WorldWideScience

Sample records for laser fusion reactors

  1. Survey of the laser-solenoid fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amherd, N.A.

    1975-09-01

    This report surveys the prospects for a laser-solenoid fusion reactor. A sample reactor and scaling laws are used to describe the concept's characteristics. Experimental results are reviewed, and the laser and magnet technologies that undergird the laser-solenoid concept are analyzed. Finally, a systems analysis of fusion power reactors is given, including a discussion of direct conversion and fusion-fission effects, to ascertain the system attributes of the laser-solenoid configuration

  2. Advances in laser solenoid fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.C.; Quimby, D.C.

    1978-01-01

    The laser solenoid is an alternate fusion concept based on a laser-heated magnetically-confined plasma column. The reactor concept has evolved in several systems studies over the last five years. We describe recent advances in the plasma physics and technology of laser-plasma coupling. The technology advances include progress on first walls, inner magnet design, confinement module design, and reactor maintenance. We also describe a new generation of laser solenoid fusion and fusion-fission reactor designs

  3. Self-sustaining nuclear pumped laser-fusion reactor experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boody, F.P.; Choi, C.K.; Miley, G.H.

    1977-01-01

    The features of a neutron feedback nuclear pumped (NFNP) laser-fusion reactor equipment were studied with the intention of establishing the feasibility of the concept. The NFNP laser-fusion concept is compared schematically to electrically pumped laser fusion. The study showed that, once a method of energy storage has been demonstrated, a self-sustaining fusion-fission hybrid reactor with a ''blanket multiplication'' of two would be feasible using nuclear pumped Xe F* excimer lasers having efficiencies of 1 to 2 percent and D-D-T pellets with gains of 50 to 100

  4. Fusion reactor pumped laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear pumped laser is described comprising: a toroidal fusion reactor, the reactor generating energetic neutrons; an annular gas cell disposed around the outer periphery of the reactor, the cell including an annular reflecting mirror disposed at the bottom of the cell and an annular output window disposed at the top of the cell; a gas lasing medium disposed within the annular cell for generating output laser radiation; neutron reflector material means disposed around the annular cell for reflecting neutrons incident thereon back into the gas cell; neutron moderator material means disposed between the reactor and the gas cell and between the gas cell and the neutron reflector material for moderating the energy of energetic neutrons from the reactor; converting means for converting energy from the moderated neutrons to energy pumping means for pumping the gas lasing medium; and beam compactor means for receiving output laser radiation from the annular output window and generating a single output laser beam therefrom

  5. Reactor concepts for laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, W.R.; Maniscalco, J.A.

    1977-07-01

    Scoping studies were initiated to identify attractive reactor concepts for producing electric power with laser fusion. Several exploratory reactor concepts were developed and are being subjected to our criteria for comparing long-range sources of electrical energy: abundance, social costs, technical feasibility, and economic competitiveness. The exploratory concepts include: a liquid-lithium-cooled stainless steel manifold, a gas-cooled graphite manifold, and fluidized wall concepts, such as a liquid lithium ''waterfall'', and a ceramic-lithium pellet ''waterfall''. Two of the major reactor vessel problems affecting the technical feasibility of a laser fusion power plant are: the effects of high-energy neutrons and cyclical stresses on the blanket structure and the effects of x-rays and debris from the fusion microexplosion on the first-wall. The liquid lithium ''waterfall'' concept is presented here in more detail as an approach which effectively deals with these damaging effects

  6. SOLASE: a conceptual laser fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.; Moses, G.A.

    1977-12-01

    The SOLASE conceptual laser fusion reactor has been designed to elucidate the technological problems posed by inertial confinement fusion reactors. This report contains a detailed description of all aspects of the study including the physics of pellet implosion and burn, optics and target illumination, last mirror design, laser system analysis, cavity design, pellet fabrication and delivery, vacuum system requirements, blanket design, thermal hydraulics, tritium analysis, neutronics calculations, radiation effects, stress analysis, shield design, reactor and plant building layout, maintenance procedures, and power cycle design. The reactor is designed as a 1000 MW/sub e/ unit for central station electric power generation

  7. SOLASE: a conceptual laser fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.; Moses, G.A.

    1977-12-01

    The SOLASE conceptual laser fusion reactor has been designed to elucidate the technological problems posed by inertial confinement fusion ractors. This report contains a detailed description of all aspects of the study including the physics of pellet implosion and burn, optics and target illumination, last mirror design, laser system analysis, cavity design, pellet fabrication and delivery, vacuum system requirements, blanket design, thermal hydraulics, tritium analysis, neutronics calculations, radiation effects, stress analysis, shield design, reactor and plant building layout, maintenance procedures, and power cycle design. The reactor is designed as a 1000 MW/sub e/ unit for central station electric power generation

  8. Confinement inertial fusion. Power reactors of nuclear fusion by lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velarde, G.; Ahnert, C.; Aragones, J.M.; Leira, G; Martinez-Val, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The energy crisis and the need of the nuclear fusion energy are analized. The nuclear processes in the laser interation with the ablator material are studied, as well as the thermohydrodinamic processes in the implossion, and the neutronics of the fusion. The fusion reactor components are described and the economic and social impact of its introduction in the future energetic strategies.(author)

  9. A feasibility study of a linear laser heated solenoid fusion reactor. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.C.

    1976-02-01

    This report examines the feasibility of a laser heated solenoid as a fusion or fusion-fission reactor system. The objective of this study, was an assessment of the laser heated solenoid reactor concept in terms of its plasma physics, engineering design, and commercial feasibility. Within the study many pertinent reactor aspects were treated including: physics of the laser-plasma interaction; thermonuclear behavior of a slender plasma column; end-losses under reactor conditions; design of a modular first wall, a hybrid (both superconducting and normal) magnet, a large CO 2 laser system; reactor blanket; electrical storage elements; neutronics; radiation damage, and tritium processing. Self-consistent reactor configurations were developed for both pure fusion and fusion-fission designs, with the latter designed both to produce power and/or fissile fuels for conventional fission reactors. Appendix A is a bibliography with commentary of theoretical and experimental studies that have been directed at the laser heated solenoid

  10. Fusion--fission hybrid reactors based on the laser solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.C.; Taussig, R.T.; Quimby, D.C.

    1976-01-01

    Fusion-fission reactors, based on the laser solenoid concept, can be much smaller in scale than their pure fusion counterparts, with moderate first-wall loading and rapid breeding capabilities (1 to 3 tonnes/yr), and can be designed successfully on the basis of classical plasma transport properties and free-streaming end-loss. Preliminary design information is presented for such systems, including the first wall, pulse coil, blanket, superconductors, laser optics, and power supplies, accounting for the desired reactor performance and other physics and engineering constraints. Self-consistent point designs for first and second generation reactors are discussed which illustrate the reactor size, performance, component parameters, and the level of technological development required

  11. SOLASE conceptual laser fusion reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, G.A.; Conn, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.; Cooper, G.W.; Howard, J.; Magelssen, G.R.

    1978-01-01

    A conceptual laser fusion reactor for electric power, SOLASE, has been designed. The SOLASE design utilizes a 1 MJ, 6.7% efficient laser to implode 20 fusion targets per second. The target gain is 150 and produces a net electrical power of 1000 MW. The reactor cavity is spherical with a 6 m radius. The first wall is graphite and has a neutron wall loading of 5 MW/m 2 . It is protected from the target debris by low pressure xenon gas that is introduced into the cavity. The blanket structure is a honeycombed graphite composite. The tritium breeding and heat transport medium is Li 2 O in the form of pellets that flow through the blanket. The tritium breeding ration is 1.34. Temperature decoupling of the graphite structure and the Li 2 O coolant enables the structure to operate at temperatures that minimize radiation damage effects. The graphite blanket is replaced every year but exhibits low levels of radioactivity so that limited hands on maintenance is possible two weeks after shutdown, thus facilitating rapid replacement

  12. Optical design considerations for laser fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monsler, M.J.; Maniscalco, J.A.

    1977-09-01

    The plan for the development of commercial inertial confinement fusion (ICF) power plants is discussed, emphasizing the utilization of the unique features of laser fusion to arrive at conceptual designs for reactors and optical systems which minimize the need for advanced materials and techniques requiring expensive test facilities. A conceptual design for a liquid lithium fall reactor is described which successfully deals with the hostile x-ray and neutron environment and promises to last the 30 year plant lifetime. Schemes for protecting the final focusing optics are described which are both compatible with this reactor system and show promise of surviving a full year in order to minimize costly downtime. Damage mechanisms and protection techniques are discussed, and a recommendation is made for a high f-number metal mirror final focusing system

  13. Tabular equation of state of lithium for laser-fusion reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, D.A.; Ross, M.; Rogers, F.J.

    1979-01-01

    A tabular lithium equation of state was formulated from three separate equation-of-state models to carry out hydrodynamic simulations of a lithium-waterfall laser-fusion reactor. The models we used are: ACTEX for the ionized fluid, soft-sphere for the liquid and vapor, and pseudopotential for the hot, dense liquid. The models are smoothly joined over the range of density and temperature conditions appropriate for a laser-fusion reactor. We also fitted the models into two forms suitable for hydrodynamic calculations

  14. Tabular equation of state of lithium for laser-fusion reactor studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, D.A.; Ross, M.; Rogers, F.J.

    1979-01-19

    A tabular lithium equation of state was formulated from three separate equation-of-state models to carry out hydrodynamic simulations of a lithium-waterfall laser-fusion reactor. The models we used are: ACTEX for the ionized fluid, soft-sphere for the liquid and vapor, and pseudopotential for the hot, dense liquid. The models are smoothly joined over the range of density and temperature conditions appropriate for a laser-fusion reactor. We also fitted the models into two forms suitable for hydrodynamic calculations.

  15. Laser fusion overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuckolls, J.

    1976-01-01

    Because of recent breakthroughs in the target area, and in the glass laser area, the scientific feasibility of laser fusion--and of inertial fusion--may be demonstrated in the early 1980's. Then the development in that time period of a suitable laser (or storage ring or other driving source) would make possible an operational inertial fusion reactor in this century. These are roughly the same time scales as projected by the Tokamak magnetic confinement approach. It thus appears that the 15-20 year earlier start by magnetic confinement fusion may be overcome. Because inertial confinement has been demonstrated, and inertial fusion reactors may operate on smaller scales than Tokamaks, laser fusion may have important technical and economic advantages

  16. First wall studies of a laser-fusion hybrid reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovingh, J.

    1976-09-01

    The design of a first wall for a 20 MW thermonuclear power laser fusion hybrid reactor is presented. The 20 mm thick graphite first wall is located 3.5 m from the DT microexplosion with a thermonuclear yield of 10 MJ. Estimates of the energy deposition, temperature, stresses, and material vaporized from the first wall due to the interaction of the x-rays, charged particle debris, and reflected laser light with the graphite are presented, along with a brief description of the analytical methods used for these estimations. Graphite is a viable first wall material for inertially-confined fusion reactors, with lifetimes of a year possible

  17. Commercial application of laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, L.A.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamentals of laser-induced fusion, some laser-fusion reactor concepts, and attendant means of utilizing the thermonuclear energy for commercial electric power generation are discussed. Theoretical fusion-pellet microexplosion energy release characteristics are described and the effects of pellet design options on pellet-microexplosion characteristics are discussed. The results of analyses to assess the engineering feasibility of reactor cavities for which protection of cavity components is provided either by suitable ablative materials or by diversion of plasmas by magnetic fields are presented. Two conceptual laser-fusion electric generating stations, based on different laser-fusion reactor concepts, are described

  18. Conceptual design of laser fusion reactor KOYO-fast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomabechi, K.; Kozaki, Y.; Norimatsu, T.

    2006-01-01

    A conceptual design of the laser fusion reactor KOYO-F based on the fast ignition scheme is reported including the target design, the laser system and the design for chamber. A Yb-YAG ceramic laser operated at 200 K is the primary candidate for the compression laser and an OPCPA (optical parametric chirped pulse amplification) system is the one for the ignition laser. The chamber is basically a wet wall type but the fire position is vertically off-set to simplify the protection scheme of the ceiling. The target consists of foam insulated, cryogenic DT shells with a LiPb, reentrant guide-cone. (authors)

  19. Tritium management in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galloway, T.R.

    1978-05-01

    This is a review paper covering the key environmental and safety issues and how they have been handled in the various magnetic and inertial confinement concepts and reference designs. The issues treated include: tritium accident analyses, tritium process control, occupational safety, HTO formation rate from the gas-phase, disposal of tritium contaminated wastes, and environmental impact--each covering the Joint European Tokamak (J.E.T. experiment), Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), Russian T-20, The Next Step (TNS) designs by Westinghouse/ORNL and General Atomic/ANL, the ANL and ORNL EPR's, the G.A. Doublet Demonstration Reactor, the Italian Fintor-D and the ORNL Demo Studies. There are also the following full scale plant reference designs: UWMAK-III, LASL's Theta Pinch Reactor Design (RTPR), Mirror Fusion Reactor (MFR), Tandem Mirror Reactor (TMR), and the Mirror Hybrid Reactor (MHR). There are four laser device breakeven experiments, SHIVA-NOVA, LLL reference designs, ORNL Laser Fusion power plant, the German ''Saturn,'' and LLL's Laser Fusion EPR I and II

  20. Civilian applications of laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maniscalco, J.; Blink, J.; Buntzen, R.; Hovingh, J.; Meier, W.; Monsler, M.; Walker, P.

    1978-01-01

    The commercial aspects of laser fusion were evaluated in an attempt to relate the end products (neutrons and energy) to significant commercial applications. We have found that by far the largest markets and highest payoffs for laser fusion are associated with electric power production. Hence, much of this report evaluates the prospects of producing commercial electricity with laser fusion. To this end, we have described in detail a new and promising laser fusion concept--the liquid lithium waterfall reactor. In addition, we have taken the most attractive features from our laser fusion studies and used them to compare laser fusion to other long-range sources of energy (breeder reactors and solar energy). It is our contention that all three sources of electrical energy should be developed to the point where the final selections are primarily based on economic competitiveness. The other potential applications of laser fusion (fissile fuel production, synthetic fuel production, actinide burning, and propulsion) are also discussed, and our preliminary plan for the engineering development of laser fusion is presented

  1. Laser fusion reactor design in a fast ignition with a dry wall chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Yichi; Goto, Takuya; Ninomiya, Daisuke; Hiwatari, Ryoji; Asaoka, Yoshiyuki; Okano, Kunihiko

    2007-01-01

    One of the critical issues in laser fusion reactor design is high pulse heat load on the first wall by the X-rays and the fast/debris ions from fusion burn. There are mainly two concepts for the first wall of laser fusion reactor, a dry wall and a liquid metal wall. We should notice that the fast ignition method can achieve sufficiently high pellet gain with smaller (about 1/10 of the conventional central ignition method) input energy. To take advantage of this property, the design of a laser fusion reactor with a small size dry wall chamber may become possible. Since a small fusion pulse leads to a small electric power, high repetition of laser irradiation is required to keep sufficient electric power. Then we tried to design a laser fusion reactor with a dry wall chamber and a high repetition laser. This is a new challenging path to realize a laser fusion plant. Based on the point model of the core plasma, we have estimated that fusion energy in one pulse can be reduced to be 40 MJ with a pellet gain around G>100. To evaluate the validity of this simple estimation and to optimize the pellet design and the pulse shaping for the fast ignition scenario, we have introduced 1-D hydrodynamic simulation code ILESTA-1D and carried out implosion simulations. Since the code is one-dimensional, the detailed physics process of fast heating cannot be reproduced. Thus the fast heating is reflected in the code as the additional artificial heating source in the energy equation. It is modeled as a homogeneous heating of electrons in core region at the time just before when the maximum compression is achieved. At present we obtained the pellet gain G∝100 with the same input energy as the above estimation by a simple point model (350kJ for implosion, 50kJ for heating and assuming 20% coupling of heating laser). A dry wall is exposed to several threats due to the cyclic load by the high energy X-ray and charged particles: surface melting, physical and chemical sputtering

  2. Civilian applications of laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maniscalco, J.; Blink, J.; Buntzen, R.; Hovingh, J.; Meier, W.; Monsler, M.; Walker, P.

    1977-01-01

    The commercial aspects of laser fusion were evaluated in an attempt to relate the end products (neutrons and energy) to significant commercial applications. It was found that by far the largest markets and highest payoffs for laser fusion are associated with electric power production. Hence, much of this report evaluates the prospects of producing commercial electricity with laser fusion. To this end, we have described in detail a new and promising laser fusion concept--the liquid lithium waterfall reactor. In addition, we have taken the most attractive features from our laser studies and used them to compare laser fusion to other long-range sources of energy (breeder reactors and solar energy). It is our contention that all three sources of electrical energy should be developed to the point where the final selections are primarily based on economic competitiveness. The other potential applications of laser fusion (fissile fuel production, synthetic fuel production, actinide burning, and propulsion) are also discussed, and our preliminary plan for the engineering development of laser fusion is presented

  3. Civilian applications of laser fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maniscalco, J.; Blink, J.; Buntzen, R.; Hovingh, J.; Meier, W.; Monsler, M.; Walker, P.

    1977-11-17

    The commercial aspects of laser fusion were evaluated in an attempt to relate the end products (neutrons and energy) to significant commercial applications. It was found that by far the largest markets and highest payoffs for laser fusion are associated with electric power production. Hence, much of this report evaluates the prospects of producing commercial electricity with laser fusion. To this end, we have described in detail a new and promising laser fusion concept--the liquid lithium waterfall reactor. In addition, we have taken the most attractive features from our laser studies and used them to compare laser fusion to other long-range sources of energy (breeder reactors and solar energy). It is our contention that all three sources of electrical energy should be developed to the point where the final selections are primarily based on economic competitiveness. The other potential applications of laser fusion (fissile fuel production, synthetic fuel production, actinide burning, and propulsion) are also discussed, and our preliminary plan for the engineering development of laser fusion is presented.

  4. Technology assessment of laser-fusion power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, L.A.; Frank, T.G.

    1976-01-01

    The inherent features of laser-induced fusion, some laser-fusion reactor concepts, and attendant means of utilizing the thermonuclear energy for commercial electric power generation are discussed. Theoretical fusion-pellet microexplosion energy release characteristics are described and the effects of pellet design options on pellet-microexplosion characteristics are discussed. The results of analyses to assess the engineering feasibility of reactor cavities for which protection of cavity components is provided either by suitable ablative materials or by diversion of plasmas by magnetic fields are presented. Two conceptual laser-fusion electric generating stations, based on different laser-fusion reactor concepts, are described. Technology developments for ultimate commercial application are outlined

  5. Pulsed fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    This summer school specialized in examining specific fusion center systems. Papers on scientific feasibility are first presented: confinement of high-beta plasma, liners, plasma focus, compression and heating and the use of high power electron beams for thermonuclear reactors. As for technological feasibility, lectures were on the theta-pinch toroidal reactors, toroidal diffuse pinch, electrical engineering problems in pulsed magnetically confined reactors, neutral gas layer for heat removal, the conceptual design of a series of laser fusion power plants with ''Saturn'', implosion experiments and the problem of the targets, the high brightness lasers for plasma generation, and topping and bottoming cycles. Some problems common to pulsed reactors were examined: energy storage and transfer, thermomechanical and erosion effects in the first wall and blanket, the problems of tritium production, radiation damage and neutron activation in blankets, and the magnetic and inertial confinement

  6. Coatings for laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowdermilk, W.H.

    1981-01-01

    Optical coatings are used in lasers systems for fusion research to control beam propagation and reduce surface reflection losses. The performance of coatings is important in the design, reliability, energy output, and cost of the laser systems. Significant developments in coating technology are required for future lasers for fusion research and eventual power reactors

  7. Fusion reactors as a future energy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifritz, W.

    A detailed update of fusion research concepts is given. Discussions are given for the following areas: (1) the magnetic confinement principle, (2) UWMAK I: conceptual design for a fusion reactor, (3) the inertial confinement principle, (4) the laser fusion power plant, (5) electron-induced fusion, (6) the long-term development potential of fusion reactors, (7) the symbiosis between fusion and fission reactors, (8) fuel supply for fusion reactors, (9) safety and environmental impact, and (10) accidents, and (11) waste removal and storage

  8. Fusion-fission hybrid reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter discusses the range of characteristics attainable from hybrid reactor blankets; blanket design considerations; hybrid reactor designs; alternative fuel hybrid reactors; multi-purpose hybrid reactors; and hybrid reactors and the energy economy. Hybrid reactors are driven by a fusion neutron source and include fertile and/or fissile material. The fusion component provides a copious source of fusion neutrons which interact with a subcritical fission component located adjacent to the plasma or pellet chamber. Fissile fuel and/or energy are the main products of hybrid reactors. Topics include high F/M blankets, the fissile (and tritium) breeding ratio, effects of composition on blanket properties, geometrical considerations, power density and first wall loading, variations of blanket properties with irradiation, thermal-hydraulic and mechanical design considerations, safety considerations, tokamak hybrid reactors, tandem-mirror hybrid reactors, inertial confinement hybrid reactors, fusion neutron sources, fissile-fuel and energy production ability, simultaneous production of combustible and fissile fuels, fusion reactors for waste transmutation and fissile breeding, nuclear pumped laser hybrid reactors, Hybrid Fuel Factories (HFFs), and scenarios for hybrid contribution. The appendix offers hybrid reactor fundamentals. Numerous references are provided

  9. Fusion--fission hybrid concepts for laser-induced fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maniscalco, J.

    1976-01-01

    Fusion-fission hybrid concepts are viewed as subcritical fission reactors driven and controlled by high-energy neutrons from a laser-induced fusion reactor. Blanket designs encompassing a substantial portion of the spectrum of different fission reactor technologies are analyzed and compared by calculating their fissile-breeding and fusion-energy-multiplying characteristics. With a large number of different fission technologies to choose from, it is essential to identify more promising hybrid concepts that can then be subjected to in-depth studies that treat the engineering safety, and economic requirements as well as the neutronic aspects. In the course of neutronically analyzing and comparing several fission blanket concepts, this work has demonstrated that fusion-fission hybrids can be designed to meet a broad spectrum of fissile-breeding and fusion-energy-multiplying requirements. The neutronic results should prove to be extremely useful in formulating the technical scope of future studies concerned with evaluating the technical and economic feasibility of hybrid concepts for laser-induced fusion

  10. Radiolytic production of chemical fuels in fusion reactor systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fish, J D

    1977-06-01

    Miley's energy flow diagram for fusion reactor systems is extended to include radiolytic production of chemical fuel. Systematic study of the economics and the overall efficiencies of fusion reactor systems leads to a criterion for evaluating the potential of radiolytic production of chemical fuel as a means of enhancing the performance of a fusion reactor system. The ecumenicity of the schema is demonstrated by application to (1) tokamaks, (2) mirror machines, (3) theta-pinch reactors, (4) laser-heated solenoids, and (5) inertially confined, laser-pellet devices. Pure fusion reactors as well as fusion-fission hybrids are considered.

  11. Radiolytic production of chemical fuels in fusion reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fish, J.D.

    1977-06-01

    Miley's energy flow diagram for fusion reactor systems is extended to include radiolytic production of chemical fuel. Systematic study of the economics and the overall efficiencies of fusion reactor systems leads to a criterion for evaluating the potential of radiolytic production of chemical fuel as a means of enhancing the performance of a fusion reactor system. The ecumenicity of the schema is demonstrated by application to (1) tokamaks, (2) mirror machines, (3) theta-pinch reactors, (4) laser-heated solenoids, and (5) inertially confined, laser-pellet devices. Pure fusion reactors as well as fusion-fission hybrids are considered

  12. First wall response to energy disposition in conceptual laser fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovingh, J.

    1976-02-01

    Discussed are energy depositions in the first wall of various proposed laser-fusion reactors and the effect of pulse time on the stress and temperature in the first wall. Simple models can be used to estimate the temperature and stress rise from x-rays and neutrons. More complex analysis is needed to estimate the response of the first wall to reflected laser light and the pellet debris

  13. Inertial thermonuclear fusion by laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watteau, J.P.

    1993-12-01

    The principles of deuterium tritium (DT) magnetic or inertial thermonuclear fusion are given. Even if results would be better with heavy ions beams, most of the results on fusion are obtained with laser beams. Technical and theoretical aspects of the laser fusion are presented with an extrapolation to the future fusion reactor. (A.B.). 34 refs., 17 figs

  14. Laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliezer, S.

    1982-02-01

    In this paper, the physics of laser fusion is described on an elementary level. The irradiated matter consists of a dense inner core surrounded by a less dense plasma corona. The laser radiation is mainly absorbed in the outer periphery of the plasma. The absorbed energy is transported inward to the ablation surface where plasma flow is created. Due to this plasma flow, a sequence of inward going shock waves and heat waves are created, resulting in the compression and heating of the core to high density and temperature. The interaction physics between laser and matter leading to thermonuclear burn is summarized by the following sequence of events: Laser absorption → Energy transport → Compression → Nuclear Fusion. This scenario is shown in particular for a Nd:laser with a wavelength of 1 μm. The wavelength scaling of the physical processes is also discussed. In addition to the laser-plasma physics, the Nd high power pulsed laser is described. We give a very brief description of the oscillator, the amplifiers, the spatial filters, the isolators and the diagnostics involved. Last, but not least, the concept of reactors for laser fusion and the necessary laser system are discussed. (author)

  15. Conceptual design of a fast-ignition laser fusion reactor based on a dry wall chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Y; Goto, T; Okano, K; Asaoka, Y; Hiwatari, R; Someya, Y

    2008-01-01

    The fast ignition is quite attractive for a compact laser fusion reactor, because a sufficiently high pellet gain is available with a small input energy. We designed an inertial fusion reactor based on Fast-ignition Advanced Laser fusion reactor CONcept, called FALCON-D, where a dry wall is employed for a chamber wall. A simple point model shows that the pellet gain G∼100 is available with laser energies of 350kJ for implosion, 50kJ for heating. This results in the fusion yield of 40 MJ in one shot. By increasing the repetition rate up to 30 Hz, the fusion power of 1.2 GWth becomes available. Plant system analysis shows the net electric power to be about 0.4 GWe In the fast ignition it is available to employ a low aspect ratio pellet, which is favorable for the stability during the implosion phase. Here the pellet aspect ratio is reduced to be 2 ∼ 4, and the optimization of the pulse shape for the implosion laser are carried out by using the 1-D hydrodynamic simulation code ILESTA-1D. A ferritic steel with a tungsten armour is employed for the chamber wall. The feasibility of this dry wall concept is studied from various engineering aspects such as surface melting, physical and chemical sputtering, blistering and exfoliation by helium retention, and thermo-mechanical fatigue, and it is found that blistering and exfoliation due to the helium retention and fatigue failure due to cyclic thermal load are major concerns. The cost analysis shows that the construction cost is moderate but the cost of electricity is slightly expensive

  16. Conceptual design of a fast-ignition laser fusion reactor based on a dry wall chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Y [High Temperature Plasma Center, University of Tokyo, Chiba (Japan); Goto, T; Okano, K [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, Chiba (Japan); Asaoka, Y; Hiwatari, R [Central Research Institute for Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo (Japan); Someya, Y [Graduate School of Engineering, Musashi Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)], E-mail: ogawa@ppl.k.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2008-05-15

    The fast ignition is quite attractive for a compact laser fusion reactor, because a sufficiently high pellet gain is available with a small input energy. We designed an inertial fusion reactor based on Fast-ignition Advanced Laser fusion reactor CONcept, called FALCON-D, where a dry wall is employed for a chamber wall. A simple point model shows that the pellet gain G{approx}100 is available with laser energies of 350kJ for implosion, 50kJ for heating. This results in the fusion yield of 40 MJ in one shot. By increasing the repetition rate up to 30 Hz, the fusion power of 1.2 GWth becomes available. Plant system analysis shows the net electric power to be about 0.4 GWe In the fast ignition it is available to employ a low aspect ratio pellet, which is favorable for the stability during the implosion phase. Here the pellet aspect ratio is reduced to be 2 {approx} 4, and the optimization of the pulse shape for the implosion laser are carried out by using the 1-D hydrodynamic simulation code ILESTA-1D. A ferritic steel with a tungsten armour is employed for the chamber wall. The feasibility of this dry wall concept is studied from various engineering aspects such as surface melting, physical and chemical sputtering, blistering and exfoliation by helium retention, and thermo-mechanical fatigue, and it is found that blistering and exfoliation due to the helium retention and fatigue failure due to cyclic thermal load are major concerns. The cost analysis shows that the construction cost is moderate but the cost of electricity is slightly expensive.

  17. Conceptual design of a fast-ignition laser fusion reactor based on a dry wall chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Y.; Goto, T.; Okano, K.; Asaoka, Y.; Hiwatari, R.; Someya, Y.

    2008-05-01

    The fast ignition is quite attractive for a compact laser fusion reactor, because a sufficiently high pellet gain is available with a small input energy. We designed an inertial fusion reactor based on Fast-ignition Advanced Laser fusion reactor CONcept, called FALCON-D, where a dry wall is employed for a chamber wall. A simple point model shows that the pellet gain G~100 is available with laser energies of 350kJ for implosion, 50kJ for heating. This results in the fusion yield of 40 MJ in one shot. By increasing the repetition rate up to 30 Hz, the fusion power of 1.2 GWth becomes available. Plant system analysis shows the net electric power to be about 0.4 GWe In the fast ignition it is available to employ a low aspect ratio pellet, which is favorable for the stability during the implosion phase. Here the pellet aspect ratio is reduced to be 2 ~ 4, and the optimization of the pulse shape for the implosion laser are carried out by using the 1-D hydrodynamic simulation code ILESTA-1D. A ferritic steel with a tungsten armour is employed for the chamber wall. The feasibility of this dry wall concept is studied from various engineering aspects such as surface melting, physical and chemical sputtering, blistering and exfoliation by helium retention, and thermo-mechanical fatigue, and it is found that blistering and exfoliation due to the helium retention and fatigue failure due to cyclic thermal load are major concerns. The cost analysis shows that the construction cost is moderate but the cost of electricity is slightly expensive.

  18. Conceptual design study for a laser fusion hybrid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maniscalco, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Bechtel Corporation have been involved in a joint effort to conceptually design a laser fusion hybrid reactor. The design which has evolved is a depleted-uranium fueled fast-fission blanket which produces fissile plutonium and electricity. A major objective of the design study was to evaluate the feasibility of producing fissile fuel with laser fusion. This feasibility evaluation was carried out by analyzing the integrated engineering performance of the complete conceptual design and by identifying the required laser/pellet performance. The performance of the laser fusion hybrid has also been compared to a typical fast breeder reactor. The results show that the laser fusion hybrid produces enough fissile material to fuel more than six light water reactors (LWRs) of equivalent thermal power while operating in a regime which requires an order of magnitude less laser and pellet performance than pure laser fusion. In comparison to a fast breeder reactor the hybrid produces 10 times more fissile fuel. An economic analysis of the design shows that the cost of electricity in a combined hybrid-LWR scenario increases by only 20 to 40 percent when the capital cost of the hybrid ranges from 2 to 3 times more than an LWR

  19. Conceptual design study for a laser fusion hybrid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maniscalco, J.A.

    1976-09-01

    Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Bechtel Corporation have been involved in a joint effort to conceptually design a laser fusion hybrid reactor. The design which has evolved is a depleted-uranium fueled fast-fission blanket which produces fissile plutonium and electricity. A major objective of the design study was to evaluate the feasibility of producing fissile fuel with laser fusion. This feasibility evaluation was carried out by analyzing the integrated engineering performance of the complete conceptual design and by identifying the required laser/pellet performance. The performance of the laser fusion hybrid has also been compared to a typical fast breeder reactor. The results show that the laser fusion hybrid produces enough fissile material to fuel more than six light water reactors (LWR's) of equivalent thermal power while operating in a regime which requires an order of magnitude less laser and pellet performance than pure laser fusion. In comparison to a fast breeder reactor the hybrid produces 10 times more fissile fuel. An economic analysis of the design shows that the cost of electricity in a combined hybrid-LWR scenario is insensitive to the capital cost of the hybrid, increasing by only 20 to 40 percent when the capital cost of the hybrid ranges from 2 to 3 times more than an LWR

  20. Conceptual design of a fast-ignition laser fusion reactor FALCON-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, T.; Ogawa, Y.; Okano, K.; Hiwatari, R.; Asaoka, Y.; Someya, Y.; Sunahara, A.; Johzaki, T.

    2008-10-01

    A new conceptual design of the laser fusion power plant FALCON-D (Fast ignition Advanced Laser fusion reactor CONcept with a Dry wall chamber) has been proposed. The fast ignition method can achieve the sufficient fusion gain for a commercial operation (∼100) with about 10 times smaller fusion yield than the conventional central ignition method. FALCON-D makes full use of this property and aims at designing with a compact dry wall chamber (5 - 6 m radius). 1-D/2-D hydrodynamic simulations showed the possibility of the sufficient gain achievement with a 40 MJ target yield. The design feasibility of the compact dry wall chamber and solid breeder blanket system was shown through the thermomechanical analysis of the dry wall and neutronics analysis of the blanket system. A moderate electric output (∼400 MWe) can be achieved with a high repetition (30 Hz) laser. This dry wall concept not only reduces some difficulties accompanied with a liquid wall but also enables a simple cask maintenance method for the replacement of the blanket system, which can shorten the maintenance time. The basic idea of the maintenance method for the final optics system has also been proposed. Some critical R and D issues required for this design are also discussed. (author)

  1. Advanced lasers for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupke, W.F.; George, E.V.; Haas, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    Laser drive systems' performance requirements for fusion reactors are developed following a review of the principles of inertial confinement fusion and of the technical status of fusion research lasers (Nd:glass; CO 2 , iodine). These requirements are analyzed in the context of energy-storing laser media with respect to laser systems design issues: optical damage and breakdown, medium excitation, parasitics and superfluorescence depumping, energy extraction physics, medium optical quality, and gas flow. Three types of energy-storing laser media of potential utility are identified and singled out for detailed review: (1) Group VI atomic lasers, (2) rare earth solid state hybrid lasers, and (3) rare earth molecular vapor lasers. The use of highly-radiative laser media, particularly the rare-gas monohalide excimers, are discussed in the context of short pulse fusion applications. The concept of backward wave Raman pulse compression is considered as an attractive technique for this purpose. The basic physics and device parameters of these four laser systems are reviewed and conceptual designs for high energy laser systems are presented. Preliminary estimates for systems efficiencies are given. (Auth.)

  2. Present status of inertial confinement fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mima, Kunioki; Ido, Shunji; Nakai, Sadao.

    1986-01-01

    Since inertial nuclear fusion reactors do not require high vacuum and high magnetic field, the structure of the reactor cavity becomes markedly simple as compared with tokamak type fusion reactors. In particular, since high vacuum is not necessary, liquid metals such as lithium and lead can be used for the first wall, and the damage of reactor structures by neutrons can be prevented. As for the core, the energy efficiency of lasers is not very high, accordingly it must be designed so that the pellet gain due to nuclear fusion becomes sufficiently high, and typically, the gain coefficient from 100 to 200 is necessary. In this paper, the perspective of pellet gain, the plan from the present status to the practical reactors, and the conceptual design of the practical reactors are discussed. The plan of fuel ignition, energy break-even and high gain by the implosion mode, of which the uncertain factor due to uneven irradiation and instability was limited to the minimum, was clarified. The scenario of the development of laser nuclear fusion reactors is presented, and the concept of the reactor system is shown. The various types of nuclear fusion-fission hybrid reactors are explained. As for the design of inertial fusion power reactors, the engineering characteristics of the core, the conceptual design, water fall type reactors and DD fuel reactors are discussed. (Kako, I.)

  3. Fusion pumped laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, D.S.

    1987-07-31

    The apparatus of this invention may comprise a system for generating laser radiation from a high-energy neutron source. The neutron source is a tokamak fusion reactor generating a long pulse of high-energy neutrons and having a temperature and magnetic field effective to generate a neutron flux of at least 10/sup 15/ neutrons/cm/sup 2//center dot/s. Conversion means are provided adjacent the fusion reactor at a location operable for converting the high-energy neutrons to an energy source with an intensity and energy effective to excite a preselected lasing medium. A lasing medium is spaced about and responsive to the energy source to generate a population inversion effective to support laser oscillations for generating output radiation. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Stagnation of ablated metal vapor in laser fusion reactor with liquid wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norimatsu, T.; Nagatomo, H.; Azechi, H.; Furukawa, H.; Shimada, Y.; Kurahashi, S.; Kunugi, T.; Kajimura, Y.

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, formation of clusters by ablated materials and those stagnation at the center of a laser fusion reactor with liquid wall are discussed using improved simulation code DECORE. We will report 1) numerical simulation on formation of clusters immediately before the stagnation, 2) preliminary results on the cluster formation at the first bounce of the stagnation, 3) experimental result on the diameter measurement of micro droplets formed in a simulation experiment with back-side irradiation of laser. (author)

  5. Laser driven fusion fission hybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, L.F.; Maniscalco, J.A.

    1977-11-01

    The role of the fusion-fission hybrid reactor (FFHR) as a fissile fuel and/or power producer is discussed. As long range options to supply the world energy needs, hybrid-fueled thermal-burner reactors are compared to liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR). A discussion of different fuel cycles (thorium, depleted uranium, and spent fuel) is presented in order to compare the energy multiplication, the production of fissile fuel, the laser efficiency and pellet gain requirements of the hybrid reactor. Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) has collaborated with Bechtel Corporation and with Westinghouse in two engineering design studies of laser fusion driven hybrid power plants. The hybrid designs which have resulted from these two studies are briefly described and analyzed by considering operational parameters, such as energy multiplication, power density, burn-up and plutonium production as a function time

  6. Laser solenoid fusion--fission design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.C.; Taussig, R.T.

    1976-01-01

    The dependence of breeding performance on system engineering parameters is examined for laser solenoid fusion-fission reactors. Reactor performance is found to be relatively insensitive to most of the engineering parameters, and compact designs can be built based on reasonable technologies. Point designs are described for the prototype series of reactors (mid-term technologies) and for second generation systems (advanced technologies). It is concluded that the laser solenoid has a good probability of timely application to fuel breeding needs

  7. The development of laser fusion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mima, Kunioki [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering

    1998-11-01

    Laser fusion research started soon after the invention of laser. In 1972, the research was declassified and nuclear fusion by laser inplosion was proposed by J. Nuckolls. Since then, 26 years has passed and laser implosion experiments demonstrated 1000 times solid density compression. By the demonstration of 1000 times solid density, the mission of the laser fusion research shifted from `implosion physics` to `ignition and high gain`, namely demonstration of fusion output of 100 times input laser energy. By the recent developments of laser technology, ultra intense laser became available and opened up a new ignition scheme which is called `Fast Ignition`. The technology for the diode pumped solid state laser (DPSSL) is developed toward a laser driver for reactor. U.S. and France are constructing MJ lasers for demonstrating ignition and burn and Osaka University is investigating the fast ignition and the equivalent plasma of confinement (EPOC) toward high gain. (author)

  8. The development of laser fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mima, Kunioki

    1998-01-01

    Laser fusion research started soon after the invention of laser. In 1972, the research was declassified and nuclear fusion by laser inplosion was proposed by J. Nuckolls. Since then, 26 years has passed and laser implosion experiments demonstrated 1000 times solid density compression. By the demonstration of 1000 times solid density, the mission of the laser fusion research shifted from 'implosion physics' to 'ignition and high gain', namely demonstration of fusion output of 100 times input laser energy. By the recent developments of laser technology, ultra intense laser became available and opened up a new ignition scheme which is called 'Fast Ignition'. The technology for the diode pumped solid state laser (DPSSL) is developed toward a laser driver for reactor. U.S. and France are constructing MJ lasers for demonstrating ignition and burn and Osaka University is investigating the fast ignition and the equivalent plasma of confinement (EPOC) toward high gain. (author)

  9. Helical-type device and laser fusion. Rivals for tokamak-type device at n-fusion development in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Under the current policy on the research and development of nuclear fusion in Japan, as enunciated by the Atomic Energy Commission of Japan, the type of a prototype fusion reactor will be chosen after 2020 from tokamak, helical or some other type including the inertial confinement fusion using lasers. A prototype fusion reactor is the next step following the tokamak type International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). With the prototype reactor, the feasibility as a power plant will be examined. At present the main research and development of nuclear fusion in Japan are on tokamak type, which have been promoted by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). As for the other types of nuclear fusion, researches have been carried out on the helical type in Kyoto University and National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), the mirror type in Tsukuba University, the tokamak type using superconductive coils in Kyushu University, and the laser fusion in Osaka University. The features and the present state of research and development of the Large Helical Device and the laser fusion which is one step away from the break-even condition are reported. (K.I.)

  10. Tritium-related materials problems in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickman, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    Pressing materials problems that must be solved before tritium can be used to produce energy economically in fusion reactors are discussed. The following topics are discussed: (1) breeding tritium, (2) recovering bred tritium, (3) containing tritium, (4) fuel recycling, and (5) laser-fusion fueling

  11. Prospect of laser fusion power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakai, Sadao

    1998-01-01

    Inertial fusion ignition, burn and energy gain are expected to be achieved within the first decade of next century with new Megajoule laser facilities which are under construction in the USA and France. Fusion reactor design studies indicate that Inertial Fusion Energy(IFE) power plants are technically feasible and have attractive safety and environmental features. The recent progress on implosion physics and relevant technologies require us to consider a strategic approach toward IFE development. The design study for a laser fusion power plant KOYO has been conducted as a joint program of universities, national laboratories and industries in Japan and also with international collaborations. The progress of high power laser technology gives us feasible project toward a laser driven IFE Power Plant. The technical breakthrough in the field of diode pumped solid state laser (DPSSL) has opened wide application of power laser to industrial technologies. Laser fusion energy development will be proceeded jointly with industrial photonics research and development. International collaborations are also promoted for efficient progress and activation of R and D on advanced technologies which are required for IFE and also useful for modern industries. (author). 7 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs

  12. Neutronics shielding analysis of the last mirror-beam duct system for a laser fusion power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragheb, M.M.H.; Klein, A.C.

    1981-01-01

    A Monte Carlo three-dimensional neutronics analysis for the last mirror-beam duct system for the SOLASE conceptual laser-driven fusion power reactor design is presented. Detailed geometric configurations including the reactor cavity, the two last mirrors, and the three-section two-right-angle bends duct are modeled. Measurements are given of the dimensions and compositions of the reactor components, and of neutron scalar fluxes, spatial dependencies and neutron volumetric heating rates for the cases of aluminum or Boral as laser beam duct liners, and ordinary concrete or lead mortar as shield material. A three-dimensional modeling of laser-driven reactor penetrations is employed. The particle leakage is found to be excessively high for the configuration of the conceptual design considered and the advantages and disadvantages of various solutions, such as the use of Boral as a duct liner and the use of lead mortar instead of ordinary concrete as a shield material, are considered

  13. Conceptual fusion reactor designs based on the laser heat solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.C.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of the laser heated solenoid (LHS) as an approach to fusion and fusion-fission commercial power generation has been examined. The LHS concept is based on magnetic confinement of a long slender plasma column which is partly heated by the axially directed beam from a powerful long wavelength laser. As a pure fusion concept, the LHS configurations studied so far are characterized by fairly difficult engineering constraints, particularly on the magnet, a large laser, and a marginally acceptable system energy balance. As a fusion-fission system, however, the LHS is capable of a very attractive energy balance, has much more relaxed engineering constraints, requires a relatively modest laser, and as such holds great potential as a power generator and fissile fuel breeding scheme

  14. Conceptual design of laser fusion reactor, SENRI-I - 1. concept and system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ido, S.; Naki, S.; Norimatsu, T.

    1981-01-01

    Design features of a laser fusion reactor concept SENRI-I and new concepts are reviewed and discussed. The unique feature is the utilization of a magnetic field to guide and control the inner liquid Li flow. Basic requirements and typical parameters used in the design are presented. Items to be discussed are constitution of the system, performance of liquid Li flow, neutronics, thermo-electric cycle, fuel cycle and new concepts

  15. Design and fabrication of foam-insulated cryogenic target for wet-wall laser fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norimatsu, T.; Takeda, T.; Nagai, K.; Mima, K.; Yamanaka, T.

    2003-01-01

    A foam insulated cryogenic target was proposed for use in a future laser fusion reactor with a wet wall. This scheme can protect the solid DT layer from melting due to surface heating by adsorption of metal vapor without significant reduction in the target gain. Design spaces for the injection velocity and the acceptable vapor pressure in the reactor are discussed. Basic technology to fabricate such structure was demonstrated by emulsion process. Concept of a cryogenic fast-ignition target with a gold guiding cone was proposed together with direct injection filling of liquid DT. (author)

  16. Shiva and Nova: progress of laser fusion at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1979-01-01

    Over the last several years we have made significant progress in the understanding of the laser plasma interaction through the use of new diagnostic instrumentation and techniques. We have also implemented the Shiva system and operated the world's most complex laser system and produced significant target data. In the implosion experiments with the Shiva system, we have archieved densities greater than 100 x liquid density of DT. The significance of this result is that we have had to overcome the questions of achieving a spherically symmetric implosion and obviating the problem of Rayleigh-Taylor instability. We see no major obstacle in the future to attaining the densities appropriate to efficient burn of microfusion pellets for application to fusion reactors. Further, we have identified a laser system which may provide the architecture required for a fusion reactor driver and we have an agressive on going program to investigate this option for a fusion reactor driver. In addition, our Systems Studies Program has identified a reactor configuration which solves many of the important problems associated with laser fusion reactors. This is not to say that a question of the configuration of an inertial confinement fusion reactor has been settled but rather that there is a very attractive possibility and one which can be used to judge other possibilities and grade them with respect to their performance compared to the Hylife reaction chamber. Thus we hold great hope for the possibility of inertial confinement fusion as an eventual energy source to provide energy for the world

  17. Fusion reactor design: On the road to commercialization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulcinski, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    The worldwide effort in fusion is now approximately 2 billion dollars per year and over 12 billion dollars has been invested since 1951 in developing this energy source for the 21st century. A vital component of the past efforts in fusion research has been the conceptual design activities performed by scientists and engineers around the world. Almost 80 such major designs of Tokamak, Mirror, Laser and Ion Beam Reactors have been published and this article discusses how recent conceptual designs have afftected our perception of future fusion reactor performance. (orig.) [de

  18. Pellet design for a laser fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiessen, A.R.; Nuckolls, J.

    1974-01-01

    The requirements for laser fusion pellet design are discussed. Computer calculations are presented of a capsule consisting of a spherical solid drop of DT surrounded by a concentric shell of DT. Gains greater than 40 fold are achieved with laser energies of approximately 0.5 MJ, and peak powers of about 10 16 W. (U.S.)

  19. Laser-heated solenoid fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlases, G.C.

    1977-01-01

    Since the suggestion by Dawson, Hertzberg, and Kidder that high-energy CO 2 lasers could be used to heat magnetically confined plasma columns to thermonuclear temperatures, a great deal of theoretical and experimental work has been performed. In this paper we first review the experiments on the basic laser-plasma interaction phenomena, in which lasers with energies up to 1 kJ have been used to produce plasmas at n/sub e/ greater than 10 18 and T/sub e/ greater than 200 eV. The second part reviews fusion reactor studies based on the laser solenoid

  20. Progress of laser nuclear fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraga, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the principle and features of nuclear fusion using laser, as well as its basic concepts such as high-temperature / high-density implosion system and fast ignition of fuel. At present, researches aiming at nuclear fusion ignition have been developing. As the current state of researches, this paper reviews the situations of FIREX (Fast Ignition Realization Experiment) project of Japan focusing on direct irradiation implosion and fast ignition system, as well as NIF (National Ignition Facility) project of the U.S. aiming at ignition combustion based on indirect irradiation implosion and central ignition system. In collaboration with the National Institute for Fusion Science, Osaka University started FIREX-1 project in 2003. It built a heating laser LFEX of 10 kJ/1 to 10ps, and started an implosion/heating integration experiment in 2009. Currently, it is developing experiment to achieve heating to 5 keV. At NIF, the self-heating of central sparks via energy of α particles generated in the nuclear fusion reaction has been realized. This paper also overviews R and D issues surrounding the lasers for reactors for use in laser nuclear fusion power generators. (A.O.)

  1. SIRIUS-P: An inertially confined direct drive laser fusion power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sviatoslavsky, I.N.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Moses, G.A.; Bruggink, D.; Engelstad, R.L.; Khater, H.Y.; Larsen, E.M.; Lovell, E.G.; MacFarlane, J.J.; Mogahed, E.A.; Peterson, R.R.; Sawan, M.E.; Wang, P.; Wittenberg, L.J.

    1993-03-01

    The SIRIUS-P conceptual design study is of a 1000 MWe laser driven inertial confinement fusion power reactor utilizing near symmetric illumination of direct drive targets. The reference driver is a KrF laser; however, any other laser capable of delivering short wavelength energy can be substituted. Sixty beams providing a total of 3.4 MJ of energy are used at a repetition rate of 6.7 Hz and a target gain of 118. The spherical chamber has an internal diameter of 6.5 m and consists of two independent components, a first wall assembly fabricated from a c/c composite and a blanket assembly made of SiC. First wall protection is provided by a xenon buffer gas at a pressure of 0.5 torr. The chamber is cooled by a flowing granular bed of solid ceramic material, TiO 2 for the first wall assembly and Li 2 O for the blanket assembly. The chamber is housed within a 42 m radius cylindrical reactor building which is 86 m high and which shares the same vacuum space as the chamber. All the laser beams are brought in at the bottom of the building, first onto a dielectrically coated final focusing mirror and finally onto a metallic grazing incidence mirror which reflects them into the chamber through beam ports open to the building. Neutron traps behind the grazing incidence mirrors are used to prolong the lifetimes of the final focusing optics. The nominal cost of electricity from this system is 65 mills/kwh assuming an 8% interest rate on capital

  2. Advanced laser fusion target fabrication research and development proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stupin, D.M.; Fries, R.J.

    1979-05-01

    A research and development program is described that will enable the fabrication of 10 6 targets/day for a laser fusion prototype power reactor in 2007. We give personnel and cost estimates for a generalized laser fusion target that requires the development of several new technologies. The total cost of the program between 1979 and 2007 is $362 million in today's dollars

  3. Optical coatings for laser fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowdermilk, W.H.; Milam, D.; Rainer, F.

    1980-01-01

    Lasers for fusion experiments use thin-film dielectric coatings for reflecting, antireflecting and polarizing surface elements. Coatings are most important to the Nd:glass laser application. The most important requirements of these coatings are accuracy of the average value of reflectance and transmission, uniformity of amplitude and phase front of the reflected or transmitted light, and laser damage threshold. Damage resistance strongly affects the laser's design and performance. The success of advanced lasers for future experiments and for reactor applications requires significant developments in damage resistant coatings for ultraviolet laser radiation

  4. ROK-PRC Cooperation on Laser Fusion Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, Yong Joo; Han, J. M.; Lee, S. M.; Nam, S. M.; Kwan, D. H.; Cha, Y. H.; Baek, S. H.

    2009-03-01

    International treaties on the reduction of green-house gases are now being established worldwide and Korea is supposed to join these treaties in a near future. Meanwhile the energy production via fission reactors proposed as a solution to this global environmental contamination has still inherent problems in that it also produces long-life radioactive nuclear waste in the long run, causing many serious social issues. Now the ultimate solution in this situation is believed to be the production of energy by the nuclear fusion reaction. In this project, the collaboration regarding high energy laser fusion has been carried out mainly at the Chinese facility such as ShengGuang II (SG II) laser facility, and ultrahigh intensity laser system of KAERI has been used for the small scale laser fusion and production of fast neutrons. Thomson scattering experiment to analyze the fusion plasma, opacity measurement to understand and develop the computer simulation techniques have been carried out at SG II facility, and experiments on implosion reaction which is basic to laser fusion as well as that of X-ray absorption and transmission have been done at the GEKKO XII facility of ILE, Japan. Satisfactory results both for Korea and China have been deduced by the strategy of project such that different approaches for high energy laser fusion and low energy laser fusion were applied. That is, Korean partner could get opportunities of doing experiments at the large laser facilities to get plasma diagnostic technologies and high density simulation technologies, besides the opportunity to participate in the K-C-J collaborative experiments of implosion and X-ray spectroscopy. And Chinese partner could solve their problem related to the laser fusion and neutron generation which were not successful even with their far high 300TW laser system

  5. Inertial fusion energy with krypton fluoride lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethian, J.D.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. We are developing the science and technologies needed for a practical fusion energy source using high energy krypton fluoride (KrF) lasers. The physics basis for this work is a family of simulations that exploit the unique advantages of KrF lasers. KrF lasers provide uniform enough laser light to illuminate the capsule directly, greatly improving the laser-target coupling efficiency, as well as simplifying the target design. KrF's shorter wavelength allows higher ablation pressures and helps suppress laser-plasma instabilities. These advantages are being demonstrated on the NRL Nike KrF laser facility. A particularly promising approach is shock ignition, in which a high intensity laser pulse drives an intense shock at peak compression. Simulations with experimentally benchmarked codes predict a 1 MJ KrF laser can produce 200 MJ of pure fusion energy. We have similarly advanced the laser technology. We have developed a KrF laser, using technologies that scale to a reactor beamline, that fires 5 times per second for long duration runs and is projected be efficient enough for a reactor. The science and the technology for the key components are developed at the same time as part of a coherent system. A multi-institutional team from industry, national labs, and universities has developed credible solutions for these components. This includes methods to fabricate the spherical pellets on mass production basis, a means to repetitively inject the capsules into the chamber and precisely hit them with the laser, scaled tests to develop the laser optics, and designs for the reaction vessel. Based on these advances NRL and its collaborators have formulated a three stage plan that could lead to practical fusion energy on a much faster time scale than currently believed. Stage I develops full scale components: a laser beam line, target factory and injector, and chamber technologies. Stage II is the Fusion Test Facility (FTF). Simulations

  6. Towards nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    The results of nuclear fusion researches in JAERI are summarized. In this report, following themes are collected: the concept of fusion reactor (including ITER), fusion reactor safety, plasma confinement, fusion reactor equipment, and so on. Includes glossary. (J.P.N.)

  7. The fusion reactor - a chance to solve the energy problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wienecke, R.

    1975-01-01

    The work deals with the physical fundamentals of nuclear fusion and the properties of the necessary plasma and gives a survey on the arrangements used today for magnetic confinement such as tokamak, stellarator, high-beta experiments and laser fusion. Finally, the technology of the fusion reactor and its potential advantages are explained. (RW/LH) [de

  8. Effects of pellet yield on electricity cost in laser fusion generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohachevsky, I.O.; Booth, L.A.; Hafer, J.F.; Pendergrass, J.H.

    1978-01-01

    The dependence of capital and net electricity production costs on fuel pellet yield is investigated for laser fusion reactors based on the magnetically protected and the wetted wall reactor cavity concepts. It is determined that above a certain pellet yield, which depends on the cavity concept, diseconomies of scale occur and the costs per unit output increase with increasing fuel pellet yield. This behavior, determined with the trade-off and analysis computer code TROFAN, is explained through analytical examination of the scaling rules for the laser fusion reactor components

  9. The search for solid state fusion lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, M.J.

    1989-04-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research puts severe demands on the laser driver. In recent years large, multibeam Nd:glass lasers have provided a flexible experimental tool for exploring fusion target physics because of their high powers, variable pulse length and shape, wavelength flexibility using harmonic generation, and adjustable that Nd:glass lasers can be scaled up to provide a single-phase, multi-megajoule, high-gain laboratory microfusion facility, and gas-cooled slab amplifiers with laser diode pump sources are viable candidates for an efficient, high repetition rate, megawatt driver for an ICF reactor. In both applications requirements for energy storage and energy extraction drastically limit the choice of lasing media. Nonlinear optical effects and optical damage are additional design constraints. New laser architectures applicable to ICF drivers and possible laser materials, both crystals and glasses, are surveyed. 20 refs., 2 figs

  10. Laser fusion hybrid reactor systems study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-07-01

    The work was performed in three phases. The first phase included a review of the many possible laser-reactor-blanket combinations and resulted in the selection of a ''demonstration size'' 500 MWe plant for further study. A number of fast fission blankets using uranium metal, uranium-molybdenum alloy, and uranium carbide as fuel were investigated. The second phase included design of the reactor vessel and internals, heat transfer system, tritium processing system, and the balance of plant, excluding the laser building and equipment. A fuel management scheme was developed, safety considerations were reviewed, and capital and operating costs were estimated. Costs developed during the second phase were unexpectedly high, and a thorough review indicated considerable unit cost savings could be obtained by scaling the plant to a larger size. Accordingly, a third phase was added to the original scope, encompassing the redesign and scaling of the plant from 500 MWe to 1200 MWe

  11. Repetitive laser fusion experiment and operation using a target injection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Yasuhiko; Komeda, Osamu; Mori, Yoshitaka

    2017-01-01

    Since 2008, a collaborative research project on laser fusion development based on a high-speed ignition method using repetitive laser has been carried out with several collaborative research institutes. This paper reports the current state of operation of high repetition laser fusion experiments, such as target introduction and control based on a target injection system that allows free falling under 1 Hz, using a high repetition laser driver that has been under research and development, as well as the measurement of targets that freely fall. The HAMA laser driver that enabled high repetition fusion experiments is a titanium sapphire laser using a diode-pumped solid-state laser KURE-I of green light output as a driver pump light source. In order to carry out high repetition laser fusion experiments, the target injection device allows free falling of deuterated polystyrene solid sphere targets of 1 mm in diameter under 1 Hz. The authors integrated the developed laser and injection system, and succeeded first in the world in making the nuclear fusion reaction continuously by hitting the target to be injected with laser, which is essential technology for future laser nuclear fusion reactor. In order to realize repetition laser fusion experiments, stable laser, target synchronization control, and target position measurement technologies are indispensable. (A.O.)

  12. Inertial fusion program in Japan and ignition experiment facility by laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakai, S.

    1989-01-01

    The recent progress in laser fusion research is remarkable with respect to obtaining the high density and high temperature plasma which produces thermonuclear neutrons of 10 13 per shot (pellet gain of 0.2%) and to the understanding of implosion physics. Data bases for laser fusion have been accumulated and technologies for advanced experiments have been developed, both of which enable us to make the reserarch step toward the fusion ignition experiment and the achievement of the breakeven condition, which is estimated to be possible with a 100 kJ blue laser. The demonstration of high gain pellets requires laser energy in the range MJ in blue light. The design studies of the MJ laser are continue in the framework of the solid state laser at ILE. The design studies on the commercial reactor of ICF have proceeded and several conceptual designs have been proposed. These designs utilize a liquid metal first wall and blanket which enable long life for commercial use. As a consequence, the ICF reactor has technically a high feasibility for commercial application. (orig.)

  13. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory laser-fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    The goals of the Laser-Fusion Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are to produce well-diagnosed, high-gain, laser-driven fusion explosions in the laboratory and to exploit this capability for both military applications and for civilian energy production. In the past year we have made significant progress both theoretically and experimentally in our understanding of the laser interaction with both directly coupled and radiation-driven implosion targets and their implosion dynamics. We have made significant developments in fabricating the target structures. Data from the target experiments are producing important near-term physics results. We have also continued to develop attractive reactor concepts which illustrate ICF's potential as an energy producer

  14. Inertial fusion by laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dautray, R.; Watteau, J.-P.

    1980-01-01

    Following a brief historical survey of research into the effects of interaction of laser with matter, the principles of fusion by inertial confinement are described and the main parameters and possible levels given. The development of power lasers is then discussed with details of performances of the main lasers used in various laboratories, and with an assessment of the respective merits of neodymium glass, carbon dioxide or iodine lasers. The phenomena of laser radiation and its interaction with matter is then described, with emphasis on the results of experiments concerned with target implosion with the object of compressing and heating the mixture of heavy hydrogen and tritium to be ignited. Finally, a review is made of future possibilities opened up by the use of large power lasers which have recently become operational or are being constructed, and the ground still to be covered before a reactor can be produced [fr

  15. Fusion reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    Nuclear fusion could soon become a viable energy source. Work in plasma physics, fusion technology and fusion safety is progressing rapidly in a number of Member States and international collaboration continues on work aiming at the demonstration of fusion power generation. Safety of fusion reactors and technological and radiological aspects of waste management are important aspects in the development and design of fusion machines. In order to provide an international forum to review and discuss the status and the progress made since 1983 in programmes related to operational safety aspects of fusion reactors, their waste management and decommissioning concepts, the IAEA had organized the Technical Committee on ''Fusion Reactor Safety'' in Culham, 3-7 November 1986. All presentations of this meeting were divided into four sessions: 1. Statements on National-International Fusion Safety Programmes (5 papers); 2. Operation and System Safety (15 papers); 3. Waste Management and Decommissioning (5 papers); 4. Environmental Impacts (6 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these 31 papers. Refs, figs, tabs

  16. New technology and neo-science on the nuclear fusion reactor engineering. ITER and super high speed phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-12-01

    This research meeting has been held under cooperation of the ''nuclear fusion reactor engineering research group'' and ''nuclear fusion reactor materials research group'' of the Yayoi Research Group. This meeting was planned and conducted for 2 days under the following predominant thema: Present status of research on thermo-nuclear fusion experimental reactor engineering design (ITER/EDA) and its promoting method in Japan, and a new scientific side in the research and development of nuclear fusion reactor materials or the super high speed phenomena. In the former item, the following reports were published: Creative period of R and D on the nuclear fusion reactor, present statue and future development of ITER/EDA, meanings of ITER under realization of the nuclear fusion energy, and others. And in the latter item, the following reports were published: Nuclear fusion materials engineering and system quantum engineering, dynamic imagination of atom and molecule using pulse snap shot method, laser wake field acceleration and ultra short x-ray pulse generation, development of T-cube laser in JAERI, and others. (G.K.)

  17. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the radiation-induced behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components as well as to help the international community in building the scientific and technical basis needed for the construction of the future reactor. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical and chemical (corrosion) behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation and water coolant environment; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; investigations on the management of materials resulting from the dismantling of fusion reactors including waste disposal. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2001 are discussed

  18. Mirror fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.A.; Moir, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    We have carried out conceptual design studies of fusion reactors based on the three current mirror confinement concepts: the standard mirror, the tandem mirror, and the field-reversed mirror. Recent studies of the standard mirror have emphasized its potential as a fusion-fission hybrid reactor, designed to produce fission fuel for fission reactors. We have designed a large commercial hybrid based on standard mirror confinement, and also a small pilot plant hybrid. Tandem mirror designs include a commercial 1000 MWe fusion power plant and a nearer term tandem mirror hybrid. Field-reversed mirror designs include a multicell commercial reactor producing 75 MWe and a single cell pilot plant

  19. Mirror fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Conceptual design studies were made of fusion reactors based on the three current mirror-confinement concepts: the standard mirror, the tandem mirror, and the field-reversed mirror. Recent studies of the standard mirror have emphasized its potential as a fusion-fission hybrid reactor, designed to produce fuel for fission reactors. We have designed a large commercial hybrid and a small pilot-plant hybrid based on standard mirror confinement. Tandem mirror designs include a commercial 1000-MWe fusion power plant and a nearer term tandem mirror hybrid. Field-reversed mirror designs include a multicell commercial reactor producing 75 MWe and a single-cell pilot plant

  20. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components during and after irradiation. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; the detection of abrupt electrical degradation of insulating ceramics under high temperature and neutron irradiation; and the study of dismantling and waste disposal strategy for fusion reactors. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2000 are discussed

  1. Laser-fusion research progress report, January--June 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-08-01

    Three prototypical laser systems; iodine, and HF, are being developed. The iodine laser program is designed to delineate possible problem areas in the development of higher-power iodine lasers and to improve its efficiency to where net energy gain is possible using complex targets or hybrid, fusion-fission reactors. To provide data for the oxygen laser, studies are under way on excited-state production efficiencies, electron-beam device development, and low-pressure gain phenomena. In the HF-laser program, technology is being developed applicable to high-power, high-gain laser systems

  2. Metrology/viewing system for next generation fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spampinato, P.T.; Barry, R.E.; Chesser, J.B.; Menon, M.M.; Dagher, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    Next generation fusion reactors require accurate measuring systems to verify sub-millimeter alignment of plasma-facing components in the reactor vessel. A metrology system capable of achieving such accuracy must be compatible with the vessel environment of high gamma radiation, high vacuum, elevated temperature, and magnetic field. This environment requires that the system must be remotely deployed. A coherent, frequency modulated laser radar system is being integrated with a remotely operated deployment system to meet these requirements. The metrology/viewing system consists of a compact laser transceiver optics module which is linked through fiber optics to the laser source and imaging units that are located outside of the harsh environment. The deployment mechanism is a telescopic-mast positioning system. This paper identifies the requirements for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor metrology and viewing system, and describes a remotely operated precision ranging and surface mapping system

  3. Materials for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrlich, K.; Kaletta, D.

    1978-03-01

    The following report describes five papers which were given during the IMF seminar series summer 1977. The purpose of this series was to discuss especially the irradiation behaviour of materials intended for the first wall of future fusion reactors. The first paper deals with the basic understanding of plasma physics relating to the fusion reactor and presents the current state of art of fusion technology. The next two talks discuss the metals intended for the first wall and structural components of a fusion reactor. Since 14 MeV neutrons play an important part in the process of irradiation damage their role is discussed in detail. The question which machines are presently available to simulate irradiation damage under conditions similar to the ones found in a fusion reactor are investigated in the fourth talk which also presents the limitations of the different methods of simulation. In this context also discussed is the importance future intensive neutron sources and materials test reactors will have for this problem area. The closing paper has as a theme the review of the present status of research of metallic and non-metallic materials in view of the quite different requirements for different fusion systems; a closing topic is the world supply on rare materials required for fusion reactors. (orig) [de

  4. Fusion Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2002-04-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the radiation-induced behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components as well as to help the international community in building the scientific and technical basis needed for the construction of the future reactor. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical and chemical (corrosion) behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation and water coolant environment; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; investigations on the management of materials resulting from the dismantling of fusion reactors including waste disposal. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2001 are discussed.

  5. MIRI: A multichannel far-infrared laser interferometer for electron density measurements on TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansfield, D.K.; Park, H.K.; Johnson, L.C.; Anderson, H.M.; Chouinard, R.; Foote, V.S.; Ma, C.H.; Clifton, B.J.

    1987-07-01

    A ten-channel far-infrared laser interferometer which is routinely used to measure the spatial and temporal behavior of the electron density profile on the TFTR tokamak is described and representative results are presented. This system has been designed for remote operation in the very hostile environment of a fusion reactor. The possible expansion of the system to include polarimetric measurements is briefly outlined. 13 refs., 8 figs

  6. Remote welding and cutting techniques for fusion experimental reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozuka, M.; Ishide, T.; Oda, Y.; Nagaoka, E.; Ue, K.; Kamei, H.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental investigation of the YAG laser cutting/welding and plasma gouging techniques has been conducted to examine their suitability for remote maintenance systems in future fusion experimental reactors. Using a hybrid beam coupling system, two laser beams of 500W and 740W powers were successfully combined to provide a 1,240W beam power. The combined laser was transmitted through the optical fiber for cutting and welding. The transmission loss for the beams is in the range of 13% to 14%, which is low. As for plasma gouging, the shallow gouging made a groove measuring 10 mm in width and 4 mm in depth on the stainless steel plates at a traversing speed of 75 cm/min, while the deep gouging made a groove of 12 mm in width and 7.5 mm in depth at a traversing speed of 50 cm/min. In addition, it was found that the shallow gouging did not leave byproducts from the material, providing a clean surface. Based on the findings, it is shown that the YAG laser cutting/welding and plasma gouging techniques can be us3ed for remote welding and cutting in future fusion experimental reactors

  7. Remote welding and cutting techniques for fusion experimental reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onozuka, M.; Ishide, T.; Oda, Y.; Nagaoka, E.; Ue, K.; Kamei, H. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Yokohama (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    Experimental investigation of the YAG laser cutting/welding and plasma gouging techniques has been conducted to examine their suitability for remote maintenance systems in future fusion experimental reactors. Using a hybrid beam coupling system, two laser beams of 500W and 740W powers were successfully combined to provide a 1,240W beam power. The combined laser was transmitted through the optical fiber for cutting and welding. The transmission loss for the beams is in the range of 13% to 14%, which is low. As for plasma gouging, the shallow gouging made a groove measuring 10 mm in width and 4 mm in depth on the stainless steel plates at a traversing speed of 75 cm/min, while the deep gouging made a groove of 12 mm in width and 7.5 mm in depth at a traversing speed of 50 cm/min. In addition, it was found that the shallow gouging did not leave byproducts from the material, providing a clean surface. Based on the findings, it is shown that the YAG laser cutting/welding and plasma gouging techniques can be us3ed for remote welding and cutting in future fusion experimental reactors.

  8. The fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennan, M.H.

    1974-01-01

    Basic principles of the fusion reactor are outlined. Plasma heating and confinement schemes are described. These confinement systems include the linear Z pinch, magnetic mirrors and Tokamaks. A fusion reactor is described and a discussion is given of its environmental impact and its fuel situation. (R.L.)

  9. Progress of nuclear fusion research and review on development of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Set up in October 1971, the ad hoc Committee on Survey of Nuclear Fusion Reactors has worked on overall fusion reactor aspects and definition of the future problems under four working groups of core, nuclear heat, materials and system. The presect volume is intended to provide reference materials in the field of fusion reactor engineering, prepared by members of the committee. Contents are broadly the following: concept of the nuclear fusion reactor, fusion core engineering, fusion reactor blanket engineering, fusion reactor materials engineering, and system problems in development of fusion reactors. (Mori, K.)

  10. CO2-laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, E.E. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The basic concept of laser fusion is described, with a set of requirements on the laser system. Systems and applications concepts are presented and discussed. The CO 2 laser's characteristics and advantages for laser fusion are described. Finally, technological issues in the development of CO 2 laser systems for fusion applications are discussed

  11. Laser-start-up system for magnetic mirror fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, A.M.; Thomas, S.R.; Denhoy, B.S.; Chargin, A.K.

    1976-01-01

    A CO 2 laser system has been developed at LLL to provide hot start-up plasmas for magnetic mirror fusion experiments. A frozen ammonia pellet is irradiated with a laser power density in excess of 10 13 W/cm 2 in a 50-ns pulse. This system uses commercially available laser systems. Optical components were fabricated both by direct machining and standard techniques. The technologies used in this system are directly applicable to reactor scale systems

  12. Fusion reactor development: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    This paper is a review of the current prospects for fusion reactor development based upon the present status in plasma physics research, fusion technology development and reactor conceptual design for the tokamak magnetic confinement concept. Recent advances in tokamak plasma research and fusion technology development are summarized. The direction and conclusions of tokamak reactor conceptual design are discussed. The status of alternate magnetic confinement concept research is reviewed briefly. A feasible timetable for the development of fusion reactors is presented

  13. Fusion reactor radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaser, J.D.; Postma, A.K.; Bradley, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    Quantities and compositions of non-tritium radioactive waste are estimated for some current conceptual fusion reactor designs, and disposal of large amounts of radioactive waste appears necessary. Although the initial radioactivity of fusion reactor and fission reactor wastes are comparable, the radionuclides in fusion reactor wastes are less hazardous and have shorter half-lives. Areas requiring further research are discussed

  14. Advanced lasers for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupke, W.F.

    1978-11-01

    Projections indicate that MJ/MW laser systems, operating with efficiencies in escess of 1 percent, are required to drive laser fusion power reactors. Moreover, a premium in pellet performance is anticipated as the wavelength of the driver laser system is decreased. Short wavelength laser systems based on atomic selenium (lambda = 0.49μ), terbium molcular vapors (0.55μ), thulium doped dielectric solids (0.46μ), and on pulse compressions of KrF excimer laser radiaton (0.27μ) have been proposed and studied for this purpose. The technological scalability and efficiency of each of these systems is examined in this paper. All of these systems are projected to meet minimum systems requirements. Amont them, the pulse-compressed KrF system is projected to have the highest potential efficiency (6%) and the widest range of systems design options

  15. Conceptual design and issues of the laser inertial fusion test (LIFT) reactor—targets and chamber systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norimatsu, T.; Kozaki, Y.; Shiraga, H.; Fujita, H.; Okano, K.; Members of LIFT Design Team

    2017-11-01

    We present the conceptual design of an experimental laser fusion plant known as the laser inertial fusion test (LIFT) reactor. The conceptual design aims at technically connecting a single-shot experiment and a commercial power plant. The LIFT reactor is designed on a three-phase scheme, where each phase has specific goals and the dedicated chambers of each phase are driven by the same laser. Technical issues related to the chamber technology including radiation safety to repeat burst mode operation are discussed in this paper.

  16. Directions for improved fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.; Delene, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    Conceptual fusion reactor studies over the past 10 to 15 years have projected systems that may be too large, complex, and costly to be of commercial interest. One main direction for improved fusion reactors points towards smaller, higher-power-density approaches. First-order economic issues (i.e., unit direct cost and cost of electricity) are used to support the need for more compact fusion reactors. A generic fusion physics/engineering/costing model is used to provide a quantiative basis for these arguments for specific fusion concepts

  17. Some safety considerations in laser-controlled thermonuclear reactors. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botts, T.E.; Breton, D.; Chan, C.K.; Levy, S.I.; Sehnert, M.; Ullman, A.Z.

    1978-07-01

    A major objective of this study was to identify potential safety questions for laser controlled thermonuclear reactors. From the safety viewpoint, it does not appear that the actual laser controlled thermonuclear reactor conceptual designs present hazards very different than those of magnetically confined fusion reactors. Some aspects seem beneficial, such as small lithium inventories, and the absence of cryogenic devices, while other aspects are new, for example the explosion of pressure vessels and laser hazards themselves. Major aspects considered in this report include: (a) general safety considerations, (b) tritium inventories, (c) system behavior during loss of flow accidents, and (d) safety considerations of laser related penetrations

  18. Fusion reactors - types - problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitter, K.H.

    1979-07-01

    A short account is given of the principles of fusion reactions and of the expected advantages of fusion reactors. Descriptions are presented of various Tokamak experimental devices being developed in a number of countries and of some mirror machines. The technical obstacles to be overcome before a fusion reactor could be self-supporting are discussed. (U.K.)

  19. On fusion and fission breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, B.; Schuurman, W.; Klippel, H.Th.

    1981-02-01

    Fast breeder reactors and fusion reactors are suitable candidates for centralized, long-term energy production, their fuel reserves being practically unlimited. The technology of a durable and economical fusion reactor is still to be developed. Such a development parallel with the fast breeder is valuable by reasons of safety, proliferation, new fuel reserves, and by the very broad potential of the development of the fusion reactor. In order to facilitate a discussion of these aspects, the fusion reactor and the fast breeder reactor were compared in the IIASA-report. Aspects of both reactor systems are compared

  20. Advanced methods for nuclear reactor gas laser coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, G.H.; Verdeyen, J.T.

    1978-06-01

    Research is described that led to the discovery of three nuclear-pumped lasers (NPLs) using mixtures of Ne--N 2 , He--Hg, and He or Ne with CO or CO 2 . The Ne--N 2 NPL was the first laser obtained with modest neutron fluxes from a TRIGA reactor (vs fast burst reactors used elsewhere in such work), the He--Hg NPL was the first visible nuclear-pumped laser, while the Ne--CO and He--CO 2 lasers are the first to provide energy storage on a millisecond time scale. Important potential applications of NPLs include coupling and power transmission from remote power stations such as nuclear plants in satellites and neutron-feedback operation of inertial confinement fusion plants

  1. Fusion reactor design studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmert, G.A.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Santarius, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the ARIES tokamak: systems; plasma power balance; impurity control and fusion ash removal; fusion product ripple loss; energy conversion; reactor fueling; first wall design; shield design; reactor safety; and fuel cost and resources

  2. Compact fusion reactors

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Fusion research is currently to a large extent focused on tokamak (ITER) and inertial confinement (NIF) research. In addition to these large international or national efforts there are private companies performing fusion research using much smaller devices than ITER or NIF. The attempt to achieve fusion energy production through relatively small and compact devices compared to tokamaks decreases the costs and building time of the reactors and this has allowed some private companies to enter the field, like EMC2, General Fusion, Helion Energy, Lawrenceville Plasma Physics and Lockheed Martin. Some of these companies are trying to demonstrate net energy production within the next few years. If they are successful their next step is to attempt to commercialize their technology. In this presentation an overview of compact fusion reactor concepts is given.

  3. Fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowcliffe, A.F.; Burn, G.L.; Knee', S.S.; Dowker, C.L.

    1994-02-01

    This is the fifteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; Special purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide

  4. Prospect of realizing nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This Report describes the results of the research work on nuclear fusion, which CRIEPI has carried out for about ten years from the standpoint of electric power utilities, potential user of its energy. The principal points are; (a) economic analysis (calculation of costs) based on Japanese analysis procedures and database of commercial fusion reactors, including fusion-fission hybrid reactors, and (b) conceptual design of two types of hybrid reactors, that is, fission-fuel producing DMHR (Demonstration Molten-Salt Hybrid Reactor) and electric-power producing THPR (Tokamak Hybrid Power Reactor). The Report consists of the following chapters: 1. Introduction. 2. Conceptual Design of Hybrid Reactors. 3. Economic Analysis of Commercial Fusion Reactors. 4. Basic Studies Applicable Also to Nuclear Fusion Technology. 5. List of Published Reports and Papers; 6. Conclusion. Appendices. (author)

  5. Terrestrial and extraterrestrial superresonators as drivers for an inertial confinement fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifritz, W.; Vath, W.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on the recirculating power fraction of a laser-driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor which can be reduced by using laser diodes to pump a neodymium solid-state laser. To overcome the high costs of two-dimensional arrays of laser diodes, two types of superresonators are proposed: a terrestrially based one and an extraterrestrially based one on a geostationary orbit. Both are designed in such a way that a sequence of short laser pulses (10 to 20 ns wide), each with an energy of 5 to 10 MJ and a frequency of 10 Hz, are produced to trigger a deuterium-tritium ICF reactor. The terrestrial superresonator needs a much smaller number of two-dimensional laser diode arrays than a conventionally pumped once-through solid-state laser system, and the extraterrestrial resonator is pumped by means of concentrated solar radiation. In practice, at least an order of magnitude fewer laser diodes and crystalline calcium fluoride gain media are needed to meet the requirements of a laser driver for an ICF reactor. If, finally, a liquid neodymium laser system could be used for an ICF reactor, the cooling of the gain slabs would be facilitated substantially

  6. Preliminary design and neutronic analysis of a laser fusion driven actinide waste burning hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berwald, D.H.; Duderstadt, J.J.

    1979-01-01

    The laser fusion driven actinide waste burner (LDAB) system investigated uses partitioned fission power reactor generated actinide wastes dissolved in a molten tin alloy as feed material (or fuel). A novel fuel processing concept based on the high-temperature precipitation of ''actinide--nitrides'' from a liquid tin solution is proposed. This concept will allow for fission product removal to be performed entirely within the device at high burnup. No attempt has been made to optimize this system, but potential performance is impressive. The equilibrium LDAB design consumes 7.6 MT/y of actinide waste. This corresponds to the waste output from 136 light water reactors [1000 MW (electric)]. The mean life of an actinide atom in the LDAB is only 4.5 y; and actinides, once charged to the LDAB, might be reprocessed fewer times during irradiation than in previously proposed systems

  7. Possible fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, S.

    1976-05-01

    A scheme to improve performance characteristics of a tokamak-type fusion reactor is proposed. Basically, the tokamak-type plasma could be moved around so that the plasma could be heated by compression, brought to the region where the blanket surrounds the plasma, and moved so as to keep wall loading below the acceptable limit. This idea should be able to help to economize a fusion reactor

  8. Fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The following topics are briefly discussed: (1) surface blistering studies on fusion reactor materials, (2) TFTR design support activities, (3) analysis of samples bombarded in-situ in PLT, (4) chemical sputtering effects, (5) modeling of surface behavior, (6) ion migration in glow discharge tube cathodes, (7) alloy development for irradiation performance, (8) dosimetry and damage analysis, and (9) development of tritium migration in fusion devices and reactors

  9. Research on the wetted first wall concept for future laser fusion reactors. Final report No. 1, October 1, 1974--January 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, M.A.; Munir, Z.A.

    1976-01-01

    Research is in progress to determine the feasibility of the wetted first wall concept for a future laser fusion reactor. The basic idea involves the use of a thin coating of lithium on the inner wall of the laser fusion containment vessel to protect it from the micro-explosion blast debris. This report contains a review of the available information on contact angles and wettability of alkali metals on various metal substrates as well as a review of literature on thin falling liquid films. A proposed experiment to measure the contact angles of lithium on stainless steel and niobium is described. The requirements for a second experiment to measure certain key characteristics of thin falling films are also included

  10. Generic magnetic fusion reactor cost assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, J.

    1985-01-01

    The Fusion Energy Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory discusses ''generic'' magnetic fusion reactors. The author comments on DT burning magnetic fusion reactor models being possibly operational in the 21st century. Representative parameters from D-T reactor studies are given, as well as a shematic diagram of a generic fusion reactor. Values are given for winding pack current density for existing and future superconducting coils. Topics included are the variation of the cost of electricity (COE), the dependence of the COE on the net electric power of the reactor, and COE formula definitions

  11. Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasche, G.P.

    1988-01-01

    A method for recovering energy in an inertial confinement fusion reactor having a reactor chamber and a sphere forming means positioned above an opening in the reactor chamber is described, comprising: embedding a fusion target fuel capsule having a predetermined yield in the center of a hollow solid lithium tube and subsequently embedding the hollow solid lithium tube in a liquid lithium medium; using the sphere forming means for forming the liquid lithium into a spherical shaped liquid lithium mass having a diameter smaller than the length of the hollow solid lithium tube with the hollow solid lithium tube being positioned along a diameter of the spherical shaped mass, providing the spherical shaped liquid lithium mass with the fusion fuel target capsule and hollow solid lithium tube therein as a freestanding liquid lithium shaped spherical shaped mass without any external means for maintaining the spherical shape by dropping the liquid lithium spherical shaped mass from the sphere forming means into the reactor chamber; producing a magnetic field in the reactor chamber; imploding the target capsule in the reactor chamber to produce fusion energy; absorbing fusion energy in the liquid lithium spherical shaped mass to convert substantially all the fusion energy to shock induced kinetic energy of the liquid lithium spherical shaped mass which expands the liquid lithium spherical shaped mass; and compressing the magnetic field by expansion of the liquid lithium spherical shaped mass and recovering useful energy

  12. Laser fusion program overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmett, J.L.

    1977-01-01

    This program is structured to proceed through a series of well defined fusion milestones to proof of the scientific feasibility, of laser fusion with the Shiva Nova system. Concurrently, those key technical areas, such as advanced lasers, which are required to progress beyond proof of feasibility, are being studied. We have identified and quantified the opportunities and key technical issues in military applications, such as weapons effects simulations, and in civilian applications, such as central-station electric power production. We summarize the current status and future plans for the laser fusion program at LLL, emphasizing the civilian applications of laser fusion

  13. Laser fusion: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, K.

    1975-01-01

    The laser fusion concept is described along with developments in neodymium and carbon dioxide lasers. Fuel design and fabrication are reviewed. Some spin-offs of the laser fusion program are discussed. (U.S.)

  14. Reactor potential of the magnetically insulated inertial fusion (MICF) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kammash, T.; Galbraith, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    The Magnetically Insulated Inertial Confinement Fusion (MICF) scheme is examined with regard to its potential as a power-producing reactor. This approach combines the favorable aspects of both magnetic and inertial fusions in that physical containment of the plasma is provided by a metallic shell while thermal insulation of its energy is provided by a strong, self-generated magnetic field. The plasma is created at the core of the target as a result of irradiation of the fuel-coated inner surface by a laser beam that enters through a hole in the spherical shell. The instantaneous magnetic field is generated by the current loops formed by the laser-heated, laser-ablated electrons, and preliminary experimental results at Osaka University have confirmed the presence of such a field. These same experiments have also yielded a Lawson parameter of about 5x10 12 cm -3 sec, and because of these unique properties, the plasma lifetimes in MICF have been shown to be about two orders of magnitude longer than conventional, pusher type inertial fusion schemes. In this paper a quasi one dimensional, time dependent set of particle and energy balance equations for the thermal species, namely, electrons, ions and thermal alphas which also allows for an appropriate set of fast alpha groups is utilized to assess the reactor prospects of a DT-burning MICF system. (author) [pt

  15. Research on economics and CO2 emission of magnetic and inertial fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Kenjiro; Yamazaki, Kozo; Oishi, Tetsutarou; Arimoto, Hideki; Shoji, Tatsuo

    2011-01-01

    An economical and environment-friendly fusion reactor system is needed for the realization of attractive power plants. Comparative system studies have been done for magnetic fusion energy (MFE) reactors, and been extended to include inertial fusion energy (IFE) reactors by Physics Engineering Cost (PEC) system code. In this study, we have evaluated both tokamak reactor (TR) and IFE reactor (IR). We clarify new scaling formulas for cost of electricity (COE) and CO 2 emission rate with respect to key design parameters. By the scaling formulas, it is clarified that the plant availability and operation year dependences are especially dominant for COE. On the other hand, the parameter dependences of CO 2 emission rate is rather weak than that of COE. This is because CO 2 emission percentage from manufacturing the fusion island is lower than COE percentage from that. Furthermore, the parameters dependences for IR are rather weak than those for TR. Because the CO 2 emission rate from manufacturing the laser system to be exchanged is very large in comparison with CO 2 emission rate from TR blanket exchanges. (author)

  16. Environmental aspects of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffman, F.E.; Williams, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    With the continued depletion of fossil and uranium resources in the coming decades, the U. S. will be forced to look more toward renewable energy resources (e.g., wind, tidal, geothermal, and solar power) and toward such longer-term and nondepletable energy resources as fissile fast breeder reactors and fusion power. Several reference reactor designs have been completed for full-scale fusion power reactors that indicate that the environmental impacts from construction, operation, and eventual decommissioning of fusion reactors will be quite small. The principal environmental impact from fusion reactor operation will be from thermal discharges. Some of the safety and environmental characteristics that make fusion reactors appear attractive include an effectively infinite fuel supply at low cost, inherent incapability for a ''nuclear explosion'' or a ''nuclear runaway,'' the absence of fission products, the flexibility of selecting low neutron-cross-section structural materials so that emergency core cooling for a loss-of-coolant or other accident will not be necesary, and the absence of special nuclear materials such as 235 U or 239 Pu, so that diversion of nuclear weapons materials will not be possible and nuclear blackmail will not be a serious concern

  17. Overview of fusion reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.; Crocker, J.G.

    1981-01-01

    Use of deuterium-tritium burning fusion reactors requires examination of several major safety and environmental issues: (1) tritium inventory control, (2) neutron activation of structural materials, fluid streams and reactor hall environment, (3) release of radioactivity from energy sources including lithium spill reactions, superconducting magnet stored energy release, and plasma disruptions, (4) high magnetic and electromagnetic fields associated with fusion reactor superconducting magnets and radio frequency heating devices, and (5) handling and disposal of radioactive waste. Early recognition of potential safety problems with fusion reactors provides the opportunity for improvement in design and materials to eliminate or greatly reduce these problems. With an early start in this endeavor, fusion should be among the lower risk technologies for generation of commercial electrical power

  18. Review of fusion DEMO reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Yasushi

    1996-01-01

    Fusion DEMO Reactor is defined and the Steady State Tokamak Reactor (SSTR) concept is introduced as a typical example of a DEMO reactor. Recent DEMO reactor studies in Japan and abroad are introduced. The DREAM Reactor concept is introduced as an ultimate target of fusion research. (author)

  19. Conceptual design of a laser fusion power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maniscalco, J.A.; Meier, W.R.; Monsler, M.J.

    1977-01-01

    A conceptual design of a laser fusion power plant is extensively discussed. Recent advances in high gain targets are exploited in the design. A smaller blanket structure is made possible by use of a thick falling region of liquid lithium for a first wall. Major design features of the plant, reactor, and laser systems are described. A parametric analysis of performance and cost vs. design parameters is presented to show feasible design points. A more definitive follow-on conceptual design study is planned

  20. Review on Recent Developments in Laser Driven Inertial Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghoranneviss

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Discovery of the laser in 1960 hopes were based on using its very high energy concentration within very short pulses of time and very small volumes for energy generation from nuclear fusion as “Inertial Fusion Energy” (IFE, parallel to the efforts to produce energy from “Magnetic Confinement Fusion” (MCF, by burning deuterium-tritium (DT in high temperature plasmas to helium. Over the years the fusion gain was increased by a number of magnitudes and has reached nearly break-even after numerous difficulties in physics and technology had been solved. After briefly summarizing laser driven IFE, we report how the recently developed lasers with pulses of petawatt power and picosecond duration may open new alternatives for IFE with the goal to possibly ignite solid or low compressed DT fuel thereby creating a simplified reactor scheme. Ultrahigh acceleration of plasma blocks after irradiation of picosecond (PS laser pulses of around terawatt (TW power in the range of 1020 cm/s2 was discovered by Sauerbrey (1996 as measured by Doppler effect where the laser intensity was up to about 1018 W/cm2. This is several orders of magnitude higher than acceleration by irradiation based on thermal interaction of lasers has produced.

  1. Overview of fusion reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.; Crocker, J.G.

    1981-01-01

    Present trends in magnetic fusion research and development indicate the promise of commercialization of one of a limited number of inexhaustible energy options early in the next century. Operation of the large-scale fusion experiments, such as the Joint European Torus (JET) and Takamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) now under construction, are expected to achieve the scientific break even point. Early design concepts of power producing reactors have provided problem definition, whereas the latest concepts, such as STARFIRE, provide a desirable set of answers for commercialization. Safety and environmental concerns have been considered early in the development of magnetic fusion reactor concepts and recognition of proplem areas, coupled with a program to solve these problems, is expected to provide the basis for safe and environmentally acceptable commercial reactors. First generation reactors addressed in this paper are expected to burn deuterium and tritium fuel because of the relatively high reaction rates at lower temperatures compared to advanced fuels such as deuterium-deuterium. This paper presents an overwiew of the safety and environmental problems presently perceived, together with some of the programs and techniques planned and/or underway to solve these problems. A preliminary risk assessment of fusion technology relative to other energy technologies is made. Improvements based on material selection are discussed. Tritium and neutron activation products representing potential radiological hazards in fusion reactor are discussed, and energy sources that can lead to the release of radioactivity from fusion reactors under accident conditions are examined. The handling and disposal of radioactive waste are discussed; the status of biological effects of magnetic fields are referenced; and release mechanisms for tritium and activation products, including analytical methods, are presented. (orig./GG)

  2. Advanced nuclear reactor and nuclear fusion power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-04-01

    This book comprised of two issues. The first one is a advanced nuclear reactor which describes nuclear fuel cycle and advanced nuclear reactor like liquid-metal reactor, advanced converter, HTR and extra advanced nuclear reactors. The second one is nuclear fusion for generation energy, which explains practical conditions for nuclear fusion, principle of multiple magnetic field, current situation of research on nuclear fusion, conception for nuclear fusion reactor and economics on nuclear fusion reactor.

  3. Radioisotope production in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engholm, B.A.; Cheng, E.T.; Schultz, K.R.

    1986-01-01

    Radioisotope production in fusion reactors is being investigated as part of the Fusion Applications and Market Evaluation (FAME) study. /sup 60/Co is the most promising such product identified to date, since the /sup 60/Co demand for medical and food sterilization is strong and the potential output from a fusion reactor is high. Some of the other radioisotopes considered are /sup 99/Tc, /sup 131/l, several Eu isotopes, and /sup 210/Po. Among the stable isotopes of interest are /sup 197/Au, /sup 103/Rh and Os. In all cases, heat or electricity can be co-produced from the fusion reactor, with overall attractive economics

  4. Volume ignition of laser driven fusion pellets and double layer effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cicchitelli, L.; Eliezer, S.; Goldsworthy, M.P.; Green, F.; Hora, H.; Ray, P.S.; Stening, R.J.; Szichman, H.

    1988-01-01

    The realization of an ideal volume compression of laser-irradiated fusion pellets opens the possibility for an alternative to spark ignition proposed for many years for inertial confinement fusion. A re-evaluation of the difficulties of the central spark ignition of laser driven pellets is given. The alternative volume compression theory, together with volume burn and volume ignition, have received less attention and are re-evaluated in view of the experimental verification generalized fusion gain formulas, and the variation of optimum temperatures derived at self-ignition. Reactor-level DT fusion with MJ-laser pulses and volume compression to 50 times the solid-state density are estimated. Dynamic electric fields and double layers at the surface and in the interior of plasmas result in new phenomena for the acceleration of thermal electrons to suprathermal electrons. Double layers also cause a surface tension which stabilizes against surface wave effects and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. (author)

  5. Assessment of fusion reactor development. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, N.; Tazima, T.

    1994-04-01

    Symposium on assessment of fusion reactor development was held to make clear critical issues, which should be resolved for the commercial fusion reactor as a major energy source in the next century. Discussing items were as follows. (1) The motive force of fusion power development from viewpoints of future energy demand, energy resources and earth environment for 'Sustainable Development'. (2) Comparison of characteristics with other alternative energy sources, i.e. fission power and solar cell power. (3) Future planning of fusion research and advanced fuel fusion (D 3 He). (4) Critical issues of fusion reactor development such as Li extraction from the sea water, structural material and safety. (author)

  6. What have fusion reactor studies done for you today?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulchinski, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    The University of Wisconsin examines the fusion program and puts into perspective what return is being made on investments in fusion reactor studies. Illustations show financial support for fusion research from the four major programs, FY'82 expenditures on fusion research, and the total expenditures on fusion research since 1951. Topics discussed include the estimated number of scientists conducting fusion research, the conceptual design study of a fusion reactor, scoping study of a reactor, the chronology of fusion reactor design studies, published fusion reactor studies 1967-1983, conceptual fusion reactor design studies, STARFIRE reference design, MARS central cell, HYLIFE reaction chamber, and selected contributions of reactor design studies to base programs

  7. Development of Laser Based Plasma Diagnostics for Fusion Research on NSTX-U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchfeld, Robert Adam

    plasma diagnostics. Plasma diagnostics collect data from fusion reactors in a number of different ways. Among these are far infrared (FIR) laser based systems. By probing a fusion plasma with FIR lasers, many properties can be measured, such as density and density fluctuations. This dissertation discusses the theory and design of two laser based diagnostic instruments: 1) the Far Infrared Tangential Interferometer and Polarimeter (FIReTIP) systems, and 2) the High-ktheta Scattering System. Both of these systems have been designed and fabricated at UC Davis for use on the National Spherical Torus Experiment - Upgrade (NSTX-U), located at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). These systems will aid PPPL scientists in fusion research. The FIReTIP system uses 119 ?m methanol lasers to pass through the plasma core to measure a chord averaged plasma density through interferometry. It can also measure the toroidal magnetic field strength by the way of polarimetery. The High-ktheta Scattering System uses a 693 GHz formic acid laser to measure electron scale turbulence. Through collective Thomson scattering, as the probe beam passes through the plasma, collective electron motion will scatter power to a receiver with the angle determined by the turbulence wavenumber. This diagnostic will measure ktheta from 7 to 40 cm-1 with a 4-channel receiver array. The High-ktheta Scattering system was designed to facilitate research on electron temperature gradient (ETG) modes, which are believed to be a major contributor to anomalous transport on NSTX-U. The design and testing of these plasma diagnostics are described in detail. There are a broad range of components detailed including: optically pumped gas FIR lasers, overmoded low loss waveguide, launching and receiving optical designs, quasi-optical mixers, electronics, and monitoring and control systems. Additionally, details are provided for laser maintenance, alignment techniques, and the fundamentals of nano-CNC-machining.

  8. Laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, M.H.; Oxford Univ.

    1990-04-01

    The use of lasers to drive implosions for the purpose of inertially confined fusion is an area of intense activity where progress compares favourably with that made in magnetic fusion and there are significant prospects for future development. In this brief review the basic concept is summarised and the current status is outlined both in the area of laser technology and in the most recent results from implosion experiments. Prospects for the future are also considered. (author)

  9. Fusion reactors and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancox, R.

    1990-04-01

    Fusion power, based on the nuclear fusion of light elements to yield a net gain of energy, has the potential to extend the world's resources in a way which is environmentally attractive. Nevertheless, the easiest route to fusion - the reaction between deuterium and tritium - involves hazards from the use of tritium and the neutron activation of the structural materials. These hazards have been considered on the basis of simple conceptual reactor designs, both in relation to normal operation and decommissioning and to potential accident situations. Results from several studies are reviewed and suggest that fusion reactors appear to have an inherently lower environmental impact than fission reactors. However, the realization of this potential has yet to be demonstrated. (author)

  10. Coatings for fusion reactor environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattox, D.M.

    1979-01-01

    The internal surfaces of a tokamak fusion reactor control the impurity injection and gas recycling into the fusion plasma. Coating of internal surfaces may provide a desirable and possibly necessary design flexibility for achieving the temperatures, ion densities and containment times necessary for net energy production from fusion reactions to take place. In this paper the reactor environments seen by various componentare reviewed along with possible materials responses. Characteristics of coating-substrate systems, important to fusion applications, are delineated and the present status of coating development for fusion applications is reviewed. Coating development for fusion applications is just beginning and poses a unique and important challenge for materials development

  11. Radiative processes in a laser-fusion plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, P.M.; Kubis, J.J.; Mitrovich, D.

    1976-01-01

    Plasmas compressed and heated by an intense laser pulse offer promise for the ignition of propagating thermonuclear burn and, ultimately, for use in fusion reactors. It is evident theoretically that the emission and absorption of x-rays by the plasma has a significant effect on the dynamics of the laser compression process. In order to achieve densities high enough for efficient thermonuclear burn, the fusion pellet must be compressed along a low adiabat. This will not be possible if the compressed region of the pellet is significantly preheated by x-rays originating in the hot outer regions. A satisfactory model of compression hydrodynamics must, therefore, include a comprehensive treatment of radiation transport based on a non-LTE model of the plasma. The model must be valid for Fermi-Dirac statistics, since high compression along a low adiabat will, in general, produce degenerate electron distributions. This report is concerned with the plasma model and the corresponding radiation emission and absorption coefficients, including nonthermal processes which occur in the laser deposition region

  12. Fusion reactor wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    The fusion reactor currently is being developed as a clean source of electricity with an essentially infinite source of fuel. These reactors are visualized as using a fusion reaction to generate large quantities of high temperature energy which can be used as process heat or for the generation of electricity. The energy would be created primarily as the kinetic energy of neutrons or other reaction products. Neutron energy could be converted to high-temperature heat by moderation and capture of the neutrons. The energy of other reaction products could be converted to high-temperature heat by capture, or directly to electricity by direct conversion electrostatic equipment. An analysis to determine the wastes released as a result of operation of fusion power plants is presented

  13. Laser for fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzrichter, J.F.

    1995-01-01

    Solid state lasers have proven to be very versatile tools for the study and demonstration of inertial confinement fusion principles. When lasers were first contemplated to be used for the compression of fusion fuel in the late 1950s, the laser output energy levels were nominally one joule and the power levels were 10 3 watts (pulse duration's of 10 -3 sec). During the last 25 years, lasers optimized for fusion research have been increased in power to typically 100,000 joules with power levels approaching 10 14 watts. As a result of experiments with such lasers at many locations, DT target performance has been shown to be consistent with high gain target output. However, the demonstration of ignition and gain requires laser energies of several megajoules. Laser technology improvements demonstrated over the past decade appear to make possible the construction of such multimegajoule lasers at affordable costs. (author)

  14. Progress of laser fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Chiyoe

    1988-01-01

    The history of the research on nuclear fusion utilizing laser is described. It started in USSR in 1968, but the full scale start of laser implosion nuclear fusion was in 1972. In Osaka University, nuclear fusion neutrons were detected with a solid deuterium target and the phenomenon of parametric abnormal absorption in laser plasma was found in 1971. The new type target for implosion nuclear fusion ''Canon ball'' was devised in 1975. The phenomenon of the abnormal transmission of laser beam through a thin metal film in a multiple film target was found in 1976, and named ''Osaka effect''. Also the development of lasers has been advanced, and in 1983, a largest glass laser in the world, Gekko 12, with 12 beams, 30 kJ output, 55 TW, was completed. The new target LHART was devised, which enabled the generation of 10 trillion D-T reaction neutrons. Due to the development of high power laser technology, the realization of the new design of fuel pellets, the evaluation of the data by computer simulation, and the realization of new plasma diagnostic method, the research on laser nuclear fusion has developed rapidly, and the attainment of break-even is expected in 1990s. The features of inertial nuclear fusion are enumerated. (Kako, I.)

  15. Technical issues in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohatgi, V.K.; Vijayan, T.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper the issues in fusion reactor technology are examined. Rapid progress in fusion technology research in recent years can be attributed to the advances in various technologies. The commercial generation of fusion power greatly depends on the evolution and improvements in these technologies. With better understanding of plasma physics, fusion reactor designs are becoming more and more realistic and comprehensive. It is now possible to compare various concepts within the framework of established technologies. The technological issues needing better understanding and solutions to problem areas are identified. Various instabilities and energy losses are major problem areas. Extensive developments in reactor-relevant advanced materials, compact and powerful superconducting magnets, high-power systems, and plasma heating drivers need to be undertaken and emphasized

  16. Polymer materials for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaoka, H.

    1993-01-01

    The radiation-resistant polymer materials have recently drawn much attention from the viewpoint of components for fusion reactors. These are mainly applied to electrical insulators, thermal insulators and structural supports of superconducting magnets in fusion reactors. The polymer materials used for these purposes are required to withstand the synergetic effects of high mechanical loads, cryogenic temperatures and intense nuclear radiation. The objective of this review is to summarize the anticipated performance of candidate materials including polymer composites for fusion magnets. The cryogenic properties and the radiation effects of polymer materials are separately reviewed, because there is only limited investigation on the above-mentioned synergetic effects. Additional information on advanced polymer materials for fusion reactors is also introduced with emphasis on recent developments. (orig.)

  17. Intelligible seminar on fusion reactors. (12) Next step toward the realization of fusion reactors. Future vision of fusion energy research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, Kunihiko; Kurihara, Kenichi; Tobita, Kenji

    2006-01-01

    In the last session of this seminar the progress of research and development for the realization of fusion reactors and future vision of fusion energy research and development are summarized. The some problems to be solved when the commercial fusion reactors would be realized, (1) production of deuterium as the fuel, (2) why need the thermonuclear reactors, (3) environmental problems, and (4) ITER project, are described. (H. Mase)

  18. Laser-induced nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jablon, Claude

    1977-01-01

    Research programs on laser-induced thermonuclear fusion in the United States, in Europe and in USSR are reviewed. The principle of the fusion reactions induced is explained, together with the theoretical effects of the following phenomena: power and type of laser beams, shape and size of the solid target, shock waves, and laser-hydrodynamics coupling problems [fr

  19. Survey of fusion reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, M.K.; Kang, H.D.; Oh, Y.K.; Lee, K.W.; In, S.Y.; Kim, Y.C.

    1983-01-01

    The present object of the fusion research is to accomplish the scientific break even by the year of 1986. In view of current progress in the field of Fusion reactor development, we decided to carry out the conceptual design of Tokamak-type fusion reactor during the year of 82-86 in order to acquire the principles of the fusion devices, find the engineering problems and establish the basic capabilities to develop the key techniques with originality. In this year the methods for calculating the locations of the poloidal coils and distribution of the magnetic field, which is one of the most essential and complicated task in the fusion reactor design works, were established. Study on the optimization of the design method of toroidal field coil was also done. Through this work, we established the logic for the design of the toroidal field coil in tokamak and utilize this technique to the design of small compact tokamak. Apart from the development work as to the design technology of tokamak, accelerating column and high voltage power supply (200 KVDC, 100 mA) for intense D-T neutron generator were constructed and now beam transport systems are under construction. This device will be used to develop the materials and the components for the tokamak fusion reactor. (Author)

  20. Development of key technologies in DPSSL system for fast-ignition, laser fusion reactor - FIREX, HALNA, and protection of final optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norimatsu, T.; Azechi, H.; Fujimoto, Y.; Jitsuno, T.; Kanabe, T.; Kodama, R.; Kondo, K.; Miyanaga, N.; Nagatomo, H.; Nakatsuka, M.; Shiraga, H.; Tanaka, K.A.; Tsubakimoto, K.; Yamanaka, M.; Yasuhara, R.; Izawa, Y.; Kawashima, T.; Kurita, T.; Matsumoto, O.; Tsuchiya, Y.; Sekine, T.; Kan, H.

    2005-01-01

    A critical path to a laser fusion power plant is construction of a reliable, efficient, high repetitive energy driver including the relation with the reactor environment. At ILE, Osaka University, FIREX project has been proposed and the phase I to show heating of compressed fuel to 5 keV has started with construction of the FIREX laser. This project will demonstrate physics of fast ignition and elemental studies are carried out to obtain persuasive data to find the path to the goal. A diode-laser-pumped, solid-state-laser (DPSSL) HALNA-10 succeeded in operation of 7.5J output power at 10 Hz rep-rate. Contamination of final optics by metal vapor was studied using a 1/10 model of the beam duct. The result indicated that contamination can be controlled with high speed shutters and a low pressure buffer gas. (author)

  1. Hydrogen production in fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudo, S.; Tomita, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-11-01

    As one of the methods of innovative energy production in fusion reactors (that do not include a conventional turbine-type generator), the efficient use of fusion-reactor radiation and semiconductors to supply clean fuel in the form of hydrogen gas is studied. Taking the reactor candidates such as a toroidal system and an open system for application of the new concepts, the expected efficiency and a plant system concept are investigated.

  2. Roles of plasma neutron source reactor in development of fusion reactor engineering: Comparison with fission reactor engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, Shoichi; Kawabe, Takaya

    1995-01-01

    The history of development of fusion power reactor has come to a turning point, where the main research target is now shifting from the plasma heating and confinement physics toward the burning plasma physics and reactor engineering. Although the development of fusion reactor system is the first time for human beings, engineers have experience of development of fission power reactor. The common feature between them is that both are plants used for the generation of nuclear reactions for the production of energy, nucleon, and radiation on an industrial scale. By studying the history of the development of the fission reactor, one can find the existence of experimental neutron reactors including irradiation facilities for fission reactor materials. These research neutron reactors played very important roles in the development of fission power reactors. When one considers the strategy of development of fusion power reactors from the points of fusion reactor engineering, one finds that the fusion neutron source corresponds to the neutron reactor in fission reactor development. In this paper, the authors discuss the roles of the plasma-based neutron source reactors in the development of fusion reactor engineering, by comparing it with the neutron reactors in the history of fission power development, and make proposals for the strategy of the fusion reactor development. 21 refs., 6 figs

  3. Fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethi, V.K.; Scholz, R.; Nolfi, F.V. Jr.; Turner, A.P.L.

    1980-01-01

    Data are given for each of the following areas: (1) effects of irradiation on fusion reactor materials, (2) hydrogen permeation and materials behavior in alloys, (3) carbon coatings for fusion applications, (4) surface damage of TiB 2 coatings under energetic D + and 4 He + irradiations, and (5) neutron dosimetry

  4. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2000-01-01

    SCK-CEN's research and development programme on fusion reactor materials includes: (1) the study of the mechanical behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation (including steels, inconel, molybdenum, chromium); (2) the determination and modelling of the characteristics of irradiated first wall materials such as beryllium; (3) the detection of abrupt electrical degradation of insulating ceramics under high temperature and neutron irradiation; (4) the study of the dismantling and waste disposal strategy for fusion reactors.; (5) a feasibility study for the testing of blanket modules under neutron radiation. Main achievements in these topical areas in the year 1999 are summarised

  5. Fusion Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2000-07-01

    SCK-CEN's research and development programme on fusion reactor materials includes: (1) the study of the mechanical behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation (including steels, inconel, molybdenum, chromium); (2) the determination and modelling of the characteristics of irradiated first wall materials such as beryllium; (3) the detection of abrupt electrical degradation of insulating ceramics under high temperature and neutron irradiation; (4) the study of the dismantling and waste disposal strategy for fusion reactors.; (5) a feasibility study for the testing of blanket modules under neutron radiation. Main achievements in these topical areas in the year 1999 are summarised.

  6. Alternate laser fusion drivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleasance, L.D.

    1979-11-01

    One objective of research on inertial confinement fusion is the development of a power generating system based on this concept. Realization of this goal will depend on the availability of a suitable laser or other system to drive the power plant. The primary laser systems used for laser fusion research, Nd 3+ : Glass and CO 2 , have characteristics which may preclude their use for this application. Glass lasers are presently perceived to be incapable of sufficiently high average power operation and the CO 2 laser may be limited by and issues associated with target coupling. These general perceptions have encouraged a search for alternatives to the present systems. The search for new lasers has been directed generally towards shorter wavelengths; most of the new lasers discovered in the past few years have been in the visible and ultraviolet region of the spectrum. Virtually all of them have been advocated as the most promising candidate for a fusion driver at one time or another

  7. Hydrogen production in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, S.; Tomita, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-11-01

    As one of methods of innovative energy production in fusion reactors without having a conventional turbine-type generator, an efficient use of radiation produced in a fusion reactor with utilizing semiconductor and supplying clean fuel in a form of hydrogen gas are studied. Taking the candidates of reactors such as a toroidal system and an open system for application of the new concepts, the expected efficiency and a concept of plant system are investigated. (author)

  8. Hydrogen production in fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudo, S.; Tomita, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-11-01

    As one of methods of innovative energy production in fusion reactors without having a conventional turbine-type generator, an efficient use of radiation produced in a fusion reactor with utilizing semiconductor and supplying clean fuel in a form of hydrogen gas are studied. Taking the candidates of reactors such as a toroidal system and an open system for application of the new concepts, the expected efficiency and a concept of plant system are investigated. (author).

  9. Lower activation materials and magnetic fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.; Bloom, E.E.; Davis, J.W.; Gold, R.E.; Little, R.; Schultz, K.R.; Smith, D.L.; Wiffen, F.W.

    1984-01-01

    Radioactivity in fusion reactors can be effectively controlled by materials selection. The detailed relationship between the use of a material for construction of a magnetic fusion reactor and the material's characteristics important to waste disposal, safety, and system maintainability has been studied. The quantitative levels of radioactivation are presented for many materials and alloys, including the role of impurities, and for various design alternatives. A major outcome has been the development of quantitative definitions to characterize materials based on their radioactivation properties. Another key result is a four-level classification scheme to categorize fusion reactors based on quantitative criteria for waste management, system maintenance, and safety. A recommended minimum goal for fusion reactor development is a reference reactor that (a) meets the requirements for Class C shallow land burial of waste materials, (b) permits limited hands-on maintenance outside the magnet's shield within 2 days of a shutdown, and (c) meets all requirements for engineered safety. The achievement of a fusion reactor with at least the characteristics of the reference reactor is a realistic goal. Therefore, in making design choices or in developing particular materials or alloys for fusion reactor applications, consideration must be given to both the activation characteristics of a material and its engineering practicality for a given application

  10. Trends in fusion reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herring, J.S.; Holland, D.F.; Piet, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    Fusion has the potential to be an attractive energy source. From the safety and environmental perspective, fusion must avoid concerns about catastrophic accidents and unsolvable waste disposal. In addition, fusion must achieve an acceptable level of risk from operational accidents that result in public exposure and economic loss. Finally, fusion reactors must control routine radioactive effluent, particularly tritium. Major progress in achieving this potential rests on development of low-activation materials or alternative fuels. The safety and performance of various material choices and fuels for commercial fusion reactors can be investigated relatively inexpensively through reactor design studies. These studies bring together experts in a wide range of backgrounds and force the group to either agree on a reactor design or identify areas for further study. Fusion reactors will be complex with distributed radioactive inventories. The next generation of experiments will be critical in demonstrating that acceptable levels of safe operation can be achieved. These machines will use materials which are available today and for which a large database exists (e.g. for 316 stainless steel). Researchers have developed a good understanding of the risks associated with operation of these devices. Specifically, consequences from coolant system failures, loss of vacuum events, tritium releases, and liquid metal reactions have been studied. Recent studies go beyond next step designs and investigate commercial reactor concerns including tritium release and liquid metal reactions. 18 refs

  11. Vacuum engineering for fusion research and fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pittenger, L.C.

    1976-01-01

    The following topics are described: (1) surface pumping by cryogenic condensation, (2) operation of large condensing cryopumps, (3) pumping for large fusion experiments, and (4) vacuum technology for fusion reactors

  12. Status of fusion reactor concept development in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji-Iio, Shunji

    1996-01-01

    Fusion power reactor studies in Japan based on magnetic confinement schemes are reviewed. As D-T fusion reactors, a steady-state tokamak reactor (SSTR) was proposed and extensively studied at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and an inductively operated day-long tokamak reactor (IDLT) was proposed by a group at the University of Tokyo. The concept of a drastically easy maintenance (DREAM) tokamak reactor is being developed at JAERI. A high-field tokamak reactor with force-balanced coils as a volumetric neutron source is being studied by our group at Tokyo Institute of Technology. The conceptual design of a force-free helical reactor (FFHR) is under way at the National Institute for Fusion Science. A design study of a D- 3 He field-reversed configuration (FRC) fusion reactor called ARTEMIS was conducted by the FRC fusion working group of research committee of lunar base an lunar resources. (author)

  13. Fusion reactor problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carruthers, R.

    It is pointed out that plasma parameters for a fusion reactor have been fairly accurately defined for many years, and the real plasma physics objective must be to find the means of achieving and maintaining these specifiable parameters. There is good understanding of the generic technological problems: breading blankets and shields, radiation damage, heat transfer and methods of magnet design. The required plasma parameters for fusion self-heated reactors are established at ntausub(E) approximately 2.10 14 cm -3 sec, plasma radius 1.5 to 3 m, wall loading 5 to 10 MW cm -2 , temperature 15 keV. Within this model plasma control by quasi-steady burn as a key problem is studied. It is emphasized that the future programme must interact more closely with engineering studies and should concentrate upon research which is relevant to reactor plasmas. (V.P.)

  14. Prospects for Tokamak Fusion Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, J.; Galambos, J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper first reviews briefly the status and plans for research in magnetic fusion energy and discusses the prospects for the tokamak magnetic configuration to be the basis for a fusion power plant. Good progress has been made in achieving fusion reactor-level, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas with the production of significant fusion power in the Joint European Torus (up to 2 MW) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (up to 10 MW) tokamaks. Advances on the technologies of heating, fueling, diagnostics, and materials supported these achievements. The successes have led to the initiation of the design phases of two tokamaks, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the US Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX). ITER will demonstrate the controlled ignition and extended bum of D-T plasmas with steady state as an ultimate goal. ITER will further demonstrate technologies essential to a power plant in an integrated system and perform integrated testing of the high heat flux and nuclear components required to use fusion energy for practical purposes. TPX will complement ITER by testing advanced modes of steady-state plasma operation that, coupled with the developments in ITER, will lead to an optimized demonstration power plant

  15. New materials in nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Shuichi

    1988-01-01

    In the autumn of 1987, the critical condition was attained in the JET in Europe and Japanese JT-60, thus the first subject in the physical verification of nuclear fusion reactors was resolved, and the challenge to the next attainment of self ignition condition started. As the development process of nuclear fusion reactors, there are the steps of engineering, economical and social verifications after this physical verification, and in respective steps, there are the critical problems related to materials, therefore the development of new materials must be advanced. The condition of using nuclear fusion reactors is characterized by high fluence, high thermal flux and strong magnetic field, and under such extreme condition, the microscopic structures of materials change, and they behave much differently from usual case. The subjects of material development for nuclear fusion reactors, the material data base being built up, the materials for facing plasma and high thermal flux, first walls, blanket structures, electric insulators and others are described. The serious effect of irradiation and the rate of defect inducement must be taken in consideration in the structural materials for nuclear fusion reactors. (Kako, I.)

  16. Open-ended fusion devices and reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabe, T.; Nariai, H.

    1983-01-01

    Conceptual design studies on fusion reactors based upon open-ended confinement schemes, such as the tandem mirror and rf plugged cusp, have been carried out in Japan. These studies may be classified into two categories: near-term devices (Fusion Engineering Test Facility), and long-term fusion power recators. In the first category, a two-component cusp neutron source was proposed. In the second category, the GAMMA-R, a tandem-mirror power reactor, and the RFC-R, an axisymetric mirror and cusp, reactor studies are being conducted at the University of Tsukuba and the Institute of Plasma Physics. Mirror Fusion Engineering Facility parameters and a schematic are shown. The GAMMA-R central-cell design schematic is also shown

  17. Small mirror fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.A.; Schultz, K.R.; Smith, A.C. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Basic requirements for the pilot plants are that they produce a net product and that they have a potential for commercial upgrade. We have investigated a small standard mirror fusion-fission hybrid, a two-component tandem mirror hybrid, and two versions of a field-reversed mirror fusion reactor--one a steady state, single cell reactor with a neutral beam-sustained plasma, the other a moving ring field-reversed mirror where the plasma passes through a reaction chamber with no energy addition

  18. Fusion reactors and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrixon, A.D.

    1976-01-01

    A summary is given of the report of a study group set up in 1971 by the Director of the UKAEA Culham Laboratory to investigate environmental and safety aspects of future commercial fusion reactors (1975, Carruthers, R., Dunster, H.J., Smith, R.D., Watson, C.J.H., and Mitchell, J.T.D., Culham Study Group Report on Fusion Reactors and the Environment, CLM-R148, HMSO, London). This report was originally issued in 1973 under limited distribution, but has only recently been made available for open circulation. Deuterium/tritium fusion is thought to be the most likely reaction to be used in the first generation of reactors. Estimates were made of the local and world-wide population hazards from the release of tritium, both under normal operating conditions and in the event of an accident. One serious type of accident would be a lithium metal fire in the blanket region of the reactor. The use of a fusible lithium salt (FLIBE), eliminating the lithium fire risk, is considered but the report concentrates on lithium metal in the blanket region. The main hazards to operating staff arise both from tritium and from neutron activation of the construction materials. Remote servicing of the reactor structure will be essential, but radioactive waste management seems less onerous than for fission reactors. Meaningful comparison of the overall hazards associated with fusion and fission power programmes is not yet possible. The study group emphasized the need for more data to aid the safety assessments, and the need for such assessments to keep pace with fusion power station design. (U.K.)

  19. Relativistic self focussing of laser beams at fast ignitor inertial fusion with volume ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, F.; Castillo, R.; Hora, H.

    1999-01-01

    The alternative to the magnetic confinement fusion is inertial fusion energy mostly using lasers as drivers for compression and heating of pellets with deuterium and tritium fuel. Following the present technology of lasers with pulses of some megajoules energy and nanosecond duration, a power station for very low cost energy production (and without the problems of well erosion of magnetic confinement) could be available within 15 to 20 years. For the pellet compression, the scheme of spark ignition was mostly applied but its numerous problems with asymmetries and instabilities may be overcome by the alternative scheme of high gain volume ignition. This is a well established option of inertial fusion energy with lasers where a large range of possible later improvements is implied with respect to laser technology or higher plasma compression leading to energy production of perhaps five times below the present lowest level cost from fission reactors. A further improvement may be possible by the recent development of lasers with picosecond pulse duration using the fast igniter scheme which may reach even higher fusion gains with laser pulse energies of some 100 kilojoules

  20. Advanced fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Yukihiro

    2003-01-01

    The main subjects on fusion research are now on D-T fueled fusion, mainly due to its high fusion reaction rate. However, many issues are still remained on the wall loading by the 14 MeV neutrons. In the case of D-D fueled fusion, the neutron wall loading is still remained, though the technology related to tritium breeding is not needed. The p- 6 Li and p- 11 B fueled fusions are not estimated to be the next generation candidate until the innovated plasma confinement technologies come in useful to achieve the high performance plasma parameters. The fusion reactor of D- 3 He fuels has merits on the smaller neutron wall loading and tritium handling. However, there are difficulties on achieving the high temperature plasma more than 100 keV. Furthermore the high beta plasma is needed to decrease synchrotron radiation loss. In addition, the efficiency of the direct energy conversion from protons coming out from fusion reaction is one of the key parameters in keeping overall power balance. Therefore, open magnetic filed lines should surround the plasma column. In this paper, we outlined the design of the commercial base reactor (ARTEMIS) of 1 GW electric output power configured by D- 3 He fueled FRC (Field Reversed Configuration). The ARTEMIS needs 64 kg of 3 He per a year. On the other hand, 1 million tons of 3 He is estimated to be in the moon. The 3 He of about 10 23 kg are to exist in gaseous planets such as Jupiter and Saturn. (Y. Tanaka)

  1. Some thoughts on the muon catalyzed fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, H.

    1986-01-01

    The design of the muon catalyzed fusion reactor is discussed. Some of the engineering challenges and critical research areas such as ..pi../sup -/ meson transport, beam entry single crystal window and coherent x-ray for stripping the muon from ..cap alpha.. particle, are considered. In order to reduce the tritium inventory and neutron wall loading, use of the laser technique for manipulating the d-t mixture is considered. The heterogeneous d-t mixture using the droplet or jet is discussed. 39 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Advance in physics of laser thermonuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanasev, J.; Basov, N.; Gamalij, J.; Krokhin, O.; Rozanov, V.

    1977-01-01

    A survey is given of current advance in the physics of laser thermonuclear fusion (LTF). The LTF physical model is discussed with regard to the optimal laser-target systems not only for attaining the physical limit but also for future thermonuclear reactors. The basic physical principles of LTF are formulated which make use of the fact that in focusing laser radiation on the surface of a substance a high density may be attained of the energy flux (10 5 to 10 6 J) and thereby also a high velocity of energy release in the substance. A detailed description is given of the processes which take place in laser irradiation of a spherical target. The problem is discussed of hydrodynamic stability in the compression of matter in laser thermonuclear targets, the concept is explained of the physical threshold of a thermonuclear reaction in laser excitation as are the conditions for attaining this threshold. The quantitative criterion is examined of the attainment of the physical threshold of LTF for pulsed systems. (B.S.)

  3. Introduction to magnetic fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Kenji

    1988-01-01

    Trend of the tokamak reactor design works so far carried out is reviewed, and method of conceptual design for commercial fusion reactor is critically considered concerning the black-box conpepts. System-framework of the engineering of magnetic fusion (commercial) reactor design is proposed as four steps. Based on it the next design studies are recommended in parallel approaches for making real-overcome of reactor material problem, from the view point of technological realization and not from the economical one. Real trials are involved. (author)

  4. Tritium resources available for fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovari, M.; Coleman, M.; Cristescu, I.; Smith, R.

    2018-02-01

    The tritium required for ITER will be supplied from the CANDU production in Ontario, but while Ontario may be able to supply 8 kg for a DEMO fusion reactor in the mid-2050s, it will not be able to provide 10 kg at any realistic starting time. The tritium required to start DEMO will depend on advances in plasma fuelling efficiency, burnup fraction, and tritium processing technology. It is in theory possible to start up a fusion reactor with little or no tritium, but at an estimated cost of 2 billion per kilogram of tritium saved, it is not economically sensible. Some heavy water reactor tritium production scenarios with varying degrees of optimism are presented, with the assumption that only Canada, the Republic of Korea, and Romania make tritium available to the fusion community. Results for the tritium available for DEMO in 2055 range from zero to 30 kg. CANDU and similar heavy water reactors could in theory generate additional tritium in a number of ways: (a) adjuster rods containing lithium could be used, giving 0.13 kg per year per reactor; (b) a fuel bundle with a burnable absorber has been designed for CANDU reactors, which might be adapted for tritium production; (c) tritium production could be increased by 0.05 kg per year per reactor by doping the moderator with lithium-6. If a fusion reactor is started up around 2055, governments in Canada, Argentina, China, India, South Korea and Romania will have the opportunity in the years leading up to that to take appropriate steps: (a) build, refurbish or upgrade tritium extraction facilities; (b) extend the lives of heavy water reactors, or build new ones; (c) reduce tritium sales; (d) boost tritium production in the remaining heavy water reactors. All of the alternative production methods considered have serious economic and regulatory drawbacks, and the risk of diversion of tritium or lithium-6 would also be a major concern. There are likely to be serious problems with supplying tritium for future

  5. The need and prospects for improved fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Hagenson, R.L.; Miller, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    Conceptual fusion reactor studies over the past 10-15 yr have projected systems that may be too large, complex, and costly to be of commercial interest. One main direction for improved fusion reactors points toward smaller, higher-power-density approaches. First-order economic issues (i.e., unit direct cost and cost of electricity) are used to support the need for more compact fusion reactors. The results of a number of recent conceptual designs of reversed-field pinch, spheromak, and tokamak fusion reactors are summarized as examples of more compact approaches. While a focus has been placed on increasing the fusion-power-core mass power density beyond the minimum economic threshold of 100-200 kWe/tonne, other means by which the overall attractiveness of fusion as a long-term energy source are also addressed

  6. Activation product transport in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, A.C.; Vogelsang, W.F.

    1984-01-01

    Activated corrosion and neutron sputtering products will enter the coolant and/or tritium breeding material of fusion reactor power plants and experiments and cause personnel access problems. Radiation levels around plant components due to these products will cause difficulties with maintenance and repair operations throughout the plant. A computer code, RAPTOR, has been developed to determine the transport of these products in fusion reactor coolant/tritium breeding materials. Without special treatment, it is likely that fusion reactor power plant operators could experience dose rates as high as 8 rem per hour around a number of plant components after only a few years of operation. (orig.)

  7. Advanced fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomita, Yukihiro [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2003-04-01

    The main subjects on fusion research are now on D-T fueled fusion, mainly due to its high fusion reaction rate. However, many issues are still remained on the wall loading by the 14 MeV neutrons. In the case of D-D fueled fusion, the neutron wall loading is still remained, though the technology related to tritium breeding is not needed. The p-{sup 6}Li and p-{sup 11}B fueled fusions are not estimated to be the next generation candidate until the innovated plasma confinement technologies come in useful to achieve the high performance plasma parameters. The fusion reactor of D-{sup 3}He fuels has merits on the smaller neutron wall loading and tritium handling. However, there are difficulties on achieving the high temperature plasma more than 100 keV. Furthermore the high beta plasma is needed to decrease synchrotron radiation loss. In addition, the efficiency of the direct energy conversion from protons coming out from fusion reaction is one of the key parameters in keeping overall power balance. Therefore, open magnetic filed lines should surround the plasma column. In this paper, we outlined the design of the commercial base reactor (ARTEMIS) of 1 GW electric output power configured by D-{sup 3}He fueled FRC (Field Reversed Configuration). The ARTEMIS needs 64 kg of {sup 3}He per a year. On the other hand, 1 million tons of {sup 3}He is estimated to be in the moon. The {sup 3}He of about 10{sup 23} kg are to exist in gaseous planets such as Jupiter and Saturn. (Y. Tanaka)

  8. Maintenance of fission and fusion reactors. 10. workshop on fusion reactor engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    This report contains copies of OHP presented at the title meeting. The presented topics are as follows, maintenance of nuclear power plants and ITER, exchange of shroud in BWR type reactors, deterioration of fission and fusion reactor materials, standards of pressure vessels, malfunction diagnosis method with neural network. (J.P.N.)

  9. Critical technical issues and evaluation and comparison studies for inertial fusion energy reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdou, M.A. (Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering Dept., Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Ying, A.Y. (Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering Dept., Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Tillack, M.S. (Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering Dept., Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Ghoniem, N.M. (Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering Dept., Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Waganer, L.M. (McDonnell Douglas Aerospace, St. Louis, MI (United States)); Driemeyer, D.E. (McDonnell Douglas Aerospace, St. Louis, MI (United States)); Linford, G.J. (TRW Space and Electronics Div., Redondo Beach, CA (United States)); Drake, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    Two inertial fusion energy (IFE) reactor design concepts developed in the Prometheus studies were evaluated. Objectives were to identify and characterize critical issues and the R and D required to resolve them, and to establish a sound basis for future IFE technical and programmatic decisions. Each critical issue contains several key physics and engineering issues associated with major reactor components and impacts key aspects of feasibility, safety, and economic potential of IFE reactors. Generic critical issues center around: demonstration of moderate gain at low driver energy, feasibility of direct drive targets, feasibility of indirect drive targets for heavy ions, feasibility of indirect drive targets for lasers, cost reduction strategies for heavy ion drivers, demonstration of higher overall laser driver efficiency, tritium self-sufficiency in IFE reactors, cavity clearing at IFE pulse repetition rates, performance/reliability/lifetime of final laser optics, viability of liquid metal film for first wall protection, fabricability/reliability/lifetime of SiC composite structures, validation of radiation shielding requirements, design tools, and nuclear data, reliability and lifetime of laser and heavy ion drivers, demonstration of large-scale non-linear optical laser driver architecture, demonstration of cost effective KrF amplifiers, and demonstration of low cost, high volume target production techniques. Quantitative evaluation and comparison of the two design options have been made with special focus on physics feasibility, engineering feasibility, economics, safety and environment, and research and development (R and D) requirements. Two key conclusions are made based on the overall evaluation analysis. The heavy-ion driven reactors appear to have an overall advantage over laser-driven reactors.

  10. Nuclear data requirements for fusion reactor nucleonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, M.R.; Abdou, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    Nuclear data requirements for fusion reactor nucleonics are reviewed and the present status of data are assessed. The discussion is divided into broad categories dealing with data for Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT), D-T Fusion Reactors, Alternate Fuel Cycles and the Evaluated Data Files that are available or would be available in the near future

  11. Design study of laser fusion rocket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Hideki; Shoyama, Hidetoshi; Kanda, Yukinori

    1991-01-01

    A design study was made on a rocket powered by laser fusion. Dependence of its flight performance on target gain, driver repetition rate and fuel composition was analyzed to obtain optimal design parameters of the laser fusion rocket. The results indicate that the laser fusion rocket fueled with DT or D 3 He has the potential advantages over other propulsion systems such as fission rocket for interplanetary travel. (author)

  12. Physics of laser fusion. Volume III. High-power pulsed lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzrichter, J.F.; Eimerl, D.; George, E.V.; Trenholme, J.B.; Simmons, W.W.; Hunt, J.T.

    1982-09-01

    High-power pulsed lasers can deliver sufficient energy on inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) time scales (0.1 to 10 ns) to heat and compress deuterium-tritium fuel to fusion-reaction conditions. Several laser systems have been examined, including Nd:glass, CO 2 , KrF, and I 2 , for their ICF applicability. A great deal of developmental effort has been applied to the Nd:glass laser and the CO 2 gas laser systems; these systems now deliver > 10 4 J and 20 x 10 12 W to ICF targets. We are constructing the Nova Nd:glass laser at LLNL to provide > 100 kJ and > 100 x 10 12 W of 1-μm radiation for fusion experimentation in the mid-1980s. For ICF target gain > 100 times the laser input, we expect that the laser driver must deliver approx. 3 to 5 MJ of energy on a time scale of 10 to 20 ns. In this paper we review the technological status of fusion-laser systems and outline approaches to constructing high-power pulsed laser drivers

  13. Feasibility study of a magnetic fusion production reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moir, R. W.

    1986-12-01

    A magnetic fusion reactor can produce 10.8 kg of tritium at a fusion power of only 400 MW —an order of magnitude lower power than that of a fission production reactor. Alternatively, the same fusion reactor can produce 995 kg of plutonium. Either a tokamak or a tandem mirror production plant can be used for this purpose; the cost is estimated at about 1.4 billion (1982 dollars) in either case. (The direct costs are estimated at 1.1 billion.) The production cost is calculated to be 22,000/g for tritium and 260/g for plutonium of quite high purity (1%240Pu). Because of the lack of demonstrated technology, such a plant could not be constructed today without significant risk. However, good progress is being made in fusion technology and, although success in magnetic fusion science and engineering is hard to predict with assurance, it seems possible that the physics basis and much of the needed technology could be demonstrated in facilities now under construction. Most of the remaining technology could be demonstrated in the early 1990s in a fusion test reactor of a few tens of megawatts. If the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program constructs a fusion test reactor of approximately 400 MW of fusion power as a next step in fusion power development, such a facility could be used later as a production reactor in a spinoff application. A construction decision in the late 1980s could result in an operating production reactor in the late 1990s. A magnetic fusion production reactor (MFPR) has four potential advantages over a fission production reactor: (1) no fissile material input is needed; (2) no fissioning exists in the tritium mode and very low fissioning exists in the plutonium mode thus avoiding the meltdown hazard; (3) the cost will probably be lower because of the smaller thermal power required; (4) and no reprocessing plant is needed in the tritium mode. The MFPR also has two disadvantages: (1) it will be more costly to operate because it consumes rather than sells

  14. Laser fusion and precision engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakai, Sadao

    1989-01-01

    The development of laser nuclear fusion energy for attaining the self supply of energy in Japan and establishing the future perspective as the nation is based in the wide fields of high level science and technology. Therefore to its promotion, large expectation is placed as the powerful traction for the development of creative science and technology which are particularly necessary in Japan. The research on laser nuclear fusion advances steadily in the elucidation of the physics of pellet implosion which is its basic concept and compressed plasma parameters. In September, 1986, the number of neutron generation 10 13 , and in October, 1988, the high density compression 600 times as high as solid density have been achieved. Based on these results, now the laser nuclear fusion is in the situation to begin the attainment of ignition condition for nuclear fusion and the realization of break even. The optical components, high power laser technology, fuel pellet production, high resolution measurement, the simulation of implosion using a supercomputer and so on are closely related to precision engineering. In this report, the mechanism of laser nuclear fusion, the present status of its research, and the basic technologies and precision engineering are described. (K.I.)

  15. Conceptual design of inertial confinement fusion power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mima, Kunioki; Yamanaka, Tatsuhiko; Nakai, Sadao

    1994-01-01

    Presented is the status of the conceptual design studies of inertial confinement fusion reactors. The recent achievements of the laser fusion research enable us to refine the conceptual design of the power plant. In the paper, main features of several new conceptual designs of ICF reactor; KOYO, SIRIUS-P, HYLIFE-II and so on are summarized. In particular, the target design and the reactor chamber design are described. Finally, the overview of the laser fusion reactor and the irradiation system is also described. (author)

  16. Advances in fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    The author addresses the tokamak as a power reactor. Contrary to popular opinion, there are still a few people that think a tokamak might make a good fusion power reactor. In thinking about advances in fusion reactor design, in the U.S., at least, that generally means advances relevant to the Starfire design. He reviews some of the features of Starfire. Starfire is the last major study done of the tokamak as a reactor in this country. It is now over eight years old in the sense that eight years ago was really the time in which major decisions were made as to its features. Starfire was a tokamak with a major radius of seven meters, about twice the linear dimensions of a machine like TIBER

  17. Laser fusion experiments at LLL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1980-06-16

    These notes present the experimental basis and status for laser fusion as developed at LLL. Two other chapters, one authored by K.A. Brueckner and the other by C. Max, present the theoretical implosion physics and laser plasma interaction physics. The notes consist of six sections. The first is an introductory section which provides some of the history of inertial fusion and a simple explanation of the concepts involved. The second section presents an extensive discussion of diagnostic instrumentation used in the LLL Laser Fusion Program. The third section is a presentation of laser facilities and capabilities at LLL. The purpose here is to define capability, not to derive how it was obtained. The fourth and fifth sections present the experimental data on laser-plasma interaction and implosion physics. The last chapter is a short projection of the future.

  18. Laser fusion experiments at LLL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1980-01-01

    These notes present the experimental basis and status for laser fusion as developed at LLL. Two other chapters, one authored by K.A. Brueckner and the other by C. Max, present the theoretical implosion physics and laser plasma interaction physics. The notes consist of six sections. The first is an introductory section which provides some of the history of inertial fusion and a simple explanation of the concepts involved. The second section presents an extensive discussion of diagnostic instrumentation used in the LLL Laser Fusion Program. The third section is a presentation of laser facilities and capabilities at LLL. The purpose here is to define capability, not to derive how it was obtained. The fourth and fifth sections present the experimental data on laser-plasma interaction and implosion physics. The last chapter is a short projection of the future

  19. The LOFA analysis of fusion-fission hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Z.-C.; Xie, H.

    2014-01-01

    The fusion-fission hybrid energy reactor can produce energy, breed nuclear fuel, and handle the nuclear waste, etc, with the fusion neutron source striking the subcritical blanket. The passive safety system, consisting of passive residual heat removal system, passive safety injection system and automatic depressurization system, was adopted into the fusion-fission hybrid energy reactor in this paper. Modeling and nodalization of primary loop, passive core cooling system and partial secondary loop of the fusion-fission hybrid energy reactor using RELAP5 were conducted and LOFA (Loss of Flow Accident) was analyzed. The results of key transient parameters indicated that the PRHRs could mitigate the accidental consequence of LOFA effectively. It is also concluded that it is feasible to apply the passive safety system concept to fusion-fission hybrid energy reactor. (author)

  20. Composites as structural materials in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megusar, J.

    1989-01-01

    In fusion reactors, materials are used under extreme conditions of temperature, stress, irradiation, and chemical environment. The absence of adequate materials will seriously impede the development of fusion reactors and might ultimately be one of the major difficulties. Some of the current materials problems can be solved by proper design features. For others, the solution will have to rely on materials development. A parallel and balanced effort between the research in plasma physics and fusion-related technology and in materials research is, therefore, the best strategy to ultimately achieve economic, safe, and environmentally acceptable fusion. The essential steps in developing composites for structural components of fusion reactors include optimization of mechanical properties followed by testing under fusion-reactor-relevant conditions. In optimizing the mechanical behavior of composite materials, a wealth of experience can be drawn from the research on ceramic matrix and metal matrix composite materials sponsored by the Department of Defense. The particular aspects of this research relevant to fusion materials development are methodology of the composite materials design and studies of new processing routes to develop composite materials with specific properties. Most notable examples are the synthesis of fibers, coatings, and ceramic materials in their final shapes form polymeric precursors and the infiltration of fibrous preforms by molten metals

  1. Laser-induced mobilization of dust produced during fusion reactors operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatry, A.

    2010-01-01

    During tokamak operation, plasma-wall interactions lead to material erosion process and dusts production. These dusts are mainly composed by carbon and tungsten, with sizes ranging from 10 nm to 100 μm. For safety reasons and to guarantee an optimum reactor functioning, the dusts have to be kept in reasonable quantity. The dusts mobilization is a first step to collect them, and the laser is a promising technique for this application. To optimize the cleaning, physical mechanisms responsible for dust ejection induced by laser have been identified. Some particles, such as aggregates, are directly ablated by the laser. The metal droplets are ejected intact by an electrostatic force, induced by the photoelectrons. We also characterized the particles ejection to choose an appropriate collection device. (author) [fr

  2. Towards diagnostics for a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costley, A. E.

    2009-01-01

    The requirements for measurements on modern tokamak fusion plasmas are outlined, and the techniques and systems used to make the measurements, usually referred to as 'diagnostics', are introduced. The basics of three particular diagnostics - magnetics, neutron systems and a laser based optical system - are outlined as examples of modern diagnostic systems, and the implementation of these diagnostics on a current tokamak (JET) are described. The next major step in magnetic confinement fusion is the construction and operation of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), which is a joint project of China, Europe, Japan, India, Korea, the Russian Federation, and the United States. Construction has begun in Cadarache, France. It is expected that ITER will operate at the 500 MW level. Because of the harsh environment in the vacuum vessel where many diagnostic components are located, the development of diagnostics for ITER is a major challenge - arguably the most difficult challenge ever undertaken in the field of diagnostics. The main elements in the diagnostic step are outlined using the three chosen techniques as examples. Finally, the step beyond ITER to a demonstration reactor, DEMO, that is expected to produce several GWs of fusion power is considered and the impact on diagnostics outlined. It is shown that the applicability and development steps needed for the individual diagnostics techniques will differ. The challenges for DEMO diagnostics are substantial and a dedicated effort should be made to find and develop new techniques, and especially techniques appropriate to the DEMO environment. It is argued that the limitations and difficulties in diagnostics should be a consideration in the optimization and designs of DEMO. (author)

  3. Inertial confinement fusion (ICF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuckolls, J.

    1977-01-01

    The principal goal of the inertial confinement fusion program is the development of a practical fusion power plant in this century. Rapid progress has been made in the four major areas of ICF--targets, drivers, fusion experiments, and reactors. High gain targets have been designed. Laser, electron beam, and heavy ion accelerator drivers appear to be feasible. Record-breaking thermonuclear conditions have been experimentally achieved. Detailed diagnostics of laser implosions have confirmed predictions of the LASNEX computer program. Experimental facilities are being planned and constructed capable of igniting high gain fusion microexplosions in the mid 1980's. A low cost long lifetime reactor design has been developed

  4. Falling liquid film flow along cascade-typed first wall of laser-fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunugi, T.; Nakai, T.; Kawara, Z.

    2007-01-01

    To protect from high energy/particle fluxes caused by nuclear fusion reaction such as extremely high heat flux, X rays, Alpha particles and fuel debris to a first wall of an inertia fusion reactor, a 'cascade-typed' first wall with a falling liquid film flow is proposed as the 'liquid wall' concept which is one of the reactor chamber cooling and wall protection schemes: the reactor chamber can protect by using a liquid metal film flow (such as Li 17 Pb 83 ) over the wall. In order to investigate the feasibility of this concept, we conducted the numerical analyses by using the STREAM code and also conducted the flow visualization experiments. The numerical results suggested that the cascade structure design should be improved, so that we redesigned the cascade-typed first wall and performed the flow visualization as a POP (proof-of-principle) experiment. In the numerical analyses, the water is used as the working liquid and an acrylic plate as the wall. These selections are based on two reasons: (1) from the non-dimensional analysis approach, the Weber number (We=ρu 2 δ/σ: ρ is density, u is velocity, δ is film thickness, σ is surface tension coefficient) should be the same between the design (Li 17 Pb 83 flow) and the model experiment (water flow) because of the free-surface instability, (2) the SiC/SiC composite would be used as the wall material, so that the wall may have the less wettability: the acrylic plate has the similar feature. The redesigned cascade-typed first wall for one step (30 cm height corresponding to 4 Hz laser duration) consists of a liquid tank having a free-surface for keeping the constant water-head located at the backside of the first wall, and connects to a slit which is composed of two plates: one plate is the first wall, and the other is maintaining the liquid level. This design solved the trouble of the previous design. The test section for the flow visualization has the same structure and the same height as the reactor design

  5. Space Propulsion via Spherical Torus Fusion Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Craig H.; Juhasz, Albert J.; Borowski, Stanley K.; Dudzinski, Leonard A.

    2003-01-01

    A conceptual vehicle design enabling fast outer solar system travel was produced predicated on a small aspect ratio spherical torus nuclear fusion reactor. Analysis revealed that the vehicle could deliver a 108 mt crew habitat payload to Saturn rendezvous in 204 days, with an initial mass in low Earth orbit of 1630 mt. Engineering conceptual design, analysis, and assessment were performed on all major systems including nuclear fusion reactor, magnetic nozzle, power conversion, fast wave plasma heating, fuel pellet injector, startup/re-start fission reactor and battery, and other systems. Detailed fusion reactor design included analysis of plasma characteristics, power balance and utilization, first wall, toroidal field coils, heat transfer, and neutron/X-ray radiation

  6. Physics of laser fusion. Volume II. Diagnostics of experiments on laser fusion targets at LLNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    These notes present the experimental basis and status for laser fusion as developed at LLNL. There are two other volumes in this series: Vol. I, by C.E. Max, presents the theoretical laser-plasma interaction physics; Vol. III, by J.F. Holzrichter et al., presents the theory and design of high-power pulsed lasers. A fourth volume will present the theoretical implosion physics. The notes consist of six sections. The first, an introductory section, provides some of the history of inertial fusion and a simple explanation of the concepts involved. The second section presents an extensive discussion of diagnostic instrumentation used in the LLNL Laser Fusion Program. The third section is a presentation of laser facilities and capabilities at LLNL. The purpose here is to define capability, not to derive how it was obtained. The fourth and fifth sections present the experimental data on laser-plasma interaction and implosion physics. The last chapter is a short projection of the future.

  7. Physics of laser fusion. Volume II. Diagnostics of experiments on laser fusion targets at LLNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    These notes present the experimental basis and status for laser fusion as developed at LLNL. There are two other volumes in this series: Vol. I, by C.E. Max, presents the theoretical laser-plasma interaction physics; Vol. III, by J.F. Holzrichter et al., presents the theory and design of high-power pulsed lasers. A fourth volume will present the theoretical implosion physics. The notes consist of six sections. The first, an introductory section, provides some of the history of inertial fusion and a simple explanation of the concepts involved. The second section presents an extensive discussion of diagnostic instrumentation used in the LLNL Laser Fusion Program. The third section is a presentation of laser facilities and capabilities at LLNL. The purpose here is to define capability, not to derive how it was obtained. The fourth and fifth sections present the experimental data on laser-plasma interaction and implosion physics. The last chapter is a short projection of the future

  8. Fusion reactor start-up without an external tritium source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, S., E-mail: Shanliang.Zheng@ccfe.ac.uk; King, D.B.; Garzotti, L.; Surrey, E.; Todd, T.N.

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Investigated the feasibility (including plasma physics, neutronics and economics) of starting a fusion reactor from running pure D–D fusion reactor to gradually move towards the D–T operation. • Proposed building up tritium from making use of neutrons generated by D–D fusion reactions. • Studied plasma physics feasibility for pure D–D operation and provided consistent fusion power and neutron yield in the plasma with different mixture of deuterium and tritium. • Discussed the economics aspect for operating a pure D–D fusion reactor towards a full-power D–T fusion reactor. - Abstract: It has long been recognised that the shortage of external tritium sources for fusion reactors using D–T, the most promising fusion fuel, requires all such fusion power plants (FPP) to breed their own tritium. It is also recognised that the initial start-up of a fusion reactor will require several kilograms of tritium within a scenario in which radioactive decay, ITER and subsequent demonstrator reactors are expected to have consumed most of the known tritium stockpile. To circumvent this tritium fuel shortage and ultimately achieve steady-state operation for a FPP, it is essential to first accumulate sufficient tritium to compensate for loss due to decay and significant retention in the materials in order to start a new FPP. In this work, we propose to accumulate tritium starting from D–D fusion reactions, since D exists naturally in water, and to gradually build up the D–T plasma targeted in fusion reactor designs. There are two likely D–D fusion reaction channels, (1) D + D → T + p, and (2) D + D → He3 + n. The tritium can be generated via the reaction channel ‘(1)’ and the 2.45 MeV neutrons from ‘(2)’ react with lithium-6 in the breeding blanket to produce more tritium to be fed back into plasma fuel. Quantitative evaluations are conducted for two blanket concepts to assess the feasibility and suitability of this approach to FPP

  9. Review of mirror fusion reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, D.J.

    1977-01-01

    Three magnetic confinement concepts, based on the mirror principle, are described. These mirror concepts are summarized as follows: (1) fusion-fission hybrid reactor, (2) tandem mirror reactor, and (3) reversed field mirror reactor

  10. Development scenario for laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maniscalco, J.A.; Hovingh, J.; Buntzen, R.R.

    1976-01-01

    This scenario proposes establishment of test and engineering facilities to (1) investigate the technological problems associated with laser fusion, (2) demonstrate fissile fuel production, and (3) demonstrate competitive electrical power production. Such facilities would be major milestones along the road to a laser-fusion power economy. The relevant engineering and economic aspects of each of these research and development facilities are discussed. Pellet design and gain predictions corresponding to the most promising laser systems are presented for each plant. The results show that laser fusion has the potential to make a significant contribution to our energy needs. Beginning in the early 1990's, this new technology could be used to produce fissile fuel, and after the turn of the century it could be used to generate electrical power

  11. Tritium problems in fusion reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickman, R.G.

    1975-01-01

    A brief introduction is given to the role tritium will play in the development of fusion power. The biological and worldwide environmental behavior of tritium is reviewed. The tritium problems expected in fusion power reactors are outlined. A few thoughts on tritium permeation and recent results for tritium cleanup and CT 4 accumulation are presented. Problems involving the recovery of tritium from the breeding blanket in fusion power reactors are also considered, including the possible effect of impurities in lithium blankets and the use of lithium as a regenerable getter pump. (auth)

  12. Laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashby, D.E.T.F.

    1976-01-01

    A short survey is given on laser fusion its basic concepts and problems and the present theoretical and experimental methods. The future research program of the USA in this field is outlined. (WBU) [de

  13. Inertial fusion reactors and magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornwell, J.B.; Pendergrass, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The application of magnetic fields of simple configurations and modest strengths to direct target debris ions out of cavities can alleviate recognized shortcomings of several classes of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactors. Complex fringes of the strong magnetic fields of heavy-ion fusion (HIF) focusing magnets may intrude into reactor cavities and significantly affect the trajectories of target debris ions. The results of an assessment of potential benefits from the use of magnetic fields in ICF reactors and of potential problems with focusing-magnet fields in HIF reactors conducted to set priorities for continuing studies are reported. Computational tools are described and some preliminary results are presented

  14. Advanced nuclear fuel production by using fission-fusion hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Kusayer, T.A.; Sahin, S.; Abdulraoof, M.

    1993-01-01

    Efforts are made at the College of Engineering, King Saud University, Riyadh to lay out the main structure of a prototype experimental fusion and fusion-fission (hybrid) reactor blanket in cylindrical geometry. The geometry is consistent with most of the current fusion and hybrid reactor design concepts in respect of the neutronic considerations. Characteristics of the fusion chamber, fusion neutrons and the blanket are provided. The studies have further shown that 1 GWe fission-fusion reactor can produce up to 957 kg/year which is enough to fuel five light water reactors of comparable power. Fuel production can be increased further. 29 refs

  15. Development of high power solid-state laser for inertial fusion energy driver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, K.; Yamanaka, M.; Nakatsuka, M.; Sasaki, T.; Nakai, S.

    1997-01-01

    The design study of the laser fusion power plant KOYO has been conducted as a joint program of universities, national laboratories, and industries in Japan and also with international collaborations. In the design of KOYO, the gain scaling of direct drive implosion with 0.35 μ m wavelength laser light is used. A driver of diode pumped solid state laser (DPSSL) generates 4 MJ/pulse with 12 Hz and the output pulses are switched to deliver the laser energy successively to four chambers, which operate with 3 Hz. The chamber wall is protected with thick liquid metal which flows down in a SiC woven tube. Following to the conceptual design study, the critical key issues which may affect the technical and economical feasibility of the commercial power plant KOYO have been examined. Research and development of some key technologies have been performed. As the results of the studies on KOYO, it is concluded that the technical and economical feasibility of laser fusion reactor is well in our scope to reach

  16. Parameter study toward economical magnetic fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Tomoaki; Okano, Kunihiko; Nanahara, Toshiya; Hatayama, Akiyoshi; Yamaji, Kenji; Takuma, Tadashi.

    1996-01-01

    Although the R and D of nuclear fusion reactors has made a steady progress as seen in ITER project, it has become of little doubt that fusion power reactors require hugeness and enormous amount of construction cost as well as surmounting the physics and engineering difficulties. Therefore, it is one of the essential issues to investigate the prospect of realizing fusion power reactors. In this report we investigated the effects of physics and engineering improvements on the economics of ITER-like steady state tokamak fusion reactors using our tokamak system and costing analysis code. With the results of this study, we considered what is the most significant factor for realizing economical competitive fusion reactors. The results show that with the conventional TF coil maximum field (12T), physics progress in β-value (or Troyon coefficient) has the most considerable effect on the reduction of fusion plant COE (Cost of Electricity) while the achievement of H factor = 2-3 and neutron wall load =∼5MW/m 2 is necessary. The results also show that with the improvement of TF coil maximum field, reactors with a high aspect ratio are economically advantageous because of low plasma current driving power while the improvement of current density in the conductors and yield strength of support structures is indispensable. (author)

  17. Development of diode-pumped solid-state laser HALNA for fusion reactor driver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, Toshiyuki; Kanabe, Tadashi; Matsumoto, Osamu

    2005-01-01

    The diode-pumped slab laser for inertial fusion energy driver has been demonstrated, which produces the 1053-nm output energy of 10 J at 10 Hz. The glass slab laser amplifier has been pumped by quasi-CW 290 kW AlGaAs laser-diode arrays at 803 nm. The optical system can compensate for thermal effects by use of zig-zag optical propagation, image-relayed telescope, and 45deg Faraday rotator. The output energy of 10.6 J at 1 Hz with the optical to optical conversion efficiency of 19.9% has been successfully obtained. Also the 10 Hz operation has been performed with a 5.1 J output energy. (author)

  18. A comparison of radioactive waste from first generation fusion reactors and fast fission reactors with actinide recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, M.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1991-04-01

    Limitations of the fission fuel resources will presumably mandate the replacement of thermal fission reactors by fast fission reactors that operate on a self-sufficient closed fuel cycle. This replacement might take place within the next one hundred years, so the direct competitors of fusion reactors will be fission reactors of the latter rather than the former type. Also, fast fission reactors, in contrast to thermal fission reactors, have the potential for transmuting long-lived actinides into short-lived fission products. The associated reduction of the long-term activation of radioactive waste due to actinides makes the comparison of radioactive waste from fast fission reactors to that from fusion reactors more rewarding than the comparison of radioactive waste from thermal fission reactors to that from fusion reactors. Radioactive waste from an experimental and a commercial fast fission reactor and an experimental and a commercial fusion reactor has been characterized. The fast fission reactors chosen for this study were the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 and the Integral Fast Reactor. The fusion reactors chosen for this study were the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and a Reduced Activation Ferrite Helium Tokamak. The comparison of radioactive waste parameters shows that radioactive waste from the experimental fast fission reactor may be less hazardous than that from the experimental fusion reactor. Inclusion of the actinides would reverse this conclusion only in the long-term. Radioactive waste from the commercial fusion reactor may always be less hazardous than that from the commercial fast fission reactor, irrespective of the inclusion or exclusion of the actinides. The fusion waste would even be far less hazardous, if advanced structural materials, like silicon carbide or vanadium alloy, were employed

  19. A comparison of radioactive waste from first generation fusion reactors and fast fission reactors with actinide recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, M.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1991-04-01

    Limitations of the fission fuel resources will presumably mandate the replacement of thermal fission reactors by fast fission reactors that operate on a self-sufficient closed fuel cycle. This replacement might take place within the next one hundred years, so the direct competitors of fusion reactors will be fission reactors of the latter rather than the former type. Also, fast fission reactors, in contrast to thermal fission reactors, have the potential for transmuting long-lived actinides into short-lived fission products. The associated reduction of the long-term activation of radioactive waste due to actinides makes the comparison of radioactive waste from fast fission reactors to that from fusion reactors more rewarding than the comparison of radioactive waste from thermal fission reactors to that from fusion reactors. Radioactive waste from an experimental and a commercial fast fission reactor and an experimental and a commercial fusion reactor has been characterized. The fast fission reactors chosen for this study were the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 and the Integral Fast Reactor. The fusion reactors chosen for this study were the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and a Reduced Activation Ferrite Helium Tokamak. The comparison of radioactive waste parameters shows that radioactive waste from the experimental fast fission reactor may be less hazardous than that from the experimental fusion reactor. Inclusion of the actinides would reverse this conclusion only in the long-term. Radioactive waste from the commercial fusion reactor may always be less hazardous than that from the commercial fast fission reactor, irrespective of the inclusion or exclusion of the actinides. The fusion waste would even be far less hazardous, if advanced structural materials, like silicon carbide or vanadium alloy, were employed.

  20. Trends and developments in magnetic confinement fusion reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.C.; Carlson, G.A.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    An overview is presented of recent design trends and developments in reactor concepts for magnetic confinement fusion. The paper emphasizes the engineering and technology considerations of commercial fusion reactor concepts. Emphasis is placed on reactors that operate on the deuterium/tritium/lithium fuel cycle. Recent developments in tokamak, mirror, and Elmo Bumpy Torus reactor concepts are described, as well as a survey of recent developments on a wide variety of alternate magnetic fusion reactor concepts. The paper emphasizes recent developments of these concepts within the last two to three years

  1. Studies of conceptual spheromak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsurai, M.; Yamada, M.

    1982-01-01

    Preliminary design studies are carried out for a spheromak fusion reactor. Simplified circuit theory is applied to obtain the characteristic relations among various parameters of the spheromak configuration for an aspect ratio of A >or approx. 1.6. These relations are used to calculate the parameters for the conceptual designs of three types of fusion reactor: (1) the DT reactor with two-component-type operation, (2) the ignited DT reactor, and (3) the ignited catalysed-type DD reactor. With a total wall loading of approx. 4 MW.m -2 , it is found that edge magnetic fields of only approx. 4 T (DT) and approx. 9 T (Cat. DD) are required for ignited reactors of 1 m plasma (minor) radius with output powers in the gigawatt range. An assessment of various schemes of generation, compression and translation of spheromak plasmas is presented. (author)

  2. Development of laser diode pumped Nd:glass slab laser driver for the inertial fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Masanobu; Kanabe, Tadashi; Yasuhara, Ryo

    2002-01-01

    A diode-pumped solid state laser (DPSSL) is promising candidate of reactor driver for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE). As a first step of a driver development for the IFE, we are developing a laser diode pumped zig-zag Nd:glass slab laser amplifier system HALNA 10 (High Average-power Laser for Nuclear-fusion Application) which can generated an output of 10 J per pulse at 1053 nm in 10 Hz operation. The water-cooled zig zag Nd:glass slab is pumped from both sides by 803 nm AIGaAs laser diode (LD) module, each LD module has an emitting area of 420 mm x 10 mm and two LD modules generate in total 218 (max.) kW peak power with 2.6 kW/cm 2 peak intensity at 10 Hz repetition rate. We have obtained in first-stage experiment 8.5 J output energy at 0.5 Hz with a beam quality of 2 times diffraction limited far-field pattern, which nearly confirmed our conceptual design. Since the key issue for the IFE DPSSL drive module were almost satisfactory, we have a confidence that a next 100 J x 10 Hz DPSSL module (HALNA 100) can be constructed. Thermal effects in laser slab, Faraday rotator, Faraday isolator and Pockets cell and their managements are discussed.

  3. Radiation shielding for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, R.T.

    2000-01-01

    Radiation shielding requirements for fusion reactors present different problems than those for fission reactors and accelerators. Fusion devices, particularly tokamak reactors, are complicated by geometry constraints that complicate disposition of fully effective shielding. This paper reviews some of these shielding issues and suggested solutions for optimizing the machine and biological shielding. Radiation transport calculations are essential for predicting and confirming the nuclear performance of the reactor and, as such, must be an essential part of the reactor design process. Development and optimization of reactor components from the first wall and primary shielding to the penetrations and containment shielding must be carried out in a sensible progression. Initial results from one-dimensional transport calculations are used for scoping studies and are followed by detailed two- and three-dimensional analyses to effectively characterize the overall radiation environment. These detail model calculations are essential for accounting for the radiation leakage through ports and other penetrations in the bulk shield. Careful analysis of component activation and radiation damage is cardinal for defining remote handling requirements, in-situ replacement of components, and personnel access at specific locations inside the reactor containment vessel. (author)

  4. Fusion reactor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1989-01-01

    This paper discuses the following topics on fusion reactor materials: irradiation, facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters, and activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; fundamental mechanical behavior; radiation effects; development of structural alloys; solid breeding materials; and ceramics.

  5. Fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This paper discuses the following topics on fusion reactor materials: irradiation, facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters, and activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; fundamental mechanical behavior; radiation effects; development of structural alloys; solid breeding materials; and ceramics

  6. Present status of fusion reactor materials, 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasaki, Ryukichi; Shiraishi, Kensuke; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Murakami, Yoshio; Takamura, Saburo

    1982-01-01

    Recently, the design of fusion reactors such as Intor has been carried out, and various properties that fusion reactor materials should have been clarified. In the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the research and development of materials aiming at a tokamak type experimental fusion reactor are in progress. In this paper, the problems, the present status of research and development and the future plan about the surface materials and structural materials for the first wall, blanket materials and magnet materials are explained. The construction of the critical plasma testing facility JT-60 developed by JAERI has progressed smoothly, and the operation is expected in 1985. The research changes from that of plasma physics to that of reactor technology. In tokamak type fusion reactors, high temperature D-T plasma is contained with strong magnetic field in vacuum vessels, and the neutrons produced by nuclear reaction, charged particles diffusing from plasma and neutral particles by charge exchange strike the first wall. The PCA by improving 316 stainless steel is used as the structural material, and TiC coating techniques are developed. As the blanket material, Li 2 O is studied, and superconducting magnets are developed. (Koko, I.)

  7. Public acceptance of fusion energy and scientific feasibility of a fusion reactor. Design of inductively driven long pulse tokamak reactors: IDLT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Yuichi

    1998-01-01

    Based on scientific data based adopted for designing ITER plasmas and on the advancement of fusion nuclear technology from the recent R and D program, the scientific feasibility of inductively-driven tokamak fusion reactors is studied. A low wall-loading DEMO fusion reactor is designed, which utilizes an austenitic stainless steel in conjunction with significant data bases and operating experiences, since we have given high priority to the early and reliable realization of a tokamak fusion plasma over the cost performance. Since the DEMO reactor with the relatively large volume (i.e., major radius of 10 m) is employed, plasma ignition is achievable with a low fusion power of 0.8 GW, and an operation period of 4 - 5 hours is available only with inductive current drive. Disadvantages of pulsed operation in commercial fusion reactors include fatigue in structural materials and the necessity of an energy storage system to compensate the electric power during the dwell time. To overcome these disadvantages, a pulse length is prolonged up to about 10 hours, resulting in the remarkable reduction of the total cycle number to 10 4 during the life of the fusion plant. (author)

  8. Updated comparison of economics of fusion reactors with advanced fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delene, J.G.

    1990-01-01

    The projected cost of electricity (COE) for fusion is compared with that from current and advanced nuclear fission and coal-fired plants. Fusion cost models were adjusted for consistency with advanced fission plants and the calculational methodology and cost factors follow guidelines recommended for cost comparisons of advanced fission reactors. The results show COEs of about 59--74 mills/kWh for the fusion designs considered. In comparison, COEs for future fission reactors are estimated to be in the 43--54 mills/kWh range with coal-fired plant COEs of about 53--69 mills/kWh ($2--3/GJ coal). The principal cost driver for the fusion plants relative to fission plants is the fusion island cost. Although the estimated COEs for fusion are greater than those for fission or coal, the costs are not so high as to preclude fusion's competitiveness as a safe and environmentally sound alternative

  9. Standard mirror fusion reactor design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    This report covers the work of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Division's reactor study group during FY 1976 on the standard mirror reactor. The ''standard'' mirror reactor is characterized as a steady state, neutral beam sustained, D-T fusioning plasma confined by a Yin-Yang magnetic mirror field. The physics parameters are obtained from the same physics model that explains the 2XIIB experiment. The model assumes that the drift cyclotron loss cone mode occurs on the boundary of the plasma, and that it is stabilized by warm plasma with negligible energy investment. The result of the study was a workable mirror fusion power plant, steady-state blanket removal made relatively simple by open-ended geometry, and no impurity problem due to the positive plasma potential. The Q (fusion power/injected beam power) turns out to be only 1.1 because of loss out the ends from Coulomb collisions, i.e., classical losses. This low Q resulted in 77% of the gross electrical power being used to power the injectors, thereby causing the net power cost to be high. The low Q stimulated an intensive search for Q-enhancement concepts, resulting in the LLL reactor design effort turning to the field reversal mirror and the tandem mirror, each having Q of order 5

  10. Lasers and particle beam for fusion and strategic defense

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    This special issue of the Journal of Fusion Energy consists of the edited transscripts of a symposium on the applications of laser and particle beams to fusion and strategic defense. Its eleven papers discuss these topics: the Strategic Defense Initiative; accelerators for heavy ion fusion; rf accelerators for fusion and strategic defense; Pulsed power, ICF, and the Strategic Defense Initiative; chemical lasers; the feasibility of KrF lasers for fusion; the damage resistance of coated optic; liquid crystal devices for laser systems; fusion neutral-particle beam research and its contribution to the Star Wars program; and induction linacs and free electron laser amplifiers for ICF devices and directed-energy weapons

  11. Nuclear data needs for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohar, Y.

    1986-01-01

    The nuclear design of fusion components (e.g., first wall, blanket, shield, magnet, limiter, divertor, etc.) requires an accurate prediction of the radiation field, the radiation damage parameters, and the activation analysis. The fusion nucleonics for these tasks are reviewed with special attention to point out nuclear data needs and deficiencies which effect the design process. The main areas included in this review are tritium breeding analyses, nuclear heating calculations, radiation damage in reactor components, shield designs, and results of uncertainty analyses as applied to fusion reactor studies. Design choices and reactor parameters that impact the neutronics performance of the blanket are discussed with emphasis on the tritium breeding ratio. Nuclear data required for kerma factors, shielding analysis, and radiation damage are discussed. Improvements in the evaluated data libraries are described to overcome the existing problems. 84 refs., 11 figs., 9 tabs

  12. Advanced fuels for nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNally, J.R. Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Should magnetic confinement of hot plasma prove satisfactory at high β (16 πnkT//sub B 2 / greater than 0.1), thermonuclear fusion fuels other than D.T may be contemplated for future fusion reactors. The prospect of the advanced fusion fuels D.D and 6 Li.D for fusion reactors is quite promising provided the system is large, well reflected and possesses a high β. The first generation reactions produce the very active, energy-rich fuels t and 3 He which exhibit a high burnup probability in very hot plasmas. Steady state burning of D.D can ensue in a 60 kG field, 5 m reactor for β approximately 0.2 and reflectivity R/sub mu/ = 0.9 provided the confinement time is about 38 sec. The feasibility of steady state burning of 6 Li.D has not yet been demonstrated but many important features of such systems still need to be incorporated in the reactivity code. In particular, there is a need for new and improved nuclear cross section data for over 80 reaction possibilities

  13. Fusion reactor cost reductions by employing non-nuclear grade components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourque, R.F.; Maya, I.; Schultz, K.R.; Sonn, D.L.; Wise, R.K.

    1987-09-01

    The Cascade inertial confinement fusion reactor fits the requirements of low radioactive inventories and inherent safety and is therefore a candidate for non-nuclear construction throughout. This reactor consists of a rotating blanket of ceramic granules that absorb the energy from D-T target explosions occurring along the rotational axis. Laser energy is beamed in axially from both ends. Two cost estimates were made for an 815 MWe Cascade power plant. One was based on an ''all conventional'' plant, which is constructed and costed using well-established, conventional fossil power plant methods. The second was a ''nuclear plus conventional'' design, constructed and costed using a combination of fossil and fission reactor plant methods and standards that would be typical of advanced fission reactors. The total capital requirements for the ''all conventional'' construction plant were estimated in 1985 dollars at $1490 M, including indirect costs. Similarly, the ''nuclear plus conventional'' construction plant was estimated at $1940 M. The savings of $450 M (23%) represents strictly the difference between Cascade ICF power plants designed and constructed to nuclear safety-related requirements versus all non-nuclear. This example clearly shows that, if fusion plants can take advantage of low activation materials and inherent safety features to eliminate the need for nuclear-related expenses, then such plants may have economic advantages over nuclear-grade systems. 13 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs

  14. Breeder control fusion reactor. Topical interview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlueter, A [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching/Muenchen (Germany, F.R.)

    1977-09-01

    The energy sources of the future are extremely controversial. The consumption of fossil fuel shall decrease during the next decades, because exhaustion of the resources, pollution, increase of CO/sub 2/ in the atmosphere and other reasons. But at present the question it not yet settled which alternative energy system should replace the fossil fuel. First of all nuclear energy in the form of fission reactions seems to come into operation to a larger extent. The next step may be the controlled thermonuclear fusion reaction. Furthermore, a comparison between fusion and fission is given which shows that fusion would bring about less risks than the breeders. An advantage of the fusion reactor would be the fact that the fuel cycle is closed. Unfortunately, the physical questions are not as yet satisfactorily clarified so that one cannot be sure whether a fusion reactor can really be built.

  15. Nuclear characteristics of D-D fusion reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Hideki; Ohta, Masao

    1978-01-01

    Fusion reactors operating on deuterium (D-D) cycle are considered to be of long range interest for their freedom from tritium breeding in the blanket. The present paper discusses the various possibilities of D-D fusion reactor blanket designs mainly from the standpoint of the nuclear characteristics. Neutronic and photonic calculations are based on presently available data to provide a basis of the optimal blanket design in D-D fusion reactors. It is found that it appears desirable to design a blanket with blanket/shield (BS) concept in D-D fusion reactors. The BS concept is designed to obtain reasonable shielding characteristics for superconducting magnet (SCM) by using shielding materials in the compact blanket. This concept will open the possibility of compact radiation shield design based on assured technology, and offer the advantage from the system economics point of view. (auth.)

  16. Multi-terawatt fusion laser systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzrichter, J.F.

    1993-01-01

    The evolution of laser fusion systems started with a description of the basic principles of the laser in 1959, then a physical demonstration showing 1000 Watts of peak optical power in 1961 to the present systems that deliver 10 14 watts of peak optical power, are presented. Physical limits to large systems are reviewed: thermal limits, material stress limits, structural limits and stability, parasitic coupling, measurement precision and diagnostics. The various steps of the fusion laser-system development process are then discussed through an historical presentation. 3 figs., 8 refs

  17. An analysis of the estimated capital cost of a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollis, A.A.

    1981-06-01

    The cost of building a fusion reactor similar to the Culham Conceptual Tokamak reactor Mark IIB is assessed and compared with other published capital costs of fusion and fission reactors. It is concluded that capital-investment and structure-renewal costs for a typical fusion reactor as presently conceived are likely to be higher than for thermal-fission reactors. (author)

  18. An analysis of the estimated capital cost of a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollis, A.A.; Evans, L.S.

    1981-01-01

    The cost of building a fusion reactor similar to the Culham Conceptual Tokamak reactor Mark IIB is assessed and compared with other published capital costs of fusion and fission reactors. It is concluded that capital-investment and structure-renewal costs for a typical fusion reactor as presently conceived are likely to be higher than for thermal-fission reactors. (author)

  19. Current trends in laser fusion driver and beam combination laser system using stimulated Brillouin scattering phase conjugate mirrors for a fusion driver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Hong Jin

    2008-01-01

    Laser fusion energy (LFE) is well known as one of the promising sources if clean energy for mankind. Laser fusion researches have been actively progressed, since Japan and the Soviet Union as well as USA developed ultrahigh power lasers at the beginning of 1970s. At present in USA, NIF (National Ignition Facility), which is the largest laser fusion facility in the world, is under construction and will be completed in 2008. Japan as a leader of the laser fusion research has developed a high energy and high power laser system, Gekko XII, and is under contemplation of FIREX projects for the fast ignition. China also has SG I, II lasers for performing the fusion research, and SG III is under construction as a next step. France is also constructing LMJ (Laser countries, many other developed countries in Europe, such as Russia, Germany, UK, and so on, have their own high energy laser systems for the fusion research. In Korea, the high power laser development started with SinMyung laser in KAIST in 1994, and KLF (KAERI Laser Facility) of KAERI was recently completed in 2007. For the practical use of laser fusion energy, the laser driver should be operated with a high repetition rate around 10Hz. Yet, current high energy laser systems, Such as NIF, Gekko XII, and etc., can be operated with only several shots per day. Some researchers have developed their own techniques to reduce the thermal loads of the laser material, by using laser diodes as pump sources and ceramic laser materials with high thermal energy scaling up for the real fusion driver. For this reason, H. J. Kong et al. proposed the beam combination laser system using stimulated Brillouin scattering phase conjugate mirrors (SBS PCMs) for a fusion driver. Proposed beam combination has many advantages for energy scaling up; it is composed by simple optical systems with small amount of components, there is no interaction between neighbored sub beams, the SBS PCMs can be used for a high energy beam reflection with

  20. Prospects for toroidal fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, J.; Galambos, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    Work on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) tokamak has refined understanding of the realities of a deuterium-tritium (D-T) burning magnetic fusion reactor. An ITER-like tokamak reactor using ITER costs and performance would lead to a cost of electricity (COE) of about 130 mills/kWh. Advanced tokamak physics to be tested in the Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX), coupled with moderate components in engineering, technology, and unit costs, should lead to a COE comparable with best existing fission systems around 60 mills/kWh. However, a larger unit size, ∼2000 MW(e), is favored for the fusion system. Alternative toroidal configurations to the conventional tokamak, such as the stellarator, reversed-field pinch, and field-reversed configuration, offer some potential advantage, but are less well developed, and have their own challenges

  1. Fusion reactor safety studies, FY 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darby, J.B. Jr.

    1978-04-01

    This report reviews the technical progress in the fusion reactor safety studies performed during FY 1977 in the Fusion Power Program at the Argonne National Laboratory. The subjects reported on include safety considerations of the vacuum vessel and first-wall design for the ANL/EPR, the thermal responses of a tokamak reactor first wall, the vacuum wall electrical resistive requirements in relationship to magnet safety, and a major effort is reported on considerations and experiments on air detritiation

  2. Fusion-Fission hybrid reactors and nonproliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.

    1984-09-01

    New options for the development of the nuclear energy economy which might become available by a successful development of fusion-breeders or fusion-fission hybrid power reactors, identified and their nonproliferative attributes are discussed. The more promising proliferation-resistance ettributes identified include: (1) Justification for a significant delay in the initiation of fuel processing, (2) Denaturing the plutonium with 238 Pu before its use in power reactors of any kind, and (3) Making practical the development of denatured uranium fuel cycles and, in particular, denaturing the uranium with 232 U. Fuel resource utilization, time-table and economic considerations associated with the use of fusion-breeders are also discussed. It is concluded that hybrid reactors may enable developing a nuclear energy economy which is more proliferation resistant than possible otherwise, whileat the same time, assuring high utilization of t he uranium and thorium resources in an economically acceptable way. (author)

  3. Design windows of laser fusion power plants and conceptual design of laser-diode pumped slab laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozaki, Y.; Eguchi, T.; Izawa, Y.

    1999-01-01

    An analysis of the design space available to laser fusion power plants has been carried out, in terms of design key parameters such as target gain, laser energy and laser repetition rate, the number of fusion react ion chambers, and plant size. The design windows of economically attractive laser fusion plants is identified with the constraints of key design parameters and the cost conditions. Especially, for achieving high repetition rate lasers, we have proposed and designed a diode-pumped solid-state laser driver which consists of water-cooled zig-zag path slab amplifiers. (author)

  4. Status of fusion reactor blanket design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.; Sze, D.K.

    1986-02-01

    The recent Blanket Comparison and Selection Study (BCSS), which was a comprehensive evaluation of fusion reactor blanket design and the status of blanket technology, serves as an excellent basis for further development of blanket technology. This study provided an evaluation of over 130 blanket concepts for the reference case of electric power producing, DT fueled reactors in both Tokamak and Tandem Mirror (TMR) configurations. Based on a specific set of reactor operating parameters, the current understanding of materials and blanket technology, and a uniform evaluation methodology developed as part of the study, a limited number of concepts were identified that offer the greatest potential for making fusion an attractive energy source

  5. High-energy krypton fluoride lasers for inertial fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obenschain, Stephen; Lehmberg, Robert; Kehne, David; Hegeler, Frank; Wolford, Matthew; Sethian, John; Weaver, James; Karasik, Max

    2015-11-01

    Laser fusion researchers have realized since the 1970s that the deep UV light from excimer lasers would be an advantage as a driver for robust high-performance capsule implosions for inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Most of this research has centered on the krypton-fluoride (KrF) laser. In this article we review the advantages of the KrF laser for direct-drive ICF, the history of high-energy KrF laser development, and the present state of the art and describe a development path to the performance needed for laser fusion and its energy application. We include descriptions of the architecture and performance of the multi-kilojoule Nike KrF laser-target facility and the 700 J Electra high-repetition-rate KrF laser that were developed at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory. Nike and Electra are the most advanced KrF lasers for inertial fusion research and energy applications.

  6. Fusion reactor design studies: standard accounts for cost estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte, S.C.; Willke, T.L.; Young, J.R.

    1978-05-01

    The fusion reactor design studies--standard accounts for cost estimates provides a common format from which to assess the economic character of magnetically confined fusion reactor design concepts. The format will aid designers in the preparation of design concept costs estimates and also provide policymakers with a tool to assist in appraising which design concept may be economically promising. The format sets forth a categorization and accounting procedure to be used when estimating fusion reactor busbar energy cost that can be easily and consistently applied. Reasons for developing the procedure, explanations of the procedure, justifications for assumptions made in the procedure, and the applicability of the procedure are described in this document. Adherence to the format when evaluating prospective fusion reactor design concepts will result in the identification of the more promising design concepts thus enabling the fusion power alternatives with better economic potential to be quickly and efficiently developed

  7. Prospects for spheromak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.K.; Hua, D.D.

    1995-01-01

    The reactor study of Hagenson and Krakowski demonstrated the attractiveness of the spheromak as a compact fusion reactor, based on physics principles confirmed in CTX experiments in many respects. Most uncertain was the energy confinement time and the role of magnetic turbulence inherent in the concept. In this paper, a one-dimensional model of heat confinement, calibrated by CTX, predicts negligible heat loss by magnetic turbulence at reactor scale

  8. Neutronics issues in fusion-fission hybrid reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chengan

    1995-01-01

    The coupled neutron and γ-ray transport equations and nuclear number density equations, and its computer program systems concerned in fusion-fission hybrid reactor design are briefly described. The current status and focal point for coming work of nuclear data used in fusion reactor design are explained

  9. The ICRH tokamak fusion test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, F.W.

    1976-01-01

    A Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor where the ion are maintained at Tsub(i) approximately 20keV>Tsub(e) approximately 7keV by ion-cyclotron resonance heating is shown to produce an energy amplification of Q>2 provided the principal ion energy loss channel is via collisional transfer to the electrons. Such a reactor produces 19MW of fusion power to the electrons. Such a reactor produces 19MW of fusion power and requires a 50MHz radio-frequency generator capable of 50MW peak power; it is otherwise compatible with the conceptual design for the Princeton TFTR. The required n tausub(E) values for electrons and ions are respectively ntausub(Ee)>1.5.10 13 cm -3 -sec and ntausub(Ei)>4.10 13 cm -3 -sec. The principal areas where research is needed to establish this concept are: tokamak transport calculations, ICRH physics, trapped-particle instability energy losses, tokamak equilibria with high values of βsub(theta), and, of course, impurities

  10. Symbiosis of near breeder HTR's with hybrid fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifritz, W.

    1978-07-01

    In this contribution to INFCE a symbiotic fusion/fission reactor system, consisting of a hybrid beam-driven micro-explosion fusion reactor (HMER) and associated high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTR) with a coupled fuel cycle, is proposed. This system is similar to the well known Fast Breeder/Near Breeder HTR symbiosis except that the fast fission breeder - running on the U/Pu-cycle in the core and the axial blankets and breeding the surplus fissile material as U-233 in its radial thorium metal or thorium oxide blankets - is replaced by a hybrid micro-explosion DT fusion reactor

  11. Heat transfer in inertial confinement fusion reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovingh, J.

    1979-01-01

    The transfer of energy produced by the interaction of the intense pulses of short-ranged fusion microexplosion products with materials is one of the most difficult problems in inertially-confined fusion (ICF) reactor design. The short time and deposition distance for the energy results in local peak power densities on the order of 10 18 watts/m 3 . High local power densities may cause change of state or spall in the reactor materials. This will limit the structure lifetimes for ICF reactors of economic physical sizes, increasing operating costs including structure replacement and radioactive waste management. Four basic first wall protection methods have evolved: a dry-wall, a wet-wall, a magnetically shielded wall, and a fluid wall. These approaches are distinguished by the way the reactor wall interfaces with fusion debris as well as the way the ambient cavity conditions modify the fusion energy forms and spectra at the first wall. Each of these approaches requires different heat transfer considerations

  12. Fusion reactor design and technology 1986. V. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The first volume of the Proceedings of the Fourth Technical Committee Meeting and Workshop on Fusion Reactor Design and Technology organized by the IAEA (Yalta, 26 May - 6 June 1986) includes 36 papers devoted to the following topics: fusion programmes (3 papers), tokamaks (15 papers), non-tokamak reactors and open systems (9 papers), inertial confinement concepts (5 papers), fission-fusion hybrids (4 papers). Each of these papers has a separate abstract. Refs, figs and tabs

  13. Helium cooling of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Baxi, C.; Bourque, R.; Dahms, C.; Inamati, S.; Ryder, R.; Sager, G.; Schleicher, R.

    1994-01-01

    On the basis of worldwide design experience and in coordination with the evolution of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) program, the application of helium as a coolant for fusion appears to be at the verge of a transition from conceptual design to engineering development. This paper presents a review of the use of helium as the coolant for fusion reactor blanket and divertor designs. The concept of a high-pressure helium cooling radial plate design was studied for both ITER and PULSAR. These designs can resolve many engineering issues, and can help with reaching the goals of low activation and high performance designs. The combination of helium cooling, advanced low-activation materials, and gas turbine technology may permit high thermal efficiency and reduced costs, resulting in the environmental advantages and competitive economics required to make fusion a 21st century power source. ((orig.))

  14. Neutronic study of fusion reactor blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, F.

    1984-02-01

    The problem of effective regeneration is a crucial issue for the fusion reactor, specially for the power reactor because of the conflicting requirements of heat removal and tritium breeding. For that, calculations are performed to evaluate blanket materials. Precise techniques are herein developed to improve the accuracy of the tritium production and the neutron and gamma transport calculations. Many configurations are studied with realistic breeder, structure, and coolant proportions. Accuracy of the results are evaluated from the sensitivity theory and uncertainty study using covariance matricies. At the end of this work, we presented the needs of nuclear data for fusion reactors and we give some advices for improving our knowledge of these data [fr

  15. Neutronic study of fusion reactor blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, F.

    1983-06-01

    The problem of effective regeneration is a crucial issue for the fusion reactor, specially for the power reactor because of the conflicting requirements of heat removal and tritium breeding. For that, calculations are performed to evaluate blanket materials. Precise techniques are herein developed to improve the accuracy of the tritium production and the neutron and gamma transport calculations. Many configurations are studied with realistic breeder, structure, and coolant proportions. Accuracy of the results are evaluated from the sensitivity theory and uncertainty study using covariance matrices. At the end of this work, we presented the needs of nuclear data for fusion reactors and we give some advices for improving our knowledge of these data [fr

  16. Development of our laser fusion integration simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.; Zhai, C.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Zheng, W.; Yong, H.; Zeng, Q.; Hang, X.; Qi, J.; Yang, R.; Cheng, J.; Song, P.; Gu, P.; Zhang, A.; An, H.; Xu, X.; Guo, H.; Cao, X.; Mo, Z.; Pei, W.; Jiang, S.; Zhu, S. P.

    2013-01-01

    In the target design of the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program, it is common practice to apply radiation hydrodynamics code to study the key physical processes happening in ICF process, such as hohlraum physics, radiation drive symmetry, capsule implosion physics in the radiation-drive approach of ICF. Recently, many efforts have been done to develop our 2D integrated simulation capability of laser fusion with a variety of optional physical models and numerical methods. In order to effectively integrate the existing codes and to facilitate the development of new codes, we are developing an object-oriented structured-mesh parallel code-supporting infrastructure, called JASMIN. Based on two-dimensional three-temperature hohlraum physics code LARED-H and two-dimensional multi-group radiative transfer code LARED-R, we develop a new generation two-dimensional laser fusion code under the JASMIN infrastructure, which enable us to simulate the whole process of laser fusion from the laser beams' entrance into the hohlraum to the end of implosion. In this paper, we will give a brief description of our new-generation two-dimensional laser fusion code, named LARED-Integration, especially in its physical models, and present some simulation results of holhraum. (authors)

  17. Power balancing of multibeam laser fusion lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seka, W.; Morse, S.; Letzring, S.; Kremens, R.; Kessler, T.J.; Jaanimagi, P.; Keck, R.; Verdon, C.; Brown, D.

    1989-01-01

    The success of laser fusion depends to a good degree on the ability to compress the target to very high densities of ≥1000 times liquid DT. To achieve such compressions require that the irradiation nonuniformity must not exceed ∼1% rms over the whole time of the compression, particularly during the early phases of irradiation. The stringent requirements for the irradiation uniformity for laser fusion have been known for quite some time but until recently the energy balance was mistakenly equated to power balance. The authors describe their effort on energy balance and irradiation patterns on the target. They significantly improved the laser performance with respect to overall intensity distributions on target including the implementation of distributed (random) phase plates in each high power beam. However, the slightly varying performance of the third harmonic conversion crystals in the twenty-four beams of their laser system was generally compensated for by appropriately adjusted 1.054μm input laser energy. Computational analysis of the results of the recent high density campaign are shown

  18. Laser fusion systems for industrial process heat. Third semiannual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, F.J.; Denning, R.S.; Dykhuizen, R.C.; Goldthwaite, W.H.; Kok, K.D.; Skelton, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    This report concentrates not only on the design of the laser fusion system but also on the cost of this system and the costs of alternative sources of energy that are expected to be in competition with the laser fusion system. The absolute values of the cost of the laser fusion system are limited by the estimates of the cost of the components and subsystems making up the laser fusion energy station. The method used in calculating costs of the laser fusion and alternative systems are laid out in detail

  19. Thermonuclear fusion plasma produced by lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, C.; Yokoyama, M.; Nakai, S.; Sasaki, T.; Yoshida, K.; Matoba, M.; Yamabe, C.; Tschudi, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Mizui, J.; Yamaguchi, N.; Nishikawa, K.

    1975-01-01

    Recently, much attention has been focused on laser fusion schemes using high-density plasmas produced by implosion. Scientific-feasibility laser-fusion experiments are now in time. But the physics of interaction between laser and plasma, the high-compression technique and the development of high-power lasers are still important problems to be solved if laser fusion is to make some progress. In the field of laser-plasma coupling, experiments were carried out in which hydrogen and deuterium sticks were bombarded by laser beams; in these experiments, a glass-laser system, LETKKO-I, with an energy of 50 J in a nanosecond pulse, and a double-discharge TEA CO 2 laser system with an energy of 100 J in a 100-ns pulse were used. A decrease in reflectivity occurred at a laser intensity one order of magnitude higher than the parametric-instability threshold. Self-phase modulation of scattered light due to modulational instability was found. A Brillouin-backscattering isotope effect due to the hydrogen and deuterium plasma has also been observed in the red-side part of the SHG-light. Preliminary compression experiments have been carried out using a glass-laser system LETKKO-II, with an energy of 250-1000 J in a ns-pulse. A hologram has been used to study shock waves in the plasma due to the SHG-light converted from the main laser beam. Development of high-power lasers has been promoted, such as disc-glass lasers, E-beam CO 2 lasers and excimer lasers. (author)

  20. A system dynamics model for tritium cycle of pulsed fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Zuolong; Nie, Baojie; Chen, Dehong

    2017-01-01

    As great challenges and uncertainty exist in achieving steady plasma burning, pulsed plasma burning may be a potential scenario for fusion engineering test reactor, even for fusion DEMOnstration reactor. In order to analyze dynamic tritium inventory and tritium self-sufficiency for pulsed fusion systems, a system dynamics model of tritium cycle was developed on the basis of earlier version of Tritium Analysis program for fusion System (TAS). The model was verified with TRIMO, which was developed by KIT in Germany. Tritium self-sufficiency and dynamic tritium inventory assessment were performed for a typical fusion engineering test reactor. The verification results show that the system dynamics model can be used for tritium cycle analysis of pulsed fusion reactor with sufficient reliability. The assessment results of tritium self-sufficiency indicate that the fusion reactor might only need several hundred gram tritium to startup if achieved high efficient tritium handling ability (Referred ITER: 1 h). And the initial tritium startup inventory in pulsed fusion reactor is determined by the combined influence of pulse length, burn availability, and tritium recycle time. Meanwhile, tritium self-sufficiency can be achieved under the defined condition.

  1. A system dynamics model for tritium cycle of pulsed fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Zuolong; Nie, Baojie [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China); Chen, Dehong, E-mail: dehong.chen@fds.org.cn [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China)

    2017-05-15

    As great challenges and uncertainty exist in achieving steady plasma burning, pulsed plasma burning may be a potential scenario for fusion engineering test reactor, even for fusion DEMOnstration reactor. In order to analyze dynamic tritium inventory and tritium self-sufficiency for pulsed fusion systems, a system dynamics model of tritium cycle was developed on the basis of earlier version of Tritium Analysis program for fusion System (TAS). The model was verified with TRIMO, which was developed by KIT in Germany. Tritium self-sufficiency and dynamic tritium inventory assessment were performed for a typical fusion engineering test reactor. The verification results show that the system dynamics model can be used for tritium cycle analysis of pulsed fusion reactor with sufficient reliability. The assessment results of tritium self-sufficiency indicate that the fusion reactor might only need several hundred gram tritium to startup if achieved high efficient tritium handling ability (Referred ITER: 1 h). And the initial tritium startup inventory in pulsed fusion reactor is determined by the combined influence of pulse length, burn availability, and tritium recycle time. Meanwhile, tritium self-sufficiency can be achieved under the defined condition.

  2. Cost assessment of a generic magnetic fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, J.; Dory, R.A.; Cohn, S.M.; Delene, J.G.; Parsly, L.F.; Ashby, D.E.T.F.; Reiersen, W.T.

    1986-03-01

    A generic reactor model is used to examine the economic viability of generating electricity by magnetic fusion. The simple model uses components that are representative of those used in previous reactor studies of deuterium-tritium-burning tokamaks, stellarators, bumpy tori, reversed-field pinches (RFPs), and tandem mirrors. Conservative costing assumptions are made. The generic reactor is not a tokamak; rather, it is intended to emphasize what is common to all magnetic fusion rectors. The reactor uses a superconducting toroidal coil set to produce the dominant magnetic field. To this extent, it is not as good an approximation to systems such as the RFP in which the main field is produced by a plasma current. The main output of the study is the cost of electricity as a function of the weight and size of the fusion core - blanket, shield, structure, and coils. The model shows that a 1200-MW(e) power plant with a fusion core weight of about 10,000 tonnes should be competitive in the future with fission and fossil plants. Studies of the sensitivity of the model to variations in the assumptions show that this result is not sensitively dependent on any given assumption. Of particular importance is the result that a fusion reactor of this scale may be realized with only moderate advances in physics and technology capabilities

  3. Fusion-reactor blanket and coolant material compatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeppson, D.W.; Keough, R.F.

    1981-01-01

    Fusion reactor blanket and coolant compatibility tests are being conducted to aid in the selection and design of safe blanket and coolant systems for future fusion reactors. Results of scoping compatibility tests to date are reported for blanket material and water interactions at near operating temperatures. These tests indicate the quantitative hydrogen release, the maximum temperature and pressures produced and the rates of interactions for selected blanket materials

  4. Laser solenoid: an alternate use of lasers in fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, P.H.

    1977-01-01

    A unique laser assisted fusion approach is under development at Mathematical Sciences Northwest, Inc. (MSNW). This approach captures one of the most developed aspects of high energy laser technology, the efficient, large, scalable, pulsed electron beam initiated, electric discharge, CO 2 infrared laser. This advanced technology is then combined with the simple geometry of a linear magnetic confinement system. The laser solenoid concept will be described, current work and experimental progress will be discussed, and the technological problems of building such a system will be assessed. Finally a comparison will be made of the technology and economics for the laser solenoid and alternative fusion approaches

  5. Mirror hybrid (fusion--fission) reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, D.J.; Lee, J.D.; Neef, W.S.; Devoto, R.S.; Galloway, T.R.; Fink, J.H.; Schultz, K.R.; Culver, D.; Rao, S.

    1977-10-01

    The reference mirror hybrid reactor design performed by LLL and General Atomic is summarized. The reactor parameters have been chosen to minimize the cost of producing fissile fuel for consumption in fission power reactors. As in the past, we have emphasized the use of existing technology where possible and a minimum extrapolation of technology otherwise. The resulting reactor may thus be viewed as a comparatively near-term goal of the fusion program, and we project improved performance for the hybrid in the future as more advanced technology becomes available

  6. The laser thermonuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutant, J.; Dautray, R.; Decroisette, M.; Watteau, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    Principle of the thermonuclear fusion by inertial confinement: required characteristics of the deuterium-tritium plasma and of the high power lasers to be used Development of high power lasers: active media used; amplifiers; frequency conversion; beam quality; pulse conditioning; existing large systems. The laser-matter interaction: collision and collective interaction of the laser radiation with matter; transport of the absorbed energy; heating and compression of deuterium-tritium; diagnoses and their comparison with the numerical simulation of the experiment; performances. Conclusions: difficulties to overcome; megajoule lasers; other energy source: particles beams [fr

  7. The prospect of laser fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, C.

    2000-01-01

    The inertial confinement fusion research has developed remarkably in these 30 years, which enables us to scope the inertial fusion energy in the next century. The recent progress in the ICF is briefly reviewed. The GEKKO XII n d glass laser has succeeded to get the long cherished world's purpose that was to compress a D-T fuel up to 1000 times the normal density. The neutron yield was some what less than the expected value. The MJ laser system is under construction expecting to ignite and bum a fuel. The alternative way is to use a PW short pulse laser for the fast ignition. The inertial fusion energy strategy is described with economic overviews on IFE power plants. Various applications of IFE are summarized. (author)

  8. The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch fusion reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) fusion reactor study is a multi-institutional research effort to determine the technical feasibility and key developmental issues of an RFP fusion reactor, especially at high power density, and to determine the potential economics, operations, safety, and environmental features of high-mass-power-density fusion systems. The TITAN conceptual designs are DT burning, 1000 MWe power reactors based on the RFP confinement concept. The designs are compact, have a high neutron wall loading of 18 MW/m 2 and a mass power density of 700 kWe/tonne. The inherent characteristics of the RFP confinement concept make fusion reactors with such a high mass power density possible. Two different detailed designs have emerged: the TITAN-I lithium-vanadium design, incorporating the integrated-blanket-coil concept; and the TITAN-II aqueous loop-in-pool design with ferritic steel structure. This report contains a collection of 16 papers on the results of the TITAN study which were presented at the International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology. This collection describes the TITAN research effort, and specifically the TITAN-I and TITAN-II designs, summarizing the major results, the key technical issues, and the central conclusions and recommendations. Overall, the basic conclusions are that high-mass power-density fusion reactors appear to be technically feasible even with neutron wall loadings up to 20 MW/m 2 ; that single-piece maintenance of the FPC is possible and advantageous; that the economics of the reactor is enhanced by its compactness; and the safety and environmental features need not to be sacrificed in high-power-density designs. The fact that two design approaches have emerged, and others may also be possible, in some sense indicates the robustness of the general findings

  9. Past, present and future of the fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbaum P, M.

    1992-01-01

    Among the alternate technologies that have acquired a special interest in the present decade, we find the nuclear fusion. Within this, the fusion reactors by magnetic confinement of the Tokamak type have shown an increasing technological progress during this period. For this reason, a new strategy, coordinated at international level, has been implemented for the specific development of the nuclear fusion reactors, aimed to face those scientific and technological aspects which still remain, and which will determine their future economic feasibility. (Author)

  10. Integrity of the first wall in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Ryoichi

    2004-07-01

    Future fusion power reactors DREAM and A-SSTR2, which have been conceptually designed in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, use the SiC/SiC composite material as the first wall of the blanket because of its characteristics of high heat-resistance and low radiation material. DEMO reactor, which was conceptually designed in 2001, uses the low activation ferritic steel as the first-wall material of the blanket. The problems in the thermal structural design of the plasma facing component such as the blanket first wall and the divertor plate which receives very high heat flux were examined in the design of the fusion power reactors. Compact high fusion power reactor must give high heat flux and high-speed neutron flux from the plasma to the first wall and the divertor plate. In this environmental situation, the micro cracks should be generated in material of the first wall. Structural integrity of the first wall would be very low during the operation of the reactor, if those micro-cracks grow in a crack having significant size by the fatigue or the creep. The crack penetration in the first wall can be a factor which threatens the safety of the fusion power reactor. This paper summarizes the problems on the structural integrity in the first wall made of the SiC/SiC composite material or the ferritic steel. (author)

  11. Inertial fusion reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, W.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, a variety of reactor concepts are proposed. One of the prime concerns is dealing with the x-rays and debris that are emitted by the target. Internal neutron shielding can reduce radiation damage and activation, leading to longer life systems, reduced activation and fewer safety concerns. There is really no consensus on what the best reactor concept is at this point. There has been virtually no chamber technology development to date. This is the flip side of the coin of the separability of the target physics and the reactor design. Since reactor technology has not been required to do target experiments, it's not being developed. Economic analysis of conceptual designs indicates that ICF can be economically competitive with magnetic fusion, fission and fossil plants

  12. Advanced spheromak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.K.

    1996-01-01

    The spheromak has no toroidal magnetic field coils or other structure along its geometric axis, and is thus more attractive than the leading magnetic fusion reactor concept, the tokamak. As a consequence of this and other attributes, the spheromak reactor may be compact and produce a power density sufficiently high to warrant consideration of a liquid 'blanket' that breeds tritium, converts neutron kinetic energy to heat, and protects the reactor vessel from severe neutron damage. However, the physics is more complex, so that considerable research is required to learn how to achieve the reactor potential. Critical physics problems and possible ways of solving them are described. The opportunities and issues associated with a possible liquid wall are considered to direct future research

  13. Laser Fusion: status, future, and tritium control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coyle, P.E.

    1978-11-01

    At Livermore the 10 kJ, 20 to 30 TW Shiva facility is now operational and producing regular new fusion results. Design work has begun on a 200 to 300 TW laser designed to carry the program through the first breakeven demonstration experiments in the mid-1980's. Confidence in reaching this goal is based on the significant progress we have made in state-of-the-art, high-power Nd:glass laser technology, in experimental laser fusion and laser plasma interaction physics, and in theoretical and analytical computer codes which reliably model and predict experimental results. For all of these experiments, a variety of fusion targets are being fabricated in the laboratory, and the control and handling of tritium is now a regular and routine part of ongoing inertial fusion experiments. Target design with gains of about 1000 have been studied and the means to mass produce such pellets at low cost are also being developed

  14. Conceptual design of the SlimCS fusion DEMO reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobita, Kenji; Nishio, Satoshi; Enoeda, Mikio; Nakamura, Hirofumi; Hayashi, Takumi; Asakura, Nobuyuki; Utoh, Hiroyasu; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Nishitani, Takeo; Isono, Takaaki; Sakurai, Shinji; Kurita, Genichi; Hayashi, Takao; Oyama, Naoyuki; Liu Changle; Hamamatsu, Kiyotaka; Inoue, Takashi; Ozeki, Takahisa; Sato, Masayasu; Suzuki, Satoshi; Kawashima, Hisato; Ezato, Koichiro; Tsuru, Daigo; Koizumi, Norikiyo; Sakamoto, Keiji; Ando, Masami; Sakamoto, Yoshiteru; Shibama, Yusuke; Suzuki, Takahiro; Takechi, Manabu; Takahashi, Koji; Hirose, Takanori; Sato, Satoru; Nozawa, Takashi; Tanigawa, Hisashi; Kakudate, Satoshi; Kawamura, Yoshinori; Yamanishi, Toshihiko; Hoshino, Tsuyoshi; Ochiai, Kentaro; Ide, Shunsuke; Aiba, Nobuyuki; Shimizu, Katsuhiro; Honda, Mitsuru; Nakamichi, Masaru; Nishi, Hiroshi; Seki, Yoji; Nakamura, Yukiharu; Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Yoshida, Tohru; Song Yuntao

    2010-08-01

    This report describes the results of the conceptual design study of the SlimCS fusion DEMO reactor aiming at demonstrating fusion power production in a plant scale and allowing to assess the economic prospects of a fusion power plant. The design study has focused on a compact and low aspect ratio tokamak reactor concept with a reduced-sized central solenoid, which is novel compared with previous tokamak reactor concept such as SSTR (Steady State Tokamak Reactor). Owing to low aspect ratio, the reactor will be capable of having comparatively high beta limit and high elongation (which can elevate the Greenwald density limit), having potential for high power density. The reactor has the main parameters of a major radius of 5.5 m, aspect ratio of 2.6, elongation of 2.0, normalized beta of 4.3, fusion out put of 2.95 GW and average neutron wall load of 3 MW/m 2 . This report covers various aspects of design study including systematic design, physics design, torus configuration, blanket, superconducting magnet, maintenance and building, which were carried out increase the engineering feasibility of the concept. (author)

  15. Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor D-T results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meade, D.M.

    1995-01-01

    Temperatures, densities and confinement of deuterium plasmas confined in tokamaks have been achieved within the last decade that are approaching those required for a D-T reactor. As a result, the unique phenomena present in a D-T reactor plasma (D-T plasma confinement, α confinement, α heating and possible α-driven instabilities) can now be studied in the laboratory. Recent experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have been the first magnetic fusion experiments to study plasmas with reactor fuel concentrations of tritium. The injection of about 20MW of tritium and 14MW of deuterium neutral beams into the TFTR produced a plasma with a T-to-D density ratio of about 1 and yielding a maximum fusion power of about 9.2MW. The fusion power density in the core of the plasma was about 1.8MWm -3 , approximating that expected in a D-T fusion reactor. A TFTR plasma with a T-to-D density ratio of about 1 was found to have about 20% higher energy confinement time than a comparable D plasma, indicating a confinement scaling with average ion mass A of τ E ∝A 0.6 . The core ion temperature increased from 30 to 37keV owing to a 35% improvement of ion thermal conductivity. Using the electron thermal conductivity from a comparable deuterium plasma, about 50% of the electron temperature increase from 9 to 10.6keV can be attributed to electron heating by the α particles. The approximately 5% loss of α particles, as observed on detectors near the bottom edge of the plasma, was consistent with classical first orbit loss without anomalous effects. Initial measurements have been made of the confined high energy α particles and the resultant α ash density. At fusion power levels of 7.5MW, fluctuations at the toroidal Alfven eigen-mode frequency were observed by the fluctuation diagnostics. However, no additional α loss due to the fluctuations was observed. (orig.)

  16. Plutonium-239 production rate study using a typical fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faghihi, F.; Havasi, H.; Amin-Mozafari, M.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to compute fissile 239 Pu material by supposed typical fusion reactor operation to make the fuel requirement for other purposes (e.g. MOX fissile fuel, etc.). It is assumed that there is a fusion reactor has a cylindrical geometry and uses uniformly distributed deuterium-tritium as fuel so that neutron wall load is taken at 10(MW)/(m 2 ) . Moreover, the reactor core is surrounded by six suggested blankets to make best performance of the physical conditions described herein. We determined neutron flux in each considered blanket as well as tritium self-sufficiency using two groups neutron energy and then computation is followed by the MCNP-4C code. Finally, material depletion according to a set of dynamical coupled differential equations is solved to estimate 239 Pu production rate. Produced 239 Pu is compared with two typical fission reactors to find performance of plutonium breeding ratio in the case of the fusion reactor. We found that 0.92% of initial U is converted into fissile Pu by our suggested fusion reactor with thermal power of 3000 MW. For comparison, 239 Pu yield of suggested large scale PWR is about 0.65% and for LMFBR is close to 1.7%. The results show that the fusion reactor has an acceptable efficiency for Pu production compared with a large scale PWR fission reactor type

  17. New facilities in Japan materials testing reactor for irradiation test of fusion reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, H.; Sagawa, H.; Ishitsuka, E.; Sakamoto, N.; Niiho, T.

    1996-01-01

    The testing and evaluation of fusion reactor components, i.e. blanket, plasma facing components (divertor, etc.) and vacuum vessel with neutron irradiation is required for the design of fusion reactor components. Therefore, four new test facilities were developed in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor: an in-pile functional testing facility, a neutron multiplication test facility, an electron beam facility, and a re-weldability facility. The paper describes these facilities

  18. Radioactive waste management and disposal scenario for fusion power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabara, Takashi; Yamano, Naoki [Sumitomo Atomic Energy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Seki, Yasushi; Aoki, Isao

    1997-10-01

    The environmental and economic impact of radioactive waste (radwaste) generated from fusion power reactors using five types of structural materials and a light water reactor (LWR) have been evaluated and compared. At first, the amount and the radioactive level of the radwaste generated in five fusion reactors ware evaluated by an activation calculation code. Next, a possible radwaste disposal scenario applicable to fusion radwaste in Japan is considered and the disposal cost evaluated under certain assumptions. The exposure doses are evaluated for the skyshine of gamma-rays during the disposal operation, groundwater migration scenario during the institutional control period of 300 years and future site use scenario after the institutional period. The radwaste generated from a typical LWR was estimated based on a literature survey and the disposal cost was evaluated using the same assumptions as for the fusion reactors. It is found that the relative cost of disposal is strongly dependent on the cost for interim storage of medium level waste of fusion reactors and the cost of high level waste for the LWR. (author)

  19. Laser requirements for a laser fusion energy power plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephen; E.Bodner; Andrew; J.Schmitt; John; D.Sethian

    2013-01-01

    We will review some of the requirements for a laser that would be used with a laser fusion energy power plant, including frequency, spatial beam smoothing, bandwidth, temporal pulse shaping, efficiency, repetition rate, and reliability. The lowest risk and optimum approach uses a krypton fluoride gas laser. A diode-pumped solid-state laser is a possible contender.

  20. First preliminary design of an experimental fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    A preliminary design of a tokamak experimental fusion reactor to be built in the near future is under way. The goals of the reactor are to achieve reactor-level plasma conditions for a sufficiently long operation period and to obtain design, construction and operational experience for the main components of full-scale power reactors. This design covers overall reactor system including plasma characteristics, reactor structure, blanket neutronics, shielding, superconducting magnets, neutral beam injector, electric power supply system, fuel circulating system, reactor cooling system, tritium recovery system and maintenance scheme. The main design parameters are as follows: the reactor fusion power 100 MW, torus radius 6.75 m, plasma radius 1.5 m, first wall radius 1.75 m, toroidal magnet field on axis 6 T, blanket fertile material Li 2 O, coolant He, structural material 316SS and tritium breeding ratio 0.9. (auth.)

  1. Fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.K.

    1977-01-01

    Three types of thermonuclear fusion devices currently under development are reviewed for an electric utilities management audience. Overall design features of laser fusion, tokamak, and magnetic mirror type reactors are described and illustrated. Thrusts and trends in current research on these devices that promise to improve performance are briefly reviewed. Twenty photographs and drawings are included

  2. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moons, F.

    1998-01-01

    SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials includes studies (1) to investigate fracture mechanics of neutron-irradiated beryllium; (2) to describe the helium behaviour in irradiated beryllium at atomic scale; (3) to define the kinetics of beryllium reacting with air or steam; (3) to perform a feasibility study for the testing of integrated blanket modules under neutron irradiation. Progress and achievements in 1997 are reported

  3. Electromagnetic analysis for fusion reactors: status and needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.

    1983-01-01

    Electromagnetic effects have far-reaching implications for the design, operation, and maintenance of future fusion reactors. Two-dimensional (2-D) eddy current computer codes are available, but are of limited value in analyzing reactors. Three-dimensional (3-D) codes are needed, but are only beginning to be developed. Both 2-D and 3-D codes need verification against experimental data, such as that provided by the upcoming FELIX experiments. Coupling between eddy currents and deflections has application in fusion reactor design and is being studied both by analysis and experiment

  4. Fusion reactor remote maintenance study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sniderman, M.

    1979-04-01

    An analysis of a major maintenance operation, the remote replacement of a modular sector of a tokamak reactor, was performed in substantial detail. Specific assumptions were developed which included concepts from various existing designs so that the operation which was studied includes some design features generic to any fusion reactor design. Based on the work performed in this study, the principal conclusions are: (1) It appears feasible to design a tokamak fusion reactor plant with availability comparable to existing fossil and fission plants, but this will require diligence and comprehensive planning during the complete design phase. (2) Since the total fusion program is paced by the success of each device, maintenance considerations must be incorporated into each device during design, even if the device is an experimental unit. (3) Innovative approaches, such as automatic computer controlled operations, should be developed so that large step reductions in planned maintenance times can be achieved

  5. Remote assembly and maintenance of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becquet, M.C.; Farfaletti-Casali, F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper intend to present the state of the art in the field of remote assembly and maintenance, including system analysis design and operation for controlled fusion device such as JET, and the next NET and ITER reactors. The operational constraints of fusion reactors with respect to temperature, radiations dose rates and cumulated doses are considered with the resulting design requirements. Concepts like articulated boom, in-vessel vehicle and blanket handling device are presented. The close relations between computer simulations and experimental validation of those concepts are emphasized to ensure reliability of the operational behavior. Mockups and prototypes in reduced and full scale, as operating machines are described to illustrate the progress in remote operations for fusion reactors. The developments achieved at the Institute for System Engineering and Informatics of the Joint Research Center, in the field of remote blanket maintenance, reliability assessment of RH systems and remote cut and welding of lips joints are considered. (author)

  6. ITER, the 'Broader Approach', a DEMO fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janeschitz, G.; Bahm, W.

    2007-01-01

    Fusion is a very promising future energy option, which is characterized by almost unlimited fuel reserves, favourable safety features and environmental sustainability. The aim of the worldwide fusion research is a fusion power station which imitates the process taking place in the sun and thus gains energy from the fusion of light atomic nuclei. The experimental reactor ITER which will be built in Cadarache, France, marks a breakthrough in the worldwide fusion research: For the first time an energy multiplication factor of at least 10 will be achieved, the factor by which the fusion power exceeds the external plasma heating. Partners in this project are the European Union, Japan, the Russian Federation, USA, China, South Korea and India as well as Brazil as associated partner. The facility is supposed to demonstrate a long burning, reactor-typical plasma and to test techniques such as plasma heating, plasma confinement by superconducting magnets, fuel cycle as well as energy transition, tritium breeding and remote handling technologies. The next step beyond ITER will be the demonstration power station DEMO which requires further developments in order to create the basis for its design and construction. The roadmap to fusion energy is described. It consists of several elements which are needed to develop the knowledge required for a commercial fusion reactor. The DEMO time schedule depends on the efforts in terms of personnel and budget resources the society is willing to invest in fusion taking into account the long term energy supply and its environmental impact. (orig.)

  7. Computer simulation of multi-elemental fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voertler, K.

    2011-01-01

    Thermonuclear fusion is a sustainable energy solution, in which energy is produced using similar processes as in the sun. In this technology hydrogen isotopes are fused to gain energy and consequently to produce electricity. In a fusion reactor hydrogen isotopes are confined by magnetic fields as ionized gas, the plasma. Since the core plasma is millions of degrees hot, there are special needs for the plasma-facing materials. Moreover, in the plasma the fusion of hydrogen isotopes leads to the production of high energetic neutrons which sets demanding abilities for the structural materials of the reactor. This thesis investigates the irradiation response of materials to be used in future fusion reactors. Interactions of the plasma with the reactor wall leads to the removal of surface atoms, migration of them, and formation of co-deposited layers such as tungsten carbide. Sputtering of tungsten carbide and deuterium trapping in tungsten carbide was investigated in this thesis. As the second topic the primary interaction of the neutrons in the structural material steel was examined. As model materials for steel iron chromium and iron nickel were used. This study was performed theoretically by the means of computer simulations on the atomic level. In contrast to previous studies in the field, in which simulations were limited to pure elements, in this work more complex materials were used, i.e. they were multi-elemental including two or more atom species. The results of this thesis are in the microscale. One of the results is a catalogue of atom species, which were removed from tungsten carbide by the plasma. Another result is e.g. the atomic distributions of defects in iron chromium caused by the energetic neutrons. These microscopic results are used in data bases for multiscale modelling of fusion reactor materials, which has the aim to explain the macroscopic degradation in the materials. This thesis is therefore a relevant contribution to investigate the

  8. Fusion reactors: physics and technology. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.

    1983-08-01

    Fusion reactors are designed to operate at full power and generally at steady state. Yet experience shows the load variations, licensing constraints, and frequent sub-system failures often require a plant to operate at fractions of rated power. The aim of this study has been to assess the technology problems and design implications of startup and fractional power operation on fusion reactors. The focus of attention has been tandem mirror reactors (TMR) and we have concentrated on the plasma and blanket engineering for startup and fractional power operation. In this report, we first discuss overall problems of startup, shutdown and staged power operation and their influence on TMR design. We then present a detailed discussion of the plasma physics associated with TMR startup and various means of achieving staged power operation. We then turn to the issue of instrumentation and safety controls for fusion reactors. Finally we discuss the limits on transient power variations during startup and shutdown of Li 17 Pb 83 cooled blankets

  9. Controlled thermonuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walstrom, P.L.

    1976-01-01

    Controlled production of energy by fusion of light nuclei has been the goal of a large portion of the physics community since the 1950's. In order for a fusion reaction to take place, the fuel must be heated to a temperature of 100 million degrees Celsius. At this temperature, matter can exist only in the form of an almost fully ionized plasma. In order for the reaction to produce net power, the product of the density and energy confinement time must exceed a minimum value of 10 20 sec m -3 , the so-called Lawson criterion. Basically, two approaches are being taken to meet this criterion: inertial confinement and magnetic confinement. Inertial confinement is the basis of the laser fusion approach; a fuel pellet is imploded by intense laser beams from all sides and ignites. Magnetic confinement devices, which exist in a variety of geometries, rely upon electromagnetic forces on the charged particles of the plasma to keep the hot plasma from expanding. Of these devices, the most encouraging results have been achieved with a class of devices known as tokamaks. Recent successes with these devices have given plasma physicists confidence that scientific feasibility will be demonstrated in the next generation of tokamaks; however, an even larger effort will be required to make fusion power commercially feasible. As a result, emphasis in the controlled thermonuclear research program is beginning to shift from plasma physics to a new branch of nuclear engineering which can be called fusion engineering, in which instrumentation and control engineers will play a major role. Among the new problem areas they will deal with are plasma diagnostics and superconducting coil instrumentation

  10. Commercial applications of inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, L.A.; Frank, T.G.

    1977-05-01

    This report describes the fundamentals of inertial-confinement fusion, some laser-fusion reactor (LFR) concepts, and attendant means of utilizing the thermonuclear energy for commercial electric power generation. In addition, other commercial energy-related applications, such as the production of fissionable fuels, of synthetic hydrocarbon-based fuels, and of process heat for a variety of uses, as well as the environmental and safety aspects of fusion energy, are discussed. Finally, the requirements for commercialization of laser fusion technologies are described

  11. Nuclear design of a very-low-activation fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, E.T.; Hopkins, G.R.

    1983-06-01

    An investigation was conducted to study the nuclear design aspects of using very-low-activation materials, such as SiC, MgO, and aluminum for fusion-reactor first wall, blanket, and shield applications. In addition to the advantage of very-low radioactive inventory, it was found that the very-low-activation fusion reactor can also offer an adequate tritium-breeding ratio and substantial amount of blanket nuclear heating as a conventional-material-structured reactor does. The most-stringent design constraint found in a very-low-activation fusion reactor is the limited space available in the inboard region of a tokamak concept for shielding to protect the superconducting toroidal field coil. A reference design was developed which mitigates the constraint by adopting a removable tungsten shield design that retains the inboard dimensions and gives the same shield performance as the reference STARFIRE tokamak reactor design

  12. Plutonium-239 production rate study using a typical fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faghihi, F. [Research Center for Radiation Protection, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: faghihif@shirazu.ac.ir; Havasi, H.; Amin-Mozafari, M. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, School of Engineering, Shiraz University, 71348-51154 Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    The purpose of the present paper is to compute fissile {sup 239}Pu material by supposed typical fusion reactor operation to make the fuel requirement for other purposes (e.g. MOX fissile fuel, etc.). It is assumed that there is a fusion reactor has a cylindrical geometry and uses uniformly distributed deuterium-tritium as fuel so that neutron wall load is taken at 10(MW)/(m{sup 2}) . Moreover, the reactor core is surrounded by six suggested blankets to make best performance of the physical conditions described herein. We determined neutron flux in each considered blanket as well as tritium self-sufficiency using two groups neutron energy and then computation is followed by the MCNP-4C code. Finally, material depletion according to a set of dynamical coupled differential equations is solved to estimate {sup 239}Pu production rate. Produced {sup 239}Pu is compared with two typical fission reactors to find performance of plutonium breeding ratio in the case of the fusion reactor. We found that 0.92% of initial U is converted into fissile Pu by our suggested fusion reactor with thermal power of 3000 MW. For comparison, {sup 239}Pu yield of suggested large scale PWR is about 0.65% and for LMFBR is close to 1.7%. The results show that the fusion reactor has an acceptable efficiency for Pu production compared with a large scale PWR fission reactor type.

  13. Control of tritium permeation through fusion reactor strucural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maroni, V.A.

    1978-01-01

    The intention of this paper is to provide a brief synopsis of the status of understanding and technology pertaining to the dissolution and permeation of tritium in fusion reactor materials. The following sections of this paper attempt to develop a simple perspective for understanding the consequences of these phenomena and the nature of the technical methodology being contemplated to control their impact on fusion reactor operation. Considered in order are: (1) the occurrence of tritium in the fusion fuel cycle, (2) a set of tentative criteria to guide the analysis of tritium containment and control strategies, (3) the basic mechanisms by which tritium may be released from a fusion plant, and (4) the methods currently under development to control the permeation-related release mechanisms. To provide background and support for these considerations, existing solubility and permeation data for the hydrogen isotopes are compared and correlated under conditions to be expected in fusion reactor systems

  14. Computer simulation of superthermal transport for laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kershaw, D.S.

    1979-01-01

    The relativistic multigroup diffusion equations describing superthermal electron transport in laser fusion plasmas were derived in an earlier UCRL. A successful numerical scheme based on these equations which is now being used to model laser fusion experiments is described

  15. Elemental volatility of HT-9 fusion reactor alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henslee, S.P.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The volatility of elemental constituents from HT-9, a ferritic steel, proposed for fusion reactor structures, was investigated. Tests were conducted in flowing air at temperatures from 800 to 1200 0 C for durations of 1 to 20 h. Elemental volatility was calculated in terms of the weight fraction of the element volatilized from the initial alloy; molybdenum, manganese, and nickel were the primary constituents volatilized. Comparisons with elemental volatilities observed for another candidate fusion reactor materials. Primary Candidate Alloy (PCA), an austenitic stainless steel, indicate significant differences between the volatilities of these steels that may impact fusion reactor safety analysis and alloy selection. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometry were used to investigate the oxide layers formed on HT-9 and to measure elemental contents within these layers

  16. Environmental and economic assessments of magnetic and inertial fusion energy reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, K.; Oishi, T.; Mori, K.

    2011-10-01

    Global warming due to rapid greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is one of the present-day crucial problems, and fusion reactors are expected to be abundant electric power generation systems to reduce human GHG emission amounts. To search for an environmental-friendly and economical fusion reactor system, comparative system studies have been done for several magnetic fusion energy reactors, and have been extended to include inertial fusion energy reactors. We clarify new scaling formulae for the cost of electricity and GHG emission rate with respect to key design parameters, which might be helpful in making a strategy for fusion research development. Comparisons with other conventional electric power generation systems are carried out taking into account the introduction of GHG taxes and the application of the carbon dioxide capture and storage system to fossil power generators.

  17. Fusion reactors-high temperature electrolysis (HTE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    Results of a study to identify and develop a reference design for synfuel production based on fusion reactors are given. The most promising option for hydrogen production was high-temperature electrolysis (HTE). The main findings of this study are: 1. HTE has the highest potential efficiency for production of synfuels from fusion; a fusion to hydrogen energy efficiency of about 70% appears possible with 1800 0 C HTE units and 60% power cycle efficiency; an efficiency of about 50% possible with 1400 0 C HTE units and 40% power cycle efficiency. 2. Relative to thermochemical or direct decomposition methods HTE technology is in a more advanced state of development, 3. Thermochemical or direct decomposition methods must have lower unit process or capital costs if they are to be more attractive than HTE. 4. While design efforts are required, HTE units offer the potential to be quickly run in reverse as fuel cells to produce electricity for restart of Tokamaks and/or provide spinning reserve for a grid system. 5. Because of the short timescale of the study, no detailed economic evaluation could be carried out.A comparison of costs could be made by employing certain assumptions. For example, if the fusion reactor-electrolyzer capital installation is $400/(KW(T) [$1000/KW(E) equivalent], the H 2 energy production cost for a high efficiency (about 70 %) fusion-HTE system is on the same order of magnitude as a coal based SNG plant based on 1976 dollars. 6. The present reference design indicates that a 2000 MW(th) fusion reactor could produce as much at 364 x 10 6 scf/day of hydrogen which is equivalent in heating value to 20,000 barrels/day of gasoline. This would fuel about 500,000 autos based on average driving patterns. 7. A factor of three reduction in coal feed (tons/day) could be achieved for syngas production if hydrogen from a fusion-HTE system were used to gasify coal, as compared to a conventional syngas plant using coal-derived hydrogen

  18. Light ion driven inertial fusion reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, D.L.; Sweeney, M.A.; Buttram, M.T.; Prestwich, K.R.; Moses, G.A.; peterson, R.R.; Lovell, E.G.; Englestad, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    The possibility of designing fusion reactor systems using intense beams of light ions has been investigated. concepts for beam production, transport, and focusing on target have been analyzed in light of more conservative target performance estimates. Analyses of the major criteria which govern the design of the beam-target-cavity tried indicate the feasibility of designing power systems at the few hundred megawatt (electric) level. This paper discusses light ion fusion reactor (LIFR) concepts and presents an assessment of the design limitations through quantitative examples

  19. Comparison of nuclear irradiation parameters of fusion breeder materials in high flux fission test reactors and a fusion power demonstration reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, U.; Herring, S.; Hogenbirk, A.; Leichtle, D.; Nagao, Y.; Pijlgroms, B.J.; Ying, A.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear irradiation parameters relevant to displacement damage and burn-up of the breeder materials Li 2 O, Li 4 SiO 4 and Li 2 TiO 3 have been evaluated and compared for a fusion power demonstration reactor and the high flux fission test reactor (HFR), Petten, the advanced test reactor (ATR, INEL) and the Japanese material test reactor (JMTR, JAERI). Based on detailed nuclear reactor calculations with the MCNP Monte Carlo code and binary collision approximation (BCA) computer simulations of the displacement damage in the polyatomic lattices with MARLOWE, it has been investigated how well the considered HFRs can meet the requirements for a fusion power reactor relevant irradiation. It is shown that a breeder material irradiation in these fission test reactors is well suited in this regard when the neutron spectrum is well tailored and the 6 Li-enrichment is properly chosen. Requirements for the relevant nuclear irradiation parameters such as the displacement damage accumulation, the lithium burn-up and the damage production function W(T) can be met when taking into account these prerequisites. Irradiation times in the order of 2-3 full power years are necessary for the HFR to achieve the peak values of the considered fusion power Demo reactor blanket with regard to the burn-up and, at the same time, the dpa accumulation

  20. Laser fusion program at LASL. Progress report, January 1--June 30, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stark, E.

    1976-11-01

    Progress in the development of high-energy short-pulse CO/sub 2/ laser systems for fusion research is reported. The Single-Beam System continued to be used in target experiments at a peak intensity of 7 x 10/sup 14/ W/cm/sup 2/, and the system was improved. The status of the Two-Beam System, on which target experiments have begun with 300-J, 1-ns pulses in one beam, is described. Construction and checkout of the Eight-Beam System are continuing. Further design studies for the High-Energy Gas Laser Facility and the initiation of a prototype program are reported. The rare-gas oxides and dimeric mercury were emphasized in investigations into new lasers for fusion research. Experimental kinetics studies, a study of heat-pipe containment of metal vapors, theoretical support, and optical-damage investigations are described. Significant experimental and theoretical results are reported on the question of wavelength-scaling in laser-plasma interaction physics. Studies of vacuum insulation as a means of preventing target preheat by hot electrons are also summarized. Analyses of the ponderomotive force in laser-plasma interactions and of the relationship between x-ray spectrum and suprathermal electron distribution are described. Improvements to the MCRAD and LASNEX design codes are outlined, and a LASNEX analysis of a target heated by laser-generated fast ions is discussed. Improved methods of screening, characterizing, and fabricating microballoons and more complex targets are described, and progress in applying uniform layers of DT ice on the inside of a microballoon is reported. Improvements in diagnostics include x-ray streak photographs, the fabrication of x-ray microscope systems, and x-ray film imaging. New results in our feasibility and systems studies are presented, including the wetted-wall and magnetically protected reactor concepts, the effect of ionized debris on cavity walls, the fusion-fission breeder concept, and the production of synthetic fuels by fusion

  1. Conceptual design of fusion experimental reactor (FER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-03-01

    A conceptual design study (option C) has been carried out for the fusion experimental reactor (FER). In addition to design of the tokamak reactor and associated systems based on the reference design specifications, feasibility of a water-shield reactor concept was examined as a topical study. The design study for the reference tokamak reactor has produced a reactor concept for the FER, along with major R D items for the concept, based on close examinations on thermal design, electromagnetics, neutronics and remote maintenance. Particular efforts have been directed to the area of electromagnetics. Detailed analyses with close simulation models have been performed on PF coil arrangements and configurations, shell effects of the blanket for plasma position unstability, feedback control, and eddy currents during disruptions. The major design specifications are as follows; Peak fusion power 437 MW Major radius 5.5 m Minor radius 1.1 m Plasma elongation 1.5 Plasma current 5.3 MA Toroidal beta 4 % Field on axis 5.7 T (author)

  2. Investigation of cascade-typed falling liquid film flow along first wall of laser-fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunugi, Tomoaki; Nakai, Tadakatsu; Kawara, Zensaku

    2007-01-01

    To protect from high energy/particle fluxes caused by nuclear fusion reaction such as extremely high heat flux, X rays, Alpha particles and fuel debris to a first wall of an inertia fusion reactor, a ''cascade-typed'' falling liquid film flow is proposed as the ''liquid wall'' concept which is one of the reactor chamber cooling and wall protection schemes: the reactor chamber can protect by using a liquid metal film flow (such as Li 17 Pb 83 ) over the wall. In order to investigate the feasibility of this concept, we conducted the numerical analyses by using the commercial code (STREAM: unsteady three-dimensional general purpose thermofluid code) and also conducted the flow visualization experiments. The numerical results suggested that the cascade structure design should be improved, so that we redesigned the cascade-typed first wall and performed the flow visualization as a POP (proof-of-principle) experiment. In the numerical analyses, the water is used as the working liquid and an acrylic plate as the wall. These selections are based on two reasons: (1) from the non-dimensional analysis approach, the Weber number (We=ru 2 d/s: r is density, u is velocity, d is film thickness, s is surface tension coefficient) should be the same between the design (Li 17 Pb 83 flow) and the model experiment (water flow) because of the free-surface instability, (2) the SiC/SiC composite would be used as the wall material, so that the wall may have the less wettability: the acrylic plate has the similar feature. The redesigned cascade-typed first wall for one step (30 cm height corresponding to 4 Hz laser duration) consists of a liquid tank having a free-surface for keeping the constant waterhead located at the backside of the first wall, and connects to a slit which is composed of two plates: one plate is the first wall, and the other is maintaining the liquid level. This design solved the trouble of the previous design. The test section for the flow visualization has the same

  3. Blankets for fusion reactors : materials and neutronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, S.H. de.

    1980-03-01

    The studies about Fusion Reactors have lead to several problems for which there is no general agreement about the best solution. Nevertheless, several points seem to be well defined, at least for the first generation of reactors. The fuel, for example, should be a mixture of deuterium and tritium. Therefore, the reactor should be able to generate the tritium to be burned and also to transform kinetic energy of the fusion neutrons into heat in a process similar to the fission reactors. The best materials for the composition of the blanket were first selected and then the neutronics for the proposed system was developed. The neutron flux in the blanket was calculated using the discrete ordinates transport code, ANISN. All the nuclides cross sections came from the DLC-28/CTR library, that processed the ENDF/B data, using the SUPERTOG Program. (Author) [pt

  4. Laser induced fusion - theoretical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawande, S.V.; Gunye, M.R.

    1979-01-01

    The theoretical aspects of thermonuclear fusion induced by laser are discussed. After outlining the basic features and the energetics of laser fusion in the chapter 1, various non-linear mechanisms responsible for an enhanced absorption of laser energy into the plasma and the stimulated scattering processes which hinder the absorption are discussed in the second chapter on laser plasma interactions. The third chapter on gas dynamics and the shock phenomena presents the mathematical formulation of the compression to high densities of the core of the pellet for its implosion. A hydrodynamic model developed to stimulate the evolution of laser heated symmetric plasma is outlined in the chapter four on numerichigly relativistic noninteracting particles, regular bouncing states may occur at high densities, or at high temperatures. The latter case is considered in details for the collapse phase of a hot universe; lepton pair creation may completely decelerate the collapse of a hot hadronic plasma, provided the observational parameters, the Hubble constant Hsub(deg), the matter parameter Ωsub(deg) and the deceleration parameter qsub(deg) satisfy certain constraint conditions

  5. Fusion neutronics plan in the development of fusion reactor. With the aim of realizing electric power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Hiroo; Morimoto, Yuichi; Ochiai, Kentarou; Sugimoto, Masayoshi; Nishitani, Takeo; Takeuchi, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-10-01

    On June 1992, Atomic Energy Commission in Japan has settled Third Phase Program of Fusion Research and Development to achieve self-ignition condition, to realize long pulse burning plasma and to establish basis of fusion engineering for demonstration reactor. This report describes research plan of Fusion Neutron Laboratory in JAERI toward a development of fusion reactor with an aim of realizing electric power. The fusion neutron laboratory has a fusion neutronics facility (FNS), intense fusion neutron source. The plan includes research items in the FNS; characteristics of shielding and breeding materials, nuclear characteristics of materials, fundamental irradiation process of insulator, diagnostics materials and structural materials, and development of in-vessel diagnostic technology. Upgrade of the FNS is also described. Also, the International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) for intense neutron source to develop fusion materials is described. (author)

  6. Cost assessment of demo fusion reactor with considering maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashizume, Hidetoshi; Kitagoh, Kazutoshi

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to perform cost assessment of nuclear fusion reactors in order to draw up commercial plants. A fusion reactor may have a complex configuration to achieve high beta value, which leads to low and instable availability when maintenance is taken into account. Therefore, reactor's availability must be evaluated with considering the influence of the configuration complexity. Furthermore the availability has the strong impact on COE (Cost of Electricity), that is, a fusion reactor with low availability will not be accepted as a commercial plant. Therefore, we developed a new method to calculate availabilities with random numbers, in which the complexity of reactor's configuration could become considered. In addition, we considered the reduction of superconducting coil's maintenance time by introducing remountable magnet system because the coil maintenance requires quite long time in the present technology. The results show that the availability becomes relatively large if the short maintenance time of coils could be achieved, for example, by remountable magnetic systems. (author)

  7. Controlled thermonuclear fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Bobin, Jean Louis

    2014-01-01

    The book is a presentation of the basic principles and main achievements in the field of nuclear fusion. It encompasses both magnetic and inertial confinements plus a few exotic mechanisms for nuclear fusion. The state-of-the-art regarding thermonuclear reactions, hot plasmas, tokamaks, laser-driven compression and future reactors is given.

  8. Safety and Environment aspects of Tokamak- type Fusion Power Reactor- An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, Bharat; Reddy, D. Chenna

    2017-04-01

    Naturally occurring thermonuclear fusion reaction (of light atoms to form a heavier nucleus) in the sun and every star in the universe, releases incredible amounts of energy. Demonstrating the controlled and sustained reaction of deuterium-tritium plasma should enable the development of fusion as an energy source here on Earth. The promising fusion power reactors could be operated on the deuterium-tritium fuel cycle with fuel self-sufficiency. The potential impact of fusion power on the environment and the possible risks associated with operating large-scale fusion power plants is being studied by different countries. The results show that fusion can be a very safe and sustainable energy source. A fusion power plant possesses not only intrinsic advantages with respect to safety compared to other sources of energy, but also a negligible long term impact on the environment provided certain precautions are taken in its design. One of the important considerations is in the selection of low activation structural materials for reactor vessel. Selection of the materials for first wall and breeding blanket components is also important from safety issues. It is possible to fully benefit from the advantages of fusion energy if safety and environmental concerns are taken into account when considering the conceptual studies of a reactor design. The significant safety hazards are due to the tritium inventory and energetic neutron fluence induced activity in the reactor vessel, first wall components, blanket system etc. The potential of release of radioactivity under operational and accident conditions needs attention while designing the fusion reactor. Appropriate safety analysis for the quantification of the risk shall be done following different methods such as FFMEA (Functional Failure Modes and Effects Analysis) and HAZOP (Hazards and operability). Level of safety and safety classification such as nuclear safety and non-nuclear safety is very important for the FPR (Fusion

  9. Tritium-management requirements for D-T fusion reactors (ETF, INTOR, FED)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, P.A.; Clemmer, R.G.; Misra, B.

    1981-10-01

    The successful operation of D-T fusion reactors will depend on the development of safe and reliable tritium-containment and fuel-recycle systems. The tritium handling requirements for D-T reactors were analyzed. The reactor facility was then designed from the viewpoint of tritium management. Recovery scenarios after a tritium release were generated to show the relative importance of various scenarios. A fusion-reactor tritium facility was designed which would be appropriate for all types of plants from the Engineering Test Facility (ETF), the International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR), and the Fusion Engineering Device (FED) to the full-scale power plant epitomized by the STARFIRE design

  10. Tritium experience in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, C.H.; Blanchard, W.; Hosea, J.; Mueller, D.; Nagy, A.; Hogan, J.

    1998-01-01

    Tritium management is a key enabling element in fusion technology. Tritium fuel was used in 3.5 years of successful deuterium-tritium (D-T) operations in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The D-T campaign enabled TFTR to explore the transport, alpha physics, and MHD stability of a reactor core. It also provided experience with tritium retention and removal that highlighted the importance of these issues in future D-T machines. In this paper, the authors summarize the tritium retention and removal experience in TFTR and its implications for future reactors

  11. Materials design data for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavassoli, A.A.F.

    1998-01-01

    Design data needed for fusion reactors are characterized by the diversity of materials and the complexity of loading situations found in these reactors. In addition, advanced fabrication techniques, such as hot isostatic pressing, envisaged for fabrication of single and multilayered in-vessel components, could significantly change the original materials properties for which the current design rules are written. As a result, additional materials properties have had to be generated for fusion reactors and new structural design rules formulated. This paper recalls some of the materials properties data generated for ITER and DEMO, and gives examples of how these are converted into design criteria. In particular, it gives specific examples for the properties of 316LN-IG and modified 9Cr-1Mo steels, and CuCrZr alloy. These include, determination of tension, creep, isochronous, fatigue, and creep-fatigue curves and their analysis and conversion into design limits. (orig.)

  12. Materials design data for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavassoli, A.A.F. [CEA Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, Gif sur Yvette (France). CEREM

    1998-10-01

    Design data needed for fusion reactors are characterized by the diversity of materials and the complexity of loading situations found in these reactors. In addition, advanced fabrication techniques, such as hot isostatic pressing, envisaged for fabrication of single and multilayered in-vessel components, could significantly change the original materials properties for which the current design rules are written. As a result, additional materials properties have had to be generated for fusion reactors and new structural design rules formulated. This paper recalls some of the materials properties data generated for ITER and DEMO, and gives examples of how these are converted into design criteria. In particular, it gives specific examples for the properties of 316LN-IG and modified 9Cr-1Mo steels, and CuCrZr alloy. These include, determination of tension, creep, isochronous, fatigue, and creep-fatigue curves and their analysis and conversion into design limits. (orig.) 19 refs.

  13. Designing the Cascade inertial confinement fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitts, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    The primary goal in designing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactors is to produce electrical power as inexpensively as possible, with minimum activation and without compromising safety. This paper discusses a method for designing the Cascade rotating ceramic-granule-blanket reactor (Pitts, 1985) and its associated power plant (Pitts and Maya, 1985). Although focus is on the cascade reactor, the design method and issues presented are applicable to most other ICF reactors

  14. Preliminary neutronics calculation of fusion-fission hybrid reactor breeding spent fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xubo; Chen Yixue; Gao Bin

    2013-01-01

    The possibility of using the fusion-fission hybrid reactor breeding spent fuel in PWR was preliminarily studied in this paper. According to the fusion-fission hybrid reactor breeding spent fuel characteristics, PWR assembly including fusion-fission hybrid reactor breeding spent fuel was designed. The parameters such as fuel temperature coefficient, moderator temperature coefficient and their variation were investigated. Results show that the neutron properties of uranium-based assembly and hybrid reactor breeding spent fuel assembly are similar. The design of this paper has a smaller uniformity coefficient of power at the same fissile isotope mass percentage. The results will provide technical support for the future fusion-fission hybrid reactor and PWR combined with cycle system. (authors)

  15. Characteristics of irradiation creep in the first wall of a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coghlan, W.A.; Mansur, L.K.

    1981-01-01

    A number of significant differences in the irradiation environment of a fusion reactor are expected with respect to the fission reactor irradiation environment. These differences are expected to affect the characteristics of irradiation creep in the fusion reactor. Special conditions of importance are identified as the (1) large number of defects produced per pka, (2) high helium production rate, (3) cyclic operation, (4) unique stress histories, and (5) low temperature operations. Existing experimental data from the fission reactor environment is analyzed to shed light on irradiation creep under fusion conditions. Theoretical considerations are used to deduce additional characteristics of irradiation creep in the fusion reactor environment for which no experimental data are available

  16. Evaluation of the impact of a committed site on fusion reactor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Nagy, A.

    1979-01-01

    The technical and economic merits of a committed fusion site for development of tokamak, mirror, and EBT reactor from ignition through demo phases were evaluated. Schedule compression resulting from evolving several reactor concepts and/or phases on a committed site as opposed to sequential use of independent sites was estimated. Land, water, and electrical power requirements for a committed fusion site were determined. A conceptual plot plan for siting three fusion reactors on a committed site was configured. Reactor support equipment common to the various concepts was identified as candidates for sharing. Licensing issues for fusion plants were briefly addressed

  17. The ITER fusion reactor and its role in the development of a fusion power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLean, A.

    2002-01-01

    Energy from nuclear fusion is the future source of sustained, full life-cycle environmentally benign, intrinsically safe, base-load power production. The nuclear fusion process powers our sun, innumerable other stars in the sky, and some day, it will power the Earth, its cities and our homes. The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, ITER, represents the next step toward fulfilling that promise. ITER will be a test bed for key steppingstones toward engineering feasibility of a demonstration fusion power plant (DEMO) in a single experimental step. It will establish the physics basis for steady state Tokamak magnetic containment fusion reactors to follow it, exploring ion temperature, plasma density and containment time regimes beyond the breakeven power condition, and culminating in experimental fusion self-ignition. (author)

  18. Extrap conceptual fusion reactor design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eninger, J.E; Lehnert, B.

    1987-12-01

    A study has recently been initiated to asses the fusion reactor potential of the Extrap concept. A reactor model is defined that fulfills certain economic and environmental criteria. This model is applied to Extrap and a reference reactor is outlined. The design is optimized by varying parameters subject to both physics and engineering constraints. Several design options are examined and key engineering issues are identified and addressed. Some preliminary results and conclusions of this work are summarized. (authors)

  19. Materials needs for compact fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    The economic prospects for magnetic fusion energy can be dramatically improved if for the same total power output the fusion neutron first-wall (FW) loading and the system power density can be increased by factors of 3 to 5 and 10 to 30, respectively. A number of compact fusion reactor embodiments have been proposed, all of which would operate with increased FW loadings, would use thin (0.5 to 0.6 m) blankets, and would confine quasi-steady-state plasma with resistive, water-cooled copper or aluminum coils. Increased system power density (5 to 15 MWt/m 3 versus 0.3 to 0.5 MW/m 3 ), considerably reduced physical size of the fusion power core (FPC), and appreciably reduced economic leverage exerted by the FPC and associated physics result. The unique materials requirements anticipated for these compact reactors are outlined against the well documented backdrop provided by similar needs for the mainline approaches. Surprisingly, no single materials need that is unique to the compact systems is identified; crucial uncertainties for the compact approaches must also be addressed by the mainline approaches, particularly for in-vacuum components (FWs, limiters, divertors, etc.)

  20. Laser fusion: an assessment of pellet injection, tracking and beam pointing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monsler, M.J.

    1978-01-01

    A conceptual design is presented for a target injection and final optical system which can be integrated with a lithium waterfall laser fusion reactor and operate repetitively within the presented tolerances. A high f-number focusing system using coated metal optics at 30 to 60 meters distance is suggested. An intermediate section of the differentially pumped beam tube contains flowing xenon which effectively shields the optics from debris and x rays, allowing the mirrors to operate at least a year without optical degradation. Pellets are injected with a repeating gas gun positioned horizontally just above the laser beam. No pellet trajectory correction is desired or required. Simple tracking of the target using a low power laser illuminator, a position sensing photodetector, and a trajectory prediction scheme are assumed. Two-degree of freedom x-y beam steering is preferred, without focus capability. Both the tracker and the adaptive mirror are placed in the laser building, well away from the fixed final optical mirror which faces the microexplosion

  1. Numerical analysis of magnetoelastic coupled buckling of fusion reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demachi, K.; Yoshida, Y.; Miya, K.

    1994-01-01

    For a tokamak fusion reactor, it is one of the most important subjects to establish the structural design in which its components can stand for strong magnetic force induced by plasma disruption. A number of magnetostructural analysis of the fusion reactor components were done recently. However, in these researches the structural behavior was calculated based on the small deformation theory where the nonlinearity was neglected. But it is known that some kinds of structures easily exceed the geometrical nonlinearity. In this paper, the deflection and the magnetoelastic buckling load of fusion reactor components during plasma disruption were calculated

  2. Health physics in fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K.Y.; Dinner, P.J.

    1984-06-01

    Experience in the control of tritium exposures to workers and the public gained through the design and operation of Ontario Hydro's nuclear stations has been applied to fusion projects and to design studies on emerging fusion reactor concepts. Ontario Hydro performance in occupational tritium exposure control and environmental impact is reviewed. Application of tritium control technologies and dose management methodology during facility design is highlighted

  3. Hybrid fission-fusion nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucchetti, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    A fusion-fission hybrid could contribute to all components of nuclear power - fuel supply, electricity production, and waste management. The idea of the fusion-fission hybrid is many decades old. Several ideas, both new and revisited, have been investigated by hybrid proponents. These ideas appear to have attractive features, but they require various levels of advances in plasma science and fusion and nuclear technology. As a first step towards the development of hybrid reactors, fusion neutron sources can be considered as an option. Compact high-field tokamaks can be a candidate for being the neutron source in a fission-fusion hybrid, essentially due to their design characteristics, such as compact dimensions, high magnetic field, flexibility of operation. This study presents the development of a tokamak neutron source for a material testing facility using an Ignitor-based concept. The computed values show the potential of this neutron-rich device for fusion materials testing. Some full-power months of operation are sufficient to obtain relevant radiation damage values in terms of dpa. (Author)

  4. Hydrogen production from high temperature electrolysis and fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang, V.D.; Steinberg, J.F.; Issacs, H.S.; Lazareth, O.; Powell, J.R.; Salzano, F.J.

    1978-01-01

    Production of hydrogen from high temperature electrolysis of steam coupled with a fusion reactor is studied. The process includes three major components: the fusion reactor, the high temperature electrolyzer and the power conversion cycle each of which is discussed in the paper. Detailed process design and analysis of the system is examined. A parametric study on the effect of process efficiency is presented

  5. Fusion driver study. Final technical report, April 1, 1978-March 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, H.W.

    1980-04-01

    A conceptual design of a multi-megajoule, repetitively pulsed CO 2 laser system for Inertial Confinement Fusion is presented. System configurations consisting of 50 to 100 kJ modules operating at subatmospheric pressures with multiple pass optical extraction appear feasible with present or near term technology. Overall laser system efficiencies of greater than 10% at repetition rates in excess of 10 Hz are possible with the state-of-the-art pulsed power technology. The synthesis of all the laser subsystems into a specific configuration for a Laser Fusion Driver depends upon the reactor chamber(s) layout, subsystem reliability and restrictions on overall dimensions of the fusion driver. A design is presented which stacks power amplifier modules in series in a large torus with centrally located reactor chamber. Cost estimates of the overall Laser Fusion Driver are also presented

  6. Utilization of fusion neutrons in the tokamak fusion test reactor for blanket performance testing and other nuclear engineering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldwell, C.S.; Pettus, W.G.; Schmotzer, J.K.; Welfare, F.; Womack, R.

    1979-01-01

    In addition to developing a set of reacting-plasma/blanket-neutronics benchmark data, the TFTR fusion application experiments would provide operational experience with fast-neutron dosimetry and the remote handling of blanket modules in a tokamak reactor environment; neutron streaming and hot-spot information invaluable for the optimal design of penetrations in future fusion reactors; and the identification of the most damage-resistant insulators for a variety of fusion-reactor components

  7. Inertial fusion energy; L'energie de fusion inertielle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decroisette, M.; Andre, M.; Bayer, C.; Juraszek, D. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, Dir. des Systemes d' Information (CEA/DIF), 91 (France); Le Garrec, B. [CEA Centre d' Etudes Scientifiques et Techniques d' Aquitaine, 33 - Le Barp (France); Deutsch, C. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France); Migus, A. [Institut d' Optique Centre scientifique, 91 - Orsay (France)

    2005-07-01

    We first recall the scientific basis of inertial fusion and then describe a generic fusion reactor with the different components: the driver, the fusion chamber, the material treatment unit, the target factory and the turbines. We analyse the options proposed at the present time for the driver and for target irradiation scheme giving the state of art for each approach. We conclude by the presentation of LMJ (laser Megajoule) and NIF (national ignition facility) projects. These facilities aim to demonstrate the feasibility of laboratory DT ignition, first step toward Inertial Fusion Energy. (authors)

  8. Multi-MJ KrF laser driver for a 2050 IFE reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linford, G.J.C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on a new design of a multi-megajoule KrF laser driver for the Prometheus inertial fusion energy (IFE) reactor c. year 2050 which has been developed exploiting advances achieved in non-linear optics (NLO) during the past decade. Optimized excimer e-beam sustained electric-discharge lasers (EBSEDLs) are predicted to produce output energies too low (∼4 kJ) with pulses too long (∼500 ns) to meet IFE target irradiation requirements ΔE target ∼ 5 MJ, τ target (∼ 6 ns). The NLO devices used in this design permit the independent optimization of excimer laser modules while providing the important functions of coherent beam combination, intensity smoothing, and temporal pulse compression at high efficiencies

  9. Towards abundant and pollution-free energy. Laser nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robieux, J.

    2008-01-01

    This book shows that it is now practically certain that by the year 2080 laser nuclear fusion will allow to produce an abundant and relatively cheap energy. Thanks to this energy, it will be possible to convert a mixture of CO 2 , H 2 and water into an automotive fuel or a food product. Laser nuclear fusion will use deuterium as fuel and thus oil and gas will become useless. Also, thanks to this new energy source, global warming and starvation will be overcome. The laser fusion concept was introduced by J. Robieux in 1962 just after the discovery of the laser. This idea was immediately accepted and sustained by the French President De Gaulle. The research on laser fusion was initially undertaken at the Marcoussis research centre from the Compagnie Generale d'Electricite (General Electricity Company - CGE). In 1967, the lasers built at Marcoussis were 30 times more powerful than any other laser in the rest of world. A cooperation with the USA started at that time and is still going on today. In 1969, the CEA centre of Limeil realized the world premiere experiments of laser fusion. This book presents the historical aspects and the state-of-the-art of this technology today. It is written in two parts, the first part does not require any scientific knowledge and is accessible to everybody, while the second part can be understood only by readers having a basic scientific background. (J.S.)

  10. Magnet design considerations for Tokamak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purcell, J.R.; Chen, W.; Thomas, R.

    1976-01-01

    Design problems for superconducting ohmic heating and toroidal field coils for large Tokamak fusion reactors are discussed. The necessity for making these coils superconducting is explained, together with the functions of these coils in a Tokamak reactor. Major problem areas include materials related aspects and mechanical design and cryogenic considerations. Projections and comparisons are made based on existing superconducting magnet technology. The mechanical design of large-scale coils, which can contain the severe electromagnetic loading and stress generated in the winding, are emphasized. Additional major tasks include the development of high current conductors for pulsed applications to be used in fabricating the ohmic heating coils. It is important to note, however, that no insurmountable technical barriers are expected in the course of developing superconducting coils for Tokamak fusion reactors. (Auth.)

  11. Thermal energy and bootstrap current in fusion reactor plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, G.

    1993-01-01

    For DT fusion reactors with prescribed alpha particle heating power P α , plasma volume V and burn temperature i > ∼ 10 keV specific relations for the thermal energy content, bootstrap current, central plasma pressure and other quantities are derived. It is shown that imposing P α and V makes these relations independent of the magnitudes of the density and temperature, i.e. they only depend on P α , V and shape factors or profile parameters. For model density and temperature profiles analytic expressions for these shape factors and for the factor C bs in the bootstrap current formula I bs ∼ C bs (a/R) 1/2 β p I p are given. In the design of next-step devices and fusion reactors, the fusion power is a fixed quantity. Prescription of the alpha particle heating power and plasma volume results in specific relations which can be helpful for interpreting computer simulations and for the design of fusion reactors. (author) 5 refs

  12. Theory of high density laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, G.B.; Nuckolls, J.H.

    1975-01-01

    A basic laser fusion scheme is presented. Some of its subtleties are described and the theoretical difficulties which now appear to be the major obstacles are considered. Interpretations of some recent laser compression experiments are given. (U.S.)

  13. Assessment of tritium breeding requirements for fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, J.

    1983-12-01

    This report presents an assessment of tritium-breeding requirements for fusion power reactors. The analysis is based on an evaluation of time-dependent tritium inventories in the reactor system. The method presented can be applied to any fusion systems in operation on a steady-state mode as well as on a pulsed mode. As an example, the UWMAK-I design was analyzed and it has been found that the startup inventory requirement calculated by the present method significantly differs from those previously calculated. The effect of reactor-parameter changes on the required tritium breeding ratio is also analyzed for a variety of reactor operation scenarios

  14. Laser-fusion targets for reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuckolls, J.H.; Thiessen, A.R.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a target having a centrally located substantially spherically configured quantity of solid fuel for implosion by a pulse of laser energy and having no material therein with a Z of over about 13. The improvement consists of: means in spaced apart and non-contiguous relationship surrounding the fuel for at least providing an atmosphere about the fuel for ensuring electron transport around the fuel and enhancing subsequent implosion symmetry of the fuel, the fuel being configured as a hollow shell; the means consisting of at least one outer layer of substantially solid atmosphere forming material having a Z of 1-13. The atmosphere forms material comprising a shell positioned about the fuel defining a space therebetween, the space being filled with He, the fuel and the shell of atmosphere forming material being each composed of DT, the layer of atmosphere forming material being impacted and at least partially exploded by at least one separate and distinct laser prepulse to produce the atmosphere about the fuel prior to implosion of the fuel by the pulse of laser energy

  15. R and D toward highly repetitive laser fusion demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Nakahiro; Matsukado, Koji; Watari, Takeshi; Sekine, Takashi; Takeuchi, Yasuki; Kawashima, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    Hamamatsu Photonics conducts research on a unique continuous neutron generation method by integrating and utilizing elemental technologies such as laser, target, and measurement for laser nuclear fusion research. In addition, in collaboration with the Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries, Toyota Motor Corporation, and others, it is conducting research on laser fusion. As a high power laser of element technology, it constructed an ultrahigh intensity laser system by combining glass slab laser KURE-I and ultrahigh intensity femtosecond laser MATSU-I equipped with titanium sapphire transmitter, and achieved a peak output of 20 TW, It plans to further increase this to 100 TW. As other element technologies, it is also considering nuclear fusion fuel - target technology and light - high energy particle measurement technology. Regarding the demonstration of continuous generation of laser fusion neutrons, it performed 100 times of continuous laser beam irradiation at 1 Hz, and actually measured the number of neutrons generated. It measured 4.5x10 4 pieces of neutrons on average (maximum 10 5 ) with a frequency of 98%. Since 100% of neutron generation should occur in principle, in the future it will be necessary to enhancing laser collecting intensity and to improve solid particle number density in order to put this process into practical use as a neutron source. (A.O.)

  16. Interplay between parametric instabilities in fusion - relevant laser plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huller, St.

    2003-01-01

    The control of parametric instabilities plays an important role in laser fusion. They are driven by the incident laser beams in the underdense plasma surrounding a fusion capsule and hinder the absorption process of incident laser light which is necessary to heat the fusion target. Due to its high intensity and power, the laser light modifies the plasma density dynamically, such that two or more parametric instabilities compete, in particular stimulated Brillouin scattering and the filamentation instability. The complicated interplay between these parametric instabilities is studied in detail by developing an adequate model accompanied by numerical simulations with multidimensional codes. The model is applied to generic and to smoothed laser beams, which are necessary to limit parametric instabilities, with parameters close to experimental conditions. (author)

  17. Thermonuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisse, J.

    2000-01-01

    This document takes stock of the two ways of thermonuclear fusion research explored today: magnetic confinement fusion and inertial confinement fusion. The basic physical principles are recalled first: fundamental nuclear reactions, high temperatures, elementary properties of plasmas, ignition criterion, magnetic confinement (charged particle in a uniform magnetic field, confinement and Tokamak principle, heating of magnetized plasmas (ohmic, neutral particles, high frequency waves, other heating means), results obtained so far (scale laws and extrapolation of performances, tritium experiments, ITER project), inertial fusion (hot spot ignition, instabilities, results (Centurion-Halite program, laser experiments). The second part presents the fusion reactor and its associated technologies: principle (tritium production, heat source, neutron protection, tritium generation, materials), magnetic fusion (superconducting magnets, divertor (role, principle, realization), inertial fusion (energy vector, laser adaptation, particle beams, reaction chamber, stresses, chamber concepts (dry and wet walls, liquid walls), targets (fabrication, injection and pointing)). The third chapter concerns the socio-economic aspects of thermonuclear fusion: safety (normal operation and accidents, wastes), costs (costs structure and elementary comparison, ecological impact and external costs). (J.S.)

  18. Some safety studies for conceptual fusion--fission hybrid reactors. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastenberg, W.E.; Okrent, D.

    1978-07-01

    The objective of this study was to make a preliminary examination of some potential safety questions for conceptual fusion-fission hybrid reactors. The study and subsequent analysis was largely based upon reference to one design, a conceptual mirror fusion-fission reactor, operating on the deuterium-tritium plasma fusion fuel cycle and the uranium-plutonium fission fuel cycle. The blanket is a fast-spectrum, uranium carbide, helium cooled, subcritical reactor, optimized for the production of fissile fuel. An attempt was made to generalize the results wherever possible

  19. Nuclear data for fusion reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    The meeting was organized in four sessions and four working groups devoted to the following topics: Requirements of nuclear data for fusion reactor technology (6 papers); Status of experimental and theoretical investigations of microscopic nuclear data (10 papers); Status of existing libraries for fusion neutronic calculations (5 papers); and Status of integral experiments and benchmark tests (6 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  20. TORFA - toroidal reactor for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.

    1980-09-01

    The near-term goal of the US controlled fusion program should be the development, for practical applications, of an intense, quasi-steady, reliable 14-MeV neutron source with an electrical utilization efficiency at least 10 times larger than the value characterizing beam/solid-target neutron generators. This report outlines a method for implementing that goal, based on tokamak fusion reactors featuring resistive toroidal-field coils designed for ease of demountability

  1. MINIMARS: An attractive small tandem mirror fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, L.J.; Logan, B.G.; Doggett, J.N.; Devoto, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    Through the innovative design of a novel end plug scheme employing octopole MHD stabilization, the authors present the conceptual design of ''MINIMARS'', a small commercial fusion reactor based on the tandem mirror principle. The current baseline for MINIMARS has a net electric output of 600 MWe and they have configured the design for short construction times, factory-built modules, inherently safe blanket systems, and multiplexing in station sizes of ≅ 600-2400 MWe. They demonstrate that the compact octopole end cell provides a number of advantages over the more conventional quadrupole (yin-yang) end cell encountered in the MARS tandem mirror reactor study, and enables ignition to be achieved with much shorter central cell lengths. Accordingly, being economic in small sizes, MINIMARS provides an attractive alternative to the more conventional larger conceptual fusion reactors encountered to date, and would contribute significantly to the lowering of utility financial risk in a developing fusion economy

  2. Individual dose due to radioactivity accidental release from fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie, Baojie [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China); Ni, Muyi, E-mail: muyi.ni@fds.org.cn [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Wei, Shiping [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China)

    2017-04-05

    Highlights: • Conservative early dose of different unit fusion radioactivity release were assessed. • Data of accident level in INES for fusion reactor were proposed. • Method of environmental restoration time after fusion accident was proposed. • The maximum possible accident level for ITER like fusion reactor is 6. • We need 34–52 years to live after the fusion hypothetical accident. - Abstract: As an important index shaping the design of fusion safety system, evaluation of public radiation consequences have risen as a hot topic on the way to develop fusion energy. In this work, the comprehensive public early dose was evaluated due to unit gram tritium (HT/HTO), activated dust, activated corrosion products (ACPs) and activated gases accidental release from ITER like fusion reactor. Meanwhile, considering that we cannot completely eliminate the occurrence likelihood of multi-failure of vacuum vessel and tokamak building, we conservatively evaluated the public radiation consequences and environment restoration after the worst hypothetical accident preliminarily. The comparison results show early dose of different unit radioactivity release under different conditions. After further performing the radiation consequences, we find it possible that the hypothetical accident for ITER like fusion reactor would result in a level 6 accident according to INES, not appear level 7 like Chernobyl or Fukushima accidents. And from the point of environment restoration, we need at least 69 years for case 1 (1 kg HTO and 1000 kg dust release) and 34–52 years for case 2 (1 kg HTO and 10kg–100 kg dust release) to wait the contaminated zone drop below the general public safety limit (1mSv per year) before it is suitable for human habitation.

  3. Synfuels production from fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.; Steinberg, M.

    The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and supplement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approximately 40 to 60 percent and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approximately 50 to 70 percent are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets

  4. Material for fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abhishek, Anuj; Ranjan, Prem

    2011-01-01

    To make nuclear fusion power a reality, the scientists are working restlessly to find the materials which can confine the power generated by the fusion of two atomic nuclei. A little success in this field has been achieved, though there are still miles to go. Fusion reaction is a special kind of reaction which must occur at very high density and temperature to develop extremely large amount of energy, which is very hard to control and confine within using the present techniques. As a whole it requires the physical condition that rarely exists on the earth to carry out in an efficient manner. As per the growing demand and present scenario of the world energy, scientists are working round the clock to make effective fusion reactions to real. In this paper the work presently going on is considered in this regard. The progress of the Joint European Torus 2010, ITER 2005, HiPER and minor works have been studied to make the paper more object oriented. A detailed study of the technological and material requirement has been discussed in the paper and a possible suggestion is provided to make a contribution in the field of building first ever nuclear fusion reactor

  5. Mechanical technology unique to laser fusion experimental systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurley, C.A.

    1980-01-01

    Hardware design for laser fusion experimental machines has led to a combination of engineering technologies that are critical to the successful operation of these machines. These large opto-mechanical systems are dependent on extreme cleanliness, accommodation to efficient maintenance, and high stability. These three technologies are the primary mechanical engineering criteria for laser fusion devices

  6. Radiation environment of fusion experimental reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Seiji; Seki, Yasushi

    1988-01-01

    Next step device (experimental reactor), which is planned to succeed the large plasma experimental devices such as JT-60, JET and TFTR, generates radiation (neutron + gamma ray) during its operation. Radiation (neutronic) properties of the material are basis for the study on neutron utilization (energy recovery and tritium breeding), material selection (irradiation damage and lifetime evaluation) and radiation safety (personnel exposure and radiation waste). It is necessary, therefore, to predict radiation behaviour in the reactor correctly for the engineering design of the reactor. This report describes the outline of the radiation environment of the reactor based on the information obtained by the neutronic and shielding design calculation of the fusion experimental reactor (FER). (author)

  7. Economic, safety and environmental prospects of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.; Holdren, J.P.; Sharafat, S.

    1990-01-01

    Controlled fusion energy is one of the long term, non-fossil energy sources available to mankind. It has the potential of significant advantages over fission nuclear power in that the consequences of severe accidents are predicted to be less and the radioactive waste burden is calculated to be smaller. Fusion can be an important ingredient in the future world energy mix as a hedge against environmental, supply or political difficulties connected with the use of fossil fuel and present-day nuclear power. Progress in fusion reactor technology and design is described for both magnetic and inertial fusion energy systems. The projected economic prospects show that fusion will be capital intensive, and the historical trend is towards greater mass utilization efficiency and more competitive costs. Recent studies emphasizing safety and environmental advantages show that the competitive potential of fusion can be further enhanced by specific choices of materials and design. The safety and environmental prospects of fusion appear to exceed substantially those of advanced fission and coal. Clearly, a significant and directed technology effort is necessary to achieve these advantages. Typical parameters have been established for magnetic fusion energy reactors, and a tokamak at moderately high magnetic field (about 7 T on axis) in the first regime of MHD stability (β ≤ 3.5 I/aB) is closest to present experimental achievement. Further improvements of the economic and technological performance of the tokamak are possible. In addition, alternative, non-tokamak magnetic fusion approaches may offer substantive economic and operational benefits, although at present these concepts must be projected from a less developed physics base. For inertial fusion energy, the essential requirements are a high efficiency (≥ 10%) repetitively pulsed pellet driver capable of delivering up to 10 MJ of energy on target, targets capable of an energy gain of about 100, reactor chambers capable of

  8. The European Fusion Energy Research Programme towards the realization of a fusion demonstration reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparotto, M.; Laesser, R.

    2006-01-01

    Since its inception, the European Fusion Programme has been orientated towards the establishment of the knowledge base needed for the definition of a reactor to be used for power production. Its ultimate goal is then to demonstrate the scientific and the technological feasibility of fusion power while incorporating the assessment of the safety, environmental, social and economic features of this type of energy source. At present, the JET device, the largest tokamak in the world, and the other medium-sized experimental machines are contributing essentially to the basic scientific phase of this development path. Their successful operation greatly contributed to support the design basis of ITER, the next step in fusion, which will aim to demonstrate the scientific and technical feasibility of fusion power production by achieving extended D-T burning plasma operation. Following ITER, the conception and construction of the DEMO device is planned. DEMO will be a demonstration power plant which will be the first fusion device to generate a significant amount of electrical power from fusion. This paper describes the status of fusion research and the European strategy for achievement of the ultimate goal of construction of a prototype reactor. (author)

  9. ELMO Bumpy Torus fusion-reactor design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathke, C.G.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    A complete power plant design of a 1200-MWe ELMO Bumpy Torus Reactor (EBTR) is described that emphasizes those features that are unique to the EBT confinement concept, with subsystems and balance-of-plant items that are generic to magnetic fusion being adopted from past, more extensive tokamak reactor designs

  10. KrF laser development for fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolford, Matthew F.; Sethian, John D.; Myers, Matthew C.; Giuliani, John L.; Obenschain, Stephen P.; Hegeler, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The United States Naval Research Laboratory is developing an electron beam pumped krypton fluoride laser technology for a direct drive inertial fusion energy power plant. The repetitively pulsed krypton fluoride laser technology being developed meets the fusion energy requirements for laser beam quality, wavelength, and repetition rate. The krypton fluoride laser technology is projected, based on experiments, to meet the requirements for wall plug efficiency and durability. The projected wall plug efficiency based on experiments is greater than 7 percent. The Electra laser using laser triggered gas switches has conducted continuous operation for 90,000 shots at 2.5 Hertz operation (ten hours). The Electra laser has achieved greater than 700 Joules per pulse at 1 and 2.5 Hertz repetition rate. The comparison of krypton fluoride laser performance with krypton fluoride kinetics code shows good agreement for pulse shape and laser yield. Development and operation of a durable pulse power system with solid state switches has achieved a continuous run of 11 million pulses into a resistive load at 10 Hz. (author)

  11. Mirror Fusion Test Facility: an intermediate device to a mirror fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpenko, V.N.

    1983-01-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) now under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory represents more than an order-of-magnitude step from earlier magnetic-mirror experiments toward a future mirror fusion reactor. In fact, when the device begins operating in 1986, the Lawson criteria of ntau = 10 14 cm -3 .s will almost be achieved for D-T equivalent operation, thus signifying scientific breakeven. Major steps have been taken to develop MFTF-B technologies for tandem mirrors. Steady-state, high-field, superconducting magnets at reactor-revelant scales are used in the machine. The 30-s beam pulses, ECRH, and ICRH will also introduce steady-state technologies in those systems

  12. Laser-induced fusion of human embryonic stem cells with optical tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Shuxun; Wang Xiaolin; Sun Dong [Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Cheng Jinping; Han Cheng, Shuk [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Kong, Chi-Wing [Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Consortium, and Departments of Medicine and Physiology, LKS Faculty of Medicine, University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Li, Ronald A. [Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Consortium, and Departments of Medicine and Physiology, LKS Faculty of Medicine, University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Center of Cardiovascular Research, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York 10029 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    We report a study on the laser-induced fusion of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) at the single-cell level. Cells were manipulated by optical tweezers and fused under irradiation with pulsed UV laser at 355 nm. Successful fusion was indicated by green fluorescence protein transfer. The influence of laser pulse energy on the fusion efficiency was investigated. The fused products were viable as gauged by live cell staining. Successful fusion of hESCs with somatic cells was also demonstrated. The reported fusion outcome may facilitate studies of cell differentiation, maturation, and reprogramming.

  13. Fusion reactor high vacuum pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedgley, D.W.; Walthers, C.R.; Jenkins, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on recent experiments which have shown the practicality of using activated carbon (coconut charcoal) at 4K to pump helium and hydrogen isotopes for a fusion reactor. Both speed and capacity for deuterium/helium and tritium/helium-3 mixtures were satisfactory. The long-term effects of tritium on the charcoal/cement system developed by Grumman and LLNL was now known; therefore a program was undertaken to see what, if any, effect long-term tritium exposure has on the cryosorber. Several charcoal on aluminum test samples were subjected to six months exposure of tritium at approximately 77 K. The tritium was scanned several times with a residual gas analyzer and the speed-capacity performance of the samples was measured before, approximately one-third way through, and after the exposure. Modest effects were noted which would not seriously restrict the use of charcoal as a cryosorber for fusion reactor high-vacuum pumping applications

  14. Vanadium-base alloys for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.; Loomis, B.A.; Diercks, D.R.

    1984-10-01

    Vanadium-base alloys offer potentially significant advantages over other candidate alloys as a structural material for fusion reactor first wall/blanket applications. Although the data base is more limited than that for the other leading candidate structural materials, viz., austenitic and ferritic steels, vanadium-base alloys exhibit several properties that make them particularly attractive for the fusion reactor environment. This paper presents a review of the structural material requirements, a summary of the materials data base for selected vanadium-base alloys, and a comparison of projected performance characteristics compared to other candidate alloys. Also, critical research and development (R and D) needs are defined

  15. Vanadium-base alloys for fusion reactor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.L.; Loomis, B.A.; Diercks, D.R.

    1984-10-01

    Vanadium-base alloys offer potentially significant advantages over other candidate alloys as a structural material for fusion reactor first wall/blanket applications. Although the data base is more limited than that for the other leading candidate structural materials, viz., austenitic and ferritic steels, vanadium-base alloys exhibit several properties that make them particularly attractive for the fusion reactor environment. This paper presents a review of the structural material requirements, a summary of the materials data base for selected vanadium-base alloys, and a comparison of projected performance characteristics compared to other candidate alloys. Also, critical research and development (R and D) needs are defined.

  16. Progress of electromagnetic analysis for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, T.; Ruatto, P.; Boccaccini, L.V.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the recent progress of electromagnetic analysis research for fusion reactors including methods, codes, verification tests and some applications. Due to the necessity of the research effort for the structural design of large tokamak devices since the 1970's with the help of the introduction of new numerical methods and the advancement of computer technologies, three-dimensional analysis methods have become as practical as shell approximation methods. The electromagnetic analysis is now applied to the structural design of new fusion reactors. Some more modeling and verification tests are necessary when the codes are applied to new materials with nonlinear material properties. (orig.)

  17. Helios, a 20 TW CO2 laser fusion facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladish, J.S.

    1979-01-01

    Since June 1978 the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's Helios CO 2 laser fusion facility has been committed to an experimental target program to investigate the feasibility of laser produced inertial confinement fusion. This system is briefly described, and preliminary experimental results are reported

  18. Fusion reactor design and technology program in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, J.H.

    1994-01-01

    A fusion-fission hybrid reactor program was launched in 1987. The purpose of development of the hybrid reactor is twofold: to solve the problem of nuclear fuel supply for an expected large-scale development of fission reactor plants, and to maintain the momentum of fusion research. The program is described and the activities and progress of the program are presented. Two conceptual designs of an engineering test reactor with tokamak configuration were developed at the Southwestern Institute of Physics and the Institute of Plasma Physics. The results are a tokamak engineering test breeder (TETB) series design and a fusion-fission hybrid reactor design (SSEHR), characterized by a liquid-Li self-cooled blanket and an He-cooled solid tritium breeder blanket respectively. In parallel with the design studies, relevant technological experiments on a small or medium scale have been supported by this program. These include LHCD, ICRH and pellet injection in the area of plasma engineering; neutronics integral experiments with U, Pu, Fe and Be; various irradiation tests of austenitic and ferritic steels, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pressure drop experiments using a liquid metal loop; research into permeation barriers for tritium and hydrogen isotopes; solid tritium breeder tests using an in-situ loop in a fission reactor. All these experiments have proceeded successfully. The second step of this program is now starting. It seems reasonable that most of the research carried out in the first step will continue. ((orig.))

  19. The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This paper on titan plasma engineering contains papers on the following topics: reversed-field pinch as a fusion reactor; parametric systems studies; magnetics; burning-plasma simulations; plasma transient operations; current drive; and physics issues for compact RFP reactors

  20. Waste management for JAERI fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobita, K.; Nishio, S.; Konishi, S.; Jitsukawa, S.

    2004-01-01

    In the fusion reactor design study at Japan Atomic Energy Institute (JAERI), several waste management strategies were assessed. The assessed strategies are: (1) reinforced neutron shield to clear the massive ex-shielding components from regulatory control; (2) low aspect ratio tokamak to reduce the total waste; (3) reuse of liquid metal breeding material and neutron shield. Combining these strategies, the weight of disposal waste from a low aspect ratio reactor VECTOR is expected to be comparable with the metal radwaste from a light water reactor (∼4000 t)

  1. Scoping studies of 233U breeding fusion fission hybrid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maniscalco, J.A.; Hansen, L.F.; Allen, W.O.

    1978-05-01

    Neutronic calculations have been carried out in order to design a laser fusion driven hybrid blanket which maximizes 233 U production per unit of thermal energy (greater than or equal to 1 kg/MW/sub T/-year) with acceptable fusion energy multiplication (M/sub F/ approximately 4). Two hybrid blankets, a thorium and a uranium-thorium blanket, are discussed in detail and their performance is evaluated by incorporating them into an existing hybrid design (the LLL/Bechtel design). The overall performance of the two laser fusion driven 233 U producers is discussed and estimates are given of (1) the number of equivalent thermal power fission reactors (LWR, HWR, SSCR and HTGR) that these fusion breeders can fuel, (2) their capital cost, and (3) the cost of electricity in the combined fusion breder-converter reactor scenario

  2. Scoping studies of 233U breeding fusion fission hybrid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maniscalco, J.A.; Hansen, L.F.; Allen, W.O.

    1978-01-01

    Neutronic calculations have been carried out in order to design a laser fusion driven hybrid blanket which maximizes 233 U production per unit of thermal energy (greater than or equal to 1 kg/MW/sub T/-year) with acceptable fusion energy multiplication (M/sub F/ approx. 4). Two hybrid blankets, a thorium and a uranium--thorium blanket, are discussed in detail and their performance is evaluated by incorporating them into an existing hybrid design (the LLL/Bechtel design). The overall performance of the two laser fusion driven 233 U producers is discussed and estimates are given of (1) the number of equivalent thermal power fission reactors (LWR, HWR, SSCR and HTGR) that these fusion breeders can fuel, (2) their capital cost, and (3) the cost of electricity in the combined fusion breeder-converter reactor scenario

  3. ITER: the first experimental fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebut, P.H.

    1995-01-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project is a multiphased project, at present proceeding under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency according to the terms of a four-party agreement between the European Atomic Energy Community, the Government of Japan, the Government of the USA and the Government of Russia (''the parties''). The project is based on the tokamak, a Russian invention which has been brought to a high level of development and progress in all major fusion programs throughout the world.The objective of ITER is to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy for commercial energy production and to test technologies for a demonstration fusion power plant. During the extended performance phase of ITER, it will demonstrate the characteristics of a fusion power plant, producing more than 1500MW of fusion power.The objective of the engineering design activity (EDA) phase is to produce a detailed, complete and fully integrated engineering design of ITER and all technical data necessary for the future decision on the construction of ITER.The ITER device will be a major step from present fusion experiments and will encompass all the major elements required for a fusion reactor. It will also require the development and the implementation of major new components and technologies.The inside surface of the plasma containment chamber will be designed to withstand temperature of up to 500 C, although normal operating temperatures will be substantially lower. Materials will have to be carefully chosen to withstand these temperatures, and a high neutron flux. In addition, other components of the device will be composed of state-of-the-art metal alloys, ceramics and composites, many of which are now in the early stage of development of testing. (orig.)

  4. Fusion reactions initiated by laser-accelerated particle beams in a laser-produced plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labaune, C.; Baccou, C.; Loisel, G.; Yahia, V.; Depierreux, S.; Goyon, C.; Rafelski, J.

    2013-01-01

    The advent of high-intensity-pulsed laser technology enables the generation of extreme states of matter under conditions that are far from thermal equilibrium. This in turn could enable different approaches to generating energy from nuclear fusion. Relaxing the equilibrium requirement could widen the range of isotopes used in fusion fuels permitting cleaner and less hazardous reactions that do not produce high-energy neutrons. Here we propose and implement a means to drive fusion reactions between protons and boron-11 nuclei by colliding a laser-accelerated proton beam with a laser-generated boron plasma. We report proton-boron reaction rates that are orders of magnitude higher than those reported previously. Beyond fusion, our approach demonstrates a new means for exploring low-energy nuclear reactions such as those that occur in astrophysical plasmas and related environments. (authors)

  5. Conceptual design study of Fusion Experimental Reactor (FY87FER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-05-01

    The design study of Fusion Experimental Reactor(FER) which has been proposed to be the next step fusion device has been conducted by JAERI Reactor System Laboratory since 1982 and by FER design team since 1984. This is the final report of the FER design team program and describes the results obtained in FY1987 (partially in FY1986) activities. The contents of this report consist of the reference design which is based on the guideline in FY1986 by the Subcomitees set up in Nuclear Fusion Council of Atomic Energy Commission of Japan, the Low-Physics-Risk reactor design for achieving physics mission more reliably and the system study of FER design candidates including above two designs. (author)

  6. Improvement of system code importing evaluation of Life Cycle Analysis of tokamak fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobori, Hikaru; Kasada, Ryuta; Hiwatari, Ryoji; Konishi, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We incorporated the Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) of tokamak type DEMO reactor and following commercial reactors as an extension of a system code. • We calculated CO_2 emissions from reactor construction, operation and decommissioning that is considered as a major environmental cost. • We found that the objective of conceptual design of the tokamak fusion power reactor is moved by changing evaluation index. • The tokamak fusion reactor can reduce CO_2 emissions in the life cycle effectively by reduction of the amount involved in the replacement of internal components. • The tokamak fusion reactor achieves under 0.174$/kWh electricity cost, the tokamak fusion reactor is contestable with 1500 degrees-class LNG-fired combined cycle power plant. - Abstract: This study incorporate the Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) of tokamak type DEMO reactor and following commercial reactors as an extension of a system code to calculate CO_2 emissions from reactor construction, operation and decommissioning that is considered as a major environmental cost. Competitiveness of tokamak fusion power reactors is expected to be evaluated by the cost and environmental impact represented by the CO_2 emissions, compared with present and future power generating systems such as fossil, nuclear and renewables. Result indicated that (1) The objective of conceptual design of the tokamak fusion power reactor is moved by changing evaluation index. (2) The tokamak fusion reactor can reduce CO_2 emissions in the life cycle effectively by reduction of the amount involved in the replacement of internal components. (3) The tokamak fusion reactor achieves under 0.174$/kWh electricity cost, the tokamak fusion reactor is contestable with 1500 degrees-class LNG-fired combined cycle power plant.

  7. Improvement of system code importing evaluation of Life Cycle Analysis of tokamak fusion power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobori, Hikaru [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kasada, Ryuta, E-mail: r-kasada@iae.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Hiwatari, Ryoji [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan); Konishi, Satoshi [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We incorporated the Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) of tokamak type DEMO reactor and following commercial reactors as an extension of a system code. • We calculated CO{sub 2} emissions from reactor construction, operation and decommissioning that is considered as a major environmental cost. • We found that the objective of conceptual design of the tokamak fusion power reactor is moved by changing evaluation index. • The tokamak fusion reactor can reduce CO{sub 2} emissions in the life cycle effectively by reduction of the amount involved in the replacement of internal components. • The tokamak fusion reactor achieves under 0.174$/kWh electricity cost, the tokamak fusion reactor is contestable with 1500 degrees-class LNG-fired combined cycle power plant. - Abstract: This study incorporate the Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) of tokamak type DEMO reactor and following commercial reactors as an extension of a system code to calculate CO{sub 2} emissions from reactor construction, operation and decommissioning that is considered as a major environmental cost. Competitiveness of tokamak fusion power reactors is expected to be evaluated by the cost and environmental impact represented by the CO{sub 2} emissions, compared with present and future power generating systems such as fossil, nuclear and renewables. Result indicated that (1) The objective of conceptual design of the tokamak fusion power reactor is moved by changing evaluation index. (2) The tokamak fusion reactor can reduce CO{sub 2} emissions in the life cycle effectively by reduction of the amount involved in the replacement of internal components. (3) The tokamak fusion reactor achieves under 0.174$/kWh electricity cost, the tokamak fusion reactor is contestable with 1500 degrees-class LNG-fired combined cycle power plant.

  8. Inertial-confinement fusion with lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betti, R.; Hurricane, O. A.

    2016-01-01

    The quest for controlled fusion energy has been ongoing for over a half century. The demonstration of ignition and energy gain from thermonuclear fuels in the laboratory has been a major goal of fusion research for decades. Thermonuclear ignition is widely considered a milestone in the development of fusion energy, as well as a major scientific achievement with important applications to national security and basic sciences. The U.S. is arguably the world leader in the inertial con fment approach to fusion and has invested in large facilities to pursue it with the objective of establishing the science related to the safety and reliability of the stockpile of nuclear weapons. Even though significant progress has been made in recent years, major challenges still remain in the quest for thermonuclear ignition via laser fusion

  9. Challenges of designing fusion reactors for remote maintainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masson, L.S.

    1981-01-01

    One of the major problems faced by the fusion community is the development of the high level of reliability required to assure that fusion will be a viable commercial power source. Much of the responsibility for solving this problem falls directly on the designer in developing concepts that have a high level of maintainability for the next generation engineering oriented reactors; and long range, in developing full maintainability for the more complicated commercial concepts with their required high level of on-line time. The near-term challenge will include development of unique design concepts to perform inspection, maintenance, replacement, and testing under the stringent conditions imposed by the next generation engineering oriented machines. The long range challenge will focus on basic design concepts that will enable the full maintainability required by commercial fusion. In addition to the purely technical challenges, the fusion community is also faced with the problem of developing programmatic means to assure that reactor maintenance issues are given proper and timely emphasis as the nuclear phase of fusion is approached

  10. Critical technical issues and evaluation and comparison studies for inertial fusion energy reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.A.; Ying, A.Y.; Tillack, M.S.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Waganer, L.M.; Driemeyer, D.E.; Linford, G.J.; Drake, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    The critical issues, evaluation and comparison of two inertial fusion energy (IFE) reactor design concepts developed in the Prometheus studies are presented. The objectives were (1) to identify and characterize the critical issues and the R and D required to solve them, and (2) to establish a sound basis for future IFE technical and programmatic decisions by evaluating and comparing the different design concepts. Quantitative evaluation and comparison of the two design options have been made with special focus on physics feasibility, engineering feasibility, economics, safety and environment, and research and development (R and D) requirements. Two key conclusions are made based on the overall evaluation analysis: (1) The heavy-ion driven reactors appear to have an overall advantage over laser-driven reactors; and: (2) The differences in scores are not large and future results of R and D could change the overall ranking of the two IFE concepts

  11. Free electron laser as a fusion driver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosnitz, D.; Schlitt, L.

    1981-01-01

    The Free Electron Laser (FEL) is shown to be a potentially attractive solution to the problem of finding a suitable short wavelength fusion driver. The design of a 3 MJ, 250 nm FEL fusion driver is discussed

  12. Transmutation of actinide 237Np with a fusion reactor and a hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, K.M.; Huang, J.H.

    1994-01-01

    The use of fusion reactors to transmute fission reactor wastes to stable species is an attractive concept. In this paper, the feasibility of transmutation of the long-lived actinide radioactive waste Np-237 with a fusion reactor and a hybrid reactor has been investigated. A new waste management concept of burning HLW (High Level Waste), utilizing released energy and converting Np-237 into fissile fuel Pu-239 through transmutation has been adopted. The detailed neutronics and depletion calculation of waste inventories was carried out with a modified version of one-dimensional neutron transport and burnup calculation code system BISON1.5 in this study. The transmutation rate of Np with relationship to neutron wall loading, Pu and Np with relationship to neutron wall load, Pu and Np concentration in the transmutation zone have been explored as well as relevant results are also given

  13. Neutron personnel dosimetry considerations for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, T.P.; Easterly, C.E.

    1979-07-01

    The increasing development of fusion reactor technology warrants an evaluation of personnel neutron dosimetry systems to aid in the concurrent development of a radiation protection program. For this reason, current state of knowledge neutron dosimeters have been reviewed with emphasis placed on practical utilization and the problems inherent in each type of dosimetry system. Evaluations of salient parameters such as energy response, latent image instability, and minimum detectable dose equivalent are presented for nuclear emulsion films, track etch techniques, albedo and other thermoluminescent dosimetry techniques, electrical conductivity damage effects, lyoluminescence, thermocurrent, and thermally stimulated exoelectron emission. Brief summaries of dosimetry regulatory requirements and intercomparison study results help to establish compliance and recent trends, respectively. Spectrum modeling data generated by the Neutron Physics Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the Princeton Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Facility have been analyzed by both International Commission on Radiological Protection fluence to dose conversion factors and an adjoint technique of radiation dosimetry, in an attempt to determine the applicability of current neutron dosimetry systems to deuterium and tritium fusion reactor leakage spectra. Based on the modeling data, a wide range of neutron energies will probably be present in the leakage spectra of the TFTR facility, and no appreciable risk of somatic injury to occupationally exposed workers is expected. The relative dose contributions due to high energy and thermal neutrons indicate that neutron dosimetry will probably not be a serious limitation in the development of fusion power

  14. Compact approach to fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Miller, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    The potential of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) for development into an efficient, compact, copper-coil fusion reactor has been quantified by comprehensive parametric tradeoff studies. These compact systems promise to be competitive in size, power density, and cost to alternative energy sources. Conceptual engineering designs that largely substantiate these promising results have since been completed. This 1000-MWe(net) design is described along with a detailed rationale and physics/technology assessment for the compact approach to fusion

  15. Development of 'low activation superconducting wire' for an advanced fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishinuma, Y.; Yamada, S.; Sagara, A.; Kikuchi, A.; Takeuchi, T.; Matsuda, K.; Taniguchi, H.

    2011-01-01

    In the D-T burning plasma reactor beyond ITER such as DEMO and fusion power plants assuming the steady-state and long time operation, it will be necessary to consider carefully induced radioactivity and neutron irradiation properties on the all components for fusion reactors. The decay time of the induced radioactivity can control the schedule and scenarios of the maintenance and shutdown on the fusion reactor. V 3 Ga and MgB 2 compound have shorter decay time within 1 years and they will be desirable as a candidate material to realize 'low activation and high magnetic field superconducting magnet' for advanced fusion reactor. However, it is well known that J c -B properties of V 3 Ga and MgB 2 wires are lower than that of the Nb-based A15 compound wires, so the J c -B enhancements on the V 3 Ga and MgB 2 wires are required in order to apply for an advanced fusion reactor. We approached and succeeded to developing the new process in order to improve J c properties of V 3 Ga and MgB 2 wires. In this paper, the recent activities for the J c improvements and detailed new process in V 3 Ga and MgB 2 wires are investigated. (author)

  16. Inertial fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decroisette, M.; Andre, M.; Bayer, C.; Juraszek, D.; Le Garrec, B.; Deutsch, C.; Migus, A.

    2005-01-01

    We first recall the scientific basis of inertial fusion and then describe a generic fusion reactor with the different components: the driver, the fusion chamber, the material treatment unit, the target factory and the turbines. We analyse the options proposed at the present time for the driver and for target irradiation scheme giving the state of art for each approach. We conclude by the presentation of LMJ (laser Megajoule) and NIF (national ignition facility) projects. These facilities aim to demonstrate the feasibility of laboratory DT ignition, first step toward Inertial Fusion Energy. (authors)

  17. Inertial fusion program. Progress report, July 1-December 31, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, R.B.

    1980-11-01

    Progress at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) in the development of high-energy short-pulse CO 2 laser systems for fusion research is reported. Improvements to LASL's two-beam system, Gemini, are outlined and experimental results are discussed. Our eight-beam system, Helios, was fired successfully on target for the first time, and became the world's most powerful gas laser for laser fusion studies. Work on Antares, our 100- to 200-TW target irradiation system, is summarized, indicating that design work and building construction are 70 and 48% complete, respectively. A baseline design for automatic centering of laser beams onto the various relay mirrors and the optical design of the Antares front end are discussed. The results of various fusion reactor studies are summarized, as well as investigations of synthetic-fuel production through application of fusion energy to hydrogen production by thermochemical water splitting. Studies on increased efficiency of energy extraction in CO 2 lasers and on lifetimes of cryogenic pellets in a reactor environment are summarized, as well as the results of studies on pellet injection, tracking, and beam synchronization

  18. Activation and Radiation Damage Behaviour of Russian Structural Materials for Fusion Reactors in the Fission and Fusion Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blokhin, A.; Demin, N.; Chernov, V.; Leonteva-Smirnova, M.; Potapenko, M.

    2006-01-01

    Various structural low (reduced) activated materials have been proposed as a candidate for the first walls-blankets of fusion reactors. One of the main problems connected with using these materials - to minimise the production of long-lived radionuclides from nuclear transmutations and to provide with good technological and functional properties. The selection of materials and their metallurgical and fabrication technologies for fusion reactor components is influenced by this factor. Accurate prediction of induced radioactivity is necessary for the development of the fusion reactor materials. Low activated V-Ti-Cr alloys and reduced activated ferritic-martensitic steels are a leading candidate material for fusion first wall and blanket applications. At the present time a range of compositions and an impurity level are still being investigated to better understand the sensitive of various functional and activation properties to small compositional variations and impurity level. For the two types of materials mentioned above (V-Ti-Cr alloys and 9-12 % Cr f/m steels) and manufactured in Russia (Russia technologies) the analysis of induced activity, hydrogen and helium-production as well as the accumulation of such elements as C, N, O, P, S, Zn and Sn as a function of irradiation time was performed. Materials '' were irradiated '' by fission (BN-600, BOR-60) and fusion (Russian DEMO-C Reactor Project) typical neutron spectra with neutron fluency up to 10 22 n/cm 2 and the cooling time up to 1000 years. The calculations of the transmutation of elements and the induced radioactivity were carried out using the FISPACT inventory code, and the different activation cross-section libraries like the ACDAM, FENDL-2/A and the decay data library FENDL-2/D. It was shown that the level of impurities controls a long-term behaviour of induced activity and contact dose rate for materials. From this analysis the concentration limits of impurities were obtained. The generation of gas

  19. How much laser power can propagate through fusion plasma?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lushnikov, Pavel M; Rose, Harvey A

    2006-01-01

    Propagation of intense laser beams is crucial for inertial confinement fusion, which requires precise beam control to achieve the compression and heating necessary to ignite the fusion reaction. The National Ignition Facility (NIF), where fusion will be attempted, is now under construction. Control of intense beam propagation may be ruined by laser beam self-focusing. We have identified the maximum laser beam power that can propagate through fusion plasma without significant self-focusing and have found excellent agreement with recent experimental data. This maximum is determined by the collective forward stimulated Brillouin scattering instability which suggests a way to increase the maximum power by appropriate choice of plasma composition with implication for NIF designs. Our theory also leads to the prediction of anti-correlation between beam spray and backscatter and therefore raises the possibility of indirect control of backscatter through manipulation of plasma ionization state or acoustic damping. We find a simple expression for laser intensity at onset of enhanced beam angular divergence (beam spray)

  20. Fission-suppressed hybrid reactor: the fusion breeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.; Lee, J.D.; Coops, M.S.

    1982-12-01

    Results of a conceptual design study of a 233 U-producing fusion breeder are presented. The majority of the study was devoted to conceptual design and evaluation of a fission-suppressed blanket and to fuel cycle issues such as fuel reprocessing, fuel handling, and fuel management. Studies in the areas of fusion engineering, reactor safety, and economics were also performed

  1. Development of laser technology in Research Center of Laser Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Wanguo; Deng Ying; Zhou Wei

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the progress in the construction of SG-Ⅲ laser facility, integrated Testbed and XG-Ⅲ laser facility and that in the upgrade of the prototype of SG-Ⅲ, and the development in assembling and installing technology, and the achievements in maintaining cleanliness project and metrology in Laser Fusion Research Center, China Academy of Engineering Physics in China in 2012. (authors)

  2. Conceptual design of fusion experimental reactor (FER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-02-01

    This report describes the engineering conceptual design of Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) which is to be built as a next generation tokamak machine. This design covers overall reactor systems including MHD equilibrium analysis, mechanical configuration of reactor, divertor, pumped limiter, first wall/breeding blanket/shield, toroidal field magnet, poloidal field magnet, cryostat, electromagnetic analysis, vacuum system, power handling and conversion, NBI, RF heating device, tritium system, neutronics, maintenance, cooling system and layout of facilities. The engineering comparison of a divertor with pumped limiters and safety analysis of reactor systems are also conducted. (author)

  3. A view of technology maturity assessment to realize fusion reactor by Japanese young researchers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasada, Ryuta; Goto, Takuya; Miyazawa, Junichi; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Hiwatari, Ryoji; Oyama, Naoyuki; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu

    2013-01-01

    Japanese young researchers who have interest in realizing fusion reactor have analyzed Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) in Young Scientists Special Interest Group on Fusion Reactor Realization. In this report, brief introduction to TRL assessment and a view of TRL assessment against fusion reactor projects conducting in Japan. (J.P.N.)

  4. Applying design principles to fusion reactor configurations for propulsion in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, S.A.; Deveny, M.E.; Schulze, N.R.

    1993-01-01

    The application of fusion power to space propulsion requires rethinking the engineering-design solution to controlled-fusion energy. Whereas the unit cost of electricity (COE) drives the engineering-design solution for utility-based fusion reactor configurations; initial mass to low earth orbit (IMLEO), specific jet power (kW(thrust)/kg(engine)), and reusability drive the engineering-design solution for successful application of fusion power to space propulsion. Three design principles (DP's) were applied to adapt and optimize three candidate-terrestrial-fusion-reactor configurations for propulsion in space. The three design principles are: provide maximum direct access to space for waste radiation, operate components as passive radiators to minimize cooling-system mass, and optimize the plasma fuel, fuel mix, and temperature for best specific jet power. The three candidate terrestrial fusion reactor configurations are: the thermal barrier tandem mirror (TBTM), field reversed mirror (FRM), and levitated dipole field (LDF). The resulting three candidate space fusion propulsion systems have their IMLEO minimized and their specific jet power and reusability maximized. A preliminary rating of these configurations was performed, and it was concluded that the leading engineering-design solution to space fusion propulsion is a modified TBTM that we call the Mirror Fusion Propulsion System (MFPS)

  5. Graphs of neutron cross section data for fusion reactor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asami, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Shigeya

    1979-03-01

    Graphs of neutron cross section data relevant to fusion reactor development are presented. Nuclides and reaction types in the present compilation are based on a WRENDA request list from Japan for fusion reactor development. The compilation contains various partial cross sections for 55 nuclides from 6 Li to 237 Np in the energy range up to 20 MeV. (author)

  6. Materials data base for fusion reactors-I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, S.; Nogami, A.; Ishino, S.; Mishima, Y.; Takao, Y.; Aruga, T.; Shiraishi, K.

    1982-01-01

    The materials data base is a set of experimental and/or calculated data being compiled to meet the broad needs for materials data by taking advantage of the data base management systems. In this paper the objective of such computerized data base is described and the characteristics of fusion reactor materials are discussed from the viewpoint of the data base development. The near-term emphasis of the development has been put on the irradiation data for 316 type stainless steels. Through the test of this small data base, it can be concluded that this approach is promising for materials data base management and for the establishment of the interface between fusion reactor designer and materials investigator. (orig.)

  7. FRESCO: fusion reactor simulation code for tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantsinen, M.J.

    1995-03-01

    The study of the dynamics of tokamak fusion reactors, a zero-dimensional particle and power balance code FRESCO (Fusion Reactor Simulation Code) has been developed at the Department of Technical Physics of Helsinki University of Technology. The FRESCO code is based on zero-dimensional particle and power balance equations averaged over prescribed plasma profiles. In the report the data structure of the FRESCO code is described, including the description of the COMMON statements, program input, and program output. The general structure of the code is described, including the description of subprograms and functions. The physical model used and examples of the code performance are also included in the report. (121 tabs.) (author)

  8. Overview of materials research for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muroga, T.; Gasparotto, M.; Zinkle, S.J.

    2002-01-01

    Materials research for fusion reactors is overviewed from Japanese, EU and US perspectives. Emphasis is placed on programs and strategies for developing blanket structural materials, and recent highlights in research and development for reduced activation ferritic martensitic steels, vanadium alloys and SiC/SiC composites, and in mechanistic experimental and modeling studies. The common critical issue for the candidate materials is the effect of irradiation with helium production. For the qualification of materials up to the full lifetime of a DEMO and Power Plant reactors, an intense neutron source with relevant fusion neutron spectra is crucial. Elaborate use of the presently available irradiation devices will facilitate efficient and sound materials development within the required time scale

  9. A look at the fusion reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohatgi, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    The prospects of fusion energy have been summarised in this paper. The rapid progress in the field in recent years can be attributed to the advances in various technologies. The commercial fusion energy depends more heavily on the evolution and improvement in these technologies. With better understanding of plasma physics, the fusion reactor designs have become more realistic and comprehensive. It is now possible to make intercomparison between various concepts within the frame work of the established technologies. Assuming certain growth rate of the technological development, it is estimated that fusion energy can become available during the early part of the next century. (author)

  10. In pursuit of fusion; ARGUS laser system at Livermore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, W.W.

    1976-01-01

    The ARGUS laser facility has been developed to achieve significant laser fusion milestones; high density (greater than 10 g/cm 3 ) implosions, high temperature (greater than 10 KeV) implosions, and high yield from advanced target designs. The ARGUS laser, central to this facility is a twin-beam, 20 cm output aperture, Nd:glass solid state laser capable of delivering greater than 3 TW of power to laser fusion targets. At the present time, ARGUS is fully operational, and has produced up to 10 9 neutrons in selected target irradiation experiments. The performance of this facility is described

  11. The spheromak as a compact fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1987-03-01

    After summarizing the economic and utility-based rationale for compact, higher-power-density fusion reactors, the gun-sustained spheromak concept is explored as one of a number of poloidal-field-dominated confinement configurations that might improve the prospects for economically attractive and operationally simplified fusion power plants. Using a comprehensive physics/engineering/costing model for the spheromak, guided by realistic engineering constraints and physics extrapolation, a range of cost-optimized reactor design points is presented, and the sensitivity of cost to key physics, engineering, and operational variables is reported. The results presented herein provide the basis for conceptual engineering designs of key fusion-power-core (FPC) subsystems and more detailed plasma modeling of this promising, high mass-power-density concept, which stresses single-piece FPC maintenance, steady-state current drive through electrostatic magnetic helicity injection, a simplified co-axial electrode-divertor, and efficient resistive-coal equilibrium-field coils. The optimal FPC size and the cost estimates project a system that competes aggressively with the best offered by alternative energy sources while simplifying considerably the complexity that has generally been associated with most approaches to magnetic fusion energy.

  12. The spheromak as a compact fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1987-03-01

    After summarizing the economic and utility-based rationale for compact, higher-power-density fusion reactors, the gun-sustained spheromak concept is explored as one of a number of poloidal-field-dominated confinement configurations that might improve the prospects for economically attractive and operationally simplified fusion power plants. Using a comprehensive physics/engineering/costing model for the spheromak, guided by realistic engineering constraints and physics extrapolation, a range of cost-optimized reactor design points is presented, and the sensitivity of cost to key physics, engineering, and operational variables is reported. The results presented herein provide the basis for conceptual engineering designs of key fusion-power-core (FPC) subsystems and more detailed plasma modeling of this promising, high mass-power-density concept, which stresses single-piece FPC maintenance, steady-state current drive through electrostatic magnetic helicity injection, a simplified co-axial electrode-divertor, and efficient resistive-coal equilibrium-field coils. The optimal FPC size and the cost estimates project a system that competes aggressively with the best offered by alternative energy sources while simplifying considerably the complexity that has generally been associated with most approaches to magnetic fusion energy

  13. Introduction to Nuclear Fusion Power and the Design of Fusion Reactors. An Issue-Oriented Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillo, J. A.

    This three-part module focuses on the principles of nuclear fusion and on the likely nature and components of a controlled-fusion power reactor. The physical conditions for a net energy release from fusion and two approaches (magnetic and inertial confinement) which are being developed to achieve this goal are described. Safety issues associated…

  14. Nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, H.

    1978-01-01

    A comprehensive survey is presented of the present state of knowledge in nuclear fusion research. In the first part, potential thermonuclear reactions, basic energy balances of the plasma (Lawson criterion), and the main criteria to be observed in the selection of appropriate thermonuclear reactions are dealt with. This is followed by a discussion of the problems encountered in plasma physics (plasma confinement and heating, transport processes, plasma impurities, plasma instabilities and plasma diagnostics) and by a consideration of the materials problems involved, such as material of the first wall, fuel inlet and outlet, magnetic field generation, as well as repair work and in-service inspections. Two main methods have been developed to tackle these problems: reactor concepts using the magnetic pinch (stellarator, Tokamak, High-Beta reactors, mirror machines) on the one hand, and the other concept using the inertial confinement (laser fusion reactor). These two approaches and their specific problems as well as past, present and future fusion experiments are treated in detail. The last part of the work is devoted to safety and environmental aspects of the potential thermonuclear aspects of the potential thermonuclear reactor, discussing such problems as fusion-specific hazards, normal operation and potential hazards, reactor incidents, environmental pollution by thermal effluents, radiological pollution, radioactive wastes and their disposal, and siting problems. (orig./GG) [de

  15. Commissioning of a DT fusion reactor without external supply of tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaoka, Y.; Konishi, S.; Nishio, S.; Hiwatari, R.; Okano, K.; Yoshida, T.; Tomabechi, K.

    2001-01-01

    Commissioning of a DT fusion reactor without external supply of tritium is discussed. The DD reactions in a DT-oriented fusion reactor with external power injection by neutral beams produce tritium and neutrons. Tritium produced by the DD reaction together with that produced in the blanket by the 2.45 MeV neutron is re-circulated into the plasma. Then, the DT reaction rate increases gradually, as tritium concentration in plasma builds up towards the level of nominal operation. Time required to reach the nominal operational condition, i.e. 50 % tritium in plasma, is estimated with assumptions based on a model of fusion power plant. As a result, the start-up period of a DT fusion reactor without external supply of tritium is estimated to be approximately 55 days, with the plasma parameters of CREST having a high performance blanket and tritium processing systems. Major factors to determine the start-up period are DD and DT reaction rates, net tritium breeding gain of the plant and dead inventory in/on facing materials. Elimination of a constraint for fusion reactor deployment and operation without any tritium transportation in and out of plant through its entire life may be possible. (author)

  16. Thermonuclear fusion by laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delpech, J.-F.; Fabre, Edouard.

    1978-01-01

    This paper is intended to describe the principle of inetia containment by laser and the research effort undertaken for this purpose. After having enumerated the principal thermonuclear reactions useful for fusion, the authors derive the rhoR criterion that characterizes inertia containment, as well as the Lawson criterion in the case of magnetic containment. The main physics problems involved in inertia containment by laser are enunciated and the article ends with a review of means resorted to in France and abroad for studying this problem. This review also reports C.N.R.S. bustling in this field, within the scope of competence of G.I.L.M. (Groupement de Recherches Coordonnees sur l'Interaction Laser-Matiere = Group for coordinated investigation of matter-laser interaction) established in Paris at the Ecole Polytechnique [fr

  17. Utilization of fission reactors for fusion engineering testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deis, G.A.; Miller, L.G.

    1985-01-01

    Fission reactors can be used to conduct some of the fusion nuclear engineering tests identified in the FINESSE study. To further define the advantages and disadvantages of fission testing, the technical and programmatic constraints on this type of testing are discussed here. This paper presents and discusses eight key issues affecting fission utilization. Quantitative comparisons with projected fusion operation are made to determine the technical assets and limitations of fission testing. Capabilities of existing fission reactors are summarized and compared with technical needs. Conclusions are then presented on the areas where fission testing can be most useful

  18. Laser development for laser fusion applications research. Progress report, October 1977--March 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-06-01

    Research progress is reported on three laser programs being developed for the commercialization of laser-fusion energy. The lasers include iodine, hydrogen fluoride and Group VI atoms (e.g., O, S, Se, Te)

  19. Fuel cycle problems in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickman, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    Fuel cycle problems of fusion reactors evolve around the breeding, recovery, containment, and recycling of tritium. These processes are described, and their implications and alternatives are discussed. Technically, fuel cycle problems are solvable; economically, their feasibility is not yet known

  20. Development step toward fusion power plant and role of experimental reactor ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiwatari, Ryouji; Asaoka, Yoshiyuki; Okano, Kunihiko

    2005-01-01

    The development of fusion energy is going into the experimental reactor stage, and the thermal energy from the fusion reaction will be generated in a plant scale through the ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) project. The remaining critical issue toward the realization of fusion energy is to map out the development strategy. Recently early realization approach as for the fusion energy development is being discussed in Japan, Europe, and the United States. This approach implies that the devices for a Demo reactor and a proto-type reactor as seen in the fast breeder reactor are combined into a single device in order to advance the fusion energy development. On the other hand, a clear development road map for fusion energy hasn't been suggested yet, and whether that early realization approach is feasible or not is still ambiguous. In order to realize the fusion energy as an user-friendly energy system, the suggestion of the development missions and the road map from the user-side point of view is instructive not only to Japanese but also to other country's development policy after the ITER project. In this report, first of all, the development missions from the user's point of view have been structured. Second, the development target required to demonstrate net electric generation and to introduce the fusion energy into the market is investigated, respectively. This investigation reveals that the completion of the ITER reference operation gives the outlook toward the demonstration of net electric generation and that the completion of the ITER advanced operation gives the possibility to introduce the fusion energy into the market. At last, the electric demonstration power plant Demo-CREST and the commercial power plant CREST are proposed to construct the development road map for fusion energy. (author)

  1. Beryllium and lithium resource requirements for solid blanket designs for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    The lithium and beryllium requirements are analyzed for an economy of 10 6 MW(e) CTR 3 capacity using solid blanket fusion reactors. The total lithium inventory in fusion reactors is only approximately 0.2 percent of projected U. S. resources. The lithium inventory in the fusion reactors is almost entirely 6 Li, which must be extracted from natural lithium. Approximately 5 percent of natural lithium can be extracted as 6 Li. Thus the total feed of natural lithium required is approximately 20 times that actually used in fusion reactors, or approximately 4 percent of U. S. resources. Almost all of this feed is returned to the U. S. resource base after 6 Li is extracted, however. The beryllium requirements are on the order of 10 percent of projected U. S. resources. Further, the present cost of lithium and the cost of beryllium extraction could both be increased tenfold with only minor effects on CTR capital cost. Such an increase should substantially multiply the economically recoverable resources of lithium and beryllium. It is concluded that there are no lithium or beryllium resource limitations preventing large-scale implementation of solid blanket fusion reactors. (U.S.)

  2. Role of fission-reactor-testing capabilities in the development of fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, P.Y.; Deis, G.A.; Longhurst, G.R.; Miller, L.G.; Schmunk, R.E.; Takata, M.L.; Watts, K.D.

    1981-01-01

    Testing of fusion materials and components in fission reactors will be increasingly important in the future due to the near-term lack of fusion engineering test devices, and the long-term high demand for testing when fusion reactors become available. Fission testing is capable of filling many gaps in fusion reactor design information, and thus should be aggressively pursued. EG and G Idaho has investigated the application of fission testing in three areas, which are discussed in this paper. First, we investigated radiation damage to magnet insulators. This work is now continuing with the use of an improved test capsule. Second, a study was performed which indicated that a fission-suppressed hybrid blanket module could be effectively tested in a reactor such as the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR), closely reproducing the predicted performance in a fusion environment. Finally, we explored a conceptual design for a fission-based Integrated Test Facility (ITF), which can accommodate entire First Wall/Blanket (FW/B) modules for testing in a nuclear environment, simultaneously satisfying many of the FW/B test requirements. This ITF can provide a cyclic neutron/gamma flux, as well as the necessary module support functions

  3. Assessment of the slowly-imploding liner (LINUS) fusion reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    Prospects for the slowly-imploding liner (LINUS) fusion reactor concept are reviewed. The concept envisages the nondestructive, repetitive and reversible implosion of a liquid-metal cylindrical annulus (liner) onto field-reversed DT plasmoids. Adiabatic heating of the plasmoid to ignition at ultra-high magnetic fields results in a compact, high power density fusion reactor with unique solutions to several technological problems and potentially favorable economics

  4. Tritium in fusion reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, J.S.; Fisher, P.W.; Talbot, J.B.

    1980-01-01

    When tritium is used in a fusion energy experiment or reactor, several implications affect and usually restrict the design and operation of the system and involve questions of containment, inventory, and radiation damage. Containment is expected to be particularly important both for high-temperature components and for those components that are prone to require frequent maintenance. Inventory is currently of major significance in cases where safety and environmental considerations limit the experiments to very low levels of tritium. Fewer inventory restrictions are expected as fusion experiments are placed in more-remote locations and as the fusion community gains experience with the use of tritium. However, the advent of power-producing experiments with high-duty cycle will again lead to serious difficulties based principally on tritium availability; cyclic operations with significant regeneration times are the principal problems

  5. Laser drivers for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzrichter, J.F.

    1983-01-01

    Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is the technology that we are developing to access the vast stored energy potential of deuterium fuel located in the world's water supply. This form of fusion is accomplished by compressing and heating small volumes of D-T fuel to very high temperatures (greater than 100M 0 C) and to very high densities (greater than 1000 times the normal liquid density). Under these fuel conditions, a thermonuclear reaction can occur, leading to a net energy release compared to the energy used to heat the fuel initially. To accomplish the condition where fusion reactions begin, effective drivers are required. These are lasers or particle beam accelerators which can provide greater than 10 14 W/cm 2 over millimeter scale targets with an appropriately programmed intensity vs time. At present, we are using research lasers to obtain an understanding of the physics and engineering of fuel compression

  6. Reactor potential for magnetized target fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlin, J.E.

    2001-06-01

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) is a possible pathway to thermonuclear fusion different from both magnetic fusion and inertial confinement fusion. An imploding cylindrical metal liner compresses a preheated and magnetized plasma configuration until thermonuclear conditions are achieved. In this report the Magnetized Target Fusion concept is evaluated and a zero-dimensional computer model of the plasma, liner and circuit as a connected system is designed. The results of running this code are that thermonuclear conditions are achieved indeed, but only during a very short time. At peak compression the pressure from the compressed plasma and magnetic field is so large reversing the liner implosion into an explosion. The time period of liner motion reversal is termed the dwell time and is crucial to the performance of the fusion system. Parameters as liner thickness and plasma density are certainly of significant importance to the dwell time, but it seems like a reactor based on the MTF principle hardly can become economic if not innovative solutions are introduced. In the report two such solutions are presented as well

  7. Reactor potential for magnetized target fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlin, J.E

    2001-06-01

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) is a possible pathway to thermonuclear fusion different from both magnetic fusion and inertial confinement fusion. An imploding cylindrical metal liner compresses a preheated and magnetized plasma configuration until thermonuclear conditions are achieved. In this report the Magnetized Target Fusion concept is evaluated and a zero-dimensional computer model of the plasma, liner and circuit as a connected system is designed. The results of running this code are that thermonuclear conditions are achieved indeed, but only during a very short time. At peak compression the pressure from the compressed plasma and magnetic field is so large reversing the liner implosion into an explosion. The time period of liner motion reversal is termed the dwell time and is crucial to the performance of the fusion system. Parameters as liner thickness and plasma density are certainly of significant importance to the dwell time, but it seems like a reactor based on the MTF principle hardly can become economic if not innovative solutions are introduced. In the report two such solutions are presented as well.

  8. Tritium production in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, E.

    1981-08-01

    The present analyses on the possibilities of extracting tritium from the liquid and solid fusion reactor blankets show up many problems. A consistent ensemble of materials and devices for extracting the heat and the tritium has not yet been integrated in a fusion reactor blanket project. The dimensioning of the many pipes required for shifting the tritium can only be done very approximately and the volume taken up by the blanket is difficult to evaluate, etc. The utilization of present data leads to over-dimensioning the installations by prudence and perhaps rejecting the best solutions. In order to measure the parameters of the most promising materials, work must be carried out on well defined samples and not only determine the base physical-chemical coefficients, such as thermal conductivity, scattering coefficients, Sievert parameters, but also the kinetic parameters conventional in chemical engineering, such as the hourly space rates of degassing. It is also necessary to perform long duration experiments under radiation and at operating temperatures, or above, in order to study the ageing of the bodies employed [fr

  9. Design optimization of single-main-amplifier KrF laser-fusion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.B.; Pendergrass, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    KrF lasers appear to be a very promising laser fusion driver for commercial applications. The Large Amplifier Module for the Aurora Laser System at Los Alamos is the largest KrF laser in the world and is currently operating at 5 kJ with 10 to 15 kJ eventually expected. The next generation system is anticipated to be a single-main-amplifier system that generates approximately 100 kJ. This paper examines the cost and efficiency tradeoffs for a complete single-main-amplifier KrF laser fusion experimental facility. It has been found that a 7% efficient $310/joule complete laser-fusion system is possible by using large amplifier modules and high optical fluences

  10. Laser-prearc railgun: Development for the application to a fuel pellet injector of a nuclear fusion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, H.; Sawaoka, A. B.; Oda, Y.; Onozuka, M.; Kuribayashi, S.; Shimizu, K.

    1992-05-01

    The laser-prearc railgun, that utilizes the phenomenon of laser-induced arc formation, was constructed and tested with plastic pellet projectiles. We envision our railgun as especially well suited as a solid hydrogen pellet injector for magnetic confinement fusion. The system consisted of a gas gun for preacceleration of a pellet and a railgun for its primary acceleration. A Q-switched ruby laser was used to induce electrical breakdown of propellant helium gas behind a dielectric pellet in the railgun. The present railgun was shown to accelerate a plastic pellet up to a velocity of 2.4 km/s.

  11. Requirements and new materials for fusion laser systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokowski, S.E.; Weber, M.J.; Saroyan, R.A.; Hagen, W.F.

    1977-10-01

    Higher focusable power in neodymium glass fusion lasers can be obtained through the use of new materials with lower nonlinear index (n 2 ) and better energy storage capabilities than the presently employed silicate glass. Silicate, phosphate, fluorophosphate, and beryllium fluoride glasses are discussed in terms of fusion laser requirements, particularly those for the proposed Nova laser. Examples of the variation in spectroscopic and optical properties obtainable with compositional changes are given. Results of a system evaluation of potential laser materials show that fluorophosphate glasses have many of the desired properties for use in Nova. These glasses are now being cast in large sizes (30-cm diameter) and will be tested in prototype amplifiers in 1978

  12. Requirements and new materials for fusion laser systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokowski, S.E.; Weber, M.J.; Saroyan, R.A.; Hagen, W.F.

    1977-10-01

    Higher focusable power in neodymium glass fusion lasers can be obtained through the use of new materials with lower nonlinear index (n/sub 2/) and better energy storage capabilities than the presently employed silicate glass. Silicate, phosphate, fluorophosphate, and beryllium fluoride glasses are discussed in terms of fusion laser requirements, particularly those for the proposed Nova laser. Examples of the variation in spectroscopic and optical properties obtainable with compositional changes are given. Results of a system evaluation of potential laser materials show that fluorophosphate glasses have many of the desired properties for use in Nova. These glasses are now being cast in large sizes (30-cm diameter) and will be tested in prototype amplifiers in 1978.

  13. Structural materials for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Victoria, M.; Baluc, N.; Spaetig, P.

    2001-01-01

    In order to preserve the condition of an environmentally safe machine, present selection of materials for structural components of a fusion reactor is made not only on the basis of adequate mechanical properties, behavior under irradiation and compatibility with other materials and cooling media, but also on their radiological properties, i.e. activity, decay heat, radiotoxicity. These conditions strongly limit the number of materials available to a few families of alloys, generically known as low activation materials. We discuss the criteria for deciding on such materials, the alloys resulting from the application of the concept and the main issues and problems of their use in a fusion environment. (author)

  14. Safety and environmental aspects of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilic, H.; Jensen, B.

    1982-01-01

    This paper deals with those problems concerning safety and environmental aspects of the future fusion reactors (e.g. fuel cycle, magnetic failure, after heat disturbances, radioactive waste and magnetic field)

  15. Inertial fusion with ultra-powerful lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabak, M.; Hammer, J.; Glinsky, M.; Kruer, W.; Wilks, S.; Woodworth, J.; Campbell, E.M.; Perry, M.D.; Mason, R.

    1993-10-01

    Ultra-high intensity lasers can be used to ignite ICF capsules with a few tens of kilojoules of light and can lead to high gain with as little as 100 kilojoules of incident laser light. We propose a scheme with three phases. First, a capsule is imploded as in the conventional approach to inertial fusion to assemble a high density fuel configuration. Second, a hole is bored through capsule corona composed of ablated material, pushing critical density close to the high density core of the capsule, by employing the ponderomotive force associated with high intensity laser light. Finally, the fuel is ignited by suprathermal electrons, produced in the high intensity laser plasma interactions, which propagate from critical density to this high density core. This paper reviews two models of energy gain in ICF capsules and explains why ultra-high intensity lasers allow access to the model producing the higher gains. This new scheme also drastically reduces the difficulty of the implosion and thereby allows lower quality fabrication and less stringent beam quality and symmetry requirements from the implosion driver. The difficulty of the fusion scheme is transferred to the technological difficulty of producing the ultra-high-intensity laser and of transporting this energy to the fuel

  16. Soft x-ray streak camera for laser fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stradling, G.L.

    1981-04-01

    This thesis reviews the development and significance of the soft x-ray streak camera (SXRSC) in the context of inertial confinement fusion energy development. A brief introduction of laser fusion and laser fusion diagnostics is presented. The need for a soft x-ray streak camera as a laser fusion diagnostic is shown. Basic x-ray streak camera characteristics, design, and operation are reviewed. The SXRSC design criteria, the requirement for a subkilovolt x-ray transmitting window, and the resulting camera design are explained. Theory and design of reflector-filter pair combinations for three subkilovolt channels centered at 220 eV, 460 eV, and 620 eV are also presented. Calibration experiments are explained and data showing a dynamic range of 1000 and a sweep speed of 134 psec/mm are presented. Sensitivity modifications to the soft x-ray streak camera for a high-power target shot are described. A preliminary investigation, using a stepped cathode, of the thickness dependence of the gold photocathode response is discussed. Data from a typical Argus laser gold-disk target experiment are shown

  17. Fusion reactor fuel processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.F.

    1972-06-01

    For thermonuclear power reactors based on the continuous fusion of deuterium and tritium the principal fuel processing problems occur in maintaining desired compositions in the primary fuel cycled through the reactor, in the recovery of tritium bred in the blanket surrounding the reactor, and in the prevention of tritium loss to the environment. Since all fuel recycled through the reactor must be cooled to cryogenic conditions for reinjection into the reactor, cryogenic fractional distillation is a likely process for controlling the primary fuel stream composition. Another practical possibility is the permeation of the hydrogen isotopes through thin metal membranes. The removal of tritium from the ash discharged from the power system would be accomplished by chemical procedures to assure physiologically safe concentration levels. The recovery process for tritium from the breeder blanket depends on the nature of the blanket fluids. For molten lithium the only practicable possibility appears to be permeation from the liquid phase. For molten salts the process would involve stripping with inert gas followed by chemical recovery. In either case extremely low concentrations of tritium in the melts would be desirable to maintain low tritium inventories, and to minimize escape of tritium through unwanted permeation, and to avoid embrittlement of metal walls. 21 refs

  18. Conceptual design of the fast ignition laser fusion power plant (KOYO-Fast). 6. Design of chamber and reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozaki, Yasuji; Norimatsu, Takayoshi; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Takumi; Souman, Yoshihito; Nishikawa, Masabumi; Tomabechi, Ken

    2007-01-01

    A conceptual design of the reactor chamber system with LiPb liquid wall based on the fast ignition cone target design and the related reactor systems with exhaust system, laser beam shutter, blanket and cooling system are summarized. The multi overflow fall method was investigated as the structure of chamber and repeating 4 Hz pulse potential. The ablation depth of LiPb liquid wall was estimated and the conditions of repeat of operation were evaluated. The basic design of chamber, selection and conditions of liquid wall chamber, recycle type multi overflow fall (MOF) wall, LiPb two layers blanket structure, basic specification of reactor system, laser beam line shutter, design of chamber exhaust system, cooling system, tritium recovery system, power plant total design and arrangement of chamber and laser beam, and issues are stated. (S.Y.)

  19. (Fusion energy research)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, C.A. (ed.)

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY88); tokamak fusion test reactor; Princeton beta Experiment-Modification; S-1 Spheromak; current drive experiment; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical plasma; tokamak modeling; compact ignition tokamak; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; Engineering Department; Project Planning and Safety Office; quality assurance and reliability; and technology transfer.

  20. [Fusion energy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY88); tokamak fusion test reactor; Princeton beta Experiment-Modification; S-1 Spheromak; current drive experiment; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical plasma; tokamak modeling; compact ignition tokamak; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; Engineering Department; Project Planning and Safety Office; quality assurance and reliability; and technology transfer

  1. Brief review of the fusion-fission hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenney, F.H.

    1977-01-01

    Much of the conceptual framework of present day fusion-fission hybrid reactors is found in the original work of the early 1950's. Present day motivations for development are quite different. The role of the hybrid reactor is discussed as well as the current activities in the development program

  2. Diamond Wire Cutting of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keith Rule; Erik Perry; Robert Parsells

    2003-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is a one-of-a-kind, tritium-fueled fusion research reactor that ceased operation in April 1997. As a result, decommissioning commenced in October 1999. The 100 cubic meter volume of the donut-shaped reactor makes it the second largest fusion reactor in the world. The deuterium-tritium experiments resulted in contaminating the vacuum vessel with tritium and activating the materials with 14 MeV neutrons. The total tritium content within the vessel is in excess of 7,000 Curies, while dose rates approach 50 mRem/hr. These radiological hazards along with the size of the tokamak present a unique and challenging task for dismantling. Engineers at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) decided to investigate an alternate, innovative approach for dismantlement of the TFTR vacuum vessel: diamond wire cutting technology. In August 1999, this technology was successfully demonstrated and evaluated on vacuum vessel surrogates. Subsequently, the technology was improved and redesigned for the actual cutting of the vacuum vessel. Ten complete cuts were performed in a 6-month period to complete the removal of this unprecedented type of DandD (Decontamination and Decommissioning) activity

  3. Conceptual design of a mirror reactor for a fusion engineering research facility (FERF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batzer, T.H.; Burleigh, R.C.; Carlson, G.A.; Dexter, W.L.; Hamilton, G.W.; Harvey, A.R.; Hickman, R.G.; Hoffman, M.A.; Hooper, E.B. Jr.; Moir, R.W.; Nelson, R.L.; Pittenger, L.C.; Smith, B.H.; Taylor, C.E.; Werner, R.W.; Wilcox, T.P.

    1975-01-01

    A conceptual design is presented for a small mirror fusion reactor for a Fusion Engineering Research Facility (FERF). The reactor produces 3.4 MW of fusion power and a useful neutron flux of about 10 14 n.cm -2 .s -1 . Superconducting ''yin-yang'' coils are used, and the plasma is sustained by injection of energetic neutral D 0 and T 0 . Conceptual layouts are given for the reactor, its major components, and supporting facilities. (author)

  4. Application of optical tweezers and excimer laser to study protoplast fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantawang, Titirat; Samipak, Sompid; Limtrakul, Jumras; Chattham, Nattaporn

    2015-07-01

    Protoplast fusion is a physical phenomenon that two protoplasts come in contact and fuse together. Doing so, it is possible to combine specific genes from one protoplast to another during fusion such as drought resistance and disease resistance. There are a few possible methods to induce protoplast fusion, for example, electrofusion and chemical fusion. In this study, chemical fusion was performed with laser applied as an external force to enhance rate of fusion and observed under a microscope. Optical tweezers (1064 nm with 100X objective N.A. 1.3) and excimer laser (308 nm LMU-40X-UVB objective) were set with a Nikon Ti-U inverted microscope. Samples were prepared by soaking in hypertonic solution in order to induce cell plasmolysis. Elodea Canadensis and Allium cepa plasmolysed leaves were cut and observed under microscope. Concentration of solution was varied to induce difference turgor pressures on protoplasts pushing at cell wall. Free protoplasts in solution were trapped by optical tweezers to study the effect of Polyethylene glycol (PEG) solution. PEG was diluted by Ca+ solution during the process to induced protoplast cell contact and fusion. Possibility of protoplast fusion by excimer laser was investigated and found possible. Here we report a novel tool for plant cell fusion using excimer laser. Plant growth after cell fusion is currently conducted.

  5. Interatomic potentials for fusion reactor material simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoerkas, C.

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, the behaviour of a material situated in a fusion reactor was studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Simulations of processes in the next generation fusion reactor ITER include the reactor materials beryllium, carbon and tungsten as well as the plasma hydrogen isotopes. This means that interaction models, i.e. interatomic potentials, for this complicated quaternary system are needed. The task of finding such potentials is nonetheless nearly at its end, since models for the beryllium-carbon-hydrogen interactions were constructed in this thesis and as a continuation of that work, a beryllium-tungsten model is under development. These potentials are combinable with the earlier tungsten-carbon-hydrogen ones. The potentials were used to explain the chemical sputtering of beryllium due to deuterium plasma exposure. During experiments, a large fraction of the sputtered beryllium atoms were observed to be released as BeD molecules, and the simulations identified the swift chemical sputtering mechanism, previously not believed to be important in metals, as the underlying mechanism. Radiation damage in the reactor structural materials vanadium, iron and iron chromium, as well as in the wall material tungsten and the mixed alloy tungsten carbide, was also studied in this thesis. Interatomic potentials for vanadium, tungsten and iron were modified to be better suited for simulating collision cascades that are formed during particle irradiation, and the potential features affecting the resulting primary damage were identified. Including the often neglected electronic effects in the simulations was also shown to have an impact on the damage. With proper tuning of the electronphonon interaction strength, experimentally measured quantities related to ion-beam mixing in iron could be reproduced. The damage in tungsten carbide alloys showed elemental asymmetry, as the major part of the damage consisted of carbon defects. On the other hand, modelling the damage

  6. FELIX experiments and computational needs for eddy current analysis of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.

    1984-01-01

    In a fusion reactor, changing magnetic fields are closely coupled to the electrically-conducting metal structure. This coupling is particularly pronounced in a tokamak reactor in which magnetic fields are used to confine, stabilize, drive, and heat the plasma. Electromagnetic effects in future fusion reactors will have far-reaching implications in the configuration, operation, and maintenance of the reactors. This paper describes the impact of eddy-current effects on future reactors, the requirements of computer codes for analyzing those effects, and the FELIX experiments which will provide needed data for code validation

  7. Dynamic loading of the structural wall in a lithium fall fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glenn, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    In one version of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) power reactor, the laser-imploded pellet is surrounded by a thick, annular 'waterfall' of liquid lithium. The fall has three functions: to breed tritium for pellet resupply, to act as an energy sink and heat exchange mdeium with an external power loop, and to protect the first wall of the reactor from excessive neutronic and hydrodynamic loading. Our primary concern here is with this last function. We formulated a simple model of a lithium-fall ICF reactor and calculated the fall disassembly and the subsequent fluid-wall interaction resulting from the energy deposition by the imploded pellet. Two potential mechanisms for wall damage were identified: surface erosion and hoop failure. For single fall designs, the erosion problem appears to be serious. Concentric annuli (multiple fall) or packed jet configurations may be feasible but experiments are needed to clarify the physical model, especially with reg (orig.)ard to /orig.the characteristics of the cavitated liquid lithium and of the two-phase liquid-vapor region.

  8. Present status and future prospects for direct drive laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodner, S.E.

    1986-01-01

    If one assumes that the best short wavelength laser will have an efficiency of 5--7%, and if one assumes that reasonable cost electricity requires that the product of laser efficiency and pellet gain be greater than 10--15, then pellet grains for laser fusion must be at least 150--300. The only laser fusion concept with any potential for energy applications then seems to be directly driven targets with moderately thin shells and 1/4 micron KrF laser light. This direct drive concept has potential pellet energy gains of 200--300

  9. Factors affecting potential market penetration of laser fusion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deonigi, D.E.; Fraley, D.W.

    1979-08-01

    A mini-model has been constructed to estimate the optimal size of laser fusion power plants and to estimate the allowable cost of the first such plant in relation to the next best alternative. In estimating the costs of laser fusion, the mini-model incorporates such factors as market penetration, learning, economies of scale, system size, transmission costs, reserve requirements, development and licensing costs and site costs. The results of the mini-model simulations indicate that the optimal laser fusion plant size is approximately 3 GWe; risk considerations unincorporated in the mini-model suggest an optimal size closer to 2.5 GWe

  10. Tritium containment of controlled thermonuclear fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yoshihisa; Tsukumo, Kiyohiko; Suzuki, Tatsushi

    1979-01-01

    It is well known that tritium is used as the fuel for nuclear fusion reactors. The neutrons produced by the nuclear fusion reaction of deuterium and tritium react with lithium in blankets, and tritium is produced. The blankets reproduce the tritium consumed in the D-T reaction. Tritium circulates through the main cooling system and the fuel supply and evacuation system, and is accumulated. Tritium is a radioactive substance emitting β-ray with 12.6 year half-life, and harmful to human bodies. It is an isotope of hydrogen, and apt to diffuse and leak. Especially at high temperature, it permeates through materials, therefore it is important to evaluate the release of tritium into environment, to treat leaked tritium to reduce its release, and to select the method of containing tritium. The permeability of tritium and its solubility in structural materials are discussed. The typical blanket-cooling systems of nuclear fusion reactors are shown, and the tungsten coating of steam generator tubes and tritium recovery system are adopted for reducing tritium leak. In case of the Tokamak type reactor of JAERI, the tritium recovery system is installed, in which the tritium gas produced in blankets is converted to tritium steam with a Pd-Pt catalytic oxidation tower, and it is dehydrated and eliminated with a molecular sieve tower, then purified and recovered. (Kako, I.)

  11. Cermet coatings for magnetic fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.F.; Whitley, J.B.; McDonald, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Cermet coatings consisting of SiC particles in an aluminum matrix were produced by a low pressure chamber plasma spray process. Properties of these coatings are being investigated to evaluate their suitability for use in the next generation of magnetic confinement fusion reactors. Although this preliminary study has focused primarily upon SiC-Al cermets, the deposition process can be adapted to other ceramic-metal combinations. Potential applications for cermet coatings in magnetic fusion devices are presented along with experimental results from thermal tests of candidate coatings. (Auth.)

  12. Nuclear Fusion Effects Induced in Intense Laser-Generated Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Torrisi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Deutered polyethylene (CD2n thin and thick targets were irradiated in high vacuum by infrared laser pulses at 1015W/cm2 intensity. The high laser energy transferred to the polymer generates plasma, expanding in vacuum at supersonic velocity, accelerating hydrogen and carbon ions. Deuterium ions at kinetic energies above 4 MeV have been measured by using ion collectors and SiC detectors in time-of-flight configuration. At these energies the deuterium–deuterium collisions may induce over threshold fusion effects, in agreement with the high D-D cross-section valuesaround 3 MeV energy. At the first instants of the plasma generation, during which high temperature, density and ionacceleration occur, the D-D fusions occur as confirmed by the detection of mono-energetic protonsand neutrons with a kinetic energy of 3.0 MeV and 2.5 MeV, respectively, produced by the nuclear reaction. The number of fusion events depends strongly on the experimental set-up, i.e. on the laser parameters (intensity, wavelength, focal spot dimension, target conditions (thickness, chemical composition, absorption coefficient, presence of secondary targets and used geometry (incidence angle, laser spot, secondary target positions.A number of D-D fusion events of the order of 106÷7 per laser shot has been measured.

  13. Economic, safety and environmental prospects of fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conn, R W; Holdren, J P; Sharafat, S [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (USA). Inst. of Plasma and Fusion Research; and others

    1990-09-01

    Controlled fusion energy is one of the long term, non-fossil energy sources available to mankind. It has the potential of significant advantages over fission nuclear power in that the consequences of severe accidents are predicted to be less and the radioactive waste burden is calculated to be smaller. Fusion can be an important ingredient in the future world energy mix as a hedge against environmental, supply or political difficulties connected with the use of fossil fuel and present-day nuclear power. Progress in fusion reactor technology and design is described for both magnetic and inertial fusion energy systems. The projected economic prospects show that fusion will be capital intensive, and the historical trend is towards greater mass utilization efficiency and more competitive costs. Recent studies emphasizing safety and environmental advantages show that the competitive potential of fusion can be further enhanced by specific choices of materials and design. The safety and environmental prospects of fusion appear to exceed substantially those of advanced fission and coal. Clearly, a significant and directed technology effort is necessary to achieve these advantages. Typical parameters have been established for magnetic fusion energy reactors, and a tokamak at moderately high magnetic field (about 7 T on axis) in the first regime of MHD stability ({beta} {le} 3.5 I/aB) is closest to present experimental achievement. Further improvements of the economic and technological performance of the tokamak are possible. In addition, alternative, non-tokamak magnetic fusion approaches may offer substantive economic and operational benefits, although at present these concepts must be projected from a less developed physics base. (Abstract Truncated)

  14. Status of fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, Ashok

    1978-01-01

    The current status of fusion technology is surveyed. Limited reserves of fossil fuel and dangers of proliferation from nuclear reactors have brought into focus the need to develop an optional energy source. Fusion is being looked upon as an optional energy source which is free from environmental hazards unlike fossil fuels and nuclear reactors. Investments in R and D of fusion energy have increased rapidly in USA, Japan, USSR and European countries. Out of the various fusion fuels known, a mixture of D and T is widely chosen. The main problem in fusion technology is the confinement of plasma for a time sufficient to start the fusion reaction. This can be done magnetically or inertially. The three approaches to magnetic confinement are : (1) tokamak, (2) mirror and (3) pinch. Inertial confinement makes use of lasers or electron beams or ion beams. Both the methods of confinement i.e. magnetic and inertial have problems which are identified and their nature is discussed. (M.G.B.)

  15. Inertial fusion program. Progress report, July 1-December 31, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, R.B.

    1980-11-01

    Progress at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) in the development of high-energy short-pulse CO/sub 2/ laser systems for fusion research is reported. Improvements to LASL's two-beam system, Gemini, are outlined and experimental results are discussed. Our eight-beam system, Helios, was fired successfully on target for the first time, and became the world's most powerful gas laser for laser fusion studies. Work on Antares, our 100- to 200-TW target irradiation system, is summarized, indicating that design work and building construction are 70 and 48% complete, respectively. A baseline design for automatic centering of laser beams onto the various relay mirrors and the optical design of the Antares front end are discussed. The results of various fusion reactor studies are summarized, as well as investigations of synthetic-fuel production through application of fusion energy to hydrogen production by thermochemical water splitting. Studies on increased efficiency of energy extraction in CO/sub 2/ lasers and on lifetimes of cryogenic pellets in a reactor environment are summarized, as well as the results of studies on pellet injection, tracking, and beam synchronization.

  16. Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, E.; Chrzanowski, J.; Rule, K.; Viola, M.; Williams, M.; Strykowsky, R.

    1999-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is a one-of-a-kind, tritium-fueled fusion research reactor that ceased operation in April 1997. The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) of the TFTR is scheduled to occur over a period of three years beginning in October 1999. This is not a typical Department of Energy D and D Project where a facility is isolated and cleaned up by ''bulldozing'' all facility and hardware systems to a greenfield condition. The mission of TFTR D and D is to: (a) surgically remove items which can be re-used within the DOE complex, (b) remove tritium contaminated and activated systems for disposal, (c) clear the test cell of hardware for future reuse, (d) reclassify the D-site complex as a non-nuclear facility as defined in DOE Order 420.1 (Facility Safety) and (e) provide data on the D and D of a large magnetic fusion facility. The 100 cubic meter volume of the donut-shaped reactor makes it the second largest fusion reactor in the world. The record-breaking deuterium-tritium experiments performed on TFTR resulted in contaminating the vacuum vessel with tritium and activating the materials with 14 Mev neutrons. The total tritium content within the vessel is in excess of 7,000 Curies while dose rates approach 75 mRem/hr. These radiological hazards along with the size and shape of the Tokamak present a unique and challenging task for dismantling

  17. Fusion Reactor Safety Research Program annual report, FY-79

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crocker, J.G.; Cohen, S.

    1980-08-01

    The objective of the program is the development, coordination, and execution of activities related to magnetic fusion devices and reactors that will: (a) identify and evaluate potential hazards, (b) assess and disclose potential environmental impacts, and (c) develop design standards and criteria that eliminate, mitigate, or reduce those hazards and impacts. The program will provide a sound basis for licensing fusion reactors. Included in this report are portions of four reports from two outside contractors, discussions of the several areas in which EG and G Idaho is conducting research activities, a discussion of proposed program plan development, mention of special tasks, a review of fusion technology program coordination by EG and G with other laboratories, and a brief view of proposed FY-80 activities

  18. Thermal aspects of a superconducting coil for fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, H.T.

    1975-01-01

    Computer models are used to simulate both localized and extensive thermal excursions in a large superconducting magnet for fusion reactor. Conditions for the failure of fusion magnet due to thermal excursion are delineated. Designs to protect the magnet against such thermal excursion are evaluated

  19. Influence of Impurities on the Fuel Retention in Fusion Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Reinhart, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The topic of this thesis is the influence of plasma impurities on the hydrogen retentionin metals, in the scope of plasma-wall-interaction research for fusion reactors.This is addressed experimentally and by modelling. The mechanisms of the hydrogenretention are influenced by various parameters like the wall temperature, ionenergy, flux and fluence as well as the plasma composition. The plasma compositionis a relevant factor for hydrogen retention in fusion reactors, as their plasma willalso ...

  20. Evaluation of the activity levels in fusion reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, J.

    1977-05-01

    The activation of a fusion reactor blanket (316 SS or V-10Cr-10Ti as structure) with a minimum lithium inventory has been calculated for 0.83 MW/m 2 wall load. The resulting radiation levels and waste problems are discussed. The dose rate near the steel structure will always be higher than 0.1 rem/h due to its niobium content. After 200 to 100,000 years of decay the potential biological hazard originating from this high level fusion reactor waste (with plutonium recyclation). (orig.) [de

  1. Laser fusion experiments at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1975-01-01

    A short review is given of some of the important dates in the experimental fusion program at Livermore. A few of the parameters of the laser systems which are being used for these experiments are mentioned. Some information about specialized diagnostics which have been developed at the Livermore Laboratory for these experiments is described. The focusing arrangements for each of the systems are discussed. Experiments both on planar targets and on targets for laser fusion are described

  2. Diode-pumped solid-state-laser drivers and the competitiveness of inertial fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orth, C.D.

    1993-12-01

    Based on five technical advances at LLNL and a new systems-analysis code that we have written, we present conceptual designs for diode-pumped solid-state laser (DPSSL) drivers for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) power plants. Such designs are based on detailed physics calculations for the drive, and on generic scaling relationships for the reactor and balance of plant (BOP). We describe the performance and economics of such power plants, show how sensitive these results are to changes in the major parameters, and indicate how technological improvements can make DPSSL-driven IFE plants more competitive

  3. Fusion technology development: role of fusion facility upgrades and fission test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, P.Y.; Deis, G.A.; Longhurst, G.R.; Miller, L.G.; Schmunk, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    The near term national fusion program is unlikely to follow the aggressive logic of the Fusion Engineering Act of 1980. Faced with level budgets, a large, new fusion facility with an engineering thrust is unlikely in the near future. Within the fusion community the idea of upgrading the existing machines (TFTR, MFTF-B) is being considered to partially mitigate the lack of a design data base to ready the nation to launch an aggressive, mission-oriented fusion program with the goal of power production. This paper examines the cost/benefit issues of using fusion upgrades to develop the technology data base which will be required to support the design and construction of the next generation of fusion machines. The extent of usefulness of the nation's fission test reactors will be examined vis-a-vis the mission of the fusion upgrades. The authors show that while fission neutrons will provide a useful test environment in terms of bulk heating and tritium breeding on a submodule scale, they can play only a supporting role in designing the integrated whole modules and systems to be used in a nuclear fusion machine

  4. Fusion technology development: role of fusion facility upgrades and fission test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, P.Y.; Deis, G.A.; Miller, L.G.; Longhurst, G.R.; Schmunk, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    The near term national fusion program is unlikely to follow the aggressive logic of the Fusion Engineering Act of 1980. Faced with level budgets, a large, new fusion facility with an engineering thrust is unlikely in the near future. Within the fusion community the idea of upgrading the existing machines (TFTR, MFTF-B) is being considered to partially mitigate the lack of a design data base to ready the nation to launch an aggressive, mission-oriented fusion program with the goal of power production. This paper examines the cost/benefit issues of using fusion upgrades to develop the technology data base which will be required to support the design and construction of the next generation of fusion machines. The extent of usefulness of the nation's fission test reactors will be examined vis-a-vis the mission of the fusion upgrades. We will show that while fission neutrons will provide a useful test environment in terms of bulk heating and tritium breeding on a submodule scale, they can play only a supporting role in designing the integrated whole modules and systems to be used in a nuclear fusion machine

  5. Review of heat transfer problems associated with magnetically-confined fusion reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, M.A.; Werner, R.W.; Carlson, G.A.; Cornish, D.N.

    1976-01-01

    Conceptual design studies of possible fusion reactor configurations have revealed a host of interesting and sometimes extremely difficult heat transfer problems. The general requirements imposed on the coolant system for heat removal of the thermonuclear power from the reactor are discussed. In particular, the constraints imposed by the fusion plasma, neutronics, structure and magnetic field environment are described with emphasis on those aspects which are unusual or unique to fusion reactors. Then the particular heat transfer characteristics of various possible coolants including lithium, flibe, boiling alkali metals, and helium are discussed in the context of these general fusion reactor requirements. Some specific areas where further experimental and/or theoretical work is necessary are listed for each coolant along with references to the pertinent research already accomplished. Specialized heat transfer problems of the plasma injection and removal systems are also described. Finally, the challenging heat transfer problems associated with the superconducting magnets are reviewed, and once again some of the key unsolved heat transfer problems are enumerated

  6. Situation and role of industrial fields in nuclear fusion reactor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Gen-ichi

    1983-01-01

    Japan Atomic Industrial Forum (JAIF) established the nuclear fusion technical committee in October, 1980, and has investigated the attitude of industrial fields in progressing nuclear fusion research and development and the measures to cooperate with national development plans. Corresponding to the new long term plan and the establishment of the basic policy for nuclear fusion research and development by Atomic Energy Commission of Japan in June, 1982, JAIF has settled the policy on the situation and role of industrial fields. In this report, first the necessity of firmly grasping the position of nuclear fusion research in atomic energy development is described, next, the present status of the research and development in Japan is reported, and it is mentioned that the role of manufacturers in reinforcing engineering has become more important in industrial fields. In the stage of the construction of a nuclear fusion reactor, the experiences in the engineering safety in fission reactors, environmental safety and system engineering will be utilized. Japanese industrial fields feature that they have made larger cooperation with national projects even in the research and development stage as compared to foreign countries. When the plan of next phase system will be promoted in the future, the cooperating methods in the past should be evaluated, investigated and improved, and the experiences in fast breeder reactors and advanced heavy water reactors should be referred to. Finally, the problems and the countermeasures in nuclear fusion development are described. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  7. Advanced materials: The key to attractive magnetic fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.E.

    1992-01-01

    Fusion is one of the most attractive central station power sources from the viewpoint of potential safety and environmental impact characteristics. Studies also indicate that fusion can be economically competitive with other options such as fission reactors and fossil-fired power stations. However, to achieve this triad of characteristics we must develop advanced materials with properties tailored for performance in the various fusion reactor systems. This paper discusses the desired characteristics of materials and the status of materials technology in four critical areas: (1) structural material for the first wail and blanket (FWB), (2) plasma-facing materials, (3) materials for superconducting magnets, and (4) ceramics for electrical and structural applications

  8. Advanced materials - the key to attractive magnetic fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.E.

    1992-01-01

    Fusion is one of the most attractive central station power sources from the viewpoint of potential safety and environmental impact characteristics. Studies also indicate that fusion can be economically competitive with other options such as fission reactors and fossil-fired power stations. However, to achieve this triad of characteristics we must develop advanced materials with properties tailored for performance in the various fusion reactor systems. This paper discusses the desired characteristics of materials and the status of materials technology in four critical areas: (1) structural materials for the first wall and blanket (FWB), (2) plasmafacing materials, (3) materials for superconducting magnets, and (4) ceramics for electrical and structural applications. (author)

  9. Progress on the reference mirror fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.A.; Doggett, J.N.; Moir, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    The design of a reference mirror fusion reactor is underway at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The reactor, rated at about 900 MWe, features steady-state operation, an absence of plasma impurity problems, and good accessibility for blanket maintenance. It is concluded that a mirror reactor appears workable, but its dollar/kWe cost will be considerably higher than present-day nuclear costs. The cost would be reduced most markedly by an increase in plasma Q

  10. Helium effect on mechanical property of fusion reactor structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Norikazu; Chuto, Toshinori; Murase, Yoshiharu; Nakagawa, Johsei

    2004-01-01

    High-energy neutrons produced in fusion reactor core caused helium in the structural materials of fusion reactors, such as blankets. We injected alpha particles accelerated by the cyclotron to the samples of martensite steel (9Cr3WVTaB). Equivalent helium doses injected to the sample is estimated to be up to 300 ppm, which were estimated to be equivalent to helium accumulation after the 1-year reactor operation. Creep tests of the samples were made to investigate helium embrittlement. There were no appreciable changes in the relation between the stresses and the rupture time, the minimum creep rate and the applied stress. Grain boundary effect by helium was not observed in ruptured surfaces. Fatigue tests were made for SUS304 samples, which contain helium up to 150 ppm. After 0.05 Hz cyclic stress tests, it was shown that the fatigue lifetime (cycles to rupture and extension to failure) are 1/5 in 150 ppm helium samples compared with no helium samples. The experimental results suggest martensite steel is promising for structural materials of fusion reactors. (Y. Tanaka)

  11. Cassette blanket and vacuum building: key elements in fusion reactor maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    The integration of two concepts important to fusion power reactors is discussed. The first concept is the vacuum building which improves upon the current fusion reactor designs. The second concept, the use of the cassette blanket within the vacuum building environment, introduces four major improvements in blanket design: cassette blanket module, zoning concept, rectangular blanket concept, and internal tritium recovery

  12. Present status of design, research and development of nuclear fusion reactors and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    Seven years have elapsed since the publication of ''Progress of nuclear fusion research and perspective toward the development of power reactors'' by the Atomic Energy Society of Japan in August, 1976. During this period, the research and development of nuclear fusion have changed from plasma physics to reactor technology, being conscious of the realization of fusion reactors. There are the R project in the Institute of Plasma Physics, Nagoya University, and the design and construction of JT-60 in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, to put it concretely. Now the research and development taking the economical efficiency into account are adopted. However, the type of fusion reactors is not reduced to tokamak type, accordingly the research and development to meet the diverse possibilities are forwarded. The progress of tokamak reactor research, core plasma design, nuclear design and shielding design, thermal structure design, the design of superconducting magnets, disassembling and repair, safety, economical efficiency, the conceptual design of other types than tokamak and others are reported. (Kako, I.)

  13. Safety and environmental advantages of breeding blanketless fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucchetti, M.; Merola, M.; Matera, R.

    1994-01-01

    Next-step reactors will use DT cycle. However, environmental advantage will be the main chance for fusion to compete with other energy sources. The environmental problems of DT cycle due to tritium and neutron activation, are examined. Fusion commercial reactors could be based on alternative fuel cycles like D-He3. Advantages and disadvantages of this fuel cycle are outlined. All the technologies related with the self-breeding of tritium and the concept of breeding blanket itself may be not reactor relevant. In the frame of the Next-step studies, the potential advantages of intermediate DT devices without breeding blanket are discussed. Simplified design, lower cost, higher safety are the main ones. The problem of the source of tritium is examined. (author)

  14. Laser diode pumped ND: Glass slab laser for inertial fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, M.; Kanabe, T.; Matsui, H.

    2001-01-01

    As a first step of a driver development for the inertial fusion energy, we are developing a laser-diode-pumped zig-zag Nd:glass slab laser amplifier system HALNA 10 (High Average-power Laser for Nuclear-fusion Application) which can generate an output of 10 J per pulse at 1053 nm in 10 Hz operation. The water-cooled zig-zag Nd:glass slab is pumped from both sides by 803-nm AlGaAs laser-diode(LD) module; each LD module has an emitting area of 420 mm x 10 mm and two LD modules generated in total 218 (max.) kW peak power with 2.6kW/cm 2 peak intensity at 10 Hz repetition rate. We have obtained in a preliminary experiment a 8.5 J output energy at 0.5 Hz with beam quality of 2 times diffraction limited far-field pattern, which nearly confirmed our conceptual design. (author)

  15. Evaluation of tritiated water retention capacity of fusion reactor concrete building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numata, S.; Fujii, Y.; Okamoto, M.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper the diffusion of tritiated water vapor into concrete walls is studied to evaluate tritiated water retention capacity of a fusion reactor concrete building. Using a model of the tritiated water diffusion determined form experimental results, depth profiles of tritiated water in concrete are calculated in the case of being exposed to air containing tritiated water vapor during the normal operational condition of a fusion reactor. A 0.5-m-thick concrete is sufficient for reactor hall walls from a viewpoint of the tritium containment

  16. Neutronic assessment of strontium-90 transmutation in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parish, T.A.

    1979-01-01

    Transmutation of 90 Sr using fusion neutrons has been suggested as a possible technique for disposing of this waste nuclide. For transmutation to be attractive, high transmutation rates relative to natural decay are required. Effective half-lives for 90 Sr were computed for fusion reactor blankets constructed of various materials. To obtain satisfactory transmutation rates, fusion reactors with high first wall neutron currents and with highly moderating blankets were found to be necessary. An effective half-life for 90 Sr of 90 Sr inventory and the number of burners required for various fission usage scenarios. Efficient and fast chemical separations were needed to reap the benefits of a short effective half-life. For the fusion burners considered, it was found that the 90 Sr inventory could not be reduced to less than one-fourth of the inventory without transmutation if fission usage continued at a constant rate. Such a reduction is not sufficient to justify the transmutation disposal of 90 Sr

  17. Electron beam pumped KrF lasers for fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethian, J.D.; Friedman, M.; Giuliani, J.L. Jr.; Lehmberg, R.H.; Obenschain, S.P.; Kepple, P.; Wolford, M.; Hegeler, F.; Swanekamp, S.B.; Weidenheimer, D.; Welch, D.; Rose, D.V.; Searles, S.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the development of electron beam pumped KrF lasers for inertial fusion energy. KrF lasers are an attractive driver for fusion, on account of their demonstrated very high beam quality, which is essential for reducing imprint in direct drive targets; their short wavelength (248 nm), which mitigates the growth of plasma instabilities; and their modular architecture, which reduces development costs. In this paper we present a basic overview of KrF laser technology as well as current research and development in three key areas: electron beam stability and transport; KrF kinetics and laser propagation; and pulsed power. The work will be cast in context of the two KrF lasers at the Naval Research Laboratory, The Nike Laser (5 kJ, single shot), and The Electra Laser (400-700 J repetitively pulsed)

  18. Conceptual design study of fusion experimental reactor (FER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-11-01

    Since 1980 the design study has been conducted at JAERI for the Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) which has been proposed to be the next machine to JT-60 in the Japanese long term program of fusion reactor development. During two years from 1984 to 1985 FER concept was reviewed and redesigned. This report is the summary of the results obtained in the review and redesign activities in 1984 and 85. In the first year FER concept was discussed again and its frame work was reestablished. According to the new frame work the major reactor components of FER were designed. In the second year the whole plant system design including plant layout plan was conducted as well as the more detailed design analysis of the reactor conponents. The newly established frame for FER design is as follows: 1) Plasma : Self-ignition. 2) Operation scenario : Quasi-steady state operation with long burn pulse. 3) Neutron fluence on the first wall : 0.3 MWY/M 2 . 4) Blanket : Non-tritium breeding blanket with test modules for breeding blanket development. 5) Magnets : Superconducting Magnets. (author)

  19. Tritium chemistry in fission and fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, E.; Masson, M.; Briec, M.

    1986-09-01

    We are interested in the behaviour of tritium inside the solids where it is generated both in the case of fission nuclear reactor fuel elements, and in that of blankets of future fusion reactor. In the first case it is desirable to be able to predict whether tritium will be found in the hulls or in the uranium oxide, and under what chemical form, in order to take appropriate steps for it's removal in reprocessing plants. In fusion reactors breeding large amounts of tritium and burning it in the plasma should be accomplished in as short a cycle as possible in order to limit inventories that are associated with huge activities. Mastering the chemistry of every step is therefore essential. Amounts generated are not of the same order of magnitude in the two cases studied. Ternary fissions produce about 66 10 13 Bq (18 000 Ci) per year of tritium in a 1000 MWe fission generator, i.e., about 1.8 10 10 Bq (0.5 Ci) per day per ton of fuel

  20. Innovative energy production in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H.; Motojima, O.

    1994-01-01

    Concepts of innovative energy production in neutron-lean fusion reactors without having the conventional turbine-type generator are proposed for improving the plant efficiency. These concepts are (a) traveling wave direct energy conversion of 14.7 MeV protons, (b) cusp type direct energy conversion of charged particles, (c) efficient use of radiation with semiconductor and supplying clean fuel in a form of hydrogen gas, and (d) direct energy conversion from deposited heat to electric power with semiconductor utilizing Nernst effect. The candidates of reactors such as a toroidal system and an open system are also studied for application of the new concepts. The study shows the above concepts for a commercial reactor are promising. (author)

  1. Innovative energy production in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Sudo, S.; Tomita, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-10-01

    Concepts of innovative energy production in neutron-lean fusion reactors without having the conventional turbine-type generator are proposed for improving the plant efficiency. These concepts are (a) traveling wave direct energy conversion of 14.7 MeV protons, (b) cusp type direct energy conversion of charged particles, (c) efficient use of radiation with semiconductor and supplying clean fuel in a form of hydrogen gas, and (d) direct energy conversion from deposited heat to electric power with semiconductor utilizing Nernst effect. The candidates of reactors such as a toroidal system and an open system are also studied for application of the new concepts. The study shows the above concepts for a commercial reactor are promising. (author)

  2. Innovative energy production in fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Sudo, S.; Tomita, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-10-01

    Concepts of innovative energy production in neutron-lean fusion reactors without having the conventional turbine-type generator are proposed for improving the plant efficiency. These concepts are: (1) traveling wave direct energy conversion of 14.7 MeV protons; (2) cusp type direct energy conversion of charged particles; (3) efficient use of radiation with semiconductor and supplying clean fuel in a form of hydrogen gas; and (4) direct energy conversion from deposited heat to electric power with semiconductor utilizing Nernst effect. The candidates of reactors such as a toroidal system and an open system are also studied for application of the new concepts. The study shows the above concepts for a commercial reactor are promising.

  3. Innovative energy production in fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Sudo, S.; Tomita, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-10-01

    Concepts of innovative energy production in neutron-lean fusion reactors without having the conventional turbine-type generator are proposed for improving the plant efficiency. These concepts are (a) traveling wave direct energy conversion of 14.7 MeV protons, (b) cusp type direct energy conversion of charged particles, (c) efficient use of radiation with semiconductor and supplying clean fuel in a form of hydrogen gas, and (d) direct energy conversion from deposited heat to electric power with semiconductor utilizing Nernst effect. The candidates of reactors such as a toroidal system and an open system are also studied for application of the new concepts. The study shows the above concepts for a commercial reactor are promising. (author).

  4. Stat-of-the art of nuclear fusion and its future outlook in

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelaziz, M.E.; Elnadi, A.M.; Masoud, M.; Elshaer, M.A.; Khalil, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    The study in this project is carried out with the objective of being able to present a clear view for the state-of-the art of nuclear fusion as one of the most promising coming energy source and its future outlook in Egypt. The study introduce a summary of the world energy problem and the advantages of thermonuclear fusion energy compared to other energy sources. A description of the two main techniques of confining plasma in the fusion experiments, namely the magnetic and the inertial confinement. These techniques are discussed and investigated through linear pinches and tokamaks. Tokamaks showed to be a promising machines for achieving the controlled thermonuclear fusion power reactor. Recent development of the research on laser fusion together with fast progress in pellet and laser technology suggest that it may be possible to achieve laser fusion power reactor. The story of the strange phenomena of cold fusion, muon-catalyzed fusion, and cold fusion in condensed matter are also studied and showed to be non promising. The project study in details the future fusion reactor, its nuclear engineering and its safety and environmental aspects. The study is based on the magnetic fusion using the tokamak configuration. The positive safety and environmental aspects of fusion reactors, if exist, is also investigated. Status of plasma physics and nuclear fusion activities and strategies in the developing countries (including egypt and the arab countries) are reviewed, besides, some national programmes are proposed. In addition, the status of international activities in plasma technology and its application are represented. Future outlook for egyptian programmes on different plasma technologies are studied. Finally, conclusions and recommendations are presented which summarized the principle achiements and future research opportunities in nuclear fusion activities. In fact, it must be emphasized that fusion is an exciting and challenging field of research -the most

  5. Vacuum pumping of tritium in fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffin, D.O.; Walthers, C.R.

    1979-01-01

    Compound cryopumps of three different designs will be tested with deuterium-tritium (DT) mixtures under simulated fusion reactor conditions at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) now being constructed at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL). The first of these pumps is already in operation, and its preliminary performance is presented. The supporting vacuum facility necessary to regenerate these fusion facility cryopumps is also described. The next generation of fusion system vacuum pumps may include non-cryogenic or conventional-cryogenic hybrid systems, several of which are discussed

  6. Fluid mechanics of fusion lasers. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shwartx, J.; Golik, R.J.; Merkle, C.L.; Ausherman, D.R.; Fishman, E.

    1978-04-01

    The primary objective of this study is to define the fluid mechanical requirements for a repetitively-pulsed high energy laser that may be used as a driver in an inertial confinement fusion system designed for electric power generation. Emphasis was placed on defining conceptual designs of efficient laser flow systems that are capable of conserving gas and minimizing operating power requirements. The development of effective pressure wave suppression concepts to produce acceptable beam quality for fusion applications was also considered

  7. Core fusion accidents in nuclear power reactors. Knowledge review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentaib, Ahmed; Bonneville, Herve; Clement, Bernard; Cranga, Michel; Fichot, Florian; Koundy, Vincent; Meignen, Renaud; Corenwinder, Francois; Leteinturier, Denis; Monroig, Frederique; Nahas, Georges; Pichereau, Frederique; Van-Dorsselaere, Jean-Pierre; Cenerino, Gerard; Jacquemain, Didier; Raimond, Emmanuel; Ducros, Gerard; Journeau, Christophe; Magallon, Daniel; Seiler, Jean-Marie; Tourniaire, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    This reference document proposes a large and detailed review of severe core fusion accidents occurring in nuclear power reactors. It aims at presenting the scientific aspects of these accidents, a review of knowledge and research perspectives on this issue. After having recalled design and operation principles and safety principles for reactors operating in France, and the main studied and envisaged accident scenarios for the management of severe accidents in French PWRs, the authors describe the physical phenomena occurring during a core fusion accident, in the reactor vessel and in the containment building, their sequence and means to mitigate their effects: development of the accident within the reactor vessel, phenomena able to result in an early failure of the containment building, phenomena able to result in a delayed failure with the corium-concrete interaction, corium retention and cooling in and out of the vessel, release of fission products. They address the behaviour of containment buildings during such an accident (sizing situations, mechanical behaviour, bypasses). They review and discuss lessons learned from accidents (Three Mile Island and Chernobyl) and simulation tests (Phebus-PF). A last chapter gives an overview of software and approaches for the numerical simulation of a core fusion accident

  8. Fusion power and its prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kammash, T.

    1981-01-01

    Recent progress in research towards the development of fusion power is reviewed. In the magnetic approach, the impressive advances made in Tokamak research in the past few years have bolstered the confidence that experimental Tokamak devices currently under construction will demonstrate the break-even condition or scientific feasibility of fusion power. Exciting and innovative ideas in mirror magnetic confinement are expected to culminate in high-Q devices which will make open-ended confinement a serious contender for fusion reactors. In the inertial confinement approach, conflicting pellet temperature requirements have placed severe constraints on useful laser intensities and wavelengths for laser-driven fusion. Relativistic electron beam fusion must solve critical focusing and pellet coupling problems, and the newly proposed heavy ion beam fusion, though feasible and attractive in principle, requires very high energy particles for which the accelerator technology may not be available for some time to come

  9. Present status of laser driven fusion--fission energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maniscalco, J.A.; Hansen, L.F.

    1978-01-01

    The potential of laser fusion driven hybrids to produce fissile fuel and/or electricity has been investigated in the laser program at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) for several years. Our earlier studies used neutronic methods of analysis to estimate hybrid performance. The results were encouraging, but it was apparent that a more accurate assessment of the hybrid's potential would require studies which treat the engineering, environmental, and economic issues as well as the neutronic aspects. More recently, we have collaborated with Bechtel and Westinghouse Corporations in two engineering design studies of laser fusion driven hybrid power plants. With Bechtel, we have been engaged in a joint effort to design a laser fusion driven hybrid which emphasizes fissile fuel production while the primary objective of our joint effort with Westinghouse has been to design a hybrid which emphasizes power production. The hybrid designs which have resulted from these two studies are briefly described and analyzed by considering their most important operational parameters

  10. 8th International School of Fusion Reactor Technology "Ettore Majorana"

    CERN Document Server

    Leotta, G G; Muon-catalyzed fusion and fusion with polarized nuclei

    1988-01-01

    The International School of Fusion Reactor Technology started its courses 15 years ago and since then has mantained a biennial pace. Generally, each course has developed the subject which was announced in advance at the closing of the previous course. The subject to which the present proceedings refer was chosen in violation of that rule so as to satisfy the recent and diffuse interest in cold fusion among the main European laboratories involved in controlled thermonuclear research (CTR). In the second half of 1986 we started to prepare a workshop aimed at assessing the state of the art and possibly of the perspectives of muon- catalyzed fusion. Research in this field has recently produced exciting experimental results open to important practical applications. We thought it worthwhile to consider also the beneficial effects and problems of the polarization ofthe nuclei in both cold and thermonuclear fusion. In preparing the 8th Course on Fusion Reactor Technology, it was necessary to abandon the tradi...

  11. An optimized symbiotic fusion and molten-salt fission reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinkin, V.L.; Novikov, V.M.

    A symbiotic fusion-fission reactor system which breeds nuclear fuel is discussed. In the blanket of the controlled thermonuclear reactor (CTR) uranium-233 is generated from thorium, which circulates in the form of ThF 4 mixed with molten sodium and beryllium fluorides. The molten-salt fission reactor (MSR) burns up the uranium-233 and generates tritium for the fusion reactor from lithium, which circulates in the form of LiF mixed with BeF 2 and 233 UF 4 through the MSR core. With a CTR-MSR thermal power ratio of 1:11 the system can produce electrical energy and breed fuel with a doubling time of 4-5 years. The system has the following special features: (1) Fuel reprocessing is much simpler and cheaper than for contemporary fission reactors; reprocessing consists simply in continuous removal of 233 U from the salt circulating in the CTR blanket by the fluorination method and removal of xenon from the MSR fuel salt by gas scavenging; the MSR fuel salt is periodically exchanged for fresh salt and the 233 U is then removed from it; (2) Tritium is produced in the fission reactor, which is a much simpler system than the fusion reactor; (3) The CTR blanket is almost ''clean''; no tritium is produced in it and fission fragment activity does not exceed the activity induced in the structural materials; (4) Almost all the thorium introduced into the CTR blanket can be used for producing 233 U

  12. Biomagnetic effects: a consideration in fusion reactor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahlum, D.D.

    1976-02-01

    Fusion as a power source is receiving an increasing amount of attention. Several designs have been proposed and the feasibility of each alternative is being studied. As we move closer to a working design, attention can be paid to potential biological hazards. Large magnetic fields and the emission of tritium and lithium are unique to some fusion reactor designs. The results of a review of the current state of knowledge concerning the biological effects of magnetic fields alone and in combination with ionizing radiation are summarized in this report. The purpose of the review is to help identify areas where additional biomedical research is needed for establishing guidelines for reactor design and operation. 64 references

  13. Secret high-temperature reactor concept for inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monsler, M.J.; Meier, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    The goal of our SCEPTRE project was to create an advanced second-generation inertial fusion reactor that offers the potential for either of the following: (1) generating electricity at 50% efficiency, (2) providing high temperature heat (850 0 C) for hydrogen production, or (3) producing fissile fuel for light-water reactors. We have found that these applications are conceptually feasible with a reactor that is intrinsically free of the hazards of catastrophic fire or tritium release

  14. Irradiation capsule for testing magnetic fusion reactor first-wall materials at 60 and 2000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conlin, J.A.

    1985-08-01

    A new type of irradiation capsule has been designed, and a prototype has been tested in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) for low-temperature irradiation of Magnetic Fusion Reactor first-wall materials. The capsule meets the requirements of the joint US/Japanese collaborative fusion reactor materials irradiation program for the irradiation of first-wall fusion reactor materials at 60 and 200 0 C. The design description and results of the prototype capsule performance are presented

  15. Behavior of Type 316 stainless steel under simulated fusion reactor irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiffen, F.W.; Maziasz, P.J.; Bloom, E.E.; Stiegler, J.O.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1978-05-01

    Fusion reactor irradiation response in alloys containing nickel can be simulated in thermal-spectrum fission reactors, where displacement damage is produced by the high-energy neutrons and helium is produced by the capture of two thermal neutrons in the reactions: 58 Ni + n → 59 Ni + γ; 59 Ni + n → 56 Fe + α. Examination of type 316 stainless steel specimens irradiated in HFIR has shown that swelling due to cavity formation and degradation of mechanical properties are more severe than can be predicted from fast reactor irradiations, where the helium contents produced are far too low to simulate fusion reactor service. Swelling values are greater and the temperature dependence of swelling is different than in the fast reactor case

  16. Conceptual design of light ion beam inertia nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-07-01

    Light ion beam, inertia nuclear fusion system drew attention recently as one of the nuclear fusion systems for power reactors in the history of the research on nuclear fusion. Its beginning seemed to be the judgement that the implosion of fusion fuel pellets with light ions can be realized with the light ions which can be obtained in view of accelerator techniques. Of course, in order to generate practically usable nuclear fusion reaction by this system and maintain it, many technical difficulties must be overcome. This research was carried out for the purpose of discovering such technical problems and searching for their solution. At the time of doing the works, the following policy was adopted. Though their is the difference of fine and rough, the design of a whole reactor system is performed conformably. In order to make comparison with other reactor types and nuclear fusion systems, the design is carried out as the power plant of about one million kWe output. As the extent of the design, the works at conceptual design stage are performed to present the concept of design which satisfies the required function. Basically, the design is made from conservative standpoint. This research of design was started in 1981, and in fiscal 1982, the mutual adjustment among the design of respective parts was performed on the basis of the results in 1981, and the possible revision and new proposal were investigated. (Kako, I.)

  17. Method for mounting laser fusion targets for irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, R. Jay; Farnum, Eugene H.; McCall, Gene H.

    1977-07-26

    Methods for preparing laser fusion targets of the ball-and-disk type are disclosed. Such targets are suitable for irradiation with one or two laser beams to produce the requisite uniform compression of the fuel material.

  18. Pre-Amplifier Module for Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heebner, J E; Bowers, M W

    2008-02-06

    The Pre-Amplifier Modules (PAMs) are the heart of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), providing most of the energy gain for the most energetic laser in the world. Upon completion, NIF will be the only laboratory in which scientists can examine the fusion processes that occur inside stars, supernovae, and exploding nuclear weapons and that may someday serve as a virtually inexhaustible energy source for electricity. Consider that in a fusion power plant 50 cups of water could provide the energy comparable to 2 tons of coal. Of paramount importance for achieving laser-driven fusion ignition with the least energy input is the synchronous and symmetric compression of the target fuel--a condition known as laser power balance. NIF's 48 PAMs thus must provide energy gain in an exquisitely stable and consistent manner. While building one module that meets performance requirements is challenging enough, our design has already enabled the construction and fielding of 48 PAMs that are stable, uniform, and interchangeable. PAM systems are being tested at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics, and the Atomic Weapons Enterprise of Great Britain has purchased the PAM power system.

  19. ITER at the international conference on fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinin, G.; Barabash, V.; Matera, R.

    1998-01-01

    The reports summarizes the topics of the eighth International Conference on Fusion Reactor Materials (ICFRM-8) which was held in Sendai, Japan, on 26-31 October 1997. The ICFRM is focused on the whole spectrum of materials and technologies to be applied in fusion reactors and related facilities. The total number of conference participants was over 500, representing 24 countries and about 600 oral and poster papers were presented at the conference. Three sessions were devoted to ITER materials: (i) Design-Materials Interface and ITER (oral session); (ii) ITER, Irradiation Facility and Technology, (poster session); (iii) ITER and Beyond (discussion session)

  20. Intense neutron irradiation facility for fusion reactor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Kenji; Oyama, Yukio; Kato, Yoshio; Sugimoto, Masayoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Technical R and D of d-Li stripping type neutron irradiation facilities for development of fusion reactor materials was carried out in Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT) project and Energy Selective Neutron Irradiation Test Facility (ESNIT) program. Conceptual design activity (CDA) of International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), of which concept is an advanced version of FMIT and ESNIT concepts, are being performed. Progress of users` requirements and characteristics of irradiation fields in such neutron irradiation facilities, and outline of baseline conceptual design of IFMIF were described. (author)

  1. Conceptual design study of fusion experimental reactor (FY86 FER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Yamada, Masao; Mizoguchi, Tadanori

    1987-09-01

    This report describes the results of the reactor configuration/structure design for the fusion experimental reactor (FER) performed in FY 1986. The design was intended to meet the physical and engineering mission of the next step device which was decided by the subcommittee on the next step device of the nuclear fusion council. The objectives of the design study in FY 1986 are to advance and optimize the design concept of the last year because the recommendation of the subcommittee was basically the same as the design philosophy of the last year. Six candidate reactor configurations which correspond to options C ∼ D presented by the subcommittee were extensively examined. Consequently, ACS reactor (Advanced Option-C with Single Null Divertor) was selected as the reference configuration from viewpoints of technical risks and cost performance. Regarding the reactor structure, the following items were investigated intensively: minimization of reactor size, protection of first wall against plasma disruption, simplification of shield structure, reactor configuration which enables optimum arrangement of poloidal field coils. (author)

  2. Neutron irradiation facilities for fission and fusion reactor materials studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1985-01-01

    The successful development of energy-conversion machines based upon nuclear fission or fusion reactors is critically dependent upon the behavior of the engineering materials used to construct the full containment and primary heat extraction systems. The development of radiation damage-resistant materials requires irradiation testing facilities which reproduce, as closely as possible, the thermal and neutronic environment expected in a power-producing reactor. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reference core design for the Center for Neutron Research (CNR) reactor provides for instrumented facilities in regions of both hard and mixed neutron spectra, with substantially higher fluxes than are currently available. The benefits of these new facilities to the development of radiation damage resistant materials are discussed in terms of the major US fission and fusion reactor programs

  3. Tritium monitoring within the reactor hall of a DT fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalbert, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Monitoring the reactor hall atmosphere of DT-fueled fusion reactors will probably be performed with conventional ion chamber and proportional counter instruments modified as necessry to deal with the background radiation. Background includes external neutron and gamma radiation and internal beta-gamma radiation from the activated atmosphere. Although locating instruments in remote areas of the reactor hall and adding local shielding and electronic compensation may be feasible, placing the instruments in accessible low-background areas outside of the reactor hall and doing remote sampling is preferable and solves most of the radiation problems. The remaining problem of the activated atmosphere may be solved by recently developed instruments in conjunction with the use of semi-permeable membranes currently under development and evaluation

  4. Risk assessment of computer-controlled safety systems for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fryer, M.O.; Bruske, S.Z.

    1983-01-01

    The complexity of fusion reactor systems and the need to display, analyze, and react promptly to large amounts of information during reactor operation will require a number of safety systems in the fusion facilities to be computer controlled. Computer software, therefore, must be included in the reactor safety analyses. Unfortunately, the science of integrating computer software into safety analyses is in its infancy. Combined plant hardware and computer software systems are often treated by making simple assumptions about software performance. This method is not acceptable for assessing risks in the complex fusion systems, and a new technique for risk assessment of combined plant hardware and computer software systems has been developed. This technique is an extension of the traditional fault tree analysis and uses structured flow charts of the software in a manner analogous to wiring or piping diagrams of hardware. The software logic determines the form of much of the fault trees

  5. Conceptual design of a laser fusion power plant. Part I. An integrated facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-07-01

    This study is a new preliminary conceptual design and economic analysis of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) power plant performed by Bechtel under the direction of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The purpose of a new conceptual design is to examine alternatives to the LLNL HYLIFE power plant and to incorporate information from the recent liquid metal cooled power plant conceptual design study (CDS) into the reactor system and balance of plant design. A key issue in the design of a laser fusion power plant is the degree of symmetry in the illumination of the target that will be required for a proper burn. Because this matter is expected to remain unresolved for some time, another purpose of this study is to determine the effect of symmetry requirements on the total plant size, layout, and cost

  6. Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    This is the ninth in series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following technical progress reports: Alloy Development of Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; and Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide

  7. Fusion reactor materials: Semiannual progress report for period ending September 30, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    This is the third in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following technical progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performances; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide

  8. Conceptual design of fusion experimental reactor (FER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Conceptual Design of Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) of which the objective will be to realize self-ignition with D-T reaction is reported. Mechanical Configurations of FER are characterized with a noncircular plasma and a double-null divertor. The primary aim of design studies is to demonstrate fissibility of reactor structures as compact and simple as possible with removable torus sectors. The structures of each component such as a first-wall, blanket, shielding, divertor, magnet and so on have been designed. It is also discussed about essential reactor plant system requirements. In addition to the above, a brief concept of a steady-state reactor based on RF current drive is also discussed. The main aim, in this time, is to examine physical studies of a possible RF steady-state reactor. (author)

  9. Fluorescence-pumped photolytic gas laser system for a commercial laser fusion power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monsler, M.J.

    1977-01-01

    The first results are given for the conceptual design of a short-wavelength gas laser system suitable for use as a driver (high average power ignition source) for a commercial laser fusion power plant. A comparison of projected overall system efficiencies of photolytically excited oxygen, sulfur, selenium and iodine lasers is described, using a unique windowless laser cavity geometry which will allow scaling of single amplifier modules to 125 kJ per aperture for 1 ns pulses. On the basis of highest projected overall efficiency, a selenium laser is chosen for a conceptual power plant fusion laser system. This laser operates on the 489 nm transauroral transition of selenium, excited by photolytic dissociation of COSe by ultraviolet fluorescence radiation. Power balances and relative costs for optics, electrical power conditioning and flow conditioning of both the laser and fluorescer gas streams are discussed for a system with the following characteristics: 8 operating modules, 2 standby modules, 125 kJ per module, 1.4 pulses per second, 1.4 MW total average power. The technical issues of scaling visible and near-infrared photolytic gas laser systems to this size are discussed

  10. Avalanche boron fusion by laser picosecond block ignition with magnetic trapping for clean and economic reactor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hora, H.; Korn, Georg; Eliezer, S.; Nissim, N.; Lalousis, P.; Giuffrida, Lorenzo; Margarone, Daniele; Picciotto, A.; Miley, G. H.; Moustaizis, S.; Martinez-Val, J.M.; Barty, C.P.J.; Kirchhoff, G.J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 4, Oct (2016), 1-9, č. článku e35. ISSN 2095-4719 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EF15_008/0000162 Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_008/0000162 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : boron fusion energy * dielectric nonlinear force explosion * economic reactor * environmentally clean energy Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  11. Powerful lasers for thermonuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basov, N.; Krokhin, O.; Sklizkov, G.; Fedotov, S.

    1977-01-01

    The parameters are discussed of the radiation of powerful lasers (internal energy of the plasma determined by the volume, density and temperature of the plasma, duration of the heating pulse, focusing of the laser pulse energy in a small volume of matter, radiation contrast) for attaining an effective thermonuclear fusion at minimum microexplosion energy. A survey is given of the methods of shaping laser pulses with limit parameters, and the principle of the construction of powerful laser systems is described. The general diagram and parameters are given of the Delfin thermonuclear apparatus and a diagram is presented of the focusing system of high luminosity for spherical plasma heating using spherical mirrors. A diagram is presented of the vacuum chamber and of the complex diagnostic apparatus for determining the basic parameters of thermonuclear plasma in the Delfin apparatus. The prospects are indicated of the further development of thermonuclear laser apparatus with neodymium and CO 2 lasers. (B.S.)

  12. Modular Stellarator Fusion Reactor (MSR) concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    A preliminary conceptual study has been made of the Modulator Stellarator Reactor (MSR) as a stedy-state, ignited, DT-fueled, magnetic fusion reactor. The MSR concept combines the physics of classic stellarator confinement with an innovative, modular-coil design. Parametric tradeoff calculations are described, leading to the selection of an interim design point for a 4.8-GWt plant based on Alcator transport scaling and an average beta value of 0.04 in an l = 2 system with a plasma aspect ratio of 11. Neither an economic analysis nor a detailed conceptual engineering design is presented here, as the primary intent of this scoping study is the elucidation of key physics tradeoffs, constraints, and uncertainties for the ultimate power-reactor embodiment

  13. SEBREZ: an inertial-fusion-reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, W.R.

    1982-01-01

    The neutronic aspects of an inertial fusion reactor concept that relies on asymmetrical neutronic effects to enhance the tritium production in the breeding zones have been studied. We find that it is possible to obtain a tritium breeding ratio greater than 1.0 with a chamber configuration in which the breeding zones subtend only a fraction of the total solid angle. This is the origin of the name SEBREZ which stands for SEgregated BREeding Zones. It should be emphasized that this is not a reactor design study; rather this study illustrates certain neutronic effects in the context of a particular reactor concept. An understanding of these effects forms the basis of a design technique which has broader application than just the SEBREZ concept

  14. Occupational health physics at a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shank, K.E.; Easterly, C.E.; Shoup, R.L.

    1975-01-01

    Future generation of electrical power using controlled thermonuclear reactors will involve both traditional and new concerns for health protection. A review of the problems associated with exposures to tritium and magnetic fields is presented with emphasis on the occupational worker. The radiological aspects of tritium, inventories and loss rates of tritium for fusion reactors, and protection of the occupational worker are discussed. Magnetic fields in which workers may be exposed routinely and possible biological effects are also discussed

  15. Quality assurance in the Antares laser fusion construction project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichelt, W.H.

    1984-01-01

    The Antares CO 2 laser facility came on line in November 1983 as an experimental physics facility; it is the world's largest CO 2 laser fusion system. Antares is a major component of the Department of Energy's Inertial Confinement Fusion Program. Antares is a one-of-a-kind laser system that is used in an experimental environment. Given limited project funds and tight schedules, the quality assurance program was tailored to achieve project goals without imposing oppressive constraints. The discussion will review the Antares quality assurance program and the utility of various portions to completion of the project

  16. Materials degradation in fission reactors: Lessons learned of relevance to fusion reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Was, Gary S.

    2007-01-01

    The management of materials in power reactor systems has become a critically important activity in assuring the safe, reliable and economical operation of these facilities. Over the years, the commercial nuclear power reactor industry has faced numerous 'surprises' and unexpected occurrences in materials. Mitigation strategies have sometimes solved one problem at the expense of creating another. Other problems have been solved successfully and have motivated the development of techniques to foresee problems before they occur. This paper focuses on three aspects of fission reactor experience that may benefit future fusion systems. The first is identification of parameters and processes that have had a large impact on the behavior of materials in fission systems such as temperature, dose rate, surface condition, gradients, metallurgical variability and effects of the environment. The second is the development of materials performance and failure models to provide a basis for assuring component integrity. Last is the development of proactive materials management programs that identify and pre-empt degradation processes before they can become problems. These aspects of LWR experience along with the growing experience with materials in the more demanding advanced fission reactor systems form the basis for a set of 'lessons learned' to aid in the successful management of materials in fusion reactor systems

  17. Fusion technologies for Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE∗

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kramer K.J.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy (LIFE engine design builds upon on going progress at the National Ignition Facility (NIF and offers a near-term pathway to commercial fusion. Fusion technologies that are critical to success are reflected in the design of the first wall, blanket and tritium separation subsystems. The present work describes the LIFE engine-related components and technologies. LIFE utilizes a thermally robust indirect-drive target and a chamber fill gas. Coolant selection and a large chamber solid-angle coverage provide ample tritium breeding margin and high blanket gain. Target material selection eliminates the need for aggressive chamber clearing, while enabling recycling. Demonstrated tritium separation and storage technologies limit the site tritium inventory to attractive levels. These key technologies, along with the maintenance and advanced materials qualification program have been integrated into the LIFE delivery plan. This describes the development of components and subsystems, through prototyping and integration into a First Of A Kind power plant.

  18. Activation product transport in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, A.C.

    1983-01-01

    Activated corrosion and neutron sputtering products will enter the coolant and/or tritium breeding material of fusion reactor power plants and experiments and cause personnel access problems. Radiation levels around plant components due to these products will cause difficulties with maintenance and repair operations throughout the plant. Similar problems are experienced around fission reactor systems. The determination of the transport of radioactive corrosion and neutron sputtering products through the system is achieved using the computer code RAPTOR. This code calculates the mass transfer of a number of activation products based on the corrosion and sputtering rates through the system, the deposition and release characteristics of various plant components, the neturon flux spectrum, as well as other plant parameters. RAPTOR assembles a system of first order linear differential equations into a matrix equation based upon the reactor system parameters. Included in the transfer matrix are the deposition and erosion coefficients, and the decay and activation data for the various plant nodes and radioactive isotopes. A source vector supplies the corrosion and neutron sputtering source rates. This matrix equation is then solved using a matrix operator technique to give the specific activity distribution of each radioactive species throughout the plant. Once the amount of mass transfer is determined, the photon transport due to the radioactive corrosion and sputtering product sources can be evaluated, and dose rates around the plant components of interest as a function of time can be determined. This method has been used to estimate the radiation hazards around a number of fusion reactor system designs

  19. Cryogenic hydrogen fuel for controlled inertial confinement fusion (formation of reactor-scale cryogenic targets)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleksandrova, I. V.; Koresheva, E. R., E-mail: elena.koresheva@gmail.com; Krokhin, O. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Osipov, I. E. [Power Efficiency Centre, Inter RAO UES (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    In inertial fusion energy research, considerable attention has recently been focused on low-cost fabrication of a large number of targets by developing a specialized layering module of repeatable operation. The targets must be free-standing, or unmounted. Therefore, the development of a target factory for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is based on methods that can ensure a cost-effective target production with high repeatability. Minimization of the amount of tritium (i.e., minimization of time and space at all production stages) is a necessary condition as well. Additionally, the cryogenic hydrogen fuel inside the targets must have a structure (ultrafine layers—the grain size should be scaled back to the nanometer range) that supports the fuel layer survivability under target injection and transport through the reactor chamber. To meet the above requirements, significant progress has been made at the Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI) in the technology developed on the basis of rapid fuel layering inside moving free-standing targets (FST), also referred to as the FST layering method. Owing to the research carried out at LPI, unique experience has been gained in the development of the FST-layering module for target fabrication with an ultrafine fuel layer, including a reactor- scale target design. This experience can be used for the development of the next-generation FST-layering module for construction of a prototype of a target factory for power laser facilities and inertial fusion power plants.

  20. Reactor prospects of muon-catalyzed fusion of deuterium and tritium concentrated in transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, W.M. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    It is conjectured that the number of fusion events catalyzed by a single muon is orders of magnitude greater for deuterium and tritium concentrated in a transition metal than in gaseous form and that the recent observation of 2.5-MeV neutrons from a D 2 O electrolytic cell with palladium and titanium cathodes can thereby be interpreted in terms of cosmic muon-catalyzed deuterium-deuterium fusion. This suggests a new fusion reactor reactor consisting of deuterium and tritium concentrated in transition metal fuel elements in a fusion core that surrounds an accelerator-produced muon source. The feasibility of net energy production in such a reactor is established in terms of requirements on the number of fusion events catalyzed per muon. The technological implications for a power reactor based on this concept are examined. The potential of such a concept as a neutron source for materials testing and tritium and plutonium production is briefly discussed

  1. NDT studies of laser cladding defects of pure copper on SS316L for in vessel materials for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, S.; Buddu, Ramesh Kumar; Raole, P.M.; Sarkar, B.

    2015-01-01

    The pure thick copper coatings of 1-3 mm are required for the in-vessel materials for the plasma facing components in fusion reactor systems to extract the very high heat flux in shorter durations (like VDEs) and to protect the in vessel components. Laser cladding technique is one of the potential technique for thick coatings on substrate materials. The present study reports the NDT characterization studies carried on samples of pure copper powder cladded on SS316L substrates of thickness 1 mm - 3 mm , fabricated by CO_2 laser system. Process parameters optimization like laser power, laser travel speed, spot size, powder feed rate and shield gas flow show the effect on quality of final cladding on steel substrates. X-ray radiography and Ultrasonic testing has been carried out thoroughly on the fabricated samples and defects are analyzed. Ultrasonic scan tests using different probes are employed as the interface defects are not thoroughly revealed by radiography. The calibration has been carried out by the test sample plate with known defect size created and various process parameters like amplitude, gain and metal velocity, relevant to specimen are chosen for probes calibration. The interface defects of porosity, lack of penetration, cracks or group porosities are observed in few set of samples developed. Radiography examination revealed the porosity at extreme edges and distributed porosity in the middle for thick cladding. Ultrasonic manual A-scanning with TR probe provides qualitative information about flaw and broadly gives its location of the defects. Samples of 1 mm thick cladding have shown relatively less porosity defects at the interface compared to 3 mm thick samples. (author)

  2. Application of the integrated blanket-coil concept (IBC) to fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Embrechts, M.J.; Steiner, D.; Mohanti, R.; Duggan, W.

    1987-01-01

    A novel concept is proposed for combining the blanket and coil functions of a fusion reactor into a single component and several unique applications to fusion reactor embodiments are identified. The proposed concept takes advantage of the fact that lithium is a good electrical conductor in addition to being a unique tritium-breeding material capable of energy recovery and transport at high temperatures. This concept, designated the ''integrated-blanket-coil (IBC) concept'' has the potential for: allowing fusion reactor embodiments which are easier to maintain; making fusion reactors more compact with an intrinsic ultra-high mass power density (net kW/sub E//metric tonne); and enhancing the tritium breeding potential for special coil applications such as ohmic heating and bean identation. By assuming a sandwich construction for the IBC walls (i.e., a layered combination of a thin wall of structural material, insulator and structural materials) the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD)-induced pressure drops and associated pressure stresses are modest and well below design limits. Possible unique applications of the IBC concept have been investigated and include the IBC concept applied to the poloidal field (PF) coils, toroidal field (TF) coils, divertor coils, ohmic heating (OH) coils, and identation coils for bean shaping

  3. Pulse Star inertial confinement fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blink, J.A.; Hogan, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    Pulse Star is a pool-type ICF reactor that emphasizes low cost and high safety levels. The reactor consists of a vacuum chamber (belljar) submerged in a compact liquid metal (Li 17 Pb 83 or lithium) pool which also contains the heat exchangers and liquid metal pumps. The shielding efficiency of the liquid metal pool is high enough to allow hands-on maintenance of (removed) pumps and heat exchangers. Liquid metal is allowed to spray through the 5.5 m radius belljar at a controlled rate, but is prohibited from the target region by a 4 m radius mesh first wall. The wetted first wall absorbs the fusion x-rays and debris while the spray region absorbs the fusion neutrons. The mesh allows vaporized liquid metal to blow through to the spray region where it can quickly cool and condense. Preliminary calculations show that a 2 m thick first wall could handle the mechanical (support, buckling, and x-ray-induced hoop) loads. Wetting and gas flow issues are in an initial investigation stage

  4. Decay heat measurement on fusion reactor materials and validation of calculation code system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekawa, Fujio; Ikeda, Yujiro; Wada, Masayuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    Decay heat rates for 32 fusion reactor relevant materials irradiated with 14-MeV neutrons were measured for the cooling time period between 1 minute and 400 days. With using the experimental data base, validity of decay heat calculation systems for fusion reactors were investigated. (author)

  5. Conceptual design of nuclear fusion power reactor DREAM. Reactor structures and remote maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Satoshi; Seki, Yasushi; Ueda, Shuzo; Kurihara, Ryoichi; Adachi, Junichi; Yamazaki, Seiichiro; Hashimoto, Toshiyuki.

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear fusion reactors are required to be able to compete another energy sources in economy, reliability, safety and environmental integrity for commercial use. In the DREAM (DRastically EAsy Maintenance) reactor, a very low activated material of SiC/SiC composite has been introduced for the structural material, a reactor configuration for very easy maintenance and the helium gas of a high temperature for the cooling system, and hence DREAM has been proven to be very attractively as the commercial power reactor due to the high availability and efficiency of the plant and minimization of radioactive wastes. (author)

  6. Fusion Canada issue 29

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue Canada-Europe Accords: 5 year R and D collaboration for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) AECL is designated to arrange and implement the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) and the ITER Engineering Design Activities (EDA) while EUROTAM is responsible for operating Europe's Fusion R and D programs plus MOU and EDA. The MOU includes tokamaks, plasma physics, fusion technology, fusion fuels and other approaches to fusion energy (as alternatives to tokamaks). STOR-M Tokamak was restarted at the University of Saskatchewan following upgrades to the plasma chamber to accommodate the Compact Toroid (CT) injector. The CT injector has a flexible attachment thus allowing for injection angle adjustments. Real-time video images of a single plasma discharge on TdeV showing that as the plasma density increases, in a linear ramp divertor, the plasma contact with the horizontal plate decreases while contact increases with the oblique plate. Damage-resistant diffractive optical elements (DOE) have been developed for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) research by Gentac Inc. and the National Optics Institute, laser beam homogeniser and laser harmonic separator DOE can also be made using the same technology. Studies using TdeV indicate that a divertor will be able to pump helium from the tokamak with a detached-plasma divertor but helium extraction performance must first be improved, presently the deuterium:helium retention radio-indicates that in order to pump enough helium through a fusion reactor, too much deuterium-tritium fuel would be pumped out. 2 fig

  7. Major features of a mirror fusion--fast fission hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.; Lee, J.D.; Burleigh, R.J.

    1974-01-01

    A conceptual design was made of a fusion-fission reactor. The fusion component is a D-T plasma confined by a pair of magnetic mirror coils in a Yin-Yang configuration and sustained by hot neutral beam injection. The neutrons from the fusion plasma drive the fission assembly which is composed of natural uranium carbide fuel rods clad with stainless steel and is cooled by helium. It was shown how the reactor can be built using essentially present day construction technology and how the uranium bearing blanket modules can be routinely changed to allow separation of the bred fissile fuel of which approximately 1200 kg of plutonium are produced each year along with the approximately 750 MW of electricity. (U.S.)

  8. Impurity studies in fusion devices using laser-fluorescence-spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husinsky, W.R.

    1980-08-01

    Resonance fluorescence excitation of neutral atoms using tunable radiation from dye lasers offers a number of unique advantages for impurity studies in fusion devices. Using this technique, it is possible to perform local, time-resolved measurements of the densities and velocity distributions of metallic impurities in fusion devices without disturbing the plasma. Velocities are measured by monitoring the fluorescence intensity while tuning narrow bandwidth laser radiation through the Doppler - broadened absorbtion spectrum of the transition. The knowledge of the velocity distribution of neutral impurities is particularly useful for the determination of impurity introduction mechanisms. The laser fluorescence technique will be described in terms of its application to metallic impurities in fusion devices and related laboratory experiments. Particular attention will be given to recent results from the ISX-B tokamak using pulsed dye lasers where detection sensitivities for neutral Fe of 10 6 atoms/cm 3 with a velocity resolution of 600 m/sec (0.1 eV) have been achieved. Techniques for exciting plasma particles (H,D) will also be discussed

  9. Automated laser fusion target production concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1977-01-01

    A target production concept is described for the production of multilayered cryogenic spherical inertial confinement fusion targets. The facility is to deliver targets to the reactor chamber at rates up to 10 per second and at costs consistent with economic production of power

  10. Neutronics design for a spherical tokamak fusion-transmutation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Meigen; Feng Kaiming; Yang Bangchao

    2002-01-01

    Based on studies of the spherical tokamak fusion reactors, a concept of fusion-transmutation reactor is put forward. By using the one-dimension transport and burn-up code BISON3.0 to process optimized design, a set of plasma parameters and blanket configuration suitable for the transmutation of MA (Minor Actinides) nuclear waste is selected. Based on the one-dimension calculation, two-dimension calculation has been carried out by using two-dimension neutronics code TWODANT. Combined with the neutron flux given by TWODANT calculation, burn-up calculation has been processed by using the one-dimension radioactivity calculation code FDKR and some useful and reasonable results are obtained

  11. TOKMINA, Toroidal Magnetic Field Minimization for Tokamak Fusion Reactor. TOKMINA-2, Total Power for Tokamak Fusion Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatch, A.J.

    1975-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: TOKMINA finds the minimum magnetic field, Bm, required at the toroidal coil of a Tokamak type fusion reactor when the input is beta(ratio of plasma pressure to magnetic pressure), q(Kruskal-Shafranov plasma stability factor), and y(ratio of plasma radius to vacuum wall radius: rp/rw) and arrays of PT (total thermal power from both d-t and tritium breeding reactions), Pw (wall loading or power flux) and TB (thickness of blanket), following the method of Golovin, et al. TOKMINA2 finds the total power, PT, of such a fusion reactor, given a specified magnetic field, Bm, at the toroidal coil. 2 - Method of solution: TOKMINA: the aspect ratio(a) is minimized, giving a minimum value for Bm. TOKMINA2: a search is made for PT; the value of PT which minimizes Bm to the required value within 50 Gauss is chosen. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Input arrays presently are dimensioned at 20. This restriction can be overcome by changing a dimension card

  12. Tokamak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nohara, Kiyohiko

    2009-01-01

    The structural material is one of key issues for the development of reliable superconducting magnets and peripheral equipments of fusion reactors. Standard stainless steels like SUS 304 and 316 steels available at present do not meet requirements. We are developing a new austenitic steel that has proposed target properties named 'JAERI BOX'. Additions of N and V at different amounts were tested to improve strength and fracture toughness of a base alloy SUS316LN at 4.2 K. Mechanical properties of the developed steel were examined. It is found that the charpy absorbed energy and the fracture toughness of the developed steel at 4.2 K are within JAERI BOX. (T.I.)

  13. A conceptual fusion reactor based on the high-plasma-density Z-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, C.W.; Carlson, G.; Hoffman, M.; Werner, R.

    1977-01-01

    Conceptual DT and DD fusion reactors are discussed based on magnetic confinement with the high-plasma-density Z-pinch. The reactor concepts have no ''first wall'', the fusion neutrons and plasma energy being absorbed directly into a surrounding lithium vortex blanket. Efficient systems with low re-circulated power are projected, based on a flow-through pinch cycle for which overall Q values can approach 10. The conceptual reactors are characterized by simplicity, small minimum size (100MW(e)) and by the potential for minimal radioactivity hazards. (author)

  14. Burn-up calculation of fusion-fission hybrid reactor using thorium cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shido, S.; Matsunaka, M.; Kondo, K.; Murata, I.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2006-01-01

    A burn-up calculation system has been developed to estimate performance of blanket in a fusion-fission hybrid reactor which is a fusion reactor with a blanket region containing nuclear fuel. In this system, neutron flux is calculated by MCNP4B and then burn-up calculation is performed by ORIGEN2. The cross-section library for ORIGEN2 is made from the calculated neutron flux and evaluated nuclear data. The 3-dimensional ITER model was used as a base fusion reactor. The nuclear fuel (reprocessed plutonium as the fission materials mixed with thorium as the fertile materials), transmutation materials (minor actinides and long-lived fission products) and tritium breeder were loaded into the blanket. Performances of gas-cooled and water-cooled blankets were compared with each other. As a result, the proposed reactor can meet the requirement for TBP and power density. As far as nuclear waste incineration is concerned, the gas-cooled blanket has advantages. On the other hand, the water cooled-blanket is suited to energy production. (author)

  15. Steady-state operation requirements of tokamak fusion reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knobloch, A.F.

    1991-06-01

    In the last two decades tokamak conceptual reactor design studies have been deriving benefit from progressing plasma physics experiments, more depth in theory and increasing detail in technology and engineering. Recent full-scale reactor extrapolations such as the US ARIES-I and the EC Reference Reactor study provide information on rather advanced concepts that are called for when economic boundary conditions are imposed. The ITER international reactor design activity concentrated on defining the next step after the JET generation of experiments. For steady-state operation as required for any future commercial tokamak fusion power plants it is essential to have non-inductive current drive. The current drive power and other internal power requirements specific to magnetic confinement fusion have to be kept as low as possible in order to attain a competitive overall power conversion efficiency. A high plasma Q is primarily dependent on a high current drive efficiency. Since such conditions have not yet been attained in practice, the present situation and the degree of further development required are characterized. Such development and an appropriately designed next-step tokamak reactor make the gradual realization of high-Q operation appear feasible. (orig.)

  16. Fusion reactors for hydrogen production via electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.; Steinberg, M.

    1979-01-01

    The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and supplement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approx. 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approx. 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets

  17. Fusion reactor technology studies. Final report for period August 1, 1972 - October 31, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulcinski, G.L.; Maynard, C.W.

    1984-04-01

    Major accomplishments for the period August 1, 1972 - October 31, 1978 include the publishing of four comprehensive fusion reactor conceptual design studies; experimental studies in the areas of radiation damage, plasma-wall interactions, superconducting magnets and 14-MeV neutron cross sections; development of the concepts of carbon curtains and ISSEC's for use in fusion reactors; development of a neutron and gamma heating computer code, a radioactivity and afterheat computer code and a neutral transport computer code; and studies in the areas of RF heating for tokamaks and resource assessment for fusion reactors

  18. Japanese program of materials research for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasiguti, R.R.

    1982-01-01

    The Japanese program of materials research for fusion reactors is described based on the report to the Nuclear Fusion Council, the project research program of the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture, and other official documents. The alloy development for the first wall and its radiation damage are the main topics discussed in this paper. Materials viewpoints for the Japanese Tokamak facilities and the problems of irradiation facilities are also discussed. (orig.)

  19. Proceedings of the Office of Fusion Energy/DOE workshop on ceramic matrix composites for structural applications in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.H.; Lucas, G.E.

    1990-11-01

    A workshop to assess the potential application of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) for structural applications in fusion reactors was held on May 21--22, 1990, at University of California, Santa Barbara. Participants included individuals familiar with materials and design requirements in fusion reactors, ceramic composite processing and properties and radiation effects. The primary focus was to list the feasibility issues that might limit the application of these materials in fusion reactors. Clear advantages for the use of CMCs are high-temperature operation, which would allow a high-efficiency Rankine cycle, and low activation. Limitations to their use are material costs, fabrication complexity and costs, lack of familiarity with these materials in design, and the lack of data on radiation stability at relevant temperatures and fluences. Fusion-relevant feasibility issues identified at this workshop include: hermetic and vacuum properties related to effects of matrix porosity and matrix microcracking; chemical compatibility with coolant, tritium, and breeder and multiplier materials, radiation effects on compatibility; radiation stability and integrity; and ability to join CMCs in the shop and at the reactor site, radiation stability and integrity of joints. A summary of ongoing CMC radiation programs is also given. It was suggested that a true feasibility assessment of CMCs for fusion structural applications could not be completed without evaluation of a material ''tailored'' to fusion conditions or at least to radiation stability. It was suggested that a follow-up workshop be held to design a tailored composite after the results of CMC radiation studies are available and the critical feasibility issues are addressed

  20. Comparative energetics of three fusion-fission symbiotic nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, C.W.; Harms, A.A.

    1975-01-01

    The energetics of three symbiotic fusion-fission nuclear reactor concepts are investigated. The fuel and power balances are considered for various values of systems parameters. The results from this analysis suggest that symbiotic fusion-fission systems are advantageous from the standpoint of economy and resource utilization. (Auth.)