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Sample records for laser deposited bcn

  1. Deposition of hard and adherent TiBCN films for cutting tools applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tillmann, Wolfgang; Hoffmann, Fabian [Institute of Materials Engineering, Technische Universitaet Dortmund (Germany); Bejarano, Gilberto [Institute of Materials Engineering, Technische Universitaet Dortmund (Germany); Department of Materials Engineering, Universidad de Antioquia, Group for Corrosion and Protection-CIDEMAT, Calle 67 No. 53-108, Medellin (Colombia)

    2012-08-15

    Metal cutting tools having wear resistant and chemically stable ceramic coatings are in many applications superior in performance to uncoated tools. Titanium boron carbon nitride (TiBCN) is a hard material particularly suitable as a protective coating for cutting tools due to its excellent properties, such as a high hardness and high wear and corrosion resistance, among other. TiBCN films were grown on Si (100) and high speed steel substrates by means of reactively pulsed DC magnetron sputtering technique. Two B{sub 4}C- and two Ti-targets, to which a pulsed DC voltage of middle frequency was applied, were used for the deposition of TiBCN. A chromium layer was first deposited to obtain a better adhesion of TiBCN to the substrates. The mechanical properties of these coatings deposited under different N{sub 2} contents were investigated. The substrates were biased through a medium frequency power supply. The bias voltage value was -90 V for all coatings. The total film thickness was maintained at approximately 2 {mu}m. The hardness of the coatings increased with reduced nitrogen content, while the adhesion decreased from 40.8 to 24.2 N, and the wear rate increased from 0.154 to 0.744 x 10{sup -16} m{sup 3}/N.m, the latter probably caused by the low content of the self-lubricating amorphous matrix of our coatings. However, the sample deposited by a nitrogen gas flow of 60 sccm presented a wear rate of four orders of magnitude smaller than the uncoated sample. The deposition method presented in this work seems very promising for the manufacture of TiBCN coatings. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Deposition of B{sub 4}C/BCN/c-BN multilayered thin films by r.f. magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bejarano, G. [Laboratorio de Recubrimientos Duros del CDT-ASTIN SENA, Cali (Colombia); Caicedo, J.M. [Laboratorio de Recubrimientos Duros del CDT-ASTIN SENA, Cali (Colombia); Baca, E. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del Valle, A.A. 25360, Cali (Colombia); Prieto, P. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del Valle, A.A. 25360, Cali (Colombia)]. E-mail: pprieto@calima.univalle.edu.co; Balogh, A.G. [Institute for Material Science, Darmstadt University of Technology (Germany); Enders, S. [Max Plank Institute, Department of Material Research, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2006-01-03

    Thin films of cubic boron nitride (c-BN) and B{sub 4}C/BCN/c-BN multilayers, were deposited by r.f. (13.56 MHz) multi-target magnetron sputtering from high-purity (99.99%) h-BN and a (99.5%) B{sub 4}C targets, in an Ar (90%)/N{sub 2} (10%) gas mixture. Films were deposited onto silicon substrates with (100) orientations at 300 {sup o}C, with r.f. power density near 7 W/cm{sup 2}. In order to obtain the highest fraction of the c-BN phase, an r.f. substrate bias voltage between - 100 and - 300 V was applied during the initial nucleation process and - 50 to - 100 V during the film growth. Additionally, B{sub 4}C and BCN films were deposited and analyzed individually. For their deposition, we varied the bias voltage of the B{sub 4}C films between - 50 and - 250 V, and for the BCN coatings, the nitrogen gas flow from 3% to 12%. A 300-nm-thick TiN buffer layer was first deposited to improve the adhesion of all samples. X-ray diffraction patterns revealed the presence of c-BN (111) and h-BN phases. FTIR spectroscopy measurements indicate the presence of a peak at 780 cm{sup -} {sup 1} referred to as 'out-of-plane' h-BN vibration mode; another peak at 1100 cm{sup -} {sup 1} corresponds to the c-BN TO mode and the 'in-plane' vibration mode of the h-BN at 1400 cm{sup -} {sup 1}. BN films deposited at 300 deg. C at a pressure of 4.0 Pa and under - 150 V of nucleation r.f. bias, applied for 35 min, presented the highest c-BN fraction, near 85%. By using 32 layers, it was possible to deposit a 4.6-{mu}m-thick c-BN film with adequate mechanical properties and good adhesion to the substrate.

  3. Effect of annealing on the mechanical and scratch properties of BCN films obtained by magnetron sputtering deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Shuyan, E-mail: xsynefu@126.com [Key Laboratory of Forest Sustainable Management and Environmental Microorganism Engineering of Heilongjiang Province, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China); Ma, Xinxin [School of Material Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wen, Huiying [Key Laboratory of Forest Sustainable Management and Environmental Microorganism Engineering of Heilongjiang Province, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China); Tang, Guangze [School of Material Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Li, Chunwei [Key Laboratory of Forest Sustainable Management and Environmental Microorganism Engineering of Heilongjiang Province, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • The amorphous BCN films were annealed at different temperatures under vacuum condition. • The order degree increases with the annealing temperature increasing, and the films do not decompose even the annealing temperature rise to 1000 °C. • The nano-hardness and modulus of the films decrease with the increasing of annealing temperatures. • The critical load of BCN films is not affected by the annealing temperature, and the films have good interfacial adhesion. • The scratch resistance properties of BCN film are improved by annealing at 600 °C. - Abstract: Boron-carbon-nitride (BCN) films have been fabricated by direct current unbalanced magnetron sputtering. Boron carbide/graphite compound and a mixture of nitrogen and argon are used as target and carrier gas, respectively, during BCN synthesis. The obtained BCN films are annealed at different temperatures under vacuum condition. The effect of annealing temperature on the structure, mechanical properties and scratch behavior of the BCN films has been investigated. The results indicate that no decomposition products are found even the BCN films are annealed at 1000 °C. The hardness and elastic modulus of the films decrease with the increase of annealing temperatures. The BCN film annealed at 600 °C has the strongest scratch resistance. The friction coefficient of all BCN films is in range of 0.05 to 0.15.

  4. GRISS BCN European Style for Ladies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ GRISS BCN genesis Spain style brand, which is with authentic Spanish, French & Italian style that includes international brands such as Kleymac, Sita Murt, Mariona Gen, IKKS, Bleu Blanc Rouge. GRISS BCN brings a Mediterranean style and colors, a very high quality in all the garments, which are made of high level materials and hand made art items in order to service for the beautiful ladies who are seeking for better design, style and taste fashion boutique in Shanghai.

  5. Pulsed laser deposition: Prospects for commercial deposition of epitaxial films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muenchausen, R.E.

    1999-03-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is a physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique for the deposition of thin films. The vapor source is induced by the flash evaporation that occurs when a laser pulse of sufficient intensity (about 100 MW/cm{sup 2}) is absorbed by a target. In this paper the author briefly defines pulsed laser deposition, current applications, research directed at gaining a better understanding of the pulsed laser deposition process, and suggests some future directions to enable commercial applications.

  6. GRISS BCN European Style for Ladies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    GRISS BCN genesis Spain style brand,which is with authentic Spanish,French & Italian style that includes international brands such as Kleymac,Sita Murt,Mariona Gen,IKKS,Bleu Blanc Rouge.GRISS BCN brings a Mediterranean style and colors,a very high quality in all the garments,which are made of high level materials and hand made art items in order to service for the beautiful ladies who are seeking for better design,style and taste fashion boutique in Shanghai.

  7. Microstructure and Dielectric Properties of LPCVD/CVI-SiBCN Ceramics Annealed at Different Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available SiBCN ceramics were introduced into porous Si3N4 ceramics via a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition and infiltration (LPCVD/CVI technique, and then the composite ceramics were heat-treated from 1400 °C to 1700 °C in a N2 atmosphere. The effects of annealing temperatures on microstructure, phase evolution, dielectric properties of SiBCN ceramics were investigated. The results revealed that α-Si3N4 and free carbon were separated below 1700 °C, and then SiC grains formed in the SiBCN ceramic matrix after annealing at 1700 °C through a phase-reaction between free carbon and α-Si3N4. The average dielectric loss of composites increased from 0 to 0.03 due to the formation of dispersive SiC grains and the increase of grain boundaries.

  8. Surface Finish after Laser Metal Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rombouts, M.; Maes, G.; Hendrix, W.; Delarbre, E.; Motmans, F.

    Laser metal deposition (LMD) is an additive manufacturing technology for the fabrication of metal parts through layerwise deposition and laser induced melting of metal powder. The poor surface finish presents a major limitation in LMD. This study focuses on the effects of surface inclination angle and strategies to improve the surface finish of LMD components. A substantial improvement in surface quality of both the side and top surfaces has been obtained by laser remelting after powder deposition.

  9. Laser Velocimetry of Chemical Vapor Deposition Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Laser velocimetry (LV) is being used to measure the gas flows in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactors. These gas flow measurements can be used to improve industrial processes in semiconductor and optical layer deposition and to validate numerical models. Visible in the center of the picture is the graphite susceptor glowing orange-hot at 600 degrees C. It is inductively heated via the copper cool surrounding the glass reactor.

  10. Pulsed laser deposition of rare earth compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Stone, L A

    2001-01-01

    Magnetostrictive thin films have been deposited using various techniques such as sputtering and evaporation but the use of laser deposition has been limited. This research presents the results from pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of TbFe sub 2 , DyFe sub 2 and Terfenol-D thin films using an infra red Transversely Excited Atmospheric (TEA) CO sub 2 laser at lambda approx 10.6 mu m and an ultra violet Argon-Fluoride (ArF) excimer laser at lambda approx 193 nm. Results have showed that the TEA CO sub 2 laser under the range of conditions studied is not suitable for the production of magnetostrictive films. The problems experienced are a mixture of mostly fracture debris at low fluences (F approx 20 Jcm sup - sup 2) and melt droplets at high fluences (F approx 60 Jcm sup - sup 2). In all cases the destruction of the target is a major problem, with the Terfenol-D targets being the worst affected. Thin films produced were all iron rich. The use of an excimer laser has proved more successful in providing stoichiometri...

  11. A series of BCN nanosheets with enhanced photoelectrochemical performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junqi; Lei, Nan; Hao, Hongjuan; Zhou, Jian

    2017-03-01

    A series of flake-like BCN compounds were produced by calcination at different reaction temperatures via thermal substitution of C atoms with B atoms of boric acid substructures in graphitic carbon nitrides (g-C3N4). The structural and optical properties of the samples were characterized by XRD, TEM, HRTEM, XPS and UV-vis absorption. The photoelectrochemical (PEC) performance of all samples were characterized through photocurrent and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurement. The test results demonstrated that BCN nanosheets exhibited higher PEC performance with increasing substituted amount of boron.

  12. Research on laser direct metal deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongzhong; Shi, Likai

    2003-03-01

    Laser direct deposition of metallic parts is a new manufacturing technology, which combines with computer-aided design, laser cladding and rapid prototyping. Fully dense metallic parts can be directly obtained through melting the coaxially fed powders with a high-power laser in a layer-by-layer manner. The process characteristics, system composition as well as some research and advancement on laser direct deposition are presented here. The microstructure and properties observation of laser direct formed 663 copper alloy, 316L stainless steel and Rene'95 nickel super alloy samples indicate that, the as-deposited microstructure is similar to rapidly solidified materials, with homogenous composition and free of defects. Under certain conditions, directionally solidified microstructure can be obtained. The as-formed mechanical properties are equal to or exceed those for casting and wrought annealed materials. At the same time, some sample parts with complicate shape are presented for technology demonstration. The formed parts show good surface quality and dimensional accuracy.

  13. LASER DEPOSITION. THE AREA THERMAL FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin CIOFU

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available By laser direct deposition, the parts are manufactured by injecting powder in a melt metal bath with the help of the laser. During the manufacture it is deployed a complex “ thermic history” in the different built regions. This includes re-melting and many thermic cycles at low temperatures (of hundreds of degrees. The phenomena of thermic transmission are variable in time, being by excellence reversible phenomena, too, as the temperature difference which intervenes cannot be ever small infinite. In the most general case, the temperature is a function of space coordinates, and of the time ح

  14. Pulsed laser deposition of pepsin thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kecskemeti, G. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dom ter 9 (Hungary)]. E-mail: kega@physx.u-szeged.hu; Kresz, N. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dom ter 9 (Hungary); Smausz, T. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences and University of Szeged, Research Group on Laser Physics, H-6720 Szeged, Dom ter 9 (Hungary); Hopp, B. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences and University of Szeged, Research Group on Laser Physics, H-6720 Szeged, Dom ter 9 (Hungary); Nogradi, A. [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Szeged, H-6720, Szeged, Koranyi fasor 10-11 (Hungary)

    2005-07-15

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of organic and biological thin films has been extensively studied due to its importance in medical applications among others. Our investigations and results on PLD of a digestion catalyzing enzyme, pepsin, are presented. Targets pressed from pepsin powder were ablated with pulses of an ArF excimer laser ({lambda} = 193 nm, FWHM = 30 ns), the applied fluence was varied between 0.24 and 5.1 J/cm{sup 2}. The pressure in the PLD chamber was 2.7 x 10{sup -3} Pa. The thin layers were deposited onto glass and KBr substrates. Our IR spectroscopic measurements proved that the chemical composition of deposited thin films is similar to that of the target material deposited at 0.5 and 1.3 J/cm{sup 2}. The protein digesting capacity of the transferred pepsin was tested by adapting a modified 'protein cube' method. Dissolution of the ovalbumin sections proved that the deposited layers consisted of catalytically active pepsin.

  15. A new pulsed laser deposition technique: scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, D; de la Fuente, G F; Jansen, M

    2012-04-01

    The scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method realizes uniform depositions of desired coatings by a modified pulsed laser deposition process, preferably with a femto-second laser-system. Multi-component coatings (single or multilayered) are thus deposited onto substrates via laser induced ablation of segmented targets. This is achieved via horizontal line-scanning of a focused laser beam over a uniformly moving target's surface. This process allows to deposit the desired composition of the coating simultaneously, starting from the different segments of the target and adjusting the scan line as a function of target geometry. The sequence and thickness of multilayers can easily be adjusted by target architecture and motion, enabling inter/intra layer concentration gradients and thus functional gradient coatings. This new, simple PLD method enables the achievement of uniform, large-area coatings. Case studies were performed with segmented targets containing aluminum, titanium, and niobium. Under the laser irradiation conditions applied, all three metals were uniformly ablated. The elemental composition within the rough coatings obtained was fixed by the scanned area to Ti-Al-Nb = 1:1:1. Crystalline aluminum, titanium, and niobium were found to coexist side by side at room temperature within the substrate, without alloy formation up to 600 °C.

  16. Pulsed laser deposition of nanostructured Ag films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnelly, Tony [School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Doggett, Brendan [School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Lunney, James G. [School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)]. E-mail: jlunney@tcd.ie

    2006-04-30

    Ultra-thin (0.5-5 nm) films of Ag have been prepared by pulsed laser deposition in vacuum using a 26 ns KrF excimer laser at 1 J cm{sup -2}. The deposition was controlled using a Langmuir ion probe and a quartz crystal thickness monitor. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the films are not continuous, but are structured on nanometer size scales. Optical absorption spectra showed the expected surface plasmon resonance feature, which shifted to longer wavelength and increased in strength as the equivalent film thickness was increased. It is shown that Maxwell Garnett effective medium theory can be used to calculate the main features of optical absorption spectra.

  17. Nanosecond laser ablation and deposition of silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siew, Wee Ong; Tou, Teck Yong [Multimedia University, Faculty of Engineering, Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Yap, Seong Shan; Reenaas, Turid Worren [Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Department of Physics, Trondheim (Norway); Ladam, Cecile; Dahl, Oeystein [SINTEF Materials and Chemistry, Trondheim (Norway)

    2011-09-15

    Nanosecond-pulsed KrF (248 nm, 25 ns) and Nd:YAG (1064 nm, 532 nm, 355 nm, 5 ns) lasers were used to ablate a polycrystalline Si target in a background pressure of <10{sup -4} Pa. Si films were deposited on Si and GaAs substrates at room temperature. The surface morphology of the films was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Round droplets from 20 nm to 5 {mu}m were detected on the deposited films. Raman Spectroscopy indicated that the micron-sized droplets were crystalline and the films were amorphous. The dependence of the properties of the films on laser wavelengths and fluence is discussed. (orig.)

  18. Laser deposition of bimetallic island films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucherik, A. O.; Arakelyan, S. M.; Kutrovskaya, S. V.; Osipov, A. V.; Istratov, A. V.; Vartanyan, T. A.; Itina, T. E.

    2016-08-01

    In this work the results of a bimetallic Au-Ag structure deposition from the colloidal system by nanosecond laser radiation are presented. The formation of the extended arrays of gold and silver nanoparticles with controlled morphology is examined. We report the results of formation bimetallic islands films with various electrical and optical properties. The changes in the optical properties of the obtained thin films are found to depend on their morphology.

  19. Pulsed laser deposition of tantalum pentoxide film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.-Y.; Boyd, I. W.

    We report thin tantalum pentoxide (Ta2O5) films grown on quartz and silicon substrates by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique employing a Nd:YAG laser (wavelength λ=532 nm) in various O2 gas environments. The effect of oxygen pressure, substrate temperature, and annealing under UV irradiation using a 172-nm excimer lamp on the properties of the grown films has been studied. The optical properties determined by UV spectrophotometry were also found to be a sensitive function of oxygen pressure in the chamber. At an O2 pressure of 0.2 mbar and deposition temperatures between 400 and 500 °C, the refractive index of the films was around 2.18 which is very close to the bulk Ta2O5 value of 2.2, and an optical transmittance around 90% in the visible region of the spectrum was obtained. X-ray diffraction measurements showed that the as-deposited films were amorphous at temperatures below 500 °C and possessed an orthorhombic (β-Ta2O5) crystal structure at temperatures above 600 °C. The most significant result of the present study was that oxygen pressure could be used to control the composition and modulate optical band gap of the films. It was also found that UV annealing can significantly improve the optical and electrical properties of the films deposited at low oxygen pressures (<0.1 mbar).

  20. DNA deposition through laser induced forward transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colina, M; Serra, P; Fernández-Pradas, J M; Sevilla, L; Morenza, J L

    2005-02-15

    Laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a laser direct write technique that appears to be specially adequate for the production of biosensors, since it permits to deposit patterns of biomolecules with high spatial resolution. In the LIFT technique, a laser pulse is focused on a thin film of the material to be transferred through a transparent support, and under the action of the laser pulse, a small fraction of the film is transferred to a receptor substrate that is placed parallel to the film-support system. In the case of biomolecules transfer, the thin film consists in a liquid solution containing the biomolecules. In this work, microarrays of two different cDNAs have been both spotted by LIFT and pin microspotting onto a poly-L-lysine treated glass slide. Once transferred, all the microarrays have been submitted to hybridization with the complementary strands of the spotted cDNAs, each one tagged with a different fluorochrome. Comparative fluorescence scanner analyses have revealed that the microarrays transferred through LIFT are equivalent to those transferred through pin microspotting in terms of signal intensity and gene discrimination capacity, and that the action of the laser pulse does not result in significant damage of the transferred DNA.

  1. Preparation of bulk superhard B-C-N nanocomposite compact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yusheng (Los Alamos, NM); He, Duanwei (Sichuan, CN)

    2011-05-10

    Bulk, superhard, B--C--N nanocomposite compacts were prepared by ball milling a mixture of graphite and hexagonal boron nitride, encapsulating the ball-milled mixture at a pressure in a range of from about 15 GPa to about 25 GPa, and sintering the pressurized encapsulated ball-milled mixture at a temperature in a range of from about 1800-2500 K. The product bulk, superhard, nanocomposite compacts were well sintered compacts with nanocrystalline grains of at least one high-pressure phase of B--C--N surrounded by amorphous diamond-like carbon grain boundaries. The bulk compacts had a measured Vicker's hardness in a range of from about 41 GPa to about 68 GPa.

  2. Resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition of thin biodegradable polymer films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bubb, D.M.; Toftmann, B.; Haglund Jr., R.F.

    2002-01-01

    Thin films of the biodegradable polymer poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) were deposited using resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition (RIR-PLD). The output of a free-electron laser was focused onto a solid target of the polymer, and the films were deposited using 2.90 (resonant with O-H str...

  3. High speed titanium coating by Supersonic Laser Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    LUPOI, ROCCO

    2011-01-01

    PUBLISHED The importance of metal coating technologies drives the continuous improvement of metal deposition techniques for application in a wide range of industrial sectors. This work presents the foundations of a new process technology f or the deposition of t itanium coatings on steel tube substrates using supersonic powder streams and impact site laser heating , known as Supersonic Laser Deposition (SLD). M et...

  4. 25 years of pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Michael; Ramachandra Rao, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    It is our pleasure to introduce this special issue appearing on the occasion of the 25th anniversary of pulsed laser deposition (PLD), which is today one of the most versatile growth techniques for oxide thin films and nanostructures. Ever since its invention, PLD has revolutionized the research on advanced functional oxides due to its ability to yield high-quality thin films, multilayers and heterostructures of a variety of multi-element material systems with rather simple technical means. We appreciate that the use of lasers to deposit films via ablation (now termed PLD) has been known since the 1960s after the invention of the first ruby laser. However, in the first two decades, PLD was something of a 'sleeping beauty' with only a few publications per year, as shown below. This state of hibernation ended abruptly with the advent of high T c superconductor research when scientists needed to grow high-quality thin films of multi-component high T c oxide systems. When most of the conventional growth techniques failed, the invention of PLD by T (Venky) Venkatesan clearly demonstrated that the newly discovered high-T c superconductor, YBa2Cu3O7-δ , could be stoichiometrically deposited as a high-quality nm-thin film with PLD [1]. As a remarkable highlight of this special issue, Venkatesan gives us his very personal reminiscence on these particularly innovative years of PLD beginning in 1986 [2]. After Venky's first paper [1], the importance of this invention was realized worldwide and the number of publications on PLD increased exponentially, as shown in figure 1. Figure 1. Figure 1. Published items per year with title or topic PLD. Data from Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge in September 2013. After publication of Venky's famous paper in 1987 [1], the story of PLD's success began with a sudden jump in the number of publications, about 25 years ago. A first PLD textbook covering its basic understanding was soon published, in 1994, by Chrisey and Hubler [3]. Within a

  5. Exploring laser-guided metal deposition through a microbe metabolite

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to describe exploring laser-guided metal deposition through a microbe metabolite.Design/methodology/approach: A maskless micro-fabrication of laser-guided deposition process through the metabolite of Acidophilic bacteria Thiobacillus ferrooxidans (T.f.) is explored.Findings: The authors have conducted an analysis of the metal deposition process using the point thermal-source of the Nd:YAG laser through the metabolite of Acidophilic bacteria Thiobacillus. A...

  6. Stabilizing laser energy density on a target during pulsed laser deposition of thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowden, Paul C.; Jia, Quanxi

    2016-05-31

    A process for stabilizing laser energy density on a target surface during pulsed laser deposition of thin films controls the focused laser spot on the target. The process involves imaging an image-aperture positioned in the beamline. This eliminates changes in the beam dimensions of the laser. A continuously variable attenuator located in between the output of the laser and the imaged image-aperture adjusts the energy to a desired level by running the laser in a "constant voltage" mode. The process provides reproducibility and controllability for deposition of electronic thin films by pulsed laser deposition.

  7. Nanosecond laser-induced phase transitions in pulsed laser deposition-deposited GeTe films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xinxing, E-mail: xinxing.sun@iom-leipzig.de; Thelander, Erik; Lorenz, Pierre; Gerlach, Jürgen W.; Decker, Ulrich; Rauschenbach, Bernd [Leibniz Institute of Surface Modification, Permoserstr. 15, D-04318, Leipzig (Germany)

    2014-10-07

    Phase transformations between amorphous and crystalline states induced by irradiation of pulsed laser deposition grown GeTe thin films with nanosecond laser pulses at 248 nm and pulse duration of 20 ns are studied. Structural and optical properties of the Ge-Te phase-change films were studied by X-ray diffraction and optical reflectivity measurements as a function of the number of laser pulses between 0 and 30 pulses and of the laser fluence up to 195 mJ/cm². A reversible phase transition by using pulse numbers ≥ 5 at a fluence above the threshold fluence between 11 and 14 mJ/cm² for crystallization and single pulses at a fluence between 162 and 182 mJ/cm² for amorphization could be proved. For laser fluences from 36 up to 130 mJ/cm², a high optical contrast of 14.7% between the amorphous and crystalline state is measured. A simple model is used that allows the discussion on the distribution of temperature in dependency on the laser fluence.

  8. Pulsed laser deposition of ferroelectric thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Somnath; McKnight, Steven H.; Sengupta, Louise C.

    1997-05-01

    It has been shown that in bulk ceramic form, the barium to strontium ratio in barium strontium titanium oxide (Ba1- xSrxTiO3, BSTO) affects the voltage tunability and electronic dissipation factor in an inverse fashion; increasing the strontium content reduces the dissipation factor at the expense of lower voltage tunability. However, the oxide composites of BSTO developed at the Army Research Laboratory still maintain low electronic loss factors for all compositions examined. The intent of this study is to determine whether such effects can be observed in the thin film form of the oxide composites. The pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method has been used to deposit the thin films. The different compositions of the compound (with 1 wt% of the oxide additive) chosen were: Ba0.3Sr0.7TiO3, Ba0.4Sr0.6TiO3, Ba0.5Sr0.5TiO3, Ba0.6Sr0.4TiO3, and Ba0.7Sr0.3TiO3. The electronic properties investigated in this study were the dielectric constant and the voltage tunability. The morphology of the thin films were examined using the atomic force microscopy. Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy was also utilized for optical characterization of the thin films. The electronic and optical properties of the thin films and the bulk ceramics were compared. The results of these investigations are discussed.

  9. Stoichiometric magnetite grown by infrared nanosecond pulsed laser deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Sanz, Mikel; Oujja, M.; Rebollar, Esther; Marco, J.F.; Figuera, Juan de la; Monti, Matteo; Bollero, A.; Camarero, J.; Pedrosa, Francisco J.; García-Hernández, M; Castillejo, Marta

    2013-01-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is a versatile technique for the fabrication of nanostructures due to the possibilities it offers to control size and shape of nanostructured deposits by varying the laser parameters. Magnetite nanostructures are currently promising materials to be used in computing, electronic devices and spintronic applications. For all these uses the fabrication of uniform nanostructured pure magnetite thin films is highly advantageous. In PLD of magnetite, the laser irradiati...

  10. Spectroscopic monitoring of metallic bonding in laser metal deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ya, Wei; Konuk, A.R.; Aarts, R.G.K.M.; Pathiraj, B.; Huis in 't Veld, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    A new approach is presented in this paper to link optical emission spectrum analysis to the quality of clad layers produced with laser metal deposition (LMD). A Nd:YAG laser (λ = 1.064 μm) was used to produce clad tracks with Metco 42C powder on AISI 4140 steel substrate. The laser power was ramped

  11. Bismuth thin films obtained by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Teresa; Arronte, Miguel; Rodriguez, Eugenio; Ponce, Luis; Alonso, J. C.; Garcia, C.; Fernandez, M.; Haro, E.

    1999-07-01

    In the present work Bi thin films were obtained by Pulsed Laser Deposition, using Nd:YAG lasers. The films were characterized by optical microscopy. Raman spectroscopy and X-rays diffraction. It was accomplished the real time spectral emission characterization of the plasma generated during the laser evaporation process. Highly oriented thin films were obtained.

  12. Imposed layer by layer growth by pulsed laser interval deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, Gertjan; Rijnders, Guus J.H.M.; Blank, Dave H.A.; Rogalla, Horst

    1999-01-01

    Pulsed laser deposition has become an important technique to fabricate novel materials. Although there is the general impression that, due to the pulsed deposition, the growth mechanism differs partially from continuous physical and chemical deposition techniques, it has hardly been used. Here, we w

  13. Femtosecond and nanosecond pulsed laser deposition of silicon and germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reenaas, Turid Worren [Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Lee, Yen Sian [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Chowdhury, Fatema Rezwana; Gupta, Manisha; Tsui, Ying Yin [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta (Canada); Tou, Teck Yong [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Yap, Seong Ling [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Kok, Soon Yie [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Yap, Seong Shan, E-mail: seongshan@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-11-01

    Highlights: • Ge and Si were deposited by fs and ns laser at room temperature and at vacuum. • Ion of 10{sup 4} ms{sup −1} and 30–200 eV was obtained for ns ablation for Ge and Si. • Highly energetic ions of 10{sup 5} ms{sup −1} with 2–7 KeV were produced in fs laser ablation. • Nanocrystalline Si and Ge were deposited by using fs laser. • Nanoparticles < 10 nm haven been obtained by fs laser. - Abstract: 150 fs Ti:Sapphire laser pulsed laser deposition of Si and Ge were compared to a nanosecond KrF laser (25 ns). The ablation thresholds for ns lasers were about 2.5 J cm{sup −2} for Si and 2.1 J cm{sup −2} for Ge. The values were about 5–10 times lower when fs laser were used. The power densities were 10{sup 8}–10{sup 9} W cm{sup −2} for ns but 10{sup 12} W cm{sup −2} for fs. By using an ion probe, the ions emission at different fluence were measured where the emitting ions achieving the velocity in the range of 7–40 km s{sup −1} and kinetic energy in the range of 30–200 eV for ns laser. The ion produced by fs laser was measured to be highly energetic, 90–200 km s{sup −1}, 2–10 KeV. Two ion peaks were detected above specific laser fluence for both ns and fs laser ablation. Under fs laser ablation, the films were dominated by nano-sized crystalline particles, drastically different from nanosecond pulsed laser deposition where amorphous films were obtained. The ions characteristics and effects of pulse length on the properties of the deposited films were discussed.

  14. Lipase biofilm deposited by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aronne, Antonio [Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Industrial Production, University of Naples “Federico II”, Napoli (Italy); Bloisi, Francesco, E-mail: bloisi@na.infn.it [SPIN – CNR, Naples (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Naples “Federico II”, Napoli (Italy); Calabria, Raffaela; Califano, Valeria [Istituto Motori – CNR, Naples (Italy); Depero, Laura E. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Brescia, Brescia (Italy); Fanelli, Esther [Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Industrial Production, University of Naples “Federico II”, Napoli (Italy); Federici, Stefania [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Brescia, Brescia (Italy); Massoli, Patrizio [Istituto Motori – CNR, Naples (Italy); Vicari, Luciano R.M. [SPIN – CNR, Naples (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Naples “Federico II”, Napoli (Italy)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • A lipase film was deposited with Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation technique. • FTIR spectra show that laser irradiation do not damage lipase molecule. • Laser fluence controls the characteristics of complex structure generated by MAPLE. - Abstract: Lipase is an enzyme that finds application in biodiesel production and for detection of esters and triglycerides in biosensors. Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE), a technique derived from Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) for deposition of undamaged biomolecules or polymers, is characterized by the use of a frozen target obtained from a solution/suspension of the guest material (to be deposited) in a volatile matrix (solvent). The presence of the solvent avoids or at least reduces the potential damage of guest molecules by laser radiation but only the guest material reaches the substrate in an essentially solvent-free deposition. MAPLE can be used for enzymes immobilization, essential for industrial application, allowing the development of continuous processes, an easier separation of products, the reuse of the catalyst and, in some cases, enhancing enzyme properties (pH, temperature stability, etc.) and catalytic activity in non-aqueous media. Here we show that MAPLE technique can be used to deposit undamaged lipase and that the complex structure (due to droplets generated during extraction from target) of the deposited material can be controlled by changing the laser beam fluence.

  15. Pulsed laser ablation and deposition of niobium carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, M.; De Bonis, A.; Santagata, A.; Rau, J. V.; Galasso, A.; Teghil, R.

    2016-06-01

    NbC crystalline films have been deposited in vacuum by ultra-short pulsed laser deposition technique. The films have been characterized by transmission and scanning electron microscopies and by X-ray diffraction. To clarify the ablation-deposition mechanism, the plasma produced by the ablation process has been characterized by optical emission spectroscopy and fast imaging. A comparison of the results with those obtained by ns pulsed deposition of the same target has been carried out.

  16. Exploring laser-guided metal deposition through a microbe metabolite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hocheng

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to describe exploring laser-guided metal deposition through a microbe metabolite.Design/methodology/approach: A maskless micro-fabrication of laser-guided deposition process through the metabolite of Acidophilic bacteria Thiobacillus ferrooxidans (T.f. is explored.Findings: The authors have conducted an analysis of the metal deposition process using the point thermal-source of the Nd:YAG laser through the metabolite of Acidophilic bacteria Thiobacillus. An analytical model adopting the moving point heat source on the substrate and heat transfer conditions is presented. The thermal field generated by the laser input energy is investigated.Practical implications: Though the mechanism of the laser-assisted deposition process is not fully revealed by biologist yet, the current model provides a means of control of the line deposition of metals.Originality/value: Based on the fundamental knowledge of how the line width varies with laser power and scanning speed, more investigation of the mini-scale heat convection and the threshold temperature of chemical reaction is expected in the future for further understanding of this novel metal deposition method triggered and written by laser.

  17. Nanometer sized structures grown by pulsed laser deposition

    KAUST Repository

    ElZein, Basma

    2015-10-01

    Nanometer sized materials can be produced by exposing a target to a laser source to remove material from the target and deposit the removed material onto a surface of a substrate to grow a thin film in a vacuum chamber

  18. Manufacturing of Er:ZBLAN ridge waveguides by pulsed laser deposition and ultrafast laser micromachining for green integrated lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottmann, Jens [Lehrstuhl fuer Lasertechnik, RWTH Aachen University, Steinbachstr. 15, 52074 Aachen (Germany)], E-mail: jens.gottmann@llt.rwth-aachen.de; Moiseev, Leonid; Vasilief, Ion; Wortmann, Dirk [Lehrstuhl fuer Lasertechnik, RWTH Aachen University, Steinbachstr. 15, 52074 Aachen (Germany)

    2008-01-15

    Laser radiation is used both for the deposition of the laser active thin films and for the microstructuring to define wave guiding structures for the fabrication of waveguide lasers. Thin films of Er:ZBLAN (a fluoride glass consisting of ZrF{sub 4}, BaF{sub 2}, LaF{sub 3}, AlF{sub 3}, NaF, ErF{sub 3}) for green up-conversion lasers (545 nm) are produced by pulsed laser deposition using ArF excimer laser radiation (wavelength 193 nm). Manufacturing of the laser active waveguides by microstructuring is done using fs-laser ablation of the deposited films. The structural and optical properties of the films and the damping losses of the structured waveguides are determined in view of the design and the fabrication of compact and efficient diode pumped waveguide lasers. The resulting waveguides are polished, provided with resonator mirrors, pumped using diode lasers and characterized.

  19. Pulsed laser deposition: metal versus oxide ablation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doeswijk, L.M.; Rijnders, G.; Blank, D.H.A.

    2004-01-01

    We present experimental results of pulsed laser interaction with metal (Ni, Fe, Nb) and oxide (TiO2, SrTiO3, BaTiO3) targets. The influence of the laser fluence and the number of laser pulses on the resulting target morphology are discussed. Although different responses for metal and oxide targets t

  20. Deposition of tantalum carbide coatings on graphite by laser interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veligdan, James; Branch, D.; Vanier, P. E.; Barietta, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    Graphite surfaces can be hardened and protected from erosion by hydrogen at high temperatures by refractory metal carbide coatings, which are usually prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or chemical vapor reaction (CVR) methods. These techniques rely on heating the substrate to a temperature where a volatile metal halide decomposes and reacts with either a hydrocarbon gas or with carbon from the substrate. For CVR techniques, deposition temperatures must be in excess of 2000 C in order to achieve favorable deposition kinetics. In an effort to lower the bulk substrate deposition temperature, the use of laser interactions with both the substrate and the metal halide deposition gas has been employed. Initial testing involved the use of a CO2 laser to heat the surface of a graphite substrate and a KrF excimer laser to accomplish a photodecomposition of TaCl5 gas near the substrate. The results of preliminary experiments using these techniques are described.

  1. Characterization of polymer thin films obtained by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla-Papavlu, A.; Dinca, V.; Ion, V.; Moldovan, A.; Mitu, B.; Luculescu, C.; Dinescu, M.

    2011-04-01

    The development of laser techniques for the deposition of polymer and biomaterial thin films on solid surfaces in a controlled manner has attracted great attention during the last few years. Here we report the deposition of thin polymer films, namely Polyepichlorhydrin by pulsed laser deposition. Polyepichlorhydrin polymer was deposited on flat substrate (i.e. silicon) using an NdYAG laser (266 nm, 5 ns pulse duration and 10 Hz repetition rate). The obtained thin films have been characterized by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry. It was found that for laser fluences up to 1.5 J/cm 2 the chemical structure of the deposited polyepichlorhydrin polymer thin layers resembles to the native polymer, whilst by increasing the laser fluence above 1.5 J/cm 2 the polyepichlorohydrin films present deviations from the bulk polymer. Morphological investigations (atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy) reveal continuous polyepichlorhydrin thin films for a relatively narrow range of fluences (1-1.5 J/cm 2). The wavelength dependence of the refractive index and extinction coefficient was determined by ellipsometry studies which lead to new insights about the material. The obtained results indicate that pulsed laser deposition method is potentially useful for the fabrication of polymer thin films to be used in applications including electronics, microsensor or bioengineering industries.

  2. CTS and CZTS for solar cells made by pulsed laser deposition and pulsed electron deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettlinger, Rebecca Bolt

    , which make them promising alternatives to the commercially successful solar cell material copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS). Complementing our group's work on pulsed laser deposition of CZTS, we collaborated with IMEM-CNR in Parma, Italy, to deposit CZTS by pulsed electron deposition for the first...... time. We compared the results of CZTS deposition by PLD at DTU in Denmark to CZTS made by PED at IMEM-CNR, where CIGS solar cells have successfully been fabricated at very low processing temperatures. The main results of this work were as follows: Monoclinic-phase CTS films were made by pulsed laser...

  3. State-of-the-art Pb photocathodes deposited by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gontad, F., E-mail: Francisco.gontad@le.infn.it; Perrone, A.

    2014-05-21

    In this article we present and discuss the current status of thin film Pb photocathodes deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) with different laser parameters, such as laser fluence, wavelength or pulse duration. The PLD technique appears very efficient for the fabrication of pure Pb photocathodes, providing good adherence and respectable quantum efficiency. The films deposited on the picosecond and subpicosecond regimes are practically free of big droplets and fragments, whereas in the nanosecond regime their presence cannot be neglected. All the films present a granular structure and polycrystalline character with preferential orientation along the (111) crystalline planes, irrespective of the laser pulse duration or wavelength. The main results obtained from the photoemission performance of Pb thin films deposited by PLD demonstrate their chemical stability under vacuum conditions and respectable quantum efficiency with a maximum of 7.3×10{sup −5} for films deposited on the subpicosecond regime. The photoemission properties confirm that Pb thin films deposited by PLD are a notable alternative for the fabrication of photocathodes for superconductive radio-frequency electron guns. - Highlights: • Lead samples were grown by Pulsed Laser Deposition at different laser parameters • All films present a granular morphology • Lead films grow preferentially along the 111 crystalline planes of the cubic net • A maximum quantum efficiency of 7.3 × 10-5 has been found.

  4. Application of laser assisted cold spraying process for metal deposition

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tlotleng, Monnamme

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Laser assisted cold spraying (LACS) process is a hybrid technique that uses laser and cold spray to deposit solid powders on metal substrates. For bonding to occur, the particle velocities must be supersonic which are achieved by entraining...

  5. Stoichiometry controlled oxide thin film growth by pulsed laser deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenen, Rik; Smit, Jasper; Orsel, Kasper; Vailionis, Arturas; Bastiaens, Bert; Huijben, Mark; Boller, Klaus; Rijnders, Guus; Koster, Gertjan

    2015-01-01

    The oxidation of species in the plasma plume during pulsed laser deposition controls both the stoichiometry as well as the growth kinetics of the deposited SrTiO3 thin films, instead of the commonly assumed mass distribution in the plasma plume and the kinetic energy of the arriving species. It was

  6. RHEED study of titanium dioxide with pulsed laser deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Inge Lise; Pryds, Nini; Schou, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) operated at high pressure has been used to monitor the growth of thin films of titanium dioxide (TiO2) on (1 0 0) magnesium oxide (MgO) substrates by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The deposition is performed with a synthetic rutile TiO2 target...

  7. Pulsed laser ablation and deposition of niobium carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sansone, M.; De Bonis, A. [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università della Basilicata, Viale dell’Ateneo Lucano 10, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Santagata, A. [Istituto di Struttura della Materia, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, UOS Tito Scalo, C.da Santa Loja, 85010 Tito, PZ (Italy); Rau, J.V. [Istituto di Struttura della Materia, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere, 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Galasso, A. [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università della Basilicata, Viale dell’Ateneo Lucano 10, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Teghil, R., E-mail: roberto.teghil@unibas.it [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università della Basilicata, Viale dell’Ateneo Lucano 10, 85100 Potenza (Italy)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • We have deposited in vacuum niobium carbide films by fs and ns PLD. • We have compared PLD performed by ultra-short and short laser pulses. • The films deposited by fs PLD of NbC are formed by nanoparticles. • The structure of the films produced by fs PLD at 500 °C corresponds to NbC. - Abstract: NbC crystalline films have been deposited in vacuum by ultra-short pulsed laser deposition technique. The films have been characterized by transmission and scanning electron microscopies and by X-ray diffraction. To clarify the ablation–deposition mechanism, the plasma produced by the ablation process has been characterized by optical emission spectroscopy and fast imaging. A comparison of the results with those obtained by ns pulsed deposition of the same target has been carried out.

  8. Laser-Focused Atomic Deposition for Nanascale Grating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Yan; LI Tong-Bao; WU Wen; XIAO Yi-Li; ZHANG Ping-Ping; GONG Wei-Gang

    2011-01-01

    Laser-focused atomic deposition is a technique with which nearly resonant light is used to pattern an atom beam.To solve the problem that the result of laser-cooled atoms cannot be monitored during the 30-rmin depositing time,we present a three-hole mechanically precollimated aperture apparatus.A 425 nm laser light standing wave is used to focus a beam of chromium atoms to fabricate the nanoscale grating. The period of the grating is 213(+-)0.1 nm,the height is 4nm and the full width at half miximum is 64(+-)6nm.

  9. Innovations in laser cladding and direct metal deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brückner, Frank; Nowotny, Steffen; Leyens, Christoph

    2012-03-01

    The present paper reviews recent progress in productivity, precision and quality of laser-based cladding and additive layer manufacturing. Recently, we have demonstrated the great benefits obtained from induction assisted laser cladding. This novel hybrid technology combines high deposition rates with excellent cladding properties. Laser-based direct metal deposition is a novel concept for the fabrication of components and repair as well as geometrical surface modifications. Newly developed nozzle design allows focused powder spots to generate wall thicknesses of about 30 μm. An in-depth understanding of the processes and the resulting materials properties is key for the development of technically viable and economically reasonable customized solutions.

  10. Enhancement of surface integrity of titanium alloy with copper by means of laser metal deposition process

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Erinosho, MF

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The laser metal deposition process possesses the combination of metallic powder and laser beam respectively. However, these combinations create an adhesive bonding that permanently solidifies the laser-enhanced-deposited powders. Titanium alloys (Ti...

  11. Ultraviolet laser deposition of graphene thin films without catalytic layers

    KAUST Repository

    Sarath Kumar, S. R.

    2013-01-09

    In this letter, the formation of nanostructured graphene by ultraviolet laser ablation of a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite target under optimized conditions is demonstrated, without a catalytic layer, and a model for the growth process is proposed. Previously, graphene film deposition by low-energy laser (2.3 eV) was explained by photo-thermal models, which implied that graphene films cannot be deposited by laser energies higher than the C-C bond energy in highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (3.7 eV). Here, we show that nanostructured graphene films can in fact be deposited using ultraviolet laser (5 eV) directly over different substrates, without a catalytic layer. The formation of graphene is explained by bond-breaking assisted by photoelectronic excitation leading to formation of carbon clusters at the target and annealing out of defects at the substrate.

  12. Exploring the deposition of oxides on silicon for photovoltaic cells by pulsed laser deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doeswijk, Lianne M.; Moor, de Hugo H.C.; Rogalla, Horst; Blank, Dave H.A.

    2002-01-01

    Since most commercially available solar cells are still made from silicon, we are exploring the introduction of passivating qualities in oxides, with the potential to serve as an antireflection coating. Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) was used to deposit TiO2 and SrTiO3 coatings on silicon substrates.

  13. Simulation of Chromium Atom Deposition Pattern in a Gaussain Laser Standing Wave with Different Laser Power

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen-Tao; ZHU Bao-Hua

    2009-01-01

    One-dimensional deposition of a neutral chromium atomic beam focused by a near-resonant Gaussian standing-laser field is discussed by using a fourth-order Runge-Kutta type algorithm. The deposition pattern of neutral chromium atoms in a laser standing wave with different laser power is discussed and the simulation result shows that the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of a nanometer stripe is 115nm and the contrast is 2.5:1 with laser power 3.93mW; the FWHM is 0.Snm and the contrast is 27:1 with laser power 16mW, the optimal laser power; but with laser power increasing to 50mW, the nanometer structure forms multi-crests and the quality worsens quickly with increasing laser power.

  14. Pulsed laser deposition of niobium nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farha, Ashraf Hassan, E-mail: ahass006@odu.edu; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E., E-mail: helsayed@odu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529 (United States); Applied Research Center, Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo 11566 (Egypt); Ufuktepe, Yüksel, E-mail: ufuk@cu.edu.tr [Department of Physics, University of Cukurova, 01330 Adana (Turkey); Myneni, Ganapati, E-mail: rao@jlab.org [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States)

    2015-12-04

    Niobium nitride (NbN{sub x}) films were grown on Nb and Si(100) substrates using pulsed laser deposition. NbN{sub x} films were deposited on Nb substrates using PLD with a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (λ = 1064 nm, ∼40 ns pulse width, and 10 Hz repetition rate) at different laser fluences, nitrogen background pressures and deposition substrate temperatures. When all the fabrication parameters are fixed, except for the laser fluence, the surface roughness, nitrogen content, and grain size increase with increasing laser fluence. Increasing nitrogen background pressure leads to a change in the phase structure of the NbN{sub x} films from mixed β-Nb{sub 2}N and cubic δ-NbN phases to single hexagonal β-Nb{sub 2}N. The substrate temperature affects the preferred orientation of the crystal structure. The structural and electronic, properties of NbN{sub x} deposited on Si(100) were also investigated. The NbN{sub x} films exhibited a cubic δ-NbN with a strong (111) orientation. A correlation between surface morphology, electronic, and superconducting properties was found. The observations establish guidelines for adjusting the deposition parameters to achieve the desired NbN{sub x} film morphology and phase.

  15. Divalent Mn in calcium hydroxyapatite by pulse laser deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, I; Peto, G; Karacs, A; Molnár, G; Popov, I

    2010-10-01

    Pulse laser deposition (PLD) was used to deposit Mn containing calcium hydroxyapatite (HAMn). The PLD process ensures that the composition of the target and the deposited layer is the same. In some cases additional effort should be made to preserve some volatile components, namely OH. This was ensured by water steam supply. Calcium hydroxyapatite deposited by this method has the same properties as the target in respect to lattice parameters and valence state of Mn, which ensures the fixation between hard tissue and metal implants. This fact makes PLD grown HAMn layer covering implants to be improved for practical use.

  16. Laser plasmatron for diamond coating deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glova, A. F., E-mail: afglova@triniti.ru; Lysikov, A. Yu.; Malyuta, D. D.; Nelyubin, S. S.; Peretyatko, P. I.; Ryzhkov, Yu. F. [JSC State Research Center of the Russian Federation Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    An experimental installation with a laser plasmatron based on a continuous wave CO{sub 2} laser with a radiation power of up to 3.5 kW has been created. The plasmatron design makes it possible to bring out the plasma jet into atmospheric air both along and across the laser beam direction. The spatial temperature distributions on the metal substrate surface heated by the plasma jet are measured. The threshold power for optical discharge maintenance as a function of the gas flow rate and the focal length of the focusing lens are obtained for an Ar and Ar/CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} gas mixture under atmospheric pressure; the radiation spectrum of the discharge plasma is measured. A one-dimensional model of the discharge for estimation of its geometrical parameters in a convergent laser beam with consideration of radiation refraction on the discharge is given.

  17. Lipase biofilm deposited by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronne, Antonio; Bloisi, Francesco; Calabria, Raffaela; Califano, Valeria; Depero, Laura E.; Fanelli, Esther; Federici, Stefania; Massoli, Patrizio; Vicari, Luciano R. M.

    2015-05-01

    Lipase is an enzyme that finds application in biodiesel production and for detection of esters and triglycerides in biosensors. Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE), a technique derived from Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) for deposition of undamaged biomolecules or polymers, is characterized by the use of a frozen target obtained from a solution/suspension of the guest material (to be deposited) in a volatile matrix (solvent). The presence of the solvent avoids or at least reduces the potential damage of guest molecules by laser radiation but only the guest material reaches the substrate in an essentially solvent-free deposition. MAPLE can be used for enzymes immobilization, essential for industrial application, allowing the development of continuous processes, an easier separation of products, the reuse of the catalyst and, in some cases, enhancing enzyme properties (pH, temperature stability, etc.) and catalytic activity in non-aqueous media. Here we show that MAPLE technique can be used to deposit undamaged lipase and that the complex structure (due to droplets generated during extraction from target) of the deposited material can be controlled by changing the laser beam fluence.

  18. Effects of laser fluence on the structural properties of pulsed laser deposited ruthenium thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Wai-Keat; Wong, Hin-Yong; Chan, Kah-Yoong; Tou, Teck-Yong [Multimedia University, Centre for Advanced Devices and Systems (CADS), Faculty of Engineering, Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Yong, Thian-Khok [Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Faculty of Engineering and Science, Setapak, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Yap, Seong-Shan [Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Institute of Physics, Trondheim (Norway)

    2010-08-15

    Ruthenium (Ru) has received great interest in recent years for applications in microelectronics. Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) enables the growth of Ru thin films at low temperatures. In this paper, we report for the first time the characterization of pulsed laser deposited Ru thin films. The deposition processes were carried out at room temperature in vacuum environment for different durations with a pulsed Nd:YAG laser of 355-nm laser wavelength, employing various laser fluences ranging from 2 J/cm{sup 2} to 8 J/cm{sup 2}. The effect of the laser fluence on the structural properties of the deposited Ru films was investigated using surface profilometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Ru droplets, some spherical in shape and some flattened into round discs were found on the deposited Ru. The droplets were correlated to ripple formations on the target during the laser-induced ejection from the target. In addition, crystalline Ru with orientations of (100), (101), and (002) was observed in the XRD spectra and their intensities were found to increase with increasing laser fluence and film thickness. Grain sizes ranging from 20 nm to 35 nm were deduced using the Scherrer formula. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) show that the composition of the plume and the deposited Ru film was of high purity. (orig.)

  19. Influence of laser power on microstructure of laser metal deposited 17-4 ph stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyemi, A. A.; Akinlabi, ET; Mahamood, R. M.; Sanusi, K. O.; Pityana, S.; Tlotleng, M.

    2017-08-01

    The influence of laser power on the microstructure of 17-4 PH stainless steel produced by laser metal deposition was investigated. Multiple-trackof 17-4 stainless steel powder was deposited on 316 stainless steel substrate using laser metal deposition, an additive manufacturing process. In this research, laser power was varied between 1.0 kW and 2.6 kW with scanning speed fixed at 1.2 m/s. The powder flow rate and the gas flow rate were also kept constant at values of 5 g/min and 2 l/min respectively. The microstructure was studied under optical microscope and it revealed that the microstructure was dendritic in structure with finer and lesser δ-ferriteat low laser power while the appearance of coarse and more δ-ferriteare seen at higher laser power.

  20. Pulsed laser deposition and characterization of Alnico5 magnetic films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butt, M.Z., E-mail: mzbutt49@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, GC University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Ali, Dilawar [Department of Physics, GC University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Ahmad, Fayyaz [Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore 54890 (Pakistan); Magnetophotonics Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-01

    Alnico5 films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition on glass substrate at room temperature under a vacuum ∼10{sup −3} Torr in the absence and in the presence of 500 Oe external transverse magnetic field applied on the plasma plume during film deposition. For this purpose, Nd:YAG laser was employed to ablate the Alnico5 target. The ablated material was deposited on glass substrate placed at a distance of 2 cm from the target. The structural and magnetic properties of the film were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscope, and vibrating sample magnetometer. X-ray diffraction patterns showed that the Alnico5 films were amorphous in nature. Atomic force microscopy revealed that the Alnico5 film deposited in absence of external magnetic field has larger root-mean-square roughness value (60.2 nm) than the magnetically deposited film (42.9 nm). Vibrating sample magnetometer measurements showed that the in-plane saturation magnetization of Alnico5 film deposited in the presence of external magnetic field increases by 32% as compared to that for the film deposited in the absence of external magnetic field. However, the out-of-plane saturation magnetization was almost independent of the external magnetic field. In magnetically deposited film, there is in-plane anisotropy parallel to the applied external magnetic field.

  1. History and current status of commercial pulsed laser deposition equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, James A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper will review the history of the scale-up of the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) process from small areas ∼1 cm2 up to 10 m2 starting in about 1987. It also documents the history of commercialization of PLD as various companies become involved in selling fully integrated laser deposition tools starting in 1989. The paper will highlight the current state of the art of commercial PLD equipment for R&D that is available on the market today from mainstream vendors as well as production-oriented applications directed at piezo-electric materials for microelectromechanical systems and high-temperature superconductors for coated-conductor applications. The paper clearly demonstrates that considerable improvements have been made to scaling this unique physical vapour deposition process to useful substrate sizes, and that commercial deposition equipment is readily available from a variety of vendors to address a wide variety of technologically important thin-film applications.

  2. Characterization of laser metal deposited 316L stainless steel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bayode, A

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available and metallographic samples were prepared according to ASTM E3 – 11 standard for metallurgical preparation of stainless steel [15]. The surface of the polished samples was etched with Kalling’s No. 2 reagent (5g CuCl2, 100 ml HCl, 100 ml ethanol). Microstructural... surface which is typical of most Laser deposited materials. Fig. 2. Deposited tracks at different laser power: (a) 1.8kW, (b) 2.0kW, (c) 2.2 and (d) 2.kW. LMD produces different zones in the processed material [16]. A macro-view of sample 1...

  3. Laser ablation deposition measurements from silver and nickel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Ellegaard, Ole; Schou, Jørgen

    1996-01-01

    The deposition rate for laser ablated metals has been studied in a standard geometry for fluences up to 20 J/cm(2). The rate for silver and nickel is a few percent of a monolayer per pulse at the laser wavelengths 532 nm and 355 nm. The rate for nickel is significantly higher than that for silver...... at 532 nm, whereas the rate for the two metals is similar at 355 nm. This behaviour disagrees with calculations based on the thermal properties at low intensities as well as predictions based on formation of an absorbing plasma at high intensities. The deposition rate falls strongly with increasing...

  4. Continuous wave infrared laser deposition of organic thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaginuma, Seiichiro [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Jun [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Haemori, Masamitsu [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Itaka, Kenji [Department of Advanced Materials Science, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, Univesity of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan); Matsumoto, Yuji [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Kondo, Michio [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Koinuma, Hideomi [Department of Advanced Materials Science, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, Univesity of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan)

    2007-04-15

    We developed a continuous-wave infrared laser molecular beam epitaxy (CW-IR-LMBE) optimized for the fabrication of organic semiconductor films. The crystal quality of these organic thin films deposited by CW-IR-LMBE was substantially the same as those deposited by thermal evaporation. Due to the possibility of quick switching of evaporation sources, CW-IR-LMBE is especially advantageous for rapid screening of composition, thickness, and fabrication parameters in materials and device optimization based on combinatorial technology.

  5. UV laser deposition of metal films by photogenerated free radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, R. K.; Mantei, T. D.

    1986-01-01

    A novel photochemical method for liquid-phase deposition of metal films is described. In the liquid phase deposition scheme, a metal containing compound and a metal-metal bonded carbonyl complex are dissolved together in a polar solvent and the mixture is irradiated using a UV laser. The optical arrangement consists of a HeCd laser which provides 7 mW of power at a wavelength of 325 nm in the TEM(OO) mode. The beam is attenuated and may be expanded to a diameter of 5-20 mm. Experiments with photochemical deposition of silver films onto glass and quartz substrates are described in detail. Mass spectrometric analysis of deposited silver films indicated a deposition rate of about 1 A/s at incident power levels of 0.01 W/sq cm. UV laser-induced copper and palladium films have also been obtained. A black and white photograph showing the silver Van Der Pauw pattern of a solution-deposited film is provided.

  6. Laser cleaning of pulsed laser deposited rhodium films for fusion diagnostic mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uccello, A., E-mail: andrea.uccello@mail.polimi.it [Dipartimento di Energia, Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy); Maffini, A., E-mail: alessandro.maffini@mail.polimi.it [Dipartimento di Energia, Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy); Dellasega, D., E-mail: david.dellasega@polimi.it [Dipartimento di Energia, Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Milan (Italy); Passoni, M., E-mail: matteo.passoni@polimi.it [Dipartimento di Energia, Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Milan (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Pulsed laser deposition is exploited to produce Rh films for first mirrors. ► Pulsed laser deposition is exploited to produce tokamak-like C contaminants. ► Rh laser damage threshold has been evaluated for infrared pulses. ► Laser cleaning of C contaminated Rh films gives promising results. -- Abstract: In this paper an experimental investigation on the laser cleaning process of rhodium films, potentially candidates to be used as tokamak first mirrors (FMs), from redeposited carbon contaminants is presented. A relevant issue that lowers mirror's performance during tokamak operations is the redeposition of sputtered material from the first wall on their surface. Among all the possible techniques, laser cleaning, in which a train of laser pulses is launched to the surface that has to be treated, is a method to potentially mitigate this problem. The same laser system (Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with a fundamental wavelength of 1064-nm and 7-ns pulses) has been employed with three aims: (i) production by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of Rh film mirrors, (ii) production by PLD of C deposits with controlled morphology, and (iii) investigation of the laser cleaning method onto C contaminated Rh samples. The evaluation of Rh films laser damage threshold, as a function of fluence and number of pulses, is discussed. Then, the C/Rh films have been cleaned by the laser beam. The exposed zones have been characterized by visual inspection and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), showing promising results.

  7. Laser surface modification of titanium substrate for pulsed laser deposition of highly adherent hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, P; Muraleedharan, C V; Komath, Manoj; Varma, Harikrishna

    2011-07-01

    Biomedical implant devices made out of titanium and its alloys are benefited by a modified surface or a bioactive coating to enhance bone bonding ability and to function effectively in vivo for the intended period of time. In this respect hydroxyapatite coating developed through pulsed laser deposition is a promising approach. Since the success of the bioactive ceramic coated implant depends mainly on the substrate-coating strength; an attempt has been made to produce micro patterned surface structure on titanium substrate for adherent hydroxyapatite coating. A pulsed Nd-YAG laser beam (355 nm) with 10 Hz repetition rate was used for surface treatment of titanium as well as hydroxyapatite deposition. The unfocussed laser beam was used to modify the substrate surface with 500-18,000 laser pulses while keeping the polished substrate in water. Hydroxyapatite deposition was done in a vacuum deposition chamber at 400 °C with the focused laser beam under 1 × 10⁻³ mbar oxygen pressure. Deposits were analyzed to understand the physico-chemical, morphological and mechanical characteristics. The obtained substrate and coating surface morphology indicates that laser treatment method can provide controlled micro-topography. Scratch test analysis and microindentation hardness values of coating on laser treated substrate indicate higher mechanical adhesion with respect to coatings on untreated substrates.

  8. Influence of laser power on deposition of the chromium atomic beam in laser standing wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    One-dimensional deposition of collimated Cr atomic beam focused by a near-resonant Gaussian standing-laser field with wavelength of 425.55 nm is examined from particle-optics approach by using an adaptive step size,fourth-order Runge-Kutta type algorithm.The influence of laser power on deposition of atoms in laser standing wave is discussed and the simulative result shows that the FWHM of nanometer stripe is 102 nm and contrast is 2:1 with laser power equal to 3 mW,the FWHM is 1.2 nm and contrast is 32:1 with laser power equal to 16 mW,but with laser power increase,equal to 50 mW,the nonmeter structure forms the multi-crests and exacerbates.

  9. Influence of laser power on deposition of the chromium atomic beam in laser standing wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG WenTao; ZHU BaoHua; ZHANG BaoWu; LI TongBao

    2009-01-01

    One-dimensional deposition of collimated Cr atomic beam focused by a near-resonant Gaussian standing-laser field with wavelength of 425.55 nm is examined from particle-optics approach by using an adaptive step size, fourth-order Runge-Kutta type algorithm. The influence of laser power on depo-sition of atoms in laser standing wave is discussed and the simulative result shows that the FWHM of nanometer stripe is 102 nm and contrast is 2:1 with laser power equal to 3 mW, the FWHM is 1.2 nm and contrast is 32:1 with laser power equal to 16 mW, but with laser power increase, equal to 50 mW, the nonmeter structure forms the multi-crests and exacerbates.

  10. Epitaxial thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blank, D.H.A.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique to control the growth of metal oxide materials at atomic level using high-pressure reflective high-energy electron diffraction and ellipsometry. These developments have helped to make PLD a grown-up technique to fabricate complex

  11. Transparent conducting oxides on polymeric substrates by pulsed laser deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekkers, Jan Matthijn

    2007-01-01

    This thesis describes the research on thin films of transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) on polymeric substrates manufactured by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). TCOs are an indispensable part in optoelectronic applications such as displays, solar cells, light-emitting diodes, etc. At present, in many

  12. Iridium thin films deposited via pulsed laser deposition for future applications as transition-edge sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galeazzi, M. E-mail: galeazzi@physics.miami.edu; Chen, C.; Cohn, J.L.; Gundersen, J.O

    2004-03-11

    The University of Miami has recently started developing and studying high-resolution microcalorimeters operating near 100 mK for X-ray and particle physics and astrophysics. These detectors will be based on Transition Edge Sensors technology fabricated using iridium thin films deposited via the Pulsed Laser Deposition technique. We report here the preliminary result of the room temperature characterization of the Ir thin films, and an overview of future plans to use the films as transition edge sensors.

  13. Laser-deposited Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta orthopedic alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, R; Nag, S; Samuel, S; Fraser, H L

    2006-08-01

    The complex quaternary Ti-35Nb-7Zr-5Ta orthopedic alloy has been successfully deposited from a powder feedstock consisting of a blend of elemental titanium, niobium, zirconium, and tantalum powders, using the laser engineered net-shaping (LENStrade mark) process. In the as laser-deposited form, these alloys exhibit a substantially higher tensile strength as compared with more conventionally processed counterparts of similar composition, while maintaining excellent ductility and a low modulus. Furthermore, the as-deposited alloys appear to exhibit a texture, with a substantially large number of grains of the beta phase aligning one of their axes nearly normal to the substrate or parallel to the growth direction. The microstructure of the as-deposited as well as tensile-tested alloys have been characterized in detail using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), orientation microscopy (OM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Formation of a high density of shear bands, possibly arising from slip localization due to precipitates of the omega phase in the beta matrix, is clearly evident in the tensile-tested sample. The enhanced tensile strength and low modulus in these laser-deposited alloys coupled with the ability to form near-net shape components makes LENS an attractive processing technology for orthopedic implants.

  14. Laser deposition of sulfonated phthalocyanines for gas sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitl, Premysl, E-mail: fitlp@vscht.cz [Department of Physics and Measurements, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, Technicka 5, Prague 6 CZ-166 28 (Czech Republic); Department of Analysis of Functional Materials, Institute of Physics AS CR v.v.i, Na Slovance 1999/2, Prague 8 CZ-182 21 (Czech Republic); Vrnata, Martin; Kopecky, Dusan; Vlcek, Jan; Skodova, Jitka [Department of Physics and Measurements, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, Technicka 5, Prague 6 CZ-166 28 (Czech Republic); Bulir, Jiri; Novotny, Michal; Pokorny, Petr [Department of Analysis of Functional Materials, Institute of Physics AS CR v.v.i, Na Slovance 1999/2, Prague 8 CZ-182 21 (Czech Republic)

    2014-05-01

    Thin layers of nickel and copper tetrasulfonated phthalocyanines (NiPcTS and CuPcTS) were prepared by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation method. The depositions were carried out with KrF excimer laser (energy density of laser radiation E{sub L} = 0.1–0.5 J cm{sup −2}) from dimethylsulfoxide matrix. For both materials the ablation threshold E{sub L-th} was determined. The following properties of deposited layers were characterized: (a) chemical composition (FTIR spectra); (b) morphology (SEM and AFM portraits); and (c) impedance of gas sensors based on NiPcTS and CuPcTS layers in the presence of two analytes – hydrogen and ozone. The prepared sensors exhibit response to 1000 ppm of hydrogen and 100 ppb of ozone even at laboratory temperature.

  15. Laser deposition of sulfonated phthalocyanines for gas sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitl, Premysl; Vrnata, Martin; Kopecky, Dusan; Vlcek, Jan; Skodova, Jitka; Bulir, Jiri; Novotny, Michal; Pokorny, Petr

    2014-05-01

    Thin layers of nickel and copper tetrasulfonated phthalocyanines (NiPcTS and CuPcTS) were prepared by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation method. The depositions were carried out with KrF excimer laser (energy density of laser radiation EL = 0.1-0.5 J cm-2) from dimethylsulfoxide matrix. For both materials the ablation threshold EL-th was determined. The following properties of deposited layers were characterized: (a) chemical composition (FTIR spectra); (b) morphology (SEM and AFM portraits); and (c) impedance of gas sensors based on NiPcTS and CuPcTS layers in the presence of two analytes - hydrogen and ozone. The prepared sensors exhibit response to 1000 ppm of hydrogen and 100 ppb of ozone even at laboratory temperature.

  16. Energy deposition from focused terawatt laser pulses in air

    CERN Document Server

    Point, Guillaume; Mysyrowicz, André; Houard, Aurélien

    2015-01-01

    Laser filamentation is responsible for the deposition of a significant part of the laser pulse energy in the propagation medium. We found that using terawatt laser pulses and relatively tight focusing conditions in air, resulting in a bundle of co-propagating multifilaments, more than 50 % of the pulses energy is transferred to the medium, eventually degrading into heat. This results in a strong hydrodynamic reaction of air with the generation of shock waves and associated underdense channels for each short-scale filament. In the focal zone, where filaments are close to each other, these discrete channels eventually merge to form a single cylindrical low-density tube over a $\\sim 1~ \\mu\\mathrm{s}$ timescale. We measured the maximum lineic deposited energy to be more than 1 J/m.

  17. Pulsed laser deposition for the synthesis of monolayer WSe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, A.; Nakamura, H.; Wochner, P.; Ibrahimkutty, S.; Schulz, A.; Müller, K.; Starke, U.; Stuhlhofer, B.; Cristiani, G.; Logvenov, G.; Takagi, H.

    2017-08-01

    Atomically thin films of WSe2 from one monolayer up to 8 layers were deposited on an Al2O3 r-cut ( 1 1 ¯ 02 ) substrate using a hybrid-Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) system where a laser ablation of pure W is combined with a flux of Se. Specular X-ray reflectivities of films were analysed and were consistent with the expected thickness. Raman measurement and atomic force microscopy confirmed the formation of a WSe2 monolayer and its spatial homogeneity over the substrate. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction uncovered an in-plane texture in which WSe2 [ 10 1 ¯ 0 ] preferentially aligned with Al2O3 [ 11 2 ¯ 0 ]. These results present a potential to create 2D transition metal dichalcogenides by PLD, where the growth kinetics can be steered in contrast to common growth techniques like chemical vapor deposition and molecular beam epitaxy.

  18. Powder Flux Regulation in the Laser Material Deposition Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrizubieta, Jon Iñaki; Wegener, Maximiliam; Arntz, Kristian; Lamikiz, Aitzol; Ruiz, Jose Exequiel

    In the present research work a powder flux regulation system has been designed, developed and validated with the aim of improving the Laser Material Deposition (LMD) process. In this process, the amount of deposited material per substrate surface unit area depends on the real feed rate of the nozzle. Therefore, a regulation system based on a solenoid valve has been installed at the nozzle entrance in order to control the powder flux. The powder flux control has been performed based on the machine real feed rate, which is compared with the programmed feed rate. An instantaneous velocity error is calculated and the powder flow is controlled as a function of this variation using Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) signals. Thereby, in zones where the Laser Material Deposition machine reduces the feed rate due to a trajectory change, powder accumulation can be avoided and the generated clads would present a homogeneous shape.

  19. Pulsed laser deposition of fluoride glass thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganser, Dimitri; Gottmann, Jens; Mackens, Uwe; Weichmann, Ulrich

    2010-11-01

    The development of integrated waveguide lasers for different applications such as marking, illumination or medical technology has become highly desirable. Diode pumped planar waveguide lasers emitting in the green visible spectral range, e.g. thin films from praseodymium doped fluorozirconate glass matrix (called ZBLAN, owing to the main components ZrF 4, BaF 2, LaF 3, AlF 3 and NaF) as the active material pumped by a blue laser diode, have aroused great interest. In this work we have investigated the deposition of Pr:ZBLAN thin films using pulsed laser radiation of λ = 193 and λ = 248 nm. The deposition has been carried out on MgF 2 single crystal substrates in a vacuum chamber by varying both processing gas pressure and energy fluence. The existence of an absorption line at 210 nm in Pr:ZBLAN leads to absorption and radiative relaxation of the absorbed laser energy of λ = 193 nm preventing the evaporation of target material. The deposited thin films consist of solidified and molten droplets and irregular particulates only. Furthermore, X-ray radiation has been applied to fluoride glass targets to enhance the absorption in the UV spectral region and to investigate the deposition of X-ray treated targets applying laser radiation of λ = 248 nm. It has been shown that induced F-centres near the target surface are not thermally stable and can be easily ablated. Therefore, λ = 248 nm is not suitable for evaporation of Pr:ZBLAN.

  20. Pulsed laser deposition of fluoride glass thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganser, Dimitri, E-mail: dimitri.ganser@llt.rwth-aachen.de [Chair for Laser Technology LLT, RWTH Aachen University, Steinbachstr. 15, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Gottmann, Jens [Chair for Laser Technology LLT, RWTH Aachen University, Steinbachstr. 15, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Mackens, Uwe; Weichmann, Ulrich [Philips Research Laboratories, Weisshausstrasse 2, D-52066 Aachen (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    The development of integrated waveguide lasers for different applications such as marking, illumination or medical technology has become highly desirable. Diode pumped planar waveguide lasers emitting in the green visible spectral range, e.g. thin films from praseodymium doped fluorozirconate glass matrix (called ZBLAN, owing to the main components ZrF{sub 4}, BaF{sub 2}, LaF{sub 3}, AlF{sub 3} and NaF) as the active material pumped by a blue laser diode, have aroused great interest. In this work we have investigated the deposition of Pr:ZBLAN thin films using pulsed laser radiation of {lambda} = 193 and {lambda} = 248 nm. The deposition has been carried out on MgF{sub 2} single crystal substrates in a vacuum chamber by varying both processing gas pressure and energy fluence. The existence of an absorption line at 210 nm in Pr:ZBLAN leads to absorption and radiative relaxation of the absorbed laser energy of {lambda} = 193 nm preventing the evaporation of target material. The deposited thin films consist of solidified and molten droplets and irregular particulates only. Furthermore, X-ray radiation has been applied to fluoride glass targets to enhance the absorption in the UV spectral region and to investigate the deposition of X-ray treated targets applying laser radiation of {lambda} 248 nm. It has been shown that induced F-centres near the target surface are not thermally stable and can be easily ablated. Therefore, {lambda} = 248 nm is not suitable for evaporation of Pr:ZBLAN.

  1. Study of Nanocrystalline Diamond Film Deposited Rapidly by 500 W Excimer Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Hongyan; SHEN Jiajing; YANG Guilong

    2000-01-01

    High quality nanocrystalline diamond film deposited rapidly by an XeCl excimer laser operated at high laser power (500 W) and repetition rate (300~500 Hz) is presented. A high deposition rate, 250 nm/thousand pulses, was obtained. The effects of laser energy fluence and repetition rate on the deposition of diamond film were investigated.

  2. The spatial thickness distribution of metal films produced by large area pulsed laser deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryds, Nini; Schou, Jørgen; Linderoth, Søren

    2007-01-01

    Thin films of metals have been deposited in the large-area Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) Facility at Riso National Laboratory. Thin films of Ag and Ni were deposited with laser pulses from an excimer laser at 248 nm with a rectangular beam spot at a fluence of 10 J/cm(2) on glass substrates of 12...

  3. Stoichiometric magnetite grown by infrared nanosecond pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz, Mikel, E-mail: mikel.sanz@iqfr.csic.es [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, CSIC, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Oujja, Mohamed; Rebollar, Esther; Marco, José F.; Figuera, Juan de la; Monti, Matteo [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, CSIC, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Bollero, Alberto [IMDEA Nanoscience, Instituto Madrileño de Estudios Avanzados en Nanociencia, Campus Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Camarero, Julio [IMDEA Nanoscience, Instituto Madrileño de Estudios Avanzados en Nanociencia, Campus Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Instituto Nicolás Cabrera, Campus Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Pedrosa, Francisco J. [IMDEA Nanoscience, Instituto Madrileño de Estudios Avanzados en Nanociencia, Campus Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); García-Hernández, Mar [Instituto de Ciencias Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Castillejo, Marta [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, CSIC, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-10-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is a versatile technique for the fabrication of nanostructures due to the possibilities it offers to control size and shape of nanostructured deposits by varying the laser parameters. Magnetite nanostructures are currently promising materials to be used in computing, electronic devices and spintronic applications. For all these uses the fabrication of uniform nanostructured pure magnetite thin films is highly advantageous. In PLD of magnetite, the laser irradiation wavelength and substrate temperature crucially affect the composition, crystallinity, surface structure and the magnetic properties of the grown samples. This work shows that the use of nanosecond IR laser at 1064 nm enhances the quality of the resulting magnetite thin films, compared to the extensively used UV wavelengths. Deposition at 1064 nm, upon heating the substrate at 750 K, produces thin films constituted by stoichiometric magnetite nanoparticles with sharp edges and sizes ranging from 80 to 150 nm, with a Verwey transition at 119 K and a coercivity of 232 Oe at room temperature, close to those of pure bulk magnetite. Thus, IR-PLD of self-prepared hematite sintered targets constitutes a low-cost procedure of fabrication of pure magnetite nanostructured thin films.

  4. Experimental study of porosity reduction in high deposition-rate Laser Material Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Chongliang; Gasser, Andres; Schopphoven, Thomas; Poprawe, Reinhart

    2015-12-01

    For several years, the interest in Additive Manufacturing (AM) is continuously expanding, owing to the paradigm shift that new production processes, such as Laser Material Deposition (LMD), provide over conventional manufacturing technologies. With LMD, three-dimensional, complex components out of a wide range of materials can be manufactured consecutively layer-by-layer. Despite the technological advantages of the LMD process, currently achieved deposition-rates of approx. 0.5 kg/h for Inconel 718 (IN 718) remain a major concern in regards to processing times and economic feasibility. Moreover, processing conditions need to be chosen carefully or else material defects can be systematically formed either at the interface separating two adjacent clad layers, at the bonding zone or within the bulk of the layer. In this respect, the effects of powder humidity, laser power, nominal powder particle size, powder morphology and shielding gas flow rate on the porosity in laser deposited single tracks at an increased deposition-rate of approx. 2 kg/h was investigated through experiments. Based on experimental results, several approaches of reducing porosity in high deposition-rate LMD are proposed in this paper.

  5. Matrix shaped pulsed laser deposition: New approach to large area and homogeneous deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akkan, C.K.; May, A. [INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials, CVD/Biosurfaces Group, Campus D2 2, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany); Hammadeh, M. [Department for Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine, IVF Laboratory, Saarland University Medical Center and Faculty of Medicine, Building 9, 66421 Homburg, Saar (Germany); Abdul-Khaliq, H. [Clinic for Pediatric Cardiology, Saarland University Medical Center and Faculty of Medicine, Building 9, 66421 Homburg, Saar (Germany); Aktas, O.C., E-mail: cenk.aktas@inm-gmbh.de [INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials, CVD/Biosurfaces Group, Campus D2 2, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany)

    2014-05-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is one of the well-established physical vapor deposition methods used for synthesis of ultra-thin layers. Especially PLD is suitable for the preparation of thin films of complex alloys and ceramics where the conservation of the stoichiometry is critical. Beside several advantages of PLD, inhomogeneity in thickness limits use of PLD in some applications. There are several approaches such as rotation of the substrate or scanning of the laser beam over the target to achieve homogenous layers. On the other hand movement and transition create further complexity in process parameters. Here we present a new approach which we call Matrix Shaped PLD to control the thickness and homogeneity of deposited layers precisely. This new approach is based on shaping of the incoming laser beam by a microlens array and a Fourier lens. The beam is split into much smaller multi-beam array over the target and this leads to a homogenous plasma formation. The uniform intensity distribution over the target yields a very uniform deposit on the substrate. This approach is used to deposit carbide and oxide thin films for biomedical applications. As a case study coating of a stent which has a complex geometry is presented briefly.

  6. Defect control in room temperature deposited cadmium sulfide thin films by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Como, N. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX, 75080 (United States); Martinez-Landeros, V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX, 75080 (United States); Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados, Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, 66600, México (Mexico); Mejia, I. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX, 75080 (United States); Aguirre-Tostado, F.S. [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados, Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, 66600, México (Mexico); Nascimento, C.D.; Azevedo, G. de M; Krug, C. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, 91509-900 (Brazil); Quevedo-Lopez, M.A., E-mail: mquevedo@utdallas.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX, 75080 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The control of defects in cadmium sulfide thin films and its impact on the resulting CdS optical and electrical characteristics are studied. Sulfur vacancies and cadmium interstitial concentrations in the CdS films are controlled using the ambient pressure during pulsed laser deposition. CdS film resistivities ranging from 10{sup −1} to 10{sup 4} Ω-cm are achieved. Hall Effect measurements show that the carrier concentration ranges from 10{sup 19} to 10{sup 13} cm{sup −3} and is responsible for the observed resistivity variation. Hall mobility varies from 2 to 12 cm{sup 2}/V-s for the same pressure regime. Although the energy bandgap remains unaffected (∼ 2.42 eV), the optical transmittance is reduced due to the increase of defects in the CdS films. Rutherford back scattering spectroscopy shows the dependence of the CdS films stoichiometry with deposition pressure. The presence of CdS defects is attributed to more energetic species reaching the substrate, inducing surface damage in the CdS films during pulsed laser deposition. - Highlights: • CdS thin films deposited by pulsed laser deposition at room temperature. • The optical, electrical and structural properties were evaluated. • Carrier concentration ranged from 10{sup 19} to 10{sup 13} cm{sup −3}. • The chemical composition was studied by Rutherford back scattering. • The density of sulfur vacancies and cadmium interstitial was varied.

  7. ZnO thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsoutsouva, M.G. [Laboratory of Physical Metallurgy, National Technical University of Athens, Zografos, 15780 Athens (Greece); Panagopoulos, C.N., E-mail: chpanag@metal.ntua.gr [Laboratory of Physical Metallurgy, National Technical University of Athens, Zografos, 15780 Athens (Greece); Papadimitriou, D. [National Technical University of Athens, Department of Physics, GR-15780 Athens (Greece); Fasaki, I.; Kompitsas, M. [Theor. and Phys./Chem. Institute, National Hellenic Research Foundation, 48 Vas. Konstantinou Ave., 11635 Athens (Greece)

    2011-04-15

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films were deposited on soda lime glass substrates by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) in an oxygen-reactive atmosphere. The structural, optical, and electrical properties of the as-prepared thin films were studied in dependence of substrate temperature and oxygen pressure. High quality polycrystalline ZnO films with hexagonal wurtzite structure were deposited at substrate temperatures of 100 and 300 deg. C. The RMS roughness of the deposited oxide films was found to be in the range 2-9 nm and was only slightly dependent on substrate temperature and oxygen pressure. Electrical measurements indicated a decrease of film resistivity with the increase of substrate temperature and the decrease of oxygen pressure. The ZnO films exhibited high transmittance of 90% and their energy band gap and thickness were in the range 3.26-3.30 eV and 256-627 nm, respectively.

  8. Pulsed laser deposition of metal films and nanoparticles in vacuum using subnanosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganeev, R A; Chakravarty, U; Naik, P A; Srivastava, H; Mukherjee, C; Tiwari, M K; Nandedkar, R V; Gupta, P D

    2007-03-10

    A study of silver, chromium, stainless-steel, and indium thin films prepared by subnanosecond laser deposition in vacuum is reported. We compare the laser ablation in vacuum at the weak- and tight-focusing conditions of a Ti:sapphire laser beam and analyze the nanoparticles synthesized in the latter case using absorption spectroscopy, x-ray fluorescence, atomic force microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Our results show that the nanoparticle formation can be accomplished using long laser pulses under tight-focusing conditions.

  9. Advanced laser diagnostics for diamond deposition research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, C.H.; Owano, T.G.; Wahl, E.H. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) using thermal plasmas is attractive for diamond synthesis applications due to the inherently high reactant densities and throughput, but the associated high gas-phase collision rates in the boundary layer above the substrate produce steep thermal and species gradients which can drive the complex plasma chemistry away from optimal conditions. To understand and control these environments, accurate measurements of temperature and species concentrations within the reacting boundary layer are needed. This is challenging in atmospheric pressure reactors due to the highly luminous environment, steep thermal and species gradients, and small spatial scales. The applicability of degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) as a spectroscopic probe of atmospheric pressure reacting plasmas has been investigated. This powerful, nonlinear technique has been applied to the measurement of temperature and radical species concentrations in the boundary layer of a diamond growth substrate immersed in a flowing atmospheric pressure plasma. In-situ measurements of CH and C{sub 2} radicals have been performed to determine spatially resolved profiles of vibrational temperature, rotational temperature, and species concentration. Results of these measurements are compared with the predictions of a detailed numerical simulation.

  10. Laser energy density, structure and properties of pulsed-laser deposited zinc oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsoutsouva, M.G.; Panagopoulos, C.N. [Laboratory of Physical Metallurgy, National Technical University of Athens, Zografos, Athens 15780 (Greece); Kompitsas, M., E-mail: mcomp@eie.gr [National Hellenic Research Foundation, Theoretical and Physical Chemistry Institute, Vasileos Konstantinou Ave. 48, Athens 11635 (Greece)

    2011-05-01

    Zinc oxide thin films were deposited on soda lime glass substrates by pulsed laser deposition in an oxygen-reactive atmosphere at 20 Pa and a constant substrate temperature at 300 deg. C. A pulsed KrF excimer laser, operated at 248 nm with pulse duration 10 ns, was used to ablate the ceramic zinc oxide target. The structure, the optical and electrical properties of the as-deposited films were studied in dependence of the laser energy density in the 1.2-2.8 J/cm{sup 2} range, with the aid of X-ray Diffraction, Atomic Force Microscope, Transmission Spectroscopy techniques, and the Van der Pauw method, respectively. The results indicated that the structural and optical properties of the zinc oxide films were improved by increasing the laser energy density of the ablating laser. The surface roughness of the zinc oxide film increased with the decrease of laser energy density and both the optical bang gap and the electrical resistivity of the film were significantly affected by the laser energy density.

  11. Pulsed laser deposition and characterisation of thin superconducting films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morone, A. [CNR, zona industriale di Tito Scalo, Potenza (Italy). Istituto per i Materiali Speciali

    1996-09-01

    Same concepts on pulsed laser deposition of thin films will be discussed and same examples of high transition temperature (HTc) BiSrCaCuO (BISCO) and low transition temperature NbN/MgO/NbN multilayers will be presented. X-ray and others characterizations of these films will be reported and discussed. Electrical properties of superconducting thin films will be realized as a function of structural and morphological aspect.

  12. Scaling in film growth by pulsed laser deposition and modulated beam deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Bub

    2011-04-01

    The scalings in film growth by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and modulated beam deposition (MBD) were investigated by Monte Carlo simulations. In PLD, an atomic pulse beam with a period t(0) were deposited instantaneously on a substrate, whereas in MBD, adatoms were deposited during a short time interval t(1) (0≤t(1)≤t(0)) within each period. If t(1)=0, MBD will be identical to PLD and, if t(1)=t(0), MBD will become usual molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Specifically, logarithmic scaling was investigated for the nucleation density reported for PLD, and the scaling of island density was studied regarding the growth for 0MBE growth was observed as t(1) increased. The phase diagram was also presented.

  13. Research on the processing experiments of laser metal deposition shaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Liu, Weijun; Shang, Xiaofeng

    2007-04-01

    Laser additive direct deposition of metals is a new rapid manufacturing technology, which combines with computer-aided design (CAD), laser cladding and rapid prototyping. The advanced technology can build fully dense metal components directly from CAD files with neither mould nor tool. Based on the theory of this technology, a promising rapid manufacturing system called "Laser Metal Deposition Shaping (LMDS)" has been constructed and developed successfully by Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang Institute of Automation. Through the LMDS system, comprehensive experiments are carried out with nickel-based superalloy to systematically investigate the influences of the processing parameters on forming characteristics. By adjusting to the optimal processing parameters, fully dense and near-net-shaped metallic parts can be directly obtained through melting coaxially fed powder with a laser. Moreover, the microstructure and mechanical properties of as-formed samples are tested and analyzed synthetically. As a result, significant processing flexibility with the LMDS system over conventional processing capabilities is recognized, with potentially lower production cost, higher quality components, and shorter lead-time.

  14. Laser deposition of coatings for aeronautical and industrials turbine blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teleginski, V. [Instituto Federal de Sao Paulo (IFSP), SP (Brazil); Silva, S.A.; Riva, R.; Vasconcelos, G. [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Silva Pita, G.R. [Universidade Braz Cubas, Mogi das Cruzes, SP (Brazil); Yamin, L.S. [Escola Tecnica Everardo Passos (ETEP), Sao Jose dos Campos, DP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: Zirconium-based ceramic materials are widely employed as Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBC), due to its excellent wear and corrosion resistance at high temperatures. The application of TBC includes aeronautical and industrials turbine blades. The working conditions include oxidizing environments and temperatures above 1000°C. The zirconium-based ceramics are developed in such a way that the microstructural control is possible through the control of chemical composition, fabrication route and, thermal treatment. The present paper proposes a laser route to deposit the TBC coating, where the microstructural control is a function of power density and interaction time between the laser beam and the material. The main objective of this work is to study the influence of the CO2 laser beam (Synrad Evolution 125) parameters: power density and interaction time, on the deposition process of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) powders on NiCrAlY/AISI 316L substrates. The resulting coating surface and interface were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results indicate that is possible to match laser parameters of scanning speed and intensity to produce homogenous coatings. The X-Ray analyses show that the obtained ceramic coating has reduced number of phases, with prevalence of tetragonal phase.(author)

  15. A Haldane-Shastry spin chain of BC_N type in a constant magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Enciso, A; González-López, A; Rodríguez, M A

    2004-01-01

    We compute the spectrum of the trigonometric Sutherland spin model of BC_N type in the presence of a constant magnetic field. Using Polychronakos's freezing trick, we derive an exact formula for the partition function of its associated Haldane-Shastry spin chain.

  16. Picosecond and subpicosecond pulsed laser deposition of Pb thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Gontad

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Pb thin films were deposited on Nb substrates by means of pulsed laser deposition (PLD with UV radiation (248 nm, in two different ablation regimes: picosecond (5 ps and subpicosecond (0.5 ps. Granular films with grain size on the micron scale have been obtained, with no evidence of large droplet formation. All films presented a polycrystalline character with preferential orientation along the (111 crystalline planes. A maximum quantum efficiency (QE of 7.3×10^{-5} (at 266 nm and 7 ns pulse duration was measured, after laser cleaning, demonstrating good photoemission performance for Pb thin films deposited by ultrashort PLD. Moreover, Pb thin film photocathodes have maintained their QE for days, providing excellent chemical stability and durability. These results suggest that Pb thin films deposited on Nb by ultrashort PLD are a noteworthy alternative for the fabrication of photocathodes for superconductive radio-frequency electron guns. Finally, a comparison with the characteristics of Pb films prepared by ns PLD is illustrated and discussed.

  17. Aluminosilicate glass thin films elaborated by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlier, Thibault; Saitzek, Sébastien; Méar, François O.; Blach, Jean-François; Ferri, Anthony; Huvé, Marielle; Montagne, Lionel

    2017-03-01

    In the present work, we report the elaboration of aluminosilicate glass thin films by Pulsed Laser Deposition at various temperatures deposition. The amorphous nature of glass thin films was highlighted by Grazing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction and no nanocristallites were observed in the glassy matrix. Chemical analysis, obtained with X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Time of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy, showed a good transfer and homogeneous elementary distribution with of chemical species from the target to the film a. Structural studies performed by Infrared Spectroscopy showed that the substrate temperature plays an important role on the bonding configuration of the layers. A slight shift of Si-O modes to larger wavenumber was observed with the synthesis temperature, assigned to a more strained sub-oxide network. Finally, optical properties of thins film measured by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry are similar to those of the bulk aluminosilicate glass, which indicate a good deposition of aluminosilicate bulk glass.

  18. Roughness of laser deposited metal / metal oxide layered structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liese, Tobias; Meschede, Andreas; Roeder, Johanna; Krebs, Hans-Ulrich [Institut fuer Materialphysik, University of Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The roughness of laser deposited Ti/MgO and Ag/ZrO{sub 2} layered thin films were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray reflectivity (XRR), which are sensitive on the surface and interface roughness, respectively. When depositing the metals, nucleation and island growth occur which first roughen the surfaces with increasing layer thickness. Then, coalescence and island zipping processes reduce the roughness again. Minimal roughness is reached, when the metal layers are just closed. In both systems, the deposition of the metal oxide leads to layer smoothing. The underlying growth processes for single and double layers as well as the reduction of roughness in multilayers are discussed.

  19. Thermochromic VO2 on Zinnwaldite Mica by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathevula, L.; Ngom, B. D.; Kotsedi, L.; Sechogela, P.; Doyle, T. B.; Ghouti, M.; Maaza, M.

    2014-09-01

    VO2 thin films have been deposited by pulsed laser deposition on Zinnwaldite Mica substrates. The crystal structure, chemical composition, morphology were determined and the semiconductor/metal transition (SMT) properties of the deposited films were investigated. Without any post annealing, the films exhibit a textured nature with a VO2 (0 1 1) preferred crystallographic orientation and an elevated thermal variation of the electric resistance ratio RS/RM through the SMT at T ≈ 68 °C of the order of 104 and a narrow ∼7 °C hysteresis. In addition, the growth of the VO2 crystallites seem to be governed likely by a Volmer-Weber or Stranski-Krastanov mechanisms and certainly not a Frank-van Der Merwe process.

  20. Optical Multichannel Imaging of Pulsed Laser Deposition of ZnO (PostPrint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2014-0186 OPTICAL MULTICHANNEL IMAGING OF PULSED LASER DEPOSITION OF ZNO (POSTPRINT) John G. Jones AFRL/RXAN...PULSED LASER DEPOSITION OF ZNO (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-House 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62102F 6. AUTHOR(S...Optical Multichannel Imaging of Pulsed Laser Deposition of ZnO John G. Jones, Lirong Sun, Neil R. Murphy, and Rachel Jakubiak Abstract— Pulsed laser

  1. Resonant Infrared Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Deposition of Polymers: Improving the Morphology of As-Deposited Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubb, Daniel; Papantonakis, Michael; Collins, Brian; Brookes, Elijah; Wood, Joshua; Gurudas, Ullas

    2008-03-01

    Resonant infrared matrix assisted pulsed laser deposition has been used to deposit thin films of PMMA, a widely used industrial polymer. This technique is similar to conventional pulsed laser deposition, except that the polymer to be deposited is dissolved in a solvent and the solution is frozen before ablation in a vacuum chamber. The laser wavelength is absorbed by a vibrational band in the frozen matrix. The polymer lands on the substrate to form a film, while the solvent is pumped away. Our preliminary results show that the surface roughness of the as-deposited films depends strongly on the differential solubility radius, as defined by Hansen solubility parameters of the solvent and the solubility radius of the polymer. Our results will be compared with computational and experimental studies of the same polymer using a KrF (248 nm) laser. The ejection mechanism will be discussed as well as the implications of these results for the deposition of smooth high quality films.

  2. Growth of tantalum pentoxide film by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun-Ying; Fang, Qi; Boyd, Ian W.

    1999-01-01

    Thin films of Ta 2O 5 have been deposited on quartz and silicon substrates by 532-nm (Nd:YAG) pulsed laser deposition (PLD) in various O 2 gas environments. The influence of the deposition parameters, such as oxygen pressure, substrate temperature and annealing under UV irradiation using a 172-nm excimer lamp, on the properties of the grown films, has been studied. The refractive index of the films increases with increasing pressure of O 2. X-ray diffraction measurements show that the as-deposited films are amorphous at temperatures below 500°C and possess orthorhombic (β-Ta 2O 5) crystal structure at temperatures above 600°C. The optical properties determined by UV spectrophotometry also strongly depend on the deposition parameters. At O 2 pressures above 0.15 mbar, the refractive index of the films was about 2.12 which is close to the bulk Ta 2O 5 value of 2.2. Optical transmittance around 85% in the visible region of the spectrum was obtained at an oxygen pressure of 0.2 mbar.

  3. Electron microscopy study of direct laser deposited IN718

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, R.G., E-mail: r.ding@bham.ac.uk [School of Metallurgy and Materials, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Huang, Z.W.; Li, H.Y. [School of Metallurgy and Materials, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Mitchell, I.; Baxter, G. [Rolls-Royce plc., Derby DE24 8BJ (United Kingdom); Bowen, P. [School of Metallurgy and Materials, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    The microstructure of direct laser deposited (DLD) IN718 has been investigated in detail using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results confirm that the dendrite core microstructure can be linked to the cooling rate experienced during the deposition. A ~ 100 μm wide δ partially dissolved region in the IN718 substrate was observed close to the substrate/deposit boundary. In the deposited IN718, γ/Laves eutectic constituent is the predominant minor microconstituent. Irregular and regular (small) (Nb,Ti)C carbides and a mixture of the carbides and Laves were observed. Most M{sub 3}B{sub 2} borides were nucleated around a (Nb,Ti)C carbide. Needles of δ phase precipitated from the Laves phase were also observed. A complex constituent (of Laves, δ, α-Cr, γ″, and γ matrix) is reported in IN718 for the first time. The formation of α-Cr particles could be related to Cr rejection during the formation and growth of Cr-depleted δ phase. - Highlights: • Secondary phases in IN718 deposits were identified using electron diffraction and EDS. • MC, M{sub 3}B{sub 2}, γ/Laves eutectic and γ/NbC/Laves eutectic were observed. • Needle-like δ phases were precipitated from the Laves phase. • A complex constituent (Laves, δ, α-Cr, γ″ and γ) was reported for the first time.

  4. Characterization and Electrical Properties of TiO2 Thin Films Deposited by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badar, Nurhanna; Kamarulzaman, Norlida

    2011-12-01

    Thin film technology is very important in today's high-tech industry. TiO2 is a high-k dielectric material. Problems with thin film deposition arise when the thickness of the thin layers approaches a few hundred nm to less than 100 nm. High quality thin films within these dimensions are difficult to obtain. Issues of adhesion, crystal mismatch, crystal orientation, surface roughness, densification, etc. are problems that need to be addressed if good quality thin films for devices are to be fabricated. These factors have a relation with the thin film technique used. As an example, spin coating technique may be a cheaper technique but may not result in dense and very smooth surfaces. Pulsed LASER deposition (PLD) is a relatively newer method used in thin film fabrication. The advantages of PLD are, capability of very thin films being deposited on different types of substrates (up to monolayers), control of crystal orientation, capability of depositing materials with complex stoichiometry and ease of methodology with high throughput. This has industrial implications as a good method for thin film preparation. This work involves the deposition of TiO2 thin films using different deposition parameters and chamber environments.

  5. Vitroceramic interface deposited on titanium substrate by pulsed laser deposition method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voicu, Georgeta; Miu, Dana; Dogaru, Ionut; Jinga, Sorin Ion; Busuioc, Cristina

    2016-08-30

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method was used to obtain biovitroceramic thin film coatings on titanium substrates. The composition of the targets was selected from SiO2-CaO-P2O5-(CaF2) systems and the corresponding masses were prepared using the sol-gel method. The depositions were performed in oxygen atmosphere (100mTorr), while the substrates were heated at 400°C. The PLD deposited films were analysed through different experimental techniques: X-ray diffraction, scanning (SEM, EDX) and transmission (HRTEM, SAED) electron microscopy and infra-red spectroscopy coupled with optical microscopy. They were also biologically tested by in vitro cell culture and the contact angle was determined. The bioevaluation results indicate a high biocompatibilty of the obtained materials, demonstrating their potential use for biomedical applications.

  6. Resonant infrared pulsed-laser deposition of a sorbent chemoselective polymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bubb, D.M.; Horwitz, J.S.; McGill, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    Fluoropolyol, a sorbent chemoselective polymer, has been deposited as a thin film by resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition using a free electron laser operating at 2.90 mum, a wavelength resonant with the hydroxl stretch. A comparison of the infrared absorbance of the deposited film...

  7. Study of liquid deposition during laser printing of liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duocastella, M.; Patrascioiu, A.; Dinca, V.; Fernández-Pradas, J. M.; Morenza, J. L.; Serra, P.

    2011-04-01

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a direct-writing technique which can be used to successfully print various complex and sensitive materials with a high degree of spatial resolution. However, the optimization of its performances requires a deep understanding of the LIFT dynamics. Such understanding should allow correlating the phenomena underlying the liquid transfer process with the morphology of the obtained deposits. To this end, in this work it is presented a study related to two aspects: first, the correlation of the morphological characteristics of the transferred droplets with the variation of the film thickness combined with laser fluence; and second, a correlation of the dependences observed with the dynamics of the transfer process. The work is focused on the understanding of the observed dependences for which the information provided by time-resolved analysis on liquid transfer dynamics has proved to be crucial.

  8. Structural and optical properties of tellurite thin film glasses deposited by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz-Martin, D.; Fernandez-Navarro, J.M. [Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Optica (CSIC), Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Gonzalo, J., E-mail: j.gonzalo@io.cfmac.csic.es [Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Optica (CSIC), Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Jose, G.; Jha, A. [Institute for Materials Research, University of Leeds, Clarendon Road, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Fierro, J.L.G. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), Marie Curie s/n, 28049 Cantoblanco (Spain); Domingo, C. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia (CSIC), Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Garcia-Lopez, J. [Centro Nacional de Aceleradores, P. Tecnologico ' Cartuja 93' , 41092 Sevilla (Spain)

    2011-10-31

    Tellurite (TeO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2}-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}) thin film glasses have been produced by pulsed laser deposition at room temperature at laser energy densities in the range of 0.8-1.5 J/cm{sup 2} and oxygen pressures in the range of 3-11 Pa. The oxygen concentration in the films increases with laser energy density to reach values very close to that of the bulk glass at 1.5 J/cm{sup 2}, while films prepared at 1.5 J/cm{sup 2} and pressures above 5 Pa show oxygen concentration in excess of 10% comparing to the glass. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows the presence of elementary Te in films deposited at O{sub 2} pressures {<=} 5 Pa that is not detected at higher pressures, while analysis of Raman spectra of the samples suggests a progressive substitution of TeO{sub 3} trigonal pyramids by TeO{sub 4} trigonal bipyramids in the films when increasing their oxygen content. Spectroscopic ellipsometry analysis combined with Cauchy and effective medium modeling demonstrates the influence of these compositional and structural modifications on the optical response of the films. Since the oxygen content determines their optical response through the structural modifications induced in the films, those can be effectively controlled by tuning the deposition conditions, and films having large n (2.08) and reduced k (< 10{sup -4}) at 1.5 {mu}m have been produced using the optimum deposition conditions.

  9. Inorganic-organic thin implant coatings deposited by lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sima, Felix; Davidson, Patricia M; Dentzer, Joseph; Gadiou, Roger; Pauthe, Emmanuel; Gallet, Olivier; Mihailescu, Ion N; Anselme, Karine

    2015-01-14

    The lifetime of bone implants inside the human body is directly related to their osseointegration. Ideally, future materials should be inspired by human tissues and provide the material structure-function relationship from which synthetic advanced biomimetic materials capable of replacing, repairing, or regenerating human tissues can be produced. This work describes the development of biomimetic thin coatings on titanium implants to improve implant osseointegration. The assembly of an inorganic-organic biomimetic structure by UV laser pulses is reported. The structure consists of a hydroxyapatite (HA) film grown onto a titanium substrate by pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) and activated by a top fibronectin (FN) coating deposited by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). A pulsed KrF* laser source (λ = 248 nm, τ = 25 ns) was employed at fluences of 7 and 0.7J/cm(2) for HA and FN transfer, respectively. Films approximately 1500 and 450 nm thick were obtained for HA and FN, respectively. A new cryogenic temperature-programmed desorption mass spectrometry analysis method was employed to accurately measure the quantity of immobilized protein. We determined that less than 7 μg FN per cm(2) HA surface is adequate to improve adhesion, spreading, and differentiation of osteoprogenitor cells. We believe that the proposed fabrication method opens the door to combining and immobilizing two or more inorganic and organic materials on a solid substrate in a well-defined manner. The flexibility of this method enables the synthesis of new hybrid materials by simply tailoring the irradiation conditions according to the thermo-physical properties of the starting materials.

  10. Functionally Graded Materials by Laser Metal Deposition (PREPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    A similar work carried out by Domack et al [14] showed macroscopic cracking in powder blends containing 40-60 percent Inconel 718 on Ti6Al4V...composition of Fe-82 wt% V (powder-1) and Inconel -625 (powder-2) powders are listed in Table 1. The substrate materials used for the experiment were cold...like laser power, travel speed and powder feed rate is yet to be determined to obtain a successful FGM. Inconel -625 deposits showed macro-cracks

  11. In-situ CdS/CdTe Heterojuntions Deposited by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Avila-Avendano, Jesus

    2016-04-09

    In this paper pulsed laser deposition (PLD) methods are used to study p-n CdTe/CdS heterojunctions fabricated in-situ. In-situ film deposition allows higher quality p-n interfaces by minimizing spurious contamination from the atmosphere. Morphologic and structural analyses were carried for CdTe films deposited on various substrates and different deposition conditions. The electrical characteristics and performance of the resulting p-n heterojunctions were studied as function of substrate and post-deposition anneal temperature. In-situ growth results on diodes with a rectification factor of ~ 105, an ideality factor < 2, and a reverse saturation current ~ 10-8 A. The carrier concentration in the CdTe film was in the range of ~ 1015 cm-3, as measured by C-V methods. The possible impact of sulfur diffusion from the CdS into the CdTe film is also investigated using High Resolution Rutherford Back-Scattering.

  12. Dual laser deposition of Ti:DLC composite for implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelínek, Miroslav; Zemek, Josef; Kocourek, Tomáš; Remsa, Jan; Mikšovský, Jan; Písařík, Petr; Jurek, Karel; Tolde, Zdeněk; Trávníčková, Martina; Vandrovcová, Marta; Filová, Elena

    2016-10-01

    Ti-doped hydrogen free diamond-like carbon (DLC) layers of dopation up to ~25 at.% were prepared by dual beam pulsed laser deposition (PLD) using two excimer lasers. The arrangement allows continuous fine tuning of dopant concentration on a large scale and deposition flexibility. The layers were prepared on Si(1 0 0) and Ti6Al4V substrates at room temperature. The surface morphology, mechanical properties, bonds, composition, morphology of human osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells, their metabolic activity and production of osteocalcin, a marker of osteogenic cells’ differentiation were tested. The films’ composition changed after x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) surface cleaning by argon clusters. Adhesion moved with Ti dopation from 4 N (DLC film) to 11 N (25 at.% of Ti in DLC). Creation of TiC was observed for higher Ti dopation. The contact angle and surface free energy stayed unchanged for higher Ti dopation. Saos-2 cells had the highest metabolic activity/viability on DLC with 10 at.% of Ti and on control polystyrene dishes on days 1 and 3. The Ti dopation improved the formation of vinculin-containing focal adhesion plaques in Saos-2 cells. Immunofluorescence staining revealed similar production of osteocalcin in cells on all tested samples.

  13. Deposition and characterization of ITO films produced by laser ablation at 355 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmelund, E.; Thestrup Nielsen, Birgitte; Schou, Jørgen;

    2002-01-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) films have been deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at 355 nm. Even though the absorption of laser light at the wavelength 355 nm is much smaller than that of the standard excimer lasers for PLD at 248 nm and 193 nm, high-quality films can be produced. At high fluenc...... light, about 0.9, is also comparable to values for films deposited by excimer lasers. The crystalline structure of films produced at 355 nm is similar to that of samples produced by these lasers....

  14. Laser energy deposition and its dynamic uniformity for direct-drive capsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yan; Wu, SiZhong; Zheng, WuDi [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China)

    2015-04-15

    The total laser energy deposition of multi-laser-beam irradiation is not only associated with the dynamic behavior of capsule but also the time-dependent angular distribution of the energy deposition of each beam around its axis. The dynamic behavior of laser energy deposition does not linearly respond to the dynamic behavior of laser irradiation. The laser energy deposition uniformity determines the symmetry of implosion. The dynamic behavior of laser energy deposition non-uniformity in OMEGA for laser with square beam shape intensity profile is investigated. In the case of smaller laser spot, the initial non-uniformity caused by laser beam overlap is very high. The shell asymmetry caused by the high initial laser irradiation non-uniformity is estimated by the extent of distortion of shock front which is not as severe as expected before the shock driven by main pulse arrives. This suggests that the large initial non-uniformity due to smaller laser spot is one of the elements that seed disturbance before the main pulse. The rms of laser energy deposition during the main pulse remains above 2%. Since the intensity of main driving pulse usually is several times higher than that of picket pulses, the non-uniformity in main pulse period may jeopardize the symmetrical implosion. When dynamic behavior of capsule is considered, the influence of beam pointing error, the target positioning error, and beam-to-beam power unbalance is quite different for the case of static capsule.

  15. Pulsed laser deposition of nano-glassy carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ossi, P.M. [Dip. Ingegneria Nucleare and Centre of Excellence, NanoEngineered Materials and Surfaces (NEMAS), Politecnico di Milano, via Ponzio, 34-3, 20133 Milan (Italy)]. E-mail: paolo.ossi@polimi.it; Bottani, C.E. [Dip. Ingegneria Nucleare and Centre of Excellence, NanoEngineered Materials and Surfaces (NEMAS), Politecnico di Milano, via Ponzio, 34-3, 20133 Milan (Italy); Miotello, A. [Dip. Fisica, Universita di Trento, 38050 Povo (TN) (Italy)

    2005-07-30

    Carbon films have been deposited at room temperature on (1 0 0) Si substrates by pulsed laser ablation (PLA) from a highly oriented pyrolitic graphite source. Changing the laser power density from 8.5 to 19 MW mm{sup -2} and using various ambient atmospheres (helium, argon from 0.6 Pa to 2 kPa), nano-sized cluster-assembled films were obtained. Scanning electron microscopy shows that the film morphology, changes with increasing ambient gas pressure. We observed in the sequence: dense columns, node-like morphology, platelets (only in argon) and an open dendritic structure. By atomic force microscopy, on representative films, we evaluated the size distribution and relative abundancy of aggregates of carbon clusters, as well as film roughness. Raman spectroscopy shows that all the films are sp{sup 2} coordinated, structurally disordered and belong to the family of carbon nano-glasses. The estimated film coherence length gives an average size of about 5 nm for the agglomerated carbon clusters in the films. The average number of carbon atoms per cluster depends on ambient gas pressure, but is nearly independent of laser intensity.

  16. Epitaxial yttrium iron garnet films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, P. C.; Bushnell, S. E.; Seed, R. G.; Vittoria, C.

    1993-07-01

    Epitaxial Y3Fe5O12 (YIG) films have been grown by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique on (111) gadolinium gallium garnet substrates. The effect of substrate temperature and oxygen partial pressure on the structure, composition, and magnetic properties of the films was investigated and compared to liquid phase epitaxy YIG films. The results demonstrated that epitaxial YIG films could be prepared under a wide range of deposition conditions, but narrow linewidth (ΔH≂1 Oe) films were producible only at low oxygen partial pressures (O2temperatures (Ts≳800 °C). Since the linewidth of single-crystal YIG is dominated by surface and volume defects and/or impurities, the narrow linewidth indicated that PLD is a viable technique for producing high-quality ferrite films for microwave device applications. In addition, under all deposition conditions (50-1000 mTorr and 700-850 °C) there is a uniaxial axis perpendicular to the film plane. However, at low oxygen pressure the uniaxial anisotropy energy constant Ku is negative while at high oxygen pressure Ku is positive.

  17. Stability of Y-Ti-O nanoparticles during laser deposition of oxide dispersion strengthened steel powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euh, Kwangjun; Arkhurst, Barton; Kim, Il Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Gil; Kim, Jeoung Han

    2017-09-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of a direct energy deposition process for fabrication of oxide dispersion strengthened steel cladding. The effect of the laser working power and scan speed on the microstructural stability of oxide nanoparticles in the deposition layer was examined. Y-Ti-O type oxide nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 45 nm were successfully dispersed by the laser deposition process. The laser working power significantly affected nanoparticle size and number density. A high laser power with a low scan speed seriously induced particle coarsening and agglomeration. Compared with bulk oxide dispersion strengthened steel, the hardness of the laser deposition layer was much lower because of a relatively coarse particle and grain size. Formation mechanism of nanoparticles during laser deposition was discussed.

  18. Advances in Laser Surface Engineering : Tackling the Cracking Problem in Laser-Deposited Ni-Cr-B-Si-C Alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmati, I.; Ocelik, V.; De Hosson, J. Th M.

    Laser-deposition technologies are being increasingly used for surface modification and three-dimensional manufacturing applications. The biggest technical obstacle to a wider usage of these technologies especially for deposition of hard alloys is cracking of the deposited samples. In this work, the

  19. Advances in Laser Surface Engineering : Tackling the Cracking Problem in Laser-Deposited Ni-Cr-B-Si-C Alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmati, I.; Ocelik, V.; De Hosson, J. Th M.

    2013-01-01

    Laser-deposition technologies are being increasingly used for surface modification and three-dimensional manufacturing applications. The biggest technical obstacle to a wider usage of these technologies especially for deposition of hard alloys is cracking of the deposited samples. In this work, the

  20. Chalcogenide compounds made by pulsed laser deposition at 355 and 248 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettlinger, Rebecca Bolt; Cazzaniga, Andrea Carlo; Crovetto, Andrea;

    Thin films made by pulsed laser deposition may differ depending on the laser wavelength. We compared ZnS, Cu2SnS3 and a target enriched with SnS relative to Cu2SnS3 using 355 nm and 248 nm lasers......Thin films made by pulsed laser deposition may differ depending on the laser wavelength. We compared ZnS, Cu2SnS3 and a target enriched with SnS relative to Cu2SnS3 using 355 nm and 248 nm lasers...

  1. Laser-induced ion emission during polymer deposition from a flash-frozen water ice matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigo, K.; Toftmann, Bo; Schou, Jørgen;

    2004-01-01

    Flash-frozen water solutions of 1% weight PEG (polyethylene glycol) at -50 degreesC were used as targets at a laser wavelength of 355 nm for polymer deposition with Matrix-Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE). For medium laser fluences the transfer of PEG material to the substrate was accomp......Flash-frozen water solutions of 1% weight PEG (polyethylene glycol) at -50 degreesC were used as targets at a laser wavelength of 355 nm for polymer deposition with Matrix-Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE). For medium laser fluences the transfer of PEG material to the substrate...... Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  2. Noble metal nanoparticles deposited on self-assembled monolayers using Pulsed Laser Deposition show coulomb blockade at room temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speets, Emiel A.; Dordi, Barbara; Ravoo, Bart Jan; Oncel, Nuri; Hallbäck, Ann-Sofie; Zandvliet, Harold J.W.; Poelsema, Bene; Rijnders, Guus; Blank, Dave H.A.; Reinhoudt, David N.

    2005-01-01

    Nanometer-sized noble-metal clusters are fabricated on top of alkylthiolate self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on annealed gold by pulsed laser deposition at elevated pressures. The size distribution of the clusters depends on the metal and on the pressure during the deposition. Scanning tunneling mic

  3. Processing Parameters Optimization for Material Deposition Efficiency in Laser Metal Deposited Titanium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahamood, Rasheedat M.; Akinlabi, Esther T.

    2016-03-01

    Ti6Al4V is an important Titanium alloy that is mostly used in many applications such as: aerospace, petrochemical and medicine. The excellent corrosion resistance property, the high strength to weight ratio and the retention of properties at high temperature makes them to be favoured in most applications. The high cost of Titanium and its alloys makes their use to be prohibitive in some applications. Ti6Al4V can be cladded on a less expensive material such as steel, thereby reducing cost and providing excellent properties. Laser Metal Deposition (LMD) process, an additive manufacturing process is capable of producing complex part directly from the 3-D CAD model of the part and it also has the capability of handling multiple materials. Processing parameters play an important role in LMD process and in order to achieve desired results at a minimum cost, then the processing parameters need to be properly controlled. This paper investigates the role of processing parameters: laser power, scanning speed, powder flow rate and gas flow rate, on the material utilization efficiency in laser metal deposited Ti6Al4V. A two-level full factorial design of experiment was used in this investigation, to be able to understand the processing parameters that are most significant as well as the interactions among these processing parameters. Four process parameters were used, each with upper and lower settings which results in a combination of sixteen experiments. The laser power settings used was 1.8 and 3 kW, the scanning speed was 0.05 and 0.1 m/s, the powder flow rate was 2 and 4 g/min and the gas flow rate was 2 and 4 l/min. The experiments were designed and analyzed using Design Expert 8 software. The software was used to generate the optimized process parameters which were found to be laser power of 3.2 kW, scanning speed of 0.06 m/s, powder flow rate of 2 g/min and gas flow rate of 3 l/min.

  4. Numerical simulation of thermal behavior during laser metal deposition shaping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG Ri-sheng; LIU Wei-jun; XING Fei; WANG Hua-bing

    2008-01-01

    Based on the element life and death theory of finite element analysis (FEA),a three-dimensional multi-track and multi-layer model for laser metal deposition shaping (LMDS) was developed with ANSYS parametric design language (APDL),and detailed numerical simulations of temperature and thermal stress were conducted.Among those simulations,long-edge parallel reciprocating scanning method was introduced.The distribution regularities of temperature,temperature gradient,Von Mise's effective stress,X-directional,Y-directional and Z-directional thermal stresses were studied.LMDS experiments were carried out with nickel-based superalloy using the same process parameters as those in simulation.The measured temperatures of molten pool are in accordance with the simulated results.The crack engendering and developing regularities of samples show good agreement with the simulation results.

  5. Effects of an external magnetic field in pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, T. [Universidad Autonoma de la Ciudad de Mexico (UACM), Prolongacion San Isidro 151, Col. San Lorenzo Tezonco, C.P. 09790, Mexico DF (Mexico)], E-mail: tupacgarcia@yahoo.com; Posada, E. de [CINVESTAV-IPN Unidad Merida, Applied Physics Department, A.P. 73, Cordemex, C.P. 97130 Merida, Yuc. (Mexico); Villagran, M. [CCADET, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), A.P. 70-186, C.P. 04510, Mexico DF (Mexico); Ll, J.L. Sanchez [Laboratorio de Magnetismo, Facultad de Fisica-IMRE, Universidad de La Habana, La Habana 10400 (Cuba); Bartolo-Perez, P.; Pena, J.L. [CINVESTAV-IPN Unidad Merida, Applied Physics Department, A.P. 73, Cordemex, C.P. 97130 Merida, Yuc. (Mexico)

    2008-12-30

    Thin films were grown by pulsed laser deposition, PLD, on Si (1 0 0) substrates by the ablation of a sintered ceramic SrFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} target with and without the presence of a nonhomogeneous magnetic field of {mu}{sub 0}H = 0.4 T perpendicular to substrate plane and parallel to the plasma expansion axis. The field was produced by a rectangular-shaped Nd-Fe-B permanent magnet and the substrate was just placed on the magnet surface (Aurora method). An appreciable increment of optical emission due to the presence of the magnetic field was observed, but no film composition change or thickness increment was obtained. It suggests that the increment of the optical emission is due mainly to the electron confinement rather than confinement of ionic species.

  6. Laser Metal Deposition of the Intermetallic TiAl Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Marc; Malot, Thierry; Aubry, Pascal

    2017-06-01

    Laser metal deposition of the commercial intermetallic Ti-47Al-2Cr-2Nb alloy was investigated. A large number of experiments were conducted under controlled atmosphere by changing the processing parameters to manufacture a series of beads, thin walls, and massive blocks. Optimal process parameters were successfully found to prevent cracking which is generally observed in this brittle material due to built-up residual stresses during fast cooling. These non-equilibrium cooling conditions tend to generate ultra-fine and metastable structures exhibiting high microhardness values, thus requiring post-heat treatments. The latter were successfully used to restore homogeneous lamellar or duplex microstructures and to relieve residual stresses. Subsequent tensile tests enabled us to validate the soundness and homogeneity of the Intermetallic TiAl alloy. Finally, a higher mechanical performance was achieved for the LMD material with respect to cast+HIP and EBM counterparts.

  7. Properties of pulsed laser deposited NiO/MWCNT thin films

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Yalisi, B

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is a thin-film deposition technique, which uses short and intensive laser pulses to evaporate target material. The technique has been used in this work to produce selective solar absorber (SSA) thin film composites...

  8. LASER-INDUCED DECOMPOSITION OF METAL CARBONYLS FOR CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION OF MICROSTRUCTURES

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    Tungsten and nickel carbonyls were used to produce metal microstructures by laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on various substrates. The deposition rate of microstructures produced by thermodecomposition of W(CO)6 on Si substrates heated with a cw Ar+ laser beam was relatively low (10 to 30 nm/s) even at high temperatures (above 900°C). Ni microstructures were deposited on quartz substrates irradiated with a CO2 laser beam. Relatively high laser powers were needed to heat the Ni s...

  9. Reactive pulsed laser deposition of gold nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caricato, A.P. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Fernandez, M. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Leggieri, G. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy)]. E-mail: leggieri@le.infn.it; Luches, A. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Martino, M. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Romano, F. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Tunno, T. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Valerini, D. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Verdyan, A. [Science Department, Holon Academic Institute of Technology, Holon 58102 (Israel); Soifer, Y.M. [Science Department, Holon Academic Institute of Technology, Holon 58102 (Israel); Azoulay, J. [Science Department, Holon Academic Institute of Technology, Holon 58102 (Israel); Meda, L. [IGD Polimeri Europa S.p.A, Novara (Italy)

    2007-07-31

    We report on the growth and characterization of gold nitride thin films on Si <1 0 0> substrates at room temperature by reactive pulsed laser ablation. A pure (99.95%) Au target was ablated with KrF excimer laser pulses in nitrogen containing atmosphere (N{sub 2} or NH{sub 3}). The gas ambient pressure was varied in the range 0.1-100 Pa. The morphology of the films was studied by using optical, scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, evidencing compact films with RMS roughness in the range 3.6-35.1 nm, depending on the deposition pressure. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS) were used to detect the nitrogen concentration into the films. The EDS nitrogen peak does not decrease in intensity after 2 h annealing at 250 deg. C. Film resistivity was measured using a four-point probe and resulted in the (4-20) x 10{sup -8} {omega} m range, depending on the ambient pressure, to be compared with the value 2.6 x 10{sup -8} {omega} m of a pure gold film. Indentation and scratch measurements gave microhardness values of 2-3 GPa and the Young's modulus close to 100 GPa. X-ray photoemission spectra clearly showed the N 1s peak around 400 eV and displaced with respect to N{sub 2} phase. All these measurements point to the formation of the gold nitride phase.

  10. Reactive pulsed laser deposition of gold nitride thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caricato, A. P.; Fernàndez, M.; Leggieri, G.; Luches, A.; Martino, M.; Romano, F.; Tunno, T.; Valerini, D.; Verdyan, A.; Soifer, Y. M.; Azoulay, J.; Meda, L.

    2007-07-01

    We report on the growth and characterization of gold nitride thin films on Si substrates at room temperature by reactive pulsed laser ablation. A pure (99.95%) Au target was ablated with KrF excimer laser pulses in nitrogen containing atmosphere (N 2 or NH 3). The gas ambient pressure was varied in the range 0.1-100 Pa. The morphology of the films was studied by using optical, scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, evidencing compact films with RMS roughness in the range 3.6-35.1 nm, depending on the deposition pressure. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS) were used to detect the nitrogen concentration into the films. The EDS nitrogen peak does not decrease in intensity after 2 h annealing at 250 °C. Film resistivity was measured using a four-point probe and resulted in the (4-20) × 10 -8 Ω m range, depending on the ambient pressure, to be compared with the value 2.6 × 10 -8 Ω m of a pure gold film. Indentation and scratch measurements gave microhardness values of 2-3 GPa and the Young's modulus close to 100 GPa. X-ray photoemission spectra clearly showed the N 1s peak around 400 eV and displaced with respect to N 2 phase. All these measurements point to the formation of the gold nitride phase.

  11. Laser-guided direct writing: a novel method to deposit biomolecules for biosensors arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Juntao; Grant, Sheila A; Pastel, Robert L

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we present a potential biomolecular patterning method, laser-guided direct writing guidance (LGDW), which may be utilized to deposit organic and bioactive particles for biosensor arrays. The instrumentation and operation of the LGDW system is introduced and the system settings used to achieve deposition are reported. The biomolecule, avidin, was deposited onto a substrate using LGDW to evaluate the possible damage from the laser on the biomolecules. The functionality of avidin after laser-based guidance was examined by exposing the deposited avidin molecules to its ligand, biotin. The results show some avidin retained its affinity to biotin after LGDW demonstrating little damage to the biomolecules.

  12. Pulsed laser deposition of carbon nanotube and polystyrene-carbon nanotube composite thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stramel, A. A.; Gupta, M. C.; Lee, H. R.; Yu, J.; Edwards, W. C.

    2010-12-01

    In this work, we report on the fabrication of carbon nanotube thin films via pulsed laser deposition using a pulsed, diode pumped, Tm:Ho:LuLF laser with 2 μm wavelength. The thin films were deposited on silicon substrates using pure carbon nanotube targets and polystyrene-carbon nanotube composite targets. Raman spectra, scanning electron micrographs, and transmission electron micrographs show that carbon nanotubes are present in the deposited thin films, and that the pulsed laser deposition process causes minimal degradation to the quality of the nanotubes when using pure carbon nanotube targets.

  13. Performance characterization of Ni60-WC coating on steel processed with supersonic laser deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Luo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ni60-WC particles are used to improve the wear resistance of hard-facing steel due to their high hardness. An emerging technology that combines laser with cold spraying to deposit the hard-facing coatings is known as supersonic laser deposition. In this study, Ni60-WC is deposited on low-carbon steel using SLD. The microstructure and performance of the coatings are investigated through SEM, optical microscopy, EDS, XRD, microhardness and pin-on-disc wear tests. The experimental results of the coating processed with the optimal parameters are compared to those of the coating deposited using laser cladding.

  14. In situ X-ray diffraction during pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vonk, Vedran [Max-Planck-Institute for Metals Research, Stuttgart (Germany); Huijben, Mark [University of California, Berkeley (United States); Driessen, Kurt; Rijnders, Guus; Blank, Dave; Harkema, Sybolt [University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Graafsma, Heinz [Deutsches Elektronen- Synchrotron, Hamburg (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The use of in situ X-ray diffraction for the study of thin film growth enables in a straightforward way to derive the atomic structure, because the kinematical scattering approximation holds. Here we present the results of studying the heteroepitaxial growth by Pulsed Laser Deposition of complex oxides such as the High-T c superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} and the insulator LaAlO{sub 3} on SrTiO{sub 3}(001) substrates. A special sample chamber has been constructed to be used with synchrotron X-rays. Detailed pictures of the growth kinetics and of the atomic interface structure at deposition conditions result from fitting quantitatively both the intensity growth oscillations and the crystal truncation rods. The growth of the complex oxide thin films presented here is characterized by substantial interlayer-mass transport and large deviations from the bulk room-temperature atomic structure. The results show the effects of the interplay between formation and diffusion energies on the processes of nucleation and kinetics during heteroepitaxial growth.

  15. Pulsed laser deposition of graphite in air and in vacuum for field emission studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jadhav, Harshada; Singh, A.K.; Sinha, Sucharita, E-mail: ssinha@barc.gov.in

    2015-07-15

    A comparative study of pulsed laser deposition (PLD) based carbon films when deposited either, in atmospheric air, or under vacuum, has been performed. Micro-structural characterization of deposited films was carried out employing X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopic techniques. While, nanocrystalline graphite phase was observed in carbon films deposited in air, PLD films deposited under vacuum were largely amorphous in nature. Field emission (FE) properties of films deposited in air and under vacuum were investigated. Superior FE behavior characterized by a lower turn-on field (2.72 V/μm) and high field enhancement factor (∼2580) was observed for PLD films deposited in air. This improved field emission demonstrated by carbon films deposited via PLD in air can be attributed to presence of nanocrystalline graphite aggregates in such carbon films and local field enhancement near the sp{sup 2} sites. Our results therefore, establish PLD in air as a simple technique for deposition of carbon films having good field emission capability. - Highlights: • Pulsed laser deposition of graphite films, deposited in air and in vacuum. • Micro-structural, X-ray diffraction and micro-Raman spectroscopic characterization of deposited films. • Field emission properties of deposited films investigated. • Superior field emission behavior observed for films deposited in air than in vacuum. • Pulsed laser deposition in air leads to carbon films with excellent field emission capability.

  16. Laser deposition and structuring of laser active planar waveguides of Er:ZBLAN, Nd:YAG and Nd:GGG for integrated waveguide lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottmann, Jens; Moiseev, Leonid; Wortmann, Dirk; Vasilief, Ion; Starovoytova, Larisa; Ganser, Dimitri; Wagner, Ralph

    2007-02-01

    Laser radiation is used both for the deposition of the laser active thin films and for the micro structuring to define wave guiding structures for the fabrication of waveguide lasers. Thin films of Er:ZBLAN (a glass consisting of ZrF 4, BaF II, LaF 3, AlF 3, NaF, ErF 3) for green upconversion lasers (545 nm), Nd:YAG (Y 3Al 5O 12) and Nd:GGG (Gd 3Ga 5O 12) for infrared lasers (1064 nm) are produced. Manufacturing of the laser active waveguides by micro-structuring is done using fs laser ablation of the deposited films. The structural and optical properties of the films and the damping losses of the structured waveguides are determined in view of the design and the fabrication of compact and efficient diode pumped waveguide lasers. The resulting waveguides are polished, provided with resonator mirrors, pumped using diode lasers and characterized. Laser operation of a ridge waveguide structure grown by pulsed laser deposition and structured by fs laser ablation is demonstrated. A 1 μm thick, 100 μm wide and 3 mm long structured waveguide consisting of amorphous neodymium doped Gd 3Ga 5O 12 has shown laser activity at 1.068 μm when pumped by a diode laser at 808 nm.

  17. Vapor deposition of polystyrene thin films by intense laser vibrational excitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bubb, D.M.; Papantonakis, M.R.; Horwitz, J.S.

    2002-01-01

    Polystyrene films were deposited using resonant infrared pulsed laser depositions (RIR-PLD). Thin films were grown on Si(1 1 1) wafers and NaCl substrates and analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The depositions were carried out...

  18. XPS analysis and luminescence properties of thin films deposited by the pulsed laser deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolo, J. J.; Swart, H. C.; Coetsee, E.; Terblans, J. J.; Ntwaeaborwa, O. M.; Dejene, B. F.

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents the effect of substrate temperature and oxygen partial pressure on the photoluminescence (PL) intensity of the Gd2O2S:Tb3 + thin films that were grown by using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The PL intensity increased with an increase in the oxygen partial pressure and substrate temperature. The thin film deposited at an oxygen pressure of 900 mTorr and substrate temperature of 900°C was found to be the best in terms of the PL intensity of the Gd2O2S:Tb3 + emission. The main emission peak due to the 5D4-7F5 transition of Tb was measured at a wavelength of 545 nm. The stability of these thin films under prolonged electron bombardment was tested with a combination of techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and Cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy. It was shown that the main reason for the degradation in luminescence intensity under electron bombardment is the formation of a non-luminescent Gd2O3 layer, with small amounts of Gd2S3, on the surface.

  19. Hydrodynamic Instability in High-speed Direct Laser Deposition for Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turichin, Gleb; Zemlyakov, Evgeny; Klimova, Olga; Babkin, Konstantin

    High speed direct laser deposition, when product forms from metal powder, transferred by gas-powder jet, supplied coaxially or non-coaxially to focused laser beam, in one of most prospective additive technologies for production parts for aircraft engines. The limit of process productivity is connected with development of hydrodynamic instability of the melt pool in conditions of high power laser action and material supply by gas-powder jet. Theoretical analysis and experiments allowed clarified a physical nature of instability appearance, determine a stability conditions and invent a methods which allow avoid instability in deposition process. Nozzles for direct laser deposition, designed with consideration of stability conditions, allow get a level of process productivity more then 2 kg/h. The developed technology of deposition and technological equipment, based on high power fiber laser, has been used for manufacturing of parts for "high temperature" unit of aircraft engine.

  20. Laser controlled deposition of metal microstructures via nondiffracting Bessel beam illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drampyan, Rafael; Leonov, Nikita; Vartanyan, Tigran

    2016-04-01

    The technique of the laser controlled deposition of sodium and rubidium deposits on the sapphire substrate is presented. The metals were deposited on the clean sapphire substrate from the vapor phase contained in the evacuated and sealed cell. We use an axicon to produce a non-diffracting Bessel beam out of the beam got from the cw diode laser with 200 mW power at the wavelength of 532 nm. After 30 minutes of the laser-controlled deposition the substrates were examined in the optical microscope. The obtained metal deposits form the sharp-cut circles with the pitch of 10 μm, coincident with the tens of dark rings of the Bessel beam. Reduction of the laser power leads to the build up of the continuous metal film over the whole substrate.

  1. Morphology and structural studies of WO3 films deposited on SrTiO3 by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalhori, Hossein; Porter, Stephen B.; Esmaeily, Amir Sajjad; Coey, Michael; Ranjbar, Mehdi; Salamati, Hadi

    2016-12-01

    WO3 films have been grown by pulsed laser deposition on SrTiO3 (001) substrates. The effects of substrate temperature, oxygen partial pressure and energy fluence of the laser beam on the physical properties of the films were studied. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) patterns during and after growth were used to determine the surface structure and morphology. The chemical composition and crystalline phases were obtained by XPS and XRD respectively. AFM results showed that the roughness and skewness of the films depend on the substrate temperature during deposition. Optimal conditions were determined for the growth of the highly oriented films.

  2. Diamond-like carbon and ceramic materials as protective coatings grown by pulsed laser deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Perera Mercado, Yibran Argenis

    2004-01-01

    A rather large number of nitride, carbide, and oxide thin films are used as hard and wear-resistant coatings, for optical, corrosive, and refractory applications that are of crucial importance. Additional requirements place even more stringent conditions on the deposition processes. The properties of coatings deposited by pulsed laser deposition are determined by the deposition parameters, the composition of the PLD plasma and its ionization states, the substrate conditions, etc.. In this way...

  3. Pulsed laser deposition of ZnSe N epilayers

    CERN Document Server

    Boo, B H; Xu, N

    2000-01-01

    A high-quality epitaxial film of nitrogen-doped ZsSe has been grown on a GaAs(100) substrate by using pulsed laser deposition assisted by an atomic nitrogen beam produced by a supersonic nozzle beam source. Atomic force microscopy shows that the surface of the ZnSe epilayer grown on GaAs(100) at 2 x 10 sup - sup 3 Torr is flat and dense. It also shows that its roughness is approx = 1.6 nm, less than that of epilayers grown by using metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. X-ray diffraction results show that this ZnSe epilayer is a single crystalline epitaxial film. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicates that the epilayer is composed of 84 % Zn and Se, 10 % N, and 6 % O; other impurities are rare. The XPS spectra involving the Zn(2p sub 3 sub / sub 2) and the N(1s) core levels also indicate that the concentration of doped nitrogen atoms is above 10 sup 2 sup 1 /cm sup 3.

  4. Doped Titanium Dioxide Films Prepared by Pulsed Laser Deposition Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juguang Hu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available TiO2 was intensively researched especially for photocatalystic applications. The nitrogen-doped TiO2 films prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD method were reviewed, and some recent new experimental results were also presented in this paper. A new optical transmission method for evaluating the photocatalystic activity was presented. The main results are (1 PLD method is versatile for preparing oxide material or complex component films with excellent controllability and high reproducibility. (2 Anatase nitrogen-doped TiO2 films were prepared at room temperature, 200°C, and 400°C by PLD method using novel ceramic target of mixture of TiN and TiO2. UV/Vis spectra, AFM, Raman spectra, and photocatalystic activity for decomposition of methyl orange (MO tests showed that visible light response was improved at higher temperature. (3 The automatic, continuous optical transmission autorecorder method is suitable for detecting the photodecomposition dynamic process of organic compound.

  5. Laser diagnostics of chemical vapour deposition of diamond films

    CERN Document Server

    Wills, J B

    2002-01-01

    Cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) has been used to make diagnostic measurements of chemically activated CH sub 4 / H sub 2 gas mixtures during the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of thin diamond films. Absolute absorbances, concentrations and temperatures are presented for CH sub 3 , NH and C sub 2 H sub 2 in a hot filament (HF) activated gas mixture and CH, C sub 2 and C sub 2 H sub 2 in a DC arc plasma jet activated mixture. Measurements of the radical species were made using a pulsed dye laser system to generate tuneable visible and UV wavelengths. These species have greatest concentration in the hottest, activated regions of the reactors. Spatial profiling of the number densities of CH sub 3 and NH radicals have been used as stringent tests of predictions of radical absorbance and number densities made by 3-D numerical simulations, with near quantitative agreement. O sub 2 has been shown to reside in the activated region of the Bristol DC arc jet at concentrations (approx 10 sup 1 sup 3 molecules / cm...

  6. Comparison of the properties of Pb thin films deposited on Nb substrate using thermal evaporation and pulsed laser deposition techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrone, A., E-mail: alessio.perrone@unisalento.it [Università del Salento, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi”, 73100 Lecce (Italy); INFN-Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare e Università del Salento, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Gontad, F. [INFN-Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare e Università del Salento, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Lorusso, A.; Di Giulio, M. [Università del Salento, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi”, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Broitman, E. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Ferrario, M. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, 00044 Frascati (Italy)

    2013-11-21

    Pb thin films were prepared at room temperature and in high vacuum by thermal evaporation and pulsed laser deposition techniques. Films deposited by both the techniques were investigated by scanning electron microscopy to determine their surface topology. The structure of the films was studied by X-ray diffraction in θ–2θ geometry. The photoelectron performances in terms of quantum efficiency were deduced by a high vacuum photodiode cell before and after laser cleaning procedures. Relatively high quantum efficiency (>10{sup −5}) was obtained for all the deposited films, comparable to that of corresponding bulk. Finally, film to substrate adhesion was also evaluated using the Daimler–Benz Rockwell-C adhesion test method. Weak and strong points of these two competitive techniques are illustrated and discussed. -- Highlights: •Comparison of Pb thin films deposited on Nb substrate by thermal evaporation and pulsed laser deposition (PLD). •Photoelectron performances of Pb thin films. •Good quality of adhesion strength of Pb films deposited by PLD.

  7. Direct patterning of complex oxides by pulsed laser deposition through stencils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riele, Paul te; Janssens, Arjen; Rijnders, Guus; Blank, Dave H A [University of Twente, Inorganic Material Science, Faculty of Science and Technology MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, PO Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2007-04-15

    The possibilities to grow isolated structures of complex oxides by pulsed laser deposition through stencils were investigated. A stencil consisting of a SiN membrane with apertures of several hundred nanometers embedded in a Si chip is placed in front of a heated substrate (up to 750 degrees Celsius). Deposition through these apertures results in resistless, direct patterning by local deposition of complex oxides like ferroelectric Lead Zirconate Titanate. The created isolated structures were analyzed by AFM imaging. Under-deposition, in this work called broadening, is inevitable during stencil deposition and is depending on deposition parameters, especially pressure. Different causes of broadening are mapped and discussed.

  8. UV and RIR matrix assisted pulsed laser deposition of organic MEH-PPV films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Papantonalis, M.R.; Auyeung, R.C.Y.

    2004-01-01

    were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV-visible absorbance and photoluminescence. Photoluminescent material was deposited by RIR-MAPLE and 248-nm MAPLE, while the RIR-PLD and 193-nm-MAPLE depositions displayed the smoothest surfaces but did not show photoluminescence. (C) 2003......-PLD). For the first time resonant infrared matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (RIR-MAPLE) was successfully demonstrated on a luminescent polymer system. In addition to this, an excimer laser has been used for UV-MAPLE depositions at 193 and 248-nm irradiation. Films deposited onto NaCl and quartz substrates...

  9. Nanosecond laser ablation and deposition of silver, copper, zinc and tin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cazzaniga, Andrea Carlo; Ettlinger, Rebecca Bolt; Canulescu, Stela

    2014-01-01

    Nanosecond pulsed laser deposition of different metals (Ag, Cu, Sn, Zn) has been studied in high vacuum at a laser wavelength of 355 nm and pulse length of 6 ns. The deposition rate is roughly similar for Sn, Cu and Ag, which have comparable cohesive energies, and much higher for the deposition o...... be explained by the continuous erosion by nanoparticles during deposition of the Sn films which appear to have a much rougher surface than those of the other metals studied in the present work....

  10. Pulsed laser deposition of lysozyme: the dependence on shot numbers and the angular distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Constantinescu, C.; Matei, A.; Schou, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    . This was verified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) spectrometry of thin films deposited on silicon substrates. The deposition rate of lysozyme was found to decrease with the number of shots and was correlated with increasing thermal damage of the lysozyme. This was monitored by measurements...... of the optical reflectivity of dry lysozyme. The angular distribution of the mass deposition can be fitted well by Anisimov’s hydrodynamic model. The total deposited yield over the entire hemisphere from direct laser ablation of lysozyme was estimated from this model and found to be three orders of magnitude...

  11. Pulsed Laser Deposition of Er doped tellurite films on large area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouazaoui, M [Laboratoire PhLAM, UMR 8523, Groupe Photonique, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Capoen, B [Laboratoire PhLAM, UMR 8523, Groupe Photonique, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Caricato, A P [L3 group, Dipartimento di Fisica, Lecce, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Chiasera, A [CNR-IFN, CSMFO group, via Sommarive 14, 38100 Povo-Trento (Italy); Fazzi, A [L3 group, Dipartimento di Fisica, Lecce, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Ferrari, M [CNR-IFN, CSMFO group, via Sommarive 14, 38100 Povo-Trento (Italy); Leggieri, G [L3 group, Dipartimento di Fisica, Lecce, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Martino, M [L3 group, Dipartimento di Fisica, Lecce, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Mattarelli, M [Physics Department, CSMFO group, via Sommarive 14, 38100 Povo-Trento (Italy); Montagna, M [Physics Department, CSMFO group, via Sommarive 14, 38100 Povo-Trento (Italy); Romano, F [L3 group, Dipartimento di Fisica, Lecce, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Tunno, T [L3 group, Dipartimento di Fisica, Lecce, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Turrel, S [Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, Laboratoire de Spectrochimie Infrarouge et Raman, LASIR - UMR 8516 du CNRS - Bat C5 - 59655 - Villeneuve d' Ascq cedex (France); Vishnubhatla, K [Physics Department, CSMFO group, via Sommarive 14, 38100 Povo-Trento (Italy)

    2007-04-15

    Thin films of Er{sup 3+}-doped tungsten tellurite glass have been prepared by the pulsed laser deposition technique using an ArF excimer laser. The depositions were performed at different O{sub 2} pressure (5, 10 Pa) and at different substrate temperatures (RT, 100deg. C and 200deg. C). The composition and the optical properties of the deposited films, such as transmission, dispersion curves of refraction index and extinction coefficient, and film thickness were studied for the different deposition parameters. Transparent films at the highest substrate temperature were obtained only for a higher oxygen pressure with respect to the RT conditions.

  12. Enhanced transduction of polymer photonic crystal band-edge lasers via additional layer deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Cameron; Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Buss, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We present the concept of enhanced transduction for polymer photonic crystal lasers by deposition of an additional polymer layer with selective gas response. We report a significant increase in sensitivity to changes in gas concentration....

  13. Surface electronic and structural properties of nanostructured titanium oxide grown by pulsed laser deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fusi, M.; Maccallini, E.; Caruso, T.; Casari, C. S.; Bassi, A. Li; Bottani, C. E.; Rudolf, P.; Prince, K. C.; Agostino, R. G.

    2011-01-01

    Titanium oxide nanostructured thin films synthesized by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) were here characterized with a multi-technique approach to investigate the relation between surface electronic, structural and morphological properties. Depending on the growth parameters, these films present chara

  14. Microstructure and microhardness of 17-4 PH stainless steel made by laser metal deposition

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bayode, A

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Laser metal deposition (LMD) is an additive manufacturing process. Unlike conventional manufacturing process which is subtractive, LMD produces part layer by layer from the ground up and has been used to fabricate fully dense components using a...

  15. Formation of Metal Nano- and Micropatterns on Self-Assembled Monolayers by Pulsed Laser Deposition Through Nanostencils and Electroless Deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speets, Emiel A.; Riele, te Paul; Boogaart, van den Marc A.F.; Doeswijk, Lianne M.; Ravoo, Bart Jan; Rijnders, Guus; Brugger, Jürgen; Reinhoudt, David N.; Blank, Dave H.A.

    2006-01-01

    Patterns of noble-metal structures on top of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on Au and SiO2 substrates have been prepared following two approaches. The first approach consists of pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of Pt, Pd, Au, or Cu through nano- and microstencils. In the second approach, noble-metal

  16. Laser annealing of sputter-deposited -SiC and -SiCN films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M A Fraga; M Massi; I C Oliveira; F D Origo; W Miyakawa

    2011-12-01

    This work describes the laser annealing of -SiC and -SiCN films deposited on (100) Si and quartz substrates by RF magnetron sputtering. Two samples of -SiCN thin films were produced under different N2/Ar flow ratios. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), Raman analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) techniques were used to investigate the composition and bonding structure of as-deposited and laser annealed SiC and SiCN films.

  17. Pulsed Laser Deposition of YBCO With Yttrium Oxide Buffer Layers (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    AFRL-RZ-WP-TP-2012-0092 PULSED LASER DEPOSITION OF YBCO WITH YTTRIUM OXIDE BUFFER LAYERS (POSTPRINT) Paul N. Barnes, Timothy J. Haugan...Paper Postprint 01 January 2002 – 01 January 2004 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE PULSED LASER DEPOSITION OF YBCO WITH YTTRIUM OXIDE BUFFER LAYERS (POSTPRINT...Textured metallic substrate based HTS coated conductors with the YBCO /CeO2/YSZ/CeO2/Ni architecture have already been shown to exhibit high current

  18. Nanosecond pulsed laser deposition of TiO{sub 2}: nanostructure and morphology of deposits and plasma diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz, Mikel; Walczak, Malgorzata; Oujja, Mohamed; Cuesta, Angel [Instituto de Quimica Fisica Rocasolano, CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Castillejo, Marta, E-mail: marta.castillejo@iqfr.csic.e [Instituto de Quimica Fisica Rocasolano, CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-10-30

    Nanostructured TiO{sub 2} films on Si (100) substrates have been grown by nanosecond pulsed laser deposition at the wavelengths of 266, 355 and 532 nm using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and TiO{sub 2} sintered rutile targets. The effect of laser irradiation wavelength, the temperature of the substrate and the presence of O{sub 2} as background gas on the crystallinity and surface structure of deposits were determined, together with the composition, expansion dynamics and thermodynamic parameters of the ablation plume. Deposits were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, environmental scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, while in situ monitoring of the plume was carried out and characterized with spectral, temporal and spatial resolution by optical emission spectroscopy. Stoichiometric, crystalline deposits, with nanostructured morphology were obtained at substrate temperatures above 600 {sup o}C. Microscopic particulates were found overimposed on the nanostructured films but their size and density were significantly reduced by operating at short wavelength (266 nm) and upon addition of a low pressure of oxygen (0.05 Pa). The dominant crystalline phase is rutile at 355 and 532 nm. At the short irradiation wavelength, 266 nm, the preferred phase in the presence of oxygen is rutile, while anatase is preferably observed under vacuum. The narrowest size distribution and smallest nanoparticle diameters, of around 25 nm, were found by deposition at 266 nm under 0.05 Pa of oxygen.

  19. Electrical and magnetic properties of ZnNiO thin films deposited by pulse laser deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie JIANG; Xue-tao WANG; Li-ping ZHU; Li-qiang ZHANG; Zhi-guo YANG; Zhi-zhen YE

    2011-01-01

    ZnNiO thin films with different contents of Ni (0-10 at.%) were fabricated on quartz and Si (100) substrates bY pulsed laser deposition (PLD).We measured the samples by X-ray diffraction (XRD),field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM),X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS),ultraviolet-visible spectrometer (UV-VIS),and Hall testing.When the Ni contents were below 3 at.%,partial Zn2+ ions were replaced by the Ni2+ ions without forming any other phases,which enhanced the conductivity of the film.When the Ni contents were above 3 at.%,Ni ions were at the interstitial sites,and Ni-related clusters and defects were able to emerge in the films,resulting in a worsening of electrical and optical properties.A ferromagnetic hysteresis with a coercive force of approximately 30 Oe was observed in the ZnNiO film with a Ni content of 3 at.% at room temperature.

  20. Comparison of the properties of Pb thin films deposited on Nb substrate using thermal evaporation and pulsed laser deposition techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, A.; Gontad, F.; Lorusso, A.; Di Giulio, M.; Broitman, E.; Ferrario, M.

    2013-11-01

    Pb thin films were prepared at room temperature and in high vacuum by thermal evaporation and pulsed laser deposition techniques. Films deposited by both the techniques were investigated by scanning electron microscopy to determine their surface topology. The structure of the films was studied by X-ray diffraction in θ-2θ geometry. The photoelectron performances in terms of quantum efficiency were deduced by a high vacuum photodiode cell before and after laser cleaning procedures. Relatively high quantum efficiency (>10-5) was obtained for all the deposited films, comparable to that of corresponding bulk. Finally, film to substrate adhesion was also evaluated using the Daimler-Benz Rockwell-C adhesion test method. Weak and strong points of these two competitive techniques are illustrated and discussed.

  1. Deposition and alignment of cells on laser-patterned quartz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Sajan D., E-mail: sajan.george@manipal.edu [Centre for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Manipal University, Manipal 576 104 (India); Ladiwala, Uma, E-mail: brainwave@cbs.ac.in [UM-DAE Centre for Excellence in Basic Sciences, Kalina Campus, Mumbai 400 098 (India); Thomas, John; Bankapur, Aseefhali; Chidangil, Santhosh [Centre for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Manipal University, Manipal 576 104 (India); Mathur, Deepak [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, 1 Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005 (India)

    2014-06-01

    Linear grooves have been laser-written on quartz surfaces using ultrashort (50 fs) pulses of 800 nm light. Measurements of water contact angle indicate that laser patterning makes the quartz surface more hydrophilic. Fibroblast cells were cultured on such laser-written surfaces; they were observed to align preferentially along the direction of the laser written grooves (width ∼2 μm. Raman spectroscopy results indicate that there are no chemical changes induced in the surface upon our laser writing. Most unexpectedly, there are also no chemical changes induced in the cells that are spatially aligned along the laser-written grooves. Atomic force microscopy measurements confirm that our laser-writing induces dramatic enhancement of surface roughness along the grooves, and the cells appear to respond to this. Thus, cell alignment seems to be in response to physical cues rather than chemical signals.

  2. Laser assisted modification and chemical metallization of electron-beam deposited ceria thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumov, E., E-mail: emodk@clf.bas.bg [Central Laboratory of Photoprocesses ' Acad. Jordan Malinowski' , Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. Georgy Bonchev Str., bl. 109, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Starbov, N.; Starbova, K. [Central Laboratory of Photoprocesses ' Acad. Jordan Malinowski' , Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. Georgy Bonchev Str., bl. 109, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Perea, A.; Solis, J. [Instituto de Optica ' Daza de Valdes' , CSIC, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-11-15

    Excimer laser processing is applied for tailoring the surface morphology and phase composition of CeO{sub 2} ceramic thin films. E-beam evaporation technique is used to deposit samples on stainless steel and silicate glass substrates. The films are then irradiated with ArF* excimer laser pulses under different exposure conditions. Scanning electron microscopy, optical spectrophotometry, X-ray diffractometry and EDS microanalysis are used to characterize the non-irradiated and laser-processed films. Upon UV laser exposure there is large increase of the surface roughness that is accompanied by photo-darkening and ceria reduction. It is shown that the laser induced changes in the CeO{sub 2} films facilitate the deposition of metal nano-aggregates in a commercial copper electroless plating bath. The significance of laser modification as a novel approach for the production of CeO{sub 2} based thin film catalysts is discussed.

  3. Preparation of γ-Al2O3 films by laser chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ming; Ito, Akihiko; Goto, Takashi

    2015-06-01

    γ- and α-Al2O3 films were prepared by chemical vapor deposition using CO2, Nd:YAG, and InGaAs lasers to investigate the effects of varying the laser wavelength and deposition conditions on the phase composition and microstructure. The CO2 laser was found to mostly produce α-Al2O3 films, whereas the Nd:YAG and InGaAs lasers produced γ-Al2O3 films when used at a high total pressure. γ-Al2O3 films had a cauliflower-like structure, while the α-Al2O3 films had a dense and columnar structure. Of the three lasers, it was the Nd:YAG laser that interacted most with intermediate gas species. This promoted γ-Al2O3 nucleation in the gas phase at high total pressure, which explains the cauliflower-like structure of nanoparticles observed.

  4. Laser deposition rates of thin films of selected metals and alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cazzaniga, Andrea Carlo; Canulescu, Stela; Schou, Jørgen

    . The experiments have been carried out at a laser wavelength of 355 nm in vacuum with a PLD chamber at DTU Fotonik, Risø Campus. The deposition rates have been measured by a quartz crystal microbalance. At a laser fluence of 2 J/cm2 the total ablated yield of copper is about 1x1015 atoms per pulse. The film...

  5. Multiphysics simulation of thermal phenomena in direct laser metal powder deposition

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pityana, SL

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The direct laser metal deposition (DLMD) is a recently developed technique for manufacturing solid parts, layer by layer, directly from powder. The process uses a high power laser beam focused onto a metallic substrate to generate a molten pool...

  6. Three-dimensional defects in CdTe films obtained by pulsed laser deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sagan, P; Virt, IS; Zawislak, J; Rudyj, IO; Kuzma, M

    2004-01-01

    The quality of Cd chalcodenides epitaxial films can be enhanced seriously by applying a pulsed (electron beam or laser beam) method for ablation of targets. The structure of laser deposited CdTe layers was investigated by transmission high energy electron diffraction. This method is very useful for

  7. Toughening mechanism for Ni-Cr-B-Si-C laser deposited coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmati, I.; Ocelik, V.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2013-01-01

    Laser deposited coatings were made from Colmonoy 69 Ni-Cr-B-Si-C alloy and Nb-modified Colmonoy 69 using laser cladding with powder injection. Addition of Nb was done to decrease the structural scale of Cr boride precipitates by providing Nb-rich nucleation agents. The purpose of the study was to ev

  8. Analysis and removal of ITER relevant materials and deposits by laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qingmei; Huber, Alexander; Philipps, Volker; Sergienko, Gennady; Gierse, Niels; Mertens, Philippe; Hai, Ran; Ding, Hongbin

    2014-12-01

    The analysis of the deposition of eroded wall material on the plasma-facing materials in fusion devices is one of the crucial issues to maintain the plasma performance and to fulfill safety requirements with respect to tritium retention by co-deposition. Laser ablation with minimal damage to the plasma facing material is a promising method for in situ monitoring and removal of the deposition, especially for plasma-shadowed areas which are difficult to reach by other cleaning methods like plasma discharge. It requires the information of ablation process and the ablation threshold for quantitative analysis and effective removal of the different deposits. This paper presents systemic laboratory experimental analysis of the behavior of the ITER relevant materials, graphite, tungsten, aluminum (as a substitution of beryllium) and mixed deposits ablated by a Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) with different energy densities (1-27 J/cm2, power density 0.3-3.9 GW/cm2). The mixed deposits consisted of W-Al-C layer were deposited on W substrate by magnetron sputtering and arc plasma deposition. The aim was to select the proper parameters for the quantitative analysis and for laser removal of the deposits by investigating the ablation efficiency and ablation threshold for the bulk materials and deposits. The comparison of the ablation and saturation energy thresholds for pure and mixed materials shows that the ablation threshold of the mixed layer depends on the concentration of the components. We propose laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for determination of the elemental composition of deposits and then we select the laser parameters for the layer removal. Comparison of quantitative analysis results from laboratory to that from TEXTOR shows reasonable agreements. The dependence of the spectra on plasma parameters and ambient gas pressure is investigated.

  9. Protein enrichment by capture-release based on strain-promoted cycloaddition of azide with bicyclononyne (BCN).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Temming, R.P.; Scherpenzeel, M. van; Brinke, E. te; Schoffelen, S.; Gloerich, J.; Lefeber, D.J.; Delft, F.L. van

    2012-01-01

    An enrichment strategy was devised for azide derivatized macromolecules, based on strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition (SPAAC) and a cleavable linker. A ring-strained alkyne, bicyclo[6.1.0]non-4-yne (BCN), was covalently attached to agarose beads via a hydrazine-sensitive linker. Benchmark

  10. PULSED LASER DEPOSITION OF MAGNETIC MULTILAYERS FOR THE GRANT ENTITLED LASER PROCESSING OF ADVANCED MAGNETIC MATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monica Sorescu

    2003-10-11

    Nanostructured magnetite/T multilayers, with T = Ni, Co, Cr, have been prepared by pulsed laser deposition. The thickness of individual magnetite and metal layers takes values in the range of 5-40 nm with a total multilayer thickness of 100-120 nm. X-ray diffraction has been used to study the phase characteristics as a function of thermal treatment up to 550 C. Small amounts of maghemite and hematite were identified together with prevailing magnetite phase after treatments at different temperatures. The mean grain size of magnetite phase increases with temperature from 12 nm at room temperature to 54 nm at 550 C. The thermal behavior of magnetite in multilayers in comparison with powder magnetite is discussed. These findings were published in peer-reviewed conference proceedings after presentation at an international materials conference.

  11. Pulsed laser deposition of permanent magnetic Nd2Fe14B thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurtsen, A.J.M.; Kools, J.C.S.; Wit, L.; Lodder, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) is applied to deposit thin (thickness typically 100 nm) films of Nd2Fe14B. It is shown that films can be grown which have the desired composition and phase. Nd2Fe14B grows with the c-axis along the film normal on 110 Al2O3 single crystal substrates covered with a Ta lay

  12. In-situ monitoring during pulsed laser deposition using RHEED at high pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blank, David H.A.; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.; Koster, Gertjan; Rogalla, Horst

    1998-01-01

    Reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) is, due to its surface sensitivity, often used for the analysis and monitoring of thin film growth in ultra-high vacuum deposition systems. RHEED is usually applied in combination with pulsed laser deposition (PLD) by adjusting the background

  13. Pulsed laser deposition of Cu-Sn-S for thin film solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettlinger, Rebecca Bolt; Crovetto, Andrea; Bosco, Edoardo

    Thin films of copper tin sulfide were deposited from a target of the stoichiometry Cu:Sn:S ~1:2:3 using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Annealing with S powder resulted in films close to the desired Cu2SnS3 stoichiometry although the films remained Sn rich. Xray diffraction showed that the final...

  14. Pure and Sn-doped ZnO films produced by pulsed laser deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmelund, E.; Schou, Jørgen; Tougaard, S.;

    2002-01-01

    A new technique, metronome doping, has been used for doping of films during pulsed laser deposition (PLD). This technique makes it possible to dope continuously during film growth with different concentrations of a dopant in one deposition sequence. Films of pure and doped ZnO have been produced...

  15. Pulsed laser deposition-induced reduction of SrTiO3 crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scullin, Matthew L.; Ravichandran, Jayakanth; Yu, Choongho; Huijben, Mark; Seidel, Jan; Majumdar, Arun; Ramesh, R.; Ramesh, R.

    2010-01-01

    We report a generic method for fast and efficient reduction of strontium titanate (SrTiO3, STO) single crystals by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of thin-films. The reduction was largely independent of the thin-film material deposited on the crystals. It is shown that thermodynamic conditions (450 °C

  16. High energy conversion efficiency in laser-proton acceleration by controlling laser-energy deposition onto thin foil targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, C. M.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Markey, K.; Scott, R. H. H.; Gray, R. J.; Rosinski, M.; Deppert, O.; Badziak, J.; Batani, D.; Davies, J. R.; Hassan, S. M.; Lancaster, K. L.; Li, K.; Musgrave, I. O.; Norreys, P. A.; Pasley, J.; Roth, M.; Schlenvoigt, H.-P.; Spindloe, C.; Tatarakis, M.; Winstone, T.; Wolowski, J.; Wyatt, D.; McKenna, P.; Neely, D.

    2014-02-01

    An all-optical approach to laser-proton acceleration enhancement is investigated using the simplest of target designs to demonstrate application-relevant levels of energy conversion efficiency between laser and protons. Controlled deposition of laser energy, in the form of a double-pulse temporal envelope, is investigated in combination with thin foil targets in which recirculation of laser-accelerated electrons can lead to optimal conditions for coupling laser drive energy into the proton beam. This approach is shown to deliver a substantial enhancement in the coupling of laser energy to 5-30 MeV protons, compared to single pulse irradiation, reaching a record high 15% conversion efficiency with a temporal separation of 1 ps between the two pulses and a 5 μm-thick Au foil. A 1D simulation code is used to support and explain the origin of the observation of an optimum pulse separation of ˜1 ps.

  17. High energy conversion efficiency in laser-proton acceleration by controlling laser-energy deposition onto thin foil targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenner, C. M. [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Robinson, A. P. L.; Markey, K.; Scott, R. H. H.; Lancaster, K. L.; Musgrave, I. O.; Spindloe, C.; Winstone, T.; Wyatt, D.; Neely, D. [Central Laser Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Gray, R. J.; McKenna, P. [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Rosinski, M.; Badziak, J.; Wolowski, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Deppert, O. [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Batani, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica G. Occhialini, Universita di Milano Bicocca, 20126 Milan (Italy); Davies, J. R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Fusion Science Center for Extreme States of Matter, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Hassan, S. M.; Tatarakis, M. [Department of Electronics Engineering, Centre for Plasma Physics and Lasers, 73133 Chania, 74100 Rethymno, Crete (Greece); and others

    2014-02-24

    An all-optical approach to laser-proton acceleration enhancement is investigated using the simplest of target designs to demonstrate application-relevant levels of energy conversion efficiency between laser and protons. Controlled deposition of laser energy, in the form of a double-pulse temporal envelope, is investigated in combination with thin foil targets in which recirculation of laser-accelerated electrons can lead to optimal conditions for coupling laser drive energy into the proton beam. This approach is shown to deliver a substantial enhancement in the coupling of laser energy to 5–30 MeV protons, compared to single pulse irradiation, reaching a record high 15% conversion efficiency with a temporal separation of 1 ps between the two pulses and a 5 μm-thick Au foil. A 1D simulation code is used to support and explain the origin of the observation of an optimum pulse separation of ∼1 ps.

  18. The effect of powder recycling in direct metal laser deposition on powder and manufactured part characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Carroll, P A; Pinkerton, A. J.; Allen, J.; Syed, W. U. H.; Sezer, H. K.; Brown, P.; Ng, G; Scudamore, R.; Li, L.

    2006-01-01

    A potential way of improving the material efficiency and cost effectiveness of the Direct Metal Laser Deposition (DMLD) process is to take powder that is not utilised in each deposition attempt and re-use it in subsequent attempts (powder recycling). Currently, this is not widely implemented for fear of a detrimental effect on part quality. This study examines how powder recycling, using simple normalisation techniques, affects the powder and the quality of the deposited part. Work was conduc...

  19. Pulsed laser deposition process of PLZT thin films using an infrared Nd:YAG laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, T. [CCADET-UNAM, A.P. 70-186, Mexico D.F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico)]. E-mail: tupacgarcia@yahoo.com; Posada, E. de [IMRE-Physics Faculty, Havana University (Cuba); Bartolo-Perez, P. [CINVESTAV-IPN Unidad, Applied Physics Department, A.P. 73 Cordemex, Merida, Yuc. (Mexico); Programa de Corrosion del Golfo de Mexico, UAC, Compeche (Mexico); Pena, J.L. [CINVESTAV-IPN Unidad, Applied Physics Department, A.P. 73 Cordemex, Merida, Yuc. (Mexico); Diamant, R. [UAM-Unidad Iztapalapa, D.F. (Mexico); Calderon, F. [IMRE-Physics Faculty, Havana University (Cuba); Pelaiz, A. [IMRE-Physics Faculty, Havana University (Cuba)

    2006-03-15

    Pulsed laser depositions of PLZT thin films were performed using an Nd:YAG (1064 nm) laser. The growths took place in vacuum or in an oxygen background. Room temperature and 500 deg. C were the used substrate temperatures. The X-ray diffraction analysis revealed a preferential crystallographic orientation in the films grown at room temperature in vacuum. Such result is discussed. The velocity distribution functions of the species in the plasma plume were obtained from a time of flight study using optical emission spectroscopy. The maximums of these distributions functions fall around 10{sup 6} cm/s, equivalent to an energy range of 18-344 eV. Ionic species of heavy elements (like lead) achieved higher velocities than other lighter species. This result is linked to the creation of an accelerating spatial charge and to the thermal nature of the target material extraction that allows some elements to be released first than others. Chemical state variations of the elements present in the films were analyzed. Under these different growing conditions, lead chemical states varied the most.

  20. Investigation of coatings of austenitic steels produced by supersonic laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorunov, A. I.; Gilmutdinov, A. Kh.

    2017-02-01

    The structure and properties of stainless austenitic steel coatings obtained by the supersonic laser deposition are studied in the paper. Implantation of the powder particles into the substrate surface and simultaneous plastic deformation at partial melting improved the mechanical properties of the coatings - tensile strength limit was 650 MPa and adhesion strength was 105 MPa. It was shown that insufficient laser power leads to disruption of the deposition process stability and coating cracking. Surface temperature increase caused by laser heating above 1300 °C resulted in coating melting. The X-ray analysis showed that radiation intensifies the cold spray process and does not cause changes in the austenitic base structure.

  1. Thickness dependence of electrical properties of PZT films deposited on metal substrates by laser-assisted aerosol deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, S; Tsuda, H; Akedo, J

    2008-05-01

    Dependence of electrical properties-dielectric, ferroelectric, and piezoelectric properties-on film thickness was studied for lead-zirconate titanate (PZT) thick films directly deposited onto stainless-steel (SUS) substrates in actuator devices by using a carbon dioxide (CO(2) ), laser assisted aerosol deposition technique. Optical spectroscopic analysis data and laser irradiation experiments revealed that absorption at a given wavelength by the film increased with increasing film thickness. Dielectric constant epsilon, remanent polarization value P(r), and coercive field strength E(c) of PZT films directly deposited onto a SUS-based piezoelectric actuator substrate annealed by CO(2) laser irradiation at 850 degrees C improved with increasing film thickness, and for films thicker than 25 microm, epsilon 800, P(r) 40 microC/cm(2), and E(c) 45 kV/cm. In contrast, the displacement of the SUS-based actuator with the laser-annealed PZT thick film decreased with increasing film thickness.

  2. Thin films deposited by femtosecond pulsed laser ablation of tungsten carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bonis, A.; Teghil, R.; Santagata, A.; Galasso, A.; Rau, J. V.

    2012-09-01

    Ultra-short Pulsed Laser Deposition has been applied to the production of thin films from a tungsten carbide target. The gaseous phase obtained by the laser ablation shows a very weak primary plume, in contrast with a very strong secondary one. The deposited films, investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and X-Ray Diffraction, present a mixture of WC and other phases with lower carbon content. All films are amorphous, independently from the substrate temperature. The characteristics of the deposits have been explained in terms of thermal evaporation and cooling rate of molten particles ejected from the target.

  3. Influence of dc bias on amorphous carbon deposited by pulse laser ablation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Amorphous carbon films were deposited on single-crystalline silicon and K9 glass by pulse laser ablation using different negative substrate bias. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to observe morphology of the surface. Thickness and refractive index of the film deposited on K9 glass were measured by ellipsometry. Micro-hardness of films was measured relatively to single crystal silicon. All films deposited on silicon were analyzed by Raman spectra. All spectra were deconvoluted to three peaks. Line-width ratios varied similarly with bias voltage when the laser energy was kept invariant.

  4. Growth and thermoelectric properties of FeSb2 films produced by pulsed laser deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Ye; Canulescu, Stela; Sun, Peijie

    2011-01-01

    by ablating specifically prepared compound targets made of Fe and Sb powders in atomic ratio of 1:4. The thermoelectric transport properties of FeSb2 films were investigated. Pulsed laser deposition was demonstrated as a method for production of good-quality FeSb2 films.......Thermoelectric FeSb2 films were produced by pulsed laser deposition on silica substrates in a low-pressure Ar environment. The growth conditions for near phase-pure FeSb2 films were confirmed to be optimized at a substrate temperature of 425°C, an Ar pressure of 2 Pa, and deposition time of 3 h...

  5. Characterization of ethylcellulose and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose thin films deposited by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla-Papavlu, A.; Rusen, L.; Dinca, V.; Filipescu, M.; Lippert, T.; Dinescu, M.

    2014-05-01

    In this study is reported the deposition of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) and ethylcellulose (EC) by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). Both HPMC and EC were deposited on silicon substrates using a Nd:YAG laser (266 nm, 5 ns laser pulse and 10 Hz repetition rate) and then characterized by atomic force microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. It was found that for laser fluences up to 450 mJ/cm2 the structure of the deposited HPMC and EC polymer in the thin film resembles to the bulk. Morphological investigations reveal island features on the surface of the EC thin films, and pores onto the HPMC polymer films. The obtained results indicate that MAPLE may be an alternative technique for the fabrication of new systems with desired drug release profile.

  6. Characterization of ethylcellulose and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose thin films deposited by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palla-Papavlu, A., E-mail: apalla@nipne.ro [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, PO Box MG-36, Magurele, RO-077125 Bucharest (Romania); Rusen, L.; Dinca, V.; Filipescu, M. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, PO Box MG-36, Magurele, RO-077125 Bucharest (Romania); Lippert, T. [Paul Scherrer Institut, General Energy Research Department, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Dinescu, M. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, PO Box MG-36, Magurele, RO-077125 Bucharest (Romania)

    2014-05-01

    In this study is reported the deposition of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) and ethylcellulose (EC) by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). Both HPMC and EC were deposited on silicon substrates using a Nd:YAG laser (266 nm, 5 ns laser pulse and 10 Hz repetition rate) and then characterized by atomic force microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. It was found that for laser fluences up to 450 mJ/cm{sup 2} the structure of the deposited HPMC and EC polymer in the thin film resembles to the bulk. Morphological investigations reveal island features on the surface of the EC thin films, and pores onto the HPMC polymer films. The obtained results indicate that MAPLE may be an alternative technique for the fabrication of new systems with desired drug release profile.

  7. High laser-fluence deposition of organic materials in water ice matrices by ''MAPLE''

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Rodrigo, K.; Schou, Jørgen

    2005-01-01

    Matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) is a deposition technique for organic material. Water ice was used as a matrix for the biotechnologically important guest material, polyethylene glycol (PEG), for concentrations from 0.5 to 4 wt.%. The target was irradiated with 6 ns laser pulses...... at 355 nm at a fluence of 2.5-12 J/cm(2). Even at this high fluence, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) indicates a chemical structure of the deposit close to that of the un-irradiated PEG. Matrix assisted laser desorption and ionization (MALDI) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) show...... that the mass distribution of the deposited PEG is similar to that of the starting material. Optical pictures of the films show particle structures of PEG of a size up to 5-10 mu m. The deposition rate measured with a quartz crystal microbalance is typically of the order of 1 ng/ (cm(2) shot). (c) 2005 Elsevier...

  8. Laser-assisted deposition of thin C60 films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Canulescu, Stela; Fæster, Søren

    bound carbon molecule with a well-defined mass (M = 720 amu) and therefore a good, organic test molecule. C60 fullerene thin films of average thickness of more than 100 nm was produced in vacuum by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). A 355 nm Nd:YAG laser was directed onto a frozen target...

  9. Biomolecular papain thin films grown by matrix assisted and conventional pulsed laser deposition: A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    György, E.; Pérez del Pino, A.; Sauthier, G.; Figueras, A.

    2009-12-01

    Biomolecular papain thin films were grown both by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) and conventional pulsed laser deposition (PLD) techniques with the aid of an UV KrF∗ (λ =248 nm, τFWHM≅20 ns) excimer laser source. For the MAPLE experiments the targets submitted to laser radiation consisted on frozen composites obtained by dissolving the biomaterial powder in distilled water at 10 wt % concentration. Conventional pressed biomaterial powder targets were used in the PLD experiments. The surface morphology of the obtained thin films was studied by atomic force microscopy and their structure and composition were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The possible physical mechanisms implied in the ablation processes of the two techniques, under comparable experimental conditions were identified. The results showed that the growth mode, surface morphology as well as structure of the deposited biomaterial thin films are determined both by the incident laser fluence value as well as target preparation procedure.

  10. Pulsed laser deposition of tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) on polycarbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yong, T.K. [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Tou, T.Y. [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia)]. E-mail: tytou@mmu.edu.my; Teo, B.S. [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2005-07-30

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) films were deposited on polycarbonate (PC) substrates in oxygen at room temperature by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) using a Nd:YAG laser with 355 and 532 nm wavelengths. The ITO films were analyzed by the four-point probe technique, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and UV-visible-Near IR spectrophotometry for electrical conductivity, surface morphological and optical transmission properties, respectively. The main plume species were identified by using a fiber optic spectrometer, which showed that the emission intensity produced by the 355 nm laser wavelength was considerably stronger than that produced by the 532 nm laser wavelength. The ITO film resistivity was an order of magnitude higher than that achieved by a KrF excimer laser, but comparable to ITO-coated substrates prepared by the sputtering method.

  11. Noble metal nanoparticles deposited on self-assembled monolayers by pulsed laser deposition show coulomb blockade at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speets, Emiel A; Dordi, Barbara; Ravoo, Bart Jan; Oncel, Nuri; Hallbäck, Ann-Sofie; Zandvliet, Harold J W; Poelsema, Bene; Rijnders, Guus; Blank, Dave H A; Reinhoudt, David N

    2005-04-01

    Nanometer-sized noble-metal clusters are fabricated on top of alkylthiolate self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on annealed gold by pulsed laser deposition at elevated pressures. The size distribution of the clusters depends on the metal and on the pressure during the deposition. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and conductive probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM) showed that the metal clusters are insulated from the substrate on top of the SAM. Coulomb blockades could be measured at room temperature by STM for palladium clusters on decanethiol SAMs.

  12. Growth of arrays of Al-doped ZnO nanocones by pulsed laser deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ye; Addison, Katherine E; Ashfold, Michael N R

    2007-12-12

    Arrays of aligned Al-doped ZnO nanocones have been synthesized by pulsed laser deposition following excimer laser ablation of a ceramic ZnO target containing 2% Al(2)O(3) (by weight). The elemental composition, microstructural and optical properties of the products were examined by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and room temperature photoluminescence measurements. The incident laser fluence was identified as a key parameter in nanocone formation. Their tapered morphologies and small tip diameters (approximately 5 nm) suggest that Al-doped ZnO nanocones could find application as field emitters and as a gas sensing material.

  13. Laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition setup for fast synthesis of graphene patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chentao; Zhang, Jianhuan; Lin, Kun; Huang, Yuanqing

    2017-05-01

    An automatic setup based on the laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition method has been developed for the rapid synthesis of graphene patterns. The key components of this setup include a laser beam control and focusing unit, a laser spot monitoring unit, and a vacuum and flow control unit. A laser beam with precision control of laser power is focused on the surface of a nickel foil substrate by the laser beam control and focusing unit for localized heating. A rapid heating and cooling process at the localized region is induced by the relative movement between the focalized laser spot and the nickel foil substrate, which causes the decomposing of gaseous hydrocarbon and the out-diffusing of excess carbon atoms to form graphene patterns on the laser scanning path. All the fabrication parameters that affect the quality and number of graphene layers, such as laser power, laser spot size, laser scanning speed, pressure of vacuum chamber, and flow rates of gases, can be precisely controlled and monitored during the preparation of graphene patterns. A simulation of temperature distribution was carried out via the finite element method, providing a scientific guidance for the regulation of temperature distribution during experiments. A multi-layer graphene ribbon with few defects was synthesized to verify its performance of the rapid growth of high-quality graphene patterns. Furthermore, this setup has potential applications in other laser-based graphene synthesis and processing.

  14. n-type In2S3 films deposited by pulsed laser deposition: effect of laser power on the properties of the films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chunyan; Mao, Dun; Liu, Zhu; Liang, Qi; Chen, Shirong; Yu, Yongqiang; Wang, Li; Luo, Linbao; Xu, Jun

    2015-05-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) with different levels of laser power was first used to deposit In2S3 films from homemade, high-purity In2S3 targets. This process was followed by post-annealing in an N2 atmosphere to improve the films’ crystallinity and conductivity. The annealed films were verified to be stoichiometric, body-centered, tetragonal In2S3 with the preferred orientation (103). The bandgap of the films decreased from 2.8 to 2.2 eV with an increase in the laser power, which was believed to be the result of the grain growth caused by the higher laser power. The electrical transport property of the bottom-gate field-effect transistor revealed the n-type conduction of the annealed In2S3 films, and the heterojunction p+-Si/annealed In2S3 film showed remarkable photovoltaic behavior upon light illumination, indicating that PLD-deposited In2S3 films may have great potential as a buffer layer in thin-film solar cells. What’s more, doped In2S3 films can be easily realized due to the fairly stoichiometric transfer of the PLD method.

  15. Evaluation of Direct Diode Laser Deposited Stainless Steel 316L on 4340 Steel Substrate for Aircraft Landing Gear Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2010-4149 EVALUATION OF DIRECT DIODE LASER DEPOSITED STAINLESS STEEL 316L ON 4340 STEEL SUBSTRATE FOR AIRCRAFT LANDING GEAR...March 2010 – 01 March 2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE EVALUATION OF DIRECT DIODE LASER DEPOSITED STAINLESS STEEL 316L ON 4340 STEEL SUBSTRATE FOR...Code) N/A Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-18 Evaluation of Direct Diode Laser Deposited Stainless Steel 316L on

  16. Laser cleaning of silicon surface with deposition of different liquid films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y. F.; Zhang, Y.; Wan, Y. H.; Song, W. D.

    1999-01-01

    Laser cleaning can efficiently remove tiny particles from a silicon surface on which a liquid film has been previously deposited when the laser fluence is large enough. The cleaning force is due to the high pressure of stress wave generated through the rapid growth of vapor bubbles inside the superheated liquid. The behaviors of this type of laser cleaning are theoretically described with deposition of two kinds of liquid film: acetone and ethanol. The cleaning threshold of laser fluence is different for these two kinds of liquids for some differences in their thermodynamic properties. For removal of alumina particles with a size of 1 μm, the lower cleaning threshold of laser fluence is obtained with deposition of acetone because of its lower boiling point and volume heat capacity. The theoretical result also indicates that the cleaning force with deposition of ethanol increases more quickly along with laser fluence than with acetone. This phenomenon is much useful for removal of smaller particles and can lead to high cleaning efficiency.

  17. Harmonic generation in ZnO nanocrystalline laser deposited thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, V.; Thareja, R. K.

    2006-04-01

    ZnO plasma produced by third harmonic 355 nm of Nd:YAG laser at various ambient pressures of oxygen was used for depositing quality nanocrystalline ZnO thin films. Time and space resolved optical emission spectroscopy is used to correlate the plasma properties with that of deposited thin films. The deposited films showed particle size of 8 and 84 nm at ambient oxygen pressure of 100 and 900 mTorr, respectively. Third harmonic generation observed in ZnO thin films deposited under 100 mTorr of ambient oxygen is reported.

  18. Microstructural and Electrical Characterization of Barium Strontium Titanate-Based Solid Solution Thin Films Deposited on Ceramic Substrates by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-04-03

    Strontium Titanate-Based Solid Solution Thin Films Deposited on Ceramic Substrates by Pulsed Laser Deposition DISTRIBUTION: Approved for public...Society H2.4 Microstructural and Electrical Characterization of Barium Strontium Titanate- based Solid Solution Thin Films Deposited on Ceramic...investigated and report the microstructural and electrical characterization of selected barium strontium titanate-based solid solution thin films

  19. Photoluminescence Response in Carbon Films Deposited by Pulsed Laser Deposition onto GaAs Substrates at Low Vacuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Caballero-Briones

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon films were deposited onto GaAs substrates by pulsed laser deposition at low vacuum (10–15 mTorr from a graphite target. Films were prepared at different number of pulses (1500 to 6000 with fixed fluence (32 J/cm2, target-to-substrate distance, and pulse frequency using a Q:Switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm operating at a frequency of 10 Hz and producing burst-mode pulses with total duration per shot of 49 ns. Films were characterized by optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Deposited films were visually smooth and adherent but on the other hand evidence of splashing was observed in all the films. Thickness varied linearly with the number of pulses from 8 to 42 μm with maximum height differences around 700 nm. Hexagonal and orthorhombic carbon was found in all the films and there was no evidence of nitrogen or oxygen incorporation during ablation process. Broad photoluminescence bands were observed and, particularly, emission peaks at 475–480 nm, 540–550 nm, 590 nm, and 625 nm. Bands tend to shift to lower wavelength with film thickness, suggesting that luminescence comes from splashed nanostructures influenced by the semiconducting substrate. This particular substrate effect is vanished as thickness of the films increases.

  20. Direct laser powder deposition - 'State of the Art'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sears, J.W.

    1999-11-01

    Recent developments on Laser Cladding and Rapid Prototyping have led to Solid Freeform Fabrication (SFF) technologies that produce net shape metal components by laser fusion of metal powder alloys. These processes are known by various names such as Directed Light Fabrication (DLF{trademark}), Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS{trademark}), and Direct Metal Deposition (DMD{trademark}) to name a few. These types of processes can be referred to as direct laser powder deposition (DLPD). DLPD involves fusing metal alloy powders in the focal point of a laser (or lasers) that is (are) being controlled by Computer Aided Design-Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAD-CAM) technology. DLPD technology has the capability to produce fully dense components with little need for subsequent processing. Research and development of DLPD is being conducted throughout the world. The list of facilities conducting work in this area continues to grow (over 25 identified in North America alone). Selective Laser Sintering (SLS{trademark}) is another type of SFF technology based on laser fusion of powder. The SLS technology was developed as a rapid prototyping technique, whereas DLPD is an extension of the laser cladding technology. Most of the effort in SLS has been directed towards plastics and ceramics. In SLS, the powder is pre-placed by rolling out a layer for each laser pass. The computer control selects where in the layer the powder will be sintered by the laser. Sequential layers are sintered similarly forming a shape. In DLPD, powder is fed directly into a molten metal pool formed at the focal point of the laser where it is melted. As the laser moves on the material it rapidly resolidifies to form a shape. This talk elaborates on the state of these developments.

  1. Laser metal deposition with spatial variable orientation based on hollow-laser beam with internal powder feeding technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Tuo; Lu, Bingheng; Shi, Shihong; Meng, Weidong; Fu, Geyan

    2017-02-01

    In this study, a hollow-laser beam with internal powder feeding (HLB-IPF) head is applied to achieve non-horizontal cladding and deposition of overhanging structure. With the features of this head such as uniform scan energy distribution, thin and straight spraying of the powder beam, the deposition in spatial variable orientation is conducted using a 6-axis robot. During the deposition process the head keeps tangential to the growth direction of the part. In the experiment, a "vase" shaped metal part with overhanging structure is successfully deposited, and the largest overhanging angle achieves 80° to the vertical direction. The "step effect" between cladding layers is completely eliminated with the best surface roughness of Ra=3.864 μm. Cross section of cladding layers with unequal height are deposited for angle change. Test results indicate that the formed part has uniform wall thickness, fine microstructure and high microhardness.

  2. Laser power and Scanning Speed Influence on the Mechanical Property of Laser Metal Deposited Titanium-Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahamood, Rasheedat M.; Akinlabi, Esther T.; Akinlabi, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    The influence of the laser power and the scanning speed on the microhardness of the Laser Metal Deposited Ti6Al4V, an aerospace Titanium-alloy, was studied. Ti6Al4V powder was deposited on the Ti6Al4V substrate using the Laser Metal Deposition (LMD) process, an Additive Manufacturing (AM) manufacturing technology. The laser power was varied between 1.8 kW 3 kW and the scanning speed was varied between 0.05 m/s and 0.1 m/s. The powder flow rate and the gas flow rate were kept at constant values of 2 g/min and 2 l/min respectively. The full factorial design of experiment was used to design the experiment and to also analyze the results in the Design Expert 9 software environment. The microhardness profiling was studied using Microhardness indenter performed at a load of 500 g and at a dwelling time of 15 s. The distance between indentations was maintained at a distance of 15 μm. The study revealed that as the laser power was increased, the microhardness was found to decrease and as the scanning speed was increased, the microhardness was found to also increase. The results are presented and fully discussed.

  3. Electrical conductivity mechanisms in zinc oxide thin films deposited by pulsed laser deposition using different growth environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heluani, S.P. [Laboratorio de Fisica del Solido, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnologia, Universidad Nacional de Tucuman (Argentina)]. E-mail: sperez@herrera.unt.edu.ar; Braunstein, G. [Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); Villafuerte, M. [Laboratorio de Fisica del Solido, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnologia, Universidad Nacional de Tucuman (Argentina); Simonelli, G. [Laboratorio de Fisica del Solido, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnologia, Universidad Nacional de Tucuman (Argentina); Duhalde, S. [Laboratorio de Ablacion Laser, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2006-12-05

    The mechanisms of electrical conduction in zinc oxide thin films, grown by pulsed laser deposition, have been investigated as a function of preparation conditions. The films were deposited on glass and silicon nitride coated silicon, using oxygen rich, oxygen deficient, or nitrogen atmospheres. The substrates were held at 473 K during deposition, and subsequently cooled down to room temperature in oxygen rich atmosphere of 4 Pa, or oxygen deficient atmosphere of 2 x 10{sup -3} Pa. Films deposited and cooled in an oxygen deficient atmosphere exhibited very high donor concentration, originated in intrinsic defects, and an impurity band related mechanism of conduction. Films deposited under relatively high oxygen pressure were highly resistive and showed, upon ultraviolet light irradiation, grain boundary controlled electrical transport. An enhancement of the conductivity was observed when using a nitrogen atmosphere during the deposition, and oxygen atmosphere during cooling. In this case, the dependence of the conductivity with temperature followed Motts' Law of variable range hopping, characteristic of a material with localized states randomly located in space. Since the density of hopping centers appears to be much larger than the density of nitrogen incorporated in this sample, it is suggested that the nitrogen induces defects in the zinc oxide lattice that behave as localized hopping centers, as well as carrier suppliers, giving rise to the observed conductivity.

  4. Structural and optical properties of manganese oxide thin films deposited by pulsed laser deposition at different substrate temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, H.; Khaleeq-ur-Rahman, M.; Dildar, I. M.; Shaukat, Saima

    2017-09-01

    We report the use of pulsed laser deposition (PLD) to grow manganese oxide thin films at a fixed low oxygen pressure at different temperatures on silicon (1 0 0) substrates. Structural properties of the thin films were examined using x-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Surface morphology and topography of the films was determined using atomic force microscopy and optical microscopy, while optical properties of the thin films were studied using spectroscopic ellipsometry. It was found that PLD is a convenient technique to deposit different phases of manganese oxide by tuning the deposition temperature. All measured physical properties such as morphology, topography, crystallite size, and optical band gap were clearly dependent on the substrate temperature chosen.

  5. Pulsed laser deposition and in vitro characteristics of triphasic - HASi composition on titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palangadan, Rajesh; Sukumaran, Anil; Fernandez, Francis B; John, Annie; Varma, Harikrishna

    2014-02-01

    Pulsed laser deposition was used to deposit bioactive triphasic glass-ceramic composition (HASi) over titanium substrate using dense HASi target. Bioactive glass compositions are considered the most useful synthetic materials for immediate bone attachment because of its bioresorption, osteoconduction and osteointegration characteristics under in vivo conditions. The disadvantage of its brittleness associated with bioactive glass-ceramics has prompted its coating over metallic implants for the combination of duo mechanical and bioactive properties. The hard HASi target was able to undergo laser ablation under ambient gas pressure without bulk erosion of the target. Laser deposition was found to be efficient in depositing triphasic composition for immediate bone integration. The target and deposits were analyzed for the phase, composition and microstructural characteristics by means of X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis and scanning electron microscopy. Simultaneously, the adherent nature and mechanical behaviour of deposits were confirmed by scratch test and micro-indentation methods. Further, the in vitro dissolution and bioactivity were assessed by soaking in simulated body fluid followed by elemental analysis using inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy. The deposits were found to be cell-friendly, which was indicated by the phenomenology of stem cells under in vitro conditions.

  6. Nanocomposite tantalum-carbon-based films deposited by femtosecond pulsed laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benchikh, N. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, UMR 5516, Universite J. Monnet, 10 rue Barrouin, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Garrelie, F. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, UMR 5516, Universite J. Monnet, 10 rue Barrouin, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Wolski, K. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, Centre SMS - URA CNRS 5146, 158 cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint-Etienne, Cedex 02 (France); Donnet, C. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, UMR 5516, Universite J. Monnet, 10 rue Barrouin, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France)]. E-mail: Christophe.Donnet@univ-st-etienne.fr; Fillit, R.Y. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, Centre SMS - URA CNRS 5146, 158 cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint-Etienne, Cedex 02 (France); Rogemond, F. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, UMR 5516, Universite J. Monnet, 10 rue Barrouin, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Subtil, J.L. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, UMR 5516, Universite J. Monnet, 10 rue Barrouin, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Rouzaud, J.N. [Laboratoire de Geologie de l' Ecole Normale Superieure de Paris 24, rue Lhomond 75231-Paris Cedex 5 (France); Laval, J.Y. [Laboratoire de Physique du Solide, UPR5 CNRS-ESPCI, 10 rue Vauquelin 75231-Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2006-01-03

    Nanostructured coatings of metal (tantalum) containing diamond-like carbon (a-C:Ta) have been prepared by femtosecond pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The films, containing 15 at.% tantalum, have been deposited by ablating sequentially graphite and metallic tantalum in vacuum conditions with an amplified Ti:sapphire laser. The coatings have been investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, grazing angle X-ray diffraction, energy filtered transmission electron microscopy, scanning and high resolution transmission electron microscopies. Evidence of metallic {alpha}-Ta and {beta}-Ta particles (diameter in the 100 nm range) and smaller quasi-amorphous tantalum clusters embedded in the carbonaceous matrix have been shown. A thin tantalum carbide interface between the carbon matrix and the top surface of the tantalum nodules has also been identified. The ability of femtosecond pulsed laser deposition to synthetize nanocomposite carbon-based films and to control their nanostructure is discussed.

  7. Ultra-thin Cu2ZnSnS4 solar cell by pulsed laser deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cazzaniga, Andrea Carlo; Crovetto, Andrea; Yan, Chang

    2017-01-01

    We report on the fabrication of a 5.2% efficiency Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) solar cell made by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) featuring an ultra-thin absorber layer (less than 450 nm). Solutions to the issues of reproducibility and micro-particulate ejection often encountered with PLD are proposed. At the ......We report on the fabrication of a 5.2% efficiency Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) solar cell made by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) featuring an ultra-thin absorber layer (less than 450 nm). Solutions to the issues of reproducibility and micro-particulate ejection often encountered with PLD are proposed....... At the optimal laser fluence, amorphous CZTS precursors with optimal stoichiometry for solar cells are deposited from a single target. Such precursors do not result in detectable segregation of secondary phases after the subsequent annealing step. In the analysis of the solar cell device, we focus on the effects...

  8. Towards fast femtosecond laser micromachining of fused silica: The effect of deposited energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, Sheeba; Bellouard, Yves

    2010-09-27

    Femtosecond laser micromachining of glass material using low-energy, sub-ablation threshold pulses find numerous applications in the fields of integrated optics, lab-on-a-chips and microsystems in general. In this paper, we study the influence of the laser-deposited energy on the performance of the micromachining process. In particular, we show that the energy deposited in the substrate affects its etching rate. Furthermore, we demonstrate the existence of an optimal energy deposition value. These results are not only important from an industrial point-of-view but also provide new evidences supporting the essential role of densification and consequently stress-generation as the main driving factor promoting enhanced etching rate following laser exposure.

  9. The characteristics of arc beam shaping in hybrid plasma and laser deposition manufacturing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Hai'ou; QIAN; Yingping; WANG; Guilan; ZHENG; Qiguang

    2006-01-01

    As a new direct metal prototyping technology,the hybrid plasma and laser deposition manufacturing (PLDM) is proposed in this paper. In order to figure out the characteristics of plasma arc beam and mould in the PLDM process of high temperature alloy, the high speed CCD camera is used to obtain the picture around the plasma arc. Afterwards the sketch of picture is clearly obtained. And the effect of laser parameter, such as average power, pulse width, pulse repetition frequency and the angle between laser beam and plasma arc beam on the plasma arc appearance, is studied experimentally. The results show that the modality of plasma arc beam is markedly influenced by laser beam. And the improvements of shape precision and surface state of the layer deposited by PLDM are confirmed.

  10. Performance properties of electro-spark deposited carbide-ceramic coatings modified by laser beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radek, Norbert; Bartkowiak, Konrad

    The work presented in this paper determines the influence of the laser treatment process on the properties of electrospark coatings. The properties after laser treatment were examined by microstructure analysis, microhardness, roughness and adhesion tests. The studies were conducted using WC-Co-Al2O3 electrodes produced by sintering nanostructural powders. The anti-wear coatings were first deposited by an EIL-8A apparatus on C45 carbon steel and then laser melted within various process parameters. In this case Nd:YAG laser (BLS 720 model) was applied. The electro-spark deposited coatings are very promising to improve abrasive wear resistance of tools and machine parts, which was indicated by tribological tests.

  11. Laser annealing study of PECVD deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbon alloy films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coscia, U.; Ambrosone, G.; Gesuele, F.; Grossi, V.; Parisi, V.; Schutzmann, S.; Basa, D. K.

    2007-12-01

    The influence of carbon content on the crystallization process has been investigated for the excimer laser annealed hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbon alloy films deposited by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (PECVD) technique, using silane methane gas mixture diluted in helium, as well as for the hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon carbon alloy films prepared by PECVD from silane methane gas mixture highly diluted in hydrogen, for comparison. The study demonstrates clearly that the increase in the carbon content prevents the crystallization process in the hydrogen diluted samples while the crystallization process is enhanced in the laser annealing of amorphous samples because of the increase in the absorbed laser energy density that occurs for the amorphous films with the higher carbon content. This, in turn, facilitates the crystallization for the laser annealed samples with higher carbon content, resulting in the formation of SiC crystallites along with Si crystallites.

  12. Target-plane deposition of diamond-like carbon in pulsed laser ablation of graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, S.S. [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Tou, T.Y. [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia)], E-mail: tytou@mmu.edu.my

    2007-10-15

    In pulsed Nd:YAG laser ablation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) at 10{sup -6} Torr, diamond-like carbon (DLC) are deposited at laser wavelengths of 1064, 532, and 355 nm on substrates placed in the target-plane. These target-plane samples are found to contain varying sp{sup 3} content and composed of nanostructures of 40-200 nm in size depending on the laser wavelength and laser fluence. The material and origin of sp{sup 3} in the target-plane samples is closely correlated to that in the laser-modified HOPG surface layer, and hardly from the backward deposition of ablated carbon plume. The surface morphology of the target-plane samples shows the columnar growth and with a tendency for agglomeration between nanograins, in particular for long laser wavelength at 1064 nm. It is also proposed that DLC formation mechanism at the laser-ablated HOPG is possibly via the laser-induced subsurface melting and resolidification.

  13. High-speed deposition of titanium carbide coatings by laser-assisted metal–organic CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Yansheng [Faculty of Materials Science and Chemistry, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Tu, Rong, E-mail: turong@whut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Material Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Goto, Takashi [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Aoba-ku, 2-1-1 Katahira, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A semiconductor laser was first used to prepare wide-area LCVD-TiC{sub x} coatings. • The effect of laser power for the deposition of TiC{sub x} coatings was discussed. • TiC{sub x} coatings showed a columnar cross section and a dense surface texture. • TiC{sub x} coatings had a 1–4 order lower laser density than those of previous reports. • This study gives the possibility of LCVD applying on the preparation of TiC{sub x} coating. - Abstract: A semiconductor laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) of titanium carbide (TiC{sub x}) coatings on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate using tetrakis (diethylamido) titanium (TDEAT) and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} as source materials were investigated. The influences of laser power (P{sub L}) and pre-heating temperature (T{sub pre}) on the microstructure and deposition rate of TiC{sub x} coatings were examined. Single phase of TiC{sub x} coatings were obtained at P{sub L} = 100–200 W. TiC{sub x} coatings had a cauliflower-like surface and columnar cross section. TiC{sub x} coatings in the present study had the highest R{sub dep} (54 μm/h) at a relative low T{sub dep} than those of conventional CVD-TiC{sub x} coatings. The highest volume deposition rate (V{sub dep}) of TiC{sub x} coatings was about 4.7 × 10{sup −12} m{sup 3} s{sup −1}, which had 3–10{sup 5} times larger deposition area and 1–4 order lower laser density than those of previous LCVD using CO{sub 2}, Nd:YAG and argon ion laser.

  14. Nanostructured rhodium films for advanced mirrors produced by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uccello, A., E-mail: andrea.uccello@mail.polimi.it [Dipartimento di Energia, Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy); Dellasega, D., E-mail: david.dellasega@polimi.it [Dipartimento di Energia, Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Milan (Italy); Perissinotto, S., E-mail: stefano.perissinotto@iit.it [Center for Nano Science and Technology - Polimi, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Milan (Italy); Lecis, N., E-mail: nora.lecis@polimi.it [Dipartimento di Meccanica, Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy); Passoni, M., E-mail: matteo.passoni@polimi.it [Dipartimento di Energia, Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Milan (Italy)

    2013-01-15

    In this paper advantages in the production by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) of nanostructured, nanoengineered rhodium films to be used in tokamak First Mirrors (FMs) are shown. The peculiar PLD capability to tailor film structure at the nanoscale gives the possibility to deposit low roughness Rh films with a wide variety of structures and morphologies. By a proper movimentation of the substrate and using high fluence (10-19 J/cm{sup 2}) infrared laser pulses, it has been possible to deposit planar and homogeneous Rh films effectively suppressing surface defects on areas of the order of 10 cm{sup 2} with a satisfactory specular reflectivity. Multilayer deposition has been exploited to produce coatings with high adhesion and good mechanical properties. Finally, an estimation of the requirements to produce by PLD rhodium films suitable for the requests of ITER is provided.

  15. Effect of Precipitation on the Microhardness Distribution of Diode Laser Epitaxially Deposited IN718 Alloy Coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaocheng Zhang; Zhuguo Li; Pulin Nie; Yixiong Wu

    2013-01-01

    The microhardness distribution of the diode laser epitaxially deposited IN718 alloy coating was investigated.The Laves concentration in different regions of the coating was measured by binarization processing.The strengthening phase of the coating was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM).The results showed that the microhardness increased along the depth of the coating.Part of Laves dissolved into austenitic matrix during the successive laser deposition.A little amount of strengthening phase was precipitated in the bottom region of the coating.It was attributed to the heat effect from the thermal cycle of successive deposition on the microstructure in the bottom region of the epitaxially deposited coating.

  16. Radio-frequency oxygen-plasma-enhanced pulsed laser deposition of IGZO films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Man Chou

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the crystalline structures, optical transmittance, surface and cross-sectional morphologies, chemical compositions, and electrical properties of indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO-based thin films deposited on glass and silicon substrates through pulsed laser deposition (PLD incorporated with radio-frequency (r.f.-generated oxygen plasma. The plasma-enhanced pulsed laser deposition (PEPLD-based IGZO thin films exhibited a c-axis-aligned crystalline (CAAC structure, which was attributed to the increase in Zn-O under high oxygen vapor pressure (150 mTorr. High oxygen vapor pressure (150 mTorr and low r.f. power (10 W are the optimal deposition conditions for fabricating IGZO thin films with improved electrical properties.

  17. Radio-frequency oxygen-plasma-enhanced pulsed laser deposition of IGZO films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chia-Man; Lai, Chih-Chang; Chang, Chih-Wei; Wen, Kai-Shin; Hsiao, Vincent K. S.

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate the crystalline structures, optical transmittance, surface and cross-sectional morphologies, chemical compositions, and electrical properties of indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO)-based thin films deposited on glass and silicon substrates through pulsed laser deposition (PLD) incorporated with radio-frequency (r.f.)-generated oxygen plasma. The plasma-enhanced pulsed laser deposition (PEPLD)-based IGZO thin films exhibited a c-axis-aligned crystalline (CAAC) structure, which was attributed to the increase in Zn-O under high oxygen vapor pressure (150 mTorr). High oxygen vapor pressure (150 mTorr) and low r.f. power (10 W) are the optimal deposition conditions for fabricating IGZO thin films with improved electrical properties.

  18. Pulsed laser deposition of PbTe under monopulse and multipulse regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvira, F. C.; Cabrera, L. Ponce; Peñaloza Mendoza, Y.; Martinez Ricci, M. L.; Videla, F.

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to compare PLD technique with monopulse and multipulse nanosecond laser excitation. We show the feasibility of depositing nanometric layers of PbTe employing the regimes already mentioned. Each of the grown layers were characterized by XRD, EDXS, SEM, Spectroscopic Elipsometry, AFM and the thickness was measured by mechanic profilometry. We have conducted comparative experiments to show the advantages and drawbacks of making PLD with mono and multipulse nanosecond laser.

  19. Influence of laser power on the deposition Ti64l4V/W composite

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ndou, N

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available to the improvement of new aviation, motor vehicle and organic applications [1]. Elective assembly strategies assume an exceptionally basic part in these improvements. Laser-based added substance assembling is one of such options. Close net-formed titanium... and 373MJm− 2 energy densities in a nitrogen environment. Journal of materials processing technology, 185, 38-45, 2007 [10] E. Toyserkani & A. Khajepour, A mechatronics approach to laser powder deposition process. Mechatronics, 16, 631-641, 2006 [11...

  20. PbTe thin films grown by femtosecond pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, E.; Silva, D.; Moya, L.; Cesar, C. L.; Barbosa, L. C.; Schrank, A.; Souza Filho, C. R.; de Oliveira, E. P.

    2007-09-01

    PbTe thin films were grown on BK7 glass and Si(100) substrates using femtosecond pulsed laser deposition at room temperature. The influence of the background pressure and the laser fluence on the structural and optical characteristics of the PbTe films was studied. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the surface and structural properties of the deposited PbTe thin films, respectively. Transmission spectroscopy measurements in the visible and infrared region (VIS-IR) were used to investigate the optical properties of the PbTe thin films.

  1. Research on laser-removal of a deuterium deposit from a graphite sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubkowska, M.; Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Malinowski, K.; Sadowski, M. J.; Rosinski, M.; Gasior, P.

    2014-04-01

    The paper presents experimental results of investigation of a removal of deuterium deposits from a graphite target by means of pulsed laser beams. The sample was a part of the TEXTOR limiter with a deuterium-deposited layer. That target was located in the vacuum chamber, pumped out to 5×10-5 Torr, and it was irradiated with a Nd:YAG laser, which generated 3.5-ns pulses of energy of 0.5 J at λ1 = 1063 nm, or 0.1 J at λ3 = 355 nm.

  2. Note: Large area deposition of Rh single and Rh/W/Cu multilayer thin films on stainless steel substrate by pulsed laser deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mostako, A. T. T.; Khare, Alika, E-mail: alika@iitg.ernet.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781039 (India)

    2014-04-15

    Mirror like thin films of single layer Rh and multilayer Rh/W/Cu are deposited on highly polished 50 mm diameter stainless steel substrate by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) technique for first mirror application in fusion reactors. For this, the conventional PLD technique has been modified by incorporating substrate rastering stage for large area deposition via PLD. Process optimization to achieve uniformity of deposition as estimated from fringe visibility and thickness is also discussed.

  3. Pulsed laser deposition growth of FeSb2 films for thermoelectric applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Ye; Canulescu, Stela; Sun, Peijie

    2011-01-01

    FeSb2 films were produced in a low-pressure Ar environment by pulsed laser deposition at 355 nm. The influence of growth parameters such as substrate temperature, Ar pressure and deposition time on the growth of FeSb2 films was studied. Nearly phase-pure FeSb2 films with thicknesses of 100–400 nm...... properties of FeSb2 films if they are to eventually reach thermoelectric applications at cryogenic temperatures....

  4. Glass surface metal deposition with high-power femtosecond fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Deng, Cheng; Bai, Shuang

    2016-12-01

    Using femtosecond fiber laser-based additive manufacturing (AM), metal powder is deposited on glass surface for the first time to change its surface reflection and diffuse its transmission beam. The challenge, due to mismatch between metal and glass on melting temperature, thermal expansion coefficient, brittleness, is resolved by controlling AM parameters such as power, scan speed, hatching, and powder thickness. Metal powder such as iron is successfully deposited and demonstrated functions such as diffusion of light and blackening effects.

  5. Pulsed Laser Deposition of BaTiO3 Thin Films on Different Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaodong Yang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the deposition of BaTiO3 (BTO thin films on various substrates. Three representative substrates were selected from different types of material systems: (i SrTiO3 single crystals as a typical oxide, (ii Si wafers as a semiconductor, and (iii Ni foils as a magnetostrictive metal. We have compared the ferroelectric properties of BTO thin films obtained by pulsed laser deposition on these diverse substrates.

  6. Characterisation of Pb thin films prepared by the nanosecond pulsed laser deposition technique for photocathode application

    OpenAIRE

    Lorusso, Antonella; Gontad, F.; Broitman, Esteban; Chiadroni, E.; Perrone, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Pb thin films were prepared by the nanosecond pulsed laser deposition technique on Si (100) and polycrystalline Nb substrates for photocathode application. As the photoemission performances of a cathode are strongly affected by its surface characteristics, the Pb films were grown at different substrate temperatures with the aim of modifying the morphology and structure of thin films. An evident morphological modification in the deposited films with the formation of spherical grains at higher ...

  7. Laser textured superhydrophobic surfaces and their applications for homogeneous spot deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ta, Van Duong; Dunn, Andrew; Wasley, Thomas J.; Li, Ji; Kay, Robert W.; Stringer, Jonathan; Smith, Patrick J.; Esenturk, Emre; Connaughton, Colm; Shephard, Jonathan D.

    2016-03-01

    This work reports the laser surface modification of 304S15 stainless steel to develop superhydrophobic properties and the subsequent application for homogeneous spot deposition. Superhydrophobic surfaces, with steady contact angle of ∼154° and contact angle hysteresis of ∼4°, are fabricated by direct laser texturing. In comparison with common pico-/femto-second lasers employed for this patterning, the nanosecond fiber laser used in this work is more cost-effective, compact and allows higher processing rates. The effect of laser power and scan line separation on surface wettability of textured surfaces are investigated and optimized fabrication parameters are given. Fluid flows and transportations of polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles suspension droplets on the processed surfaces and unprocessed wetting substrates are investigated. After evaporation is complete, the coffee-stain effect is observed on the untextured substrates but not on the superhydrophobic surfaces. Uniform deposition of PS particles on the laser textured surfaces is achieved and the deposited material is confined to smaller area.

  8. Growth Model for Pulsed-Laser Deposited Perovskite Oxide Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xu; FEI Yi-Yan; ZHU Xiang-Dong; Lu Hui-Bin; YANG Guo-Zhen

    2008-01-01

    We present a multi-level growth model that yields some of the key features of perovskite oxide film growth as observed in the reflection high energy electron diffraction(RHEED)and ellipsometry studies.The model describes the effect of deposition,temperature,intra-layer transport,interlayer transport and Ostwald ripening on the morphology of a growth surface in terms of the distribution of terraces and step edges during and after deposition.The numerical results of the model coincide well with the experimental observation.

  9. Nanodomain Structure and Energetics of Carbon Rich SiCN and SiBCN Polymer-Derived Ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Yan

    2014-01-01

    This Ph.D. thesis focuses on the synthesis, processing, solid state structure, nanodomain structure, structural evolution, thermodynamic stability, and functional properties of carbon rich SiCN and SiBCN ceramics derived from preceramic polymers with tailored compositions and structures. The main objective of the studies is to better understand the effects of the composition and structure of the starting precursors, on the behavior of the resultant ceramics. First, a set of preceramic pol...

  10. Oxidation Resistance of SiBCN Ceramics%SiBCN陶瓷的抗氧化性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宗波; 曾凡; 刘伟; 罗永明; 徐彩虹

    2012-01-01

    通过聚合物前驱体热解方法制备了SiBCN陶瓷,对其在1 200℃空气条件下的抗氧化性能进行了研究,并与前驱体法制得的SiCN陶瓷进行了比较.结果表明,SiBCN陶瓷经氧化10 h后样品氧化增重只有0.35%,并且样品中没有裂纹的出现,表现出良好的抗氧化性能.而同样条件下SiCN陶瓷氧化增重达到3.1%,样品出现裂纹.样品表面元素组成分析表明,SiBCN陶瓷表面氧化物主要以SiO2形式存在,而SiCN陶瓷表面主要以SiOx(x<2)存在.%The oxidation behavior of SiBCN ceramics, derived from pyrolysis of polymeric precursor, was investigated by oxidizing the SiBCN ceramics at 1 200°C under air for different time. As a reference, SiCN ceramic was studied using the same process. The results show that after oxidation for 10 h, the weight gain of SiBCN is only 0. 35% and the ceramic keeps its original morphology without cracks. Whereas, the oxidation of SiCN results in a weight gain of 3.10% and cracks. The elemental composition of the sample surface is mainly SiO2 for SiBCN and SiO, ( x<2 ) for SiCN ceramics, respectively.

  11. Preparation and analysis of chemically gradient functional bioceramic coating formed by pulsed laser deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, P; Muraleedharan, C V; Sureshbabu, S; Komath, Manoj; Varma, Harikrishna

    2012-02-01

    Bioactive ceramic coatings based on calcium phosphates yield better functionality in the human body for a variety of metallic implant devices including orthopaedic and dental prostheses. In the present study chemically and hence functionally gradient bioceramic coating was obtained by pulsed laser deposition method. Calcium phosphate bioactive ceramic coatings based on hydroxyapatite (HA) and tricalcium phosphate (TCP) were deposited over titanium substrate to produce gradation in physico-chemical characteristics and in vitro dissolution behaviour. Sintered targets of HA and α-TCP were deposited in a multi target laser deposition system. The obtained deposits were characterized by X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy was used to estimate the in vitro dissolution behaviour of coatings. The variation in mechanical property of the gradient layer was evaluated through scratch test and micro-indentation hardness. The bioactivity was examined in vitro with respect to the ability of HA layer to form on the surface as a result of contact with simulated body fluid. It could be inferred that chemically gradient functional bioceramic coating can be produced by laser deposition of multiple sintered targets with variable chemical composition.

  12. The role of transverse speed on deposition height and material efficiency in laser deposited titanium alloy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mahamood, RM

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available measured with Venier Caliper and the material efficiencies were determined using developed equations. The effect of the scanning speed on the material efficiency and deposit height were extensively studied and the results showed that for the set...

  13. The effect of process variables on microstructure in laser-deposited materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bontha, Srikanth

    Laser deposition of titanium alloys is under consideration for aerospace applications, which require the consistent control of microstructure and resulting mechanical properties. To date, only limited experimental data exists to link deposition process variables (e.g., laser power and velocity) to resulting microstructure (e.g., grain size and morphology) in laser-deposited materials, and suitable microstructures have typically been obtained only by trial and error. In addition, it is unclear whether knowledge based on small-scale laser deposition processes (e.g., LENS(TM)) can be applied to large-scale (higher power) processes currently under development for commercial applications. Therefore, simulation-based methods are needed to predict the effects of process variables and size-scale on microstructure in laser-deposited titanium and other aerospace materials. The ability to predict and control microstructure in laser deposition processes requires an understanding of the thermal conditions at the onset of solidification. The focus of this work is the development of thermal process maps relating solidification cooling rate and thermal gradient (the key parameters controlling microstructure) to laser deposition process variables (laser power and velocity). The approach employs the well-known Rosenthal solution for a moving point heat source traversing an infinite substrate. Cooling rates and thermal gradients at the onset of solidification are numerically extracted from the Rosenthal solution throughout the depth of the melt pool, and dimensionless process maps are presented for both 2-D thin-wall and bulky 3-D geometries. Results for both small-scale (LENS(TM)) and large-scale (higher power) processes are plotted on solidification maps for predicting trends in grain morphology in laser-deposited Ti-6Al-4V. Although the Rosenthal predictions neglect the nonlinear effects of temperature-dependent properties and latent heat of transformation, a comparison with 2-D

  14. Physical properties of a non-transparent cadmium oxide thick film deposited at low fluence by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quiñones-Galván, J.G., E-mail: erk_183@hotmail.com [Departamento de Física, Centro Universitario de Ciencias Exactas e Ingenierías, Universidad de Guadalajara, Boulevard Marcelino García Barragán 1421, Guadalajara, Jalisco C.P. 44430 (Mexico); Lozada-Morales, R. [Facultad de Ciencias Físico-Matemáticas, Postgrado en Física Aplicada, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Av. 14 sur y Av. San Claudio, Col. San Manuel, Puebla (Mexico); Jiménez-Sandoval, S. [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Unidad Querétaro, Apartado Postal 1-798 Querétaro, Qro 76001 (Mexico); Camps, Enrique [Departamento de Física, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apartado postal 18-1027, México D.F. C.P. 11801 (Mexico); and others

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • A non-transparent cadmium oxide film has been deposited by pulsed laser deposition. • The CdO film is polycrystalline and highly oriented in the (2 0 0) direction. • Thermal treatment was applied in order to see the effect on its physical properties. - Abstract: A stable non-transparent CdO film was grown by pulsed laser deposition. The sample was thermally annealed at 500 °C in air. A (2 0 0) highly oriented polycrystalline film was obtained. The annealed sample has not preferred orientation. Scanning electron micrographs show a grain size reduction for the annealed sample. By Raman spectroscopy, the defects related second order vibrational modes of CdO were observed. Chemical composition analysis shows the presence of CdO together with a substoichiometric CdO{sub x} phase for the as-grown sample. For the annealed sample a compensation of oxygen vacancies was observed. Electrical resistivity measurements give a value of 8.602 × 10{sup −4} (Ω cm) for the as-grown film. For the annealed sample the electrical resistivity increased to a value of 9.996 × 10{sup −3} (Ω cm). Zero transmission has never been reported for CdO films. The photoluminescence spectra were measured in order to shed some light on the origin of the zero transmission.

  15. Pulsed laser deposition of AlMgB14 thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britson, Jason Curtis [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2008-11-18

    Hard, wear-resistant coatings of thin film borides based on AlMgB14 have the potential to be applied industrially to improve the tool life of cutting tools and pump vanes and may account for several million dollars in savings as a result of reduced wear on these parts. Past work with this material has shown that it can have a hardness of up to 45GPa and be fabricated into thin films with a similar hardness using pulsed laser deposition. These films have already been shown to be promising for industrial applications. Cutting tools coated with AlMgB14 used to mill titanium alloys have been shown to substantially reduce the wear on the cutting tool and extend its cutting life. However, little research into the thin film fabrication process using pulsed laser deposition to make AlMgB14 has been conducted. In this work, research was conducted into methods to optimize the deposition parameters for the AlMgB14 films. Processing methods to eliminate large particles on the surface of the AlMgB14 films, produce films that were at least 1m thick, reduce the surface roughness of the films, and improve the adhesion of the thin films were investigated. Use of a femtosecond laser source rather than a nanosecond laser source was found to be effective in eliminating large particles considered detrimental to wear reduction properties from the films. Films produced with the femtosecond laser were also found to be deposited at a rate 100 times faster than those produced with the nanosecond laser. However, films produced with the femtosecond laser developed a relatively high RMS surface roughness around 55nm. Attempts to decrease the surface roughness were largely unsuccessful. Neither increasing the surface temperature of the substrate during deposition nor using a double pulse to ablate the material was found to be extremely successful to reduce the surface roughness. Finally, the adhesion of the thin films to M2 tool steel

  16. Polycrystalline ZnTe thin film on silicon synthesized by pulsed laser deposition and subsequent pulsed laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Menglei; Gao, Kun; Wu, Jiada; Cai, Hua; Yuan, Ye; Prucnal, S.; Hübner, R.; Skorupa, W.; Helm, M.; Zhou, Shengqiang

    2016-03-01

    ZnTe thin films on Si substrates have been prepared by pulsed laser deposition and subsequent pulsed laser melting (PLM) treatment. The crystallization during PLM is confirmed by Raman scattering, x-ray diffraction and room temperature photoluminescence (PL) measurements. The PL results show a broad peak at 574 nm (2.16 eV), which can be assigned to the transitions from the conduction band to the acceptor level located at 0.145 eV above the valence band induced by zinc-vacancy ionization. Our work provides an applicable approach to low temperature preparation of crystalline ZnTe thin films.

  17. High fluence deposition of polyethylene glycol films at 1064 nm by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Purice, Andreea; Schou, Jørgen; Kingshott, P.;

    2007-01-01

    Matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) has been applied for deposition of thin polyethylene glycol (PEG) films with infrared laser light at 1064 nm. We have irradiated frozen targets (of 1 wt.% PEG dissolved in water) and measured the deposition rate in situ with a quartz crystal 2...

  18. Functional porphyrin thin films deposited by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristescu, R., E-mail: rodica.cristescu@inflpr.ro [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Lasers Department, P.O. Box MG-36, Atomistilor 409, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Popescu, C.; Popescu, A.C.; Mihailescu, I.N. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Lasers Department, P.O. Box MG-36, Atomistilor 409, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Ciucu, A.A. [Univeristy of Bucharest, Chemistry Department, Bucharest (Romania); Andronie, A.; Iordache, S.; Stamatin, I. [University of Bucharest, 3 Nano-SAE Research Center, P.O. Box MG-38, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Fagadar-Cosma, E. [Institute of Chemistry Timisoara of Romanian Academy, Department of Organic Chemistry, 300223 Timisoara (Romania); Chrisey, D.B. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, School of Engineering, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Troy 12180-3590, NY (United States)

    2010-05-25

    We report the first successful deposition of functionalized and nanostructured Zn(II)- and Co(II)-metalloporphyrin thin films by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation onto silicon wafers, quartz plates and screen-printed electrodes. The deposited nanostructures have been characterized by Raman spectrometry and cyclic voltammetry. The novelty of our contribution consists of the evaluation of the sensitivity of the MAPLE-deposited Zn(II)- and Co(II)-metalloporphyrin thin films on screen-printed carbon nanotube electrodes when challenged with dopamine.

  19. Investigations of ZnO thin films deposited by a reactive pulsed laser ablation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.; C.; SOO; H.; KANDEL; M.; A.; THOMAS; C.; P.; DAGHLIAN

    2009-01-01

    Highly transparent ZnO thin films were deposited at different substrate temperatures by pulsed laser deposition in an oxygen atmosphere. The thin films were characterized by various techniques including X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, optical absorption, and photoluminescence. We demonstrated that oriented wurtzite ZnO thin films could be deposited at room temperature using a high purity zinc target. Variable temperature photoluminescence revealed new characteristics in the band edge emission. The underlying mechanism for the observed phenomena was also discussed.

  20. Pulsed laser deposited Si on multilayer graphene as anode material for lithium ion batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gouri Radhakrishnan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed laser deposition and chemical vapor deposition were used to deposit very thin silicon on multilayer graphene (MLG on a nickel foam substrate for application as an anode material for lithium ion batteries. The as-grown material was directly fabricated into an anode without a binder, and tested in a half-cell configuration. Even under stressful voltage limits that accelerate degradation, the Si-MLG films displayed higher stability than Si-only electrodes. Post-cycling images of the anodes reveal the differences between the two material systems and emphasize the role of the graphene layers in improving adhesion and electrochemical stability of the Si.

  1. Surface modification of biomaterials by pulsed laser ablation deposition and plasma/gamma polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Kaustubh R.

    Surface modification of stainless-steel was carried out by two different methods: pulsed laser ablation deposition (PLAD) and a combined plasma/gamma process. A potential application was the surface modification of endovascular stents, to enhance biocompatibility. The pulsed laser ablation deposition process, had not been previously reported for modifying stents and represented a unique and potentially important method for surface modification of biomaterials. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elatomer was studied using the PLAD technique. Cross- linked PDMS was deemed important because of its general use for biomedical implants and devices as well as in other fields. Furthermore, PDMS deposition using PLAD had not been previously studied and any information gained on its ablation characteristics could be important scientifically and technologically. The studies reported here showed that the deposited silicone film properties had a dependence on the laser energy density incident on the target. Smooth, hydrophobic, silicone-like films were deposited at low energy densities (100-150 mJ/cm2). At high energy densities (>200 mJ/cm2), the films had an higher oxygen content than PDMS, were hydrophilic and tended to show a more particulate morphology. It was also determined that (1)the deposited films were stable and extremely adherent to the substrate, (2)silicone deposition exhibited an `incubation effect' which led to the film properties changing with laser pulse number and (3)films deposited under high vacuum were similar to films deposited at low vacuum levels. The mechanical properties of the PLAD films were determined by nanomechanical measurements which are based on the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). From these measurements, it was possible to determine the modulus of the films and also study their scratch resistance. Such measurement techniques represent a significant advance over current state-of-the-art thin film characterization methods. An empirical model for

  2. Laser Photolysis and Thermolysis of Organic Selenides and Tellurides for Chemical Gas-phase Deposition of Nanostructured Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Pola

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Laser radiation-induced decomposition of gaseous organic selenides and tellurides resulting in chemical deposition of nanostructured materials on cold surfaces is reviewed with regard to the mechanism of the gas-phase decomposition and properties of the deposited materials. The laser photolysis and laser thermolysis of the Se and Te precursors leading to chalcogen deposition can also serve as a useful approach to nanostructured chalcogen composites and IVA group (Si, Ge, Sn element chalcogenides provided that it is carried out simultaneously with laser photolysis or thermolysis of polymer and IVA group element precursor.

  3. Laser photolysis and thermolysis of organic selenides and tellurides for chemical gas-phase deposition of nanostructured materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pola, Josef; Ouchi, Akihiko

    2009-03-12

    Laser radiation-induced decomposition of gaseous organic selenides and tellurides resulting in chemical deposition of nanostructured materials on cold surfaces is reviewed with regard to the mechanism of the gas-phase decomposition and properties of the deposited materials. The laser photolysis and laser thermolysis of the Se and Te precursors leading to chalcogen deposition can also serve as a useful approach to nanostructured chalcogen composites and IVA group (Si, Ge, Sn) element chalcogenides provided that it is carried out simultaneously with laser photolysis or thermolysis of polymer and IVA group element precursor.

  4. Thin-film preparation by back-surface irradiation pulsed laser deposition using metal powder targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Hiroharu; Ohshima, Tamiko; Yagyu, Yoshihito; Ihara, Takeshi; Yamauchi, Makiko; Suda, Yoshiaki

    2017-01-01

    Several kinds of functional thin films were deposited using a new thin-film preparation method named the back-surface irradiation pulsed laser deposition (BIPLD) method. In this BIPLD method, powder targets were used as the film source placed on a transparent target holder, and then a visible-wavelength pulsed laser was irradiated from the holder side to the substrate. Using this new method, titanium oxide and boron nitride thin films were deposited on the silicon substrate. Surface scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images suggest that all of the thin films were deposited on the substrate with some large droplets irrespective of the kind of target used. The deposition rate of the films prepared by using this method was calculated from film thickness and deposition time to be much lower than that of the films prepared by conventional PLD. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement results suggest that rutile and anatase TiO2 crystal peaks were formed for the films prepared using the TiO2 rutile powder target. Crystal peaks of hexagonal boron nitride were observed for the films prepared using the boron nitride powder target. The crystallinity of the prepared films was changed by annealing after deposition.

  5. Helium-Charged Titanium Films Deposited by Pulsed Laser Deposition in an Electron-Cyclotron-Resonance Helium Plasma Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金钦华; 胡佩钢; 凌浩; 吴嘉达; 施立群; 周筑颖

    2003-01-01

    Titanium thin films incorporated with helium are produced by pulsed laser deposition in an electron cyclotron resonance helium plasma environment. Helium is distributed evenly in the film and a relatively high He/Ti atomic ratio (~ 20%) is obtained from the proton backscattering spectroscopy. This high concentration ofhelium leads to a surface blistering which is observed by scanning electron microscopy. Laser repetition rate has little influence on film characters. Substrate bias voltage is also changed for the helium incorporating mechanism study, and this is a helium ion implantation process during the film growth. Choosing suitable substrate bias voltage, one can avoid the damage produced by ion implantation, which is always present in general implantation case.

  6. Pulsed laser deposition of barium metaplumbate thin films for ferroelectric capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardare, A. I.; Mardare, C. C.; Fernandes, J. R. A.; Vilarinho, P. M.; Joanni, E.

    2003-08-01

    Barium metaplumbate thin films were deposited in situ by pulsed laser deposition on Si/SiO2/Ti/Pt substrates with a high deposition rate. The temperatures used ranged between 400 ^circ C and 700 ^circ C. As the deposition temperature was increased, the films assumed a strong (222) preferential orientation. This orientation of the electrodes was reflected on the PZT films, having a very big influence on their ferroelectric behavior. The PZT films made over BPO deposited at high temperature presented high values of remanent polarization (43 μC/cm^2) but indications of high leakage currents could be observed in the hysteresis loops. By using BPO bottom electrodes, a 30% improvement in the fatigue behavior of PZT capacitors when compared with the normal platinum electrodes was observed.

  7. Sorbitol as an efficient reducing agent for laser-induced copper deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochemirovsky, V. A.; Logunov, L. S.; Safonov, S. V.; Tumkin, I. I.; Tver'yanovich, Yu. S.; Menchikov, L. G.

    2012-10-01

    We have pioneered in revealing the fact that sorbitol may be used as an efficient reducing agent in the process of laser-induced copper deposition from solutions; in this case, it is possible to obtain copper lines much higher quality than by using conventional formalin.

  8. Oxygen content of YBaCuO thin films during growth by pulsed laser deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia lopez, F.J.; Garcia lopez, J.J.; Blank, David H.A.; Rogalla, Horst

    1998-01-01

    The oxidation ability of the laser plasma plume during in situ formation of YBa2Cu3O6+x (YBaCuO) thin films has been studied as a function of the deposition conditions. A quenching technique has been used immediately after termination of growth to avoid any oxygen in or out-diffusion during the

  9. Direct patterning of complex oxides by pulsed laser deposition through stencils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riele, te Paul; Janssens, Arjen; Rijnders, Guus; Blank, Dave H.A.

    2007-01-01

    The possibilities to grow isolated structures of complex oxides by pulsed laser deposition through stencils were investigated. A stencil consisting of a SiN membrane with apertures of several hundred nanometers embedded in a Si chip is placed in front of a heated substrate (up to 750 degrees Celsius

  10. Microstructural evolution in additive manufacturing with high power lasers : Deposition, characterization and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nenadl, Ondrej

    2017-01-01

    High power lasers provide time and cost effective method for metallic surface modification. In this work these modifications are explored as: 1) a simple melting and subsequent rapid solidification of a metallic surface – resulting in superior properties post-treatment; 2) deposition of an

  11. Electron Microscopy Characterization of Ni-Cr-B-Si-C Laser Deposited Coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmati, I.; Rao, J. C.; Ocelik, V.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    During laser deposition of Ni-Cr-B-Si-C alloys with high amounts of Cr and B, various microstructures and phases can be generated from the same chemical composition that results in heterogeneous properties in the clad layer. In this study, the microstructure and phase constitution of a high-alloy

  12. Theoretical Study of Laser-Stimulated Chemical Vapor Deposition Processes of Importance in Microelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    fundamental microscopic theory for the laser-induced periodic surface structure ( LIPSS ), which includes electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom of the...deposition rate. The dynamics of subsequent multilayer LIPSS formation is treated using a metal-metal interaction potential obtained by combining MO theory

  13. Development of laser deposited multilayer zone plate structures for soft X-ray radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liese, Tobias; Radisch, Volker; Knorr, Inga [Institut fuer Materialphysik, University of Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Reese, Michael; Grossmann, Peter; Mann, Klaus [Laser-Laboratorium Goettingen e.V., Hans-Adolf-Krebs-Weg 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Krebs, Hans-Ulrich, E-mail: krebs@ump.gwdg.de [Institut fuer Materialphysik, University of Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany)

    2011-04-01

    As a novel approach, the combination of pulsed laser deposition and focused ion beam was applied to fabricate different types of multilayer zone plate structures for soft X-ray applications. For this purpose, high quality non-periodic ZrO{sub 2}/Ti multilayers were deposited by pulsed laser deposition on planar Si substrates and on rotating steel wires with layer thicknesses according to the Fresnel zone plate law. Linear focusing optics were fabricated by cutting slices out of the multilayers by focused ion beam and placing them directly over pinholes within Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} substrates. Additionally, it was shown that laser deposition of depth-graded multilayers on a wire is also a promising way for building up multilayer zone plates with point focus. First experiments using a table-top X-ray source based on a laser-induced plasma show that the determined focal length and spatial resolution of the fabricated multilayer Laue lens corresponds to the designed optic.

  14. Microstructural evolution in laser deposited nickel-titanium-carbon in situ metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopagoni, S. [Center for Advanced Research and Technology and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Hwang, J.Y., E-mail: Junyeon.Hwang@unt.edu [Center for Advanced Research and Technology and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Singh, A.R.P.; Mensah, B.A.; Bunce, N. [Center for Advanced Research and Technology and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Tiley, J. [Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Dayton, OH 45433 (United States); Scharf, T.W.; Banerjee, R. [Center for Advanced Research and Technology and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States)

    2011-01-28

    Research highlights: > Laser deposition of Ni-TiC composites with a relatively low volume fraction of refined homogeneously distributed carbide precipitates resulting from an in situ reaction between elemental titanium and carbon (graphite) within the molten nickel pool. > Detailed characterization of the Ni/TiC interface using high resolution TEM. > Evaluation of the microhardness and tribological properties of this novel in situ composite with comparisons to laser deposited pure Ni. - Abstract: Laser deposition of a mixture of elemental nickel, titanium, and carbon (graphite) powders via the laser engineered net shaping (LENS) process results in an in situ titanium carbide reinforced nickel metal matrix composites. The composites have been characterized in detail using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (including energy dispersive spectroscopy mapping), Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission (including high resolution) electron microscopy. Both primary and eutectic titanium carbides, observed in this composite, exhibited the FCC-TiC structure (NaCl-type). Detailed characterization of the nickel/titanium carbide interface was carried out using high resolution TEM with the orientation relationship between the phases being <1 0 0> TiC//<1 1 0> Ni and (0 0 2) TiC//(1-bar 11) Ni. Mechanical and tribological testing determined that the composites exhibited a relatively high hardness of 370 VHN and a steady-state friction coefficient of {approx}0.5, both improvements in comparison to LENS deposited pure Ni.

  15. Microstructural evolution in additive manufacturing with high power lasers : Deposition, characterization and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nenadl, Ondrej

    2017-01-01

    High power lasers provide time and cost effective method for metallic surface modification. In this work these modifications are explored as: 1) a simple melting and subsequent rapid solidification of a metallic surface – resulting in superior properties post-treatment; 2) deposition of an additiona

  16. State of residual stress in laser-deposited ceramic composite coatings on aluminum alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kadolkar, P. B.; Watkins, T. R.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.; Kooi, B. J.; Dahotre, N. B.

    2007-01-01

    The nature and magnitude of the residual stresses within laser-deposited titanium carbide (TiC) coatings on 2024 and 6061 aluminum (Al) alloys were investigated. Macro- and micro-stresses within the coatings were determined using an X-ray diffraction method. Owing to increased debonding between the

  17. Microstructural characterization of Co-based coating deposited by low power pulse laser cladding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farnia, A.; Ghaini, F. Malek; Ocelik, V.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    A detailed microstructural study of Stellite 6 coating deposited on a low carbon ferritic steel substrate using preplaced powder method and low power Nd:YAG pulse laser is performed. The grain structure and solidification texture of the coating are investigated by orientation imaging microscopy

  18. Epitaxial growth of atomically flat gadolinia-doped ceria thin films by pulsed laser deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yunzhong; Pryds, Nini; Schou, Jørgen;

    2011-01-01

    Epitaxial growth of Ce0.8Gd0.2O2(CGO) films on (001) TiO2-terminated SrTiO3 substrates by pulsed laser deposition was investigated using in situ reflective high energy electron diffraction. The initial film growth shows a Stransky–Krastanov growth mode. However, this three-dimensional island...

  19. Microstructural characterization of Co-based coating deposited by low power pulse laser cladding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farnia, A.; Ghaini, F. Malek; Ocelik, V.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2013-01-01

    A detailed microstructural study of Stellite 6 coating deposited on a low carbon ferritic steel substrate using preplaced powder method and low power Nd:YAG pulse laser is performed. The grain structure and solidification texture of the coating are investigated by orientation imaging microscopy (OIM

  20. CdS thin films prepared by laser assisted chemical bath deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, L.V.; Mendivil, M.I.; Garcia Guillen, G.; Aguilar Martinez, J.A. [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Av. Pedro de Alba s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon 66450 (Mexico); Krishnan, B. [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Av. Pedro de Alba s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon 66450 (Mexico); CIIDIT – Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Apodaca, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Avellaneda, D.; Castillo, G.A.; Das Roy, T.K. [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Av. Pedro de Alba s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon 66450 (Mexico); Shaji, S., E-mail: sshajis@yahoo.com [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Av. Pedro de Alba s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon 66450 (Mexico); CIIDIT – Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Apodaca, Nuevo Leon (Mexico)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • CdS thin films by conventional CBD and laser assisted CBD. • Characterized these films using XRD, XPS, AFM, optical and electrical measurements. • Accelerated growth was observed in the laser assisted CBD process. • Improved dark conductivity and good photocurrent response for the LACBD CdS. - Abstract: In this work, we report the preparation and characterization of CdS thin films by laser assisted chemical bath deposition (LACBD). CdS thin films were prepared from a chemical bath containing cadmium chloride, triethanolamine, ammonium hydroxide and thiourea under various deposition conditions. The thin films were deposited by in situ irradiation of the bath using a continuous laser of wavelength 532 nm, varying the power density. The thin films obtained during deposition of 10, 20 and 30 min were analyzed. The changes in morphology, structure, composition, optical and electrical properties of the CdS thin films due to in situ irradiation of the bath were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and UV–vis spectroscopy. The thin films obtained by LACBD were nanocrystalline, photoconductive and presented interesting morphologies. The results showed that LACBD is an effective synthesis technique to obtain nanocrystalline CdS thin films having good optoelectronic properties.

  1. High quality ZnS/Au/ZnS transparent conductive tri-layer films deposited by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Caifeng; Li, Qingshan; Wang, Jisuo; Zhang, Lichun; Zhao, Fengzhou; Dong, Fangying

    2016-07-01

    ZnS/Au/ZnS tri-layer films were deposited on quartz glass substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The influence of Au layer thickness on optical and electrical properties of the tri-layer ZnS/Au/ZnS was studied. X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and scanning electron microscope were employed to characterize the crystalline structure and surface morphology of the tri-layer films. Hall measurements, ultraviolet and visible spectrophotometer, four-point probe were used to explore the optoelectronic properties of the ZnS/Au/ZnS. The increase of Au layer thickness resulted in the decreased resistivity, the increased carrier concentration, and the declined transmittance in the visible light region.

  2. An analytical model of beam attenuation and powder heating during coaxial laser direct metal deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkerton, Andrew J.

    2007-12-01

    In the laser direct metal deposition process, interaction between the laser beam and powder from a coaxial powder delivery nozzle alters the temperature of powder and the amount and spatial distribution of laser intensity reaching the deposition melt pool. These factors significantly affect the process and are also important input parameters for any finite element or analytical models of the melt pool and deposition tracks. The analytical model in this paper presents a method to calculate laser attenuation and powder temperatures at every point below such a nozzle. It is applicable to laser beams that are approximately parallel over the beam-powder interaction distance of any initial intensity distribution (Top Hat, Gaussian, TEM01ast or other). The volume below the nozzle is divided into the region above the powder consolidation plane, where the powder stream is annular, and below it, where it is a single Gaussian stream, and expressions derived for each region. Modelled and measured results are reasonably matched. Results indicate that attenuation is more severe once the annular powder stream has consolidated into a single stream but is not zero before that point. The temperature of powder reaching any point is not constant but the mean value is a maximum at the centre of the stream.

  3. RESEARCH ON LASER DIRECT DEPOSITION PROCESS OF Ti-6Al-4V ALLOY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.Y. Gao; Y.Z. Zhang; L.K. Shi; B.L. Du; M.Z. Xi; H.Z. Ji

    2007-01-01

    Laser direct deposition (LDD) of metallic components is an advanced technology of combining CAD/CAM (computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing), high power laser, and rapid prototyping. This technology uses laser beam to melt the powders fed coaxially into the molten pool by the laser beam to fabricate fully dense metallic components. The present article mainly studies the LDD of Ti-6Al-4V alloy, which can be used to fabricate aircraft components. The mechanical properties of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy, fabricated by LDD, are obtained using the tension test, and the oxygen content of used powders and deposited specimens are measured. In the present article, it can be seen that the mechanical properties obtained using this method are higher than the ones obtained by casting, and equal to those got by wrought anneal. One aircraft pan has been made using the LDD process. Because of this aircraft part, with sophisticated shape, the effect of the laser scanning track on the internal soundness of the deposited part was discussed.

  4. Effect of target density on the growth and properties of YGBCO thin films deposited by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Linfei; Li, Yiejie; Wu, Xiang; Yao, Yanjie; Wang, Menglin; Wang, Binbin

    2016-12-01

    Some works found that target density had not a large effects on the superconducting or structural properties of YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) films prepared by pulsed laser deposition. However, the possible effect of target density on the Y0.5Gd0.5Ba2Cu3O7-δ (YGBCO) is not clear. In this paper, YGBCO thin films were deposited on flexible metal substrates by pulsed laser deposition using target with different densities. The density of each YGBCO target was varied from to 4.0 g/cm3 to 5.5 g/cm3. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the microstructure and superconducting properties of YGBCO films as a function of the target density. The film structures were examined by X-ray diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The superconducting properties of the YGBCO films were evaluated using the conventional four-probe method and PPMS. It was found that all the YGBCO films had pure c-axis orientation. The target density had effect on the surface morphology and superconducting properties of the YGBCO thin films. With increasing target density, the pore became larger and the distribution density and size of the particles became higher and larger, and the critical current Ic decreased. The YGBCO film deposited at a target density of 4.0 g/cm3 exhibited the highest critical current density Jc of 5.4 MA/cm2 at 77 K and self-field, 47.2 MA/cm2 at 0 T and 8.8 MA/cm2 at 9 T at 4.2 K and B//c.

  5. Optical Properties Dependence with Gas Pressure in AlN Films Deposited by Pulsed Laser Ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, J A; Riascos, H [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Tecnologica de Pereira, Grupo plasma Laser y Aplicaciones A.A 097 (Colombia); Caicedo, J C [Grupo pelIculas delgadas, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Cabrera, G; Yate, L, E-mail: jcaicedoangulo@gmail.com [Department de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain)

    2011-01-01

    AlN films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition technique (PLD) using an Nd: YAG laser ({lambda} = 1064 nm). The films were deposited in a nitrogen atmosphere as working gas; the target was an aluminum high purity (99.99%). The films were deposited with a laser fluence of 7 J/cm2 for 10 minutes on silicon (100) substrates. The substrate temperature was 300 deg. C and the working pressure was varied from 3 mtorr to 11 mtorr. The thickness measured by profilometer was 150 nm for all films. The crystallinity was observed via XRD pattern, the morphology and composition of the films were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), respectively. The optical reflectance spectra and color coordinates of the films were obtained by optical spectral reflectometry technique in the range of 400 cm-1- 900 cm-1 by an Ocean Optics 2000 spectrophotometer. In this work, a clear dependence of the reflectance, dominant wavelength and color purity was found in terms of the applied pressure to the AlN films. A reduction in reflectance of about 55% when the pressure was increased from 3 mtorr to 11 mtorr was observed. This paper deals with the formation of AlN thin films as promising materials for the integration of SAW devices on Si substrates due to their good piezoelectric properties and the possibility of deposition at low temperature compatible with the manufacturing of Si integrated circuits.

  6. Pulsed laser deposition of silicon dioxide thin films with silicone targets for fabricating waveguide devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoshi, Masayuki; Kuramatsu, Masaaki; Inoue, Narumi

    2002-06-01

    Silicon dioxide (SiO2) thin films were deposited at room temperature by 193-nm ArF excimer laser ablation of silicone in oxygen atmosphere. Only the side chains of the target were photo-dissociated during ablation to deposit Si-O bonds on a substrate in high laser fluence at about 10 J/cm2. Oxygen gas worked to oxidize the Si-O bonds ejected from the target to from SiO2 thin films at the gas pressure of 4.4 X 10-2 Torr, in addition to reducing the isolated carbon mixed into the films. We also found that the deposited rate could control refractive index of the films. The refractive index of the film deposited at 0.05 nm/pulse is greater than that of the film at 0.1 nm/pulse. Thus, a 0.2-micrometers thick SiO2 cladding film deposited at 0.1 nm/pulse was firstly formed on the whole surface of a 100- micrometers -thick polyester film, and then a 0.6 micrometers -thick SiO2 core film at 0.05 nm/pulse was fabricated in a line on the sample. The sample functioned as a waveguide device for a 633-nm line of He-Ne laser.

  7. Atomic force microscopic characterization of films grown by inverse pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egerhazi, L. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 406, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary); Geretovszky, Zs. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 406, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary); Csako, T. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 406, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary); Szoerenyi, T. [Research Group on Laser Physics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 406, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary)]. E-mail: t.szorenyi@physx.u-szeged.hu

    2006-04-30

    Carbon nitride films have been deposited by KrF excimer laser ablation of a rotating graphite target in 5 Pa nitrogen ambient in an inverse pulsed laser deposition configuration, where the backward motion of the ablated species is utilised for film growth on substrates lying in the target plane. Topometric AFM scans of the films, exhibiting elliptical thickness distribution, have been recorded along the axes of symmetry of the deposition area. High resolution AFM scans revealed the existence of disk-like, or somewhat elongated rice-like features of 5-10 nm average thickness and {approx}100 nm largest dimension, densely packed over the whole, approximately 14 x 10 cm{sup 2} deposition area. The RMS roughness of the film decreased from 9 nm near to the laser spot down to 2 nm in the outer regions. Even the highest RMS value obtained for IPLD films was less than half of the typical, 25 nm roughness measured on simultaneously deposited PLD films.

  8. Characterisation of Pb thin films prepared by the nanosecond pulsed laser deposition technique for photocathode application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorusso, A., E-mail: antonella.lorusso@le.infn.it [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi” and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Università del Salento, Lecce 73100 (Italy); Gontad, F. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi” and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Università del Salento, Lecce 73100 (Italy); Broitman, E. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, Linköping SE-581 83 (Sweden); Chiadroni, E. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Frascati 00044 (Italy); Perrone, A. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi” and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Università del Salento, Lecce 73100 (Italy)

    2015-03-31

    Pb thin films were prepared by the nanosecond pulsed laser deposition technique on Si (100) and polycrystalline Nb substrates for photocathode application. As the photoemission performances of a cathode are strongly affected by its surface characteristics, the Pb films were grown at different substrate temperatures with the aim of modifying the morphology and structure of thin films. An evident morphological modification in the deposited films with the formation of spherical grains at higher temperatures has been observed. X-ray diffraction measurements showed that a preferred orientation of Pb (111) normal to the substrate was achieved at 30 °C while the Pb (200) plane became strongly pronounced with the increase in the substrate temperature. Finally, a Pb thin film deposited on Nb substrate at 30 °C and tested as the photocathode showed interesting results for the application of such a device in superconducting radio frequency guns. - Highlights: • Pb thin films obtained by the nanosecond pulsed laser deposition technique at different substrate temperature. • The substrate temperature modifies the morphology and structure of Pb films. • Pb thin film was deposited at room temperature for photocathode application. • The Pb thin film photocathode was tested and the quantum efficiency of the device improved after laser cleaning treatment of the film surface.

  9. Phase-selective vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) nanostructured thin films by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masina, B. N., E-mail: BMasina@csir.co.za, E-mail: slafane@cdta.dz [CSIR-National Laser Centre, PO BOX 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); School of Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X54001, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Lafane, S., E-mail: BMasina@csir.co.za, E-mail: slafane@cdta.dz; Abdelli-Messaci, S.; Kerdja, T. [Division des Milieux Ionisés et Laser, Centre de Développement des Technologies Avancées, Cité du 20 Août 1956, BP 17, Baba Hassen (Algeria); Wu, L. [CSIR-National Laser Centre, PO BOX 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Akande, A. A.; Mwakikunga, B. [DST/CSIR National Centre for Nano-Structured Materials, PO BOX 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Forbes, A. [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, Wits 2050, Johannesburg (South Africa)

    2015-10-28

    Thin films of monoclinic nanostructured vanadium dioxide are notoriously difficult to produce in a selective manner. To date, post-annealing, after pulsed laser deposition (PLD), has been used to revert the crystal phase or to remove impurities, and non-glass substrates have been employed, thus reducing the efficacy of the transparency switching. Here, we overcome these limitations in PLD by optimizing a laser-ablation and deposition process through optical imaging of the laser-induced plasma. We report high quality monoclinic rutile-type vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) (M1) nanoparticles without post-annealing, and on a glass substrate. Our samples demonstrate a reversible metal-to-insulator transition at ∼43 °C, without any doping, paving the way to switchable transparency in optical materials at room temperature.

  10. Modeling of Crystal Orientations in Laser Powder Deposition of Single Crystal Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Huan; Liu, Zhaoyang

    This paper presents a numerical model which simulates the dynamic molten pool formation and the crystal orientations of solidified SX alloy in a multi-layer laser powder deposition process. Based on the mathematical model of coaxial laser direct deposition, the effect of parameters (laser power, scanning speed, powder feed rate) on the tendency to form [001] direction expitaxial grains during solidification was evaluated. In the transient three- dimensional model, physical phenomena including heat transfer, melting, grain formation during solidification, mass addition, and fluid flow in the melt pool, were modeled in a self-consistent manner. The temperature fields, fluid flow velocity, clad geometry (width, height and melt pool depth) and grain formation in melting pool of single layer are predicted.

  11. Incongruent transfer in laser deposition of FeSiGaRu thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Riet, E.; Kools, J. C. S.; Dieleman, J.

    1993-06-01

    The laser ablation and deposition of FeSiGaRu is studied. The deposited thin films are analyzed with Auger electron spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. It is found that the gallium and ruthenium content of the thin films is strongly dependent on the laser fluence. At high laser fluences (6 J/cm2) the thin films are depleted of gallium due to preferential sputtering of the gallium atoms from the thin film. Near the threshold fluence (1.9 J/cm2) the films contain an excess of gallium due to preferential evaporation of gallium from the target. The latter conclusions are based on time-of-flight studies of ablated atoms and ions and on measurements of the atoms that are sputtered from the substrate by the incoming flux.

  12. Characterization of laser-irradiated co-deposited layers on plasma facing components from a tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasior, P.; Badziak, J.; Czarnecka, A.; Parys, P.; Wolowski, J.; Rosinski, M. [Andrzej Soltan Inst. for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Rubel, Marek [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Alfven Laboratory; Philipps, V. [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik

    2006-04-15

    An experimental setup and ion diagnostic method for laser-induced fuel removal and decomposition of co-deposited layers on plasma facing components from tokamaks are described. Nd:YAG 3.5 ns pulse laser with a repetition rate of 10 Hz and single-pulse energy of up to 0.8 J at 1.06 {mu}m has been used for irradiation of a graphite limiter tile from the TEXTOR tokamak. Comparative studies have been performed for a pure graphite plate as a reference target. Energy of emitted ions has been measured using a time-of-flight method. Early results show that laser pulses efficiently ablate the co-deposit removing both fuel species and heavy components such as Si, Ni, Cr, Fe and W present in the layers. Surface topography of the irradiated targets is also presented.

  13. Investigation of droplet formation in pulsed Nd:YAG laser deposition of metals and silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siew, Wee-Ong; Lee, Wai-Keat; Wong, Hin-Yong; Tou, Teck-Yong [Multimedia University, Faculty of Engineering, Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Yong, Thian-Khok [Multimedia University, Faculty of Engineering, Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Faculty of Engineering and Science, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Yap, Seong-Shan [Multimedia University, Faculty of Engineering, Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Institute of Physics, Trondheim (Norway)

    2010-12-15

    In the process of pulsed laser deposition of nickel (Ni) and ruthenium (Ru) thin films, the occurrence of phase explosion in ablation was found to affect the deposition rate and enhance the optical emissions from the plasma plume. Faster thin-film growth rates coincide with the onset of phase explosion as a result of superheating and/or sub-surface boiling which also increased the particulates found on the thin-film surface. These particulates were predominantly droplets which may not be round but flattened and also debris for the case of silicon (Si) ablation. The droplets from Ni and Ru thin films were compared in terms of size distribution and number density for different laser fluences. The origins of these particulates were correlated to the bubble and ripple formations on the targets while the transfer to the thin film surface was attributed to the laser-induced ejection from the targets. (orig.)

  14. Hyperthermal Pulsed-Laser Ablation Beams for Film Deposition and Surface Microstructural Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowndes, D.H.

    1999-11-08

    This paper presents an overview of pulsed-laser ablation for film deposition and surface microstructure formation. By changing the ambient gas pressure from high vacuum to several Torr (several hundred Pa) and by selecting the pulsed-laser wavelength, the kinetic energy of ablated atoms/ions can be varied from several hundred eV down to {approximately}0.1 eV and films ranging from superhard to nanocrystalline may be deposited. Furthermore, cumulative (multi-pulse) irradiation of a semiconductor surface (e.g. silicon) in an oxidizing gas (0{sub 2}, SF{sub 6}) et atmospheric pressure can produce dense, self-organized arrays of high-aspect-ratio microcolumns or microcones. Thus, a wide range of materials synthesis and processing opportunities result from the hyperthermal flux and reactive growth conditions provided by pulsed-laser ablation.

  15. Nonlinear optical properties of laser deposited CuO thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Aiping [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Yang Guang, E-mail: gyang@mail.hust.edu.c [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Long Hua; Li Fang; Li Yuhua [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Lu Peixiang, E-mail: lupeixiang@mail.hust.edu.c [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2009-06-01

    In this work we investigate the third-order optical nonlinearities in CuO films by Z-scan method using a femtosecond laser (800 nm, 50 fs, 200 Hz). Single-phase CuO thin films have been obtained using pulsed laser deposition technique. The structure properties, surface image, optical transmittance and reflectance of the films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and UV-vis spectroscopy. The Z-scan results show that laser-deposited CuO films exhibit large nonlinear refractive coefficient, n{sub 2} = - 3.96 x 10{sup -17} m{sup 2}/W, and nonlinear absorption coefficient, {beta} = - 1.69 x 10{sup -10} m/W, respectively.

  16. Growth parameter enhancement for MoS{sub 2} thin films synthesized by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serna, Martha I.; Higgins, Marissa; Quevedo-Lopez, Manuel A. [Materials Science and Engineering Department, The University of Texas at Dallas, 800 W Campbell Road RL 10, Richardson TX 75080 (United States); Moreno, Salvador [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75080 (United States); Choi, Hyunjoo [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Kookmin University, Jeongneung-dong Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of); Minary-Jolandan, Majid [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75080 (United States); Alan MacDiarmid Nanotech Institute, The University of Texas at Dallas, 800 W Campbell Road RL 10, Richardson TX 75080 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Two-dimensional materials such as graphene and MoS{sub 2} have been the main focus of intense research efforts over the past few years. The most common method of exfoliating these materials, although efficient for lab-scale experiments, is not acceptable for large area and practical applications. Here, we report the deposition of MoS{sub 2} layered films on amorphous (SiO{sub 2}) and crystalline substrates (sapphire) using a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method. Increased substrate temperature (∝700 C) and laser energy density (>530 mJ /cm{sup 2}) promotes crystalline MoS{sub 2} films < 20 nm, as demonstrated by fast Fourier transform (FFT) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The method reported here opens the possibility for large area layered MoS{sub 2} films by using a laser ablation processes. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Dimensional and material characteristics of direct deposited tool steel by CO II laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J.

    2006-01-01

    Laser aided direct metalimaterial deposition (DMD) process builds metallic parts layer-by-layer directly from the CAD representation. In general, the process uses powdered metaUmaterials fed into a melt pool, creating fully dense parts. Success of this technology in the die and tool industry depends on the parts quality to be achieved. To obtain designed geometric dimensions and material properties, delicate control of the parameters such as laser power, spot diameter, traverse speed and powder mass flow rate is critical. In this paper, the dimensional and material characteristics of directed deposited H13 tool steel by CO II laser are investigated for the DMD process with a feedback height control system. The relationships between DMD process variables and the product characteristics are analyzed using statistical techniques. The performance of the DMD process is examined with the material characteristics of hardness, porosity, microstructure, and composition.

  18. Nanostructured and amorphous-like tungsten films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellasega, D.; Merlo, G.; Conti, C.; Bottani, C. E.; Passoni, M.

    2012-10-01

    An experimental investigation of nanostructured, micrometer-thick, tungsten films deposited by pulsed laser deposition is presented. The films are compact and pore-free, with crystal grain sizes ranging from 14 nm to less than 2 nm. It is shown how, by properly tailoring deposition rate and kinetic energy of ablated species, it is possible to achieve a detailed and separate control of both film morphology and structure. The role of the main process parameters, He background pressure, laser fluence, and energy, is elucidated. In contrast with W films produced with other PVD techniques, β-phase growth is avoided and the presence of impurities and contaminants, like oxygen, is not correlated with film structure. These features make these films interesting for the development of coatings with improved properties, like increased corrosion resistance and enhanced diffusion barriers.

  19. Fabrication of CdTe solar cells by laser-driven physical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compaan, A.; Bhat, A.; Tabory, C.; Liu, S.; Nguyen, M.; Aydinli, A.; Tsien, L.H.; Bohn, R.G. (Toledo Univ., OH (USA). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1991-05-01

    Polycrystalline cadmium sulfide-cadmium telluride heterojunction solar cells were fabricated for the first time using a laser-driven physical vapor deposition method. An XeCl excimer laser was used to deposit both of the II-VI semiconductor layers in a single vacuum chamber from pressed powder targets. Results are presented from optical absorption. Raman scattering, X-ray diffraction, and electrical characterization of the films. Solar cells were fabricated by deposition onto SnO{sub 2}-coated glass with top contacts produced by gold evaporation. Device performance was evaluated from the spectral quantum efficiency and current-voltage measurements in the dark and with air mass 1.5 solar illumination. (orig.).

  20. Hypersonic wave drag reduction performance of cylinders with repetitive laser energy depositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, J; Hong, Y J; Li, Q; Huang, H, E-mail: fangjuan314@163.com [Academy of Equipment Command and Technology, Post Box 3380-86, Huairou Dis. Beijing 101416 (China)

    2011-02-01

    It has been widely research that wave drag reduction on hypersonic vehicle by laser energy depositions. Using laser energy to reduce wave drag can improve vehicle performance. A second order accurate scheme based on finite-difference method and domain decomposition of structural grid is used to compute the drag performance of cylinders in a hypersonic flow of Mach number 2 at altitude of 15km with repetitive energy depositions. The effects of frequency on drag reduction are studied. The calculated results show: the recirculation zone is generated due to the interaction between bow shock over the cylinder and blast wave produced by energy deposition, and a virtual spike which is supported by an axis-symmetric recirculation, is formed in front of the cylinder. By increasing the repetitive frequency, the drag is reduced and the oscillation of the drag is decreased; however, the energy efficiency decreases by increasing the frequency.

  1. Monolithic Laser Scribed Graphene Scaffold with Atomic Layer Deposited Platinum for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Nayak, Pranati

    2017-09-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) electrode architectures as scaffolds for conformal deposition of catalysts is an emerging research area with significant potential for electrocatalytic applications. In this study, we report the fabrication of monolithic, self-standing, 3D graphitic carbon scaffold with conformally deposited Pt by atomic layer deposition (ALD) as a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst. Laser scribing is employed to transform polyimide into 3D porous graphitic carbon, which possesses good electronic conductivity and numerous edge plane sites. This laser scribed graphene (LSG) architecture makes it possible to fabricate monolithic electrocatalyst support without any binders or conductive additives. The synergistic effect between ALD of Pt on 3D network of LSG provides an avenue for minimal yet effective Pt usage, leading to an enhanced HER activity. This strategy establish a general approach for inexpensive and large scale HER device fabrication with minimum catalyst cost.

  2. Antimony sulfide thin films prepared by laser assisted chemical bath deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaji, S.; Garcia, L. V.; Loredo, S. L.; Krishnan, B.; Aguilar Martinez, J. A.; Das Roy, T. K.; Avellaneda, D. A.

    2017-01-01

    Antimony sulfide (Sb2S3) thin films were prepared by laser assisted chemical bath deposition (LACBD) technique. These thin films were deposited on glass substrates from a chemical bath containing antimony chloride, acetone and sodium thiosulfate under various conditions of normal chemical bath deposition (CBD) as well as in-situ irradiation of the chemical bath using a continuous laser of 532 nm wavelength. Structure, composition, morphology, optical and electrical properties of the Sb2S3 thin films produced by normal CBD and LACBD were analyzed by X-Ray diffraction (XRD), Raman Spectroscopy, Atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis spectroscopy and Photoconductivity. The results showed that LACBD is an effective synthesis technique to obtain Sb2S3 thin films for optoelectronic applications.

  3. Bismuth Oxide Thin Films Deposited on Silicon Through Pulsed Laser Ablation, for Infrared Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condurache-Bota, Simona; Constantinescu, Catalin; Tigau, Nicolae; Praisler, Mirela

    2016-12-01

    Infrared detectors are used in many human activities, from industry to military, telecommunications, environmental studies and even medicine. Bismuth oxide thin films have proved their potential for optoelectronic applications, but their uses as infrared sensors have not been thoroughly studied so far. In this paper, pulsed laser ablation of pure bismuth targets within a controlled oxygen atmosphere is proposed for the deposition of bismuth oxide films on Si (100) substrates. Crystalline films were obtained, whose uniformity depends on the deposition conditions (number of laser pulses and the use of a radio-frequency (RF) discharge of the oxygen inside the deposition chamber). The optical analysis proved that the refractive index of the films is higher than 3 and that their optical bandgap is around 1eV, recommending them for infrared applications.

  4. Study on absorbance and laser damage threshold of HfO2 films prepared by ion-assisted reaction deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dawei Zhang(张大伟); Shuhai Fan(范树海); Weidong Gao(高卫东); Hongbo He(贺洪波); Yingjian Wang(王英剑); Jianda Shao(邵建达); Zhengxiu Fan(范正修); Haojie Sun(孙浩杰)

    2004-01-01

    Using a new kind of EH1000 ion source, hafnium dioxide (HfO2) films are deposited with different deposition techniques and different conditions. The absorbance and the laser damage threshold of these films have been measured and studied. By comparing these characteristics, one can conclude that under right conditions, such as high partial pressure of oxygen and right kind of ion source, the ion-assisted reaction deposition can prepare HfO2 films with higher laser induced damage threshold.

  5. Influence of laser pulse frequency on the microstructure of aluminum nitride thin films synthesized by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonova, K.; Duta, L.; Szekeres, A.; Stan, G. E.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Anastasescu, M.; Stroescu, H.; Gartner, M.

    2017-02-01

    Aluminum Nitride (AlN) thin films were synthesized on Si (100) wafers at 450 °C by pulsed laser deposition. A polycrystalline AlN target was multipulsed irradiated in a nitrogen ambient, at different laser pulse repetition rate. Grazing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction and Atomic Force Microscopy analyses evidenced nanocrystallites with a hexagonal lattice in the amorphous AlN matrix. The thickness and optical constants of the layers were determined by infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry. The optical properties were studied by Fourier Transform Infrared reflectance spectroscopy in polarised oblique incidence radiation. Berreman effect was observed around the longitudinal phonon modes of the crystalline AlN component. Angular dependence of the A1LO mode frequency was analysed and connected to the orientation of the particles' optical axis to the substrate surface normal. The role of the laser pulse frequency on the layers' properties is discussed on this basis.

  6. Substrate dependent structural and magnetic properties of pulsed laser deposited Fe3O4 thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Rajendra N; Kaur, Davinder; Pandey, Ashish K

    2010-12-01

    Nanocrystalline iron oxide thin films have been deposited on various substrates such as quartz, MgO(100), and Si(100) by pulsed laser deposition technique using excimer KrF laser (248 nm). The orientations, crystallite size and lattice parameters were studied using X-ray diffraction. The XRD results show that the films deposited on MgO and Si substrates are highly oriented and show only (400) and (311) reflections respectively. On the other hand, the orientation of the films deposited on quarts substrate changed from (311) to (400) with an increase in the substrate temperature from 400 degrees C to 600 degrees C, indicating thereby that the film growth direction is highly affected with nature of substrate and substrate temperature. The surface morphology of the deposited films was studied using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and spherical ball like regular features of nanometer size grains were obtained. The magnetic properties were studied by Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometer in the magnetic field +/- 6 Tesla. The magnetic field dependent magnetization (M-H) curves of all the Fe3O4 thin films measured at 5 K and 300 K show the ferrimagnetic nature. The electrochemical sensing of dopamine studied for these films shows that the film deposited on MgO substrate can be used as a sensing electrode.

  7. Eggshell- and fur-like microstructures of yttrium silicate film prepared by laser chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Akihiko, E-mail: itonium@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577, Miyagi (Japan); Endo, Jun; Kimura, Teiichi; Goto, Takashi [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577, Miyagi (Japan)

    2011-01-01

    Yttrium silicate (Y-Si-O) films with eggshell- and fur-like microstructures were prepared by laser chemical vapor deposition using a Nd:YAG laser, and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and yttrium dipivaloylmethane (Y(dpm){sub 3}) precursors. Amorphous Y-Si-O films were prepared at deposition temperature below 1200 K. The crystalline Y-Si-O films with mixtures of Y{sub 4.67}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 3}O and {alpha}-Y{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} phases were obtained at deposition temperature above 1200 K. y-Y{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} and X1-Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} minor phases were also formed at a higher deposition temperature. At deposition temperature ranging between 1285 and 1355 K, a dome-like structure covered with fine fur-like projections was formed under a total pressure of 3.5 kPa, whereas an eggshell-like structure 200-300 {mu}m in diameter and 10-20 {mu}m in shell thickness was formed at 7.5 kPa. The deposition rate for the Y-Si-O films with fur- and eggshell-like microstructures reached 300 and 1000 {mu}m h{sup -1}, respectively.

  8. Fabrication of selective solar absorbers using pulsed laser deposition

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Yalisi, B

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available , stainless steel to silicon 600 0.4 0.6 Po w er de n sit y (W /m 2 µ m ) Id ea l a bs o rb er re fle ct an ce Blackbody radiation 1000 1200 1400 1000 1200 1400 wafers. 200 400 0.2 Po w er de n sit y (W /m... and is called the Rayleigh range, the distance at which the laser beam has increased to twice the beam waist diameter and is the beam quality. is the wavelength of the KrF  R λ pi 2 2 M w z oR = ow 2M λ distance of the target from the lens...

  9. Jump electroconductivity in the laser deposited nanoclustered structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipov, A.; Shagurina, A.; Osipov, A.; Istratov, A.; Skryabin, I.; Arakelian, S.

    2017-01-01

    The quantum states verification in cluster semiconductor/metallic structures by jump/tunneling electroconductivity and possible mechanisms for their implementation are considered in experiment and theory. By our laser ablation technique we have nanostructurized the films for which the ability to control the change in their electrical properties does exist by variation of the topology for the system. The granular conductivity specificity has been under study. The current-voltage characteristics behavior has been measured for a nanocluster bimetallic film (Au+Ag), and the experiments for multilayer bimetal thin films of the different composition have been carried out. Two associated mechanisms for electroconductivity occur in the case, i.e. tunnel transition for electrons and electron activation in the frames of the shell model for a cluster system, in dependence on the nanostructure topology.

  10. Applications of ultra-short pulsed laser ablation: thin films deposition and fs/ns dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teghil, R; De Bonis, A; Galasso, A [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita della Basilicata, Via N. Sauro 85, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Santagata, A; Albano, G; Villani, P; Spera, D; Parisi, G P [CNR-IMIP, Unita di Potenza, Via S. Loja, 85050 Tito Scalo (Italy)], E-mail: roberto.teghil@unibas.it

    2008-10-15

    In this paper, we report a survey of two of the large number of possible practical applications of the laser ablation performed by an ultra-short pulse laser, namely pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and fs/ns dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS). These applications differ from those using just longer pulsed lasers as a consequence of the distinctive characteristics of the plasma produced by ultra-short laser beams. The most important feature of this plasma is the large presence of particles with nanometric size which plays a fundamental role in both applications.

  11. Structural and Magnetic Properties of Mn doped ZnO Thin Film Deposited by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Baras, Abdulaziz

    2011-07-01

    Diluted magnetic oxide (DMO) research is a growing field of interdisciplinary study like spintronic devices and medical imaging. A definite agreement among researchers concerning the origin of ferromagnetism in DMO has yet to be reached. This thesis presents a study on the structural and magnetic properties of DMO thin films. It attempts to contribute to the understanding of ferromagnetism (FM) origin in DMO. Pure ZnO and Mn doped ZnO thin films have been deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) using different deposition conditions. This was conducted in order to correlate the change between structural and magnetic properties. Structural properties of the films were characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) was used to investigate the magnetic properties of these films. The structural characterizations showed that the quality of pure ZnO and Mn doped ZnO films increased as oxygen pressure (PO) increased during deposition. All samples were insulators. In Mn doped films, Mn concentration decreased as PO increased. The Mn doped ZnO samples were deposited at 600˚C and oxygen pressure from 50-500mTorr. All Mn doped films displayed room temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM). However, at 5 K a superparamagnetic (SPM) behavior was observed in these samples. This result was accounted for by the supposition that there were secondary phase(s) causing the superparamagnetic behavior. Our findings hope to strengthen existing research on DMO origins and suggest that secondary phases are the core components that suppress the ferromagnetism. Although RTFM and SPM at low temperature has been observed in other systems (e.g., Co doped ZnO), we are the first to report this behavior in Mn doped ZnO. Future research might extend the characterization and exploration of ferromagnetism in this system.

  12. Laser deposition and direct-writing of thermoelectric misfit cobaltite thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jikun; Palla-Papavlu, Alexandra; Li, Yulong; Chen, Lidong; Shi, Xun; Döbeli, Max; Stender, Dieter; Populoh, Sascha; Xie, Wenjie; Weidenkaff, Anke; Schneider, Christof W.; Wokaun, Alexander; Lippert, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    A two-step process combining pulsed laser deposition of calcium cobaltite thin films and a subsequent laser induced forward transfer as micro-pixel is demonstrated as a direct writing approach of micro-scale thin film structures for potential applications in thermoelectric micro-devices. To achieve the desired thermo-electric properties of the cobaltite thin film, the laser induced plasma properties have been characterized utilizing plasma mass spectrometry establishing a direct correlation to the corresponding film composition and structure. The introduction of a platinum sacrificial layer when growing the oxide thin film enables a damage-free laser transfer of calcium cobaltite thereby preserving the film composition and crystallinity as well as the shape integrity of the as-transferred pixels. The demonstrated direct writing approach simplifies the fabrication of micro-devices and provides a large degree of flexibility in designing and fabricating fully functional thermoelectric micro-devices.

  13. Development of 100W class blue direct diode laser coating system for laser metal deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashino, R.; Tsukamoto, M.; Sato, Y.; Abe, N.; Asano, K.; Funada, Y.

    2017-02-01

    Laser cladding technique is widely used for industrial application such as oil, energy industry, and aircraft and so on because it is able to repair and to form a near net shape. This process have been employed infrared lasers with wavelength of 0.8-10.6μm since output power of these lasers have over 1000W. Metal processing efficiency was, however, low in these wavelength, because the absorption was low. Thus, we developed the laser cladding system with blue direct diode laser at the wavelength of 445nm. 6 blue diode lasers was combined on the focusing spot to reach the output power of 100W by a lens, which one blue diode laser module was maximum output power of 20W. By using this laser cladding system, a pure copper film coating on a SUS304 stainless steel plate was demonstrated from a copper powder. As the result, the copper layer was formed on SUS304 stainless steel plate at the width of 322μm and thickness of 534μm was formed on the substrate.

  14. Evolution of energy deposition during glass cutting with pulsed femtosecond laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalupka, C.; Großmann, D.; Reininghaus, M.

    2017-05-01

    We report on investigations of the energy deposition in the volume of thin glass during an ablation cutting process with pulsed femtosecond laser radiation by time-resolved pump-probe shadowgraphy. For a single laser pulse, the temporal evolution of the transient electronic excitation of the glass volume is imaged up to 10 ps after initial excitation. For an increasing number of laser pulses, the spatial excitation of the glass volume significantly changes compared to single pulse irradiation. Sharp spikes are observed, which reduce the transmission of the illuminating probe pulse. This indicates local maxima of the absorption and, therefore, energy deposition of the pump pulse energy in the glass volume. Furthermore, for an increasing number of pulses, different shapes of the surface ablation crater are observed. To study the correlation between the shape of the surface ablation crater and the energy deposition in the glass volume, simulations of the spatial intensity distribution of the pump pulse are executed by means of linear beam propagation method. We show that the transient excitation spikes observed by pump-probe shadowgraphy can be explained by refraction and diffraction of the laser radiation at the surface ablation crater. Our results provide an experimental validation for the physical reason of an ablation stop for an ablation cutting process. Moreover, the simulations allow for the prediction of damage inside the glass volume.

  15. Plasma and Laser-Enhanced Deposition of Powders and Thin Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Moses

    The objective of this thesis has been the development of novel plasma and laser based techniques for the deposition and characterization of thin films and nano-scale powders. The different energy sources utilized for excitation and break -down of reactive species prior to deposition include an RF plasma discharge, an excimer laser and a CO _2 laser. Nanometer-scale (10-20 nm) powders and thin films of aluminum nitride (AlN) have been successfully deposited in a glow discharge by reacting trimethylaluminum and ammonia. Macroquantities (~800 mg/hr) of powder have been collected at the centers of two vortices around which the reactant gases swirl. Powders of AlN have large surface areas (85 m^2/g) and are free from oxygen contamination. Diamond-like-carbon (DLC) films have been deposited from ternary mixtures of butadiene, argon and hydrogen. DLC films have been etched in O _2 and CF_4/O _2 plasmas. The etching behavior was correlated with the deposition feed gas composition by combining the etch rate, bias voltage during deposition and the deposition rate into a new non-dimensional number. Two new processes for depositing copper films have been developed. The first technique involves the hydrogen plasma reduction of copper formate films and the second technique involves the reactive excimer laser ablation of copper formate. Particle forming plasmas have been characterized by measuring the light scattering intensity during the deposition of silicon nitride from silane/ammonia plasmas. Both spatial variations and transients during the plasma start -up and shut-off steps have been measured. The ultraviolet (vacuum ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet) reflectance characteristics of AlN, DLC and SiC thin films has been measured. AlN and SiC films exhibit a relatively high (~20-40%) reflectance in the different regions of the ultraviolet spectrum. An improved algorithm has been developed for estimating thin film parameters such as thickness, refractive index, band-gap, and

  16. Deposition of Y thin films by nanosecond UV pulsed laser ablation for photocathode application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorusso, A. [Università del Salento, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi”, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare-Lecce, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Anni, M. [Università del Salento, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi”, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Caricato, A.P. [Università del Salento, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi”, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare-Lecce, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Gontad, F., E-mail: francisco.gontad@le.infn.it [Università del Salento, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi”, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare-Lecce, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Perulli, A. [Università del Salento, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi”, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Taurino, A. [National Research Council, Institute for Microelectronics & Microsystems, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Perrone, A. [Università del Salento, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi”, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare-Lecce, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Chiadroni, E. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, 00044 Frascati (Italy)

    2016-03-31

    In this work, yttrium (Y) thin films have been deposited on Si (100) substrates by the pulsed laser deposition technique. Ex-situ morphological, structural and optical characterisations of such films have been performed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, atomic force microscopy and ellipsometry. Polycrystalline films with a thickness of 1.2 μm, homogenous with a root mean square roughness of about 2 nm, were obtained by optimised laser irradiation conditions. Despite the relatively high thickness, the films resulted very adherent to the substrates. The high quality of such thin films is important to the synthesis of metallic photocathodes based on Y thin film, which could be used as electron sources of high photoemission performance in radio-frequency guns. - Highlights: • Pulsed laser deposition of Yttrium thin films is investigated. • 1.2 μm thick films were deposited with very low RMS roughness. • The Y thin films were very adherent to the Si substrate • Optical characterisation showed a very high absorption coefficient for the films.

  17. Fluence dependent electrical conductivity in aluminium thin films grown by infrared pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebollar, Esther; Martínez-Tong, Daniel E.; Sanz, Mikel; Oujja, Mohamed; Marco, José F.; Ezquerra, Tiberio A.; Castillejo, Marta

    2016-11-01

    We studied the effect of laser fluence on the morphology, composition, structure and electric conductivity of deposits generated by pulsed laser ablation of a metallic aluminium target in vacuum using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm, 15 ns). Upon irradiation for one hour at a repetition rate of 10 Hz, a smooth layer of several tens of nanometres, as revealed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) was deposited on glass. Surface chemical composition was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and to study the conductivity of deposits both I-V curves and conductive-AFM measurements were performed. Irradiation at fluences around 2.7 J/cm2 resulted in deposition of amorphous aluminium oxide films. Differently, at higher fluences above 7 J/cm2, the films are constituted by metallic aluminium. Optical emission spectroscopy revealed that highly ionized species are more abundant in the ablation plumes generated at higher fluences. The results demonstrate the possibility to control by PLD the metal or dielectric character of the films.

  18. Synthesis of functionally graded bioactive glass-apatite multistructures on Ti substrates by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaskovic, D.; Jokic, B.; Socol, G.; Popescu, A.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Petrovic, R.; Janackovic, Dj.

    2007-12-01

    Functionally graded glass-apatite multistructures were synthesized by pulsed laser deposition on Ti substrates. We used sintered targets of hydroxyapatite Ca 10(PO 4) 6(OH) 2, or bioglasses in the system SiO 2-Na 2O-K 2O-CaO-MgO-P 2O 5 with SiO 2 content of either 57 wt.% (6P57) or 61 wt.% (6P61). A UV KrF* ( λ = 248 nm, τ > 7 ns) excimer laser source was used for the multipulse laser ablation of the targets. The hydroxyapatite thin films were obtained in H 2O vapors, while the bioglass layers were deposited in O 2. Thin films of 6P61 were deposited in direct contact with Ti, because Ti and this glass have similar thermal expansion behaviors, which ensure good bioglass adhesion to the substrate. This glass, however, is not bioactive, so yet more depositions of 6P57 bioglass and/or hydroxyapatite thin films were performed. All structures with hydroxyapatite overcoating were post-treated in a flux of water vapors. The obtained multistructures were characterized by various techniques. X-ray investigations of the coatings found small amounts of crystalline hydroxyapatite in the outer layers. The scanning electron microscopy analyses revealed homogeneous coatings with good adhesion to the Ti substrate. Our studies showed that the multistructures we had obtained were compatible with further use in biomimetic metallic implants with glass-apatite coating applications.

  19. Electrochemical Response of Platinum Ultrathin Layer Formed by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Ito

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrathin layer of platinum (ULPt was deposited on glassy carbon (GC substrate by using pulsed laser deposition (PLD method, and electrochemical properties of the ULPt were discussed. The deposition was simply performed at room temperature with short deposition time. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy images showed the flat surface of the ULPt. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS characterized the ULPt in the Pt(0 state, and biding energy of ULPt was positively shifted. These results indicated that nanostructure of Pt thin layer was formed. The electrochemical activity of the prepared ULPt on GC substrate was superior to a bulk Pt electrode regarding the potential and the magnitude of current on oxidizing hydrogen peroxide. This fast and easily prepared low-cost electrode had the potential to replace a conventional bulk metal electrode.

  20. Optimizing coverage of metal oxide nanoparticle prepared by pulsed laser deposition on nonenzymatic glucose detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Satoru; Ito, Takeshi; Hirabayashi, Yasuo; Ozawa, Takeshi; Okuda, Tetsuya; Motoizumi, Yu; Hirai, Kiyohito; Naganuma, Yasuhiro; Soga, Masayasu; Yoshimoto, Mamoru; Suzuki, Koji

    2011-04-15

    Metal oxide nanoparticles prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) were applied to nonenzymatic glucose detection. NiO nanoparticles with size of 3 nm were deposited on glassy carbon (GC) and silicon substrates at room temperature in an oxygen atmosphere. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) image showed nanoparticles with the size of 3 nm uniformly scattered on the Si(001) substrate. Unlike co-sputtering nanoparticle and carbon simultaneously, the PLD method can easily control the surface coverage of nanoparticles on the surface of substrate by deposition time. Cyclic voltammetry was performed on the samples deposited on the GC substrates for electrochemical detection of glucose. The differences between peak currents with and without glucose was used to optimize the coverage of nanoparticles on carbon electrode. The results indicated that optimal coverage of nanoparticles on carbon electrode.

  1. Nanostructured Diamond-Like Carbon Films Grown by Off-Axis Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Shan Yap

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured diamond-like carbon (DLC films instead of the ultrasmooth film were obtained by pulsed laser ablation of pyrolytic graphite. Deposition was performed at room temperature in vacuum with substrates placed at off-axis position. The configuration utilized high density plasma plume arriving at low effective angle for the formation of nanostructured DLC. Nanostructures with maximum size of 50 nm were deposited as compared to the ultrasmooth DLC films obtained in a conventional deposition. The Raman spectra of the films confirmed that the films were diamond-like/amorphous in nature. Although grown at an angle, ion energy of >35 eV was obtained at the off-axis position. This was proposed to be responsible for subplantation growth of sp3 hybridized carbon. The condensation of energetic clusters and oblique angle deposition correspondingly gave rise to the formation of nanostructured DLC in this study.

  2. Study of deposition parameters for the fabrication of ZnO thin films using femtosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashmi, Jaweria Zartaj; Siraj, Khurram; Latif, Anwar; Murray, Mathew; Jose, Gin

    2016-08-01

    Femtosecond (fs) pulsed laser deposition (fs-PLD) of ZnO thin film on borosilicate glass substrates is reported in this work. The effect of important fs-PLD parameters such as target-substrate distance, laser pulse energy and substrate temperature on structure, morphology, optical transparency and luminescence of as-deposited films is discussed. XRD analysis reveals that all the films grown using the laser energy range 120-230 μJ are polycrystalline when they are deposited at room temperature in a ~10-5 Torr vacuum. Introducing 0.7 mTorr oxygen pressure, the films show preferred c-axis growth and transform into a single-crystal-like film when the substrate temperature is increased to 100 °C. The scanning electron micrographs show the presence of small nano-size grains at 25 °C, which grow in size to the regular hexagonal shape particles at 100 °C. Optical transmission of the ZnO film is found to increase with an increase in crystal quality. Maximum transmittance of 95 % in the wavelength range 400-1400 nm is achieved for films deposited at 100 °C employing a laser pulse energy of 180 μJ. The luminescence spectra show a strong UV emission band peaked at 377 nm close to the ZnO band gap. The shallow donor defects increase at higher pulse energies and higher substrate temperatures, which give rise to violet-blue luminescence. The results indicate that nano-crystalline ZnO thin films with high crystalline quality and optical transparency can be fabricated by using pulses from fs lasers.

  3. Fluence dependent electrical conductivity in aluminium thin films grown by infrared pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebollar, Esther, E-mail: e.rebollar@csic.es [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, IQFR-CSIC, Serrano 19, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Martínez-Tong, Daniel E. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Sanz, Mikel; Oujja, Mohamed; Marco, José F. [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, IQFR-CSIC, Serrano 19, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Ezquerra, Tiberio A. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Castillejo, Marta [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, IQFR-CSIC, Serrano 19, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • IR pulsed laser ablation of aluminium gives rise to smooth layers of several tens of nanometers. • Irradiation at fluences around 2.7 J/cm{sup 2} and above 7 J/cm{sup 2} resulted in deposition of amorphous aluminium oxide films and metallic aluminium films respectively. • Highly ionized species are more abundant in the ablation plumes generated at higher fluences. • It is possible to control by PLD the metal or dielectric character of the films. - Abstract: We studied the effect of laser fluence on the morphology, composition, structure and electric conductivity of deposits generated by pulsed laser ablation of a metallic aluminium target in vacuum using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm, 15 ns). Upon irradiation for one hour at a repetition rate of 10 Hz, a smooth layer of several tens of nanometres, as revealed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) was deposited on glass. Surface chemical composition was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and to study the conductivity of deposits both I–V curves and conductive-AFM measurements were performed. Irradiation at fluences around 2.7 J/cm{sup 2} resulted in deposition of amorphous aluminium oxide films. Differently, at higher fluences above 7 J/cm{sup 2}, the films are constituted by metallic aluminium. Optical emission spectroscopy revealed that highly ionized species are more abundant in the ablation plumes generated at higher fluences. The results demonstrate the possibility to control by PLD the metal or dielectric character of the films.

  4. Role of laser pulse duration and gas pressure in deposition of AlN thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyorgy, Eniko; Ristoscu, Carmen; Mihailescu, I. N.; Klini, Argyro; Vainos, N.; Fotakis, C.; Ghica, C.; Schmerber, G.; Faerber, J.

    2001-07-01

    We investigated the relative merits and limits of pulsed laser deposition from AlN targets in vacuum and low-pressure nitrogen in obtaining stoichiometric and crystalline aluminum nitride thin films. We used two UV excimer laser sources ({lambda}=248 nm): a nanosecond system ({tau}{sub FWHM}=30 ns) and, a subpicosecond ({tau}{sub FWHM}=450 fs) system. The obtained structures were characterized by x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy in cross section, selected area electron diffraction, and profilometry. We demonstrated that the best results are obtained with the sub-ps laser source in vacuum and in low pressure nitrogen when the AlN thin films are very pure, crystalline, clearly exhibiting a tendency to epitaxy. Metallic Al is present in the films deposited with the ns laser source. We believe this is an effect of the gradual decomposition of AlN inside the crater on the target surface under multipulse laser irradiation. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  5. Structure and Morphology Effects on the Optical Properties of Bimetallic Nanoparticle Films Laser Deposited on a Glass Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Kucherik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Moving nanosecond laser system is used for laser-assisted thermodiffusion deposition of metallic nanoparticles from water-based colloidal solutions. The results obtained for both gold and silver nanoparticles show that film morphology strongly depends on laser scanning speed and the number of passages. We show, furthermore, the possibility of producing bimetallic Au:Ag thin films by laser irradiation of the mixed solutions. As a result of several laser scans, granular nanometric films are found to grow with a well-controlled composition, thickness, and morphology. By changing laser scanning parameters, film morphology can be varied from island structures to quasi-periodic arrays. The optical properties of the deposited structures are found to depend on the film composition, thickness, and mean separation between the particles. The transparency spectra of the deposited films are shown to be defined by their morphology.

  6. Porous nanostructured ZnO films deposited by picosecond laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sima, Cornelia [University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, 405 Atomistilor, P.O. Box MG-11, 077125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Laser Department, 409 Atomistilor, P.O. Box MG-36, 077125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Grigoriu, Constantin, E-mail: grigoriu@ifin.nipne.ro [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Laser Department, 409 Atomistilor, P.O. Box MG-36, 077125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Besleaga, Cristina; Mitran, Tudor; Ion, Lucian; Antohe, Stefan [University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, 405 Atomistilor, P.O. Box MG-11, 077125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

    2012-08-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We deposite porous nanostructured ZnO films by picoseconds laser ablation (PLA). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine changes of the films structure on the experimental parameter deposition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrate PLA capability to produce ZnO nanostructured films free of particulates. - Abstract: Porous nanostructured polycrystalline ZnO films, free of large particulates, were deposited by picosecond laser ablation. Using a Zn target, zinc oxide films were deposited on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates using a picosecond Nd:YVO{sub 4} laser (8 ps, 50 kHz, 532 nm, 0.17 J/cm{sup 2}) in an oxygen atmosphere at room temperature (RT). The morpho-structural characteristics of ZnO films deposited at different oxygen pressures (150-900 mTorr) and gas flow rates (0.25 and 10 sccm) were studied. The post-deposition influence of annealing (250-550 Degree-Sign C) in oxygen on the film characteristics was also investigated. At RT, a mixture of Zn and ZnO formed. At substrate temperatures above 350 Degree-Sign C, the films were completely oxidized, containing a ZnO wurtzite phase with crystallite sizes of 12.2-40.1 nm. At pressures of up to 450 mTorr, the porous films consisted of well-distinguished primary nanoparticles with average sizes of 45-58 nm, while at higher pressures, larger clusters (3.1-14.7 {mu}m) were dominant, leading to thicker films; higher flow rates favored clustering.

  7. Microstructural characterization and chemical compatibility of pulsed laser deposited yttria coatings on high density graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sure, Jagadeesh [Corrosion Science and Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam — 603 102 (India); Mishra, Maneesha [Physical Metallurgy Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam-603 102 (India); Tarini, M. [SRM University, Kattankulathur-603 203 (India); Shankar, A. Ravi; Krishna, Nanda Gopala [Corrosion Science and Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam — 603 102 (India); Kuppusami, P. [Physical Metallurgy Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam-603 102 (India); Mallika, C. [Corrosion Science and Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam — 603 102 (India); Mudali, U. Kamachi, E-mail: kamachi@igcar.gov.in [Corrosion Science and Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam — 603 102 (India)

    2013-10-01

    Yttria coatings were deposited on high density (HD) graphite substrate by pulsed laser deposition method and subsequently annealing in vacuum at 1373 K was carried out to evaluate the thermal stability of the coatings. Yttria deposited on HD graphite samples were exposed to molten LiCl–KCl salt at 873 K for 3 h to evaluate the corrosion behavior of the coating for the purpose of pyrochemical reprocessing applications. The microstructure and the corrosion behavior of the yttria coating deposited on HD graphite in molten LiCl–KCl salt were evaluated by several characterization techniques. X-ray diffraction and Laser Raman patterns confirmed the presence of cubic phase of yttria in the coating. The surface morphology of yttria coating on HD graphite examined by scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscopy revealed the agglomeration of oxide particles and formation of clusters. After annealing at 1373 K, no appreciable grain growth of yttria particles could be observed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis was carried out for elemental analysis before and after chemical compatibility test of the coated samples in molten LiCl–KCl salt to identify the corrosive elements present on the yttria coatings. The chemical compatibility and thermal stability of the yttria coating on HD graphite in molten LiCl–KCl salt medium have been established. - Highlights: • Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating was deposited on graphite by pulsed laser deposition method. • Chemical compatibility of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating in LiCl–KCl salt at 873 K was studied. • Gibbs free energy change was positive for Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} reaction with Cl{sub 2}, U and UCl{sub 3}. • Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating exhibited better corrosion performance in molten LiCl–KCl salt.

  8. Orientation of hyperfine magnetic fields of {alpha}-iron films produced by laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuike, Mamoru, E-mail: yyasu@rs.kagu.tus.ac.jp; Usui, Ryo; Yamada, Yasuhiro [Tokyo University of Science (Japan); Kobayashi, Yoshio [RIKEN (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Iron films were produced by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of iron in Ar gas and Moessbauer spectra of these films were obtained at room temperature. The orientation of the hyperfine magnetic field was found to vary depending on the pressure of the Ar gas. Iron films produced at low Ar pressures exhibited magnetic fields parallel to the substrate surface. The magnetic field became increasingly perpendicular to the substrate with increasing Ar pressure. Collisions with Ar gas molecules reduced the translational energies of laser-evaporated iron atoms and thus the orientation of crystals formed on the substrate varied depending on the Ar pressure.

  9. Pulsed laser deposition of hydroxyapatite on titanium substrate with titania interlayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, P; Muraleedharan, C V; Komath, Manoj; Varma, Harikrishna

    2011-03-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) has been used to deposit hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramic over titanium substrate with an interlayer of titania. PLD has been identified as a potential candidate for bioceramic coatings over metallic substrates to be used as orthopedic and dental implants because of better process control and preservation of phase identity of the coating component. However, direct deposition of hydroxyapatite on titanium at elevated temperature results in the formation of natural oxide layer along with some perovskites like calcium titanate at the interface. This leads to easy debonding of ceramic layer from the metal and thereby affecting the adhesion strength. In the present study, adherent and stable HA coating over Ti6Al4V was achieved with the help of an interlayer of titania. The interlayer was made to a submicron level and HA was deposited consecutively to a thickness of around one micron by exposing to laser ablation at a substrate temperature of 400°C. The deposited phase was identified to be phase pure HA by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and inductively coupled plasma spectrometry. The mechanical behavior of coating evaluated by scratch test indicates that the adhesion strength of HA coating was improved with the presence of titania interlayer.

  10. Bioactive glass and hydroxyapatite thin films obtained by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyorgy, E.; Grigorescu, S.; Socol, G.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Janackovic, D.; Dindune, A.; Kanepe, Z.; Palcevskis, E.; Zdrentu, E. L.; Petrescu, S. M.

    2007-07-01

    Bioactive glass (BG), calcium hydroxyapatite (HA), and ZrO 2 doped HA thin films were grown by pulsed laser deposition on Ti substrates. An UV KrF * ( λ = 248 nm, τ ≥ 7 ns) excimer laser was used for the multi-pulse irradiation of the targets. The substrates were kept at room temperature or heated during the film deposition at values within the (400-550 °C) range. The depositions were performed in oxygen and water vapor atmospheres, at pressure values in the range (5-40 Pa). The HA coatings were heat post-treated for 6 h in a flux of hot water vapors at the same temperature as applied during deposition. The surface morphology, chemical composition, and crystalline quality of the obtained thin films were studied by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray diffractometry. The films were seeded for in vitro tests with Hek293 (human embryonic kidney) cells that revealed a good adherence on the deposited layers. Biocompatibility tests showed that cell growth was better on HA than on BG thin films.

  11. Laser deposition and deformation behavior of Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta alloys for orthopedic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, S; Banerjee, R

    2012-12-01

    Microstructure and mechanical properties of laser deposited complex quaternary Ti-34Nb-7Zr-7Ta (all wt%), an orthopedic load-bearing implant alloy, has been investigated in detail in both as-deposited as well as heat-treated (β-solutionized and quenched) conditions. The difference in stress-strain behavior of this alloy in the above conditions has been characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), orientation imaging microscopy (OIM™) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Compared to the sample in heat-treated condition, the as-deposited sample showed evidence of strong growth related texture. Again in the as-deposited post tensile-tested condition formation of a high density of shear bands, possibly arising from slip localization due to shearing of ω precipitates in the β matrix is observed. TEM investigations also show the presence of lenticular shaped deformation induced ω phase within the shear bands. In contrast, in case of the β-solutionized sample, twinning and the formation of stress-induced plates appears to be the primary mode of deformation. The change in deformation mechanism and thus the tensile property of this alloy could be attributed to the crystallographic texture along the growth direction as well as diffusion mediated isothermal ω precipitates, that cause an enrichment of Nb and Ta in the β matrix, during the laser-deposition process. This is no longer present after the solutionizing treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Bioactive glass and hydroxyapatite thin films obtained by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyorgy, E. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, P.O. Box MG 36, 77125 Bucharest (Romania) and Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Barcelona, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain)]. E-mail: egyorgy@icmab.es; Grigorescu, S. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, P.O. Box MG 36, 77125 Bucharest (Romania); Socol, G. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, P.O. Box MG 36, 77125 Bucharest (Romania); Mihailescu, I.N. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, P.O. Box MG 36, 77125 Bucharest (Romania); Janackovic, D. [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Dindune, A. [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry of the Riga Technical University (Latvia); Plasma and Ceramic Technologies Ltd. (PCT Ltd.) (Latvia); Kanepe, Z. [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry of the Riga Technical University (Latvia); Plasma and Ceramic Technologies Ltd. (PCT Ltd.) (Latvia); Palcevskis, E. [Plasma and Ceramic Technologies Ltd. (PCT Ltd.) (Latvia); Zdrentu, E.L. [Institute of Biochemistry, Splaiul Independentei 296, Bucharest (Romania); Petrescu, S.M. [Institute of Biochemistry, Splaiul Independentei 296, Bucharest (Romania)

    2007-07-31

    Bioactive glass (BG), calcium hydroxyapatite (HA), and ZrO{sub 2} doped HA thin films were grown by pulsed laser deposition on Ti substrates. An UV KrF{sup *} ({lambda} = 248 nm, {tau} {>=} 7 ns) excimer laser was used for the multi-pulse irradiation of the targets. The substrates were kept at room temperature or heated during the film deposition at values within the (400-550 deg. C) range. The depositions were performed in oxygen and water vapor atmospheres, at pressure values in the range (5-40 Pa). The HA coatings were heat post-treated for 6 h in a flux of hot water vapors at the same temperature as applied during deposition. The surface morphology, chemical composition, and crystalline quality of the obtained thin films were studied by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray diffractometry. The films were seeded for in vitro tests with Hek293 (human embryonic kidney) cells that revealed a good adherence on the deposited layers. Biocompatibility tests showed that cell growth was better on HA than on BG thin films.

  13. In vivo evaluation of titanium implants coated with bioactive glass by pulsed laser deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrajo, Jacinto P; Serra, Julia; González, Pío; León, Betty; Muñoz, Fernando M; López, M

    2007-12-01

    During the past years, different techniques, like chemical treatment, plasma spraying, sputtering, enamelling or sol-gel; and materials, like metals, hydroxylapatite, calcium phosphates, among others, have been applied in different combinations to improve the performance of prostheses. Among the techniques, Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) is very promising to produce coatings of bioactive glass on any metal alloy used as implant. In this work the biocompatibility of PLD coatings deposited on titanium substrates was examined by implantation in vivo. Different coating compositions were checked to find the most bioactive that was then applied on titanium and implanted into paravertebral muscle of rabbit.

  14. Quantitative TEM analysis of Al/Cu multilayer systems prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Haihua; Pryds, Nini; Schou, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    Thin films composed of alternating Al/Cu/Al layers were deposited on a (111) Si substrate using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The thicknesses of the film and the individual layers, and the detailed internal structure within the layers were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy...... for the formation of the first layer of nano-sized Al grains. The results demonstrate that the PLD technique is a powerful tool to produce nano-scale multilayered metal films with controllable thickness and grain sizes....

  15. Pulsed laser deposition of gadolinia doped ceria layers at moderate temperature – a seeding approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigo, Katarzyna Agnieszka; Heiroth, Sebastian; Pryds, Nini

    ), to the growth of dense, gas impermeable 10 mol% gadolinia-doped ceria (CGO10) solid electrolyte can be overcome by the seeding process. In order to evaluate the seed layer preparation, the effects of different thermal annealing treatments on the morphology, microstructure and surface roughness of ultrathin CGO...... the preparation of ultrathin seed layers in the first stage of the deposition process is often envisaged to control the growth and physical properties of the subsequent coating. This work suggests that the limitations of conventional pulsed laser deposition (PLD), performed at moderate temperature (400°C...

  16. Epitaxial growth of atomically flat gadolinia-doped ceria thin films by pulsed laser deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yunzhong; Pryds, Nini; Schou, Jørgen

    ), to the growth of dense, gas impermeable 10 mol% gadolinia-doped ceria (CGO10) solid electrolyte can be overcome by the seeding process. In order to evaluate the seed layer preparation, the effects of different thermal annealing treatments on the morphology, microstructure and surface roughness of ultrathin CGO...... the preparation of ultrathin seed layers in the first stage of the deposition process is often envisaged to control the growth and physical properties of the subsequent coating. This work suggests that the limitations of conventional pulsed laser deposition (PLD), performed at moderate temperature (400°C...

  17. Preparation and characterization of YBCO coating on metallic RABiT substrates by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonal, M. R.; Prajapat, C. L.; Igalwar, P. S.; Maji, B. C.; Singh, M. R.; Krishnan, M.

    2016-05-01

    Superconducting YBCO films are coated on metallic Rolling Assisted Bi-axially Textured Substrates (RABiTS) Ni-5wt % W (NiW) (002) substrate using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) system. Targets of YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) and buffer layers of Ceria and 8 mole % Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) of high density are synthesized. At each stage of deposition coatings are characterized by XRD. Transport studies show superconducting nature of YBCO only when two successive buffer layers of YSZ and CeO2 are used.

  18. Growth evolution of ZnO films deposited by pulsed laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasco, E.; Zaldo, C.; Vazquez, L. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: lvb@icmm.csic.es

    2001-07-16

    We study the surface morphology evolution of ZnO films grown by pulsed laser deposition. Atomic force microscopy measurements show the existence of two growth regimes. Initially, the growth morphology is determined by shadowing effects due to the angular spreading of the plume in the 0.1 mbar oxygen working pressure. For longer deposition times a stepped pyramid-like structure is developed, whose roughening and coarsening behaviours are in agreement with those expected for growth systems with step-edge barriers. (author). Letter-to-the-editor.

  19. Thin films of silver nanoparticles deposited in vacuum by pulsed laser ablation using a YAG:Nd laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, J.C., E-mail: alonso@servidor.unam.mx [Division de Ciencias Basicas e Ingenieria, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col Vicentina, Iztapalapa, 09340 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Diamant, R.; Castillo, P.; Acosta-Garcia, M.C.; Batina, N.; Haro-Poniatowski, E. [Division de Ciencias Basicas e Ingenieria, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col Vicentina, Iztapalapa, 09340 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-02-15

    We report the deposition of thin films of silver (Ag) nanoparticles by pulsed laser ablation in vacuum using the third line (355 nm) of a YAG:Nd laser. The nanostructure and/or morphology of the films was investigated as a function of the number of ablation pulses, by means of transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Our results show that films deposited with a small number of ablation pulses (500 or less), are not continuous, but formed of isolated nearly spherical Ag nanoparticles with diameters in the range from 1 nm to 8 nm. The effect of increasing the number of pulses by one order of magnitude (5000) is to increase the mean diameter of the globular nanoparticles and also the Ag areal density. Further increase of the number of pulses, up to 10,000, produces the formation of larger and anisotropic nanoparticles, and for 15,000 pulses, quasi-percolated Ag films are obtained. The presence of Ag nanoparticles in the films was also evidenced from the appearance of a strong optical absorption band associated with surface plasmon resonance. This band was widened and its peak shifted from 425 nm to 700 nm as the number of laser pulses was increased from 500 to 15,000.

  20. Enhancement of surface mechanical properties by using TiN[BCN/BN]{sub n}/c-BN multilayer system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, H. [Laboratorio de Recubrimientos Duros, CDT-ASTIN SENA, Cali (Colombia); Caicedo, J.C., E-mail: Jcesarca@calima.univalle.edu.co [Grupo de Peliculas Delgadas, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Amaya, C. [Grupo de Peliculas Delgadas, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Munoz-Saldana, J. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Unidad Queretaro, Mexico (Mexico); Yate, L.; Esteve, J. [Department de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain); Prieto, P. [Grupo de Peliculas Delgadas, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Centro de Excelencia en Nuevos Materiales, CENM, Cali (Colombia)

    2010-11-15

    The aim of this work is to improve the mechanical properties of AISI 4140 steel substrates by using a TiN[BCN/BN]{sub n}/c-BN multilayer system as a protective coating. TiN[BCN/BN]{sub n}/c-BN multilayered coatings via reactive r.f. magnetron sputtering technique were grown, systematically varying the length period ({Lambda}) and the number of bilayers (n) because one bilayer (n = 1) represents two different layers (t{sub BCN} + t{sub BN}), thus the total thickness of the coating and all other growth parameters were maintained constant. The coatings were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showing bands associated with h-BN bonds and c-BN stretching vibrations centered at 1400 cm{sup -1} and 1100 cm{sup -1}, respectively. Coating composition and multilayer modulation were studied via secondary ion mass spectroscopy. Atomic force microscopy analysis revealed a reduction in grain size and roughness when the bilayer number (n) increased and the bilayer period decreased. Finally, enhancement of mechanical properties was determined via nanoindentation measurements. The best behavior was obtained when the bilayer period ({Lambda}) was 80 nm (n = 25), yielding the relative highest hardness ({approx}30 GPa) and elastic modulus (230 GPa). The values for the hardness and elastic modulus are 1.5 and 1.7 times greater than the coating with n = 1, respectively. The enhancement effects in multilayered coatings could be attributed to different mechanisms for layer formation with nanometric thickness due to the Hall-Petch effect; because this effect, originally used to explain increased hardness with decreasing grain size in bulk polycrystalline metals, has also been used to explain hardness enhancements in multilayered coatings taking into account the thickness reduction at individual single layers that make up the multilayered system. The Hall-Petch model based on dislocation motion within layered and across layer interfaces has been successfully applied to

  1. Abrasive wear property of laser melting/deposited Ti2Ni/TiNi intermetallic alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A wear resistant intermetallic alloy consisting of TiNi primary dendrites and Ti2Ni matrix was fabricated by the laser melting deposition manufacturing process. Wear resistance of Ti2Ni/TiNi alloy was evaluated on an abrasive wear tester at room temperature under the different loads. The results show that the intermetallic alloy suffers more abrasive wear attack under low wear test load of 7, 13 and 25 N than high-chromium cast-iron. However, the intermetallic alloy exhibits better wear resistance under wear test load of 49 N. Abrasive wear of the laser melting deposition Ti2Ni/TiNi alloy is governed by micro-cutting and plowing.Pseudoelasticity of TiNi plays an active role in contributing to abrasive wear resistance.

  2. Ultrashort Pulsed Laser Ablation of Magnesium Diboride: Plasma Characterization and Thin Films Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela De Bonis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A MgB2 target has been ablated by Nd:glass laser with a pulse duration of 250 fs. The plasma produced by the laser-target interaction, showing two temporal separated emissions, has been characterized by time and space resolved optical emission spectroscopy and ICCD fast imaging. The films, deposited on silicon substrates and formed by the coalescence of particles with nanometric size, have been analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The first steps of the films growth have been studied by Transmission Electron Microscopy. The films deposition has been studied by varying the substrate temperature from 25 to 500°C and the best results have been obtained at room temperature.

  3. Physical characterization of Ge films on polyethylene obtained by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuffrida, L.; Torrisi, L.; Rosinski, M.; Caridi, F.; Cutroneo, M.

    2012-05-01

    A Nd:YAg laser, operating in fundamental wavelength at 1064 nm, is focused at an intensity of the order of 1010 W/cm2 to ablate a solid Ge target. A Laser Ion Source (LIS) system is employed to produce ion emission at high directionality, high current, high rate of production and high charge states. LIS is used to implant and/or to deposit Ge ions in polyethylene (UHMWPE). Mechanical (roughness, wetting ability and microhardness), optical (reflectivity and transmission) and electrical properties (resistivity) were investigated, in comparison to the pristine values, in order to reach understanding of the ion implantation/deposition effects as a function of the irradiation ion dose.

  4. Physical characterization of Ge films on polyethylene obtained by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giuffrida, L. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Torrisi, L. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Universita di Messina, Dipartimento di Fisica, Messina (Italy); Rosinski, M. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Caridi, F. [Universita di Messina, Facolta di Scienze MM.FF.NN., Messina (Italy); INFN-Sez. CT, Gr. Coll. di ME, Messina (Italy); Cutroneo, M. [Universita di Messina, Dipartimento di Fisica, Messina (Italy); INFN-Sez. CT, Gr. Coll. di ME, Messina (Italy)

    2012-05-15

    A Nd:YAg laser, operating in fundamental wavelength at 1064 nm, is focused at an intensity of the order of 10{sup 10} W/cm{sup 2} to ablate a solid Ge target. A Laser Ion Source (LIS) system is employed to produce ion emission at high directionality, high current, high rate of production and high charge states. LIS is used to implant and/or to deposit Ge ions in polyethylene (UHMWPE). Mechanical (roughness, wetting ability and microhardness), optical (reflectivity and transmission) and electrical properties (resistivity) were investigated, in comparison to the pristine values, in order to reach understanding of the ion implantation/deposition effects as a function of the irradiation ion dose. (orig.)

  5. Study of structural and optical properties of ZnO films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemlikchi, S., E-mail: lemlikchi_safo@yahoo.fr [Advanced Technology Development Centre, Cite 20 Aout 1956 BP 17 Baba Hassen, Algiers (Algeria); Abdelli-Messaci, S.; Lafane, S.; Kerdja, T. [Advanced Technology Development Centre, Cite 20 Aout 1956 BP 17 Baba Hassen, Algiers (Algeria); Guittoum, A.; Saad, M. [Nuclear Research Centre of Algiers, 2 Bd Frantz-Fanon, Algiers (Algeria)

    2010-07-01

    Wurtzite zinc oxides films (ZnO) were deposited on silicon (0 0 1) and corning glass substrates using the pulsed laser deposition technique. The laser fluence, target-substrate distance, substrate temperature of 300 deg. C were fixed while varying oxygen pressures from 2 to 500 Pa were used. It is observed that the structural properties of ZnO films depend strongly on the oxygen pressure and the substrate nature. The film crystallinity improves with decreasing oxygen pressure. At high oxygen pressure, the films are randomly oriented, whereas, at low oxygen pressures they are well oriented along [0 0 1] axis for Si substrates and along [1 0 3] axis for glass substrates. A honeycomb structure is obtained at low oxygen pressures, whereas microcrystalline structures were obtained at high oxygen pressures. The effect of oxygen pressure on film transparency, band gap E{sub g} and Urbach energies was investigated.

  6. Pulsed laser deposition of chromium-doped zinc selenide thin films for mid-infrared applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. E.; Camata, R. P.; Fedorov, V. V.; Mirov, S. B.

    2008-05-01

    We have grown Cr doped ZnSe thin films by pulsed laser deposition on GaAs, sapphire and Si substrates through KrF excimer laser ablation of hot-pressed targets containing appropriate stoichiometric mixtures of Zn, Se, and Cr species and hot-pressed ceramic targets made of ZnSe and CrSe powders in vacuum and in an He background environment (10-4 Torr). Deposited films were analyzed using X-ray diffraction to determine crystallinity and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence to confirm Cr incorporation into the films. Photoluminescence measurements on the films show intracenter Cr2+ emission in the technologically important 2 2.6 μm spectral range.

  7. Pulsed laser deposition of antimicrobial silver coating on Ormocer (registered) microneedles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gittard, S D; Narayan, R J; Jin, C; Monteiro-Riviere, N A [Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Ovsianikov, A; Chichkov, B N [Laser Zentrum Hannover, Hollerithallee 8, 30419 Hannover (Germany); Stafslien, S; Chisholm, B, E-mail: roger_narayan@msn.co [Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering, North Dakota State University, 1805 Research Park Drive, Fargo, ND 58102 (United States)

    2009-12-15

    One promising option for transdermal delivery of protein- and nucleic acid-based pharmacologic agents involves the use of microneedles. However, microneedle-generated pores may allow microorganisms to penetrate the stratum corneum layer of the epidermis and cause local or systemic infection. In this study, microneedles with antimicrobial functionality were fabricated using two-photon polymerization-micromolding and pulsed laser deposition. The antibacterial activity of the silver-coated organically modified ceramic (Ormocer (registered) ) microneedles was demonstrated using an agar diffusion assay. Human epidermal keratinocyte viability on the Ormocer (registered) surfaces coated with silver was similar to that on uncoated Ormocer (registered) surfaces. This study indicates that coating microneedles with silver thin films using pulsed laser deposition is a useful and novel approach for creating microneedles with antimicrobial functionality. (communication)

  8. Characterization of Environmental Stability of Pulsed Laser Deposited Oxide Ceramic Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ADAMS, THADM

    2004-03-02

    A systematic investigation of candidate hydrogen permeation materials applied to a substrate using Pulsed Laser Deposition has been performed. The investigation focused on application of leading permeation-resistant materials types (oxide, carbides, and metals) on a stainless steel substrate. and evaluation of the stability of the applied coatings. Type 304L stainless steel substrates were coated with aluminum oxide, chromium oxide, and aluminum. Characterization of the coating-substrate system adhesion was performed using scratch adhesion testing and microindentation. Coating stability and environmental susceptibility were evaluated for two conditions-air at 350 degrees Celsius and Ar-H2 at 350 degrees Celsius for up to 100 hours. Results from this study have shown the pulsed laser deposition process to be an extremely versatile technology that is capable of producing a sound coating/substrate system for a wide variety of coating materials.

  9. Resonant vibrational excitation of ethylene molecules in laser-assisted diamond deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, L. S.; Zhou, Y. S.; Wang, M. X.; Gao, Y.; Liu, L.; Silvain, J. F.; Lu, Y. F.

    2014-07-01

    The influence of resonant vibrational excitation of ethylene molecules in combustion chemical vapor deposition of diamond was investigated. Resonant vibrational excitation of the CH2-wagging mode (a type c fundamental band, υ7, at 949.3 cm-1) in ethylene molecules was achieved by using a wavelength-tunable CO2 laser with a matching wavelength at 10.532 µm. By comparing to laser irradiation at off-resonance wavelengths, an on-resonance vibrational excitation is more efficient in energy coupling, increasing flame temperatures, accelerating the combustion reactions, and promoting diamond deposition. An enhanced rate of 5.7 was achieved in terms of the diamond growth rate with an improved diamond quality index at a high flame temperature under a resonant excitation of the CH2-wagging mode. This study demonstrates that a resonant vibrational excitation is an effective route for coupling energy into the gas phase reactions and promoting the diamond synthesis process.

  10. Effect of deposition temperature on electron-beam evaporated polycrystalline silicon thin-film and crystallized by diode laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, J., E-mail: j.yun@unsw.edu.au; Varalmov, S.; Huang, J.; Green, M. A. [School of Photovoltaic and Renewable Energy Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); Kim, K. [School of Photovoltaic and Renewable Energy Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); Suntech R and D Australia, Botany, New South Wales 2019 (Australia)

    2014-06-16

    The effects of the deposition temperature on the microstructure, crystallographic orientation, and electrical properties of a 10-μm thick evaporated Si thin-film deposited on glass and crystallized using a diode laser, are investigated. The crystallization of the Si thin-film is initiated at a deposition temperature between 450 and 550 °C, and the predominant (110) orientation in the normal direction is found. Pole figure maps confirm that all films have a fiber texture and that it becomes stronger with increasing deposition temperature. Diode laser crystallization is performed, resulting in the formation of lateral grains along the laser scan direction. The laser power required to form lateral grains is higher in case of films deposited below 450 °C for all scan speeds. Pole figure maps show 75% occupancies of the (110) orientation in the normal direction when the laser crystallized film is deposited above 550 °C. A higher density of grain boundaries is obtained when the laser crystallized film is deposited below 450 °C, which limits the solar cell performance by n = 2 recombination, and a performance degradation is expected due to severe shunting.

  11. Structural and magnetic properties of Gd/Fe multilayers grown by pulsed laser deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kant, K. Mohan; Bahl, Christian Robert Haffenden; Pryds, Nini

    2010-01-01

    This work investigates the structural and the magnetic properties of Gd/Fe multilayered thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition onto Si (001) substrates at room temperature. he Fe layer thickness is varied from 70 to 150 nm and its effect on the structural and magnetic properties of Fe....../Gd/Fe sandwich multilayers has been explored. Gd films were found to change from amorphous to polycrystalline at a critical thickness of 20 nm....

  12. On the growth of gadolinia-doped ceria by pulsed laser deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryds, Nini; Rodrigo, Katarzyna Agnieszka; Linderoth, Søren

    2009-01-01

    gadolinia doped ceria (GDC), an electrolytematerial, likely to replace the traditional yttria-stabilised zirconia (YSZ) for low temperature applications. GDC films were grown on a single crystal Si by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The microstructure of the films as a function of growth time has been...... studied. We have found that the mean grain size increases with film thickness h as h2/5, in agreement with theoretical results....

  13. Numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in laser metal deposition by powder injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhiqiang

    Laser metal deposition is an additive manufacturing technique which allows quick fabrication of fully-dense metallic components directly from Computer Aided Design (CAD) solid models. A self-consistent three-dimensional model was developed for the laser metal deposition process by powder injection, which simulates heat transfer, phase changes, and fluid flow in the melt pool. The governing equations for solid, liquid and gas phases in the calculation domain have been formulated using the continuum model. The free surface in the melt pool has been tracked by the Volume of Fluid (VOF) method, while the VOF transport equation was solved using the Piecewise Linear Interface Calculation (PLIC) method. Surface tension was modeled by taking the Continuum Surface Force (CSF) model combined with a force-balance flow algorithm. Laser-powder interaction was modeled to account for the effects of laser power attenuation and powder temperature rise during the laser metal deposition process. The governing equations were discretized in the physical space using the finite volume method. The advection terms were approximated using the MUSCL flux limiter scheme. The fluid flow and energy equations were solved in a coupled manner. The incompressible flow equations were solved using a two-step projection method, which requires a solution of a Poisson equation for the pressure field. The discretized pressure Poisson equation was solved using the ICCG (Incomplete Cholesky Conjugate Gradient) solution technique. The energy equation was solved by an enthalpy-based method. Temperature-dependent thermal-physical material properties were considered in the numerical implementation. The numerical model was validated by comparing simulations with experimental measurements.

  14. Pulsed-laser deposition of vicinal and c-axis oriented high temperature superconducting thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Rössler, R

    2000-01-01

    respect to the temperature, oxygen pressure and laser fluence. (Re,Hg)Ba sub 2 Ca sub ( n-1)Cu sub n O sub x films are synthesized on (001) and vicinal SrTiO sub 3 substrates in a two step process employing pulsed-laser deposition of Hg-free precursor films and Hg-vapour annealing in a sealed quartz tube. The sealed quartz tube technique is described in detail and the thermodynamics and the phase formation are discussed. The influence of the Hg-vapour pressure and the annealing temperature on the film properties are investigated. The influence of Hg-vapour annealing on Bi sub 2 Sr sub 2 CaCu sub 2 O sub x films is described. YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub x films with thicknesses 20 to 480 nm are deposited on vicinal SrTiO sub 3 substrates (10 degrees tilt angle). Variation of the resistivities and changes in the film morphology depending on film thickness are described. The influence of post-annealing treatments on the film properties is discussed. Pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) of high temperature superconducting ...

  15. Nanoscale physical properties of polymer glasses formed by solvent-assisted laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Kimberly; Arnold, Craig; Priestley, Rodney

    2015-03-01

    High-energy, low-density nanostructured polymer glasses are formed via the solvent-assisted laser deposition technique MAPLE (Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation). During film deposition, micro- to nano-size polymer/solvent clusters are ejected via laser ablation from a frozen dilute polymer solution. During flight to the substrate under vacuum, the clusters experience rapid cooling and solvent stripping, forming polymer nanoglobules. Bulk polymer films are formed via the gradual assembly of these spherical-like nanostructured building blocks (i.e. nanoglobules). The MAPLE process thus enables investigation of the exceptional properties of glasses formed under extreme processing conditions. In the bulk state, we probe the effect of process parameters and chemical identity of the thermal behavior of a series of methacrylate polymers. We also employ multiple techniques to directly measure the properties of the polymer nanoglobules and connect the results to the global film properties. This talk will address nanoscale dilatometry via AFM, in which the volume of an individual polymer nanoglobule is tracked as it is heated through its glass transition, as well as Flash DSC analysis of the thermal properties of nanogram size MAPLE-deposited polymer glasses. We then discuss these findings in the context of the material's unconventional route to the glassy state.

  16. Laser Metal Deposition as Repair Technology for a Gas Turbine Burner Made of Inconel 718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrat, Torsten; Graf, Benjamin; Gumenyuk, Andrey; Rethmeier, Michael

    Maintenance, repair and overhaul of components are of increasing interest for parts of high complexity and expensive manufacturing costs. In this paper a production process for laser metal deposition is presented, and used to repair a gas turbine burner of Inconel 718. Different parameters for defined track geometries were determined to attain a near net shape deposition with consistent build-up rate for changing wall thicknesses over the manufacturing process. Spot diameter, powder feed rate, welding velocity and laser power were changed as main parameters for a different track size. An optimal overlap rate for a constant layer height was used to calculate the best track size for a fitting layer width similar to the part dimension. Deviations in width and height over the whole build-up process were detected and customized build-up strategies for the 3D sequences were designed. The results show the possibility of a near net shape repair by using different track geometries with laser metal deposition.

  17. Incorporation of gold into silicon by thin film deposition and pulsed laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrender, Jeffrey M.; Hudspeth, Quentin; Malladi, Girish; Efstathiadis, Harry; Mathews, Jay

    2016-12-01

    We report on the incorporation of gold into silicon at a peak concentration of 1.9 × 1020 at./cm3, four orders of magnitude above the equilibrium solubility limit, using pulsed laser melting of a thin film deposited on the silicon surface. We vary the film thickness and laser process parameters (fluence, number of shots) to quantify the range of concentrations that can be achieved. Our approach achieves gold concentrations comparable to those achieved with ion implantation followed by pulsed laser melting, in a layer with high crystalline quality. This approach offers an attractive alternative to ion implantation for forming high quality, high concentration layers of transition metals like gold in silicon.

  18. Laser-assisted nanomaterial deposition, nanomanufacturing, in situ monitoring and associated apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Samuel S; Grigoropoulos, Costas P; Hwang, David J; Minor, Andrew M

    2013-11-12

    Laser-assisted apparatus and methods for performing nanoscale material processing, including nanodeposition of materials, can be controlled very precisely to yield both simple and complex structures with sizes less than 100 nm. Optical or thermal energy in the near field of a photon (laser) pulse is used to fabricate submicron and nanometer structures on a substrate. A wide variety of laser material processing techniques can be adapted for use including, subtractive (e.g., ablation, machining or chemical etching), additive (e.g., chemical vapor deposition, selective self-assembly), and modification (e.g., phase transformation, doping) processes. Additionally, the apparatus can be integrated into imaging instruments, such as SEM and TEM, to allow for real-time imaging of the material processing.

  19. Optical Characterization of SERS Substrates Based on Porous Au Films Prepared by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Strelchuk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The SERS (surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy substrates based on nanocomposite porous films with gold nanoparticles (Au NPs arrays were formed using the method of the pulsed laser deposition from the back low-energy flux of erosion torch particles on the glass substrate fixed at the target plain. The dependencies of porosity, and morphology of the surface of the film regions located near and far from the torch axis on the laser ablation regime, laser pulses energy density, their number, and argon pressure in the vacuum chamber, were ascertained. The Au NPs arrays with the controllable extinction spectra caused by the local surface plasmon resonance were prepared. The possibility of the formation of SERS substrates for the detection of the Rhodamine 6G molecules with the concentration 10−10 Mol/L with the enhancement factor 4·107 was shown.

  20. IN SITU Deposition of Fe-TiC Nanocomposite on Steel by Laser Cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Mansour; Rahimipour, Mohammad Reza; Ganji, Mojdeh; Ganjali, Mansoreh; Gangali, Monireh

    The possibility of deposition of Fe-TiC nanocomposite on the surface of carbon steel substrate with the laser coating method had been investigated. Mechanical milling was used for the preparation of raw materials. The mixture of milled powders was used as a coating material on the substrate steel surface and a CO2 laser was used in continuous mode for coating. Microstructural studies were performed by scanning electron microscopy. Determinations of produced phases, crystallite size and mean strain have been done by X-ray diffraction. The hardness and wear resistance of coated samples were measured. The results showed that the in situ formation of Fe-TiC nanocomposite coating using laser method is possible. This coating has been successfully used to improve the hardness and wear resistance of the substrate so that the hardness increased by about six times. Coated iron and titanium carbide crystallite sizes were in the nanometer scale.

  1. Laser deposition of TiO2 nanoparticles on glass fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, J.; Shahidi, S.; Goba, M. M.

    2013-02-01

    In this research work light laser irradiation was used for deposition of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the surface of glass mat. For this purpose TiO2 nanoparticles were evenly applied on the surface of a glass fiber mat. The glass fiber mat containing the metals was then irradiated with the laser light beam (100 μs). The morphology of the fabrics was observed using a Scanning Electron Microscope. An X-ray fluorescence spectrum and energy dispersive X-ray were used for elemental analysis. Also mechanical properties and air permeability of the irradiated samples were analyzed and the results show that both tenacity and elongation of laser irradiated sample are reduced but the air permeability is improved after laser irradiation. The photocatalytic activities of TiO2 deposited glass fabrics were assessed by analyzing the decrease in concentration of the Orange II as a colorant after exposure to UV irradiation. The results clarify that the Orange II concentration decreases continuously, concomitant with the UV irradiation time up to 270 min.

  2. Rare Earth Doped Gallium Gadolinium Orthogallate Films Prepared by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lancok, J [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8, Czech Republic (Czech Republic); Novotny, M [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8, Czech Republic (Czech Republic); Garapon, C [LPCML, UMR 5620 CNRS-Universite Claude Bernard Lyon-I, 10 rue Andre Marie Ampere, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); JelInek, M [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8, Czech Republic (Czech Republic)

    2007-04-15

    The decomposition of Gd{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12} single crystal target induced by a KrF excimer laser pulse during the deposition process was observed. This phenomenon was studied ex situ by EDX analyse of ablated target and in situ by Optical Emission Spectroscopy of the laser plasma. The decomposition process depends mainly on the absorption coefficient of the target on the corresponding laser wavelength and oxygen partial pressure in the deposition chamber during laser ablation. Taking into account the differences between absorption coefficients of Pr:Gd{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12} and Yb:Gd{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12} targets the Pr:GdGaO{sub 3} and Yb:GdGaO{sub 3} thin films were successfully fabricated at different oxygen pressures of 1 Pa and 2.5 Pa, respectively. The structural properties of the fabricated films were studied by RBS and XRD.

  3. Amorphous carbon-silicon heterojunctions by pulsed Nd:YAG laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, Seong-Shan; Yow, Ho-Kwang [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, Cyberjaya, Selangor 63100 (Malaysia); Tou, Teck-Yong, E-mail: tytou@mmu.edu.m [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, Cyberjaya, Selangor 63100 (Malaysia)

    2009-07-31

    Amorphous carbon (a-C) films were deposited at 10{sup -4} Pa on n-Si (Si-111) and p-Si (Si-100) substrates using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fundamental, second- and third-harmonic outputs. These unhydrogenated and undoped a-C films were characterized by visible and UV Raman spectroscopy which indicated the presence of substantial amount of sp{sup 3} hybridized carbon network depending on the laser wavelength. The bulk resistivity in the Au/a-C/indium tin oxide structure varied between (10{sup 9}-10{sup 13}) {Omega} cm - the lowest resistivity was obtained for films deposited by the fundamental laser output at 1064 nm while the highest value was by the third-harmonic laser output at 355 nm. All the a-C/Si heterostructures exhibited a nonlinear current density-voltage characteristic. Under light illumination, by taking into consideration the fill factor of {approx} 0.2 for a-C/n-Si, the conversion efficiency at the highest photovoltage and photocurrent, at an illumination density of 0.175 mW/cm{sup 2} was estimated to be {approx} 0.28%.

  4. Pulsed laser deposition of YBCO films on ISD MgO buffered metal tapes

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, B; Koritala, R E; Fisher, B L; Markowitz, A R; Erck, R A; Baurceanu, R; Dorris, S E; Miller, D J; Balachandran, U

    2003-01-01

    Biaxially textured magnesium oxide (MgO) films deposited by inclined-substrate deposition (ISD) are desirable for rapid production of high-quality template layers for YBCO-coated conductors. High-quality YBCO films were grown on ISD MgO buffered metallic substrates by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Columnar grains with a roof-tile surface structure were observed in the ISD MgO films. X-ray pole figure analysis revealed that the (002) planes of the ISD MgO films are tilted at an angle from the substrate normal. A small full-width at half maximum (FWHM) of approx 9deg was observed in the phi-scan for ISD MgO films deposited at an inclination angle of 55deg . In-plane texture in the ISD MgO films developed in the first approx 0.5 mu m from the substrate surface, and then stabilized with further increases in film thickness. Yttria-stabilized zirconia and ceria buffer layers were deposited on the ISD MgO grown on metallic substrates prior to the deposition of YBCO by PLD. YBCO films with the c-axis parallel to the...

  5. Thermochromic VO{sub 2} on Zinnwaldite Mica by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathevula, L., E-mail: langu@tlabs.ac.za [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, PO Box 722, Western Cape (South Africa); Ngom, B.D.; Kotsedi, L.; Sechogela, P. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, PO Box 722, Western Cape (South Africa); Doyle, T.B. [Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, PO Box 722, Western Cape (South Africa); School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4001 (South Africa); Ghouti, M.; Maaza, M. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, PO Box 722, Western Cape (South Africa)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • Vanadium dioxide was successfully synthesized by pulsed laser deposition method on mica. • The morphology evolution within the samples is characterized by a change from isolated and less-percolating (0 1 1) VO{sub 2} crystallites to a percolating granular configuration. • Without any post annealing, the films exhibit a textured nature with a VO{sub 2} (0 1 1) preferred crystallographic orientation and an elevated thermal variation of the electric resistance ratio R{sub S}/R{sub M} through the SMT at T ≈ 68 °C of the order of 10{sup 4} and a narrow ∼7 °C hysteresis. - Abstract: VO{sub 2} thin films have been deposited by pulsed laser deposition on Zinnwaldite Mica substrates. The crystal structure, chemical composition, morphology were determined and the semiconductor/metal transition (SMT) properties of the deposited films were investigated. Without any post annealing, the films exhibit a textured nature with a VO{sub 2} (0 1 1) preferred crystallographic orientation and an elevated thermal variation of the electric resistance ratio R{sub S}/R{sub M} through the SMT at T ≈ 68 °C of the order of 10{sup 4} and a narrow ∼7 °C hysteresis. In addition, the growth of the VO{sub 2} crystallites seem to be governed likely by a Volmer-Weber or Stranski-Krastanov mechanisms and certainly not a Frank-van Der Merwe process.

  6. Thin films deposited by femtosecond pulsed laser ablation of tungsten carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Bonis, A. [Dipartimento di Chimica ' A.M. Tamburro' , Universita della Basilicata, Via dell' Ateneo Lucano 10, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali - INSTM, Via G. Giusti 9, 00121 Florence (Italy); Teghil, R., E-mail: roberto.teghil@unibas.it [Dipartimento di Chimica ' A.M. Tamburro' , Universita della Basilicata, Via dell' Ateneo Lucano 10, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali - INSTM, Via G. Giusti 9, 00121 Florence (Italy); Santagata, A. [Istituto Metodologie Inorganiche e Plasmi, CNR, Unita di Potenza, via S. Loja, 85050 Tito Scalo PZ (Italy); Galasso, A. [Dipartimento di Chimica ' A.M. Tamburro' , Universita della Basilicata, Via dell' Ateneo Lucano 10, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Rau, J.V. [Istituto di Struttura della Materia, CNR, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have deposited amorphous tungsten carbide films by ultra-short PLD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the films different W-C phases are present. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The films are formed mainly by particles with nanometric size. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We propose that the particles are directly ejected from the target. - Abstract: Ultra-short Pulsed Laser Deposition has been applied to the production of thin films from a tungsten carbide target. The gaseous phase obtained by the laser ablation shows a very weak primary plume, in contrast with a very strong secondary one. The deposited films, investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and X-Ray Diffraction, present a mixture of WC and other phases with lower carbon content. All films are amorphous, independently from the substrate temperature. The characteristics of the deposits have been explained in terms of thermal evaporation and cooling rate of molten particles ejected from the target.

  7. Oxidation of ZnO thin films during pulsed laser deposition process

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E De Posada; L Moreira; J Pérez De La Cruz; M Arronte; L V Ponce; T Flores; J G Lunney

    2013-06-01

    Pulsed laser deposition of ZnO thin films, using KrF laser, is analysed. The films were deposited on (001) sapphire substrates at 400 °C, at two different oxygen pressures (0.3 and 0.4 mbar) and two different target–substrate distances (30 and 40 mm). It is observed that in order to obtain good quality in the photoluminescence of the films, associated with oxygen stoichiometry, it is needed to maximize the time during which the plasma remains in contact with the growing film (plasma residence time), which is achieved by selecting suitable combinations of oxygen pressures and target to substrate distances. It is also discussed that for the growth parameters used, the higher probability for ZnO films growth results from the oxidation of Zn deposited on the substrate and such process takes place during the time that the plasma is in contact with the substrate. Moreover, it is observed that maximizing the plasma residence time over the growing film reduces the rate of material deposition, favouring the surface diffusion of adatoms, which favours both Zn–O reaction and grain growth.

  8. Mechanism of the formation of metal nanoclusters during pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pushkin, M.A. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, 31 Kashirskoe chausse, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Lebid' ko, V.V. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, 31 Kashirskoe chausse, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Borman, V.D. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, 31 Kashirskoe chausse, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Tronin, V.N. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, 31 Kashirskoe chausse, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Troyan, V.I. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, 31 Kashirskoe chausse, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Smurov, I. [Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Saint Etienne, 58 rue Jean Parot, 42023 St-Etienne (France)]. E-mail: smurov@enise.fr

    2006-04-30

    The geometrical structure of Au, Ni, Co and Cr nanoclusters self-assembled on NaCl and HOPG surfaces under pulsed laser deposition (PLD) has been experimentally investigated. The PLD technique is characterized by an extremely high instantaneous deposition rate. Unlike for the thermal evaporation (TE) process, formation of fractal nanoclusters under PLD conditions has been observed with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The driving mechanism for this phenomenon occurring at high deposition rate is thought to be the evolution of the initial interacting-adatom states in a system far from thermodynamic equilibrium. The obtained results can be explained by proposing a new mechanism of condensed phase formation under the conditions of strong deviation from thermodynamic equilibrium.

  9. Metallization of bacterial surface layer by cross-beam pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompe, Wolfgang; Mertig, Michael; Kirsch, Remo; Gorbunov, Andre A.; Sewing, Andreas; Engelhardt, Harald; Mensch, Axel

    1996-04-01

    We present first results on thin film metal deposition on the regular bacterial surface layer of Sporsarcina urea by pulsed laser deposition. To prevent structural damage of the biological specimen a recently developed cross beam technique is applied providing an effective filtering of the most energetic plasma particles. The deposited films are examined by low voltage scanning electron microscopy. The surface profile of the S-layer adsorbed onto mica substrate was investigated by atomic force microscopy. A lattice constant of 13.2 nm has been measured. The lattice parameters and the structural appearance of the protein layer is in reasonable agreement with the results of an electron microscopical 3D structural analysis.

  10. Research Update: Stoichiometry controlled oxide thin film growth by pulsed laser deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rik Groenen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The oxidation of species in the plasma plume during pulsed laser deposition controls both the stoichiometry as well as the growth kinetics of the deposited SrTiO3 thin films, instead of the commonly assumed mass distribution in the plasma plume and the kinetic energy of the arriving species. It was observed by X-ray diffraction that SrTiO3 stoichiometry depends on the composition of the background gas during deposition, where in a relative small pressure range between 10−2 mbars and 10−1 mbars oxygen partial pressure, the resulting film becomes fully stoichiometric. Furthermore, upon increasing the oxygen (partial pressure, the growth mode changes from 3D island growth to a 2D layer-by-layer growth mode as observed by reflection high energy electron diffraction.

  11. Pulsed laser deposition of tungsten carbide thin films on silicon (100) substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Y.; Nakazono, T.; Ebihara, K.; Baba, K.

    1997-01-01

    A method of synthesizing tungsten carbide (WC) thin films by a pulsed YAG laser deposition is investigated. WC thin films are deposited on silicon (100) substrates by using WC5%Co alloy targets. Glancing angle X-ray diffraction shows that the strong peaks of W 2C appear at the substrate temperature of 500°C. Beside the strong peaks of W 2C, weak peaks of WC and W 3Co 3C appear at the substrate temperature of 650°C. Auger electron spectroscopy shows that the almost stoichiometric WC films are deposited at the methane gas pressure of 1.0 Pa. Morphological features of the samples have been obtained by employing the technique of scanning electron microscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy has been used to obtain structural and compositional information about the samples.

  12. Development of ITER relevant laser techniques for deposited layer characterisation and tritium inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malaquias, A., E-mail: artur.malaquias@jet.efda.org [Associação EURATOM/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001, Lisboa (Portugal); EFDA-CSU, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Philipps, V.; Huber, A. [Institute for Energy Research – Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Association EURATOM-FZJ (Germany); Hakola, A.; Likonen, J. [VTT, Association EURATOM-TEKES, P.O. Box 1000, 02044 VTT (Finland); Kolehmainen, J.; Tervakangas, S. [DIARC-Technology Inc., Kattilalaaksontie 1, 02330 Espoo (Finland); Aints, M.; Paris, P.; Laan, M.; Lissovski, A. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Association EURATOM-TEKES, Tahe 4, Tartu 51010 (Estonia); Almaviva, S.; Caneve, L.; Colao, F. [ENEA, UTAPRAD-DIM, C.R. Frascati, P.O. Box 65, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Maddaluno, G. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, C. R. Frascati, P.O. Box 65, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Kubkowska, M.; Gasior, P. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Association EURATOM/IPPLM, 00-908 Warsaw, P.O. Box 49, Hery St. 23 (Poland); Meiden, H.J. van der; Lof, A.R.; Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A. [FOM Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); and others

    2013-07-15

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a potential candidate to monitor the layer composition and fuel retention during and after plasma shots on specific locations of the main chamber and divertor of ITER. This method is being investigated in a cooperative research programme on plasma devices such as TEXTOR, FTU, MAGNUM-PSI and in other various laboratorial experiments. In this paper LIBS results from targets of D–H-rich carbon films and mixed W–Al–C deposits on bulk tungsten substrates are reported (simulating ITER-like deposits with Al as proxy for Be). Two independent methods, one to determine the relative elemental composition and the other the absolute contents of the target based on the experimental LIBS signals are proposed. The results show that LIBS has the capability to provide the relative concentrations of the elements on the deposited layer when the experimental conditions on the targets surface are identical to the calibration samples.

  13. Research Update: Stoichiometry controlled oxide thin film growth by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groenen, Rik; Smit, Jasper; Orsel, Kasper; Vailionis, Arturas; Bastiaens, Bert; Huijben, Mark; Boller, Klaus; Rijnders, Guus; Koster, Gertjan, E-mail: g.koster@utwente.nl [Faculty of Science and Technology and MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2015-07-01

    The oxidation of species in the plasma plume during pulsed laser deposition controls both the stoichiometry as well as the growth kinetics of the deposited SrTiO{sub 3} thin films, instead of the commonly assumed mass distribution in the plasma plume and the kinetic energy of the arriving species. It was observed by X-ray diffraction that SrTiO{sub 3} stoichiometry depends on the composition of the background gas during deposition, where in a relative small pressure range between 10{sup −2} mbars and 10{sup −1} mbars oxygen partial pressure, the resulting film becomes fully stoichiometric. Furthermore, upon increasing the oxygen (partial) pressure, the growth mode changes from 3D island growth to a 2D layer-by-layer growth mode as observed by reflection high energy electron diffraction.

  14. High-rate laser metal deposition of Inconel 718 component using low heat-input approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, C. Y.; Scudamore, R. J.; Allen, J.

    Currently many aircraft and aero engine components are machined from billets or oversize forgings. This involves significant cost, material wastage, lead-times and environmental impacts. Methods to add complex features to another component or net-shape surface would offer a substantial cost benefit. Laser Metal Deposition (LMD), currently being applied to the repair of worn or damaged aero engine components, was attempted in this work as an alternative process route, to build features onto a base component, because of its low heat input capability. In this work, low heat input and high-rate deposition was developed to deposit Inconel 718 powder onto thin plates. Using the optimised process parameters, a number of demonstrator components were successfully fabricated.

  15. Development of long Y-123 coated conductors by ion-beam-assisted-deposition and the pulsed-laser-deposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iijima, Yasuhiro; Kakimoto, Kazuomi; Sutoh, Yasunori; Ajimura, Shoji; Saitoh, Takashi [Material Technology Laboratory, Fujikura Ltd, 1-5-1, Kiba, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8512 (Japan)

    2004-05-01

    100 m class Y-123 coated conductors were produced by using reel-to-reel vacuum ion-beam-assisted-deposition (IBAD) and pulsed-laser-deposition (PLD) apparatuses. 100 m long IBAD-Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} template films were uniformly and routinely obtained on non-textured Ni-alloy tapes, with FWHM of {delta}{phi} below 10 deg. Y-123 films with FWHM of {delta}{phi} below 7 deg. were formed on them by PLD. End-to-end I{sub c} of 38 A and J{sub c} of 0.76 MA cm{sup -2} (77 K, self-field) were obtained in a 100 m long sample. For further texture improvement, secondary buffer layers of CeO{sub 2} and Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} grown by PLD on IBAD-Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} template films were studied. {delta}{phi} of 3 deg. and J{sub c} of 2.9 MA cm{sup -2} were obtained in a 0.1 m long Y-123 film and J{sub c} improved to 1.6 MA cm{sup -2} for an 80 m long Y-123 tape by using the CeO{sub 2} buffer layers.

  16. Ultrafast Pulsed-Laser Applications for Semiconductor Thin Film Deposition and Graphite Photoexfoliation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oraiqat, Ibrahim Malek

    This thesis focuses on the application of ultrafast lasers in nanomaterial synthesis. Two techniques are investigated: Ultrafast Pulsed Laser Deposition (UFPLD) of semiconductor nanoparticle thin films and ultrafast laser scanning for the photoexfoliation of graphite to synthesize graphene. The importance of the work is its demonstration that the process of making nanoparticles with ultrafast lasers is extremely versatile and can be applied to practically any material and substrate. Moreover, the process is scalable to large areas: by scanning the laser with appropriate optics it is possible to coat square meters of materials (e.g., battery electrodes) quickly and inexpensively with nanoparticles. With UFPLD we have shown there is a nanoparticle size dependence on the laser fluence and the optical emission spectrum of the plume can be used to determine a fluence that favors smaller nanoparticles, in the range of 10-20 nm diameter and 3-5 nm in height. We have also demonstrated there are two structural types of particles: amorphous and crystalline, as verified with XRD and Raman spectroscopy. When deposited as a coating, the nanoparticles can behave as a quasi-continuous thin film with very promising carrier mobilities, 5-52 cm2/Vs, substantially higher than for other spray-coated thin film technologies and orders of magnitude larger than those of colloidal quantum dot (QD) films. Scanning an ultrafast laser over the surface of graphite was shown to produce both filamentary structures and sheets which are semi-transparent to the secondary-electron beam in SEM. These sheets resemble layers of graphene produced by exfoliation. An ultrafast laser "printing" configuration was also identified by coating a thin, transparent substrate with graphite particles and irradiating the back of the film for a forward transfer of material onto a receiving substrate. A promising application of laser-irradiated graphene coatings was investigated, namely to improve the charge

  17. Synthesis of designed materials by laser-based direct metal deposition technique: Experimental and theoretical approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Huan

    Direct metal deposition (DMD), a laser-cladding based solid freeform fabrication technique, is capable of depositing multiple materials at desired composition which makes this technique a flexible method to fabricate heterogeneous components or functionally-graded structures. The inherently rapid cooling rate associated with the laser cladding process enables extended solid solubility in nonequilibrium phases, offering the possibility of tailoring new materials with advanced properties. This technical advantage opens the area of synthesizing a new class of materials designed by topology optimization method which have performance-based material properties. For better understanding of the fundamental phenomena occurring in multi-material laser cladding with coaxial powder injection, a self-consistent 3-D transient model was developed. Physical phenomena including laser-powder interaction, heat transfer, melting, solidification, mass addition, liquid metal flow, and species transportation were modeled and solved with a controlled-volume finite difference method. Level-set method was used to track the evolution of liquid free surface. The distribution of species concentration in cladding layer was obtained using a nonequilibrium partition coefficient model. Simulation results were compared with experimental observations and found to be reasonably matched. Multi-phase material microstructures which have negative coefficients of thermal expansion were studied for their DMD manufacturability. The pixel-based topology-optimal designs are boundary-smoothed by Bezier functions to facilitate toolpath design. It is found that the inevitable diffusion interface between different material-phases degrades the negative thermal expansion property of the whole microstructure. A new design method is proposed for DMD manufacturing. Experimental approaches include identification of laser beam characteristics during different laser-powder-substrate interaction conditions, an

  18. The effect of cladding speed on phase constitution and properties of AISI 431 stainless steel laser deposited coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmati, I.; Ocelik, V.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2011-01-01

    Shorter processing time has given impetus to laser cladding technology and therefore in this research the AISI 431 martensitic stainless steel coatings are laser deposited at high cladding speeds, i.e. up to 117 mm/s. The analysis of phase constitution and functional properties of the coatings are p

  19. Exploration of microstructure and wear behaviour of laser metal deposited Ti6Al 4V/Cu composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Erinosho, MF

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the explorations conducted on the evolving microstructures and the dry sliding wear of the laser deposited Ti6Al 4V/Cu composites. The laser powers between 1300 W and 1600 W; scanning speeds between 0.30 and 0.72 m/min were...

  20. Properties of multilayer gallium and aluminum doped ZnO(GZO/AZO)transparent thin films deposited by pulsed laser deposition process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Hyum SHIN; Dong-Kyun SHIN; Hee-Young LEE; Jai-Yeoul LEE

    2011-01-01

    Multilayer gallium and aluminum doped ZnO (GZO/AZO) films were fabricated by alternative deposition of Ga-doped zinc oxide(GZO) and Al-doped zinc oxide(AZO) thin film by using pulsed laser deposition(PLD) process. The electrical and optical properties of these GZO/AZO thin films were investigated and compared with those of GZO and AZO thin films. The GZO/AZO GZO/AZO thin films linearly decreases with increasing the Al ratio.

  1. Formation of copper tin sulfide films by pulsed laser deposition at 248 and 355 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettlinger, Rebecca Bolt; Crovetto, Andrea; Canulescu, Stela;

    2016-01-01

    The influence of the laser wavelength on the deposition of copper tin sulfide (CTS) and SnS-rich CTS with a 248-nm KrF excimer laser (pulse length τ = 20 ns) and a 355-nm frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser (τ = 6 ns) was investigated. A comparative study of the two UV wavelengths shows that the CTS...

  2. Formation of copper tin sulfide films by pulsed laser deposition at 248 and 355 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettlinger, Rebecca Bolt; Crovetto, Andrea; Canulescu, Stela

    2016-01-01

    The influence of the laser wavelength on the deposition of copper tin sulfide (CTS) and SnS-rich CTS with a 248-nm KrF excimer laser (pulse length τ = 20 ns) and a 355-nm frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser (τ = 6 ns) was investigated. A comparative study of the two UV wavelengths shows that the CTS...

  3. Tailoring out-of-plane magnetic properties of pulsed laser deposited FePt thin films by changing laser energy fluence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ying; Tan, T.L.; Tan, K.S.; Lee, P. [NSSE, NIE, Nanyang Technological University, 1 Nanyang Walk, Singapore 637616 (Singapore); Liu, Hai; Yadian, Boluo; Hu, Ge; Huang, Yizhong; Ramanujan, R.V. [School of Material Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Rawat, R.S., E-mail: rajdeep.rawat@nie.edu.sg [NSSE, NIE, Nanyang Technological University, 1 Nanyang Walk, Singapore 637616 (Singapore)

    2014-10-01

    Highlights: • Laser energy fluence (LEF) effect on composition, microstructure and magnetism. • Enhancing out-of-plane magnetic properties by tailoring LEF on target surface. • Higher LEF results in more energetic plasma species causing vacancy defects. • Formation of vacancy defect in FePt thin films leads to improved magnetic properties. • Best out-of-plane magnetic properties are achieved with medium LEF. - Abstract: Magnetic properties of pulsed laser deposited (PLD) FePt thin films are investigated at three different laser energy fluences of 51, 136 and 182 J/cm{sup 2}. Deposition at lower laser energy fluence (51 J/cm{sup 2}) yields softer out-of-plane coercivity (≤0.4 kG), whereas deposition at higher laser energy fluence (136 and 182 J/cm{sup 2}) results in harder out-of-plane coercivity (≥5.0 kG). The improved coercivity is found to be attributed to the formation of vacancy defects in thin films, which is indicated by stress change from tensile to compressive form with increasing laser energy fluence. Maximum out-of-plane saturated magnetization of 615 emu/cm{sup 3} and remanent squareness ratio of 0.88 are achieved for 16 nm thick FePt thin films deposited at moderate laser energy fluence of 136 J/cm{sup 2}, making them suitable for high density perpendicular data storage applications.

  4. Fabrication of arrays of gold islands on self-assembled monolayers using pulsed laser deposition through nanosieves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speets, Emiel A.; Ravoo, Bart Jan; Roesthuis, Frank J.G.; Vroegindeweij, Frank; Blank, Dave H.A.; Reinhoudt, David N.

    2004-01-01

    Sandwich structures of gold-self-assembled monolayer-gold were prepared by deposition of gold on alkylthiolate self-assembled monolayers on polycrystalline gold, using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) through a nanosieve. The arrays of sandwiches, around 600 nm in diameter, approximately 10 nm high, an

  5. Physical aspects of the pulsed laser deposition technique: The stoichiometric transfer of material from target to film

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    The physical processes of pulsed laser deposition (PLD) change strongly from the initial light absorption in a target to the final deposition and growth of a film. One of the primary advantages of PLD is the stoichiometric transfer of material from target to a film on a substrate. Even for a stoi...

  6. Development of a new laser heating system for thin film growth by chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Eiji; Sumiya, Masatomo; Ohnishi, Tsuyoshi; Lippmaa, Mikk; Takeguchi, Masaki; Koinuma, Hideomi; Matsumoto, Yuji

    2012-09-01

    We have developed a new laser heating system for thin film growth by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). A collimated beam from a high-power continuous-wave 808 nm semiconductor laser was directly introduced into a CVD growth chamber without an optical fiber. The light path of the heating laser inside the chamber was isolated mechanically from the growth area by bellows to protect the optics from film coating. Three types of heat absorbers, (10 × 10 × 2 mm(3)) consisting of SiC, Ni/NiO(x), or pyrolytic graphite covered with pyrolytic BN (PG/PBN), located at the backside of the substrate, were tested for heating performance. It was confirmed that the substrate temperature could reach higher than 1500 °C in vacuum when a PG/PBN absorber was used. A wide-range temperature response between 400 °C and 1000 °C was achieved at high heating and cooling rates. Although the thermal energy loss increased in a H(2) gas ambient due to the higher thermal conductivity, temperatures up to 1000 °C were achieved even in 200 Torr H(2). We have demonstrated the capabilities of this laser heating system by growing ZnO films by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The growth mode of ZnO films was changed from columnar to lateral growth by repeated temperature modulation in this laser heating system, and consequently atomically smooth epitaxial ZnO films were successfully grown on an a-plane sapphire substrate.

  7. CW laser induced crystallization of thin amorphous silicon films deposited by EBE and PECVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Said-Bacar, Z., E-mail: zabardjade@yahoo.fr [InESS (UMR 7163 CNRS-UDS), 23 rue de Loess, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Prathap, P. [InESS (UMR 7163 CNRS-UDS), 23 rue de Loess, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Cayron, C. [CEA, LITEN, DEHT, Minatec, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Cedex 9 (France); Mermet, F. [IREPA LASER, Pole API - Parc d' Innovation, 67400 Illkirch (France); Leroy, Y.; Antoni, F.; Slaoui, A.; Fogarassy, E. [InESS (UMR 7163 CNRS-UDS), 23 rue de Loess, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of hydrogen in CW laser crystallization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films has been investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Large hydrogen content results in decohesion of the films due to hydrogen effusion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Very low hydrogen content or hydrogen free amorphous silicon film are suitable for crystallization induced by CW laser. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Grains of size between 20 and 100 {mu}m in width and about 200 {mu}m in long in scanning direction are obtained with these latter films. - Abstract: This work presents the Continuous Wave (CW) laser crystallization of thin amorphous silicon (a-Si) films deposited by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) and by Electron Beam Evaporation (EBE) on low cost glass substrate. The films are characterized by Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA) and by Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to evaluate the hydrogen content. Analysis shows that the PECVD films contain a high hydrogen concentration ({approx}10 at.%) while the EBE films are almost hydrogen-free. It is found that the hydrogen is in a bonding configuration with the a-Si network and in a free form, requiring a long thermal annealing for exodiffusion before the laser treatment to avoid explosive effusion. The CW laser crystallization process of the amorphous silicon films was operated in liquid phase regime. We show by Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) that polysilicon films with large grains can be obtained with EBE as well as for the PECVD amorphous silicon provided that for the latest the hydrogen content is lower than 2 at.%.

  8. Pulsed Laser Deposition of Thin Films for Lasers and Quasi-Phase Matched Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-16

    Optics , waveguides, Lasers 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18, NUMBER OF PAGES 11 19a. NAME OF...and AFRL, concerning PLD research  in general. The  offer has been made  for a current student to visit ARFL, and  interact over  multibeam  PLD

  9. Room temperature growth of biaxially aligned yttria-stabilized zirconia films on glass substrates by pulsed-laser deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Li Peng; Mazumder, J

    2003-01-01

    Room temperature deposition of biaxially textured yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) films on amorphous glass substrates was successfully achieved by conventional pulsed-laser deposition. The influence of the surrounding gases, their pressure and the deposition time on the structure of the films was studied. A columnar growth process was revealed based on the experimental results. The grown biaxial texture appears as a kind of substrate independence, which makes it possible to fabricate in-plane aligned YSZ films on various substrates.

  10. Superconducting MgB2 Thin Films with Tc ≈ 39 K Grown by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王淑芳; 戴守愚; 周岳亮; 陈正豪; 崔大复; 许佳迪; 何萌; 吕惠宾; 杨国桢

    2001-01-01

    Superconducting MgB2 thin films were fabricated on Al2 O3 (0001) substrates under ex situ processing conditions.Boron thin films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition followed by a post-annealing process. Resistance measurements of the deposited MgB2 films show Tc of ~39 K, while scanning electron microscopy and x-ray vdiffraction analysis indicate that the films consist of well-crystallized grains with a highly c-axis-oriented structure.

  11. Random lasing of ZnO thin films grown by pulsed-laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cachoncinlle, C., E-mail: christophe.cachoncinlle@univ-orleans.fr [GREMI, UMR 7344 CNRS—Université Orléans, 45067 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Hebert, C.; Perrière, J. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Université Paris 06, UMR 7588, INSP, 75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7588, INSP, 75005 Paris (France); Nistor, M. [NILPRP, L 22 PO Box. MG-36, 77125 Bucharest—Magurele (Romania); Petit, A.; Millon, E. [GREMI, UMR 7344 CNRS—Université Orléans, 45067 Orléans Cedex 2 (France)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Random lasing at RT in nanocrystalline ZnO PLD thin film (<100 nm). • Low optical pumping threshold (<30 kW cm{sup −2}) for UV random lasing. • Random lasing interpreted by the electron-hole plasma (EHP) model. - Abstract: Low-dimensional semiconductor structures on nanometer scale are of great interest because of their strong potential applications in nanotechnologies. We report here optical and structural properties on UV lasing in ZnO thin films. The ZnO films, 110 nm thick, were prepared using pulsed-laser deposition on c-cut sapphire substrates at 500 °C under 10{sup −2} oxygen pressure. The ZnO films are nearly stoichiometric, dense and display the wurtzite phase. The films are highly textured along the ZnO c-axis and are constituted of nanocrystallites. According to Hall measurements these films are conductive (0.11 Ω cm). Photoluminescence measurements reveals a so-called random lasing in the range 390 to 410 nm, when illuminating at 355 nm with a tripled frequency pulsed Nd-YAG laser. Such random lasing is obtained at rather low optical pumping, 45 kW cm{sup −2}, a value lower than those classically reported for pulsed-laser deposition thin films.

  12. Property improvement of pulsed laser deposited boron carbide films by pulse shortening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Csako, T. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 406, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary); Budai, J. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 406, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary); Szoerenyi, T. [Research Group on Laser Physics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 406, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary)]. E-mail: t.szorenyi@physx.u-szeged.hu

    2006-04-30

    Growth characteristics and surface morphology of boron carbide films fabricated by ablating a B{sub 4}C target in high vacuum with a traditional KrF excimer laser and a high brightness hybrid dye/excimer laser system emitting at the same wavelength while delivering 700 fs pulses are compared. The ultrashort pulse processing is highly effective. Energy densities between 0.25 and 2 J cm{sup -2} result in apparent growth rates ranging from 0.017 to 0.085 nm/pulse. Ablation with nanosecond pulses of one order of magnitude higher energy densities yields smaller growth rates, the figures increase from 0.002 to 0.016 nm/pulse within the 2-14.3 J cm{sup -2} fluence window. 2D thickness maps derived from variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry reveal that, when ablating with sub-ps pulses, the spot size rather than the energy density determines both the deposition rate and the angular distribution of film material. Pulse shortening leads to significant improvement in surface morphology, as well. While droplets with number densities ranging from 1 x 10{sup 4} to 7 x 10{sup 4} mm{sup -2} deteriorate the surface of the films deposited by the KrF excimer laser, sub-ps pulses produce practically droplet-free films. The absence of droplets has also a beneficial effect on the stoichiometry and homogeneity of the films fabricated by ultrashort pulses.

  13. Deposition of NbC thin films by pulsed laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhalde, S.; Colaco, R.; Audebert, F.; Perrone, A.; Zocco, A.

    Niobium carbide thin films were prepared by pulsed laser ablation of a stoichiometric NbC target. XeCl (308 nm, 30 ns) and Nd:YAG (266 nm, 5 ns) lasers operating at a repetition rate of 10 Hz were used. Films were deposited on Si (100) substrates at room temperature either in vacuum or in an argon atmosphere (2×10-1 mbar). Different laser fluences (2, 4 and 6 J/cm2) and different numbers of pulses (1×104, 2×104 and 4×104) were tested. For the first time, NbC films were prepared through a clean procedure without the addition of a hydrocarbon atmosphere. The phase constitution of the films, unit cell size, mean crystallite dimensions and preferred orientation are determined as a function of deposition conditions by X-ray diffraction. Complementary morphological and structural analysis of the films were performed by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy.

  14. Thin-film CdTe photovoltaic cells by laser deposition and rf sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compaan, A.; Bohn, R.G.; Bhat, A.; Tabory, C.; Shao, M.; Li, Y.; Savage, M.E.; Tsien, L. (Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio 43606 (United States))

    1992-12-01

    Laser-driven physical vapor deposition (LDPVD) and radio-frequency (rf) sputtering have been used to fabricate thin-film solar cells on SnO[sub 2]-coated glass substrates. The laser-ablation process readily permits the use of several target materials in the same vacuum chamber and complete solar cell structures have been fabricated on SnO[sub 2]-coated glass using LDPVD for the CdS, CdTe, and CdCl[sub 2]. To date the best devices ([similar to]9% AM1.5) have been obtained after a post-deposition anneal at 400 [degree]C. In addition, cells have been fabricated with the combination of LDPVD CdS, rf-sputtered CdTe, and LDPVD CdCl[sub 2]. The performance of these cells indicates considerable promise for the potential of rf sputtering for CdTe photovoltaic devices. The physical mechanisms of LDPVD have been studied by transient optical spectroscopy on the laser ablation plume. These measurements have shown that, e.g., Cd is predominantly in the neutral atomic state in the plume but with a large fraction which is highly excited internally ([ge]6 eV) and that the typical neutral Cd translational kinetic energies perpendicular to the target are 20 eV and greater. Quality of as-grown and annealed films has been analyzed by optical absorption. Raman scattering, photoluminescence, electrical conductivity, Hall effect, x-ray diffraction, and SEM/EDS.

  15. KTN thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition on transparent single crystal quartz (100)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Xiaodong; PENG; Xiaofeng; ZHANG; Duanming

    2005-01-01

    Using the Sol-Gel method to produce the KTN ultrafine powder and the sintering technique with K2O atmosphere to prepare KTN ceramics as the targets instead of the KTN single crystal, highly oriented KTN thin films were produced on the transparent single crystal quartz (100) by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Since the thermal stress sustained by the quartz is relatively small, the limit temperature of the quartz substrates(300℃) is much lower than that of the P-Si substrates (560℃); the prepared thin film is at amorphous state. Increasing the pulsed laser energy density in the process incorporated with annealing the film after deposition at different temperatures converts the amorphous films into crystal. The optimal pulsed laser energy density and annealing temperature were 2.0 J/cm2 and 600℃, respectively. A discussion was made to understand the mechanism of film production at relatively low substrate temperature by PLD and effects of the annealing temperatures on the forming of the perovskite phase, and optimal conditions for the orientation of the crystal grain.

  16. Structural and Optical Properties of Eu Doped ZnO Nanorods prepared by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Alarawi, Abeer

    2014-06-23

    Nano structured wide band gap semiconductors have attracted attention of many researchers due to their potential electronic and optoelectronic applications. In this thesis, we report successful synthesis of well aligned Eu doped ZnO nano-rods prepared, for the first time to our knowledge, by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) without any catalyst. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns shows that these Eu doped ZnO nanorods are grown along the c-axis of ZnO wurtzite structure. We have studied the effect of the PLD growth conditions on forming vertically aligned Eu doped ZnO nanorods. The structural properties of the material are investigated using a -scanning electron microscope (SEM). The PLD parameters must be carefully controlled in order to obtain c-axis oriented ZnO nanorods on sapphire substrates, without the use of any catalyst. The experiments conducted in order to identify the optimal growth conditions confirmed that, by adjusting the target-substrate distance, substrate temperature, laser energy and deposition duration, the nanorod size could be successfully controlled. Most importantly, the results indicated that the photoluminescence (PL) properties reflect the quality of the ZnO nanorods. These parameters can change the material’s structure from one-dimensional to two-dimensional however the laser energy and frequency affect the size and the height of the nanorods; the xygen pressure changes the density of the nanorods.

  17. Pulsed Laser Deposition of YBa2Cu3Ox with Scanning Beam: Target to Substrate Composition Transfer and Film Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mozhaev, Peter; Khoryushin, Alexey; Mozhaeva, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Pulsed laser deposition is often considered a process providing congruent transfer of target composition to the growing film. In fact, many different processes affect compositional preservation, starting from incongruent target ablation, to scattering on the way to the substrate, and to processes...... of the film formation on the substrate surface. We developed a pulsed laser deposition process trying to minimize the compositional deviations due to the scattering by the ambient gas by applying laser beam scanning across the target surface and substitution of oxygen with argon in the chamber during...

  18. Highly sensitive NO2 sensors by pulsed laser deposition on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodu, Margus; Berholts, Artjom; Kahro, Tauno; Avarmaa, Tea; Kasikov, Aarne; Niilisk, Ahti; Alles, Harry; Jaaniso, Raivo

    2016-09-01

    Graphene as a single-atomic-layer material is fully exposed to environmental factors and has therefore a great potential for the creation of sensitive gas sensors. However, in order to realize this potential for different polluting gases, graphene has to be functionalized—adsorption centers of different types and with high affinity to target gases have to be created at its surface. In the present work, the modification of graphene by small amounts of laser-ablated materials is introduced for this purpose as a versatile and precise tool. The approach has been demonstrated with two very different materials chosen for pulsed laser deposition (PLD)—a metal (Ag) and a dielectric oxide (ZrO2). It was shown that the gas response and its recovery rate can be significantly enhanced by choosing the PLD target material and deposition conditions. The response to NO2 gas in air was amplified up to 40 times in the case of PLD-modified graphene, in comparison with pristine graphene, and it reached 7%-8% at 40 ppb of NO2 and 20%-30% at 1 ppm of NO2. The PLD process was conducted in a background gas (5 × 10-2 mbar oxygen or nitrogen) and resulted in the atomic areal densities of the deposited materials of about 1015 cm-2. The ultimate level of NO2 detection in air, as extrapolated from the experimental data obtained at room temperature under mild ultraviolet excitation, was below 1 ppb.

  19. Coordination compounds as precursors for laser deposition of nickel-based conducting films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devillers, M.; Dupuis, O.; Janosi, A.; Soumillion, J. P.

    1994-09-01

    Coordination compounds of nickel(II) are used as precursors for the formation of nickel and nickel oxide deposits on alumina substrates by direct laser writing using an argon ion laser. The starting resins are made of aqueous, methanolic or N,N-dimethylformamide (dmf) solutions of nickel(II) acetate, formate or acetylacetonate in the presence of a polymeric cellulose-based additive which controls the spin-coating step of the substrate. Infrared, UV-visible and NMR spectroscopic studies are carried out on the acetate solutions and resins to understand the interactions occurring between the various components. Arguments supporting the replacement of water molecules in tetrahydrated nickel(II) acetate by the organic solvent are described. The nature of the obtained deposits is determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Whereas resins based on acetate or acetylacetonate compounds in dmf and methanol are shown to generate nickel oxide films, aqueous resins based on nickel(II) formate are found to be very promising in view of obtaining conductive deposits of nickel metal. The role of the cellulosic additive is clearly restricted to the viscosity modulation.

  20. ZnO thin films on single carbon fibres fabricated by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, André; Engel, Sebastian; Sangiorgi, Nicola; Sanson, Alessandra; Bartolomé, Jose F.; Gräf, Stephan; Müller, Frank A.

    2017-03-01

    Single carbon fibres were 360° coated with zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films by pulsed laser deposition using a Q-switched CO2 laser with a pulse duration τ ≈ 300 ns, a wavelength λ = 10.59 μm, a repetition frequency frep = 800 Hz and a peak power Ppeak = 15 kW in combination with a 3-step-deposition technique. In a first set of experiments, the deposition process was optimised by investigating the crystallinity of ZnO films on silicon and polished stainless steel substrates. Here, the influence of the substrate temperature and of the oxygen partial pressure of the background gas were characterised by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses. ZnO coated carbon fibres and conductive glass sheets were used to prepare photo anodes for dye-sensitised solar cells in order to investigate their suitability for energy conversion devices. To obtain a deeper insight of the electronic behaviour at the interface between ZnO and substrate I-V measurements were performed.

  1. Regularly arranged indium islands on glass/molybdenum substrates upon femtosecond laser and physical vapor deposition processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringleb, F.; Eylers, K.; Teubner, Th.; Boeck, T., E-mail: torsten.boeck@ikz-berlin.de [Leibniz-Institute for Crystal Growth, Max-Born-Straße 2, Berlin 12489 (Germany); Symietz, C.; Bonse, J.; Andree, S.; Krüger, J. [Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und-prüfung (BAM), Unter den Eichen 87, Berlin 12205 (Germany); Heidmann, B.; Schmid, M. [Department of Physics, Freie Universität Berlin, Arnimalle 14, Berlin 14195 (Germany); Nanooptical Concepts for PV, Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, Berlin 14109 (Germany); Lux-Steiner, M. [Nanooptical Concepts for PV, Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, Berlin 14109 (Germany); Heterogeneous Material Systems, Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, Berlin 14109 (Germany)

    2016-03-14

    A bottom-up approach is presented for the production of arrays of indium islands on a molybdenum layer on glass, which can serve as micro-sized precursors for indium compounds such as copper-indium-gallium-diselenide used in photovoltaics. Femtosecond laser ablation of glass and a subsequent deposition of a molybdenum film or direct laser processing of the molybdenum film both allow the preferential nucleation and growth of indium islands at the predefined locations in a following indium-based physical vapor deposition (PVD) process. A proper choice of laser and deposition parameters ensures the controlled growth of indium islands exclusively at the laser ablated spots. Based on a statistical analysis, these results are compared to the non-structured molybdenum surface, leading to randomly grown indium islands after PVD.

  2. Observation of self-assembled periodic nano-structures induced by femtosecond laser in both ablation and deposition regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Mingzhen; Zhang, Haitao; Her, Tsing-Hua

    2008-02-01

    We observed the spontaneous formation of periodic nano-structures in both femtosecond laser ablation and deposition. The former involved 400-nm femtosecond pulses from a 250-KHz regenerated amplified mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser and periodic nanocracks and the nano-structure are in the form of periodic nanocracks in the substrate, the latter applied an 80-MHz mode-locked Ti:sapphire oscillator with pulse energy less than half nanojoule in a laser-induced chemical vapor deposition configuration and tungsten nanogratings grow heterogeneously on top of the substrates. These two observed periodic nanostructures have opposite orientations respecting to laser polarization: the periodic nanocracks are perpendicular to, whereas the deposited tungsten nanogratings are parallel to laser polarization direction. By translating the substrate respecting to the laser focus, both the periodic nanocrack and tungsten nanograting extend to the whole scanning range. The deposited tungsten nanogratings possess excellent uniformity on both the grating period and tooth length. Both the attributes can be tuned precisely by controlling the laser power and scanning speed. Furthermore, we discovered that the teeth of transverse tungsten nanogratings are self aligned along their axial direction during multiple scanning with appropriate offset between scans. We demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating large-area one-dimensional grating by exploiting such unique property. These distinct phenomena of nanocracks and tungsten nanogratings indicate different responsible mechanisms.

  3. Experimental study of direct laser deposition of Ti-6Al-4V and Inconel 718 by using pulsed parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Kamran; Izhar Ul Haq; Shah, Shaukat Ali; Khan, Farid Ullah; Khan, Muhammad Tahir; Khan, Sikander

    2014-01-01

    Laser direct metal deposition (LDMD) has developed from a prototyping to a single metal manufacturing tool. Its potential for creating multimaterial and functionally graded structures is now beginning to be explored. This work is a first part of a study in which a single layer of Inconel 718 is deposited on Ti-6Al-4V substrate. Single layer tracks were built at a range of powder mass flow rates using a coaxial nozzle and 1.5 kW diode laser operating in both continuous and pulsed beam modes. This part of the study focused on the experimental findings during the deposition of Inconel 718 powder on Ti-6Al-4V substrate. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction analysis were performed for characterization and phase identification. Residual stress measurement had been carried out to ascertain the effects of laser pulse parameters on the crack development during the deposition process.

  4. Experimental Study of Direct Laser Deposition of Ti-6Al-4V and Inconel 718 by Using Pulsed Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Shah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser direct metal deposition (LDMD has developed from a prototyping to a single metal manufacturing tool. Its potential for creating multimaterial and functionally graded structures is now beginning to be explored. This work is a first part of a study in which a single layer of Inconel 718 is deposited on Ti-6Al-4V substrate. Single layer tracks were built at a range of powder mass flow rates using a coaxial nozzle and 1.5 kW diode laser operating in both continuous and pulsed beam modes. This part of the study focused on the experimental findings during the deposition of Inconel 718 powder on Ti-6Al-4V substrate. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-ray diffraction analysis were performed for characterization and phase identification. Residual stress measurement had been carried out to ascertain the effects of laser pulse parameters on the crack development during the deposition process.

  5. In situ electron spectroscopic identification of carbon species deposited by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samano, E.C.; Gamietea, A.; Cota, L. [IFUNAM, Ensenada (Mexico). Lab. de Ensenada; Soto, G. [IFUNAM, Ensenada (Mexico). Lab. de Ensenada]|[Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada (Mexico). Programa de Posgrado en Fisica de Materiales

    1997-05-01

    Thin carbon films were grown on Si (111) substrates by ablating a graphite target utilizing an excimer pulsed laser in a UHV Riber {copyright} LDM-32 system. Two kinds of films were produced, a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) type and a diamond-like carbon (DLC) type. A relationship of the films microstructure with laser power density and substrate conditions was observed. The HOPG films were homogeneous but the DLC films were heterogeneous, as shown by micrographs. The thin films are monitored and analyzed in situ during the first stages of the deposition process. The monitoring was done by RHEED and the characterization by several surface spectroscopic techniques, AES, XPS and EELS. The formation of a SiC interface was observed for both films due to the reaction of the first carbon species with the substrate surface.

  6. Characteristic Features of the Formation of a Combined Magnetron-Laser Plasma in the Processes of Deposition of Film Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmakov, A. P.; Kuleshov, V. N.; Prokopchik, K. Yu.

    2016-09-01

    A block diagram of a facility for combined magnetron-laser deposition of coatings and of the systems of controlling and managing this process is considered. The results of analysis of the influence of the gas medium and of laser radiation parameters on the emission-optical properties of laser plasma are considered. The influence of the laser plasma on the electric characteristics of a magnetron discharge is analyzed. The formation of the laser plasma-initiated pulse arc discharge has been established and the influence of the laser radiation parameters on the electric characteristics of this discharge has been determined. The emission optical spectra of the magnetron discharge plasma and of erosion laser plasma are compared separately and in combination.

  7. Tailoring out-of-plane magnetic properties of pulsed laser deposited FePt thin films by changing laser energy fluence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Tan, T. L.; Tan, K. S.; Lee, P.; Liu, Hai; Yadian, Boluo; Hu, Ge; Huang, Yizhong; Ramanujan, R. V.; Rawat, R. S.

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic properties of pulsed laser deposited (PLD) FePt thin films are investigated at three different laser energy fluences of 51, 136 and 182 J/cm2. Deposition at lower laser energy fluence (51 J/cm2) yields softer out-of-plane coercivity (≤0.4 kG), whereas deposition at higher laser energy fluence (136 and 182 J/cm2) results in harder out-of-plane coercivity (≥5.0 kG). The improved coercivity is found to be attributed to the formation of vacancy defects in thin films, which is indicated by stress change from tensile to compressive form with increasing laser energy fluence. Maximum out-of-plane saturated magnetization of 615 emu/cm3 and remanent squareness ratio of 0.88 are achieved for 16 nm thick FePt thin films deposited at moderate laser energy fluence of 136 J/cm2, making them suitable for high density perpendicular data storage applications.

  8. Laser ablation source for formation and deposition of size-selected metal clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vucković, S; Svanqvist, M; Popok, V N

    2008-07-01

    This work describes construction of a source and optimisation of its parameters for production of cluster ion beams using material ablation by the second harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser (532 nm). The influence of different source parameters such as carrier gas pressure, laser power, delay time between gas, and laser pulses as well as nozzle configuration on the cluster formation are studied. For the current experiments the laser ablation cluster source was optimized for production of Con+ cluster ions. Clusters with n up to 150 atoms are registered by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Deposition of size-selected Co50+ clusters with kinetic energies in the interval of 250-4850 eV/cluster on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite is studied. At the highest impact energies the clusters are implanted. Craters and well-like structures can be seen by scanning tunneling microscopy at impact spots. A decrease in cluster kinetic energy leads to formation of bumplike structures which probably represent damaged graphite areas with incorporated Co atoms. Further decrease in the cluster impact energy to the level of 450-250 eV/cluster creates condition for so-called cluster pinning when the cluster constituents are intact but the energy transferred to the graphite is still enough to produce radiation defects to which the cluster is bound.

  9. Influence of processing parameters on lattice parameters in laser deposited tool alloy steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, G.F., E-mail: gfsun82@gmail.com [Center for Laser-Aided Intelligent Manufacturing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109 (United States); School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu, 212013 (China); Bhattacharya, S. [Center for Laser-Aided Intelligent Manufacturing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109 (United States); Dinda, G.P.; Dasgupta, A. [Center for Advanced Technologies, Focus: Hope, Detroit, MI, 48238 (United States); Mazumder, J. [Center for Laser-Aided Intelligent Manufacturing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: {yields} Orientation relationships among phases in the DMD are given. {yields} Martensite lattice parameters increased with laser specific energy. {yields} Austenite lattice parameters decreased with laser specific energy. - Abstract: Laser aided direct metal deposition (DMD) has been used to form AISI 4340 steel coating on the AISI 4140 steel substrate. The microstructural property of the DMD coating was analyzed by means of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry. Microhardness of the DMD was measured with a Vickers microhardness tester. Results indicate that DMD can be used to form dense AISI 4340 steel coatings on AISI 4140 steel substrate. The DMD coating is mainly composed of martensite and retained austenite. Consecutive thermal cycles have a remarkable effect on the microstructure of the plan view of the DMD coating and on the corresponding microhardness distribution. Orientation relationships among austenite, martensite and cementite in the DMD coating followed the ones in conventional heat treated steels. As the laser specific energy decreased, cooling rate increased, and martensite peaks broadened and shifted to a lower Bragg's angle. Also martensite lattice parameters increased and austenite lattice parameters decreased due to the above parameter change.

  10. Wear Characteristics of Ni-Based Hardfacing Alloy Deposited on Stainless Steel Substrate by Laser Cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Reena; Limaye, P. K.; Kumar, Santosh; Kushwaha, Ram P.; Viswanadham, C. S.; Srivastava, Dinesh; Soni, N. L.; Patel, R. J.; Dey, G. K.

    2015-03-01

    In this study, dry sliding wear characteristics of the Ni-based hardfacing alloy (Ni-Mo-Cr-Si) deposited on stainless steel SS316L substrate by laser cladding have been presented. Dry sliding wear behavior of the laser clad layer was evaluated against two different counter bodies, AISI 52100 chromium steel (~850 VHN) and tungsten carbide ball (~2200 VHN) to study both adhesive and abrasive wear characteristics, in comparison with the substrate SS316L using ball on plate reciprocating wear tester. The wear resistance was evaluated as a function of load and sliding speed for a constant sliding amplitude and sliding distance. The wear mechanisms were studied on the basis of wear surface morphology and microchemical analysis of the wear track using SEM-EDS. Laser clad layer of Ni-Mo-Cr-Si on SS316L exhibited much higher hardness (~700 VHN) than that of substrate SS316L (~200 VHN). The laser clad layer exhibited higher wear resistance as compared to SS316L substrate while sliding against both the counterparts. However, the improvement in the wear resistance of the clad layer as compared to the substrate was much higher while sliding against AISI 52100 chromium steel than that while sliding against WC, at the same contact stress intensity.

  11. Decoration of silica nanowires with gold nanoparticles through ultra-short pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontad, F.; Caricato, A. P.; Cesaria, M.; Resta, V.; Taurino, A.; Colombelli, A.; Leo, C.; Klini, A.; Manousaki, A.; Convertino, A.; Rella, R.; Martino, M.; Perrone, A.

    2017-10-01

    The ablation of a metal target at laser energy densities in the range of 1-10 TW/cm2 leads to the generation of nanoparticles (NP) of the ablated material. This aspect is of particular interest if the immobilization of NPs on three-dimensional (3D) substrates is necessary as for example in sensing applications. In this work the deposition of Au NP by irradiation of a Au bulk target with a sub-picosecond laser beam (500 fs; 248 nm; 10 Hz) on 2D (silica and Si(100)) and 3D substrates (silica nanowire forests) is reported for different number of laser pulses (500, 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500). A uniform coverage of small Au NPs (with a diameter of few nm) on both kinds of substrates has been obtained using a suitable number of laser pulses. The presence of spherical droplets, with a diameter ranging from tens of nm up to few μm was also detected on the substrate surface and their presence can be explained by the weak electron-phonon coupling of Au. The optical characterization of the samples on 2D and 3D substrates evidenced the surface plasmon resonance peak characteristic of the Au NPs although further improvements of the size-distribution are necessary for future applications in sensing devices.

  12. Pressure effects during pulsed-laser deposition of barium titanate thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalo, J.; Afonso, C.N. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Optica; Gomez San Roman, R.; Perez Casero, R. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada C-XII, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Perriere, J. [Groupe de Physique des Solides, Universites Paris VII et VI, URA 17 du CNRS, Tour 23, 2 Place Jussieu, 75251 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    1998-05-01

    The composition and homogeneity of barium titanate films grown by pulsed-laser deposition at different substrate temperatures (room temperature, 700 C) and gas environments (O{sub 2},Ar) in a broad pressure range (10{sup -7}-1 mbar) are correlated to the plasma expansion dynamics. It is found that the deposited films present an excess of Ba in the intermediate pressure range (10{sup -2}

  13. Chalcogenide-based thin film sensors prepared by pulsed laser deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, J.; Schöning, M. J.; Schmidt, C.; Siegert, M.; Mesters, St.; Zander, W.; Kordos, P.; Lüth, H.; Legin, A.; Mourzina, Yu. G.; Seleznev, B.; Vlasov, Yu. G.

    One advantage of the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method is the stoichiometric transfer of multi-component target material to a given substrate. This advantage of the PLD determined the choice to prepare chalco-genide-based thin films with an off-axis geometry PLD. Ag-As-S and Cu-Ag-As-Se-Tetargets were used to deposit thin films on Si substrates for an application as a heavy metal sensing device. The films were characterized by means of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and electrochemical measurements. The same stoichiometry of the films and the targets was confirmed by RBS measurements. We observed a good long-term stability of more than 60 days and a nearly Nernstian sensitivity towards Pb and Cu, which is comparable to bulk sensors.

  14. Sims Characterisation of ZnO Layer Prepared By Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Vincze

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available New material development requires new technologies to create and prepare basic material for semiconductor industry and device applications. Materials have given properties, which exhibit particulary small tolerances. One of the most important and promising material is recently ZnO. ZnO has specific properties for near UV emission and absorption optical devices. The pulsed laser deposition (PLD is one of the methods to prepare this type of material. The aim of this paper is to compare properties of ZnO layers deposited from pure Zn target in oxygen atmosphere and the analysis of their surface properties by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS, atomic force microscopy (AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM.

  15. Thickness Influence on In Vitro Biocompatibility of Titanium Nitride Thin Films Synthesized by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu Duta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a study on the biocompatibility vs. thickness in the case of titanium nitride (TiN films synthesized on 410 medical grade stainless steel substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The films were grown in a nitrogen atmosphere, and their in vitro cytotoxicity was assessed according to ISO 10993-5 [1]. Extensive physical-chemical analyses have been carried out on the deposited structures with various thicknesses in order to explain the differences in biological behavior: profilometry, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, X-ray diffraction and surface energy measurements. XPS revealed the presence of titanium oxynitride beside TiN in amounts that vary with the film thickness. The cytocompatibility of films seems to be influenced by their TiN surface content. The thinner films seem to be more suitable for medical applications, due to the combined high values of bonding strength and superior cytocompatibility.

  16. Structural modification of titanium surface by octacalcium phosphate via Pulsed Laser Deposition and chemical treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Smirnov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD technique was applied to coat titanium for orthopaedic and dental implant applications. Calcium carbonate (CC was used as starting coating material. The deposited CC films were transformed into octacalcium phosphate (OCP by chemical treatments. The results of X-ray diffraction (XRD, Raman, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM studies revealed that the final OCP thin films are formed on the titanium surface. Human myofibroblasts from peripheral vessels and the primary bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BMMSs were cultured on the investigated materials. It was shown that all the investigated samples had no short-term toxic effects on cells. The rate of division of myofibroblast cells growing on the surface and saturated BMMSs concentration for the OCP coating were about two times faster than of cells growing on the CC films.

  17. Apparatus and method for pulsed laser deposition of materials on wires and pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Felix E. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Methods and apparatuses are disclosed which allow uniform coatings to be applied by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on inner and outer surfaces of cylindrical objects, such as rods, pipes, tubes, and wires. The use of PLD makes this technique particularly suitable for complex multicomponent materials, such as superconducting ceramics. Rigid objects of any length, i.e., pipes up to a few meters, and with diameters from less than 1 centimeter to over 10 centimeters can be coated using this technique. Further, deposition is effected simultaneously onto an annular region of the pipe wall. This particular arrangement simplifies the apparatus, reduces film uniformity control difficulties, and can result in faster operation cycles. In addition, flexible wires of any length can be continuously coated using the disclosed invention.

  18. Diffusion barrier performance of pulsed laser deposited amorphous tungsten carbide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaisas, Smita

    1991-12-01

    The performance of pulsed laser deposited tungsten carbide films as diffusion barriers between a Si substrate and an Al overlayer has been investigated. Four-point probe measurement of resistance is employed to monitor the electrical stability of the Al/WC/Si metallization schemes upon thermal annealing in a vacuum for 30 min in a temperature range from 100 to 500 °C. The Glancing angle x-ray diffraction technique has been used to characterize the as-deposited as well as annealed samples. To study the metallurgical interaction between Al overlayer and the barrier film, experiments on isothermal annealings are carried out. The data obtained have been used to estimate the activation energy for the formation of the intermetallic compound WAl12. Morphological features of the annealed samples have been obtained by employing the technique of scanning electron microscopy.

  19. Field emission properties of amorphous GaN ultrathin films fabricated by pulsed laser deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG FengYing; WANG RuZhi; ZHAO Wei; SONG XueMei; WANG Bo; YAN Hui

    2009-01-01

    Amorphous gallium nitride (a-GaN) films with thicknesses of 5 and 300 nm are deposited on n-Si (100) substrates by pulsed laser deposition (PLD), and their field emission (FE) properties are studied. It shows that compared with thicker (300 nm) a-GaN film, better FE performance is obtained on ultrathin (5 nm) a-GaN film with a threshold field of 0.78 V/μm, which is the lowest value ever reported. Furthermore, the current density reaches 42 mA/cm~2 when the applied field is 3.72 V/μm. These experimental results unambiguously confirm Binh's theoretical analysis (Birth et al. Phys Rev Lett, 2000, 85(4): 864-867) that the FE performance would be prominently enhanced with the coating of an ultra-thin wide band-gap semiconductor film.

  20. Pulsed-laser-deposited YBCO thin films using modified MTG processed targets

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, C H; Kim, I T; Hahn, T S

    1999-01-01

    YBCO thin films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition from targets fabricated using the modified melt-textured growth (MTG) method and the solid-state sintering (SSS) method. All of the films showed c-axis orientations, but the films from the MTG targets had better crystallinity than those from the SSS targets. As the substrate temperature was increased, T sub c and J sub c of the films increased. The films from the MTG targets showed better superconducting properties than those from the SSS targets. From the composition analysis of the targets, the Y-richer vapor species arriving at the substrate from the MTG targets are thought to form a thermodynamically more stable YBCO phase with less cation disorder.

  1. Multilayer zone plates for X-ray focusing fabricated by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doering, Florian; Eberl, Christian; Liese, Tobias; Krebs, Hans-Ulrich [Institut fuer Materialphysik, University of Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    X-ray microscopy in the soft and hard regime is a highly useful technique for biological and materials sciences, polymer research, colloidal science and even earth science. One alternative approach for two-dimensional x-ray focusing is to prepare non-periodic multilayer structures. They can be designed in zone plate geometry by depositing high quality non-periodic multilayers on wires according to the Fresnel zone plate law. For this, ZrO{sub 2}/Ti and W/Si multilayers with high optical contrast in the soft and hard x-ray region, respectively, were pulsed laser deposited (PLD) at 248 nm. In this contribution, the growth of multilayers on flat and curved surfaces (studied by electron microscopy after focused ion beam preparation) is compared, and the fabrication steps of different zone plate structures are presented.

  2. Structural and morphological properties of metallic thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition for photocathode application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorusso, A.; Gontad, F.; Caricato, A. P.; Chiadroni, E.; Broitman, E.; Perrone, A.

    2016-03-01

    In this work yttrium and lead thin films have been deposited by pulsed laser deposition technique and characterized by ex situ different diagnostic methods. All the films were adherent to the substrates and revealed a polycrystalline structure. Y films were uniform with a very low roughness and droplet density, while Pb thin films were characterized by a grain morphology with a relatively high roughness and droplet density. Such metallic materials are studied because they are proposed as a good alternative to copper and niobium photocathodes which are generally used in radiofrequency and superconducting radiofrequency guns, respectively. The photoemission performances of the photocathodes based on Y and Pb thin films have been also studied and discussed.

  3. On the wetting behavior of ceria thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Sin-Pui; Rossero, Jorge; Chen, Chen; Li, Daniel; Takoudis, Christos G.; Abiade, Jeremiah T.

    2017-02-01

    Polymers are most widely used in the production of water-repellant coatings. However, their use in applications requiring wear resistance or high-temperature stability is extremely limited. A recent report suggests that wear resistant, thermally stable rare earth oxide materials like cerium dioxide (ceria) are intrinsically water repellant. We have studied this intriguing finding for ceria thin films fabricated by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at different oxygen pressures and different substrate temperatures. We used a custom apparatus for measuring water contact angles on ceria films deposited by PLD. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to determine the relationship between the ceria wetting behavior and ceria surface chemistry. Our results show that ceria thin films are intrinsically hydrophilic and that hydrophobicity arises due to adsorption of hydrocarbon species after ˜24 h.

  4. Nanostructured rhodium films produced by pulsed laser deposition for nuclear fusion applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passoni, M.; Dellasega, D.; Grosso, G.; Conti, C.; Ubaldi, M. C.; Bottani, C. E.

    2010-09-01

    In this paper the possibilities offered by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) for the production of nanostructured rhodium films with improved properties are explored. Thanks to its high reflectivity and low sputtering yield, rhodium is one of the best candidates for the development of thin films to be used in first mirrors, which are crucial components in many diagnostic systems of thermonuclear magnetic fusion machines, like tokamaks. Due to the features of PLD, by varying the process parameters it is possible to tailor both the structure, i.e. the nanocrystalline domain size of the deposited films, down to less than 5 nm and separately control the other relevant physical properties. This leads to modifications in growth regime and annealing dynamics, in such a way that both morphology and reflectivity achieve the properties demanded to use these films as mirrors for fusion applications, opening at the same time new possibilities for the future improvement of thermo-mechanical and adhesion properties.

  5. TC17 titanium alloy laser melting deposition repair process and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qi; Wang, Yudai; Zheng, Hang; Tang, Kang; Li, Huaixue; Gong, Shuili

    2016-08-01

    Due to the high manufacturing cost of titanium compressor blisks, aero engine repairing process research has important engineering significance and economic value. TC17 titanium alloy is a rich β stable element dual α+β phase alloy whose nominal composition is Ti-5Al-2Sn-2Zr-4Mo-4Cr. It has high mechanical strength, good fracture toughness, high hardenability and a wide forging-temperature range. Through a surface response experiment with different laser powers, scanning speeds and powder feeding speeds, the coaxial powder feeding laser melting deposition repair process is studied for the surface circular groove defects. In this paper, the tensile properties, relative density, microhardness, elemental composition, internal defects and microstructure of the laser-repaired TC17 forging plate are analyzed. The results show that the laser melting deposition process could realize the form restoration of groove defect; tensile strength and elongation could reach 1100 MPa and 10%, which could reach 91-98% that of original TC17 wrought material; with the optimal parameters (1000 W-25 V-8 mm/s), the microhardness of the additive zone, the heat-affected zone and base material is evenly distributed at 370-390 HV500. The element content difference between the additive zone and base material is less than ±0.15%. Due to the existence of the pores 10 μm in diameter, the relative density could reach 99%, which is mainly inversely proportional to the powder feeding speed. The repaired zone is typically columnar and dendrite crystal, and the 0.5-1.5 mm-deep heat-affected zone in the groove interface is coarse equiaxial crystal.

  6. Statistical analysis and optimization of direct metal laser deposition of 227-F Colmonoy nickel alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelastro, A.; Campanelli, S. L.; Casalino, G.

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a study on process parameters and building strategy for the deposition of Colmonoy 227-F powder by CO2 laser with a focal spot diameter of 0.3 mm. Colmonoy 227-F is a nickel alloy especially designed for mold manufacturing. The substrate material is a 10 mm thick plate of AISI 304 steel. A commercial CO2 laser welding machine was equipped with a low-cost powder feeding system. In this work, following another one in which laser power, scanning speed and powder flow rate had been studied, the effects of two important process parameters, i.e. hatch spacing and step height, on the properties of the built parts were analysed. The explored ranges of hatch spacing and step height were respectively 150-300 μm and 100-200 μm, whose dimensions were comparable with that of the laser spot. The roughness, adhesion, microstructure, microhardness and density of the manufactured specimens were studied for multi-layer samples, which were made of 30 layers. The statistical significance of the studied process parameters was assessed by the analysis of the variance. The process parameters used allowed to obtain both first layer-to-substrate and layer-to-layer good adhesions. The microstructure was fine and almost defect-free. The microhardness of the deposited material was about 100 HV higher than that of the starting powder. The density as high as 98% of that of the same bulk alloy was more than satisfactory. Finally, simultaneous optimization of density and roughness was performed using the contour plots.

  7. Electronic and optical studies of pulse laser deposited ZnO/NiO bilayer film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraskar, P.; Dar, T. A.; Choudhary, R. J.; Sen, P. K.; Sen, P.

    2016-10-01

    We report the structural, optical and electronic properties of polycrystalline ZnO and NiO thin films and amorphous ZnO/NiO bilayer film, prepared by pulsed laser deposition technique. Despite of the presence of both Zn and Ni in +2 state in the bilayer film, the grown bilayer shows no reflections (in XRD) corresponding to ZnO or NiO. The difference in crystal structure of ZnO and NiO leads to the strain in the grown bilayer film. An increase in the band gap has been observed in bilayer film which can be attributed to the amorphous nature of the structure.

  8. Monitoring of the morphologic reconstruction of deposited ablation products in laser irradiation of silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlasova M.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Using electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray microanalysis, and IR spectroscopy, it was established that, in the regime of continuous laser irradiation of silicon at P = 170 W in different gaseous atmospheres with an oxygen impurity, SiOx composite films with a complex morphology form. The main components of ablation products are clusters that form during flight of ablation products and as a result of separation of SiOx-clusters from the zone of the irradiation channel. The roughness and density of the films depend on the heating temperature of the target surface and the type of deposited clusters.

  9. Technological Aspects of High Speed Direct Laser Deposition Based on Heterophase Powder Metallurgy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turichin, G. A.; Klimova, O. G.; Zemlyakov, E. V.; Babkin, K. D.; Kolodyazhnyy, D. Yu.; Shamray, F. A.; Travyanov, A. Ya.; Petrovskiy, P. V.

    The article deals with physical peculiarities and technology of high speed processes of direct laser deposition. On the base of theoretic research and computer modeling the powder transfer has been optimized, increasing process stability and productivity. Principles of nozzles design also have been developed in accordance with technological needs. An influence of process mode on product properties and material structure was defined for heat resisted Ni-based superalloys. Developed technology provided the mechanic properties of products on the level of rolled material and allows avoid heat treatment and HIP in production process. Possible ways for increasing process performance and economic efficiency also have been discussed.

  10. Growth of ZnO thin films on GaAs by pulsed laser deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Craciun, V.; Elders, J.; Gardeniers, J.G.E.; Geretovsky, J.; Boyd, Ian W.

    1995-01-01

    ZnO thin films have been grown on GaAs substrates using the pulsed laser deposition technique with or without a photodeposited SiO2 buffer layer. The presence of the SiO2 layer has a beneficial effect on the crystalline quality of the grown ZnO films. Highly c-axis oriented ZnO films having a full width at half maximum value of the (002) X-ray diffraction line of less than 0.13 ° have been grown on such buffer layers at a substrate temperature of only 350 °C.

  11. Nanostructured molybdenum carbide thin films obtained by femtosecond pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teghil, Roberto; De Bonis, Angela [Dipartimento di Chimica ' ' A.M. Tamburro' ' , Universita della Basilicata, Potenza (Italy); IMIP-U.O.S. di Potenza, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Tito (Italy); Galasso, Agostino; Sansone, Maria [Dipartimento di Chimica ' ' A.M. Tamburro' ' , Universita della Basilicata, Potenza (Italy); Rau, Julietta V. [ISM, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Rome (Italy); Santagata, Antonio [IMIP-U.O.S. di Potenza, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Tito (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    The films obtained by ultra-short pulsed laser deposition of a target of molybdenum carbide, at different substrate temperatures, have been characterized by different techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results indicate that the films are formed by a large number of particles with nanometric dimensions and are composed mainly of Mo{sub 2}C. The presence of an excess of carbon, found in the films, is probably due the presence of a certain amount of graphite in the target (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. CEMS study on diluted magneto titanium oxide films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, K.; Inaba, K.; Iio, S.; Hitosugi, T.; Hasegawa, T.; Hirose, Y.; Homonnay, Z.

    6% 57Fe doped titanium oxide films, prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on sapphire substrate at 650° under various vacuum conditions, were characterized mainly by conversion electron Mössbauer spectrometry (CEMS). Two magnetic sextets with hyperfine fields 33 and 29 T, and one doublet were observed in the CEMS spectra of Ti02 films prepared under P02=10-6 and 10-8 torr, which showed ferromagnetism at room temperature, whereas only the doublet of paramagnetic Fe3+ species was observed for the film prepared under P02=10-1 torr.

  13. Structural and magnetic properties of Gd/Fe multilayers grown by pulsed laser deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kant, K. Mohan; Bahl, Christian Robert Haffenden; Pryds, Nini;

    This work investigates structural and magnetic properties of Gd/Fe multilayered thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition onto Si (001) substrates at room temperature. The Fe layer thickness is varied from 70 to 150 nm and its effect on structural and magnetic properties of Gd/Fe multilayers has...... been explored. The samples have a 10 nm Ag capping layer to prevent oxidation during the processing. Two magnetization saturation plateaus were observed in the magnetization vs field isotherm at 290 K, in parallel configuration and these plateau values correspond to that of MFe and MFe + MGd....

  14. Quantum cascade laser-based measurement of metal alkylamide density during atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslar, James E; Kimes, William A; Sperling, Brent A

    2012-03-01

    An in situ gas-phase diagnostic for the metal alkylamide compound tetrakis(ethylmethylamido) hafnium (TEMAH), Hf[N(C(2)H(5))(CH(3))](4), was demonstrated. This diagnostic is based on direct absorption measurement of TEMAH vapor using an external cavity quantum cascade laser emitting at 979 cm(-1), coinciding with the most intense TEMAH absorption in the mid-infrared spectral region, and employing 50 kHz amplitude modulation with synchronous detection. Measurements were performed in a single-pass configuration in a research-grade atomic layer deposition (ALD) chamber. To examine the detection limit of this technique for use as a TEMAH delivery monitor, this technique was demonstrated in the absence of any other deposition reactants or products, and to examine the selectivity of this technique in the presence of deposition products that potentially interfere with detection of TEMAH vapor, it was demonstrated during ALD of hafnium oxide using TEMAH and water. This technique successfully detected TEMAH at molecular densities present during simulated industrial ALD conditions. During hafnium oxide ALD using TEMAH and water, absorbance from gas-phase reaction products did not interfere with TEMAH measurements while absorption by reaction products deposited on the optical windows did interfere, although interfering absorption by deposited reaction products corresponded to only ≈4% of the total derived TEMAH density. With short measurement times and appropriate signal averaging, estimated TEMAH minimum detectable densities as low as ≈2 × 10(12) molecules/cm(3) could be obtained. While this technique was demonstrated specifically for TEMAH delivery and hafnium oxide ALD using TEMAH and water, it should be readily applicable to other metal alkylamide compounds and associated metal oxide and nitride deposition chemistries, assuming similar metal alkylamide molar absorptivity and molecular density in the measurement chamber.

  15. Optical properties of PMN-PT thin films prepared using pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, X.L., E-mail: tongxinglin@yahoo.com.cn [Key Laboratory of Fiber Optic Sensing Technology and Information Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Ministry of Education, 122 Luoshi Road, Wuhan 430070 (China); Lin, K.; Lv, D.J.; Yang, M.H.; Liu, Z.X.; Zhang, D.S. [Key Laboratory of Fiber Optic Sensing Technology and Information Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Ministry of Education, 122 Luoshi Road, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2009-06-30

    (1 - x)Pb(Mg{sub 1/3}Nb{sub 2/3})O{sub 3}-xPbTiO{sub 3} (PMN-PT) thin films have been deposited on quartz substrates using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Crystalline microstructure of the deposited PMN-PT thin films has been investigated with X-ray diffraction (XRD). Optical transmission spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy are used to characterize optical properties of the deposited PMN-PT thin films. The results show that the PMN-PT thin films of perovskite structure have been formed, and the crystalline and optical properties of the PMN-PT thin films can be improved as increasing the annealing temperature to 750 deg. C, but further increasing the annealing temperature to 950 deg. C may lead to a degradation of the crystallinity and the optical properties of the PMN-PT thin films. In addition, a weak second harmonic intensity (SHG) has been observed for the PMN-PT thin film formed at the optimum annealing temperature of 750 deg. C according to Maker fringe method. All these suggest that the annealing temperature has significant effect on the structural and optical properties of the PMN-PT thin films.

  16. Post-deposition cooling in oxygen is critical for YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 sub - sub d films deposited by eclipse pulsed laser deposition method

    CERN Document Server

    Ohmukai, M; Ohno, T

    2001-01-01

    YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 sub - sub d thin films were deposited on MgO single crystals by means of an eclipse pulsed laser deposition method. Deposited films are cooled down in situ under an oxygen atmosphere at a given oxygen pressure. The relationship between critical temperature and oxygen deficiency was investigated by means of electrical resistance R(T) and X-ray diffraction measurements. Post- deposition cooling is critical and the high pressure of oxygen during cooling is favorable.

  17. Thermoluminescence of thin films deposited by laser ablation; Termoluminiscencia de peliculas delgadas depositadas por ablacion laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobar A, L.; Camps, E.; Arrieta, A.; Romero, S.; Gonzalez, P.R.; Olea M, O.; Diaz E, R. [Depto. de Fisica, ININ, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    Materials in thin film form have received great attention in the last few years mainly because of their singular properties, which may differ significantly from their bulk attributes making them attractive for a wide variety of applications. In particular, thermoluminescence (Tl) properties of thin films have been studied recently owing to their potential applications in detection for both ionizing and non ionizing radiation. The aim of the present work is to report the synthesis and characterization of C Nx, aluminum oxide and titanium oxide thin films. Thermoluminescence response of the obtained thin films was studied after subject thin films to UV radiation (254 nm) as well as to gamma radiation (Co-60). Thermoluminescence glow curves exhibited a peak centered at 150 C for CN{sub x} whereas for titanium oxide the glow curve shows a maximum peaking at 171 C. Characterization of the physical properties of the deposited materials is presented. (Author)

  18. Microstructure and mechanical properties of hybrid fabricated 1Cr12Ni2WMoVNb steel by laser melting deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yudai; Tang Haibo; Fang Yanli; Wang Huaming

    2013-01-01

    Laser melting deposition was carried out to deposit a 1Cr12Ni2WMoVNb steel bar on a wrought bar of same material.Room-temperature tensile properties of the hybrid fabricated 1Cr1 2Ni2WMoVNb steel sample were evaluated,and microstructure,fracture surface morphology,and hardness profile were analyzed by an optical microscope (OM),a scanning electron microscope (SEM),and a hardness tester.Results show that the hybrid fabricated 1Cr12Ni2WMoVNb steel sample consists of laser deposited zone,wrought substrate zone,and heat affected zone (HAZ)of the wrought substrate.The laser deposited zone has coarse columnar prior austenite grains and fine well-aligned dendritic structure,while the HAZ of the wrought substrate has equiaxed prior austenite grains which are notably finer than those in the wrought substrate zone.Besides,austenitic transformation mechanism of the HAZ of the wrought substrate is different from that of the laser deposited zone during the reheating period of the laser deposition,which determines the different prior austenite grain morphologies of the two zones.Microhardness values of both the laser deposited zone and the HAZ of the wrought substrate are higher than that of the wrought substrate zone.Tensile properties of the hybrid fabricated 1Cr12Ni2WMoVNb steel sample are comparable to those of the wrought bar,and fracture occurs in the wrought substrate zone during the tensile test.

  19. Laser-induced fluorescence analysis of plasmas for epitaxial growth of YBiO3 films with pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsel, Kasper; Groenen, Rik; Bastiaens, Bert; Koster, Gertjan; Rijnders, Guus; Boller, Klaus-J.

    2016-12-01

    We record the two-dimensional laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) on multiple plasma constituents in a YBiO3 plasma. This allows us to directly link the influence of oxygen present in the background gas during pulsed laser deposition to the oxidation of plasma species as well as the formation of epitaxial YBiO3 films. With spatiotemporal LIF mapping of the plasma species (Y, YO, Bi, and BiO) in different background gas compositions, we find that little direct chemical interaction takes place between the plasma plume constituents and the background gas. However, a strong influence of the background gas composition can be seen on the YBO film growth, as well as a strong correlation between the oxygen fraction in the background gas and the amount of YO in the plasma plume. We assign this correlation to a direct interaction between the background gas and the target in between ablation pulses. In an O2 background, an oxygen-rich surface layer forms in between ablation pulses, which provides additional oxygen for the plasma plume during target ablation. This differs from our previous observations in STO and LAO plasmas, where species oxidation primarily takes place during propagation of the plasma plume towards the substrate.

  20. Laser-induced fluorescence analysis of plasmas for epitaxial growth of YBiO3 films with pulsed laser deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper Orsel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We record the two-dimensional laser-induced fluorescence (LIF on multiple plasma constituents in a YBiO3 plasma. This allows us to directly link the influence of oxygen present in the background gas during pulsed laser deposition to the oxidation of plasma species as well as the formation of epitaxial YBiO3 films. With spatiotemporal LIF mapping of the plasma species (Y, YO, Bi, and BiO in different background gas compositions, we find that little direct chemical interaction takes place between the plasma plume constituents and the background gas. However, a strong influence of the background gas composition can be seen on the YBO film growth, as well as a strong correlation between the oxygen fraction in the background gas and the amount of YO in the plasma plume. We assign this correlation to a direct interaction between the background gas and the target in between ablation pulses. In an O2 background, an oxygen-rich surface layer forms in between ablation pulses, which provides additional oxygen for the plasma plume during target ablation. This differs from our previous observations in STO and LAO plasmas, where species oxidation primarily takes place during propagation of the plasma plume towards the substrate.

  1. An Experimental Study on Slurry Erosion Resistance of Single and Multilayered Deposits of Ni-WC Produced by Laser-Based Powder Deposition Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balu, Prabu; Hamid, Syed; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2013-11-01

    Single and multilayered deposits containing different mass fractions of tungsten carbide (WC) in nickel (Ni)-matrix (NT-20, NT-60, NT-80) are deposited on a AISI 4140 steel substrate using a laser-based powder deposition process. The transverse cross section of the coupons reveals that the higher the mass fraction of WC in Ni-matrix leads to a more uniform distribution through Ni-matrix. The slurry erosion resistance of the fabricated coupons is tested at three different impingement angles using an abrasive water jet cutting machine, which is quantified based on the erosion rate. The top layer of a multilayered deposit (i.e., NT-60 in a two-layer NT-60 over NT-20 deposit) exhibits better erosion resistance at all three tested impingement angles when compared to a single-layer (NT-60) deposit. A definite increase in the erosion resistance is noted with an addition of nano-size WC particles. The relationship between the different mass fractions of reinforcement (WC) in the deposited composite material (Ni-WC) and their corresponding matrix (Ni) hardness on the erosion rate is studied. The eroded surface is analyzed in the light of a three-dimensional (3-D) profilometer and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results show that a volume fraction of approximately 62% of WC with a Ni-matrix hardness of 540 HV resulting in the gouging out of WC from the Ni-matrix by the action of slurry. It is concluded that the slurry erosion resistance of the AISI 4140 steel can be significantly enhanced by introducing single and multilayered deposits of Ni-WC composite material fabricated by the laser-based powder deposition process.

  2. Fretting wear behavior of laser-nitrided Ti-5Al-5Mo-5V-1Cr-1Fe alloy fabricated by laser melting deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L.; Shangguan, Y. J.; Tang, H. B.; Wang, H. M.

    2014-09-01

    Fretting wear behavior of laser-nitrided titanium alloy (Ti-5Al-5Mo-5V-1Cr-1Fe) fabricated by laser melting deposition (LMD) has been investigated to explore surface engineering for protection against wear damage of laser melting deposited titanium alloy. The morphology and volume of the wear scars of unmodified and laser-nitrided LMD Ti-5Al-5Mo-5V-1Cr-1Fe tested at different frequencies, 10 and 50 Hz, were studied using non-contact three-dimensional surface profilometer and scanning electron microscope. Friction coefficients measured at different frequencies or loading forces were compared for unmodified and laser-nitrided LMD specimens. Experimental results show that laser-nitrided LMD specimens have shown fretting resistance superior to unmodified LMD specimens due to the presence of hard TiN dendrites in the laser-nitrided layer. W-shaped wear scar caused by local rotation of fretting ball at the two ends of the scar was observed. Given a constant loading force of 50 N, unmodified and laser-nitrided LMD specimens exhibited similar friction coefficients and their friction coefficients increased with test frequency. The friction coefficients of both specimens increased with the reduction of normal load, which corresponds to the trend in Hertzian contact model.

  3. Effect of laser power on the microstructural behaviour and strength of modified laser deposited Ti6Al4V+Cu alloy for medical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erinosho, Mutiu F.; Akinlabi, Esther T.

    2016-03-01

    The excellent biocompatibility property of Grade 5 titanium alloy has made its desirability largely increasing in the field of biomedical. The titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) was modified with the addition of 3 weight percent (wt %) copper via a laser deposition process using the Ytterbium fiber laser with a wavelength of 1.047 μm. Therefore, this paper presents the effect of laser power on the microstructural behaviour and strength of the modified Ti6Al4V+Cu alloy. The laser powers were varied between 600 W and 1600 W respectively while all other parameters such as the scanning speed, powder flow rates and gas flow rates were kept constant. The melt pool and width of the deposited alloy increases as the laser power was increased. The α-lamella was observed to be finer at low laser power, and towards the fusion zone, Widmanstettan structures were fused and become smaller; and showing an evidence of α-martensite phases. The strength of the modified alloy was derived from the hardness values. The strength was observed to increase initially to a point as the laser power increases and afterwards decreased as the laser power was further increased. The improved Ti6Al4V+Cu alloy can be anticipated for biomedical application.

  4. Effect of thermal exposure on microstructure and tensile properties of laser deposited Ti60A alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ali [Engineering Research Center of Ministry of Education on Laser Direct Manufacturing for Large Metallic Components, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, 37 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Liu, Dong, E-mail: liudong.buaa@gmail.com [Engineering Research Center of Ministry of Education on Laser Direct Manufacturing for Large Metallic Components, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, 37 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Wang, Huaming [Engineering Research Center of Ministry of Education on Laser Direct Manufacturing for Large Metallic Components, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, 37 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2013-02-01

    A near {alpha} high-temperature titanium alloy Ti60A (Ti5.54Al3.38Sn3.34Zr0.37Mo0.46Si) was fabricated by laser melting deposition (LMD) manufacturing process. Room-temperature tensile properties before and after 600 Degree-Sign C/100 h thermal exposure were evaluated. Microstructural changes and tensile fracture characteristics were examined by OM, SEM and TEM equipped with EDX. Results indicate that {alpha} lamellae coarsening and the precipitation of incoherent silicides and coherent Ti{sub 3}Al in the alloys after thermal exposure cause the degradation of tensile properties. The silicides are confirmed to be hexagonal quasi-S{sub 2} type (TiZr{sub 0.3}){sub 6}Si{sub 3}, with a=0.71 nm and c=0.37 nm by electron diffraction analysis. Compared to wrought Ti60A alloy with coarse Widmanstatten microstructure, laser deposited Ti60A alloy with fine basket-weave microstructure exhibits slightly higher strength and ductility after thermal exposure. The effect of thermal exposure on tensile properties related to the precipitation of Ti{sub 3}Al and silicides is discussed.

  5. Yttria and ceria doped zirconia thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Saporiti

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Yttria stabilized Zirconia (YSZ is a standard electrolyte for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs, which are potential candidates for next generation portable and mobile power sources. YSZ electrolyte thin films having a cubic single phase allow reducing the SOFC operating temperature without diminishing the electrochemical power density. Films of 8 mol% Yttria stabilized Zirconia (8YSZ and films with addition of 4 weight% Ceria (8YSZ + 4CeO2 were grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD technique using 8YSZ and 8YSZ + 4CeO2 targets and a Nd-YAG laser (355 nm. Films have been deposited on Soda-Calcia-Silica glass and Si(100 substrates at room temperature. The morphology and structural characteristics of the samples have been studied by means of X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Films of a cubic-YSZ single phase with thickness in the range of 1-3 µm were grown on different substrates.

  6. Yttria and ceria doped zirconia thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saporiti, F.; Juarez, R. E., E-mail: cididi@fi.uba.ar [Grupo de Materiales Avanzados, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Audebert, F. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Boudard, M. [Laboratoire des Materiaux et du Genie Physique (CNRS), Grenoble (France)

    2013-11-01

    The Yttria stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) is a standard electrolyte for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), which are potential candidates for next generation portable and mobile power sources. YSZ electrolyte thin films having a cubic single phase allow reducing the SOFC operating temperature without diminishing the electrochemical power density. Films of 8 mol% Yttria stabilized Zirconia (8YSZ) and films with addition of 4 weight% Ceria (8YSZ + 4CeO{sub 2}) were grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique using 8YSZ and 8YSZ + 4CeO{sub 2} targets and a Nd-YAG laser (355 nm). Films have been deposited on Soda-Calcia-Silica glass and Si(100) substrates at room temperature. The morphology and structural characteristics of the samples have been studied by means of X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Films of a cubic-YSZ single phase with thickness in the range of 1-3 Micro-Sign m were grown on different substrates (author)

  7. Structural and electrical properties of tantalum oxide films grown by photo-assisted pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun-Ying; Boyd, Ian W.

    2002-01-01

    We describe the growth of thin films of Ta 2O 5 on quartz and silicon (1 0 0) substrates by an in situ photo-assisted pulsed laser deposition (photo-PLD) using radiation from a Nd:YAG laser (wavelength, λ=532 nm) to stimulate the ablation, and from an excimer lamp to excite additional photochemistry. The layers grown were investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, UV spectrophotometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM), ellipsometry and electrical measurements. We have found that they exhibit a significant improvement in microstructure, and optical and electrical properties compared with conventional PLD films prepared under, otherwise, identical conditions. For example, FT-IR results showed that the suboxide content in the as-grown films deposited by the photo-PLD process is less, while the leakage current density was an order of magnitude less at around 10 -6 A/cm 2 at a bias of 1 V. These results indicate that this photo-PLD process approach can be advantageous for dielectric and optical oxide film growth.

  8. Pulsed laser deposition of hydroxyapatite on nanostructured titanium towards drug eluting implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh P; Mohan, Nimmy; Yokogawa, Y; Varma, Harikrishna

    2013-07-01

    Titania nanotubes grown on titanium substrates by electrochemical anodization in glycerol-ammonium fluoride-water system were used to develop efficient drug carrying implants upon coating hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramic. The nanostructured surfaces achieved by anodization were caped with HA crystallites by pulsed laser deposition. The implant substrates were studied for their drug carrying capacity using gentamicin as a model. The nano-tubular surface with HA coating had better drug loading capacity of about 800 μg/cm(2) gentamicin while the bare anodized substrate carried less than 660 μg/cm(2). The HA coating alone stored as low as 68 μg/cm(2) and released the drug within the initial burst period itself. The ceramic coated anodized substrates were found to be more efficient in controlled delivery for longer than 160 h with a drug release of 0.5 μg/cm(2) even towards the end. The substrate with nanostructuring alone delivered the whole drug within 140 h. This study proposes the application of laser deposition of HA over nanostructured titanium, which proves to be promising towards controlled drug eluting bioceramic coated metallic prostheses.

  9. Electron microscopy characterization of Ni-Cr-B-Si-C laser deposited coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, I; Rao, J C; Ocelík, V; De Hosson, J Th M

    2013-02-01

    During laser deposition of Ni-Cr-B-Si-C alloys with high amounts of Cr and B, various microstructures and phases can be generated from the same chemical composition that results in heterogeneous properties in the clad layer. In this study, the microstructure and phase constitution of a high-alloy Ni-Cr-B-Si-C coating deposited by laser cladding were analyzed by a combination of several microscopy characterization techniques including scanning electron microscopy in secondary and backscatter imaging modes, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The combination of EDS and EBSD allowed unequivocal identification of micron-sized precipitates as polycrystalline orthorhombic CrB, single crystal tetragonal Cr5B3, and single crystal hexagonal Cr7C3. In addition, TEM characterization showed various equilibrium and metastable Ni-B, Ni-Si, and Ni-Si-B eutectic products in the alloy matrix. The findings of this study can be used to explain the phase formation reactions and to tune the microstructure of Ni-Cr-B-Si-C coatings to obtain the desired properties.

  10. Layered MoS{sub 2} grown on c-sapphire by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Yen-Teng; Ma, Chun-Hao; Luong, Tien-Tung; Wei, Lin-Lung; Yen, Tzu-Chun; Chu, Yung-Ching; Tu, Yung-Yi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu (China); Hsu, Wei-Ting; Chang, Wen-Hao [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu (China); Pande, Krishna Prasad [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu (China); Chang, Edward Yi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu (China); Department of Electronics Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu (China)

    2015-03-01

    Layered growth of molybdenum disulphide (MoS{sub 2}) was successfully achieved by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method on c -plane sapphire substrate. Growth of monolayer to a few monolayer MoS{sub 2}, dependent on the pulsed number of excimer laser in PLD is demonstrated, indicating the promising controllability of layer growth. Among the samples with various pulse number deposition, the frequency difference (A{sub 1g}-E{sup 1}{sub 2g}) in Raman analysis of the 70 pulse sample is estimated as 20.11 cm{sup -1}, suggesting a monolayer MoS{sub 2} was obtained. Two-dimensional (2D) layer growth of MoS{sub 2} is confirmed by the streaky reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) patterns during growth and the cross-sectional view of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The in-plane relationship, (0006) sapphire//(0002)MoS{sub 2} and [2 anti 1 anti 10] sapphire//[0 anti 1 anti 10]MoS{sub 2} is determined. The results imply that PLD is suitable for layered MoS{sub 2} growth. Additionally, the oxide states of Mo 3d core level spectra of PLD grown MoS{sub 2}, analysed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), can be effectively reduced by adopting a post sulfurization process. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. In-situ fabrication of Y-Ba-Cu oxide thin films by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, R.M.; Ferguson, A.L.; Pegrum, C.M. (Strathclyde Univ., Glasgow (United Kingdom). Dept. of Applied Physics)

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports the in-situ deposition of laser-ablated YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} films on MgO substrates, using the third and second harmonics of a Nd-YAG laser. The authors investigate the conditions needed during post-deposition oxygenation to produce the best films. The authors highly-oriented samples are made using the third harmonic (wavelength {lambda} = 355 nm) on {l angle}100{r angle} MgO and have a transition temperature T{sub c} of 85K, a critical current density J{sub c} of 1.5 {times} 10{sup 5} A/cm{sup 2} at 4.2 K. Films made with the second harmonic on MgO are, as expected, markedly poorer in quality. Highly-oriented films have also been made on {l angle}110{r angle} and {l angle}100{r angle} SrTiO{sub 3} with {lambda} = 355 nm.

  12. Comparison of laser-ablation and hot-wall chemical vapour deposition techniques for nanowire fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, E.; Cheng, G.; Guthrie, S.; Turner-Evans, D.; Broomfield, E.; Lei, B.; Li, C.; Zhang, D.; Zhou, C.; Reed, M. A.

    2006-06-01

    A comparison of the transport properties of populations of single-crystal, In2O3 nanowires (NWs) grown by unassisted hot-wall chemical vapour deposition (CVD) versus NWs grown by laser-ablation-assisted chemical vapour deposition (LA-CVD) is presented. For nominally identical growth conditions across the two systems, NWs fabricated at 850 °C with laser-ablation had significantly higher average mobilities at the 99.9% confidence level, 53.3 ± 5.8 cm2 V-1 s-1 versus 10.2 ± 1.9 cm2 V-1 s-1. It is also observed that increasing growth temperature decreases mobility for LA-CVD NWs. Transmission electron microscopy studies of CVD-fabricated samples indicate the presence of an amorphous In2O3 region surrounding the single-crystal core. Further, low-temperature measurements verify the presence of ionized impurity scattering in low-mobility CVD-grown NWs.

  13. Structural Transition in SrZnO Laser Pulse Deposited Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albrithen H. A.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We have discovered a structural transition for the SrZnO alloy films from a wurtzite to a rock-salt structure, leading to a reduction in the (112̲0/(0001 surface energy ratio. The films were grown by pulsed laser deposition using different SrO ratios, x. We have revealed that growth at a higher temperature, 750°C, resulted in a sharp 0002 peak at a low SrO content (5%, whereas growth at a higher SrO content (10% resulted in a non-crystalline film with minute crystallites with a (112̲0 orientation. Generally the crystallinity decreased as the SrO content increased. No results obtained for the crystalline films showed any orientation of significant peaks besides the peak attributed to the (0001 plane, suggesting epitaxial growth. Optical measurements showed difference in transmission widows of alloys with different SrO percentage, and this was correlated to SrO influence on growth mode as indicated by scanning electron imaging. The studied SrZnO films, with SrO/(SrO + ZnO ≤ 0.25, were grown by pulsed laser deposition using different SrO ratios, x. The effects of temperature and oxygen pressure during growth on the films’ structural properties were investigated. XRD results indicate that the film crystallinity was improved as the temperature and O2 pressure increased up to 650°C and 0.5 Torr, respectively.

  14. Towards new binary compounds: Synthesis of amorphous phosphorus carbide by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Judy N., E-mail: Judy.Hart@bristol.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); May, Paul W.; Allan, Neil L. [School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); Hallam, Keith R. [Interface Analysis Centre, University of Bristol, 121 St. Michaels Hill, Bristol BS2 8BS (United Kingdom); Claeyssens, Frederik [Kroto Research Institute, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Broad Lane, Sheffield S3 7HQ (United Kingdom); Fuge, Gareth M.; Ruda, Michelle [School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); Heard, Peter J. [Interface Analysis Centre, University of Bristol, 121 St. Michaels Hill, Bristol BS2 8BS (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-15

    We have recently undertaken comprehensive computational studies predicting possible crystal structures of the as yet unknown phosphorus carbide as a function of composition. In this work, we report the synthesis of amorphous phosphorus-carbon films by pulsed laser deposition. The local bonding environments of carbon and phosphorus in the synthesised materials have been analysed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy; we have found strong evidence for the formation of direct P-C bonding and hence phosphorus carbide. There is a good agreement between the bonding environments found in this phosphorus carbide material and those predicted in the computational work. In particular, the local bonding environments are consistent with those found in the {beta}-InS-like structures that we predict to be low in energy for phosphorus:carbon ratios between 0.25 and 1. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have synthesised amorphous phosphorus-carbon films by pulsed laser deposition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicate formation of direct P-C bonds and hence phosphorus carbide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Local bonding environments are consistent with those in predicted structures.

  15. Micrometric rods grown by nanosecond pulsed laser deposition of boron carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Quintas, Ignacio; Oujja, Mohamed; Sanz, Mikel; Benitez-Cañete, Antonio [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Chater, Richard J. [Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Cañamares, Maria Vega [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Marco, José F. [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Castillejo, Marta, E-mail: marta.castllejo@iqfr.csic.es [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Micrometric rods obtained by ns pulsed laser deposition of boron carbide at 1064 and 266 nm. • At 1064 nm microrods display crystalline polyhedral shape with sharp edges and flat sides. • Microrods consist of a mixture of boron, boron oxide, boron carbide and aliphatic hydrocarbons. - Abstract: Micrometric size rods have been fabricated via pulsed laser deposition in vacuum from boron carbide targets using nanosecond pulses of 1064 and 266 nm and room temperature Si (1 0 0) substrates. Morphological, structural and chemical characterization of the microrods was made by applying scanning electron microscopy, focussed ion beam microscopy coupled to secondary ion mass spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Ablation at 1064 nm favours the formation of microrods with high aspect ratio, sharp edges and pyramidal tips, typically 10 μm long with a cross section of around 2 μm × 2 μm. Differently, at 266 nm the microrods are of smaller size and present a more globular aspect. The analyses of the microrods provide information about their crystalline nature and composition, based on a mixture which includes boron, boron oxide and boron carbide, and allows discussion of the wavelength dependent growth mechanisms involved.

  16. A Laser-Deposition Approach to Compositional-Spread Discovery of Materials on Conventional Sample Sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christen, Hans M [ORNL; Okubo, Isao [ORNL; Rouleau, Christopher M [ORNL; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle [ORNL; Puretzky, Alexander A [ORNL; Geohegan, David B [ORNL; Lowndes, Douglas H [ORNL

    2005-01-01

    Parallel (multi-sample) approaches, such as discrete combinatorial synthesis or continuous compositional-spread (CCS), can significantly increase the rate of materials discovery and process optimization. Here we review our generalized CCS method, based on pulsed-laser deposition, in which the synchronization between laser firing and substrate translation (behind a fixed slit aperture) yields the desired variations of composition and thickness. In situ alloying makes this approach applicable to the non-equilibrium synthesis of metastable phases. Deposition on a heater plate with a controlled spatial temperature variation can additionally be used for growth-temperature-dependence studies. Composition and temperature variations are controlled on length scales large enough to yield sample sizes sufficient for conventional characterization techniques (such as temperature-dependent measurements of resistivity or magnetic properties). This technique has been applied to various experimental studies, and we present here the results for the growth of electro-optic materials (Sr{sub x}Ba{sub 1-x}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 6}) and magnetic perovskites (Sr{sub 1-x}Ca{sub x}RuO{sub 3}), and discuss the application to the understanding and optimization of catalysts used in the synthesis of dense forests of carbon nanotubes.

  17. A laser-deposition approach to compositional-spread discovery of materials on conventional sample sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, Hans M.; Ohkubo, Isao; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Jellison, Gerald E., Jr.; Puretzky, Alex A.; Geohegan, David B.; Lowndes, Douglas H.

    2005-01-01

    Parallel (multi-sample) approaches, such as discrete combinatorial synthesis or continuous compositional-spread (CCS), can significantly increase the rate of materials discovery and process optimization. Here we review our generalized CCS method, based on pulsed-laser deposition, in which the synchronization between laser firing and substrate translation (behind a fixed slit aperture) yields the desired variations of composition and thickness. In situ alloying makes this approach applicable to the non-equilibrium synthesis of metastable phases. Deposition on a heater plate with a controlled spatial temperature variation can additionally be used for growth-temperature-dependence studies. Composition and temperature variations are controlled on length scales large enough to yield sample sizes sufficient for conventional characterization techniques (such as temperature-dependent measurements of resistivity or magnetic properties). This technique has been applied to various experimental studies, and we present here the results for the growth of electro-optic materials (SrxBa1-xNb2O6) and magnetic perovskites (Sr1-xCaxRuO3), and discuss the application to the understanding and optimization of catalysts used in the synthesis of dense forests of carbon nanotubes.

  18. Modelling of heat and mass transfer in the laser cladding during direct metal deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedenko, D. V.; Kovalev, O. B.

    2013-06-01

    A physical and mathematical model has been proposed for computing the thermal state and shape of the individual deposited track at the laser powder cladding. A three-dimensional statement of the two-phase problem of Stefan type with curved moving boundaries is considered. One of the boundaries is the melting-crystallization boundary, and the other is the boundary of the deposited layer, where the conservation laws are written from the condition of the inflow of the additional mass and energy. To describe the track shape the equation of kinematic compatibility of the points of a surface is used, the motion of which occurs at the expense of the mass of powder particles supplied to the radiation spot. An explicit finite difference scheme on a rectangular nonuniform grid is used for numerical solution of equations. The computations are carried out by through computation without an explicit identification of curved boundaries by using a modification of the immersed boundary method. The computational results are presented for the thermal state and the shape of the surface of the forming individual track depending on physical parameters: the substrate initial temperature, laser radiation intensity, scanning speed, powder feeding rate, etc.

  19. Confinement of phonon propagation in laser deposited tungsten/polycarbonate multilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döring, Florian; Ulrichs, Henning; Pagel, Sinja; Müller, Markus; Mansurova, Maria; Müller, Matthias; Eberl, Christian; Erichsen, Torben; Huebner, Dennis; Vana, Philipp; Mann, Klaus; Münzenberg, Markus; Krebs, Hans-Ulrich

    2016-09-01

    Nanoscale multilayer thin films of W and PC (Polycarbonate) show, due to the great difference of the components’ characteristics, fascinating properties for a variety of possible applications and provide an interesting research field, but are hard to fabricate with low layer thicknesses. Because of the great acoustic mismatch between the two materials, such nanoscale structures are promising candidates for new phononic materials, where phonon propagation is strongly reduced. In this article we show for the first time that W/PC-multilayers can indeed be grown with high quality by pulsed laser deposition. We analyzed the polymer properties depending on the laser fluence used for deposition, which enabled us to find best experimental conditions for the fabrication of high-acoustic-mismatch W/PC multilayers. The multilayers were analyzed by fs pump-probe spectroscopy showing that phonon dynamics on the ps time-scale can strongly be tailored by structural design. While already periodic multilayers exhibit strong phonon localization, especially aperiodic structures present outstandingly low phonon propagation properties making such 1D-layered W/PC nano-structures interesting for new phononic applications.

  20. Frictional Properties of UV illuminated ZnO Thin Films Grown by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Chang, Huan-Pu; Lo, Fang-Yu; Yeh, Yu-Ting; Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University Collaboration

    Zinc Oxide (ZnO) nanostructures have potential applications in nano-electro-mechanical systems (NEMS) due to their unique physical properties. ZnO is also an excellent lubricant and hence a promising candidate for protective coatings in NEMS. By means of atomic force microscopy (AFM), we have investigated the frictional properties of ZnO thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition technique. In addition, UV illumination is used to convert the surface wettability of ZnO thin films from being more hydrophobic to superhydrophilic via the photo-catalyst effect. We found that the frictional properties of the UV illuminated, superhydrophilic ZnO surface are strongly dependent on the environment humidity. While for hydrophobic ZnO, no such dependence is found. The observed frictional behaviors can be explained by the interplay between the surface roughness, environmental humidity and the presence of nanoscale capillary condensation forming between surface asperities at the tip-ZnO contact. Our results might find applications in future ZnO related NEMS. Frictional Properties of UV illuminated ZnO Thin Films Grown by Pulsed Laser Deposition.

  1. Deposition mechanism and microstructure of laser-assisted cold-sprayed (LACS) Al-12 wt.%Si coatings: effects of laser power

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Olakanmi, EO

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available the traditional approaches (electroplating and chemical vapour deposition (CVD)) are generally slow and expensive; thermally sprayed coating techniques (vacuum plasma spray, laser cladding, and 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17... 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 4 microhardness of LACS deposited coatings produced by a 4.4kW Nd:YAG laser system were evaluated via optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). 2...

  2. Perpendicularly oriented barium ferrite thin films with low microwave loss, prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da-Ming, Chen; Yuan-Xun, Li; Li-Kun, Han; Chao, Long; Huai-Wu, Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Barium ferrite (BaM) thin films are deposited on platinum coated silicon wafers by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The effects of deposition substrate temperature on the microstructure, magnetic and microwave properties of BaM thin films are investigated in detail. It is found that microstructure, magnetic and microwave properties of BaM thin film are very sensitive to deposition substrate temperature, and excellent BaM thin film is obtained when deposition temperature is 910 °C and oxygen pressure is 300 mTorr (1 Torr = 1.3332 × 102 Pa). X-ray diffraction patterns and atomic force microscopy images show that the best thin film has perpendicular orientation and hexagonal morphology, and the crystallographic alignment degree can be calculated to be 0.94. Hysteresis loops reveal that the squareness ratio (M r/M s) is as high as 0.93, the saturated magnetization is 4004 Gs (1 Gs = 104 T), and the anisotropy field is 16.5 kOe (1 Oe = 79.5775 A·m-1). Ferromagnetic resonance measurements reveal that the gyromagnetic ratio is 2.8 GHz/kOe, and the ferromagnetic resonance linewith is 108 Oe at 50 GHz, which means that this thin film has low microwave loss. These properties make the BaM thin films have potential applications in microwave devices. Project supported by the Open Foundation of State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices (Grant No. KFJJ201506), the Scientific Research Starting Foundation of Hainan University (Grant No. kyqd1539), and the Natural Science Foundation of Hainan Province (Grant No. 20165187).

  3. Experimental and numerical studies on laser-based powder deposition of slurry erosion resistant materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balu, Prabu

    Slurry erosion (the removal of material caused by the randomly moving high velocity liquid-solid particle mixture) is a serious issue in crude oil drilling, mining, turbines, rocket nozzles, pumps, and boiler tubes that causes excessive downtime and high operating costs as a result of premature part failure. The goal of this research is to enhance the service life of high-value components subjected to slurry erosion by utilizing the concept of functionally graded metal-ceramic composite material (FGMCCM) in which the favorable properties of metal (toughness, ductility, etc.) and ceramic (hardness) are tailored smoothly to improve erosion resistance. Among the potential manufacturing processes, such as the laser-based powder deposition (LBPD), the plasma transferred arc (PTA), and the thermal spray the LBPD process offers good composition and microstructure control with a high deposition rate in producing the FGMCCM. This research focuses on the development of nickel-tungsten carbide (Ni-WC) based FGMCCM using the LBPD process for applications the above mentioned. The LBPD of Ni-WC involves the introduction of Ni and WC powder particle by an inert gas into the laser-formed molten pool at the substrate via nozzles. The LBPD of Ni-WC includes complex multi-physical interactions between the laser beam, Ni-WC powder, substrate, and carrier and shielding gases that are governed by a number of process variables such as laser power, scanning speed, and powder flow rate. In order to develop the best Ni-WC based slurry erosion resistant material using the LBPD process, the following challenges associated with the fabrication and the performance evaluation need to be addressed: 1) flow behavior of the Ni-WC powder and its interaction with the laser, 2) the effect of the process variables, the material compositions, and the thermo-physical properties on thermal cycles, temperature gradient, cooling rate, and residual stress formation within the material and the subsequent

  4. Laser plasma ion implantation and deposition of platinum for SiC-based hydrogen detector fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fominski, V. Yu., E-mail: vyfominskij@mephi.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Kashirskoe sh., 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Grigoriev, S.N. [Moscow State University of Technology STANKIN, Vadkovskii per., 3a, Moscow 127005 (Russian Federation); Romanov, R.I. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Kashirskoe sh., 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Gnedovets, A.G. [Baikov Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospect 49, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Chernykh, P.N. [Lomonosov Moscow State University Scobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1(2) Leninskie Gory, GSP-1, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •Pt ion implantation and film deposition were carried out using pulsed laser plume. •Experimental diagnostics and modeling of Pt ion implantation in SiC were performed. •Mechanism of Pt depth distribution in SiC substrate was determined. •Layered structure of Pt on Pt-doped SiC crystal was used to detect hydrogen at 500 °C. •The response of sensor to hydrogen was pronounced and stable after long-term tests. -- Abstract: A pulsed plasma plume obtained by pulsed laser irradiation of a Pt target was used to fabricate a hydrogen sensor on a 6H–SiC single crystal by means of ion implantation followed by thin film deposition. To realize the ion implantation, high voltage pulses with positive polarity were applied to the Pt target when the laser plasma expanded from the target to the SiC substrate. Experimental diagnostics of pulsed ion beams extracted from laser-produced plasma were performed and the structure of the SiC crystal after high-temperature (500 °C) ion implantation was studied by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy of {sup 4}He{sup +} ions. At the same time, a one-dimensional model of the plasma movement in a pulsed electric field was developed and simulations were carried out using the particle-in-cell method. Modeling allowed determination of the ion energy distribution depending on the delay time of the high voltage pulse after the laser pulse. The calculated energy distribution of Pt ions was used to predict the depth profile of implanted Pt ions in the SiC substrate. The predicted profile agreed sufficiently well with the experimentally measured depth distribution of Pt in the SiC substrate. To characterize the fabricated SiC sensor, the current flow through a barrier structure was studied. The volt–ampere characteristics of the structure were measured in air and in a mixture of air and hydrogen (2%) at a temperature of 500 °C. The characteristic value of the change in voltage exceeded 2 V at the bias current of 1 mA when

  5. Fabrication of 3D components by laser-aided direct metal deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, Jyotirmoy; Qi, Huan

    2005-03-01

    Breinan and Kear first reported fabrication of three-dimensional metallic components via layer by layer laser cladding in 1978 and subsequently a patent was issued to Brown et al. in 1982. Recently, various groups are working world wide on different types of layered manufacturing techniques for fabrication of near net shape metallic components. Integration of lasers with multi-axis presently available CNC machines, CAD/CAM, sensors and powder metal delivery through co-axial nozzles along with the laser beam are the main innovations for fabrication of 3-Dimensional components. Continuous corrective measures during the manufacturing process are necessary to fabricate net shape functional parts with close tolerances and acceptable residual stress. The closed loop Direct Metal Deposition(DMD) System, using an optical feedback loop along with a CNC working under the instructions from a CAD/CAM software, indicate that it can produce three dimensional components directly from the CAD data eliminating intermediate machining and reduces final machining considerably. This technology is now being commercialized.

  6. Organo-layered double hydroxides composite thin films deposited by laser techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birjega, R. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Str., 77125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Vlad, A., E-mail: angela.vlad@gmail.com [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Str., 77125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Matei, A.; Dumitru, M.; Stokker-Cheregi, F.; Dinescu, M. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Str., 77125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Zavoianu, R. [University of Bucharest, Faculty of Chemistry, Department of Chemical Technology and Catalysis, 4-12 Regina Elisabeta Bd., Bucharest 030018 (Romania); Raditoiu, V.; Corobea, M.C. [National R.& D. Institute for Chemistry and Petrochemistry, ICECHIM, 202 Splaiul Independentei Str., CP-35-274, 060021 Bucharest (Romania)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • PLD and MAPLE was successfully used to produce organo-layered double hydroxides. • The organic anions (dodecyl sulfate-DS) were intercalated in co-precipitation step. • Zn2.5Al-LDH (Zn/Al = 2.5) and Zn2.5Al-DS thin films obtained in this work could be suitable for further applications as hydrophobic surfaces. - Abstract: We used laser techniques to create hydrophobic thin films of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) and organo-modified LDHs. A LDH based on Zn-Al with Zn{sup 2+}/Al{sup 3+} ratio of 2.5 was used as host material, while dodecyl sulfate (DS), which is an organic surfactant, acted as guest material. Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) were employed for the growth of the films. The organic anions were intercalated in co-precipitation step. The powders were subsequently used either as materials for MAPLE, or they were pressed and used as targets for PLD. The surface topography of the thin films was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), the crystallographic structure of the powders and films was checked by X-ray diffraction. FTIR spectroscopy was used to evidence DS interlayer intercalation, both for powders and the derived films. Contact angle measurements were performed in order to establish the wettability properties of the as-prepared thin films, in view of functionalization applications as hydrophobic surfaces, owing to the effect of DS intercalation.

  7. Laser-processing of VO2 thin films synthesized by polymer-assisted-deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breckenfeld, Eric; Kim, Heungsoo; Gorzkowski, Edward P.; Sutto, Thomas E.; Piqué, Alberto

    2017-03-01

    We investigate a novel route for synthesis and laser-sintering of VO2 thin films via solution-based polymer-assisted-deposition (PAD). By replacing the traditional solvent for PAD (water) with propylene glycol, we are able to control the viscosity and improve the environmental stability of the precursor. The solution stability and ability to control the viscosity makes for an ideal solution to pattern simple or complex shapes via direct-write methods. We demonstrate the potential of our precursor for printing applications by combining PAD with laser induced forward transfer (LIFT). We also demonstrate large-area film synthesis on 4 in. diameter glass wafers. By varying the annealing temperature, we identify the optimal synthesis conditions, obtaining optical transmittance changes of 60% at a 2500 nm wavelength and a two-order-of-magnitude semiconductor-to-metal transition. We go on to demonstrate two routes for improved semiconductor-to-metal characteristics. The first method uses a multi-coating process to produce denser films with large particles. The second method uses a pulsed-UV-laser sintering step in films annealed at low temperatures (<450° C) to promote particle growth and improve the semiconductor-to-metal transition. By comparing the hysteresis width and semiconductor-to-metal transition magnitude in these samples, we demonstrate that both methods yield high quality VO2 with a three-order-of-magnitude transition.

  8. Manufacturing of nanoscale thickness gold lines by laser curing of a discretely deposited nanoparticle suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieri, N. R.; Chung, J.; Poulikakos, D.; Grigoropoulos, C. P.

    2004-03-01

    The present work is focused on a novel method for the manufacturing of electric microconductors for semiconductors and other devices. Three different technologies are combined in this technique: controlled (drop on demand) printing, laser curing, and the employment of nanoparticles of matter, possessing markedly different properties (here, melting point) than their bulk counterparts. A modified on demand ink jet process is utilized to print electrically conducting line patterns from a suspension of gold nanoparticles in toluene. Microdroplets of 60-100 μm diameter are generated and deposited on a moving substrate such that the droplets form continuous lines. Focused laser irradiation is utilized in order to evaporate the solvent, melt the metal nanoparticles in the suspension, and sinter the suspended particles to form continuous, electrically conducting gold microlines on a substrate. The ultrafine particles in the suspension have a diameter size range of 2-5 nm. Due to curvature and surface effects of such small particles, the melting point is markedly lower than that of bulk gold (1063 ∘C). Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy have been employed to investigate the topology of the cured line. In situ visualization of the curing process has been conducted. Results on the effect of the laser irradiation power on the topology and width of the cured line, which is directly related to the electrical conductivity, are reported.

  9. Intense laser-driven proton beam energy deposition in compressed and uncompressed Cu foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuffey, Christopher; Krauland, C. M.; Kim, J.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Habara, H.; Noma, S.; Ohtsuki, T.; Tsujii, A.; Yahata, K.; Yoshida, Y.; Uematsu, Y.; Nakaguchi, S.; Morace, A.; Yogo, A.; Nagatomo, H.; Tanaka, K.; Arikawa, Y.; Fujioka, S.; Shiraga, H.

    2016-10-01

    We investigated transport of intense proton beams from a petawatt laser in uncompressed or compressed Cu foam. The LFEX laser (1 kJ on target, 1.5 ps, 1053 nm, I >2×1019 W/cm2) irradiated a curved C foil to generate the protons. The foil was in an open cone 500 μm from the tip where the focused proton beam source was delivered to either of two Cu foam sample types: an uncompressed cylinder (1 mm L, 250 µm ϕ) , and a plastic-coated sphere (250 µm ϕ) that was first driven by GXII (9 beams, 330 J/beam, 1.3 ns, 527 nm) to achieve similar ρϕ to the cylinder sample's ρL as predicted by 2D radiation hydrodynamic simulations. Using magnetic spectrometers and a Thomson parabola, the proton spectra were measured with and without the Cu samples. When included, they were observed using Cu K-shell x-ray imaging and spectroscopy. This paper will present comparison of the experimentally measured Cu emission shape and proton spectrum changes due to deposition in the Cu with particle-in-cell simulations incorporating new stopping models. This work was made possible by laser time Awarded by the Japanese NIFS collaboration NIFS16KUGK107 and performed under the auspices of the US AFOSR YIP Award FA9550-14-1-0346.

  10. Organo-layered double hydroxides composite thin films deposited by laser techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birjega, R.; Vlad, A.; Matei, A.; Dumitru, M.; Stokker-Cheregi, F.; Dinescu, M.; Zavoianu, R.; Raditoiu, V.; Corobea, M. C.

    2016-06-01

    We used laser techniques to create hydrophobic thin films of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) and organo-modified LDHs. A LDH based on Zn-Al with Zn2+/Al3+ ratio of 2.5 was used as host material, while dodecyl sulfate (DS), which is an organic surfactant, acted as guest material. Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) were employed for the growth of the films. The organic anions were intercalated in co-precipitation step. The powders were subsequently used either as materials for MAPLE, or they were pressed and used as targets for PLD. The surface topography of the thin films was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), the crystallographic structure of the powders and films was checked by X-ray diffraction. FTIR spectroscopy was used to evidence DS interlayer intercalation, both for powders and the derived films. Contact angle measurements were performed in order to establish the wettability properties of the as-prepared thin films, in view of functionalization applications as hydrophobic surfaces, owing to the effect of DS intercalation.

  11. The influence of substrate temperature and deposition pressure on pulsed laser deposited thin films of CaS:Eu{sup 2+} phosphors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyenge, R.L. [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, P.O. Box 339, Bloemfontein ZA9300 (South Africa); Physics Department, Kenyatta University, P.O. Box 43844-0100, Nairobi (Kenya); Swart, H.C. [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, P.O. Box 339, Bloemfontein ZA9300 (South Africa); Ntwaeaborwa, O.M., E-mail: ntwaeab@ufs.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, P.O. Box 339, Bloemfontein ZA9300 (South Africa)

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of substrate temperature and argon deposition pressure on the structure, morphology and photoluminescence emission (PL) properties of pulsed laser deposited thin films of CaS:Eu{sup 2+}. The PL intensity improved significantly upon reaching substrate temperature of 650 °C. The (200) peak gradually became the preferred orientation. The increase in PL intensity as well as surface roughness is attributed to improved crystallinity and higher growth rates, respectively. The best PL intensity as a function of deposition pressure was obtained at an argon pressure of 80 mTorr. The initial increase and eventual drop in PL intensity as deposition pressure increases is ascribed to the changes in growth rates.

  12. Fabrication of nano-engineered transparent conducting oxides by pulsed laser deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondoni, Paolo; Ghidelli, Matteo; Di Fonzo, Fabio; Li Bassi, Andrea; Casari, Carlo S

    2013-02-27

    Nanosecond Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) in the presence of a background gas allows the deposition of metal oxides with tunable morphology, structure, density and stoichiometry by a proper control of the plasma plume expansion dynamics. Such versatility can be exploited to produce nanostructured films from compact and dense to nanoporous characterized by a hierarchical assembly of nano-sized clusters. In particular we describe the detailed methodology to fabricate two types of Al-doped ZnO (AZO) films as transparent electrodes in photovoltaic devices: 1) at low O₂ pressure, compact films with electrical conductivity and optical transparency close to the state of the art transparent conducting oxides (TCO) can be deposited at room temperature, to be compatible with thermally sensitive materials such as polymers used in organic photovoltaics (OPVs); 2) highly light scattering hierarchical structures resembling a forest of nano-trees are produced at higher pressures. Such structures show high Haze factor (>80%) and may be exploited to enhance the light trapping capability. The method here described for AZO films can be applied to other metal oxides relevant for technological applications such as TiO₂, Al₂O₃, WO₃ and Ag₄O₄.

  13. Interface control by homoepitaxial growth in pulsed laser deposited iron chalcogenide thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molatta, Sebastian; Haindl, Silvia; Trommler, Sascha; Schulze, Michael; Wurmehl, Sabine; Hühne, Ruben

    2015-11-01

    Thin film growth of iron chalcogenides by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is still a delicate issue in terms of simultaneous control of stoichiometry, texture, substrate/film interface properties, and superconducting properties. The high volatility of the constituents sharply limits optimal deposition temperatures to a narrow window and mainly challenges reproducibility for vacuum based methods. In this work we demonstrate the beneficial introduction of a semiconducting FeSe1-xTex seed layer for subsequent homoepitaxial growth of superconducting FeSe1-xTex thin film on MgO substrates. MgO is one of the most favorable substrates used in superconducting thin film applications, but the controlled growth of iron chalcogenide thin films on MgO has not yet been optimized and is the least understood. The large mismatch between the lattice constants of MgO and FeSe1-xTex of about 11% results in thin films with a mixed texture, that prevents further accurate investigations of a correlation between structural and electrical properties of FeSe1-xTex. Here we present an effective way to significantly improve epitaxial growth of superconducting FeSe1-xTex thin films with reproducible high critical temperatures (≥17 K) at reduced deposition temperatures (200 °C-320 °C) on MgO using PLD. This offers a broad scope of various applications.

  14. Nano-cube MgO formed on silicon substrate using pulsed laser deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Satoru; Ito, Takeshi; Akiyama, Kensuke; Yasui, Manabu; Hirabayashi, Yasuo; Soga, Masayasu; Miyake, Yumiko; Yoshimoto, Mamoru

    2012-03-01

    Nano-cube MgO particles were formed on Si substrates by deposition of an MgO target using pulsed laser deposition method. An epitaxial film grows on Si(001) substrate with its contraction of lattice constants. In this study, expecting high quality MgO film, the MgO film prepared in the oxygen pressure ranging from 75-400 mTorr at the high temperature of -750 degrees C. The deposited MgO showed the growth of (001) preferred orientation on the Si(001) substrate. However, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) indicated the MgO film did not form a continuous film on the Si surface. Interestingly, the surface morphology observed by an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) showed nano-cube MgO particles scattered on the smooth surface of Si substrate. After annealing the nano-cube MgO, the shape of MgO particles were changed from nano-cube to round shaped particles. The AFM image of the surface showed round shaped MgO nanoparticles scattered on rough surface. X-ray Diffraction (XRD) revealed the epitaxial growth of MgO(001) with cubic on cubic arrangement on the Si(001) substrate (MgO[100] parallel to Si[100]).

  15. Vacuum ultraviolet annealing of thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craciun, Valentin; Craciun, Doina; Andreazza, Pascal; Perriere, Jacques; Boyd, Ian W.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of a post-deposition annealing treatment in 1 bar of oxygen at moderate temperatures (excimer lamp upon thin ZrO 2 and hydroxyapatite (HAp) films grown by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique was investigated. The optical and structural properties of the films were improved by this treatment, the lower the deposition temperature and, accordingly, the poorer the initial characteristics, the more significant the improvements. The combination of these two techniques allowed us to obtain at temperatures below 350°C highly textured (020) ZrO 2 films, exhibiting optical absorption coefficients lower than 5×10 2 cm -1 and high refractive index values of around 2.25 in the visible region of the spectrum. The VUV treatment was also beneficial for the partially crystalline HAp layers containing tetracalcium phosphate and calcium oxide phases grown by the PLD technique under a low pressure oxidising atmosphere of only 10 -5 torr without any water vapours. After the VUV-assisted anneal, the crystalline structure and the stoichiometry greatly improved while the percentage of the other crystalline phases initially present was many times reduced.

  16. Fabrication of Nb/Pb structures through ultrashort pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gontad, Francisco; Lorusso, Antonella, E-mail: antonella.lorusso@le.infn.it; Perrone, Alessio [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi,” Università del Salento and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Klini, Argyro; Fotakis, Costas [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (FORTH), 100 N. Plastira St., GR 70013 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Broitman, Esteban [Thin Film Physics Division, IFM, Linköping University, 581-83 Linköping (Sweden)

    2016-07-15

    This work reports the fabrication of Nb/Pb structures with an application as photocathode devices. The use of relatively low energy densities for the ablation of Nb with ultrashort pulses favors the reduction of droplets during the growth of the film. However, the use of laser fluences in this ablation regime results in a consequent reduction in the average deposition rate. On the other hand, despite the low deposition rate, the films present a superior adherence to the substrate and an excellent coverage of the irregular substrate surface, avoiding the appearance of voids or discontinuities on the film surface. Moreover, the low energy densities used for the ablation favor the growth of nanocrystalline films with a similar crystalline structure to the bulk material. Therefore, the use of low ablation energy densities with ultrashort pulses for the deposition of the Nb thin films allows the growth of very adherent and nanocrystalline films with adequate properties for the fabrication of Nb/Pb structures to be included in superconducting radiofrequency cavities.

  17. Structural transformations in MoO{sub x} thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho-Lopez, M.A.; Haro-Poniatowski, E. [Departamento de Fisica, Laboratorio de Optica Cuantica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa, Apdo. Postal 55-534, 09340, Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Escobar-Alarcon, L. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apdo. Postal 18-1027, 11801, Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2004-01-01

    In this work, laser-induced crystallization in MoO{sub x} thin films (1.8{<=}x{<=}2.1) is reported. This transformation involves a MoO{sub x} oxidation and subsequently a crystallization process from amorphous MoO{sub 3} to crystalline {alpha}MoO{sub 3}. For comparison purposes crystallization is induced thermally, in an oven, as well. The crystallization kinetics is monitored by Raman spectroscopy; a threshold in the energy density necessary to induce the phase transformation is determined in the case of photo-crystallization. This threshold depends on the type of substrate on which the film is deposited. For the thin films deposited on glass substrates, the structural transformation is from amorphous MoO{sub x} to the thermodynamically stable {alpha}MoO{sub 3} crystalline phase. For the thin films deposited on Si(100) the structural transformation is from amorphous MoO{sub x} to a mixture of {alpha}MoO{sub 3} and the thermodynamically unstable {beta}MoO{sub 3} crystalline phases. The structural transformations are also characterized by scanning electron microscopy and light-transmission experiments. (orig.)

  18. Room temperature radio-frequency plasma-enhanced pulsed laser deposition of ZnO thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S.-H.; Chou, Y.-C.; Chou, C.-M.; Hsiao, V. K. S.

    2013-02-01

    In this study, we compared the crystalline structures, optical properties, and surface morphologies of ZnO thin films deposited on silicon and glass substrates by conventional pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and radio-frequency (RF) plasma-enhanced PLD (RF-PEPLD). The depositions were performed at room temperature under 30-100 mTorr pressure conditions. The RF-PEPLD process was found to have deposited a ZnO structure with preferred (0 0 2) c-axis orientation at a higher deposition rate; however, the RF-PEPLD process generated more defects in the thin films. The application of oxygen pressure to the RF-PEPLD process reduced defects effectively and also increased the deposition rate.

  19. Characterization of diamond thin films deposited by a CO{sub 2} laser-assisted combustion-flame method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKindra, Travis, E-mail: mckindra@mst.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); O' Keefe, Matthew J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Xie Zhiqiang; Lu Yongfeng [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Diamond thin films were deposited by a CO{sub 2} laser-assisted O{sub 2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 4} combustion-flame process. The effect of the deposition parameters, in particular the laser wavelength and power, on the film surface morphology, microstructure and phases present was the primary focus of the work. The laser power was set at 100, 400 and 800 W while the wavelength was varied and set at 10.591 {mu}m in the untuned condition and set at 10.532 {mu}m to resonantly match the CH{sub 2}-wagging vibrational mode of the C{sub 2}H{sub 4} molecule when in the tuned condition. When the laser was coupled to the combustion flame during deposition the diamond film growth was enhanced as the lateral grain size increased from 1 {mu}m to greater than 5 {mu}m. The greatest increase in grain size occurred when the wavelength was in the tuned condition. Scanning transmission electron microscopy images from focused-ion beam cross-sectioned samples revealed a sub-layer of smaller grains less than 1 {mu}m in size near the substrate surface at the lower laser powers and untuned wavelength. X-ray diffraction results showed a more intense Diamond (111) peak as the laser power increased from 100 to 800 W for the films deposited with the tuned laser wavelength. Micro-Raman spectra showed a diamond peak nearly twice as intense from the films with the tuned laser wavelength.

  20. Negative permittivity of ZnO thin films prepared from aluminum and gallium doped ceramics via pulsed-laser deposition

    OpenAIRE

    M.A. Bodea; Sbarcea, G.; Naik, Gururaj V.; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Klar, T. A.; Pedarnig, J. D.

    2013-01-01

    Aluminum and gallium doped zinc oxide thin films with negative dielectric permittivity in the near infrared spectral range are grown by pulsed laser deposition. Composite ceramics comprising ZnO and secondary phase Al2O3 or Ga2O3 are employed as targets for laser ablation. Films deposited on glass from dense and small-grained ceramic targets show optical transmission larger than 70 % in the visible and reveal an onset of metallic reflectivity in the near infrared at 1100 nm and a crossover to...

  1. Negative permittivity of ZnO thin films prepared from aluminum and gallium doped ceramics via pulsed-laser deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodea, M. A.; Sbarcea, G.; Naik, G. V.

    2013-01-01

    Aluminum and gallium doped zinc oxide thin films with negative dielectric permittivity in the near infrared spectral range are grown by pulsed laser deposition. Composite ceramics comprising ZnO and secondary phase Al2O3 or Ga2O3 are employed as targets for laser ablation. Films deposited on glass...... from dense and small-grained ceramic targets show optical transmission larger than 70 % in the visible and reveal an onset of metallic reflectivity in the near infrared at 1100 nm and a crossover to a negative real part of the permittivity at approximately 1500 nm. In comparison to noble metals, doped...

  2. Study on absorbance and laser damage threshold of HfO2 films prepared by ion-assisted reaction deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张大伟; 范树海; 高卫东; 贺洪波; 王英剑; 邵建达; 范正修; 孙浩杰

    2004-01-01

    Using a new kind of EH1000 ion source, hafnium dioxide (HfO2) films are deposited with different depo sition techniques and different conditions. The absorbance and the laser damage threshold of these films have been measured and studied. By comparing these characteristics, one can conclude that under right conditions, such as high partial pressure of oxygen and right kind of ion source, the ion-assisted reaction deposition can prepare HfO2 films with higher laser induced damage threshold.

  3. Laser Surface Treatment of Stellite 6 Coating Deposited by HVOF on 316L Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoja-Razavi, Reza

    2016-07-01

    This research aimed to study the effects of laser glazing treatment on microstructure, hardness, and oxidation behavior of Stellite 6 coating deposited by high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) spraying. The as-sprayed Stellite 6 coating (ST-HVOF) was subjected to single-pass and multiple-pass laser treatments to achieve the optimum glazing parameters. Microstructural characterizations were performed by x-ray diffractometry and field emission scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive spectroscopy. Two-step optimization showed that laser treatment at the power of 200 W with a scan rate of 4 mm/s causes a surface layer with a thickness of 208 ± 32 µm to be remelted, while the underlying layers retain the original ST-HVOF coating structure. The obtained sample (ST-Glazing) exhibited a highly dense and uniform structure with an extremely low porosity of ~0.3%, much lower than that of ST-HVOF coating (2.3%). The average microhardness of ST-Glazing was measured to be 519 Hv0.3 indicating a 17% decrease compared to ST-HVOF (625 Hv0.3) due to the residual stress relief and dendrite coarsening from submicron size to ~3.4 µm after laser treatment. The lowest oxidation mass gain was obtained for ST-Glazing by 2 mg/cm2 after 8 cycles at 900 °C indicating 52 and 84% improvement in oxidation resistance in comparison to ST-HVOF and bare 316L steel substrates, respectively.

  4. Study on pulsed laser ablation and deposition of ZnO thin films by L-MBE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    ZnO,as a wide-band gap semiconductor,has recently become a new research fo-cus in the field of ultraviolet optoelectronic semiconductors. Laser molecular beam epitaxy(L-MBE) is quite useful for the unit cell layer-by-layer epitaxial growth of zinc oxide thin films from the sintered ceramic target. The ZnO ceramic target with high purity was ablated by KrF laser pulses in an ultra high vacuum to deposit ZnO thin film during the process of L-MBE. It is found that the deposition rate of ZnO thin film by L-MBE is much lower than that by conventional pulsed laser deposition(PLD) . Based on the experimental phenomena in the ZnO thin film growth process and the thermal-controlling mechanism of the nanosecond(ns) pulsed laser abla-tion of ZnO ceramic target,the suggested effective ablating time during the pulse duration can explain the very low deposition rate of the ZnO film by L-MBE. The unique dynamic mechanism for growing ZnO thin film is analyzed. Both the high energy of the deposition species and the low growth rate of the film are really beneficial for the L-MBE growth of the ZnO thin film with high crystallinity at low temperature.

  5. Visible light-harvesting of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes array by pulsed laser deposited CdS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjelajac, Andjelika, E-mail: abjelajac@tmf.bg.ac.rs [Innovation Center of Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Djokic, Veljko; Petrovic, Rada [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Socol, Gabiel; Mihailescu, Ion N. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, Lasers Department, “Laser-Surface-Plasma Interactions” Laboratory, PO Box MG-54, RO-77125 Magurele, Ilfov (Romania); Florea, Ileana; Ersen, Ovidiu [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Materiaux de Strasbourg, CNRS – Université de Strasbourg (UDS) UMR 7504, 23, rue du Loess, BP 43, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 02 (France); Janackovic, Djordje [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2014-08-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanotubes arrays, obtained by anodization technique and annealing, were decorated with CdS using pulsed laser deposition method. Their structural, morphological and chemical characterization was carried out by electron microscopy in scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) modes, combined with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). It was demonstrated that the quantity of deposited CdS can be controlled by varying the number of laser pulses. The chemical mapping of the elements of interest was performed using the energy filtered mode of the electron microscope. The results showed that pulse laser deposition is an adequate technique for deposition of CdS inside and between 100 nm wide TiO{sub 2} nanotubes. The diffuse reflectance spectroscopy investigation of selected samples proved that the absorption edge of the prepared CdS/TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites is significantly extended to the visible range. The corresponding band gaps were determinated from the Tauc plot of transformed Kubelka–Munk function. The band gap reduction of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes by pulsed laser deposition of CdS was put in evidence.

  6. Growth of doped silicon nanowires by pulsed laser deposition and their analysis by electron beam induced current imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenhawer, B; Berger, A; Christiansen, S [Institute of Photonic Technology, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 9, 07745 Jena (Germany); Zhang, D; Clavel, R [Laboratory of Robotic Systems, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Station 9, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Michler, J, E-mail: bjoern.eisenhawer@ipht-jena.de [Mechanics of Materials and Nanostructures Laboratory, EMPA-Materials Science and Technology, Feuerwerkstrasse 39, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland)

    2011-02-18

    Doped silicon nanowires (NWs) were epitaxially grown on silicon substrates by pulsed laser deposition following a vapour-liquid-solid process, in which dopants together with silicon atoms were introduced into the gas phase by laser ablation of lightly and highly doped silicon target material. p-n or p{sup ++}-p junctions located at the NW-silicon substrate interfaces were thus realized. To detect these junctions and visualize them the electron beam induced current technique and two-point probe current-voltage measurements were used, based on nanoprobing individual silicon NWs in a scanning electron microscope. Successful silicon NW doping by pulsed laser deposition of doped target material could experimentally be demonstrated. This doping strategy compared to the commonly used doping from the gas phase during chemical vapour deposition is evaluated essentially with a view to potentially overcoming the limitations of chemical vapour deposition doping, which shows doping inhomogeneities between the top and bottom of the NW as well as between the core and shell of NWs and structural lattice defects, especially when high doping levels are envisaged. The pulsed laser deposition doping technique yields homogeneously doped NWs and the doping level can be controlled by the choice of the target material. As a further benefit, this doping procedure does not require the use of poisonous gases and may be applied to grow not only silicon NWs but also other kinds of doped semiconductor NWs, e.g. group III nitrides or arsenides.

  7. Study on pulsed laser ablation and deposition of ZnO thin films by L-MBE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE YongNing; ZHANG JingWen; YANG XiaoDong; XU QingAn; ZHU ChangChun; HOU Xun

    2007-01-01

    ZnO, as a wide-band gap semiconductor, has recently become a new research focus in the field of ultraviolet optoelectronic semiconductors. Laser molecular beam epitaxy (L-MBE) is quite useful for the unit cell layer-by-layer epitaxial growth of zinc oxide thin films from the sintered ceramic target. The ZnO ceramic target with high purity was ablated by KrF laser pulses in an ultra high vacuum to deposit ZnO thin film during the process of L-MBE. It is found that the deposition rate of ZnO thin film by L-MBE is much lower than that by conventional pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Based on the experimental phenomena in the ZnO thin film growth process and the thermal-controlling mechanism of the nanosecond (ns) pulsed laser ablation of ZnO ceramic target, the suggested effective ablating time during the pulse duration can explain the very low deposition rate of the ZnO film by L-MBE. The unique dynamic mechanism for growing ZnO thin film is analyzed. Both the high energy of the deposition species and the low growth rate of the film are really beneficial for the L-MBE growth of the ZnO thin film with high crystallinity at low temperature.

  8. Pulsed laser deposition of nanostructured Co-B-O thin films as efficient catalyst for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jadhav, H., E-mail: jadhav.hs2013@gmail.com [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Singh, A.K. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Patel, N.; Fernandes, R.; Gupta, S.; Kothari, D.C. [Department of Physics and National Centre for Nanosciences & Nanotechnology, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari, Santacruz (E), Mumbai 400098 (India); Miotello, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Trento, I-38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Sinha, S. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Pulsed laser deposition was used to deposit Co-B-O film nanocatalyst. • Co-B-O NPs are well separated, stable and immobilized on film surface. • Catalytic H{sub 2} production was studied by hydrolysis of Sodium Borohydride. • Four times higher H{sub 2} production rate was recorded for Co-B-O film than Co-B-O powder. • High particle density, polycrystalline nature and good stability against agglomeration of Co NPs. - Abstract: Nanoparticles assembled Co-B-O thin film catalysts were synthesized by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique for hydrolysis of Sodium Borohydride (SBH). Surface morphology of the deposited films was investigated using SEM and TEM, while compositional analysis was studied using XPS. Structural properties of Co-B-O films were examined using XRD and HRTEM. Laser process is able to produce well separated and immobilized Co-B-O NPs on the film surface which act as active centers leading to superior catalytic activity producing hydrogen at a significantly higher rate as compared to bulk powder. Co-B-O thin film catalyst produces hydrogen at a maximum rate of ∼4400 ml min{sup −1} g{sup −1} of catalyst, which is four times higher than powder catalyst. PLD parameters such as laser fluence and substrate-target distance were varied during deposition in order to understand the role of size and density of the immobilized Co-B-O NPs in the catalytic process. Films deposited at 3–5 cm substrate-target distance showed better performance than that deposited at 6 cm, mainly on account of the higher density of active Co-B-O NPs on the films surface. Features such as high particle density, polycrystalline nature of Co NPs and good stability against agglomeration mainly contribute towards the superior catalytic activity of Co-B-O films deposited by PLD.

  9. Growth of γ-alumina thin films by pulsed laser deposition and plasma diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahiaoui, K.; Abdelli-Messaci, S.; Messaoud Aberkane, S.; Siad, M.; Kellou, A.

    2017-07-01

    The present work discusses about the synthesis of alumina thin films, which have applications in current and next-generation solid-state electronic devices due to their attractive properties. Alumina thin films were synthesized by pulsed laser deposition at different oxygen pressures and substrate temperatures. The dependence of substrate temperature, oxygen pressure, and the deposition time on the properties of the films has been observed by growing three series of alumina thin films on Si (100). The first films are synthesized using substrate temperatures ranging from room temperature to 780 °C at 0.01 mbar of O2. The second series was realized at a fixed substrate temperature of 760 °C and varied oxygen pressure (from 0.005 to 0.05 mbar). The third set of series was elaborated at different deposition times (from 15 to 60 min) while the oxygen pressure and the substrate temperature were fixed at 0.01 mbar and 760 °C, respectively. The films were characterized using X-ray diffractometer (XRD) for structural analysis, a scanning electron microscope for morphological analysis, a nano-indenter for mechanical analysis (hardness and Young's modulus), and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy for thickness and stoichiometry measurements. Using optical emission spectroscopy, plasma diagnostic was carried out both in the vacuum and in the presence of oxygen with a pressure ranging from 0.01 to 0.05 mbar. Several neutral, ionic, and molecular species were identified such as Al, Al+, and Al++ in vacuum and in oxygen ambiance, O and AlO molecular bands in oxygen-ambient atmosphere. The spatiotemporal evolution of the most relevant species was achieved and their velocities were estimated. The highest amount of crystallized alumina in γ-phase was found in the films elaborated under 0.01 mbar of O2, at a substrate temperature of 780 °C, and a deposition time of 60 min.

  10. Laser-assisted atom probe tomography of Ti/TiN films deposited on Si.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, N A; Blanchard, P T; White, R; Vissers, M R; Diercks, D R; Davydov, A V; Pappas, D P

    2017-03-01

    Laser-assisted atom probe tomography (L-APT) was used to examine superconducting TiN/Ti/TiN trilayer films with nominal respective thicknesses of 5/5/5 (nm). Such materials are of interest for applications that require large arrays of microwave kinetic inductance detectors. The trilayers were deposited on Si substrates by reactive sputtering. Electron energy loss microscopy performed in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM/EELS) was used to corroborate the L-APT results and establish the overall thicknesses of the trilayers. Three separate batches were studied where the first (bottom) TiN layer was deposited at 500°C (for all batches) and the subsequent TiN/Ti bilayer was deposited at ambient temperature, 250°C, and 500°C, respectively. L-APT rendered an approximately planar TiN/Si interface by making use of plausible mass-spectral assignments to N3(1+), SiN(1+), and SiO(1+). This was necessary since ambiguities associated with the likely simultaneous occurrence of Si(1+) and N2(1+) prevented their use in rendering the TiN/Si interface upon reconstruction. The non-superconducting Ti2N phase was also revealed by L-APT. Neither L-APT nor STEM/EELS rendered sharp Ti/TiN interfaces and the contrast between these layers diminished with increased film deposition temperature. L-APT also revealed that hydrogen was present in varying degrees in all samples including control samples that were composed of single layers of Ti or TiN.

  11. Differences in Nanosecond Laser Ablation and Deposition of Tungsten, Boron, and WB2/B Composite due to Optical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Moscicki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The first attempt to the deposition of WB3 films using nanosecond Nd:YAG laser demonstrated that deposited coatings are superhard. However, they have very high roughness. The deposited films consisted mainly of droplets. Therefore, in the present work, the explanation of this phenomenon is conducted. The interaction of Nd:YAG nanosecond laser pulse with tungsten, boron, and WB2/B target during ablation is investigated. The studies show the fundamental differences in ablation of those materials. The ablation of tungsten is thermal and occurs due to only evaporation. In the same conditions, during ablation of boron, the phase explosion and/or fragmentation due to recoil pressure is observed. The deposited films have a significant contribution of big debris with irregular shape. In the case of WB2/B composite, ablation is significantly different. The ablation seems to be the detonation in the liquid phase. The deposition mechanism is related mainly to the mechanical transport of the target material in the form of droplets, while the gaseous phase plays marginal role. The main origin of differences is optical properties of studied materials. A method estimating phase explosion occurrence based on material data such as critical temperature, thermal diffusivity, and optical properties is shown. Moreover, the effect of laser wavelength on the ablation process and the quality of the deposited films is discussed.

  12. Growth of centimeter-scale atomically thin MoS2 films by pulsed laser deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gene Siegel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We are reporting the growth of single layer and few-layer MoS2 films on single crystal sapphire substrates using a pulsed-laser deposition technique. A pulsed KrF excimer laser (wavelength: 248 nm; pulse width: 25 ns was used to ablate a polycrystalline MoS2 target. The material thus ablated was deposited on a single crystal sapphire (0001 substrate kept at 700 °C in an ambient vacuum of 10−6 Torr. Detailed characterization of the films was performed using atomic force microscopy (AFM, Raman spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and photoluminescence (PL measurements. The ablation of the MoS2 target by 50 laser pulses (energy density: 1.5 J/cm2 was found to result in the formation of a monolayer of MoS2 as shown by AFM results. In the Raman spectrum, A1g and E12g peaks were observed at 404.6 cm−1 and 384.5 cm−1 with a spacing of 20.1 cm−1, confirming the monolayer thickness of the film. The UV-Vis absorption spectrum exhibited two exciton absorption bands at 672 nm (1.85 eV and 615 nm (2.02 eV, with an energy split of 0.17 eV, which is in excellent agreement with the theoretically predicted value of 0.15 eV. The monolayer MoS2 exhibited a PL peak at 1.85 eV confirming the direct nature of the band-gap. By varying the number of laser pulses, bi-layer, tri-layer, and few-layer MoS2 films were prepared. It was found that as the number of monolayers (n in the MoS2 films increases, the spacing between the A1g and E12g Raman peaks (Δf increases following an empirical relation, Δ f = 26 . 45 − 15 . 42 1 + 1 . 44 n 0 . 9 cm − 1 .

  13. Growth of strained ZnSe layers on GaAs substrates by pulsed laser deposition carried out in an off-axis deposition geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganguli, Tapas [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, 452 013 (India)], E-mail: tapas@cat.ernet.in; Porwal, Sanjay; Sharma, Tarun; Ingale, Alka; Kumar, Shailendra; Tiwari, Pragya [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, 452 013 (India); Balamurugan, A.K.; Rajagopalan, S.; Tyagi, A.K. [Materials Science Division, IGCAR, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Chandrasekaran, K.S.; Arora, B.M. [Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science, TIFR, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Rustagi, K.C. [Department of Physics, IIT, Powai, Mumbai 400 076 (India)

    2007-07-31

    We have deposited thin layers of ZnSe on (001) oriented GaAs substrates by pulsed laser deposition at different incident laser fluence (referred to as normal geometry) and in an off-axis geometry where the plasma plume direction is at an angle of {approx} 25{sup o} away from the direction of the substrate. The crystalline quality of these layers has been studied by high-resolution X-ray diffraction measurements and Raman scattering. We find that we are in a position to deposit pseudomorphic strained layers of ZnSe on GaAs in the off-axis deposition geometry when the ZnSe layer thickness is less than the critical thickness of ZnSe on GaAs i.e. 150 nm. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, photoluminescence and electrical transport measurements have also been carried out in all the ZnSe layers and the results of all the above characterizations have been compared for the normal geometry and the off-axis geometry of deposition. All the results indicate that the ZnSe layers deposited in the off-axis geometry have better crystalline quality and an improved interface as compared to the ones deposited in the normal geometry. We attribute this improvement in the overall quality of the ZnSe layers in the off-axis geometry to the reduction in the average energy of the plume particles that reach the GaAs substrate in the off-axis geometry.

  14. Annealing Effect of Pulsed Laser Deposited Transparent Conductive Ta-Doped Titanium Oxide Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Bin-Bin; PAN Feng-Ming; YANG Yu-E

    2011-01-01

    Tantalum-doped TiO2 Rilms were deposited on glass at 300℃PG by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). After post-annealing in vacuum (~10-4 Pa) at temperatures ranging from 450℃ to 650℃, these films were crystallized into an anatase TiO2 structure and presented good conductive features. With increasing annealing temperature up to 550℃, the resistivity of the films was measured to be around 8.7 x 10-4 Ω·cm. Such films exhibit high transparency of over 80% in the visible light region. These results indicate that tantalum-doped anatase TiO2 films have a great potential as transparent conducting oxides.%Tantalum-doped TiO2 films were deposited on glass at 300℃ by pulsed laser deposition (PLD).After postannealing in vacuum (~10-4 Pa) at temperatures ranging from 450℃ to 650℃,these films were crystallized into an anatase TiO2 structure and presented good conductive features.With increasing annealing temperature up to 550℃,the resistivity of the films was measured to be around 8.7 × 10-4 Ω·cm.Such films exhibit high transparency of over 80% in the visible light region.These results indicate that tantalum-doped anatase TiO2 films have a great potential as transparent conducting oxides.Transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) have received much attention both in fundamental research and device applications due to their good combination of high electrical conductivity and excellent optical transparency.[1] Among various TCOs,indium tin oxide (ITO) is considered as the most beneficial TCO due to its excellent properties:low resistivity (~10-4 Ω·cm),high optical transmittance (80-90%)and simple preparation process.[2] However,due to the scarcity and high cost of indium,ITO may not be able to satisfy the demands in the future.Hence,it is necessary to explore new candidates of TCOs for expanding application usage.

  15. Investigation of superfast deposition of metal oxide and Diamond-Like Carbon thin films by nanosecond Ytterbium (Yb+) fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbezov, V.; Sotirov, S.; Benkhouja, K.; Zawadzka, A.; Sahraoui, B.

    2013-11-01

    Metal oxide (MOx, M: titanium, magnesium) and Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) thin films were synthesized by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) at room temperature and low vacuum of 2 Pa for MOx and vacuum of 4 × 10-3 Pa for DLC films. A fiber based Ytterbium (Yb+) laser operating in the nanosecond regime at a repetition rate of 20 kHz was used as an ablation source. Dense and smooth thin films with a thickness from 120 to 360 nm and an area of up to 10 cm2 were deposited on glass and stainless steel substrates at high growth rates up to 2 nm/s for a laser intensity of 10-12 J/cm2. The thin films synthesis was compared for two fiber laser modes of operation, at a repetition rate of 20 kHz and with an additional modulation at 1 kHz. The morphology, chemical composition and structure of the obtained thin films were evaluated using optical microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) and Raman spectroscopy. The morphology of the MOx thin films and the deposition rate strongly depend on the fiber laser mode of operation. Very smooth surfaces were obtained for the metal oxide thin films deposited at lower deposition rates in the modulation mode at 1 kHz. The effect of the substrate on the DLC film structure was studied. The films deposited on dielectric substrates were identified as typical tetrahedral (ta-C) DLC with high sp3 content. DLC films on metal substrates were found typical a-C amorphous carbon films with mixing sp2/sp3 bonds.

  16. In-situ Monitoring and Defect Detection for Laser Metal Deposition by Using Infrared Thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassler, Ulf; Gruber, Daniel; Hentschel, Oliver; Sukowski, Frank; Grulich, Tobias; Seifert, Lars

    Aim of the presented approach is the early detection of defects (mainly material inhomogeneities like voids, delaminations, kissing bonds) occuring during the additive Laser Metal Deposition (LMD) process. Basis of the approach is the evaluation of the surface temperature gradient within the welding spot using a high speed thermographic sensor. Our contribution covers the following aspects: Estimation of the expected defect contrast by means of a simulation study Second point Experimental setup and performed experiments Achieved results on different welding parameters and mock-up defects together with the associated image processing chain First experiments showed that a set of process parameters can be monitored through the temperature signature of the welding spot. Also, the available defects have been detected down to a diameter of 0.5 mm. The presented work has been carried out within the research project 'ForNextGen' funded by the Bavarian Research Foundation and is part of the work package 6 (Non destructive testing).

  17. Preparation of BiFeO3 thin films by pulsed laser deposition method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Guan-jun; CHENG Jin-rong; CHEN Rui; YU Sheng-wen; MENG Zhong-yan

    2006-01-01

    BiFeO3 (BFO) thin films were prepared on Pt(111)/TiO2/SiO2/Si(100) substrates by the pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) technique at a low temperature of 450℃. The XRD results indicate that the BFO thin films are of perovskite structure with the presence of small amount of second phases. The oxygen pressures have great effect on the crystalline structures and dielectric properties of BFO thin films. The dielectric constant of the BFO thin films decreases with increasing oxygen pressures,achieving 186,171 and 160 at the frequency of 104 Hz for the oxygen pressures of 0.666,1.333 and 13.332 Pa,respectively. The BFO thin films prepared at the oxygen pressure of 0.666 Pa reveal a saturated hysteresis loop with the remanent polarization of 7.5 μC/cm2 and the coercive field of 176 kV/cm.

  18. Manifestation of unusual size effects in granular thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeenkov, S.; Cichetto, L.; Diaz, J. C. C. A.; Bastos, W. B.; Longo, E.; Araújo-Moreira, F. M.

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate manifestation of some rather unusual size effects in granular thin films prepared by a pulsed laser deposition technique. We observed that the temperature dependence of resistivity ρ(T) notably depends on the relation between the grain size Rg and the film thickness d. Namely, more granular LaNiO3 thin films (with small values of Rg) grown on LaAlO3 substrate are found to follow a universal ρ(T) ∝T 3 / 2 law for all the measured temperatures. While less granular thin films (with larger values of Rg), exhibit a more complicated behavior accompanied by a clear-cut crossover (around Tcr = 200 K), from ρ(T) ∝T 3 / 2 (for 20 K temperature size effects (when an average grain size Rg becomes comparable with the thermal de Broglie wavelength Λ) leading to the crossover temperature Tcr ∝(d /Rg) 2 .

  19. Self-catalyst synthesis of aligned ZnO nanorods by pulsed laser deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEN; Song-En; Andy

    2009-01-01

    High-density well-aligned ZnO nanorods were successfully synthesized on ZnO-buffer-layer coated indium phosphide (InP) (100) substrates by a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method. Scanning electron microscopy images show that the ZnO buffer layer formed uniform drip-like structure and ZnO nano- rods were well-oriented perpendicular to the substrate surface. The sharp diffraction peak observed at 34.46° in X-ray diffraction scanning pattern suggests that the ZnO nanorods exhibit a (002)-preferred orientation. The PL spectra of ZnO samples shows a strong near band edge emission centered at about 380 nm and a weak deep level emission centered at around 495 nm, and it demonstrates that the ZnO nanorods produced in this work have high optical quality, which sheds light on further applications for nanodevices.

  20. Laser deposition of YBaCuO thin films: stress measurements and microstructure investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaboriaud, R. J.; Pailloux, F.

    1999-01-01

    Superconducting thin films of YBaCuO have been deposited by laser ablation at 750°C on MgO (001) single crystals. X-ray pole figures indicate a high crystalline quality of c-axis oriented films. A four-circle X-ray goniometer has been used for the measurements of the internal stress in the films by means of the fundamental metric tensor method generally used in the field of continuum mechanics. Microstructural investigation has been done by HRTEM on plan-view samples in order to study the film-substrate epitaxy relations from the observation of the moiré pattern brought about by the superimposition of both YBaCuO and MgO lattices (9% misfit). The results are discussed in terms of crystallographic accommodation and stress relaxation between the film and the substrate.

  1. Lithium outdiffusion in LiTi2O4 thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesoraca, S.; Kleibeuker, J. E.; Prasad, B.; MacManus-Driscoll, J. L.; Blamire, M. G.

    2016-11-01

    We report surface chemical cation composition analysis of high quality superconducting LiTi2O4 thin films, grown epitaxially on MgAl2O4 (111) substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The superconducting transition temperature of the films was 13.8 K. Surface chemical composition is crucial for the formation of a good metal/insulator interface for integrating LiTi2O4 into full-oxide spin-filtering devices in order to minimize the formation of structural defects and increase the spin polarisation efficiency. In consideration of this, we report a detailed angle resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. Results show Li segregation at the surface of LiTi2O4 films. We attribute this process due to outdiffusion of Li toward the outermost LiTi2O4 layers.

  2. Fabrication of organic-inorganic perovskite thin films for planar solar cells via pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yangang; Yao, Yangyi; Zhang, Xiaohang; Hsu, Wei-Lun; Gong, Yunhui; Shin, Jongmoon; Wachsman, Eric D.; Dagenais, Mario; Takeuchi, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    We report on fabrication of organic-inorganic perovskite thin films using a hybrid method consisting of pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of lead iodide and spin-coating of methylammonium iodide. Smooth and highly crystalline CH3NH3PbI3 thin films have been fabricated on silicon and glass coated substrates with fluorine doped tin oxide using this PLD-based hybrid method. Planar perovskite solar cells with an inverted structure have been successfully fabricated using the perovskite films. Because of its versatility, the PLD-based hybrid fabrication method not only provides an easy and precise control of the thickness of the perovskite thin films, but also offers a straightforward platform for studying the potential feasibility in using other metal halides and organic salts for formation of the organic-inorganic perovskite structure.

  3. Fabrication of organic-inorganic perovskite thin films for planar solar cells via pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Yangang; Zhang, Xiaohang; Gong, Yunhui; Shin, Jongmoon; Wachsman, Eric D.; Takeuchi, Ichiro, E-mail: takeuchi@umd.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States); Yao, Yangyi; Hsu, Wei-Lun; Dagenais, Mario [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    We report on fabrication of organic-inorganic perovskite thin films using a hybrid method consisting of pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of lead iodide and spin-coating of methylammonium iodide. Smooth and highly crystalline CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} thin films have been fabricated on silicon and glass coated substrates with fluorine doped tin oxide using this PLD-based hybrid method. Planar perovskite solar cells with an inverted structure have been successfully fabricated using the perovskite films. Because of its versatility, the PLD-based hybrid fabrication method not only provides an easy and precise control of the thickness of the perovskite thin films, but also offers a straightforward platform for studying the potential feasibility in using other metal halides and organic salts for formation of the organic-inorganic perovskite structure.

  4. Fabrication of organic-inorganic perovskite thin films for planar solar cells via pulsed laser deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangang Liang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on fabrication of organic-inorganic perovskite thin films using a hybrid method consisting of pulsed laser deposition (PLD of lead iodide and spin-coating of methylammonium iodide. Smooth and highly crystalline CH3NH3PbI3 thin films have been fabricated on silicon and glass coated substrates with fluorine doped tin oxide using this PLD-based hybrid method. Planar perovskite solar cells with an inverted structure have been successfully fabricated using the perovskite films. Because of its versatility, the PLD-based hybrid fabrication method not only provides an easy and precise control of the thickness of the perovskite thin films, but also offers a straightforward platform for studying the potential feasibility in using other metal halides and organic salts for formation of the organic-inorganic perovskite structure.

  5. Detecting salt deposition on a wind turbine blade using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathiesh Kumar, V.; Vasa, Nilesh J.; Sarathi, R.

    2013-07-01

    The study of pollution performance on a wind turbine blade due to lightning is important, as it can cause major damage to wind turbine blades. In the present work, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) technique is used to understand the influence of pollutant deposited on a wind turbine blade in an off-shore environment. A methodical experimental study was carried out by adopting IEC 60507 standards, and it was observed that the lightning discharge propagates at the interface between the pollutant and the glass fiber reinforced plastic (Material used in manufacturing of wind turbine blades). In addition, as a diagnostic condition monitoring technique, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is proposed and demonstrated to rank the severity of pollutant on the wind turbine blades from a remote area. Optical emission spectra observed during surface discharge process induced by lightning impulse voltage is in agreement with the spectra observed during LIBS.

  6. Optical Properties of Nitrogen-Substituted Strontium Titanate Thin Films Prepared by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Wokaun

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Perovskite-type N-substituted SrTiO3 thin films with a preferential (001 orientation were grown by pulsed laser deposition on (001-oriented MgO and LaAlO3 substrates. Application of N2 or ammonia using a synchronized reactive gas pulse produces SrTiO3-x:Nx films with a nitrogen content of up to 4.1 at.% if prepared with the NH3 gas pulse at a substrate temperature of 720 °C. Incorporating nitrogen in SrTiO3 results in an optical absorption at 370-460 nm associated with localized N(2p orbitals. The estimated energy of these levels is ≈2.7 eV below the conduction band. In addition, the optical absorption increases gradually with increasing nitrogen content.

  7. Pulsed Laser Deposited Nickel Doped Zinc Oxide Thin Films: Structural and Optical Investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanveer A. Dar

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Structural and optical studies has been done on Nickel doped Zinc Oxide (NixZn1 – xO, x  0.03, 0.05 and 0.07 by weight thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition technique. The films are characterized by X-ray diffraction, Uv-vis spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We observed a slight red shift in the optical band gap in the NiZnO subsequent to Ni doping. This shift can be assigned due to the sp-d exchange interaction of Ni- d states with s and p-states of ZnO. Also X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies show that Ni has well substituted in + 2 oxidation state by replacing Zn2+.

  8. Deposition and sputtering yields on EUV collector mirror from Laser Plasma Extreme Ultraviolet Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Tao [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, School of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Rao Zhiming [Depart of Computer Science, Jiangxi University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanchang 330004, Jiangxi (China); Wang Shifang, E-mail: flatime@163.com [School of Physics and Electric Information, Hubei University of Education 1 Nanhuan Road, Wuhan East High-Tech. Zone, Wuhan 430205, Hubei (China)

    2011-02-01

    Based on the self-similar solution of gas dynamic equations, spherical expansion of the highly ionized plasma with limited mass into a vacuum is investigated for the droplet target laser-produced plasma extreme ultraviolet (LPP-EUV) sources. Using partially numerical and partially analytical technology, the velocity, the temperature and the density profiles in the plume versus ionization degree, adiabatic index and initial conditions are presented. Furthermore, the spatial thickness variations of the deposited substrate witness and ion sputtering yields for Ru, Mo, and Si under Sn ion bombardment are theoretically calculated, which can be useful to enable LPP-EUV sources suppliers to estimate collector lifetime and improve debris mitigation systems.

  9. Technology of High-speed Direct Laser Deposition from Ni-based Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimova-Korsmik, Olga; Turichin, Gleb; Zemlyakov, Evgeniy; Babkin, Konstantin; Petrovsky, Pavel; Travyanov, Andrey

    Recently, additive manufacturing is the one of most perspective technologies; it can replace conventional methods of casting and subsequent time-consuming machining. One of the most interesting additive technologies - high-speed direct laser deposition (HSDLD) allows realizing heterophase process during the manufacturing, which there is process takes place with a partial melting of powder. This is particularly important for materials, which are sensitive to strong fluctuations of temperature treatment regimes, like nickel base alloys with high content of gamma prime phase. This alloys are interested for many industrial areas, mostly there are used in engine systems, aircraft and shipbuilding, aeronautics. Heating and cooling rates during the producing process determine structure and affect on its properties. Using HSDLD process it possible to make a products from Ni superalloys with ultrafine microstructure and satisfactory mechanical characteristics without special subsequent heatreatment.

  10. Enhanced photoluminescence and heterojunction characteristics of pulsed laser deposited ZnO nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannam, Ramanjaneyulu; Kumar, E. Senthil; Priyadarshini, D. M.; Bellarmine, F.; DasGupta, Nandita; Ramachandra Rao, M. S.

    2017-10-01

    We report on the growth of ZnO nanostructures in different gas ambient (Ar and N2) using pulsed laser deposition technique. Despite the similar growth temperature, use of N2 ambient gas resulted in well-aligned nanorods with flat surface at the tip, whereas, nanorods grown with Ar ambient exhibited tapered tips. The Nanorods grown under N2 ambient exhibited additional Raman modes corresponding to N induced zinc interstitials. The nanorods are c-axis oriented and highly epitaxial in nature. Photoluminescence spectroscopy reveals that the UV emission can be significantly enhanced by 10 times for the nanorods grown under Ar ambient. The enhanced UV emission is attributed to the reduction in polarization electric field along the c-axis. n-ZnO nanorods/p-Si heterojunction showed rectifying I-V characteristics with a turn of voltage of 3.4 V.

  11. Pulsed laser deposited LaInO{sub 3} thin films and their photoluminescence characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaluvadi, Sandeep Kumar [CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Centre for Nanotechnology Research, SENSE, VIT University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu 632014 (India); Aswin, V.; Kumar, Pramod; Singh, Pooja; Haranath, D.; Rout, P.K. [CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Dogra, Anjana, E-mail: anjanad@nplindia.org [CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India)

    2015-10-15

    Photoluminescence studies of pulsed laser deposition grown LaInO{sub 3} thin films on TiO{sub 2} terminated SrTiO{sub 3} substrate showed a broad-band blue emission peaking at 412 nm, which is primarily attributed to the charge transfer transitions between oxygen and indium, inter (d–f) and intra (f–f) band transitions. The results are analysed based on the mechanism of absorption and emission within the d{sup 10} levels of In{sup 3+} ions. Broadening of the photoluminescence emission is observed with reduction in size of the crystallite owing to quantum confinement effects. - Highlights: • First time grown thin films of LaInO{sub 3} by PLD. • Interesting new photoluminescence features in thin films of LaInO{sub 3}. • Results are discussed on the basis of quantum confinement.

  12. Preparation and tribological properties of DLC/Ti film by pulsed laser arc deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Zhen-Yu; Lu Xin-Chun; Luo Jian-Bin; Shao Tian-Min; Qing Tao; Zhang Chen-Hui

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports that DLC (diamond like carbon)/Ti and DLC films were prepared by using pulsed laser arc deposition. R-ray diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, nanoindenter, spectroscopic ellipsometer, surface profiler and micro-tribometer were employed to study the structure and tribological properties of DLC/Ti and DLC films. The results show that DLC/Ti film, with I(D)/I(G) 0.28 and corresponding to 76% sp3 content calculated by Raman spectroscopy, uniform chemical composition along depth direction, 98 at% content of carbon, hardness 8.2 GPa and Young's modulus 110.5 GPa, compressive stress 6.579 GPa, thickness 46 nm,coefficient of friction 0.08, and critical load 95mN, exhibits excellent mechanical and tribological properties.

  13. How to obtain a magnetic hard-soft architecture by pulsed laser deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fix, T; Trassin, M; Hassan, R Sayed; Schmerber, G; Viart, N; Mény, C; Colis, S; Dinia, A

    2007-12-12

    In spin valve type systems, one ferromagnetic electrode must be magnetically hard to act as a reference layer while the other electrode must be magnetically soft to act as a sensor or storage layer. This magnetic hard-soft architecture can usually be obtained by four different methods: the use of two ferromagnets with different coercive fields (here CoFe(2) and Ni(80)Fe(20)), the use of an underlayer enhancing the coercive field of one of the two ferromagnets (here Ta and Ru), the use of a ferromagnet coupled to a ferrimagnet or antiferromagnet (here NiO/CoFe(2) and CoFe(2)O(4)/CoFe(2)), or the use of an artificial antiferromagnet (here CoFe(2)/Ru/CoFe(2)). We show that at least the first and the third methods seem to work with pulsed laser deposition in the thermodynamic conditions used.

  14. Forced convection and transport effects during hyperbaric laser chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, James L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chavez, Craig A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Espinoza, Miguel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Black, Marcie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Maskaly, Karlene [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boman, Mats [UPPSALA UNIV

    2009-01-01

    This work explores mass transport processes during HP-LCYD, including the transverse forced-flow of precursor gases through a nozzle to enhance fiber growth rates. The use of laser trapping and suspension of nano-scale particles in the precursor flow is also described, providing insights into the nature of the gas flow, including jetting from the fiber tip and thermodiffusion processes near the reaction zone. The effects of differing molecular-weight buffer gases is also explored in conjunction with the Soret effect, and it is found that nucleation at the deposit surface (and homogeneous nucleation in the gas phase) can be enhanced/ retarded, depending on the buffer gas molecular weight. To demonstrate that extensive microstructures can be grown simultaneously, three-dimensional fiber arrays are also grown in-parallel using diffractive optics--without delatory effects from neighboring reaction sites.

  15. Pulsed laser deposition of air-sensitive hydride epitaxial thin films: LiH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oguchi, Hiroyuki, E-mail: oguchi@nanosys.mech.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Nanomechanics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Micro System Integration Center (muSIC), Tohoku University, Sendai 980-0845 (Japan); Isobe, Shigehito [Creative Research Institution, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Kuwano, Hiroki [Department of Nanomechanics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Shiraki, Susumu; Hitosugi, Taro [Advanced Institute for Materials Research (AIMR), Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Orimo, Shin-ichi [Advanced Institute for Materials Research (AIMR), Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2015-09-01

    We report on the epitaxial thin film growth of an air-sensitive hydride, lithium hydride (LiH), using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). We first synthesized a dense LiH target, which is key for PLD growth of high-quality hydride films. Then, we obtained epitaxial thin films of [100]-oriented LiH on a MgO(100) substrate at 250 °C under a hydrogen pressure of 1.3 × 10{sup −2} Pa. Atomic force microscopy revealed that the film demonstrates a Stranski-Krastanov growth mode and that the film with a thickness of ∼10 nm has a good surface flatness, with root-mean-square roughness R{sub RMS} of ∼0.4 nm.

  16. Pulsed laser deposition of the lysozyme protein: an unexpected “Inverse MAPLE” process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Matei, Andreea; Constantinescu, Catalin

    2012-01-01

    the ejection and deposition of lysozyme. This can be called an “inverse MAPLE” process, since the ratio of “matrix” to film material in the target is 10:90, which is inverse of the typical MAPLE process where the film material is dissolved in the matrix down to several wt.%. Lysozyme is a well-known protein...... which is used in food processing and is also an important constituent of human secretions such as sweat and saliva. It has a well-defined mass (14307 u) and can easily be detected by mass spectrometric methods such as MALDI (Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization) in contrast to many other organic...

  17. Surface roughness analysis after machining of direct laser deposited tungsten carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowski, S.; Twardowski, P.; Chwalczuk, T.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, an experimental surface roughness analysis in machining of tungsten carbide is presented. The tungsten carbide was received using direct laser deposition technology (DLD). Experiments carried out included milling of tungsten carbide samples using monolithic torus cubic boron nitride (CBN) tool and grinding with the diamond cup wheel. The effect of machining method on the generated surface topography was analysed. The 3D surface topographies were measured using optical surface profiler. The research revealed, that surface roughness generated after the machining of tungsten carbide is affected by feed per tooth (fz) value related to kinematic-geometric projection only in a minor extent. The main factor affecting machined surface roughness is the occurrence of micro grooves and protuberances on the machined surface, as well as other phenomena connected, inter alia, with the mechanism for material removal.

  18. Electrical characterization of gadolinia doped ceria films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigo, Katarzyna Agnieszka; Heiroth, Sebastian; Lundberg, Mats

    2010-01-01

    Electrical characterization of 10 mol% gadolinia doped ceria (CGO10) films of different thicknesses prepared on MgO(100) substrates by pulsed laser deposition is presented. Dense, polycrystalline and textured films characterized by fine grains (grain sizes ... thickness. The conductivity of the nanocrystalline films is lower (7.0×10−4 S/cm for the 20-nm film and 3.6×10−3 S/cm for the 435-nm film, both at 500°C) than that of microcrystalline, bulk samples ( S/cm at 500°C). The activation energy for the conduction is found to be 0.83 eV for the bulk material, while...

  19. Pulsed Laser Deposition of Cr2-x Fe x TeO 6 Thin Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junlei; Belashchenko, Kirill D.; Dowben, Peter A.; Binek, Christian

    2011-03-01

    Promising spintronic concepts such as Cr 2 O3 based voltage-controlled exchange bias system employ electric controlled boundary magnetization. Symmetry arguments reveal that equilibrium boundary magnetization is a generic property of magnetoelectric antiferromagnets. However, experimental evidence of the boundary magnetization is scarce. Here we explore non-traditional growth of magnetoelectric oxides with tri-rutile structure using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) methodology. We grow and characterize structurally and magnetically various magnetoelectric thin films of the Cr 2-x Fe x Te O6 family starting from x=2 in order to take advantage of the reduced chemical complexity of Fe 2 Te O6 and the beneficial high temperature onset of antiferromagnetic order at 230K in comparison to 90K of Cr 2 Te O6 . Our investigation aims on an experimental test of the predicted generality of the equilibrium boundary magnetization in magnetoelectric antiferromagnets. This project is supported by MRSEC Supplement.

  20. Epitaxial oxide thin films by pulsed laser deposition: Retrospect and prospect

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M S Hegde

    2001-10-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is a unique method to obtain epitaxial multi-component oxide films. Highly stoichiometric, nearly single crystal-like materials in the form of films can be made by PLD. Oxides which are synthesized at high oxygen pressure can be made into films at low oxygen partial pressure. Epitaxial thin films of high c cuprates, metallic, ferroelectric, ferromagnetic, dielectric oxides, super conduc tor-metal-superconductor Josephson junctions and oxide superlattices have been made by PLD. In this article, an overview of preparation, characterization and properties of epitaxial oxide films and their applications are presented. Future prospects of the method for fabricating epitaxial films of transition metal nitrides, chalcogenides, carbides and borides are discussed.