WorldWideScience

Sample records for laser assisted plasma

  1. Process characteristics of fibre-laser-assisted plasma arc welding

    OpenAIRE

    Mahrle, A; SCHNICK, M; Rose, S; Demuth, C; Beyer, E.; Füssel, U

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Experimental and theoretical investigations on fibre-laser assisted plasma arc welding (LAPW) have been performed. Welding experiments were carried out on aluminium and steel sheets. In case of a highly focused laser beam and a separate arrangement of plasma torch and laser beam, high-speed video recordings of the plasma arc and corresponding measurements of the time-dependent arc voltage revealed differences in the process behaviour for both materials. In case of aluminium weldin...

  2. Process characteristics of fibre-laser-assisted plasma arc welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahrle, A; Schnick, M; Rose, S; Demuth, C; Beyer, E; Fuessel, U, E-mail: achim.mahrle@iws.fraunhofer.de [Dresden University of Technology, Institute of Surface and Manufacturing Technology, PO Box, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-08-31

    Experimental and theoretical investigations on fibre-laser-assisted plasma arc welding (LAPW) were performed. Welding experiments were carried out on aluminium and steel sheets. In the case of a highly focused laser beam and a separate arrangement of plasma torch and laser beam, high-speed video recordings of the plasma arc and corresponding measurements of the time-dependent arc voltage revealed differences in the process behaviour for both materials. In the case of aluminium welding, a sharp decline in arc voltage and stabilization and guiding of the anodic arc root was observed whereas in steel welding the arc voltage was slightly increased after the laser beam was switched on. However, significant improvement of the melting efficiency with the combined action of plasma arc and laser beam was achieved for both types of material. Theoretical results of additional numerical simulations of the arc behaviour suggest that the properties of the arc plasma are mainly influenced not by a direct interaction with the laser radiation but by the laser-induced evaporation of metal. Arc stabilization with increased current densities is predicted for moderate rates of evaporated metal only whereas metal vapour rates above a certain threshold causes a destabilization of the arc and reduced current densities along the arc axis.

  3. Laser Diagnostics Study of Plasma Assisted Combustion for Scramjet Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    treatment of the fuel or reactants into hydrogen rich syngas prior to thermal oxidation [11-12], enhanced ignition of hydrocarbon fuels [9,13-14...dramatically, and a significant rise of OH in the post combustion gas region is evident. It is 532 nm Power Supply N d: YA G L as er Dye Laser...plasma, ne~1014-1015 cm-3). The power supply is a 2 kW magnetron (2.45 GHz), although no more than 40 W seems to be required for most test conditions due

  4. Analysis of plasma characteristics and conductive mechanism of laser assisted pulsed arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuangyu; Chen, Shixian; Wang, Qinghua; Li, Yanqing; Zhang, Hong; Ding, Hongtao

    2017-05-01

    This study aims to investigate the arc plasma shape and the spectral characteristics during the laser assisted pulsed arc welding process. The arc plasma shape was synchronously observed using a high speed camera, and the emission spectrum of plasma was obtained by spectrometer. The well-known Boltzmann plot method and Stark broadening were used to calculate the electron temperature and density respectively. The conductive mechanism of arc ignition in laser assisted arc hybrid welding was investigated, and it was found that the plasma current moved to the arc anode under the action of electric field. Thus, a significant parabolic channel was formed between the keyhole and the wire tip. This channel became the main method of energy transformation between the arc and the molten pool. The calculation results of plasma resistivity show that the laser plasma has low resistivity as the starting point of conductive channel formation. When the laser pulse duration increases, the intensity of the plasma radiation spectrum and the plasma electron density will increase, and the electron temperature will decrease.

  5. Metal-Assisted Laser-Induced Gas Plasma for the Direct Analysis of Powder Using Pulse CO2 Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khumaeni, A.; Lie, Z. S.; Kurniawan, K. H.; Kagawa, K.

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of powder samples available in small quantities has been carried out using metal-assisted gas plasma by utilizing a transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO2 laser. The powder was homogeneously mixed with Si grease, and the mixed powder was painted on a metal subtarget. When a TEA CO2 laser was directly focused on the metal subtarget at atmospheric pressure of He gas, a high-temperature He gas plasma was induced. It is assumed that the powder particles were vaporized to be effectively atomized and excited in the gas plasma region. This method has been employed in the rapid analyses of elements in organic and inorganic powder samples present in small quantities. Detection of trace elements of Cr and Pb has been successfully made by using the supplement powder and loam soil, respectively. The detection limits of Pb in loam soil were approximately 20 mg/kg.

  6. Propane decomposition and conversion into other hydrocarbons using metal target assisted laser induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosakhani, A.; Parvin, P.; Reyhani, A.; Mortazavi, S. Z.

    2017-01-01

    It is shown that the propane molecules are strongly decomposed in the metal assisted laser induced plasma based on the nano-catalytic adsorption. A Q-Switched Nd:YAG laser is employed to irradiate the propane gas filled in the control chamber in the presence of the reactive metals such as Ni, Fe, Pd, and Cu in order to study the effect of catalysts during the decomposition. The catalytic targets simultaneously facilitate the plasma formation and the decomposition events leading to generate a wide distribution of the light and heavy hydrocarbon molecules, mainly due to the recombination processes. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and gas chromatography instruments support the findings by detecting the synthetic components. Furthermore, the optical emission spectroscopy of the laser induced plasma emissions realizes the real time monitoring of the reactions taking place during each laser shot. The subsequent recombination events give rise to the generation of a variety of the hydrocarbon molecules. The dissociation rate, conversion ratio, selectivity, and yield as well as the performance factor arise mainly from the catalytic effects of the metal species. Moreover, the ablation rate of the targets of interest is taken into account as a measure of the catalytic reactivity due to the abundance of the metal species ablated from the target. This leads to assess the better performance factor for Pd among four metal catalysts of interest during propane decomposition. Finally, the molecules such as ethane and ethylene are identified as the stable abundant species created during the successive molecular recombination processes.

  7. Fast steel-cleanness characterization by means of laser-assisted plasma spectrometric methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Gregor; Stahnke, Frank; Bleiner, Davide

    2006-12-15

    Laser-assisted plasma spectrometry is a palette of analytical techniques (L-OES, LA-ICP-MS) capable of fast spatially-resolved elemental analysis in the micrometer range. For fast estimation of the occurrence in steel samples of non-metallic inclusions, which degrade the material's technical properties, simultaneous OES detection and sequential ICP-MS detection were compared. Histograms were obtained for the intensity distribution of the acquired signals (laser pulse statistics). The skewness coefficient of the histograms for Al (indicator of non-metallic inclusions) was found to be clearly dependent on the fraction of non-metallic inclusions in the case of scanning L-OES. For LA-ICP-MS less clear dependence was observed, which was influenced by the acquisition characteristics. In fact, less measurement throughput limited for LA-ICP-MS the counting statistics to an extent that overrides the benefit of higher detection power as compared to L-OES.

  8. Laser diagnostics and modeling of plasma assisted CVD. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    Plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) represents a novel approach for utilizing the nonequilibrium effects of reactive plasmas for depositing a wide range of protective hardface coatings that have both wear and erosion application. The nonequilibrium plasma is the heart of this complex system and has the function of generating the reactive molecular fragments (radicals) and atomic species at concentration levels unattainable by other competing processes. It is now widely accepted that such advanced protective hardface coatings materials will play a vital role in the energy technologies of the coming decades, with major applications in diverse areas ranging from aerospace and commercial propulsion systems (jet engines) to automotive components and internal combustion engines, (ceramic heat engines), cutting and machining tools, electronic packaging, thermal management, and possibly room-temperature superconductors. Wear and associated erosion aspects are responsible for an enormous expenditure of energy and fiscal resources in almost all DOE applications. Many of the results from this investigation arc also applicable to other materials processing reactors such as electron beam, PVD, CVD, laser ablation, microwave, high energy cathodic arc, thermal plasma (rf or dc) and combustion spray. These also include the various hybrid systems such as the rf/dc arc as used in Japan for diamond deposition and e-beam PVD deposition of advanced titanium alloy coatings as used at the Paton Institute in Kiev, Ukraine.

  9. Nitride-based laser diodes grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skierbiszewski, C.; Turski, H.; Muziol, G.; Siekacz, M.; Sawicka, M.; Cywiński, G.; Wasilewski, Z. R.; Porowski, S.

    2014-02-01

    The progress in the growth of nitride-based laser diodes (LDs) made by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) is reviewed. In this work we describe the GaN and InGaN growth peculiarities, p-type doping efficiency, and the properties of InGaN quantum wells (QWs) grown by PAMBE. We demonstrate continuous wave (cw) LDs operating in the range from 410 to 482 nm. These LDs were grown on low dislocation (0 0 0 1) c-plane bulk GaN substrate, which allow one to fabricate cw LDs with a lifetime exceeding 2000 h. Also, the ultraviolet LDs at 388 nm grown on (2 0 -2 1) semipolar substrates are discussed. The use of high active nitrogen fluxes up to 2 µm/h during the InGaN growth was essential for pushing the lasing wavelengths of PAMBE LDs above 460 nm. Recent advancement of InGaN growth by PAMBE allows one to demonstrate high-quality quantum QWs and excellent morphology for thick layers. We discuss the influence of LDs design on their parameters such as lasing threshold current and laser beam quality.

  10. Investigation of the dynamics of the Z-pinch imploding plasma for a laser-assisted discharge-produced Sn plasma EUV source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Q; Yamada, J; Kishi, N; Watanabe, M; Okino, A; Horioka, K; Hotta, E, E-mail: zhu.q.ab@m.titech.ac.jp [Department of Energy Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsuta 4259 J2-35, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan)

    2011-04-13

    Dynamics of the imploding plasma and its relations to the 13.5 nm EUV emissions have been experimentally investigated for a laser-assisted Sn based discharge-produced plasma EUV source. The behaviours and two-dimensional electron density distributions of the EUV-emitting plasma were obtained using the time-resolved shadowgraph and Nomarski interferometric techniques. Observation of the plasma piston in the prepinch phase justified the validity of the zero-dimensional thin-shell model, from which the ion charge state of the prepinch plasma in the cathode region was estimated. The sausage (m = 0) instability that usually enhances the EUV emission was observed, with the radial electron density distribution that displays a concave shape at the crest of the plasma and a bell shape at the neck; the maximum of the electron density is located at one peak of the concave distribution at the crest instead of the neck. Intense EUV emission was produced by the Z-pinch plasma with the electron density (2.0-3.0) x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}. Moreover, the shock waves generated in the anode region can also produce in-band EUV emission with the intensity of 30% of that from the Z-pinch plasma.

  11. Tracking of buried layers during plasma-assisted femtosecond laser drilling of compound targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhvaniya, I. A., E-mail: irina.zhvaniya@physics.msu.ru; Garmatina, A. A.; Makarov, I. A.; Gordienko, V. M. [Faculty of Physics and International Laser Center, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991, GSP-1, 1-2 Leninskiye Gory, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-28

    It was shown that drilling of multi-layered target placed in the air by tightly focused femtosecond laser radiation with high fluence (up to 1000 J/cm{sup 2}) can be monitored online using plasma-induced X-ray emission and second harmonic of incident laser radiation. The technique based on X-rays registration is appeared to be more flexible than the method based on detection of second harmonic since its accuracy depends crucially on the target type. We demonstrated that the X-ray signal clearly indicates the transition from one layer to another during the microdrilling of targets consisting of 2–4 layers of titanium foil when a laser beam is focused beneath the target surface at a depth comparable to the layer thickness. The diagnostics of microchannel production in the chicken eggshell was performed for the first time. It was found that the presence of albumen beneath the shell accounts for longtime generation of X-ray pulses.

  12. Tracking of buried layers during plasma-assisted femtosecond laser drilling of compound targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhvaniya, I. A.; Garmatina, A. A.; Makarov, I. A.; Gordienko, V. M.

    2016-07-01

    It was shown that drilling of multi-layered target placed in the air by tightly focused femtosecond laser radiation with high fluence (up to 1000 J/cm2) can be monitored online using plasma-induced X-ray emission and second harmonic of incident laser radiation. The technique based on X-rays registration is appeared to be more flexible than the method based on detection of second harmonic since its accuracy depends crucially on the target type. We demonstrated that the X-ray signal clearly indicates the transition from one layer to another during the microdrilling of targets consisting of 2-4 layers of titanium foil when a laser beam is focused beneath the target surface at a depth comparable to the layer thickness. The diagnostics of microchannel production in the chicken eggshell was performed for the first time. It was found that the presence of albumen beneath the shell accounts for longtime generation of X-ray pulses.

  13. Laser assisted electron dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bray, Alexander William

    2016-01-01

    We apply the convergent close-coupling (CCC) formalism to analyse the processes of laser assisted electron impact ionisation of He, and the attosecond time delay in the photodetachment of the H^{-} ion and the photoionisation of He. Such time dependent atomic collision processes are of considerable interest as experimental measurements on the relevant timescale (attoseconds 10^{-18} s) are now possible utilising ultrafast and intense laser pulses. These processes in particular are furthermore of interest as they are strongly influenced by many-electron correlations. In such cases their theoretical description requires a more comprehensive treatment than that offered by first order perturbation theory. We apply such a treatment through the use of the CCC formalism which involves the complete numeric solution of the integral Lippmann-Schwinger equations pertaining to a particular scattering event. For laser assisted electron impact ionisation of He such a treatment is of a considerably greater accuracy than the...

  14. Performance Improvement of Microcrystalline p-SiC/i-Si/n-Si Thin Film Solar Cells by Using Laser-Assisted Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Ying Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The microcrystalline p-SiC/i-Si/n-Si thin film solar cells treated with hydrogen plasma were fabricated at low temperature using a CO2 laser-assisted plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (LAPECVD system. According to the micro-Raman results, the i-Si films shifted from 482 cm−1 to 512 cm−1 as the assisting laser power increased from 0 W to 80 W, which indicated a gradual transformation from amorphous to crystalline Si. From X-ray diffraction (XRD results, the microcrystalline i-Si films with (111, (220, and (311 diffraction were obtained. Compared with the Si-based thin film solar cells deposited without laser assistance, the short-circuit current density and the power conversion efficiency of the solar cells with assisting laser power of 80 W were improved from 14.38 mA/cm2 to 18.16 mA/cm2 and from 6.89% to 8.58%, respectively.

  15. Laser assisted forming techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratky, Alexander

    2007-05-01

    During forming processes high deformations rates can lead to cracks and rupture very easily. Especially brittle materials like titanium or magnesium make difficulties in forming. Due to the dependence of the yield strength on temperature, forming at elevated temperatures eases processing of such materials. Since forming takes place only at localized areas of the work piece selective heating is suffcient and advantageous in most cases. Selective Laser heating offers a possibility to heat only the areas of the work piece where strongest deformations are required. For this purpose several laser sources have been tested like CO II, Diode and Nd:YAG Lasers and their advantages and disadvantages in localized heating of the work pieces will be discussed. The work presented here summarizes research activities at the Institute for Forming and High Power Laser Technology, Vienna University of Technology, on laser assisted deep drawing, laser assisted bending, wire drawing and so on during the last decade. Recent developments like roll profiling, incremental forming processes and hydro forming are discussed briefly.

  16. Laser assisted {alpha} decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castaneda Cortes, Hector Mauricio

    2012-02-01

    Excited or short-lived nuclei often decay by emitting alpha particles that are assumed to be preformed inside the nucleus and confined in the nuclear potential well. In this picture, {alpha} decay refers to the tunneling of the alpha particle through the potential barrier. In this thesis we investigate for the first time how strong laser fields can assist the tunneling of the alpha particle and thus influence the nuclear decay. Generally speaking, laser-assisted {alpha} decay can be described as laser-assisted tunneling of a quasistationary state, i.e, a slowly decaying state. Our theoretical treatment is developed starting from the complex trajectory formulation of the well-known strong-field approximation used to describe laser-induced ionization. We extend this formulation and develop a method to treat the decay of quasistationary states. The effect of both static and optical and X-ray monochromatic fields on the lifetimes and {alpha}-particle emission spectra are investigated for a number of {alpha}-emitting nuclei. We find that even at strong intensities, the laser-induced acceleration of the {alpha} decay is negligible, ranging from a relative modification in the decay rate of 10{sup -3} for static fields of electric field strengths of 10{sup 15} V/m, to 10{sup -8} for strong optical fields with intensities of 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2}, and to 10{sup -6} for strong X-ray fields with laser intensities around 10{sup 24} W/cm{sup 2}. However, the effect of the external field is visible in the spectrum of emitted alpha particles, leading in the case of optical fields even to rescattering phenomena for intensities approaching 6 x 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2}. The dynamics of the alpha particle in laser fields of intensities below the rescattering limit is investigated.

  17. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Experimental optimisation of the gas-assisted laser cutting of thick steel sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malikov, A. G.; Orishich, Anatolii M.; Shulyat'ev, Viktor B.

    2009-06-01

    We report on the experimental optimisation of the oxygen-assisted CO2 laser cutting of low-carbon sheet steel 5 to 25 mm in thickness. It is shown that the cut edge roughness is minimal when the energy input per unit volume of the material removed and the incident beam power per unit sheet thickness remain constant at ~20 J mm-3 and ~200 W mm-1, respectively, over the entire range of sheet thicknesses examined. The corresponding Péclet number is Pe = 0.5. These results can be used to determine the optimal beam power and cutting speed for a particular sheet thickness. At sufficiently large thicknesses, the conditions that ensure the minimum roughness can be written in the form of relations between nondimensional parameters.

  18. Temperature measurement of plasma-assisted flames: comparison between optical emission spectroscopy and 2-color laser induced fluorescence techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Lacoste, Deanna A.

    2015-03-30

    Accurate thermometry of highly reactive environments, such as plasma-assisted combustion, is challenging. With the help of conical laminar premixed methane-air flames, this study compares two thermometry techniques for the temperature determination in a combustion front enhanced by nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) plasma discharges. Based on emission spectroscopic analysis, the results show that the rotational temperature of CH(A) gives a reasonable estimate for the adiabatic flame temperature, only for lean and stoichiometric conditions. The rotational temperature of N2(C) is found to significantly underestimate the flame temperature. The 2-color OH-PLIF technique gives correct values of the flame temperature.

  19. Laser-assisted hatching in assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montag, M; van der Ven, H

    1999-09-01

    The use of a 1.48 um diode laser for assisted hatching was investigated in animal experimentation. Laser assisted hatching was offered to patients with advanced maternal age to evaluate a possible benefit. Using the Fertilase(r) system we investigated the impact of openings with different size in the zona of mouse embryos on the hatching process, as well as that of two openings. Laser-drilling was performed at the blastocyst stage to look for differences in timing and efficacy of hatching. The possible benefit of assisted hatching was studied in 24 couples with advanced maternal age (38.8+2.1 years) and compared to a control group (37.8+2.5 years) treated in the same time period but without assisted hatching. A certain diameter of a laser drilled opening in the zona pellucida is necessary for efficient hatching. When two openings are present in the zona, the embryo will use both openings for hatching and subsequently become trapped. Laser-drilling at th e expanded blastocyst stage causes an immediate collapse of treated blastocysts and the onset of hatching is retarded. Assisted hatching in 24 patients with advanced maternal age resulted in a significant increase (plaser to drill an opening into the zona pellucida provides a good alternate to conventionally applied techniques. The procedure is efficient and safe as long as it is applied properly. In a human in vitro fertilization program, selected patients will have a benefit form assisted hatching.

  20. Spectroscopic characterization of the plasmas formed during the deposition of ZnO and Al-doped ZnO films by plasma-assisted pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Peipei; Cai, Hua; Yang, Xu; Li, Hui; Zhang, Wu; Xu, Ning; Sun, Jian; Wu, Jiada

    2016-11-01

    An oxygen-zinc plasma and an oxygen-zinc-aluminum plasma are formed by pulsed laser ablation of a Zn target or pulsed laser co-ablation of a Zn target and an Al target in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge-generated oxygen plasma for the deposition of ZnO and Al-doped ZnO (AZO) films. The plasmas are characterized spectroscopically by time-integrated and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy. Both the oxygen-zinc plasma and the oxygen-zinc-aluminum plasma contain excited species originally present in the working O2 gas and energetic species ablated from the targets. The optical emission of the oxygen-zinc-aluminum plasma is abundant in the emission bands of oxygen molecular ions and the emission lines of mono-atomic oxygen, zinc and aluminum atoms and atomic ions. The time-integrated spectra as well as the time-resolved spectra of the plasma emission indicate that the oxygen species in the ECR oxygen plasma experience additional excitation by the expanding ablation plumes, and the ablated species are excited frequently when traveling accompanying the plume expansion in the oxygen plasma, making the formed plasma highly excited and very reactive, which plays an important role in the reactive growth of ZnO matrix and the in-situ doping of Al into the growing ZnO matrix. The deposited ZnO and AZO films were evaluated for composition analysis by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, structure characterization by X-ray diffraction and optical transmission measurement. The deposited ZnO is slightly rich in O. The Al concentration of the AZO films can be controlled and varied simply by changing the repetition rate of the laser used for Al target ablation. Both the ZnO and the AZO films are featured with hexagonal wurtzite crystal structure and exhibit high optical transparency in a wide spectral region. Al doping results in an improvement in the ultraviolet transparency, a blue shift in the absorption edge and a widening of the band gap.

  1. Laser assisted hair-removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, S; Elsaie, M L; Nouri, K

    2009-10-01

    A number of lasers and light devices are now available for the treatment of unwanted hair. The goal of laser hair removal is to damage stem cells in the bulge of the hair follicle by targeting melanin, the endogenous chromophore for laser and light devices utilized to remove hair. The competing chromophores in the skin and hair, oxyhemoglobin and water, have a decreased absorption between 690 nm and 1000 nm, thus making this an ideal range for laser and light sources. Laser hair removal is achieved through follicular unit destruction based on selective photothermolysis. The principle of selective photothermolysis predicts that the thermal injury will be restricted to a given target if there is sufficient selective absorption of light and the pulse duration is shorter than the thermal relaxation time of the target. This review will focus on the mechanisms of laser assisted hair removal and provide an update on the newer technologies emerging in the field of lasers assisted hair removal.

  2. Large molecular mass materials in coal-derived liquids by {sup 252}Cf-plasma and matrix-assisted laser desorption mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domin, M.; Li, S.; Lazaro, M.-J.; Herod, A.A.; Larsen, J.W.; Kandiyoti, R. [School of Pharmacy, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Parmaceutical and Biological Chemistry

    1998-05-01

    The paper compares responses of {sup 252}Cf-plasma desorption MS (PD-MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption (MALDI) MS to identical samples. The two pairs of samples selected for the comparison were known from previous work to differ significantly in their high mass contents. MALDI-MS showed large differences in MM distributions within both pairs of samples. The PD-MS data showed a degree of similarity between one pair of samples (pyridine soluble/insoluble fractions of a coal tar pitch); for the second pair (a coal extract and its hydrocracked product), trends from the two MS techniques agreed closely. The MM range observed by PD-MS was somewhat narrower, extending to between 3000 and 5000 u. Significant differences within pairs of samples were observed by SEC and by UV-fluorescence spectroscopy, providing somewhat closer agreement with the MALDI spectra. The two MS instruments differ in two important respects: the ionization system (i.e., plasma vs laser desorption) and the maximum available ion extraction voltage: 30 kV for the MALDI-MS instrument and 15 kV for the PD-MS. The comparison of plasma vs laser desorption mass spectroscopy could not therefore take place at high ion extraction voltages. Work at up to 30 kV in the MALDI instrument indicated better sensitivity to high-mass materials at higher ion extraction voltages. The qualitative similarity of results from the two MS techniques is nevertheless apparent; the range of MMs observed in PD-MS as well as in MALDI-MS were, furthermore, far larger than those reported by any MS technique, to date. 38 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Plasma Assisted Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-28

    pressure hydrogen is given in Fig. 2.14. The regions typical for “common” glow discharges (negative glow, Faraday dark space, and positive column) are...Hollenstein Ch. Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion, 42 (2000) 93. [107] M.A. Heald and C.B. Wahrton, Plasma diagnostics with microwaves, John Wi- ley &Sons, New York...Nitrous Oxide J. Chem. Soc. Faraday Trans. 69 352 [194] Albers E A, Hoyermann K, Schacke H, Schmatjko K J, Wagner H Gg, Wolfrum J 1975 Absolute Rate

  4. Large molecular mass materials in coal derived liquids by {sup 252}Cf-plasma and matrix assisted laser desorption mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domin, M. [School of Pharmacy, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Pharmaceutical and Biological Chemistry; Li, S.; Herod, A.A.; Larsen, J.W. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lazaro, M.J.; Kandiyoti, R. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Chemical Technology

    1997-12-31

    A Point of Ayr coal extract, its hydrocracked product and the pyridine solubles/insolubles of a coal tar pitch have been examined using {sup 252}Cf-plasma desorption-mass spectrometry (PDMS) and matrix assisted laser desorption-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). Comparison of molecular masses (MMs) between the coal extract and its hydrocracked product by PDMS indicated ranges of masses in the product to be considerably smaller, with number and weight average MMs reduced by approximately a factor of two. MALDI-mass spectra of the same samples indicated a greater reduction in mass. Similar comparison of the pyridine soluble/insoluble fractions of the coal tar pitch showed smaller differences by PD-MS than by MALDI-MS. (orig.)

  5. Laser-Assisted Operculectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Robert; Vitruk, Peter

    2015-09-01

    The 10,600-nm CO2 laser is both an efficient and spatially precise photo-thermal ablation device and excellent coagulator because of the close match between its coagulation depth and the diameters of oral soft-tissue capillaries. The ablation of hyperplastic oral soft tissue with the flexible fiber waveguide 10,600-nm CO2 laser is a minimally invasive and typically suture-free surgical modality that ensures dependable treatment. It is, in many respects, superior to most of the alternative treatment options. Its excellent hemostatic abilities and the minimal damage to adjacent healthy tissues make the CO2 laser a perfect surgical tool for treating oral soft-tissue lesions, including the inflamed operculum.

  6. Laser assisted graffiti paints removing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, B. Y.; Chikalev, Y. V.; Shakhno, E. A.

    2011-02-01

    It's hard to imagine a modern city view without some drawings and inscriptions, usually called "graffiti". Traditional cleaning methods do not suit modern requirements. Investigation of possibilities of laser assisted paints removing is described in this article. The conditions for removing different paints from different surfaces were defined.

  7. Laser-assisted fabrication of materials

    CERN Document Server

    Manna, Indranil

    2013-01-01

    Laser assisted fabrication involves shaping of materials using laser as a source of heat. It can be achieved by removal of materials (laser assisted cutting, drilling, etc.), deformation (bending, extrusion), joining (welding, soldering) and addition of materials (surface cladding or direct laser cladding). This book on ´Laser assisted Fabrication’ is aimed at developing in-depth engineering concepts on various laser assisted macro and micro-fabrication techniques with the focus on application and a review of the engineering background of different micro/macro-fabrication techniques, thermal history of the treated zone and microstructural development and evolution of properties of the treated zone.

  8. Assisting Gas Optimization in CO2 Laser Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, Hui; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    1996-01-01

    High quality laser welding is achieved under the condition of optimizing all process parameters. Assisting gas plays an important role for sound welds. In the conventional welding process assisting gas is used as a shielding gas to prevent that the weld seam oxidates. In the laser welding process...... assisting gas is also needed to control the laser induced plasma.Assisting gas is one of the most important parameters in the laser welding process. It is responsible for obtaining a quality weld which is characterized by deep penetration, no interior imperfections, i.e. porosity, no crack, homogeneous seam...... are applied with three different flow rates for each of the gases. A number of systematic laboratory experiments is carried out by employing various experimental designs, 33 and 32 Factorial Design. In the experiments a CO2 laser is used to weld thin sheets of mild steel. The welding specimens are evaluated...

  9. Deposition by plasma-assisted laser ablation and maskless patterning of YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7-x] superconducting thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejedor, P. (Centro Nacional de Microelectronica, CSIC, Madrid (Spain)); Cagigal, M. (Dept. de Fisica de Materiales, Univ. Complutense, Madrid (Spain)); Vicent, J.L. (Dept. de Fisica de Materiales, Univ. Complutense, Madrid (Spain)); Briones, F. (Centro Nacional de Microelectronica, CSIC, Madrid (Spain))

    1994-04-01

    YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7-x] superconducting thin films were deposited in situ by plasma-assisted laser ablation onto polycrystalline yttria-stabilized-zirconia (YSZ) substrates at 700 C in a low pressure (200-400 mTorr) O[sub 2] discharge (-300 V). The laser operated at 5-50 Hz repetition rate and was focused onto a superconducting target with a typical energy density of 2.5-4 J cm[sup -2]. An in situ annealing step in 1 Torr O[sub 2] atmosphere at 425 C for 1-2 h was followed by slow cooling of the films to room temperature. The YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7-x] films grew preferentially oriented with the c-axis normal to the substrate surface. They exhibited metallic behaviour in the normal state and superconducting transitions with typical onset of 91 K and zero resistance between 82 and 87 K. The transport critical current densities J[sub c] were 10[sup 2] A cm[sup -2] for 1 [mu]m thick films and two orders of magnitude higher, J[sub c] = 3 x 10[sup 4] A cm[sup -2], for 0.08 [mu]m thick films. Maskless patterning was achieved by utilizing the ArF laser beam to induce etching selectivity of the superconducting thin films. For this purpose, the central part of the beam was apertured by a slit and focused onto the sample by means of a 15 x Schwarzschild microscope objective to give an irradiated area on the sample of approximately 10 x 150 [mu]m[sup 2]. The laser energy density on the sample was typically 10[sup 3] J cm[sup -2], while the repetition rate was varied between 10 and 20 Hz. Microbridges of different geometries with a maximum resolution of 10 [mu]m and high edge definition were obtained at 20 [mu]m s[sup -1] scan rate using this technique. (orig.)

  10. Competition between (001) and (111) MgO thin film growth on Al-doped ZnO by oxygen plasma assisted pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Bo; Yang, Qiguang; Walker, Brandon; Gonder, Casey A.; Romain, Gari C.; Mundle, Rajeh; Bahoura, Messaoud; Pradhan, A. K. [Center for Materials Research, Norfolk State University, Norfolk, Virginia 23504 (United States)

    2013-06-07

    We report on the study of epitaxial MgO thin films on (0001) Al-doped ZnO (Al: ZnO) underlayers, grown by oxygen plasma assisted pulsed laser deposition technique. A systematic investigation of the MgO thin films was performed by X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy, along with the current-voltage characteristics. A distinguished behavior was observed that the preferred MgO orientation changes from (111) to (001) in the films as the growth temperature increases. Two completely different in-plane epitaxial relationships were also determined from X-ray diffraction as: [110]MgO//[1120]Al: ZnO and [110]MgO//[1100]Al: ZnO for (001) MgO with 60 Degree-Sign rotated triplet domains, and [110]MgO//[1120]Al: ZnO for (111) MgO with 180 Degree-Sign rotated twin. The pronounced temperature dependence indicates a reconciliation of the nucleation driving forces among surface, interfacial, and strain energy for heteroepitaxy of cubic MgO on hexagonal Al: ZnO. The related interfacial atomic registry is considered to be important to the formation of unusual (001) MgO on hexagonal crystals. In addition, the electrical characterization revealed a dramatic reduction of the leakage current in (001) MgO thin films, whereas the small grain size of (111) MgO is identified by atomic force microscopy as a main cause of large leakage current.

  11. ULTRA-HIGH BW OPTICAL COMMUNICATION USING OXYGEN PLASMA ASSISTED InP BASED HYBRID Si LASER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PRATTAY BIN ABDUL WAHAB

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates the development of a hybrid integration platform to build major electrically driven photonic active devices: silicon evanescent DFB lasers, silicon evanescent amplifiers, silicon evanescent waveguide photo-detectors or pre-amplified photo-detectors on a single silicon platform consisting of III-V gain layers with passive waveguide for board to board and for chip to chip optical communication for tera scale computing. The structural description proposed here may push forward the manufacturing of photonic ICs tomake high speed communicational imaginings to reality and to start a new era.

  12. Rhabdomyolysis After Cosmetic Laser-Assisted Liposuction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jin-yong; Chang, Hak

    2015-08-01

    A 34-year-old-female patient visited our emergency room for symptoms of disturbance of urination and shortness of breath. She was diagnosed with rhabdomyolysis with acute kidney injury after laser-assisted liposuction and required hemodialysis. Although laser-assisted liposuction is a well-used procedure, it can cause local complications, such as burns and skin irregularities, as well as systemic complications, such as infection, fever, and emboli. However, laser-assisted, liposuction-induced rhabdomyolysis has not been reported. Repetitive exercises, trauma, and crush injury are the major causes of rhabdomyolysis. In this study, a unique case of rhabdomyolysis that developed after laser-assisted liposuction is reported.

  13. Thomson scattering from laser plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moody, J D; Alley, W E; De Groot, J S; Estabrook, K G; Glenzer, S H; Hammer, J H; Jadaud, J P; MacGowan, B J; Rozmus, W; Suter, L J; Williams, E A

    1999-01-12

    Thomson scattering has recently been introduced as a fundamental diagnostic of plasma conditions and basic physical processes in dense, inertial confinement fusion plasmas. Experiments at the Nova laser facility [E. M. Campbell et al., Laser Part. Beams 9, 209 (1991)] have demonstrated accurate temporally and spatially resolved characterization of densities, electron temperatures, and average ionization levels by simultaneously observing Thomson scattered light from ion acoustic and electron plasma (Langmuir) fluctuations. In addition, observations of fast and slow ion acous- tic waves in two-ion species plasmas have also allowed an independent measurement of the ion temperature. These results have motivated the application of Thomson scattering in closed-geometry inertial confinement fusion hohlraums to benchmark integrated radiation-hydrodynamic modeling of fusion plasmas. For this purpose a high energy 4{omega} probe laser was implemented recently allowing ultraviolet Thomson scattering at various locations in high-density gas-filled hohlraum plasmas. In partic- ular, the observation of steep electron temperature gradients indicates that electron thermal transport is inhibited in these gas-filled hohlraums. Hydrodynamic calcula- tions which include an exact treatment of large-scale magnetic fields are in agreement with these findings. Moreover, the Thomson scattering data clearly indicate axial stagnation in these hohlraums by showing a fast rise of the ion temperature. Its timing is in good agreement with calculations indicating that the stagnating plasma will not deteriorate the implosion of the fusion capsules in ignition experiments.

  14. EDITORIAL: Laser and plasma accelerators Laser and plasma accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Robert

    2009-02-01

    This special issue on laser and plasma accelerators illustrates the rapid advancement and diverse applications of laser and plasma accelerators. Plasma is an attractive medium for particle acceleration because of the high electric field it can sustain, with studies of acceleration processes remaining one of the most important areas of research in both laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. The rapid advance in laser and accelerator technology has led to the development of terawatt and petawatt laser systems with ultra-high intensities and short sub-picosecond pulses, which are used to generate wakefields in plasma. Recent successes include the demonstration by several groups in 2004 of quasi-monoenergetic electron beams by wakefields in the bubble regime with the GeV energy barrier being reached in 2006, and the energy doubling of the SLAC high-energy electron beam from 42 to 85 GeV. The electron beams generated by the laser plasma driven wakefields have good spatial quality with energies ranging from MeV to GeV. A unique feature is that they are ultra-short bunches with simulations showing that they can be as short as a few femtoseconds with low-energy spread, making these beams ideal for a variety of applications ranging from novel high-brightness radiation sources for medicine, material science and ultrafast time-resolved radiobiology or chemistry. Laser driven ion acceleration experiments have also made significant advances over the last few years with applications in laser fusion, nuclear physics and medicine. Attention is focused on the possibility of producing quasi-mono-energetic ions with energies ranging from hundreds of MeV to GeV per nucleon. New acceleration mechanisms are being studied, including ion acceleration from ultra-thin foils and direct laser acceleration. The application of wakefields or beat waves in other areas of science such as astrophysics and particle physics is beginning to take off, such as the study of cosmic accelerators considered

  15. Laser-plasma-based linear collider using hollow plasma channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, C.B., E-mail: CBSchroeder@lbl.gov; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2016-09-01

    A linear electron–positron collider based on laser-plasma accelerators using hollow plasma channels is considered. Laser propagation and energy depletion in the hollow channel is discussed, as well as the overall efficiency of the laser-plasma accelerator. Example parameters are presented for a 1-TeV and 3-TeV center-of-mass collider based on laser-plasma accelerators.

  16. Laser Plasmas : Optical guiding of laser beam in nonuniform plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tarsem Singh Gill

    2000-11-01

    A plasma channel produced by a short ionising laser pulse is axially nonuniform resulting from the self-defocusing. Through such preformed plasma channel, when a delayed pulse propagates, the phenomena of diffraction, refraction and self-phase modulation come into play. We have solved the nonlinear parabolic partial differential equation governing the propagation characteristics for an approximate analytical solution using variational approach. Results are compared with the theoretical model of Liu and Tripathi (Phys. Plasmas 1, 3100 (1994)) based on paraxial ray approximation. Particular emphasis is on both beam width and longitudinal phase delay which are crucial to many applications.

  17. A SIMPLE AND RAPID MATRIX-ASSISTED LASER DESORPTION/IONIZATION TIME OF FLIGHT MASS SPECTROMETRY METHOD TO SCREEN FISH PLASMA SAMPLES FOR ESTROGEN-RESPONSIVE BIOMARKERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, we describe and evaluate the performance of a simple and rapid mass spectral method for screening fish plasma for estrogen-responsive biomarkers using matrix assisted laster desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) couopled with a short...

  18. Analysis of metal-binding proteins separated by non-denaturating gel electrophoresis using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, J Susanne; Mounicou, Sandra; Zoriy, Miroslav V; Becker, J Sabine; Lobinski, Ryszard

    2008-09-15

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) have become established as very efficient and sensitive biopolymer and elemental mass spectrometric techniques for studying metal-binding proteins (metalloproteins) in life sciences. Protein complexes present in rat tissues (liver and kidney) were separated in their native state in the first dimension by blue native gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE). Essential and toxic metals, such as zinc, copper, iron, nickel, chromium, cadmium and lead, were detected by scanning the gel bands using quadrupole LA-ICP-MS with and without collision cell as a microanalytical technique. Several proteins were identified by using MALDI-TOF-MS together with a database search. For example, on one protein band cut from the BN-PAGE gel and digested with the enzyme trypsin, two different proteins - protein FAM44B and cathepsin B precursor - were identified. By combining biomolecular and elemental mass spectrometry, it was possible to characterize and identify selected metal-binding rat liver and kidney tissue proteins.

  19. Laser Plasmas : Plasma dynamics from laser ablated solid lithium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Debarati Bhattacharya

    2000-11-01

    Emission plasma plume generated by pulsed laser ablation of a lithium solid target by a ruby laser (694 nm, 20 ns, 3 J) was subjected to optical emission spectroscopy: time and space resolved optical emission was characterised as a function of distance from the target surface. Propagation of the plume was studied through ambient background of argon gas. Spectroscopic observations can, in general, be used to analyse plume structure with respect to an appropriate theoretical plasma model. The plume expansion dynamics in this case could be explained through a shock wave propagation model wherein, the experimental observations made were seen to fit well with the theoretical predictions. Spectral information derived from measurement of peak intensity and line width determined the parameters, electron temperature (e) and electron number density e, typically used to characterise laser produced plasma plume emission. These measurements were also used to validate the assumptions underlying the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) model, invoked for the high density laser plasma under study. Some interesting results pertaining to the analysis of plume structure and spatio-temporal behaviour of e and e along the plume length will be presented and discussed.

  20. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometric analysis of degradation products after treatment of methylene blue aqueous solution with three-dimensionally integrated microsolution plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirafuji, Tatsuru; Nomura, Ayano; Hayashi, Yui; Tanaka, Kenji; Goto, Motonobu

    2016-01-01

    Methylene blue can be degraded in three-dimensionally integrated microsolution plasma. The degradation products have been analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI TOF) mass spectrometry to understand the degradation mechanisms. The results of MALDI TOF mass spectrometry have shown that sulfoxide is formed at the first stage of the oxidation. Then, partial oxidation proceeds on the methyl groups left on the sulfoxide. The sulfoxide is subsequently separated to two benzene derivatives. Finally, weak functional groups are removed from the benzene derivatives.

  1. Plasma-Assisted Combustion Studies at AFRL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-04

    important for lean, gas-turbine ( powerplant ) operation Might one also mitigate/influence acoustic fluctuations? Potential for uniform performance with...Thermometry with pulsed -W Source No -W Pulsed -W Direct coupled plasma torch: flame OH vs. - wave power: Plasma-assisted Ignition Cathey, Gundersen, Wang...Determine physical mechanism, primarily for transient plasma ignition  What is role of humidity: XH2O affects detonation wave speed in PDE but not

  2. Femtosecond-laser assisted cell reprogramming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breunig, Hans Georg; Uchugonova, Aisada; Batista, Ana; König, Karsten

    2017-02-01

    Femtosecond-laser pulses can assist to transfect cells by creating transient holes in the cell membrane, thus making them temporarily permeable for extraneous genetic material. This procedure offers the advantage of being completely "virus free" since no viruses are used for the delivery and integration of gene factors into the host genome and, thereby, avoiding serious side effects which so far prevent clinical application. Unfortunately, focusing of the laser radiation onto individual cell membranes is quite elaborate and time consuming. Regarding these obstacles, we briefly review two optical setups for fast, efficient and high throughput laser-assisted cell transfection based on femtosecond laser pulse excitation. The first setup aims at assisting the transfection of adherent cells. It comprises of a modified laser-scanning microscope with beamshaping optics as well as home-made software to automate the detection, targeting and laser-irradiation process. The second setup aims at laser-assisted transfection of non-adherent cells in suspension which move in a continuous flow through the laser focus region. The setup allows to address a large number of cells, however, with much lower transfection efficiency than the individual-cell targeting approach.

  3. Commissioning of laser assisted cold spraying technology

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tlotleng, Monnamme

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates the potential of a newly designed, assembled and commissioned laser assisted cold spraying (LACS) technology at the National Laser Centre, Pretoria, South Africa, to deposit Al-12wt%Si coatings on stainless steel substrate...

  4. Online plasma diagnostics of a laser-produced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Gao; Nasr, A. M. Hafz; Song, Li; Mohammad, Mirzaie; Guangyu, Li; Quratul, Ain

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we report a laser interferometry experiment for the online-diagnosing of a laser-produced plasma. The laser pulses generating the plasma are ultra-fast (30 femtoseconds), ultra-intense (tens of Terawatt) and are focused on a helium gas jet to generate relativistic electron beams via the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) mechanism. A probe laser beam (λ = 800 nm) which is split-off the main beam is used to cross the plasma at the time of arrival of the main pulse, allowing online plasma density diagnostics. The interferometer setup is based on the NoMarski method in which we used a Fresnel bi-prism where the probe beam interferes with itself after crossing the plasma medium. A high-dynamic range CCD camera is used to record the interference patterns. Based upon the Abel inversion technique, we obtained a 3D density distribution of the plasma density.

  5. Preprosthetic Laser Assisted Mandibular Vestibuloplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kacarska M.

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A prosthetic treatment of the edentulous mandible can be very challenging. In cases with inadequate buccal depth, a necessary deepening of the oral vestibule can be achieved by surgically detaching the soft tissue attachments. A preprosthetic vestibuloplasty is usually done surgically by scalpel. With the permanent advancement of laser technology, a laser vestibuloplasty has become a preferred surgical procedure. The aim of this report was to present individuality of a mandible vestibuloplasty performed with Er.YAG laser.

  6. Laser-plasma interactions and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Neely, David; Bingham, Robert; Jaroszynski, Dino

    2013-01-01

    Laser-Plasma Interactions and Applications covers the fundamental and applied aspects of high power laser-plasma physics. With an internationally renowned team of authors, the book broadens the knowledge of young researchers working in high power laser-plasma science by providing them with a thorough pedagogical grounding in the interaction of laser radiation with matter, laser-plasma accelerators, and inertial confinement fusion. The text is organised such that the theoretical foundations of the subject are discussed first, in Part I. In Part II, topics in the area of high energy density physics are covered. Parts III and IV deal with the applications to inertial confinement fusion and as a driver of particle and radiation sources, respectively. Finally, Part V describes the principle diagnostic, targetry, and computational approaches used in the field. This book is designed to give students a thorough foundation in the fundamental physics of laser-plasma interactions. It will also provide readers with knowl...

  7. Dynamics of Molecular Emission Features from Nanosecond, Femtosecond Laser and Filament Ablation Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Yeak, J.; Brumfield, Brian E.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-06-15

    The evolutionary paths of molecular species and nanoparticles in laser ablation plumes are not well understood due to the complexity of numerous physical processes that occur simultaneously in a transient laser-plasma system. It is well known that the emission features of ions, atoms, molecules and nanoparticles in a laser ablation plume strongly depend on the laser irradiation conditions. In this letter we report the temporal emission features of AlO molecules in plasmas generated using a nanosecond laser, a femtosecond laser and filaments generated from a femtosecond laser. Our results show that, at a fixed laser energy, the persistence of AlO is found to be highest and lowest in ns and filament laser plasmas respectively while molecular species are formed at early times for both ultrashort pulse (fs and filament) generated plasmas. Analysis of the AlO emission band features show that the vibrational temperature of AlO decays rapidly in filament assisted laser ablation plumes.

  8. Laser-assisted serial tonsillectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krespi, Y P; Ling, E H

    1994-10-01

    Laser ablation of the palatine tonsils is a useful alternative to tonsillectomy in adults. Cryptic tonsillitis is a common problem causing recurrent infection, sore throat, and halitosis. Elimination and/or obliteration of surface pockets (crypts) of the palatine tonsils utilizing the CO2 laser was effective in 86 patients treated in the past 4 years. Ablation of the tonsil surface was performed in stages under local anesthesia in an office setting; CO2 laser energy delivered through the "SwiftLase" handpiece extension provided char-free, superficial layer ablation of tissue. "SwiftLase" is easily installed onto existing CO2 laser units and provides high-power densities by utilizing a focused laser beam in an extremely fast uniform scan over an extended area (up to 4 mm) within a fraction of a second. This method and results of its use are discussed.

  9. Plasma Injection Schemes for Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    OpenAIRE

    J. Faure

    2017-01-01

    Plasma injection schemes are crucial for producing high-quality electron beams in laser-plasma accelerators. This article introduces the general concepts of plasma injection. First, a Hamiltonian model for particle trapping and acceleration in plasma waves is introduced; ionization injection and colliding-pulse injection are described in the framework of this Hamiltonian model. We then proceed to consider injection in plasma density gradients.

  10. Diagnostics of laser ablated plasma plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amoruso, S.; Toftmann, B.; Schou, Jørgen;

    2004-01-01

    The effect of an ambient gas on the expansion dynamics of laser ablated plasmas has been studied for two systems by exploiting different diagnostic techniques. First, the dynamics of a MgB2 laser produced plasma plume in an Ar atmosphere has been investigated by space-and time-resolved optical...

  11. Preprosthetic Laser Assisted Mandibular Vestibuloplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Kacarska M.; Dimitrovski O.; Monevska D. Popovic

    2016-01-01

    A prosthetic treatment of the edentulous mandible can be very challenging. In cases with inadequate buccal depth, a necessary deepening of the oral vestibule can be achieved by surgically detaching the soft tissue attachments. A preprosthetic vestibuloplasty is usually done surgically by scalpel. With the permanent advancement of laser technology, a laser vestibuloplasty has become a preferred surgical procedure. The aim of this report was to present individuality of a mandible vestibuloplast...

  12. Synthesis of high Al content Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N ternary films by pulsed laser co-ablation of GaAs and Al targets assisted by nitrogen plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Hua; You, Qinghu [Department of Optical Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Hu, Zhigao; Guo, Shuang [Key Laboratory of Polar Materials and Devices, Ministry of Education, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China); Yang, Xu; Sun, Jian; Xu, Ning [Department of Optical Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Wu, Jiada, E-mail: jdwu@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Optical Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N films were synthesized by co-ablation of an Al target and a GaAs target. • Nitrogen plasma was used to assist the synthesis of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N ternary films. • The Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N films are slightly rich in N with an Al content above 0.6. • The Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N films are hexagonal wurtzite in crystal structure. • The Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N films have an absorption edge of 260 nm and a band gap of 4.7 eV. - Abstract: We present the synthesis of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N ternary films by pulsed laser co-ablation of a polycrystalline GaAs target and a metallic Al target in the environment of nitrogen plasma which provides nitrogen for the films and assists the formation of nitride films. Field emission scanning electron microscopy exposes the smooth surface appearance and dense film structure. X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and Raman scattering spectroscopy reveal the hexagonal wurtzite structure. Optical characterization shows high optical transmittance with an absorption edge of about 260 nm and a band gap of 4.7 eV. Compositional analysis gives the Al content of about 0.6. The structure and optical properties of the Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N films are compared with those of binary GaN and AlN films synthesized by ablating GaAs or Al target with the same nitrogen plasma assistance.

  13. Plasma optical modulators for intense lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lu-Le; Zhao, Yao; Qian, Lie-Jia; Chen, Min; Weng, Su-Ming; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Mori, W. B.; Zhang, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Optical modulators can have high modulation speed and broad bandwidth, while being compact. However, these optical modulators usually work for low-intensity light beams. Here we present an ultrafast, plasma-based optical modulator, which can directly modulate high-power lasers with intensity up to 1016 W cm-2 to produce an extremely broad spectrum with a fractional bandwidth over 100%, extending to the mid-infrared regime in the low-frequency side. This concept relies on two co-propagating laser pulses in a sub-millimetre-scale underdense plasma, where a drive laser pulse first excites an electron plasma wave in its wake while a following carrier laser pulse is modulated by the plasma wave. The laser and plasma parameters suitable for the modulator to work are based on numerical simulations.

  14. Plasma optical modulators for intense lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Lu-Le; Qian, Lie-Jia; Chen, Min; Weng, Su-Ming; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Jaroszynski, D A; Mori, W B; Zhang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Optical modulators can be made nowadays with high modulation speed, broad bandwidth, while being compact, owing to the recent advance in material science and microfabrication technology. However, these optical modulators usually work for low intensity light beams. Here, we present an ultrafast, plasma-based optical modulator, which can directly modulate high power lasers with intensity up to 10^16 W/cm^2 level to produce an extremely broad spectrum with a fractional bandwidth over 100%, extending to the mid-infrared regime in the low-frequency side. This concept relies on two co-propagating laser beams in a sub-mm-scale underdense plasma, where a drive laser pulse first excites an electron plasma wave in its wake while a following carrier laser beam is modulated by the plasma wave. The laser and plasma parameters suitable for the modulator to work are presented. Such optical modulators may enable new applications in the high field physics.

  15. Optical diagnostics of femtosecond laser plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李玉同; 张杰; 陈黎明; 夏江帆; 腾浩; 赵理曾; 林景全; 李英骏; 魏志义; 王龙; 江文勉

    2001-01-01

    Optical diagnostics of evolution of plasmas produced by ultrashort laser pulses is carried out using a femtosecond probing beam. The time sequence of plasma shadowgrams and interferograms are obtained. The filamentation instability in high_density region induces the local density modification. Large_scale toroidal magnetic fields confine plasma expansion in the transverse direction, resulting in the formation of a plasma jet. The plasma expansion along the target normal direction is found to scale as 1 2.

  16. Laser treatment of plasma sprayed HA coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khor, KA; Vreeling, A; Dong, ZL; Cheang, P

    1999-01-01

    Laser treatment was conducted on plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings using a Nd-YAG pulse laser. Various laser parameters were investigated. The results showed that the HA surface melted when an energy level of greater than or equal to 2 J and a spot size of 2 mm was employed during continuo

  17. Laser treatment of plasma sprayed HA coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khor, KA; Vreeling, A; Dong, ZL; Cheang, P

    1999-01-01

    Laser treatment was conducted on plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings using a Nd-YAG pulse laser. Various laser parameters were investigated. The results showed that the HA surface melted when an energy level of greater than or equal to 2 J and a spot size of 2 mm was employed during continuo

  18. Simultaneous laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and Pd-assisted methane decomposition at different pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyhani, A. [Phys. Dept., Faculty of Science, Imam Khomeini International University, Qazvin, 34149-16818 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mortazavi, S.Z. [Phys. Dept., Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Parvin, P., E-mail: parvin@aut.ac.ir [Phys. Dept., Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahmoudi, Z. [Phys. Dept., Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-08-15

    Methane decomposition is investigated during Pd-assisted laser induced plasma in the controlled chamber at various pressures using Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Real time LIBS monitoring is applied to reveal the involved mechanisms during methane decomposition by inspecting the plasma parameters at mano-metric pressures of 1 to 10 mbar. The dependence of electron density and plasma temperature with pressure is also studied. It is shown that the plasma recreates higher hydrocarbons during the decomposition of methane. In addition, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, gas chromatography, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy are applied to support the findings. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simultaneous laser induced breakdown spectroscopy Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pd-assisted methane decomposition Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanosecond pulsed laser decomposition of methane Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Generation of higher hydrocarbon Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dependence of electron density and temperature of induced plasma with pressure.

  19. Plasma heating effects during laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, G. K.; Dixon, R. D.

    Laser welding is a relatively low heat input process used in joining precisely machined components with minimum distortion and heat affects to surrounding material. The CO2 (10.6 (MU)m) and Nd-YAG (1.06 (MU)m) lasers are the primary lasers used for welding in industry today. Average powers range up to 20 kW for CO2 and 400 W for Nd-YAG with pulse lengths of milliseconds to continuous wave. Control of the process depends on an understanding of the laser-plasma-material interaction and characterization of the laser beam being used. Inherent plasma formation above the material surface and subsequent modulation of the incident laser radiation directly affect the energy transfer to the target material. The temporal and spatial characteristics of the laser beam affect the available power density incident on the target, which is important in achieving repeatability in the process. Other factors such as surface texture, surface contaminants, surface chemistry, and welding environment affect plasma formation which determines the weld penetration. This work involves studies of the laser-plasma-material interaction process and particularly the effect of the plasma on the coupling of laser energy to a material during welding. A pulsed Nd-YAG laser was used with maximum average power of 400 W.

  20. Simulation of laser interaction with ablative plasma and hydrodynamic behavior of laser supported plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong Huifeng; Yuan Hong [Institute of Fluid Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-101, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Tang Zhiping [CAS Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior and Design of Materials, Department of Mechanics and Mechanical Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2013-01-28

    When an intense laser beam irradiates on a solid target, ambient air ionizes and becomes plasma, while part of the target rises in temperature, melts, vaporizes, ionizes, and yet becomes plasma. A general Godunov finite difference scheme WENO (Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Scheme) with fifth-order accuracy is used to simulate 2-dimensional axis symmetrical laser-supported plasma flow field in the process of laser ablation. The model of the calculation of ionization degree of plasma and the interaction between laser beam and plasma are considered in the simulation. The numerical simulations obtain the profiles of temperature, density, and velocity at different times which show the evolvement of the ablative plasma. The simulated results show that the laser energy is strongly absorbed by plasma on target surface and that the velocity of laser supported detonation (LSD) wave is half of the ideal LSD value derived from Chapman-Jouguet detonation theory.

  1. Laser assisted foaming of aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kathuria, Y.P. [Laser X Co. Ltd., Aichi (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    Recently aluminum foams have evoked considerable interest as an alternative material owing to their wide range of applications ranging from microelectronics, through automobiles to aerospace industries. The manufacturing techniques and characterization methods for aluminum foams require further development to achieve effective and economical use of this material. In this communication the authors demonstrate the feasibility of unidirectional and localized expansion of the aluminum foam using the Nd-YAG/CO{sub 2} laser and powder metallurgy. (orig.)

  2. Metal surface nitriding by laser induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomann, A. L.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Andreazza-Vignolle, C.; Andreazza, P.; Hermann, J.; Blondiaux, G.

    1996-10-01

    We study a nitriding technique of metals by means of laser induced plasma. The synthesized layers are composed of a nitrogen concentration gradient over several μm depth, and are expected to be useful for tribological applications with no adhesion problem. The nitriding method is tested on the synthesis of titanium nitride which is a well-known compound, obtained at present by many deposition and diffusion techniques. In the method of interest, a laser beam is focused on a titanium target in a nitrogen atmosphere, leading to the creation of a plasma over the metal surface. In order to understand the layer formation, it is necessary to characterize the plasma as well as the surface that it has been in contact with. Progressive nitrogen incorporation in the titanium lattice and TiN synthesis are studied by characterizing samples prepared with increasing laser shot number (100-4000). The role of the laser wavelength is also inspected by comparing layers obtained with two kinds of pulsed lasers: a transversal-excited-atmospheric-pressure-CO2 laser (λ=10.6 μm) and a XeCl excimer laser (λ=308 nm). Simulations of the target temperature rise under laser irradiation are performed, which evidence differences in the initial laser/material interaction (material heated thickness, heating time duration, etc.) depending on the laser features (wavelength and pulse time duration). Results from plasma characterization also point out that the plasma composition and propagation mode depend on the laser wavelength. Correlation of these results with those obtained from layer analyses shows at first the important role played by the plasma in the nitrogen incorporation. Its presence is necessary and allows N2 dissociation and a better energy coupling with the target. Second, it appears that the nitrogen diffusion governs the nitriding process. The study of the metal nitriding efficiency, depending on the laser used, allows us to explain the differences observed in the layer features

  3. Mechanically assisted laser forming of thin beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucha, Zygmunt; Widłaszewski, Jacek; Kurp, Piotr; Mulczyk, Krystian

    2016-12-01

    Laser-assisted forming techniques have been developed in recent years to aid plastic working of materials, which are difficult in processing at normal temperatures due to a high brittleness, effects of high work-hardening or a high spring-back phenomenon. This paper reports initial experimental investigations and numerical simulations of a mechanically-assisted laser forming process. The research is aimed at facilitating plastic shaping of thin-walled parts made of high temperature resistant alloys. Stainless steel plate, 1 mm thick, 20 mm wide, was mounted in the cantilever arrangement and a gravitational load was applied to its free end. A CO2 laser beam with rectangular cross-section traversed along the plate, towards the fixed edge. Laser spot covered the whole width of the plate. Experiments and simulations using the finite element method were performed for different values of mechanical load and with constant laser processing parameters. Experimentally validated numerical model allowed analysis of plastic deformation mechanism under the hybrid thermo-mechanical processing. The revealed mechanism of deformation consists in intense material plastic flow near the laser heated surface. This behavior results mainly from the tension state close to the heated surface and the decrease of material yield stress at elevated temperature. Stress state near the side edges of the processed plate favored more intense plastic deformation and the involved residual stress in this region.

  4. Metallic foil-assisted laser cell printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yafu; Huang, Yong; Chrisey, Douglas B

    2011-02-01

    Laser direct-write technology such as modified laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is emerging as a revolutionary technology for biological construct fabrication. While many modified LIFT-based cell direct writing successes have been achieved, possible process-induced cell injury and death is still a big hurdle for modified LIFT-based cell direct writing to be a viable technology. The objective of this study is to propose metallic foil-assisted LIFT using a four-layer structure to achieve better droplet size control and increase cell viability in direct writing of human colon cancer cells (HT-29). The proposed four layers include a quartz disk, a sacrificial and adhesive layer, a metallic foil, and a cell suspension layer. The bubble formation-induced stress wave is responsible for droplet formation. It is found that the proposed metallic foil-assisted LIFT approach is an effective cell direct-write technology and provides better printing resolution and high post-transfer cell viability when compared with other conventional modified LIFT technologies such as matrix-assisted pulsed-laser evaporation direct-write; at the same time, the possible contamination from the laser energy absorbing material is minimized using a metallic foil.

  5. Plasma Arc Augmented CO2 laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Andersen, Mikkel; Frederiksen, Niels

    2001-01-01

    In order to reduce the hardness of laser beam welded 2.13 mm medium strength steel CMn 250, a plasma arc has been used simultaneously with a 2.6 kW CO2 laser source. In a number of systematic laboratory tests, the plasma arc current, plasma gas flow and distance to the laser source were varied...... with all laser parameters fixed. The welds were quality assessed and hardness measured transversely to the welding direction in the top, middle and root of the seam. In the seams welded by laser alone, hardness values between 275 and 304 HV1 were measured, about the double of the base material, 150 HV1...

  6. Optical diagnostics of femtosecond laser plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Yutong

    2001-01-01

    [1]Benattar, R., Popovics, C., Sigel, R., Polarized light interferometer for laser fusion studies, Rev. Sci. Instrum., 979, 50(2): 583.[2]Young, P. E., Hammer, J. H., Wilks, S. C. et al., Laser beam propagation and channel formation in underdense plasmas, Phys. Plasmas, 995, 2(7): 2825.[3]Zhang, P., He, J.T., Chen, D.B. et al., Effects of a prepulse on γ-ray radiation produced by a femtosecond laser with only mJ energy, Phys. Rev. E., 998, 57: R3746.[4]Stamper, J. A., Review on spontaneous magnetic fields in laser-produced plasmas: phenomena and measurements, Laser and Particle Beams, 99, 9(4): 84.[5]Stamper, J. A., McLean, E. A., Ripin, B. H., Studies of spontaneous magnetic fields in laser-produced plasmas by Faraday rotation, Phys. Rev. Lett., 978, 40(8): 77.[6]Raven, A., Willi, O., Rumsby, P. T., Megagauss magnetic field profiles in laser-produced plasmas, Phys. Rev. Lett., 978, 4(8): 554.[7]Burgess, M. D. J., Luther-Davis, B., Nugent, K. A., An experimental study of magnetic fields in plasmas created by high intensity one micron laser radiation, Phys. Fluids, 985, 28(7): 2286.[8]Borghesi, M., Mackinnon, A. J., Bell, A. R. et al., Megagauss magnetic field generation and plasma jet formation on solid targets irradiated by an ultraintense picosecond laser pulse, Phys. Rev. Lett., 998, 8(): 2.

  7. Impulsive Synchronization of Laser Plasma System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yang; LIAO Xiao-Feng; LI Chuan-Dong; CHEN Guo

    2007-01-01

    The issue of impulsive synchronization of the coupled chaotic laser plasma system is investigated. A new framework for impulsive synchronization of such chaotic systems is presented, which makes the synchronization error system a linear impulsive control system. We derive some sufficient conditions for the synchronization of a laser plasma system via impulsive control with the varying impulsive intervals, which allows us to derive the impulsive synchronization law easily. To illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed results, two numerical examples are given.

  8. Unifying physics of accelerators, lasers and plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Seryi, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    Unifying Physics of Accelerators, Lasers and Plasma introduces the physics of accelerators, lasers and plasma in tandem with the industrial methodology of inventiveness, a technique that teaches that similar problems and solutions appear again and again in seemingly dissimilar disciplines. This unique approach builds bridges and enhances connections between the three aforementioned areas of physics that are essential for developing the next generation of accelerators.

  9. Laser-Plasma Acceleration with FLAME and ILIL Ultraintense Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Pathak

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We report on the development of radiation and electron sources based on laser-plasma acceleration for biomedical and nuclear applications, using both the table top TW laser at ILIL and the 220 TW FLAME laser system at LNF. We use the ILIL laser to produce wakefield electrons in a self-focusing dominated regime in a mm scale gas-jet to generate large, uniform beams of MeV electrons for electron radiography and radiobiology applications. This acceleration regime is described in detail and key parameters are given to establish reproducible and reliable operation of this source. We use the FLAME laser to drive laser-plasma acceleration in a cm-scale gas target to obtain stable production of >100 MeV range electrons to drive a Thomson scattering ɣ-ray source for nuclear applications.

  10. Laser-assisted photoelectric effect from surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miaja-Avila, L; Lei, C; Aeschlimann, M; Gland, J L; Murnane, M M; Kapteyn, H C; Saathoff, G

    2006-09-15

    We report the first observation of the laser-assisted photoelectric effect from a solid surface. By illuminating a Pt(111) sample simultaneously with ultrashort 1.6 eV and 42 eV pulses, we observe sidebands in the extreme ultraviolet photoemission spectrum. The magnitude of these sidebands as a function of time delay between the laser and extreme ultraviolet pulses represents a cross-correlation measurement of the extreme ultraviolet pulse. This effect promises to be useful to extend extreme ultraviolet pulse duration measurements to higher photon energies, as well as opening up femtosecond-to-attosecond time-scale electron dynamics in solid and surface-adsorbate systems.

  11. Laser assisted Drug Delivery: Grundlagen und Praxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Stephan Alexander; Schrumpf, Holger; Buhren, Bettina Alexandra; Homey, Bernhard; Gerber, Peter Arne

    2016-05-01

    Die topische Applikation von Wirkstoffen ist eine zentrale Therapieoption der Dermatologie. Allerdings mindert die effektive Barrierefunktion der Haut die Bioverfügbarkeit der meisten Externa. Fraktionierte ablative Laser stellen ein innovatives Verfahren dar, um die epidermale Barriere standardisiert, kontaktfrei zu überwinden. Die Bioverfügbarkeit im Anschluss applizierter Externa wird im Sinne einer laser assisted drug delivery (LADD) signifikant gesteigert. Das Prinzip der LADD wird bereits in einigen Bereichen der Dermatologie erfolgreich eingesetzt. Die vorliegende Übersichtsarbeit soll einen Überblick über die aktuellen aber auch perspektivischen Einsatzmöglichkeiten der LADD bieten.

  12. LASER PLASMA AND LASER APPLICATIONS: Plasma transparency in laser absorption waves in metal capillaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, V. N.; Kozolupenko, A. P.; Sebrant, A. Yu

    1988-12-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the plasma transparency to heating radiation in capillaries when absorption waves propagated in these capillaries as a result of interaction with a CO2 laser pulse of 5-μs duration. When the length of the capillary was in excess of 20 mm, total absorption of the radiation by the plasma was observed at air pressures of 1-100 kPa. When the capillary length was 12 mm, a partial recovery of the transparency took place. A comparison was made with the dynamics and recovery of the plasma transparency when breakdown of air took place near the free surface.

  13. Plasma generated during underwater pulsed laser processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jacek; Chrzanowska, Justyna; Moscicki, Tomasz; Radziejewska, Joanna; Stobinski, Leszek; Szymanski, Zygmunt

    2017-09-01

    The plasma induced during underwater pulsed laser ablation of graphite is studied both experimentally and theoretically. The results of the experiment show that the maximum plasma temperature of 25000 K is reached 20 ns from the beginning of the laser pulse and decreases to 6500 K after 1000 ns. The observed OH absorption band shows that the plasma plume is surrounded by the thin layer of dissociated water vapour at a temperature around 5500 K. The hydrodynamic model applied shows similar maximum plasma temperature at delay times between 14 ns and 30 ns. The calculations show also that already at 14th ns, the plasma electron density reaches 0.97·1027 m-3, which is the critical density for 1064 nm radiation. At the same time the plasma pressure is 2 GPa, which is consisted with earlier measurements of the peak pressure exerted on a target in similar conditions.

  14. Laser assisted robotic surgery in cornea transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Francesca; Micheletti, Filippo; Magni, Giada; Pini, Roberto; Menabuoni, Luca; Leoni, Fabio; Magnani, Bernardo

    2017-03-01

    Robotic surgery is a reality in several surgical fields, such as in gastrointestinal surgery. In ophthalmic surgery the required high spatial precision is limiting the application of robotic system, and even if several attempts have been designed in the last 10 years, only some application in retinal surgery were tested in animal models. The combination of photonics and robotics can really open new frontiers in minimally invasive surgery, improving the precision, reducing tremor, amplifying scale of motion, and automating the procedure. In this manuscript we present the preliminary results in developing a vision guided robotic platform for laser-assisted anterior eye surgery. The robotic console is composed by a robotic arm equipped with an "end effector" designed to deliver laser light to the anterior corneal surface. The main intended application is for laser welding of corneal tissue in laser assisted penetrating keratoplasty and endothelial keratoplasty. The console is equipped with an integrated vision system. The experiment originates from a clear medical demand in order to improve the efficacy of different surgical procedures: when the prototype will be optimized, other surgical areas will be included in its application, such as neurosurgery, urology and spinal surgery.

  15. Staging of laser-plasma accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinke, S., E-mail: ssteinke@lbl.gov; Tilborg, J. van; Benedetti, C.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Nakamura, K.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Daniels, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Swanson, K. K.; Shaw, B. H.; Leemans, W. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    We present results of an experiment where two laser-plasma-accelerator stages are coupled at a short distance by a plasma mirror. Stable electron beams from the first stage were used to longitudinally probe the dark-current-free, quasi-linear wakefield excited by the laser of the second stage. Changing the arrival time of the electron beam with respect to the second stage laser pulse allowed reconstruction of the temporal wakefield structure, determination of the plasma density, and inference of the length of the electron beam. The first stage electron beam could be focused by an active plasma lens to a spot size smaller than the transverse wake size at the entrance of the second stage. This permitted electron beam trapping, verified by a 100 MeV energy gain.

  16. Laser-plasma interactions for fast ignition

    CERN Document Server

    Kemp, A J; Debayle, A; Johzaki, T; Mori, W B; Patel, P K; Sentoku, Y; Silva, L O

    2013-01-01

    In the electron-driven fast-ignition approach to inertial confinement fusion, petawatt laser pulses are required to generate MeV electrons that deposit several tens of kilojoules in the compressed core of an imploded DT shell. We review recent progress in the understanding of intense laser plasma interactions (LPI) relevant to fast ignition. Increases in computational and modeling capabilities, as well as algorithmic developments have led to enhancement in our ability to perform multi-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of LPI at relevant scales. We discuss the physics of the interaction in terms of laser absorption fraction, the laser-generated electron spectra, divergence, and their temporal evolution. Scaling with irradiation conditions such as laser intensity are considered, as well as the dependence on plasma parameters. Different numerical modeling approaches and configurations are addressed, providing an overview of the modeling capabilities and limitations. In addition, we discuss the compa...

  17. Plasma Channel Guided Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, C G

    2005-01-01

    High quality electron beams (several 109 electrons above 80 MeV energy with percent energy spread and low divergence) have been produced for the first time in a compact, high gradient, all-optical laser accelerator by extending the interaction distance using a pre-formed plasma density channel to guide the drive laser pulse. Laser-driven accelerators, in which particles are accelerated by the electric field of a plasma wave (wake) driven by the radiation pressure of an intense laser, have over the past decade demonstrated accelerating fields thousands of times greater than those achievable in conventional radio-frequency accelerators. This has spurred interest in them as compact next- generation sources of energetic electrons and radiation. To date, however, acceleration distances have been severely limited by the lack of a controllable method for extending the propagation distance of the focused laser pulse. The ensuing short acceleration distance resulted in low-energy beams with 100 percent electron energy...

  18. Hydrogen atom in a Laser-Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Falaye, Babatunde James; Liman, Muhammed S; Oyewumi, K J; Dong, Shi-Hai

    2016-01-01

    We scrutinize the behaviour of hydrogen atom's eigenvalues in a quantum plasma as it interacts with electric field directed along $\\theta=\\pi$ and exposed to linearly polarized intense laser field radiation. Using the Kramers-Henneberger (KH) unitary transformation, which is semiclassical counterpart of the Block-Nordsieck transformation in the quantized field formalism, the squared vector potential that appears in the equation of motion is eliminated and the resultant equation is expressed in KH frame. Within this frame, the resulting potential and the corresponding wavefunction have been expanded in Fourier series and using Ehlotzky's approximation, we obtain a laser-dressed potential to simulate intense laser field. By fitting the exponential-cosine-screened Coulomb potential into the laser-dressed potential, and then expanding it in Taylor series up to $\\mathcal{O}(r^4,\\alpha_0^9)$, we obtain the eigensolution (eigenvalues and wavefunction) of hydrogen atom in laser-plasma encircled by electric field, wit...

  19. Evolution of laser pulse shape in a parabolic plasma channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, M.; Gupta, D. N.; Suk, H.

    2017-01-01

    During high-intensity laser propagation in a plasma, the group velocity of a laser pulse is subjected to change with the laser intensity due to alteration in refractive index associated with the variation of the nonlinear plasma density. The pulse front sharpened while the back of the pulse broadened due to difference in the group velocity at different parts of the laser pulse. Thus the distortion in the shape of the laser pulse is expected. We present 2D particle-in-cell simulations demonstrating the controlling the shape distortion of a Gaussian laser pulse using a parabolic plasma channel. We show the results of the intensity distribution of laser pulse in a plasma with and without a plasma channel. It has been observed that the plasma channel helps in controlling the laser pulse shape distortion. The understanding of evolution of laser pulse shape may be crucial while applying the parabolic plasma channel for guiding the laser pulse in plasma based accelerators.

  20. Non-equilibrium Plasma-Assisted Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenting

    As a promising method to enhance combustion, plasma-assisted combustion has drawn considerable attention. Due to the fast electron impact excitation and dissociation of molecules at low temperatures, plasma introduces new reaction pathways, changes fuel oxidation timescales, and can dramatically modify the combustion processes. In this dissertation, the radical generation from the plasma and its effect on flame extinction and ignition were investigated experimentally together with detailed numerical simulation on a counterflow CH4 diffusion flame. It was found that the atomic oxygen production played a dominant role in enhancing the chain-branching reaction pathways and accelerating fuel oxidation at near limit flame conditions. To understand the direct coupling effect between plasma and flame, a novel plasma-assisted combustion system with in situ discharge in a counterflow diffusion flame was developed. The ignition and extinction characteristics of CH4/O 2/He diffusion flames were investigated. For the first time, it was demonstrated that the strong plasma-flame coupling in in situ discharge could significantly modify the ignition/extinction characteristics and create a new fully stretched ignition S-curve. To understand low temperature kinetics of combustion, it is critical to measure the formation and decomposition of H2O2. A molecular beam mass spectrometry (MBMS) system was developed and integrated with a laminar flow reactor. H2O2 measurements were directly calibrated, and compared to kinetic models. The results confirmed that low and intermediate temperature DME oxidation produced significant amounts of H2O2. The experimental characterizations of important intermediate species including H2O2, CH2O and CH3OCHO provided new capabilities to investigate and improve the chemical kinetics especially at low temperatures. A numerical scheme for model reduction was developed to improve the computational efficiency in the simulation of combustion with detailed

  1. Spectroscopic Studies of Laser Produced Plasma Metasurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon Quinones, Roberto; Underwood, Thomas; Cappelli, Mark

    2016-10-01

    In this presentation, we describe the spatial and temporal plasma characteristics of the dense plasma kernels that are used to construct a laser produced plasma metasurface (PM) that is intended to serve as a tunable THz reflector. The PM is an n x n array of plasmas generated by focusing the light from a 2 J/p Q-switched Nd:YAG laser through a multi-lens array (MLA) and into a gas of varying pressure. A gated CCD camera coupled to a high-resolution spectrometer is used to obtain chord-averaged H α broadening data for the cross section of a single plasma element at the lens focal point. The data is then Abel inverted to derive the radial plasma density distribution. Measurements are repeated for a range of pressures, laser energies, and lens f-number, with a time resolution of 100 ns and a gate width of 20 ns. Results are presented for the variation of plasma density and size over these different conditions. Work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR). R. Colon Quinones and T. Underwood acknowledge the support of the Department of Defense (DoD) through the National Defense Science & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) Program.

  2. Plasma spectroscopy using optical vortex laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Shinji; Aramaki, Mitsutoshi; Terasaka, Kenichiro; Toda, Yasunori; Czarnetzki, Uwe; Shikano, Yutaka

    2014-10-01

    Laser spectroscopy is a useful tool for nonintrusive plasma diagnostics; it can provide many important quantities in a plasma such as temperature, density, and flow velocity of ions and neutrals from the spectrum obtained by scanning the frequency of narrow bandwidth laser. Obtainable information is, however, limited in principle to the direction parallel to the laser path. The aim of this study is to introduce a Laguerre-Gaussian beam, which is called as optical vortex, in place of a widely used Hermite-Gaussian beam. One of the remarkable properties of the Laguerre-Gaussian beam is that it carries an angular momentum in contrast to the Hermite-Gaussian beam. It follows that particles in the laser beam feel the Doppler effect even in the transverse direction of the laser path. Therefore it is expected that the limitation imposed by the laser path can be overcome by using an optical vortex laser. The concept of optical vortex spectroscopy, the development of the laser system, and some preliminary results of a proof-of-principle experiment will be presented. This work is performed with the support and under the auspices of NINS young scientists collaboration program for cross-disciplinary study, NIFS collaboration research program (NIFS13KOAP026), and JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 25287152.

  3. Laser second harmonic generation in a magnetoplasma assisted by an electrostatic wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Yachna; Tripathi, Deepak; Walia, Keshav

    2017-04-01

    A laser produced plasma, and an electrostatic wave, helps to generate a strong harmonic radiation. The electrostatic wave assists k matching and contributes to non-linear coupling. In the case of the Bernstein wave assisted second harmonic, the frequency of the second harmonic is shifted from the laser second harmonic by electron cyclotron frequency. The lower hybrid wave (LHW) assisted second harmonic has frequency slightly shifted from the laser second harmonic. The upper hybrid wave (UHW) assisted second harmonic has frequency shifted by an amount ω that lies between max( ω c , ω p ) and ω U H . At a 0 = 0.1 and n ω , k → / n0 0 = 0.1, the normalized amplitude value the of electrostatic wave assisted second harmonic is quite high near the upper hybrid resonance. The effect of increasing ω c / ω p increases the max value of normalized amplitude.

  4. Laser Plasmas : Multiple charge states of titanium ions in laser produced plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Shukla; S Bandhyopadhyay; V N Rai; A V Kilpio; H C Pant

    2000-11-01

    An intense laser radiation (1012 to 1014 W/cm-2) focused on the solid target creates a hot (≥ 1 keV) and dense plasma having high ionization state. The multiple charged ions with high current densities produced during laser matter interaction have potential application in accelerators as an ion source. This paper presents generation and detection of highly stripped titanium ions (Ti) in laser produced plasma. An Nd:glass laser (KAMETRON) delivering 50 J energy ( = 0.53 m) in 2.5 ns was focused onto a titanium target to produce plasma. This plasma was allowed to drift across a space of ∼ 3 m through a diagnostic hole in the focusing mirror before ions are finally detected with the help of electrostatic ion analyzer. Maximum current density was detected for the charge states of +16 and +17 of Ti ions for laser intensity of ∼ 1014 W/cm-2.

  5. Laser-Assisted Photoelectric Effect from Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrell, C. A.; Ojeda, J.; Mewes, L.; Grilj, J.; Frassetto, F.; Poletto, L.; van Mourik, F.; Chergui, M.

    2016-09-01

    The laser-assisted photoelectric effect from liquid surfaces is reported for the first time. Photoelectrons generated by 35.6 eV radiation from a liquid microjet of water under vacuum are dressed with a ℏω =1.55 eV laser field. The subsequent redistribution of the photoelectron energies consists in the appearance of sidebands shifted by energies equivalent to ℏω , 2 ℏω , and 3 ℏω . The response has been modeled to the third order and combined with energy-resolved measurements. This result opens the possibility to investigate the dynamics at surfaces of liquid solutions and provide information about the electron emission process from a liquid.

  6. Laser-assisted rapid prototyping in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathuria, Yash P.

    2002-04-01

    In the recent past years, developments in the rapid prototyping of various parts have taken new dynamic turns in manufacturing technology. Besides the use of new materials, unrelenting demands for the downsizing of miniature components in the micro-domain have expanded the application area of the rapid prototype product. Their requirements with reduced time lag have forced the manufacturers to adopt and develop innovative techniques which meet these demands. In order to overcome this problem, several techniques, predominantly laser stereolithography, have successfully been used in Japan for the past several years to generate a complex micro-/macro part of polymer resin based in two- or three-dimensional domains. The main disadvantage of this process is that they consist of two or more steps for producing metallic/metal-matrix composite microstructures. But recently developed new technologies of selective laser sintering/generating and ballistic particles manufacturing processes offer the possibility of the direct generation of these microstructures in a single step process. The last two processes actually have limitations on the feature size produced, due to the minimum size of the molten droplet. But the selective laser sintering technique can bind the particles by melting together at the interfacial grain contact area only and thus producing smaller feature sizes. Based upon these techniques, the present paper aims to review the current status and the future prospective of laser assisted rapid prototyping in Japan.

  7. Development behavior of liquid plasma produced by YAG laser

    CERN Document Server

    Yamada, J; Yamada, Jun; Tsuda, Norio

    2004-01-01

    The laser induced plasma in liquid hasn't been studied enough. In liquid, the laser induced plasma may be able to resolve the hazardous material called the environment material. Then, the plasma produced in liquid by the laser light is studied and the plasma development is observed by a streak camera. The ultra pure water or the ultra pure water with a melted NaCl is used as a test liquid. The liquid plasma is produced by the fundamental wave of YAG laser. When NaCl concentration is varied, the plasma development behavior is obserbed by streak camera. The liquid plasma develops backward. The plasma is produced from many seeds and It consists of a group of plasmas. However, the liquid plasma produced by second harmonic wave of YAG laser develops as a single plasma. The development mechanism is investigated from the growth rate of backward plasma. The backward plasma develops by breakdown wave and radiation supported shock wave.

  8. Adventures in Laser Produced Plasma Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Key, M

    2006-01-13

    In the UK the study of laser produced plasmas and their applications began in the universities and evolved to a current system where the research is mainly carried out at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory Central Laser Facility ( CLF) which is provided to support the universities. My own research work has been closely tied to this evolution and in this review I describe the history with particular reference to my participation in it.

  9. Quantum Electrodynamics Theory of Laser Assisted Recombination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    敖淑艳; 程太旺; 李晓峰; 潘守甫; 傅盘铭

    2003-01-01

    Using a formal scattering theoretical approach, we develop a nonperturbative quantum electrodynamics theory to describe laser assisted recombination (LAR), in which an electron initially in the quantized Volkov state recombines with an ion and emits a high-energy photon with frequency defined by energy conservation laws.The transition probability is expressed as an analytic closed form and the spectrum of LAR reflects mainly the properties of general Bessel functions. For the case of a fast electron the LAR spectrum is confined in a well-defined range, while for a slow electron, the LAR spectrum exhibits a double-plateau structure.

  10. Laser-Produced Plasmas and Radiation Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-31

    Vlases, H. Rutkowski, A. Hertzberg, A. Hoffman, L. Steinhauer, J. Dawson, D.R. Cohn, W. Halverson, B. Lax, J.D. Daugherty, J.E. Eninger , E.R. Pugh, T.K...Meeting, Albuquerque (October 1974). J.D. Daugherty, J.E. Eninger , D.R. Cohn, and W. Halverson, "Scaling of Laser Heated Plasmas Confined in Long Solenoids...Cohn, H.E. Eninger , W. Halverson, and D.J. Rose, "Stress, Dissipation, and Neutronics Constraints on ’fagnets for Laser-Solenoid Reactors," APS Plasma

  11. Laser-PlasmaWakefield Acceleration with Higher Order Laser Modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geddes, C.G.R.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Mullowney, P.; Paul, K.; Cary, J.R.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-06-01

    Laser-plasma collider designs point to staging of multiple accelerator stages at the 10 GeV level, which are to be developed on the upcoming BELLA laser, while Thomson Gamma source designs use GeV stages, both requiring efficiency and low emittance. Design and scaling of stages operating in the quasi-linear regime to address these needs are presented using simulations in the VORPAL framework. In addition to allowing symmetric acceleration of electrons and positrons, which is important for colliders, this regime has the property that the plasma wakefield is proportional to the transverse gradient of the laser intensity profile. We demonstrate use of higher order laser modes to tailor the laser pulse and hence the transverse focusing forces in the plasma. In particular, we show that by using higher order laser modes, we can reduce the focusing fields and hence increase the matched electron beam radius, which is important to increased charge and efficiency, while keeping the low bunch emittance required for applications.

  12. Plasma Bursts in Deep Penetration Laser Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrňa, L.; Šarbort, M.

    We present an experimental study of the deep penetration laser welding process which aims to analyze the plasma plume oscillations on a short time scale. Using the high-speed camera we show that the plasma comes out of the keyhole in the form of short bursts rather than the continuous flow. We detect these bursts as the short-time intensity oscillations of light emissions coming from the plasma plume. We determine the period of bursts using the statistical signal processing methods and the short-time frequency analysis. Finally, we compare the characteristics of plasma bursts and the geometry of resulting welds carried out on a 2 kW Yb:YAG laser welding machine for the steel workpiece and various welding parameters settings.

  13. Laser Plasma Physics - Forces and Nonlinear Principle

    CERN Document Server

    Hora, Heinrich

    2014-01-01

    This work is an electronic pre-publication of a book manuscript being under consideration in order to provide information to interested researchers about a review of mechanical forces in plasmas by electro-dynamic fields. Beginning with Kelvin's ponderomotive force of 1845 in electrostatics, the hydrodynamic force in a plasma is linked with quadratic force quantities of electric and magnetic fields. Hydrodynamics is interlinked with single particle motion of plasma particles electric field generation and double layers and sheaths due to properties of inhomogeneous plasmas. Consequences relate to laser driven particle acceleration and fusion energy. Beyond the very broad research field of fusion using nanosecond laser pulses based on thermodynamics, the new picosecond pulses of ultrahigh power opened a categorically different non-thermal interaction finally permitting proton-boron fusion with eliminating problems of nuclear radiation.

  14. Influence of external magnetic field on laser breakdown plasma in aqueous Au nanoparticles colloidal solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Serkov, A A; Simakin, A V; Kuzmin, P G; Mikhailova, G N; Antonova, L Kh; Troitskii, A V; Kuzmin, G P; Shafeev, G A

    2016-01-01

    Influence of permanent magnetic field up to 7.5 T on plasma emission and laser-assisted Au nanoparticles fragmentation in water is experimentally studied. It is found that presence of magnetic field causes the breakdown plasma emission to start earlier regarding to laser pulse. Field presence also accelerates the fragmentation of nanoparticles down to a few nanometers. Dependence of Au NPs fragmentation rate in water on magnetic field intensity is investigated. The results are discussed on the basis of laser-induced plasma interaction with magnetic field.

  15. Effects of Confined Laser Ablation on Laser Plasma Propulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Zhi-Yuan; ZHANG Jie; LU Xin; HAO Zuo-Qiang; XU Miao-Hua; WANG Zhao-Hua; WEI Zhi-Yi

    2005-01-01

    @@ We investigate the effects of confined laser ablation on laser plasma propulsion. Compared with planar ablation,the cavity ablation provides an effective way to obtain a large target momentum and a high coupling coefficient.When laser pukes are focused into a cavity with 1 mm diameter and 2mm depth, a high coupling coefficient is obtained. By using a glass layer to cover the cavity, the coupling coefficient is enhanced by 10 times. Meanwhile,it is found that with the increase of the target surface size, the target momentum presents a linear increase.

  16. Controlling Laser Plasma Instabilities Using Temporal Bandwidth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsung, Frank; Weaver, J.; Lehmberg, R.

    2016-10-01

    We are performing particle-in-cell simulations using the code OSIRIS to study the effects of laser plasma interactions in the presence of temporal bandwidth under conditions relevant to current and future experiments on the NIKE laser. Our simulations show that, for sufficiently large bandwidth (where the inverse bandwidth is comparable with the linear growth time), the saturation level, and the distribution of hot electrons, can be effected by the addition of temporal bandwidths (which can be accomplished in experiments using beam smoothing techniques such as ISI). We will quantify these effects and investigate higher dimensional effects such as laser speckles. This work is supported by DOE and NRL.

  17. Plasma assisted synthesis of vanadium pentoxide nanoplates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Megha; Sharma, Rabindar Kumar; Kumar, Prabhat, E-mail: prabhat89k@gmail.com; Reddy, G. B. [Thin film laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi-110016 (India)

    2015-08-28

    In this work, we report the growth of α-V{sub 2}O{sub 5} (orthorhombic) nanoplates on glass substrate using plasma assisted sublimation process (PASP) and Nickel as catalyst. 100 nm thick film of Ni is deposited over glass substrate by thermal evaporation process. Vanadium oxide nanoplates have been deposited treating vanadium metal foil under high vacuum conditions with oxygen plasma. Vanadium foil is kept at fixed temperature growth of nanoplates of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} to take place. Samples grown have been studied using XPS, XRD and HRTEM to confirm the growth of α-phase of V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, which revealed pure single crystal of α- V{sub 2}O{sub 5} in orthorhombic crystallographic plane. Surface morphological studies using SEM and TEM show nanostructured thin film in form of plates. Uniform, vertically aligned randomly oriented nanoplates of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} have been deposited.

  18. IR Laser Plasma Interaction with Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabia Qindeel

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of laser plasma with respect to glass surface is reported in this paper. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser was used as ablation source. Glass material is utilized as target specimen. Aluminum plate is used as a rotating substrate. The dynamic expansion of the plasma was visualized by using CCD video camera and permanently recorded via image processing system. The exposed glass material was examined under photomicroscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM. The optical radiation from the plasma was observed by using spectrum analyzer. The results obtained show that the plasma is expanded linearly with laser energy. At low level energy symmetrical damage was found. Elongated hole is formed at high level energy. The progressive exposure on glass results in drilling process. The hole diameter is expanded non-linearly while the depth is increased linearly. The glass clusters were uniformly deposited on the aluminum substrate. The size of the glass clusters are in the range of nano and micro meter. The glass-plasma emitted radiation with majority lines of 390 and 450 nm.

  19. Laser-assisted growth of carbon nanotubes - A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgt, Y. van de

    2014-01-01

    Laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition (LACVD) is an attractive maskless process for growing locally carbon nanotubes at selected places on substrates that may contain temperature-sensitive components. This review gives a comprehensive overview of the reported research with respect to laser assist

  20. Stabilization of pulverized coal combustion by plasma assist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, M.; Maruta, K.; Takeda, K.; Solonenko, O.P.; Sakashita, M.; Nakamura, M. [Akita Prefectural University, Akita (Japan). Faculty of System Science & Technology

    2002-03-01

    Ignition and stabilization of pulverized coal combustion by plasma assist is investigated with a 10 kW plasma torch for three different kinds of coal, such as high, medium and low volatile matter coals. Not only high volatile matter coal but also low quality coal can be successfully burned with plasma assist. Research for volatile component of coal shows that a higher temperature field is necessary to extract the volatile matter from inferior coal, while their compositions are almost the same.

  1. Plasma-Assisted Atomic Layer Deposition: Basics, Opportunities, and Challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Profijt, H. B.; Potts, S. E.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Kessels, W. M. M.

    2011-01-01

    Plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (ALD) is an energy-enhanced method for the synthesis of ultra-thin films with A angstrom-level resolution in which a plasma is employed during one step of the cyclic deposition process. The use of plasma species as reactants allows for more freedom in processi

  2. Plasma-Assisted Atomic Layer Deposition: Basics, Opportunities, and Challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Profijt, H. B.; Potts, S. E.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Kessels, W. M. M.

    2011-01-01

    Plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (ALD) is an energy-enhanced method for the synthesis of ultra-thin films with A angstrom-level resolution in which a plasma is employed during one step of the cyclic deposition process. The use of plasma species as reactants allows for more freedom in

  3. Laser-produced plasma source system development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomenkov, Igor V.; Brandt, David C.; Bykanov, Alexander N.; Ershov, Alexander I.; Partlo, William N.; Myers, David W.; Böwering, Norbert R.; Vaschenko, Georgiy O.; Khodykin, Oleh V.; Hoffman, Jerzy R.; Vargas L., Ernesto; Simmons, Rodney D.; Chavez, Juan A.; Chrobak, Christopher P.

    2007-03-01

    This paper describes the development of laser produced plasma (LPP) technology as an EUV source for advanced scanner lithography applications in high volume manufacturing. EUV lithography is expected to succeed 193 nm immersion technology for critical layer patterning below 32 nm beginning with beta generation scanners in 2009. This paper describes the development status of subsystems most critical to the performance to meet joint scanner manufacturer requirements and semiconductor industry standards for reliability and economic targets for cost of ownership. The intensity and power of the drive laser are critical parameters in the development of extreme ultraviolet LPP lithography sources. The conversion efficiency (CE) of laser light into EUV light is strongly dependent on the intensity of the laser energy on the target material at the point of interaction. The total EUV light generated then scales directly with the total incident laser power. The progress on the development of a short pulse, high power CO2 laser for EUV applications is reported. The lifetime of the collector mirror is a critical parameter in the development of extreme ultra-violet LPP lithography sources. The deposition of target materials and contaminants, as well as sputtering of the collector multilayer coating and implantation of incident particles can reduce the reflectivity of the mirror substantially over the exposure time even though debris mitigation schemes are being employed. The results of measurements of high energy ions generated by a short-pulse CO2 laser on a laser-produced plasma EUV light source with Sn target are presented. Droplet generation is a key element of the LPP source being developed at Cymer for EUV lithography applications. The main purpose of this device is to deliver small quantities of liquid target material as droplets to the laser focus. The EUV light in such configuration is obtained as a result of creating a highly ionized plasma from the material of the

  4. Solitons in relativistic laser-plasma interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Bai-song; DU Shu-cheng

    2007-01-01

    Single or/and multipeak solitons in plasma under relativistic electromagnetic field are reviewed.The incident electromagnetic field iS allowed to have a zero or/and nonzero initial constant amplitude.Some interesting numerical results are obtained that include a high-number multipeak laser pulse and single or/and low-number multipeak plasma wake structures.It is also shown that there exists a combination of soliton and oscillation waves for plasma wake field.Also,the electron density exhibits multi-caviton structure or the combination of caviton and oscillation.A complete eigenvalue spectrum of parameters is given wherein some higher peak numbers of multipeak electromagnetic solitons in the plasma are included.Moreover, some interesting scaling laws are presented for field energy via numerical approaches.Some implications of results are discussed.

  5. Fuzzy model for Laser Assisted Bending Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannini Oliviero

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, a fuzzy model was developed to predict the residual bending in a conventional metal bending process assisted by a high power diode laser. The study was focused on AA6082T6 aluminium thin sheets. In most dynamic sheet metal forming operations, the highly nonlinear deformation processes cause large amounts of elastic strain energy stored in the formed material. The novel hybrid forming process was thus aimed at inducing the local heating of the mechanically bent workpiece in order to decrease or eliminate the related springback phenomena. In particular, the influence on the extent of springback phenomena of laser process parameters such as source power, scan speed and starting elastic deformation of mechanically bent sheets, was experimentally assessed. Consistent trends in experimental response according to operational parameters were found. Accordingly, 3D process maps of the extent of the springback phenomena according to operational parameters were constructed. The effect of the inherent uncertainties on the predicted residual bending caused by the approximation in the model parameters was evaluated. In particular, a fuzzy-logic based approach was used to describe the model uncertainties and the transformation method was applied to propagate their effect on the residual bending.

  6. Cell patterning by laser-assisted bioprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devillard, Raphaël; Pagès, Emeline; Correa, Manuela Medina; Kériquel, Virginie; Rémy, Murielle; Kalisky, Jérôme; Ali, Muhammad; Guillotin, Bertrand; Guillemot, Fabien

    2014-01-01

    The aim of tissue engineering is to produce functional three-dimensional (3D) tissue substitutes. Regarding native organ and tissue complexity, cell density and cell spatial 3D organization, which influence cell behavior and fate, are key parameters in tissue engineering. Laser-Assisted Bioprinting (LAB) allows one to print cells and liquid materials with a cell- or picoliter-level resolution. Thus, LAB seems to be an emerging and promising technology to fabricate tissue-like structures that have the physiological functionality of their native counterparts. This technology has additional advantages such as automation, reproducibility, and high throughput. It makes LAB compatible with the (industrial) fabrication of 3D constructs of physiologically relevant sizes. Here we present exhaustively the numerous steps that allow printing of viable cells with a well-preserved micrometer pattern. To facilitate the understanding of the whole cell patterning experiment using LAB, it is discussed in two parts: (1) preprocessing: laser set-up, bio-ink cartridge and bio-paper preparation, and pattern design; and (2) processing: bio-ink printing on the bio-paper.

  7. Tunable Plasma-Wave Laser Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromage, J.; Haberberger, D.; Davies, A.; Bucht, S.; Zuegel, J. D.; Froula, D. H.; Trines, R.; Bingham, R.; Sadler, J.; Norreys, P. A.

    2016-10-01

    Raman amplification is a process by which a long energetic pump pulse transfers its energy to a counter-propagating short seed pulse through a resonant electron plasma wave. Since its conception, theory and simulations have shown exciting results with up to tens of percent of energy transfer from the pump to the seed pulse. However, experiments have yet to surpass transfer efficiencies of a few percent. A review of past literature shows that largely chirped pump pulses and finite temperature wave breaking could have been the two most detrimental effects. A Raman amplification platform is being developed at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics where a combination of a high-intensity tunable seed laser with sophisticated plasma diagnostics (dynamic Thomson scattering) will make it possible to find the optimal parameter space for high-energy transfer. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  8. Plasma Physics Issues in Gas Discharge Laser Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    WL-TR-92-2087 PLASMA PHYSICS ISSUES IN GAS DISCHARGE LASER DEVELOPMENT AD-A257 735 ALAN GARSCADDEN MARK J. KUSNER J. GARY EDEN WL/POOC-3 WRIGHT...LASERS INFRARED MOLECULAR jAS LASERS UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED UL Plasma Physics Issues in Gas Discharge Laser Development Alan Garscadden...the close coupling between body of work was not generally useful in laser development . vibrationally excited nitrogen and CO or CO2 . In fact. the First

  9. Photon Acceleration Based On Laser-Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    One dimensional electron density perturbation is derived by using the cold fluid equation, Possion's equation and the conti nuity equation. The perturbation is generated by a driving laser pulse propagating through a plasma. The upshifting of the frequency of a trailing pulse induced by density perturbation is studied by using optical metric. The results show that it is possible that the photon will gain energy from the wakefield when assuming photon's number to be conserved, i.e., the photon will be accelerated.

  10. Carbon Multicharged Ion Generation from Laser Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balki, Oguzhan; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.

    2014-10-01

    Multicharged ions (MCI) have potential uses in different areas such as microelectronics and medical physics. Carbon MCI therapy for cancer treatment is considered due to its localized energy delivery to hard-to-reach tumors at a minimal damage to surrounding tissues. We use a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with 40 ns pulse width operated at 1064 nm to ablate a graphite target in ultrahigh vacuum. A time-of-flight energy analyzer followed by a Faraday cup is used to characterize the carbon MCI extracted from the laser plasma. The MCI charge state and energy distribution are obtained. With increase in the laser fluence, the ion charge states and ion energy are increased. Carbon MCI up to C+6 are observed along with carbon clusters. When an acceleration voltage is applied between the carbon target and a grounded mesh, ion extraction is observed to increase with the applied voltage. National Science Foundation.

  11. A novel cupping-assisted plasma treatment for skin disinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zilan; Graves, David B.

    2017-02-01

    A novel plasma treatment method/plasma source called cupping-assisted plasma treatment/source for skin disinfection is introduced. The idea combines ancient Chinese ‘cupping’ technology with plasma sources to generate active plasma inside an isolated, pressure-controlled chamber attached to the skin. Advantages of lower pressure include reducing the threshold voltage for plasma ignition and improving the spatial uniformity of the plasma treatment. In addition, with reduced pressure inside the cup, skin pore permeability might be increased and it improves attachment of the plasma device to the skin. Moreover, at a given pressure, plasma-generated active species are restricted inside the cup, raising local reactive species concentration and enhancing the measured surface disinfection rate. A surface micro-discharge (SMD) device is used as an example of a working plasma source. We report discharge characteristics and disinfection efficiency as a function of pressure and applied voltage.

  12. Summary Report of Working Group 6: Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leemans, Wim P.; Downer, Michael; Siders, Craig

    2006-07-01

    A summary is given of presentations and discussions in theLaser-Plasma Acceleration Working Group at the 2006 Advanced AcceleratorConcepts Workshop. Presentation highlights include: widespreadobservation of quasi-monoenergetic electrons; good agreement betweenmeasured and simulated beam properties; the first demonstration oflaser-plasma acceleration up to 1 GeV; single-shot visualization of laserwakefield structure; new methods for measuring<100 fs electronbunches; and new methods for "machining" laser-plasma acceleratorstructures. Discussion of future direction includes: developing a roadmapfor laser-plasma acceleration beyond 1 GeV; a debate over injection andguiding; benchmarking simulations with improved wake diagnostics;petawatt laser technology for future laser-plasmaaccelerators.

  13. Particle acceleration by ultra-intense laser-plasma interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Nakajima, K

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism of particle acceleration by ultra-increase laser-plasma interaction is explained. Laser light can generate very high electric field by focusing with electromagnetic field matched phase with frequency. 1018 W/cm sup 2 laser light produce about 3 TV/m electric field. Many laser accelerators, which particle acceleration method satisfies phase matching particle and electric field, are proposed. In these accelerators, the Inverse Cherenkov Accelerator, Inverse FEL Accelerator and Laser-Plasma Accelerator are explained. Three laser-plasma acceleration mechanisms: Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator, Laser Wake-Field Accelerator (LWFA) and Self-Modulated LWFA, showed particle acceleration by experiments. By developing a high speed Z pinch capillary-plasma optical waveguide, 2.2 TW and 90 fs laser pulse could be propagated 2 cm at 40 mu m focusing radius in 1999. Dirac acceleration or ultra-relativistic ponderomotive acceleration mechanism can increase energy exponentially. (S.Y.)

  14. Plasma Assisted Combustion: Fundamental Studies and Engine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefkowitz, Joseph K.

    Successful and efficient ignition in short residence time environments or ultra-lean mixtures is a key technological challenge for the evolution of advanced combustion devices in terms of both performance and efficiency. To meet this challenge, interest in plasma assisted combustion (PAC) has expanded over the past 20 years. However, understanding of the underlying physical processes of ignition by plasma discharge remains elementary. In order to shed light on the key processes involved, two main thrusts of research were undertaken in this dissertation. First, demonstration of the applicability of plasma discharges in engines and engine-like environments was carried out using a microwave discharge and a nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharge in an internal combustion engine and a pulsed detonation engine, respectively. Major conclusions include the extension of lean ignition limits for both engines, significant reduction of ignition time for mixtures with large minimum ignition energy, and the discovery of the inter-pulse coupling effect of nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) discharges at high frequency. In order to understand the kinetic processes that led to these improvements, the second thrust of research directly explored the chemical kinetic processes of plasma discharges with hydrocarbon fuels. For this purpose, a low pressure flow reactor with a NRP dielectric barrier discharge cell was assembled. The discharge cell was fitted with a Herriott type multipass mirror arrangement, which allowed quantitative laser absorption spectroscopy to be performed in situ during the plasma discharge. Experiments on methane and ethylene mixtures with oxygen, argon, and helium revealed the importance of low temperature oxidation pathways in PAC. In particular, oxygen addition reactions were shown to be of primary importance in the oxidation of these small hydrocarbons in the temperature range of 300-600 K. Kinetic modeling tools, including both a coupled plasma and

  15. Laser assisted hybrid additive manufacturing of thermoelectric modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Tewolde, Mahder; Longtin, Jon P.; Hwang, David J.

    2017-02-01

    Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) are an attractive means to produce electricity, particular from waste heat applications. However, TEGs are almost exclusively manufactured as flat, rigid modules of limited size and shape, and therefore an appropriate mounting for intimate contact of TEGs modules onto arbitrary surfaces represents a significant challenge. In this study, we introduce laser assisted additive manufacturing method to produce multi-layered thermoelectric generator device directly on flat and non-flat surfaces for waste heat recovery. The laser assisted processing spans from laser scribing of thermal sprayed thin films, curing of dispensed thermoelectric inks and selective laser sintering to functionalize thermoelectric materials.

  16. Excimer laser assisted angioplasty in hemodialysis access intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yevzlin, Alexander S; Urbanes, Aris

    2009-01-01

    A case is described in which an excimer laser is used to assist angioplasty of a severe central venous lesion that is refractory to conventional techniques. Modern laser technology uses the ultraviolet (UV) spectral region to generate nanosecond pulses of energy. This results in photoablation, which is the process by which energy photons cause molecular bond disruption, while minimizing thermal damage to the surrounding vascular tissues. Further investigation of excimer laser assisted angioplasty in the setting of hemodialysis access intervention is needed to rigorously define its potential role. In occlusive disease where no conventional alternative is available, however, laser therapy is a viable option.

  17. Laser Plasmas : Density oscillations in laser produced plasma decelerated by external magnetic field

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V N Rai; M Shukla; H C Pant

    2000-11-01

    This paper presents the dynamics as well as the stability of laser produced plasma expanding across the magnetic field. Observation of some high frequency fluctuations superimposed on ion saturation current along with structuring in the pin hole images of x-ray emitting plasma plume indicate the presence of instability in the plasma. Two type of slope in the variation of x-ray emission with laser intensity in the absence and presence of magnetic field shows appearance of different threshold intensity of laser corresponding to each magnetic field at which this instability or density fluctuation sets on. This instability has been identified as a large Larmor radius instability instead of classical Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability.

  18. Focusing of Intense Laser via Parabolic Plasma Concave Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weimin; Gu, Yuqiu; Wu, Fengjuan; Zhang, Zhimeng; Shan, Lianqiang; Cao, Leifeng; Zhang, Baohan

    2015-12-01

    Since laser intensity plays an important role in laser plasma interactions, a method of increasing laser intensity - focusing of an intense laser via a parabolic plasma concave surface - is proposed and investigated by three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The geometric focusing via a parabolic concave surface and the temporal compression of high harmonics increased the peak intensity of the laser pulse by about two orders of magnitude. Compared with the improvement via laser optics approaches, this scheme is much more economic and appropriate for most femtosecond laser facilities. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11174259, 11175165), and the Dual Hundred Foundation of China Academy of Engineering Physics

  19. Millisecond laser machining of transparent materials assisted by nanosecond laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yunxiang; Zhang, Hongchao; Chen, Jun; Han, Bing; Shen, Zhonghua; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiaowu

    2015-01-26

    A new form of double pulse composed of a nanosecond laser and a millisecond laser is proposed for laser machining transparent materials. To evaluate its advantages and disadvantages, experimental investigations are carried out and the corresponding results are compared with those of single millisecond laser. The mechanism is discussed from two aspects: material defects and effects of modifications induced by nanosecond laser on thermal stress field during millisecond laser irradiation. It is shown that the modifications of the sample generated by nanosecond laser improves the processing efficiency of subsequent millisecond laser, while limits the eventual size of modified region.

  20. Tapered plasma channels to phase-lock accelerating and focusing forces in laser-plasma accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rittershofer, W.; Schroeder, C.B.; Esarey, E.; Gruner, F.J.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-05-17

    Tapered plasma channels are considered for controlling dephasing of a beam with respect to a plasma wave driven by a weakly-relativistic, short-pulse laser. Tapering allows for enhanced energy gain in a single laser plasma accelerator stage. Expressions are derived for the taper, or longitudinal plasma density variation, required to maintain a beam at a constant phase in the longitudinal and/or transverse fields of the plasma wave. In a plasma channel, the phase velocities of the longitudinal and transverse fields differ, and, hence, the required tapering differs. The length over which the tapered plasma density becomes singular is calculated. Linear plasma tapering as well as discontinuous plasma tapering, which moves beams to adjacent plasma wave buckets, are also considered. The energy gain of an accelerated electron in a tapered laser-plasma accelerator is calculated and the laser pulse length to optimize the energy gain is determined.

  1. Investigation of Early Plasma Evolution Induced by Ultrashort Laser Pulses

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Wenqian; Shin, Yung C.; King, Galen B.

    2012-01-01

    Early plasma is generated owing to high intensity laser irradiation of target and the subsequent target material ionization. Its dynamics plays a significant role in laser-material interaction, especially in the air environment1-11. Early plasma evolution has been captured through pump-probe shadowgraphy1-3 and interferometry1,4-7. However, the studied time frames and applied laser parameter ranges are limited. For example, direct examinations of plasma front locations and electron number den...

  2. Mono Energetic Beams from Laser Plasma Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Cameron G; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim; Nieter, Chet; Schröder, Carl B; Toth, Csaba; Van Tilborg, Jeroen

    2005-01-01

    A laser driven wakefield accelerator has been tuned to produce high energy electron bunches with low emittance and energy spread by extending the interaction length using a plasma channel. Wakefield accelerators support gradients thousands of times those achievable in RF accelerators, but short acceleration distance, limited by diffraction, has resulted in low energy beams with 100% electron energy spread. In the present experiments on the L’OASIS laser,* the relativistically intense drive pulse was guided over 10 diffraction ranges by a plasma channel. At a drive pulse power of 9 TW, electrons were trapped from the plasma and beams of percent energy spread containing >200pC charge above 80 MeV and with normalized emittance estimated at < 2 pi -mm-mrad were produced.** Data and simulations (VORPAL***) show the high quality bunch was formed when beam loading turned off injection after initial trapping, and when the particles were extracted as they dephased from the wake. Up to 4TW was g...

  3. Complications from laser-assisted liposuction performed by noncore practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Craig A; Sasser, Charles G S; Kaplan, Jonathan L

    2013-10-01

    Liposuction is one of the most commonly performed aesthetic surgery procedures in the United States, and most plastic surgeons perform suction-assisted, ultrasound-assisted, or power-assisted liposuction. The past decade has seen a growing interest in laser-assisted liposuction (LAL) and the proposed advantages of traditional liposuction methods. However, it is performed by a minority of plastic surgeons. In fact, many LAL providers are not trained in aesthetic practice, and many offer LAL as their only body-contouring procedure. When only one method of body contouring is available to a provider, it may lead to inappropriate patient selection with associated poor outcomes. This report discusses the use of laser liposuction in body contouring and the demographics of those performing liposuction, including LAL. Complications from laser-assisted liposuction performed by noncore practitioners are illustrated.

  4. Advanced Laser and RF Plasma Sources and Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-13

    jacks, fibers, collimators, and breadboards $19,832.71 Interferometry Gunn diode and I-Q mixer $6,775.00 RF Components and Automation High...temperature diagnostics for both our laser window and radiofrequency air plasmas. We have also acquired a tunable 668 nm diode laser, optical filters...diagnostics for both our laser window and radiofrequency air plasmas. We have also acquired a tunable 668 nm diode laser, optical filters, splitters

  5. Fractional laser-assisted delivery of methyl aminolevulinate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haak, Christina S; Farinelli, William A; Tam, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Pretreatment of skin with ablative fractional lasers (AFXL) enhances the uptake of topical photosensitizers used in photodynamic therapy (PDT). Distribution of photosensitizer into skin layers may depend on depth of laser channels and incubation time. This study evaluates whether depth of intrade...... of intradermal laser channels and incubation time may affect AFXL-assisted delivery of methyl aminolevulinate (MAL).......Pretreatment of skin with ablative fractional lasers (AFXL) enhances the uptake of topical photosensitizers used in photodynamic therapy (PDT). Distribution of photosensitizer into skin layers may depend on depth of laser channels and incubation time. This study evaluates whether depth...

  6. Physics considerations for laser-plasma linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Geddes, Cameron; Benedetti, Carlo; Leemans, Wim

    2010-06-11

    Physics considerations for a next-generation linear collider based on laser-plasma accelerators are discussed. The ultra-high accelerating gradient of a laser-plasma accelerator and short laser coupling distance between accelerator stages allows for a compact linac. Two regimes of laser-plasma acceleration are discussed. The highly nonlinear regime has the advantages of higher accelerating fields and uniform focusing forces, whereas the quasi-linear regime has the advantage of symmetric accelerating properties for electrons and positrons. Scaling of various accelerator and collider parameters with respect to plasma density and laser wavelength are derived. Reduction of beamstrahlung effects implies the use of ultra-short bunches of moderate charge. The total linac length scales inversely with the square root of the plasma density, whereas the total power scales proportional to the square root of the density. A 1 TeV center-of-mass collider based on stages using a plasma density of 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} requires tens of J of laser energy per stage (using 1 {micro}m wavelength lasers) with tens of kHz repetition rate. Coulomb scattering and synchrotron radiation are examined and found not to significantly degrade beam quality. A photon collider based on laser-plasma accelerated beams is also considered. The requirements for the scattering laser energy are comparable to those of a single laser-plasma accelerator stage.

  7. Laser-assisted deposition of thin C60 films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Canulescu, Stela; Fæster, Søren

    bound carbon molecule with a well-defined mass (M = 720 amu) and therefore a good, organic test molecule. C60 fullerene thin films of average thickness of more than 100 nm was produced in vacuum by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). A 355 nm Nd:YAG laser was directed onto a frozen target...

  8. Application of laser assisted cold spraying process for metal deposition

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tlotleng, Monnamme

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Laser assisted cold spraying (LACS) process is a hybrid technique that uses laser and cold spray to deposit solid powders on metal substrates. For bonding to occur, the particle velocities must be supersonic which are achieved by entraining...

  9. Eigenstates of Laser-Assisted Scattering in a Noninertial Frame

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Zi-Min; LI Shu-Min

    2005-01-01

    In a rotating noninertial frame, we investigate the eigenstates of the time-dependent problem for electronnucleus scattering assisted by a circularly polarized laser field. Numerical results of probability distribution, quantum potential, and current density are discussed. An approximate expression of scattering cross section for low laser frequency is given.

  10. Relativistic mirrors in laser plasmas (analytical methods)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh; Kando, M.; Koga, J.

    2016-10-01

    Relativistic flying mirrors in plasmas are realized as thin dense electron (or electron-ion) layers accelerated by high-intensity electromagnetic waves to velocities close to the speed of light in vacuum. The reflection of an electromagnetic wave from the relativistic mirror results in its energy and frequency changing. In a counter-propagation configuration, the frequency of the reflected wave is multiplied by the factor proportional to the Lorentz factor squared. This scientific area promises the development of sources of ultrashort x-ray pulses in the attosecond range. The expected intensity will reach the level at which the effects predicted by nonlinear quantum electrodynamics start to play a key role. We present an overview of theoretical methods used to describe relativistic flying, accelerating, oscillating mirrors emerging in intense laser-plasma interactions.

  11. Magnetic plasma confinement for laser ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, M; Adeyemi, A; Kanesue, T; Tamura, J; Kondo, K; Dabrowski, R

    2010-02-01

    A laser ion source (LIS) can easily provide a high current beam. However, it has been difficult to obtain a longer beam pulse while keeping a high current. On occasion, longer beam pulses are required by certain applications. For example, more than 10 micros of beam pulse is required for injecting highly charged beams to a large sized synchrotron. To extend beam pulse width, a solenoid field was applied at the drift space of the LIS at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The solenoid field suppressed the diverging angle of the expanding plasma and the beam pulse was widened. Also, it was observed that the plasma state was conserved after passing through a few hundred gauss of the 480 mm length solenoid field.

  12. Thermal laser-assisted angioplasty of renal artery stenosis for renovascular hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, M; Mizuno, K; Midorikawa, H; Igari, T; Egawa, M; Niimura, S; Fukuchi, S; Hoshino, S

    1993-01-01

    Percutaneous transluminal laser-assisted angioplasty of a renal artery stenosis was performed in a 16-year-old woman with renovascular hypertension. The stenotic portion of the renal artery was predilated by delivering Nd-YAG laser energy to the terminal tip of a laser catheter. Although the luminal diameter did not increase sufficiently with laser angioplasty alone, it allowed passage of the balloon catheter and subsequent successful balloon angioplasty. Immediately after dilatation, the patient's blood pressure fell to normal, and plasma renin activity decreased. There were no serious complications. Thermal laser angioplasty seems to be an effective adjunct technique for the treatment of severe renal artery stenosis which does not allow initial passage of a balloon catheter.

  13. 21 CFR 884.6200 - Assisted reproduction laser system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Assisted reproduction laser system. 884.6200 Section 884.6200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices §...

  14. Modelling the plasma plume of an assist source in PIAD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauer, Jochen; Harhausen, Jens; Foest, Rüdiger; Loffhagen, Detlef

    2016-09-01

    Plasma ion assisted deposition (PIAD) is a technique commonly used to produce high-precision optical interference coatings. Knowledge regarding plasma properties is most often limited to dedicated scenarios without film deposition. Approaches have been made to gather information on the process plasma in situ to detect drifts which are suspected to cause limits in repeatability of resulting layer properties. Present efforts focus on radiance monitoring of the plasma plume of an Advanced Plasma Source (APSpro, Bühler) by optical emission spectroscopy to provide the basis for an advanced plasma control. In this contribution modelling results of the plume region are presented to interpret these experimental data. In the framework of the collisional radiative model used, 15 excited neutral argon states in the plasma are considered. Results of the species densities show good consistency with the measured optical emission of various argon 2 p - 1 s transitions. This work was funded by BMBF under grant 13N13213.

  15. Respiratory complications after diode-laser-assisted tonsillotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Miloš; Horn, Iris-Susanne; Quante, Mirja; Merkenschlager, Andreas; Schnoor, Jörg; Kaisers, Udo X; Dietz, Andreas; Kluba, Karsten

    2014-08-01

    Children with certain risk factors, such as comorbidities or severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) are known to require extended postoperative monitoring after adenotonsillectomy. However, there are no recommendations available for diode-laser-assisted tonsillotomy. A retrospective chart review of 96 children who underwent diode-laser-assisted tonsillotomy (07/2011-06/2013) was performed. Data for general and sleep apnea history, power of the applied diode-laser (λ = 940 nm), anesthesia parameters, the presence of postoperative respiratory complications and postoperative healing were evaluated. After initially uncomplicated diode-laser-assisted tonsillotomy, an adjustment of post-anesthesia care was necessary in 16 of 96 patients due to respiratory failure. Respiratory complications were more frequent in younger children (3.1 vs. 4.0 years, p = 0.049, 95 % CI -1.7952 to -0.0048) and in children who suffered from nocturnal apneas (OR = 5.00, p diode-laser power higher than 13 W could be identified as a risk factor for the occurrence of a postoperative oropharyngeal edema (OR = 3.45, p diode-laser-assisted tonsillotomy. We recommend a reduced diode-laser power (<13 W) to reduce oropharyngeal edema.

  16. Laser Plasma Coupling for High Temperature Hohlraums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruer, W.

    1999-11-04

    Simple scaling models indicate that quite high radiation temperatures can be achieved in hohlraums driven with the National Ignition Facility. A scaling estimate for the radiation temperature versus pulse duration for different size NIF hohlraums is shown in Figure 1. Note that a radiation temperature of about 650 ev is projected for a so-called scale 1 hohlraum (length 2.6mm, diameter 1.6mm). With such high temperature hohlraums, for example, opacity experiments could be carried out using more relevant high Z materials rather than low Z surrogates. These projections of high temperature hohlraums are uncertain, since the scaling model does not allow for the very strongly-driven laser plasma coupling physics. Lasnex calculations have been carried out to estimate the plasma and irradiation conditions in a scale 1 hohlraum driven by NIF. Linear instability gains as high as exp(100) have been found for stimulated Brillouin scattering, and other laser-driven instabilities are also far above their thresholds. More understanding of the very strongly-driven coupling physics is clearly needed in order to more realistically assess and improve the prospects for high temperature hohlraums. Not surprisingly, this regime has been avoided for inertial fusion applications and so is relatively unexplored.

  17. High N-content a-C:N films elaborated by femtosecond PLD with plasma assistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maddi, C. [Université de Lyon, F-69003, Lyon, France, Université de Saint-Étienne, Laboratoire Hubert Curien (UMR 5516 CNRS) , 42000 Saint-Étienne (France); Donnet, C., E-mail: Christophe.Donnet@univ-st-etienne.fr [Université de Lyon, F-69003, Lyon, France, Université de Saint-Étienne, Laboratoire Hubert Curien (UMR 5516 CNRS) , 42000 Saint-Étienne (France); Loir, A.-S.; Tite, T. [Université de Lyon, F-69003, Lyon, France, Université de Saint-Étienne, Laboratoire Hubert Curien (UMR 5516 CNRS) , 42000 Saint-Étienne (France); Barnier, V. [Laboratoire Georges Friedel, Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, 42023 Saint-Etienne (France); Rojas, T.C.; Sanchez-Lopez, J.C. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla (CSIC-US) , Avda. Américo Vespucio 49, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Wolski, K. [Laboratoire Georges Friedel, Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, 42023 Saint-Etienne (France); Garrelie, F. [Université de Lyon, F-69003, Lyon, France, Université de Saint-Étienne, Laboratoire Hubert Curien (UMR 5516 CNRS) , 42000 Saint-Étienne (France)

    2015-03-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Nitrogen doped amorphous carbon films were deposited by DC reactive plasma femtosecond (fs) -PLD and conventional fs-PLD. • High nitrogen content in plasma assisted films. • More ordered sp2 rich graphitic clusters both in terms of structural and topological order. • Correlation length La of the clusters increases with nitrogen incorporation. • Formation of CN bonds at the expense of CC bonds with N content. • At the highest nitrogen concentration, terminal C≡N groups are incorporated in the film. • Correlation between film composition and plasma process. - Abstract: Amorphous carbon nitride (a-C:N) thin films are a interesting class of carbon-based electrode materials. Therefore, synthesis and characterization of these materials have found lot of interest in environmental analytical microsystems. Herein, we report the nitrogen-doped amorphous carbon thin film elaboration by femtosecond pulsed laser deposition (fs-PLD) both with and without a plasma assistance. The chemical composition and atomic bonding configuration of the films were investigated by multi-wavelength (MW) Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). The highest nitrogen content, 28 at.%, was obtained with plasma assistance. The I(D)/I(G) ratio and the G peak position increased as a function of nitrogen concentration, whereas the dispersion and full width at half maximum (FWHM) of G peak decreased. This indicates more ordered graphitic like structures in the films both in terms of topological and structural, depending on the nitrogen content. EELS investigations were correlated with MW Raman results. The interpretation of XPS spectra of carbon nitride films remains a challenge. Plasma assisted PLD in the femtosecond regime led to a significant high nitrogen concentration, which is highlighted on the basis of collisional processes in the carbon plasma plume interacting with the nitrogen

  18. Laser-assisted delivery of topical methotrexate - in vitro investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taudorf, Elisabeth Hjardem

    2016-01-01

    Ablative fractional lasers (AFXL) are increasingly used to treat dermatological disorders and to facilitate laser-assisted topical drug delivery. In this thesis, laser-tissue interactions generated by stacked pulses with a miniaturized low-power 2,940 nm AFXL were characterized (study I). Knowledge...... of the correlation between laser parameters and tissue effects was used to deliver methotrexate (MTX) topically through microscopic ablation zones (MAZs) of precise dimensions. MTX is a well-known chemotherapeutic and anti-inflammatory drug that may cause systemic adverse effects, and topical delivery is thus......, while MAZ width increased linearly with the logarithm of stacked pulses. Results were gathered in a mathematical model estimating relations between laser parameters and specific MAZ dimensions. Impact of MAZ depth on AFXL-assisted topical MTX delivery: Pretreatment by AFXL facilitated topical MTX...

  19. Laser Assisted Free-Free Transition in Electron - Atom Collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, C.; Bhatia, A. K.

    2011-01-01

    Free-free transition is studied for electron-Hydrogen atom system in ground state at very low incident energies in presence of an external homogeneous, monochromatic and linearly polarized laser field. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser in a non perturbative manner by choosing the Volkov solutions in both the channels. The space part of the scattering wave function for the electron is solved numerically by taking into account the effect of electron exchange, short range as well as of the long range interactions. Laser assisted differential as well as elastic total cross sections are calculated for single photon absorption/emission in the soft photon limit, the laser intensity being much less than the atomic field intensity. A strong suppression is noted in the laser assisted cross sections as compared to the field free situations. Significant difference is noted in the singlet and the triplet cross sections.

  20. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Composition and dynamics of an erosion plasma produced by microsecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, V. N.; Grishina, V. G.; Derkach, O. N.; Sebrant, A. Yu; Stepanova, M. A.

    1995-08-01

    The ion and energy compositions were determined and the dynamics was studied of an erosion plume formed by microsecond CO2 laser pulses incident on a graphite target. The ionic emission lines were used to find the electron density and temperature of the plasma on the target surface. The temperature of the plasma source did not change throughout the line emission time (4 μs). At the plasma recombination stage the lines of the C II, C III, and C IV ions were accompanied by bands of the C2 molecule near the target surface and also near the surface of an substrate when a plasma flow interacted with it. Ways were found for controlling the plume expansion anisotropy and for producing plasma flows with controlled parameters by selection of the conditions during formation of a quasisteady erosion plasma flow.

  1. DEVICE FOR INVESTIGATION OF MAGNETRON AND PULSED-LASER PLASMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Burmakov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Various modifications of complex pulsed laser and magnetron deposition thin-film structures unit are presented. They include joint and separate variants of layer deposition. Unit realizes the plasma parameters control and enhances the possibility of laser-plasma and magnetron methods of coatings deposition.

  2. Simulations for Plasma and Laser Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vay, Jean-Luc; Lehe, Rémi

    Computer simulations have had a profound impact on the design and understanding of past and present plasma acceleration experiments, and will be a key component for turning plasma accelerators from a promising technology into a mainstream scientific tool. In this article, we present an overview of the numerical techniques used with the most popular approaches to model plasma-based accelerators: electromagnetic particle-in-cell, quasistatic and ponderomotive guiding center. The material that is presented is intended to serve as an introduction to the basics of those approaches, and to advances (some of them very recent) that have pushed the state of the art, such as the optimal Lorentz-boosted frame, advanced laser envelope solvers and the elimination of numerical Cherenkov instability. The particle-in-cell method, which has broader interest and is more standardized, is presented in more depth. Additional topics that are cross-cutting, such as azimuthal Fourier decomposition or filtering, are also discussed, as well as potential challenges and remedies in the initialization of simulations and output of data. Examples of simulations using the techniques that are presented have been left out of this article for conciseness, and because simulation results are best understood when presented together, and contrasted with theoretical and/or experimental results, as in other articles of this volume.

  3. Comparative study on interactions between laser and arc plasma during laser-GTA welding and laser-GMA welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Minghua; Xu, Jiannan; Xin, Lijun; Zhao, Zuofu; Wu, Fufa

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes an investigation on differences in interactions between laser and arc plasma during laser-gas tungsten arc (LT) welding and laser-gas metal arc (LM) welding. The characteristics of LT heat source and LM heat source, such as plasma behavior, heat penetration ability and spectral information were comparably studied. Based on the plasma discharge theory, the interactions during plasma discharge were modeled and analyzed. Results show that in both LT and LM welding, coupling discharge between the laser keyhole plasma and arc happens, which strongly enhance the arc. But, the enhancing effect in LT welding is much more sensitive than that in LM welding when parameters are adjusted.

  4. Laser--plasma interaction in a theta-pinch geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, W.T.

    1978-06-01

    Prompt stimulated Brillouin scatter (SBS) is studied in an experiment wherein a high power, pulsed CO/sub 2/ laser irradiates an independently produced, theta-pinch plasma. SBS does not significantly affect laser heating of the plasma. Measurements of density profiles and temperature histories permitted examination of laser refraction, local heating and net absorption. Refractive containment of the CO/sub 2/ laser beam by an on-axis density minimum was observed at early times during the laser pulse. However, refractive containment was lost at late times due to the diffusive loss of the density minimum. Classical modeling of the expected heating required ''bleached'' absorption to account for the observed heating. A plasma absorptivity of approximately 46% was inferred from calorimetry measurements at 250 mtorr fill pressure. These results confirm that classical heating and refraction dominated the laser-plasma interaction.

  5. Plasma Channel Diagnostic Based on Laser Centroid Oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; Lin, Chen; Osterhoff, Jens; Shiraishi, Satomi; Schroeder, Carl; Geddes, Cameron; Toth, Csaba; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2010-09-09

    A technique has been developed for measuring the properties of discharge-based plasma channels by monitoring the centroid location of a laser beam exiting the channel as a function of input alignment offset between the laser and the channel. The centroid position of low-intensity (<10{sup 14}Wcm{sup -2}) laser pulses focused at the input of a hydrogen-filled capillary discharge waveguide was scanned and the exit positions recorded to determine the channel shape and depth with an accuracy of a few %. In addition, accurate alignment of the laser beam through the plasma channel can be provided by minimizing laser centroid motion at the channel exit as the channel depth is scanned either by scanning the plasma density or the discharge timing. The improvement in alignment accuracy provided by this technique will be crucial for minimizing electron beam pointing errors in laser plasma accelerators.

  6. Image Analysis of Plasma Induced by Focused IR Pulsed Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Hadi Ali

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Plasma induced by focused laser beam is very essential especially in laser material interaction. Preliminary study leading to this research has been carried out. A Q-switch Nd:YAG laser was employed as a source of energy. The laser was focused using a wide-angle camera lens. The formation of plasma at the focal region was visualized perpendicularly using a CCD video camera interfaced to an image processing system. The dynamic expansion of the laser plasma was grabbed in conjunction with a high-speed photographic system. The observation results show that the plasma was formed in an ellipsoidal shape. The lateral width and the length of the plasma were found gradually increased

  7. Laser Initiation and Radiofrequency Sustainment of Seeded Air Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-01

    pressure plasma that projects well away from the antenna by this means that could not be obtained by RF alone. The initial plasma ionization also...a much lower RF power levels and with more enhanced axial projection away from the antenna with laser initiation than without. Power densities of 1...SCIENTECH ( Astral AD30). In order to account for the laser attenuation by the UV window, the UV window is placed in front of the energy meter. A laser

  8. Plasma-Assisted Pretreatment of Wheat Straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz-Jensen, Nadja; Leipold, Frank; Bindslev, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    O3 generated in a plasma at atmospheric pressure and room temperature, fed with dried air (or oxygen-enriched dried air), has been used for the degradation of lignin in wheat straw to optimize the enzymatic hydrolysis and to get more fermentable sugars. A fixed bed reactor was used combined with ...

  9. Nonlinear laser-plasma interaction in magnetized liner inertial fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissel, Matthias; Awe, T. J.; Bliss, D. E.; Campbell, M. E.; Gomez, M. R.; Harding, E.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Hansen, S. B.; Jennings, C.; Kimmel, M. W.; Knapp, P.; Lewis, S. M.; McBride, R. D.; Peterson, K.; Schollmeier, M.; Scoglietti, D. J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Shores, J. E.; Sinars, D. B.; Slutz, S. A.; Smith, I. C.; Speas, C. S.; Vesey, R. A.; Porter, J. L.

    2016-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is pursuing a variation of Magneto-Inertial Fusion called Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion, or MagLIF. The MagLIF approach requires magnetization of the deuterium fuel, which is accomplished by an initial external B-Field and laser-driven pre-heat. While magnetization is crucial to the concept, it is challenging to couple sufficient energy to the fuel, since laser-plasma instabilities exist, and a compromise between laser spot size, laser entrance window thickness, and fuel density must be found. Nonlinear processes in laser plasma interaction, or laser-plasma instabilities (LPI), complicate the deposition of laser energy by enhanced absorption, backscatter, filamentation and beam-spray. Key LPI processes are determined, and mitigation methods are discussed. Results with and without improvement measures are presented.

  10. The study of laser plasma plume radiation produced by laser ablation of silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qingju

    2014-12-01

    In order to study the laser plasma plume radiation mechanisms induced by the interaction between Nd: YAG plused laser and silicon, the radiation model of silicon laser plasma plume is established. Laser plasma plume radiation includes atom characteristic lines, ion lines and continuous background. It can reflect the characteristics of laser plasma plume radiation, reveal the mechanism of laser ablation on silicon. Time-resolved measurment of laser plasma plume radiation produced by pulsed Nd: YAG laser ablation of silicon in different ambient gas is thoroughly studied. The experimental ambient gas are N2 and O2.The pulse width of Nd: YAG plused laser adopted in the experiment is 20ns, the pulse energy is 60mJ, the laser pulsing frequency is 10Hz, and the emitted laser wavelength is 1064nm, The silicon target purity is 99.99%, The target is rotating at a speed of 240r/min. The focusing area of the laser on the Si target has a diameter of around 0.8mm.The pressure of ambient gas is tunable between 13Pa and 101.3kPa in the induced chamber, the number of points used in averaging is 15. The experimental results show that the ambient gas has obvious enhancement effect on the radiation intensity of silicon laser plasma plume. With the increase of the ambient gas pressure, the silicon laser plasma plume radiation intensity will first be increased and then be decreased, and the ambient gas has an obvious compression effect on the scope of silicon laser plasma plume radiation. For the two different ambient gases, the maximum silicon laser plasma plume radiation intensity and maximum pressure for they are different, for oxygen at 35kPa, for nitrogen at 50kPa. The silicon laser plasma plume radiation intensity in oxygen is bigger than that in nitrogen.The main excition mechanisms of laser plasma plume radiation induced by Nd:YAG plused laser induced silicon is analyzed, The plused laser can makes part molecules in the ambient gas and silicon atoms ionized at the surface of

  11. Spectroscopic diagnostics of plasma during laser processing of aluminium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lober, R.; Mazumder, J.

    2007-10-01

    The role of the plasma in laser-metal interaction is of considerable interest due to its influence in the energy transfer mechanism in industrial laser materials processing. A 10 kW CO2 laser was used to study its interaction with aluminium under an argon environment. The objective was to determine the absorption and refraction of the laser beam through the plasma during the processing of aluminium. Laser processing of aluminium is becoming an important topic for many industries, including the automobile industry. The spectroscopic relative line to continuum method was used to determine the electron temperature distribution within the plasma by investigating the 4158 Å Ar I line emission and the continuum adjacent to it. The plasmas are induced in 1.0 atm pure Ar environment over a translating Al target, using f/7 and 10 kW CO2 laser. Spectroscopic data indicated that the plasma composition and behaviour were Ar-dominated. Experimental results indicated the plasma core temperature to be 14 000-15 300 K over the incident range of laser powers investigated from 5 to 7 kW. It was found that 7.5-29% of the incident laser power was absorbed by the plasma. Cross-section analysis of the melt pools from the Al samples revealed the absence of any key-hole formation and confirmed that the energy transfer mechanism in the targets was conduction dominated for the reported range of experimental data.

  12. Fast photography of plasma formed by laser ablation of aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedanovska, E.; Ivkovic, M.

    2008-07-01

    In this paper we present results of the temporal and spatial analysis of laser induced plasma performed by use of ICCD fast photography. The plasma is formed by excimer laser ablation of aluminum target in vacuum, air or different pressures of argon and helium. It is shown how the plasma luminous intensity and duration depends on gas pressure. The obtained time dependence of wave propagation distance is also compared with predictions given by the blast wave and drag-force theory also.

  13. The interaction of intense subpicosecond laser pulses with underdense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coverdale, C.A.

    1995-05-11

    Laser-plasma interactions have been of interest for many years not only from a basic physics standpoint, but also for their relevance to numerous applications. Advances in laser technology in recent years have resulted in compact laser systems capable of generating (psec), 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} laser pulses. These lasers have provided a new regime in which to study laser-plasma interactions, a regime characterized by L{sub plasma} {ge} 2L{sub Rayleigh} > c{tau}. The goal of this dissertation is to experimentally characterize the interaction of a short pulse, high intensity laser with an underdense plasma (n{sub o} {le} 0.05n{sub cr}). Specifically, the parametric instability known as stimulated Raman scatter (SRS) is investigated to determine its behavior when driven by a short, intense laser pulse. Both the forward Raman scatter instability and backscattered Raman instability are studied. The coupled partial differential equations which describe the growth of SRS are reviewed and solved for typical experimental laser and plasma parameters. This solution shows the growth of the waves (electron plasma and scattered light) generated via stimulated Raman scatter. The dispersion relation is also derived and solved for experimentally accessible parameters. The solution of the dispersion relation is used to predict where (in k-space) and at what frequency (in {omega}-space) the instability will grow. Both the nonrelativistic and relativistic regimes of the instability are considered.

  14. The interaction of intense subpicosecond laser pulses with underdense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coverdale, Christine Ann [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1995-05-11

    Laser-plasma interactions have been of interest for many years not only from a basic physics standpoint, but also for their relevance to numerous applications. Advances in laser technology in recent years have resulted in compact laser systems capable of generating (psec), 1016 W/cm2 laser pulses. These lasers have provided a new regime in which to study laser-plasma interactions, a regime characterized by Lplasma ≥ 2LRayleigh > cτ. The goal of this dissertation is to experimentally characterize the interaction of a short pulse, high intensity laser with an underdense plasma (no ≤ 0.05ncr). Specifically, the parametric instability known as stimulated Raman scatter (SRS) is investigated to determine its behavior when driven by a short, intense laser pulse. Both the forward Raman scatter instability and backscattered Raman instability are studied. The coupled partial differential equations which describe the growth of SRS are reviewed and solved for typical experimental laser and plasma parameters. This solution shows the growth of the waves (electron plasma and scattered light) generated via stimulated Raman scatter. The dispersion relation is also derived and solved for experimentally accessible parameters. The solution of the dispersion relation is used to predict where (in k-space) and at what frequency (in ω-space) the instability will grow. Both the nonrelativistic and relativistic regimes of the instability are considered.

  15. Prospective study on laser-assisted laparascopic partial nephrectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroka, Ronald; Hennig, Georg; Zilinberg, Katja; Khoder, Wael Y.

    2012-02-01

    Introduction: Developments in laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) opened a demand for surgical tools compatible with laparoscopic manipulations to make laser assisted technique safe, feasible and reproducible. Warm ischemia and bleeding during laparoscopic partial nephrectomy place technical constraints on surgeons. Therefore it was the aim to develop a safe and effective laser assisted partial nephrectomy technique without need for ischemia. Patients and methods: A diode laser emitting light at 1318nm in cw mode was coupled into a bare fibre (core diameter 600 μm) thus able to transfer up to 100W to the tissue. After dry lab experience, a total of 10 patients suffering from kidney malformations underwent laparoscopic/retroperitoneoscopic partial nephrectomy. Clinically, postoperative renal function and serum c-reactive protein (CRP) were monitored. Laser induced coagulation depth and effects on resection margins were evaluated. Demographic, clinical and follow-up data are presented. Using a commercial available fibre guidance instrument for lanringeal intervention, the demands on an innovative laser fibre guidance instrument for the laser assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LLPN) are summarized. Results: Overall, all laparascopic intervention were succesfull and could be performed without conversion to open surgery. Mean operative time and mean blood loss were comparable to conventional open and laparascopic approaches. Laser assisted resection of the kidney tissue took max 15min. After extirpation of the tumours all patients showed clinical favourable outcome during follow up period. Tumour sizes were measured to be up 5cm in diameter. The depth of the coagulation on the removed tissue ranged between <1 to 2mm without effect on histopathological evaluation of tumours or resection margin. As the surface of the remaining kidney surface was laser assisted coagulated after removal. The sealing of the surface was induced by a slightly larger coagulation

  16. Plasma assisted deposition of metal fluorides for 193nm applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Martin; Sode, Maik; Gaebler, Dieter; Kaiser, Norbert; Tuennermann, Andreas

    2008-10-01

    The ArF lithography technology requires a minimization of optical losses due to scattering and absorption. Consequently it is necessary to optimize the coating process of metal fluorides. The properties of metal fluoride thin films are mainly affected by the deposition methods, their parameters, and the vacuum conditions. Until now the best results were achieved by metal boat evaporation with high substrate temperature and without plasma assistance. In fact, it was demonstrated that the plasma assisted deposition process results in optical thin films with high packing density but the losses due to absorption were extremely high for deep and vacuum ultraviolet applications. This paper will demonstrate that most of the common metal fluorides can be deposited by electron beam evaporation with plasma assistance. In comparison to other deposition methods, the prepared thin films show low absorption in the VUV spectral range, high packing density, and less water content. The densification of the thin films was performed by a Leybold LION plasma source. As working gas, a variable mixture of fluorine and argon gas was chosen. To understand the deposition process and the interaction of the plasma with the deposition material, various characterization methods like plasma emission spectroscopy and ion current measurements were implemented.

  17. Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Lin, C.; Sokollik, T.; Smith, A.; Rodgers, D.; Donahue, R.; Bryne, W.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-06-01

    The electron energy dependence of a scintillating screen (Lanex Fast) was studied with sub-nanosecond electron beams ranging from 106 MeV to 1522 MeV at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron booster accelerator. The sensitivity of the Lanex Fast decreased by 1percent per 100 MeV increase of the energy. The linear response of the screen against the charge was verified with charge density and intensity up to 160 pC/mm2 and 0.4 pC/ps/mm2, respectively. For electron beams from the laser plasma accelerator, a comprehensive study of charge diagnostics has been performed using a Lanex screen, an integrating current transformer, and an activation based measurement. The charge measured by each diagnostic was found to be within +/-10 percent.

  18. Effect of the laser wavefront in a laser-plasma accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Beaurepaire, B; Bocoum, M; Böhle, F; Jullien, A; Rousseau, J-P; Lefrou, T; Douillet, D; Iaquaniello, G; Lopez-Martens, R; Lifschitz, A; Faure, J

    2015-01-01

    A high repetition rate electron source was generated by tightly focusing kHz, few-mJ laser pulses into an underdense plasma. This high intensity laser-plasma interaction led to stable electron beams over several hours but with strikingly complex transverse distributions even for good quality laser focal spots. Analysis of the experimental data, along with results of PIC simulations demonstrate the role of the laser wavefront on the acceleration of electrons. Distortions of the laser wavefront cause spatial inhomogeneities in the out-of-focus laser distribution and consequently, the laser pulse drives an inhomogenous transverse wakefield whose focusing/defocusing properties affect the electron distribution. These findings explain the experimental results and suggest the possibility of controlling the electron spatial distribution in laser-plasma accelerators by tailoring the laser wavefront.

  19. Fractional laser-assisted drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlendsson, Andrés M; Doukas, Apostolos G; Farinelli, William A

    2016-01-01

    , potentially due to insufficient drug uptake in deeper skin layers. This study sought to investigate a standardized method to actively fill laser-generated channels by altering pressure, vacuum, and pressure (PVP), enquiring its effect on (i) relative filling of individual laser channels; (ii) cutaneous...... deposition and delivery kinetics; (iii) biodistribution and diffusion pattern, estimated by mathematical simulation. METHODS: Franz diffusion chambers (FCs) were used to evaluate the PVP-technique, comparing passive (AFXL) and active (AFXL + PVP) channel filling. A fractional CO2-laser generated superficial...... (225 µm;17.5 mJ/channel) and deep (1200 µm; 130.5 mJ/channel) channels, and PVP was delivered as a 3-minutes cycle of 1 minute pressure (+1.0 atm), 1 minute vacuum (-1.0 atm), and 1 minute pressure (+1.0 atm). Filling of laser channels was visualized with a colored biomarker liquid (n = 12 FCs, n = 588...

  20. Fractional laser-assisted drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taudorf, E H; Lerche, C M; Erlendsson, A M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Ablative fractional laser (AFXL) facilitates delivery of topical methotrexate (MTX). This study investigates impact of laser-channel depth on topical MTX-delivery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: MTX (1% [w/v]) diffused for 21 hours through AFXL-exposed porcine skin in in vitro......-thickness skin, biodistribution profiles at specific skin levels, and transdermal permeation. Fluorescence microscopy was used to visualize UVC-activated MTX-fluorescence (254 nm) and semi-quantify MTX distribution in skin. RESULTS: AFXL increased topical MTX-delivery (P ... of coagulation zones (6-47 μm, P ≥ 0.438). CONCLUSION: AFXL greatly increases topical MTX-delivery. Deeper MAZs deliver higher MTX-concentrations than superficial MAZs, which indicates that laser channel depth may be important for topical delivery of hydrophilic molecules. Lasers Surg. Med. 48:519-529, 2016...

  1. Femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery: A current review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Moshirfar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the safety, efficacy, advantages, and limitations of femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery through a review of the literature. A PubMed search was conducted using topic-appropriate keywords to screen and select articles. Initial research has shown appropriate safety and efficacy of femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery, with improvements in anterior capsulotomy, phacofragmentation, and corneal incision. Limitations of these studies include small sample size and short-term follow-up. Cost-benefit analysis has not yet been addressed. Preliminary data for femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery shows appropriate safety and efficacy, and possible advantage over conventional cataract surgery. Questions to eventually be answered include comparisons of long-term postoperative complication rates-including infection and visual outcomes-and analysis of contraindications and financial feasibility.

  2. Dependence of terahertz power from laser-produced plasma on laser intensity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, J.-H.; Zhidkov, A.; Jin, Z.; Hosokai, T.; Kodama, R. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Photon Pioneers Center, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Japan Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamadaoka (Japan)

    2012-07-11

    Power of terahertz radiation from plasma which is generated from air irradiated by coupled ({omega}, 2{omega}) femtosecond laser pulses is analyzed for high laser intensities, for which non-linear plasma effects on the pulse propagation become essential, with multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations including the self-consistent plasma kinetics. The growth rate of THz power becomes slower as the laser intensity increases. A reason of such a lowering of efficiency in THz emission is found to be ionization of air by the laser pulse, which results in poor focusing of laser pulses.

  3. Dependence of terahertz power from laser-produced plasma on laser intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, J.-H.; Zhidkov, A.; Jin, Z.; Hosokai, T.; Kodama, R.

    2012-07-01

    Power of terahertz radiation from plasma which is generated from air irradiated by coupled (ω, 2ω) femtosecond laser pulses is analyzed for high laser intensities, for which non-linear plasma effects on the pulse propagation become essential, with multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations including the self-consistent plasma kinetics. The growth rate of THz power becomes slower as the laser intensity increases. A reason of such a lowering of efficiency in THz emission is found to be ionization of air by the laser pulse, which results in poor focusing of laser pulses.

  4. Pulse laser assisted optical tweezers for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Tadao; Maeda, Saki; Honda, Ayae

    2012-01-01

    Optical tweezers which enables to trap micron to nanometer sized objects by radiation pressure force is utilized for manipulation of particles under a microscope and for measurement of forces between biomolecules. Weak force of optical tweezers causes some limitations such as particle adhesion or steric barrier like lipid membrane in a cell prevent further movement of objects. For biomedical applications we need to overcome these difficulties. We have developed a technique to exert strong instantaneous force by use of a pulse laser beam and to assist conventional optical tweezers. A pulse laser beam has huge instantaneous laser power of more than 1000 times as strong as a conventional continuous-wave laser beam so that the instantaneous force is strong enough to break chemical bonding and molecular force between objects and obstacles. We derive suitable pulse duration for pulse assist of optical tweezers and demonstrate particle manipulation in difficult situations through an experiment of particle removal from sticky surface of glass substrate.

  5. External Electric Field-Assisted Laser Percussion Drilling for Highly Reflective Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Ching Ho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an external electric field was employed during the laser percussion drilling on highly reflective materials. The laser-produced plasma was sputtered substantially, and the charged ions in the plasma plume were drawn by the electrodes. Different configurations of plate electrodes were proposed and investigated in this work to provide a simple, low-cost method that allows expelling the laser-induced plasma during the percussion drilling process. The electric field resulted from the potential that was applied across the two electrodes. This electrical perturbation produced a uniform electric field when the laser-generated plasma was created in the plane plate-charged capacitor. The electric field with different electrode configurations applied to the charged particles that are carrying the electrons was also simulated in this work. All processing work was performed in air under standard atmospheric conditions and in the absence of assisting process gas. The depth of the holes drilled when various types of electrode configurations were used was measured, and the results were used to evaluate the percussion drilling rate. Results show that vaporized debris is expelled by the applied electric field; hence, in optimal configuration the penetration depth can be increased by up to 91.1%.

  6. Physics of laser fusion. Vol. I. Theory of the coronal plasma in laser-fusion targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Max, C.E.

    1981-12-01

    This monograph deals with the physics of the coronal region in laser fusion targets. The corona consists of hot plasma which has been evaporated from the initially solid target during laser heating. It is in the corona that the laser light is absorbed by the target, and the resulting thermal energy is conducted toward cold high-density regions, where ablation occurs. The topics to be discussed are theoretical mechanisms for laser light absorption and reflection, hot-electron production, and the physics of heat conduction in laser-produced plasmas. An accompanying monograph by H. Ahlstrom (Vol.II) reviews the facilities, diagnostics, and data from recent laser fusion experiments.

  7. Plasma Jet Interaction with Thomson Scattering Probe Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byvank, Tom; Banasek, Jacob; Potter, William; Kusse, Bruce

    2016-10-01

    Thomson scattering systems can diagnose plasma temperatures and velocities. When probing a plasma jet with the Thomson scattering laser, we observe a laser-plasma interaction that inputs energy into the plasma jet. The absorbed energy causes a bubble of low density ( 5*1017 cm-2) in the jet (unperturbed 1018 cm-2). A pulsed power machine (1 MA peak current, 100 ns rise time) with a radial foil (15 μm thick Al) configuration generates the plasma jet. We compare the effects of using 10 J and 1 J laser energies, for which the 10 J laser is a larger perturbation. We discuss how the interaction affects the Thomson scattering temperature and velocity measurements. Work supported by National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Stewardship Sciences Academic Programs under Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-NA0001836 and National Science Foundation (NSF) Grant PHY-1102471.

  8. Laser and optical system for laser assisted hydrogen ion beam stripping at SNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Rakhman, A.; Menshov, A.; Webster, A.; Gorlov, T.; Aleksandrov, A.; Cousineau, S.

    2017-03-01

    Recently, a high-efficiency laser assisted hydrogen ion (H-) beam stripping was successfully carried out in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator. The experiment was not only an important step toward foil-less H- stripping for charge exchange injection, it also set up a first example of using megawatt ultraviolet (UV) laser source in an operational high power proton accelerator facility. This paper reports in detail the design, installation, and commissioning result of a macro-pulsed multi-megawatt UV laser system and laser beam transport line for the laser stripping experiment.

  9. Laser-Assisted Removal of Aspirated Thumbtacks by Flexible Bronchoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oren Fruchter

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. To describe a technique for removal of sharp aspirated metal objects employing laser through flexible bronchoscopy. Methods. We report two patients in whom a new technique for removal of sharp aspirated metal objects utilizing Nd-Yag laser flexible bronchoscopy was used. Results. Successful and uncomplicated removal of the aspirated thumbpack by flexible bronchoscopy under conscious sedation was accomplished in the two patients described. Both patients were discharged within 24 hours. Conclusions. In patients with aspirated thumbtack laser-assisted breakage of the object through flexible bronchoscopy may obviate the need for rigid bronchoscopy or thoracotomy.

  10. Frequency Comb Assisted Broadband Precision Spectroscopy with Cascaded Diode Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Junqiu; Pfeiffer, Martin H P; Kordts, Arne; Kamel, Ayman N; Guo, Hairun; Geiselmann, Michael; Kippenberg, Tobias J

    2016-01-01

    Frequency comb assisted diode laser spectroscopy, employing both the accuracy of an optical frequency comb and the broad wavelength tuning range of a tunable diode laser, has been widely used in many applications. In this letter we present a novel method using cascaded frequency agile diode lasers, which allows extending the measurement bandwidth to 37.4 THz (1355 to 1630 nm) at MHz resolution with scanning speeds above 1 THz/s. It is demonstrated as a useful tool to characterize a broadband spectrum for molecular spectroscopy and in particular it enables to characterize the dispersion of integrated microresonators up to the fourth order.

  11. Laser-plasma booster for ion post acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoh D.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A remarkable ion energy increase is demonstrated for post acceleration by a laser-plasma booster. An intense short-pulse laser generates a strong current by high-energy electrons accelerated, when this intense short-pulse laser illuminates a plasma target. The strong electric current creates a strong magnetic field along the high-energy electron current in plasma. During the increase phase in the magnetic field, a longitudinal inductive electric field is induced for the forward ion acceleration by the Faraday law. Our 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate a remarkable increase in ion energy by several tens of MeV.

  12. Lipase biofilm deposited by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aronne, Antonio [Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Industrial Production, University of Naples “Federico II”, Napoli (Italy); Bloisi, Francesco, E-mail: bloisi@na.infn.it [SPIN – CNR, Naples (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Naples “Federico II”, Napoli (Italy); Calabria, Raffaela; Califano, Valeria [Istituto Motori – CNR, Naples (Italy); Depero, Laura E. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Brescia, Brescia (Italy); Fanelli, Esther [Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Industrial Production, University of Naples “Federico II”, Napoli (Italy); Federici, Stefania [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Brescia, Brescia (Italy); Massoli, Patrizio [Istituto Motori – CNR, Naples (Italy); Vicari, Luciano R.M. [SPIN – CNR, Naples (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Naples “Federico II”, Napoli (Italy)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • A lipase film was deposited with Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation technique. • FTIR spectra show that laser irradiation do not damage lipase molecule. • Laser fluence controls the characteristics of complex structure generated by MAPLE. - Abstract: Lipase is an enzyme that finds application in biodiesel production and for detection of esters and triglycerides in biosensors. Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE), a technique derived from Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) for deposition of undamaged biomolecules or polymers, is characterized by the use of a frozen target obtained from a solution/suspension of the guest material (to be deposited) in a volatile matrix (solvent). The presence of the solvent avoids or at least reduces the potential damage of guest molecules by laser radiation but only the guest material reaches the substrate in an essentially solvent-free deposition. MAPLE can be used for enzymes immobilization, essential for industrial application, allowing the development of continuous processes, an easier separation of products, the reuse of the catalyst and, in some cases, enhancing enzyme properties (pH, temperature stability, etc.) and catalytic activity in non-aqueous media. Here we show that MAPLE technique can be used to deposit undamaged lipase and that the complex structure (due to droplets generated during extraction from target) of the deposited material can be controlled by changing the laser beam fluence.

  13. Plasma Assisted Combustion Mechanism for Small Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    O2 C2H6 C2H4 CH3OH iso‐propane CO2 C3H8 C3H6 C2H5OH neo‐pentane H2O C4H10 CH3OCH3  DME O3 C5H12 Ar H2 N2O PAC  Kinetic  Mechanism  O(-)+N(+)=N+O... Kinetic  Model:  Previous Versions D.V.Zatsepin, S.M.Starikovskaia, A.Yu.Starikovskii Hydrogen oxidation in a  stoichiometric hydrogen‐air mixtures in the... Kinetics  of ignition of saturated hydrocarbons by nonequilibrium plasma: C2H6‐ to C5H12‐containing mixtures. Combustion and Flame 156  (2009) 221–233

  14. Synthesis of Ag@Silica Nanoparticles by Assisted Laser Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Castillo, Jr.; Rodriguez, E.; Jimenez-Villar, E.; Rodríguez, D.; Salomon-García, I.; de Sá, Gilberto F.; García-Fernández, T.; Almeida, DB; Cesar, CL; Johnes, R.; Ibarra, Juana C.

    2015-10-01

    This paper reports the synthesis of silver nanoparticles coated with porous silica (Ag@Silica NPs) using an assisted laser ablation method. This method is a chemical synthesis where one of the reagents (the reducer agent) is introduced in nanometer form by laser ablation of a solid target submerged in an aqueous solution. In a first step, a silicon wafer immersed in water solution was laser ablated for several minutes. Subsequently, an AgNO3 aliquot was added to the aqueous solution. The redox reaction between the silver ions and ablation products leads to a colloidal suspension of core-shell Ag@Silica NPs. The influence of the laser pulse energy, laser wavelength, ablation time, and Ag+ concentration on the size and optical properties of the Ag@Silica NPs was investigated. Furthermore, the colloidal suspensions were studied by UV-VIS-NIR spectroscopy, X-Ray diffraction, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM).

  15. Laser-driven plasma waves in capillary tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojda, F; Cassou, K; Genoud, G; Burza, M; Glinec, Y; Lundh, O; Persson, A; Vieux, G; Brunetti, E; Shanks, R P; Jaroszynski, D; Andreev, N E; Wahlström, C-G; Cros, B

    2009-12-01

    The excitation of plasma waves over a length of up to 8 cm is demonstrated using laser guiding of intense laser pulses through hydrogen-filled glass capillary tubes. The plasma waves are diagnosed by spectral analysis of the transmitted laser radiation. The dependence of the spectral redshift-measured as a function of filling pressure, capillary tube length, and incident laser energy-is in excellent agreement with simulation results. The longitudinal accelerating field inferred from the simulations is in the range of 1-10 GV/m.

  16. Mid-infrared lasers for energy frontier plasma accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Pogorelsky

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Plasma wake field accelerators driven with solid-state near-IR lasers have been considered as an alternative to conventional rf accelerators for next-generation TeV-class lepton colliders. Here, we extend this study to the mid-IR spectral domain covered by CO_{2} lasers. We conclude that the increase in the laser driver wavelength favors the regime of laser wake field acceleration with a low plasma density and high electric charge. This regime is the most beneficial for gamma colliders to be converted from lepton colliders via inverse Compton scattering. Selecting a laser wavelength to drive a Compton gamma source is essential for the design of such a machine. The revealed benefits from spectral diversification of laser drivers for future colliders and off-spring applications validate ongoing efforts in advancing the ultrafast CO_{2} laser technology.

  17. Mid-infrared lasers for energy frontier plasma accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorelsky, I. V.; Polyanskiy, M. N.; Kimura, W. D.

    2016-09-01

    Plasma wake field accelerators driven with solid-state near-IR lasers have been considered as an alternative to conventional rf accelerators for next-generation TeV-class lepton colliders. Here, we extend this study to the mid-IR spectral domain covered by CO2 lasers. We conclude that the increase in the laser driver wavelength favors the regime of laser wake field acceleration with a low plasma density and high electric charge. This regime is the most beneficial for gamma colliders to be converted from lepton colliders via inverse Compton scattering. Selecting a laser wavelength to drive a Compton gamma source is essential for the design of such a machine. The revealed benefits from spectral diversification of laser drivers for future colliders and off-spring applications validate ongoing efforts in advancing the ultrafast CO2 laser technology.

  18. Laser-plasma interactions relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wharton, K.B.

    1998-11-02

    Research into laser-driven inertial confinement fusion is now entering a critical juncture with the construction of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Many of the remaining unanswered questions concerning NIF involve interactions between lasers and plasmas. With the eventual goal of fusion power in mind, laser-plasma interactions relevant to laser fusion schemes is an important topic in need of further research. This work experimentally addresses some potential shortcuts and pitfalls on the road to laser-driven fusion power. Current plans on NIF have 192 laser beams directed into a small cylindrical cavity which will contain the fusion fuel; to accomplish this the beams must cross in the entrance holes, and this intersection will be in the presence of outward-flowing plasma. To investigate the physics involved, interactions of crossing laser beams in flowing plasmas are investigated with experiments on the Nova laser facility at LLNL. It was found that in a flowing plasma, energy is transferred between two crossing laser beams, and this may have deleterious consequences for energy balance and ignition in NIF. Possible solutions to this problem are presented. A recently-proposed alternative to standard laser-driven fusion, the ''fast ignitor'' concept, is also experimentally addressed in this dissertation. Many of the laser-plasma interactions necessary for the success of the fast ignitor have not previously been explored at the relevant laser intensities. Specifically, the transfer of high-intensity laser energy to electrons at solid-target interfaces is addressed. 20-30% conversion efficiencies into forward-propagated electrons were measured, along with an average electron energy that varied with the type of target material. The directionality of the electrons was also measured, revealing an apparent beaming of the highest energy electrons. This work was extended to various intensities and

  19. Atmospheric pressure plasma assisted calcination of composite submicron fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvecká, Veronika; Kováčik, Dušan; Tučeková, Zlata; Zahoranová, Anna; Černák, Mirko

    2016-08-01

    The plasma assisted calcination of composite organic/inorganic submicron fibers for the preparation of inorganic fibers in submicron scale was studied. Aluminium butoxide/polyvinylpyrrolidone fibers prepared by electrospinning were treated using low-temperature plasma generated by special type of dielectric barrier discharge, so called diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge (DCSBD) at atmospheric pressure in ambient air, synthetic air, oxygen and nitrogen. Effect of plasma treatment on base polymer removal was investigated by using Attenuated total reflectance - Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. Influence of working gas on the base polymer reduction was studied by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and CHNS elemental analysis. Changes in fibers morphology were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). High efficiency of organic template removal without any degradation of fibers was observed after plasma treatment in ambient air. Due to the low-temperature approach and short exposure time, the plasma assisted calcination is a promising alternative to the conventional thermal calcination. Contribution to the topical issue "6th Central European Symposium on Plasma Chemistry (CESPC-6)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ester Marotta and Cristina Paradisi

  20. Development And Optical Absorption Properties Of A Laser Induced Plasma During CO2-Laser Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, E.; Bakowsky, L.; Loosen, P.; Poprawe, R.; Herziger, G.

    1984-03-01

    Laser material processing is accompanied by a laser induced plasma in front of the target surface as soon as the laser radiation exceeds a certain critical intensity. For cw CO2-laser machining of metal targets the threshold for plasma onset is about 106 W/cm2. Critical condition for plasma generation at this intensity level is to reach evaporation temperature at the target's surface. At intensity levels exceeding 106 W/cm2 the laser light is interacting with the laser induced plasma and then the plasma in turn interacts with the target. The absorptivity is no longer constant, but increases with increasing intensity of the incident radiation, so that the total amount of power coupled to the target is increasing. This holds up to intensity levels of 2'10 Wicm2. Then the plasma begins to withdraw from the target surface, thus interrupting plasma-target interaction so that the laser power is no longer coupled into the target completely. The results of laser welding (welding depth) in the intensity level of 106 W/cm2 are governed by the product of incident intensity times focus radius, so that welding results are a measure to determine focus radius and laser intensity.

  1. Plasma formation in diode pumped alkali lasers sustained in Cs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markosyan, Aram H.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-11-01

    In diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs), lasing action occurs on the resonant lines of alkali atoms following pumping by broadband semiconductor lasers. The goal is to convert the efficient but usually poor optical quality of inexpensive diode lasers into the high optical quality of atomic vapor lasers. Resonant excitation of alkali vapor leads to plasma formation through the excitation transfer from the 2P states to upper lying states, which then are photoionized by the pump and intracavity radiation. A first principles global model was developed to investigate the operation of the He/Cs DPAL system and the consequences of plasma formation on the efficiency of the laser. Over a range of pump powers, cell temperatures, excitation frequency, and mole fraction of the collision mixing agent (N2 or C2H6), we found that sufficient plasma formation can occur that the Cs vapor is depleted. Although N2 is not a favored collisional mixing agent due to large rates of quenching of the 2P states, we found a range of pump parameters where laser oscillation may occur. The poor performance of N2 buffered systems may be explained in part by plasma formation. We found that during the operation of the DPAL system with N2 as the collisional mixing agent, plasma formation is in excess of 1014-1015 cm-3, which can degrade laser output intensity by both depletion of the neutral vapor and electron collisional mixing of the laser levels.

  2. Tuning of betatron radiation in laser-plasma accelerators via multimodal laser propagation through capillary waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curcio, A.; Giulietti, D.; Petrarca, M.

    2017-02-01

    The betatron radiation from laser-plasma accelerated electrons in dielectric capillary waveguides is investigated. The multimode laser propagation is responsible for a modulated plasma wakefield structure, which affects the electron transverse dynamics, therefore influencing the betatron radiation spectra. Such a phenomenon can be exploited to tune the energy spectrum of the betatron radiation by controlling the excitation of the capillary modes.

  3. Ion Acceleration by Laser Plasma Interaction from Cryogenic Microjets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Propp, Adrienne [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2015-08-16

    Processes that occur in extreme conditions, such as in the center of stars and large planets, can be simulated in the laboratory using facilities such as SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the Jupiter Laser Facility (JLF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). These facilities allow scientists to investigate the properties of matter by observing their interactions with high-power lasers. Ion acceleration from laser plasma interaction is gaining greater attention today due to its widespread potential applications, including proton beam cancer therapy and fast ignition for energy production. Typically, ion acceleration is achieved by focusing a high power laser on thin foil targets through a mechanism called Target Normal Sheath Acceleration. However, this mechanism is not ideal for creating the high-energy proton beams needed for future applications. Based on research and recent experiments, we hypothesized that a pure liquid cryogenic jet would be an ideal target for exploring new regimes of ion acceleration. Furthermore, it would provide a continuous, pure target, unlike metal foils which are consumed in the interaction and easily contaminated. In an effort to test this hypothesis, we used the 527 nm split beam, frequency-doubled TITAN laser at JLF. Data from the cryogenic jets was limited due to the flow of current up the jet into the nozzle during the interaction, heating the jet and damaging the orifice. However, we achieved a pure proton beam with evidence of a monoenergetic feature. Furthermore, data from gold and carbon wires showed surprising and interesting results. Preliminary analysis of data from two ion emission diagnostics, Thomson parabola spectrometers (TPs) and radio chromic films (RCFs), suggests that shockwave acceleration occurred rather than target normal sheath acceleration, the standard mechanism of ion acceleration. Upon completion of the experiment at TITAN, I researched the possibility of transforming our liquid cryogenic

  4. Fractional CO(2) laser-assisted drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haedersdal, Merete; Sakamoto, Fernanda H; Farinelli, William A

    2010-01-01

    Ablative fractional resurfacing (AFR) creates vertical channels that might assist the delivery of topically applied drugs into skin. The purpose of this study was to evaluate drug delivery by CO(2) laser AFR using methyl 5-aminolevulinate (MAL), a porphyrin precursor, as a test drug....

  5. Fractional CO(2) laser-assisted drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haedersdal, Merete; Sakamoto, Fernanda H; Farinelli, William A

    2010-01-01

    Ablative fractional resurfacing (AFR) creates vertical channels that might assist the delivery of topically applied drugs into skin. The purpose of this study was to evaluate drug delivery by CO(2) laser AFR using methyl 5-aminolevulinate (MAL), a porphyrin precursor, as a test drug....

  6. Absorption tomography of laser induced plasmas with a large aperture

    CERN Document Server

    Shabanov, Sergei V

    2010-01-01

    An emission tomography of laser-induced plasmas employed in the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) requires long signal integration times during which the plasma cannot be considered stationary. To reduce the integration time, it is proposed to measure a plasma absorption in parallel rays with an aperture that collects light coming from large fractions of the plasma plume at each aperture position. The needed spatial resolution is achieved by a special numerical data processing. Another advantage of the proposed procedure is that inexpensive linear CCD or non-discrete (PMT, photodiode) detectors can be used instead of costly 2-dimensional detectors.

  7. Absorption of a laser light pulse in a dense plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlman-Balloffet, G.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental study of the absorption of a laser light pulse in a transient, high-density, high-temperature plasma is presented. The plasma is generated around a metallic anode tip by a fast capacitive discharge occurring in vacuum. The amount of transmitted light is measured for plasmas made of different metallic ions in the regions of the discharge of high electronic density. Variation of the transmission during the laser pulse is also recorded. Plasma electrons are considered responsible for the very high absorption observed.

  8. Examining the Potential of Plasma-Assisted Pretreated Wheat Straw for Enzyme Production by Trichoderma reesei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodríguez Gómez, Divanery; Lehmann, Linda Olkjær; Schultz-Jensen, Nadja

    2012-01-01

    Plasma-assisted pretreated wheat straw was investigated for cellulase and xylanase production by Trichoderma reesei fermentation. Fermentations were conducted with media containing washed and unwashed plasma-assisted pretreated wheat straw as carbon source which was sterilized by autoclavation...

  9. Benzene conversion by manganese dioxide assisted silent discharge plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Bin; JI Min; YU Xin; FENG Tao; YAO Shuiliang

    2007-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma technologies have shown their promising potential specially for the low concentration of volatile organic compound control in indoor air in recent years.But it is also high energy consuming.So,to improve the energy efficiency,adding catalysts which enhance the plasma chemical reactions to plasma reactors may be a good selection.Therefore,in this study the manganese dioxide assisted silent discharge plasma was developed for benzene conversion at a relatively high energy efficiency.The results show that MnO2 could promote complete oxidation of benzene with O2 and O3 produced in the plasma discharge zone.The energy efficiency of benzene conversion with MnO2 was two folds as much as that without catalysts.It was also found that the site of MnO2 in the reactor and the energy density had effects on benzene conversion.While the energy density was lower than 48 J/L,benzene conversion decreased with the increase in the distance between MnO2 bed and the plasma discharge zone.Whereas when the energy density was higher than 104 J/L,benzene conversion had an optimal value that was governed by the distance between MnO2 bed and the plasma discharge zone.The mechanism of benzene oxidation in plasma discharges and over MnO2 is discussed in detail.

  10. Transition of the BELLA PW laser system towards a collaborative research facility in laser plasma science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Csaba; Evans, Dave; Gonsalves, Anthony J.; Kirkpatrick, Mark; Magana, Art; Mannino, Greg; Mao, Hann-Shin; Nakamura, Kei; Riley, Joe R.; Steinke, Sven; Sipla, Tyler; Syversrud, Don; Ybarrolaza, Nathan; Leemans, Wim P.

    2017-03-01

    The advancement of Laser-Plasma Accelerators (LPA) requires systematic studies with ever increasing precision and reproducibility. A key component of such a research endeavor is a facility that provides reliable, well characterized laser sources, flexible target systems, and comprehensive diagnostics of the laser pulses, the interaction region, and the produced electron beams. The Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA), a PW laser facility, now routinely provides high quality focused laser pulses for high precision experiments. A description of the commissioning process, the layout of the laser systems, the major components of the laser and radiation protection systems, and a summary of early results are given. Further scientific plans and highlights of operational experience that serve as the basis for transition to a collaborative research facility in high-peak power laser-plasma interaction research are reviewed.

  11. Laser-assisted machining of difficult-to-machine materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Incropera, F.P.; Rozzi, J.C.; Pfefferkorn, F.E.; Lei, S.; Shin, Y.C.

    1999-07-01

    Laser-assisted machining (LAM) is a hybrid process for which a difficult-to-machine material, such as a ceramic or super alloy, is irradiated by a laser source prior to material removal by a cutting tool. The process has the potential to significantly increase material removal rates, as well as to improve the geometry and properties of the finished work piece. Features and limitations of theoretical and experimental procedures for determining the transient thermal response of a work piece during LAM are described, and representative results are presented for laser-assisted turning of sintered silicon nitride. Significant physical trends are revealed by the calculations, as are guidelines for the selection of appropriate operating conditions.

  12. Laser-assisted fabrication of highly viscous alginate microsphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yafu; Huang, Yong

    2011-04-01

    Encapsulated microspheres have been widely used in various biomedical applications. However, fabrication of encapsulated microspheres from highly viscous materials has always been a manufacturing challenge. The objective of this study is to explore a novel metallic foil-assisted laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT), a laser-assisted fabrication technique, to make encapsulated microspheres using high sodium alginate concentration solutions. The proposed four-layer approach includes a quartz disk, a sacrificial and adhesive layer, a metallic foil, and a transferred suspension layer. It is found that the proposed four-layer modified LIFT approach provides a promising fabrication technology for making of bead-encapsulated microspheres from highly viscous solutions. During the process, the microsphere only can be formed if the direct-writing height is larger than the critical direct-writing height; otherwise, tail structured droplets are formed; and the encapsulated microsphere diameter linearly increases with the laser fluence and decreases with the sodium alginate concentration.

  13. Scaling mechanisms of vapour/plasma shielding from laser-produced plasmas to magnetic fusion regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizyuk, Tatyana; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2014-02-01

    The plasma shielding effect is a well-known mechanism in laser-produced plasmas (LPPs) reducing laser photon transmission to the target and, as a result, significantly reducing target heating and erosion. The shielding effect is less pronounced at low laser intensities, when low evaporation rate together with vapour/plasma expansion processes prevent establishment of a dense plasma layer above the surface. Plasma shielding also loses its effectiveness at high laser intensities when the formed hot dense plasma plume causes extensive target erosion due to radiation fluxes back to the surface. The magnitude of emitted radiation fluxes from such a plasma is similar to or slightly higher than the laser photon flux in the low shielding regime. Thus, shielding efficiency in LPPs has a peak that depends on the laser beam parameters and the target material. A similar tendency is also expected in other plasma-operating devices such as tokamaks of magnetic fusion energy (MFE) reactors during transient plasma operation and disruptions on chamber walls when deposition of the high-energy transient plasma can cause severe erosion and damage to the plasma-facing and nearby components. A detailed analysis of these abnormal events and their consequences in future power reactors is limited in current tokamak reactors. Predictions for high-power future tokamaks are possible only through comprehensive, time-consuming and rigorous modelling. We developed scaling mechanisms, based on modelling of LPP devices with their typical temporal and spatial scales, to simulate tokamak abnormal operating regimes to study wall erosion, plasma shielding and radiation under MFE reactor conditions. We found an analogy in regimes and results of carbon and tungsten erosion of the divertor surface in ITER-like reactors with erosion due to laser irradiation. Such an approach will allow utilizing validated modelling combined with well-designed and well-diagnosed LPP experimental studies for predicting

  14. Radial variation of refractive index, plasma frequency and phase velocity in laser induced air plasma

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mathuthu, M

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available induced air plasma to study the spatial variation of plasma parameters in the axial direction of the laser beam. In this paper, the authors report investigation on the radial variation of the refractive index, plasma frequency, and phase velocity of a...

  15. Synchrotron radiation from a curved plasma channel laser wakefield accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Palastro, J P; Hafizi, B; Chen, Y -H; Johnson, L A; Penano, J R; Helle, M H; Mamonau, A A

    2016-01-01

    A laser pulse guided in a curved plasma channel can excite wakefields that steer electrons along an arched trajectory. As the electrons are accelerated along the curved channel, they emit synchrotron radiation. We present simple analytical models and simulations examining laser pulse guiding, wakefield generation, electron steering, and synchrotron emission in curved plasma channels. For experimentally realizable parameters, a ~2 GeV electron emits 0.1 photons per cm with an average photon energy of multiple keV.

  16. Laser pulse modulation instabilities in partially stripped plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Qiang-Lin; Liu Shi-Bing; Jiang Yi-Jian

    2005-01-01

    The laser pulse modulation instabilities in partially stripped plasma were discussed based on the phase and group velocities of the laser pulse and the two processes that modulation instabilities excited. The excitation condition and growth rate of the modulation instability were obtained. It was found that the positive chirp and competition between normal and abnormal dispersions play important roles in the modulation instability. In the partially stripped plasma,the increased positive chirp enhances the modulation instability, and the dispersion competition reduces it.

  17. Vacuum laser acceleration of relativistic electrons using plasma mirror injectors

    CERN Document Server

    Thévenet, M; Kahaly, S; Vincenti, H; Vernier, A; Quéré, F; Faure, J

    2015-01-01

    Accelerating particles to relativistic energies over very short distances using lasers has been a long standing goal in physics. Among the various schemes proposed for electrons, vacuum laser acceleration has attracted considerable interest and has been extensively studied theoretically because of its appealing simplicity: electrons interact with an intense laser field in vacuum and can be continuously accelerated, provided they remain at a given phase of the field until they escape the laser beam. But demonstrating this effect experimentally has proved extremely challenging, as it imposes stringent requirements on the conditions of injection of electrons in the laser field. Here, we solve this long-standing experimental problem for the first time by using a plasma mirror to inject electrons in an ultraintense laser field, and obtain clear evidence of vacuum laser acceleration. With the advent of PetaWatt class lasers, this scheme could provide a competitive source of very high charge (nC) and ultrashort rela...

  18. Photon Acceleration of Laser-plasma Based on Compton Scattering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Dong-shan; XIE Hong-jun

    2006-01-01

    The one-dimensional electron density disturbance is studied by using the inelastic collision model of the relativity electron and photon group, the relativity theory, the momentum equation and the continuity equation, which is generated by a driving laser pulse and scattered laser pulse propagating through a tenuous plasma, and the electron density disturbance is closely associated with the incident laser and scattering laser. The electron plasma wave(EPW)is formed by the propagation of the electron density disturbance. Owing to the action of EPW, the increasing of the frequency of the photons in the incident laser pulses that there is a distance with the driving laser pulses is studied by using optical metric. The results show that it is possible that the photon will gain higher energy from the EPW when photon number is decreased and one-photon Compton scattering enters, the photon will be accelerated.

  19. Propagation of λ3 Laser Pulses in Underdense Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhidkov, Alexei; Nemoto, Koshichi; Nayuki, Takuya; Oishi, Yuji; Fujii, Takashi

    2008-06-01

    We study the interaction of λ3 laser pulses with underdense plasma by means of real geometry particle-in-cell simulation. Underdense plasma irradiated by even low energy λ3 laser pulses can be an efficient source of multi-MeV electrons, ˜50 nC/J. The electron acceleration driven by low energy λ3 and λ2 laser pulses is monitored by means of fully relativistic 3D particle-in- cell simulation. Strong transverse wave-breaking in the vicinity of the laser focus is found to give rise to an immense electron charge injected to the acceleration phase of laser wake field. While the acceleration by λ2 pulses runs in usual way, strong blowout regime is found for λ3 pulses. Details of laser pulse self-guiding are discussed.

  20. Chemical analysis of plasma-assisted antimicrobial treatment on cotton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, C. W.; Lam, Y. L.; Yuen, C. W. M.; Luximon, A.; Lau, K. W.; Chen, K. S.

    2013-06-01

    This paper explores the use of plasma treatment as a pretreatment process to assist the application of antimicrobial process on cotton fabric with good functional effect. In this paper, antimicrobial finishing agent, Microfresh Liquid Formulation 9200-200 (MF), and a binder (polyurethane dispersion, Microban Liquid Formulation R10800-0, MB) will be used for treating the cotton fabric for improving the antimicrobial property and pre-treatment of cotton fabric by plasma under atmospheric pressure will be employed to improve loading of chemical agents. The chemical analysis of the treated cotton fabric will be conducted by Fourier transform Infrared Spectroscopy.

  1. Laser induced phase locking of hydrogen plasma striations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glab, W.; Nayfeh, M.H.

    1982-04-01

    Laser induced transient striations of a hydrogen discharge plasma are studied as a function of the ''detuning'' of the discharge parameters from the steady-state oscillatory response conditions. We observed laser induced phase locking of the steady-state striations.

  2. Laser frequency stabilization by magnetically assisted rotation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzemień, Leszek; Brzozowski, Krzysztof; Noga, Andrzej; Witkowski, Marcin; Zachorowski, Jerzy; Zawada, Michał; Gawlik, Wojciech

    2011-03-01

    We present a method of Doppler-free laser frequency stabilization based on magnetically assisted rotation spectroscopy (MARS) which combines the Doppler-free velocity-selective optical pumping (VSOP) and magnetic rotation spectroscopy. The stabilization is demonstrated for the atomic rubidium transitions at 780 nm. The proposed method is largely independent of stray magnetic fields and does not require any modulation of the laser frequency. Moreover, the discussed method allows one to choose between locking the laser exactly to the line center, or with a magnetically-controlled shift to an arbitrary frequency detuned by up to several natural linewidths. This feature is useful in many situations, e.g. for laser cooling experiments. In addition to presenting the principle of the method, its theoretical background and peculiarities inherent to the repopulation VSOP are discussed.

  3. Diode Laser Assisted Filament Winding of Thermoplastic Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Prosperi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A new consolidation method for the laser-assisted filament winding of thermoplastic prepregs is discussed: for the first time a diode laser is used, as well as long glass fiber reinforced polypropylene prepregs. A consolidation apparatus was built by means of a CNC motion table, a stepper motor and a simple tensioner. Preliminary tests were performed in a hoop winding configuration: only the winding speed was changed, and all the other process parameters (laser power, distance from the laser focus, consolidation force were kept constant. Small wound rings with an internal diameter of 25 mm were produced and compression tests were carried out to evaluate the composite agglomeration in dependence of the winding speed. At lower winding speeds, a stronginterpenetration of adjacent layers was observed.

  4. Laser propagation and soliton generation in strongly magnetized plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, W.; Li, J. Q.; Kishimoto, Y. [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    The propagation characteristics of various laser modes with different polarization, as well as the soliton generation in strongly magnetized plasmas are studied numerically through one-dimensional (1D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations and analytically by solving the laser wave equation. PIC simulations show that the laser heating efficiency substantially depends on the magnetic field strength, the propagation modes of the laser pulse and their intensities. Generally, large amplitude laser can efficiently heat the plasma with strong magnetic field. Theoretical analyses on the linear propagation of the laser pulse in both under-dense and over-dense magnetized plasmas are well confirmed by the numerical observations. Most interestingly, it is found that a standing or moving soliton with frequency lower than the laser frequency is generated in certain magnetic field strength and laser intensity range, which can greatly enhance the laser heating efficiency. The range of magnetic field strength for the right-hand circularly polarized (RCP) soliton formation with high and low frequencies is identified by solving the soliton equations including the contribution of ion's motion and the finite temperature effects under the quasi-neutral approximation. In the limit of immobile ions, the RCP soliton tends to be peaked and stronger as the magnetic field increases, while the enhanced soliton becomes broader as the temperature increases. These findings in 1D model are well validated by 2D simulations.

  5. Pulsed laser-assisted machining of Inconel 718 superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhdari Tadavani, Soheila; Shoja Razavi, Reza; Vafaei, Reza

    2017-01-01

    Nickel-based superalloys including Inconel 718(IN718) are widely used in aerospace industries due to their superior high temperature strength, toughness, and corrosion resistance. These alloys are difficult to machine mainly because of their low thermal conductivity and high work hardening rate, which cause steep temperature gradient and high cutting forces at the tool edge. The application of laser assisted machining is the subject of many new researches since shear forces; surface coarsening and tool wear are reduced. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate laser assisted machining behavior of a 718 Inconel superalloy from the view point of machining specific energy, surface roughness, tool wear and chip appearance. Experimental apparatuses used included optical and scanning electron microscopy, spark emission spectroscopy, and EDS analysis. The results indicated that increasing the temperature to about 540 °C just ahead of primary shear zone, can result in 35% reduction of machining specific energy, in comparison with conventional machining. Furthermore, surface coarsening and tool wear were reduced by 22% and 23% respectively. Flank wear was the main deteriorating factor on cutting tools during laser assisted machining. SEM micrographs indicated that increase in temperature has no noticeable effect on finished workpiece surface. Analysis of variance obtained from regression analysis indicated that frequency of laser beam has the most influential effect on temperature. The optimum conditions for laser assisted machining of 718 superalloy is suggested as follows: 80 Hz frequency, 400 W power, 24 m/min cutting speed, and 0.052 mm/rev feed rate along with 540 °C temperature, 2.51 J/mm2 machining specific energy and 130 N cutting force.

  6. Collective Thomson Scattering from Laser-Produced Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白波; 郑坚; 俞昌旋; 刘万东; 蒋小华; 袁晓东; 郑志坚; 徐冰; 向勇; 赵春茁

    2001-01-01

    Time-resolved Thomson scattering was successfully performed to diagnose the parameters (ZTe, Ue and Ui) of laser-produced gold plasma. The results show that the collisionless dynamic form factor is accurate enough to be used for reducing the plasma parameters from the experimental data.

  7. Dynamics of plasma expansion in the pulsed laser material interaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Kumar; S Dash; A K Tyagi; Baldev Raj

    2010-08-01

    A pulse Nd: YAG laser with pulse duration 5–10 ns, beam radius at focal point 0·2–0·4 mm, wavelengths 1064 nm, 532 nm and 238 nm with linearly polarized radiation and Gaussian beam profile, was impacted on a thin foil of titanium metal for generating plasma plume. Numerically, the above parameters were linked with average kinetic energy of the electrons and ions in the laser-induced plasma. In the present model, electrons having higher velocities are assumed to escape from plasma, that forms a negatively charged sheath around the plasma. It is seen from present computations that the forward directed nature of the laser evaporation process results from the anisotropic expansion velocities associated with different species. These velocities are mainly controlled by the initial dimension of the expanding plasma. An attempt was undertaken to estimate the length of the plume at different ambient gas pressures using an adiabatic expansion model. The rate of the plasma expansion for various Ar+ ion energies was derived from numerical calculations. A numerical definition of this plasma includes events like collisional/radiative, excitation/de-excitation and ionization/recombination processes involving multiples of energy levels with several ionization stages. Finally, based on a kinetic model, the plasma expansion rate across the laser beam axis was investigated.

  8. Laser-cooling-assisted mass spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Christian; Chen, Kuang; Sullivan, Scott T; Hudson, Eric R

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is used in a wide range of scientific disciplines including proteomics, pharmaceutics, forensics, and fundamental physics and chemistry. Given this ubiquity, there is a worldwide effort to improve the efficiency and resolution of mass spectrometers. However, the performance of all techniques is ultimately limited by the initial phase-space distribution of the molecules being analyzed. Here, we dramatically reduce the width of this initial phase-space distribution by sympathetically cooling the input molecules with laser-cooled, co-trapped atomic ions, improving both the mass resolution and detection efficiency of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer by over an order of magnitude. Detailed molecular dynamics simulations verify the technique and aid with evaluating its effectiveness. Our technique appears to be applicable to other types of mass spectrometers.

  9. Laser-Cooling-Assisted Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Christian; Schowalter, Steven J.; Chen, Kuang; Sullivan, Scott T.; Hudson, Eric R.

    2014-09-01

    Mass spectrometry is used in a wide range of scientific disciplines including proteomics, pharmaceutics, forensics, and fundamental physics and chemistry. Given this ubiquity, there is a worldwide effort to improve the efficiency and resolution of mass spectrometers. However, the performance of all techniques is ultimately limited by the initial phase-space distribution of the molecules being analyzed. Here, we dramatically reduce the width of this initial phase-space distribution by sympathetically cooling the input molecules with laser-cooled, cotrapped atomic ions, improving both the mass resolution and detection efficiency of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer by over an order of magnitude. Detailed molecular-dynamics simulations verify the technique and aid with evaluating its effectiveness. This technique appears to be applicable to other types of mass spectrometers.

  10. Interaction physics of multipicosecond Petawatt laser pulses with overdense plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, A J; Divol, L

    2012-11-09

    We study the interaction of intense petawatt laser pulses with overdense plasma over several picoseconds, using two- and three-dimensional kinetic particle simulations. Sustained irradiation with non-diffraction-limited pulses at relativistic intensities yields conditions that differ qualitatively from what is experimentally available today. Nonlinear saturation of laser-driven density perturbations at the target surface causes recurrent emissions of plasma, which stabilize the surface and keep absorption continuously high. This dynamics leads to the acceleration of three distinct groups of electrons up to energies many times the laser ponderomotive potential. We discuss their energy distribution for applications like the fast-ignition approach to inertial confinement fusion.

  11. Summary Report of Working Group 1: Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geddes, C.G.R.; Clayton, C.; Lu, W.; Thomas, A.G.R.

    2010-06-01

    Advances in and physics of the acceleration of particles using underdense plasma structures driven by lasers were the topics of presentations and discussions in Working Group 1 of the 2010 Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop. Such accelerators have demonstrated gradients several orders beyond conventional machines, with quasi-monoenergetic beams at MeV-GeV energies, making them attractive candidates for next generation accelerators. Workshop discussions included advances in control over injection and laser propagation to further improve beam quality and stability, detailed diagnostics and physics models of the acceleration process, radiation generation as a source and diagnostic, and technological tools and upcoming facilities to extend the reach of laser-plasma accelerators.

  12. Filamentation instability in two counter-streaming laser plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Dong, Quan-Li; Yuan, Da-Wei; Liu, Xun; Hua, Neng; Qiao, Zhan-Feng; Zhu, Bao-Qiang; Zhu, Jian-Qiang; Jiang, Bo-Bin; Du, Kai; Tang, Yong-Jian; Zhao, Gang; Yuan, Xiao-Hui; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Zhang, Jie

    2016-12-01

    The filamentation instability was observed in the interaction of two counter-streaming laser ablated plasma flows, which were supersonic, collisionless, and also closely relevant to astrophysical conditions. The plasma flows were created by irradiating a pair of oppositely standing plastic (CH) foils with 1ns-pulsed laser beams of total energy of 1.7 kJ in two laser spots. With characteristics diagnosed in experiments, the calculated features of Weibel-type filaments are in good agreement with measurements. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11074297, 11674146, and 11220101002) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CBA01500.

  13. Simulation of laser-driven plasma beat-wave propagation in collisional weakly relativistic plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Maninder; Nandan Gupta, Devki

    2016-11-01

    The process of interaction of lasers beating in a plasma has been explored by virtue of particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations in the presence of electron-ion collisions. A plasma beat wave is resonantly excited by ponderomotive force by two relatively long laser pulses of different frequencies. The amplitude of the plasma wave become maximum, when the difference in the frequencies is equal to the plasma frequency. We propose to demonstrate the energy transfer between the laser beat wave and the plasma wave in the presence of electron-ion collision in nearly relativistic regime with 2D-PIC simulations. The relativistic effect and electron-ion collision both affect the energy transfer between the interacting waves. The finding of simulation results shows that there is a considerable decay in the plasma wave and the field energy over time in the presence of electron-ion collisions.

  14. Measurements of laser-hole boring into overdense plasmas using x-ray laser refractometry (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodama, R.; Takahashi, K.; Tanaka, K.A.; Kato, Y. [Institute of Laser Engineering (ILE), Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565 (Japan); Murai, K. [DMP, ONRI, Ikeda, Osaka 563 (Japan); Weber, F.; Barbee, T.W.; DaSilva, L.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    1999-01-01

    We developed a 19.6 nm laser x-ray laser grid-image refractometer (XRL-GIR) to diagnose laser-hole boring into overdense plasmas. The XRL-GIR was optimized to measure two-dimensional electron density perturbation on a scale of a few tens of {mu}m in underdense plasmas. Electron density profiles of laser-produced plasmas were obtained for 10{sup 20}{endash}10{sup 22}thinspcm{sup {minus}3} with the XRL-GIR and for 10{sup 19}{endash}10{sup 20}thinspcm{sup {minus}3} from an ultraviolet interferometer, the profiles of which were compared with those from hydrodynamic simulation. By using this XRL-GIR, we directly observed laser channeling into overdense plasmas accompanied by a bow shock wave showing a Mach cone ascribed to supersonic propagation of the channel front. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Plasma undulator based on laser excitation of wakefields in a plasma channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rykovanov, S G; Schroeder, C B; Esarey, E; Geddes, C G R; Leemans, W P

    2015-04-10

    An undulator is proposed based on the plasma wakefields excited by a laser pulse in a plasma channel. Generation of the undulator fields is achieved by inducing centroid oscillations of the laser pulse in the channel. The period of such an undulator is proportional to the Rayleigh length of the laser pulse and can be submillimeter, while preserving high undulator strength. The electron trajectories in the undulator are examined, expressions for the undulator strength are presented, and the spontaneous radiation is calculated. Multimode and multicolor laser pulses are considered for greater tunability of the undulator period and strength.

  16. Lasers techniques Improvement of classical accelerators by lasers. Laser accelerators with and without plasmas. Lasers accelerators in vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Hora, Heinrich

    1991-01-01

    Of the unconventional accelerator techniques those including lasers are reported. After explaining the advances by lasers for classical accelerator techniques, as FELs and other methods for 100 GHz generation of GW pulses, a survey is given of far field and near field laser acceleration. Problems of the beat-wave accelerator are discussed and schemes for particle interaction in vacuum without plasma are elaborated. One scheme is the Boreham experiment and another is the acceleration of "standing" wave fields where charged particles are trapped in the intensity minima. Another scheme uses the relativistic acceleration by half waves where the now available petawatt-picosecond laser pulses should produce GeV electron pulses of high luminosity. Increase of these electron enrgies would need very large lasers in the future.

  17. Laser Desorption Ionization Quadrupole Ion Trap Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry of Au m Fe n +/- Clusters Generated from Gold-Iron Nanoparticles and their Giant Nanoflowers. Electrochemical and/or Plasma Assisted Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawale, Ravi Madhukar; Ausekar, Mayuri Vilas; Pavliňák, David; Galmiz, Oleksandr; Kubáček, Pavel; Havel, Josef

    2017-02-01

    Gold nanoparticles (NP) with average diameter 100 nm synthesized from tetrachloroauric acid solution using stainless steel as a reducing agent were found to contain iron. Applying simultaneously high frequency (HF) plasma discharge in solution during the electrochemical reduction, giant gold-iron nanoflowers with average size 1000-5000 nm were formed. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows the morphology of the nanopowders produced as polygonal yet nearly spherical, whereas iron content in both products determined by energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) was found to be at 2.5 at. %. Laser desorption ionization (LDI) of both nanomaterials and mass spectrometric analysis show the formation of Au m Fe n +/- ( m = 1-35; n = 1-3) clusters. Structure of few selected clusters in neutral or monocharged forms were computed by density functional theory (DFT) calculations and it was found that typical distances of an iron nucleus from adjacent gold nuclei lie in the interval 2.5 to 2.7 Å. Synthetized Au-Fe nanoparticles were found stable for at least 2 mo at room temperature (even in aqueous solution) without any stabilizing agent. Produced Au-Fe nanoparticles in combination with standard MALDI matrices enhance ionization of peptides and might find use in nanomedicine.

  18. Interaction of plasmas in laser ion source with double laser system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuwa, Y., E-mail: yasuhiro.fuwa@riken.jp [Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Riken, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Ikeda, S. [Riken, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Tokyo (Japan); Kumaki, M. [Riken, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Sekine, M. [Riken, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Department of Nuclear Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo (Japan); Cinquegrani, D. [Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Romanelli, M. [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14850 (United States); Kanesue, T.; Okamura, M. [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Iwashita, Y. [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    Multiple laser shots could be used to elongate an ion beam pulse width or to intensify beam current from laser ion sources. In order to confirm the feasibility of the multiple shot scheme, we investigated the properties of plasmas produced by double laser shots. We found that when the interval of the laser shots is shorter than 10 μs, the ion current profile had a prominent peak, which is not observed in single laser experiments. The height of this peak was up to five times larger than that of single laser experiment.

  19. Laser Plasma Particle Accelerators: Large Fields for Smaller Facility Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Esarey, Eric H.; Schroeder, Carl B.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Leemans, Wim P.; Bruhwiler, David L.; Cary, John R.; Cowan, Ben; Durant, Marc; Hamill, Paul; Messmer, Peter; Mullowney, Paul; Nieter, Chet; Paul, Kevin; Shasharina, Svetlana; Veitzer, Seth; Weber, Gunther; Rubel, Oliver; Ushizima, Daniela; Bethel, Wes; Wu, John

    2009-03-20

    Compared to conventional particle accelerators, plasmas can sustain accelerating fields that are thousands of times higher. To exploit this ability, massively parallel SciDAC particle simulations provide physical insight into the development of next-generation accelerators that use laser-driven plasma waves. These plasma-based accelerators offer a path to more compact, ultra-fast particle and radiation sources for probing the subatomic world, for studying new materials and new technologies, and for medical applications.

  20. Laser assisted Breit-Wheeler and Schwinger processes

    OpenAIRE

    Nousch, T.; Otto, A.(European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva, Switzerland); Seipt, D.; Kämpfer, B.; Titov, A. I.; Blaschke, D.; Panferov, A. D.; Smolyansky, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    The assistance of an intense optical laser pulse on electron-positron pair production by the Breit-Wheeler and Schwinger processes in XFEL fields is analyzed. The impact of a laser beam on high-energy photon collisions with XFEL photons consists in a phase space redistribution of the pairs emerging in the Breit-Wheeler sub-process. We provide numerical examples of the differential cross section for parameters related to the European XFEL. Analogously, the Schwinger type pair production in pul...

  1. Plasma and Ion Assistance in Physical Vapor Deposition: AHistorical Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre

    2007-02-28

    Deposition of films using plasma or plasma-assist can betraced back surprisingly far, namely to the 18th century for arcs and tothe 19th century for sputtering. However, only since the 1960s thecoatings community considered other processes than evaporation for largescale commercial use. Ion Plating was perhaps the first importantprocess, introducing vapor ionization and substrate bias to generate abeam of ions arriving on the surface of the growing film. Ratherindependently, cathodic arc deposition was established as an energeticcondensation process, first in the former Soviet Union in the 1970s, andin the 1980s in the Western Hemisphere. About a dozen various ion-basedcoating technologies evolved in the last decades, all characterized byspecific plasma or ion generation processes. Gridded and gridless ionsources were taken from space propulsion and applied to thin filmdeposition. Modeling and simulation have helped to make plasma and ionseffects to be reasonably well understood. Yet--due to the complex, oftennon-linear and non-equilibrium nature of plasma and surfaceinteractions--there is still a place for the experience plasma"sourcerer."

  2. Wakefield Resonant Excitation by Intense Laser Pulse in Capillary Plasma%Wakefield Resonant Excitation by Intense Laser Pulse in Capillary Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周素云; 袁孝; 刘明萍

    2012-01-01

    The laser-induced plasma wakefield in a capillary is investigated on the basis of a simple two-dimensional analytical model. It is shown that as an intense laser pulse reshaped by the capillary wall propagates in capillary plasma, it resonantly excites a strong wakefield if a suitable laser pulse width and capillary radius are chosen for a certain plasma density. The dependence of the laser width and capillary radius on the plasma density for resonance conditions is considered. The wakefield amplitude and longitudinal scale of bubbles in capillary plasma are much larger than those in unbounded plasma, so the capillary guided plasma wakefield is more favorable to electron acceleration.

  3. Plasma and cavitation dynamics during pulsed laser microsurgery in vivo

    CERN Document Server

    Hutson, M Shane

    2007-01-01

    We compare the plasma and cavitation dynamics underlying pulsed laser microsurgery in water and in fruit fly embryos (in vivo) - specifically for nanosecond pulses at 355 and 532 nm. We find two key differences. First, the plasma-formation thresholds are lower in vivo - especially at 355 nm - due to the presence of endogenous chromophores that serve as additional sources for plasma seed electrons. Second, the biological matrix constrains the growth of laser-induced cavitation bubbles. Both effects reduce the disrupted region in vivo when compared to extrapolations from measurements in water.

  4. Intense terahertz radiation from relativistic laser-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, G. Q.; Li, Y. T.; Li, C.; Liu, H.; Zhang, Y. H.; Jiang, W. M.; Yuan, X. H.; Nilsen, J.; Ozaki, T.; Wang, W. M.; Sheng, Z. M.; Neely, D.; McKenna, P.; Zhang, J.

    2017-01-01

    The development of tabletop intense terahertz (THz) radiation sources is extremely important for THz science and applications. This paper presents our measurements of intense THz radiation from relativistic laser-plasma interactions under different experimental conditions. Several THz generation mechanisms have been proposed and investigated, including coherent transition radiation (CTR) emitted by fast electrons from the target rear surface, transient current radiation at the front of the target, and mode conversion from electron plasma waves (EPWs) to THz waves. The results indicate that relativistic laser plasma is a promising driver of intense THz radiation sources.

  5. Interaction of nanosecond ultraviolet laser pulses with reactive dusty plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Wetering, F. M. J. H.; Oosterbeek, W.; Beckers, J.; Nijdam, S.; Gibert, T.; Mikikian, M.; Rabat, H.; Kovačević, E.; Berndt, J.

    2016-05-01

    Even though UV laser pulses that irradiate a gas discharge are small compared to the plasma volume (≲3%) and plasma-on time (≲6 × 10-6%), they are found to dramatically change the discharge characteristics on a global scale. The reactive argon-acetylene plasma allows the growth of nanoparticles with diameters up to 1 μm, which are formed inside the discharge volume due to spontaneous polymerization reactions. It is found that the laser pulses predominantly accelerate and enhance the coagulation phase and are able to suppress the formation of a dust void.

  6. Plasma-assisted cataluminescence sensor array for gaseous hydrocarbons discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Na; Liu, Haiyan; Han, Jiaying; Han, Feifei; Liu, Hualin; Ouyang, Jin

    2012-06-05

    Combining plasma activation and cross-reactivity of sensor array, we have developed a plasma-assisted cataluminescence (PA-CTL) sensor array for fast sensing and discrimination of gaseous hydrocarbons, which can be potentially used for fast diagnosis of lung cancer. Based on dielectric barrier discharge, a low-temperature plasma is generated to activate gaseous hydrocarbons with low cataluminescence (CTL) activities. Extremely increased CTL responses have been obtained, which resulted in a plasma assistance factor of infinity (∞) for some hydrocarbons. On a 4 × 3 PA-CTL sensor array made from alkaline-earth nanomaterials, gaseous hydrocarbons showed robust and unique CTL responses to generate characteristic patterns for fast discrimination. Because of the difference in the component of hydrocarbons in breath, exhaled breath samples from donors with and without lung cancer were tested, and good discrimination has been achieved by this technique. In addition, the feasibility of multidimentional detection based on temperature was confirmed. It had good reproducibility and gave a linear range of 65-6500 ng/mL or 77-7700 ppmv (R > 0.98) for CH(4) with a detection limit of 33 ng/mL (38 ppmv) on MgO. The PA-CTL sensor array is simple, low-cost, thermally stable, nontoxic, and has an abundance of alkaline-earth nanomaterials to act as sensing elements. This has expanded the applications of CTL-based senor arrays and will show great potential in clinical fast diagnosis.

  7. Picosecond resolution soft x-ray laser plasma interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, S; Nilsen, J; Ng, A; Shlyaptsev, V; Dunn, J; Hunter, J; Keenan, R; Marconi, M; Filevich, J; Rocca, J; Smith, R

    2003-12-01

    We describe a soft x-ray laser interferometry technique that allows two-dimensional diagnosis of plasma electron density with picosecond time resolution. It consists of the combination of a robust high throughput amplitude division interferometer and a 14.7 nm transient inversion soft x-ray laser that produces {approx} 5 ps pulses. Due to its picosecond resolution and short wavelength scalability, this technique has potential for extending the high inherent precision of soft x-ray laser interferometry to the study of very dense plasmas of significant fundamental and practical interest, such as those investigated for inertial confined fusion. Results of its use in the diagnostics of dense large scale laser-created plasmas are presented.

  8. Intense tera-hertz laser driven proton acceleration in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, A.; Tibai, Z.; Hebling, J.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the acceleration of a proton beam driven by intense tera-hertz (THz) laser field from a near critical density hydrogen plasma. Two-dimension-in-space and three-dimension-in-velocity particle-in-cell simulation results show that a relatively long wavelength and an intense THz laser can be employed for proton acceleration to high energies from near critical density plasmas. We adopt here the electromagnetic field in a long wavelength (0.33 THz) regime in contrast to the optical and/or near infrared wavelength regime, which offers distinct advantages due to their long wavelength ( λ = 350 μ m ), such as the λ 2 scaling of the electron ponderomotive energy. Simulation study delineates the evolution of THz laser field in a near critical plasma reflecting the enhancement in the electric field of laser, which can be of high relevance for staged or post ion acceleration.

  9. Plasma-based polarization modulator for high-intensity lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zi-Yu; Pukhov, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Manipulation of laser pulses at high intensities is an important yet challenging issue. New types of plasma-based optical devices are promising alternatives to achieve this goal. Here we propose to modulate the polarization state of intense lasers based on oblique reflection from solid-plasma surfaces. A new analytical description is presented considering the plasma as an uniaxial medium that causes birefringence effect. Particle-in-cell simulation results numerically demonstrate that such a scheme can provide a tunable polarization control of the laser pulses even in the relativistic regime. The results are thus relevant for the design of compact, easy to use, and versatile polarization modulators for high-intensity laser pulses.

  10. Investigation on laser accelerators. Plasma beat wave accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, Akihiko; Miyamoto, Yasuaki; Hagiwara, Masayoshi; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Sudo, Osamu [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Works

    1998-04-01

    Laser accelerator technology has characteristics of high energy, compact, short pulse and high luminescence{center_dot}low emittance. This means potential many applications in wide ranges of fields as well as high energy and nuclear physics. High power short laser pulses are injected to a plasma in the typical example of laser accelerators. Large electric fields are induced in the plasma. Electrons in the plasma are accelerated with the ponderomotive force of the electric field. The principles of interaction on beat wave, wakefield accelerators, inverse free electron laser and inverse Cherenkov radiation are briefly introduced. The overview of plasma beat wave accelerator study is briefly described on the programs at Chalk River Laboratories(Canada), UCLA(USA), Osaka Univ. (Japan) and Ecole Polytechnique (France). Issues of the plasma beat wave accelerator are discussed from the viewpoint of application. Existing laser technologies of CO{sub 2}, YAG and YFL are available for the present day accelerator technology. An acceleration length of beat wave interaction is limited due to its phase condition. Ideas on multi-staged acceleration using the phasing plasma fiber are introduced. (Y. Tanaka)

  11. Laser-aided diagnostics of plasmas and gases

    CERN Document Server

    Muraoka, K

    2000-01-01

    Updated and expanded from the original Japanese edition, Laser-Aided Diagnostics of Gases and Plasmas takes a unique approach in treating laser-aided diagnostics. The book unifies the subject by joining applications instead of describing each application as a totally separate system. In taking this approach, it highlights the relative strengths of each method and shows how they can complement each other in the study of gases and plasmas.The first part of the book presents a general introduction to the laser-aided study of gases and plasmas, including the various principles and hardware needed for each method, while the second part describes the applications of each general system in detail.Beneficial to a wide spectrum of academic and industrial researchers, this book provides a solid examination of the various options and methods available when involved in the analysis and diagnostics of gases and plasmas.

  12. Profiling compact toroid plasma density on CTIX with laser deflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockington, Samuel Joseph Erwin

    A laser deflectometer measures line-integrated plasma density gradient using laser diodes and amplified point detectors. A laser passing through an optically thin plasma is refracted by an amount proportional to the line-integrated electron density gradient. I have designed, installed, and operated a deflection diagnostic for the Compact Toroid Injection Experiment (CTIX), a plasma rail gun which can create compact toroid (CT) plasmas of controllable density and velocity. The diagnostic design and motivation are discussed, as well as three experiments performed with deflectometry. Thus, my thesis consists of the design of the deflectometer diagnostic, a comparison of its accuracy to interferometer density measurements, and finally a survey of compact toroid density profiles in two dimensions conducted with an array of detectors.

  13. Space-dependent characterization of laser-induced plasma plume during fiber laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xianfeng; Song, Lijun; Xiao, Wenjia; Liu, Xingbo

    2016-12-01

    The role of a plasma plume in high power fiber laser welding is of considerable interest due to its influence on the energy transfer mechanism. In this study, the space-dependent plasma characteristics including spectrum intensity, plasma temperature and electron density were investigated using optical emission spectroscopy technique. The plasma temperature was calculated using the Boltzmann plot of atomic iron lines, whereas the electron density was determined from the Stark broadening of the Fe I line at 381.584 nm. Quantitative analysis of plasma characteristics with respect to the laser radiation was performed. The results show that the plasma radiation increases as the laser power increases during the partial penetration mode, and then decreases sharply after the initiation of full penetration. Both the plasma temperature and electron density increase with the increase of laser power until they reach steady state values after full penetration. Moreover, the hottest core of the plasma shifts toward the surface of the workpiece as the penetration depth increases, whereas the electron density is more evenly distributed above the surface of the workpiece. The results also indicate that the absorption and scattering of nanoparticles in the plasma plume is the main mechanism for laser power attenuation.

  14. Electromagnetic radiation from laser wakefields in underdense plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue; Liu; Wei-Min; Wang; Zheng-Ming; Sheng

    2014-01-01

    It is demonstrated by simulations and analysis that a wakefield driven by an ultrashort intense laser pulse in underdense plasma can emit tunable electromagnetic radiation along the laser propagation direction. The profile of such a kind of radiation is closely associated with the structure of the laser wakefield. In general, electromagnetic radiation in the terahertz range with its frequency a few times the electron plasma frequency can be generated in the moderate intensity regime. In the highly nonlinear case, a chain of radiation pulses is formed corresponding to the nonlinear structure of the wake. Study shows that the radiation is associated with the self-modulation process of the laser pulse in the wakefield and resulting transverse electron momenta from modulated asymmetric laser fields.

  15. Plasma undulator excited by high-order mode lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingwei; Rykovanov, Sergey

    2016-10-01

    A laser-created plasma undulator together with a laser-plasma accelerator makes it possible to construct an economical and extremely compact XFEL. However, the spectrum spread of the radiation from the current plasma undulators is too large for XFELs, because of the different values of strength parameters. The phase slippage between the electrons and the wakefield also limits the number of the electron oscillation cycles, thus reduces the performance of XFEL. Here we proposed a phase-locked plasma undulator created by high-order mode lasers. The modulating field is uniform along the transverse direction by choosing appropriate laser intensities of the modes, which enables all the electrons oscillate with the same strength parameter. The plasma density is tapered to lock the phase between the electrons and the wakefield, which signally increases the oscillation cycles. As a result, X-ray radiation with high brightness and narrow bandwidth is generated by injecting a high-energy electron beam into the novel plasma undulator. The beam loading limit indicates that the current of the electron beam could be hundreds of Ampere. These properties imply that such a plasma undulator may have great potential in compact XFELs. This work was supported by the Helmholtz Association (Young Investigator's Group No. VH-NG-1037).

  16. Investigation of Early Plasma Evolution Induced by Ultrashort Laser Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenqian; Shin, Yung C.; King, Galen B.

    2012-01-01

    Early plasma is generated owing to high intensity laser irradiation of target and the subsequent target material ionization. Its dynamics plays a significant role in laser-material interaction, especially in the air environment1-11. Early plasma evolution has been captured through pump-probe shadowgraphy1-3 and interferometry1,4-7. However, the studied time frames and applied laser parameter ranges are limited. For example, direct examinations of plasma front locations and electron number densities within a delay time of 100 picosecond (ps) with respect to the laser pulse peak are still very few, especially for the ultrashort pulse of a duration around 100 femtosecond (fs) and a low power density around 1014 W/cm2. Early plasma generated under these conditions has only been captured recently with high temporal and spatial resolutions12. The detailed setup strategy and procedures of this high precision measurement will be illustrated in this paper. The rationale of the measurement is optical pump-probe shadowgraphy: one ultrashort laser pulse is split to a pump pulse and a probe pulse, while the delay time between them can be adjusted by changing their beam path lengths. The pump pulse ablates the target and generates the early plasma, and the probe pulse propagates through the plasma region and detects the non-uniformity of electron number density. In addition, animations are generated using the calculated results from the simulation model of Ref. 12 to illustrate the plasma formation and evolution with a very high resolution (0.04 ~ 1 ps). Both the experimental method and the simulation method can be applied to a broad range of time frames and laser parameters. These methods can be used to examine the early plasma generated not only from metals, but also from semiconductors and insulators. PMID:22806170

  17. Effects of laser power during laser assisted cold spraying of Al-12wt%Si on stainless steel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tlotleng, Monnamme

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study seeks to demonstrate Laser Assisted Cold Spraying (LACS) by depositing Al-12wt%Si on stainless steel substrate. LACS is a newly designed, assembled and commissioned technology in the CSIR, laser materials processing laboratories...

  18. Laser absorption and electron propagation in rippled plasma targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Chandrasekhar; Das, Amita; Patel, Kartik

    2016-10-01

    Efficient absorption of laser energy and the collimated propagation of relativistic electron beams (generated by the laser target interaction) in plasma are two issues which are of significant importance for applications such as fast ignition scheme of inertial confinement fusion (ICF). It is shown with the help of 2-D Particle- In- Cell simulations that introducing density ripples transverse to the laser propagation direction enhances the efficiency of laser power absorption. Furthermore, the density ripples are also instrumental in suppressing the Weibel instability of the propagating electron beam (which is responsible for the divergence of the beam). A physical understanding of the two effects is also provided.

  19. The effects of laser assisted hatching on pregnancy rates

    OpenAIRE

    Alireza Ghannadi; Marjaneh Kazerooni; Fatemeh Jamalzadeh; Sahar Amiri; Parifar Rostami; Forouzan Absalan

    2011-01-01

    Background: For infertile women aged over 35 years, failure of the ZP (zona pellucida) to rupture is believed to be associated with a decreased implantation rate in in vitro fertilization (IVF) or intra cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Objective: In this research, laser assisted hatching (LAH) was offered to patients with advanced maternal age to evaluate a possible benefit. Materials and Methods: Nine hundred thirty two cycles of IVF/ICSI in females were analyzed. Women included in this s...

  20. Laser-assisted new attachment procedure in private practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, David M; Gregg, Robert H; McCarthy, Delwin K; Colby, Leigh E; Tilt, Lloyd V

    2004-01-01

    Three private dental practices conducted a retrospective analysis of patients receiving the laser-assisted new attachment procedure (LANAP). Retrospective results were compared to clinical trial data from the University of Texas Health Sciences Center in San Antonio (UTHSCSA) to determine if outcomes from a controlled clinical trial can be duplicated in private practice. Results also are compared with published results of other surgical and nonsurgical therapies for inflammatory periodontal disease.

  1. Laser plasma acceleration of electrons with multi-PW laser beams in the frame of CILEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cros, B., E-mail: brigitte.cros@u-psud.fr [LPGP, CNRS and Université Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Paradkar, B.S. [LPGP, CNRS and Université Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Davoine, X. [CEA DAM DIF, Arpajon F-91297 (France); Chancé, A. [CEA IRFU-SACM, Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Desforges, F.G. [LPGP, CNRS and Université Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Dobosz-Dufrénoy, S. [CEA DSM-IRAMIS-SPAM, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Delerue, N. [LAL, CNRS and Universit Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Ju, J.; Audet, T.L.; Maynard, G. [LPGP, CNRS and Université Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Lobet, M.; Gremillet, L. [CEA DAM DIF, Arpajon F-91297 (France); Mora, P. [CPhT, CNRS and Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Schwindling, J.; Delferrière, O. [CEA IRFU-SACM, Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Bruni, C.; Rimbault, C.; Vinatier, T. [LAL, CNRS and Universit Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Di Piazza, A. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Grech, M. [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, Palaiseau (France); and others

    2014-03-11

    Laser plasma acceleration of electrons has progressed along with advances in laser technology. It is thus expected that the development in the near-future of multi-PW-class laser and facilities will enable a vast range of scientific opportunities for laser plasma acceleration research. On one hand, high peak powers can be used to explore the extremely high intensity regime of laser wakefield acceleration, producing for example large amounts of electrons in the GeV range or generating high energy photons. On the other hand, the available laser energy can be used in the quasi-linear regime to create accelerating fields in large volumes of plasma and study controlled acceleration in a plasma stage of externally injected relativistic particles, either electrons or positrons. In the frame of the Centre Interdisciplinaire de la Lumière EXtrême (CILEX), the Apollon-10P laser will deliver two beams at the 1 PW and 10 PW levels, in ultra-short (>15fs) pulses, to a target area dedicated to electron acceleration studies, such as the exploration of the non-linear regimes predicted theoretically, or multi-stage laser plasma acceleration.

  2. Laser plasma acceleration of electrons with multi-PW laser beams in the frame of CILEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cros, B.; Paradkar, B. S.; Davoine, X.; Chancé, A.; Desforges, F. G.; Dobosz-Dufrénoy, S.; Delerue, N.; Ju, J.; Audet, T. L.; Maynard, G.; Lobet, M.; Gremillet, L.; Mora, P.; Schwindling, J.; Delferrière, O.; Bruni, C.; Rimbault, C.; Vinatier, T.; Di Piazza, A.; Grech, M.; Riconda, C.; Marquès, J. R.; Beck, A.; Specka, A.; Martin, Ph.; Monot, P.; Normand, D.; Mathieu, F.; Audebert, P.; Amiranoff, F.

    2014-03-01

    Laser plasma acceleration of electrons has progressed along with advances in laser technology. It is thus expected that the development in the near-future of multi-PW-class laser and facilities will enable a vast range of scientific opportunities for laser plasma acceleration research. On one hand, high peak powers can be used to explore the extremely high intensity regime of laser wakefield acceleration, producing for example large amounts of electrons in the GeV range or generating high energy photons. On the other hand, the available laser energy can be used in the quasi-linear regime to create accelerating fields in large volumes of plasma and study controlled acceleration in a plasma stage of externally injected relativistic particles, either electrons or positrons. In the frame of the Centre Interdisciplinaire de la Lumière EXtrême (CILEX), the Apollon-10P laser will deliver two beams at the 1 PW and 10 PW levels, in ultra-short (> 15 fs) pulses, to a target area dedicated to electron acceleration studies, such as the exploration of the non-linear regimes predicted theoretically, or multi-stage laser plasma acceleration.

  3. Laser assisted Breit-Wheeler and Schwinger processes

    CERN Document Server

    Nousch, T; Seipt, D; Kämpfer, B; Titov, A I; Blaschke, D; Panferov, A D; Smolyansky, S A

    2016-01-01

    The assistance of an intense optical laser pulse on electron-positron pair production by the Breit-Wheeler and Schwinger processes in XFEL fields is analyzed. The impact of a laser beam on high-energy photon collisions with XFEL photons consists in a phase space redistribution of the pairs emerging in the Breit-Wheeler sub-process. We provide numerical examples of the differential cross section for parameters related to the European XFEL. Analogously, the Schwinger type pair production in pulsed fields with oscillating components referring to a superposition of optical laser and XFEL frequencies is evaluated. The residual phase space distribution of created pairs is sensitive to the pulse shape and may differ significantly from transiently achieved mode occupations.

  4. Effect of solenoidal magnetic field on drifting laser plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazumasa; Okamura, Masahiro; Sekine, Megumi; Cushing, Eric; Jandovitz, Peter

    2013-04-01

    An ion source for accelerators requires to provide a stable waveform with a certain pulse length appropriate to the application. The pulse length of laser ion source is easy to control because it is expected to be proportional to plasma drifting distance. However, current density decay is proportional to the cube of the drifting distance, so large current loss will occur under unconfined drift. We investigated the stability and current decay of a Nd:YAG laser generated copper plasma confined by a solenoidal field using a Faraday cup to measure the current waveform. It was found that the plasma was unstable at certain magnetic field strengths, so a baffle was introduced to limit the plasma diameter at injection and improve the stability. Magnetic field, solenoid length, and plasma diameter were varied in order to find the conditions that minimize current decay and maximize stability.

  5. Staging and laser acceleration of ions in underdense plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Antonio; Hafizi, Bahman; Helle, Michael; Chen, Yu-Hsin; Gordon, Daniel; Kaganovich, Dmitri; Polyanskiy, Mikhail; Pogorelsky, Igor; Babzien, Markus; Miao, Chenlong; Dover, Nicholas; Najmudin, Zulfikar; Ettlinger, Oliver

    2017-03-01

    Accelerating ions from rest in a plasma requires extra considerations because of their heavy mass. Low phase velocity fields or quasi-electrostatic fields are often necessary, either by operating above or near the critical density or by applying other slow wave generating mechanisms. Solid targets have been a favorite and have generated many good results. High density gas targets have also been reported to produce energetic ions. It is interesting to consider acceleration of ions in laser-driven plasma configurations that will potentially allow continuous acceleration in multiple consecutive stages. The plasma will be derived from gaseous targets, producing plasma densities slightly below the critical plasma density (underdense) for the driving laser. Such a plasma is experimentally robust, being repeatable and relatively transparent to externally injected ions from a previous stage. When optimized, multiple stages of this underdense laser plasma acceleration mechanism can progressively accelerate the ions to a high final energy. For a light mass ion such as the proton, relativistic velocities could be reached, making it suitable for further acceleration by high phase velocity plasma accelerators to energies appropriate for High Energy Physics applications. Negatively charged ions such as antiprotons could be similarly accelerated in this multi-staged ion acceleration scheme.

  6. Laser-assisted treatment of patients with hemorrhagic diathesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neckel, Claus P.

    2000-03-01

    Today more and more patients with bleeding disorder come to our office for treatment. The number of patients with therapeutic anticoagulation is growing steadily. Discontinuation of this therapy can often be crucial. On the other hand are oralsurgical procedures extremely sensitive to bleeding due to the constant presents of saliva with its high fibrinolytic activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of a surgical diode (wavelength 810 nm) laser as accessory tool in the treatment of patients with hemorrhagic diathesis. Enclosed in the study were 123 patients with: (1) Coumarintherapy, a Quick test ratio of 15 - 25%; (2) More than 300 mg of ASS/die; (3) Hemophilia, a factor activity under 35%; (4) Morbus Werlhof with less than 30000 thrombocytes. 179 Surgical procedures: (1) Tooth extraction 86%; (2) Apexectomy 3%; (3) Tumorexcision 9%; (4) Curettage and flapsurgery 1%; (5) Gingivectomy 1%. All procedures were laser-assisted with a diode laser emitting 810 nm. The glass fibers used were depending on the procedures either 200, 400, or 600 micron. No coagulating agents or tissue adhesives were used in addition. The postoperative outcome and complication rates were compared to substitution therapy and tissue adhesives. Laser-assisted treatment of these patients shows a high predictability and success rate leaving out side effects of drugs and human cryoprecipitates. Postoperative impairment is diminished.

  7. Plasma wakefield excitation by incoherent laser pulses: a path towards high-average power laser-plasma accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Benedetti, C; Esarey, E; Leemans, W P

    2014-01-01

    In a laser plasma accelerator (LPA), a short and intense laser pulse propagating in a plasma drives a wakefield (a plasma wave with a relativistic phase velocity) that can sustain extremely large electric fields, enabling compact accelerating structures. Potential LPA applications include compact radiation sources and high energy linear colliders. We propose and study plasma wave excitation by an incoherent combination of a large number of low energy laser pulses (i.e., without constraining the pulse phases). We show that, in spite of the incoherent nature of electromagnetic fields within the volume occupied by the pulses, the excited wakefield is regular and its amplitude is comparable or equal to that obtained using a single, coherent pulse with the same energy. These results provide a path to the next generation of LPA-based applications, where incoherently combined multiple pulses may enable high repetition rate, high average power LPAs.

  8. Energy Considerations for Plasma-Assisted N-Fixation Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikaterini Anastasopoulou

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In a time of increasing concerns about the immense energy consumption and poor environmental performance of contemporary processes in the chemical industry, there is great need to develop novel sustainable technologies that enhance energy efficiency. There is abundant chemical literature on process innovations (laboratory-scale around the plasma reactor itself, which, naturally, is the essential part to be intensified to achieve a satisfactory process. In essence, a plasma process needs attention beyond reaction engineering towards the process integration side and also with strong electrical engineering focus. In this mini-review, we have detailed our future focus on the process and energy intensification of plasma-based N-fixation. Three focal points are mainly stressed throughout the review: (I the integration of renewable energy; (II the power supply system of plasma reactors and (III process design of industrial plasma-assisted nitrogen fixation. These different enabling strategies will be set in a holistic and synergetic picture so as to improve process performance.

  9. Investigation of sewage sludge treatment using air plasma assisted gasification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striūgas, Nerijus; Valinčius, Vitas; Pedišius, Nerijus; Poškas, Robertas; Zakarauskas, Kęstutis

    2017-06-01

    This study presents an experimental investigation of downdraft gasification process coupled with a secondary thermal plasma reactor in order to perform experimental investigations of sewage sludge gasification, and compare process parameters running the system with and without the secondary thermal plasma reactor. The experimental investigation were performed with non-pelletized mixture of dried sewage sludge and wood pellets. To estimate the process performance, the composition of the producer gas, tars, particle matter, producer gas and char yield were measured at the exit of the gasification and plasma reactor. The research revealed the distribution of selected metals and chlorine in the process products and examined a possible formation of hexachlorobenzene. It determined that the plasma assisted processing of gaseous products changes the composition of the tars and the producer gas, mostly by destruction of hydrocarbon species, such as methane, acetylene, ethane or propane. Plasma processing of the producer gas reduces their calorific value but increases the gas yield and the total produced energy amount. The presented technology demonstrated capability both for applying to reduce the accumulation of the sewage sludge and production of substitute gas for drying of sewage sludge and electrical power. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [The Spectral Analysis of Laser-Induced Plasma in Laser Welding with Various Protecting Conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiao; Yang, Li-jun; Liu, Tong; Jiao, Jiao; Wang, Hui-chao

    2016-01-01

    The shielding gas plays an important role in the laser welding process and the variation of the protecting conditions has an obvious effect on the welding quality. This paper studied the influence of the change of protecting conditions on the parameters of laser-induced plasma such as electron temperature and electron density during the laser welding process by designing some experiments of reducing the shielding gas flow rate step by step and simulating the adverse conditions possibly occurring in the actual Nd : YAG laser welding process. The laser-induced plasma was detected by a fiber spectrometer to get the spectral data. So the electron temperature of laser-induced plasma was calculated by using the method of relative spectral intensity and the electron density by the Stark Broadening. The results indicated that the variation of protecting conditions had an important effect on the electron temperature and the electron density in the laser welding. When the protecting conditions were changed, the average electron temperature and the average electron density of the laser-induced plasma would change, so did their fluctuation range. When the weld was in a good protecting condition, the electron temperature, the electron density and their fluctuation were all low. Otherwise, the values would be high. These characteristics would have contribution to monitoring the process of laser welding.

  11. Laser-generated plasma by carbon nanoparticles embedded into polyethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrisi, L., E-mail: lorenzo.torrisi@unime.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche MIFT, Università di Messina, V.le F.S. D’Alcontres 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy); Ceccio, G. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche MIFT, Università di Messina, V.le F.S. D’Alcontres 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy); Cutroneo, M. [Nuclear Physics Institute, AS CR, 25068 Rez (Czech Republic)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Advanced targets are prepared using UHMWPE containing CNT at different concentrations. • The composite has different optical, mechanical, electrical and compositional properties with respect to polyethylene. • Higher ion accelerations with respect to the pure polyethylene are obtained from laser generated plasmas at 10{sup 10} W/cm{sup 2} intensity. • High carbon ion yields with respect to the pure polyethylene are obtained from laser generated plasmas at 10{sup 10} W/cm{sup 2} intensity. • Advanced targets were prepared to be irradiated in TNSA regime using laser at 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} intensity. - Abstract: Carbon nanoparticles have been embedded into polyethylene at different concentrations by using chemical–physical processes. The synthesized material was characterized in terms of physical modifications concerning the mechanical, compositional and optical properties. Obtained flat targets have been irradiated by Nd:YAG laser at intensities of the order of 10{sup 10} W/cm{sup 2} in order to generate non-equilibrium plasma in vacuum. The laser–matter interaction produces charge separation effects with consequent acceleration of protons and carbon ions. Plasma was characterized using time-of-flight measurements of the accelerated ions. Applications of the produced targets in order to generate carbon ion beams from laser-generated plasma are presented and discussed.

  12. Kinetic Study of Nonequilibrium Plasma-Assisted Methane Steam Reforming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To develop a detailed reaction mechanism for plasma-assisted methane steam reforming, a comprehensive numerical and experimental study of effect laws on methane conversion and products yield is performed at different steam to methane molar ratio (S/C, residence time s, and reaction temperatures. A CHEMKIN-PRO software with sensitivity analysis module and path flux analysis module was used for simulations. A set of comparisons show that the developed reaction mechanism can accurately predict methane conversion and the trend of products yield in different operating conditions. Using the developed reaction mechanism in plasma-assisted kinetic model, the reaction path flux analysis was carried out. The result shows that CH3 recombination is the limiting reaction for CO production and O is the critical species for CO production. Adding 40 wt.% Ni/SiO2 in discharge region has significantly promoted the yield of H2, CO, or CO2 in dielectric packed bed (DPB reactor. Plasma catalytic hybrid reforming experiment verifies the reaction path flux analysis tentatively.

  13. Two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; LaHaye, Nicole L.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-08-01

    We use a two-dimensional laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy technique to measure the coupled absorption and emission properties of atomic species in plasmas produced via laser ablation of solid aluminum targets at atmospheric pressure. Emission spectra from the Al I 394.4 nm and Al I 396.15 nm transitions are measured while a frequency-doubled, continuous-wave, Ti:Sapphire laser is tuned across the Al I 396.15 nm transition. The resulting two-dimensional spectra show the energy coupling between the two transitions via increased emission intensity for both transitions during resonant absorption of the continuous-wave laser at one transition. Time-delayed and gated detection of the emission spectrum is used to isolate the resonantly-excited fluorescence emission from the thermally-excited emission from the plasma. In addition, the tunable continuous-wave laser measures the absorption spectrum of the Al transition with ultra-high resolution after the plasma has cooled, resulting in narrower spectral linewidths than observed in emission spectra. Our results highlight that fluorescence spectroscopy employing continuous-wave laser re-excitation after pulsed laser ablation combines benefits of both traditional emission and absorption spectroscopic methods.

  14. Plasma dynamics of a laser filamentation-guided spark

    CERN Document Server

    Point, Guillaume; Carbonnel, Jérôme; Mysyrowicz, André; Houard, Aurélien

    2016-01-01

    We investigate experimentally the plasma dynamics of a centimeter-scale, laser filamentation-guided spark discharge. Using electrical and optical diagnostics to study monopolar discharges with varying current pulses we show that plasma decay is dominated by free electron recombination if the current decay time is shorter than the recombination characteristic time. In the opposite case, the plasma electron density closely follows the current evolution. We demonstrate that this criterion holds true in the case of damped AC sparks, and that alternative current is the best option to achieve a long plasma lifetime for a given peak current.

  15. Laser-assisted advanced assembly for MEMS fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanasov, Yuriy Andreev

    Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) are currently fabricated using methods originally designed for manufacturing semiconductor devices, using minimum if any assembly at all. The inherited limitations of this approach narrow the materials that can be employed and reduce the design complexity, imposing limitations on MEMS functionality. The proposed Laser-Assisted Advanced Assembly (LA3) method solves these problems by first fabricating components followed by assembly of a MEMS device. Components are micro-machined using a laser or by photolithography followed by wet/dry etching out of any material available in a thin sheet form. A wide range of materials can be utilized, including biocompatible metals, ceramics, polymers, composites, semiconductors, and materials with special properties such as memory shape alloys, thermoelectric, ferromagnetic, piezoelectric, and more. The approach proposed allows enhancing the structural and mechanical properties of the starting materials through heat treatment, tribological coatings, surface modifications, bio-functionalization, and more, a limited, even unavailable possibility with existing methods. Components are transferred to the substrate for assembly using the thermo-mechanical Selective Laser Assisted Die Transfer (tmSLADT) mechanism for microchips assembly, already demonstrated by our team. Therefore, the mechanical and electronic part of the MEMS can be fabricated using the same equipment/method. The viability of the Laser-Assisted Advanced Assembly technique for MEMS is demonstrated by fabricating magnetic switches for embedding in a conductive carbon-fiber metamaterial for use in an Electromagnetic-Responsive Mobile Cyber-Physical System (E-RMCPS), which is expected to improve the wireless communication system efficiency within a battery-powered device.

  16. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Thresholds of surface plasma formation by the interaction of laser pulses with a metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borets-Pervak, I. Yu; Vorob'ev, V. S.

    1995-04-01

    An analysis is made of a model of the formation of a surface laser plasma which takes account of the heating and vaporisation of thermally insulated surface microdefects. This model is used in an interpretation of experiments in which such a plasma has been formed by irradiation of a titanium target with microsecond CO2 laser pulses. A comparison with the experimental breakdown intensities is used to calculate the average sizes of microdefects and their concentration: the results are in agreement with the published data. The dependence of the delay time of plasma formation on the total energy in a laser pulse is calculated.

  17. Plasma-nitriding assisted micro-texturing into stainless steel molds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aizawa Tatsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Micro-texturing has grown up to be one of the most promising procedures. This related application required for large-area, fine micro-texturing onto the stainless steel mold materials. A new method other than laser-machining, micro-milling or micro-EDM was awaited for further advancement of this micro-texturing. In the present paper, a plasma nitriding assisted micro-texturing was developed to make various kinds of micro-patterns onto the martensitic stainless steels. First, original patterns were printed onto the surface of substrate by using the ink-jet printer. Then, the masked substrate was subjected to high density plasma nitriding; the un-masked surfaces were nitrided to have higher hardness. This nitrided substrate was further treated by sand-blasting to selectively dig the soft, masked surfaces. Finally, the micro-patterned martensitic stainless steel substrate was fabricated as a mold to duplicate these micro-patterns onto the work materials. The spatial resolution and depth profile controllability of this plasma nitriding assisted micro-texturing was investigated for variety of initial micro-patterns. The original size and dimension of initial micro-patterns were precisely compared with the three dimensional geometry of micro-textures after blasting treatment. The plastic cover case for smart cellular phones was employed to demonstrate how useful this processing is in practice.

  18. Laser-generated plasma by carbon nanoparticles embedded into polyethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, L.; Ceccio, G.; Cutroneo, M.

    2016-05-01

    Carbon nanoparticles have been embedded into polyethylene at different concentrations by using chemical-physical processes. The synthesized material was characterized in terms of physical modifications concerning the mechanical, compositional and optical properties. Obtained flat targets have been irradiated by Nd:YAG laser at intensities of the order of 1010 W/cm2 in order to generate non-equilibrium plasma in vacuum. The laser-matter interaction produces charge separation effects with consequent acceleration of protons and carbon ions. Plasma was characterized using time-of-flight measurements of the accelerated ions. Applications of the produced targets in order to generate carbon ion beams from laser-generated plasma are presented and discussed.

  19. Laser-plasma-based Space Radiation Reproduction in the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidding, B.; Karger, O.; Königstein, T.; Pretzler, G.; Manahan, G. G.; McKenna, P.; Gray, R.; Wilson, R.; Wiggins, S. M.; Welsh, G. H.; Beaton, A.; Delinikolas, P.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Karmakar, A.; Ferlet-Cavrois, V.; Costantino, A.; Muschitiello, M.; Daly, E.

    2017-01-01

    Space radiation is a great danger to electronics and astronauts onboard space vessels. The spectral flux of space electrons, protons and ions for example in the radiation belts is inherently broadband, but this is a feature hard to mimic with conventional radiation sources. Using laser-plasma-accelerators, we reproduced relativistic, broadband radiation belt flux in the laboratory, and used this man-made space radiation to test the radiation hardness of space electronics. Such close mimicking of space radiation in the lab builds on the inherent ability of laser-plasma-accelerators to directly produce broadband Maxwellian-type particle flux, akin to conditions in space. In combination with the established sources, utilisation of the growing number of ever more potent laser-plasma-accelerator facilities worldwide as complementary space radiation sources can help alleviate the shortage of available beamtime and may allow for development of advanced test procedures, paving the way towards higher reliability of space missions. PMID:28176862

  20. Laser-plasma-based Space Radiation Reproduction in the Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidding, B; Karger, O; Königstein, T; Pretzler, G; Manahan, G G; McKenna, P; Gray, R; Wilson, R; Wiggins, S M; Welsh, G H; Beaton, A; Delinikolas, P; Jaroszynski, D A; Rosenzweig, J B; Karmakar, A; Ferlet-Cavrois, V; Costantino, A; Muschitiello, M; Daly, E

    2017-02-08

    Space radiation is a great danger to electronics and astronauts onboard space vessels. The spectral flux of space electrons, protons and ions for example in the radiation belts is inherently broadband, but this is a feature hard to mimic with conventional radiation sources. Using laser-plasma-accelerators, we reproduced relativistic, broadband radiation belt flux in the laboratory, and used this man-made space radiation to test the radiation hardness of space electronics. Such close mimicking of space radiation in the lab builds on the inherent ability of laser-plasma-accelerators to directly produce broadband Maxwellian-type particle flux, akin to conditions in space. In combination with the established sources, utilisation of the growing number of ever more potent laser-plasma-accelerator facilities worldwide as complementary space radiation sources can help alleviate the shortage of available beamtime and may allow for development of advanced test procedures, paving the way towards higher reliability of space missions.

  1. Ultra short electron beam bunches from a laser plasma cathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekawa, Akira [Nuclear Professional School, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan)]. E-mail: maekawa@nuclear.jp; Tsujii, Ryosuke [Nuclear Professional School, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Kinoshita, Kennichi [Nuclear Professional School, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Atsushi, Yamazaki [Nuclear Professional School, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Kobayashi, Kazuyuki [Nuclear Professional School, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Uesaka, Mitsuru [Nuclear Professional School, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Shibata, Yukio [Nuclear Professional School, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Kondo, Yasuhiro [Nuclear Professional School, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Ohkubo, Takeru [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma (Japan); Hosokai, Tomonao [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Zhidkov, Alexei [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, 2-6-1 Nagasaka, Yokosuka, Kanagawa (Japan); Takahashi, Toshiharu [Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, Asahiro-nishi2, Kumatori, Sennan, Osaka (Japan)

    2007-08-15

    The fluctuation of the electron bunch duration due to energy spectrum instability in a laser plasma cathode has been examined. Previous experiments clearly proved that a laser plasma cathode can generate ultrashort electron bunches with a bunch duration of 130 fs (FWHM) and a geometrical emittance 0.07{pi} mm mrad. The effect of temporal elongation of electron bunches due to their energy spread is estimated and the results are in good agreement with previous experiments. It is also clarified that the instability of the energy spectrum not only leads to a fluctuation of the bunch shape but also to a time-of-flight jitter, affecting possible future applications of a laser plasma cathode.

  2. Advanced targets, diagnostics and applications of laser-generated plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, L.

    2015-04-01

    High-intensity sub-nanosecond-pulsed lasers irradiating thin targets in vacuum permit generation of electrons and ion acceleration and high photon yield emission in non-equilibrium plasmas. At intensities higher than 1015 W/cm2 thin foils can be irradiated in the target-normal sheath acceleration regime driving ion acceleration in the forward direction above 1 MeV per charge state. The distributions of emitted ions in terms of energy, charge state and angular emission are controlled by laser parameters, irradiation conditions, target geometry and composition. Advanced targets can be employed to increase the laser absorption in thin foils and to enhance the energy and the yield of the ion acceleration process. Semiconductor detectors, Thomson parabola spectrometer and streak camera can be employed as online plasma diagnostics to monitor the plasma parameters, shot by shot. Some applications in the field of the multiple ion implantation, hadrontherapy and nuclear physics are reported.

  3. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Romanelli, M.; Kumaki, M.; Fuwa, Y.; Kanesue, T.; Hayashizaki, N.; Lambiase, R.; Okamura, M.

    2015-09-01

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. However, it was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled by the pulsed magnetic field. This approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS.

  4. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine, M. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 2-12-1 (Japan); RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ikeda, S. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8502 (Japan); RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Romanelli, M. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850 (United States); Kumaki, M. [RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-0072 (Japan); Fuwa, Y. [RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kanesue, T. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Hayashizaki, N. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 2-12-1 (Japan); Lambiase, R. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Okamura, M. [RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2015-09-21

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. However, it was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled by the pulsed magnetic field. This approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS.

  5. Fundamentals of laser-assisted fabrication of inorganic and organic films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    The standard method for producing films by laser-assisted methods, Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) will be reviewed. The films considered are usually inorganic films, but also films of organic materials have been produced. Also the deposition of organic films by MAPLE (Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser ...

  6. New Combustion Regimes and Kinetic Studies of Plasma Assisted Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Tasks 8 and 9: Kinetic model validation) Today’s Presentation 2. Multispecies diagnostics in a flow reactor with Mid-IR and molecular beam mass...S-Curve Competition between low T RO2 kinetics high T chain branching reactions 0.00 0.02 0.04 0.06 0.08 0.10 0.12 1x10 5 2x10 5 3x10 5 4x10...in Plasma assisted combustion • LTC in turbulent combustion at engine time scales 0-D modeling of DME /O2/He (0.03/0.1/0.896) ignition, P = 72

  7. Innovative Drug Injection via Laser Induced Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tae-hee; Yoh, Jack J.

    2010-10-01

    A laser based needle-free liquid drug injection device has been developed. A laser beam is focused inside the liquid contained in the rubber chamber of micro scale. The focused laser beam causes explosive bubble growth and the sudden volume increase in a sealed chamber drives a microjet of liquid drug through the micronozzle. The exit diameter of the nozzle is 125 um and the injected microjet reaches an average velocity of 264 m/s. This device adds the time-varying feature of microjet to the current state of liquid injection for drug delivery.

  8. Microengineering laser plasma interactions at relativistic intensities

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, S; Audesirk, H; George, K M; Snyder, J; Krygier, A; Lewis, N S; Schumacher, D W; Pukhov, A; Freeman, R R; Akli, K U

    2015-01-01

    We report on the first successful proof-of-principle experiment to manipulate laser-matter interactions on the microscale using highly ordered Si microwire arrays. The interaction of a high contrast short pulse laser with a flat target via periodic Si microwires yields a substantial enhancement in both total and cut-off energies of the produced electron beam. The self generated electric and magnetic fields behave as an electromagnetic lens that confines and guides electrons between the microwires as they acquire relativistic energies via direct laser acceleration (DLA).

  9. Microengineering Laser Plasma Interactions at Relativistic Intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, S; Ji, L L; Audesirk, H; George, K M; Snyder, J; Krygier, A; Poole, P; Willis, C; Daskalova, R; Chowdhury, E; Lewis, N S; Schumacher, D W; Pukhov, A; Freeman, R R; Akli, K U

    2016-02-26

    We report on the first successful proof-of-principle experiment to manipulate laser-matter interactions on microscales using highly ordered Si microwire arrays. The interaction of a high-contrast short-pulse laser with a flat target via periodic Si microwires yields a substantial enhancement in both the total and cutoff energies of the produced electron beam. The self-generated electric and magnetic fields behave as an electromagnetic lens that confines and guides electrons between the microwires as they acquire relativistic energies via direct laser acceleration.

  10. Matrix-Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation of polythiophene films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloisi, F. [CNR-INFM Coherentia, Napoli, Dip. Scienze Fisiche, Univ. Napoli ' Federico II' , P.le V.Tecchio, 80, 80125 Naples (Italy)], E-mail: bloisi@na.infn.it; Cassinese, A.; Papa, R.; Vicari, L. [CNR-INFM Coherentia, Napoli, Dip. Scienze Fisiche, Univ. Napoli ' Federico II' , P.le V.Tecchio, 80, 80125 Naples (Italy); Califano, V. [Dip. Scienze Fisiche, Univ. Napoli ' Federico II' , P.le V.Tecchio, 80, 80125 Naples (Italy)

    2008-02-15

    Organic poly-conjugated systems have recently attracted great interest as semi-conducting materials and, among poly-conjugated systems, substituted polythiophenes have given relevant results in PVs applications. The high conductivity required is affected by both the polymer conjugation length and the chain packing. Thus, highly region-regular polymers must be used and deposited as thin films with some technique which favours orientation and crystallization of the polymer chains. A deposition technique often used for its flexibility and high control over film characteristics is Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD). In PLD, largely applied for inorganic thin film deposition, the material is ablated from a solid target by a focused pulsed laser beam and is deposited on the substrate placed at a small distance. Although some addition polymers have been successfully deposited the deposition seems to proceed via a 'depolymerization-monomer ablation-repolymerization' mechanism, this is clearly not possible in general for organic molecules and condensation polymers. On the contrary MAPLE (Matrix-Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation) is a recently developed PLD based thin film deposition technique, particularly well suited for organic/polymer thin film deposition. Up to now MAPLE depositions have been carried out mainly by means of modified PLD systems, using excimer lasers operating in UV, but use of less energetic radiations can minimize the photochemical decomposition of the polymer molecules. We have used a deposition system explicitly designed for MAPLE technique connected to a Q-switched Ng:YAG pulsed laser which can be operated at different wavelength ranging from IR to UV in order to evaluate the effect of the choice of laser radiation on the deposition of POOPT thin films. From DRIFT-IR spectroscopy, all deposited films showed structural order; it was determined that the better wavelength for POOPT deposition is 532 nm. With this value of the laser wavelength the

  11. Plasma-assisted ignition and deflagration-to-detonation transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starikovskiy, Andrey; Aleksandrov, Nickolay; Rakitin, Aleksandr

    2012-02-13

    Non-equilibrium plasma demonstrates great potential to control ultra-lean, ultra-fast, low-temperature flames and to become an extremely promising technology for a wide range of applications, including aviation gas turbine engines, piston engines, RAMjets, SCRAMjets and detonation initiation for pulsed detonation engines. The analysis of discharge processes shows that the discharge energy can be deposited into the desired internal degrees of freedom of molecules when varying the reduced electric field, E/n, at which the discharge is maintained. The amount of deposited energy is controlled by other discharge and gas parameters, including electric pulse duration, discharge current, gas number density, gas temperature, etc. As a rule, the dominant mechanism of the effect of non-equilibrium plasma on ignition and combustion is associated with the generation of active particles in the discharge plasma. For plasma-assisted ignition and combustion in mixtures containing air, the most promising active species are O atoms and, to a smaller extent, some other neutral atoms and radicals. These active particles are efficiently produced in high-voltage, nanosecond, pulse discharges owing to electron-impact dissociation of molecules and electron-impact excitation of N(2) electronic states, followed by collisional quenching of these states to dissociate the molecules. Mechanisms of deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) initiation by non-equilibrium plasma were analysed. For longitudinal discharges with a high power density in a plasma channel, two fast DDT mechanisms have been observed. When initiated by a spark or a transient discharge, the mixture ignited simultaneously over the volume of the discharge channel, producing a shock wave with a Mach number greater than 2 and a flame. A gradient mechanism of DDT similar to that proposed by Zeldovich has been observed experimentally under streamer initiation.

  12. Investigation of the Millimeter-Wave Plasma Assisted CVD Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vikharev, A; Gorbachev, A; Kozlov, A; Litvak, A; Bykov, Y; Caplan, M

    2005-07-21

    A polycrystalline diamond grown by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique is recognized as a unique material for high power electronic devices owing to unrivaled combination of properties such as ultra-low microwave absorption, high thermal conductivity, high mechanical strength and chemical stability. Microwave vacuum windows for modern high power sources and transmission lines operating at the megawatt power level require high quality diamond disks with a diameter of several centimeters and a thickness of a few millimeters. The microwave plasma-assisted CVD technique exploited today to produce such disks has low deposition rate, which limits the availability of large size diamond disk windows. High-electron-density plasma generated by the millimeter-wave power was suggested for enhanced-growth-rate CVD. In this paper a general description of the 30 GHz gyrotron-based facility is presented. The output radiation of the gyrotron is converted into four wave-beams. Free localized plasma in the shape of a disk with diameter much larger than the wavelength of the radiation is formed in the intersection area of the wave-beams. The results of investigation of the plasma parameters, as well as the first results of diamond film deposition are presented. The prospects for commercially producing vacuum window diamond disks for high power microwave devices at much lower costs and processing times than currently available are outlined.

  13. Theory and simulation of laser plasma coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruer, W.L.

    1979-08-09

    The theory and simulation of these coupling processes are considered. Particular emphasis is given to their nonlinear evolution. First a brief introduction to computer simulation of plasmas using particle codes is given. Then the absorption of light via the generation of plasma waves is considered, followed by a discussion of stimulated scattering of intense light. Finally these calculations are compared with experimental results.

  14. Fundamental Study of Nuclear Pumped Laser Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-23

    rate of up to 2pps. The plasma cell/gas- handling system obtains base pressures of 5xlO 8 Torr prior to high purity gas fill. The plasma cell is...synchronization problems, etc.). Due to the exceptional reproducibility of e-beam characteristics, todate , only prefire has caused data rejection. IV. Recent

  15. Kinetic modeling and sensitivity analysis of plasma-assisted combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togai, Kuninori

    Plasma-assisted combustion (PAC) is a promising combustion enhancement technique that shows great potential for applications to a number of different practical combustion systems. In this dissertation, the chemical kinetics associated with PAC are investigated numerically with a newly developed model that describes the chemical processes induced by plasma. To support the model development, experiments were performed using a plasma flow reactor in which the fuel oxidation proceeds with the aid of plasma discharges below and above the self-ignition thermal limit of the reactive mixtures. The mixtures used were heavily diluted with Ar in order to study the reactions with temperature-controlled environments by suppressing the temperature changes due to chemical reactions. The temperature of the reactor was varied from 420 K to 1250 K and the pressure was fixed at 1 atm. Simulations were performed for the conditions corresponding to the experiments and the results are compared against each other. Important reaction paths were identified through path flux and sensitivity analyses. Reaction systems studied in this work are oxidation of hydrogen, ethylene, and methane, as well as the kinetics of NOx in plasma. In the fuel oxidation studies, reaction schemes that control the fuel oxidation are analyzed and discussed. With all the fuels studied, the oxidation reactions were extended to lower temperatures with plasma discharges compared to the cases without plasma. The analyses showed that radicals produced by dissociation of the reactants in plasma plays an important role of initiating the reaction sequence. At low temperatures where the system exhibits a chain-terminating nature, reactions of HO2 were found to play important roles on overall fuel oxidation. The effectiveness of HO2 as a chain terminator was weakened in the ethylene oxidation system, because the reactions of C 2H4 + O that have low activation energies deflects the flux of O atoms away from HO2. For the

  16. Laser fields in dynamically ionized plasma structures for coherent acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Luu-Thanh, Ph.; Pukhov, A.; Kostyukov, I.

    2015-01-01

    With the emergence of the CAN (Coherent Amplification Network) laser technology, a new scheme for direct particle acceleration in periodic plasma structures has been proposed. By using our full electromagnetic relativistic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation code equipped with ionisation module, we simulate the laser fields dynamics in the periodic structures of different materials. We study how the dynamic ionization influences the field structure.

  17. Generation of attosecond electron bunches in a laser-plasma accelerator using a plasma density upramp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weikum, M.K., E-mail: maria.weikum@desy.de [Deutsches Elektronensynchrotron (DESY), Bdg. 30b, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom); Li, F.Y. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom); Assmann, R.W. [Deutsches Elektronensynchrotron (DESY), Bdg. 30b, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Sheng, Z.M. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom); Laboratory for Laser Plasmas and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Jaroszynski, D. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    Attosecond electron bunches and attosecond radiation pulses enable the study of ultrafast dynamics of matter in an unprecedented regime. In this paper, the suitability for the experimental realization of a novel scheme producing sub-femtosecond duration electron bunches from laser-wakefield acceleration in plasma with self-injection in a plasma upramp profile has been investigated. While it has previously been predicted that this requires laser power above a few hundred terawatts typically, here we show that the scheme can be extended with reduced driving laser powers down to tens of terawatts, generating accelerated electron pulses with minimum length of around 166 attoseconds and picocoulombs charge. Using particle-in-cell simulations and theoretical models, the evolution of the accelerated electron bunch within the plasma as well as simple scalings of the bunch properties with initial laser and plasma parameters are presented. - Highlights: • LWFA with an upramp density profile can trap and accelerate sub-fs electron beams. • A reduction of the necessary threshold laser intensity by a factor 4 is presented. • Electron properties are tuned by varying initial laser and plasma parameters. • Simulations predict electron bunch lengths below 200 attoseconds with pC charge. • Strong bunch evolution effects and a large energy spread still need to be improved.

  18. Plasma scale-length effects on electron energy spectra in high-irradiance laser plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culfa, O.; Tallents, G. J.; Rossall, A. K.; Wagenaars, E.; Ridgers, C. P.; Murphy, C. D.; Dance, R. J.; Gray, R. J.; McKenna, P.; Brown, C. D. R.; James, S. F.; Hoarty, D. J.; Booth, N.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Lancaster, K. L.; Pikuz, S. A.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Kampfer, T.; Schulze, K. S.; Uschmann, I.; Woolsey, N. C.

    2016-04-01

    An analysis of an electron spectrometer used to characterize fast electrons generated by ultraintense (1020W cm-2 ) laser interaction with a preformed plasma of scale length measured by shadowgraphy is presented. The effects of fringing magnetic fields on the electron spectral measurements and the accuracy of density scale-length measurements are evaluated. 2D EPOCH PIC code simulations are found to be in agreement with measurements of the electron energy spectra showing that laser filamentation in plasma preformed by a prepulse is important with longer plasma scale lengths (>8 μ m ).

  19. Laser amplifier based on Raman amplification in plasma (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieux, Gregory; Cipiccia, Silvia; Lemos, Nuno R. C.; Ciocarlan, Cristian; Grant, Peter A.; Grant, David W.; Ersfeld, Bernhard; Hur, MinSup; Lepipas, Panagiotis; Manahan, Grace; Reboredo Gil, David; Subiel, Anna; Welsh, Gregor H.; Wiggins, S. Mark; Yoffe, Samuel R.; Farmer, John P.; Aniculaesei, Constantin; Brunetti, Enrico; Yang, Xue; Heathcote, Robert; Nersisyan, Gagik; Lewis, Ciaran L. S.; Pukhov, Alexander; Dias, João. Mendanha; Jaroszynski, Dino A.

    2017-05-01

    The increasing demand for high laser powers is placing huge demands on current laser technology. This is now reaching a limit, and to realise the existing new areas of research promised at high intensities, new cost-effective and technically feasible ways of scaling up the laser power will be required. Plasma-based laser amplifiers may represent the required breakthrough to reach powers of tens of petawatt to exawatt, because of the fundamental advantage that amplification and compression can be realised simultaneously in a plasma medium, which is also robust and resistant to damage, unlike conventional amplifying media. Raman amplification is a promising method, where a long pump pulse transfers energy to a lower frequency, short duration counter-propagating seed pulse through resonant excitation of a plasma wave that creates a transient plasma echelon that backscatters the pump into the probe. Here we present the results of an experimental campaign conducted at the Central Laser Facility. Pump pulses with energies up to 100 J have been used to amplify sub-nanojoule seed pulses to near-joule level. An unprecedented gain of eight orders of magnitude, with a gain coefficient of 180 cm-1 has been measured, which exceeds high-power solid-state amplifying media by orders of magnitude. High gain leads to strong competing amplification from noise, which reaches similar levels to the amplified seed. The observation of 640 Jsr-1 directly backscattered from noise, implies potential overall efficiencies greater than 10%.

  20. Laser induced plasma plume imaging and surface morphology of silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaleeq-ur-Rahman, M. [Advanced Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology, G.T. Road, Lahore 54890 (Pakistan); Siraj, K. [Advanced Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology, G.T. Road, Lahore 54890 (Pakistan)], E-mail: ksiraj@uet.edu.pk; Rafique, M.S.; Bhatti, K.A.; Latif, A.; Jamil, H.; Basit, M. [Advanced Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology, G.T. Road, Lahore 54890 (Pakistan)

    2009-04-15

    Shot-to-shot variation in the characteristics of laser produced plasma plume and surface profile of N-type silicon (1 1 1) are investigated. In order to produce plasma, a Q-switched Nd: YAG laser (1064 nm, 10 mJ, 9-14 ns) is tightly focused on silicon target in air at room temperature. Target was exposed in such a way that number of laser shots was increased from point to point in ascending order starting from single shot at first point. Target was moved 2 mm after each exposure. In order to investigate shot-to-shot variation in the time integrated emission intensity regions within the plasma plume, a computer controlled CCD based image capture system was employed. Various intensity regimes were found depending strongly on the number of incident laser pulses. Plasma plume length was also found to vary with the number of pulses. The topographic analysis of the irradiated Si was performed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) which shows the primary mechanisms like thermal or non-thermal ablation depend on the number of shots. Surface morphological changes were also studied in terms of ripple formation, ejection, debris and re-deposition of material caused by laser beam at sample surface. The micrographs show ripples spacing versus wavelength dependence rule [{lambda} {approx} {lambda}/(1 - sin {theta})]. Intensity variations with number of shots are correlated with the surface morphology of the irradiated sample.

  1. Plasma Diagnostic in laser ablation plumes for isotope separation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matos, Juliana B. de [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: juliana@ieav.cta.br; Rodrigues, Nicolau A.S.; Neri, Jose W.; Silveira, Carlos A.B. [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv/EFO), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Fotonica

    2008-07-01

    The plasma plume produced in vacuum by ablation of copper, aluminum and tungsten samples, illuminated by copper laser pulses, was investigated. A Langmuir probe was used to study the macroscopic parameters electron number density (Ne) and electron temperature (Te). Plasma expansion velocity (Vp) was also investigated and it was studied the dependence of these parameters with the laser irradiance. Typical values are respectively N{sub e} {approx} 10{sup 8}-10{sup 9}/cm{sup 3}, T{sub e} {approx} 15 eV and Vp {approx} 10 km/s. (author)

  2. Angular momentum evolution in laser-plasma accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Thaury, C; Corde, S; Lehe, R; Bouteiller, M Le; Phuoc, K Ta; Davoine, X; Rax, J -M; Rousse, A; Malka, V

    2013-01-01

    The transverse properties of an electron beam are characterized by two quantities, the emittance which indicates the electron beam extend in the phase space and the angular momentum which allows for non-planar electron trajectories. Whereas the emittance of electron beams produced in laser- plasma accelerator has been measured in several experiments, their angular momentum has been scarcely studied. It was demonstrated that electrons in laser-plasma accelerator carry some angular momentum, but its origin was not established. Here we identify one source of angular momentum growth and we present experimental results showing that the angular momentum content evolves during the acceleration.

  3. Angular-momentum evolution in laser-plasma accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaury, C; Guillaume, E; Corde, S; Lehe, R; Le Bouteiller, M; Ta Phuoc, K; Davoine, X; Rax, J M; Rousse, A; Malka, V

    2013-09-27

    The transverse properties of an electron beam are characterized by two quantities, the emittance which indicates the electron beam extent in the phase space and the angular momentum which allows for nonplanar electron trajectories. Whereas the emittance of electron beams produced in a laser-plasma accelerator has been measured in several experiments, their angular momentum has been scarcely studied. It was demonstrated that electrons in a laser-plasma accelerator carry some angular momentum, but its origin was not established. Here we identify one source of angular-momentum growth and we present experimental results showing that the angular-momentum content evolves during the acceleration.

  4. Angular-Momentum Evolution in Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Thaury, C; Corde, S; Lehe, R; Le Bouteiller, M; Ta Phuoc, K; Davoine, X; Rax, J M; Rousse, A; Malka, V; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.135002

    2013-01-01

    The transverse properties of an electron beam are characterized by two quantities, the emittance which indicates the electron beam extent in the phase space and the angular momentum which allows for nonplanar electron trajectories. Whereas the emittance of electron beams produced in a laser-plasma accelerator has been measured in several experiments, their angular momentum has been scarcely studied. It was demonstrated that electrons in a laser-plasma accelerator carry some angular momentum, but its origin was not established. Here we identify one source of angular-momentum growth and we present experimental results showing that the angular-momentum content evolves during the acceleration.

  5. A "slingshot" laser-driven acceleration mechanism of plasma electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Fiore, Gaetano; Fedele, Renato

    2016-01-01

    We briefly report on the recently proposed [G. Fiore, R. Fedele, U. de Angelis, Phys. Plasmas 21 (2014), 113105], [G. Fiore, S. De Nicola, arXiv:1509.04656] electron acceleration mechanism named "slingshot effect": under suitable conditions the impact of an ultra-short and ultra-intense laser pulse against the surface of a low-density plasma is expected to cause the expulsion of a bunch of superficial electrons with high energy in the direction opposite to that of the pulse propagation; this is due to the interplay of the huge ponderomotive force, huge longitudinal field arising from charge separation, and the finite size of the laser spot.

  6. Plasma temperature clamping in filamentation laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Yeak, J.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2015-10-19

    Ultrafast laser filament induced breakdown spectroscopy is a very promising method for remote material detection. We present characteristics of plasmas generated in a metal target by laser filaments in air. Our measurements show that the temperature of the ablation plasma is clamped along the filamentation channel due to intensity clamping in a filament. Nevertheless, significant changes in radiation intensity are noticeable, and this is essentially due to variation in the number density of emitting atoms. The present results also partly explains the reason for the occurrence of atomic plume during fs LIBS in air compared to long-pulse ns LIBS.

  7. Application possibilities of plasmas generated by high power laser ablation

    OpenAIRE

    Torrisi, L.

    2009-01-01

    High-power pulsed lasers emitting IR and visible radiation with intensities ranging between 10^8 and 10^16 W/cm2, pulse duration from 0.4 to 9 ns and energy from 100 mJ up to 600 J, operating in single mode or in repetition rate, can be employed to produce non-equilibrium plasma in vacuum by irradiating solid targets. Such a laser-produced plasma generates highly charged and high-energy ions of various elements, as well as soft and hard X-ray radiations. Heavy ions with charge state up to 58+...

  8. Relativistic warm plasma theory of nonlinear laser-driven electron plasma waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, C B; Esarey, E

    2010-05-01

    A relativistic, warm fluid model of a nonequilibrium, collisionless plasma is developed and applied to examine nonlinear Langmuir waves excited by relativistically intense, short-pulse lasers. Closure of the covariant fluid theory is obtained via an asymptotic expansion assuming a nonrelativistic plasma temperature. The momentum spread is calculated in the presence of an intense laser field and shown to be intrinsically anisotropic. Coupling between the transverse and longitudinal momentum variances is enabled by the laser field. A generalized dispersion relation is derived for Langmuir waves in a thermal plasma in the presence of an intense laser field. Including thermal fluctuations in three-velocity-space dimensions, the properties of the nonlinear electron plasma wave, such as the plasma temperature evolution and nonlinear wavelength, are examined and the maximum amplitude of the nonlinear oscillation is derived. The presence of a relativistically intense laser pulse is shown to strongly influence the maximum plasma wave amplitude for nonrelativistic phase velocities owing to the coupling between the longitudinal and transverse momentum variances.

  9. Large amplitude electromagnetic solitons in intense laser plasma interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Bai-Wen; Ishiguro S; Skoric M M

    2006-01-01

    This paper shows that the standing, backward- and forward-accelerated large amplitude relativistic electromagnetic solitons induced by intense laser pulse in long underdense collisionless homogeneous plasmas can be observed by particle simulations. In addition to the inhomogeneity of the plasma density, the acceleration of the solitons also depends upon not only the laser amplitude but also the plasma length. The electromagnetic frequency of the solitons is between about half and one of the unperturbed electron plasma frequency. The electrostatic field inside the soliton has a one-cycle structure in space, while the transverse electric and magnetic fields have half-cycle and one-cycle structure respectively.Analytical estimates for the existence of the solitons and their electromagnetic frequencies qualitatively coincide with our simulation results.

  10. Collimation of laser-produced plasmas using axial magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Amitava; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Hassan, Syed M.; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomas; Hassanein, A.

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the expansion dynamics of laser-produced plasmas expanding into an axial magnetic field. Plasmas were generated by focusing 1.064 µm Nd:YAG laser pulses onto a planar tin target in vacuum and allowed to expand into a 0.5 T magnetic-filed where field lines were aligned along the plume expansion direction. Gated images employing intensified CCD showed focusing of the plasma plume, which were also compared with results obtained using particle-in-cell modelling methods. The estimated density and temperature of the plasma plumes employing emission spectroscopy revealed significant changes in the presence and absence of the 0.5T magnetic field. In the presence of the field, the electron temperature is increased with distance from the target, while the density showed opposite effects.

  11. Microengineering laser plasma interactions at relativistic intensities

    OpenAIRE

    S. Jiang; Ji,L.L.; Audesirk, H.; George, K M; Snyder, J.; Krygier, A.; Lewis, N. S.; Schumacher, D. W.; Pukhov, A.; Freeman, R. R.; Akli, K. U.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the first successful proof-of-principle experiment to manipulate laser-matter interactions on the microscale using highly ordered Si microwire arrays. The interaction of a high contrast short pulse laser with a flat target via periodic Si microwires yields a substantial enhancement in both total and cut-off energies of the produced electron beam. The self generated electric and magnetic fields behave as an electromagnetic lens that confines and guides electrons between the microw...

  12. Laser-plasma interaction physics for shock ignition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goyon C.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the shock ignition scheme, the ICF target is first compressed with a long (nanosecond pulse before creating a convergent shock with a short (∼100 ps pulse to ignite thermonuclear reactions. This short pulse is typically (∼2.1015–1016 W/cm2 above LPI (Laser Plasma Instabilities thresholds. The plasma is in a regime where the electron temperature is expected to be very high (2–4 keV and the laser coupling to the plasma is not well understood. Emulating LPI in the corona requires large and hot plasmas produced by high-energy lasers. We conducted experiments on the LIL (Ligne d'Integration Laser, 10 kJ at 3ω and the LULI2000 (0.4 kJ at 2ω facilities, to approach these conditions and study absorption and LPI produced by a high intensity beam in preformed plasmas. After introducing the main risks associated with the short pulse propagation, we present the latest experiment we conducted on LPI in relevant conditions for shock ignition.

  13. Magnetic reconnection between colliding magnetized laser-produced plasma plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiksel, G; Fox, W; Bhattacharjee, A; Barnak, D H; Chang, P-Y; Germaschewski, K; Hu, S X; Nilson, P M

    2014-09-05

    Observations of magnetic reconnection between colliding plumes of magnetized laser-produced plasma are presented. Two counterpropagating plasma flows are created by irradiating oppositely placed plastic (CH) targets with 1.8-kJ, 2-ns laser beams on the Omega EP Laser System. The interaction region between the plumes is prefilled with a low-density background plasma and magnetized by an externally applied magnetic field, imposed perpendicular to the plasma flow, and initialized with an X-type null point geometry with B=0 at the midplane and B=8  T at the targets. The counterflowing plumes sweep up and compress the background plasma and the magnetic field into a pair of magnetized ribbons, which collide, stagnate, and reconnect at the midplane, allowing the first detailed observations of a stretched current sheet in laser-driven reconnection experiments. The dynamics of current sheet formation are in good agreement with first-principles particle-in-cell simulations that model the experiments.

  14. Plasma lenses for ultrashort multi-petawatt laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Palastro, J P; Hafizi, B; Johnson, L A; Penano, J; Hubbard, R F; Helle, M; Kaganovich, D

    2015-01-01

    An ideal plasma lens can provide the focusing power of a small f-number, solid-state focusing optic at a fraction of the diameter. An ideal plasma lens, however, relies on a steady-state, linear laser pulse-plasma interaction. Ultrashort multi-petawatt (MPW) pulses possess broad bandwidths and extreme intensities, and, as a result, their interaction with the plasma lens is neither steady state nor linear. Here we examine nonlinear and time-dependent modifications to plasma lens focusing, and show that these result in chromatic and phase aberrations and amplitude distortion. We find that a plasma lens can provide enhanced focusing for 30 fs pulses with peak power up to ~1 PW. The performance degrades through the MPW regime, until finally a focusing penalty is incurred at ~10 PW.

  15. Design of an Experiment to Observe Laser-Plasma Interactions on NIKE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, L.; Weaver, J.; Manheimer, W.; Zalesak, S.; Schmitt, A.; Fyfe, D.; Afeyan, B.; Charbonneau-Lefort, M.

    2007-11-01

    Recent proposed designs (Obenschain et al., Phys. Plasmas 13 056320 (2006)) for direct-drive ICF targets for energy applications involve high implosion velocities combined with higher laser irradiances. The use of high irradiances increases the likelihood of deleterious laser plasma instabilities (LPI) that may lead, for example, to the generation of fast electrons. The proposed use of a 248 nm KrF laser to drive these targets is expected to minimize LPI; this is being studied by experiments at NRL's NIKE facility. We used a modification of the FAST code that models laser pulses with arbitrary spatial and temporal profiles to assist in designing these experiments. The goal is to design targets and pulseshapes to create plasma conditions that will produce sufficient growth of LPI to be observable on NIKE. Using, for example, a cryogenic DT target that is heated by a brief pulse and allowed to expand freely before interacting with a second, high-intensity pulse, allows the development of long scalelengths at low electron temperatures and leads to a predicted 20-efold growth in two-plasmon amplitude.

  16. Measurement of Heat Propagation in a Laser Produced Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregori, G; Glenzer, S H; Knight, J; Niemann, C; Price, D; Froula, D H; Edwards, J; Town, R P J; Brantov, A; Bychenkov, V Y; Rozmus, W

    2003-08-22

    We present the observation of a nonlocal heat wave by measuring spatially and temporally resolved electron temperature profiles in a laser produced nitrogen plasma. Absolutely calibrated measurements have been performed by resolving the ion-acoustic wave spectra across the plasma volume with Thomson scattering. We find that the experimental electron temperature profiles disagree with flux-limited models, but are consistent with transport models that account for the nonlocal effects in heat conduction by fast electrons.

  17. Langmuir probe study of plasma expansion in pulsed laser ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T.N.; Schou, Jørgen; Lunney, J.G.

    1999-01-01

    Langmuir probes were used to monitor the asymptotic expansion of the plasma produced by the laser ablation of a silver target in a vacuum. The measured angular and temporal distributions of the ion flux and electron temperature were found to be in good agreement with the self-similar isentropic...... and adiabatic solution of the gas dynamics equations describing the expansion. The value of the adiabatic index gamma was about 1.25, consistent with the ablation plume being a low temperature plasma....

  18. An investigation on co-axial water-jet assisted fiber laser cutting of metal sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhukar, Yuvraj K.; Mullick, Suvradip; Nath, Ashish K.

    2016-02-01

    Water assisted laser cutting has received significant attention in recent times with assurance of many advantages than conventional gas assisted laser cutting. A comparative study between co-axial water-jet and gas-jet assisted laser cutting of thin sheets of mild steel (MS) and titanium (Ti) by fiber laser is presented. Fiber laser (1.07 μm wavelength) was utilised because of its low absorption in water. The cut quality was evaluated in terms of average kerf, projected dross height, heat affected zone (HAZ) and cut surface roughness. It was observed that a broad range process parameter could produce consistent cut quality in MS. However, oxygen assisted cutting could produce better quality only with optimised parameters at high laser power and high cutting speed. In Ti cutting the water-jet assisted laser cutting performed better over the entire range of process parameters compared with gas assisted cutting. The specific energy, defined as the amount of laser energy required to remove unit volume of material was found more in case of water-jet assisted laser cutting process. It is mainly due to various losses associated with water assisted laser processing such as absorption of laser energy in water and scattering at the interaction zone.

  19. Resonant laser ablation of metals detected by atomic emission in a microwave plasma and by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Danielle; Stchur, Peter; Hou, Xiandeng; Yang, Karl X; Zhou, Jack; Michel, Robert G

    2005-12-01

    It has been shown that an increase in sensitivity and selectivity of detection of an analyte can be achieved by tuning the ablation laser wavelength to match that of a resonant gas-phase transition of that analyte. This has been termed resonant laser ablation (RLA). For a pulsed tunable nanosecond laser, the data presented here illustrate the resonant enhancement effect in pure copper and aluminum samples, chromium oxide thin films, and for trace molybdenum in stainless steel samples, and indicate two main characteristics of the RLA phenomenon. The first is that there is an increase in the number of atoms ablated from the surface. The second is that the bandwidth of the wavelength dependence of the ablation is on the order of 1 nm. The effect was found to be virtually identical whether the atoms were detected by use of a microwave-induced plasma with atomic emission detection, by an inductively coupled plasma with mass spectrometric detection, or by observation of the number of laser pulses required to penetrate through thin films. The data indicate that a distinct ablation laser wavelength dependence exists, probably initiated via resonant radiation trapping, and accompanied by collisional broadening. Desorption contributions through radiation trapping are substantiated by changes in crater morphology as a function of wavelength and by the relatively broad linewidth of the ablation laser wavelength scans, compared to gas-phase excitation spectra. Also, other experiments with thin films demonstrate the existence of a distinct laser-material interaction and suggest that a combination of desorption induced by electronic transition (DIET) with resonant radiation trapping could assist in the enhancement of desorption yields. These results were obtained by a detailed inspection of the effect of the wavelength of the ablation laser over a narrow range of energy densities that lie between the threshold of laser-induced desorption of species and the usual analytical

  20. Editorial: Focus on Laser- and Beam-Driven Plasma Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Chan; Malka, Victor

    2010-04-01

    The ability of short but intense laser pulses to generate high-energy electrons and ions from gaseous and solid targets has been well known since the early days of the laser fusion program. However, during the past decade there has been an explosion of experimental and theoretical activity in this area of laser-matter interaction, driven by the prospect of realizing table-top plasma accelerators for research, medical and industrial uses, and also relatively small and inexpensive plasma accelerators for high-energy physics at the frontier of particle physics. In this focus issue on laser- and beam-driven plasma accelerators, the latest advances in this field are described. Focus on Laser- and Beam-Driven Plasma Accelerators Contents Slow wave plasma structures for direct electron acceleration B D Layer, J P Palastro, A G York, T M Antonsen and H M Milchberg Cold injection for electron wakefield acceleration X Davoine, A Beck, A Lifschitz, V Malka and E Lefebvre Enhanced proton flux in the MeV range by defocused laser irradiation J S Green, D C Carroll, C Brenner, B Dromey, P S Foster, S Kar, Y T Li, K Markey, P McKenna, D Neely, A P L Robinson, M J V Streeter, M Tolley, C-G Wahlström, M H Xu and M Zepf Dose-dependent biological damage of tumour cells by laser-accelerated proton beams S D Kraft, C Richter, K Zeil, M Baumann, E Beyreuther, S Bock, M Bussmann, T E Cowan, Y Dammene, W Enghardt, U Helbig, L Karsch, T Kluge, L Laschinsky, E Lessmann, J Metzkes, D Naumburger, R Sauerbrey, M. Scḧrer, M Sobiella, J Woithe, U Schramm and J Pawelke The optimum plasma density for plasma wakefield excitation in the blowout regime W Lu, W An, M Zhou, C Joshi, C Huang and W B Mori Plasma wakefield acceleration experiments at FACET M J Hogan, T O Raubenheimer, A Seryi, P Muggli, T Katsouleas, C Huang, W Lu, W An, K A Marsh, W B Mori, C E Clayton and C Joshi Electron trapping and acceleration on a downward density ramp: a two-stage approach R M G M Trines, R Bingham, Z Najmudin

  1. Filamentation Instability of Counterstreaming Laser-Driven Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, W.; Fiksel, G.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Chang, P.-Y.; Germaschewski, K.; Hu, S. X.; Nilson, P. M.

    2013-11-01

    Filamentation due to the growth of a Weibel-type instability was observed in the interaction of a pair of counterstreaming, ablatively driven plasma flows, in a supersonic, collisionless regime relevant to astrophysical collisionless shocks. The flows were created by irradiating a pair of opposing plastic (CH) foils with 1.8 kJ, 2-ns laser pulses on the OMEGA EP Laser System. Ultrafast laser-driven proton radiography was used to image the Weibel-generated electromagnetic fields. The experimental observations are in good agreement with the analytical theory of the Weibel instability and with particle-in-cell simulations.

  2. Laser Remelting of Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang ZHANG; Yong LIANG; Yingna WU; Zhongchao FENG; Bingchun ZHANG; Fangjun LIU

    2001-01-01

    A CO2 continuous wave laser with defocused beam was used for remelting the surface of plasma sprayed ZrO2-8 wt pct Y2O3 (8YSZ)/Ni22Cr10AlY thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) on GH536 superalloy substrate. Two main laser processing parameters, power and travel speed, were adopted to produce a completely remelted layer, and their effects on remelted appearance,remelting depth, density and diameter of depression, space of segment crack and remelted microstructure were evaluated. With energy of 4.0 to 8.0 J.mm-2, an appropriate laser processing for applicable remelted layer was suggested.

  3. Filamentation instability of counter-streaming laser-driven plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Fox, W; Bhattacharjee, A; Chang, P -Y; Germaschewski, K; Hu, S X; Nilson, P M

    2013-01-01

    Filamentation due to the growth of a Weibel-type instability was observed in the interaction of a pair of counter-streaming, ablatively-driven plasma flows, in a supersonic, collisionless regime relevant to astrophysical collisionless shocks. The flows were created by irradiating a pair of opposing plastic (CH) foils with 1.8 kJ, 2-ns laser pulses on the OMEGA EP laser system. Ultrafast laser-driven proton radiography was used to image the Weibel-generated electromagnetic fields. The experimental observations are in good agreement with the analytical theory of the Weibel instability and with particle-in-cell simulations.

  4. Research progress of laser welding process dynamic monitoring technology based on plasma characteristics signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng WANG

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available During the high-power laser welding process, plasmas are induced by the evaporation of metal under laser radiation, which can affect the coupling of laser energy and the workpiece, and ultimately impact on the reliability of laser welding quality and process directly. The research of laser-induced plasma is a focus in high-power deep penetration welding field, which provides a promising research area for realizing the automation of welding process quality inspection. In recent years, the research of laser welding process dynamic monitoring technology based on plasma characteristics is mainly in two aspects, namely the research of plasma signal detection and the research of laser welding process modeling. The laser-induced plasma in the laser welding is introduced, and the related research of laser welding process dynamic monitoring technology based on plasma characteristics at home and abroad is analyzed. The current problems in the field are summarized, and the future development trend is put forward.

  5. Plasma Profile Measurements for Laser Fusion Research with the Nike KrF Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaechul; Weaver, J. L.; Serlin, V.; Obenschain, S. P.

    2015-11-01

    The grid image refractometer of the Nike laser facility (Nike-GIR) has demonstrated the capability of simultaneously measuring electron density (ne) and temperature (Te) profiles of coronal plasma. For laser plasma instability (LPI) research, the first Nike-GIR experiment successfully measured the plasma profiles in density regions up to ne ~ 4 ×1021 cm-3 (22% of the critical density for 248 nm light of Nike) using an ultraviolet probe laser (λp = 263 nm). The probe laser has been recently replaced with a shorter wavelength laser (λp = 213 nm, a 5th harmonic of the Nd:YAG laser) to diagnose a higher density region. The Nike-GIR system is being further extended to measure plasma profiles in the on-going experiment using 135°-separated Nike beam arrays for the cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) studies. We present an overview of the extended Nike-GIR arrangements and a new numerical algorithm to extract self-consistant plasma profiles with the measured quantities. Work supported by DoE/NNSA.

  6. Absorption of laser radiation by femtosecond laser-induced plasma of air and its emission characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyin, A. A.; Golik, S. S.; Shmirko, K. A.

    2015-11-01

    The energy absorbed by femtosecond laser plasma has nonlinear dependence on incident laser energy. The threshold power for plasma formation is 5.2 GW. Emission of nitrogen molecule, nitrogen molecule ion, atomic oxygen (unresolved triplet O I 777 nm) and nitrogen (triplet N I 742.4, 744.3 and 746.8 nm) lines is detected. Molecular emission consists of second positive and firs negative systems of nitrogen. Time-resolved spectroscopy of plasmas shows short molecular line emission (up to 1 ns) and long atomic line emission (up to 150 ns).

  7. High-order harmonic generation in laser plasma plumes

    CERN Document Server

    Ganeev, Rashid A

    2013-01-01

    This book represents the first comprehensive treatment of high-order harmonic generation in laser-produced plumes, covering the principles, past and present experimental status and important applications. It shows how this method of frequency conversion of laser radiation towards the extreme ultraviolet range matured over the course of multiple studies and demonstrated new approaches in the generation of strong coherent short-wavelength radiation for various applications. Significant discoveries and pioneering contributions of researchers in this field carried out in various laser scientific centers worldwide are included in this first attempt to describe the important findings in this area of nonlinear spectroscopy. "High-Order Harmonic Generation in Laser Plasma Plumes" is a self-contained and unified review of the most recent achievements in the field, such as the application of clusters (fullerenes, nanoparticles, nanotubes) for efficient harmonic generation of ultrashort laser pulses in cluster-containin...

  8. Neutron Source from Laser Plasma Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Xuejing; Shaw, Joseph; McCary, Eddie; Downer, Mike; Hegelich, Bjorn

    2016-10-01

    Laser driven electron beams and ion beams were utilized to produce neutron sources via different mechanism. On the Texas Petawatt laser, deuterized plastic, gold and DLC foil targets of varying thickness were shot with 150 J , 150 fs laser pulses at a peak intensity of 2 ×1021W /cm2 . Ions were accelerated by either target normal sheath acceleration or Breakout Afterburner acceleration. Neutrons were produced via the 9Be(d,n) and 9Be(p,n) reactions when accelerated ions impinged on a Beryllium converter as well as by deuteron breakup reactions. We observed 2 ×1010 neutron per shot in average, corresponding to 5 ×1018n /s . The efficiencies for different targets are comparable. In another experiment, 38fs , 0.3 J UT3 laser pulse interacted with mixed gas target. Electrons with energy 40MeV were produced via laser wakefield acceleration. Neutron flux of 2 ×106 per shot was generated through bremsstrahlung and subsequent photoneutron reactions on a Copper converter.

  9. Bioceramic 3D Implants Produced by Laser Assisted Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusquiños, Fernando; del Val, Jesús; Arias-González, Felipe; Comesaña, Rafael; Quintero, Félix; Riveiro, Antonio; Boutinguiza, Mohamed; Jones, Julian R.; Hill, Robert G.; Pou, Juan

    Cranial defect restoration requires a suitable implant capable to fulfill protective and aesthetic functions, such as polymeric and metallic implants. Nevertheless, the former materials cannot provide osteointegration of the implant within the host bone nor implant resorption, which is also required in pediatricorthopedics for normal patient growth. Resorbable and osteoconductivebioceramics are employed, such as silicate bioactive glasses. Nevertheless, manufacturing based on conventional casting in graphite moulds is not effective for warped shape implants suitable for patient tailored treatments. In this work, we analyze the application of rapid prototyping based on laser cladding to manufacture bioactive glass implants for low load bearing bone restoration. This laser-assisted additive technique is capable to produce three-dimensional geometries tailored to patient, with reduced fabrication time and implant composition modification. The obtained samples were characterized; the relationships between the processing conditions and the measured features were studied, in addition to the biological behavior analysis.

  10. Decay-Assisted Laser Spectroscopy of Neutron-Deficient Francium

    CERN Document Server

    Lynch, K M; Bissell, M L; Budincevic, I; Cocolios, T E; De Groote, R P; De Schepper, S; Fedosseev, V N; Flanagan, K T; Franchoo, S; Garcia Ruiz, R F; Heylen, H; Marsh, B A; Neyens, G; Procter, T J; Rossel, R E; Rothe, S; Strashnov, I; Stroke, H H; Wendt, K D A

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the hyperfine-structure and radioactive-decay studies of the neutron-deficient francium isotopes $^{202-206}$Fr performed with the Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at the ISOLDE facility, CERN. The high resolution innate to collinear laser spectroscopy is combined with the high efficiency of ion detection to provide a highly-sensitive technique to probe the hyperfine structure of exotic isotopes. The technique of decay-assisted laser spectroscopy is presented, whereby the isomeric ion beam is deflected to a decay spectroscopy station for alpha-decay tagging of the hyperfine components. Here, we present the first hyperfine-structure measurements of the neutron-deficient francium isotopes $^{202-206}$Fr, in addition to the identification of the low-lying states of $^{202,204}$Fr performed at the CRIS experiment.

  11. Laser-Assisted Elastic Electron Scattering from Argon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Qiu-Bo; SUN Jin-Feng

    2009-01-01

    The second Born approximation (SBA) theory is applied to the study of electron-atom scattering in the presence of a CO2 laser field. The absolute differential cross sections of e-At scattering are calculated with multiphoton exchange in two special scattering geometries G1 (for small-angle scattering) and G2. For geometry G1, compared with the results of two different model potentials for electron elastic scattering by atoms, it is found that electronatom polarization potential plays an important role in laser-assisted electron-atom scattering. Some calculational results in geometries G2 are given. Our results are found to be better than other theoretical results as compared with the experimental data in geometries G1 and G2.

  12. Kinetics of Laser-Assisted Carbon Nanotube Growth

    CERN Document Server

    van de Burgt, Yoeri; Mandamparambil, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Laser-assisted chemical vapour deposition (CVD) growth is an attractive mask-less process for growing locally aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in selected places on temperature sensitive substrates. The nature of the localized process results in fast carbon nanotube growth with high experimental throughput. Here, we report on detailed investigation of growth kinetics related to physical and chemical process characteristics. Specifically, the growth kinetics is investigated by monitoring the dynamical changes of reflected laser beam intensity during growth. Benefiting from the fast growth and high experimental throughput, we investigate a wide range of experimental conditions and propose several growth regimes. Rate-limiting steps are determined using rate equations linked to the proposed growth regimes, which are further characterized by Raman spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), therefore directly linking growth regimes to the structural quality of the CNTs. Activation energies for the differe...

  13. Lipase biofilm deposited by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronne, Antonio; Bloisi, Francesco; Calabria, Raffaela; Califano, Valeria; Depero, Laura E.; Fanelli, Esther; Federici, Stefania; Massoli, Patrizio; Vicari, Luciano R. M.

    2015-05-01

    Lipase is an enzyme that finds application in biodiesel production and for detection of esters and triglycerides in biosensors. Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE), a technique derived from Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) for deposition of undamaged biomolecules or polymers, is characterized by the use of a frozen target obtained from a solution/suspension of the guest material (to be deposited) in a volatile matrix (solvent). The presence of the solvent avoids or at least reduces the potential damage of guest molecules by laser radiation but only the guest material reaches the substrate in an essentially solvent-free deposition. MAPLE can be used for enzymes immobilization, essential for industrial application, allowing the development of continuous processes, an easier separation of products, the reuse of the catalyst and, in some cases, enhancing enzyme properties (pH, temperature stability, etc.) and catalytic activity in non-aqueous media. Here we show that MAPLE technique can be used to deposit undamaged lipase and that the complex structure (due to droplets generated during extraction from target) of the deposited material can be controlled by changing the laser beam fluence.

  14. Ex vivo laser lipolysis assisted with radially diffusing optical applicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jieun; Hau, Nguyen Trung; Park, Sung Yeon; Rhee, Yun-Hee; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2016-05-01

    Laser-assisted lipolysis has been implemented to reduce body fat in light of thermal interactions with adipose tissue. However, using a flat fiber with high irradiance often needs rapid cannula movements and even undesirable thermal injury due to direct tissue contact. The aim of the current study was to explore the feasibility of a radially diffusing optical applicator to liquefy the adipose tissue for effective laser lipolysis. The proposed diffuser was evaluated with a flat fiber in terms of temperature elevation and tissue liquefaction after laser lipolysis with a 980-nm wavelength. Given the same power (20 W), the diffusing applicator generated a 30% slower temperature increase with a 25% lower maximum temperature (84±3.2°C in 1 min ptissue, compared with the flat fiber. Under the equivalent temperature development, the diffuser induced up to fivefold larger area of the adipose liquefaction due to radial light emission than the flat fiber. Ex vivo tissue tests for 5-min irradiation demonstrated that the diffuser (1.24±0.15 g) liquefied 66% more adipose tissue than the flat fiber (0.75±0.05 g). The proposed diffusing applicator can be a feasible therapeutic device for laser lipolysis due to low temperature development and wide coverage of thermal treatment.

  15. Plasma channels during filamentation of a femtosecond laser pulse with wavefront astigmatism in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dergachev, A A; Kandidov, V P; Shlenov, S A [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ionin, A A; Mokrousova, D V; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V; Sunchugasheva, E S; Shustikova, A P [P N Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-31

    We have demonstrated experimentally and numerically the possibility of controlling parameters of plasma channels formed during filamentation of a femtosecond laser pulse by introducing astigmatism in the laser beam wavefront. It is found that weak astigmatism increases the length of the plasma channel in comparison with the case of aberration-free focusing and that strong astigmatism can cause splitting of the plasma channel into two channels located one after another on the filament axis. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  16. Laser Interaction and Related Plasma Phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Osman

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Computations are to be performed using the laser driven inertial fusion energy option based on volume ignition with the natural adiabatic self-similarity compression and expansion hydrodynamics [1]. The numerical work includes the establishing of a multi-branch reaction code to be used for simultaneous fusion reactions of D-D, D-T D-He3 and mutual nuclear reaction products. This will permit the studies of neutron lean reactions as well as tritium-rich cases. The D-T reactions will stress the recent new results on one step laser fusion [2] as an alternative to the two-step fast ignitor scheme whose difficulties with new physics phenomena at petawatt laser interaction are more and more evident [3].

  17. Laser-assisted structuring and modification of LiCoO2 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, R.; Proell, J.; Ulrich, S.; Trouillet, V.; Indris, S.; Przybylski, M.; Pfleging, W.

    2009-02-01

    The material development of improved lithium ion batteries will play an important role in future mobile applications and energy storage systems. Electrode materials made of nano-composited materials are expected to improve battery lifetime and will lead to an enhancement of lithium diffusion and thus improve battery capacity and cyclability. In this study, research was conducted to further improve the electrochemical properties of thin film cathodes by increasing the surface to volume ratio and thereby the lithium intercalation rate. Cathode materials were synthesised by r.f. magnetron sputtering of LiCoO2 targets in a pure argon plasma. LiCoO2 films 3 μm thick and with a grain size of 10 to 500 nm were deposited on silicon and stainless steel substrates. The deposition parameters (argon pressure, substrate bias) were varied to create stoichiometric films with controlled nano-crystalline texture and morphology. During laser-assisted surface treatment, cone-shaped periodic surface structures were produced. For this purpose high repetition excimer laser radiation at wavelengths of 193 nm and 248 nm and with short laser pulse widths (4-6 ns) were used. Structure sizes varied with laser and processing parameters, e.g. laser fluences, pulse number, wavelength and processing gas. Laser annealing in air or furnace annealing in a controlled argon/oxygen environment were then used to create the high temperature phase of LiCoO2 (HT-LiCoO2). The sputtered films were studied with Raman spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction to determine their stoichiometry and crystallinity before and after laser treatment. The development of HT-LiCoO2 and also the formation of a Co3O4 phase were discussed. By means of electrochemical cycling, the performance of the manufactured films was investigated.

  18. Investigations into ultraviolet matrix-assisted laser desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heise, Theodore W. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1993-07-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption (MALD) is a technique for converting large biomolecules into gas phase ions. Some characteristics of the commonly used uv matrices are determined. Solubilities in methanol range from 0.1 to 0.5 M. Solid phase absorption spectra are found to be similar to solution, but slightly red-shifted. Acoustic and quartz crystal microbalance signals are investigated as possible means of uv-MALD quantitation. Evidence for the existence of desorption thresholds is presented. Threshold values are determined to be in the range of 2 to 3 MW/cm2. A transient imaging technique based on laser-excited fluorescence for monitoring MALD plumes is described. Sensitivity is well within the levels required for studying matrix-assisted laser desorption, where analyte concentrations are significantly lower than those in conventional laser desorption. Results showing the effect of film morphology, particularly film thickness, on plume dynamics are presented. In particular, MALD plumes from thicker films tend to exhibit higher axial velocities. Fluorescent labeling of protein and of DNA is used to allow imaging of their uv-MALD generated plumes. Integrated concentrations are available with respect to time, making it possible to assess the rate of fragmentation. The spatial and temporal distributions are important for the design of secondary ionization schemes to enhance ion yields and for the optimization of ion collection in time-of-flight MS instruments to maximize resolution. Such information could also provide insight into whether ionization is closely associated with the desorption step or whether it is a result of subsequent collisions with the matrix gas (e.g., proton transfer). Although the present study involves plumes in a normal atmosphere, adaptation to measurements in vacuum (e.g., inside a mass spectrometer) should be straightforward.

  19. Matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation of chemoselective polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla-Papavlu, Alexandra; Dinca, Valentina; Dinescu, Maria; di Pietrantonio, Fabio; Cannatà, Domenico; Benetti, Massimiliano; Verona, Enrico

    2011-11-01

    In this work, matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation was applied to achieve gentle deposition of polymer thin films onto surface acoustic wave resonators. Polyepichlorhydrin, polyisobutylene and polyethylenimine were deposited both onto rigid substrates e.g. Si wafers as well as surface acoustic wave devices using a Nd-YAG laser (266 nm, 355 nm, 10 Hz repetition rate). Morphological investigations (atomic force microscopy and optical microscopy) reveal continuous deposited polymer thin films, and in the case of polyethylenimine a very low surface roughness of 1.2 nm (measured on a 40×40 μm2 area). It was found that only for a narrow range of laser fluences (i.e. 0.1-0.3 J/cm2 in the case of polyisobutylene) the chemical structure of the deposited polymer thin layers resembles to the native polymer. In addition, in the case of polyisobutylene it was shown that the irradiation at 355-nm wavelength produces deviations in the chemical structure of the deposited polymer, as compared to its bulk structure. Following the morphological and structural characterization, only a set of well established conditions was used for polymer deposition on the sensor structures. The surface acoustic wave resonators have been tested using the Network Analyzer before and after polymer deposition. The polymer coated surface acoustic wave resonator responses have been measured upon exposure to various concentrations of dimethylmethylphosphonate analyte. All sensors coated with different polymer layers (polyethylenimine, polyisobutylene, and polyepichlorhydrin) show a clear response to the dimethylmethylphosphonate vapor. The strongest signal is obtained for polyisobutylene, followed by polyethylenimine and polyepichlorhydrin. The results obtained indicate that matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation is potentially useful for the fabrication of polymer thin films to be used in applications including microsensor industry.

  20. Laser-assisted cleaning: Dominant role of surface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Padma Nilaya; D J Biswas

    2010-12-01

    Pulsed laser-assisted removal of particulates from substrates has decided advantages over the conventional methods of cleaning. Experiments conducted with loose contamination on metal and transparent dielectric surfaces proved conclusively the dominant role played by the absorption of the incident radiation by the surface towards the generation of the cleaning force as against the absorption in the particulates alone. Further, the presence of transparent/semi-transparent particulates on a metal surface was found to result in an increased absorption of the incident radiation by the substrate. This effect, identified as field-enhanced surface absorption was found to increase with reduction in the average particulate size.

  1. Development of laser ablation plasma by anisotropic self-radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohnishi Naofumi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We have proposed a method for reproducing an accurate solution of low-density ablation plasma by properly treating anisotropic radiation. Monte-Carlo method is employed for estimating Eddington tensor with limited number of photon samples in each fluid time step. Radiation field from ablation plasma is significantly affected by the anisotropic Eddington tensor. Electron temperature around the ablation surface changes with the radiation field and is responsible for the observed emission. An accurate prediction of the light emission from the laser ablation plasma requires a careful estimation of the anisotropic radiation field.

  2. Wavelet-analysis for Laser Images of Blood Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANGELSKY, A.-P.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The possibilities of the local wavelet-analysis of polarization-inhomogeneous laser image of human blood plasma were considered. The set of statistics, correlation and fractal parameters of the distributions of wavelet-coefficients that are characterize different scales of the polarization maps of polycrystalline networks of amino acids of blood plasma were defined. The criteria for the differentiation of the transformation of birefringence optical-anisotropic structures of blood plasma at different scales of their geometric dimensions were determined.

  3. Stagnation and interpenetration of laser-created colliding plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollaine, S.M.; Albritton, J.R.; Kauffman, R.; Keane, C.J. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Berger, R.L.; Bosch, R.; Delameter, N.D.; Failor, B.H. (KMS Fusion, Inc., Ann Arbor, MI (USA))

    1990-11-05

    A KMS laser experiment collides Aluminum (A1) and Magnesium (Mg) plasmas. The measurements include electron density, time and space resolved Ly-alpha and He-alpha lines of Al and Mg, and x-ray images. These measurements were analyzed with a hydrodynamic code, LASNEX, and a special two-fluid code OFIS. The results strongly suggest that at early times, the Al interpenetrates the counterstreaming Mg and deposits in the dense Mg region. At late times, the Al plasma stagnates against the Mg plasma.

  4. Mechanism of plasma-assisted ignition for H2 and C1-C5 hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starikovskiy, Andrey; Aleksandrov, Nikolay

    2016-09-01

    Nonequilibrium plasma demonstrates ability to control ultra-lean, ultra-fast, low-temperature flames and appears to be an extremely promising technology for a wide range of applications, including aviation GTEs, piston engines, ramjets, scramjets and detonation initiation for pulsed detonation engines. To use nonequilibrium plasma for ignition and combustion in real energetic systems, one must understand the mechanisms of plasma-assisted ignition and combustion and be able to numerically simulate the discharge and combustion processes under various conditions. A new, validated mechanism for high-temperature hydrocarbon plasma assisted combustion was built and allows to qualitatively describe plasma-assisted combustion close and above the self-ignition threshold. The principal mechanisms of plasma-assisted ignition and combustion have been established and validated for a wide range of plasma and gas parameters. These results provide a basis for improving various energy-conversion combustion systems, from automobile to aircraft engines, using nonequilibrium plasma methods.

  5. Electron-silane scattering cross section for plasma assisted processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Pankaj; Kaur, Jaspreet; Antony, Bobby

    2017-03-01

    Silane is an important molecule with numerous applications to natural and technological plasmas. In such environments, where plasma assisted processes are vital, electron induced reactions play a major role in its chemistry. In view of this, electron induced scattering of molecules such as silane finds significance. This article reports a comprehensive study of electron impact cross sections for silane over a wide energy range. In particular, the emphasis is given in providing a complete dataset for various electron scattering events possible with silane. Such dataset is the need for the plasma modeling community. Moreover, literature survey shows that the cross section database for silane is fragmentary. To fill this void, we have computed the differential elastic, total, rotational excitation, and momentum transfer cross sections. Two formalisms that are reliable in their energy domain are employed to accomplish the task: the R-matrix method through QUANTEMOL-N at low incident energies and the spherical complex optical potential formalism at intermediate to high energies. Interestingly, the comparison of the present cross section exhibits a good concurrence with the previous data, wherever available.

  6. Holmium:YAG laser-assisted otolaryngologic surgery: Lahey Clinic experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapshay, Stanley M.; Rebeiz, Elie E.; Pankratov, Michail M.

    1993-07-01

    The Holmium:YAG laser was used to assist in 36 rhinologic procedures including surgery for chronic sinus disease, chronic dacryocystitis, recurrent choanal stenosis, and a sphenoid sinus mucocele. There were no laser related complications. The laser permitted controlled ablation of bone and soft tissue in all cases with satisfactory results. The Ho:YAG laser can be used in otolaryngology to assist in cases where surgical access is difficult or when controlled, precise bone and soft tissue ablation is necessary.

  7. Study of a Laser-Produced Plasma by Langmuir Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, C. T.; Hasimi, M.; Pant, H. C.

    1977-01-01

    The structure, the parameters and the expansion of the plasma produced by focusing a 7 J, 20 ns Nd-glass laser on stainless-steel and glass targets suspended in a high-vacuum chamber were investigated by Langmuir probes. It was observed that the probe signals consisted of a photoelectric...

  8. Frequency mixing in boron carbide laser ablation plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oujja, M.; Benítez-Cañete, A.; Sanz, M.; Lopez-Quintas, I.; Martín, M.; Nalda, R. de, E-mail: r.nalda@iqfr.csic.es; Castillejo, M.

    2015-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Two-color frequency mixing has been studied in a laser ablation boron carbide plasma. • A space- and time-resolved study mapped the nonlinear optical species in the plasma. • The nonlinear process maximizes when charge recombination is expected to be completed. • Neutral atoms and small molecules are the main nonlinear species in this medium. • Evidence points to six-wave mixing as the most likely process. - Abstract: Nonlinear frequency mixing induced by a bichromatic field (1064 nm + 532 nm obtained from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser) in a boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) plasma generated through laser ablation under vacuum is explored. A UV beam at the frequency of the fourth harmonic of the fundamental frequency (266 nm) was generated. The dependence of the efficiency of the process as function of the intensities of the driving lasers differs from the expected behavior for four-wave mixing, and point toward a six-wave mixing process. The frequency mixing process was strongly favored for parallel polarizations of the two driving beams. Through spatiotemporal mapping, the conditions for maximum efficiency were found for a significant delay from the ablation event (200 ns), when the medium is expected to be a low-ionized plasma. No late components of the harmonic signal were detected, indicating a largely atomized medium.

  9. Temporary spectral analysis of a laser plasma of mineral coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebolledo, P.; Pacheco, P.; Sarmiento, R.; Cabanzo, R.; Mejía-Ospino, E.

    2013-11-01

    In this work we present results of the temporal spectral study of a plasma laser of mineral coal using the Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. The plasma was generated by focusing a laser beam of Nd:YAG laser emitting at 532 nm with energy per pulse of 35 mJ on coal target pellets. The plasma radiation was conducted by an optical fiber to the entrance slit of a spectrograph of 0.5 m, equipped with a 1200 and 2400 grooves/mm diffraction grating and an ICCD camera for registration with different delay times of the spectra in the spectral range from 250 nm to 900 nm. The temporal spectral analysis allowed the identification of the elements Al, Fe, Ca, Mg, K, and Si, and CN and C2 molecules present in natural coals. The characteristics of the spectral lines and bands were studied at different delay times obtaining the calculation of the evolution of electron temperature, electron density, and vibrational temperature of plasmas in the time. The delay times used were between 0.5 μs and 5 μs, calculating the electron temperature ranged between 5 000 K and 1 000 K.

  10. Subsurface plasma in beam of continuous CO2-laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danytsikov, Y. V.; Dymshakov, V. A.; Lebedev, F. V.; Pismennyy, V. D.; Ryazanov, A. V.

    1986-03-01

    Experiments performed at the Institute of Atomic Energy established the conditions for formation of subsurface plasma in substances by laser radiation and its characteristics. A quasi-continuous CO2 laser emitting square pulses of 0.1 to 1.0 ms duration and 1 to 10 kW power as well as a continuous CO2 laser served as radiation sources. Radiation was focused on spots 0.1 to 0.5 mm in diameter and maintained at levels ensuring constant power density during the interaction time, while the temperature of the target surface was measured continuously. Metals, graphite and dielectric materials were tested with laser action taking place in air N2 + O2 mixtures, Ar or He atmosphere under pressures of 0.01 to 1.0 atm. Data on radiation intensity thresholds for evaporation and plasma formation were obtained. On the basis of these thresholds, combined with data on energy balance and the temperature profile in plasma layers, a universal state diagram was constructed for subsurface plasma with nonquantified surface temperature and radiation intensity coordinates.

  11. Ultrashort pulse laser microsurgery system with plasma luminescence feedback control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, B.M.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Gold, D.M.; Darrow, C.B.; Da Silva, L.B.

    1997-11-10

    Plasma luminescence spectroscopy was used for precise ablation of bone tissue during ultrashort pulse laser (USPL) micro-spinal surgery. Strong contrast of the luminescence spectra between bone marrow and spinal cord provided the real time feedback control so that only bone tissue can be selectively ablated while preserving the spinal cord.

  12. DISAPPEARANCE OF TWO-PLASMON DECAY INSTABILITY IN PLASMAS PRODUCED BY ULTRASHORT LASER PULSES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN LI-MING; ZHANG JIE; LIN HAI; LI YU-TONG; ZHAO LI-ZENG; JIANG WEN-MIAN

    2001-01-01

    Harmonic emission was studied from a plasma produced by ultrashort laser pulses. Unlike the harmonics from plasmas created by long (ns) laser pulses, the 3/2 harmonic emission was not observed in the interaction between plasmas and ultrashort laser pulses. A simple model is proposed to explain this phenomenon.

  13. Saturation of Langmuir waves in laser-produced plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, K.L.

    1996-04-01

    This dissertation deals with the interaction of an intense laser with a plasma (a quasineutral collection of electrons and ions). During this interaction, the laser drives large-amplitude waves through a class of processes known as parametric instabilities. Several such instabilities drive one type of wave, the Langmuir wave, which involves oscillations of the electrons relative to the nearly-stationary ions. There are a number of mechanisms which limit the amplitude to which Langmuir waves grow. In this dissertation, these mechanisms are examined to identify qualitative features which might be observed in experiments and/or simulations. In addition, a number of experiments are proposed to specifically look for particular saturation mechanisms. In a plasma, a Langmuir wave can decay into an electromagnetic wave and an ion wave. This parametric instability is proposed as a source for electromagnetic emission near half of the incident laser frequency observed from laser-produced plasmas. This interpretation is shown to be consistent with existing experimental data and it is found that one of the previous mechanisms used to explain such emission is not. The scattering version of the electromagnetic decay instability is shown to provide an enhanced noise source of electromagnetic waves near the frequency of the incident laser.

  14. High Temperature Plasmas Theory and Mathematical Tools for Laser and Fusion Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Spatschek, Karl-Heinz

    2012-01-01

    Filling the gap for a treatment of the subject as an advanced course in theoretical physics with a huge potential for future applications, this monograph discusses aspects of these applications and provides theoretical methods and tools for their investigation. Throughout this coherent and up-to-date work the main emphasis is on classical plasmas at high-temperatures, drawing on the experienced author's specialist background. As such, it covers the key areas of magnetic fusion plasma, laser-plasma-interaction and astrophysical plasmas, while also including nonlinear waves and phenomena.

  15. Thomson scattering from laser induced plasma in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzierzega, K; Mendys, A [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, ul. Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Pellerin, S; Thouin, E [GREMI - site de Bourges, Universite d' Orleans, rue Gaston Berger BP 4043, 18028 Bourges (France); Travaille, G; Bousquet, B; Canioni, L [Centre de Physique Moleculaire Optique et Hertzienne, Universite Bordeaux I, 351 Cours de la Liberation, 33405 Talence CEDEX (France); Pokrzywka, B, E-mail: krzysztof.dzierzega@uj.edu.p [Mt. Suhora Observatory, Pedagogical University of Cracow, ul. Podchorazych 2, 30-084 Krakow (Poland)

    2010-05-01

    The laser induced plasma in air produced by 6 ns, 532 nm Nd:YAG pulses with 25 mJ energy was studied using the Thomson scattering method and plasma imaging techniques. Plasma images and Thomson scattered spectra were registered at delay times ranging from 150 ns to 1 {mu}s after the breakdown pulses. The electron density and temperature, as determined in the core of the plasma plume, were found to decrease from 7.4 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} to about 1.03 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} and from 100 900 K to 22 700 K. The highly elevated electron temperatures are the result of plasma heating by the second, probe pulse in the Thomson scattering experiments.

  16. Investigation of electron heating in laser-plasma interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Parvazian

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available  In this paper, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS and electron heating in laser plasma propagating along the plasma fusion is investigated by particle-in cell simulation. Applying an external magnetic field to plasma, production of whistler waves and electron heating associated with whistler waves in the direction perpendicular to external magnetic field was observed in this simulation. The plasma waves with low phase velocities, generated in backward-SRS and dominateing initially in time and space, accelerated the backward electrons by trapping them. Then these electrons promoted to higher energies by the forward-SRS plasma waves with high phase velocities. This tow-stage electron acceleration is more efficient due to the coexistence of these two instabilities.

  17. Frequency mixing in boron carbide laser ablation plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oujja, M.; Benítez-Cañete, A.; Sanz, M.; Lopez-Quintas, I.; Martín, M.; de Nalda, R.; Castillejo, M.

    2015-05-01

    Nonlinear frequency mixing induced by a bichromatic field (1064 nm + 532 nm obtained from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser) in a boron carbide (B4C) plasma generated through laser ablation under vacuum is explored. A UV beam at the frequency of the fourth harmonic of the fundamental frequency (266 nm) was generated. The dependence of the efficiency of the process as function of the intensities of the driving lasers differs from the expected behavior for four-wave mixing, and point toward a six-wave mixing process. The frequency mixing process was strongly favored for parallel polarizations of the two driving beams. Through spatiotemporal mapping, the conditions for maximum efficiency were found for a significant delay from the ablation event (200 ns), when the medium is expected to be a low-ionized plasma. No late components of the harmonic signal were detected, indicating a largely atomized medium.

  18. Material measurement method based on femtosecond laser plasma shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Dong; Li, Zhongming

    2017-03-01

    The acoustic emission signal of laser plasma shock wave, which comes into being when femtosecond laser ablates pure Cu, Fe, and Al target material, has been detected by using the fiber Fabry-Perot (F-P) acoustic emission sensing probe. The spectrum characters of the acoustic emission signals for three kinds of materials have been analyzed and studied by using Fourier transform. The results show that the frequencies of the acoustic emission signals detected from the three kinds of materials are different. Meanwhile, the frequencies are almost identical for the same materials under different ablation energies and detection ranges. Certainly, the amplitudes of the spectral character of the three materials show a fixed pattern. The experimental results and methods suggest a potential application of the plasma shock wave on-line measurement based on the femtosecond laser ablating target by using the fiber F-P acoustic emission sensor probe.

  19. Neutron Generation and Kinetic Energy of Expanding Laser Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yong-Sheng; WANG Nai-Yan; DUAN Xiao-Jiao; LAN Xiao-Fei; TAN Zhi-Xin; TANG Xiu-Zhang; HE Ye-Xi

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the kinetic energy of expanding plasma of a solid target heated by a ultra-short and ultra-intense laser pulse and the efficiency of energy coupling between the ultra-intense laser pulse and the solid target, in order to increase the utilization ratio of laser energy and to raise the neutron generation farther. Some new ideas about improving the energy utilization by head-on collisions between the expanding plasmas are proposed. The significance is the raise of generation of shorter duration neutron, of the order of picoseconds, which allows for an increase of energy resolution in time-of-flight experiments and also for the investigation of the dynamics of nuclear processes with high temporal resolution.

  20. Interplay of Laser-Plasma Interactions and Inertial Fusion Hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strozzi, D. J.; Bailey, D. S.; Michel, P.; Divol, L.; Sepke, S. M.; Kerbel, G. D.; Thomas, C. A.; Ralph, J. E.; Moody, J. D.; Schneider, M. B.

    2017-01-01

    The effects of laser-plasma interactions (LPI) on the dynamics of inertial confinement fusion hohlraums are investigated via a new approach that self-consistently couples reduced LPI models into radiation-hydrodynamics numerical codes. The interplay between hydrodynamics and LPI—specifically stimulated Raman scatter and crossed-beam energy transfer (CBET)—mostly occurs via momentum and energy deposition into Langmuir and ion acoustic waves. This spatially redistributes energy coupling to the target, which affects the background plasma conditions and thus, modifies laser propagation. This model shows reduced CBET and significant laser energy depletion by Langmuir waves, which reduce the discrepancy between modeling and data from hohlraum experiments on wall x-ray emission and capsule implosion shape.

  1. Validating Laser-Induced Birefringence Theory with Plasma Interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Cecilia [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2015-09-02

    Intense laser beams crossing paths in plasma is theorized to induce birefringence in the medium, resulting from density and refractive index modulations that affect the polarization of incoming light. The goal of the associated experiment, conducted on Janus at Lawrence Livermore’s Jupiter Laser Facility, was to create a tunable laser-plasma waveplate to verify the relationship between dephasing angle and beam intensity, plasma density, plasma temperature, and interaction length. Interferometry analysis of the plasma channel was performed to obtain a density map and to constrain temperature measured from Thomson scattering. Various analysis techniques, including Fast Fourier transform (FFT) and two variations of fringe-counting, were tried because interferograms captured in this experiment contained unusual features such as fringe discontinuity at channel edges, saddle points, and islands. The chosen method is flexible, semi-automated, and uses a fringe tracking algorithm on a reduced image of pre-traced synthetic fringes. Ultimately, a maximum dephasing angle of 49.6° was achieved using a 1200 μm interaction length, and the experimental results appear to agree with predictions.

  2. Progress in the applicability of plasma X-ray lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehl, T., E-mail: T.Kuehl@gsi.de; Aurand, B.; Bagnoud, V.; Ecker, B.; Eisenbarth, U. [GSI (Germany); Guilbaud, O. [Universite Paris Sud (France); Fils, J.; Goette, S. [GSI (Germany); Habib, J. [Universite Paris Sud (France); Hochhaus, D.; Javorkova, D. [GSI (Germany); Neumayer, P. [Extreme Matter Institute, EMMI (Germany); Kazamias, S.; Pittman, M.; Ros, D. [Universite Paris Sud (France); Seres, J.; Spielmann, Ch. [Friedrich Schiller-University (Germany); Zielbauer, B.; Zimmer, D. [GSI (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    Proposed as satellite-based weapons during the 1980s, X-ray lasing was for a long time only achieved with enormous amounts of pump energy in either nuclear explosions or at kilojoule-class laser installations. During the last few years a tremendous development was achieved, most visible in the realisation of the FEL lasers at DESY and SLAC. As important for a wider applicability is the enormous reduction in pump energy for laser pumped plasma X-ray lasers, which now brings such devices into the range of applications for diagnostics and spectroscopy even in smaller laboratories. Main developments were the transient excitation scheme and the optimized pumping concepts. This paper concentrates on developments at the GSI Helmholtzcenter at Darmstadt aiming towards reliable X-ray laser sources in the range from 50 to several 100 eV. The main driving forces for the laser development at GSI are the possible application for the spectroscopy of Li-like ions in the storage ring ESR and the future storage ring NESR at FAIR, and the interest in novel plasma diagnostics.

  3. Optical diagnostics for laser wakefields in plasma channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaul, E. W.; Le Blanc, S. P.; Downer, M. C.

    1998-11-01

    Laser wakefield accelerators can excite large amplitude electrostatic fields (E >= 100 GV/m) which are potentially suitable for compact accelerators and advanced high energy colliders. An accurate diagnostic tool is necessary to test the physical effects in the wakefield predicted by theory and numerical simulations, and to have control over experiments. Frequency domain interferometry (FDI) (C. W. Siders et. al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 3570 (1995) has been developed in previous work. We experimentally demonstrate single-shot FDI as a sensitive diagnostic technique for probing laser wakefields. To generate wakefields longer than the diffraction limit, optical guiding of the laser pulse is necessary. An optical guide is formed by the hydrodynamic expansion of a cylindrical shock wave driven by a laser heated plasma, which is generated by laser pulse focused with an axicon lens (C. G. Durfee and H. M. Milchberg, Phys. Rev. Lett. 71, 2409 (1993)) to intensities of ~= 10^13 W/cm^2. These are too low to reach multi-photon ionization or significant collisional ionization in <= 1 atm helium. We preionize Helium gas with an electrical discharge for efficient inverse bremsstrahlung absorption of the laser pulse and formation of a plasma channel. Spatially resolved chirped pulse interferometry is used to measure the radial electron density profile of the channel.

  4. Laser-plasma interactions in large gas-filled hohlraums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, R.E.; Powers, L.V.; Berger, R.L. [and others

    1996-06-01

    Indirect-drive targets planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser consist of spherical fuel capsules enclosed in cylindrical Au hohlraums. Laser beams, arranged in cylindrical rings, heat the inside of the Au wall to produce x rays that in turn heat and implode the capsule to produce fusion conditions in the fuel. Detailed calculations show that adequate implosion symmetry can be maintained by filling the hohlraum interior with low-density, low-Z gases. The plasma produced from the heated gas provides sufficient pressure to keep the radiating Au surface from expanding excessively. As the laser heats this gas, the gas becomes a relatively uniform plasma with small gradients in velocity and density. Such long-scale-length plasmas can be ideal mediums for stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS). SBS can reflect a large fraction of the incident laser light before it is absorbed by the hohlraum; therefore, it is undesirable in an inertial confinement fusion target. To examine the importance of SBS in NIF targets, the authors used Nova to measure SBS from hohlraums with plasma conditions similar to those predicted for high-gain NIF targets. The plasmas differ from the more familiar exploding foil or solid targets as follows: they are hot (3 keV); they have high electron densities (n{sub e}=10{sup 21}cm{sup {minus}3}); and they are nearly stationary, confined within an Au cylinder, and uniform over large distances (>2 mm). These hohlraums have <3% peak SBS backscatter for an interaction beam with intensities of 1-4 x 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}, a laser wavelength of 0.351{micro}m, f/4 or f/8 focusing optics, and a variety of beam smoothing implementations. Based on these conditions the authors conclude that SBS does not appear to be a problem for NIF targets.

  5. Modeling of laser produced plasma and z-pinch x-ray lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, J; Frati, M; Gonzales, J J; Kalashnikov, M P; Marconi, M C; Moreno, C H; Nickels, P V; Osterheld, A L; Rocca, J J; Sandner, W; Shlyaptsev, V N

    1999-02-07

    In this work we describe our theoretical activities in two directions of interest. First, we discuss progress in modeling laser produced plasmas mostly related to transient collisional excitation scheme experiments with Ne- and recently with Ni-like ions. Calculations related to the delay between laser pulses, transient gain duration and hybrid laser/capillary approach are described in more detail. Second, the capillary discharge plasma research, extended to wider range of currents and rise-times has been outlined. We have systematically evaluated the major plasma and atomic kinetic properties by comparing near- and far-field X-ray laser output with that for the capillary Argon X-ray laser operating under typical current values. Consistent with the experiment insight was obtained for the 469{angstrom} X-ray laser shadowgraphy experiments with very small kiloamp currents. At higher currents, as much as {approximately}200 kA we evaluated plasma temperature, density and compared x-ray source size and emitted spectra.

  6. Hybrid Simulation of Laser-Plasma Interactions and Fast Electron Transport in Inhomogeneous Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, B I; Kemp, A; Divol, L

    2009-05-27

    A new framework is introduced for kinetic simulation of laser-plasma interactions in an inhomogenous plasma motivated by the goal of performing integrated kinetic simulations of fast-ignition laser fusion. The algorithm addresses the propagation and absorption of an intense electromagnetic wave in an ionized plasma leading to the generation and transport of an energetic electron component. The energetic electrons propagate farther into the plasma to much higher densities where Coulomb collisions become important. The high-density plasma supports an energetic electron current, return currents, self-consistent electric fields associated with maintaining quasi-neutrality, and self-consistent magnetic fields due to the currents. Collisions of the electrons and ions are calculated accurately to track the energetic electrons and model their interactions with the background plasma. Up to a density well above critical density, where the laser electromagnetic field is evanescent, Maxwell's equations are solved with a conventional particle-based, finite-difference scheme. In the higher-density plasma, Maxwell's equations are solved using an Ohm's law neglecting the inertia of the background electrons with the option of omitting the displacement current in Ampere's law. Particle equations of motion with binary collisions are solved for all electrons and ions throughout the system using weighted particles to resolve the density gradient efficiently. The algorithm is analyzed and demonstrated in simulation examples. The simulation scheme introduced here achieves significantly improved efficiencies.

  7. Studying astrophysical particle acceleration with laser-driven plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiuza, Frederico

    2016-10-01

    The acceleration of non-thermal particles in plasmas is critical for our understanding of explosive astrophysical phenomena, from solar flares to gamma ray bursts. Particle acceleration is thought to be mediated by collisionless shocks and magnetic reconnection. The microphysics underlying these processes and their ability to efficiently convert flow and magnetic energy into non-thermal particles, however, is not yet fully understood. By performing for the first time ab initio 3D particle-in-cell simulations of the interaction of both magnetized and unmagnetized laser-driven plasmas, it is now possible to identify the optimal parameters for the study of particle acceleration in the laboratory relevant to astrophysical scenarios. It is predicted for the Omega and NIF laser conditions that significant non-thermal acceleration can occur during magnetic reconnection of laser-driven magnetized plasmas. Electrons are accelerated by the electric field near the X-points and trapped in contracting magnetic islands. This leads to a power-law tail extending to nearly a hundred times the thermal energy of the plasma and that contains a large fraction of the magnetic energy. The study of unmagnetized interpenetrating plasmas also reveals the possibility of forming collisionless shocks mediated by the Weibel instability on NIF. Under such conditions, both electrons and ions can be energized by scattering out of the Weibel-mediated turbulence. This also leads to power-law spectra that can be detected experimentally. The resulting experimental requirements to probe the microphysics of plasma particle acceleration will be discussed, paving the way for the first experiments of these important processes in the laboratory. As a result of these simulations and theoretical analysis, there are new experiments being planned on the Omega, NIF, and LCLS laser facilities to test these theoretical predictions. This work was supported by the SLAC LDRD program and DOE Office of Science, Fusion

  8. Dense monoenergetic proton beams from chirped laser-plasma interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Galow, Benjamin J; Liseykina, Tatyana V; Harman, Zoltan; Keitel, Christoph H

    2011-01-01

    Interaction of a frequency-chirped laser pulse with single protons and a hydrogen plasma cell is studied analytically and by means of particle-in-cell simulations, respectively. Feasibility of generating ultra-intense (10^7 particles per bunch) and phase-space collimated beams of protons (energy spread of about 1 %) is demonstrated. Phase synchronization of the protons and the laser field, guaranteed by the appropriate chirping of the laser pulse, allows the particles to gain sufficient kinetic energy (around 250 MeV) required for such applications as hadron cancer therapy, from state-of-the-art laser systems of intensities of the order of 10^21 W/cm^2.

  9. Ge laser-generated plasma for ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuffrida, L.; Torrisi, L.; Czarnecka, A.; Wołowski, J.; Quarta, Ge; Calcagnile, L.; Lorusso, A.; Nassisi, V.

    Laser-generated plasma obtained by Ge ablation in vacuum was investigated with the aim to implant energetic Ge ions in light substrates (C, Si, SiO2). Different intensities of laser sources were employed for these experiments: Nd:Yag of Catania-LNS; Nd:Yag of Warsaw-IPPL; excimer laser of Lecce-INFN; iodine laser of Prague-PALS. Different experimental setups were used to generate multiple ion stream emissions, multiple ion energetic distributions, high implantation doses, thin film deposition and post-acceleration effects. `On line' measurements of ion energy were obtained with ion collectors and ion energy analyzer in time-of-flight configuration. `Off line' measurement of Ge implants were obtained with 2.25 MeV helium beam in Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. Results indicated that ion implants show typical deep profiles only for substrates placed along the normal to the target surface at which the ion energy is maximum.

  10. Signal enhancement of neutral He emission lines by fast electron bombardment of laser-induced He plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hery Suyanto

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A time-resolved spectroscopic study is performed on the enhancement signals of He gas plasma emission using nanosecond (ns and picosecond (ps lasers in an orthogonal configuration. The ns laser is used for the He gas plasma generation and the ps laser is employed for the ejection of fast electrons from a metal target, which serves to excite subsequently the He atoms in the plasma. The study is focused on the most dominant He I 587.6 nm and He I 667.8 nm emission lines suggested to be responsible for the He-assisted excitation (HAE mechanism. The time-dependent intensity enhancements induced by the fast electrons generated with a series of delayed ps laser ablations are deduced from the intensity time profiles of both He emission lines. The results clearly lead to the conclusion that the metastable excited triplet He atoms are actually the species overwhelmingly produced during the recombination process in the ns laser-induced He gas plasma. These metastable He atoms are believed to serve as the major energy source for the delayed excitation of analyte atoms in ns laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS using He ambient gas.

  11. Signal enhancement of neutral He emission lines by fast electron bombardment of laser-induced He plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyanto, Hery; Pardede, Marincan; Hedwig, Rinda; Marpaung, Alion Mangasi; Ramli, Muliadi; Lie, Tjung Jie; Abdulmadjid, Syahrun Nur; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Tjia, May On; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2016-08-01

    A time-resolved spectroscopic study is performed on the enhancement signals of He gas plasma emission using nanosecond (ns) and picosecond (ps) lasers in an orthogonal configuration. The ns laser is used for the He gas plasma generation and the ps laser is employed for the ejection of fast electrons from a metal target, which serves to excite subsequently the He atoms in the plasma. The study is focused on the most dominant He I 587.6 nm and He I 667.8 nm emission lines suggested to be responsible for the He-assisted excitation (HAE) mechanism. The time-dependent intensity enhancements induced by the fast electrons generated with a series of delayed ps laser ablations are deduced from the intensity time profiles of both He emission lines. The results clearly lead to the conclusion that the metastable excited triplet He atoms are actually the species overwhelmingly produced during the recombination process in the ns laser-induced He gas plasma. These metastable He atoms are believed to serve as the major energy source for the delayed excitation of analyte atoms in ns laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) using He ambient gas.

  12. Signal enhancement of neutral He emission lines by fast electron bombardment of laser-induced He plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suyanto, Hery [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Udayana University, Kampus Bukit Jimbaran, Denpasar 80361, Bali (Indonesia); Pardede, Marincan [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Pelita Harapan, 1100 M.H. Thamrin Boulevard, Lippo Village, Tangerang 15811 (Indonesia); Hedwig, Rinda [Department of Computer Engineering, Bina Nusantara University, 9 K.H. Syahdan, Jakarta 14810 (Indonesia); Marpaung, Alion Mangasi [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Jakarta State University, Rawamangun, Jakarta 12440 (Indonesia); Ramli, Muliadi [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Syiah Kuala University, Darussalam, Banda Aceh 23111, NAD (Indonesia); Lie, Tjung Jie; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik, E-mail: kurnia18@cbn.net.id [Research Center of Maju Makmur Mandiri Foundation, 40 Srengseng Raya, Kembangan, Jakarta Barat 11630 (Indonesia); Abdulmadjid, Syahrun Nur [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Syiah Kuala University, Darussalam, Banda Aceh 23111, NAD (Indonesia); Tjia, May On [Research Center of Maju Makmur Mandiri Foundation, 40 Srengseng Raya, Kembangan, Jakarta Barat 11630 (Indonesia); Physics of Magnetism and Photonics Group, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, 10 Ganesha,Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Kagawa, Kiichiro [Research Center of Maju Makmur Mandiri Foundation, 40 Srengseng Raya, Kembangan, Jakarta Barat 11630 (Indonesia); Fukui Science Education Academy, Takagi Chuo 2 chome, Fukui 910-0804 (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    A time-resolved spectroscopic study is performed on the enhancement signals of He gas plasma emission using nanosecond (ns) and picosecond (ps) lasers in an orthogonal configuration. The ns laser is used for the He gas plasma generation and the ps laser is employed for the ejection of fast electrons from a metal target, which serves to excite subsequently the He atoms in the plasma. The study is focused on the most dominant He I 587.6 nm and He I 667.8 nm emission lines suggested to be responsible for the He-assisted excitation (HAE) mechanism. The time-dependent intensity enhancements induced by the fast electrons generated with a series of delayed ps laser ablations are deduced from the intensity time profiles of both He emission lines. The results clearly lead to the conclusion that the metastable excited triplet He atoms are actually the species overwhelmingly produced during the recombination process in the ns laser-induced He gas plasma. These metastable He atoms are believed to serve as the major energy source for the delayed excitation of analyte atoms in ns laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) using He ambient gas.

  13. Laser-Plasma Modeling Using PERSEUS Extended-MHD Simulation Code for HED Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlin, Nathaniel; Seyler, Charles

    2016-10-01

    We discuss the use of the PERSEUS extended-MHD simulation code for high-energy-density (HED) plasmas in modeling laser-plasma interactions in relativistic and nonrelativistic regimes. By formulating the fluid equations as a relaxation system in which the current is semi-implicitly time-advanced using the Generalized Ohm's Law, PERSEUS enables modeling of two-fluid phenomena in dense plasmas without the need to resolve the smallest electron length and time scales. For relativistic and nonrelativistic laser-target interactions, we have validated a cycle-averaged absorption (CAA) laser driver model against the direct approach of driving the electromagnetic fields. The CAA model refers to driving the radiation energy and flux rather than the fields, and using hyperbolic radiative transport, coupled to the plasma equations via energy source terms, to model absorption and propagation of the radiation. CAA has the advantage of not requiring adequate grid resolution of each laser wavelength, so that the system can span many wavelengths without requiring prohibitive CPU time. For several laser-target problems, we compare existing MHD results to extended-MHD results generated using PERSEUS with the CAA model, and examine effects arising from Hall physics. This work is supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration stewardship sciences academic program under Department of Energy cooperative agreements DE-FOA-0001153 and DE-NA0001836.

  14. Laser-assisted delivery of topical methotrexate - in vitro investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taudorf, Elisabeth Hjardem

    2016-06-01

    Ablative fractional lasers (AFXL) are increasingly used to treat dermatological disorders and to facilitate laser-assisted topical drug delivery. In this thesis, laser-tissue interactions generated by stacked pulses with a miniaturized low-power 2,940 nm AFXL were characterized (study I). Knowledge of the correlation between laser parameters and tissue effects was used to deliver methotrexate (MTX) topically through microscopic ablation zones (MAZs) of precise dimensions. MTX is a well-known chemotherapeutic and anti-inflammatory drug that may cause systemic adverse effects, and topical delivery is thus of potential benefit. The impact of MAZ depth (study II) and transport kinetics (study III) on MTX deposition in skin as well as transdermal permeation was determined in vitro. Quantitative analyses of dermal and transdermal MTX concentrations were performed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) (study II & III), while qualitative analyses of MTX biodistribution in skin were illustrated and semi-quantified by fluorescence microscopy (study II & III) and desorption electro spray mass spectrometry imaging (DESI-MSI) (study III). Laser-tissue interactions generated by AFXL: AFXL-exposure generated a variety of MAZ-dimensions. MAZ depth increased linearly with the logarithm of total energy delivered by stacked pulses, but was also affected by variations in power, pulse energy, pulse duration, and pulse repetition rate. Coagulation zones lining MAZs increased linearly with the applied total energy, while MAZ width increased linearly with the logarithm of stacked pulses. Results were gathered in a mathematical model estimating relations between laser parameters and specific MAZ dimensions. Impact of MAZ depth on AFXL-assisted topical MTX delivery: Pretreatment by AFXL facilitated topical MTX delivery to all skin layers. Deeper MAZs increased total MTX deposition in skin compared to superficial MAZs and altered the intradermal biodistribution profile towards

  15. Minimally invasive laser-assisted treatment of arytenoid chondritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullins, Kenneth E.

    2001-05-01

    Five adult performance horses presented with the complaints of exercise intolerance and/or upper airway noise. Endoscopy revealed reduced arytenoid movement, mucosal defects with protruding granulation masses and occasional perilaryngeal swelling. While standing, a 1-cm stab incision was created, and a 5-mm trocar with sleeve was inserted through the cricothyroid membrane using nasopharyngeal endoscopic guidance. A fiber guide containing a 600-micron diode free-beam laser fiber was inserted, and the masses were ablated to the cartilage surface. Lesions determined to be limited to the cartilage substance were further ablated using the laser. Lesions determined to extend through the cartilage were manually debrided using an angled curette. The wounds were left unsutured after placing 2-3 ml of antiseptic ointment subcutaneously. Reexamination revealed resolution of the lesions in all horses, and arytenoid mobility was present. Lesions affecting the corniculate process (two) resulted in noticeable atrophy. The author concludes that laser-assisted debridement of septic tracts in the arytenoid cartilages that have not become completely deformed by the process is a reasonable procedure to restore athletic function.

  16. Resident surgeon efficiency in femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittner, Andrew C; Sullivan, Brian R

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Comparison of resident surgeon performance efficiencies in femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) versus conventional phacoemulsification. Patients and methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted on consecutive patients undergoing phacoemulsification cataract surgery performed by senior ophthalmology residents under the supervision of 1 attending physician during a 9-month period in a large Veterans Affairs medical center. Medical records were reviewed for demographic information, preoperative nucleus grade, femtosecond laser pretreatment, operative procedure times, total operating room times, and surgical complications. Review of digital video records provided quantitative interval measurements of core steps of the procedures, including completion of incisions, anterior capsulotomy, nucleus removal, cortical removal, and intraocular lens implantation. Results Total room time, operation time, and corneal incision completion time were found to be significantly longer in the femtosecond laser group versus the traditional phacoemulsification group (each Pcataract surgery is generally less efficient when trainees have more experience with traditional phacoemulsification. FLACS was found to have a significant advantage in completion of capsulotomy, but subsequent surgical steps were not shorter or longer. Resident learning curve for the FLACS technology may partially explain the disparities of performance. Educators should be cognizant of a potential for lower procedural efficiency when introducing FLACS into resident training. PMID:28203055

  17. An improved model to analyze Langmuir probe assisted photo-detachment signal for measuring electronegative plasma parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirse, Nishant; Oudini, Noureddine; Bendib, Abderrezeg; Ellingboe, Albert R.

    2016-09-01

    A diagnostic technique for measuring negative ion parameters based on Langmuir probe assisted laser photo-detachment relies on a theoretical model which relates the rise in the electron saturation current to electronegativity in the plasma. The existing model depend on various assumptions and neglect electrostatic potential barrier formed between the laser column (electropositive column) and the surrounding electronegative plasma in order to prevent the outward flow of electrons from the electropositive plasma column. These assumptions leads to erroneous estimation of the plasma electronegativity. In the present work, we present an analytical model to analyze Langmuir probe assisted photo-detachment signal in order to improve the accuracy of measured electronegativity and extended this technique for measuring electron temperature and charged species density. The analytical model is validated using both experiments and particle-in-cell simulation. The results shows improved accuracy in the measured parameters when compared to existing model. This work was supported by the Korea Institute for the Advancement of Technology and Ministry of Knowledge Economy (L-2010-1438-000), Republic of Korea, Enterprise Ireland and the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) under NSRF 2007-2013.

  18. Laser-Hole Boring into Overdense Plasmas Measured with Soft X-Ray Laser Probing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, K. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada Oka 2-6, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, (Japan); Kodama, R. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada Oka 2-6, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, (Japan); Tanaka, K. A. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada Oka 2-6, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, (Japan); Hashimoto, H. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada Oka 2-6, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, (Japan); Kato, Y. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada Oka 2-6, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, (Japan); Mima, K. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada Oka 2-6, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, (Japan); Weber, F. A. [University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Barbee, T. W. Jr. [University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Da Silva, L. B. [University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2000-03-13

    A laser self-focused channel formation into overdense plasmas was observed using a soft x-ray laser probe system with a grid image refractometry (GIR) technique. 1.053 {mu}m laser light with a 100 ps pulse duration was focused onto a preformed plasma at an intensity of 2x10{sup 17} W /cm{sup 2} . Cross sections of the channel were obtained which show a 30 {mu}m diameter in overdense plasmas. The channel width in the overdense region was kept narrow as a result of self-focusing. Conically diverging density ridges were also observed along the channel, indicating a Mach cone created by a shock wave due to the supersonic propagation of the channel front. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  19. Plasma Cathode for E-Beam Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-08-01

    JMJIIJUillWWpi^WiffW^HipaHIP’Pi1’’’ "a" ii.lllVi;lM’iiWMlMBfj!|l|>WiiU|’lUW"L’l’w«|M>l|Wy™.^J"^^y-ff^w», iitM ^^^ The 4 cm x 40 cm plasma cathode e-gun, which is

  20. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of tantalum plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Sidra; Bashir, Shazia; Hayat, Asma; Khaleeq-ur-Rahman, M.; Faizan–ul-Haq [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, GC University, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2013-07-15

    Laser Induced Breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of Tantalum (Ta) plasma has been investigated. For this purpose Q-switched Nd: YAG laser pulses (λ∼ 1064 nm, τ∼ 10 ns) of maximum pulse energy of 100 mJ have been employed as an ablation source. Ta targets were exposed under the ambient environment of various gases of Ar, mixture (CO{sub 2}: N{sub 2}: He), O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and He under various filling pressure. The emission spectrum of Ta is observed by using LIBS spectrometer. The emission intensity, excitation temperature, and electron number density of Ta plasma have been evaluated as a function of pressure for various gases. Our experimental results reveal that the optical emission intensity, the electron temperature and density are strongly dependent upon the nature and pressure of ambient environment. The SEM analysis of the ablated Ta target has also been carried out to explore the effect of ambient environment on the laser induced grown structures. The growth of grain like structures in case of molecular gases and cone-formation in case of inert gases is observed. The evaluated plasma parameters by LIBS analysis such as electron temperature and the electron density are well correlated with the surface modification of laser irradiated Ta revealed by SEM analysis.

  1. Laser initiation and decay processes in an organic vapor plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Guowen

    A large volume organic molecular plasma (hundreds of cm3) is created by a 193 nm laser ionizing an organic molecule, Tetrakis-(dimethylamino)-ethylene (TMAE). The plasma is found to be characterized by high electron density (10 13-1011cm-3), low electron temperature (~0.1 eV), fast creation (~10 ns) and rapid decaying (electron-ion recombination coefficient ~10-6 cm3/s). Fast Langmuir probe (LP) techniques are developed for diagnosing this plasma, including a novel probe design and fabrication, a fast detection system, sampling, indirect probe heating, electro-magnetic shielding and dummy probe techniques. Plasma physical processes regarding fast LP diagnostics for different time scales (t> and <100 ns) are studied. A theory for the correction due to a rapidly decaying plasma to LP measurements is developed. The mechanisms responsible for the plasma decay are studied, and a delayed ionization process is found to be important in interpreting the decay processes. It is also found that nitrogen can enhance the delayed emission of a TMAE Rydberg state from the TMAE plasma. This result strongly suggests that a long-lifetime highly-excited state is important in the TMAE plasma decay process. This result supports the delayed ionization mechanism. A model combining electron-ion recombination and delayed ionization processes is developed to calculate the delayed ionization lifetime.

  2. Characterization of O-glycosylated precursors of insulin-like growth factor II by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jespersen, S.; Koedam, J.A.; Hoogerbrugge, C.M.; Tjaden, U.R.; Greef, J. van der; Brande, J.L. van den

    1996-01-01

    High molecular weight precursors of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) were isolated from Cohn fraction IV of human plasma by ultrafiltration, affinity chromatography and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Molecular weight determination by matrix-assisted laser

  3. Model of a laser heated plasma interacting with walls arising in laser keyhole welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tix, C.; Simon, G.

    1994-07-01

    In laser welding with laser intensities of approximately 1011 W/m2, a hole, called a keyhole, is formed in the material. In this keyhole a plasma is detected, which is characterized by high pressure as well as being influenced by the boundary of the keyhole. Experimental data on plasma parameters are rare and difficult to obtain [W. Sokolowski, G. Herziger, and E. Beyer, in High Power Lasers and Laser Machining Technology, edited by A. Quenzer, SPIE Proc. Vol. 1132 (SPIE, Bellingham, WA, 1989), pp. 288-295]. In a previous paper [C. Tix and G. Simon, J. Phys. D 26, 2066 (1993)] we considered just a simple plasma model without excited states and with constant ion-neutral-atom temperature. Therefore we neglected radiative transport of excitations and underestimated the ion-neutral-atom temperature and the ionization rate. Here we extend our previous model for a continuous CO2 laser and iron and take into account radiative transfer of excitations and a variable ion-neutral-atom temperature. We consider singly charged ions, electrons, and three excitation states of neutral atoms. The plasma is divided in plasma bulk, presheath, and sheath. The transport equations are solved with boundary conditions mainly determined through the appearance of walls. Some effort is made to clarify the energy transport mechanism from the laser beam into the material. Dependent on the incident laser power, the mean electron temperature and density are obtained to be 1.0-1.3 eV and 2.5×1023-3×1023 m-3. Radiative transport of excitations does not contribute significantly to the energy transport.

  4. Applying Quantum Cascade Laser Spectroscopy in Plasma Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Röpcke

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The considerably higher power and wider frequency coverage available from quantum cascade lasers (QCLs in comparison to lead salt diode lasers has led to substantial advances when QCLs are used in pure and applied infrared spectroscopy. Furthermore, they can be used in both pulsed and continuous wave (cw operation, opening up new possibilities in quantitative time resolved applications in plasmas both in the laboratory and in industry as shown in this article. However, in order to determine absolute concentrations accurately using pulsed QCLs, careful attention has to be paid to features like power saturation phenomena. Hence, we begin with a discussion of the non-linear effects which must be considered when using short or long pulse mode operation. More recently, cw QCLs have been introduced which have the advantage of higher power, better spectral resolution and lower fluctuations in light intensity compared to pulsed devices. They have proved particularly useful in sensing applications in plasmas when very low concentrations have to be monitored. Finally, the use of cw external cavity QCLs (EC-QCLs for multi species detection is described, using a diagnostics study of a methane/nitrogen plasma as an example. The wide frequency coverage of this type of QCL laser, which is significantly broader than from a distributed feedback QCL (DFB-QCL, is a substantial advantage for multi species detection. Therefore, cw EC-QCLs are state of the art devices and have enormous potential for future plasma diagnostic studies.

  5. Laser-induced breakdown plasma-based sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Steven T.

    2010-04-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is dependent on the interaction between the initiating Laser sequence, the sampled material and the intermediate plasma states. Pulse shaping and timing have been empirically demonstrated to have significant impact on the signal available for active/passive detection and identification. The transient nature of empirical LIBS work makes data collection for optimization an expensive process. Guidance from effective computer simulation represents an alternative. This computational method for CBRNE sensing applications models the Laser, material and plasma interaction for the purpose of performance prediction and enhancement. This paper emphasizes the aspects of light, plasma, and material interaction relevant to portable sensor development for LIBS. The modeling structure emphasizes energy balances and empirical fit descriptions with limited detailed-balance and finite element approaches where required. Dusty plasma from partially decomposed material sample interaction with pulse dynamics is considered. This heuristic is used to reduce run times and computer loads. Computer simulations and some data for validation are presented. A new University of Memphis HPC/super-computer (~15 TFLOPS) is used to enhance simulation. Results coordinated with related effort at Arkansas State University. Implications for ongoing empirical work are presented with special attention paid to the application of compressive sensing for signal processing, feature extraction, and classification.

  6. Resident surgeon efficiency in femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pittner AC

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrew C Pittner,1 Brian R Sullivan2 1Department of Ophthalmology, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, 2Edward Hines Jr VA Hospital, Ophthalmology Section, Hines, IL, USA Purpose: Comparison of resident surgeon performance efficiencies in femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS versus conventional phacoemulsification.Patients and methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted on consecutive patients undergoing phacoemulsification cataract surgery performed by senior ophthalmology residents under the supervision of 1 attending physician during a 9-month period in a large Veterans Affairs medical center. Medical records were reviewed for demographic information, preoperative nucleus grade, femtosecond laser pretreatment, operative procedure times, total operating room times, and surgical complications. Review of digital video records provided quantitative interval measurements of core steps of the procedures, including completion of incisions, anterior capsulotomy, nucleus removal, cortical removal, and intraocular lens implantation.Results: Total room time, operation time, and corneal incision completion time were found to be significantly longer in the femtosecond laser group versus the traditional phacoemulsification group (each P<0.05. Mean duration for manual completion of anterior capsulotomy was shorter in the laser group (P<0.001. There were no statistically significant differences in the individual steps of nucleus removal, cortical removal, or intraocular lens placement. Surgical complication rates were not significantly different between the groups.Conclusion: In early cases, resident completion of femtosecond cataract surgery is generally less efficient when trainees have more experience with traditional phacoemulsification. FLACS was found to have a significant advantage in completion of capsulotomy, but subsequent surgical steps were not shorter or longer. Resident learning curve for the

  7. Microstructure and Electrical Properties of PMN-PT Thin Films Prepared by Oxygen Plasma Assisted Pulsed Laser Deposition%氧等离子体辅助脉冲激光沉积法制备PMN-PT薄膜的微观结构和电学性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何邕; 李效民; 高相东; 冷雪; 王炜

    2011-01-01

    Lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) ferroelectric thin films with composition near the morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) were deposited on Si substrate by oxygen plasma assisted pulsed laser deposition (PLD).Highly (001)-oriented PMN-PT thin films with lower oxygen defect and higher crystalline property were obtained.The results show that the microstructure and electrical properties of PMN-PT thin films strongly depend on the partial pressure and the activity of oxygen in the deposition process.With the use of oxygen plasma,the dielectric constant of the PMN-PT thin film is increased from 1484 to 3012,the remnant polarization (2Pr) changes from 18μC/cm2 to 38 μC/cm2.%采用氧等离子体辅助脉冲激光沉积方法(PLD)在硅衬底上,制备出高度(001)取向的钙钛矿相结构钛铌镁酸铅(PMN-PT)薄膜.研究了氧等离子体辅助对PMN-PT薄膜相结构、微观形貌和电学性能的影响.结果表明,通过在薄膜沉积过程中引入高活性的氧等离子,可以有效地提高PMN-PT薄膜的结晶质量和微观结构.未采用氧等离子体辅助PLD方法制备PMN-PT薄膜的介电常数(10 kHz)和剩余极化(2Pr)分别为1484和18 μC/cm2,通过采用氧等离子体辅助,其介电常数和剩余极化分别提高至3012和38 μC/cm2.

  8. Parametric modeling and optimization of laser scanning parameters during laser assisted machining of Inconel 718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, K.; Ramanujam, R.; Kuppan, P.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a parametric effect, microstructure, micro-hardness and optimization of laser scanning parameters (LSP) on heating experiments during laser assisted machining of Inconel 718 alloy. The laser source used for experiments is a continuous wave Nd:YAG laser with maximum power of 2 kW. The experimental parameters in the present study are cutting speed in the range of 50-100 m/min, feed rate of 0.05-0.1 mm/rev, laser power of 1.25-1.75 kW and approach angle of 60-90°of laser beam axis to tool. The plan of experiments are based on central composite rotatable design L31 (43) orthogonal array. The surface temperature is measured via on-line measurement using infrared pyrometer. Parametric significance on surface temperature is analysed using response surface methodology (RSM), analysis of variance (ANOVA) and 3D surface graphs. The structural change of the material surface is observed using optical microscope and quantitative measurement of heat affected depth that are analysed by Vicker's hardness test. The results indicate that the laser power and approach angle are the most significant parameters to affect the surface temperature. The optimum ranges of laser power and approach angle was identified as 1.25-1.5 kW and 60-65° using overlaid contour plot. The developed second order regression model is found to be in good agreement with experimental values with R2 values of 0.96 and 0.94 respectively for surface temperature and heat affected depth.

  9. Front surface structured targets for enhancing laser-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Joseph; George, Kevin; Ji, Liangliang; Yalamanchili, Sasir; Simonoff, Ethan; Cochran, Ginevra; Daskalova, Rebecca; Poole, Patrick; Willis, Christopher; Lewis, Nathan; Schumacher, Douglass

    2016-10-01

    We present recent progress made using front surface structured interfaces for enhancing ultrashort, relativistic laser-plasma interactions. Structured targets can increase laser absorption and enhance ion acceleration through a number of mechanisms such as direct laser acceleration and laser guiding. We detail experimental results obtained at the Scarlet laser facility on hollow, micron-scale plasma channels for enhancing electron acceleration. These targets show a greater than three times enhancement in the electron cutoff energy as well as an increased slope temperature for the electron distribution when compared to a flat interface. Using three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we have modeled the interaction to give insight into the physical processes responsible for the enhancement. Furthermore, we have used PIC simulations to design structures that are more advantageous for ion acceleration. Such targets necessitate advanced target fabrication methods and we describe techniques used to manufacture optimized structures, including vapor-liquid-solid growth, cryogenic etching, and 3D printing using two-photon-polymerization. This material is based upon work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Award Number FA9550-14-1-0085.

  10. Bernstein wave aided laser third harmonic generation in a plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Yachna; Tripathi, Deepak; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-09-01

    The process of Bernstein wave aided resonant third harmonic generation of laser in a magnetized plasma is investigated. The extra-ordinary mode (X-mode) laser of frequency ω 0 and wave number k → 0 , travelling across the magnetic field in a plasma, exerts a second harmonic ponderomotive force on the electrons imparting them an oscillatory velocity v → 2 ω0 , 2 k → 0 . This velocity beats with the density perturbation due to the Bernstein wave to produce a density perturbation at cyclotron frequency shifted second harmonic. The density perturbation couples with the oscillatory velocity v → ω0 , k → 0 of X-mode of the laser to produce the cyclotron frequency shifted third harmonic current density leading to harmonic radiation. The phase matching condition for the up shifted frequency is satisfied when the Bernstein wave is nearly counter-propagating to the laser. As the transverse wave number of the Bernstein wave is large, it is effective in the phase matched third harmonic generation, when the laser frequency is not too far from the upper hybrid frequency.

  11. Laser plasma interaction in rugby-shaped hohlraums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson-Laborde, P.-E.; Philippe, F.; Tassin, V.; Monteil, M.-C.; Gauthier, P.; Casner, A.; Depierreux, S.; Seytor, P.; Teychenne, D.; Loiseau, P.; Freymerie, P.

    2014-10-01

    Rugby shaped-hohlraum has proven to give high performance compared to a classical similar-diameter cylinder hohlraum. Due to this performance, this hohlraum has been chosen as baseline ignition target for the Laser MegaJoule (LMJ). Many experiments have therefore been performed during the last years on the Omega laser facility in order to study in details the rugby hohlraum. In this talk, we will discuss the interpretation of these experiments from the point of view of the laser plasma instability problem. Experimental comparisons have been done between rugby, cylinder and elliptical shape rugby hohlraums and we will discuss how the geometry differences will affect the evolution of laser plasma instabilities (LPI). The efficiency of laser smoothing techniques on these instabilities will also be discussed as well as gas filling effect. The experimental results will be compared with FCI2 hydroradiative calculations and linear postprocessing with Piranah. Experimental Raman and Brillouin spectrum, from which we can infer the location of the parametric instabilities, will be compared to simulated ones, and will give the possibility to compare LPI between the different hohlraum geometries.

  12. Nuclear Fusion Effects Induced in Intense Laser-Generated Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Torrisi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Deutered polyethylene (CD2n thin and thick targets were irradiated in high vacuum by infrared laser pulses at 1015W/cm2 intensity. The high laser energy transferred to the polymer generates plasma, expanding in vacuum at supersonic velocity, accelerating hydrogen and carbon ions. Deuterium ions at kinetic energies above 4 MeV have been measured by using ion collectors and SiC detectors in time-of-flight configuration. At these energies the deuterium–deuterium collisions may induce over threshold fusion effects, in agreement with the high D-D cross-section valuesaround 3 MeV energy. At the first instants of the plasma generation, during which high temperature, density and ionacceleration occur, the D-D fusions occur as confirmed by the detection of mono-energetic protonsand neutrons with a kinetic energy of 3.0 MeV and 2.5 MeV, respectively, produced by the nuclear reaction. The number of fusion events depends strongly on the experimental set-up, i.e. on the laser parameters (intensity, wavelength, focal spot dimension, target conditions (thickness, chemical composition, absorption coefficient, presence of secondary targets and used geometry (incidence angle, laser spot, secondary target positions.A number of D-D fusion events of the order of 106÷7 per laser shot has been measured.

  13. Laser Mode-Dependent Size of Plasma Zones Induced by Femtosecond Laser Pulses in Fused Silica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Shan-Chun; JIANG Hong-Bing; LIU Yi; GONG Qi-Huang

    2008-01-01

    We carry out the numerical simulations of #emtosecond laser propagation with TEM00 mode, TEM10 mode and a beam combining both the modes in fused silica. It is found that the transverse size of plasma zones induced by laser pulses with the TEM10 mode is smaller than that induced by the TEMoo mode, while the longitudinal size is almost the same, and the saturated plasma density is higher. The transverse size, the longitudinal size and the ratio of the longitudinal to transverse size, for the beam combining both the modes, all could be reduced at the same time in comparison with the TEMoo mode under the same focusing conditions.

  14. Laser interaction based on resonance saturation (LIBORS): an alternative to inverse bremsstrahlung for coupling laser energy into a plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measures, R M; Drewell, N; Cardinal, P

    1979-06-01

    Resonance saturation represents an efficient and rapid method of coupling laser energy into a gaseous medium. In the case of a plasma superelastic collision quenching of the laser maintained resonance state population effectively converts the laser beam energy into translational energy of the free electrons. Subsequently, ionization of the laser pumped species rapidly ensues as a result of both the elevated electron temperature and the effective reduction of the ionization energy for those atoms maintained in the resonance state by the laser radiation. This method of coupling laser energy into a plasma has several advantages over inverse bremsstrahlung and could therefore be applicable to several areas of current interest including plasma channel formation for transportation of electron and ion beams, x-ray laser development, laser fusion, negative ion beam production, and the conversion of laser energy to electricity.

  15. In situ monitoring of single-wall carbon nanotube laser assisted growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haluška, M.; Bellouard, Y.; Burgt, Y. van de; Dietzel, A.H.

    2010-01-01

    Laser assisted catalytic chemical vapor deposition has recently emerged as an attractive method for locally growing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a cold wall reactor. So far, reported laser assisted CNT growth has been carried out without insitu process monitoring. This has made it difficult to control

  16. Streak Tubes for Diagnostics of Lasers and Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, A. Yu; Konovalov, P. I.; Nurtdinov, R. I.; Vikulin, M. P.; Pryanishnikov, I. G.; Dolotov, A. S.; Krapiva, P. S.

    2016-09-01

    Designing a facility for laser fusion research requires sufficient advancement in diagnostics techniques for lasers and plasmas, including those involving streak camera imaging. Maximum specifications of streak cameras depend on the parameters of streak tubes. The paper illustrates how these devices function, and which of their parameters are limiting. The paper presents a novel technological platform designed at VNIIA, which was used to develop a new generation of streak tubes. Using these streak tubes in streak cameras, the efficiency of streak camera imaging techniques can be improved by several orders of magnitude, and new techniques can be designed.

  17. Laser assisted die bending: a new application of high power diode lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuöcker, D.; Schumi, T.; Spitzer, O.; Bammer, F.; Schuöcker, G.; Sperrer, G.

    2015-02-01

    Nowadays high power lasers are mainly used for cutting of sheet metals, for welding, hardening and rapid prototyping. In the forming of sheet metals as bending or deep drawing lasers are not used. Nevertheless a few years ago a new application of high power lasers has been invented, where bending of materials that break at room temperature becomes possible by heating them along the bending edge with high power lasers thus allowing their treatment without cracks and rupture. For this purpose a large number of diode lasers are arranged in the bottom tool of a bending machine (a V-shaped die) which heat up the initially flat sheet metal during the bending process what is performed by pressing it into the die with a knife shaped upper tool where due to the laser heating the material is softened and thus cracks are avoided. For the technical realization of the new process of laser assisted die bending, modules equipped with numerous laser diodes and a total beam power of 2,5 kW are used. The light emitted by these modules enters a tool with a length of 15cm and is deflected towards the workpiece. By using ten of these modules with adjacent dies and by integrating those in a bending press a bending edge of sheet metals with a length of 1500mm can be realized. Such a bending press with laser assistance also needs energization with a power of practically 50kW, a respective water flow, a heat exchanger system and also a control for all functions of this system. Special measures have also been developed to avoid radiating of those tools that are not covered by a workpiece in the case of bending edges shorter than the full length of the bending tools whereas individual short circuiting of diode modules can be performed. Specific measures to ensure a safe operation without any harm to the operational person have been realized. Exploitation of the bending process has been carried out for titanium, where material thicknesses up to 3mm have been bent successfully.

  18. Relativistic Mirrors in Laser Plasmas (Analytical Methods)

    CERN Document Server

    Bulanov, Sergei V; Kando, Masaki; Koga, James K

    2016-01-01

    Relativistic flying mirrors in plasmas are realized as thin dense electron (or electron-ion) layers accelerated by high-intensity electromagnetic waves to velocities close to the speed of light in vacuum. The reflection of an electromagnetic wave from the relativistic mirror results in its energy and frequency changing. In a counter-propagation configuration, the frequency of the reflected wave is multiplied by the factor proportional to the Lorentz factor squared. This scientific area promises the development of sources of ultrashort X-ray pulses in the attosecond range. The expected intensity will reach the level at which the effects predicted by nonlinear quantum electrodynamics start to play a key role.

  19. Exploring novel structures for manipulating relativistic laser-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Liangliang

    2016-10-01

    The prospect of realizing compact particle accelerators and x-ray sources based on high power lasers has gained numerous attention. Utilization of all the proposed schemes in the field requires the laser-matter-interaction process to be repeatable or moreover, controllable. This has been very challenging at ultra-high light intensities due to the pre-pulse issue and the limitation on target manufacturing. With recent development on pulse cleaning technique, such as XPW and the use of plasma mirror, we now propose a novel approach that leverages recent advancements in 3D nano-printing of materials and high contrast lasers to manipulate the laser-matter interactions on the micro-scales. The current 3D direct laser-writing (DLW) technique can produce repeatable structures with at a resolution as high as 100 nm. Based on 3D PIC simulations, we explored two typical structures, the micro-cylinder and micro-tube targets. The former serves to enhance and control laser-electron acceleration and the latter is dedicated to manipulate relativistic light intensity. First principle-of-proof experiments were carried out in the SCARLET laser facility and confirmed some of our predictions on enhancing direct laser acceleration of electrons and ion acceleration. We believe that the use of the micro-structured elements provides another degree of freedom in LPI and these new results will open new paths towards micro-engineering interaction process that will benefit high field science, laser-based proton therapy, near-QED physics, and relativistic nonlinear optics. This work is supported by the AFOSR Basic Research Initiative (FA9550-14-1-0085).

  20. Comparative research of plasma-assisted milling and traditional milling in synthesizing AlN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sen; Wang, Wenchun; Liu, Zhijie; Yang, Dezheng

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, traditional milling and discharge plasma-assisted milling are employed to synthesize aluminum nitride (AlN) powder at nanometer scale by milling the mixture of aluminum and lithium hydroxide monohydrate. AlN powders can be generated in traditional milling and plasma-assisted milling in an hour milling time. Differential thermal analysis curves show that the reaction temperature of the powders treated by plasma-assisted milling is lower than that of traditional milling. These results indicate that plasma-assisted milling has higher efficiency in the synthesis of AlN, getting smaller crystallite size and activating powder. Moreover, an optical emission spectrum is employed to demonstrate the active species in plasma. The different formation process of AlN in the two-milling process, and the promotion effects of plasma in the milling process are discussed.

  1. Refractive Q-switching of a ruby laser by a moving plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dembinski, M.; John, P.K.

    1982-10-15

    A ruby laser was Q-switched by means of a plasma. The plasma, which had a density of up to 10/sup 18/ cm/sup -3/, was produced in an electromagnetic shock tube. The density gradient created by the reflected plasma was large enough to produce measurable refraction of the laser beam. The laser cavity, which was initially misaligned, attained perfect alignment when the plasma was introduced into the cavity.

  2. Measurements of Electron Density Profiles of Plasmas Produced by Nike KrF Laser for Laser Plasma Instability (LPI) Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaechul; Weaver, J. L.; Obenschain, S. P.; Schmitt, A. J.; Kehne, D. M.; Karasik, M.; Chan, L.-Y.; Serlin, V.; Phillips, L.

    2013-10-01

    Knowing spatial profiles of electron density (ne) in the underdense coronal region (n Nike LPI experiment, a side-on grid imaging refractometer (GIR) was deployed for measuring the underdense plasma profiles. Plasmas were produced from flat CH targets illuminated by Nike KrF laser with total energies up to 1 kJ of 0.5 ~ 1 nsec FWHM pulses. The GIR resolved ne up to 3 ×1021 /cm3 in space taking 2D snapshot images of probe laser (λ = 263 nm, Δt = 10 ps) beamlets (50 μm spacing) refracted by the plasma at a selected time during the laser illumination. The individual beamlet transmittances were also measured for Te estimation. Time-resolved spectrometers with an absolute-intensity-calibrated photodiode array and a streak camera simultaneously detected light emission from the plasma in spectral ranges relevant to Raman (SRS) and two plasmon decay instabilities. The measured spatial profiles are compared with simulation results from the FAST3D radiation hydrocode and their effects on the LPI observations are investigated. Work supported by DoE/NNSA and performed at Naval Research Laboratory.

  3. The Gridless Plasma Ion Source(GIS)for Plasma Ion Assisted Optical Coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尤大伟; 李晓谦; 王宇; 林永昌

    2004-01-01

    High-quality optical coating is a key technology for modern optics. Ion-assisted deposition technology was used to improve the vaporized coating in 1980's. The GIS (gridless ion source), which is an advanced plasma source for producing a high-quality optical coating in large area, can produce a large area uniformity>1000 mm(diameter), a high ion current density ~ 0.5mA/cm2, 20 eV ~ 200 eV energetic plasma ions and can activate reactive gas and film atoms. Now we have developed a GIS system. The GIS and the plasma ion-assisted deposition technology are investigated to achieve a high-quality optical coating. The GIS is a high power and high current source with a power of I kW ~ 7.5 kW, a current of 10 A ~ 70 A and an ion density of 200μA/cm2 ~ 500μA/cm2. Because of the special magnetic structure, the plasma-ion extraction efficiency has been improved to obtain a maximum ion density of 500μA/cm2 in the medium power (~ 4 kW) level. The GIS applied is of a special cathode structure, so that the GIS operation can be maintained under a rather low power and the lifetime of cathode will be extended. The GIS has been installed in the LPSX-1200 type box coating system. The coated TiO2, SiO2 films such as antireflective films with the system have the same performance reported by Leybold Co, 1992, along with a controllable refractive index and film structure.

  4. Laser fluence dependence on emission dynamics of ultrafast laser induced copper plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anoop, K. K.; Harilal, S. S.; Philip, Reji; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S.

    2016-11-14

    The characteristic emission features of a laser-produced plasma strongly depend strongly on the laser fluence. We investigated the spatial and temporal dynamics of neutrals and ions in femtosecond laser (800 nm, ≈ 40 fs, Ti:Sapphire) induced copper plasma in vacuum using both optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and spectrally resolved two-dimensional (2D) imaging methods over a wide fluence range of 0.5 J/cm2-77.5 J/cm2. 2D fast gated monochromatic images showed distinct plume splitting between the neutral and ions especially at moderate to higher fluence ranges. OES studies at low to moderate laser fluence regime confirm intense neutral line emission over the ion emission whereas this trend changes at higher laser fluence with dominance of the latter. This evidences a clear change in the physical processes involved in femtosecond laser matter interaction at high input laser intensity. The obtained ion dynamics resulting from the OES, and spectrally resolved 2D imaging are compared with charged particle measurement employing Faraday cup and Langmuir probe and results showed good correlation.

  5. Posterior Corneal Surface Stability after Femtosecond Laser-Assisted Keratomileusis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Cagini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate posterior corneal surface variation after femtosecond laser-assisted keratomileusis in patients with myopia and myopic astigmatism. Patients were evaluated by corneal tomography preoperatively and at 1, 6, and 12 months. We analyzed changes in the posterior corneal curvature, posterior corneal elevation, and anterior chamber depth. Moreover, we explored correlation between corneal ablation depth, residual corneal thickness, percentage of ablated corneal tissue, and preoperative corneal thickness. During follow-up, the posterior corneal surface did not have a significant forward corneal shift: no significant linear relationships emerged between the anterior displacement of the posterior corneal surface and corneal ablation depth, residual corneal thickness, or percentage of ablated corneal tissue.

  6. Chromophore-assisted laser inactivation in neural development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Li; Nico Stuurman; Guangshuo Ou

    2012-01-01

    Chromophore-assisted laser inactivation (CALI) is a technique that uses photochemically-generated reactive oxygen species to acutely inactivate target proteins in living cells.Neural development includes highly dynamic cellular processes such as asymmetric cell division,migration,axon and dendrite outgrowth and synaptogenesis.Although many key molecules of neural development have been identified since the past decades,their spatiotemporal contributions to these cellular events are not well understood.CALI provides an appealing tool for elucidating the precise functions of these molecules during neural development.In this review,we summarize the principles of CALI,a recent microscopic setup to perform CALI experiments,and the application of CALI to the study of growth-cone motility and neuroblast asymmetric division.

  7. Electromagnetic Emission from Laser Wakefields in Magnetized Underdense Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡志丹; 盛政明; 丁文君; 王伟民; 董全力; 张杰

    2012-01-01

    A wakefield driven by a short intense laser pulse in a perpendicularly magnetized underdense plasma is studied analytically and numerically for both weakly relativistic and highly relativistic situations. Owing to the DC magnetic field, a transverse component of the electric fields associated with the wakefield appears, while the longitudinal wave is not greatly affected by the magnetic field up to 22 Tesla. Moreover, the scaling law of the transverse field versus the longitudinal field is derived. One-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation results confirm the analytical results. Wakefield transmission through the plasma-vacuum boundary, where electromagnetic emission into vacuum occurs, is also investigated numerically. These results are useful for the generation of terahertz radiation and the diagnosis of laser wakefields.

  8. Direct acceleration of electrons by a CO2 laser in a curved plasma waveguide

    OpenAIRE

    Longqing Yi; Alexander Pukhov; Baifei Shen

    2016-01-01

    Laser plasma interaction with micro-engineered targets at relativistic intensities has been greatly promoted by recent progress in the high contrast lasers and the manufacture of advanced micro- and nano-structures. This opens new possibilities for the physics of laser-matter interaction. Here we propose a novel approach that leverages the advantages of high-pressure CO$_{2}$ laser, laser-waveguide interaction, as well as micro-engineered plasma structure to accelerate electrons to peak energ...

  9. Observation of plasma motion in a coaxial plasma opening switch with a chordal laser interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teramoto, Y.; Urakami, H.; Akiyama, H. [Kumamoto Univ., Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto (Japan); Kohno, S. [Ariake National College of Technology, Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Fukuoka (Japan); Katsuki, S. [Kumamoto Univ., Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    Electron densities in a coaxial plasma opening switch were measured at many lines-of-slight. In the present experiment, electron density was measured by a He-Ne laser interferometer with chordal lines-of sight. In order to observe the motion of the POS plasma, the electron density contours during the conduction, opening and post-opening phases were drawn by combining the results of interferometer experiments. The radial and axial motion of POS plasma was investigated from the density contours. As conduction time progressed, the POS plasma moved toward downstream. At 800 ns, which corresponds to the time of opening in the current waveform, low-density region less than 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} is seen at 10 mm from the cathode. After the opening was completed, the low-density gap disappeared and the shape of the corn-shape-like plasma was distorted. (author)

  10. Fast magnetic reconnection in laser-produced plasma bubbles

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Germaschewski, K.

    2011-01-01

    Recent experiments have observed magnetic reconnection in high-energy-density, laser-produced plasma bubbles, with reconnection rates observed to be much higher than can be explained by classical theory. Based on fully kinetic particle simulations we find that fast reconnection in these strongly driven systems can be explained by magnetic flux pile-up at the shoulder of the current sheet and subsequent fast reconnection via two-fluid, collisionless mechanisms. In the strong drive regime with ...

  11. High Magnetic field generation for laser-plasma experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollock, B B; Froula, D H; Davis, P F; Ross, J S; Fulkerson, S; Bower, J; Satariano, J; Price, D; Glenzer, S H

    2006-05-01

    An electromagnetic solenoid was developed to study the effect of magnetic fields on electron thermal transport in laser plasmas. The solenoid, which is driven by a pulsed power system suppling 30 kJ, achieves magnetic fields of 13 T. The field strength was measured on the solenoid axis with a magnetic probe and optical Zeeman splitting. The measurements agree well with analytical estimates. A method for optimizing the solenoid design to achieve magnetic fields exceeding 20 T is presented.

  12. VUV SOURCE FROM PULSED-LASER GENERATED PLASMA

    OpenAIRE

    Laporte, P.; Damany, N.; Damany, H.

    1987-01-01

    We describe a pulsed vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) source consisting of a plasma created by focusing a NdYAG laser beam into rare gases under moderate pressure, and we report on spectral and time properties of that source. Main features are : continuum emission in a large spectral range, with only few lines superimposed, good time characteristics of the pulses, stability, cleanliness, and relatively high repetition rate (20 Hz).

  13. Using optical pyrometer in gas assisted laser cutting of steel sheets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ The use of optical methods of nondestructive testing can permit the real time control of gas assisted laser cutting, which is especially important in cutting metal sheets of large thickness and in other cases when the specified laser power is limited by laser operation modes[1,2].

  14. Using optical pyrometer in gas assisted laser cutting of steel sheets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Grishaev; R.; V.; Dubrov; V.; D.; Dubrovin; N.; G.; Zavalov; Yu.; N.

    2005-01-01

    The use of optical methods of nondestructive testing can permit the real time control of gas assisted laser cutting, which is especially important in cutting metal sheets of large thickness and in other cases when the specified laser power is limited by laser operation modes[1,2].……

  15. Frequency-comb-assisted broadband precision spectroscopy with cascaded diode lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Junqiu; Brasch, Victor; Pfeiffer, Martin H. P.;

    2016-01-01

    Frequency-comb-assisted diode laser spectroscopy, employing both the accuracy of an optical frequency comb and the broad wavelength tuning range of a tunable diode laser, has been widely used in many applications. In this Letter, we present a novel method using cascaded frequency agile diode lasers...

  16. Experimental Investigation on the Ignition Delay Time of Plasma-Assisted Ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yang; Yu, Jin-Lu; He, Li-Ming; Jiang, Yong-Jian; Wu, Yong

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates the ignition performances of plasma-assisted ignition in propane/air mixture. The results show that a shorter ignition delay time is obtained for the plasma ignition than the spark ignition and the average ignition delay time of plasma-assisted ignition can be reduced at least by 50%. The influence of air flow rate of combustor, the arc current and argon flow rate of plasma igniter on ignition delay time are also investigated. The ignition delay time of plasma-assisted ignition increases with increasing air flow rate in the combustor. By increasing the arc current, the plasma ignition will gain more ignition energy to ignite the mixture more easily. The influence of plasma ignition argon flow rates on the ignition delay time is quite minor.

  17. Surgical adhesives for laser-assisted wound closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Diane E.; McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.; Welch, Ashley J.

    2001-10-01

    Solid protein solder-doped polymer membranes were developed for laser-assisted tissue repair. Biodegradable polymer membranes of controlled porosity were fabricated with poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), and salt particles, using a solvent-casting and particulate-leaching technique. The membranes provided a porous scaffold that readily absorbed the traditional protein solder composed of serum albumin, indocyanine green dye, and de-ionized water. In vitro investigations were conducted to assess the influence of various processing parameters on the strength of tissue repairs formed using the new membranes. These parameters included PLGA copolymer and PLGA/PEG blend ratios, membrane pore size, initial albumin weight fraction, and laser irradiance used to denature the solder. Altering the PLGA copolymer ratio had little effect on repair strength, however such variations are known to influence the degradation rate of the membranes. The repair strength increased with increased membrane pore size and bovine serum albumin concentration. The addition of PEG during the membrane casting stage increased the flexibility of the membranes but not necessarily the repair strength. Typically, the repair strength increased with increasing irradiance from 12 to 18 W/cm2. The new solder-doped polymer membranes provided all of the benefits associated with solid protein solders including high repair strength and improved edge coaptation. In addition, the flexible, moldable nature of the new membranes offers the capability of tailoring the membranes to a wide range of clinically relevant geometries.

  18. Laser-assisted manufacturing of super-insulation materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Tao; Park, Byung Kyu; Lee, Woo Il; Hwang, David

    2017-02-01

    Being lightweight materials with good mechanical and thermal properties, hollow glass micro-particles (HGMPs) have been widely studied for multiple applications. In this study, it is shown that by using reduced binder fraction diluted in solvent, enables minimal contacts among the HGMPs assisted by a natural capillary trend, as confirmed by optical and electron microscope imaging. Such material architecture fabricated in a composite level proves to have enhanced thermal insulation performance through quantitative thermal conductivity measurement. Mechanical strength has also been evaluated in terms of particle-binder bonding by tensile test via in-situ microscope inspection. Effect of laser treatment was examined for further improvement of thermal and mechanical properties by selective binder removal and efficient redistribution of remaining binder components. The fabricated composite materials have potential applications to building insulation materials for their scalable manufacturing nature, improved thermal insulation performance and reasonable mechanical strength. Further studies are needed to understand mechanical and thermal properties of the resulting composites, and key fabrication mechanisms involved with laser treatment of complex multi-component and multi-phase systems.

  19. Laser-driven electron beamlines generated by coupling laser-plasma sources with conventional transport systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antici, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via E. Fermi, 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); SAPIENZA, University of Rome, Dip. SBAI, Via A. Scarpa 14, 00161 Rome (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Roma, c/o Dipartimento di Fisica - SAPIENZA, University of Rome, P.le Aldo Moro, 2 - 00185 Rome (Italy); Bacci, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Ferrario, M.; Rossi, A. R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via E. Fermi, 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Benedetti, C. [University of Bologna and INFN - Bologna (Italy); Lancia, L.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L. [SAPIENZA, University of Rome, Dip. SBAI, Via A. Scarpa 14, 00161 Rome (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Roma, c/o Dipartimento di Fisica - SAPIENZA, University of Rome, P.le Aldo Moro, 2 - 00185 Rome (Italy); Serafini, L. [INFN-Milan and Department of Physics, University of Milan, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy)

    2012-08-15

    Laser-driven electron beamlines are receiving increasing interest from the particle accelerator community. In particular, the high initial energy, low emittance, and high beam current of the plasma based electron source potentially allow generating much more compact and bright particle accelerators than what conventional accelerator technology can achieve. Using laser-generated particles as injectors for generating beamlines could significantly reduce the size and cost of accelerator facilities. Unfortunately, several features of laser-based particle beams need still to be improved before considering them for particle beamlines and thus enable the use of plasma-driven accelerators for the multiple applications of traditional accelerators. Besides working on the plasma source itself, a promising approach to shape the laser-generated beams is coupling them with conventional accelerator elements in order to benefit from both a versatile electron source and a controllable beam. In this paper, we perform start-to-end simulations to generate laser-driven beamlines using conventional accelerator codes and methodologies. Starting with laser-generated electrons that can be obtained with established multi-hundred TW laser systems, we compare different options to capture and transport the beams. This is performed with the aim of providing beamlines suitable for potential applications, such as free electron lasers. In our approach, we have analyzed which parameters are critical at the source and from there evaluated different ways to overcome these issues using conventional accelerator elements and methods. We show that electron driven beamlines are potentially feasible, but exploiting their full potential requires extensive improvement of the source parameters or innovative technological devices for their transport and capture.

  20. Laser-driven electron beamlines generated by coupling laser-plasma sources with conventional transport systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antici, P.; Bacci, A.; Benedetti, C.; Chiadroni, E.; Ferrario, M.; Rossi, A. R.; Lancia, L.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Serafini, L.

    2012-08-01

    Laser-driven electron beamlines are receiving increasing interest from the particle accelerator community. In particular, the high initial energy, low emittance, and high beam current of the plasma based electron source potentially allow generating much more compact and bright particle accelerators than what conventional accelerator technology can achieve. Using laser-generated particles as injectors for generating beamlines could significantly reduce the size and cost of accelerator facilities. Unfortunately, several features of laser-based particle beams need still to be improved before considering them for particle beamlines and thus enable the use of plasma-driven accelerators for the multiple applications of traditional accelerators. Besides working on the plasma source itself, a promising approach to shape the laser-generated beams is coupling them with conventional accelerator elements in order to benefit from both a versatile electron source and a controllable beam. In this paper, we perform start-to-end simulations to generate laser-driven beamlines using conventional accelerator codes and methodologies. Starting with laser-generated electrons that can be obtained with established multi-hundred TW laser systems, we compare different options to capture and transport the beams. This is performed with the aim of providing beamlines suitable for potential applications, such as free electron lasers. In our approach, we have analyzed which parameters are critical at the source and from there evaluated different ways to overcome these issues using conventional accelerator elements and methods. We show that electron driven beamlines are potentially feasible, but exploiting their full potential requires extensive improvement of the source parameters or innovative technological devices for their transport and capture.

  1. 2nd Workshop on Laser Interaction and Related Plasma Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Hora, Heinrich

    1972-01-01

    Paul Harteck Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Troy, New York When the Maser and the Laser Were discovered, people were speculating if this was the beginning of a new page, or even a new chapter, in the Book of Physics. The Second Workshop on "Laser Interaction and Related Plasma Phenomena" held in Hartford made it clear that the perspective had changed, that people now question if the consequences of these discoveries constitute a new chapter, or possibly a new era in Physics. While the papers presented were all stimulating and of out­ standing quality, of special interest were the experiments which demonstrated that triggering of thermonuclear fusion by Laser techniques is indeed in the realm of the possible. Along these lines, I enjoy recalling an anecdote concerning the late F. G. Houtermans. I think that all who knew him will agree that he was an unusual genius and at the same time a very amusing colleague.

  2. Experimental study into plasma-assisted PM removal for diesel engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, F.P.T.; Creyghton, Y.; Gulijk, C. van; Oonk, H; Maisuls, S.

    2003-01-01

    Plasma-assisted PM removal is examined in a packed-bed plasma system. This study focuses on the effect of plasma power, space velocity and exhaust gas composition on PM filtration. Experiments are done on an engine dynamometer with a VW 1.2l TDI engine. During these experiments, the airflow is throt

  3. Experimental study into plasma-assisted PM removal for diesel engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, F.P.T.; Creyghton, Y.; Gulijk, C. van; Oonk, H; Maisuls, S.

    2003-01-01

    Plasma-assisted PM removal is examined in a packed-bed plasma system. This study focuses on the effect of plasma power, space velocity and exhaust gas composition on PM filtration. Experiments are done on an engine dynamometer with a VW 1.2l TDI engine. During these experiments, the airflow is

  4. Dacriocistorrinostomia transcanalicular com laser diodo: resultados preliminares Transcanalicular laser-assisted dacryocystorhinostomy: initial results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Tomoyoshi Kanecadan

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever a técnica e os resultados iniciais da dacriocistorrinostomia com laser diodo, realizada pela via transcanalicular. MÉTODOS: Dez pacientes com diagnóstico de obstrução lacrimal baixa foram submetidos à dacriocistorrinostomia com laser diodo, realizada pela via transcanalicular. A via lacrimal foi entubada com silicone, onde deveria permanecer por 6 meses. RESULTADOS: Todas as dez cirurgias foram realizadas sem intercorrências. Um paciente apresentou saída do tubo de silicone, um dia após a cirurgia. Após uma semana, os outros nove, relataram desaparecimento da epífora. Durante o primeiro mês de seguimento, mais um paciente apresentou perda do tubo de silicone e outro voltou apresentar epífora, por obstrução da fístula lacrimonasal. CONCLUSÕES: A dacriocistorrinostomia assistida por laser diodo, realizada pela via transcanalicular, é novo método para tratamento da obstrução das vias lacrimais. Com o desenvolvimento desta técnica espera-se aumento no índice de sucesso cirúrgico, tanto imediato como a longo prazo.PURPOSE: To describe the technique and initial results of laser-assisted dacryocystorhinostomy performed through the canaliculi. METHODS: Ten patients with nasolacrimal duct obstruction underwent transcanalicular laser-assisted dacryocystorhinostomy. A silicone tube was inserted through the canaliculi and the ostium into the nasal cavity where it will be kept for 6 months. RESULTS: All ten operations were performed without negative occurrences. One patient presented displacement of the silicone tube one day after surgery. Nine of the ten patients reported disappearance of epiphora at the end of the first week following surgery. During the first month, one of these patients presented with epiphora due to obstruction of the lacrimal-nasal fistula and another lost the silicone tube in the first month following surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Transcanalicular laser-assisted dacryocystorhinostomy is a

  5. 179th International School of Physics "Enrico Fermi" : Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Gizzi, L A; Faccini, R

    2012-01-01

    Impressive progress has been made in the field of laser-plasma acceleration in the last decade, with outstanding achievements from both experimental and theoretical viewpoints. Closely exploiting the development of ultra-intense, ultrashort pulse lasers, laser-plasma acceleration has developed rapidly, achieving accelerating gradients of the order of tens of GeV/m, and making the prospect of miniature accelerators a more realistic possibility. This book presents the lectures delivered at the Enrico Fermi International School of Physics and summer school: "Laser-Plasma Acceleration" , held in Varenna, Italy, in June 2011. The school provided an opportunity for young scientists to experience the best from the worlds of laser-plasma and accelerator physics, with intensive training and hands-on opportunities related to key aspects of laser-plasma acceleration. Subjects covered include: the secrets of lasers; the power of numerical simulations; beam dynamics; and the elusive world of laboratory plasmas. The object...

  6. Laser Plasmas : Effect of rippled laser beam on excitation of ion acoustic wave

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nareshpal Singh Saini; Tarsem Singh Gill

    2000-11-01

    Growth of a radially symmetrical ripple, superimposed on a Gaussian laser beam in collisional unmagnetised plasma is investigated. From numerical computation, it is observed that self-focusing of main beam as well as ripple determine the growth dynamics of ripple with the distance of propagation. The effect of growing ripple on excitation of ion acoustic wave (IAW) has also been studied

  7. Sapphire capillaries for laser-driven wakefield acceleration in plasma. Fs-laser micromachining and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwinkendorf, Jan-Patrick

    2012-08-15

    Plasma wakefields are a promising approach for the acceleration of electrons with ultrahigh (10 to 100 GV/m) electric fields. Nowadays, high-intensity laser pulses are routinely utilized to excite these large-amplitude plasma waves. However, several detrimental effects such as laser diffraction, electron-wake dephasing and laser depletion may terminate the acceleration process. Two of these phenomena can be mitigated or avoided by the application of capillary waveguides, e.g. fabricated out of sapphire for longevity. Capillaries may compensate for laser diffraction like a fiber and allow for the creation of tapered gas-density profiles working against the dephasing between the accelerating wave and the particles. Additionally, they offer the possibility of controlled particle injection. This thesis is reporting on the set up of a laser for fs-micromachining of capillaries of almost arbitrary shapes and a test stand for density-profile characterization. These devices will permit the creation of tailored gas-density profiles for controlled electron injection and acceleration inside plasma.

  8. On-line depth measurement for laser-drilled holes based on the intensity of plasma emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chao-Ching; Chiu, Chih-Mu; Chang, Yuan-Jen; Hsu, Jin-Chen; Kuo, Chia-Lung

    2014-09-01

    The direct time-resolved depth measurement of blind holes is extremely difficult due to the short time interval and the limited space inside the hole. This work presents a method that involves on-line plasma emission acquisition and analysis to obtain correlations between the machining processes and the optical signal output. Given that the depths of laser-machined holes can be estimated on-line using a coaxial photodiode, this was employed in our inspection system. Our experiments were conducted in air under normal atmospheric conditions without gas assist. The intensity of radiation emitted from the vaporized material was found to correlate with the depth of the hole. The results indicate that the estimated depths of the laser-drilled holes were inversely proportional to the maximum plasma light emission measured for a given laser pulse number.

  9. Wakefield evolution and electron acceleration in interaction of frequency-chirped laser pulse with inhomogeneous plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei-Pandari, M.; Niknam, A. R.; Massudi, R.; Jahangiri, F.; Hassaninejad, H.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M.

    2017-02-01

    The nonlinear interaction of an ultra-short intense frequency-chirped laser pulse with an underdense plasma is studied. The effects of plasma inhomogeneity and laser parameters such as chirp, pulse duration, and intensity on plasma density and wakefield evolutions, and electron acceleration are examined. It is found that a properly chirped laser pulse could induce a stronger laser wakefield in an inhomogeneous plasma and result in higher electron acceleration energy. It is also shown that the wakefield amplitude is enhanced by increasing the slope of density in the inhomogeneous plasma.

  10. Wavefront-sensor-based electron density measurements for laser-plasma accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plateau, Guillaume; Matlis, Nicholas; Geddes, Cameron; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; van Mourik, Reinier; Leemans, Wim

    2010-02-20

    Characterization of the electron density in laser produced plasmas is presented using direct wavefront analysis of a probe laser beam. The performance of a laser-driven plasma-wakefield accelerator depends on the plasma wavelength, hence on the electron density. Density measurements using a conventional folded-wave interferometer and using a commercial wavefront sensor are compared for different regimes of the laser-plasma accelerator. It is shown that direct wavefront measurements agree with interferometric measurements and, because of the robustness of the compact commercial device, have greater phase sensitivity, straightforward analysis, improving shot-to-shot plasma-density diagnostics.

  11. Emission of strong Terahertz pulses from laser wakefields in weakly coupled plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Divya; Malik, Hitendra K.

    2016-09-01

    The present paper discusses the laser plasma interaction for the wakefield excitation and the role of external magnetic field for the emission of Terahertz radiation in a collisional plasma. Flat top lasers are shown to be more appropriate than the conventional Gaussian lasers for the effective excitation of wakefields and hence, the generation of strong Terahertz radiation through the transverse component of wakefield.

  12. Spectral and spatial structure of extreme ultraviolet radiation in laser plasma-wall interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuznetsov, A. S.; Stuik, R.; F. Bijkerk,; Shevelko, A. P.

    2012-01-01

    Intense extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation was observed during the interaction of low-temperature laser plasmas and wall materials. Laser plasmas with electron temperature T-e similar to 40 eV were created on massive solid targets (CF2 and Al) by an excimer KrF laser (248 nm/0.5 J/13 ns/1 Hz). The

  13. Laser Ablation Plasma Injection into the Frankfurt 14 GHz ECRIS

    CERN Document Server

    Mironov, V; Runkel, S; Schmidt, L; Shirkov, G D; Stiebing, K E; Schmidt-Böcking, H; Schempp, A

    1999-01-01

    A Q-switched YAG:Nd3+ laser was used to evaporate a metal (Cd) target mounted close to a biased disk in the vacuum chamber of the 14 GHz Frankfurt ECRIS. The formation of the laser ablation plasma and the pulsed injection of neutral particles into ECR plasma resulting from the evaporation were studied in order to optimise the production of metal-ion beams and to perform diagnostics of the ECR plasma. The pulsed highly charged Cadmium ion beams were detected under the injection of neutral atoms of Cadmium into an Argon ECR discharge. The ionisation and confinements times for these ions were determined by using time-resolved spectroscopy of the charge state spectra. At the moment of the Cadmium injection, a pulsed increase of the Argon beam currents was detected, which is attributed to changes of the plasma potential. The amplitudes of these pulses are comparable with afterglow currents. Further investigations may provide a chance to use this effect for the injection of ion beams into the pulsed accelerators.

  14. On very short and intense laser-plasma interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Fiore, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    We briefly report on some results regarding the impact of very short and intense laser pulses on a cold, low-density plasma initially at rest, and the consequent acceleration of plasma electrons to relativistic energies. Locally and for short times the pulse can be described by a transverse plane electromagnetic travelling-wave and the motion of the electrons by a purely Magneto-Fluido-Dynamical (MFD) model with a very simple dependence on the transverse electromagnetic potential, while the ions can be regarded as at rest; the Lorentz-Maxwell and continuity equations are reduced to the Hamilton equations of a Hamiltonian system with 1 degree of freedom, in the case of a plasma with constant initial density, or a collection of such systems otherwise. We can thus describe both the well-known "wakefield" behind the pulse and the recently predicted "slingshot effect", i.e. the backward expulsion of high energy electrons just after the laser pulse has hit the surface of the plasma.

  15. Incoherent synchrotron emission of laser-driven plasma edge

    CERN Document Server

    Serebryakov, D A; Kostyukov, I Yu

    2015-01-01

    When a relativistically intense linearly polarized laser pulse is incident on an overdense plasma, a dense electron layer is formed on the plasma edge which relativistic motion results in high harmonic generation, ion acceleration and incoherent synchrotron emission of gamma-photons. Here we present a self-consistent analytical model that describes the edge motion and apply it to the problem of incoherent synchrotron emission by ultrarelativistic plasma electrons. The model takes into account both coherent radiation reaction from high harmonics and incoherent radiation reaction in the Landau-Lifshitz form. The analytical results are in agreement with 3D particle-in-cell simulations in a certain parameter region that corresponds to the relativistic electronic spring interaction regime.

  16. Incoherent synchrotron emission of laser-driven plasma edge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serebryakov, D. A., E-mail: dmserebr@gmail.com; Nerush, E. N.; Kostyukov, I. Yu. [Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 46 Ulyanov St., Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Nizhny Novgorod State University, 23 Gagarin Avenue, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    When a relativistically intense linearly polarized laser pulse is incident on an overdense plasma, a dense electron layer is formed on the plasma edge which relativistic motion results in high harmonic generation, ion acceleration, and incoherent synchrotron emission of gamma-photons. Here we present a self-consistent analytical model that describes the edge motion and apply it to the problem of incoherent synchrotron emission by ultrarelativistic plasma electrons. The model takes into account both coherent radiation reaction from high harmonics and incoherent radiation reaction in the Landau–Lifshitz form. The analytical results are in agreement with 3D particle-in-cell simulations in a certain parameter region that corresponds to the relativistic electronic spring interaction regime.

  17. Incoherent synchrotron emission of laser-driven plasma edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebryakov, D. A.; Nerush, E. N.; Kostyukov, I. Yu.

    2015-12-01

    When a relativistically intense linearly polarized laser pulse is incident on an overdense plasma, a dense electron layer is formed on the plasma edge which relativistic motion results in high harmonic generation, ion acceleration, and incoherent synchrotron emission of gamma-photons. Here we present a self-consistent analytical model that describes the edge motion and apply it to the problem of incoherent synchrotron emission by ultrarelativistic plasma electrons. The model takes into account both coherent radiation reaction from high harmonics and incoherent radiation reaction in the Landau-Lifshitz form. The analytical results are in agreement with 3D particle-in-cell simulations in a certain parameter region that corresponds to the relativistic electronic spring interaction regime.

  18. Anomalous inverse bremsstrahlung heating of laser-driven plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Mrityunjay

    2016-05-01

    Absorption of laser light in plasma via electron-ion collision (inverse bremsstrahlung) is known to decrease with the laser intensity as I 0 -3/2 or with the electron temperature as T e -3/2 where Coulomb logarithm ln Λ = 0.5ln(1 + k 2 min/k 2 max) in the expression of electron-ion collision frequency v ei is assumed to be independent of ponderomotive velocity v 0 = E0/ω which is unjustified. Here k -1 min = v th/max(ω, ω p), and k -1 max = Z/v 2 th are maximum and minimum cut-off distances of the colliding electron from the ion, v th = √T e is its thermal velocity, ω, ω p are laser and plasma frequency. Earlier with a total velocity v = (v 2 0 + v 2 th)1/2 dependent ln Λ(v) it was reported that v ei and corresponding fractional laser absorption (α) initially increases with increasing intensity, reaches a maximum value, and then fall according to the conventional I 0 -3/2 scaling. This anomalous increase in v ei and α may be objected due to an artifact introduced in ln Λ(v) through k-1 min ∝ v. Here we show similar anomalous increase of v ei and α versus I 0 (in the low temperature and under-dense density regime) with quantum and classical kinetic models of v ei without using ln Λ, but a proper choice of the total velocity dependent inverse cut-off length kmax -1 ∝ v 2 (in classical case) or kmax ∝ v (in quantum case). For a given I 0 15 eV, anomalous growth of vei and a disappear. The total velocity dependent k max in kinetic models, as proposed here, may explain anomalous increase of a with I 0 measured in some earlier laser-plasma experiments. This work may be important to understand collisional absorption in the under-dense pre-plasma region due to low intensity pre-pulses and amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) pedestal in the context of laser induced inertial confinement fusion.

  19. Experiments of discharge guiding using strongly and weakly ionized plasma channels for laser-triggered lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Yoshinori; Uchida, Shigeaki; Yamanaka, Chiyoe; Ogata, Akihisa; Yamanaka, Tatsuhiko; Kawasaki, Zen-ichiro; Fujiwara, Etsuo; Ishikubo, Yuji; Kawabata, Kinya

    2000-01-01

    Generation of a long laser-plasma channel capable of triggering and guiding an electrical discharge is a crucial issue for laser-triggering protection system. We make a long plasma channel to increase the probability of triggered lightning by laser. To produce a long laser plasma channel, we propose da new technique called hybrid plasma channel method which combines weakly and strongly ionized plasma channels to maximize laser-energy efficiency of discharge guiding. We investigate the characteristics of the hybrid plasma channels to maximize laser-energy efficiency of discharge guiding. We investigate the characteristics of the hybrid plasma channel method through several laboratory experiments. The weakly ionized channel was generated by UV laser pulses in air. As the number density of electrons in weakly ionized channel is proportional to 1.1 power of laser intensity, nitrogen and oxygen molecules can not attributed to the source of ionized plasma. It is suggested that dissociation process of impurities in air whose density is 1011 - 1012 cm-3 plays an important role in plasma formation and leader triggering effect. The 50 percent flashover voltage using the hybrid plasma channel method is lower than that without the weakly ionized plasma channel. It was also found that higher repetition rate of the plasma generation on lowers the V50 furthermore.

  20. EDITORIAL: Laser and Plasma Accelerators Workshop, Kardamyli, Greece, 2009 Laser and Plasma Accelerators Workshop, Kardamyli, Greece, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Bob; Muggli, Patric

    2011-01-01

    The Laser and Plasma Accelerators Workshop 2009 was part of a very successful series of international workshops which were conceived at the 1985 Laser Acceleration of Particles Workshop in Malibu, California. Since its inception, the workshop has been held in Asia and in Europe (Kardamyli, Kyoto, Presqu'ile de Giens, Portovenere, Taipei and the Azores). The purpose of the workshops is to bring together the most recent results in laser wakefield acceleration, plasma wakefield acceleration, laser-driven ion acceleration, and radiation generation produced by plasma-based accelerator beams. The 2009 workshop was held on 22-26 June in Kardamyli, Greece, and brought together over 80 participants. (http://cfp.ist.utl.pt/lpaw09/). The workshop involved five main themes: • Laser plasma electron acceleration (experiment/theory/simulation) • Computational methods • Plasma wakefield acceleration (experiment/theory/simulation) • Laser-driven ion acceleration • Radiation generation and application. All of these themes are covered in this special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion. The topic and application of plasma accelerators is one of the success stories in plasma physics, with laser wakefield acceleration of mono-energetic electrons to GeV energies, of ions to hundreds of MeV, and electron-beam-driven wakefield acceleration to 85 GeV. The accelerating electric field in the wake is of the order 1 GeV cm-1, or an accelerating gradient 1000 times greater than in conventional accelerators, possibly leading to an accelerator 1000 times smaller (and much more affordable) for the same energy. At the same time, the electron beams generated by laser wakefield accelerators have very good emittance with a correspondingly good energy spread of about a few percent. They also have the unique feature in being ultra-short in the femtosecond scale. This makes them attractive for a variety of applications, ranging from material science to ultra-fast time

  1. Target dependent femtosecond laser plasma implantation dynamics in enabling silica for high density erbium doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrappan, Jayakrishnan; Murray, Matthew; Kakkar, Tarun; Petrik, Peter; Agocs, Emil; Zolnai, Zsolt; Steenson, D. P.; Jha, Animesh; Jose, Gin

    2015-09-01

    Chemical dissimilarity of tellurium oxide with silica glass increases phase separation and crystallization tendency when mixed and melted for making a glass. We report a novel technique for incorporating an Er3+-doped tellurite glass composition into silica substrates through a femtosecond (fs) laser generated plasma assisted process. The engineered material consequently exhibits the spectroscopic properties of Er3+-ions, which are unachievable in pure silica and implies this as an ideal material for integrated photonics platforms. Formation of a well-defined metastable and homogeneous glass structure with Er3+-ions in a silica network, modified with tellurite has been characterized using high-resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The chemical and structural analyses using HRTEM, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and laser excitation techniques, confirm that such fs-laser plasma implanted glasses may be engineered for significantly higher concentration of Er3+-ions without clustering, validated by the record high lifetime-density product 0.96 × 1019 s.cm-3. Characterization of planar optical layers and photoluminescence emission spectra were undertaken to determine their thickness, refractive indices and photoluminescence properties, as a function of Er3+ concentration via different target glasses. The increased Er3+ content in the target glass enhance the refractive index and photoluminescence intensity of the modified silica layer whilst the lifetime and thickness decrease.

  2. Creation of electron-positron plasma with superstrong laser field

    CERN Document Server

    Narozhny, N B

    2013-01-01

    We present a short review of recent progress in studying QED effects of interaction of ultra-relativistic laser pulses with vacuum and $e^-e^+$ plasma. The development of laser technologies promises very rapid growth of laser intensities in close future already. Two exawatt class facilities (ELI and XCELS, Russia) in Europe are already in the planning stage. Realization of these projects will make available a laser of intensity $\\sim 10^{26}$W/cm$^2$ or even higher. Therefore, discussion of nonlinear optical effects in vacuum are becoming urgent for experimentalists and are currently gaining much attention. We show that, in spite of the fact that the respective field strength is still essentially less than $E_S=m^2c^3/e\\hbar=1.32\\cdot 10^{16}$V/cm, the nonlinear vacuum effects will be accessible for observation at ELI and XCELS facilities. The most promissory for observation is the effect of pair creation by laser pulse in vacuum. It is shown, that at intensities $\\sim 5\\cdot 10^{25}$W/cm$^2$, creation even o...

  3. Measurement of Laser Plasma Instability (LPI) Driven Light Scattering from Plasmas Produced by Nike KrF Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaechul; Weaver, J. L.; Phillips, L.; Obenschain, S. P.; Schmitt, A. J.; Kehne, D. M.; Serlin, V.; Lehmberg, R. H.; McLean, E. A.; Manka, C. K.

    2010-11-01

    With short wavelength (248 nm), large bandwidth (1˜3 THz), and ISI beam smoothing, Nike KrF laser provides unique research opportunities and potential for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion. Previous Nike experiments observed two plasmon decay (TPD) driven signals from CH plasmas at the laser intensities above ˜2x10^15 W/cm^2 with total laser energies up to 1 kJ of ˜350 ps FWHM pulses. We have performed a further experiment with longer laser pulses (0.5˜4.0 ns FWHM) and will present combined results of the experiments focusing on light emission data in spectral ranges relevant to the Raman (SRS) and TPD instabilities. Time- or space-resolved spectral features of TPD were detected at different viewing angles and the absolute intensity calibrated spectra of thermal background were used to obtain blackbody temperatures in the plasma corona. The wave vector distribution in k-space of the participating TPD plasmons will be also discussed. These results show promise for the proposed direct-drive designs.

  4. Development of a X-UV Michelson interferometer for probing laser produced plasmas with a X-ray laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubert, S. [Paris-Sud Univ., Orsay (France). LSAI; CEA Centre d' Etudes de Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France). DAM/CEB.3/ODIR; Zeitoun, Ph.; Vanbostal, L.; Carillon, A.; Fourcade, P.; Idir, M.; Pape, S. le; Ros, D.; Jamelot, G. [Paris-Sud Univ., Orsay (France). LSAI; Bechir, E. [CEA Centre d' Etudes de Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France). DAM/CEB.3/ODIR; Delmotte, F.; Ravet, M.F. [IOTA, Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay (France)

    2001-07-01

    We have developed and used a soft X-ray Michelson interferometer to probe large laser-produced plasmas. The aim investigated is to obtain electron density profiles and thus important informations on the plasma dynamic. This paper describes our design and presents some preliminary results using a nickel-like X-ray laser operating at 13.9 nm. We present numericals results which show the interest of using X-ray laser to probe laser-produced plasma by interferometry. (orig.)

  5. Low-temperature laser assisted CBE-growth of AlGaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jothilingam, R.; Farrell, T.; Joyce, T. B.; Goodhew, P. J.

    1998-06-01

    We report preliminary studies of low-temperature (335-400°C) chemical beam epitaxial (CBE) growth of Al xGa 1- xAs on GaAs(0 0 1) using triethylgallium (TEG), trimethylaminealane (TMAA) and thermally precracked Arsine (AsH 3) as precursors. We also report results of Ar + laser assisted chemical beam epitaxial growth over the same temperature range. The growth rate for both assisted and unassisted growth as a function of substrate temperature, laser power and precursor beam pressures was determined using laser reflectometry in which the Ar + laser was also used as the probe. In the nonlaser assisted growth Al incorporation is observed to be significantly higher than would be expected at the normal growth temperature of 500°C. With laser assistance the Al concentration, while higher than that at normal growth temperatures, is less than that without laser assistance and the growth rate is higher. These observations, which extended Abernathy's early results to higher nominal Al concentration, are discussed in terms of the relative enhancement of the decomposition of TEG and the alane during laser assistance. Using literature values of the refractive index of AlGaAs alloys at the growth temperature, laser reflectometry was used to monitor both composition and growth rate over a range of growth temperatures. Reflectometry data were compared with the results of Auger Electron Microscopy (AES) and Dektak stylus profiling.

  6. Optical emission from laser-produced chromium and magnesium plasma under the effect of two sequential laser pulses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V N Rai; F Y Yueh; J P Singh

    2005-12-01

    Parametric study of optical emission from two successive laser pulses produced chromium and magnesium plasma is presented. The line emission from chromium and magnesium plasma showed an increase by more than six times for double laser pulse excitation than for single-pulse excitation. An optimum increase in emission intensity was noted for inter-pulse delay of ∼ 2–3 s for all the elements. The experimental observations were qualitatively explained on the basis of absorption of second laser pulse in the pre-formed (by first laser) coronal plasma by inverse Bremsstrahlung process, which were found responsible for the excitation of more ions and atoms in the plasma. This process starts as the plasma scale length becomes greater than the laser wavelength. This study further indicated the suitability of this technique in the field of elemental analysis.

  7. Plasma assisted nitriding for micro-texturing onto martensitic stainless steels*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katoh Takahisa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Micro-texturing method has grown up to be one of the most promising procedures to form micro-lines, micro-dots and micro-grooves onto the mold-die materials and to duplicate these micro-patterns onto metallic or polymer sheets via stamping or injection molding. This related application requires for large-area, fine micro-texturing onto the martensitic stainless steel mold-die materials. A new method other than laser-machining, micro-milling or micro-EDM is awaited for further advancement of this micro-texturing. In the present paper, a new micro-texturing method is developed on the basis of the plasma assisted nitriding to transform the two-dimensionally designed micro-patterns to the three dimensional micro-textures in the martensitic stainless steels. First, original patterns are printed onto the surface of stainless steel molds by using the dispenser or the ink-jet printer. Then, the masked mold is subjected to high density plasma nitriding; the un-masked surfaces are nitrided to have higher hardness, 1400 Hv than the matrix hardness, 200 Hv of stainless steels. This nitrided mold is further treated by sand-blasting to selectively remove the soft, masked surfaces. Finally, the micro-patterned martensitic stainless steel mold is fabricated as a tool to duplicate these micro-patterns onto the plastic materials by the injection molding.

  8. [Influence of slide-blown on plasma characterization of laser dressing for bronze-bonded diamond wheel by a fiber laser].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Chen, Gen-Yu; Zhou, Cong; Deng, Hui; Xu, Jian-Bo; Zhou, Xing-Cai

    2014-05-01

    The effects of assistant side-blown operating parameters on the behavior of plasma characteristics and plasma geometry were studied with the aid of high-speed camera in laser dressing of bronze-bonded diamond grinding wheel. The results showed that: high pressure argon plasma reduces swelling height, and as the pressure increases, argon blowing side of the plasma effect is more obvious. Plasma emission spectrum was studied on the grinding wheel radial maximum value with the change in argon gas pressure through the acquisition of plasma emission spectroscopy using spectrometer, and according to the Boltzmann slash and Stark broadening method, the maximal values of plasma electron temperature and electron density in the wheel radial were calculated. It was found that the plasma spectral line intensity first increased and then decreased as gas pressure reached the peak at 0. 2 MPa, Larger argon pressure can significantly reduce the temperature and density of plasmas. With optical 3D scanner the wheel surface topography before and after adding side-blown gas was compared. The results indicated that: the topography of grinding wheel with 0. 5 MPa side-blown argon is better than that without adding side-blown gas.

  9. Astrophysical Weibel instability in counterstreaming laser-produced plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, William; Fiksel, Gennady; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Change, Po-Yu; Germaschewski, Kai; Hu, Suxing; Nilson, Philip

    2014-06-01

    Astrophysical shock waves play diverse roles, including energizing cosmic rays in the blast waves of astrophysical explosions, and generating primordial magnetic fields during the formation of galaxies and clusters. These shocks are typically collisionless and require collective electromagnetic fields to couple the upstream and downstream plasmas. The Weibel instability has been proposed to provide the requisite interaction mechanism for shock formation in weakly-magnetized shocks by generating turbulent electric and magnetic fields in the shock front. This work presents the first laboratory identification of this Weibel instability between counterstreaming supersonic plasma flows and confirms its basic features, a significant step towards understanding these shocks. In the experiments, conducted on the OMEGA EP laser facility at the University of Rochester, a pair of plasmas plumes are generated by irradiating of a pair of opposing parallel plastic (CH) targets. The ion-ion interaction between the two plumes is collisionless, so as the plumes interpenetrate, supersonic, counterstreaming ion flow conditions are obtained. Electromagnetic fields formed in the interaction of the two plumes were probed with an ultrafast laser-driven proton beam, and we observed the growth of a highly striated, transverse instability with extended filaments parallel to the flows. The instability is identified as an ion-driven Weibel instability through agreement with analytic theory and particle-in-cell simulations, paving the way for further detailed laboratory study of this instability and its consequences for particle energization and shock formation.[1] W. Fox, G. Fiksel, A. Bhattacharjee, P. Y. Chang, K. Germaschewski, S. X. Hu, and P. M. Nilson, “Filamentation instability of counterstreaming laser-driven plasmas,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 225002 (2013).

  10. Translational medicine in the field of ablative fractional laser (AFXL)-assisted drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haedersdal, Merete; Erlendsson, Andrés M; Paasch, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    enhanced topical drug uptake into skin after ablative fractional laser treatment. Clinical evidence encompassed 18 studies, of which 9 were randomized controlled trials and 2 were controlled trials, examining neoplastic lesions, photodamaged skin, scars, onychomycosis, and topical anesthetics. The highest......Ablative fractional lasers enhance uptake of topical therapeutics and the concept of fractional laser-assisted drug delivery has now been taken into clinical practice. Objectives We systematically reviewed preclinical data and clinical evidence for fractional lasers to enhance drug uptake...... laser-assisted drug delivery implies risks of systemic drug absorption, especially when performed over large skin areas. Conclusions Fractional laser-assisted drug delivery is beneficial in enhancing preclinical and clinical outcomes for certain skin conditions....

  11. Use and Evaluation of a Cooling Aid in Laser-Assisted Dental Surgery: An Innovative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Sara; Mummolo, Stefano; Zeka, Keti; Pajewski, Leonardo; Continenza, Maria Adelaide; Marzo, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the beneficial effect of NeoHeal during laser-assisted oral surgery. Laser-assisted surgery is a less invasive technique than conventional surgery using a blade; however, the heat produced by the laser can damage tissue proximal to the treated area. We hypothesized the hydrogel NeoHeal could be applied during oral surgery and have similar benefits as those already described for dermatological surgery. In our randomized controlled trial, we first selected 30 patients who were to undergo laser surgical intervention using a diode laser. Both at the end of intervention and at follow-up, each patient filled out a questionnaire comprising two questions. The answers to the questions were statistically analyzed with regard to frequency of each response, and validated by the Wilcoxon test with a p value cooling aid in laser-assisted dental surgery.

  12. Pulsed radiobiology with laser-driven plasma accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giulietti, Antonio; Grazia Andreassi, Maria; Greco, Carlo

    2011-05-01

    Recently, a high efficiency regime of acceleration in laser plasmas has been discovered, allowing table top equipment to deliver doses of interest for radiotherapy with electron bunches of suitable kinetic energy. In view of an R&D program aimed to the realization of an innovative class of accelerators for medical uses, a radiobiological validation is needed. At the present time, the biological effects of electron bunches from the laser-driven electron accelerator are largely unknown. In radiobiology and radiotherapy, it is known that the early spatial distribution of energy deposition following ionizing radiation interactions with DNA molecule is crucial for the prediction of damages at cellular or tissue levels and during the clinical responses to this irradiation. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the radio-biological effects obtained with electron bunches from a laser-driven electron accelerator compared with bunches coming from a IORT-dedicated medical Radio-frequency based linac's on human cells by the cytokinesis block micronucleus assay (CBMN). To this purpose a multidisciplinary team including radiotherapists, biologists, medical physicists, laser and plasma physicists is working at CNR Campus and University of Pisa. Dose on samples is delivered alternatively by the "laser-linac" operating at ILIL lab of Istituto Nazionale di Ottica and an RF-linac operating for IORT at Pisa S. Chiara Hospital. Experimental data are analyzed on the basis of suitable radiobiological models as well as with numerical simulation based on Monte Carlo codes. Possible collective effects are also considered in the case of ultrashort, ultradense bunches of ionizing radiation.

  13. Simulations Of Laser Cooling In An Ultracold Neutral Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langin, Thomas; Strickler, Trevor; Pohl, Thomas; Vrinceanu, Daniel; Killian, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold neutral plasmas (UNPs) generated by photoionization of laser-cooled, magneto-optically trapped neutral gases, are useful systems for studying strongly coupled plasmas. Coupling is parameterized by Γi, the ratio of the average nearest neighbor Coulomb interaction energy to the ion kinetic energy. For typical UNPs, Γi is currently limited to ~ 3 . For alkaline earth ions, higher Γi can be achieved by laser-cooling. Using Molecular Dynamics and a quantum trajectories approach, we have simulated laser-cooling of Sr+ ions interacting through a Yukawa potential. The simulations include re-pumping from two long-lived D-states, and are conducted at experimentally achievable parameters (density n = 2 e+14 m-3, size σ0 = 4 mm, Te = 19 K). Laser-cooling is shown to both reduce the temperature by a factor of 2 over relevant timescales (tens of μ s) and slow the electron thermal-pressure driven radial expansion of the UNP. We also discuss the unique aspects of laser-cooling in a highly collisional system; in particular, the effect of collisions on dark state formation due to the coupling of the P3/2 state to both the S1/2 (via the cooling transition) and the D5/2 (via a re-pump transition) states. Supported by NSF and DoE, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the NDSEG Program, and NIH NCRR S10RR02950, an IBM SUR Award in partnership with CISCO, Qlogic and Adaptive Computing.

  14. Three-Temperature MHD Calculation of the Critical Surface of Laser Absorption in Laser Induced Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkle Peterkin, Laurence D., Jr.

    1997-11-01

    The time-dependent location of the critical surface of laser absorption is studied numerically, using the general purpose two-dimensional finite-difference MHD software uc(Mach2.) This software, which is based on an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian fluid algorithm, includes models for partial laser absorption in underdense plasmas via inverse brehmsstrahlung, as well as total laser absorption at a critical surface. The simulations conducted are of a laboratory experiment in which a plasma is generated by a mode-locked laser interacting with a solid copper target (G.K. Chawla and C.W. von Rosenberg, Jr., IEEE Conference Record --- Abstracts, 1997 IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science). The location of the critical surface is a function of the number density of free electrons. Consequently, calculations must carefully consider the energy budget. Because of large opacities in hot regions, a non-equilibrium radiation diffusion model is employed. Adequate energy conservation in such simulations is possible only with careful attention to numerical aspects, such as time steps and flux limits. Simulations are performed for both 90^circ and 45^circ incident beams. The former are carried out using both cylindrical and plane-parallel geometries, while the latter require a plane-parallel geometry.

  15. First experimental demonstration of magnetic-field assisted fast heating of a dense plasma core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Sakata, Shohei; Lee, Seung Ho; Matsuo, Kazuki; Sawada, Hiroshi; Iwasa, Yuki; Law, King Fai Farley; Morita, Hitoki; Kojima, Sadaoki; Abe, Yuki; Yao, Akira; Hata, Masayasu; Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Sunahara, Atsushi; Ozaki, Tetsuo; Sakagami, Hitoshi; Morace, Alessio; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Yogo, Akifumi; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Nakai, Mitsuo; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Nagatomo, Hideo; Azechi, Hiroshi; Firex Project Team

    2016-10-01

    Fast heating of a dense plasma core by an energetic electron beam is being studied on GEKKO-LFEX laser facility. Here, we introduce a laser-driven kilo-tesla external magnetic field to guide the diverging electron beam to the dense plasma core. This involve placing a spherical target in the magnetic field, compressing it with the GEKKO-XII laser beams and then using the LFEX laser beams injected into the dense plasma to generate the electron beam which do the fast heating. Cu-Ka emission is used to visualize transport or heating processes of a dense plasma. X-ray spectrum from a highly ionized Cu ions indicates several keV of the temperature increment induced by the LFEX.

  16. Laser annealing of plasma-damaged silicon surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sameshima, T., E-mail: tsamesim@cc.tuat.ac.jp [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo, 184-8588 (Japan); Hasumi, M. [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo, 184-8588 (Japan); Mizuno, T. [Kanagawa University, Kanagawa, 259-1293 (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Ar plasma irradiation caused serious damage at SiO{sub 2}/Si interfaces. • The light induced minority carrier effective lifetime (τ{sub eff}) was decreased to 1.7 × 10{sup −5} s by Ar plasma irradiation. • The density of charge injection type interface traps at 9.1 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1} was formed. • 940-nm laser irradiation at 3.7 × 10{sup 4} W/cm{sup 2} for 4 × 10{sup −3} s cured the interface. • It increased τ{sub eff} to 1.7 × 10{sup −3} s and decreased D{sub it} to 2.1 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1}. - Abstract: 13.56 MHz capacitance coupled Ar plasma irradiation at 50 W for 120 s caused serious damage at SiO{sub 2}/Si interfaces for n-type 500-μm-thick silicon substrates. The 635-nm-light induced minority carrier effective lifetime (τ{sub eff}) was decreased from 1.7 × 10{sup −3} (initial) to 1.0 × 10{sup −5} s by Ar plasma irradiation. Moreover, the capacitance response at 1 MHz alternative voltage as a function of the bias voltage (C–V) was changed to hysteresis characteristic associated with the density of charge injection type interface traps at the mid gap (D{sub it}) at 9.1 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1}. Subsequent 940-nm laser annealing at 3.7 × 10{sup 4} W/cm{sup 2} for 4.0 × 10{sup −3} s markedly increased τ{sub eff} to 1.7 × 10{sup −3} s and decreased D{sub it} to 2.1 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1}. The hysteresis phenomenon was reduced in C–V characteristics. Laser annealing effectively decreased the density of plasma induced carrier recombination and trap states. However, laser annealing with a high power intensity of 4.0 × 10{sup 4} W/cm{sup 2} seriously caused a thermal damage associated with a low τ{sub eff} and a high D{sub it} with no hysteresis characteristic.

  17. Ptychographic measurements of ultrahigh-intensity laser-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, A.; Monchocé, S.; Bourassin-Bouchet, C.; Kahaly, S.; Quéré, F.

    2016-04-01

    The extreme intensities now delivered by femtosecond lasers make it possible to drive and control relativistic motion of charged particles with light, opening a path to compact particle accelerators and coherent X-ray sources. Accurately characterizing the dynamics of ultrahigh-intensity laser-plasma interactions as well as the resulting light and particle emissions is an essential step towards such achievements. This remains a considerable challenge, as the relevant scales typically range from picoseconds to attoseconds in time, and from micrometres to nanometres in space. In these experiments, owing to the extreme prevalent physical conditions, measurements can be performed only at macroscopic distances from the targets, yielding only partial information at these microscopic scales. This letter presents a major advance by applying the concepts of ptychography to such measurements, and thus retrieving microscopic information hardly accessible until now. This paves the way to a general approach for the metrology of extreme laser-plasma interactions on very small spatial and temporal scales.

  18. Neutron Generation by Laser-Driven Spherically Convergent Plasma Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, G.; Yan, J.; Liu, J.; Lan, K.; Chen, Y. H.; Huo, W. Y.; Fan, Z.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, J.; Chen, Z.; Jiang, W.; Chen, L.; Tang, Q.; Yuan, Z.; Wang, F.; Jiang, S.; Ding, Y.; Zhang, W.; He, X. T.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate a new laser-driven spherically convergent plasma fusion scheme (SCPF) that can produce thermonuclear neutrons stably and efficiently. In the SCPF scheme, laser beams of nanosecond pulse duration and 1 014- 1 015 W /cm2 intensity uniformly irradiate the fuel layer lined inside a spherical hohlraum. The fuel layer is ablated and heated to expand inwards. Eventually, the hot fuel plasmas converge, collide, merge, and stagnate at the central region, converting most of their kinetic energy to internal energy, forming a thermonuclear fusion fireball. With the assumptions of steady ablation and adiabatic expansion, we theoretically predict the neutron yield Yn to be related to the laser energy EL, the hohlraum radius Rh, and the pulse duration τ through a scaling law of Yn∝(EL/Rh1.2τ0.2 )2.5. We have done experiments at the ShengGuangIII-prototype facility to demonstrate the principle of the SCPF scheme. Some important implications are discussed.

  19. Relative ion expansion velocity in laser-produced plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, S.; Moreno, J. C.; Griem, H. R.; Cohen, Leonard; Richardson, M. C.

    1988-01-01

    The spectra of highly ionized titanium, Ti XIII through Ti XXI, and C VI Lyman lines were excited in laser-produced plasmas. The plasma was produced by uniformly irradiating spherical glass microballoons coated with thin layers of titanium and parylene. The 24-beam Omega laser system produced short, 0.6 ns, and high-intensity, 4 x 10 to the 14th W/sq cm, laser pulses at a wavelength of 351 nm. The measured wavelength for the 2p-3s Ti XIII resonance lines had an average shift of + 0.023 A relative to the C VI and Ti XX spectral lines. No shift was found between the C VI, Ti XIX, and Ti XX lines. The shift is attributed to a Doppler effect, resulting from a difference of (2.6 + or - 0.2) x 10 to the 7th cm/s in the expansion velocities of Ti XIX and Ti XX ions compared to Ti XIII ions.

  20. The effects of laser assisted hatching on pregnancy rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Ghannadi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: For infertile women aged over 35 years, failure of the ZP (zona pellucida to rupture is believed to be associated with a decreased implantation rate in in vitro fertilization (IVF or intra cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI.Objective: In this research, laser assisted hatching (LAH was offered to patients with advanced maternal age to evaluate a possible benefit.Materials and Methods: Nine hundred thirty two cycles of IVF/ICSI in females were analyzed. Women included in this study were allocated in 4 groups. In group I and II, embryos were cultured and transferred with and without LAH in women aged ≤35, whereas embryos of group III and IV were examined with and without LAH in women aged ≥ 35. Laser manipulations were performed using a suturn-Tm3 system using 2-3 pulses of 0.8 millisecond with 400 voltage duration. The size of the hole made in the zona was measured to be 5-10 μm, depending on the zona thickness of each individual embryo.Results: The performance of LAH significantly increased clinical pregnancy rates in all patients. In group I and II, the chemical (50.99% and 31.61% respectively, clinical (50% and 30.69% respectively and multiple pregnancies (22.27% and 5.94% respectively significantly differ between these groups. In the patients with advanced female age ≥35 the performance of LAH significantly increased chemical (30.12% and clinical pregnancy (27.71% rates compared to whom without LAH (18.96% and 16.37% respectively.Conclusion: Our data demonstrate in the patients who were less than 35 years old, multiple pregnancy rates were significantly increased compared to other groups who aged over 35 years old. In addition benefit of LAH in improving pregnancy rates after IVF or ICSI in women of advanced age (≥35 was shown

  1. The effects of laser assisted hatching on pregnancy rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghannadi, Alireza; Kazerooni, Marjaneh; Jamalzadeh, Fatemeh; Amiri, Sahar; Rostami, Parifar; Absalan, Forouzan

    2011-01-01

    Background: For infertile women aged over 35 years, failure of the ZP (zona pellucida) to rupture is believed to be associated with a decreased implantation rate in in vitro fertilization (IVF) or intra cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Objective: In this research, laser assisted hatching (LAH) was offered to patients with advanced maternal age to evaluate a possible benefit. Materials and Methods: Nine hundred thirty two cycles of IVF/ICSI in females were analyzed. Women included in this study were allocated in 4 groups. In group I and II, embryos were cultured and transferred with and without LAH in women aged ≤35, whereas embryos of group III and IV were examined with and without LAH in women aged ≥ 35. Laser manipulations were performed using a suturn-Tm3 system using 2-3 pulses of 0.8 millisecond with 400 voltage duration. The size of the hole made in the zona was measured to be 5-10 µm, depending on the zona thickness of each individual embryo. Results: The performance of LAH significantly increased clinical pregnancy rates in all patients. In group I and II, the chemical (50.99% and 31.61% respectively), clinical (50% and 30.69% respectively) and multiple pregnancies (22.27% and 5.94% respectively) significantly differ between these groups. In the patients with advanced female age ≥35 the performance of LAH significantly increased chemical (30.12%) and clinical pregnancy (27.71%) rates compared to whom without LAH (18.96% and 16.37% respectively). Conclusion: Our data demonstrate in the patients who were less than 35 years old, multiple pregnancy rates were significantly increased compared to other groups who aged over 35 years old. In addition benefit of LAH in improving pregnancy rates after IVF or ICSI in women of advanced age (≥35) was shown. PMID:25587254

  2. Nickel-disilicide-assisted excimer laser crystallization of amorphous silicon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liao Yan-Ping; Shao Xi-Bin; Gao Feng-Li; Luo Wen-Sheng; Wu Yuan; Fu Guo-Zhu; Jing Hai; Ma Kai

    2006-01-01

    Polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) thin film has been prepared by means of nickel-disilicide (NiSi2) assisted excimer laser crystallization (ELC). The process to prepare a sample includes two steps. One step consists of the formation of NiSi2 precipitates by heat-treating the dehydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si) coated with a thin layer of Ni. And the other step consists of the formation of poly-Si grains by means of ELC. According to the test results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), another grain growth model named two-interface grain growth has been proposed to contrast with the conventional Ni-metal-induced lateral crystallization (Ni-MILC) model and the ELC model. That is, an additional grain growth interface other than that in conventional ELC is formed, which consists of NiSi2 precipitates and a-Si.The processes for grain growth according to various excimer laser energy densities delivered to the a-Si film have been discussed. It is discovered that grains with needle shape and most of a uniform orientation are formed which grow up with NiSi2 precipitates as seeds. The reason for the formation of such grains which are different from that of Ni-MILCwithout migration of Ni atoms is not clear. Our model and analysis point out a method to prepare grains with needle shape and mostly of a uniform orientation. If such grains are utilized to make thin-film transistor, its characteristics may be improved.

  3. Femtosecond laser-assisted lamellar keratoplasty Transplante lamelar auxiliado pelo laser de fentosegundo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunson Kaz Soong

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Lamellar keratoplasty consists of transplanting partial-thickness donor cornea onto a complementary recipient bed. Manual lamellar dissection is technically very difficult, time-consuming, and imprecise. Also, the manually-dissected lamellar interface often has topographical irregularities that may optically degrade the best-corrected visual acuity. The femtosecond clinical laser (IntraLase FS LaserTM, Irvine, CA is a recent innovation that can be programmed to produce bladeless, precise lamellar cuts at any depth with accompanying trephination cuts for both anterior and posterior lamellar transplantion. Posterior laser cuts may be used to assist in deep lamellar endothelial keratoplasty or Descemet's stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty.A ceratoplastia lamelar consiste em transplante de espessura parcial da córnea doadora em um leito receptor complementar. A dissecção lamelar manual é técnica de difícil realização, imprecisa e que demanda tempo. Além disso, a interface lamelar freqüentemente apresenta irregularidade topográfica que pode comprometer a acuidade visual final. O laser clínico "femtosecond" (IntraLase FS LaserTM, Irvine, CA é uma recente inovação que pode ser utilizado para produzir cortes lamelares precisos em qualquer profundidade da córnea, acompanhados de cortes verticais tanto para transplantes lamelares anteriores como posteriores sem a utilização de lâminas. Os cortes posteriores podem ser utilizados para a realização de ceratoplastia endotelial lamelar profunda ou ceratoplastia endotelial com remoção da membrana de Descemet.

  4. An ultracompact X-ray source based on a laser-plasma undulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriyash, I A; Lehe, R; Lifschitz, A; Thaury, C; Rax, J-M; Krushelnick, K; Malka, V

    2014-08-22

    The capability of plasmas to sustain ultrahigh electric fields has attracted considerable interest over the last decades and has given rise to laser-plasma engineering. Today, plasmas are commonly used for accelerating and collimating relativistic electrons, or to manipulate intense laser pulses. Here we propose an ultracompact plasma undulator that combines plasma technology and nanoengineering. When coupled with a laser-plasma accelerator, this undulator constitutes a millimetre-sized synchrotron radiation source of X-rays. The undulator consists of an array of nanowires, which are ionized by the laser pulse exiting from the accelerator. The strong charge-separation field, arising around the wires, efficiently wiggles the laser-accelerated electrons. We demonstrate that this system can produce bright, collimated and tunable beams of photons with 10-100 keV energies. This concept opens a path towards a new generation of compact synchrotron sources based on nanostructured plasmas.

  5. Study on the effect of thermal property of metals in ultrasonic-assisted laser machining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hu Seung; Kim, Gun Woo; Park, Jong Eun [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sung Hak; Yang, Min Yang; Park, Jong Kweon [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    The laser machining process has been proposed as an advanced process for the selective fabrication of electrodes without a mask. In this study, we adapt laser machining to metals that have different thermal properties. Based on the results, the metals exhibit a different surface morphology, heat-affected zone (HAZ), and a recast layer around the machined surface according to their thermal conductivity, boiling point, and thermal diffusivity. Then, we apply ultrasonic-assisted laser machining to remove the recast layer. The ultrasonic-assisted laser machining exhibits a better surface quality in metals with higher diffusivity than those having lower diffusivity.

  6. First Demonstration of Laser-Assisted Charge Exchange for Microsecond Duration H- Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousineau, Sarah; Rakhman, Abdurahim; Kay, Martin; Aleksandrov, Alexander; Danilov, Viatcheslav; Gorlov, Timofey; Liu, Yun; Plum, Michael; Shishlo, Andrei; Johnson, David

    2017-02-01

    This Letter reports on the first demonstration of laser-assisted H- charge exchange for microsecond duration H- beam pulses. Laser-assisted charge exchange injection is a breakthrough technology that overcomes long-standing limitations associated with the traditional method of producing high intensity, time structured beams of protons in accelerators via the use of carbon foils for charge exchange injection. The central theme of this experiment is the demonstration of novel techniques that reduce the laser power requirement to allow high efficiency stripping of microsecond duration beams with commercial laser technology.

  7. Role of Density Profiles for the Nonlinear Propagation of Intense Laser Beam through Plasma Channel

    OpenAIRE

    Sonu Sen; Meenu Asthana Varshney; Dinesh Varshney

    2014-01-01

    In this work role of density profiles for the nonlinear propagation of intense laser beam through plasma channel is analyzed. By employing the expression for the dielectric function of different density profile plasma, a differential equation for beamwidth parameter is derived under WKB and paraxial approximation. The laser induces modifications of the dielectric function through nonlinearities. It is found that density profiles play vital role in laser-plasma interaction studies. To have num...

  8. Compact tunable Compton x-ray source from laser-plasma accelerator and plasma mirror

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai, Hai-En; Shaw, Joseph; Li, Zhengyan; Arefiev, Alexey V; Zhang, Xi; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Henderson, Watson; Khudik, V; Shvets, G; Downer, M C

    2014-01-01

    We present results of the first tunable Compton backscattering (CBS) x-ray source that is based on the easily aligned combination of a laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) and a plasma mirror (PM). The LPA is driven in the blowout regime by 30 TW, 30 fs laser pulses, and produces high-quality, tunable, quasi-monoenergetic electron beams. A thin plastic film near the gas jet exit efficiently retro-reflects the LPA driving pulse with relativistic intensity into oncoming electrons to produce $2\\times10^{7}$ CBS x-ray photons per shot with 10-20 mrad angular divergence and 50 % (FWHM) energy spread without detectable bremsstrahlung background. The x-ray central energy is tuned from 75 KeV to 200 KeV by tuning the LPA e-beam central energy. Particle-in-cell simulations of the LPA, the drive pulse/PM interaction and CBS agree well with measurements.

  9. Computer-Assisted Experiments with a Laser Diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2011-01-01

    A laser diode from an inexpensive laser pen (laser pointer) is used in simple experiments. The radiant output power and efficiency of the laser are measured, and polarization of the light beam is shown. The "h/e" ratio is available from the threshold of spontaneous emission. The lasing threshold is found using several methods. With a…

  10. Direct Analysis of Gold Nanoparticles from Dried Droplets Using Substrate-Assisted Laser Desorption Single Particle-ICPMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benešová, Iva; Dlabková, Kristýna; Zelenák, František; Vaculovič, Tomáš; Kanický, Viktor; Preisler, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Single particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SP-ICPMS) has been generally accepted as a powerful tool in the field of nanoanalysis. The method has usually been restricted to direct nanoparticle (NP) introduction using nebulization or microdroplet generation systems. In this work, AuNPs are introduced into ICPMS by substrate-assisted laser desorption (SALD) directly from a suitable absorbing plastic surface using a commercial ablation cell for the first time. In SALD, desorption of individual NPs is mediated using a frequency-quintupled Nd:YAG laser (213 nm) operated at a rather low laser fluence. Conditions including laser fluence, laser beam scan rate, and carrier gas flow rate were optimized in order to gain the highest AuNP transport efficiency and avoid AuNP disintegration within the laser irradiation. The method was demonstrated on a well-characterized reference material, 56 nm AuNPs with a transport efficiency of 61% and commercially available 86 nm AuNPs. Feasibility of our technique for NP detection and characterization is discussed here, and the results are compared with an established technique, nebulizer SP-ICPMS.

  11. Enhanced acceleration of injected electrons in a laser-beat-wave-induced plasma channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochitsky, S Ya; Narang, R; Filip, C V; Musumeci, P; Clayton, C E; Yoder, R B; Marsh, K A; Rosenzweig, J B; Pellegrini, C; Joshi, C

    2004-03-05

    Enhanced energy gain of externally injected electrons by a approximately 3 cm long, high-gradient relativistic plasma wave (RPW) is demonstrated. Using a CO2 laser beat wave of duration longer than the ion motion time across the laser spot size, a laser self-guiding process is initiated in a plasma channel. Guiding compensates for ionization-induced defocusing (IID) creating a longer plasma, which extends the interaction length between electrons and the RPW. In contrast to a maximum energy gain of 10 MeV when IID is dominant, the electrons gain up to 38 MeV energy in a laser-beat-wave-induced plasma channel.

  12. Boosting persistence time of laser-induced plasma by electric arc discharge for optical emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eschlböck-Fuchs, S., E-mail: simon.eschlboeck-fuchs@jku.at [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser-Assisted Diagnostics, Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Kolmhofer, P.J.; Bodea, M.A.; Hechenberger, J.G.; Huber, N. [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser-Assisted Diagnostics, Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Rössler, R. [voestalpine Stahl GmbH, A-4031 Linz (Austria); Pedarnig, J.D., E-mail: johannes.pedarnig@jku.at [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser-Assisted Diagnostics, Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria)

    2015-07-01

    Plasma induced by nanosecond laser ablation is re-excited by a pulsed electric discharge and the parameters and optical emission of the plasma are measured. The discharge is a low-voltage and high-current electric arc that is triggered by the laser-induced plasma and slowly decaying with time. The optical emission of such combined plasma lasts up to several milliseconds which is much longer than without re-excitation (μs range). The emission spectra of re-excited plasma measured on different sample materials show higher line intensities than spectra measured by conventional laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Moreover, emission lines of fluorine (spectral range 683–691 nm) and sulfur (range 520–550 nm) not detected by conventional LIBS become easily detectable with the combined plasma. The concentration of major components in metallurgical slags, as determined by calibration-free LIBS, agrees very well to the reference data evaluating the spectra taken from re-excited plasma. - Highlights: • Persistence time of laser-induced plasma in air is increased from ~ 10 μs to ~ 1 ms. • Laser-induced plasma triggers an electric arc discharge that boosts the plasma. • The combined laser-arc plasma is in LTE state over very long time (ms range). • CF-LIBS method delivers accurate results evaluating spectra of combined plasma. • Emission from S and F, not detected by LIBS, is detected with combined plasma.

  13. Ablation plasma transport using multicusp magnetic field for laser ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, K.; Umezawa, M.; Uchino, T.; Ikegami, K.; Sasaki, T.; Kikuchi, T.; Harada, N.

    2016-05-01

    We propose a plasma guiding method using multicusp magnetic field to transport the ablation plasma keeping the density for developing laser ion sources. To investigate the effect of guiding using the magnetic field on the ablation plasma, we demonstrated the transport of the laser ablation plasma in the multicusp magnetic field. The magnetic field was formed with eight permanent magnets and arranged to limit the plasma expansion in the radial direction. We investigated the variation of the plasma ion current density and charge distribution during transport in the magnetic field. The results indicate that the plasma is confined in the radial direction during the transport in the multicusp magnetic field.

  14. effect of the plasma ion channel on self-focusing of a Gaussian laser pulse in underdense plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh Irani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available  We have considered the self-focusing of a Gaussian laser pulse in unmagnetized plasma. High-intensity electromagnetic fields cause the variation of electron density in plasma. These changes in the special conditions cause the acceleration of electrons to the higher energy and velocities. Thus the equation of plasma density evolution was obtained considering the electrons ponderomotive force. Then, an equation for the width of laser pulse with a relativistic mass correction term and the effect of ion channel were derived and the propagation of high-intensity laser pulse in an underdense plasma with weak relativistic approximation was investigated. It is shown that the ratio of ion channel radius to spot size could result in different forms of self focusing for the laser pulse in plasma.

  15. Electromagnetic pulses produced by expanding laser-produced Au plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Marco Massimo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of an intense laser pulse with a solid target produces large number of fast free electrons. This emission gives rise to two distinct sources of the electromagnetic pulse (EMP: the pulsed return current through the holder of the target and the outflow of electrons into the vacuum. A relation between the characteristics of laser-produced plasma, the target return current and the EMP emission are presented in the case of a massive Au target irradiated with the intensity of up to 3 × 1016 W/cm2. The emission of the EMP was recorded using a 12 cm diameter Moebius loop antennas, and the target return current was measured using a new type of inductive target probe (T-probe. The simultaneous use of the inductive target probe and the Moebius loop antenna represents a new useful way of diagnosing the laser–matter interaction, which was employed to distinguish between laser-generated ion sources driven by low and high contrast laser pulses.

  16. Silicon carbide detector for laser-generated plasma radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertuccio, Giuseppe; Puglisi, Donatella; Torrisi, Lorenzo; Lanzieri, Claudio

    2013-05-01

    We present the performance of a Silicon Carbide (SiC) detector in the acquisition of the radiation emitted by laser generated plasmas. The detector has been employed in time of flight (TOF) configuration within an experiment performed at the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS). The detector is a 5 mm2 area 100 nm thick circular Nisbnd SiC Schottky junction on a high purity 4Hsbnd SiC epitaxial layer 115 μm thick. Current signals from the detector with amplitudes up to 1.6 A have been measured, achieving voltage signals over 80 V on a 50 Ω load resistance with excellent signal to noise ratios. Resolution of few nanoseconds has been experimentally demonstrated in TOF measurements. The detector has operated at 250 V DC bias under extreme operating conditions with no observable performance degradation.

  17. Ultrafast laser-collision-induced fluorescence in atmospheric pressure plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnat, E. V.; Fierro, A.

    2017-04-01

    The implementation and demonstration of laser-collision-induced fluorescence (LCIF) generated in atmospheric pressure helium environments is presented in this communication. As collision times are observed to be fast (~10 ns), ultrashort pulse laser excitation (<100 fs) of the 23S to 33P (388.9 nm) is utilized to initiate the LCIF process. Both neutral-induced and electron-induced components of the LCIF are observed in the helium afterglow plasma as the reduced electric field (E/N) is tuned from  <0.1 Td to over 5 Td. Under the discharge conditions presented in this study (640 Torr He), the lower limit of electron density detection is ~1012 e cm‑3. The spatial profiles of the 23S helium metastable and electrons are presented as functions of E/N to demonstrate the spatial resolving capabilities of the LCIF method.

  18. Laser-Assisted in situ Keratomileusis for Hyperopic Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester Novoa Sánchez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: currently, LASIK is one of the most common surgical procedures for refractive disorders, including hyperopic defects. Objective: to assess the results of laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis for the treatment of hyperopic defects. Methods: an ambispective study was conducted in 31 eyes (16 patients operated on for hyperopia and simple and compound hyperopic astigmatism in the Refractive Surgery Unit of the Ophthalmology Department of the Hermanos Ameijeiras Hospital between January 2009 and December 2010. Visual acuity with and without optical correction, spherical and astigmatic component before and after surgery and intra- and postoperative complications were analyzed. Results: patients aged 40 to 49 years predominated; compound hyperopic astigmatism was the most frequent defect; the mean uncorrected visual acuity improved and remained stable up to six months after surgery; the average values were 0.87 for moderate defects and 0.79 for high defects with optical correction. The mean sphero-cylindrical component decreased. The efficacy and safety rates were acceptable for moderate and high degrees of the defects and predictability was 100 % for all degrees of ametropia. Conclusion: LASIK is a safe, effective and predictable procedure to treat patients with moderate and high degrees hyperopia and hyperopic astigmatism.

  19. Laser plasma jet driven microparticles for DNA/drug delivery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viren Menezes

    Full Text Available This paper describes a microparticle delivery device that generates a plasma jet through laser ablation of a thin metal foil and uses the jet to accomplish particle delivery into soft living targets for transferring biological agents. Pure gold microparticles of 1 µm size were coated with a plasmid DNA, pIG121Hm, and were deposited as a thin layer on one surface of an aluminum foil. The laser (Nd:YAG, 1064 nm wavelength ablation of the foil generated a plasma jet that carried the DNA coated particles into the living onion cells. The particles could effectively penetrate the target cells and disseminate the DNA, effecting the transfection of the cells. Generation of the plasma jet on laser ablation of the foil and its role as a carrier of microparticles was visualized using a high-speed video camera, Shimadzu HPV-1, at a frame rate of 500 kfps (2 µs interframe interval in a shadowgraph optical set-up. The particle speed could be measured from the visualized images, which was about 770 m/s initially, increased to a magnitude of 1320 m/s, and after a quasi-steady state over a distance of 10 mm with an average magnitude of 1100 m/s, started declining, which typically is the trend of a high-speed, pulsed, compressible jet. Aluminum launch pad (for the particles was used in the present study to make the procedure cost-effective, whereas the guided, biocompatible launch pads made of gold, silver or titanium can be used in the device during the actual clinical operations. The particle delivery device has a potential to have a miniature form and can be an effective, hand-held drug/DNA delivery device for biological applications.

  20. Laser-plasma interactions in NIF-scale plasmas (HLP5 and HLP6)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacGowan, B.; Berger, R.; Fernandez, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-06-01

    The understanding of laser-plasma interactions in ignition-scale inertial confinement fusion (ICF) hohlraum targets is important for the success of the proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF). The success of an indirect-drive ICF ignition experiment depends on the ability to predict and control the history and spatial distribution of the x-radiation produced by the laser beams that are absorbed by the inside of the hohlraum wall. Only by controlling the symmetry of this x-ray drive is it possible to obtain the implosion symmetry in the fusion pellet necessary for ignition. The larger hohlraums and longer time scales required for ignition-scale targets result in the presence of several millimeters of plasma (electron density n{sub e} {approximately} 0.1 n{sub c} {approximately} 10{sup 21} cm{sup {minus}3}), through which the 3{omega} (351-nm) laser beams must propagate before they are absorbed at the hohlraum wall. Hydrodynamic simulations show this plasma to be very uniform [density-gradient scalelength L{sub n} = n{sub e}(dn{sub e}/dx){sup {minus}1}{approximately} 2mm] and to exhibit low velocity gradients [velocity-gradient scale-length L{sub v} = c{sub s}(dv/dx){sup {minus}1} > 6 mm].

  1. Properties of Erbium Doped Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon Layers Fabricated by Sputtering and Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Prajzler

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report about properties of carbon layers doped with Er3+ ions fabricated by Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition (PACVD and by sputtering on silicon or glass substrates. The structure of the samples was characterized by X-ray diffraction and their composition was determined by Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy and Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis. The Absorbance spectrum was taken in the spectral range from 400 nm to 600 nm. Photoluminescence spectra were obtained using two types of Ar laser (λex=514.5 nm, lex=488 nm and also using a semiconductor laser (λex=980 nm. Samples fabricated by magnetron sputtering exhibited typical emission at 1530 nm when pumped at 514.5 nm. 

  2. Fast magnetic reconnection in laser-produced plasma bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, W; Bhattacharjee, A; Germaschewski, K

    2011-05-27

    Recent experiments have observed magnetic reconnection in high-energy-density, laser-produced plasma bubbles, with reconnection rates observed to be much higher than can be explained by classical theory. Based on fully kinetic particle simulations we find that fast reconnection in these strongly driven systems can be explained by magnetic flux pileup at the shoulder of the current sheet and subsequent fast reconnection via two-fluid, collisionless mechanisms. In the strong drive regime with two-fluid effects, we find that the ultimate reconnection time is insensitive to the nominal system Alfvén time.

  3. Magnetic field generation during intense laser channelling in underdense plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, A. G.; Sarri, G.; Vranic, M.; Amano, Y.; Doria, D.; Guillaume, E.; Habara, H.; Heathcote, R.; Hicks, G.; Najmudin, Z.; Nakamura, H.; Norreys, P. A.; Kar, S.; Silva, L. O.; Tanaka, K. A.; Vieira, J.; Borghesi, M.

    2016-06-01

    Channel formation during the propagation of a high-energy (120 J) and long duration (30 ps) laser pulse through an underdense deuterium plasma has been spatially and temporally resolved via means of a proton imaging technique, with intrinsic resolutions of a few μm and a few ps, respectively. Conclusive proof is provided that strong azimuthally symmetric magnetic fields with a strength of around 0.5 MG are created inside the channel, consistent with the generation of a collimated beam of relativistic electrons. The inferred electron beam characteristics may have implications for the cone-free fast-ignition scheme of inertial confinement fusion.

  4. Nanoscale imaging using a compact laser plasma EUV source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Bartnik, Andrzej; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Kostecki, Jerzy; Jarocki, Roman; Szczurek, Miroslaw; Szczurek, Anna; Feigl, Torsten; Pina, Ladislav

    2012-05-01

    High resolution imaging methods and techniques are currently under development. One of them is an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) microscopy, based on Fresnel zone plates. In this paper a compact, high-repetition, laser-plasma EUV source, emitting quasi-monochromatic radiation at 13.8nm wavelength was used in a desktop EUV transmission microscopy with a spatial (half-pitch) resolution of 50nm. EUV microscopy images of objects with various thicknesses and the spatial resolution measurements using the knife-edge test are presented.

  5. Ultrafast Diagnostics for Electron Beams from Laser Plasma Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlis, N. H.; Bakeman, M.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Gonsalves, T.; Lin, C.; Nakamura, K.; Osterhoff, J.; Plateau, G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Shiraishi, S.; Sokollik, T.; van Tilborg, J.; Toth, Cs.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-06-01

    We present an overview of diagnostic techniques for measuring key parameters of electron bunches from Laser Plasma Accelerators (LPAs). The diagnostics presented here were chosen because they highlight the unique advantages (e.g., diverse forms of electromagnetic emission) and difficulties (e.g., shot-to-shot variability) associated with LPAs. Non destructiveness and high resolution (in space and time and energy) are key attributes that enable the formation of a comprehensive suite of simultaneous diagnostics which are necessary for the full characterization of the ultrashort, but highly-variable electron bunches from LPAs.

  6. Numerical simulation of filamentation in laser-plasma interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholas, D.J.; Sajjadi, S.G.

    1986-05-14

    Numerical studies of beam filamentation in laser-produced plasma are presented. This involves the numerical solution of the parabolic wave equation, known as the Schroedinger equation, coupled with the thermal transport equations for both ions and electrons, in two dimensions. The solution of the resulting equation with non-linear refractive index due to thermal and pondermotive forces, shows self-focusing and a variety of strong aberration effects. Intensity amplification at the final focus is found to be between one and two orders of magnitude greater than the initial beam intensity, governed in general by diffraction and aberration effects within the beam.

  7. Explosion of relativistic electron vortices in laser plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Lezhnin, K V; Esirkepov, T Zh; Bulanov, S V; Gu, Y; Weber, S; Korn, G

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of high intensity laser radiation with underdense plasma may lead to the formation of electron vortices. Though being quasistationary on an electron timescales, these structures tend to expand on a proton timescale due to Coloumb repulsion of ions. Using a simple analytical model of a stationary vortex as initial condition, 2D PIC simulations are performed. A number of effects are observed such as vortex boundary field intensification, multistream instabilities at the vortex boundary, and bending of the vortex boundary with the subsequent transformation into smaller electron vortices.

  8. Laser light backscatter from intermediate and high Z plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, R. L.; Constantin, C.; Divol, L.; Meezan, N.; Froula, D. H.; Glenzer, S. H.; Suter, L. J.; Niemann, C.

    2006-09-01

    In experiments at the Omega Laser Facility [J. M. Soures et al., Fusion Technol. 30, 492 (1996)], stimulated Brillouin backscatter (SBS) from gasbags filled with krypton and xenon gases was ten times lower than from CO2-filled gasbags with similar electron densities. The SBS backscatter was a 1%-5% for both 527 and 351nm interaction beams at an intensity of ˜1015W /cm2. The SRS backscatter was less than 1%. The 351nm interaction beam is below the threshold for filamentation and the SBS occurs in the density plateau between the blast waves. Inverse bremsstrahlung absorption of the incident and SBS light account for the lower reflectivity from krypton than from CO2. The 527nm interaction beam filaments in the blowoff plasma before the beam propagates through the blast wave, where it is strongly absorbed. Thus, most of the 527nm SBS occurs in the flowing plasma outside the blast waves.

  9. Preliminary results of femtosecond laser-assisted descemet stripping endothelial keratoplasty.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, Y.Y.; Hendrikse, F.; Pels, E.; Wijdh, R.J.; Cleynenbreugel, H. van; Eggink, C.A.; Rij, G. van; Rijneveld, W.J.; Nuijts, R.M.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the preliminary visual results of femtosecond laser-assisted Descemet stripping endothelial keratoplasty (FS-DSEK). METHODS: We prospectively analyzed results of 20 consecutive patients with Fuchs endothelial dystrophy or aphakic/pseudophakic bullous keratopathy who underwent

  10. Elongation of plasma channel generated by temporally shaped femtosecond laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Anmin; Li, Suyu; Qi, Hongxia; Jiang, Yuanfei; Hu, Zhan; Huang, Xuri; Jin, Mingxing

    2017-01-01

    Temporally shaped femtosecond laser pulse is used to generate the air plasma channel. The length of plasma channel is optimized by a genetic algorithm. Compared with the transform-limited pulse, the temporally shaped femtosecond laser produced by the spatial light modulator with the genetic algorithm can lead to a significant increase in length and brightness of plasma channel in atmosphere. In particular, the length of the plasma channel produced by the optimized shaped pulse can be extended by 50%. This method can be especially advantageous in the context of femtosecond laser-induced plasma channel.

  11. Peculiarities of Efficient Plasma Generation in Air and Water by Short Duration Laser Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Floyd, Bertram M.

    2017-01-01

    We have conducted experiments to demonstrate an efficient generation of plasma discharges by focused nanosecond pulsed laser beams in air and provided recommendations on the design of optical systems to implement such plasma generation. We have also demonstrated generation of the secondary plasma discharge using the unused energy from the primary one. Focused nanosecond pulsed laser beams have also been utilized to generate plasma in water where we observed self-focusing and filamentation. Furthermore, we applied the laser generated plasma to the decomposition of methylene blue dye diluted in water.

  12. Challenges in plasma and laser wakefield accelerated beams diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cianchi, A., E-mail: alessandro.cianchi@roma2.infn.it [University of Rome Tor Vergata and INFN, V. della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Anania, M.P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Castellano, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Ferrario, M.; Gatti, G. [INFN-LNF - Via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (RM) (Italy); Marchetti, B. [DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Mostacci, A. [University of Rome La Sapienza, P.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Pompili, R. [INFN-LNF - Via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (RM) (Italy); Ronsivalle, C. [ENEA C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi,45 00044 Frascati (RM) (Italy); Rossi, A.R.; Serafini, L. [INFN-Mi, Via Celoria, 16 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2013-08-21

    The new frontier in the particle beam accelerator is the so called plasma acceleration. Using the strong electric field inside a plasma it is possible to achieve accelerating gradients in the order of magnitude larger with respect to the actual technologies. Different schemes have been proposed and several already tested, producing beams of energy of several GeV. Mainly two approaches are followed: either the beam is directly produced by the interaction of a TW/PW class laser with a gas jet or a preexisting particle beam is accelerated in a plasma channel. In both cases a precise determination of the emerging beam parameters is mandatory for the fine tuning of the devices. The measurement of these parameters, in particular the emittance, is not trivial, mainly due to the large energy spread and to the tight focusing of these beams or to the background noise produced in the plasma channel. We show the problems related to the diagnostic of this kind of beams and the proposed or already realized solutions.

  13. Challenges in plasma and laser wakefield accelerated beams diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianchi, A.; Anania, M. P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Castellano, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Ferrario, M.; Gatti, G.; Marchetti, B.; Mostacci, A.; Pompili, R.; Ronsivalle, C.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.

    2013-08-01

    The new frontier in the particle beam accelerator is the so called plasma acceleration. Using the strong electric field inside a plasma it is possible to achieve accelerating gradients in the order of magnitude larger with respect to the actual technologies. Different schemes have been proposed and several already tested, producing beams of energy of several GeV. Mainly two approaches are followed: either the beam is directly produced by the interaction of a TW/PW class laser with a gas jet or a preexisting particle beam is accelerated in a plasma channel. In both cases a precise determination of the emerging beam parameters is mandatory for the fine tuning of the devices. The measurement of these parameters, in particular the emittance, is not trivial, mainly due to the large energy spread and to the tight focusing of these beams or to the background noise produced in the plasma channel. We show the problems related to the diagnostic of this kind of beams and the proposed or already realized solutions.

  14. High-performance modeling of plasma-based acceleration and laser-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vay, Jean-Luc; Blaclard, Guillaume; Godfrey, Brendan; Kirchen, Manuel; Lee, Patrick; Lehe, Remi; Lobet, Mathieu; Vincenti, Henri

    2016-10-01

    Large-scale numerical simulations are essential to the design of plasma-based accelerators and laser-plasma interations for ultra-high intensity (UHI) physics. The electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) approach is the method of choice for self-consistent simulations, as it is based on first principles, and captures all kinetic effects, and also scale favorably to many cores on supercomputers. The standard PIC algorithm relies on second-order finite-difference discretization of the Maxwell and Newton-Lorentz equations. We present here novel formulations, based on very high-order pseudo-spectral Maxwell solvers, which enable near-total elimination of the numerical Cherenkov instability and increased accuracy over the standard PIC method for standard laboratory frame and Lorentz boosted frame simulations. We also present the latest implementations in the PIC modules Warp-PICSAR and FBPIC on the Intel Xeon Phi and GPU architectures. Examples of applications will be given on the simulation of laser-plasma accelerators and high-harmonic generation with plasma mirrors. Work supported by US-DOE Contracts DE-AC02-05CH11231 and by the European Commission through the Marie Slowdoska-Curie fellowship PICSSAR Grant Number 624543. Used resources of NERSC.

  15. Spatiotemporal dynamics of Gaussian laser pulse in a multi ions plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari Milani, M. R.

    2016-08-01

    Spatiotemporal evolutions of Gaussian laser pulse propagating through a plasma with multiple charged ions are studied, taking into account the ponderomotive nonlinearity. Coupled differential equations for beam width and pulse length parameters are established and numerically solved using paraxial ray approximation. In one-dimensional geometry, effects of laser and plasma parameters such as laser intensity, plasma density, and temperature on the longitudinal pulse compression and the laser intensity distribution are analyzed for plasmas with singly and doubly charged ions. The results demonstrate that self-compression occurs in a laser intensity range with a turning point intensity in which the self-compression process has its strongest extent. The results also show that the multiply ionized ions have different effect on the pulse compression above and below turning point intensity. Finally, three-dimensional geometry is used to analyze the simultaneous evolution of both self-focusing and self-compression of Gaussian laser pulse in such plasmas.

  16. Realizing the Harper Hamiltonian with laser-assisted tunneling in optical lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Hirokazu; Siviloglou, Georgios A; Kennedy, Colin J; Burton, William Cody; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2013-11-01

    We experimentally implement the Harper Hamiltonian for neutral particles in optical lattices using laser-assisted tunneling and a potential energy gradient provided by gravity or magnetic field gradients. This Hamiltonian describes the motion of charged particles in strong magnetic fields. Laser-assisted tunneling processes are characterized by studying the expansion of the atoms in the lattice. The band structure of this Hamiltonian should display Hofstadter's butterfly. For fermions, this scheme should realize the quantum Hall effect and chiral edge states.

  17. Laser-assisted cold-sprayed hydroxyapatite/titanium composites: evaluation for tissues engineering applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tlotleng, Monnamme

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available -1 Laser-assisted cold-sprayed hydroxyapatite/titanium composites: evaluation for tissues engineering applications Monnamme Tlotleng, Mukul Shukla, Esther Akinlabi and Sisa Pityana AIMS AND OBJECTIVES This research work seeks to establish titanium... and hydroxyapatite (Ti-HAP) using Laser- Assisted Cold Spray (LACS) technique on Ti-6Al-4V substrate. The produced coatings must be characterised for: a) Micro-structure (porosity, cracks, etc.) using Optical Microscope (OM); b) Mechanical properties (Hardness...

  18. Laser light scattering in a laser-induced argon plasma: Investigations of the shock wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokrzywka, B. [Obserwatorium Astronomiczne na Suhorze, Uniwersytet Pedagogiczny, ulica Podchorazych 2, 30-084 Krakow (Poland); Mendys, A., E-mail: agata.mendys@uj.edu.pl [Instytut Fizyki im. M. Smoluchowskiego, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, ulica Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Dzierzega, K.; Grabiec, M. [Instytut Fizyki im. M. Smoluchowskiego, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, ulica Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Pellerin, S. [GREMI, site de Bourges, Universite d' Orleans, CNRS, rue Gaston Berger BP 4043, 18028 Bourges (France)

    2012-08-15

    Shock wave produced by a laser induced spark in argon at atmospheric pressure was examined using Rayleigh and Thomson scattering. The spark was generated by focusing a laser pulse from the second harmonic ({lambda} = 532 nm) of a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser using an 80 mm focal length lens, with a fluence of 2 kJ{center_dot}cm{sup -2}. Images of the spark emission were recorded for times between 30 ns and 100 {mu}s after the laser pulse in order to characterize its spatial evolution. The position of the shock wave at several instants of its evolution and for several plasma regions was determined from the Rayleigh-scattered light of another nanosecond Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 40 J{center_dot}cm{sup -2} fluence). Simultaneously, Thomson scattering technique was applied to determine the electron density and temperature in the hot plasma core. Attempts were made to describe the temporal evolution of the shock wave within a self-similar model, both by the simple Sedov-Taylor formula as well as its extension deduced by de Izarra. The temporal radial evolution of the shock position is similar to that obtained within theory taking into account the counter pressure of the ambient gas. Density profiles just behind the shock front are in qualitative agreement with those obtained by numerically solving the Euler equations for instantaneous explosion at a point with counter pressure. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated shock wave evolution by Rayleigh scattering method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 2D map of shockwave position for several times after plasma generation is presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Shock wave evolution is not satisfactorily described within self-similar models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evolution of shock position similar to theory taking into account counter pressure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Density profile behind the shock similar to numerical solution of Euler equations.

  19. Electron acceleration in preformed plasma channels with terawatt CO{sub 2} laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogorelsky, I.V.

    1995-02-01

    Extended cylindrical plasma channels produced under gas breakdown by axicon-focused laser beams may be used as optical waveguides in laser-driven electron accelerators. Plasma channeling of the laser beams will help to maintain a high acceleration gradient over many Rayleigh lengths. In addition, the rarefied gas density channel produced after the optical gas breakdown, and followed by a plasma column expansion, reduces multiple scattering of the electron beam. A high-power picosecond C0{sub 2}laser operational at the ATF and being further upgraded to the 1 TW level is considered as the source for a plasma channel formation and as the laser accelerator driver. We show how various laser accelerator schemes including beat wave, wake field, and Inverse Cherenkov accelerator benefit from using a channeled short-pulse C0{sub 2}laser as a driver.

  20. Pulse laser assisted MOVPE for InGaN with high indium content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaguchi, Norihito [Technical Development and Engineering Center, Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Yokohama 235-8501 (Japan); Dept. of Applied Chemistry, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Hida, Kennosuke; Kangawa, Yoshihiro; Kumagai, Yoshinao; Koukitu, Akinori [Dept. of Applied Chemistry, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)

    2004-09-01

    In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}N film was grown at 600 C by Nd:YAG pulse laser assisted MOVPE. The optical and structural properties of the film were compared with that grown without laser assistance at the same condition. The results of XRD measurements showed that the crystallinity of the film grown with laser was better than that of the one grown without laser. The surface morphology and cross-sectional SEM image of the film grown with laser revealed that there were no In droplets on the film. The band-edge emission of the film grown with laser at room temperature and 77 K was observed at 840 nm. The results of micro-Raman measurement showed that the film grown with laser had better crystalline structure than that of the film grown without laser and the radiative recombination which contributed to photoluminescence mainly occurred at In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}N region. Those results imply that pulse laser enhances the surface migration and reaction of elements in spite of low-growth temperature. We suggest that pulse laser assisted technique is effective for low-temperature growth of InGaN with high indium content. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. Pulse laser assisted MOVPE for InGaN with high indium content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Norihito; Hida, Ken-Nosuke; Kangawa, Yoshihiro; Kumagai, Yoshinao; Koukitu, Akinori

    2004-09-01

    In0.53Ga0.47N film was grown at 600 °C by Nd:YAG pulse laser assisted MOVPE. The optical and structural properties of the film were compared with that grown without laser assistance at the same condition. The results of XRD measurements showed that the crystallinity of the film grown with laser was better than that of the one grown without laser. The surface morphology and cross-sectional SEM image of the film grown with laser revealed that there were no In droplets on the film. The band-edge emission of the film grown with laser at room temperature and 77 K was observed at 840 nm. The results of micro-Raman measurement showed that the film grown with laser had better crystalline structure than that of the film grown without laser and the radiative recombination which contributed to photoluminescence mainly occurred at In0.53Ga0.47N region. Those results imply that pulse laser enhances the surface migration and reaction of elements in spite of low-growth temperature. We suggest that pulse laser assisted technique is effective for low-temperature growth of InGaN with high indium content.

  2. Simultaneous streak and frame interferometry for electron density measurements of laser produced plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quevedo, H. J., E-mail: hjquevedo@utexas.edu; McCormick, M.; Wisher, M.; Bengtson, Roger D.; Ditmire, T. [Center for High Energy Density Science, Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    A system of two collinear probe beams with different wavelengths and pulse durations was used to capture simultaneously snapshot interferograms and streaked interferograms of laser produced plasmas. The snapshots measured the two dimensional, path-integrated, electron density on a charge-coupled device while the radial temporal evolution of a one dimensional plasma slice was recorded by a streak camera. This dual-probe combination allowed us to select plasmas that were uniform and axisymmetric along the laser direction suitable for retrieving the continuous evolution of the radial electron density of homogeneous plasmas. Demonstration of this double probe system was done by measuring rapidly evolving plasmas on time scales less than 1 ns produced by the interaction of femtosecond, high intensity, laser pulses with argon gas clusters. Experiments aimed at studying homogeneous plasmas from high intensity laser-gas or laser-cluster interaction could benefit from the use of this probing scheme.

  3. Simultaneous streak and frame interferometry for electron density measurements of laser produced plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo, H. J.; McCormick, M.; Wisher, M.; Bengtson, Roger D.; Ditmire, T.

    2016-01-01

    A system of two collinear probe beams with different wavelengths and pulse durations was used to capture simultaneously snapshot interferograms and streaked interferograms of laser produced plasmas. The snapshots measured the two dimensional, path-integrated, electron density on a charge-coupled device while the radial temporal evolution of a one dimensional plasma slice was recorded by a streak camera. This dual-probe combination allowed us to select plasmas that were uniform and axisymmetric along the laser direction suitable for retrieving the continuous evolution of the radial electron density of homogeneous plasmas. Demonstration of this double probe system was done by measuring rapidly evolving plasmas on time scales less than 1 ns produced by the interaction of femtosecond, high intensity, laser pulses with argon gas clusters. Experiments aimed at studying homogeneous plasmas from high intensity laser-gas or laser-cluster interaction could benefit from the use of this probing scheme.

  4. Design challenges for matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation and infrared resonant laser evaporation equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, James A.

    2011-11-01

    Since the development of the Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) process by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in the late 1990s, MAPLE has become an active area of research for the deposition of a variety of polymer, biological, and organic thin films. As is often the case with advancements in thin-film deposition techniques new technology sometimes evolves by making minor or major adjustments to existing deposition process equipment and techniques. This is usually the quickest and least expensive way to try out new ideas and to "push the envelope" in order to obtain new and unique scientific results as quickly as possible. This process of "tweaking" current equipment usually works to some degree, but once the new process is further refined overall designs for a new deposition tool based on the critical attributes of the new process typically help capitalize more fully on the all the salient features of the new and improved process. This certainly has been true for the MAPLE process. In fact the first MAPLE experiments the polymer/solvent matrix was mixed and poured into a copper holder held at LN2 temperature on a laboratory counter top. The holder was then quickly placed onto a LN2 cooled reservoir in a vacuum deposition chamber and placed in a vertical position on a LN2 cooled stage and pumped down as quickly as possible. If the sample was not placed into the chamber quickly enough the frozen matrix would melt and drip into the bottom of the chamber onto the chambers main gate valve making a bit of a mess. However, skilled and motivated scientists usually worked quickly enough to make this process work most of the time. The initial results from these experiments were encouraging and led to several publications which sparked considerable interest in this newly developed technique Clearly this approach provided the vision that MAPLE was a viable deposition process, but the equipment was not optimal for conducting MAPLE experiments on a regular basis

  5. Plasma mediated ablation of biological tissues with ultrashort laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oraevsky, A.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)]|[Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; DaSilva, L.B.; Feit, M.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-03-08

    Plasma mediated ablation of collagen gels and porcine cornea was studied at various laser pulse durations in the range from 350 fs to 1 ns at 1,053 nm wavelength. A time resolved stress detection technique was employed to measure transient stress profiles and amplitudes. Optical microscopy was used to characterize ablation craters qualitatively, while a wide band acoustic transducer helped to quantify tissue mechanical response and the ablation threshold. The ablation threshold was measured as a function of laser pulse duration and linear absorption coefficient. For nanosecond pulses the ablation threshold was found to have a strong dependence on the linear absorption coefficient of the material. As the pulse length decreased into the subpicosecond regime the ablation threshold became insensitive to the linear absorption coefficient. The ablation efficiency was found to be insensitive to both the laser pulse duration and the linear absorption coefficient. High quality ablation craters with no thermal or mechanical damage to surrounding material were obtained with 350 fs laser pulses. The mechanism of optical breakdown at the tissue surface was theoretically investigated. In the nanosecond regime, optical breakdown proceeds as an electron collisional avalanche ionization initiated by thermal seed electrons. These seed electrons are created by heating of the tissue by linear absorption. In the ultrashort pulse range, optical breakdown is initiated by the multiphoton ionization of the irradiated medium (6 photons in case of tissue irradiated at 1,053 nm wavelength), and becomes less sensitive to the linear absorption coefficient. The energy deposition profile is insensitive to both the laser pulse duration and the linear absorption coefficient.

  6. Tool life of diamond inserts after laser assisted turning of cemented carbides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kieruj Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results and discussion on parameters influence on tool life when turning laser cladded cemented carbides under laser assisted machining (LAM conditions. The layers are known as Technolase 30S. This material is widely recognized as hard-to-cut. The experimental investigation was carried out with diamond inserts. The laser power density, feed rate and laser scanning speed were analysed. Flank wear (VBc indicator was measured and cutting tool life was calculated. It was proved that Technolase 30S can be machined with LAM technology. The laser enhanced turning is more efficient than conventional turning and grinding.

  7. Studies of bandwidth dependence of laser plasma instabilities driven by the Nike laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, J.; Kehne, D.; Obenschain, S.; Serlin, V.; Schmitt, A. J.; Oh, J.; Lehmberg, R. H.; Brown, C. M.; Seely, J.; Feldman, U.

    2012-10-01

    Experiments at the Nike laser facility of the Naval Research Laboratory are exploring the influence of laser bandwidth on laser plasma instabilities (LPI) driven by a deep ultraviolet pump (248 nm) that incorporates beam smoothing by induced spatial incoherence (ISI). In early ISI studies with longer wavelength Nd:glass lasers (1054 nm and 527 nm),footnotetextObenschain, PRL 62(1989);Mostovych, PRL 62(1987);Peyser, Phys. Fluids B 3(1991). stimulated Raman scattering, stimulated Brillouin scattering, and the two plasmon decay instability were reduced when wide bandwidth ISI (δν/ν˜0.03-0.19%) pulses irradiated targets at moderate to high intensities (10^14-10^15 W/cm^2). The current studies will compare the emission signatures of LPI from planar CH targets during Nike operation at large bandwidth (δν˜1THz) to observations for narrower bandwidth operation (δν˜0.1-0.3THz). These studies will help clarify the relative importance of the short wavelength and wide bandwidth to the increased LPI intensity thresholds observed at Nike. New pulse shapes are being used to generate plasmas with larger electron density scale-lengths that are closer to conditions during pellet implosions for direct drive inertial confinement fusion.

  8. Field-assisted paper spray mass spectrometry for the quantitative evaluation of imatinib levels in plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aronco, Sara; Calandra, Eleonora; Crotti, Sara; Toffoli, Giuseppe; Marangon, Elena; Posocco, Bianca; Traldi, Pietro; Agostini, Marco

    Drug levels in patients' bloodstreams vary among individuals and consequently therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is fundamental to controlling the effective therapeutic range. For TDM purposes, different analytical approaches have been used, mainly based on immunoassay, liquid chromatography- ultraviolet, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods. More recently a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation method has been proposed for the determination of irinotecan levels in the plasma of subjects under therapy and this method has been cross- validated by comparison with data achieved by LC-MS/MS. However, to reach an effective point-of-care monitoring of plasma drug concentrations, a TDM platform technology for fast, accurate, low-cost assays is required. In this frame, recently the use of paper spray mass spectrometry, which is becoming a popular and widely employed MS method, has been proposed. In this paper we report the results obtained by the development of a paper spray-based method for quantitative analysis in plasma samples of imatinib, a new generation of anticancer drug. Preliminary experiments showed that poor sensitivity, reproducibility and linear response were obtained by the "classical" paper spray set-up. In order to achieve better results, it was thought of interest to operate in presence of a higher and more homogeneous electrical field. For this aim, a stainless steel needle connected with the high voltage power supply was mounted below the paper triangle. Furthermore, in order to obtain valid quantitative data, we analysed the role of the different equilibria participating to the phenomena occurring in paper spray experiments, depending either on instrumental parameters or on the chemical nature of analyte and solvents. A calibration curve was obtained by spiking plasma samples containing different amounts of imatinib (1) with known amounts of deuterated imatinib (1d3) as

  9. Microstructure-sensitive flow stress modeling for force prediction in laser assisted milling of Inconel 718

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Zhipeng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Inconel 718 is a typical hard-to-machine material that requires thermally enhanced machining technology such as laser-assisted milling. Based upon finite element analysis, this study simulates the forces in the laser-assisted milling process of Inconel 718 considering the effects of grain growth due to γ' and γ" phases. The γ" phase is unstable and becomes the δ phase, which is likely to precipitate at a temperature over 750 °C. The temperature around the center of spot in the experiments is 850 °C, so the phase transformation and grain growth happen throughout the milling process. In the analysis, this study includes the microstructure evolution while accounting for the effects of dynamic recrystallization and grain growth through the Avrami model. The grain growth reduces the yield stress and flow stress, which improves the machinability. In finite element analysis (FEA, several boundary conditions of temperature varying with time are defined to simulate the movement of laser spot, and the constitutive model is described by Johnson-Cook equation. In experiments, this study collects three sets of cutting forces and finds that the predicted values are in close agreements with measurements especially in feed direction, in which the smallest error is around 5%. In another three simulations, this study also examines the effect of laser preheating on the cutting forces by comparison with a traditional milling process without laser assist. When the laser is off, the forces increase in all cases, which prove the softening effect of laser-assisted milling. In addition, when the axial depth of milling increases, the laser has a more significant influence, especially in axial direction, in which the force with laser is more than 18% smaller than the one without laser. Overall, this study validates the influence of laser-assisted milling on Inconel 718 by predicting the cutting forces in FEA.

  10. Laser Diagnostic Method for Plasma Sheath Potential Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Sean P.

    Electric propulsion systems are gaining popularity in the aerospace field as a viable option for long term positioning and thrusting applications. In particular, Hall thrusters have shown promise as the primary propulsion engine for space probes during interplanetary journeys. However, the interaction between propellant xenon ions and the ceramic channel wall continues to remain a complex issue. The most significant source of power loss in Hall thrusters is due to electron and ion currents through the sheath to the channel wall. A sheath is a region of high electric field that separates a plasma from a wall or surface in contact. Plasma electrons with enough energy to penetrate the sheath may result emission of a secondary electron from the wall. With significant secondary electron emission (SEE), the sheath voltage is reduced and so too is the electron retarding electric field. Therefore, a lower sheath voltage further increases the particle loss to the wall of a Hall thruster and leads to plasma cooling and lower efficiency. To further understand sheath dynamics, laser-induced fluorescence is employed to provide a non-invasive, in situ, and spatially resolved technique for measuring xenon ion velocity. By scanning the laser wavelength over an electronic transition of singly ionized xenon and collecting the resulting fluorescence, one can determine the ion velocity from the Doppler shifted absorption. Knowing the velocity at multiple points in the sheath, it can be converted to a relative electric potential profile which can reveal a lot about the plasma-wall interaction and the severity of SEE. The challenge of adequately measuring sheath potential profiles is optimizing the experiment to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio. A strong signal with low noise, enables high resolution measurements and increases the depth of measurement in the sheath, where the signal strength is lowest. Many improvements were made to reduce the background luminosity, increase the

  11. Impacts of Ambient and Ablation Plasmas on Short- and Ultrashort-Pulse Laser Processing of Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadezhda M. Bulgakova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the fact that more than five decades have passed since the invention of laser, some topics of laser-matter interaction still remain incompletely studied. One of such topics is plasma impact on the overall phenomenon of the interaction and its particular features, including influence of the laser-excited plasma re-radiation, back flux of energetic plasma species, and massive material redeposition, on the surface quality and processing efficiency. In this paper, we analyze different plasma aspects, which go beyond a simple consideration of the well-known effect of plasma shielding of laser radiation. The following effects are considered: ambient gas ionization above the target on material processing with formation of a “plasma pipe”; back heating of the target by both laser-driven ambient and ablation plasmas through conductive and radiative heat transfer; plasma chemical effects on surface processing including microstructure growth on liquid metals; complicated dynamics of the ablation plasma flow interacting with an ambient gas that can result in substantial redeposition of material around the ablation spot. Together with a review summarizing our main to-date achievements and outlining research directions, we present new results underlining importance of laser plasma dynamics and photoionization of the gas environment upon laser processing of materials.

  12. Ponderomotive self-focusing of Gaussian laser beam in warm collisional plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jafari Milani, M. R., E-mail: mrj.milani@gmail.com [Plasma Physics Research School, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Niknam, A. R., E-mail: a-niknam@sbu.ac.ir [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farahbod, A. H. [Plasma Physics Research School, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    The propagation characteristics of a Gaussian laser beam through warm collisional plasma are investigated by considering the ponderomotive force nonlinearity and the complex eikonal function. By introducing the dielectric permittivity of warm unmagnetized plasma and using the WKB and paraxial ray approximations, the coupled differential equations defining the variations of laser beam parameters are obtained and solved numerically. Effects of laser and plasma parameters such as the collision frequency, the initial laser intensity and its spot size on the beam width parameter and the axis laser intensity distribution are analyzed. It is shown that, self-focusing of the laser beam takes place faster by increasing the collision frequency and initial laser spot size and then after some distance propagation the laser beam abruptly loses its initial diameter and vastly diverges. Furthermore, the modified electron density distribution is obtained and the collision frequency effect on this distribution is studied.

  13. Miniaturized reaction chamber for optimized laser-assisted carbon nanotube growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgt, Y. van de; Loon, W. van; Mandamparambil, R.; Bellouard, Y.

    2014-01-01

    The localized growth of carbon nanotube structures has potential in many applications such as interconnects, field emitters and sensors. Using a laser to locally heat the substrate offers a highly versatile process compatible with a broad range of substrates and devices. However, for laser-assisted

  14. Production of active lysozyme films by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation at 355 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Purice, Andreea; Schou, Jørgen; Kingshott, P.;

    2007-01-01

    Thin lysozyme films have been produced in a dry environment by MAPLE (matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation) from a water ice matrix irradiated by laser light at 355 nm above the absorption threshold of the protein. A significant part of the lysozyme molecules are transferred to the film without...

  15. Processing of C60 thin films by Matrix-Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canulescu, Stela; Schou, Jørgen; Fæster, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Thin films of fullerenes (C60) were deposited onto silicon using matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). The deposition was carried out from a frozen homogeneous dilute solution of C60 in anisole (0.67 wt%), and over a broad range of laser fluences, from 0.15 J/cm2 up to 3.9 J/cm2. MAPLE...

  16. A Laser-Assisted Anastomotic Technique : Feasibility on Human Diseased Coronary Arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stecher, David; Bronkers, Glenn; Vink, Aryan; Homoet-van der Kraak, Petra H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313984166; Helthuis, Jasper; Pasterkamp, Gerard|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/138488304; Buijsrogge, Marc P|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/24420098X

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Atherosclerotic disease might hamper the efficacy of the Excimer laser-assisted Trinity Clip anastomotic connector in coronary arteries. Therefore, its efficacy was evaluated on human diseased coronary arteries (study 1). In addition, the acute laser effects onto the coronary wall were as

  17. Surface morphology of thin lysozyme films produced by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Purice, Andreea; Schou, Jørgen; Pryds, Nini;

    2007-01-01

    Thin films of the protein, lysozyme, have been deposited by the matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) technique. Frozen targets of 0.3-1.0 wt.% lysozyme dissolved in ultrapure water were irradiated by laser light at 355 mn with a fluence of 2 J/cm(2). The surface quality of the thin ly...

  18. Studies on Nitrogen Oxides Removal Using Plasma Assisted Catalytic Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V. Ravi; Young Sun Mok; B. S. Rajanikanth; Ho-Chul Kang

    2003-01-01

    An electric discharge plasma reactor combined with a catalytic reactor was studied for removing nitrogen oxides. To understand the combined process thoroughly, discharge plasma and catalytic process were separately studied first, and then the two processes were combined for the study. The plasma reactor was able to oxidize NO to NO2 well although the oxidation rate decreased with temperature. The plasma reactor alone did not reduce the NOx (NO+NO2)level effectively, but the increase in the ratio of NO2 to NO as a result of plasma discharge led to the enhancement of NOx removal efficiency even at lower temperatures over the catalyst surface (V2O5-WOa/TiO2). At a gas temperature of 100℃, the NOx removal efficiency obtained using the combined plasma catalytic process was 88% for an energy input of 36 eV/molecule or 30 J/1.

  19. A Warm Fluid Model of Intense Laser-Plasma Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarkenton, G. M.; Shadwick, B. A.; Esarey, E. H.; Leemans, W. P.

    2001-10-01

    Following up on our previous work on modeling intense laser-plasma interactions with cold fluids,(B.A.Shadwick, G. M. Tarkenton, E.H. Esarey, and W.P. Leemans, ``Fluid Modeling of Intense Laser-Plasma Interactions'', in Advanced Accelerator Concepts), P. Colestock and S. Kelley editors, AIP Conf. Proc. 569 (AIP, NY 2001), pg. 154. we are exploring warm fluid models. These models represent the next level in a hierarchy of complexity beyond the cold fluid approximation. With only a modest increase in computation effort, warm fluids incorporate effects that are relevant to a variety of technologically interesting cases. We present a derivation of the warm fluid from a kinetic (i.e. Vlasov) perspective and make a connection with the usual relativistic thermodynamic approach.(S. R. de Groot, W. A. van Leeuwen and Ch. G. van Weert, Relativistic Kinetic Theory: Principles and Applications), North-Holland (1980). We will provide examples where the warm fluids yield physics results not contained in the cold model and discuss experimental parameters where these effects are believed to be important.

  20. Analyses of the plasma generated by laser irradiation on sputtered target for determination of the thickness used for plasma generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumaki, Masafumi, E-mail: masafumi.kumaki@riken.jp [Cooperative Major in Nuclear Energy, Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); RIKEN, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Ikeda, Shunsuke; Sekine, Megumi; Munemoto, Naoya [RIKEN, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Department of Energy Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo (Japan); Fuwa, Yasuhiro [RIKEN, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Cinquegrani, David [American Nuclear Society, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Washio, Masakazu [Cooperative Major in Nuclear Energy, Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    In Brookhaven National Laboratory, laser ion source has been developed to provide heavy ion beams by using plasma generation with 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser irradiation onto solid targets. The laser energy is transferred to the target material and creates a crater on the surface. However, only the partial material can be turned into plasma state and the other portion is considered to be just vaporized. Since heat propagation in the target material requires more than typical laser irradiation period, which is typically several ns, only the certain depth of the layers may contribute to form the plasma. As a result, the depth is more than 500 nm because the base material Al ions were detected. On the other hand, the result of comparing each carbon thickness case suggests that the surface carbon layer is not contributed to generate plasma.