature and of 400 °C necessary by annealing to transform the structure in a GeSbTe alloy. The absence of this configuration after in situ annealing even up to 300 °C evidences an electronic excitation induced-transition which brings the system into a different and stable crystalline state.

  3. Laser induced structural transformation in chalcogenide based superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zallo, Eugenio, E-mail: zallo@pdi-berlin.de; Wang, Ruining; Bragaglia, Valeria; Calarco, Raffaella [Paul-Drude-Institut für Festkörperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-05-30

    Superlattices made of alternating layers of nominal GeTe and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} have been studied by micro-Raman spectroscopy. A structural irreversible transformation into ordered GeSbTe alloy is induced by high power laser light exposure. The intensity ratio of anti-Stokes and Stokes scattering under laser illumination gives a maximum average temperature in the sample of 177 °C. The latter is lower than the growth temperature and of 400 °C necessary by annealing to transform the structure in a GeSbTe alloy. The absence of this configuration after in situ annealing even up to 300 °C evidences an electronic excitation induced-transition which brings the system into a different and stable crystalline state.

  4. Applications of laser-induced gratings to spectroscopy and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohlfing, E.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This program has traditionally emphasized two principal areas of research. The first is the spectroscopic characterization of large-amplitude motion on the ground-state potential surface of small, transient molecules. The second is the reactivity of carbonaceous clusters and its relevance to soot and fullerene formation in combustion. Motivated initially by the desire to find improved methods of obtaining stimulated emission pumping (SEP) spectra of transients, most of our recent work has centered on the use of laser-induced gratings or resonant four-wave mixing in free-jet expansions. These techniques show great promise for several chemical applications, including molecular spectroscopy and photodissociation dynamics. The author describes recent applications of two-color laser-induced grating spectroscopy (LIGS) to obtain background-free SEP spectra of transients and double resonance spectra of nonfluorescing species, and the use of photofragment transient gratings to probe photodissociation dynamics.

  5. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of the copper added to gadolinium (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akaoka, Katsuaki; Maruyama, Youichiro; Oba, Masaki; Miyabe, Masabumi; Wakaida, Ikuo

    2008-11-01

    For applying Laser-induced breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) to the analysis of nuclear fuel materials, it is very important to investigate the analytical method to identify the emission spectrum and its intensity on impurities intermingled within complex emission spectra of matrix elements such as uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu). Experiments using gadolinium (Gd) as simulated sample, in which several 100 ppm of copper (Cu) was contained, were performed and the analytical performance was estimated. The spectrum was decomposed into each peak of some spectra component on Gd and Cu. And the result, intensity of Cu component intermingled in Gd was determined quantitatively. In order to evaluate the linearity in the impurity analysis, the experiments with various concentration of Cu were carried out. The detection limit was determined to be about 70 ppm from the equivalent noise level which was estimated from the standard deviation in wavelength. The results curried out under the other laser conditions (intensity and wavelength) ware also evaluated. (author)

  6. New pulsed YAG laser performances in cutting thick metallic materials for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfille, J.P.; Prunele, D. de; Pilot, G.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the capacities of the pulsed YAG laser thick cutting on metallic material and to compare with the CO 2 laser capacities. Stainless steel (304L) cutting tests were made in air and underwater using CO 2 and YAG lasers. A performance assessment was made for each laser and the wastes produced in the cutting operation were measured and the gases and the aerosols analyzed. The results show that the pulsed YAG laser is high performance tool for thick cutting and particularly attractive for nuclear applications

  7. Infrared laser induced organic reactions. 2. Laser vs. thermal inducment of unimolecular and hydrogen bromide catalyzed bimolecular dehydration of alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danen, W.C.

    1979-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that a mixture of reactant molecules can be induced by pulsed infrared laser radiation to react via a route which is totally different from the pathway resulting from heating the mixture at 300 0 C. The high-energy unimolecular elimination of H 2 O from ethanol in the presence of 2-propanol and HBr can be selectively induced with a pulsed CO 2 laser in preference to either a lower energy bimolecular HBr-catalyzed dehydration or the more facile dehydration of 2-propanol. Heating the mixture resulted in the almost exclusive reaction of 2-propanol to produce propylene. It was demonstrated that the bimolecular ethanol + HBr reaction cannot be effectively induced by the infrared laser radiation as evidenced by the detrimental effect on the yield of ethylene as the HBr pressure was increased. The selective, nonthermal inducement of H 2 O elimination from vibrationally excited ethanol in the presence of 2-propanol required relatively low reactant pressures. At higher pressures intermolecular V--V energy transfer allowed the thermally more facile dehydration from 2-propanol to become the predominant reaction channel

  8. Kalman Filtered MR Temperature Imaging for Laser Induced Thermal Therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Fuentes, D.; Yung, J.; Hazle, J. D.; Weinberg, J. S.; Stafford, R. J.

    2011-01-01

    The feasibility of using a stochastic form of Pennes bioheat model within a 3D finite element based Kalman filter (KF) algorithm is critically evaluated for the ability to provide temperature field estimates in the event of magnetic resonance temperature imaging (MRTI) data loss during laser induced thermal therapy (LITT). The ability to recover missing MRTI data was analyzed by systematically removing spatiotemporal information from a clinical MR-guided LITT procedure in human brain and comp...

  9. Ultratrace analysis of transuranic actinides by laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S.M.

    1983-10-31

    Ultratrace quantities of transuranic actinides are detected indirectly by their effect on the fluorescent emissions of a preselected fluorescent species. Transuranic actinides in a sample are coprecipitated with a host lattice material containing at least one preselected fluorescent species. The actinide either quenches or enhances the laser-induced fluorescence of the preselected fluorescent species. The degree of enhancement or quenching is quantitatively related to the concentration of actinide in the sample.

  10. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy with laser irradiation resonant with vibrational transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khachatrian, Ani; Dagdigian, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    An investigation of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of polymers, both in bulk form and spin coated on Si wafers, with laser irradiation in the mid-infrared spectral region is presented. Of particular interest is whether the LIBS signals are enhanced when the laser wavelength is resonant with a fundamental vibrational transition of the polymer. Significant increases in the LIBS signals were observed for irradiation on hydride stretch fundamental transitions, and the magnitude of the enhancement showed a strong dependence on the mode excited. The role of the substrate was investigated by comparison of results for bulk and spin-coated samples. The polymers investigated were Nylon 12 and poly(vinyl alcohol-co-ethylene).

  11. Growth behavior of laser-induced damage on fused silica optics under UV, ns laser irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negres, Raluca A; Norton, Mary A; Cross, David A; Carr, Christopher W

    2010-09-13

    The growth behavior of laser-induced damage sites is affected by a large number of laser parameters as well as site morphology. Here we investigate the effects of pulse duration on the growth rate of damage sites located on the exit surface of fused silica optics. Results demonstrate a significant dependence of the growth parameters on laser pulse duration at 351 nm from 1 ns to 15 ns, including the observation of a dominant exponential versus linear, multiple-shot growth behavior for long and short pulses, respectively. These salient behaviors are tied to the damage morphology and suggest a shift in the fundamental growth mechanisms for pulses in the 1-5 ns range.

  12. Remote sensing vegetation status by laser-induced fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Günther, K.P.; Dahn, H.G.; Lüdeker, W.

    1994-01-01

    In November 1989 the EUREKA project LASFLEUR (EU 380) started as an European research effort to investigate the future application of far-field laser-induced plant fluorescence for synoptic, airborne environmental monitoring of vegetation. This report includes a brief introduction in a theoretically approach for the laser-induced fluorescence signals of leaves and their spectral and radiometric behaviour. In addition, a detailed description of the design and realization of the second generation of the far-field fluorescence lidar (DLidaR-2) is given with special regard to the optical and electronical setup, followed by a short explanation of the data processing. The main objectives of the far field measurements are to demonstrate the link between laser-induced fluorescence data and plant physiology and to show the reliability of remote single shot lidar measurements. The data sets include the typical daily cycles of the fluorescence for different global irradiation. As expected from biophysical models, the remotely sensed chlorophyll fluorescence is highly correlated with the carbon fixation rate, while the fluorescence ratio F685 / F730 is only dependent on the chlorophyll concentration. Drought stress measurement of evergreen oaks Quercus pubescens confirm the findings of healthy plants with regard to the fluorescence ratio F685 / F730 while the fluorescence signals of stressed plants show a different behavior than nonstressed plants. Additionally, the corresponding physiological data (porometer and PAM data) are presented. (author)

  13. Heat generation above break-even from laser-induced fusion in ultra-dense deuterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif Holmlid

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous results from laser-induced processes in ultra-dense deuterium D(0 give conclusive evidence for ejection of neutral massive particles with energy >10 MeV u−1. Such particles can only be formed from nuclear processes like nuclear fusion at the low laser intensity used. Heat generation is of interest for future fusion energy applications and has now been measured by a small copper (Cu cylinder surrounding the laser target. The temperature rise of the Cu cylinder is measured with an NTC resistor during around 5000 laser shots per measured point. No heating in the apparatus or the gas feed is normally used. The fusion process is suboptimal relative to previously published studies by a factor of around 10. The small neutral particles HN(0 of ultra-dense hydrogen (size of a few pm escape with a substantial fraction of the energy. Heat loss to the D2 gas (at <1 mbar pressure is measured and compensated for under various conditions. Heat release of a few W is observed, at up to 50% higher energy than the total laser input thus a gain of 1.5. This is uniquely high for the use of deuterium as fusion fuel. With a slightly different setup, a thermal gain of 2 is reached, thus clearly above break-even for all neutronicity values possible. Also including the large kinetic energy which is directly measured for MeV particles leaving through a small opening gives a gain of 2.3. Taking into account the lower efficiency now due to the suboptimal fusion process, previous studies indicate a gain of at least 20 during long periods.

  14. Development of a compact vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser end-pumped actively Q-switched laser for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shuo; Chen, Rongzhang; Nelsen, Bryan; Chen, Kevin, E-mail: pec9@pitt.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States); Liu, Lei; Huang, Xi; Lu, Yongfeng [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    This paper reports the development of a compact and portable actively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and its applications in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The laser was end-pumped by a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). The cavity lases at a wavelength of 1064 nm and produced pulses of 16 ns with a maximum pulse energy of 12.9 mJ. The laser exhibits a reliable performance in terms of pulse-to-pulse stability and timing jitter. The LIBS experiments were carried out using this laser on NIST standard alloy samples. Shot-to-shot LIBS signal stability, crater profile, time evolution of emission spectra, plasma electron density and temperature, and limits of detection were studied and reported in this paper. The test results demonstrate that the VCSEL-pumped solid-state laser is an effective and compact laser tool for laser remote sensing applications.

  15. Formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures on niobium by femtosecond laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, A.; Dias, A.; Gomez-Aranzadi, M.; Olaizola, S. M.; Rodriguez, A.

    2014-01-01

    The surface morphology of a Niobium sample, irradiated in air by a femtosecond laser with a wavelength of 800 nm and pulse duration of 100 fs, was examined. The period of the micro/nanostructures, parallel and perpendicularly oriented to the linearly polarized fs-laser beam, was studied by means of 2D Fast Fourier Transform analysis. The observed Laser-Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS) were classified as Low Spatial Frequency LIPSS (periods about 600 nm) and High Spatial Frequency LIPSS, showing a periodicity around 300 nm, both of them perpendicularly oriented to the polarization of the incident laser wave. Moreover, parallel high spatial frequency LIPSS were observed with periods around 100 nm located at the peripheral areas of the laser fingerprint and overwritten on the perpendicular periodic gratings. The results indicate that this method of micro/nanostructuring allows controlling the Niobium grating period by the number of pulses applied, so the scan speed and not the fluence is the key parameter of control. A discussion on the mechanism of the surface topology evolution was also introduced

  16. Formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures on niobium by femtosecond laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, A.; Dias, A.; Gomez-Aranzadi, M.; Olaizola, S. M. [CIC microGUNE, Goiru Kalea 9 Polo Innovación Garaia, 20500 Arrasate-Mondragón (Spain); CEIT-IK4 and Tecnun, University of Navarra, Manuel Lardizábal 15, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Rodriguez, A. [CIC microGUNE, Goiru Kalea 9 Polo Innovación Garaia, 20500 Arrasate-Mondragón (Spain)

    2014-05-07

    The surface morphology of a Niobium sample, irradiated in air by a femtosecond laser with a wavelength of 800 nm and pulse duration of 100 fs, was examined. The period of the micro/nanostructures, parallel and perpendicularly oriented to the linearly polarized fs-laser beam, was studied by means of 2D Fast Fourier Transform analysis. The observed Laser-Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS) were classified as Low Spatial Frequency LIPSS (periods about 600 nm) and High Spatial Frequency LIPSS, showing a periodicity around 300 nm, both of them perpendicularly oriented to the polarization of the incident laser wave. Moreover, parallel high spatial frequency LIPSS were observed with periods around 100 nm located at the peripheral areas of the laser fingerprint and overwritten on the perpendicular periodic gratings. The results indicate that this method of micro/nanostructuring allows controlling the Niobium grating period by the number of pulses applied, so the scan speed and not the fluence is the key parameter of control. A discussion on the mechanism of the surface topology evolution was also introduced.

  17. Development of a Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) System with a Tunable Diode Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Hyun Jong; Do, Jeong Jun; You, Hyun Jong; Choi, Geun Sik; Lee, Myoung Jae; Chung, Kyu Sun

    2005-01-01

    The Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) is known as one of the most powerful techniques for measurements of ion velocity distribution function (IVDF) and ion temperature by means of Doppler broadening and Doppler shift. The dye lasers are generally used for LIF system with 611.66 nm (in vac.) for Ar ion, the low power diode laser was also proposed by Severn et al with the wavelength of 664.55 nm and 668.61 nm (in vac.) for Ar ion. Although the diode laser has the disadvantages of low power and small tuning range, it can be used for LIF system at the low temperature plasmas. A tunable diode laser with 668.614 nm of center wavelength and 10 GHz mode hop free tuning region has been used for our LIF system and it can be measured the ion temperature is up to 1 eV. The ion temperature and velocity distribution function have been measured with LaB6 plasma source, which is about 0.23 eV with Ar gas and 2.2 mTorr working pressure

  18. Biological effects of laser-induced stress waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doukas, A.; Lee, S.; McAuliffe, D.

    1995-01-01

    Laser-induced stress waves can be generated by one of the following mechanisms: Optical breakdown, ablation or rapid heating of an absorbing medium. These three modes of laser interaction with matter allow the investigation of cellular and tissue responses to stress waves with different characteristics and under different conditions. The most widely studied phenomena are those of the collateral damage seen in photodisruption in the eye and in 193 run ablation of cornea and skin. On the other hand, the therapeutic application of laser-induced stress waves has been limited to the disruption of noncellular material such as renal stones, atheromatous plaque and vitreous strands. The effects of stress waves to cells and tissues can be quite disparate. Stress waves can fracture tissue, damage cells, and increase the permeability of the plasma membrane. The viability of cell cultures exposed to stress waves increases with the peak stress and the number of pulses applied. The rise time of the stress wave also influences the degree of cell injury. In fact, cell viability, as measured by thymidine incorporation, correlates better with the stress gradient than peak stress. Recent studies have also established that stress waves induce a transient increase of the permeability of the plasma membrane in vitro. In addition, if the stress gradient is below the damage threshhold, the cells remain viable. Thus, stress waves can be useful as a means of drug delivery, increasing the intracellular drug concentration and allowing the use of drugs which are impermeable to the cell membrane. The present studies show that it is important to create controllable stress waves. The wavelength tunability and the micropulse structure of the free electron laser is ideal for generating stress waves with independently adjustable parameters, such as rise time, duration and peak stress

  19. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Infrared Emission From Inorganic and Organic Substances

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yang, C.S; Brown, E; Hommerich, U; Trivedi, S. B; Snyder, A. P; Samuels, A. C

    2006-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been established as a powerful method for identifying trace elemental contaminants by analyzing the atomic spectral emission lines that result subsequent to plasmas generated by laser power...

  20. Investigation of relativistic laser-plasmas using nuclear diagnostics; Untersuchung relativistischer Laserplasmen mittels nukleardiagnostischer Verfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, Marc M.

    2011-01-19

    The present work explores with the development of a novel nuclear diagnostic method for the investigation of the electron dynamics in relativistic laser-plasma interactions. An additional aim of this work was the determination of the real laser peak intensity via the interaction of an intense laser short-pulse with a solid target. The nuclear diagnostics is based on a photo-neutron disintegration nuclear activation method. The main constituent of the nuclear diagnostic are novel pseudoalloic activation targets as a kind of calorimeter to measure the high-energy bremsstrahlung produced by relativistic electrons. The targets are composed of several stable isotopes with different ({gamma},xn)-reaction thresholds. The activated nuclides were identified via the characteristic gamma-ray decay spectrum by using high-resolution gamma spectroscopy after the laser irradiation. Via the gamma spectroscopy the ({gamma},xn)-reaction yields were determined. The high-energy bremsstrahlung spectrum has been deconvolved using a novel analysis method based on a modified Penfold-Leiss method. This facilitates the reconstruction of the spectrum of bremsstrahlung photons without any anticipated fit procedures. Furthermore, the characterization of the corresponding bremsstrahlung electrons in the interaction zone is accessible immediately. The consolidated findings about the properties of the relativistic electrons were used to determine the real peak intensity at the laser-plasma interaction zone. In the context of this work, experiments were performed at three different laser facilities. First Experiments were carried out at the 100 TW laser facility at Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intense (LULI) in France and supplementary at the Vulcan laser facility at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in United Kingdom. The main part of the activation experiments were performed at the PHELIX laser facility (Petawatt High Energy Laser for heavy Ion EXperiments) at GSI

  1. Laser induced focusing for over-dense plasma beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Peter; Boine-Frankenheim, Oliver; Mulser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The capability of ion acceleration with high power, pulsed lasers has become an active field of research in the past years. In this context, the radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) mechanism has been the topic of numerous theoretical and experimental publications. Within that mechanism, a high power, pulsed laser beam hits a thin film target. In contrast to the target normal sheath acceleration, the entire film target is accelerated as a bulk by the radiation pressure of the laser. Simulations predict heavy ion beams with kinetic energy up to GeV, as well as solid body densities. However, there are several effects which limit the efficiency of the RPA: On the one hand, the Rayleigh-Taylor-instability limits the predicted density. On the other hand, conventional accelerator elements, such as magnetic focusing devices are too bulky to be installed right after the target. Therefore, we present a new beam transport method, suitable for RPA-like/over-dense plasma beams: laser induced focusing

  2. Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) of congruent voxels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piqué, Alberto; Kim, Heungsoo; Auyeung, Raymond C. Y.; Beniam, Iyoel; Breckenfeld, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) of functional materials offers unique advantages and capabilities for the rapid prototyping of electronic, optical and sensor elements. The use of LIFT for printing high viscosity metallic nano-inks and nano-pastes can be optimized for the transfer of voxels congruent with the shape of the laser pulse, forming thin film-like structures non-lithographically. These processes are capable of printing patterns with excellent lateral resolution and thickness uniformity typically found in 3-dimensional stacked assemblies, MEMS-like structures and free-standing interconnects. However, in order to achieve congruent voxel transfer with LIFT, the particle size and viscosity of the ink or paste suspensions must be adjusted to minimize variations due to wetting and drying effects. When LIFT is carried out with high-viscosity nano-suspensions, the printed voxel size and shape become controllable parameters, allowing the printing of thin-film like structures whose shape is determined by the spatial distribution of the laser pulse. The result is a new level of parallelization beyond current serial direct-write processes whereby the geometry of each printed voxel can be optimized according to the pattern design. This work shows how LIFT of congruent voxels can be applied to the fabrication of 2D and 3D microstructures by adjusting the viscosity of the nano-suspension and laser transfer parameters.

  3. Secondary ionization processes in laser induced breakdown of electronegative gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamal Yosr, E.E.D.; Shafik, M.S.; Abdel-Moneim, H.M.

    1990-08-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the stepwise ionization processes which occur during the interaction of laser radiation with electronegative gases. Calculations are carried out adopting a modified version of the electron cascade model previously developed by Evans and Gamal. The modifications of the model are performed for the case of molecular oxygen to account for electron attachment losses. Particular attention is devoted to molecular oxygen at a pressure of 2.8 x 10 4 Torr irradiated by 10 ns pulse of Nd:YAG laser (λ=1.064 μm) at a peak intensity of 1.7x10 11 Wcm -2 . The calculations consider the effect of the secondary ionization processes on the electron energy distribution function and its parameters (evolution of the density of the excited molecules, electrons density as well as the electron mean energy during the laser flash). This analysis shows how the removal of slow electrons by attachment to oxygen molecules creates a strong competition between the stepwise ionization processes. These processes namely photoionization and collisional ionization deplete the electronic excited states and contribute eventually to the ionization growth rate in laser induced breakdown of electronegative gases. (author). 7 refs, 6 figs, 1 tab

  4. The use of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for the determination of fluorine concentration in glass ionomer cement

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kratochvíl, T.; Pouzar, M.; Novotný, K.; Havránek, Vladimír; Černohorský, T.; Zvolská, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 88, OCT (2013), s. 26-31 ISSN 0584-8547 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/11/0555 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Fluorine * GIC * Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy * Quantitative analysis Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 3.150, year: 2013 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0584854713002243#

  5. Surface modifications induced by pulsed-laser texturing—Influence of laser impact on the surface properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costil, S., E-mail: sophie.costil@utbm.fr [IRTES-LERMPS, Université de Technologie de Belfort - Montbéliard, site de Sévenans, 90010 Belfort Cedex (France); Lamraoui, A.; Langlade, C. [IRTES-LERMPS, Université de Technologie de Belfort - Montbéliard, site de Sévenans, 90010 Belfort Cedex (France); Heintz, O.; Oltra, R. [ICB, Université de Bourgogne, 21078 Dijon Cedex (France)

    2014-01-01

    Laser cleaning technology provides a safe, environmentally friendly and very cost effective way to improve cleaning and surface preparation of metallic materials. Compared with efficient cleaning processes, it can avoid the disadvantages of ductile materials prepared by conventional technologies (cracks induced by sand-blasting for example) and treat only some selected areas (due to the optical fibers). By this way, laser technology could have several advantages and expand the range of thermal spraying. Moreover, new generations of lasers (fiber laser, disc laser) allow the development of new methods. Besides a significant bulk reduction, no maintenance, low operating cost, laser fibers can introduce alternative treatments. Combining a short-pulse laser with a scanner allows new applications in terms of surface preparation. By multiplying impacts using scanning laser, it is possible to shape the substrate surface to improve the coating adhesion as well as the mechanical behaviour. In addition, during the interactions of the laser beam with metallic surfaces, several modifications can be induced and particularly thermal effects. Indeed, under ambient conditions, a limited oxidation of the clean surface can occur. This phenomenon has been investigated in detail for silicon but few works have been reported concerning metallic materials. This paper aims at studying the surface modifications induced on aluminium alloy substrates after laser texturing. After morphological observations (SEM), a deeper surface analysis will be performed using XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) measures and microhardness testing.

  6. Laser-induced photo-thermal strain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Changhoon; Ahn, Joongho; Jeon, Seungwan; Kim, Chulhong

    2018-02-01

    Vulnerable plaque is the one of the leading causes of cardiovascular disease occurrence. However, conventional intravascular imaging techniques suffer from difficulty in finding vulnerable plaque due to limitation such as lack of physiological information, imaging depth, and depth sensitivity. Therefore, new techniques are needed to help determine the vulnerability of plaque, Thermal strain imaging (TSI) is an imaging technique based on ultrasound (US) wave propagation speed that varies with temperature of medium. During temperature increase, strain occurs in the medium and its variation tendency is depending on the type of tissue, which makes it possible to use for tissue differentiation. Here, we demonstrate laser-induced photo-thermal strain imaging (pTSI) to differentiate tissue using an intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) catheter and a 1210-nm continuous-wave laser for heating lipids intensively. During heating, consecutive US images were obtained from a custom-made phantom made of porcine fat and gelatin. A cross correlation-based speckle-tracking algorithm was then applied to calculate the strain of US images. In the strain images, the positive strain produced in lipids (porcine fat) was clearly differentiated from water-bearing tissue (gelatin). This result shows that laser-induced pTSI could be a new method to distinguish lipids in the plaque and can help to differentiate vulnerability of plaque.

  7. Osteoid Osteoma: Experience with Laser- and Radiofrequency-Induced Ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebauer, Bernhard; Tunn, Per-Ulf; Gaffke, Gunnar; Melcher, Ingo; Felix, Roland; Stroszczynski, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the clinical outcome of osteoid osteoma treated by thermal ablation after drill opening. A total of 17 patients and 20 procedures were included. All patients had typical clinical features (age, pain) and a typical radiograph showing a nidus. In 5 cases, additional histological specimens were acquired. After drill opening of the osteoid osteoma nidus, 12 thermal ablations were induced by laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) (9F Power-Laser-Set; Somatex, Germany) and 8 ablations by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) (RITA; StarBurst, USA). Initial clinical success with pain relief has been achieved in all patients after the first ablation. Three patients had an osteoid osteoma recurrence after 3, 9, and 10 months and were successfully re-treated by thermal ablation. No major complication and one minor complication (sensible defect) were recorded. Thermal ablation is a safe and minimally invasive therapy option for osteoid osteoma. Although the groups are too small for a comparative analysis, we determined no difference between laser- and radiofrequency-induced ablation in clinical outcome after ablation

  8. Laser-induced plasma spectrometry: truly a surface analytical tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vadillo, Jose M.; Laserna, J.

    2004-01-01

    For a long period, analytical applications of laser induced plasma spectrometry (LIPS) have been mainly restricted to overall and quantitative determination of elemental composition in bulk, solid samples. However, introduction of new compact and reliable solid state lasers and technological development in multidimensional intensified detectors have made possible the seeking of new analytical niches for LIPS where its analytical advantages (direct sampling from any material irrespective of its conductive status without sample preparation and with sensitivity adequate for many elements in different matrices) could be fully exploited. In this sense, the field of surface analysis could take advantage from the cited advantages taking into account in addition, the capability of LIPS for spot analysis, line scan, depth-profiling, area analysis and compositional mapping with a single instrument in air at atmospheric pressure. This review paper outlines the fundamental principles of laser-induced plasma emission relevant to sample surface studies, discusses the experimental parameters governing the spatial (lateral and in-depth) resolution in LIPS analysis and presents the applications concerning surface examination

  9. Studies of the confinement at laser-induced backside dry etching using infrared nanosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhardt, M.; Lorenz, P.; Bayer, L.; Han, B.; Zimmer, K.

    2018-01-01

    In the present study, laser-induced backside etching of SiO2 at an interface to an organic material using laser pulses with a wavelength of λ = 1064 nm and a pulse length of τ = 7 ns have been performed in order to investigate selected processes involved in etching of the SiO2 at confined ablation conditions with wavelengths well below the band gap of SiO2. Therefore, in between the utilized metallic absorber layer and the SiO2 surface, a polymer interlayer with a thickness between 20 nm to 150 nm was placed with the aim, to separate the laser absorption process in the metallic absorber layer from the etching process of the SiO2 surface due to the provided organic interlayer. The influence of the confinement of the backside etching process was analyzed by the deposition of different thick polymer layers on top of the metallic absorber layer. In particular, it was found that the SiO2 etching depth decreases with higher polymer interlayer thickness. However, the etching depth increases with increasing the confinement layer thickness. SEM images of the laser processed areas show that the absorber and confinement layers are ruptured from the sample surface without showing melting, and suggesting a lift off process of these films. The driving force for the layers lift off and the etching of the SiO2 is probably the generated laser-induce plasma from the confined ablation that provides the pressure for lift off, the high temperatures and reactive organic species that can chemically attack the SiO2 surface at these conditions.

  10. Femtosecond versus nanosecond laser machining: comparison of induced stresses and structural changes in silicon wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amer, M.S.; El-Ashry, M.A.; Dosser, L.R.; Hix, K.E.; Maguire, J.F.; Irwin, Bryan

    2005-01-01

    Laser micromachining has proven to be a very successful tool for precision machining and microfabrication with applications in microelectronics, MEMS, medical device, aerospace, biomedical, and defense applications. Femtosecond (FS) laser micromachining is usually thought to be of minimal heat-affected zone (HAZ) local to the micromachined feature. The assumption of reduced HAZ is attributed to the absence of direct coupling of the laser energy into the thermal modes of the material during irradiation. However, a substantial HAZ is thought to exist when machining with lasers having pulse durations in the nanosecond (NS) regime. In this paper, we compare the results of micromachining a single crystal silicon wafer using a 150-femtosecond and a 30-nanosecond lasers. Induced stress and amorphization of the silicon single crystal were monitored using micro-Raman spectroscopy as a function of the fluence and pulse duration of the incident laser. The onset of average induced stress occurs at lower fluence when machining with the femtosecond pulse laser. Induced stresses were found to maximize at fluence of 44 J cm -2 and 8 J cm -2 for nanosecond and femtosecond pulsed lasers, respectively. In both laser pulse regimes, a maximum induced stress is observed at which point the induced stress begins to decrease as the fluence is increased. The maximum induced stress was comparable at 2.0 GPa and 1.5 GPa for the two lasers. For the nanosecond pulse laser, the induced amorphization reached a plateau of approximately 20% for fluence exceeding 22 J cm -2 . For the femtosecond pulse laser, however, induced amorphization was approximately 17% independent of the laser fluence within the experimental range. These two values can be considered nominally the same within experimental error. For femtosecond laser machining, some effect of the laser polarization on the amount of induced stress and amorphization was also observed

  11. Laser-induced micro-jetting from armored droplets

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, J. O.

    2015-06-23

    We present findings from an experimental study of laser-induced cavitation within a liquid drop coated with a granular material, commonly referred to as “armored droplets” or “liquid marbles.” The cavitation event follows the formation of plasma after a nanosecond laser pulse. Using ultra-high-speed imaging up to 320,610 fps, we investigate the extremely rapid dynamics following the cavitation, which manifests itself in the form of a plethora of micro-jets emanating simultaneously from the spaces between particles on the surface of the drop. These fine jets break up into droplets with a relatively narrow diameter range, on the order of 10 μm. © 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  12. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Perini, Umberto

    2014-01-01

    This book deals with the Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), a widely used atomic emission spectroscopy technique for elemental analysis of materials. It is based on the use of a high-power, short pulse laser excitation. The book is divided into two main sections: the first one concerning theoretical aspects of the technique, the second one describing the state of the art in applications of the technique in different scientific/technological areas. Numerous examples of state of the art applications provide the readers an almost complete scenario of the LIBS technique. The LIBS theoretical aspects are reviewed. The book helps the readers who are less familiar with the technique to understand the basic principles. Numerous examples of state of the art applications give an almost complete scenario of the LIBS technique potentiality. These examples of applications may have a strong impact on future industrial utilization. The authors made important contributions to the development of this field.

  13. Laser-induced vibration of a thin soap film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emile, Olivier; Emile, Janine

    2014-09-21

    We report on the vibration of a thin soap film based on the optical radiation pressure force. The modulated low power laser induces a counter gravity flow in a vertical free-standing draining film. The thickness of the soap film is then higher in the upper region than in the lower region of the film. Moreover, the lifetime of the film is dramatically increased by a factor of 2. Since the laser beam only acts mechanically on the film interfaces, such a film can be employed in an optofluidic diaphragm pump, the interfaces behaving like a vibrating membrane and the liquid in-between being the fluid to be pumped. Such a pump could then be used in delicate micro-equipment, in chips where temperature variations are detrimental and even in biological systems.

  14. Laser-induced incandescence: Towards quantitative soot volume fraction measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzannis, A P; Wienbeucker, F; Beaud, P; Frey, H -M; Gerber, T; Mischler, B; Radi, P P [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    Laser-Induced Incandescence has recently emerged as a versatile tool for measuring soot volume fraction in a wide range of combustion systems. In this work we investigate the essential features of the method. LII is based on the acquisition of the incandescence of soot when heated through a high power laser pulse. Initial experiments have been performed on a model laboratory flame. The behaviour of the LII signal is studied experimentally. By applying numerical calculations we investigate the possibility to obtain two-dimensional soot volume fraction distributions. For this purpose a combination of LII with other techniques is required. This part is discussed in some extent and the future work is outlined. (author) 4 figs., 3 refs.

  15. Theory of laser-induced demagnetization at high temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Manchon, Aurelien

    2012-02-17

    Laser-induced demagnetization is theoretically studied by explicitly taking into account interactions among electrons, spins, and lattice. Assuming that the demagnetization processes take place during the thermalization of the subsystems, the temperature dynamics is given by the energy transfer between the thermalized interacting baths. These energy transfers are accounted for explicitly through electron-magnon and electron-phonon interactions, which govern the demagnetization time scale. By properly treating the spin system in a self-consistent random phase approximation, we derive magnetization dynamic equations for a broad range of temperature. The dependence of demagnetization on the temperature and pumping laser intensity is calculated in detail. In particular, we show several salient features for understanding magnetization dynamics near the Curie temperature. While the critical slowdown in dynamics occurs, we find that an external magnetic field can restore the fast dynamics. We discuss the implication of the fast dynamics in the application of heat-assisted magnetic recording.

  16. Kinetic analysis of pulsed laser induced phosphorescence for uranium determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serdeiro, Nelida H.

    2003-01-01

    The laser induced kinetic phosphorescence allows the uranium determination in different kind of matrices, with a lower detection limit than those reached by other spectroscopic methods. It involves the uranyl ions excitation by a pulsed dye-laser source, followed by temporal resolution of the phosphorescence. This method is used for the determination of trace quantities of uranium in aqueous solution, with a suitable complexant agent, without chemical separation before the analysis. The objective of this paper is to present the results of uranium determinations in different standard samples, water, soil, filter and urine, and a comparison with other methods such as fluorimetry, alpha spectrometry and mass spectrometry. Moreover, the measurement conditions, the advantages and disadvantages, the sample preparation, the interferences and the detection limit are described. (author)

  17. Theory of laser-induced demagnetization at high temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Manchon, Aurelien; Li, Q.; Xu, L.; Zhang, S.

    2012-01-01

    Laser-induced demagnetization is theoretically studied by explicitly taking into account interactions among electrons, spins, and lattice. Assuming that the demagnetization processes take place during the thermalization of the subsystems, the temperature dynamics is given by the energy transfer between the thermalized interacting baths. These energy transfers are accounted for explicitly through electron-magnon and electron-phonon interactions, which govern the demagnetization time scale. By properly treating the spin system in a self-consistent random phase approximation, we derive magnetization dynamic equations for a broad range of temperature. The dependence of demagnetization on the temperature and pumping laser intensity is calculated in detail. In particular, we show several salient features for understanding magnetization dynamics near the Curie temperature. While the critical slowdown in dynamics occurs, we find that an external magnetic field can restore the fast dynamics. We discuss the implication of the fast dynamics in the application of heat-assisted magnetic recording.

  18. Ultraviolet laser-induced voltage in anisotropic shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Xinyang; Zhu, Jing; Li, Yizhang; Zhao, Kun; Zhan, Honglei; Yue, Wenzheng

    2018-01-01

    The anisotropy of shales plays a significant role in oil and gas exploration and engineering. Owing to various problems and limitations, anisotropic properties were seldom investigated by direct current resistivity methods. Here in this work, a 248 nm ultraviolet laser was employed to assess the anisotropic electrical response of a dielectric shale. Angular dependence of laser-induced voltages (V p) were obtained, with a data symmetry at the location of 180° and a ~62.2% V p anisotropy of the sample. The double-exponential functions have provided an explanation for the electrical field controlled carrier transportation process in horizontal and vertical directions. The results demonstrate that the combination of optics and electrical logging analysis (Opti-electrical Logging) is a promising technology for the investigation of unconventional reservoirs.

  19. Analysis of fresco by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caneve, L.; Diamanti, A.; Grimaldi, F.; Palleschi, G.; Spizzichino, V.; Valentini, F.

    2010-01-01

    The laser-based techniques have been shown to be a very powerful tool for artworks characterization and are used in the field of cultural heritage for the offered advantages of minimum invasiveness, in situ applicability and high sensitivity. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, in particular, has been applied in this field to many different kinds of ancient materials with successful results. In this work, a fragment of a Roman wall painting from the archaeological area of Pompeii has been investigated by LIBS. The sample elemental composition resulting from LIBS measurements suggested the presence of certain pigments. The ratio of the intensities of different lines related to some characteristic elements is proposed as an indicator for pigment recognition. The depth profiling permitted to put in evidence the presence of successive paint layers with different compositions. A comparison with the results obtained by the microscopy inspection of the sample has been done.

  20. Laser induced sonofusion: A new road toward thermonuclear reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadighi-Bonabi, Rasoul, E-mail: Sadighi@sharif.ir [Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-91, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gheshlaghi, Maryam [Payame noor University, P.O. Box 19395-3697, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Laser and optics research school, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRL), P.O. Box 14155-1339, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The Possibility of the laser assisted sonofusion is studied via single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) in Deuterated acetone (C{sub 3}D{sub 6}O) using quasi-adiabatic and hydro-chemical simulations at the ambient temperatures of 0 and −28.5 °C. The interior temperature of the produced bubbles in Deuterated acetone is 1.6 × 10{sup 6} K in hydro-chemical model and it is reached up to 1.9 × 10{sup 6} K in the laser induced SBSL bubbles. Under these circumstances, temperature up to 10{sup 7} K can be produced in the center of the bubble in which the thermonuclear D-D fusion reactions are promising under the controlled conditions.

  1. Femtosecond laser-induced decomposition in triazenepolymer thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonse, J.; Wiggins, S.M.; Solis, J.; Lippert, T.; Sturm, H.

    2005-01-01

    The damage induced by ultrashort, 130 fs, near-infrared, 800 nm, Ti:sapphire laser pulses in 1 μm thick triazenepolymer films on glass substrates has been investigated. Real-time reflectivity measurements with a ps-resolution streak camera and a ns-resolution photodiode set-up have been performed to study in situ the structural transformation dynamics upon single-pulse excitation with laser fluences above the threshold of permanent damage. Scanning force microscopy has been used to probe ex situ the corresponding surface topography of the ablated spots. Modulated lateral force microscopy (M-LFM) has been applied to observe alterations of the local friction properties within and around the irradiated areas

  2. Ion and laser beam induced metastable alloy formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westendorp, J.F.M.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis deals with ion and laser beam induced thin film mixing. It describes the development of an Ultra High Vacuum apparatus for deposition, ion irradiation and in situ analysis of thin film sandwiches. This chamber has been developed in close collaboration with High Voltage Engineering Europa. Thin films can be deposited by an e-gun evaporator. The atom flux is monitored by a quadrupole mass spectrometer. A comparison is made between ion beam and laser mixing of Cu with Au and Cu with W. The comparison provides a better understanding of the relative importance of purely collisional mixing, the role of thermodynamic effects and the contribution of diffusion due to defect generation and migration. (Auth.)

  3. Time evolution of laser-induced breakdown spectrometry of lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhongwen; Zhang Jianhui

    2011-01-01

    The plasma have been generated by a pulsed Nd: YAG laser at the fundamental wavelength of 1.06 μm ablating a metal lead target in air at atmospheric pressure, and the time resolved emission spectra were gotten. Time evolution of electron temperatures were measured according to the wavelength and relative intensity of spectra; then the electron densities were obtained from the Stark broadening of Pb-line; the time evolution of electron temperatures and electron densities along the direction plumbing the target surface were imaged. The analysis of results showed that electron temperature averaged to 14500 K, electron densities up to 10 17 cm -3 . The characteristics of time evolution of electron temperature and electron density were qualitatively explained from the aspect of generation mechanism of laser-induced plasmas. (authors)

  4. Laser-induced forward transfer of hybrid carbon nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palla-Papavlu, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, General Energy Research Department, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); National Institute for Lasers, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, Lasers Department, Atomistilor 409, 077125 Magurele (Romania); University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, 405 Atomistilor Street, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Filipescu, M., E-mail: mihaela.filipescu@inflpr.ro [Paul Scherrer Institut, General Energy Research Department, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); National Institute for Lasers, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, Lasers Department, Atomistilor 409, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Vizireanu, S. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, Lasers Department, Atomistilor 409, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Vogt, L. [Paul Scherrer Institut, General Energy Research Department, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Antohe, S. [University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, 405 Atomistilor Street, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Academy of Romanian Scientists, Splaiul Independentei 54, 050094 Bucharest (Romania); Dinescu, M. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, Lasers Department, Atomistilor 409, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Wokaun, A.; Lippert, T. [Paul Scherrer Institut, General Energy Research Department, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • Rapid prototyping of carbon nanowalls (CNW) and functionalized CNWs is described. • CNW and CNW:SnO{sub 2} pixels are successfully printed by laser-induced forward transfer. • Flexible (polyimide) and rigid (glass) supports are used as substrates. • 4 μm thick CNW and CNW:SnO{sub 2} pixels maintain their morphology and structure after LIFT. - Abstract: Chemically functionalized carbon nanowalls (CNWs) are promising materials for a wide range of applications, i.e. gas sensors, membranes for fuel cells, or as supports for catalysts. However, the difficulty of manipulation of these materials hinders their integration into devices. In this manuscript a procedure for rapid prototyping of CNWs and functionalized CNWs (i.e. decorated with SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles) is described. This procedure enables the use of laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) as a powerful technique for printing CNWs and CNW:SnO{sub 2} pixels onto rigid and flexible substrates. A morphological study shows that for a large range of laser fluences i.e. 500–700 mJ/cm{sup 2} it is possible to transfer thick (4 μm) CNW and CNW:SnO{sub 2} pixels. Micro-Raman investigation of the transferred pixels reveals that the chemical composition of the CNWs and functionalized CNWs does not change as a result of the laser transfer. Following these results one can envision that CNWs and CNW:SnO{sub 2} pixels obtained by LIFT can be ultimately applied in technological applications.

  5. Design of remote laser-induced fluorescence system's acquisition circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoqing; Lou, Yue; Wang, Ran; Yan, Debao; Li, Xin; Zhao, Xin; Chen, Dong; Zhao, Qi

    2017-10-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence system(LIfS) has been found its significant application in identifying one kind of substance from another by its properties even it's thimbleful, and becomes useful in plenty of fields. Many superior works have reported LIfS' theoretical analysis , designs and uses. However, the usual LIPS is always constructed in labs to detect matter quite closely, for the system using low-power laser as excitation source and charge coupled device (CCD) as detector. Promoting the detectivity of LIfS is of much concern to spread its application. Here, we take a high-energy narrow-pulse laser instead of commonly used continuous wave laser to operate sample, thus we can get strong fluorescent. Besides, photomultiplier (PMT) with high sensitivity is adopted in our system to detect extremely weak fluorescence after a long flight time from the sample to the detector. Another advantage in our system, as the fluorescence collected into spectroscopy, multiple wavelengths of light can be converted to the corresponding electrical signals with the linear array multichannel PMT. Therefore, at the cost of high-powered incentive and high-sensitive detector, a remote LIFS is get. In order to run this system, it is of importance to turn light signal to digital signal which can be processed by computer. The pulse width of fluorescence is deeply associated with excitation laser, at the nanosecond(ns) level, which has a high demand for acquisition circuit. We design an acquisition circuit including, I/V conversion circuit, amplifying circuit and peak-holding circuit. The simulation of circuit shows that peak-holding circuit can be one effective approach to reducing difficulty of acquisition circuit.

  6. Wavelength comparison for laser induced breakdown spectroscopy caries detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Marcello M.; Raele, Marcus P.; Ana, Patrícia A.; Núñez, Sílvia C.; Zamataro, Claudia B.; Zezell, Denise M.

    2018-02-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a technique capable to perform elemental analyses of a variety of samples, independent of matter state. Other spectroscopy techniques may require a destructive and time-consuming sample preparation. On the other hand, LIBS is a less destructive technique with no (or considerably less) sample preparation, using a relatively simple experimental setup. LIBS also provides a multielement analysis into one single spectrum acquisition, applying a Nd:YAG short-pulsed laser to ensure the stoichiometry between the sample and the generated plasma. LIBS have been applied on the study of carious lesions using a Nd:YAG into its fundamental emission at 1064 nm. It was shown that ratio of P/Ca and Zn/Ca can be used to monitor the cariogenic process. Another minor elements, e.g. C and Cu, associated with bacteria biofilm were also measured with the Nd:YAG laser. The fundamental wavelength emission (1064 nm) of Nd:YAG is coincident with a hydroxyapatite transmission window and it may affect the result. In order to address this issue a study used the second harmonic of the Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm. It was show that it is also possible perform LIBS on carious lesion using the Nd:YAG at 532 nm. However, there is not a work direct comparing the LIBS at 532 nm and 1064 nm for carious lesion detection. So, the aim of this work was to investigate the influence of laser wavelength on the LIBS performance for carious lesion detection. In both cases the carious lesion was detected with the advantage of no interference with hydroxyapatite at 532 nm.

  7. Charged particle-induced nuclear fission reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The nuclear fission phenomenon continues to be an enigma, even after nearly 75 years of its discovery. Considerable progress has been made towards understanding the fission process. Both light projectiles and heavy ions have been employed to investigate nuclear fission. An extensive database of the properties of ...

  8. Evidence of liquid phase during laser-induced periodic surface structures formation induced by accumulative ultraviolet picosecond laser beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huynh, T. T. D.; Petit, A.; Semmar, N., E-mail: nadjib.semmar@univ-orleans.fr [GREMI, UMR7344, CNRS/University of Orleans, 14 rue d' Issoudun, BP6744, 45067 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Vayer, M. [ICMN, UMR 7374, CNRS/University of Orleans, 1b rue de la Ferollerie, CS 40059, 45071 Orleans Cedex (France); Sauldubois, A. [CME, UFR Sciences, University of Orleans, 1 Rue de Chartres, BP 6759, 45067 Orleans Cedex 2 (France)

    2015-11-09

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) were formed on Cu/Si or Cu/glass thin films using Nd:YAG laser beam (40 ps, 10 Hz, and 30 mJ/cm{sup 2}). The study of ablation threshold is always achieved over melting when the variation of the number of pulses increases from 1 to 1000. But the incubation effect is leading to reduce the threshold of melting as increasing the number of laser pulse. Also, real time reflectivity signals exhibit typical behavior to stress the formation of a liquid phase during the laser-processing regime and helps to determine the threshold of soft ablation. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analyses have shown the topology of the micro-crater containing regular spikes with different height. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) allows finally to show three distinguished zones in the close region of isolated protrusions. The central zone is a typical crystallized area of few nanometers surrounded by a mixed poly-crystalline and amorphous area. Finally, in the region far from the protrusion zone, Cu film shows an amorphous structure. The real time reflectivity, AFM, and HR-TEM analyses evidence the formation of a liquid phase during the LIPSS formation in the picosecond regime.

  9. Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) of congruent voxels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piqué, Alberto, E-mail: pique@nrl.navy.mil [Materials Science and Technology Division, Code 6364, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Kim, Heungsoo; Auyeung, Raymond C.Y.; Beniam, Iyoel [Materials Science and Technology Division, Code 6364, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Breckenfeld, Eric [National Research Council Fellow at the Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is demonstrated with high viscosity Ag nanopaste. • Under the right conditions (viscosity and fluence) the transfer of congruent voxels was achieved. • For viscosities under 100 Pa s, congruent voxel transfer of silver nano-suspensions is only possible under a very narrow range of conditions. • For viscosities over 100 Pa s, congruent voxel transfer of silver nano-pastes works over a wider range of fluences, donor substrate thickness, gap distances and voxel areas. • The laser transfer of congruent voxels can be used for printing electronic patterns in particular interconnects. - Abstract: Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) of functional materials offers unique advantages and capabilities for the rapid prototyping of electronic, optical and sensor elements. The use of LIFT for printing high viscosity metallic nano-inks and nano-pastes can be optimized for the transfer of voxels congruent with the shape of the laser pulse, forming thin film-like structures non-lithographically. These processes are capable of printing patterns with excellent lateral resolution and thickness uniformity typically found in 3-dimensional stacked assemblies, MEMS-like structures and free-standing interconnects. However, in order to achieve congruent voxel transfer with LIFT, the particle size and viscosity of the ink or paste suspensions must be adjusted to minimize variations due to wetting and drying effects. When LIFT is carried out with high-viscosity nano-suspensions, the printed voxel size and shape become controllable parameters, allowing the printing of thin-film like structures whose shape is determined by the spatial distribution of the laser pulse. The result is a new level of parallelization beyond current serial direct-write processes whereby the geometry of each printed voxel can be optimized according to the pattern design. This work shows how LIFT of congruent voxels can be applied to the fabrication of 2D

  10. Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) of congruent voxels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piqué, Alberto; Kim, Heungsoo; Auyeung, Raymond C.Y.; Beniam, Iyoel; Breckenfeld, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is demonstrated with high viscosity Ag nanopaste. • Under the right conditions (viscosity and fluence) the transfer of congruent voxels was achieved. • For viscosities under 100 Pa s, congruent voxel transfer of silver nano-suspensions is only possible under a very narrow range of conditions. • For viscosities over 100 Pa s, congruent voxel transfer of silver nano-pastes works over a wider range of fluences, donor substrate thickness, gap distances and voxel areas. • The laser transfer of congruent voxels can be used for printing electronic patterns in particular interconnects. - Abstract: Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) of functional materials offers unique advantages and capabilities for the rapid prototyping of electronic, optical and sensor elements. The use of LIFT for printing high viscosity metallic nano-inks and nano-pastes can be optimized for the transfer of voxels congruent with the shape of the laser pulse, forming thin film-like structures non-lithographically. These processes are capable of printing patterns with excellent lateral resolution and thickness uniformity typically found in 3-dimensional stacked assemblies, MEMS-like structures and free-standing interconnects. However, in order to achieve congruent voxel transfer with LIFT, the particle size and viscosity of the ink or paste suspensions must be adjusted to minimize variations due to wetting and drying effects. When LIFT is carried out with high-viscosity nano-suspensions, the printed voxel size and shape become controllable parameters, allowing the printing of thin-film like structures whose shape is determined by the spatial distribution of the laser pulse. The result is a new level of parallelization beyond current serial direct-write processes whereby the geometry of each printed voxel can be optimized according to the pattern design. This work shows how LIFT of congruent voxels can be applied to the fabrication of 2D

  11. Nuclear moments and isotopic variation of the mean square charge radii of strontium nuclei by atomic beam laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chongkum, S.

    1987-10-01

    Hyperfine structure and optical isotope shift measurements have been performed on a series of stable and radioactive strontium isotopes (A = 80 to 90), including two isomers 85m and 87m. The spectroscopy applied continuous wave dye laser induced fluorescence of free atoms at λ=293.2 nm in a well collimated atomic beam. The 293.2 nm ultraviolet light was generated by frequency doubling the output of a dye laser in either a temperature tuned Ammonium Dihydrogen Arsenate (ADA) crystal or an angle tuned Lithium Iodate crystal. A special radio frequency (rf) technique was used to tune the dye laser frequency with long term stability. Radioactive Sr isotopes were produced either by neutron capture of stable strontium or by (α,xn) reactions from krypton gas. The samples were purified by an electromagnetic mass separator and their sizes were of order 100 pg, which corresponds to 10 11 atoms. The observed results of the hyperfine structure components are evaluated in terms of nuclear magnetic dipole moments and electric quadrupole moments. Changes in mean square charge radii of strontium nuclei which were extracted from the isotope shift measurements, exhibit a distinct shell effect at the neutron magic number N=50. The experimental data are analysed and compared with some theoretical nuclear model predictions. The strong increase of the nuclear charge radii with decreasing neutron number of isotopes below N=50 is in agreement with the variation of the mean square deformation extracted from measured B(E2) values. (orig.) [de

  12. Laser cutting sandwich structure glass-silicon-glass wafer with laser induced thermal-crack propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yecheng; Wang, Maolu; Zhang, Hongzhi; Yang, Lijun; Fu, Xihong; Wang, Yang

    2017-08-01

    Silicon-glass devices are widely used in IC industry, MEMS and solar energy system because of their reliability and simplicity of the manufacturing process. With the trend toward the wafer level chip scale package (WLCSP) technology, the suitable dicing method of silicon-glass bonded structure wafer has become necessary. In this paper, a combined experimental and computational approach is undertaken to investigate the feasibility of cutting the sandwich structure glass-silicon-glass (SGS) wafer with laser induced thermal-crack propagation (LITP) method. A 1064 nm semiconductor laser cutting system with double laser beams which could simultaneously irradiate on the top and bottom of the sandwich structure wafer has been designed. A mathematical model for describing the physical process of the interaction between laser and SGS wafer, which consists of two surface heating sources and two volumetric heating sources, has been established. The temperature stress distribution are simulated by using finite element method (FEM) analysis software ABAQUS. The crack propagation process is analyzed by using the J-integral method. In the FEM model, a stationary planar crack is embedded in the wafer and the J-integral values around the crack front edge are determined using the FEM. A verification experiment under typical parameters is conducted and the crack propagation profile on the fracture surface is examined by the optical microscope and explained from the stress distribution and J-integral value.

  13. Nuclear proliferation using laser isotope separation - Verification options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, Stanley A.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: This paper discusses the use of laser isotope separation techniques for the purpose of nuclear proliferation by a Non-Nuclear Weapons State (NNWS) that is a signatory of the Non- Proliferation Treaty (NPT) and is subject to inspections by the IAEA. It includes an analysis of the feasibility of the technique by a NNWS, what conditions are necessary for success, what would be required for either the use of the technique as a covert enrichment method or its use as a non-declared adjunct to a declared enrichment facility, and what signs might be available for the detection of such activity. The Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) technology, developed by LLNL from 1973 through 1999, is used as a concrete example to allow more determination of the questions of feasibility, requirements, and signatures, as this technology has been further developed than others, and has been documented extensively. The question of feasibility of the technique for the enrichment of significant quantities of uranium or plutonium to produce weapons-grade materials is investigated by decomposing the development necessary for the technique into steps that can be analyzed for requirements, both in expertise, equipment, and scientific knowledge. The paper concludes that the technique is usable for proliferation, although with difficulty, by some nations during the next two decades. The technique may be developed in a completely covert method, with no declarations and no public indication that it is under research and development, or alternatively, some admissions may be made to allow or promote exchange of information. The technique can be disclosed as a research and development technology for the separation of non-radioactive isotopes, for the separation of radioactive isotopes including those in commercial use for medical or industrial purposes, or as part of a nuclear fuel cycle. The ability to translate development work from the first two of these to a system usable for

  14. Enhancement of laser induced damage threshold of fused silica by acid etching combined with UV laser conditioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Meng; Xiang Xia; Jiang Yong; Zu Xiaotao; Yuan Xiaodong; Zheng Wanguo; Wang Haijun; Li Xibin; Lu Haibing; Jiang Xiaodong; Wang Chengcheng

    2010-01-01

    Acid etching combined with UV laser conditioning is developed to enhance the laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) of fused silica. Firstly, the fused silica is etched for 1 ∼ 100 min with a buffered 1% HF solution. After acid etching, its transmittance, surface roughness and LIDT are measured. The results reveal that the fused silica has the highest LIDT and transmittance after etching for 10 min. Then UV laser (355 nm) conditioning is adopted to process the 10-min-etched fused silica. When the laser fluence is below 60% of fused silica's zero probability damage threshold, the LIDT increases gradually with the increase of laser conditioning fluence. However, the LIDT rapidly decreases to be lower than the threshold of the 10-min-etched fused silica when the conditioning fluence is up to 80% of the threshold. Proper acid etching and laser conditioning parameters will effectively enhance the laser damage resistance of fused silica. (authors)

  15. Laser-based analytical monitoring in nuclear-fuel processing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohimer, J.P.

    1978-09-01

    The use of laser-based analytical methods in nuclear-fuel processing plants is considered. The species and locations for accountability, process control, and effluent control measurements in the Coprocessing, Thorex, and reference Purex fuel processing operations are identified and the conventional analytical methods used for these measurements are summarized. The laser analytical methods based upon Raman, absorption, fluorescence, and nonlinear spectroscopy are reviewed and evaluated for their use in fuel processing plants. After a comparison of the capabilities of the laser-based and conventional analytical methods, the promising areas of application of the laser-based methods in fuel processing plants are identified

  16. Isotopic imaging via nuclear resonance fluorescence with laser-based Thomson radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barty, Christopher P. J. [Hayward, CA; Hartemann, Frederic V [San Ramon, CA; McNabb, Dennis P [Alameda, CA; Pruet, Jason A [Brentwood, CA

    2009-07-21

    The present invention utilizes novel laser-based, high-brightness, high-spatial-resolution, pencil-beam sources of spectrally pure hard x-ray and gamma-ray radiation to induce resonant scattering in specific nuclei, i.e., nuclear resonance fluorescence. By monitoring such fluorescence as a function of beam position, it is possible to image in either two dimensions or three dimensions, the position and concentration of individual isotopes in a specific material configuration. Such methods of the present invention material identification, spatial resolution of material location and ability to locate and identify materials shielded by other materials, such as, for example, behind a lead wall. The foundation of the present invention is the generation of quasimonochromatic high-energy x-ray (100's of keV) and gamma-ray (greater than about 1 MeV) radiation via the collision of intense laser pulses from relativistic electrons. Such a process as utilized herein, i.e., Thomson scattering or inverse-Compton scattering, produces beams having diameters from about 1 micron to about 100 microns of high-energy photons with a bandwidth of .DELTA.E/E of approximately 10E.sup.-3.

  17. Effect of the R dependence of laser-induced polarizability on molecular dynamic alignment in an intense femtosecond laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jianxin; Cui Xiaomei; Huang Bomin; Wu Hongchun; Zhuo Shuangmu

    2006-01-01

    In the rotation equation of the angle θ between the molecular axis and the laser polarization direction, the dependence of laser-induced polarizability on the molecular internuclear distance R is considered. The effect of the R dependence of laser-induced polarizability on molecular dynamic alignment in an intense femtosecond laser field is investigated with 20 and 100 fs laser pulses for N 2 molecules and with 60 and 100 fs laser pulses for Br 2 molecules at intensities of 5x10 14 W cm -2 and 5x10 15 W cm -2 . This effect exists and only occurs during the dissociative process after the molecule is ionized. It enhances the degrees of molecular dynamic alignment and is more significant in reorienting the angular distributions of molecules towards the laser polarization direction in the conditions of high laser intensity and short pulse length. Compared with the N 2 molecule, the effect of the R dependence of laser-induced polarizability on molecular dynamic alignment for Br 2 is stronger. The reasons are presented and discussed

  18. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy library for the Martian environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cousin, A.; Forni, O.; Maurice, S.; Gasnault, O.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Mars Science Laboratory rover will carry the first Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy experiment in space: ChemCam. We have developed a laboratory model which mimics ChemCam's main characteristics. We used a set of target samples relevant to Mars geochemistry, and we recorded individual spectra. We propose a data reduction scheme for Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy data incorporating de-noising, continuum removal, and peak fitting. Known effects of the Martian atmosphere are confirmed with our experiment: better Signal-to-Noise Ratio on Mars compared to Earth, narrower peak width, and essentially no self-absorption. The wavelength shift of emission lines from air to Mars pressure is discussed. The National Institute of Standards and Technology vacuum database is used for wavelength calibration and to identify the elemental lines. Our Martian database contains 1336 lines for 32 elements: H, Li, Be, B, C, N, O, F, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ar, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Rb, Sr, Cs, Ba, and Pb. It is a subset of the National Institute of Standards and Technology database to be used for Martian geochemistry. Finally, synthetic spectra can be built from the Martian database. Correlation calculations help to distinguish between elements in case of uncertainty. This work is used to create tools and support data for the interpretation of ChemCam results. - Highlights: ► Chemcam: first Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy technique on Mars. ► Creation of a LIBS specific database to ChemCam on Mars. ► Data reduction scheme is proposed. ► Best signal under Martian conditions. ► LIBS emission lines database: subset of NIST database for Martian geochemistry.

  19. Experimental studies of particle acceleration with ultra-intense lasers - Applications to nuclear physics experiments involving laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plaisir, C.

    2010-11-01

    For the last ten years, the Ultra High Intensity Lasers offer the opportunity to produce accelerated particle beams which contain more than 10 12 electrons, protons accelerated into a few ps. We have simulated and developed some diagnostics based on nuclear activation to characterize both the angular and the energy distributions of the particle beams produced with intense lasers. The characterization methods which are presented are illustrated by means of results obtained in different experiments. We would use the particle beams produced to excite nuclear state in a plasma environment. It can modify intrinsic characteristics of the nuclei such as the half-life of some isomeric states. To prepare this kind of experiments, we have measured the nuclear reaction cross section (gamma,n) to produce the isomeric state of the 84 Rb, which has an excitation energy of 463 keV, with the electron accelerator ELSA of CEA/DIF in Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France). (author)

  20. Aphidicolin-induced nuclear elongation in tobacco BY-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuhara, Hiroki; Kitamoto, Kazuki

    2014-05-01

    Plant nuclei are known to differentiate into various shapes within a single plant. However, little is known about the mechanisms of nuclear morphogenesis. We found that nuclei of tobacco BY-2 cells were highly elongated on long-term treatment with 5 mg l⁻¹ aphidicolin, an inhibitor of DNA polymerase α. In aphidicolin-treated cells, the nuclear length was correlated with the cell length. During culture in the presence of aphidicolin, the nuclei were elongated in parallel with cell elongation. Nuclear elongation was inhibited by the inhibition of cell elongation with 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile, a cellulose synthesis inhibitor. However, cell elongation induced in the auxin-depleted medium in the absence of aphidicolin did not cause nuclear elongation, indicating that cell elongation alone is not sufficient for nuclear elongation. Treatment with either latrunculin B or propyzamide inhibited the aphidicolin-induced nuclear elongation, indicating that both actin filaments and microtubules (MTs) are required for nuclear elongation. Observations using BY-YTHCLR2 cells, in which actin filaments, MTs and nuclei were simultaneously visualized, revealed that the longitudinally arranged MT bundles associated with the nucleus play an important role in nuclear elongation, and that actin filaments affect the formation of these MT bundles. In aphidicolin-treated cells, the nuclear DNA contents of the elongated nuclei exceeded 4C, and the nuclear length was highly correlated with the nuclear DNA content. In cells treated with 50 mg l⁻¹ aphidicolin, cells were elongated and nucleus-associated longitudinal MT bundles were formed, but the nuclear DNA contents did not exceed 4C and the nuclei did not elongate. These results indicate that an increase in the nuclear DNA content above 4C is also required for nuclear elongation.

  1. Laser-induced cracks in ice due to temperature gradient and thermal stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Song; Yang, Ying-Ying; Zhang, Jing-Yuan; Zhang, Zhi-Yan; Zhang, Ling; Lin, Xue-Chun

    2018-06-01

    This work presents the experimental and theoretical investigations on the mechanism of laser-induce cracks in ice. The laser-induced thermal gradient would generate significant thermal stress and lead to the cracking without thermal melting in the ice. The crack density induced by a pulsed laser in the ice critically depends on the laser scanning speed and the size of the laser spot on the surface, which determines the laser power density on the surface. A maximum of 16 cracks within an area of 17 cm × 10 cm can be generated when the laser scanning speed is at 10 mm/s and the focal point of the laser is right on the surface of the ice with a laser intensity of ∼4.6 × 107 W/cm2. By comparing the infrared images of the ice generated at various experimental conditions, it was found that a larger temperature gradient would result in more laser-induced cracks, while there is no visible melting of the ice by the laser beam. The data confirm that the laser-induced thermal stress is the main cause of the cracks created in the ice.

  2. Heparanase-1 activities in the development of laser induced choroidal neovascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao-Ke Hou

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To investigate the role of heparanase-1 in laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV.METHODS:Experimental CNV was induced by krypton laser photocoagulation in 15 male Brown Norway rats. Fundus fluorescein angiography and histopathological examination were performed in observing the CNV development. The expression and distribution of heparanase-1 protein in the laser lesions were determined by immunohistochemistry and western blotting analysis.RESULTS:The success rate of laser induced CNV was approximately 75% on 3-4 weeks after laser photocoagulation. The protein levels of heparanase-1 increased significantly in the retina-choroidal complex of CNV models when compared to normal rat eyes (P<0.01. Immunostaining confirmed strong heparanase-1 expressions in all laser lesions, and it displayed to be highest at the newly formed blood vessels within the fibrovascular complex in the subretinal space.CONCLUSION:Heparanase-1 is closely involved in the development of laser induced CNV.

  3. Urinary incontinence monitoring system using laser-induced graphene sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Nag, Anindya

    2017-12-25

    This paper presents the design and development of a sensor patch to be used in a sensing system to deal with the urinary incontinence problem primarily faced by women and elderly people. The sensor patches were developed from laser-induced graphene from low-cost commercial polyimide (PI) polymers. The graphene was manually transferred to a commercial tape, which was used as sensor patch for experimentation. Salt solutions with different concentrations were tested to determine the most sensitive frequency region of the sensor. The results are encouraging to further develop this sensor in a platform for a fully functional urinary incontinence detection system.

  4. The performance and application of laser-induced photoacoustic spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Bo; Chen Xi; Yao Jun

    2012-01-01

    Laser-induced photoacoustic spectrometer (LIPAS) is a key instrument can be used in the investigation of radionuclides migration behaviors due to its higher sensitivity for the detection and identification of radionuclides speciation in aqueous solutions. The speciation of radionuclides such as oxidation states and complexation may be determined directly by using this specific non-contact and nondestructive analytical technique, and the sensitivity of LIPAS surpasses that of conventional absorption spectroscopy by one to two orders of magnitude. In the present work, LIPAS system was established at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE), and the principle, performance and preliminary application of LIPAS are also be presented. (authors)

  5. Laser-induced reaction alumina coating on ceramic composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Chenghe

    Silicon carbide ceramics are susceptible to corrosion by certain industrial furnace environments. It is also true for a new class of silicon carbide-particulate reinforced alumina-matrix composite (SiCsb(P)Alsb2Osb3) since it contains more than 55% of SiC particulate within the composite. This behavior would limit the use of SiCsb(P)Alsb2Osb3 composites in ceramic heat exchangers. Because oxide ceramics corrode substantially less in the same environments, a laser-induced reaction alumina coating technique has been developed for improving corrosion resistance of the SiCsb(P)Alsb2Osb3 composite. Specimens with and without the laser-induced reaction alumina coating were subjected to corrosion testing at 1200sp°C in an air atmosphere containing Nasb2COsb3 for 50 ˜ 200 hours. Corroded specimens were characterized via x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). The uncoated SiCsbP/Alsb2Osb3 composite samples experienced an initial increase in weight during the exposure to Nasb2COsb3 at 1200sp°C due to the oxidation of residual aluminum metal in the composite. There was no significant weight change difference experienced during exposure times between 50 and 200 hours. The oxidation layer formed on the as-received composite surface consisted of Si and Alsb2Osb3 (after washing with a HF solution). The oxidation layer grew outward and inward from the original surface of the composite. The growth rate in the outward direction was faster than in the inward direction. The formation of the Si/Alsb2Osb3 oxidation layer on the as-received composite was nonuniform, and localized corrosion was observed. The coated samples experienced very little mass increase. The laser-induced reaction alumina coating effectively provided protection for the SiCsbP/Alsb2Osb3 composite by keeping the corrodents from contacting the composite and by the formation of some refractory compounds such as Nasb2OAlsb2Osb3SiOsb2 and Nasb2Alsb{22}Osb

  6. Multiple pulse nanosecond laser induced damage threshold on hybrid mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanda, Jan; Muresan, Mihai-George; Bilek, Vojtech; Sebek, Matej; Hanus, Martin; Lucianetti, Antonio; Rostohar, Danijela; Mocek, Tomas; Škoda, Václav

    2017-11-01

    So-called hybrid mirrors, consisting of broadband metallic surface coated with dielectric reflector designed for specific wavelength, becoming more important with progressing development of broadband mid-IR sources realized using parametric down conversion system. Multiple pulse nanosecond laser induced damage on such mirrors was tested by method s-on-1, where s stands for various numbers of pulses. We show difference in damage threshold between common protected silver mirrors and hybrid silver mirrors prepared by PVD technique and their variants prepared by IAD. Keywords: LIDT,

  7. Laser induced single-crystal transition in polycrystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitali, G.; Bertolotti, M.; Foti, G.; Rimini, E.

    1978-01-01

    Transition to single crystal of polycrystalline Si material underlying a Si crystal substrate of 100 orientation was obtained via laser irradiation. The changes in the structure were analyzed by reflection high energy electron diffraction and by channeling effect technique using 2.0 MeV He Rutherford scattering. The power density required to induce the transition in a 4500 A thick polycrystalline layer is about 70 MW/cm 2 (50ns). The corresponding amorphous to single transition has a threshold of about 45 MW/cm 2 . (orig.) 891 HPOE [de

  8. Laser ablation-laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for the measurement of total elemental concentration in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Jhon; López, Sebastian; Jaramillo, Daniel; Hahn, David W; Molina, Alejandro

    2013-04-10

    The performances of traditional laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser ablation-LIBS (LA-LIBS) were compared by quantifying the total elemental concentration of potassium in highly heterogeneous solid samples, namely soils. Calibration curves for a set of fifteen samples with a wide range of potassium concentrations were generated. The LA-LIBS approach produced a superior linear response different than the traditional LIBS scheme. The analytical response of LA-LIBS was tested with a large set of different soil samples for the quantification of the total concentration of Fe, Mn, Mg, Ca, Na, and K. Results showed an acceptable linear response for Ca, Fe, Mg, and K while poor signal responses were found for Na and Mn. Signs of remaining matrix effects for the LA-LIBS approach in the case of soil analysis were found and discussed. Finally, some improvements and possibilities for future studies toward quantitative soil analysis with the LA-LIBS technique are suggested.

  9. High power CO2 lasers and their applications in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nath, A.K.

    2002-01-01

    Carbon dioxide laser is one of the most popular lasers in industry for material processing applications. It has very high power capability and high efficiency, can be operated in continuous wave (CW), modulated and pulsed modes, and has relatively low cost. Due to these characteristics high power CO 2 lasers are being used worldwide in different industries for a wide variety of materials processing operations. In nuclear industry, CO 2 laser has made its way in many applications. Some of the tasks performed by multikilowatt CO 2 laser are cutting operations necessary to remove unprocessible hardware from reactor fuel assemblies, sealing/fixing/removing radioactive contaminations onto/from concrete surfaces and surface modification of engineering components for improved surface mechanical and metallurgical characteristics. We have developed various models of CW CO 2 lasers of power up to 12 kW and a high repetitive rate TEA (Transversely Excited Atmospheric pressure) CO 2 laser of 500 W average power operating at 500 Hz repetition rates. We have carried many materials processing applications of direct relevance to DAE. Recent work includes laser welding of end plug PFBR fuel tubes, martensitic stainless steel and titanium alloy, surface cladding of turbine blades made of Ni-super alloy with stellite 694, fabrication on graded material of stainless steel and stellite, and laser scabbling, drilling and cutting of concrete which have potential application in decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. A brief overview of these indigenous developments will be presented. (author)

  10. Modeling of plasma plume induced during laser welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moscicki, T.; Hoffman, J.; Szymanski, Z.

    2005-01-01

    During laser welding, the interaction of intense laser radiation with a work-piece leads to the formation of a long, thin, cylindrical cavity in a metal, called a keyhole. Generation of a keyhole enables the laser beam to penetrate into the work-piece and is essential for deep welding. The keyhole contains ionized metal vapour and is surrounded by molten material called the weld pool. The metal vapour, which flows from the keyhole mixes with the shielding gas flowing from the opposite direction and forms a plasma plume over the keyhole mouth. The plasma plume has considerable influence on the processing conditions. Plasma strongly absorbs laser radiation and significantly changes energy transfer from the laser beam to a material. In this paper the results of theoretical modelling of plasma plume induced during welding with CO 2 laser are presented. The set of equations consists of equation of conservation of mass, energy, momentum and the diffusion equation: ∂ρ/∂t + ∇·(ρ ρ ν =0; ∂(ρE)/∂t + ∇·( ρ ν (ρE + p)) = ∇ (k eff ∇T - Σ j h j ρ J j + (τ eff · ρ ν )) + Σ i κ i I i - R; ∂/∂t(ρ ρ ν ) + ∇· (ρ ρ ν ρ ν ) = - ∇p + ∇(τ) + ρ ρ g + ρ F, where τ is viscous tensor τ = μ[(∇ ρ ν + ∇ ρT ν )-2/3∇· ρ ν I]; ∂/∂t(ρY i ) + ∇·(ρ ρ ν Y i ) = ∇·ρD i,m ∇T i ; where μ ν denotes velocity vector, E - energy, ρ mass density; k - thermal conductivity, T- temperature, κ - absorption coefficient, I i local laser intensity, R - radiation loss function, p - pressure, h j enthalpy, J j - diffusion flux of j component, ν g - gravity, μ F - external force, μ - dynamic viscosity, I - unit tensor, Y i - mass fraction of iron vapor in the gas mixture, D i,m - mass diffusion coefficient. The terms k eff and τ eff contain the turbulent component of the thermal conductivity and the viscosity, respectively. All the material functions are functions of the temperature and mass fraction only. The equations

  11. Molecular signatures in femtosecond laser-induced organic plasmas: comparison with nanosecond laser ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Jorge; Moros, Javier; Laserna, J Javier

    2016-01-28

    During the last few years, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has evolved significantly in the molecular sensing area through the optical monitoring of emissions from organic plasmas. Large efforts have been made to study the formation pathways of diatomic radicals as well as their connections with the bonding framework of molecular solids. Together with the structural and chemical-physical properties of molecules, laser ablation parameters seem to be closely tied to the observed spectral signatures. This research focuses on evaluating the impact of laser pulse duration on the production of diatomic species that populate plasmas of organic materials. Differences in relative intensities of spectral signatures from the plasmas of several organic molecules induced in femtosecond (fs) and nanosecond (ns) ablation regimes have been studied. Beyond the abundance and origin of diatomic radicals that seed the plasma, findings reveal the crucial role of the ablation regime in the breakage pattern of the molecule. The laser pulse duration dictates the fragments and atoms resulting from the vaporized molecules, promoting some formation routes at the expense of other paths. The larger amount of fragments formed by fs pulses advocates a direct release of native bonds and a subsequent seeding of the plasma with diatomic species. In contrast, in the ns ablation regime, the atomic recombinations and single displacement processes dominate the contribution to diatomic radicals, as long as atomization of molecules prevails over their progressive decomposition. Consequently, fs-LIBS better reflects correlations between strengths of emissions from diatomic species and molecular structure as compared to ns-LIBS. These new results entail a further step towards the specificity in the analysis of molecular solids by fs-LIBS.

  12. Laser application maintenance technologies for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shima, Seishi; Sato, Kenji; Kobayashi, Masahiro; Sano, Yuji; Kimura, Seiichiro

    2000-01-01

    Several plants that were the first to be constructed in Japan have been operating for more than 20 years now, and preventive maintenance is therefore a matter of great importance. This paper summarizes the status of applied laser maintenance technologies both preventive and repair. Especially for the laser peening and laser de-sensitization treatment technology, field applications were also described in detail. In future, expansion of field application area on the preventive maintenance, repair and inspection technologies will be developed. (author)

  13. Laser light scattering in a laser-induced argon plasma: Investigations of the shock wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokrzywka, B. [Obserwatorium Astronomiczne na Suhorze, Uniwersytet Pedagogiczny, ulica Podchorazych 2, 30-084 Krakow (Poland); Mendys, A., E-mail: agata.mendys@uj.edu.pl [Instytut Fizyki im. M. Smoluchowskiego, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, ulica Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Dzierzega, K.; Grabiec, M. [Instytut Fizyki im. M. Smoluchowskiego, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, ulica Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Pellerin, S. [GREMI, site de Bourges, Universite d' Orleans, CNRS, rue Gaston Berger BP 4043, 18028 Bourges (France)

    2012-08-15

    Shock wave produced by a laser induced spark in argon at atmospheric pressure was examined using Rayleigh and Thomson scattering. The spark was generated by focusing a laser pulse from the second harmonic ({lambda} = 532 nm) of a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser using an 80 mm focal length lens, with a fluence of 2 kJ{center_dot}cm{sup -2}. Images of the spark emission were recorded for times between 30 ns and 100 {mu}s after the laser pulse in order to characterize its spatial evolution. The position of the shock wave at several instants of its evolution and for several plasma regions was determined from the Rayleigh-scattered light of another nanosecond Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 40 J{center_dot}cm{sup -2} fluence). Simultaneously, Thomson scattering technique was applied to determine the electron density and temperature in the hot plasma core. Attempts were made to describe the temporal evolution of the shock wave within a self-similar model, both by the simple Sedov-Taylor formula as well as its extension deduced by de Izarra. The temporal radial evolution of the shock position is similar to that obtained within theory taking into account the counter pressure of the ambient gas. Density profiles just behind the shock front are in qualitative agreement with those obtained by numerically solving the Euler equations for instantaneous explosion at a point with counter pressure. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated shock wave evolution by Rayleigh scattering method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 2D map of shockwave position for several times after plasma generation is presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Shock wave evolution is not satisfactorily described within self-similar models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evolution of shock position similar to theory taking into account counter pressure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Density profile behind the shock similar to numerical solution of Euler equations.

  14. Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, F. J.; De la Rosa, J.; Gallegos, F. J.

    2006-02-01

    Fluorescence methods are being used increasingly in the measurement of species concentrations in gases, liquids and solids. Laser induced fluorescence is spontaneous emission from atoms or molecules that have been excited by laser radiation. Here we present a time resolved fluorescence instrument that consists of a 5 μJ Nitrogen laser (337.1 nm), a sample holder, a quartz optical fiber, a spectrometer, a PMT and a PC that allows the measurement of visible fluorescence spectra (350-750 nm). Time response of the system is approximately 5 ns. The instrument has been used in the measurement of colored bond paper, antifreeze, diesel, cochineal pigment and malignant tissues. The data acquisition was achieved through computer control of a digital oscilloscope (using General Purpose Interface Bus GPIB) and the spectrometer via serial (RS232). The instrument software provides a graphic interface that lets make some data acquisition tasks like finding fluorescence spectra, and fluorescence lifetimes. The software was developed using the Lab-View 6i graphic programming package and can be easily managed in order to add more functions to it.

  15. Laser induced damage and fracture in fused silica vacuum windows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.H.; Hurst, P.A.; Heggins, D.D.; Steele, W.A.; Bumpas, S.E.

    1996-11-01

    Laser-induced damage, that initiates catastrophic fracture, has been observed in large (≤61 cm dia) fused silica lenses that also serve as vacuum barriers in Nova and Beamlet lasers. If the elastic stored energy in the lens is high enough, the lens will fracture into many pieces (implosion). Three parameters control the degree of fracture in the vacuum barrier window: elastic stored energy (tensile stress), ratio of window thickness to flaw depth, and secondary crack propagation. Fracture experiments were conducted on 15-cm dia fused silica windows that contain surface flaws caused by laser damage. Results, combined with window failure data on Beamlet and Nova, were used to develop design criteria for a ''fail-safe'' lens (that may catastrophically fracture but not implode). Specifically, the window must be made thick enough so that the peak tensile stress is less than 500 psi (3.4 MPa) and the thickness/critical flaw size is less than 6. The air leak through the window fracture and into the vacuum must be rapid enough to reduce the load on the window before secondary crack growth occurs. Finite element stress calculations of a window before and immediately following fracture into two pieces show that the elastic stored energy is redistributed if the fragments ''lock'' in place and thereby bridge the opening. In such cases, the peak stresses at the flaw site can increase, leading to further (i.e. secondary) crack growth

  16. Induced Compton scattering of a laser in an inhomogeneous plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.S.; Tripathi, V. K.

    2003-01-01

    A laser propagating through a high temperature low density plasma undergoes induced Compton backscattering involving the coupling of the laser pump and the scattered electromagnetic wave via the resonant electrons or the resistive quasimode. The region of nonlinear interaction is localized due to plasma inhomogeneity. At short density scale lengths when the interaction region is strongly localized and resonant electrons quickly move out of it, the electron distribution function remains Maxwellian and Compton reflectivity is significant at laser intensity >10 16 W/cm 2 . In gentle density gradients the resonant electrons are trapped in the ponderomotive and self-consistent potential well of the quasimode as they enter the interaction region. The ones with velocity v z p (v p being the phase velocity of the ponderomotive wave propagating along z direction) are accelerated to v p while those with v z >v p are retarded to v p . Since the number of the former is more than that of the latter there is a net momentum transfer to electrons. Momentum and action conservation lead to a reflectivity, R, that initially goes as the square of pump intensity, then rises gradually at higher intensity. R decreases rapidly with v th /v p , where v th is the thermal velocity of electrons

  17. Physical analysis on laser-induced cerebral damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaosen; Liu, Jiangang; Tao, Chunkan; Lan, Xiufeng; Cao, Lingyan; Pan, Weimin; Shen, Zhonghua; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiaowu

    2005-01-01

    Experimental investigation on cerebral damage of adult SD rats induced by 532nm CW laser was performed. Tissue heat conductive equation was set up based on two-layered structure model. Finite difference algorithm was utilized to numerically simulate the temperature distribution in the brain tissue. Allowing for tissue response to temperature variation, free boundary model was used to discuss tissue thermal coagulation formation in brain. Experimental observations show that thermal coagulation and necrosis can be caused due to laser light absorption. The result of the calculation shows that the process of the thermal coagulation of the given mode comprises two stages: fast and slow. At the first stage, necrosis domain grows fast. Then necrosis domain growth becomes slower because of the competition between the heat diffusion into the surrounding undamaged tissue and the heat dissipation caused by blood perfusion. At the center of coagulation area no neuron was observed and at the transitional zone few nervous cells were seen by microscope. The research can provide reference data for developing clinical therapy of some kind of encephalic diseases by using 532nm laser, and for making cerebral infarction models in animal experiment.

  18. Aluminum alloy analysis using microchip-laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freedman, Andrew [Center for Sensor Systems and Technologies, Aerodyne Research, Inc., 45 Manning Road Billerica, MA, 01821-3976 (United States)]. E-mail: af@aerodyne.com; Iannarilli, Frank J. [Center for Sensor Systems and Technologies, Aerodyne Research, Inc., 45 Manning Road Billerica, MA, 01821-3976 (United States); Wormhoudt, Joda C. [Center for Sensor Systems and Technologies, Aerodyne Research, Inc., 45 Manning Road Billerica, MA, 01821-3976 (United States)

    2005-08-31

    A laser induced breakdown spectroscopy-based apparatus for the analysis of aluminum alloys which employs a microchip laser and a handheld spectrometer with an ungated, non-intensified CCD array has been built and tested. The microchip laser, which emits low energy pulses (4-15 {mu}J) at high repetition rates (1-10 kHz) at 1064 nm, produces, when focused, an ablation crater with a radius on the order of only 10 {mu}m. The resulting emission is focused onto an optical fiber connected to 0.10 m focal length spectrometer with a spectral range of 275-413 nm. The apparatus was tested using 30 different aluminum alloy reference samples. Two techniques for constructing calibration curves from the data, peak integration and partial least squares regression, were quantitatively evaluated. Results for Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, Si, and Zn indicated limits of detection (LOD) that ranged from 0.05 to 0.14 wt.% and overall measurement errors which varied from 0.06 to 0.18 wt.%. Higher limits of detection and overall error for Cu (> 0.3 wt.%) were attributed to analysis problems associated with the presence of optically thick lines and a spectral interference from Zn. Improvements in design and component sensitivity should increase overall performance by at least a factor of 2, allowing for dependable aluminum alloy classification.

  19. The LILIA (laser induced light ions acceleration) experiment at LNF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agosteo, S.; Anania, M.P.; Caresana, M.; Cirrone, G.A.P.; De Martinis, C.; Delle Side, D.; Fazzi, A.; Gatti, G.; Giove, D.; Giulietti, D.; Gizzi, L.A.; Labate, L.; Londrillo, P.; Maggiore, M.; Nassisi, V.; Sinigardi, S.; Tramontana, A.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Turchetti, G.

    2014-01-01

    Laser-matter interaction at relativistic intensities opens up new research fields in the particle acceleration and related secondary sources, with immediate applications in medical diagnostics, biophysics, material science, inertial confinement fusion, up to laboratory astrophysics. In particular laser-driven ion acceleration is very promising for hadron therapy once the ion energy will attain a few hundred MeV. The limited value of the energy up to now obtained for the accelerated ions is the drawback of such innovative technique to the real applications. LILIA (laser induced light ions acceleration) is an experiment now running at LNF (Frascati) with the goal of producing a real proton beam able to be driven for significant distances (50–75 cm) away from the interaction point and which will act as a source for further accelerating structure. In this paper the description of the experimental setup, the preliminary results of solid target irradiation and start to end simulation for a post-accelerated beam up to 60 MeV are given

  20. The LILIA (laser induced light ions acceleration) experiment at LNF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agosteo, S. [Energy Department, Polytechnic of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Anania, M.P. [INFN LNF Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Caresana, M. [Energy Department, Polytechnic of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P. [INFN LNS Catania, Catania (Italy); De Martinis, C. [Physics Department, University of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Delle Side, D. [LEAS, University of Salento and INFN, Lecce (Italy); Fazzi, A. [Energy Department, Polytechnic of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Gatti, G. [INFN LNF Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Giove, D. [Physics Department, University of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Giulietti, D. [Physics Department, University of Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Gizzi, L.A.; Labate, L. [INO-CNR and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Londrillo, P. [Physics Department, University of Bologna and INFN, Bologna (Italy); Maggiore, M. [INFN LNL, Legnaro (Italy); Nassisi, V., E-mail: vincenzo.nassisi@le.infn.it [LEAS, University of Salento and INFN, Lecce (Italy); Sinigardi, S. [Physics Department, University of Bologna and INFN, Bologna (Italy); Tramontana, A.; Schillaci, F. [INFN LNS Catania, Catania (Italy); Scuderi, V. [INFN LNS Catania, Catania (Italy); Institute of Physics of the ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Turchetti, G. [Physics Department, University of Bologna and INFN, Bologna (Italy); and others

    2014-07-15

    Laser-matter interaction at relativistic intensities opens up new research fields in the particle acceleration and related secondary sources, with immediate applications in medical diagnostics, biophysics, material science, inertial confinement fusion, up to laboratory astrophysics. In particular laser-driven ion acceleration is very promising for hadron therapy once the ion energy will attain a few hundred MeV. The limited value of the energy up to now obtained for the accelerated ions is the drawback of such innovative technique to the real applications. LILIA (laser induced light ions acceleration) is an experiment now running at LNF (Frascati) with the goal of producing a real proton beam able to be driven for significant distances (50–75 cm) away from the interaction point and which will act as a source for further accelerating structure. In this paper the description of the experimental setup, the preliminary results of solid target irradiation and start to end simulation for a post-accelerated beam up to 60 MeV are given.

  1. Time-resolved resonance fluorescence spectroscopy for study of chemical reactions in laser-induced plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Deng, Leimin; Fan, Lisha; Huang, Xi; Lu, Yao; Shen, Xiaokang; Jiang, Lan; Silvain, Jean-François; Lu, Yongfeng

    2017-10-30

    Identification of chemical intermediates and study of chemical reaction pathways and mechanisms in laser-induced plasmas are important for laser-ablated applications. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), as a promising spectroscopic technique, is efficient for elemental analyses but can only provide limited information about chemical products in laser-induced plasmas. In this work, time-resolved resonance fluorescence spectroscopy was studied as a promising tool for the study of chemical reactions in laser-induced plasmas. Resonance fluorescence excitation of diatomic aluminum monoxide (AlO) and triatomic dialuminum monoxide (Al 2 O) was used to identify these chemical intermediates. Time-resolved fluorescence spectra of AlO and Al 2 O were used to observe the temporal evolution in laser-induced Al plasmas and to study their formation in the Al-O 2 chemistry in air.

  2. Nanosecond laser-induced synthesis of nanoparticles with tailorable magneticanisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishna, H.; Gangopadhyay, A.K.; Strader, J.; Kalyanaraman, R.

    2011-01-01

    Controlling the magnetic orientation of nanoparticles is important for many applications. Recently, it has been shown that single domain ferromagnetic hemispherical Co nanoparticles prepared by nanosecond laser-induced self-organization, show magnetic orientation that was related to the negative sign of the magnetostrictive coefficient λ S [J. Appl. Phys. v103, p073902, 2008]. Here we have extended this work to the Fe 50 Co 50 alloy, which has a positive λ S and Ni, which has a negative λ S . Patterned arrays of ferromagnetic nanoparticles of Fe 50 Co 50 , Ni, (and Co) were synthesized from their ultrathin metal films on SiO 2 substrate by nanosecond laser-induced self-organization. The morphology, nanostructure, and magnetic behavior of the nanoparticle arrays were investigated by a combination of electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and magnetic force microscopy techniques. Transmission electron microscopy investigations revealed a granular polycrystalline nanostructure, with the number of grains inside the nanoparticle increasing with their diameter. Magnetic force measurements showed that the magnetization direction of the hemispherical Co and Ni nanoparticles was predominantly out-of-plane while those for the Fe 50 Co 50 alloy was in the plane of the substrate. Finite element analysis was used to estimate the average residual strain in the nanoparticles, following laser processing. The difference in behavior is due to the dominating influence of magnetostrictive energy on the magnetization as a result of residual thermal strain following fast laser processing. Since λ S is negative for polycrystalline Co and Ni, and positive for Fe 50 Co 50 , the tensile residual strain forces the magnetization direction to out-of-plane and in-plane, respectively. This work demonstrates a cost-effective non-epitaxial technique for the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles with tailored magnetization orientations. - Research Highlights: → Pulsed laser self

  3. Liquid steel analysis by laser-induced plasma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, J.

    2002-11-01

    When a nanosecond pulsed laser is focused onto a sample and the intensity exceeds a certain threshold, material is vaporized and a plasma is formed above the sample surface. The laser-light becomes increasingly absorbed by inverse bremsstrahlung and by photo-excitation and photo-ionization of atoms and molecules. The positive feedback, by which the number of energetic electrons for ionization is increased in an avalanche-like manner under the influence of laser-light, is the so-called optical breakdown. Radiating excited atoms and ions within the expanding plasma plume produce a characteristic optical emission spectrum. A spectroscopic analysis of this optical emission of the laser-induced plasma permits a qualitative and quantitative chemical analysis of the investigated sample. This technique is therefore often called laser-induced plasma spectroscopy (LIPS) or laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). LIPS is a fast non-contact technique, by which solid, liquid or gaseous samples can be analyzed with respect to their chemical composition. Hence, it is an appropriate tool for the rapid in-situ analysis of not easily accessible surfaces for process control in industrial environments. In this work, LIPS was studied as a technique to determine the chemical composition of solid and liquid steel. A LIPS set-up was designed and built for the remote and continuous in-situ analysis of the steel melt. Calibration curves were prepared for the LIPS analysis of Cr, Mn, Ni and Cu in solid steel using reference samples with known composition. In laboratory experiments an induction furnace was used to melt steel samples in crucibles, which were placed at a working distance of 1.5 m away from the LIPS apparatus. The response of the LIPS system was monitored on-line during the addition of pure elements to the liquid steel bath within certain concentration ranges (Cr: 0.11 - 13.8 wt%, Cu: 0.044 - 0.54 wt%, Mn: 1.38 - 2.5 wt%, Ni: 0.049 - 5.92 wt%). The analysis of an element

  4. Laser induced magnetization switching in a TbFeCo ferrimagnetic thin film: discerning the impact of dipolar fields, laser heating and laser helicity by XPEEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gierster, L.; Ünal, A.A.; Pape, L.; Radu, F.; Kronast, F.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate laser induced magnetic switching in a ferrimagnetic thin film of Tb_2_2Fe_6_9Co_9 by PEEM. Using a small laser beam with a spot size of 3–5 µm in diameter in combination with high resolution magnetic soft X-ray microscopy we are able to discriminate between different effects that govern the microscopic switching process, namely the influence of the laser heating, of the helicity dependent momentum transfer, and of the dipolar coupling. Applying a sequence of femtosecond laser pulses to a previously saturated TbFeCo film leads to the formation of ring shaped magnetic structures in which all three effects can be observed. Laser helicity assisted switching is only observed in a narrow region within the Gaussian profile of the laser spot. Whereas in the center of the laser spot we find clear evidence for thermal demagnetization and in the outermost areas magnetic switching is determined by dipolar coupling with the surrounding film. Our findings demonstrate that by reducing the laser spot size the influence of dipolar coupling on laser induced switching is becoming increasingly important. - Highlights: • With a new PEEM sample holder a laser spot size of 3–5 µm in diameter is reached. • Spatial resolved imaging of laser induced magnetization reversal. • A single femtosecond laser pulse leads to a multi-domain state in TbFeCo. • A pulse sequence results in a ring-shaped magnetic pattern caused by dipolar fields. • Laser helicity dependent effects appear only in a narrow fluence region.

  5. Time differentiated nuclear resonance spectroscopy coupled with pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupenko, I., E-mail: kupenko@esrf.fr; Strohm, C. [Bayerisches Geoinstitut, Universität Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany); ESRF-The European Synchrotron, CS 40220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); McCammon, C.; Cerantola, V.; Petitgirard, S.; Dubrovinsky, L. [Bayerisches Geoinstitut, Universität Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Glazyrin, K. [Photon Science, DESY, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Vasiukov, D.; Aprilis, G. [Laboratory of Crystallography, Material Physics and Technology at Extreme Conditions, Universität Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Chumakov, A. I.; Rüffer, R. [ESRF-The European Synchrotron, CS 40220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2015-11-15

    Developments in pulsed laser heating applied to nuclear resonance techniques are presented together with their applications to studies of geophysically relevant materials. Continuous laser heating in diamond anvil cells is a widely used method to generate extreme temperatures at static high pressure conditions in order to study the structure and properties of materials found in deep planetary interiors. The pulsed laser heating technique has advantages over continuous heating, including prevention of the spreading of heated sample and/or the pressure medium and, thus, a better stability of the heating process. Time differentiated data acquisition coupled with pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells was successfully tested at the Nuclear Resonance beamline (ID18) of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. We show examples applying the method to investigation of an assemblage containing ε-Fe, FeO, and Fe{sub 3}C using synchrotron Mössbauer source spectroscopy, FeCO{sub 3} using nuclear inelastic scattering, and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} using nuclear forward scattering. These examples demonstrate the applicability of pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells to spectroscopic techniques with long data acquisition times, because it enables stable pulsed heating with data collection at specific time intervals that are synchronized with laser pulses.

  6. Ultrasound imaging of Nd:YAG laser-induced tissue coagulation in porcine livers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzel, U; Wietzke-Braun, P; Brinck, U; Leonhardt, U; Ramadori, G

    2001-12-01

    Absorption of laser light energy induces denaturation of proteins and thermocoagulation of irradiated tissue. Recently, MRI-guided laser coagulation in combination with MR thermometry was reported as a treatment of liver tumours. In the present study ultrasonographic imaging was evaluated for its suitability in laser induced tissue thermocoagulation. Fresh porcine livers were used for ex vivo examinations. Placement of the laser catheter and tissue coagulation during laser light emission were online monitored by ultrasonography. Nd:YAG laser-induced tissue damage was evaluated by macroscopical and microscopical examinations of histological sections. During laser light emission a marked hyperdense signal enhancement was observed by ultrasonography which strongly correlated with the extent of macroscopic tissue damage. The size of laser-induced coagulation zone depended on both the power setting and total energy delivered. Carbonization of the tissue surrounding the laser tip is a limiting factor because of laser light absorption. However our data indicate that using appropriate laser energy and exposure time prevent carbonization although carbonization can not be visualized by ultrasonography. It is concluded from the present ex vivo studies that laser coagulation can be effectively performed under ultrasonographic guidance.

  7. Quantum Hooke's Law to Classify Pulse Laser Induced Ultrafast Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hao; Ding, Hepeng; Liu, Feng

    2015-02-01

    Ultrafast crystal-to-liquid phase transition induced by femtosecond pulse laser excitation is an interesting material's behavior manifesting the complexity of light-matter interaction. There exist two types of such phase transitions: one occurs at a time scale shorter than a picosecond via a nonthermal process mediated by electron-hole plasma formation; the other at a longer time scale via a thermal melting process mediated by electron-phonon interaction. However, it remains unclear what material would undergo which process and why? Here, by exploiting the property of quantum electronic stress (QES) governed by quantum Hooke's law, we classify the transitions by two distinct classes of materials: the faster nonthermal process can only occur in materials like ice having an anomalous phase diagram characterized with dTm/dP < 0, where Tm is the melting temperature and P is pressure, above a high threshold laser fluence; while the slower thermal process may occur in all materials. Especially, the nonthermal transition is shown to be induced by the QES, acting like a negative internal pressure, which drives the crystal into a ``super pressing'' state to spontaneously transform into a higher-density liquid phase. Our findings significantly advance fundamental understanding of ultrafast crystal-to-liquid phase transitions, enabling quantitative a priori predictions.

  8. Fusion--fission hybrid concepts for laser-induced fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maniscalco, J.

    1976-01-01

    Fusion-fission hybrid concepts are viewed as subcritical fission reactors driven and controlled by high-energy neutrons from a laser-induced fusion reactor. Blanket designs encompassing a substantial portion of the spectrum of different fission reactor technologies are analyzed and compared by calculating their fissile-breeding and fusion-energy-multiplying characteristics. With a large number of different fission technologies to choose from, it is essential to identify more promising hybrid concepts that can then be subjected to in-depth studies that treat the engineering safety, and economic requirements as well as the neutronic aspects. In the course of neutronically analyzing and comparing several fission blanket concepts, this work has demonstrated that fusion-fission hybrids can be designed to meet a broad spectrum of fissile-breeding and fusion-energy-multiplying requirements. The neutronic results should prove to be extremely useful in formulating the technical scope of future studies concerned with evaluating the technical and economic feasibility of hybrid concepts for laser-induced fusion

  9. Kr II laser-induced fluorescence for measuring plasma acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargus, W A; Azarnia, G M; Nakles, M R

    2012-10-01

    We present the application of laser-induced fluorescence of singly ionized krypton as a diagnostic technique for quantifying the electrostatic acceleration within the discharge of a laboratory cross-field plasma accelerator also known as a Hall effect thruster, which has heritage as spacecraft propulsion. The 728.98 nm Kr II transition from the metastable 5d(4)D(7/2) to the 5p(4)P(5/2)(∘) state was used for the measurement of laser-induced fluorescence within the plasma discharge. From these measurements, it is possible to measure velocity as krypton ions are accelerated from near rest to approximately 21 km/s (190 eV). Ion temperature and the ion velocity distributions may also be extracted from the fluorescence data since available hyperfine splitting data allow for the Kr II 5d(4)D(7/2)-5p(4)P(5/2)(∘) transition lineshape to be modeled. From the analysis, the fluorescence lineshape appears to be a reasonable estimate for the relatively broad ion velocity distributions. However, due to an apparent overlap of the ion creation and acceleration regions within the discharge, the distributed velocity distributions increase ion temperature determination uncertainty significantly. Using the most probable ion velocity as a representative, or characteristic, measure of the ion acceleration, overall propellant energy deposition, and effective electric fields may be calculated. With this diagnostic technique, it is possible to nonintrusively characterize the ion acceleration both within the discharge and in the plume.

  10. Titanium monoxide spectroscopy following laser-induced optical breakdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parigger, Christian G.; Woods, Alexander C.; Keszler, Anna; Nemes, László; Hornkohl, James O.

    2012-01-01

    This work investigates Titanium Monoxide (TiO) in ablation-plasma by employing laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) with 1 to 10 TW/cm 2 irradiance, pulsed, 13 nanosecond, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser radiation at the fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. The analysis of TiO is based on our first accurate determination of transition line strengths for selected TiO A-X, B-X, and E-X transitions, particularly TiO A-X γ and B-X γ′ bands. Electric dipole line strengths for the A 3 Φ-X 3 δ and B 3 Π-X 3 δ bands of TiO are computed. The molecular TiO spectra are observed subsequent to laser-induced breakdown (LIB). We discuss analysis of diatomic molecular spectra that may occur simultaneously with spectra originating from atomic species. Gated detection is applied to investigate the development in time of the emission spectra following LIB. Collected emission spectra allow one to infer micro-plasma parameters such as temperature and electron density. Insight into the state of the micro-plasma is gained by comparing measurements with predictions of atomic and molecular spectra. Nonlinear fitting of recorded and computed diatomic spectra provides the basis for molecular diagnostics, while atomic species may overlap and are simultaneously identified. Molecular diagnostic approaches similar to TiO have been performed for diatomic molecules such as AlO, C 2 , CN, CH, N 2 , NH, NO and OH.

  11. The development of fieldable laser-induced breakdown spectrometer: No limits on the horizon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortes, F.J.; Laserna, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    In this review, new trends in the development of fieldable instrumentation based on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and its recent applications is presented. Depending on the LIBS configuration we will distinguish between portable, remote and stand-off instruments. Moreover, the development of portable systems gives greater flexibility and also increases the range of LIBS applications. In general, portable instruments are employed in close-contact applications like immovable artworks, contaminated soils and environmental diagnostic, while remote and stand-off instruments are normally used in analytical applications at distances where access to the sample is difficult or hazardous. Although remote and stand-off instruments are both used for chemical analysis at distances, the instrumental configurations are completely different. In remote analysis, an optical fiber is employed to deliver the laser energy a certain distance. This approach has been usually restricted to industrial applications, bulk analysis in water, geological measurements and chemical analysis on nuclear stations. In the case of stand-off applications, the laser beam and the returning plasma light are transmitted in an open-path configuration. In this article we also discuss the instrumental requirements in the design of remote and stand-off instruments.

  12. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) in a Novel Molten Salt Aerosol System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ammon N; Phongikaroon, Supathorn

    2017-04-01

    In the pyrochemical separation of used nuclear fuel (UNF), fission product, rare earth, and actinide chlorides accumulate in the molten salt electrolyte over time. Measuring this salt composition in near real-time is advantageous for operational efficiency, material accountability, and nuclear safeguards. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been proposed and demonstrated as a potential analytical approach for molten LiCl-KCl salts. However, all the studies conducted to date have used a static surface approach which can lead to issues with splashing, low repeatability, and poor sample homogeneity. In this initial study, a novel molten salt aerosol approach has been developed and explored to measure the composition of the salt via LIBS. The functionality of the system has been demonstrated as well as a basic optimization of the laser energy and nebulizer gas pressure used. Initial results have shown that this molten salt aerosol-LIBS system has a great potential as an analytical technique for measuring the molten salt electrolyte used in this UNF reprocessing technology.

  13. A comparative study of the laser induce breakdown spectroscopy in single- and double-pulse laser geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Duixiong; Su Maogen; Dong Chenzhong; Wen Guanhong; Cao Xiangnian

    2013-01-01

    A time resolved laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique (LIBS) was used for the investigation of emission signal enhancement on double-pulse LIBS. Two Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers at 1064 nm wavelength have been employed to generate laser-induced plasma on aluminium-based alloys. The plasma emission signals were recorded by spectrometer with ICCD detector. Spectral response calibration was performed by using deuterium and tungsten halogen lamps. Time evolution of the plasma temperature and electron density was investigated in SP and DP experiments. Based on the investigation of plasma parameters, the enhancements of emission line intensities were investigated, and the mechanisms of it were discussed. (author)

  14. LASER INDUCED SELECTIVE ACTIVATION UTILIZING AUTO-CATALYTIC ELECTROLESS PLATING ON POLYMER SURFACE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yang; Nielsen, Jakob Skov; Tang, Peter Torben

    2009-01-01

    . Characterization of the deposited copper layer was used to select and improve laser parameters. Several types of polymers with different melting points were used as substrate. Using the above mentioned laser treatment, standard grades of thermoplastic materials such as ABS, SAN, PE, PC and others have been......This paper presents a new method for selective micro metallization of polymers induced by laser. An Nd: YAG laser was employed to draw patterns on polymer surfaces using a special set-up. After subsequent activation and auto-catalytic electroless plating, copper only deposited on the laser tracks....... Induced by the laser, porous and rough structures are formed on the surface, which favours the palladium attachment during the activation step prior to the metallization. Laser focus detection, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and other instruments were used to analyze the topography of the laser track...

  15. Study of the laser-induced forward transfer of liquids for laser bioprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duocastella, M.; Colina, M.; Fernández-Pradas, J. M.; Serra, P.; Morenza, J. L.

    2007-07-01

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a direct-writing technique that allows printing patterns of diverse materials with a high degree of spatial resolution. In conventional LIFT a small fraction of a solid thin film is vaporized by means of a laser pulse focused on the film through its transparent holder, and the resulting material recondenses on the receptor substrate. It has been recently shown that LIFT can also be used to transfer materials from liquid films. This widened its field of application to biosensors manufacturing, where small amounts of biomolecules-containing solutions have to be deposited with high precision on the sensing elements. However, there is still little knowledge on the physical processes and parameters determining the characteristics of the transfers. In this work, different parameters and their effects upon the transferred material were studied. It was found that the deposited material corresponds to liquid droplets which volume depends linearly on the laser pulse energy, and that a minimum threshold energy has to be overcome for transfer to occur. The liquid film thickness was varied and droplets as small as 10 μm in diameter were obtained. Finally, the effects of the variation of the film to substrate distance were also studied and it was found that there exists a wide range of distances where the morphology of the transferred droplets is independent of this parameter, what provides LIFT with a high degree of flexibility.

  16. Laser micromachining of indium tin oxide films on polymer substrates by laser-induced delamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, David A; Dreier, Adam L

    2009-01-01

    A Q-switched neodymium : yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Nd : YAG) laser was used to ablate indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films from polyethylene terephthalate substrates. Film damage and partial removal with no evidence of a melt zone was observed above 1.7 J cm -2 . Above the film removal threshold (3.3 J cm -2 ) the entire film thickness was removed without substrate damage, suggesting that ablation was a result of delamination of the film in the solid phase. Measurements of ablated fragment velocities near the ablation threshold were consistent with calculations of velocities caused by stress-induced delamination of the ITO film, except for a high velocity component at higher fluences. Nanosecond time-resolved shadowgraph photography revealed that the high velocity component was a shock wave induced by the rapid compression of ambient air when the film delaminated.

  17. Development of laser application technologies for nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Cheol Jung; Rhee, Y.; Cha, B. H.

    2004-03-01

    The stable laser isotope facility will supply raw stable isotope material to produce radioisotope elements for medical and industrial applications. The medical stable isotope, Tl-203 was separated by the isotope selective optical pumping (ISOP) method native to the laboratory for quantum optics, KAERI. The extraction rate of 10 mg/hr was achieved from the separation chamber of 80cm x 80cm x 100cm dimension. The Yb-168 separation facility was improved in stability, durability, and efficiency. The old copper vapor pumping laser system was replaced with two 40W green DPSSL's. The tunable dye laser system was also improved in stability. The extraction rate was measured as 1.5 mg/hr in the improved system. The 200W infrared DPSSL system was also developed and used for photoionization of thallium isotopes. The adaptive optics and beam path control system was applied to the isotope separation facilities. Also the beam quality of the lasers was monitored and improved. To maintain constant isotope composition during reaction process, the wavelengths of tunable lasers are locked by being the mass composition information fed back into the oscillator control unit of the lasers. To optimize isotope separation process timely, the extractor surface is directly analyzed by laser irradiation and TOF mass spectrometer. And the final products in high purity is recovered in maximum by solution chemistry

  18. Laser-induced fluorescence detection strategies for sodium atoms and compounds in high-pressure combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Karen J. R.; Wise, Michael L.; Smith, Gregory P.

    1993-01-01

    A variety of laser-induced fluorescence schemes were examined experimentally in atmospheric pressure flames to determine their use for sodium atom and salt detection in high-pressure, optically thick environments. Collisional energy transfer plays a large role in fluorescence detection. Optimum sensitivity, at the parts in 10 exp 9 level for a single laser pulse, was obtained with the excitation of the 4p-3s transition at 330 nm and the detection of the 3d-3p fluorescence at 818 nm. Fluorescence loss processes, such as ionization and amplified spontaneous emission, were examined. A new laser-induced atomization/laser-induced fluorescence detection technique was demonstrated for NaOH and NaCl. A 248-nm excimer laser photodissociates the salt molecules present in the seeded flames prior to atom detection by laser-induced fluorescence.

  19. High resolution laser beam induced current images under trichromatic laser radiation: approximation to the solar irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas, F J; Alcántara, R; Fernández-Lorenzo, C; Martín-Calleja, J

    2010-03-01

    A laser beam induced current (LBIC) map of a photoactive surface is a very useful tool when it is necessary to study the spatial variability of properties such as photoconverter efficiency or factors connected with the recombination of carriers. Obtaining high spatial resolution LBIC maps involves irradiating the photoactive surface with a photonic beam with Gaussian power distribution and with a low dispersion coefficient. Laser emission fulfils these characteristics, but against it is the fact that it is highly monochromatic and therefore has a spectral distribution different to solar emissions. This work presents an instrumental system and procedure to obtain high spatial resolution LBIC maps in conditions approximating solar irradiation. The methodology developed consists of a trichromatic irradiation system based on three sources of laser excitation with emission in the red, green, and blue zones of the electromagnetic spectrum. The relative irradiation powers are determined by either solar spectrum distribution or Planck's emission formula which provides information approximate to the behavior of the system if it were under solar irradiation. In turn, an algorithm and a procedure have been developed to be able to form images based on the scans performed by the three lasers, providing information about the photoconverter efficiency of photovoltaic devices under the irradiation conditions used. This system has been checked with three photosensitive devices based on three different technologies: a commercial silicon photodiode, a commercial photoresistor, and a dye-sensitized solar cell. These devices make it possible to check how the superficial quantum efficiency has areas dependent upon the excitation wavelength while it has been possible to measure global incident photon-to-current efficiency values approximating those that would be obtained under irradiation conditions with sunlight.

  20. Precision linac and laser technologies for nuclear photonics gamma-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, F.; Hartemann, F. V.; Anderson, S. G.; Cross, R. R.; Gibson, D. J.; Hall, J.; Marsh, R. A.; Messerly, M.; Wu, S. S.; Siders, C. W.; Barty, C. P. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, NIF and Photon Science, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Tunable, high precision gamma-ray sources are under development to enable nuclear photonics, an emerging field of research. This paper focuses on the technological and theoretical challenges related to precision Compton scattering gamma-ray sources. In this scheme, incident laser photons are scattered and Doppler upshifted by a high brightness electron beam to generate tunable and highly collimated gamma-ray pulses. The electron and laser beam parameters can be optimized to achieve the spectral brightness and narrow bandwidth required by nuclear photonics applications. A description of the design of the next generation precision gamma-ray source currently under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is presented, along with the underlying motivations. Within this context, high-gradient X-band technology, used in conjunction with fiber-based photocathode drive laser and diode pumped solid-state interaction laser technologies, will be shown to offer optimal performance for high gamma-ray spectral flux, narrow bandwidth applications.

  1. Application of CO2 laser beam weld for repair of fuel element of nuclear reactor 'YAYOI'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Mitsuo; Yanagi, Hideharu; Sukegawa, Toshio; Saito, Isao; Sasuga, Norihiko; Aizawa, Nagaaki; Miya, Kenzo

    1986-01-01

    The present studies are to develop CO 2 laser beam welding techniques in order to apply for repoint of nuclear reactor fuel of Fast Neutron Source Reactor YAYOI. For that purpos, many experiments were conduted to obtain various effects of laser welding variables with use of SUS 304 plates, pipes and simulated dumy fuels. These experiments provided us an optimal welding condition through metallurgical observations, non-destructive and mechanical tests. It was found that the laser welds exhibited properties equivalent to those of the base metal, in addition they provided us a favorable system than that of electron beam welds against a cladding of radioactive nuclear fuel in a hot cell. The present paper reports on the characteristics of laser welds, structural analysis of fuel element and a system design of remotely operated devices setting in a hot cell. (author)

  2. Intravitreal itraconazole inhibits laser-induced choroidal neovascularization in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Hun Bae

    Full Text Available Choroidal neovascularization (CNV is a major cause of severe visual loss in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD. Recently, itraconazole has shown potent and dose-dependent inhibition of tumor-associated angiogenesis. We evaluated the anti-angiogenic effect of itraconazole in a rat model of laser-induced CNV. After laser photocoagulation in each eye to cause CNV, right eyes were administered intravitreal injections of itraconazole; left eyes received balanced salt solution (BSS as controls. On day 14 after laser induction, fluorescein angiography (FA was used to assess abnormal vascular leakage. Flattened retinal pigment epithelium (RPE-choroid tissue complex was stained with Alexa Fluor 594-conjugated isolectin B4 to measure the CNV area and volume. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2 mRNA and protein expression was determined 1, 4, 7, and 14 days after intravitreal injection by quantitative RT-PCR or Western blot. VEGF levels were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Intravitreal itraconazole significantly reduced leakage from CNV as assessed by FA and CNV area and volume on flat mounts compared with intravitreal BSS (p = 0.002 for CNV leakage, p<0.001 for CNV area and volume. Quantitative RT-PCR showed significantly lower expression of VEGFR2 mRNA in the RPE-choroid complexes of itraconazole-injected eyes than those of BSS-injected eyes on days 7 and 14 (p = 0.003 and p = 0.006. Western blots indicated that VEGFR2 was downregulated after itraconazole treatment. ELISA showed a significant difference in VEGF level between itraconazole-injected and BSS-injected eyes on days 7 and 14 (p = 0.04 and p = 0.001. Our study demonstrated that intravitreal itraconazole significantly inhibited the development of laser-induced CNV in rats. Itraconazole had anti-angiogenic activity along with the reduction of VEGFR2 and VEGF levels. Itraconazole may prove beneficial for treating CNV as an alternative or

  3. Remote triggering of high voltage systems by laser-induced plasmas

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    West, NJ

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available -induced plasma was found to play a significant role in the breakdown process – best results being obtained when the laser was focused in the centre of the gap. Finally, the shape of the laser-induced arc is dependant on the applied electric field. When the field...

  4. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Qualitative Analysis of Metals in Simulated Martian Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowry, Curtis; Milofsky, Rob; Collins, William; Pimentel, Adam S.

    2017-01-01

    This laboratory introduces students to laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for the analysis of metals in soil and rock samples. LIBS employs a laser-initiated spark to induce electronic excitation of metal atoms. Ensuing atomic emission allows for qualitative and semiquantitative analysis. The students use LIBS to analyze a series of…

  5. Amorphous-polycrystal transition induced by laser pulse in self-ion implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foti, G.; Rimini, E.; Vitali, G.; Bertolotti, M.

    1977-01-01

    Reflection high energy electron diffraction has been used to investigate the amorphous to polycrystalline structure transition in silicon induced by laser pulse. The power density of the ruby laser pulse, in the free generation mode, has been maintained below the threshold to induce surface damage. Depth analysis has been carried out in silicon crystal using the channeling effect technique. (orig.) [de

  6. Review of the utilization of laser and electron beam methods in the nuclear domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charissoux, C.; Bonnin, P.; Calvet, J.N.; Contre, M.

    1987-01-01

    The use of laser and electron beams by the nuclear industry for making components, fabricating fuels, waste processing, maintenance, and dismantling installations is reviewed. The advantages in welding include very rapid thermal cycles, deep weld zones with a restricted effect on surrounding material, and reduced residual stress. Surface treatments can also take advantage of these benefits. In cutting, the intrinsic advantages of the laser are completed by its high potential for robotization [fr

  7. Nuclear Excitation by a Zeptosecond Multi-MeV Laser Pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidenmueller, Hans A.

    2011-01-01

    A zeptosecond multi-MeV laser pulse may either excite a ''plasma'' of strongly interacting nucleons or a collective mode. We derive the conditions on laser energy and photon number such that either of these scenarios is realized. We use the nuclear giant dipole resonance as a representative example, and a random-matrix description of the fine-structure states and perturbation theory as tools.

  8. Induced γ emission for nuclear isomer long-lived

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Tianli; Hao Fanhua

    2007-06-01

    It is pointed that the induced 7 emission for long lived isomer 178m2 Hf by low energy X rays has been a topic subject in the nuclear field recently. The background and development status are described. A principle for T ray transitions induced by X rays and the theoretical about magnificent induced emission have been related. In addition, the possible method of 178m2 Hf produce has been introduced also. Although the argument has existed for the experimental results of induced 7 emission, it can push forward in solving energy crisis and in future military field after controlling effectively the releasing of high excited energy for isomer. (authors)

  9. In-source laser spectroscopy of polonium isotopes: From atomic physics to nuclear structure

    CERN Multimedia

    Rothe, S

    2014-01-01

    The Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source RILIS [1] at the CERN-ISOLDE on-line radioactive ion beam facility is essential for ion beam production for the majority of experiments, but it is also powerful tool for laser spectroscopy of rare isotopes. A series of experiments on in-source laser spectroscopy of polonium isotopes [2, 3] revealed the nuclear ground state properties of 191;211;216;218Po. However, limitations caused by the isobaric background of surface-ionized francium isotopes hindered the study of several neutron rich polonium isotopes. The development of the Laser Ion Source and Trap (LIST) [4] and finally its integration at ISOLDE has led to a dramatic suppression of surface ions. Meanwhile, the RILIS laser spectroscopy capabilities have advanced tremendously. Widely tunable titanium:sapphire (Ti:Sa) lasers were installed to complement the established dye laser system. Along with a new data acquisition system [5], this more versatile laser setup enabled rst ever laser spectroscopy of the radioact...

  10. Laser Induced Fluorescence of Helium Ions in a Helicon Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, C. S.; Biloui, C.; Hardin, R. A.; Keesee, A. M.; Scime, E. E.; Boivin, R.

    2003-10-01

    The lack of a suitable Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) scheme for helium ions at visible wavelengths has prevented LIF from being employed in helium plasmas for measurements of ion temperature and bulk ion flow speeds. In this work, we will discuss our attempts to perform LIF of helium ions in a helicon source plasma using an infrared, tunable diode laser operating at 1012.36 nm. The infrared transition corresponds to excitation from the n = 4 level (4f ^2F) to the n = 5 (5g ^2G) level of singly ionized helium and therefore requires substantial electron temperatures (> 10 eV) to maintain an adequate ion population in the n = 4 state. Calculations using a steady state coronal model predict that the n = 4 state population will be 25% larger than the n = 5 population for our experimental conditions. The fluorescence decay from the n = 5 (5f ^2F) level of singly ionized helium level to the n = 3 (3d ^2D) level at 320.31 nm is monitored as the diode laser is swept through 10 GHz around the 1012.36 nm line. Note that the fluorescence emission requires a collisionally coupled transition between two different n = 5 quantum states. We will also present measurements of the emission intensities of both the 1012.36 nm and the 320.31 nm lines as a function of source neutral pressure, rf power, and plasma density. This work supported by the U.S. DoE EPSCoR Lab Partnership Program.

  11. DNA damage-induced inflammation and nuclear architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratigi, Kalliopi; Chatzidoukaki, Ourania; Garinis, George A

    2017-07-01

    Nuclear architecture and the chromatin state affect most-if not all- DNA-dependent transactions, including the ability of cells to sense DNA lesions and restore damaged DNA back to its native form. Recent evidence points to functional links between DNA damage sensors, DNA repair mechanisms and the innate immune responses. The latter raises the question of how such seemingly disparate processes operate within the intrinsically complex nuclear landscape and the chromatin environment. Here, we discuss how DNA damage-induced immune responses operate within chromatin and the distinct sub-nuclear compartments highlighting their relevance to chronic inflammation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Laser induced breakdown detection for the assessment of colloid mediated radionuclide migration

    CERN Document Server

    Walther, C; Hauser, W; Kim, J I; Scherbaum, F J

    2002-01-01

    Colloids play an important role in the transport of pollutants in the environment. Harmful substances can undergo transport over large distances if bound to colloids in aqueous surrounding. One important example is the migration of Pu(IV) at unexpectedly high rates over several miles at a Nevada nuclear detonation test site. For long term safety assessments of radioactive waste repositories, it is hence crucial to know about the amount, size distribution and chemical composition of colloids in the ground water. Standard methods (e.g. light scattering) can be applied for high concentrations and large sizes of particles. Colloids smaller than 50 nm, however, are detected with very low efficiency. Laser induced breakdown detection (LIBD) can fill this gap. A new instrumentation is presented, which as compared to previous instruments, opens up a much wider operational dynamic range, now covering three orders of magnitude in size (5-1000 nm) and seven orders of magnitude in particle concentration (1 ppt - several ...

  13. Use of laser cutting techniques for dismantling tasks in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haferkamp, H.; Drygalla, M.; Goede, M.

    2001-01-01

    A handguided laser processing system developed by laser zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) allows impressive cutting, notching, and material removal applications for the dismantling of nuclear power plants. The handguided unit is equipped with a motor drive for consistent processing results and flexible processing for as long as desired. It offers the possibility to adjust the nozzle as well as focal position in order that various materials with different material thicknesses may be processed. The set process parameters may be viewed on a display which also indicates the laser processing programme selected. An integrated exhaust system guarantees a shielded process. The operator is not only protected against process emissions but also against laser beam reflexions. The handguided unit is connected to the laser beam source via an optical fibre and can be used for laser output powers of up to 1500 W with a high beam quality. For handguided laser material processing low emissions at high feed rates as well as cutting kerf widths between 0.5 and 0.3 mm for special applications such as the dismantling of large facilities or units, etc. are decisive, especially when cutting metal sheets for the dismantling of nuclear power plants. (orig.)

  14. Use of laser cutting techniques for dismantling tasks in nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haferkamp, H.; Drygalla, M.; Goede, M. [Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    A handguided laser processing system developed by laser zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) allows impressive cutting, notching, and material removal applications for the dismantling of nuclear power plants. The handguided unit is equipped with a motor drive for consistent processing results and flexible processing for as long as desired. It offers the possibility to adjust the nozzle as well as focal position in order that various materials with different material thicknesses may be processed. The set process parameters may be viewed on a display which also indicates the laser processing programme selected. An integrated exhaust system guarantees a shielded process. The operator is not only protected against process emissions but also against laser beam reflexions. The handguided unit is connected to the laser beam source via an optical fibre and can be used for laser output powers of up to 1500 W with a high beam quality. For handguided laser material processing low emissions at high feed rates as well as cutting kerf widths between 0.5 and 0.3 mm for special applications such as the dismantling of large facilities or units, etc. are decisive, especially when cutting metal sheets for the dismantling of nuclear power plants. (orig.)

  15. Hyperspectral laser-induced autofluorescence imaging of dental caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürmen, Miran; Fidler, Aleš; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2012-01-01

    Dental caries is a disease characterized by demineralization of enamel crystals leading to the penetration of bacteria into the dentine and pulp. Early detection of enamel demineralization resulting in increased enamel porosity, commonly known as white spots, is a difficult diagnostic task. Laser induced autofluorescence was shown to be a useful method for early detection of demineralization. The existing studies involved either a single point spectroscopic measurements or imaging at a single spectral band. In the case of spectroscopic measurements, very little or no spatial information is acquired and the measured autofluorescence signal strongly depends on the position and orientation of the probe. On the other hand, single-band spectral imaging can be substantially affected by local spectral artefacts. Such effects can significantly interfere with automated methods for detection of early caries lesions. In contrast, hyperspectral imaging effectively combines the spatial information of imaging methods with the spectral information of spectroscopic methods providing excellent basis for development of robust and reliable algorithms for automated classification and analysis of hard dental tissues. In this paper, we employ 405 nm laser excitation of natural caries lesions. The fluorescence signal is acquired by a state-of-the-art hyperspectral imaging system consisting of a high-resolution acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) and a highly sensitive Scientific CMOS camera in the spectral range from 550 nm to 800 nm. The results are compared to the contrast obtained by near-infrared hyperspectral imaging technique employed in the existing studies on early detection of dental caries.

  16. Elemental analysis of cotton by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenk, Emily R.; Almirall, Jose R.

    2010-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to the elemental characterization of unprocessed cotton. This research is important in forensic and fraud detection applications to establish an elemental fingerprint of U.S. cotton by region, which can be used to determine the source of the cotton. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a LIBS method for the elemental analysis of cotton. The experimental setup consists of a Nd:YAG laser that operates at the fundamental wavelength as the LIBS excitation source and an echelle spectrometer equipped with an intensified CCD camera. The relative concentrations of elements Al, Ba, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, and Sr from both nutrients and environmental contributions were determined by LIBS. Principal component analysis was used to visualize the differences between cotton samples based on the elemental composition by region in the U.S. Linear discriminant analysis of the LIBS data resulted in the correct classification of >97% of the cotton samples by U.S. region and >81% correct classification by state of origin.

  17. Detection of vegetation stress from laser-induced fluorescence signatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subhash, N.

    1995-01-01

    The in vivo laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) signatures of UV irradiated Salvia splendens plants were measured using an Optical Multichannel Analyser (OMA) system with Nitrogen laser excitation. The LIF spectra which consisted of the blue-green and the red chlorophyll bands were analysed with a non-linear interactive procedure using Gaussian spectral functions. The fluorescence intensity ratios of the various bands obtained from curve fitted parameters were found to be more sensitive to changes in the photosynthetic activity of the plant. The variation in the intensity ratio for the chlorophyll bands for nutrient stressed sunflower, cotton and groundnut plants as well as the nutrient and water stressed rice plants are also presented. It is observed that vegetation stress not only changes the fluorescence intensity ratios and the vitality index of the plant but also changes the peak position of the emission bands, in some cases. It is also seen that analysis of the fluorescence spectra in vegetation remote sensing applications would require a deconvolution procedure to evaluate the exact contribution of each band in the total spectra. (author). 23 refs, 8 figs, 5 tabs

  18. Forensic comparative glass analysis by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridge, Candice M.; Powell, Joseph; Steele, Katie L.; Sigman, Michael E.

    2007-01-01

    Glass samples of four types commonly encountered in forensic examinations have been analyzed by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for the purpose of discriminating between samples originating from different sources. Some of the glass sets were also examined by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Refractive index (RI) measurements were also made on all glass samples and the refractive index data was combined with the LIBS and with the LA-ICP-MS data to enhance discrimination. The glass types examined included float glass taken from front and side automobile windows (examined on the non-float side), automobile headlamp glass, automobile side-mirror glass and brown beverage container glass. The largest overall discrimination was obtained by employing RI data in combination with LA-ICP-MS (98.8% discrimination of 666 pairwise comparisons at 95% confidence), while LIBS in combination with RI provided a somewhat lower discrimination (87.2% discrimination of 1122 pairwise comparisons at 95% confidence). Samples of side-mirror glass were less discriminated by LIBS due to a larger variance in emission intensities, while discrimination of side-mirror glass by LA-ICP-MS remained high

  19. Liquids microprinting through laser-induced forward transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serra, P.; Duocastella, M.; Fernandez-Pradas, J.M.; Morenza, J.L.

    2009-01-01

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a direct-writing technique which allows the deposition of tiny amounts of material from a donor thin film onto a receptor substrate. When LIFT is applied to liquid donor films, the laser radiation affects only a localized fraction of the liquid, thereby impelling the unaffected portion towards the receptor substrate. Thus, transfer takes place with no melting or vaporization of the deposited fraction and, in this way, LIFT can be used to successfully print complex materials like inorganic inks and pastes, biomolecules in solution, and even living cells and microorganisms. In addition, and for a wide range of liquid rheologies, the material can be deposited in the form of circular microdroplets; this provides LIFT with a high degree of spatial resolution leading to feature sizes below 10 μm, and making it competitive in front of conventional printing techniques. In this work, a revision of the main achievements of the LIFT of liquids is carried out, correlating the morphological characteristics of the generated features with the results of the study of the transfer process. Special emphasis is put on the characterization of the dynamics of liquid ejection, which has provided valuable information for the understanding of microdroplets deposition. Thus, new time-resolved imaging analyses have shown a material release behavior which contrasts with most of the previously made assumptions, and that allows clarifying some of the questions open during the study of the LIFT technique

  20. Analysis of human nails by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinimakarem, Zahra; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan

    2011-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is applied to analyze human fingernails using nanosecond laser pulses. Measurements on 45 nail samples are carried out and 14 key species are identified. The elements detected with the present system are: Al, C, Ca, Fe, H, K, Mg, N, Na, O, Si, Sr, Ti as well as CN molecule. Sixty three emission lines have been identified in the spectrum that are dominated by calcium lines. A discriminant function analysis is used to discriminate among different genders and age groups. This analysis demonstrates efficient discrimination among these groups. The mean concentration of each element is compared between different groups. Correlation between concentrations of elements in fingernails is calculated. A strong correlation is found between sodium and potassium while calcium and magnesium levels are inversely correlated. A case report on high levels of sodium and potassium in patients with hyperthyroidism is presented. It is shown that LIBS could be a promising technique for the analysis of nails and therefore identification of health problems.

  1. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in industrial and security applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Yoo, Jong H.; Liu Chunyi; Plumer, John R.; Russo, Richard E.

    2010-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) offers rapid, localized chemical analysis of solid or liquid materials with high spatial resolution in lateral and depth profiling, without the need for sample preparation. Principal component analysis and partial least squares algorithms were applied to identify a variety of complex organic and inorganic samples. This work illustrates how LIBS analyzers can answer a multitude of real-world needs for rapid analysis, such as determination of lead in paint and children's toys, analysis of electronic and solder materials, quality control of fiberglass panels, discrimination of coffee beans from different vendors, and identification of generic versus brand-name drugs. Lateral and depth profiling was performed on children's toys and paint layers. Traditional one-element calibration or multivariate chemometric procedures were applied for elemental quantification, from single laser shot determination of metal traces at ∼10 μg/g to determination of halogens at 90 μg/g using 50-shot spectral accumulation. The effectiveness of LIBS for security applications was demonstrated in the field by testing the 50-m standoff LIBS rasterizing detector.

  2. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy, advances in resolution and portability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponce, L.; Flores, T.; Arronte, M.; Moreira, L.; Hernandez, L. C.; Posada, E. de

    2009-01-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), can be considered as one of the most dynamic and promising technique in the field of analytical spectroscopy. LIBS has turned into a powerful alternative for a wide front of applications, from the geological exploration to the industrial inspection, including the environmental monitoring, the biomedical analysis, the study of patrimonial works, the safety and defense. The advances in LIBS instrumentation have allowed improving gradually the analysis services and quality, on the basis of a better knowledge of the technology principles. Recently, systems of double pulse have facilitated a better dosing of energy, the improvement of the signal-noise relation and the study of the different process stages. Femtosecond lasers offers the possibility of study in detail the ablation and atomic emission processes. New advances like multi-pulse or multi-wavelength systems -in fact stilling without exploring, must offer new information to advance in this knowledge. Finally, which it does to this technology really attractive, is the aptitude to be employed in field conditions, or for the detection of the elementary composition at long distances. In this presentation there are discussed the designs of portable instrumentation, compact and low cost, which can improve substantially the LIBS possibilities. (Author)

  3. Solenoid for Laser Induced Plasma Experiments at Janus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Sallee; Leferve, Heath; Kemp, Gregory; Mariscal, Derek; Rasmus, Alex; Williams, Jackson; Gillespie, Robb; Manuel, Mario; Kuranz, Carolyn; Keiter, Paul; Drake, R.

    2017-10-01

    Creating invariant magnetic fields for experiments involving laser induced plasmas is particularly challenging due to the high voltages at which the solenoid must be pulsed. Creating a solenoid resilient enough to survive through large numbers of voltage discharges, enabling it to endure a campaign lasting several weeks, is exceptionally difficult. Here we present a solenoid that is robust through 40 μs pulses at a 13 kV potential. This solenoid is a vast improvement over our previously fielded designs in peak magnetic field capabilities and robustness. Designed to be operated at small-scale laser facilities, the solenoid housing allows for versatility of experimental set-ups among diagnostic and target positions. Within the perpendicular field axis at the center there is 300 degrees of clearance which can be easily modified to meet the needs of a specific experiment, as well as an f/3 cone for transmitted or backscattered light. After initial design efforts, these solenoids are relatively inexpensive to manufacture.

  4. Laser-induced fluorescence in the detection of esophageal carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kenneth K.; Gutta, Kumar; Laukka, Mark A.; Densmore, John

    1995-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) is a technique which can perform an 'optical biopsy' of gastrointestinal mucosa. LIF was performed in resected specimens using a pulsed N2-laser coupled fiberoptically to a probe. Fluorescence was measured using a 0.2 meter spectroscope with an intensified photodiode array. Measurements were made on fresh (esophagus, and adenocarcinoma. Each tissue section was examined using an optical probe consisting of a central fiber for delivering the excitation energy and a 6 fiber bundle surrounding the central fiber for detection of the fluorescence. An excitation wavelength of 337 nm was used which generated 3-ns pulses while fluorescence intensities were acquired from 300-800 nm. Spectra were obtained from each section in a standardized fashion and background spectra subtracted. Fluorescence readings were taken from 54 normal esophageal sections and 32 sections of adenocarcinoma. A fluorescence index obtained from the tumor sections was 0.68+/- 0.01 compared with 0.51+/- 0.01 for the normal sections (pesophagus with good accuracy.

  5. Discrimination of forensic trace evidence using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Candice Mae

    Elemental analysis in forensic laboratories can be tedious and many trace evidence items are not analyzed to determine their elemental composition. Presently, scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) is the primary analytical tool for determining the elemental composition of trace evidence items. However, due to the time it takes to obtain the required vacuum and the limited number of samples that can be analyzed at any one time, SEM-EDS can be impractical for a high volume of evidence items. An alternative instrument that can be used for this type of analysis is laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). While LA-ICP-MS is a very precise and quantitative analytical method that determines elemental composition based on isotopic mass measurements; however, the instrumentation is relatively expensive and therefore is budgetarily prohibitive for many forensic laboratories. It is the purpose of this research to evaluate an inexpensive instrument that can potentially provide rapid elemental analysis for many forensic laboratories. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an analytical method that meets these requirements and offers information about the elemental composition based on ionic, atomic and diatomic molecular emissions.

  6. Nuclear microprobe characterization of surface hardening by precipitation of chromium carbides after laser beam treatment of a Ni-Cr substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosbah, M.; Gosset, J.; Trocellier, P.; Puig, T.; Cantarel, M.; Condat, M.

    1989-01-01

    Surface treatment by laser provides interesting solutions to the problem of accelerated wear of materials. The aim of the present study is the characterization of chromium carbides rich surface alloys after laser beam melting of a Ni 70 Cr 30 carbon precoated substrate. The carbon profiling of the lasered surface was performed by nuclear microprobe using the 12 C(d,p 0 ) 13 C reaction, Ni and Cr were evaluated by means of PIXE (Particle Induced X Ray Emission). The specificity of the method and the experimental conditions are explained. Wear results are very satisfactory and close to those obtained by injection of chromium carbide powders into the laser beam in the case of a Nimonic alloy: wear rates are divided by two orders of magnitude

  7. Optimization of an Image-Guided Laser-Induced Choroidal Neovascularization Model in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Gong

    Full Text Available The mouse model of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV has been used in studies of the exudative form of age-related macular degeneration using both the conventional slit lamp and a new image-guided laser system. A standardized protocol is needed for consistent results using this model, which has been lacking. We optimized details of laser-induced CNV using the image-guided laser photocoagulation system. Four lesions with similar size were consistently applied per eye at approximately double the disc diameter away from the optic nerve, using different laser power levels, and mice of various ages and genders. After 7 days, the mice were sacrificed and retinal pigment epithelium/choroid/sclera was flat-mounted, stained with Isolectin B4, and imaged. Quantification of the area of the laser-induced lesions was performed using an established and constant threshold. Exclusion criteria are described that were necessary for reliable data analysis of the laser-induced CNV lesions. The CNV lesion area was proportional to the laser power levels. Mice at 12-16 weeks of age developed more severe CNV than those at 6-8 weeks of age, and the gender difference was only significant in mice at 12-16 weeks of age, but not in those at 6-8 weeks of age. Dietary intake of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid reduced laser-induced CNV in mice. Taken together, laser-induced CNV lesions can be easily and consistently applied using the image-guided laser platform. Mice at 6-8 weeks of age are ideal for the laser-induced CNV model.

  8. Study on Laser Induced Plasma Produced in Liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuda, N.; Yamada, J.

    2003-01-01

    When an intense laser light is focused in liquid, a hot plasma is produced at the focal spot. The breakdown threshold and the transmittance of sodium choroids solution are observed using excimer laser or YAG laser. The breakdown threshold decreases with increasing NaCl concentration. Threshold intensity of plasma produced by YAG laser is lower than excimer laser. The behavior of plasma development is observed by a streak camera. The plasma produced by a YAG laser develops only backward. However, the plasma produced by excimer laser develops not only backward but also forward same as the plasma development in high-pressure gases

  9. Liquid Atomization Induced by Pulse Laser Reflection underneath Liquid Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsunomiya, Yuji; Kajiwara, Takashi; Nishiyama, Takashi; Nagayama, Kunihito; Kubota, Shiro; Nakahara, Motonao

    2009-05-01

    We observed a novel effect of pulse laser reflection at the interface between transparent materials with different refractive indices. The electric field intensity doubles when a laser beam is completely reflected from a material with a higher refractive index to a material with a lower index. This effect appreciably reduces pulse laser ablation threshold of transparent materials. We performed experiments to observe the entire ablation process for laser incidence on the water-air interface using pulse laser shadowgraphy with high-resolution film; the minimum laser fluence for laser ablation at the water-air interface was approximately 12-16 J/cm2. We confirmed that this laser ablation occurs only when the laser beam is incident on the water-air interface from water. Many slender liquid ligaments extend like a milk crown and seem to be atomized at the tip. Their detailed structures can be resolved only by pulse laser photography using high-resolution film.

  10. Laser-induced charge exchange in ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riera, A.

    1986-01-01

    The theory of laser-induced charge transfer (LICT) in ion-atom collisions is presented for the range of impact energies in which a quasimolecular description is appropriate. For each relative orientation of the AC field, LICT cross sections can be obtained with trivial modifications of standard programs. Simpler, perturbative expressions for the orientation-averaged cross sections are accurate for I v -1 6 W s cm -3 , and the analytical Landau-Zener perturbative expression often provides good estimates for these cross sections. The practical advantages of the dressed state formalism as an alternative approach are critically examined, and the general characteristics of LICT cross sections in multicharged ion-atom collisions are shown with the help of an example. (Auth.)

  11. Characterisation of estuarine intertidal macroalgae by laser-induced fluorescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gameiro, Carla; Utkin, Andrei B.; Sousa Dias Cartaxana, Paulo Jorge

    2015-01-01

    The article reports the application of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) for the assessment of macroalgae communities of estuarine intertidal areas. The method was applied for the characterisation of fifteen intertidal macroalgae species of the Tagus estuary, Portugal, and adjacent coastal area...... spectra were determined by differences in the main fluorescing pigments: phycoerythrin, phycocyanin and chlorophyll a (Chl a). In the green and brown macroalgae groups, the relative significance of the two emission maxima seems to be related to the thickness of the photosynthetic layer. In thick...... macroalgae, like Codium tomentosum or Fucus vesiculosus, the contribution of the far-red emission fluorescence peak was more significant, most probably due to re-absorption of the emitted red Chl a fluorescence within the dense photosynthetic layer. Similarly, an increase in the number of layers of the thin...

  12. Laser-induced single point nanowelding of silver nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Shuowei; Li, Qiang; Liu, Guoping; Yang, Hangbo; Yang, Yuanqing; Zhao, Ding; Wang, Wei; Qiu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Nanowelding of nanomaterials opens up an emerging set of applications in transparent conductors, thin-film solar cells, nanocatalysis, cancer therapy, and nanoscale patterning. Single point nanowelding (SPNW) is highly demanded for building complex nanostructures. In this letter, the precise control of SPNW of silver nanowires is explored in depth, where the nanowelding is laser-induced through the plasmonic resonance enhanced photothermal effect. It is shown that the illumination position is a critical factor for the nanowelding process. As an example of performance enhancement, output at wire end can be increased by 65% after welding for a plasmonic nanocoupler. Thus, single point nanowelding technique shows great potentials for high-performance electronic and photonic devices based on nanowires, such as nanoelectronic circuits and plasmonic nanodevices.

  13. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Noll, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive source of the fundamentals, process parameters, instrumental components and applications of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The effect of multiple pulses on material ablation, plasma dynamics and plasma emission is presented. A heuristic plasma modeling allows to simulate complex experimental plasma spectra. These methods and findings form the basis for a variety of applications to perform quantitative multi-element analysis with LIBS. These application potentials of LIBS have really boosted in the last years ranging from bulk analysis of metallic alloys and non-conducting materials, via spatially resolved analysis and depth profiling covering measuring objects in all physical states: gaseous, liquid and solid. Dedicated chapters present LIBS investigations for these tasks with special emphasis on the methodical and instrumental concepts as well as the optimization strategies for a quantitative analysis. Requirements, concepts, design and characteristic features of LI...

  14. Laser-induced single point nanowelding of silver nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Shuowei; Li, Qiang, E-mail: qiangli@zju.edu.cn; Liu, Guoping; Yang, Hangbo; Yang, Yuanqing; Zhao, Ding; Wang, Wei; Qiu, Min, E-mail: minqiu@zju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Modern Optical Instrumentation, College of Optical Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2016-03-21

    Nanowelding of nanomaterials opens up an emerging set of applications in transparent conductors, thin-film solar cells, nanocatalysis, cancer therapy, and nanoscale patterning. Single point nanowelding (SPNW) is highly demanded for building complex nanostructures. In this letter, the precise control of SPNW of silver nanowires is explored in depth, where the nanowelding is laser-induced through the plasmonic resonance enhanced photothermal effect. It is shown that the illumination position is a critical factor for the nanowelding process. As an example of performance enhancement, output at wire end can be increased by 65% after welding for a plasmonic nanocoupler. Thus, single point nanowelding technique shows great potentials for high-performance electronic and photonic devices based on nanowires, such as nanoelectronic circuits and plasmonic nanodevices.

  15. Combined raman spectrometer/laser-induced breakdown spectrometer design concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazalgette Courrèges-Lacoste, Gregory; Ahlers, Berit; Boslooper, Erik; Rull-Perez, Fernando; Maurice, Sylvestre

    2017-11-01

    Amongst the different instruments that have been preselected to be on-board the Pasteur payload on ExoMars is the Raman/ Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) instrument. Raman spectroscopy and LIBS will be integrated into a single instrument sharing many hardware commonalities. An international team under the lead of TNO has been gathered to produce a design concept for a combined Raman Spectrometer/ LIBS Elegant Bread-Board (EBB). The instrument is based on a specifically designed extremely compact spectrometer with high resolution over a large wavelength range, suitable for both Raman spectroscopy and LIBS measurements. Low mass, size and resources are the main drivers of the instrument's design concept. The proposed design concept, realization and testing programme for the combined Raman/ LIBS EBB is presented as well as background information on Raman and LIBS.

  16. Kalman filtered MR temperature imaging for laser induced thermal therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, D; Yung, J; Hazle, J D; Weinberg, J S; Stafford, R J

    2012-04-01

    The feasibility of using a stochastic form of Pennes bioheat model within a 3-D finite element based Kalman filter (KF) algorithm is critically evaluated for the ability to provide temperature field estimates in the event of magnetic resonance temperature imaging (MRTI) data loss during laser induced thermal therapy (LITT). The ability to recover missing MRTI data was analyzed by systematically removing spatiotemporal information from a clinical MR-guided LITT procedure in human brain and comparing predictions in these regions to the original measurements. Performance was quantitatively evaluated in terms of a dimensionless L(2) (RMS) norm of the temperature error weighted by acquisition uncertainty. During periods of no data corruption, observed error histories demonstrate that the Kalman algorithm does not alter the high quality temperature measurement provided by MR thermal imaging. The KF-MRTI implementation considered is seen to predict the bioheat transfer with RMS error 10 sec.

  17. INDUCED NUCLEAR ACTIVITY IN GALAXY PAIRS

    OpenAIRE

    F. J. Hernández-Ibarra; D. Dultzin; Y. Krongold; A. Del Olmo; J. Perea

    2011-01-01

    Analizamos espectros del núcleo de 893 galaxias entre pares de galaxias y galaxias aisladas de la muestra SLOAN (DR7). Estos pares pueden ser divididos en tres grupos: S+S, E+E y E+S de acuerdo con el catálago de pares aislados de galaxias de Karachentsev (KPG). También analizamos dos muestras de galaxias aisladas: el catálogo de galaxias aisladas de Karachentseva (CIG) y la muestra de galaxias aisladas en el hemisferio norte de Varela. Estudiamos la incidencia de la actividad nuclear en cada...

  18. Simultaneous bilateral laser therapy accelerates recovery after noise-induced hearing loss in a rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Hun Lee

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Noise-induced hearing loss is a common type of hearing loss. The effects of laser therapy have been investigated from various perspectives, including in wound healing, inflammation reduction, and nerve regeneration, as well as in hearing research. A promising feature of the laser is its capability to penetrate soft tissue; depending on the wavelength, laser energy can penetrate into the deepest part of the body without damaging non-target soft tissues. Based on this idea, we developed bilateral transtympanic laser therapy, which uses simultaneous laser irradiation in both ears, and evaluated the effects of bilateral laser therapy on cochlear damage caused by noise overexposure. Thus, the purpose of this research was to assess the benefits of simultaneous bilateral laser therapy compared with unilateral laser therapy and a control. Eighteen Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to narrow-band noise at 115 dB SPL for 6 h. Multiple auditory brainstem responses were measured after each laser irradiation, and cochlear hair cells were counted after the 15th such irradiation. The penetration depth of the 808 nm laser was also measured after sacrifice. Approximately 5% of the laser energy reached the contralateral cochlea. Both bilateral and unilateral laser therapy decreased the hearing threshold after noise overstimulation in the rat model. The bilateral laser therapy group showed faster functional recovery at all tested frequencies compared with the unilateral laser therapy group. However, there was no difference in the endpoint ABR results or final hair cell survival, which was analyzed histologically.

  19. Ablative fractional laser enhances MAL-induced PpIX accumulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haak, C S; Christiansen, K; Erlendsson, Andrés M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Pretreatment of skin with ablative fractional laser enhances accumulation of topical provided photosensitizer, but essential information is lacking on the interaction between laser channel densities and pharmacokinetics. Hence our objectives were to investigate how...... (range 46-133min) induced fluorescence levels similar to curettage and 180min incubation. Furthermore, MAL 80 and 160mg/g induced similar fluorescence intensities in skin exposed to laser densities of 1, 2 and 5% (p>0.0537, 30-180min). CONCLUSION: MAL-induced protoporphyrin accumulation is augmented...... protoporphyrin accumulation was affected by laser densities, incubation time and drug concentration. METHODS: We conducted the study on the back of healthy male volunteers (n=11). Test areas were pretreated with 2940nm ablative fractional Er:YAG laser, 11.2mJ per laser channel using densities of 1, 2, 5, 10...

  20. Role of Laser Power, Wavelength, and Pulse Duration in Laser Assisted Tin-Induced Crystallization of Amorphous Silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Neimash

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This work describes tin-induced crystallization of amorphous silicon studied with Raman spectroscopy in thin-film structures Si-Sn-Si irradiated with pulsed laser light. We have found and analyzed dependencies of the nanocrystals’ size and concentration on the laser pulse intensity for 10 ns and 150 μm duration laser pulses at the wavelengths of 535 nm and 1070 nm. Efficient transformation of the amorphous silicon into a crystalline phase during the 10 ns time interval of the acting laser pulse in the 200 nm thickness films of the amorphous silicon was demonstrated. The results were analyzed theoretically by modeling the spatial and temporal distribution of temperature in the amorphous silicon sample within the laser spot location. Simulations confirmed importance of light absorption depth (irradiation wavelength in formation and evolution of the temperature profile that affects the crystallization processes in irradiated structures.

  1. Diode-Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of an Optically Thick Plasma in Combination with Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nomura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Distortion of laser-induced fluorescence profiles attributable to optical absorption and saturation broadening was corrected in combination with laser absorption spectroscopy in argon plasma flow. At high probe-laser intensity, saturated absorption profiles were measured to correct probe-laser absorption. At low laser intensity, nonsaturated absorption profiles were measured to correct fluorescence reabsorption. Saturation broadening at the measurement point was corrected using a ratio of saturated to non-saturated broadening. Observed LIF broadening and corresponding translational temperature without correction were, respectively, 2.20±0.05 GHz and 2510±100 K and corrected broadening and temperature were, respectively, 1.96±0.07 GHz and 1990±150 K. Although this correction is applicable only at the center of symmetry, the deduced temperature agreed well with that obtained by LAS with Abel inversion.

  2. Value added cleaning and disinfection of the root canal: laser-activated irrigation and laser-induced photoporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Moor, Roeland J. G.; Meire, Maarten A.

    2016-03-01

    Among present-day marketed systems ultrasonic activation appears to be the best way to activate and potentiate endodontic irrigants. An alternative for ultrasonic activation of irrigants is laser activated irrigation (LAI) or photoninitiated acoustic streaming. Based on present-day research it appears that LAI (especially with Erbium lasers) can be more efficient for debris removal out of root canals and interaction with the endodontic biofilms thanks to the induction of specific cavitation phenomena and acoustic streaming. Other wavelengths are now explored to be used for LAI. Another way to interact with biofilms is to rely on laser-induced photoporation in combination with gold nanoparticles ( AuNPs). The latter is an alternative physical method for delivering macromolecules in cells. Nanosized membrane pores can be created upon pulsed laser illumination. Depending on the laser energy, pores are created through either direct heating of the AuNPs or by vapour nanobubbles that can emerge around the AuNPs.

  3. Method and apparatus for induced nuclear beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiss, H.

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to a method and apparatus for inducing beta decay transition that are normally inhibited by angular momentum or parity considerations. According to one aspect of this invention a method of inducing nuclear beta decay transition comprises providing a medium which includes atomic nuclei that have forbidden beta decay transition in which the initial and final nuclear states do not have the same intrinsic parity or have total angular momenta which differ by more than one quantum unit of angular momentum, and applying to the medium an electromagnetic field which has an intensity sufficient to provide the angular momentum or intrinsic parity necessary to overcome the forbiddenness of the beta decay transition of the atomic nuclei, thereby to induce the beta decay transitions. According to another aspect of this invention an apparatus for inducing beta decay transition comprises a medium which includes atomic nuclei that have forbidden beta decay transitions in which the initial and final nuclear states do not have the same intrinsic parity or have total angular momenta which differ by more than one quantum unit of angular momentum, field producing means for producing an electromagnetic field in the medium and means for energising the field producing means to establish the field at an intensity sufficient to provide the angular momentum or intrinsic parity necessary to overcome the forbiddenness of the beta decay transitions of the atomic nuclei. The energy released in these induced nuclear transition is useful for the controlled production of power. The induced beta dacay transitions are also useful to reduce the halflives of long-lived fission product wastes from conventional nuclear fission power plants

  4. Plasma plume induced during laser welding of Magnesium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, J.; Szymanski, Z.; Azharonok, V.

    2005-01-01

    assuming a certain realistic radial temperature distribution and calculating the corresponding synthetic line profile, which, subsequently, is compared to the experimental one. It has been assumed that the radial temperature profile is either Gaussian or triangular, since they are close to the solution of the time-dependent heat transfer equation with a Gaussian source. Owing to relatively high electron density, N e >10 22 m -3 , it can be assumed that a laser-induced plasma is in a state of local thermal equilibrium (LTE). The boundary temperature of 3 kK is assumed. The plasma diameter is 1.0-2.0 mm depending on the distance from the surface. The profile of the spectral line P λ is given by the Voigt function resulting from the convolution of a Gaussian (Doppler effect) and Lorenzian (Stark effect) profile. The synthetic line profiles are calculated for each plasma radius and added along the plasma diameter to get the total profiles. The maximum temperature is varied until the total synthetic profiles fit well the experimental ones and full widths of both profiles are the same. (author)

  5. Study on the high-precision laser welding technology of nuclear fuel elements processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Soo Sung; Yang, M. S.; Kim, W. K.; Lee, D. Y

    2001-01-01

    The proper welding method for appendage of bearing pads and spacers of PHWR nuclear fuel elements is considered important in respect to the soundness of weldments and the improvement of the performance of nuclear fuels during the operation in reactor. The probability of welding defects of the appendage parts is mostly apt to occur and it is connected directly with the safty and life prediction of the nuclear reactor in operation. Recently there has been studied all over the world to develope welding technology by laser in nuclear fuel processing, and the appendage of bearing pads and spacers of PHWR nuclear fuel elements. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate the characteristics of the laser welded specimens and make some samples for the appendage of bearing pads of PHWR nuclear fuel elements. This study will be also provide the basic data for the fabrications of the appendage of bearing pads and spacers. Especially the laser welding is supposed to be used in the practical application such as precise materials manufacturing fields. In this respect this technology is not only a basic advanced technology with wide applications but also likely to be used for the development of directly applicable technologies for industries, with high potential benefits derived in the view point of economy and industry.

  6. Study on the high-precision laser welding technology of nuclear fuel elements processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soo Sung; Yang, M. S.; Kim, W. K.; Lee, D. Y.

    2001-01-01

    The proper welding method for appendage of bearing pads and spacers of PHWR nuclear fuel elements is considered important in respect to the soundness of weldments and the improvement of the performance of nuclear fuels during the operation in reactor. The probability of welding defects of the appendage parts is mostly apt to occur and it is connected directly with the safty and life prediction of the nuclear reactor in operation. Recently there has been studied all over the world to develope welding technology by laser in nuclear fuel processing, and the appendage of bearing pads and spacers of PHWR nuclear fuel elements. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate the characteristics of the laser welded specimens and make some samples for the appendage of bearing pads of PHWR nuclear fuel elements. This study will be also provide the basic data for the fabrications of the appendage of bearing pads and spacers. Especially the laser welding is supposed to be used in the practical application such as precise materials manufacturing fields. In this respect this technology is not only a basic advanced technology with wide applications but also likely to be used for the development of directly applicable technologies for industries, with high potential benefits derived in the view point of economy and industry

  7. High-power fiber laser cutting parameter optimization for nuclear Decommissioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Beatriz Lopez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available For more than 10 years, the laser process has been studied for dismantling work; however, relatively few research works have addressed the effect of high-power fiber laser cutting for thick sections. Since in the nuclear sector, a significant quantity of thick material is required to be cut, this study aims to improve the reliability of laser cutting for such work and indicates guidelines to optimize the cutting procedure, in particular, nozzle combinations (standoff distance and focus position, to minimize waste material. The results obtained show the performance levels that can be reached with 10 kW fiber lasers, using which it is possible to obtain narrower kerfs than those found in published results obtained with other lasers. Nonetheless, fiber lasers appear to show the same effects as those of CO2 and ND:YAG lasers. Thus, the main factor that affects the kerf width is the focal position, which means that minimum laser spot diameters are advised for smaller kerf widths.

  8. Study into the applicabilities of lasers for the dismantling of decommissioned nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haferkamp, H.; Bach, F.W.; Vinke, T.; Kinzel, A.; Mack, N.; Kuboschek, M.; Grobe, K.

    1989-01-01

    The project was intended to screen current laser technology for potential applications of laser beams in the dismantling of decommissioned nuclear power plant. As with CO 2 , Nd-YAG, or excimer lasers, developments clearly proceed towards higher output power. The market survey shows the CO 2 -laser to be the most efficient at present, with a great number of laser units available on the market in the range up to 5 kW, and some in the range up to 15 kW. The CO 2 -laser has exclusively been used so far for cutting work in steel plates thicker than 10 mm. Characteristic conditions of application include the high output power of more than 2 kW, long beam lengths, oxygen supply at strongly increased working pressure, sometimes from external sources. The maximum cutting work achieved in the laboratory was 110 mm in structural steel, 90 mm in austenitic steel, and 160 mm in concrete, all under conditions of easy access to the material. It remains to be examined whether steel cutting work at constrained positions will allow separation of wall thicknesses of more than 10 mm. Laser beam cutting under water is feasible in principle but has not been much studied yet. There also are only few sampling results of measurements of dust and aerosol quantities resulting from laser beam cutting work. (orig.) [de

  9. High-power fiber laser cutting parameter optimization for nuclear decommissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, Ana Beatriz; Assuncao, Eurico; Quintino, Luisa [IDMEC, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); Khan, Ali; Blackbun, Jonathan [TWI Ltd., Cambridge (United States)

    2017-06-15

    For more than 10 years, the laser process has been studied for dismantling work; however, relatively few research works have addressed the effect of high-power fiber laser cutting for thick sections. Since in the nuclear sector, a significant quantity of thick material is required to be cut, this study aims to improve the reliability of laser cutting for such work and indicates guidelines to optimize the cutting procedure, in particular, nozzle combinations (standoff distance and focus position), to minimize waste material. The results obtained show the performance levels that can be reached with 10 kW fiber lasers, using which it is possible to obtain narrower kerfs than those found in published results obtained with other lasers. Nonetheless, fiber lasers appear to show the same effects as those of CO{sub 2} and ND:YAG lasers. Thus, the main factor that affects the kerf width is the focal position, which means that minimum laser spot diameters are advised for smaller kerf widths.

  10. Laser-Induced Fluorescence diagnostic of barium ion plasmas in the Paul Trap Simulator Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Moses; Gilson, Erik P.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Efthimion, Philip C.; Majeski, Richard; Startsev, Edward A.

    2005-01-01

    The Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX) is a cylindrical Paul trap whose purpose is to simulate the nonlinear dynamics of intense charged particle beam propagation in alternating-gradient magnetic transport systems. To investigate the ion plasma microstate in PTSX, including the ion density profile and the ion velocity distribution function, a laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic system is being developed as a nondestructive diagnostic. Instead of cesium, which has been used in the initial phase of the PTSX experiment, barium has been selected as the preferred ion for the laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic. A feasibility study of the laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic using barium ions is presented with the characterization of a tunable dye laser. The installation of the barium ion source and the development of the laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic system are also discussed

  11. Effects of ionizing radiation on laser-induced damage in SiO/sub 2/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soileau, M J; Mansour, N; Canto, E; Griscom, D L

    1988-05-01

    The effects of radiation damage on bulk laser-induced damage in SiO/sub 2/ were investigated. Samples studied included Spectrasil A, B, and WF (water free). Measurements of laser-induced breakdown were conducted with 532 and 1064 nm laser pulses of approximately 20 ns duration. Reductions of up to 40% in the laser-induced breakdown threshold were observed at 532 nm for samples exposed to 10/sup 8/ rad of ..gamma..-radiation. The decrease in breakdown threshold for irradiated SiO/sub 2/ samples at 532 nm was found to be proportional to the linear absorption of the specimen at 266 nm. These results are in good agreement with a proposed model which suggests that two-photon absorption initiated avalanche process is responsible for laser-induced breakdown for these materials.

  12. Electrochemically induced nuclear fusion of deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorne, J.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper cold fusion of deuterium by electrolysis of heavy water onto a palladium (or titanium) cathode is reported. Contrary to the assumption of Fleishmann and Pons that electrochemically compressed D + exists inside the palladium cathode, the observations of Jones et al. can be partially explained by the simultaneous presence of deuteride D - and the highly mobile positive deuterium ion D + . The opposite charges reduce the intranuclear distance and enhance the tunneling fusion rate. Furthermore, alloying of lithium with palladium can stabilize a negatively charged deuteride ion due to the salinelike character of lithium deuteride. The enormous pressure (or fugacity), achieved by the applied electrochemical potential (10 30 atm), is a virtual pressure that would have existed in equilibrium with palladium deuteride (PdD x ). It is speculated that nuclear fusion occurs at the surface, and the PdD x serves as a reservoir for the supply of deuteride ions

  13. CW-laser induced microchannels in dye-polymethacrylic acid films

    OpenAIRE

    M.A. Camacho-López

    2007-01-01

    In this work we report on the formation of microchannels on dye-polymethacrylic acid films using a cw-laser. A focalized beam of a He-Ne laser (632.8 nm emission line) was used to form microchannels on the films. It was found that there exists a laser power density threshold for a pit formation that depends on the dye concentration. The dimensions of the laser-induced channels are dependent on the laser power density. Microchannel formation in the transparent polymethacrylic acid films was no...

  14. Laser-based sensor for a coolant leak detection in a nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, T.-S.; Park, H.; Ko, K.; Lim, G.; Cha, Y.-H.; Han, J.; Jeong, D.-Y.

    2010-08-01

    Currently, the nuclear industry needs strongly a reliable detection system to continuously monitor a coolant leak during a normal operation of reactors for the ensurance of nuclear safety. In this work, we propose a new device for the coolant leak detection based on tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLS) by using a compact diode laser. For the feasibility experiment, we established an experimental setup consisted of a near-IR diode laser with a wavelength of about 1392 nm, a home-made multi-pass cell and a sample injection system. The feasibility test was performed for the detection of the heavy water (D2O) leaks which can happen in a pressurized heavy water reactor (PWHR). As a result, the device based on the TDLS is shown to be operated successfully in detecting a HDO molecule, which is generated from the leaked heavy water by an isotope exchange reaction between D2O and H2O. Additionally, it is suggested that the performance of the new device, such as sensitivity and stability, can be improved by adapting a cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy and a compact DFB diode laser. We presume that this laser-based leak detector has several advantages over the conventional techniques currently employed in the nuclear power plant, such as radiation monitoring, humidity monitoring and FT-IR spectroscopy.

  15. UV-tunable laser induced phototransformations of matrix isolated anethole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupa, Justyna; Wierzejewska, Maria; Nunes, Cláudio M; Fausto, Rui

    2014-03-14

    A matrix isolation study of the infrared spectra and structure of anethole (1-methoxy-4-(1-propenyl)benzene) has been carried out, showing the presence of two E conformers (AE1, AE2) of the molecule in the as-deposited matrices. Irradiation using ultraviolet-tunable laser light at 308-307 nm induced conformationally selective phototransformations of these forms into two less stable Z conformers (AZ1, AZ2). The back reactions were also detected upon irradiation at 301 nm. On the whole, the obtained results allow for full assignment of the infrared spectra of all the four experimentally observed anethole isomers and showed that the narrowband UV-induced E-Z photoisomerization is an efficient and selective way to interconvert the two isomers of anethole into each other, with conformational discrimination. Photolysis of anethole was observed as well, with initial methoxyl O-C bond cleavage and formation of CH3 and p-propenylphenoxy (AR) radicals, followed by radical recombination to form 2-methyl-4-propenyl-2,4-cyclohexadienone, which subsequently undergoes ring-opening generating several conformers of long-chain conjugated ketenes. Interpretation of the experimental observations was supported by density functional theory (B3LYP and B2PLYD) calculations.

  16. Nuclear laser spectroscopy with on-line ion traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, M.; Nakamura, T.; Ohtani, S.

    1996-01-01

    The hyperfine structure of atoms informs us various static characteristics of nuclei, particularly for electro-magnetic moments and their distributions. We have been developing an experimental method to perform laser-microwave double-resonance spectroscopy for the hyperfine structure of Be and Ca isotopes, including unstable nuclei. The purpose and the status of the experiments are described. (orig.)

  17. Two-pulse laser control of nuclear and electronic motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønager, Michael; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1997-01-01

    We discuss an explicitly time-dependent two-pulse laser scheme for controlling where nuclei and electrons are going in unimolecular reactions. We focus on electronic motion and show, with HD+ as an example, that one can find non-stationary states where the electron (with some probability...

  18. Evolution of Technology Laser Scanner. Implications for use in Nuclear Power and Radioactive Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarti Fernandez, F.; Bonet, J.

    2012-01-01

    The main technical factors affecting these teams their actual implementation in nuclear power plants will be analyzed: data acquisition speed, sensitivity, laser power, autonomy, contamination of equipment, radiation effect, etc. In conclusion, the real difference is displayed in the data collection in function of various technologies, embodied in field time, and costs.

  19. Gas laser spectrometer for nuclear investigation at nucleonic stability limit. (project)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myshinskij, G.V.

    1989-01-01

    It is proposed to obtain the atomic beam of the proton-rich and neutron-rich nuclides with half-lives of up to 1 ms, by using the gas-jet technique. Subsequently their properties are investigated using the methods of laser resonance ionization and nuclear spectroscopy. 8 refs.; 4 figs

  20. About a fuel for burnup reactor of periodical pulsed nuclear pumped laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, A.I.; Lukin, A.V.; Magda, L.E.; Magda, E.P.; Pogrebov, I.S.; Putnikov, I.S.; Khmelnitsky, D.V.; Scherbakov, A.P.

    1998-01-01

    A physical scheme of burnup reactor for a Periodic Pulsed Nuclear Pumped Laser was supposed. Calculations of its neutron physical parameters were made. The general layout and construction of basic elements of the reactor are discussed. The requirements for the fuel and fuel elements are established. (author)

  1. Optically induced dynamic nuclear spin polarisation in diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheuer, Jochen; Naydenov, Boris; Jelezko, Fedor; Schwartz, Ilai; Chen, Qiong; Plenio, Martin B; Schulze-Sünninghausen, David; Luy, Burkhard; Carl, Patrick; Höfer, Peter; Retzker, Alexander; Sumiya, Hitoshi; Isoya, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) depends strongly on nuclear spin polarisation and, motivated by this observation, dynamical nuclear spin polarisation has recently been applied to enhance MRI protocols (Kurhanewicz et al 2011 Neoplasia 13 81). Nuclear spins associated with the 13 C carbon isotope (nuclear spin I = 1/2) in diamond possess uniquely long spin lattice relaxation times (Reynhardt and High 2011 Prog. Nucl. Magn. Reson. Spectrosc. 38 37). If they are present in diamond nanocrystals, especially when strongly polarised, they form a promising contrast agent for MRI. Current schemes for achieving nuclear polarisation, however, require cryogenic temperatures. Here we demonstrate an efficient scheme that realises optically induced 13 C nuclear spin hyperpolarisation in diamond at room temperature and low ambient magnetic field. Optical pumping of a nitrogen-vacancy centre creates a continuously renewable electron spin polarisation which can be transferred to surrounding 13 C nuclear spins. Importantly for future applications we also realise polarisation protocols that are robust against an unknown misalignment between magnetic field and crystal axis. (paper)

  2. Study of xenon binding in cryptophane-A using laser-induced NMR polarization enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luhmer, M.; Goodson, B.M.; Song, Y.Q.; Laws, D.D.; Kaiser, L.; Pines, A.; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA

    1999-01-01

    Xenon is chemically inert, yet exhibits NMR parameters that are highly sensitive to its chemical environment. Considerable work has therefore capitalized on the utility of 129 Xe (I = 1/2) as a magnetic resonance probe of molecules, materials, and biological systems. In solution, spin-polarization transfer between laser-polarized xenon and the hydrogen nuclei of nearby molecules leads to signal enhancements in the resolved 1 H NMR spectrum, offering new opportunities for probing the chemical environment of xenon atoms. Following binding of laser-polarized xenon to molecules of cryptophane-A, selective enhancements of the 1 H NMR signals were observed. A theoretical framework for the interpretation of such experimental results is provided, and the spin polarization-induced nuclear Overhauser effects are shown to yield information about the molecular environment of xenon. The observed selective 1 H enhancements allowed xenon-proton internuclear distances to be estimated. These distances reveal structural characteristics of the complex, including the preferred molecular conformations adopted by cryptophane-A upon binding of xenon

  3. Lanthanide-based laser-induced phosphorescence for spray diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voort, D. D. van der, E-mail: d.d.v.d.voort@tue.nl; Water, W. van de; Kunnen, R. P. J.; Clercx, H. J. H.; Heijst, G. J. F. van [Applied Physics Department, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5612 AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Maes, N. C. J.; Sweep, A. M.; Dam, N. J. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5612 AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Lamberts, T. [Institute of Theoretical Chemistry, University of Stuttgart, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Laser-induced phosphorescence (LIP) is a relatively recent and versatile development for studying flow dynamics. This work investigates certain lanthanide-based molecular complexes for their use in LIP for high-speed sprays. Lanthanide complexes in solutions have been shown to possess long phosphorescence lifetimes (∼1-2 ms) and to emit light in the visible wavelength range. In particular, europium and terbium complexes are investigated using fluorescence/phosphorescence spectrometry, showing that europium-thenoyltrifluoracetone-trioctylphosphineoxide (Eu-TTA-TOPO) can be easily and efficiently excited using a standard frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser. The emitted spectrum, with maximum intensity at a wavelength of 614 nm, is shown not to vary strongly with temperature (293-383 K). The decay constant of the phosphorescence, while independent of ambient pressure, decreases by approximately 12 μs/K between 323 and 373 K, with the base level of the decay constant dependent on the used solvent. The complex does not luminesce in the gas or solid state, meaning only the liquid phase is visualized, even in an evaporating spray. By using an internally excited spray containing the phosphorescent complex, the effect of vaporization is shown through the decrease in measured intensity over the length of the spray, together with droplet size measurements using interferometric particle imaging. This study shows that LIP, using the Eu-TTA-TOPO complex, can be used with different solvents, including diesel surrogates. Furthermore, it can be easily handled and used in sprays to investigate spray breakup and evaporation.

  4. Application of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy under Polar Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, J. L.; Hark, R.; Bol'shakov, A.; Plumer, J.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade our research team has evaluated the use of commercial-off-the-shelf laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for chemical analysis of snow and ice samples under polar conditions. One avenue of research explored LIBS suitability as a detector of paleo-climate proxy indicators (Ca, K, Mg, and Na) in ice as it relates to atmospheric circulation. LIBS results revealed detection of peaks for C and N, consistent with the presence of organic material, as well as major ions (Ca, K, Mg, and Na) and trace metals (Al, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ti). The detection of Ca, K, Mg, and Na confirmed that LIBS has sufficient sensitivity to be used as a tool for characterization of paleo-climate proxy indicators in ice-core samples. Techniques were developed for direct analysis of ice as well as indirect measurements of ice via melting and filtering. Pitfalls and issues of direct ice analysis using several cooling techniques to maintain ice integrity will be discussed. In addition, a new technique, laser ablation molecular isotopic spectroscopy (LAMIS) was applied to detection of hydrogen and oxygen isotopes in ice as isotopic analysis of ice is the main tool in paleoclimatology and glaciology studies. Our results demonstrated that spectra of hydroxyl isotopologues 16OH, 18OH, and 16OD can be recorded with a compact spectrograph to determine hydrogen and oxygen isotopes simultaneously. Quantitative isotopic calibration for ice analysis can be accomplished using multivariate chemometric regression as previously realized for water vapor. Analysis with LIBS and LAMIS required no special sample preparation and was about ten times faster than analysis using ICP-MS. Combination of the two techniques in one portable instrument for in-field analysis appears possible and would eliminate the logistical and cost issues associated with ice core management.

  5. Characterization of cinematographic films by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspard, S.; Oujja, M.; Rebollar, E.; Abrusci, C.; Catalina, F.; Castillejo, M.

    2007-01-01

    The emulsion-coated transparent plastic-base film has been the main carrier for production and preservation of motion picture contents since the 19th century. The knowledge of the composition of black and white silver gelatine cinematographic films is of great importance for the characterization of the photographic process and for identifying the optimum conditions for conservation. A cinematographic film is a multi-component system that consists of a layer of photographic emulsion overcoating a polymeric support (plasticized cellulose triacetate) and a protective transparent cross-linked gelatine layer coating the emulsion. In the present work, Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is used to characterize the composition of the materials of cinematographic films. LIB spectra of film samples and of different individual film components, polymeric support and reference gelatines, were acquired in vacuum by excitation at 266 nm (Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, 6 ns, 10 Hz). In the cinematographic film, silver lines from the light-sensitive silver halide salts of the photographic emulsion are accompanied by iron, lead, chrome and phosphorus lines. Iron and lead are constituents of film developers, chrome is included in the composition of the hardening agents and phosphorus has its origin in the plasticizer used in the polymeric support. By applying successive pulses on the same spot of the film sample, it was possible to observe through stratigraphic analysis the different layers composition. Additionally, the results obtained reveal the analytical capacity of LIBS for the study and classification of the different gelatine types and qualities used for the protecting layer and the photographic emulsion

  6. Measurement of copper vapour laser-induced deformation of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-14

    Feb 14, 2014 ... Laser & Plasma Technology Division, Beam Technology Development Group,. Bhabha Atomic ... of dielectric-coated mirror, caused by an incident repetitive pulsed laser beam with high average power. Minimum ... the optical surface deformation, caused by irradiation by a copper vapour laser (CVL) beam.

  7. IR Laser-Induced Thermolysis and UV Laser-Induced Photolysis of 1,3-Diethyldisiloxane: Chemical Vapour Deposition of Nanotextured Hydridoalkylsilicones

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Urbanová, Markéta; Bastl, Zdeněk; Šubrt, Jan; Pola, Josef

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 6 (2001), s. 1557-1562 ISSN 0959-9428 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4072806 Keywords : thermolysis * UV laser photolysis * composition Subject RIV: CH - Nuclear ; Quantum Chemistry Impact factor: 2.736, year: 2001

  8. Sources of high energy particles obtained with intense lasers for applications in nuclear physics; Sources de particules de hautes energies obtenues avec des lasers intenses pour applications a la physique nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerbaux, M

    2007-12-15

    This experimental study concerns the characterization of the beams of electrons and protons with energies above a few MeV produced in the interaction of an ultra-intense (10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) laser beam with a 10 {mu}m thick solid target. This work was issued in the framework to use these beams in nuclear physics experiments. It was hence necessary to know quantitatively the characteristics of these particle beams. Laser accelerated particle beams have very different characteristics from conventional ones produced in accelerators, especially on account of their transience and intensity as well as their continuous energy distribution. These properties make their characterization complex and led us to develop methods combining measurements with diodes spectrometers, radiochromic films, nuclear activation of chosen materials and Monte-Carlo simulations. These methods have been employed on 2 different facilities but with similar characteristics for the study of the electron beams as a function of the target material. The angular aperture of the electron beam appears to be strongly dependent on the atomic number of the target. An experiment was also carried out to characterize at each shot the proton beam produced with the LULI 100 TW laser facility. This experiment also proved the possibility to induce nuclear reactions in plasma and to measure quantitatively the reaction rate in order to scale an experiment on the perturbation of the nucleus electronic-shells coupling via a strong electromagnetic field due to the laser. (author)

  9. Nuclear dynamics in heavy ion induced fusion-fission reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapoor, S.S.

    1992-01-01

    Heavy ion induced fission and fission-like reactions evolve through a complex nuclear dynamics encountered in the medium energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. In the recent years, measurements of the fragment-neutron and fragment-charged particle angular correlations in heavy ion induced fusion-fission reactions, have provided new information on the dynamical times of nuclear deformations of the initial dinuclear complex to the fission saddle point and the scission point. From the studies of fragment angular distributions in heavy ion induced fission it has been possible to infer the relaxation times of the dinuclear complex in the K-degree of freedom and our recent measurements on the entrance channel dependence of fragment anisotropies have provided an experimental signature of the presence of fissions before K-equilibration. This paper reviews recent experimental and theoretical status of the above studies with particular regard to the questions relating to dynamical times, nuclear dissipation and the effect of nuclear dissipation on the K-distributions at the fission saddle in completely equilibrated compound nucleus. (author). 19 refs., 9 figs

  10. Activation cross-section data for -particle-induced nuclear reactions ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B M ALI

    2018-02-20

    particle-induced nuclear reactions on natural vanadium up to 20 MeV. It should be mentioned that this study represents a part of (a supplement) systematical study of charged particles-induced nuclear reactions. Earlier studies were.

  11. Production of photofission fragments and study of their nuclear structure by laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangrskij, Yu.P.; Zemlyanoj, S.G.; Karaivanov, D.V.; Marinova, K.P.; Markov, B.N.; Mel'nikova, L.M.; Myshinskij, G.V.; Penionzhkevich, Yu.Eh.; Zhemenik, V.I.

    2005-01-01

    The prospective nuclear structure investigations of the fission fragments by resonance laser spectroscopy methods are discussed. Research in this field is currently being carried out as part of the DRIBs project, which is under development at the Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, JINR. The fission fragments under study are mainly very neutron-rich nuclei near the proton (Z=50) and neutron (N=50 and 82) closed shells, nuclei in the region of strong deformation (N>60 and N>90) and nuclei with high-spin isomeric states. Resonance laser spectroscopy is used successfully in the study of the structure of such nuclei. It allows one to determine a number of nuclear parameters (mean-square charge radius, magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments) and to make conclusions about the collective and single particle properties of the nuclei

  12. Influence of nuclear radiation and laser beams on optical fibers and components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelić Slađana N.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of nuclear radiation and particles has been the object of investigation for a long time. For new materials and systems the research should be continued. Human activities in various environments, including space, call for more detailed research. The role of fibers in contemporary communications, medicine, and industry increases. Fibers, their connections and fused optics components have one type of tasks - the transmission of information and power. The other type of tasks is reserved for fiber lasers: quantum generators and amplifiers. The third type of tasks is for fiber sensors, including high energy nuclear physics. In this paper we present some chosen topics in the mentioned areas as well as our experiments with nuclear radiation and laser beams to fiber and bulk materials of various nature (glass, polymer, metallic, etc..

  13. Study on VCSEL laser heating chip in nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaoyang; Zhou, Binquan; Wu, Wenfeng; Jia, Yuchen; Wang, Jing

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, atomic gyroscope has become an important direction of inertial navigation. Nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope has a stronger advantage in the miniaturization of the size. In atomic gyroscope, the lasers are indispensable devices which has an important effect on the improvement of the gyroscope performance. The frequency stability of the VCSEL lasers requires high precision control of temperature. However, the heating current of the laser will definitely bring in the magnetic field, and the sensitive device, alkali vapor cell, is very sensitive to the magnetic field, so that the metal pattern of the heating chip should be designed ingeniously to eliminate the magnetic field introduced by the heating current. In this paper, a heating chip was fabricated by MEMS process, i.e. depositing platinum on semiconductor substrates. Platinum has long been considered as a good resistance material used for measuring temperature The VCSEL laser chip is fixed in the center of the heating chip. The thermometer resistor measures the temperature of the heating chip, which can be considered as the same temperature of the VCSEL laser chip, by turning the temperature signal into voltage signal. The FPGA chip is used as a micro controller, and combined with PID control algorithm constitute a closed loop control circuit. The voltage applied to the heating resistor wire is modified to achieve the temperature control of the VCSEL laser. In this way, the laser frequency can be controlled stably and easily. Ultimately, the temperature stability can be achieved better than 100mK.

  14. Simulation of primary processes for laser-induced plasma by short laser pulses in KDP crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gayet, R.; Jequier, S.; Bachau, H.; Rodriguez, V.; Duchateau, G.; Dyan, A.; Mathis, H.

    2006-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. A theoretical approach designed for the description of local micro-plasma formation induced by short laser pulses in KH 2 PO 4 (KDP) crystal is addressed. Indeed, when such a crystal is illuminated by short pulses, the early stage of photo-production, enhanced by local defects, leads to a subsequent strong electronic absorption revealing a transient metallic-like behavior. The lattice then is rapidly heated up by electron-phonon coupling at temperature as high as 10000 K. This results in the local formation of a micro-plasma whose initial electronic energy distribution, which can be used in Particle-In-Cell codes, may be predicted by the present approach. The latter includes both, electron promotion from the valence band to the conduction band, and the subsequent interaction with phonons and photons. The electron promotion is described by a theoretical method based on Coulomb-Volkov (CV) wave functions whereas the electron diffusion in the conduction band is described by the standard Boltzmann's formalism. Although results about diffusion are shown, the present work focuses on the photo-production step. Hence, an extension of a previous theory, which has been developed essentially to describe ionization of atoms or molecules by intense femtosecond laser pulses, in under way. The first theory gives reliable predictions whenever both, (i) the photon energy is greater than the ionization potential, and (ii) perturbation conditions prevail. The restriction (i) prevents from intermediate state contribution to the ionization mechanism. The CV approach has been improved by introducing these states in the initial wave function, thus leading to an excellent agreement with predictions based on a full numerical solution to the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. Further, keeping the restriction (i), one can discard the condition (ii) by introducing a time-dependent initial state population in a CV approach. Since defects induce

  15. Thermal Effects Induced by Laser Irradiation of Solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galovic, S.

    2004-01-01

    A part of incident energy is absorbed within the irradiated sample when a solid is exposed to the influence of laser radiation, to more general electromagnetic radiation within the wide range of wavelengths (from microwaves, to infrared radiation to X-rays), or to the energy of particle beams (electronic, protonic, or ionic). The absorption process signifies a highly selective excitation of the electronic state of atoms or molecules, followed by thermal and non-thermal de-excitation processes. Non-radiation de-excitation-relaxation processes induce direct sample heating. In addition, a great number of non-thermal processes (e.g., photoluminescence, photochemistry, photovoltage) may also induce heat generation as a secondary process. This method of producing heat is called the photothermal effect.The photothermal effect and subsequent propagation of thermal waves on the surface and in the volume of the solid absorbing the exciting beam may produce the following: variations in the temperature on the surfaces of the sample; deformation and displacement of surfaces; secondary infrared radiation (photothermal radiation); the formation of the gradient of the refractivity index; changes in coefficients of reflection and absorbtion; the generation of sound (photoacoustic generation), etc. These phenomena may be used in the investigation and measurement of various material properties since the profile and magnitude of the generated signal depend upon the nature of material absorbing radiation. A series of non-destructive spectroscopic, microscopic and defectoscopic detecting techniques, called photothermal methods, is developed on the basis of the above-mentioned phenomena.This paper outlines the interaction between the intensity modulated laser beam and solids, and presents a mathematical model of generated thermal sources. Generalized models for a photothermal response of optically excited materials have been obtained, including thermal memory influence on the propagation

  16. Determination of uranium concentration in an ore sample using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.-S.; Han, B.-Y.; Shin, H.S.; Kim, H.D.; Jung, E.C.; Jung, J.H.; Na, S.H.

    2012-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been recognized as a promising technique for analyzing sensitive nuclear materials such as uranium, plutonium, and curium in a high-radiation environment, especially since the implementation of IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) safeguards. The uranium spectra of ore samples were quantitatively analyzed prior to analyzing sensitive materials in the nuclear industry. The purpose of this experiment is to extract quantitative information about the uranium in a uranium ore using a standard addition approach. The uranium ore samples containing different concentrations of U were prepared by mixing raw ore powder with natural uranium oxide powders. Calibration sets of 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 wt.% uranium concentrations within the uranium ore sample were achieved. A pulsed and Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at a wavelength of 532 nm was used as a light source. An echelle spectrometer that covers a 190–420 nm wavelength range is used to generate a calibration curve and determine the detection limit of uranium in the ore matrix. The neutral atomic-emission peak at a wavelength of 356.659 nm indicated a detection limit of ∼ 158 ppm for uranium, and the uranium concentration was determined in a raw ore sample that has an unknown quantity of uranium. - Highlights: ► The feasibility of LIBS application to monitor uranium element was carried out. ► The detection limit of U in ore was determined by a standard additional approach. ► Quantitative analyses of U concentration in a natural uranium ore were performed.

  17. Q-switched Nd:YAG/V:YAG microchip 1338 nm laser for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šulc, Jan; Jelínková, Helena; Nejezchleb, Karel; Škoda, Václav

    2017-12-01

    Q-switched microchip laser emitting radiation at wavelength 1338nm was tested as a radiation source for laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). This laser used sandwich crystal which combined in one piece the cooling part (undoped YAG crystal 4mm long), the active laser part (Nd:YAG crystal 12mm long), and the saturable absorber (V:YAG crystal 0.7mm long). The diameter of this crystal was 5 mm. The microchip resonator consisted of dielectric mirrors directly deposited on the monolith crystal surfaces. The pump mirror (HT @ 808 nm, HR @ 1.3 ¹m) was placed on the undoped YAG part. The output coupler (R = 90% @ 1338 nm) was placed on the V:YAG part. The fibre-coupled 808nm pumping laser diode was operating in pulsed regime (rep. rate 250 Hz, pulse width 300 ¹s, pulse energy 6 mJ). Using this pumping, stable and high reproducible Q-switched pulses were generated at wavelength 1338 nm. Pulse length was 6.2 ns (FWHM) and the mean output power was 33mW. The single pulse energy and peak power was 0.13mJ and 21kW, respectively. Laser was operating in fundamental TEM00 mode. The laser radiation was focused on a tested sample using single plano-convex lens (focal length 75 mm). The focal spot radius was 40 ¹m. The corresponding peak-power density was 0.83GW/cm2. The laser induced break-down was successfully reached and corresponding laser-induced plasma spectra were recorded for set of metallic elements (Cu, Ag, Au, In, Zn, Al, Fe, Ni, Cr) and alloys (Sn-Pb solder, duralumin, stainless-steel, brass). To record the spectra, StellarNet BLACK-Comet concave grating CCD-based spectrometer was used without any special collimation optics. Thanks to used laser wavelength far from the detector sensitivity, no special filtering was needed to overcome the CCD dazzling. The constructed laser could significantly improve repletion-rate of up-to-date LIBS devices.

  18. The influence of the laser spot size and the pulse number on laser-induced backside wet etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehme, R.; Zimmer, K.

    2005-01-01

    The laser-induced backside wet etching (LIBWE) of transparent solids at the interface to absorbing liquid is a new promising method for laser microstructuring. The influence of the laser spot size and the applied pulse number to the etch rate were investigated in detail for fused silica and two different liquids. Additional to the significant rise of the etch rate with increasing spot size considerable incubation effects have been observed at low laser fluences and pulse numbers. Based on the bubble formation during LIBWE processing, a relation between the bubble collapse time and the etch rate was ascertained. This relation fits the etch rate dependence on the spot size well. It is assumed that the deposition of decomposition products from the bubble accounts for the spot size influence the etch rate

  19. High-Frequency Gravitational Wave Induced Nuclear Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontana, Giorgio; Baker, Robert M. L. Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear fusion is a process in which nuclei, having a total initial mass, combine to produce a single nucleus, having a final mass less than the total initial mass. Below a given atomic number the process is exothermic; that is, since the final mass is less than the combined initial mass and the mass deficit is converted into energy by the nuclear fusion. On Earth nuclear fusion does not happen spontaneously because electrostatic barriers prevent the phenomenon. To induce controlled, industrial scale, nuclear fusion, only a few methods have been discovered that look promising, but net positive energy production is not yet possible because of low overall efficiency of the systems. In this paper we propose that an intense burst of High Frequency Gravitational Waves (HFGWs) could be focused or beamed to a target mass composed of appropriate fuel or target material to efficiently rearrange the atomic or nuclear structure of the target material with consequent nuclear fusion. Provided that efficient generation of HFGW can be technically achieved, the proposed fusion reactor could become a viable solution for the energy needs of mankind and alternatively a process for beaming energy to produce a source of fusion energy remotely - even inside solid materials

  20. A review of the development of portable laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and its applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rakovský, Jozef; Čermák, P.; Musset, O.; Veis, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 101, NOV 2014 (2014), s. 269-287 ISSN 0584-8547 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-11635S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Fiber laser * Fieldable LIBS * Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.176, year: 2014

  1. Laser-induced field-free alignment of the OCS molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loriot, V; Tzallas, P; Benis, E P; Hertz, E; Lavorel, B; Charalambidis, D; Faucher, O

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the dynamical alignment of jet-cooled OCS molecules induced by a short laser pulse. The alignment is measured through the orientational contribution of the optical Kerr effect using a second weak laser pulse as a probe. Maximum alignment is observed at conditions close to saturation of ionization. The results are analysed with a quantum mechanical model solving for the rotational dynamics

  2. [Study of enhancement effect of laser-induced crater on plasma radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin-Zhong; Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Guo, Qing-Lin; Su, Hong-Xin; Li, Guang

    2009-02-01

    Single pulses exported from high-energy neodymium glass laser were used to act on the same position of soil sample surface repeatedly, and the plasma emission spectra generated from sequential laser pulse action were collected by spectral recording system. The experimental results show that the laser-induced soil plasma radiation was enhanced continuously under the confinement effect of the crater walls, and the line intensities and signal-to-background ratios both had different improvements along with increasing the number of acting pulses. The photographs of the plasma image and crater appearance were taken to study the plasma shape, laser-induced crater appearance, and the mass of the ablated sample. The internal mechanism behind that laser-induced crater enhanced plasma radiation was researched. Under the sequential laser pulse action, the forming plasma as a result enlarges gradually first, leading to distortion at the trail of plasma plume, and then, its volume diminishes slowly. And also, the color of the plasma changes from buff to white gradually, which implies that the temperature increases constantly. The laser-induced crater had a regular shape, that is, the diameter increased from its bottom to top gradually, thus forming a taper. The mass of the laser-ablated substance descends along with increasing the amount of action pulse. Atomization degree of vaporized substance was improved in virtue of the crater confinement effect, Fresnel absorption produced from the crater walls reflection, and the inverse bremsstrahlung, and the plasma radiation intensity was enhanced as a result.

  3. Quantitative laser-induced fluorescence measurements of nitric oxide in a heavy-duty Diesel engine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbiezen, K.; Klein-Douwel, R. J. H.; van Viet, A. P.; Donkerbroek, A. J.; Meerts, W. L.; Dam, N. J.; ter Meulen, J. J.

    2007-01-01

    We present quantitative, in-cylinder, UV-laser-induced fluorescence measurements of nitric oxide in a heavy-duty Diesel engine. Processing of the raw fluorescence signals includes a detailed correction, based on additional measurements, for the effect of laser beam and fluorescence attenuation, and

  4. Polarisation Control of DFB Fibre Laser Using UV-Induced Birefringent Phase-Shift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philipsen, Jacob Lundgreen; Lauridsen, Vibeke Claudia; Berendt, Martin Ole

    1998-01-01

    The polarisation properties of a distributed feedback (DFB) fibre laser are investigated experimentally. A birefringent phase-shift is induced by side illumination of the centre part of the lasing structure with ultraviolet (UV) light and it is experimentally shown that the birefringence...... of the phase-shift is the dominating effect controlling the polarisation properties of the laser....

  5. Independent component analysis classification of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forni, Olivier; Maurice, Sylvestre; Gasnault, Olivier; Wiens, Roger C.; Cousin, Agnès; Clegg, Samuel M.; Sirven, Jean-Baptiste; Lasue, Jérémie

    2013-01-01

    The ChemCam instrument on board Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover uses the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique to remotely analyze Martian rocks. It retrieves spectra up to a distance of seven meters to quantify and to quantitatively analyze the sampled rocks. Like any field application, on-site measurements by LIBS are altered by diverse matrix effects which induce signal variations that are specific to the nature of the sample. Qualitative aspects remain to be studied, particularly LIBS sample identification to determine which samples are of interest for further analysis by ChemCam and other rover instruments. This can be performed with the help of different chemometric methods that model the spectra variance in order to identify a the rock from its spectrum. In this paper we test independent components analysis (ICA) rock classification by remote LIBS. We show that using measures of distance in ICA space, namely the Manhattan and the Mahalanobis distance, we can efficiently classify spectra of an unknown rock. The Mahalanobis distance gives overall better performances and is easier to manage than the Manhattan distance for which the determination of the cut-off distance is not easy. However these two techniques are complementary and their analytical performances will improve with time during MSL operations as the quantity of available Martian spectra will grow. The analysis accuracy and performances will benefit from a combination of the two approaches. - Highlights: • We use a novel independent component analysis method to classify LIBS spectra. • We demonstrate the usefulness of ICA. • We report the performances of the ICA classification. • We compare it to other classical classification schemes

  6. Ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence detection strategies in capillary electrophoresis: determination of naphthalene sulphonates in river water.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, S.J.; Isberg, I.C.K.; Gooijer, C.; Brinkman, U.A.T.; Velthorst, N.H.

    1998-01-01

    Various UV-laser-induced fluorescence detection strategies for capillary electrophoresis (CE) are compared, i.e. two UV-laser systems (a pulsed laser providing up to 25 mW of tunable emission, applied at 280, 290 and 325 nm, and a continuous wave (cw) laser providing up to 100 mW of 257 nm emission)

  7. Microstructure and mechanical characteristics of a laser welded joint in SA508 nuclear pressure vessel steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Wei, E-mail: wei.guo-2@manchester.ac.uk [Laser Processing Research Centre, School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, University of Manchester, Sackville Street, Manchester, M13 9 PL (United Kingdom); Dong, Shiyun [Laser Processing Research Centre, School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, University of Manchester, Sackville Street, Manchester, M13 9 PL (United Kingdom); Institute of Laser Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Guo, Wei; Francis, John A.; Li, Lin [Laser Processing Research Centre, School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, University of Manchester, Sackville Street, Manchester, M13 9 PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-11

    SA508 steels are typically used in civil nuclear reactors for critical components such as the reactor pressure vessel. Nuclear components are commonly joined using arc welding processes, but with design lives for prospective new build projects exceeding 60 years, new welding technologies are being sought. In this exploratory study, for the first time, autogenous laser welding was carried out on 6 mm thick SA508 Cl.3 steel sheets using a 16 kW fiber laser system operating at a power of 4 kW. The microstructure and mechanical properties (including microhardness, tensile strength, elongation, and Charpy impact toughness) were characterized and the microstructures were compared with those produced through arc welding. A three-dimensional transient model based on a moving volumetric heat source model was also developed to simulate the laser welding thermal cycles in order to estimate the cooling rates included by the process. Preliminary results suggest that the laser welding process can produce welds that are free of macroscopic defects, while the strength and toughness of the laser welded joint in this study matched the values that were obtained for the parent material in the as-welded condition.

  8. A versatile interaction chamber for laser-based spectroscopic applications, with the emphasis on Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novotný, J.; Brada, M.; Petrilak, M.; Prochazka, D.; Novotný, K.; Hrdička, A.; Kaiser, J.

    2014-01-01

    The technical note describes the interaction chamber developed particularly for the laser spectroscopy technique applications, such as Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), Raman Spectroscopy and Laser-Induced Fluorescence. The chamber was designed in order to provide advanced possibilities for the research in mentioned fields and to facilitate routine research procedures. Parameters and the main benefits of the chamber are described, such as the built-in module for automatic 2D chemical mapping and the possibility to set different ambient gas conditions (pressure value and gas type). Together with the chamber description, selected LIBS application examples benefiting from chamber properties are described. - Highlights: • Development of the interaction chamber for LIBS applications • Example of automated chemical mapping of lead in a chalcopyrite sample • Example of LIBS measurement of fluorine in underpressure • Overview of chamber benefits

  9. Study of Bacterial Samples Using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooq W A; Atif M; Tawfik W; Alsalhi M S; Alahmed Z A; Sarfraz M; Singh J P

    2014-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique has been applied to investigate two different types of bacteria, Escherichia coli (B1) and Micrococcus luteus (B2) deposited on glass slides using Spectrolaser 7000. LIBS spectra were analyzed using spectrolaser software. LIBS spectrum of glass substrate was compared with bacteria spectra. Ca, Mg, Na, K, P, S, Cl, Fe, Al, Mn, Cu, C, H and CN-band appeared in bacterial samples in air. Two carbon lines at 193.02 nm, 247.88 nm and one hydrogen line at 656.28 nm with intensity ratios of 1.9, 1.83 and 1.53 appeared in bacterial samples B1 and B2 respectively. Carbon and hydrogen are the important components of the bio-samples like bacteria and other cancer cells. Investigation on LIBS spectra of the samples in He and Ar atmospheres is also presented. Ni lines appeared only in B2 sample in Ar atmosphere. From the present experimental results we are able to show that LIBS technique has a potential in the identification and discrimination of different types of bacteria. (plasma technology)

  10. The motional stark effect with laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, E. L.; Levinton, F. M.

    2010-05-01

    The motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic is the worldwide standard technique for internal magnetic field pitch angle measurements in magnetized plasmas. Traditionally, it is based on using polarimetry to measure the polarization direction of light emitted from a hydrogenic species in a neutral beam. As the beam passes through the magnetized plasma at a high velocity, in its rest frame it perceives a Lorentz electric field. This field causes the H-alpha emission to be split and polarized. A new technique under development adds laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) to a diagnostic neutral beam (DNB) for an MSE measurement that will enable radially resolved magnetic field magnitude as well as pitch angle measurements in even low-field (experiments. An MSE-LIF system will be installed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. It will enable reconstructions of the plasma pressure, q-profile and current as well as, in conjunction with the existing MSE system, measurements of radial electric fields.

  11. In-situ hydrocarbon delineation using laser-induced fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taer, A.D.; Hastings, R.W.; Brown, A.Y.; Frend, R.

    1996-01-01

    An investigation of hydrocarbons in soils was conducted at an active Shell Oil Company petroleum products terminal, located in Carson, California. An investigation approach involving Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) and Cone Penetrometer Testing (CPT) technologies was implemented to provide real-time, in-situ characterization of site stratigraphy, hydrocarbon distribution and importantly, hydrocarbon product differentiation. The area of investigation is located along a property boundary, where a plume of separate phase hydrocarbons has been actively recovered for several years. CPT/LIF technology was selected for the investigation since previous delineation efforts using hydrocarbon fingerprinting methods proved inconclusive. Additionally, the CPT/LIF technology had the potential to provide a cost effective solution to accomplish project objectives. Based on the information obtained during this investigation, it was determined that the plume of separate phase hydrocarbons along the northern property boundary is from a source distinctly different than any identified hydrocarbons known to be from on-site sources. In addition, the plume was determined to not be connected with any other known on-site hydrocarbon plumes. The results of this CPT/LIF investigation were consistent with the known hydrogeologic conditions. This evaluation determined that CPT/LIF technology was very effective in addressing project objectives and resulted in a significant cost savings

  12. Femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilyin, Alexey A.; Golik, Sergey S.

    2013-01-01

    The composition of the line and band spectra of the plasma induced by a femtosecond laser pulse on the surface of sea water is determined. The temporal behaviors of the intensity of the continuum and the Ca II, Mg II and Na I lines are investigated. It is shown that the time dependence of the intensity of the Na I line is described by a monoexponential function. The characteristic decay times of the line intensities of Mg II and Na I were used to estimate the three-body recombination times. Using these values, we estimate the electron number density and the feasibility of Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) criterion. A method involving excitation rate constants is proposed for the comparison of detection limits. For a plasma generated on a liquid surface, the following relation among detection limits will be obtained: LOD(Na) 2 were recorded. • Recombination determines characteristic decay time of line intensity. • Three-body recombination time was used to estimate electron density. • Excitation rate constants allow to determine relation of detection limits

  13. Airborne laser induced fluorescence imaging. Innovative technology summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-06-01

    Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) was demonstration as part of the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) Plant 1 Large Scale Demonstration and Deployment Project (LSDDP) sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and Technology, Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area located at the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) in Morgantown, West Virginia. The demonstration took place on November 19, 1996. In order to allow the contaminated buildings undergoing deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) to be opened to the atmosphere, radiological surveys of floors, walls and ceilings must take place. After successful completion of the radiological clearance survey, demolition of the building can continue. Currently, this process is performed by collecting and analyzing swipe samples for radiological analysis. Two methods are used to analyze the swipe samples: hand-held frisker and laboratory analysis. For the purpose of this demonstration, the least expensive method, swipe samples analyzed by hand-held frisker, is the baseline technology. The objective of the technology demonstration was to determine if the baseline technology could be replaced using LIF

  14. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Cinematographic Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oujja, M.; Abrusci, C.; Gaspard, S.; Rebollar, E.; Amo, A. del; Catalina, F.; Castillejo, M.

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to characterize the composition of black-and-white, silver-gelatine photographic films. LIB spectra of samples and reference gelatine (of various gel strengths, Bloom values 225 and 75 and crosslinking degrees) were acquired in vacuum by excitation at 266 nm. The elemental composition of the gelatine used in the upper protective layer and in the underlying emulsion is revealed by the stratigraphic analysis carried out by delivering successive pulses on the same spot of the sample. Silver (Ag) lines from the light-sensitive silver halide salts are accompanied by iron, lead and chrome lines. Fe and Pb are constituents of film developers and Cr is included in the hardening agent. The results demonstrate the analytical capacity of LIBS for study and classification of different gelatine types and the sensitivity of the technique to minor changes in gelatine composition. In addition LIBS analysis allows extracting important information on the chemicals used as developers and hardeners of archival cinematographic films.

  15. Laser Induced Fluorescence Diagnostic for the Plasma Couette Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Noam; Skiff, Fred; Collins, Cami; Weisberg, Dave; Wallace, John; Clark, Mike; Garot, Kristine; Forest, Cary

    2010-11-01

    The Plasma Couette Experiment (PCX) at U. Wisconsin-Madison consists of a rotating high-beta plasma and is well-suited to the study of flow-driven, astrophysically-relevant plasma phenomena. PCX confinement relies on alternating rings of 1kG permanent magnets and the rotation is driven by electrode rings, interspersed between the magnets, which provide an azimuthal ExB. I will discuss the development of a laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic (LIF) to characterize the ion distribution function of argon plasmas in PCX. The LIF system--which will be scanned radially--will be used to calibrate internal Mach probes, as well as to measure the time-resolved velocity profile, ion temperature and density non-perturbatively. These diagnostics will be applied to study the magneto-rotational instability in a plasma, as well as the buoyancy instability thought to be involved in producing the solar magnetic field. This work is supported by NSF and DOE.

  16. Analysis of bakery products by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilge, Gonca; Boyacı, İsmail Hakkı; Eseller, Kemal Efe; Tamer, Uğur; Çakır, Serhat

    2015-08-15

    In this study, we focused on the detection of Na in bakery products by using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as a quick and simple method. LIBS experiments were performed to examine the Na at 589 nm to quantify NaCl. A series of standard bread sample pellets containing various concentrations of NaCl (0.025-3.5%) were used to construct the calibration curves and to determine the detection limits of the measurements. Calibration graphs were drawn to indicate functions of NaCl and Na concentrations, which showed good linearity in the range of 0.025-3.5% NaCl and 0.01-1.4% Na concentrations with correlation coefficients (R(2)) values greater than 0.98 and 0.96. The obtained detection limits for NaCl and Na were 175 and 69 ppm, respectively. Performed experimental studies showed that LIBS is a convenient method for commercial bakery products to quantify NaCl concentrations as a rapid and in situ technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of Mechanical Sealing and Laser Welding Technology to Instrument Thermocouple for Nuclear Fuel Test Rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joung, Chang-Young; Ahn, Sung-Ho; Hong, Jin-Tae; Kim, Ka-Hye; Huh, Sung-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Zircaloy-4 of the nuclear fuel test rod, AISI 316L of the mechanical sealing parts, and the MI (mineral insulated) cable at a thermocouple instrumentation are hetero-metals, and are difficult to weld to dissimilar materials. Therefore, a mechanical sealing method to instrument the thermocouple should be conducted using two kinds of sealing process as follows: One is a mechanical sealing process using Swagelok, which is composed of sealing components that consists of an end-cap, a seal tube, a compression ring and a Swagelok nut. The other is a laser welding process used to join a seal tube, and an MI cable, which are made of the same material. The mechanical sealing process should be sealed up with the mechanical contact compressed by the strength forced between a seal tube and an end-cap, and the laser welding process should be conducted to have no defects on the sealing area between a seal tube and an MI cable. Therefore, the mechanical sealing and laser welding techniques need to be developed to accurately measure the centerline temperature of the nuclear fuel test rod in an experimental reactor. The mechanical sealing and laser welding tests were conducted to develop the thermocouple instrumentation techniques for the nuclear fuel test rod. The optimum torque value of a Swagelok nut to seal the mechanical sealing part between the end-cap and seal tube was established through various torque tests using a torque wrench. The optimum laser welding conditions to seal the welding part between a seal tube and an MI cable were obtained through various welding tests using a laser welding system

  18. Development of Mechanical Sealing and Laser Welding Technology to Instrument Thermocouple for Nuclear Fuel Test Rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joung, Chang-Young; Ahn, Sung-Ho; Hong, Jin-Tae; Kim, Ka-Hye; Huh, Sung-Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Zircaloy-4 of the nuclear fuel test rod, AISI 316L of the mechanical sealing parts, and the MI (mineral insulated) cable at a thermocouple instrumentation are hetero-metals, and are difficult to weld to dissimilar materials. Therefore, a mechanical sealing method to instrument the thermocouple should be conducted using two kinds of sealing process as follows: One is a mechanical sealing process using Swagelok, which is composed of sealing components that consists of an end-cap, a seal tube, a compression ring and a Swagelok nut. The other is a laser welding process used to join a seal tube, and an MI cable, which are made of the same material. The mechanical sealing process should be sealed up with the mechanical contact compressed by the strength forced between a seal tube and an end-cap, and the laser welding process should be conducted to have no defects on the sealing area between a seal tube and an MI cable. Therefore, the mechanical sealing and laser welding techniques need to be developed to accurately measure the centerline temperature of the nuclear fuel test rod in an experimental reactor. The mechanical sealing and laser welding tests were conducted to develop the thermocouple instrumentation techniques for the nuclear fuel test rod. The optimum torque value of a Swagelok nut to seal the mechanical sealing part between the end-cap and seal tube was established through various torque tests using a torque wrench. The optimum laser welding conditions to seal the welding part between a seal tube and an MI cable were obtained through various welding tests using a laser welding system.

  19. Laser-Induced Emissions Sensor for Soot Mass in Rocket Plumes, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A method is proposed to measure soot mass concentration non-intrusively from a distance in a rocket engine exhaust stream during ground tests using laser-induced...

  20. Laser-induced multi-point ignition for enabling high-performance engines

    KAUST Repository

    Chung, Suk-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Various multi-point laser-induced ignition techniques were reviewed, which adopted conical cavity and prechamber configurations. Up to five-point ignitions have been achieved with significant reduction in combustion duration, demonstrating potential increase in combustion system efficiency.

  1. Quantitative mixture fraction measurements in combustion system via laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Mansour, Mohy S.; Imam, Hisham; Elsayed, Khaled A.; Elbaz, Ayman M.; Abbass, Wafaa

    2015-01-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique has been applied to quantitative mixture fraction measurements in flames. The measured spectra of different mixtures of natural gas and air are used to obtain the calibration parameters for local

  2. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Measurements within a Laboratory Hall Thruster (Postprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hargus, Jr., W. A; Cappelli, M. A

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the results of a study of laser induced fluorescence velocimetry of ionic xenon in the plume and interior acceleration channel of a laboratory Hall type thruster operating...

  3. Strengthening of the nuclear valve sealing surface by laser cladding technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Shihong; Huang Guodong

    1998-07-01

    A 5 kW laser with CO 2 flow transverse for cladding Co-base alloy or Ni-base alloy coat on the austenite matrix of the nuclear valve sealing surface is introduced. The results show that, after the sealing surface of valve is processed by the laser cladding, the coat of 3.0 mm thick can be made with smooth surface. The test and comparison analysis indicate that the structure and all performance have obvious advantages over that of the plasma spurt welding, bead welding and flame welding processing

  4. Recent trends in precision measurements of atomic and nuclear properties with lasers and ion traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Michael

    2017-11-01

    The X. international workshop on "Application of Lasers and Storage Devices in Atomic Nuclei Research" took place in Poznan in May 2016. It addressed the latest experimental and theoretical achievements in laser and ion trap-based investigations of radionuclides, highly charged ions and antiprotons. The precise determination of atomic and nuclear properties provides a stringent benchmark for theoretical models and eventually leads to a better understanding of the underlying fundamental interactions and symmetries. This article addresses some general trends in this field and highlights select recent achievements presented at the workshop. Many of these are covered in more detail within the individual contributions to this special issue of Hyperfine Interactions.

  5. Recent trends in precision measurements of atomic and nuclear properties with lasers and ion traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, Michael, E-mail: m.block@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    The X. international workshop on “Application of Lasers and Storage Devices in Atomic Nuclei Research” took place in Poznan in May 2016. It addressed the latest experimental and theoretical achievements in laser and ion trap-based investigations of radionuclides, highly charged ions and antiprotons. The precise determination of atomic and nuclear properties provides a stringent benchmark for theoretical models and eventually leads to a better understanding of the underlying fundamental interactions and symmetries. This article addresses some general trends in this field and highlights select recent achievements presented at the workshop. Many of these are covered in more detail within the individual contributions to this special issue of Hyperfine Interactions.

  6. Impact of environmental contamination on laser induced damage of silica optics in Laser MegaJoule; Impact de l'environnement sur l'endommagement laser des optiques de silice du Laser MegaJoule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bien-Aime, K.

    2009-11-15

    Laser induced damage impact of molecular contamination on fused polished silica samples in a context of high power laser fusion facility, such as Laser MegaJoule (LMJ) has been studied. One of the possible causes of laser induced degradation of optical component is the adsorption of molecular or particular contamination on optical surfaces. In the peculiar case of LMJ, laser irradiation conditions are a fluence of 10 J/cm{sup 2}, a wavelength of 351 nm, a pulse duration of 3 ns for a single shot/days frequency. Critical compounds have been identified thanks to environmental measurements, analysis of material outgassing, and identification of surface contamination in the critical environments. Experiments of controlled contamination involving these compounds have been conducted in order to understand and model mechanisms of laser damage. Various hypotheses are proposed to explain the damage mechanism. (author)

  7. Pulsed laser-induced SEU in integrated circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchner, S.; Kang, K.; Stapor, W.J.; Campbell, A.B.; Knudson, A.R.; McDonald, P.; Rivet, S.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have used a pulsed picosecond laser to measure the threshold for single event upset (SEU) and single event latchup (SEL) for two different kinds of integrated circuits. The relative thresholds show good agreement with published ion upset data. The consistency of the results together with the advantages of using a laser system suggest that the pulsed laser can be used for SEU/SEL hardness assurance of integrated circuits

  8. Nuclear reactions induced by high-energy alpha particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, B. S. P.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of nuclear reactions induced by high energy protons and heavier ions are included. Fundamental data needed in the shielding, dosimetry, and radiobiology of high energy particles produced by accelerators were generated, along with data on cosmic ray interaction with matter. The mechanism of high energy nucleon-nucleus reactions is also examined, especially for light target nuclei of mass number comparable to that of biological tissue.

  9. Polarized nuclear target based on parahydrogen induced polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Budker, D.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Appelt, S.; Bouchard, L. S.; Wojtsekhowski, B.

    2012-01-01

    We discuss a novel concept of a polarized nuclear target for accelerator fixed-target scattering experiments, which is based on parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP). One may be able to reach a 33% free-proton polarization in the ethane molecule. The potential advantages of such a target include operation at zero magnetic field, fast ($\\sim$100 Hz) polarization reversal, and operation with large intensity of an electron beam.

  10. In vitro Models of Laser Induced Injury: Pathophysiology and Cytoprotection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bowman, Phillip D; Schuschereba, Steven T

    2007-01-01

    Lasers generating predominantly thermal energy are used in medicine and research for a variety of purposes including surgical excision, pan retinal photocoagulation for treating diabetic retinopathy...

  11. Optical-fiber-based laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for detection of early caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasazawa, Shuhei; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2015-06-01

    A laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system targeting for the in vivo analysis of tooth enamel is described. The system is planned to enable real-time analysis of teeth during laser dental treatment by utilizing a hollow optical fiber that transmits both Q-switched Nd:YAG laser light for LIBS and infrared Er:YAG laser light for tooth ablation. The sensitivity of caries detection was substantially improved by expanding the spectral region under analysis to ultraviolet (UV) light and by focusing on emission peaks of Zn in the UV region. Subsequently, early caries were distinguished from healthy teeth with accuracy rates above 80% in vitro.

  12. CO2 laser photo-induced decomposition of ammoniated ammonium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikezoe, Yasumasa; Soga, Takesi; Suzuki, Kazuya; Moriyama, Noboru; Ohno, Shin-ichi

    1995-01-01

    Photo-induced decomposition of ammoniated (clustered) ammonium ions was studied using a CO 2 laser to excite vibrational levels of the cluster ion. A tandem mass spectrometer (TMS) was installed with two quadrupole mass filters, a corona discharge ionization chamber, and a series of einzel lenses. Cluster ions of NH 4 + ·nNH 3 with n=1-7 were formed in TMS, and found to decompose at the frequency of 1077 cm -1 to an extent in proportional to laser intensity. CO 2 laser between 925 and 1055 do not decompose the cluster ions with laser intensities examined. (author)

  13. Laser induced ultrasonic phased array using full matrix capture data acquisition and total focusing method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratoudaki, Theodosia; Clark, Matt; Wilcox, Paul D

    2016-09-19

    Laser ultrasonics is a technique where lasers are employed to generate and detect ultrasound. A data collection method (full matrix capture) and a post processing imaging algorithm, the total focusing method, both developed for ultrasonic arrays, are modified and used in order to enhance the capabilities of laser ultrasonics for nondestructive testing by improving defect detectability and increasing spatial resolution. In this way, a laser induced ultrasonic phased array is synthesized. A model is developed and compared with experimental results from aluminum samples with side drilled holes and slots at depths of 5 - 20 mm from the surface.

  14. Investigation of specific applications of laser cutting for dismantling of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarroni, G.; De Zaiacomo, T.; Melandri, C.; Formignani, M.; Barilli, L.; Di Fino, M.; Picini, P.; Galuppi, G.; Rocca, C.; Manassero, G.; Migliorati, B.

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this work, performed on an experimental basis in a frame of strict collaboration between industry (FIAT-CIEI and FIAT-CRF in Turin) and public research laboratories (ENEA-PAS-FIBI in Bologna, ENEA-PAS-ISP and ENEA-TIB-TECNLAS in Rome) and supported by a CEC contract, was to bring out the items for better evaluation of the laser beam application possibilities in dismantling nuclear power plants. The main topics of the research have been: study and definition of the relevant basic parameters ruling the aerosol generation rate and behaviour in terms of physical and chemical characteristics. This work has been performed in a facility specifically designed for aerosol measurements and equipped with a 2kW laser source; study of the feasibility of local abatement of the aerosols produced and of the pressure drop in the HEPA filters; study of long distance transmission of the laser beam power performed with a 5kW laser source with an evaluation of the power loss and beam characteristic modifications; study of laser beam technique application for dismantling the Garigliano power plant steam drum in order to better demonstrate the feasibility of the use of this technique. The research resulted in the conclusion that the laser beam is actually appropriate for long distance dismantling of metal components.

  15. High-temperature laser induced spectroscopy in nuclear steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allmon, W.E.; Berthold, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes an apparatus for conducting optical spectroscopy in a hostile environment. It comprises: a source of high intensity light; an optical fiber connected to the source of high intensity light for transmitting light therefrom. The optical fiber having an end for discharging light onto a material to be spectroscopically analyzed; a sheath defining a space around at least a part of the optical fiber carrying the end of the optical fiber for shielding the optical fiber from the hostile environment; a window in the sheath for closing the space and for passing light transmitted through the end of the optical fiber out of the sheath; light detector means for detecting and spectroscopically analyzing emitted light from the material; an optical fiber means for transmitting the emitted light from the material to the light detector means; a standardization module for containing a sample having a known composition and being exposed to known temperature and pressure conditions; an additional optical fiber connected to the module for transmitting light to the sample in the module; multiplexer means; and additional optical fiber means for returning light from the module to the detector through the multiplexer means

  16. Applications of ultra-short pulsed laser ablation: thin films deposition and fs/ns dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teghil, R; De Bonis, A; Galasso, A; Santagata, A; Albano, G; Villani, P; Spera, D; Parisi, G P

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we report a survey of two of the large number of possible practical applications of the laser ablation performed by an ultra-short pulse laser, namely pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and fs/ns dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS). These applications differ from those using just longer pulsed lasers as a consequence of the distinctive characteristics of the plasma produced by ultra-short laser beams. The most important feature of this plasma is the large presence of particles with nanometric size which plays a fundamental role in both applications.

  17. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy Diagnostic of Laser-Induced Optical Breakdown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian G. Parigger

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Transient laser plasma is generated in laser-induced optical breakdown (LIOB. Here we report experiments conducted with 10.6-micron CO2 laser radiation, and with 1.064-micron fundamental, 0.532-micron frequency-doubled, 0.355-micron frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser radiation. Characterization of laser induced plasma utilizes laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS techniques. Atomic hydrogen Balmer series emissions show electron number density of 1017 cm−3 measured approximately 10 μs and 1 μs after optical breakdown for CO2 and Nd:YAG laser radiation, respectively. Recorded molecular recombination emission spectra of CN and C2 Swan bands indicate an equilibrium temperature in excess of 7000 Kelvin, inferred for these diatomic molecules. Reported are also graphite ablation experiments where we use unfocused laser radiation that is favorable for observation of neutral C3 emission due to reduced C3 cation formation. Our analysis is based on computation of diatomic molecular spectra that includes accurate determination of rotational line strengths, or Hönl-London factors.

  18. Laser induced florescence: application to spectroscopy and new microscopy imaging methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galaup, L. P.

    2012-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence is one of the light using techniques which allows the highest sensitivity for atoms and molecules detection, up to the single atom or single molecule level. This field is much too large for an extensive review; therefor we have chosen to focus on two main points: 1- the observation of laser stimulated fluorescence in phthalocyanine and porphyrin like molecules in rare gas and nitrogen matrices at low temperatures. 2- the presentation of laser induced fluorescence techniques suitable for achieving ultra-high spatial resolution imaging, below the diffraction limit of conventional microscopy, thanks to highly fluorescent molecules to be used as biological markers. (Author)

  19. Laser-filamentation-induced condensation and snow formation in a cloud chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Jingjing; Liu, Jiansheng; Wang, Cheng; Sun, Haiyi; Wang, Wentao; Ge, Xiaochun; Li, Chuang; Chin, See Leang; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2012-04-01

    Using 1 kHz, 9 mJ femtosecond laser pulses, we demonstrate laser-filamentation-induced spectacular snow formation in a cloud chamber. An intense updraft of warm moist air is generated owing to the continuous heating by the high-repetition filamentation. As it encounters the cold air above, water condensation and large-sized particles spread unevenly across the whole cloud chamber via convection and cyclone like action on a macroscopic scale. This indicates that high-repetition filamentation plays a significant role in macroscopic laser-induced water condensation and snow formation.

  20. Laser-induced thermoelectric voltage in normal state MgB2 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Songqing; Zhou Yueliang; Zhao Kun; Wang Shufang; Chen Zhenghao; Jin Kuijuan; Lue Huibin; Cheng Bolin; Yang Guozhen

    2006-01-01

    Laser-induced voltage has been observed in c-axis oriented MgB 2 thin film at room temperature. The amplitude of the signal is approximately proportional to the film thickness. For the film with the thickness of 150 nm, a very fast response has been detected when the film was irradiated by a 308 nm pulsed laser of 20 ns duration. The rise time and full width at half-maximum of the signal are about 3 and 25 ns, respectively. The physical origin of the laser-induced voltage can be attributed to a transverse thermoelectricity due to the anisotropic thermopower in MgB 2