WorldWideScience

Sample records for laser altimeter measurements

  1. Polarimetric, Two-Color, Photon-Counting Laser Altimeter Measurements of Forest Canopy Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, David J.; Dabney, Philip W.; Valett, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Laser altimeter measurements of forest stands with distinct structures and compositions have been acquired at 532 nm (green) and 1064 nm (near-infrared) wavelengths and parallel and perpendicular polarization states using the Slope Imaging Multi-polarization Photon Counting Lidar (SIMPL). The micropulse, single photon ranging measurement approach employed by SIMPL provides canopy structure measurements with high vertical and spatial resolution. Using a height distribution analysis method adapted from conventional, 1064 nm, full-waveform lidar remote sensing, the sensitivity of two parameters commonly used for above-ground biomass estimation are compared as a function of wavelength. The results for the height of median energy (HOME) and canopy cover are for the most part very similar, indicating biomass estimations using lidars operating at green and near-infrared wavelengths will yield comparable estimates. The expected detection of increasing depolarization with depth into the canopies due to volume multiple-scattering was not observed, possibly due to the small laser footprint and the small detector field of view used in the SIMPL instrument. The results of this work provide pathfinder information for NASA's ICESat-2 mission that will employ a 532 nm, micropulse, photon counting laser altimeter.

  2. Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) on the ICESat Mission: Initial Science Measurement Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, J. B.; Sun, X.; Riris, H.; Sirota, M.; McGarry, J.; Palm, S.

    2003-12-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System is the space lidar on the NASA ICESat mision. Its design combines an altimeter with 5 cm precision with a laser pointing angle determination system and a dual wavelength cloud and aerosol lidar. GLAS measures the range to the Earth's surface with 1064 nm laser pulses. Each laser pulse produces a precision pointing measurement from the stellar reference system (SRS) and an echo pulse waveform, which permits range determination and waveform spreading analysis. The single shot ranging accuracy is < 10 cm for ice surfaces with slopes < 2 degrees. GLAS also measures atmospheric backscatter profiles at both 1064 and 532 nm. The 1064 nm measurements use an analog Si APD detector and measure the height and profile the backscatter signal from thicker clouds. The measurements at 532 nm use photon counting detectors, and will measure the vertical height distributions of optically thin clouds and aerosol layers Before launch, the measurement performance of GLAS was evaluated using a lidar test instrument called the Bench Check Equipment (BCE). The BCE was developed in parallel with GLAS and served as an inverse altimeter, inverse lidar and a stellar source simulator. It was used to simulate the range of expected optical inputs to the GLAS receiver by illuminating its telescope with simulated background light as well as laser echoes with known powers, energy levels, widths and delay times. The BCE also allowed monitoring of the transmitted laser energy, the angle measurements of the SRS, the co-alignment of the transmitted laser beam to the receiver line of sight, and performance of the flight science algorithms. Performance was evaluated during the GLAS development, before and after environmental tests, and after delivery to the spacecraft. The ICESat observatory was launched into a 94 degree inclination, 590 km altitude circular polar orbit on January 12, 2003. Beginning in early February, GLAS was powered on tested in stages. Its 1064 nm

  3. Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) on the ICESat Mission: Science Measurement Performance since Launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, X.; Abshire, J. B.; Riris, H.; McGarry, J.; Sirota, M.

    2004-12-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System is a space lidar and the primary instrument on NASA's ICESat mision. Since launch in January 2003 GLAS has produced about 544 million measurements of the Earth's surface and atmosphere. It has made global measurements of the Earth's icesheets, land topography and atmosphere with unprecedented vertical resolution and accuracy. GLAS was first activated for science measurements in February 2003. Since then its operation and performance has confirmed many pre-launch expectations and exceed a few of the most optimistic expectations in vertical resolution and sensitivity. However GLAS also suffered an unexpected failure with its first laser, and the GLAS measurements have yielded some surprises in other areas. This talk will give a post-launch assessment of the science measurement performance of the GLAS instrument, and compare the measurement environment and its science measurements to pre-launch expectations. It also will address some of what has been learned from the GLAS design, operations and measurements which may benefit future space lidar.

  4. Laser altimeter of CE-1 payloads system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The design and operation of the Laser Altimeter of CE-1 Payloads System are presented in this paper.The paper includes the design of the system and spacecraft-level laser,the description of the emitting-system and receiving system,and the testing of the laser altimeter.The CE-1 laser altimeter is the first Chinese deep-space probe using a laser.It has one beam and operates at 1 Hz,with a nominal accuracy of 5 m.The laser altimeter has operated successfully in lunar orbit since November 28,2007.It has obtained 9120 thousand data values about the lunar altitude.

  5. Robust Control for the Mercury Laser Altimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Jacob S.

    2006-01-01

    Mercury Laser Altimeter Science Algorithms is a software system for controlling the laser altimeter aboard the Messenger spacecraft, which is to enter into orbit about Mercury in 2011. The software will control the altimeter by dynamically modifying hardware inputs for gain, threshold, channel-disable flags, range-window start location, and range-window width, by using ranging information provided by the spacecraft and noise counts from instrument hardware. In addition, because of severe bandwidth restrictions, the software also selects returns for downlink.

  6. Laser Altimeter for Flight Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, L. D.

    1986-01-01

    Height of flight-simulator probe above model of terrain measured by automatic laser triangulation system. Airplane simulated by probe that moves over model of terrain. Altitude of airplane scaled from height of probe above model. Height measured by triangulation of laser beam aimed at intersection of model surface with plumb line of probe.

  7. Crater Morphometry and Crater Degradation on Mercury: Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) Measurements and Comparison to Stereo-DTM Derived Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leight, C.; Fassett, C. I.; Crowley, M. C.; Dyar, M. D.

    2017-01-01

    Two types of measurements of Mercury's surface topography were obtained by the MESSENGER (MErcury Surface Space ENvironment, GEochemisty and Ranging) spacecraft: laser ranging data from Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) [1], and stereo imagery from the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) camera [e.g., 2, 3]. MLA data provide precise and accurate elevation meaurements, but with sparse spatial sampling except at the highest northern latitudes. Digital terrain models (DTMs) from MDIS have superior resolution but with less vertical accuracy, limited approximately to the pixel resolution of the original images (in the case of [3], 15-75 m). Last year [4], we reported topographic measurements of craters in the D=2.5 to 5 km diameter range from stereo images and suggested that craters on Mercury degrade more quickly than on the Moon (by a factor of up to approximately 10×). However, we listed several alternative explanations for this finding, including the hypothesis that the lower depth/diameter ratios we observe might be a result of the resolution and accuracy of the stereo DTMs. Thus, additional measurements were undertaken using MLA data to examine the morphometry of craters in this diameter range and assess whether the faster crater degradation rates proposed to occur on Mercury is robust.

  8. Single photon laser altimeter data processing, analysis and experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacek, Michael; Peca, Marek; Michalek, Vojtech; Prochazka, Ivan

    2015-10-01

    Spaceborne laser altimeters are common instruments on-board the rendezvous spacecraft. This manuscript deals with the altimeters using a single photon approach, which belongs to the family of time-of-flight range measurements. Moreover, the single photon receiver part of the altimeter may be utilized as an Earth-to-spacecraft link enabling one-way ranging, time transfer and data transfer. The single photon altimeters evaluate actual altitude through the repetitive detections of single photons of the reflected laser pulses. We propose the single photon altimeter signal processing and data mining algorithm based on the Poisson statistic filter (histogram method) and the modified Kalman filter, providing all common altimetry products (altitude, slope, background photon flux and albedo). The Kalman filter is extended for the background noise filtering, the varying slope adaptation and the non-causal extension for an abrupt slope change. Moreover, the algorithm partially removes the major drawback of a single photon altitude reading, namely that the photon detection measurement statistics must be gathered. The developed algorithm deduces the actual altitude on the basis of a single photon detection; thus, being optimal in the sense that each detected signal photon carrying altitude information is tracked and no altitude information is lost. The algorithm was tested on the simulated datasets and partially cross-probed with the experimental data collected using the developed single photon altimeter breadboard based on the microchip laser with the pulse energy on the order of microjoule and the repetition rate of several kilohertz. We demonstrated that such an altimeter configuration may be utilized for landing or hovering a small body (asteroid, comet).

  9. Lunar Impact Basins: Stratigraphy, Sequence and Ages from Superposed Impact Crater Populations Measured from Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassett, C. I.; Head, J. W.; Kadish, S. J.; Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    2012-01-01

    Impact basin formation is a fundamental process in the evolution of the Moon and records the history of impactors in the early solar system. In order to assess the stratigraphy, sequence, and ages of impact basins and the impactor population as a function of time, we have used topography from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) to measure the superposed impact crater size-frequency distributions for 30 lunar basins (D = 300 km). These data generally support the widely used Wilhelms sequence of lunar basins, although we find significantly higher densities of superposed craters on many lunar basins than derived by Wilhelms (50% higher densities). Our data also provide new insight into the timing of the transition between distinct crater populations characteristic of ancient and young lunar terrains. The transition from a lunar impact flux dominated by Population 1 to Population 2 occurred before the mid-Nectarian. This is before the end of the period of rapid cratering, and potentially before the end of the hypothesized Late Heavy Bombardment. LOLA-derived crater densities also suggest that many Pre-Nectarian basins, such as South Pole-Aitken, have been cratered to saturation equilibrium. Finally, both crater counts and stratigraphic observations based on LOLA data are applicable to specific basin stratigraphic problems of interest; for example, using these data, we suggest that Serenitatis is older than Nectaris, and Humboldtianum is younger than Crisium. Sample return missions to specific basins can anchor these measurements to a Pre-Imbrian absolute chronology.

  10. Diode-pumped laser altimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welford, D.; Isyanova, Y.

    1993-01-01

    TEM(sub 00)-mode output energies up to 22.5 mJ with 23 percent slope efficiencies were generated at 1.064 microns in a diode-laser pumped Nd:YAG laser using a transverse-pumping geometry. 1.32-micron performance was equally impressive at 10.2 mJ output energy with 15 percent slope efficiency. The same pumping geometry was successfully carried forward to several complex Q-switched laser resonator designs with no noticeable degradation of beam quality. Output beam profiles were consistently shown to have greater than 90 percent correlation with the ideal TEM(sub 00)-order Gaussian profile. A comparison study on pulse-reflection-mode (PRM), pulse-transmission-mode (PTM), and passive Q-switching techniques was undertaken. The PRM Q-switched laser generated 8.3 mJ pulses with durations as short as 10 ns. The PTM Q-switch laser generated 5 mJ pulses with durations as short as 5 ns. The passively Q-switched laser generated 5 mJ pulses with durations as short as 2.4 ns. Frequency doubling of both 1.064 microns and 1.32 microns with conversion efficiencies of 56 percent in lithium triborate and 10 percent in rubidium titanyl arsenate, respectively, was shown. Sum-frequency generation of the 1.064 microns and 1.32 microns radiations was demonstrated in KTP to generate 1.1 mJ of 0.589 micron output with 11.5 percent conversion efficiency.

  11. Effective aerodynamic roughness estimated from airborne laser altimeter measurements of surface features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vries, AC; Kustas, WP; Ritchie, JC; Klaassen, W; Menenti, M; Rango, A; Prueger, JH

    2003-01-01

    Aerodynamic roughness length (z(0)) and displacement height (d(0)) are important surface parameters for estimating surface fluxes in numerical models. These parameters are generally determined from wind flow characteristics using logarithmic wind profiles measured at a meteorological tower or by

  12. Effective aerodynamic roughness estimated from airborne laser altimeter measurements of surface features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vries, AC; Kustas, WP; Ritchie, JC; Klaassen, W; Menenti, M; Rango, A; Prueger, JH

    2003-01-01

    Aerodynamic roughness length (z(0)) and displacement height (d(0)) are important surface parameters for estimating surface fluxes in numerical models. These parameters are generally determined from wind flow characteristics using logarithmic wind profiles measured at a meteorological tower or by bal

  13. In-Flight Performance of the Mercury Laser Altimeter Laser Transmitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Anthony W.; Sun, Xiaoli; Li, Steven X.; Cavanaugh, John F.; Neumann, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    The Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) is one of the payload instruments on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, which was launched on August 3, 2004. MLA maps Mercury's shape and topographic landforms and other surface characteristics using a diode-pumped solid-state laser transmitter and a silicon avalanche photodiode receiver that measures the round-trip time of individual laser pulses. The laser transmitter has been operating nominally during planetary flyby measurements and in orbit about Mercury since March 2011. In this paper, we review the MLA laser transmitter telemetry data and evaluate the performance of solid-state lasers under extended operation in a space environment.

  14. ZY3-02 Laser Altimeter Footprint Geolocation Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junfeng Xie

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Successfully launched on 30 May 2016, ZY3-02 is the first Chinese surveying and mapping satellite equipped with a lightweight laser altimeter. Calibration is necessary before the laser altimeter becomes operational. Laser footprint location prediction is the first step in calibration that is based on ground infrared detectors, and it is difficult because the sample frequency of the ZY3-02 laser altimeter is 2 Hz, and the distance between two adjacent laser footprints is about 3.5 km. In this paper, we build an on-orbit rigorous geometric prediction model referenced to the rigorous geometric model of optical remote sensing satellites. The model includes three kinds of data that must be predicted: pointing angle, orbit parameters, and attitude angles. The proposed method is verified by a ZY3-02 laser altimeter on-orbit geometric calibration test. Five laser footprint prediction experiments are conducted based on the model, and the laser footprint prediction accuracy is better than 150 m on the ground. The effectiveness and accuracy of the on-orbit rigorous geometric prediction model are confirmed by the test results. The geolocation is predicted precisely by the proposed method, and this will give a reference to the geolocation prediction of future land laser detectors in other laser altimeter calibration test.

  15. Geoscience Laser Altimeter System: Characteristics and Performance of the Altimeter Receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao-Li; Yi, Dong-Hui; Abshire, James B.

    2003-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) on board ICESat spacecraft measures the surface height (altimetry) via the time of flight of its 1064 nm laser pulse. The GLAS laser transmitter produces 6 ns wide pulses with 70 mJ energy at 1064 nm at a 40 Hz rate. The altimeter receiver consists of a telescope, aft optics, a silicon avalanche photodiode, and electronic amplifiers. The transmitted and echo pulse waveforms are digitized at 1 GHz rate. The laser pulse time of flight is determined on the ground from the two digitized pulse waveforms and their positions in the full waveform record (about 5.4 ms ong) by computing the pulse centroids or by curve fitting. The GLAS receiver algorithms in on board software selects the two waveform segments containing the transmitted and the echo pulses and sends them to ground. The probability of echo pulse detection and the accuracy of time of flight measurement depend on the received signal level, the background light within the receiver field of view, the inherent detector and amplifier noise, the quantization of the digitizer, and some times by cloud obscurations. A receiver model has been developed to calculate the probability of detection and accuracy of the altimeter measurements with these noise sources. From prelaunch testing, the minimum detectable echo pulse energy for 90% detection probability was about 0.1 fj/pulse onto the detector. Such a receiver sensitivity allows GLAS to measure the surface height through clouds with optical density less than 2. The echo pulse energy required to achieve 10 cm ranging accuracy was found to be about 3 times higher than the minimum detectable signal level. The smallest single shot range measurement error, which was determined by ranging to a fixed target with strong echo pulses and no background light, was 2 to 3cm. The maximum linear response echo pulse energy was 10 fJ/pulse for the strongest echo signals, assuming a Lambertian scattering snow surface, clear sky atmosphere

  16. The OSIRIS-REx Laser Altimeter (OLA) Investigation and Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, M. G.; Barnouin, O. S.; Dickinson, C.; Seabrook, J.; Johnson, C. L.; Cunningham, G.; Haltigin, T.; Gaudreau, D.; Brunet, C.; Aslam, I.; Taylor, A.; Bierhaus, E. B.; Boynton, W.; Nolan, M.; Lauretta, D. S.

    2017-08-01

    The Canadian Space Agency (CSA) has contributed to the Origins Spectral Interpretation Resource Identification Security-Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) spacecraft the OSIRIS-REx Laser Altimeter (OLA). The OSIRIS-REx mission will sample asteroid 101955 Bennu, the first B-type asteroid to be visited by a spacecraft. Bennu is thought to be primitive, carbonaceous, and spectrally most closely related to CI and/or CM meteorites. As a scanning laser altimeter, the OLA instrument will measure the range between the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft and the surface of Bennu to produce digital terrain maps of unprecedented spatial scales for a planetary mission. The digital terrain maps produced will measure ˜7 cm per pixel globally, and ˜3 cm per pixel at specific sample sites. In addition, OLA data will be used to constrain and refine the spacecraft trajectories. Global maps and highly accurate spacecraft trajectory estimates are critical to infer the internal structure of the asteroid. The global and regional maps also are key to gain new insights into the surface processes acting across Bennu, which inform the selection of the OSIRIS-REx sample site. These, in turn, are essential for understanding the provenance of the regolith sample collected by the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft. The OLA data also are important for quantifying any hazards near the selected OSIRIS-REx sample site and for evaluating the range of tilts at the sampling site for comparison against the capabilities of the sample acquisition device.

  17. Test Port for Fiber-Optic-Coupled Laser Altimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Izquierdo, Luis; Scott, V. Stanley; Rinis, Haris; Cavanaugh, John

    2011-01-01

    A test port designed as part of a fiber optic coupled laser altimeter receiver optical system allows for the back-illumination of the optical system for alignment verification, as well as illumination of the detector(s) for testing the receiver electronics and signal-processing algorithms. Measuring the optical alignment of a laser altimeter instrument is difficult after the instrument is fully assembled. The addition of a test port in the receiver aft-optics allows for the back-illumination of the receiver system such that its focal setting and boresight alignment can be easily verified. For a multiple-detector receiver system, the addition of the aft-optics test port offers the added advantage of being able to simultaneously test all the detectors with different signals that simulate the expected operational conditions. On a laser altimeter instrument (see figure), the aft-optics couple the light from the receiver telescope to the receiver detector(s). Incorporating a beam splitter in the aft-optics design allows for the addition of a test port to back-illuminate the receiver telescope and/or detectors. The aft-optics layout resembles a T with the detector on one leg, the receiver telescope input port on the second leg, and the test port on the third leg. The use of a custom beam splitter with 99-percent reflection, 1-percent transmission, and a mirrored roof can send the test port light to the receiver telescope leg as well as the detector leg, without unduly sacrificing the signal from the receiver telescope to the detector. The ability to test the receiver system alignment, as well as multiple detectors with different signals without the need to disassemble the instrument or connect and reconnect components, is a great advantage to the aft-optics test port. Another benefit is that the receiver telescope aperture is fully back-illuminated by the test port so the receiver telescope focal setting vs. pressure and or temperature can be accurately measured (as

  18. Improving maps of ice-sheet surface elevation change using combined laser altimeter and stereoscopic elevation model data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredenslund Levinsen, Joanna; Howat, I. M.; Tscherning, C. C.

    2013-01-01

    laser altimeters have relatively low errors but are spatially limited to the ground tracks, while DEMs have larger errors but provide spatially continuous surfaces. The principle of our method is to fit the DEM surface to the altimeter point clouds in time and space to minimize the DEM errors and use......We combine the complementary characteristics of laser altimeter data and stereoscopic digital elevation models (DEMs) to construct high-resolution (_100 m) maps of surface elevations and elevation changes over rapidly changing outlet glaciers in Greenland. Measurements from spaceborne and airborne...... that surface to extrapolate elevations away from altimeter flight lines. This reduces the DEM registration errors and fills the gap between the altimeter paths. We use data from ICESat and ATM as well as SPOT 5 DEMs from 2007 and 2008 and apply them to the outlet glaciers Jakobshavn Isbræ (JI...

  19. Shuttle Laser Altimeter (SLA): A pathfinder for space-based laser altimetry and lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufton, Jack; Blair, Bryan; Cavanaugh, John; Garvin, James

    1995-01-01

    The Shuttle Laser Altimeter (SLA) is a Hitchhiker experiment now being integrated for first flight on STS-72 in November 1995. Four Shuttle flights of the SLA are planned at a rate of about a flight every 18 months. They are aimed at the transition of the Goddard Space Flight Center airborne laser altimeter and lidar technology to low Earth orbit as a pathfinder for operational space-based laser remote sensing devices. Future alser altimeter sensors such as the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), an Earth Observing System facility instrument, and the Multi-Beam Laser Altimeter (MBLA), the land and vegetation laser altimeter for the NASA TOPSAT (Topography Satellite) Mission, will utilize systems and approaches being tested with SLA. The SLA Instrument measures the distance from the Space Shuttle to the Earth's surface by timing the two-way propagation of short (approximately 10 na noseconds) laser pulses. laser pulses at 1064 nm wavelength are generated in a laser transmitter and are detected by a telescope equipped with a silicon avalanche photodiode detector. The SLA data system makes the pulse time interval measurement to a precision of about 10 nsec and also records the temporal shape of the laser echo from the Earth's surface for interpretation of surface height distribution within the 100 m diam. sensor footprint. For example, tree height can be determined by measuring the characteristic double-pulse signature that results from a separation in time of laser backscatter from tree canopies and the underlying ground. This is accomplished with a pulse waveform digitizer that samples the detector output with an adjustable resolution of 2 nanoseconds or wider intervals in a 100 sample window centered on the return pulse echo. The digitizer makes the SLA into a high resolution surface lidar sensor. It can also be used for cloud and atmospheric aerosol lidar measurements by lengthening the sampling window and degrading the waveform resolution. Detailed test

  20. Simulation of Full-Waveform Laser Altimeter Echowaveform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Y.; Tong, X. H.; Liu, S. J.; Xie, H.; Luan, K. F.; Liu, J.

    2016-06-01

    Change of globe surface height is an important factor to study human living environment. The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) on ICESat is the first laser-ranging instrument for continuous global observations of the Earth. In order to have a comprehensive understanding of full-waveform laser altimeter, this study simulated the operating mode of ICESat and modeled different terrains' (platform terrain, slope terrain, and artificial terrain) echo waveforms based on the radar equation. By changing the characteristics of the system and the targets, numerical echo waveforms can be achieved. Hereafter, we mainly discussed the factors affecting the amplitude and size (width) of the echoes. The experimental results implied that the slope of the terrain, backscattering coefficient and reflectivity, target height, target position in the footprint and area reacted with the pulse all can affect the energy distribution of the echo waveform and the receiving time. Finally, Gaussian decomposition is utilized to decompose the echo waveform. From the experiment, it can be noted that the factors which can affect the echo waveform and by this way we can know more about large footprint full-waveform satellite laser altimeter.

  1. Receiver characteristics of laser altimeters with avalanche photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Davidson, Frederic M.; Boutsikaris, Leo; Abshire, James B.

    1992-01-01

    The receiver characteristics of a laser altimeter system containing an avalanche photodiode photodetector are analyzed using the Gaussian approximation, the saddle-point approximation, and a nearly exact analysis. The last two methods are shown to yield very similar results except when the background noise is extremely low and the probability of false alarm is high. However, the Gaussian approximation method is shown to cause significant errors even under relatively high levels of background noise and received signal energy.

  2. Lessons Learned from the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Matt; Patel, Deepak; Bradshaw, Heather; Robinson, Frank; Neuberger, Dave

    2016-01-01

    The ICESat-2 Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) instrument is an upcoming Earth Science mission focusing on the effects of climate change. The flight instrument passed all environmental testing at GSFC (Goddard Space Flight Center) and is now ready to be shipped to the spacecraft vendor for integration and testing. This presentation walks through the lessons learned from design, hardware, analysis and testing perspective. ATLAS lessons learned include general thermal design, analysis, hardware, and testing issues as well as lessons specific to laser systems, two-phase thermal control, and optical assemblies with precision alignment requirements.

  3. 20,000 Photons Under the Snow: Subsurface Scattering of Visible Laser Light and the Implications for Laser Altimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeley, A.; Kurtz, N. T.; Shappirio, M.; Neumann, T.; Cook, W. B.; Markus, T.

    2014-12-01

    Existing visible light laser altimeters such as ATM (Airborne Topographical Mapper) with NASA's Operation IceBridge and NASA's MABEL (Multiple Altimeter Beam Experimental Lidar; a simulator for NASA's ICESat-2 mission) are providing scientists with a view of Earth's ice sheets, glaciers, and sea ice with unprecedented detail. Measuring how these surfaces evolve in the face of a rapidly changing climate requires the utmost attention to detail in the design and calibration of these instruments, as well as understanding the changing optical properties of these surfaces. As single photon counting lidars, MABEL and NASA's ATLAS (Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System) on the upcoming ICESat-2 mission provide fundamentally different information compared with waveform lidars such as ATM, or GLAS (Geoscience Laser Altimeter System) on NASA's previous ICESat-1 mission. By recording the travel times of individual photons, more detailed information about the surface, and potentially the subsurface, are available and must be considered in elevation retrievals from the observed photon cloud. Here, we investigate possible sources of uncertainty associated with monochromatic visible light scattering in subsurface snow, which may affect the precision and accuracy of elevation estimates. We also explore the capacity to estimate snow grain size in near surface snow using experimental visible light laser data obtained in laboratory experiments.

  4. The BepiColombo Laser Altimeter BELA: Instrument Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiferlin, K.; Thomas, N.; Spohn, T.; Oberst, J.; Michaelis, H.; Gunderson, K.; Whitby, J. A.

    2005-12-01

    The BepiColombo Laser Altimeter (BELA) is among the instruments that have been selected for flight aboard the MPO of ESA's BepiColombo mission to Mercury. A consortium led by Physikalisches Institut Universitaet Bern, Switzerland) and Institut für Planetenforschung (DLR, Berlin, Germany) will develop the first European laser altimeter for planetary exploration. The instrument follows the classical principle of direct detection of the returned laser light using a 200 mm telescope. The receiver telescope is made of electroformed nickel in order to save mass. The transmitter is based on a longitudinally pumped ND:YAG laser with 50 mJ pulses and about 5 ns pulse duration, operating at 10 Hz. The range finding and pulse detection uses digital filtering of return pulse shapes. Operation is possible on the dayside as well as on the night side of Mercury, but limited to about 1200 km altitude. We will present the instrument concept as well as the set-up of new test, verification and calibration facilities that are required for this type of instrument.

  5. Laser altimeter observations from MESSENGER's first Mercury flyby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, Maria T; Smith, David E; Solomon, Sean C; Phillips, Roger J; Peale, Stanton J; Head, James W; Hauck, Steven A; McNutt, Ralph L; Oberst, Jürgen; Neumann, Gregory A; Lemoine, Frank G; Sun, Xiaoli; Barnouin-Jha, Olivier; Harmon, John K

    2008-07-04

    A 3200-kilometers-long profile of Mercury by the Mercury Laser Altimeter on the MESSENGER spacecraft spans approximately 20% of the near-equatorial region of the planet. Topography along the profile is characterized by a 5.2-kilometer dynamic range and 930-meter root-mean-square roughness. At long wavelengths, topography slopes eastward by 0.02 degrees , implying a variation of equatorial shape that is at least partially compensated. Sampled craters on Mercury are shallower than their counterparts on the Moon, at least in part the result of Mercury's higher gravity. Crater floors vary in roughness and slope, implying complex modification over a range of length scales.

  6. Receiver Design, Performance Analysis, and Evaluation for Space-Borne Laser Altimeters and Space-to-Space Laser Ranging Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Frederic M.; Sun, Xiaoli; Field, Christopher T.

    1996-01-01

    This progress report consists of two separate reports. The first one describes our work on the use of variable gain amplifiers to increase the receiver dynamic range of space borne laser altimeters such as NASA's Geoscience Laser Altimeter Systems (GLAS). The requirement of the receiver dynamic range was first calculated. A breadboard variable gain amplifier circuit was made and the performance was fully characterized. The circuit will also be tested in flight on board the Shuttle Laser Altimeter (SLA-02) next year. The second report describes our research on the master clock oscillator frequency calibration for space borne laser altimeter systems using global positioning system (GPS) receivers.

  7. Crossover Analysis of CHANG'E-1 Laser Altimeter Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, W.; Yue, Z.; Di, K.

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents a preliminary result of crossover analysis and adjustment of Chang'E-1(CE-1) Laser Altimeter (LAM) data of the Moon for global and regional mapping applications. During the operation of Chang'E-1 from November 28, 2007 to December 4, 2008, the laser altimeter acquired 1400 orbital profiles with about 9.12 million altimetric points. In our experiment, we derived more than 1.38 million crossovers from 1395 ground tracks covering the entire lunar surface after eliminating outliers of orbits and altimetric points. A method of least-squares crossover adjustment with a series of basis functions of time (trigonometric functions and polynomials) is developed to reconcile the LAM data by minimizing the crossover residuals globally. The normal equations are very large but sparse; therefore they are stored and solved using sparse matrix technique. In a test area (0°N~60°N, 50°W~0°W), the crossover residuals are reduced from 62.1m to 32.8m, and the quality of the DEM generated from the adjusted LAM data is improved accordingly. We will optimize the method for the global adjustment to generate a high precision consistent global DEM, which can be used as absolute control for lunar mapping with orbital images.

  8. Development of the Laser Altimeter (LIDAR) for Hayabusa2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, T.; Kase, T.; Shiina, T.; Mita, M.; Namiki, N.; Senshu, H.; Yamada, R.; Noda, H.; Kunimori, H.; Hirata, N.; Terui, F.; Mimasu, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Hayabusa2 was launched on 3 December 2014 on an H-IIA launch vehicle from the Tanegashima Space Center, and is, at the time of writing, cruising toward asteroid 162137 Ryugu ( 1999JU3). After reaching the asteroid, it will stay for about 1.5 years to observe the asteroid and collect surface material samples. The light detection and ranging (LIDAR) laser altimeter on Hayabusa2 has a wide dynamic range, from 25 km to 30 m, because the LIDAR is used as a navigation sensor for rendezvous, approach, and touchdown procedures. Since it was designed for use in planetary explorers, its weight is a low 3.5 kg. The LIDAR can serve not only as a navigation sensor, but also as observation equipment for estimating the asteroid's topography, gravity and surface reflectivity (albedo). Since Hayabusa2 had a development schedule of just three years from the start of the project to launch, minimizing development time was a particular concern. A key to shortening the development period of Hayabusa2's LIDAR system was heritage technology from Hayabusa's LIDAR and the SELENE lunar explorer's LALT laser altimeter. Given that the main role of Hayabusa2's LIDAR is to serve as a navigation sensor, we discuss its development from an engineering viewpoint. However, detailed information about instrument development and test results is also important for scientific analysis of LIDAR data and for future laser altimetry in lunar and planetary exploration. Here we describe lessons learned from the Hayabusa LIDAR, as well as Hayabusa2's hardware, new technologies and system designs based on it, and flight model evaluation results. The monolithic laser used in the laser module is a characteristic technology of this LIDAR. It was developed to solve issues with low-temperature storage that were problematic when developing the LIDAR system for the first Hayabusa mission. The new module not only solves such problems but also improves reliability and miniaturization by reducing the number of parts.

  9. On retrieving sea ice freeboard from ICESat laser altimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khvorostovsky, Kirill; Rampal, Pierre

    2016-10-01

    Sea ice freeboard derived from satellite altimetry is the basis for the estimation of sea ice thickness using the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium. High accuracy of altimeter measurements and freeboard retrieval procedure are, therefore, required. As of today, two approaches for estimating the freeboard using laser altimeter measurements from Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat), referred to as tie points (TP) and lowest-level elevation (LLE) methods, have been developed and applied in different studies. We reproduced these methods for the ICESat observation periods (2003-2008) in order to assess and analyse the sources of differences found in the retrieved freeboard and corresponding thickness estimates of the Arctic sea ice as produced by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). Three main factors are found to affect the freeboard differences when applying these methods: (a) the approach used for calculation of the local sea surface references in leads (TP or LLE methods), (b) the along-track averaging scales used for this calculation, and (c) the corrections for lead width relative to the ICESat footprint and for snow depth accumulated in refrozen leads. The LLE method with 100 km averaging scale, as used to produce the GSFC data set, and the LLE method with a shorter averaging scale of 25 km both give larger freeboard estimates comparing to those derived by applying the TP method with 25 km averaging scale as used for the JPL product. Two factors, (a) and (b), contribute to the freeboard differences in approximately equal proportions, and their combined effect is, on average, about 6-7 cm. The effect of using different methods varies spatially: the LLE method tends to give lower freeboards (by up to 15 cm) over the thick multiyear ice and higher freeboards (by up to 10 cm) over first-year ice and the thin part of multiyear ice; the higher freeboards dominate. We show that the freeboard underestimation

  10. The Rigorous Geometric Model of Satellite Laser Altimeter and Preliminarily Accuracy Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TANG Xinming

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available It has been paid attention to improving the elevation accuracy of satellite stereo images aided by laser altimeter. The GF-7 satellite scheduled to launch in 2018 will be equipped with optical stereo cameras and a laser altimeter. ICESat (Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite with GLAS(Geo-science Laser Altimeter System is the first and still only laser altimeter satellite for earth observation until now. In this paper, the comprehensively analysis about the rigorous geometric model and accuracy analysis of laser altimeter is presented. The error induced by laser pointing aberration and mounting is proposed, and the data processing workflow of ICESat/GLAS from level 0 to level 2 is introduced. What's more, the geo-location accuracy between this paper and GLAS product is compared and the model is validated by the result that the accuracy based on the model is about 3 cm and 11 cm in the horizontal and vertical direction, respectively. The laser altimeter data loaded on the ZY3-02 satellite has been processed and validated preliminarily. The conclusion of this paper is valuable and can be viewed as reference for the subsequent domestic laser altimeter satellites.

  11. The OSIRIS-REx laser altimeter (OLA): Development progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, M.; Barnouin, O.; Johnson, C.; Bierhaus, E.; Seabrook, J.; Dickinson, C.; Haltigin, T.; Gaudreau, D.; Brunet, C.; Cunningham, G.; Lauretta, D.; Boynton, W.; Beshore, E.

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: The NASA New Frontiers Origins Spectral Interpretation Resource Identification Security Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) mission will be the first to sample the B-type asteroid (101955) Bennu [1]. This asteroid is thought to be primitive and carbonaceous, and is probably closely related to CI and/or CM meteorites [2]. The OSIRIS-REx mission hopes to better understand both the physical and geochemical origin and evolution of carbonaceous asteroids through its investigation of Bennu. The OSIRIS-REx spacecraft will launch in September 2016, and arrive at Bennu two years later. The Canadian Space Agency is contributing a scanning lidar system known as the OSIRIS-REx Laser Altimeter (OLA), to the OSIRIS-REx Mission. The OLA instrument is part of suite of onboard instruments [3] including cameras (OCAMS) [4], a visible and near- infrared spectrometer (OVIRS) [5], a thermal emission spectrometer (OTES), and an X-ray imaging spectrometer (REXIS) [6]. OLA Objectives: The OLA instrument has a suite of scientific and mission operations purposes. At a global scale, it will update the shape and mass of Bennu to provide insights on the geological origin and evolution of Bennu, by, for example, further refining constraints on its bulk density. With a carefully undertaken geodesy campaign, OLA-based precision ranges, constraints from radio science (2-way tracking) data and stereo OCAMS images, it will yield broad-scale, quantitative constraints on any internal heterogeneity of Bennu and hence provide further clues to Bennu's origin and subsequent collisional evolution. OLA-derived global asteroid maps of slopes, elevation relative to the asteroid geoid, and vertical roughness will provide quantitative insights on how local-regional surfaces on Bennu evolved subsequent to the formation of the asteroid. In addition, OLA data and derived products support the assessment of the safety and sampleability of potential sample sites. At the sample-site scale, the OLA instrument

  12. A BP neural network model for sea state recognition using laser altimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chun-bo; Jia, Xiao-dong; Li, Sheng; Wang, Zhen

    2009-07-01

    A BP neural network method for the recognition of sea state in laser altimeter is presented in this paper. Sea wave is the typical stochastic disturbance factor of laser altimeter effecting on low-altitude defense penetration of the intelligent antiship missiles, the recognition of sea state is studied in order to satisfy the practical needs of flying over the ocean. The BP neural network fed with the feature vector of laser range-measurement presents the analysis of features and outputs the estimation result of sea state. The two most distinguishing features are the mean and the variance of the sea echo, which are extracted from the distance characteristics of sea echo using general theory of statistics. The use of a feedforward network trained with the back-propagation algorithm is also investigated. The BP neural network is trained using sample data set to the neural network, and then the BP neural network trained is tested to recognize the sea state waiting for the classification. The network output shows the recognition accuracy of the model can up to 88%, and the results of tests show that the BP neural network model for the recognition of sea state is feasible and effective.

  13. Waveform model of a laser altimeter for an elliptical Gaussian beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Ma; Mingwei, Wang; Guoyuan, Li; Xiushan, Lu; Fanlin, Yang

    2016-03-10

    The current waveform model of a laser altimeter is based on the Gaussian laser beam of the fundamental mode, whose cross section is a circular spot, whereas some of the cross sections of Geoscience Laser Altimeter System lasers are closer to elliptical spots. Based on the expression of the elliptical Gaussian beam and the waveform theory of laser altimeters, the primary parameters of an echo waveform were derived. In order to examine the deduced expressions, a laser altimetry waveform simulator and waveform processing software were programmed and improved under the circumstance of an elliptical Gaussian beam. The result shows that all the biases between the theoretical and simulated waveforms were less than 0.5%, and the derived model of an elliptical spot is universal and can also be used for the conventional circular spot. The shape of the waveforms is influenced by the ellipticity of the laser spot, the target slope, and the "azimuth angle" between the major axis and the slope direction. This article provides the waveform theoretical basis of a laser altimeter under an elliptical Gaussian beam.

  14. Space-qualified laser system for the BepiColombo Laser Altimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallenbach, Reinald; Murphy, Eamonn; Gramkow, Bodo; Rech, Markus; Weidlich, Kai; Leikert, Thomas; Henkelmann, Reiner; Trefzger, Boris; Metz, Bodo; Michaelis, Harald; Lingenauber, Kay; DelTogno, Simone; Behnke, Thomas; Thomas, Nicolas; Piazza, Daniele; Seiferlin, Karsten

    2013-12-20

    The space-qualified design of a miniaturized laser for pulsed operation at a wavelength of 1064 nm and at repetition rates up to 10 Hz is presented. This laser consists of a pair of diode-laser pumped, actively q-switched Nd:YAG rod oscillators hermetically sealed and encapsulated in an environment of dry synthetic air. The system delivers at least 300 million laser pulses with 50 mJ energy and 5 ns pulse width (FWHM). It will be launched in 2017 aboard European Space Agency's Mercury Planetary Orbiter as part of the BepiColombo Laser Altimeter, which, after a 6-years cruise, will start recording topographic data from orbital altitudes between 400 and 1500 km above Mercury's surface.

  15. Baseline Design and Performance Analysis of Laser Altimeter for Korean Lunar Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyung-Chul; Neumann, Gregory A.; Choi, Myeong-Hwan; Yu, Sung-Yeol; Bang, Seong-Cheol; Ka, Neung-Hyun; Park, Jong-Uk; Choi, Man-Soo; Park, Eunseo

    2016-09-01

    Korea’s lunar exploration project includes the launching of an orbiter, a lander (including a rover), and an experimental orbiter (referred to as a lunar pathfinder). Laser altimeters have played an important scientific role in lunar, planetary, and asteroid exploration missions since their first use in 1971 onboard the Apollo 15 mission to the Moon. In this study, a laser altimeter was proposed as a scientific instrument for the Korean lunar orbiter, which will be launched by 2020, to study the global topography of the surface of the Moon and its gravitational field and to support other payloads such as a terrain mapping camera or spectral imager. This study presents the baseline design and performance model for the proposed laser altimeter. Additionally, the study discusses the expected performance based on numerical simulation results. The simulation results indicate that the design of system parameters satisfies performance requirements with respect to detection probability and range error even under unfavorable conditions.

  16. Lunar topographic model CLTM-s01 from Chang'E-1 laser altimeter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PING JinSong; HUANG Qian; YAN JianGuo; CAO JianFeng; TANG GeShi; SHU Rong

    2009-01-01

    More than 3 million range measurements from the Chang'E-1 Laser Altimeter have been used to pro-duce a global topographic model of the Moon with improved accuracy. Our topographic model, a 360th degree and order spherical harmonic expansion of the lunar radii, is designated as Chang'E-1 Lunar Topography Model s01 (CLTM-s01). This topographic field, referenced to a mean radius of 1738 km, has an absolute vertical accuracy of approximately 31 m and a spatial resolution of 0.25° (~7.5 km). This new lunar topographic model has greatly improved previous models in spatial coverage, accuracy and spatial resolution, and also shows the polar regions with the altimeter results for the first time. From CLTM-s01, the mean, equatorial, and polar radii of the Moon are 1737103, 1737646, and 1735843 m, re-spectively. In the lunar-fixed coordinate system, this model shows a COM/COF offset to be (-1.777, -0.730, 0.237) km along the x, y, and z directions, respectively. All the basic lunar shape parameters derived from CLTM-s01 are in agreement with the results of Clementine GLTM2, but CLTM-s01 offers higher accuracy and reliability due to its better global samplings.

  17. Lunar topographic model CLTM-s01 from Chang’E-1 laser altimeter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    More than 3 million range measurements from the Chang’E-1 Laser Altimeter have been used to produce a global topographic model of the Moon with improved accuracy. Our topographic model, a 360th degree and order spherical harmonic expansion of the lunar radii, is designated as Chang’E-1 Lunar Topography Model s01 (CLTM-s01). This topographic field, referenced to a mean radius of 1738 km, has an absolute vertical accuracy of approximately 31 m and a spatial resolution of 0.25o (~7.5 km). This new lunar topographic model has greatly improved previous models in spatial coverage, accuracy and spatial resolution, and also shows the polar regions with the altimeter results for the first time. From CLTM-s01, the mean, equatorial, and polar radii of the Moon are 1737103, 1737646, and 1735843 m, respectively. In the lunar-fixed coordinate system, this model shows a COM/COF offset to be (-1.777, -0.730, 0.237) km along the x, y, and z directions, respectively. All the basic lunar shape parameters derived from CLTM-s01 are in agreement with the results of Clementine GLTM2, but CLTM-s01 offers higher accuracy and reliability due to its better global samplings.

  18. Regional applicability of forest height and aboveground biomass models for the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirk Pflugmacher; Warren B. Cohen; Robert E. Kennedy; Michael. Lefsky

    2008-01-01

    Accurate estimates of forest aboveground biomass are needed to reduce uncertainties in global and regional terrestrial carbon fluxes. In this study we investigated the utility of the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) onboard the Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite for large-scale biomass inventories. GLAS is the first spaceborne lidar sensor that will...

  19. A digital elevation model of the Greenland ice sheet and validation with airborne laser altimeter data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamber, Jonathan L.; Ekholm, Simon; Krabill, William B.

    1997-01-01

    A 2.5 km resolution digital elevation model (DEM) of the Greenland ice sheet was produced from the 336 days of the geodetic phase of ERS-1. During this period the altimeter was operating in ice-mode over land surfaces providing improved tracking around the margins of the ice sheet. Combined with the high density of tracks during the geodetic phase, a unique data set was available for deriving a DEM of the whole ice sheet. The errors present in the altimeter data were investigated via a comparison with airborne laser altimeter data obtained for the southern half of Greenland. Comparison with coincident satellite data showed a correlation with surface slope. An explanation for the behavior of the bias as a function of surface slope is given in terms of the pattern of surface roughness on the ice sheet.

  20. Lidar Altimeter Measurements of Canopy Structure: Methods and Validation for Closed Canopy, Broadleaf Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, D. J.; Lefsky, M. A.; Parker, G. G.; Blair, J. B.

    1999-01-01

    Lidar altimeter observations of vegetated landscapes provide a time-resolved measure of laser pulse backscatter energy from canopy surfaces and the underlying ground. Airborne lidar altimeter data was acquired using the Scanning Lidar Imager of Canopies by Echo Recovery (SLICER) for a successional sequence of four, closed-canopy, deciduous forest stands in eastern Maryland. The four stands were selected so as to include a range of canopy structures of importance to forest ecosystem function, including variation in the height and roughness of the outer-most canopy surface and the vertical organization of canopy stories and gaps. The character of the SLICER backscatter signal is described and a method is developed that accounts for occlusion of the laser energy by canopy surfaces, transforming the backscatter signal to a canopy height profile (CHP) that quantitatively represents the relative vertical distribution of canopy surface area. The transformation applies an increased weighting to the backscatter amplitude as a function of closure through the canopy and assumes a horizontally random distribution of the canopy components. SLICER CHPs, averaged over areas of overlap where lidar ground tracks intersect, are shown to be highly reproducible. CHP transects across the four stands reveal spatial variations in vegetation, at the scale of the individual 10 m diameter laser footprints, within and between stands. Averaged SLICER CHPs are compared to analogous height profile results derived from ground-based sightings to plant intercepts measured on plots within the four stands. Tbe plots were located on the segments of the lidar ground tracks from which averaged SLICER CHPs were derived, and the ground observations were acquired within two weeks of the SLICER data acquisition to minimize temporal change. The differences in canopy structure between the four stands is similarly described by the SLICER and ground-based CHP results, however a Chi-square test of similarity

  1. In-Flight Thermal Performance of the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grob, Eric; Baker, Charles; McCarthy, Tom

    2003-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) instrument is NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's first application of Loop Heat Pipe technology that provides selectable/stable temperature levels for the lasers and other electronics over a widely varying mission environment. GLAS was successfully launched as the sole science instrument aboard the Ice, Clouds, and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) from Vandenberg AFB at 4:45pm PST on January 12, 2003. After SC commissioning, the LHPs started easily and have provided selectable and stable temperatures for the lasers and other electronics. This paper discusses the thermal development background and testing, along with details of early flight thermal performance data.

  2. The development of the CHANG'`E-1 lunar explorer laser altimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, R.; Wang, J. Y.; Hu, Y. H.; Jia, J. J.

    According to Chinese fable CHANG prime E is the name of a peri who lives in the moon with a white rabbit The CHANG prime E-1 lunar explorer will be launched in April 2007 The Lunar Explorer Laser Altimeter LELA is one of the 6 payloads in Chang prime E-1 which is developed by Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences The data of LELA will be used with the Optical Imager for acquiring the three dimension image of the moon surface The LELA transmits laser pulses determines their round trip times to the surface of the moon using a time interval counter and measures ranges between CHANG prime E-1 lunar explorer and the lunar surface in the nadir direction with 5m accuracy every 1 second for 1 year s mission period The acquired range data are transformed to the topography of the moon with the aid of position and attitude data of the CHANG prime E-1 lunar explorer obtained from the ground-based tracking and on board star sensor respectively The mean distances between Chang prime E-1 and the surface of moon is 200Km The LELA utilizes a laser diode LD pumped Q-switched Nd YAG laser that has a wavelength of 1064nm a pulse width of 10ns The output beam divergence is improved to 0 6mrad by Galileo refractor-type collimator which resulted in a moon surface spot size foot print of 120m The return pulses are captured by Cassegrain-type reflector and detected by Si-APD detector The prototype began from 2003 Until now the engineering model had been finished

  3. Status of the Ganymede Laser Altimeter (GALA) for ESA's Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer (JUICE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussmann, Hauke; Luedicke, Fabian

    2017-04-01

    The Ganymede Laser Altimeter (GALA) is one of the instruments selected for ESA's Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer (JUICE). A fundamental goal of any exploratory space mission is to characterize and measure the shape, topography, and rotation of the target bodies. A state of the art tool for this task is laser altimetry because it can provide absolute topographic height and position with respect to a body centered reference system. With respect to Ganymede, the GALA instrument aims at mapping of global, regional and local topography; confirming the global subsurface ocean and further characterization of the water-ice/liquid shell by monitoring the dynamic response of the ice shell to tidal forces; providing constraints on the forced physical librations and spin-axis obliquity; determining Ganymede's shape; obtaining detailed topographic profiles across the linear features of grooved terrain, impact structures, possible cryo-volcanic features and other different surface units; providing information about slope, roughness and albedo (at 1064nm) of Ganymede's surface. After several flyby's (Ganymede, Europa, Callisto) it is scheduled that the JUICE orbiter will enter first into an elliptical orbit (200 km x 10.000 km) for around 150 days and then into a circular orbit (500 km) around Ganymede for 130 days. Accordingly to the different orbits and trajectories, distances to the moons respectively, the spot size of the GALA laser varies between 21 m and 140 m. GALA uses the direct-detection (classical) approach of laser altimetry. Laser pulses are emitted at a wavelength of 1064 nm by using an actively Q-switched Nd:Yag laser. The pulse energy and pulse repetition frequency are 17 mJ at 30 Hz (nominal), respectively. For targeted observations and flybys the frequency can be switched to 50 Hz. The emission time of each pulse is measured by the detector. The beam is reflected from the surface and received at a 25 cm diameter telescope. The returning laser pulse is refocused onto

  4. Summary of the results from the lunar orbiter laser altimeter after seven years in lunar orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Mazarico, Erwan; Lemoine, Frank G.; Head, James W., III; Lucey, Paul G.; Aharonson, Oded; Robinson, Mark S.; Sun, Xiaoli; Torrence, Mark H.; Barker, Michael K.; Oberst, Juergen; Duxbury, Thomas C.; Mao, Dandan; Barnouin, Olivier S.; Jha, Kopal; Rowlands, David D.; Goossens, Sander; Baker, David; Bauer, Sven; Gläser, Philipp; Lemelin, Myriam; Rosenburg, Margaret; Sori, Michael M.; Whitten, Jennifer; Mcclanahan, Timothy

    2017-02-01

    In June 2009 the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft was launched to the Moon. The payload consists of 7 science instruments selected to characterize sites for future robotic and human missions. Among them, the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) was designed to obtain altimetry, surface roughness, and reflectance measurements. The primary phase of lunar exploration lasted one year, following a 3-month commissioning phase. On completion of its exploration objectives, the LRO mission transitioned to a science mission. After 7 years in lunar orbit, the LOLA instrument continues to map the lunar surface. The LOLA dataset is one of the foundational datasets acquired by the various LRO instruments. LOLA provided a high-accuracy global geodetic reference frame to which past, present and future lunar observations can be referenced. It also obtained high-resolution and accurate global topography that were used to determine regions in permanent shadow at the lunar poles. LOLA further contributed to the study of polar volatiles through its unique measurement of surface brightness at zero phase, which revealed anomalies in several polar craters that may indicate the presence of water ice. In this paper, we describe the many LOLA accomplishments to date and its contribution to lunar and planetary science.

  5. IMPROVE THE ZY-3 HEIGHT ACCURACY USING ICESAT/GLAS LASER ALTIMETER DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ZY-3 is the first civilian high resolution stereo mapping satellite, which has been launched on 9th, Jan, 2012. The aim of ZY-3 satellite is to obtain high resolution stereo images and support the 1:50000 scale national surveying and mapping. Although ZY-3 has very high accuracy for direct geo-locations without GCPs (Ground Control Points, use of some GCPs is still indispensible for high precise stereo mapping. The GLAS (Geo-science Laser Altimetry System loaded on the ICESat (Ice Cloud and land Elevation Satellite, which is the first laser altimetry satellite for earth observation. GLAS has played an important role in the monitoring of polar ice sheets, the measuring of land topography and vegetation canopy heights after launched in 2003. Although GLAS has ended in 2009, the derived elevation dataset still can be used after selection by some criteria. In this paper, the ICESat/GLAS laser altimeter data is used as height reference data to improve the ZY-3 height accuracy. A selection method is proposed to obtain high precision GLAS elevation data. Two strategies to improve the ZY-3 height accuracy are introduced. One is the conventional bundle adjustment based on RFM and bias-compensated model, in which the GLAS footprint data is viewed as height control. The second is to correct the DSM (Digital Surface Model straightly by simple block adjustment, and the DSM is derived from the ZY-3 stereo imaging after freedom adjustment and dense image matching. The experimental result demonstrates that the height accuracy of ZY-3 without other GCPs can be improved to 3.0 meter after adding GLAS elevation data. What’s more, the comparison of the accuracy and efficiency between the two strategies is implemented for application.

  6. Improve the ZY-3 Height Accuracy Using Icesat/glas Laser Altimeter Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoyuan; Tang, Xinming; Gao, Xiaoming; Zhang, Chongyang; Li, Tao

    2016-06-01

    ZY-3 is the first civilian high resolution stereo mapping satellite, which has been launched on 9th, Jan, 2012. The aim of ZY-3 satellite is to obtain high resolution stereo images and support the 1:50000 scale national surveying and mapping. Although ZY-3 has very high accuracy for direct geo-locations without GCPs (Ground Control Points), use of some GCPs is still indispensible for high precise stereo mapping. The GLAS (Geo-science Laser Altimetry System) loaded on the ICESat (Ice Cloud and land Elevation Satellite), which is the first laser altimetry satellite for earth observation. GLAS has played an important role in the monitoring of polar ice sheets, the measuring of land topography and vegetation canopy heights after launched in 2003. Although GLAS has ended in 2009, the derived elevation dataset still can be used after selection by some criteria. In this paper, the ICESat/GLAS laser altimeter data is used as height reference data to improve the ZY-3 height accuracy. A selection method is proposed to obtain high precision GLAS elevation data. Two strategies to improve the ZY-3 height accuracy are introduced. One is the conventional bundle adjustment based on RFM and bias-compensated model, in which the GLAS footprint data is viewed as height control. The second is to correct the DSM (Digital Surface Model) straightly by simple block adjustment, and the DSM is derived from the ZY-3 stereo imaging after freedom adjustment and dense image matching. The experimental result demonstrates that the height accuracy of ZY-3 without other GCPs can be improved to 3.0 meter after adding GLAS elevation data. What's more, the comparison of the accuracy and efficiency between the two strategies is implemented for application.

  7. Advanced topographic laser altimeter system (ATLAS) receiver telescope assembly (RTA) and transmitter alignment and test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagopian, John; Bolcar, Matthew; Chambers, John; Crane, Allen; Eegholm, Bente; Evans, Tyler; Hetherington, Samuel; Mentzell, Eric; Thompson, Patrick L.; Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis; Vaughnn, David

    2016-09-01

    The sole instrument on NASA's ICESat-2 spacecraft shown in Figure 1 will be the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS)1. The ATLAS is a Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) instrument; it measures the time of flight of the six transmitted laser beams to the Earth and back to determine altitude for geospatial mapping of global ice. The ATLAS laser beam is split into 6 main beams by a Diffractive Optical Element (DOE) that are reflected off of the earth and imaged by an 800 mm diameter Receiver Telescope Assembly (RTA). The RTA is composed of a 2-mirror telescope and Aft Optics Assembly (AOA) that collects and focuses the light from the 6 probe beams into 6 science fibers. Each fiber optic has a field of view on the earth that subtends 83 micro Radians. The light collected by each fiber is detected by a photomultiplier and timing related to a master clock to determine time of flight and therefore distance. The collection of the light from the 6 laser spots projected to the ground allows for dense cross track sampling to provide for slope measurements of ice fields. NASA LIDAR instruments typically utilize telescopes that are not diffraction limited since they function as a light collector rather than imaging function. The more challenging requirements of the ATLAS instrument require better performance of the telescope at the ¼ wave level to provide for improved sampling and signal to noise. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) contracted the build of the telescope to General Dynamics (GD). GD fabricated and tested the flight and flight spare telescope and then integrated the government supplied AOA for testing of the RTA before and after vibration qualification. The RTA was then delivered to GSFC for independent verification and testing over expected thermal vacuum conditions. The testing at GSFC included a measurement of the RTA wavefront error and encircled energy in several orientations to determine the expected zero gravity figure, encircled

  8. The Reflectivity of Mars at 1064 nm: Derivation from Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter Data and Application to Climatology and Meteorology

    CERN Document Server

    Heavens, Nicholas G

    2016-01-01

    The Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) on board Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) made $\\gg 10^{8}$ measurements of the reflectivity of Mars at 1064 nm ($R_{1064}$) by both active sounding and passive radiometry. Past studies of $R_{1064}$ neglected the effects of atmospheric opacity and viewing geometry on both active and passive measurements and also identified a potential calibration issue with passive radiometry. Therefore, as yet, there exists no acceptable reference $R_{1064}$ to derive a column opacity product from surface returns during active sounding for the purposes of atmospheric studies. Here, such a reference $R_{1064}$ is derived by seeking $R^{M,N}_{1064}$: a Minnaert-corrected normal albedo under clear conditions and assuming minimal phase angle dependence. Over darker surfaces, $R^{M,N}_{1064}$ and the absolute level of atmospheric opacity were estimated from active sounding. Over all surfaces, the opacity derived from active sounding were used to filter out the cloudiest passive radiometry measur...

  9. The accuracy of satellite radar altimeter data over the Greenland ice sheet determined from airborne laser data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bamber, J.L.; Ekholm, Simon; Krabill, W.

    1998-01-01

    The 336 days of the geodetic phase of ERS-1 provides dense coverage, by satellite radar altimetry, of the whole of the Greenland ice sheet. These data have been used to produce a digital elevation model of the ice sheet. The errors present in the altimeter data were investigated via a comparison...... with airborne laser altimeter data an absolute accuracy typically in the range 2-10 cm +/- 10 cm. Comparison of differences between the radar and laser derived elevations, showed a correlation with surface slope. The difference between the two data sets ranged from 84 cm +/- 79 cm for slopes below 0.1 degrees...

  10. The BepiColombo Laser Altimeter (BeLA) power converter module (PCM): Concept and characterisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, J.; Gasquet, E.; Castro, J.-M.; Herranz, M.; Lara, L.-M.; Muñoz, M.; Simon, A.; Behnke, T.; Thomas, N.

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents the principal considerations when designing DC-DC converters for space instruments, in particular for the power converter module as part of the first European space laser altimeter: "BepiColombo Laser Altimeter" on board the European Space Agency-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) mission BepiColombo. The main factors which determine the design of the DC-DC modules in space applications are printed circuit board occupation, mass, DC-DC converter efficiency, and environmental-survivability constraints. Topics included in the appropriated DC-DC converter design flow are hereby described. The topology and technology for the primary and secondary stages, input filters, transformer design, and peripheral components are discussed. Component selection and design trade-offs are described. Grounding, load and line regulation, and secondary protection circuitry (under-voltage, over-voltage, and over-current) are then introduced. Lastly, test results and characterization of the final flight design are also presented. Testing of the inrush current, the regulated output start-up, and the switching function of the power supply indicate that these performances are fully compliant with the requirements.

  11. Extraction of the tidal amplitude from synthetic topography data of the BepiColombo laser altimeter in the polar regions of Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Ch.; Christensen, U. R.; Kallenbach, R.

    2008-09-01

    ABSTRACT BepiColombo is one of the cornerstone missions of ESA to investigate Mercury which is the least investigated planet in the Solar System. The weak magnetic field observed by Mariner 10 in 1974 can be explained by a partly liquid core. The tidal Love number h2 reveals information on the thickness of the liquid outer core. The BepiColombo laser altimeter (BELA) on board the MPO spacecraft will map the entire surface of Mercury and should in principle allow for the retrieval of the tidal elevation of order one meter caused by solar gravitation. The highest density of BELA data are to be expected in the polar regions of Mercury because MPO orbits Mercury on a nearly polar trajectory. In previous simulations, we have tested whether it is possible to retrieve the tidal Love number h2 simultaneously with a spherical harmonic analysis of the global static topography of Mercury. Here, the analysis of orbit crossing points is presented. This analysis contains three main sources of uncertainty: a) instrumental and spacecraft positioning uncertainties, b) uncertainties due to the small-scale topography between two laser altimeter measurements, and c) uncertainties from the interpolation between laser altimeter measurement points. It can be shown that the uncertainty of the Love number can be reduced to about 3% using the crossing-point method. This is sufficient to test present theoretical models on the interior structure of Mercury.

  12. Low-amplitude topographic features and textures on the Moon: Initial results from detrended Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreslavsky, Mikhail A.; Head, James W.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Zuber, Maria T.; Smith, David E.

    2017-02-01

    Global lunar topographic data derived from ranging measurements by the Lunar Oribter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) onboard LRO mission to the Moon have extremely high vertical precision. We use detrended topography as a means for utilization of this precision in geomorphological analysis. The detrended topography was calculated as a difference between actual topography and a trend surface defined as a median topography in a circular sliding window. We found that despite complicated distortions caused by the non-linear nature of the detrending procedure, visual inspection of these data facilitates identification of low-amplitude gently-sloping geomorphic features. We present specific examples of patterns of lava flows forming the lunar maria and revealing compound flow fields, a new class of lava flow complex on the Moon. We also highlight the identification of linear tectonic features that otherwise are obscured in the images and topographic data processed in a more traditional manner.

  13. Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) Instrument: Flight Loop Heat Pipe (LHP) Acceptance Thermal Vacuum Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Charles; Butler, Dan; Ku, Jentung; Grob, Eric; Swanson, Ted; Nikitkin, Michael; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Two loop heat pipes (LHPs) are to be used for tight thermal control of the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) instrument, planned for flight in late 2001. The LHPs are charged with Propylene as a working fluid. One LHP will be used to transport 110 W from a laser to a radiator, the other will transport 160 W from electronic boxes to a separate radiator. The application includes a large amount of thermal mass in each LHP system and low initial startup powers. The initial design had some non-ideal flight design compromises, resulted in a less than ideal charge level for this design concept with a symmetrical secondary wick. This less than ideal charge was identified as the source of inadequate performance of the flight LHPs during the flight thermal vacuum test in October of 2000. We modified the compensation chamber design, re-built and charged the LHPs for a final LHP acceptance thermal vacuum test. This test performed March of 2001 was 100% successful. This is the last testing to be performed on the LHPs prior to instrument thermal vacuum test. This sensitivity to charge level was shown through varying the charge on a Development Model Loop Heat Pipe (DM LHP) and evaluating performance at various fill levels. At lower fills similar to the original charge in the flight units, the same poor performance was observed. When the flight units were re-designed and filled to the levels similar to the initial successful DM LHP test, the flight units also successfully fulfilled all requirements. This final flight Acceptance test assessed performance with respect to startup, low power operation, conductance, and control heater power, and steady state control. The results of the testing showed that both LHPs operated within specification. Startup on one of the LHPs was better than the other LHP because of the starter heater placement and a difference in evaporator design. These differences resulted in a variation in the achieved superheat prior to startup. The LHP with

  14. A sample design for globally consistent biomass estimation using lidar data from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sean P. Healey; Paul L. Patterson; Sassan S. Saatchi; Michael A. Lefsky; Andrew J. Lister; Elizabeth A. Freeman

    2012-01-01

    Lidar height data collected by the Geosciences Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) from 2002 to 2008 has the potential to form the basis of a globally consistent sample-based inventory of forest biomass. GLAS lidar return data were collected globally in spatially discrete full waveform "shots," which have been shown to be strongly correlated with aboveground forest...

  15. Lunar phase function at 1064 nm from Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter passive and active radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, M. K.; Sun, X.; Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; Zuber, M. T.; Smith, D. E.

    2016-07-01

    We present initial calibration and results of passive radiometry collected by the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter onboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter over the course of 12 months. After correcting for time- and temperature-dependent dark noise and detector responsivity variations, the LOLA passive radiometry measurements are brought onto the absolute radiance scale of the SELENE Spectral Profiler. The resulting photometric precision is estimated to be ∼5%. We leverage the unique ability of LOLA to measure normal albedo to explore the 1064 nm phase function's dependence on various geologic parameters. On a global scale, we find that iron abundance and optical maturity (quantified by FeO and OMAT) are the dominant controlling parameters. Titanium abundance (TiO2), surface roughness on decimeter to decameter scales, and soil thermophysical properties have a smaller effect, but the latter two are correlated with OMAT, indicating that exposure age is the driving force behind their effects in a globally-averaged sense. The phase function also exhibits a dependence on surface slope at ∼300 m baselines, possibly the result of mass wasting exposing immature material and/or less space weathering due to reduced sky visibility. Modeling the photometric function in the Hapke framework, we find that, relative to the highlands, the maria exhibit decreased backscattering, a smaller opposition effect (OE) width, and a smaller OE amplitude. Immature highlands regolith has a higher backscattering fraction and a larger OE width compared to mature highlands regolith. Within the maria, the backscattering fraction and OE width show little dependence on TiO2 and OMAT. Variations in the phase function shape at large phase angles are observed in and around the Copernican-aged Jackson crater, including its dark halo, a putative impact melt deposit. Finally, the phase function of the Reiner Gamma Formation behaves more optically immature than is typical for its composition and OMAT

  16. Lunar Phase Function at 1064 Nm from Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter Passive and Active Radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, M. K.; Sun, X.; Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; Zuber, M. T.; Smith, D. E.

    2016-01-01

    We present initial calibration and results of passive radiometry collected by the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter onboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter over the course of 12 months. After correcting for time- and temperature-dependent dark noise and detector responsivity variations, the LOLA passive radiometry measurements are brought onto the absolute radiance scale of the SELENE Spectral Profiler. The resulting photometric precision is estimated to be 5%. We leverage the unique ability of LOLA to measure normal albedo to explore the 1064 nm phase function's dependence on various geologic parameters. On a global scale, we find that iron abundance and optical maturity (quantified by FeO and OMAT) are the dominant controlling parameters. Titanium abundance (TiO2), surface roughness on decimeter to decameter scales, and soil thermo- physical properties have a smaller effect, but the latter two are correlated with OMAT, indicating that exposure age is the driving force behind their effects in a globally-averaged sense. The phase function also exhibits a dependence on surface slope at approximately 300 m baselines, possibly the result of mass wasting exposing immature material and/or less space weathering due to reduced sky visibility. Modeling the photometric function in the Hapke framework, we find that, relative to the highlands, the maria exhibit decreased backscattering, a smaller opposition effect (OE) width, and a smaller OE amplitude. Immature highlands regolith has a higher backscattering fraction and a larger OE width compared to mature highlands regolith. Within the maria, the backscattering fraction and OE width show little dependence on TiO2 and OMAT. Variations in the phase function shape at large phase angles are observed in and around the Copernican-aged Jackson crater, including its dark halo, a putative impact melt deposit. Finally, the phase function of the Reiner Gamma Formation behaves more optically immature than is typical for its composition

  17. Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) Loop Heat Pipes: An Eventual First Year On-Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grob, E.; Baker, C.; McCarthy, T.

    2004-01-01

    Goddard Space Flight Center's Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) is the sole scientific instrument on the Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) that was launched on January 12, 2003 from Vandenberg AFB. A thermal control architecture based on propylene Loop Heat Pipe technology was developed to provide selectable/stable temperature control for the lasers and other electronics over the widely varying mission environment. Following a nominal LHP and instrument start-up, the mission was interrupted with the failure of the first laser after only 36 days of operation. During the 5-month failure investigation, the two GLAS LHPs and the electronics operated nominally, using heaters as a substitute for the laser heat load. Just prior to resuming the mission, following a seasonal spacecraft yaw maneuver, one of the LHPs deprimed and created a thermal runaway condition that resulted in an emergency shutdown of the GLAS instrument. This paper presents details of the LHP anomaly, the resulting investigation and recovery, along with on-orbit flight data during these critical events.

  18. Photon-counting spaceborne altimeter simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazej, Josef

    2004-11-01

    We are presenting of a photon counting laser altimeter simulator. The simulator is designed to be a theoretical and numerical complement for a Technology Demonstrator of the space born laser altimeter for planetary studies built on our university. The European Space Agency has nominated the photon counting altimeter as one of the attractive devices for planetary research. The device should provide altimetry in the range 400 to 1400 km with one meter range resolution under rough conditions - Sun illumination, radiation, etc. The general altimeter concept expects the photon counting principle laser radar. According to this concept, the simulator is based on photon counting radar simulation, which has been enhanced to handle planetary surface roughness, vertical terrain profile and its reflectivity. The simulator is useful complement for any photon counting altimeter both for altimeter design and for measured data analysis. Our simulator enables to model the orbital motion, range, terrain profile, reflectivity, and their influence on the over all energy budget and the ultimate signal to noise ratio acceptable for the altimetry. The simulator can be adopted for various air or space born application.

  19. Vertical Accuracy Assessment of ZY-3 Digital Surface Model Using Icesat/glas Laser Altimeter Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G.; Tang, X.; Yuan, X.; Zhou, P.; Hu, F.

    2017-05-01

    The Ziyuan-3 (ZY-3) satellite, as the first civilian high resolution surveying and mapping satellite in China, has a very important role in national 1 : 50,000 stereo mapping project. High accuracy digital surface Model (DSMs) can be generated from the three line-array images of ZY-3, and ZY-3 DSMs of China can be produced without using any ground control points (GCPs) by selecting SRTM (Shuttle Radar Topography Mission) and ICESat/GLAS (Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite, Geo-science Laser Altimeter System) as the datum reference in the Satellite Surveying and Mapping Application Center, which is the key institute that manages and distributes ZY-3 products. To conduct the vertical accuracy evaluation of ZY-3 DSMs of China, three representative regions were chosen and the results were compared to ICESat/GLAS data. The experimental results demonstrated that the root mean square error (RMSE) elevation accuracy of the ZY-3 DSMs was better than 5.0 m, and it even reached to less than 2.5 m in the second region of eastern China. While this work presents preliminary results, it is an important reference for expanding the application of ZY-3 satellite imagery to widespread regions. And the satellite laser altimetry data can be used as referenced data for wide-area DSM evaluation.

  20. A new, high-resolution digital elevation model of Greenland fully validated with airborne laser altimeter data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bamber, J.L.; Ekholm, Simon; Krabill, W.B.

    2001-01-01

    A new digital elevation model of the Greenland ice sheet and surrounding rock outcrops has been produced at 1-km postings from a comprehensive suite of satellite remote sensing and cartographic data sets. Height data over the ice sheet were mainly from ERS-1 and Geosat radar altimetry. These data...... coverage existed. The data were interpolated onto a regular grid with a spacing of similar to1 km. The accuracy of the resultant digital elevation model over the ice sheet was assessed using independent and spatially extensive measurements from an airborne laser altimeter that had an accuracy of between 10...... and 12 cm. In a comparison with the laser altimetry the digital elevation model was found to have a slope-dependent accuracy ranging from -1.04 +/-1.98 m to -0.06 +/- 14.33 m over the ice sheet for a slope range of 0.0-1.0 degrees. The mean accuracy over the whole ice sheet was -0.33 +/-6.97 m. Over...

  1. Testing of the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) Prototype Loop Heat Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Donya; Ku, Jentung; Kaya, Tarik

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the testing of the prototype loop heat pipe (LHP) for the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS). The primary objective of the test program was to verify the loop's heat transport and temperature control capabilities under conditions pertinent to GLAS applications. Specifically, the LHP had to demonstrate a heat transport capability of 100 W, with the operating temperature maintained within +/-2K while the condenser sink was subjected to a temperature change between 273K and 283K. Test results showed that this loop heat pipe was more than capable of transporting the required heat load and that the operating temperature could be maintained within +/-2K. However, this particular integrated evaporator-compensation chamber design resulted in an exchange of energy between the two that affected the overall operation of the system. One effect was the high temperature the LHP was required to reach before nucleation would begin due to inability to control liquid distribution during ground testing. Another effect was that the loop had a low power start-up limitation of approximately 25 W. These Issues may be a concern for other applications, although it is not expected that they will cause problems for GLAS under micro-gravity conditions.

  2. A new lunar digital elevation model from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter and SELENE Terrain Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, M. K.; Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; Zuber, M. T.; Haruyama, J.; Smith, D. E.

    2016-07-01

    We present an improved lunar digital elevation model (DEM) covering latitudes within ±60°, at a horizontal resolution of 512 pixels per degree (∼60 m at the equator) and a typical vertical accuracy ∼3 to 4 m. This DEM is constructed from ∼ 4.5 ×109 geodetically-accurate topographic heights from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) onboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, to which we co-registered 43,200 stereo-derived DEMs (each 1° × 1°) from the SELENE Terrain Camera (TC) (∼1010 pixels total). After co-registration, approximately 90% of the TC DEMs show root-mean-square vertical residuals with the LOLA data of profiles (typically amounting to <10 m horizontally and <1 m vertically). By combining both co-registered datasets, we obtain a near-global DEM with high geodetic accuracy, and without the need for surface interpolation. We evaluate the resulting LOLA + TC merged DEM (designated as "SLDEM2015") with particular attention to quantifying seams and crossover errors.

  3. A New Lunar Digital Elevation Model from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter and SELENE Terrain Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, M. K.; Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; Zuber, M. T.; Haruyama, J.; Smith, D. E.

    2015-01-01

    We present an improved lunar digital elevation model (DEM) covering latitudes within +/-60 deg, at a horizontal resolution of 512 pixels per degree ( approx.60 m at the equator) and a typical vertical accuracy approx.3 to 4 m. This DEM is constructed from approx.4.5 ×10(exp 9) geodetically-accurate topographic heights from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) onboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, to which we co-registered 43,200 stereo-derived DEMs (each 1 deg×1 deg) from the SELENE Terrain Camera (TC) ( approx.10(exp 10) pixels total). After co-registration, approximately 90% of the TC DEMs show root-mean-square vertical residuals with the LOLA data of < 5 m compared to approx.50% prior to co-registration. We use the co-registered TC data to estimate and correct orbital and pointing geolocation errors from the LOLA altimetric profiles (typically amounting to < 10 m horizontally and < 1 m vertically). By combining both co-registered datasets, we obtain a near-global DEM with high geodetic accuracy, and without the need for surface interpolation. We evaluate the resulting LOLA + TC merged DEM (designated as "SLDEM2015") with particular attention to quantifying seams and crossover errors.

  4. Observations of the north polar region of Mars from the Mars orbiter laser altimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, M. T.; Smith, D. E.; Solomon, S. C.; Abshire, J. B.; Afzal, R. S.; Aharonson, O.; Fishbaugh, K.; Ford, P. G.; Frey, H. V.; Garvin, J. B.; Head, J. W.; Ivanov, A. B.; Johnson, C. L.; Muhleman, D. O.; Neumann, G. A.; Pettengill, G. H.; Phillips, R. J.; Sun, X.; Zwally, H. J.; Banerdt, W. B.; Duxbury, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    Elevations from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) have been used to construct a precise topographic map of the martian north polar region. The northern ice cap has a maximum elevation of 3 kilometers above its surroundings but lies within a 5-kilometer-deep hemispheric depression that is contiguous with the area into which most outflow channels emptied. Polar cap topography displays evidence of modification by ablation, flow, and wind and is consistent with a primarily H2O composition. Correlation of topography with images suggests that the cap was more spatially extensive in the past. The cap volume of 1.2 x 10(6) to 1.7 x 10(6) cubic kilometers is about half that of the Greenland ice cap. Clouds observed over the polar cap are likely composed of CO2 that condensed out of the atmosphere during northern hemisphere winter. Many clouds exhibit dynamical structure likely caused by the interaction of propagating wave fronts with surface topography.

  5. Martian Polar Region Impact Craters: Geometric Properties From Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvin, J. B.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Frawley, J. J.; Matias, A.

    1998-01-01

    The Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) instrument onboard the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft has so far observed approximately 100 impact landforms in the north polar latitudes (>60 degrees N) of Mars. Correlation of the topography with Viking Orbiter images indicate that many of these are near-center profiles, and for some of the most northern craters, multiple data passes have been acquired. The northern high latitudes of Mars may contain substantial ground ice and be topped with seasonal frost (largely CO2 with some water), forming each winter. We have analyzed various diagnostic crater topologic parameters for this high-latitude crater population with the objective of characterizing impact features in north polar terrains, and we explore whether there is evidence of interaction with ground ice, frost, dune movement, or other polar processes. We find that there are substantial topographic variations from the characteristics of midlatitude craters in the polar craters that are not readily apparent from prior images. The transition from small simple craters to large complex craters is not well defined, as was observed in the midlatitude MOLA data (transition at 7-8 km). Additionally, there appear to be additional topographic complexities such as anomalously large central structures in many polar latitude impact features. It is not yet clear if these are due to target-induced differences in the formation of the crater or post-formation modifications from polar processes.

  6. Analysis of global static and time-dependent topography from laser altimeter data records using a rectangular-grid method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Ch.; Christensen, U. R.; Kallenbach, R.

    2008-09-01

    ABSTRACT BepiColombo is one of the cornerstone missions of ESA to investigate Mercury. The mission consists of two orbiters, one for studying Mercury's magnetosphere (MMO) and the other for investigating the planet itself (MPO). MPO includes the laser altimeter BELA whose main goals are the mapping of the long-wavelength topography and retrieving time-dependent variations of Mercury's surface. Due to its proximity to the Sun tidal elevations ofMercury's surface of order one meter are likely, if the planet's core is partly liquid. The tidal amplitude is characterized by the tidal Love number h2. Its quantity reveals information on the interior structure of Mercury such as the thickness of the liquid outer core. In previous simulations, Mercury's topography data from synthetic laser altimeter records have directly been decomposed into a spherical harmonic expansion. In this work, we test a decomposition of the data using a rectangular grid. In latitudinal direction, the basis functions are simple step functions which are only non-zero for a particular grid cell. In longitudinal direction, the basis functions are either step functions, linear functions, or more sophisticated interpolations. This choice of basis functions is well suited for the nearly polar orbit of MPO which makes laser shots very dense in latitudinal direction but less dense in longitudinal direction. We show first results on the extraction of the global topography and the tidal Love number h2.

  7. Stratigraphy, Sequence, and Crater Populations of Lunar Impact Basins from Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) Data: Implications for the Late Heavy Bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassett, C. I.; Head, J. W.; Kadish, S. J.; Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    2012-01-01

    New measurements of the topography of the Moon from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA)[1] provide an excellent base-map for analyzing the large crater population (D.20 km)of the lunar surface [2, 3]. We have recently used this data to calculate crater size-frequency distributions (CSFD) for 30 lunar impact basins, which have implications for their stratigraphy and sequence. These data provide an avenue for assessing the timing of the transitions between distinct crater populations characteristic of ancient and young lunar terrains, which has been linked to the late heavy bombardment (LHB). We also use LOLA data to re-examine relative stratigraphic relationships between key lunar basins.

  8. Development and validation of a microchip pulsed laser for ESA space altimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couto, Bruno; Abreu, Hernâni; Gordo, Paulo; Amorim, António

    2016-10-01

    The development and validation of small size laser sources for space based range finding is of crucial importance to the development of miniature LIDAR devices for European space missions, particularly for planet lander probes. In this context, CENTRA-SIM is developing a passively q-switched microchip laser in the 1.5μm wavelength range. Pulses in the order of 2 ns and 100μJ were found to be suitable for range finding for small landing platforms. Both glass and crystalline Yb-Er doped active media are commonly available. Crystalline media present higher thermal conductivity and hardness, which allows for higher pumping intensities. However, glass laser media present longer laser upper-state lifetime and 99% Yb-Er transfer efficiency make phosphate glasses the typically preferred host for this type of application. In addition to this, passively q-switched microchip lasers with Yb-Er doped phosphate glass have been reported to output >100μJ pulses while their crystalline host counterparts achieve a few tens of μJ at best. Two different types of rate equation models have been found: microscopic quantities based models and macroscopic quantities based models. Based on the works of Zolotovskaya et al. and Spühler et al, we have developed a computer model that further exploits the equivalence between the two types of approaches. The simulation studies, using commercial available components allowed us to design a compact laser emitting 80μJ pulses with up to 30kW peak power and 1 to 2 ns pulse width. We considered EAT14 Yb-Er doped glass as active medium and Co2+:MgAl2O4 as saturable absorber. The active medium is pumped by a 975nm semiconductor laser focused into a 200μm spot. Measurements on an experimental test bench to validate the numerical model were carried out. Several different combinations of, saturable absorber length and output coupling were experimented.

  9. Recent Data Campaigns and Results from the Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS): An Airborne, Medium-Footprint, Full-Waveform, Swath Mapping Laser Altimeter System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, J. B.; Hofton, M. A.; Rabine, D. L.; Luthcke, S. B.; Greim, H.

    2005-12-01

    The Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) is an airborne, medium-sized footprint laser altimeter system. By digitally recording the shape of the returning laser pulse (waveform), LVIS provides a precise and accurate view of the vertical structure within each footprint/pixel including both the sub-canopy and canopy-top topography. Applications of LVIS data include biomass estimation for a wide variety of forest types, ground surface change detection for tectonic studies, mapping sea surface topography to assist in coastal hazard assessment, and hydrology studies utilizing sub-canopy topography in densely forested regions. Since 1998, LVIS data have been collected in various areas of New Hampshire, Maine, Massachusetts, California, Maryland, Panama and Costa Rica. The data calibration and geolocation processing system utilizes a formal Bayesian least-squares-estimation of pointing, ranging and timing parameters based on a batch reduction of altimeter range residuals. Data are released publicly on the LVIS website at http://lvis.gsfc.nasa.gov. Results show data precisions of landcover type and study site location. Comparisons between LVIS and ICESat will also be presented.

  10. Semiconductor Laser Measurements Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Semiconductor Laser Measurements Laboratory is equipped to investigate and characterize the lasing properties of semiconductor diode lasers. Lasing features such...

  11. Retrievals of Thick Cloud Optical Depth from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) by Calibration of Solar Background Signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuekui; Marshak, Alexander; Chiu, J. Christine; Wiscombe, Warren J.; Palm, Stephen P.; Davis, Anthony B.; Spangenberg, Douglas A.; Nguyen, Louis; Spinhirne, James D.; Minnis, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Laser beams emitted from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), as well as other space-borne laser instruments, can only penetrate clouds to a limit of a few optical depths. As a result, only optical depths of thinner clouds (thick clouds using solar background light and treating GLAS as a solar radiometer. To do so we first calibrate the reflected solar radiation received by the photon-counting detectors of GLAS' 532 nm channel, which is the primary channel for atmospheric products. The solar background radiation is regarded as a noise to be subtracted in the retrieval process of the lidar products. However, once calibrated, it becomes a signal that can be used in studying the properties of optically thick clouds. In this paper, three calibration methods are presented: (I) calibration with coincident airborne and GLAS observations; (2) calibration with coincident Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and GLAS observations of deep convective clouds; (3) calibration from the first principles using optical depth of thin water clouds over ocean retrieved by GLAS active remote sensing. Results from the three methods agree well with each other. Cloud optical depth (COD) is retrieved from the calibrated solar background signal using a one-channel retrieval. Comparison with COD retrieved from GOES during GLAS overpasses shows that the average difference between the two retrievals is 24%. As an example, the COD values retrieved from GLAS solar background are illustrated for a marine stratocumulus cloud field that is too thick to be penetrated by the GLAS laser. Based on this study, optical depths for thick clouds will be provided as a supplementary product to the existing operational GLAS cloud products in future GLAS data releases.

  12. The validation of HY-2 altimeter measurements of a significant wave height based on buoy data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jichao; ZHANG Jie; YANG Jungang

    2013-01-01

    HY-2 has been launched by China on August 16, 2011 which assembles multi-microwave remote sensing payloads in a body and has the ability of monitoring ocean dynamic environments. The HY-2 satellite data need to be calibrated and validated before being put into use. Based on the in-situ buoys from the Nation-al Data Buoy Center (NDBC), Ku-band significant wave heights (SWH, hs) of HY-2 altimeter are validated. Eleven months of HY-2 altimeter Level 2 products data are chose from October 1, 2011 to August 29, 2012. Using NDBC 60 buoys yield 902 collocations for HY-2 by adopting collocation criteria of 30 min for tempo-ral window and 50 km for a spatial window. An overall RMS difference of the SWH between HY-2 and buoy data is 0.297 m. A correlation coefficient between these is 0.964. An ordinary least squares (OLS) regression is performed with the buoy data as an independent variable and the altimeter data as a dependent vari-able. The regression equation of hs is hs(HY-2)=0.891×hs(NDBC)+0.022. In addition, 2016 collocations are matched with temporal window of 30 min at the crossing points of HY-2 and Jason-2 orbits. RMS difference of Ku-band SWH between the two data sets is 0.452 m.

  13. Altimeter Setting Indicator

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Altimeter Setting Indicator (ASI) is an aneroid system used at airports to provide an altimeter setting for aircraft altimeters. This indicator may be an analog...

  14. High Resolution Airborne InSAR DEM of Bagley Ice Valley, South-central Alaska: Geodetic Validation with Airborne Laser Altimeter Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muskett, R. R.; Lingle, C. S.; Echelmeyer, K. A.; Valentine, V. B.; Elsberg, D.

    2001-12-01

    Bagley Ice Valley, in the St. Elias and Chugach Mountains of south-central Alaska, is an integral part of the largest connected glacierized terrain on the North American continent. From the flow divide between Mt. Logan and Mt. St. Elias, Bagley Ice Valley flows west-northwest for some 90 km down a slope of less than 1o, at widths up to 15 km, to a saddle-gap where it turns south-west to become Bering Glacier. During 4-13 September 2000, an airborne survey of Bagley Ice Valley was performed by Intermap Technologies, Inc., using their Star-3i X-band SAR interferometer. The resulting digital elevation model (DEM) covers an area of 3243 km2. The DEM elevations are orthometric heights, in meters above the EGM96 geoid. The horizontal locations of the 10-m postings are with respect to the WGS84 ellipsoid. On 26 August 2000, 9 to 18 days prior to the Intermap Star-3i survey, a small-aircraft laser altimeter profile was acquired along the central flow line for validation. The laser altimeter data consists of elevations above the WGS84 ellipsoid and orthometric heights above GEOID99-Alaska. Assessment of the accuracy of the Intermap Star-3i DEM was made by comparison of both the DEM orthometric heights and elevations above the WGS84 ellipsoid with the laser altimeter data. Comparison of the orthometric heights showed an average difference of 5.4 +/- 1.0 m (DEM surface higher). Comparison of elevations above the WGS84 ellipsoid showed an average difference of -0.77 +/- 0.93 m (DEM surface lower). This indicates that the X-band Star-3i interferometer was penetrating the glacier surface by an expected small amount. The WGS84 comparison is well within the 3 m RMS accuracy quoted for GT-3 DEM products. Snow accumulation may have occurred, however, on Bagley Ice Valley between 26 August and 4-13 September 2000. This will be estimated using a mass balance model and used to correct the altimeter-derived surface heights. The new DEM of Bagley Ice Valley will provide a reference

  15. Detecting volcanic resurfacing of heavily cratered terrain: Flooding simulations on the Moon using Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitten, Jennifer L.; Head, James W.

    2013-09-01

    Early extrusive volcanism from mantle melting marks the transition from primary to secondary crust formation. Detection of secondary crust is often obscured by the high impact flux early in solar system history. To recognize the relationship between heavily cratered terrain and volcanic resurfacing, this study documents how volcanic resurfacing alters the impact cratering record and models the thickness, area, and volume of volcanic flood deposits. Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) data are used to analyze three different regions of the lunar highlands: the Hertzsprung basin; a farside heavily cratered region; and the central highlands. Lunar mare emplacement style is assumed to be similar to that of terrestrial flood basalts, involving large volumes of material extruded from dike-fed fissures over relatively short periods of time. Thus, each region was flooded at 0.5 km elevation intervals to simulate such volcanic flooding and to assess areal patterns, thickness, volumes, and emplacement history. These simulations show three primary stages of volcanic flooding: (1) Initial flooding is largely confined to individual craters and deposits are thick and localized; (2) basalt flows breach crater rim crests and are emplaced laterally between larger craters as thin widespread deposits; and (3) lateral spreading decreases in response to regional topographic variations and the deposits thicken and bury intermediate-sized and larger craters. Application of these techniques to the South Pole-Aitken basin shows that emplacement of ∼1-2 km of cryptomaria can potentially explain the paucity of craters 20-64 km in diameter on the floor of the basin relative to the distribution in the surrounding highlands.

  16. Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS): Final Test Report of DM LHP TV Testing. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Charles

    2000-01-01

    The Demonstration Model (DM) Loop Heat Pipe (LHP) was tested at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) during September and October, 1999. The LHP system was placed in the Dynavac 36 in. chamber in Building 4. The test lasted for about 6 weeks. The LHP was built, designed, and manufactured at Dynatherm Corporation, Inc. In Hunt Valley, MD according to GSFC specifications. The purpose of the test was to evaluate the performance of a propylene LHP for the Geoscience Laser Altimetry System (GLAS) instrument application.

  17. Engineering study for pallet adapting the Apollo laser altimeter and photographic camera system for the Lidar Test Experiment on orbital flight tests 2 and 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuebert, E. J.

    1977-01-01

    A Laser Altimeter and Mapping Camera System was included in the Apollo Lunar Orbital Experiment Missions. The backup system, never used in the Apollo Program, is available for use in the Lidar Test Experiments on the STS Orbital Flight Tests 2 and 4. Studies were performed to assess the problem associated with installation and operation of the Mapping Camera System in the STS. They were conducted on the photographic capabilities of the Mapping Camera System, its mechanical and electrical interface with the STS, documentation, operation and survivability in the expected environments, ground support equipment, test and field support.

  18. A sample design for globally consistent biomass estimation using lidar data from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Healey Sean P

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lidar height data collected by the Geosciences Laser Altimeter System (GLAS from 2002 to 2008 has the potential to form the basis of a globally consistent sample-based inventory of forest biomass. GLAS lidar return data were collected globally in spatially discrete full waveform “shots,” which have been shown to be strongly correlated with aboveground forest biomass. Relationships observed at spatially coincident field plots may be used to model biomass at all GLAS shots, and well-established methods of model-based inference may then be used to estimate biomass and variance for specific spatial domains. However, the spatial pattern of GLAS acquisition is neither random across the surface of the earth nor is it identifiable with any particular systematic design. Undefined sample properties therefore hinder the use of GLAS in global forest sampling. Results We propose a method of identifying a subset of the GLAS data which can justifiably be treated as a simple random sample in model-based biomass estimation. The relatively uniform spatial distribution and locally arbitrary positioning of the resulting sample is similar to the design used by the US national forest inventory (NFI. We demonstrated model-based estimation using a sample of GLAS data in the US state of California, where our estimate of biomass (211 Mg/hectare was within the 1.4% standard error of the design-based estimate supplied by the US NFI. The standard error of the GLAS-based estimate was significantly higher than the NFI estimate, although the cost of the GLAS estimate (excluding costs for the satellite itself was almost nothing, compared to at least US$ 10.5 million for the NFI estimate. Conclusions Global application of model-based estimation using GLAS, while demanding significant consolidation of training data, would improve inter-comparability of international biomass estimates by imposing consistent methods and a globally coherent sample frame. The

  19. Deriving Time Series of Ice-Sheet Accumulation Variations from Altimeter Measurements of Surface-Elevation Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwally, H. J.; Li, J.

    2014-12-01

    Information on ice-sheet surface accumulation, A(t), is needed for studies of mass balance, polar climate variability, ice-sheet evolution, and dynamics. This paper describes a new method for deriving time series of A(t) variations, δA(t), on a monthly basis from continuous altimeter measurements. Changes in ice-sheet thickness and surface elevation are driven by a combination of δA(t), changes in the rates of firn compaction, and the rates of dynamic ice thickening or thinning (dHd/dt). Relevant time scales range from monthly fluctuations in δA(t) and surface temperature, Ts(t), to decadal to millennial scales of dynamic changes in ice flow. Our concept is based on the widely differing time-scales of principal processes, e.g. T> 5 years for dynamic changes and t = year/12 for δA(t) so that T >> t. An important aspect is our use of a baseline of ICESat-1 and ERS-1/ERS-2 altimeter measurements to obtain the multi-year (e.g. 5 to 17 years) dHd/dt of the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets. We calculate changes in surface elevations caused by variations in the rate of firn compaction driven by both δA(t) and Ts(t) to adjust the altimeter-observed height changes, dH/dt, in order to derive dHd/dt over time periods of ≥ 5 years. Although monthly values of both δA(t) and Ts(t) are used, the derived dHd/dt is dependent only on the average change in δA(t) over the period and not on the higher-frequency monthly δA(t). On a monthly basis, the total accumulation-driven height change, dHaCA/dt, is a sum of the direct-height change, dHa/dt, and the change in firn compaction, dCA/dt, both caused by δA(t). dHa/dt is equal to δA(t)/ρs, where ρs is relative density of surface snow (typically 0.3) and δA(t) is w.e. Model simulations of dHaCA/dt driven by monthly δA(t) from ERA-interim re-analyses show that altimeter-observable dHaCA/dt and the desired dHa/dt = δA(t)/ρs are closely related. The relationship is better at colder locations such as the South Pole (Tm

  20. Controls on ERS altimeter measurements over ice sheets: Footprint-scale topography, backscatter fluctuations, and the dependence of microwave penetration depth on satellite orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthern, R. J.; Wingham, D. J.; Ridout, A. L.

    2001-12-01

    We consider the reliability of radar altimeter measurements of ice sheet elevation and snowpack properties in the presence of surface undulations. We demonstrate that over ice sheets the common practice of averaging echoes by aligning the first return from the surface at the origin can result in a redistribution of power to later times in the average echo, mimicking the effects of microwave penetration into the snowpack. Algorithms that assume the topography affects the radar echo shape in the same way that waves affect altimeter echoes over the ocean will therefore lead to biased estimates of elevation. This assumption will also cause errors in the retrieval of echoshape parameters intended to quantify the penetration of the microwave pulse into the snowpack. Using numerical simulations, we estimate the errors in retrievals of extinction coefficient, surface backscatter, and volume backscatter for various undulating topographies. In the flatter portions of the Antarctic plateau, useful estimates of these parameters may be recovered by averaging altimeter echoes recorded by the European Remote Sensing satellite (ERS-1). By numerical deconvolution of the average echoes we resolve the depths in the snowpack at which temporal changes and satellite travel-direction effects occur, both of which have the potential to corrupt measurements of ice sheet elevation change. The temporal changes are isolated in the surface-backscatter cross section, while directional effects are confined to the extinction coefficient and are stable from year to year. This allows the removal of the directional effect from measurement of ice-sheet elevation change.

  1. Comparison of airborne radar altimeter and ground-based Ku-band radar measurements on the ice cap Austfonna, Svalbard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Brandt

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We compare coincident data from the European Space Agency's Airborne SAR/Interferometric Radar Altimeter System (ASIRAS with ground-based Very High Bandwidth (VHB stepped-frequency radar measurements in the Ku-band. The ASIRAS instrument obtained data from ~700 m above the surface, using a 13.5 GHz center frequency and a 1 GHz bandwidth. The ground-based VHB radar measurements were acquired using the same center frequency, but with a variable bandwidth of either 1 or 8 GHz. Four sites were visited with the VHB radar; two sites within the transition region from superimposed ice to firn, and two sites in the long-term firn area (wet-snow zone. The greater bandwidth VHB measurements show that the first peak in the airborne data is a composite of the return from the surface (i.e. air-snow interface and returns of similar or stronger amplitude from reflectors in the upper ~30 cm of the subsurface. The peak position in the airborne data is thus not necessarily a good proxy for the surface since the maximum and width of the first return depend on the degree of interference between surface and subsurface reflectors. The major response from the winter snowpack was found to be caused by units of thin crust/ice layers (0.5–2 mm surrounded by large crystals (>3 mm. In the airborne data, it is possible to track such layers for tens of kilometers. The winter snowpack lacked thicker ice layers. The last year's summer surface, characterized by a low density large crystal layer overlaying a harder denser layer, gives a strong radar response, frequently the strongest. The clear relationship observed between the VHB and ASIRAS waveforms, justifies the use of ground-based radar measurements in the validation of air- or spaceborne radars.

  2. 用于月球着陆的激光高度计热控设计探讨%Optimization of thermal control design for laser altimeter used during lunar landing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋馨; 张有为; 贾建军; 刘自军

    2014-01-01

    The Land-On-Moon Orbit has obvious transient characteristics. The optimization principle of the thermal control design plan for the laser equipment used on the Land-On-Moon Orbit is discussed through the thermal analysis. The best thermal control design plan is to use the heat capacity of the equipment, unless the laser equipment is required to operate for a long time. An application case is the thermal control design plan for the laser altimeter used on the Chang’e-3, which uses the heat capacity of the equipment. The remote measurement data show that the temperature restriction of the equipment is realized. The thermal control design method is shown to be practical.%文章对落月轨道的外热流进行了分析,比较了几种热控设计方案的优缺点,探讨了热控优化设计的原则,认为在落月轨道上激光设备的热控设计应首选热容热控方案,对于在其他飞行阶段有长期开机需求的情况再考虑散热面方案或热电致冷方案。“嫦娥三号”月面探测器激光高度计采用了热容热控设计,该设备热控设计能够满足不同阶段温度指标要求并且与热分析结果相一致,热控设计方案正确、优化原则合理可行。

  3. Optical pulses, lasers, measuring techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Früngel, Frank B A

    1965-01-01

    High Speed Pulse Technology: Volume II: Optical Pulses - Lasers - Measuring Techniques focuses on the theoretical and engineering problems that result from the capacitor discharge technique.This book is organized into three main topics: light flash production from a capacitive energy storage; signal transmission and ranging systems by capacitor discharges and lasers; and impulse measuring technique. This text specifically discusses the air spark under atmospheric conditions, industrial equipment for laser flashing, and claims for light transmitting system. The application of light impulse sign

  4. Quantifying Seasonal Skill In Coupled Sea Ice Models Using Freeboard Measurements From Spaceborne Laser Altimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    10  Figure 9.  Linear Trend (%/year) of solar heat flux into the Arctic Ocean. Source: Perovich (2007). The color scale...Anisotropic ice flow in the Beaufort Sea, April 29, 2011. Source: Global Fiducials Library (2015) Angles between leads that are formed across ice floes... Panels a-d correspond to Figure 44 c-f. Bias( fbmodel ) that is statistically significant at the 95% confidence interval is represented in red

  5. The transition from complex crater to peak-ring basin on the Moon: New observations from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, David M. H.; Head, James W.; Fassett, Caleb I.; Kadish, Seth J.; Smith, Dave E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Neumann, Gregory A.

    2011-08-01

    Impact craters on planetary bodies transition with increasing size from simple, to complex, to peak-ring basins and finally to multi-ring basins. Important to understanding the relationship between complex craters with central peaks and multi-ring basins is the analysis of protobasins (exhibiting a rim crest and interior ring plus a central peak) and peak-ring basins (exhibiting a rim crest and an interior ring). New data have permitted improved portrayal and classification of these transitional features on the Moon. We used new 128 pixel/degree gridded topographic data from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) instrument onboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, combined with image mosaics, to conduct a survey of craters >50 km in diameter on the Moon and to update the existing catalogs of lunar peak-ring basins and protobasins. Our updated catalog includes 17 peak-ring basins (rim-crest diameters range from 207 km to 582 km, geometric mean = 343 km) and 3 protobasins (137-170 km, geometric mean = 157 km). Several basins inferred to be multi-ring basins in prior studies (Apollo, Moscoviense, Grimaldi, Freundlich-Sharonov, Coulomb-Sarton, and Korolev) are now classified as peak-ring basins due to their similarities with lunar peak-ring basin morphologies and absence of definitive topographic ring structures greater than two in number. We also include in our catalog 23 craters exhibiting small ring-like clusters of peaks (50-205 km, geometric mean = 81 km); one (Humboldt) exhibits a rim-crest diameter and an interior morphology that may be uniquely transitional to the process of forming peak rings. A power-law fit to ring diameters ( Dring) and rim-crest diameters ( Dr) of peak-ring basins on the Moon [ Dring = 0.14 ± 0.10( Dr) 1.21±0.13] reveals a trend that is very similar to a power-law fit to peak-ring basin diameters on Mercury [ Dring = 0.25 ± 0.14( Drim) 1.13±0.10] [Baker, D.M.H. et al. [2011]. Planet. Space Sci., in press]. Plots of ring

  6. Laser scattering measurement for laser removal of graffiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tearasongsawat, Watcharawee; Kittiboonanan, Phumipat; Luengviriya, Chaiya; Ratanavis, Amarin

    2015-07-01

    In this contribution, a technical development of the laser scattering measurement for laser removal of graffiti is reported. This study concentrates on the removal of graffiti from metal surfaces. Four colored graffiti paints were applied to stainless steel samples. Cleaning efficiency was evaluated by the laser scattering system. In this study, an angular laser removal of graffiti was attempted to examine the removal process under practical conditions. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at 1.06 microns with the repetition rate of 1 Hz was used to remove graffiti from stainless steel samples. The laser fluence was investigated from 0.1 J/cm2 to 7 J/cm2. The laser parameters to achieve the removal effectiveness were determined by using the laser scattering system. This study strongly leads to further development of the potential online surface inspection for the removal of graffiti.

  7. Laboratory laser reflectance measurement and applications to asteroid surface analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, A.; Daly, M. G.; Cloutis, E. A.; Tait, K. T.; Izawa, M. R. M.; Barnouin, O. S.; Hyde, B. C.; Nicklin, I.

    2014-07-01

    Introduction Laboratory reflectance measurement of asteroid analogs is an important tool for interpreting the reflectance of asteroids. One dominant factor affecting how measured reflectance changes as a function of phase angle (180° minus the scattering angle) is surface roughness [1], which is related to grain size. A major goal of this study is to be able to use the angular distributions (phase functions) of scattered light from various regions on an asteroid surface to determine the relative grain size between those regions. Grain size affects the spectral albedo and continuum slopes of surface materials, has implications in terms of understanding geologic processes on asteroids and is also valuable for the planning and operations of upcoming missions to asteroids, such as the New Frontiers OSIRIS-REx sample return mission to the asteroid (101955) Bennu [2]. Information on surface roughness is particularly powerful when combined with other datasets, such as thermal inertia maps (e.g., a smooth, low-backscatter surface of low thermal inertia likely contains fine grains). Approach To better constrain the composition and surface texture of Bennu, we are conducting experiments to investigate the laser return signature of terrestrial and meteorite analogs to Bennu. The objective is to understand the nature of laser returns given possible compositional, grain size and slope distributions on the surface of Bennu to allow surface characterization, particularly surface grain size, which would significantly aid efforts to identify suitable sites for sampling by the OSIRIS-REx mission. Setup A 1064-nm laser is used to determine the reflectance of Bennu analogs and their constituents (1064 nm is the wavelength of many laser altimeters including the one planned to fly on OSIRIS-REx). Samples of interest include serpentinites (greenalite, etc.), magnetite, and shungite. To perform the experiments, a goniometer has been built. This instrument allows reflectance measurements

  8. Altimeter Estimation of Sea Surface Wind Stress for Light to Moderate Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandemark, Douglas; Edson, James B.; Chapron, Bertrand

    1997-01-01

    Aircraft altimeter and in situ measurements are used to examine relationships between altimeter backscatter and the magnitude of near-surface wind and friction velocities. Comparison of altimeter radar cross section with wind speed is made through the modified Chelton-Wentz algorithm. Improved agreement is found after correcting 10-m winds for both surface current and atmospheric stability. An altimeter friction velocity algorithm is derived based on the wind speed model and an open-ocean drag coefficient. Close agreement between altimeter- and in situ-derived friction velocities is found. For this dataset, quality of the altimeter inversion to surface friction velocity is comparable to that for adjusted winds and clearly better than the inversion to true 10-m wind speed.

  9. New Radar Altimeter Missions are Providing a Dramatically Sharper Image of Global Marine Tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandwell, D. T.; Müller, D.; Garcia, E.; Matthews, K. J.; Smith, W. H. F.; Zaron, E.; Zhang, S.; Bassett, D.; Francis, R.

    2015-12-01

    Marine gravity, derived from satellite radar altimetry, is a powerful tool for mapping tectonic structures, especially in the deep ocean basins where the topography remains unmapped by ships or is buried by thick sediment. The ability to infer seafloor tectonics from space was first demonstrated in 1978 using Seasat altimeter data but the spatial coverage was incomplete because of the short three-month lifetime of the satellite. Most ocean altimeters have repeat ground tracks with spacings of hundreds of kilometers so they do not resolve tectonic structures. Adequate altimeter coverage became available in 1995 when the United States Navy declassified the Geosat radar altimeter data and the ERS-1 altimeter completed a 1-year mapping phase. These mid-1990's altimeter-derived images of the ocean basins remained static for 15 years because there were no new non-repeat altimeter missions. This situation changed dramatically in 2010 when CryoSat-2, with its advanced radar altimeter, was launched into a non-repeat orbit and continues to collect data until perhaps 2020. In addition the Jason-1 altimeter was placed into a 14-month geodetic phase at the end of its lifetime. More recently the 1.5 times higher precision measurements from the AltiKa altimeter aboard the SARAL spacecraft began to drift away from its 35-day repeat trackline. The Chinese HY-2 altimeter is scheduled to begin a dense mapping phase in early 2016. Moreover in 2020 we may enjoy significantly higher resolution maps of the ocean basins from the planned SWOT altimeter mission with its advanced swath mapping ability. All of this new data will provide a much sharper image of the tectonics of the deep ocean basins and continental margins. During this talk we will tour of the new tectonic structures revealed by CryoSat-2 and Jason-1 and speculate on the tectonic views of the ocean basins in 2020 and beyond.

  10. Further development of an improved altimeter wind speed algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelton, Dudley B.; Wentz, Frank J.

    1986-01-01

    A previous altimeter wind speed retrieval algorithm was developed on the basis of wind speeds in the limited range from about 4 to 14 m/s. In this paper, a new approach which gives a wind speed model function applicable over the range 0 to 21 m/s is used. The method is based on comparing 50 km along-track averages of the altimeter normalized radar cross section measurements with neighboring off-nadir scatterometer wind speed measurements. The scatterometer winds are constructed from 100 km binned measurements of radar cross section and are located approximately 200 km from the satellite subtrack. The new model function agrees very well with earlier versions up to wind speeds of 14 m/s, but differs significantly at higher wind speeds. The relevance of these results to the Geosat altimeter launched in March 1985 is discussed.

  11. Polarization measurement of laser-accelerated protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raab, Natascha; Engels, Ralf; Engin, Ilhan; Greven, Patrick; Holler, Astrid; Lehrach, Andreas; Maier, Rudolf [Institut für Kernphysik and Jülich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Büscher, Markus, E-mail: m.buescher@fz-juelich.de [Institut für Kernphysik and Jülich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Peter Grünberg Institut (PGI-6), Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Institute for Laser- and Plasma Physics, Heinrich-Heine Universität Düsseldorf, Universitätsstr. 1, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany); Cerchez, Mirela; Swantusch, Marco; Toncian, Monika; Toncian, Toma; Willi, Oswald [Institute for Laser- and Plasma Physics, Heinrich-Heine Universität Düsseldorf, Universitätsstr. 1, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany); Gibbon, Paul; Karmakar, Anupam [Institute for Advanced Simulation, Jülich Supercomputing Centre, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    We report on the successful use of a laser-driven few-MeV proton source to measure the differential cross section of a hadronic scattering reaction as well as on the measurement and simulation study of polarization observables of the laser-accelerated charged particle beams. These investigations were carried out with thin foil targets, illuminated by 100 TW laser pulses at the Arcturus laser facility; the polarization measurement is based on the spin dependence of hadronic proton scattering off nuclei in a Silicon target. We find proton beam polarizations consistent with zero magnitude which indicates that for these particular laser-target parameters the particle spins are not aligned by the strong magnetic fields inside the laser-generated plasmas.

  12. A new approach to lightweight radar altimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levanon, N.; Stremler, F. G.; Suomi, V. E.

    1974-01-01

    Test results and key principles are given for a radar altimeter designed for meteorological balloons. The instrument, which weighs 160 g and consumes 0.7 W, will fill a gap in meteorological sensing using balloons - an area where pressure altitude was formerly the prevailing reference. The instrument is basically a delay-lock radar utilizing a superregenerative RF stage. Long-term absolute accuracy of plus or minus 10 m and short-term stability of better than 2 m rms were measured at altitudes of 20 km.

  13. Laser shaft alignment measurement model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Chang-tao; Chen, Changzheng; Hou, Xiang-lin; Zhang, Guoyu

    2007-12-01

    Laser beam's track which is on photosensitive surface of the a receiver will be closed curve, when driving shaft and the driven shaft rotate with same angular velocity and rotation direction. The coordinate of arbitrary point which is on the curve is decided by the relative position of two shafts. Basing on the viewpoint, a mathematic model of laser alignment is set up. By using a data acquisition system and a data processing model of laser alignment meter with single laser beam and a detector, and basing on the installation parameter of computer, the state parameter between two shafts can be obtained by more complicated calculation and correction. The correcting data of the four under chassis of the adjusted apparatus moving on the level and the vertical plane can be calculated. This will instruct us to move the apparatus to align the shafts.

  14. NASA Ocean Altimeter Pathfinder Project. Report 1; Data Processing Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koblinsky, C. J.; Beckley, Brian D.; Ray, Richard D.; Wang, Yan-Ming; Tsaoussi, Lucia; Brenner, Anita; Williamson, Ron

    1998-01-01

    The NOAA/NASA Pathfinder program was created by the Earth Observing System (EOS) Program Office to determine how satellite-based data sets can be processed and used to study global change. The data sets are designed to be long time-sedes data processed with stable calibration and community consensus algorithms to better assist the research community. The Ocean Altimeter Pathfinder Project involves the reprocessing of all altimeter observations with a consistent set of improved algorithms, based on the results from TOPEX/POSEIDON (T/P), into easy-to-use data sets for the oceanographic community for climate research. This report describes the processing schemes used to produce a consistent data set and two of the products derived f rom these data. Other reports have been produced that: a) describe the validation of these data sets against tide gauge measurements and b) evaluate the statistical properties of the data that are relevant to climate change. The use of satellite altimetry for earth observations was proposed in the early 1960s. The first successful space based radar altimeter experiment was flown on SkyLab in 1974. The first successful satellite radar altimeter was flown aboard the Geos-3 spacecraft between 1975 and 1978. While a useful data set was collected from this mission for geophysical studies, the noise in the radar measured and incomplete global coverage precluded ft from inclusion in the Ocean Altimeter Pathfinder program. This program initiated its analysis with the Seasat mission, which was the first satellite radar altimeter flown for oceanography.

  15. 高速铁路CPⅢ高程控制网测量方法研究%Methods to derive lunar DEM from Chang'E-1 laser altimeter data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李书亮; 刘成龙; 倪先桃; 徐小左

    2011-01-01

    本文分析高速铁路CPⅢ高程控制网建网时普遍采用的德国测量方法,指出其存在的不足,在此基础上提出了技术上更为合理又适合我国国情的矩形法测量方法.通过对矩形法相邻点高差相对中误差和最弱点高程中误差的估算以及实验验证,认为矩形法可以用于CPⅢ高程网的建网测量.研究结果对于目前高速铁路工程测量相关规范的制订和在建高速铁路CPⅢ高程网的测量具有重要的参照价值.%High-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) based on data from Laser Altimeter (LAM) of Chinese Chang'E-1 mission provide geospatial characterizations of lunar topography. The primary LAM elevation data are two-dimensional topographic profiles. Developing three-dimensional DEMs from these profile data requires the elimination of gross errors and the interpolation of a confinuous surface. To detect and remove the error ( pseudo elevation) data from LAM observations the paper suggested an improved linear filter based on empirical formula which adapts the lunar surface feature. And the key parameters for this filter were discussed. In the second part, it tested eight different techniques of spatial interpolation with the filtered data. After comparing and analyzing these interpolation methods by their accuracies, shaded-relief visualizations and topographic profiles, it found the Kriging method worked better than other seven methods in deriving DEM grid. At last, an effective procedure for processing CE-1 elevation data was outlined, and the corresponding parameters were suggested.

  16. Alexandrite laser source for atmospheric lidar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelon, J.; Loth, C.; Flamant, P.; Megie, G.

    1986-01-01

    During the past years, there has been a marked increase in interest in the applications of vibronic solid state lasers to meteorology and atmospheric physics. Two airborne lidar programs are now under development in France. The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) method with vibronic solid state lasers is very attractive for water vapor, temperature and pressure measurements. Alexandrite laser and titanium-sapphire are both suitable for these applications. However, only alexandrite rods are commercially available. The requirements on the laser source for airborne dial applications are two fold: (1) a restriction on laser linewidth and a requirement on stability and tunability with a good spectral purity; and (2) a requirement on the time separation between the two pulses. These constraints are summarized.

  17. Web-based Altimeter Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, P. S.; Wilson, B. D.; Xing, Z.; Raskin, R. G.

    2010-12-01

    We have developed a web-based system to allow updating and subsetting of TOPEX data. The Altimeter Service will be operated by PODAAC along with their other provision of oceanographic data. The Service could be easily expanded to other mission data. An Altimeter Service is crucial to the improvement and expanded use of altimeter data. A service is necessary for altimetry because the result of most interest - sea surface height anomaly (SSHA) - is composed of several components that are updated individually and irregularly by specialized experts. This makes it difficult for projects to provide the most up-to-date products. Some components are the subject of ongoing research, so the ability for investigators to make products for comparison or sharing is important. The service will allow investigators/producers to get their component models or processing into widespread use much more quickly. For coastal altimetry, the ability to subset the data to the area of interest and insert specialized models (e.g., tides) or data processing results is crucial. A key part of the Altimeter Service is having data producers provide updated or local models and data. In order for this to succeed, producers need to register their products with the Altimeter Service and to provide the product in a form consistent with the service update methods. We will describe the capabilities of the web service and the methods for providing new components. Currently the Service is providing TOPEX GDRs with Retracking (RGDRs) in netCDF format that has been coordinated with Jason data. Users can add new orbits, tide models, gridded geophysical fields such as mean sea surface, and along-track corrections as they become available and are installed by PODAAC. The updated fields are inserted into the netCDF files while the previous values are retained for comparison. The Service will also generate SSH and SSHA. In addition, the Service showcases a feature that plots any variable from files in netCDF. The

  18. Laser Feedback Technique for Precise Retardation Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FEI Li-Gang; ZHANG Shu-Lian

    2006-01-01

    @@ A simple and precise retardation measurement based on laser feedback is demonstrated. The measurement principle is based on polarization flipping induced by optical feedback from an external birefringence cavity.The measured wave plate is located in the external cavity. When the length of the external cavity is tuned,the polarization states of laser will flip between two eigenstates, and the position of polarization flipping in one period of intensity modulation will vary with retardation of the wave plate. The duty ratio of two eigenstates is used to determine the retardation. Main advantages of the technique are that it is compact, low cost, fast and flexible. Especially, it is insensitive to a fluctuation of laser intensity and is suitable for on-line measurement. The experimental results have shown that the measurement uncertainty is better than 0.03° in the range 30°-150°.

  19. Computation of a new Mean Dynamic Topography for the Mediterranean Sea from model outputs, altimeter measurements and oceanographic in-situ data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.-H. Rio

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The accurate knowledge of the ocean Mean Dynamic Topography (MDT is a crucial issue for a number of oceanographic applications and in some areas of the Mediterranean Sea, important limitations have been found pointing to the need of an upgrade. We present a new Mean Dynamic Topography (MDT that was computed for the Mediterranean Sea. It takes profit of improvements made possible by the use of extended datasets and refined processing. The updated dataset spans the 1993–2012 period and consists of: drifter velocities, altimetry data, hydrological profiles and model data. The methodology is similar to the previous MDT Rio et al. (2007. However, in Rio et al. (2007 no hydrological profiles had been taken into account. This has required the development of dedicated processing. A number of sensitivity studies have been carried out to obtain the most accurate MDT as possible. The main results from these sensitivity studies are the following: moderate impact to the choice of correlation scales but almost negligible sensitivity to the choice of the first guess (model solution. A systematic external validation to independent data has been made to evaluate the performance of the new MDT. Compared to previous version, SMDT-MED-2014 features shorter scales structures, which results in an altimeter velocity variance closer to the observed velocity variance and, at the same time, gives better Taylor skills.

  20. Laser wire emittance measurement line AT CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia, H; Blair, G A; Aumeyr, T; Schulte, D; Stulle, F

    2011-01-01

    A precise measurement of the transverse beam size and beam emittances upstream of the final focus is essential for ensuring the full luminosity at future linear colliders. A scheme for the emittance measurements at the RTML line of the CLIC using laser-wire beam profile monitors is described. A lattice of the measurement line is discussed and results of simulations of statistical errors and of their impact on the accuracy of the emittance reconstruction are given. Laser wire systems suitable for CLIC and their main characteristics are discussed.

  1. Improved retracking algorithm for oceanic altimeter waveforms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lifeng Bao; Yang Lu; Yong Wang

    2009-01-01

    Over the deep oceans without land/ice interference, the waveforms created by the return altimeter pulse generally follow the ocean model of Brown, and the corresponding range can be properly determined using the result from an onboard tracker. In the case of com-plex altimeter waveforms corrupted due to a variety of reasons, the processor on the satellite cannot properly determine the center of the leading edge, and range observations can be in error. As an efficacious method to improve the precision of those altimeter observations with complex waveforms, waveform retracking is required to reprocess the original returning pulse. Based on basic altimeter theory and the geometric feature of altimeter waveforms, we developed a new altimeter waveform retracker, which is valid for all altimeter wave-forms once there exists a reasonable returning signal. The performances of the existing Beta-5 retracker, threshold retracker, improved threshold retracker, and the new retracker are assessed in the experimental regions (China Seas and its adjacent regions), and the improvements in the accuracy of sea surface height are investigated by the difference between retracked altimeter observations and ref-erenced geoid. The comparisons denote that the new algorithm gives the best performance in both the open ocean and coastal regions. Also, the new retracker presents a uniform performance in the whole test region. Besides, there is a significant improvement in the short-wavelength precision and the spatial resolution of sea surface height after retracking process.

  2. Effects of tropospheric and ionospheric refraction errors in the utilization of GEOS-C altimeter data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goad, C. C.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of tropospheric and ionospheric refraction errors are analyzed for the GEOS-C altimeter project in terms of their resultant effects on C-band orbits and the altimeter measurement itself. Operational procedures using surface meteorological measurements at ground stations and monthly means for ocean surface conditions are assumed, with no corrections made for ionospheric effects. Effects on the orbit height due to tropospheric errors are approximately 15 cm for single pass short arcs (such as for calibration) and 10 cm for global orbits of one revolution. Orbit height errors due to neglect of the ionosphere have an amplitude of approximately 40 cm when the orbits are determined from C-band range data with predominantly daylight tracking. Altimeter measurement errors are approximately 10 cm due to residual tropospheric refraction correction errors. Ionospheric effects on the altimeter range measurement are also on the order of 10 cm during the GEOS-C launch and early operation period.

  3. Velocity Measurement Based on Laser Doppler Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yan-Yan; HUO Yu-Jing; HE Shu-Fang; GONG Ke

    2010-01-01

    @@ A novel method for velocity measurement is presented.In this scheme,a parallel-linear-polarization dualfrequency laser is incident on the target and senses the target velocity with both the frequencies,which can increase the maximum measurable velocity significantly.The theoretical analysis and verification experiment of the novel method are presented,which show that high-velocity measurement can be achieved with high precision using this method.

  4. Metrology of vibration measurements by laser techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Martens, Hans-Jürgen

    2008-06-01

    Metrology as the art of careful measurement has been understood as uniform methodology for measurements in natural sciences, covering methods for the consistent assessment of experimental data and a corpus of rules regulating application in technology and in trade and industry. The knowledge, methods and tools available for precision measurements can be exploited for measurements at any level of uncertainty in any field of science and technology. A metrological approach to the preparation, execution and evaluation (including expression of uncertainty) of measurements of translational and rotational motion quantities using laser interferometer methods and techniques will be presented. The realization and dissemination of the SI units of motion quantities (vibration and shock) have been based on laser interferometer methods specified in international documentary standards. New and upgraded ISO standards are reviewed with respect to their suitability for ensuring traceable vibration measurements and calibrations in an extended frequency range of 0.4 Hz to higher than 100 kHz. Using adequate vibration exciters to generate sufficient displacement or velocity amplitudes, the upper frequency limits of the laser interferometer methods specified in ISO 16063-11 for frequencies procedures (i.e. measurement uncertainty 0.05 % at frequencies <= 10 kHz, <= 1 % up to 100 kHz).

  5. High Speed Laser 3D Measurement System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Yuan-he; FAN Chang-zhou; GUO Ying; LI Hong-wei; ZHAO Hong

    2003-01-01

    Using the method of line structure light produced by a laser diode,three dimensional profile measurement is deeply researched.A hardware circuit developed is used to get the center position of light section for the improvement of the measurement speed.A double CCD compensation technology is used to improve the measurement precision. An easy and effective calibration method of the least squares to fit the parameter of system structure is used to get the relative coordinate relationship of objects and images of light section in the directions of height and axis. Sensor scanning segment by segment and layer by layer makes the measurement range expand greatly.

  6. A topographic parameter inversion method based on laser altimetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG ChunMing; ZHANG ShaoDong; CHEN Xi

    2012-01-01

    A topographic parameter inversion method based on laser altimetry is developed in this paper,which can be used to deduce the surface vertical profile and retrieve the topographic parameters within the laser footprints by analyzing and simulating return waveforms.This method comprises three steps.The first step is to build the numerical models for the whole measuring procedure of laser altimetry,construct digital elevation models for surfaces with different topographic parameters,and calculate return waveforms.The second step is to analyze the simulated return waveforms to obtain their characteristics parameters,summarize the effects of the topographic parameter variations on the characteristic parameters of simulated return waveforms,and analyze the observed return waveforms of laser altimeters to acquire their characteristic parameters at the same time.The last step is to match the characteristic parameters of the simulated and observed return waveforms,and deduce the topographic parameters within the laser footprint.This method can be used to retrieve the topographic parameters within the laser footprint from the observed return waveforms of spaceborne laser altimeters and to get knowledge about the surface altitude distribution within the laser footprint other than only getting the height of the surface encountered firstly by the laser beam,which extends laser altimeters' function and makes them more like radars.

  7. Measurement of small vibration by laser interferometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Menglu; LIU Hewei

    2003-01-01

    The method and experimental results of measuring a small vibrating displacement by laser interferometer are introduced in this paper. The dynamic response of a new kind of tiny piezoelectric driver is detected. Results show that this kind of PZN-PZT tiny driver not only has high voltage-displacement sensitivity, but also its frequency response approaches to 1 kHz.Therefore this kind of piezoelectric driver can be used widely in many fields.

  8. Methods to derive lunar DEM from Chang'E-1 laser altimeter data%利用嫦娥一号激光高度计数据制作月球DEM的方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹小端; 刘建军; 任鑫; 王文睿; 牟伶俐; 李春来

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) based on data from Laser Altimeter (LAM) of Chinese Chang'E-1 mission provide geospatial characterizations of lunar topography. The primary LAM elevation data are two-dimensional topographic profiles. Developing three-dimensional DEMs from these profile data requires the elimination of gross errors and the interpolation of a continuous surface. To detect and remove the error ( pseudo elevation) data from LAM observations the paper suggested an improved linear filter based on empirical formula which adapts the lunar surface feature. And the key parameters for this filter were discussed. In the second part, it tested eight different techniques of spatial interpolation with the filtered data. After comparing and analyzing these interpolation methods by their accuracies, shaded-relief visualizations and topographic profiles, it found the Kriging method worked better than other seven methods in deriving DEM grid. At last, an effective procedure for processing CE-1 elevation data was outlined, and the corresponding parameters were suggested.%本文结合嫦娥一号卫星(CE-1)激光高度计产品数据,研究卫星激光测距数据处理和数字高程模型(DEM)制作的方法.通过滤波实验分析,构造了符合月球地形特征的经验滤波器,并确定了适合LAM数据的滤波窗口大小和地形滤波参数.结合实验结果改进了滤波流程,并对实验区滤波.利用滤波后的数据对八种基本的插值方法进行实验,通过计算插值精度、比较地形晕渲图以及地形剖面细节,评价和比较各方法的插值结果,由此得到结论,克里金插值方法较其他七种方法更适用于月球地形规则格网的生成.最后结合月海和高地两个典型区数据,验证了该套DEM提取方案对不同地形特征区域的适用性.从而,为利用CE-1激光高度计数据开展月球科学研究的科研人员.提供一套行之有效的地形数据处理参考方案.

  9. Laser Beam Caustic Measurement with Focal Spot Analyser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming Ove; Gong, Hui; Bagger, Claus

    2005-01-01

    In industrial applications of high power CO2-lasers the caustic characteristics of the laser beam have great effects on the performance of the lasers. A welldefined high intense focused spot is essential for reliable production results. This paper presents a focal spot analyser that is developed...... for measuring the beam profiles of focused high power CO2-lasers....

  10. Strategies for estimating the marine geoid from altimeter data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argentiero, P.; Kahn, W. D.; Garza-Robles, R.

    1974-01-01

    In processing altimeter data from a spacecraft borne altimeter to estimate the fine structure of the marine geoid, a problem is encountered. In order to describe the geoid fine structure, a large number of parameters must be employed and it is not possible to simultaneously estimate all of them. Unless the parameterization exhibits good orthogonality in the data, serious aliasing results. From simulation studies it has been found that amongst several competing parameterizations, the mean free air gravity anomaly model (i.e., Stokes' formula) exhibited promising geoid recovery characteristics. Using covariance analysis techniques, this report provides quantitative measures of the orthogonality properties associated with the above mentioned parameterization. It has been determined that a 5 deg x 5 deg area mean free air gravity anomaly can be estimated with an uncertainty of 1 mgal (40 cm undulation) provided that all free air gravity anomalies within a spherical radius of 10 arc degrees are simultaneously estimated.

  11. Surface roughness measurement with laser triangulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Fuzhong; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Tian, Chaoping

    2016-09-01

    A surface roughness measurement method is introduced in the paper, which is based on laser triangulation and digital image processing technique. In the measuring system, we use the line-structured light as light source, microscope lens and high-accuracy CCD sensor as displacement sensor as well. In addition, the working angle corresponding to the optimal sensitivity is considered in the optical structure design to improve the measuring accuracy. Through necessary image processing operation for the light strip image, such as center-line extraction with the barycenter algorithm, Gaussian filtering, the value of roughness is calculated. A standard planing surface is measured experimentally with the proposed method and the stylus method (Mitutoyo SJ-410) respectively. The profilograms of surface appearance are greatly similar in the shape and the amplitude to two methods. Also, the roughness statistics values are close. The results indicate that the laser triangulation with the line-structured light can be applied to measure the surface roughness with the advantages of rapid measurement and visualized display of surface roughness profile.

  12. Three-component laser anemometer measurement systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Louis J.

    1991-01-01

    A brief overview of the different laser anemometer (LA) optical designs available is presented. Then, the LA techniques that can be used to design a three-component measurement system for annular geometries are described. Some of the facility design considerations unique to these LA systems are also addressed. Following this, the facilities and the LA systems that were used to successfully measure the three components of velocity in the blading of annular-flow machines are reviewed. Finally, possible LA system enhancements and future research directions are presented.

  13. Errors of measurement by laser goniometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapov, Mikhail Y.; Bournashev, Milhail N.

    2000-11-01

    The report is dedicated to research of systematic errors of angle measurement by a dynamic laser goniometer (DLG) on the basis of a ring laser (RL), intended of certification of optical angle encoders (OE), and development of methods of separation the errors of different types and their algorithmic compensation. The OE was of the absolute photoelectric angle encoder type with an informational capacity of 14 bits. Cinematic connection with a rotary platform was made through mechanical connection unit (CU). The measurement and separation of a systematic error to components was carried out with applying of a method of cross-calibration at mutual turns OE in relation to DLG base and CU in relation to OE rotor. Then the Fourier analysis of observed data was made. The research of dynamic errors of angle measurements was made with use of dependence of measured angle between reference direction assigned by the interference null-indicator (NI) with an 8-faced optical polygon (OP), and direction defined by means of the OE, on angular rate of rotation. The obtained results allow to make algorithmic compensation of a systematic error and in the total considerably to reduce a total error of measurements.

  14. Wind waves in tropical cyclones: satellite altimeter observations and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubkin, Pavel; Kudryavtsev, Vladimir; Chapron, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    Results of investigation of wind-wave generation by tropical cyclones using satellite altimeter data are presented. Tropical cyclones are generally relatively small rapidly moving low pressure systems that are capable of generating severe wave conditions. Translation of a tropical cyclone leads to a prolonged period of time surface waves in the right sector remain under high wind forcing conditions. This effect has been termed extended fetch, trapped fetch or group velocity quasi-resonance. A tropical cyclone wave field is thus likely more asymmetrical than the corresponding wind field: wind waves in the tropical cyclone right sector are more developed with larger heights than waves in the left one. A dataset of satellite altimeter intersections of the Western Pacific tropical cyclones was created for 2010-2013. Data from four missions were considered, i.e., Jason-1, Jason-2, CryoSat-2, SARAL/AltiKa. Measurements in the rear-left and front-right sectors of tropical cyclones were examined for the presence of significant wave asymmetry. An analytical model is then derived to efficiently describe the wave energy distribution in a moving tropical cyclone. The model essentially builds on a generalization of the self-similar wave growth model and the assumption of a strongly dominant single spectral mode in a given quadrant of the storm. The model provides a criterion to anticipate wave enhancement with the generation of trapped abnormal waves. If forced during a sufficient timescale interval, also defined from this generalized self-similar wave growth model, waves can be trapped and large amplification of the wave energy will occur in the front-right storm quadrant. Remarkably, the group velocity and corresponding wavelength of outrunning wave systems will become wind speed independent and solely relate to the translating velocity. The resulting significant wave height also only weakly depends on wind speed, and more strongly on the translation velocity. Satellite

  15. A Stochastic Approach to Noise Modeling for Barometric Altimeters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Maria Sabatini

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The question whether barometric altimeters can be applied to accurately track human motions is still debated, since their measurement performance are rather poor due to either coarse resolution or drifting behavior problems. As a step toward accurate short-time tracking of changes in height (up to few minutes, we develop a stochastic model that attempts to capture some statistical properties of the barometric altimeter noise. The barometric altimeter noise is decomposed in three components with different physical origin and properties: a deterministic time-varying mean, mainly correlated with global environment changes, and a first-order Gauss-Markov (GM random process, mainly accounting for short-term, local environment changes, the effects of which are prominent, respectively, for long-time and short-time motion tracking; an uncorrelated random process, mainly due to wideband electronic noise, including quantization noise. Autoregressive-moving average (ARMA system identification techniques are used to capture the correlation structure of the piecewise stationary GM component, and to estimate its standard deviation, together with the standard deviation of the uncorrelated component. M-point moving average filters used alone or in combination with whitening filters learnt from ARMA model parameters are further tested in few dynamic motion experiments and discussed for their capability of short-time tracking small-amplitude, low-frequency motions.

  16. A stochastic approach to noise modeling for barometric altimeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, Angelo Maria; Genovese, Vincenzo

    2013-11-18

    The question whether barometric altimeters can be applied to accurately track human motions is still debated, since their measurement performance are rather poor due to either coarse resolution or drifting behavior problems. As a step toward accurate short-time tracking of changes in height (up to few minutes), we develop a stochastic model that attempts to capture some statistical properties of the barometric altimeter noise. The barometric altimeter noise is decomposed in three components with different physical origin and properties: a deterministic time-varying mean, mainly correlated with global environment changes, and a first-order Gauss-Markov (GM) random process, mainly accounting for short-term, local environment changes, the effects of which are prominent, respectively, for long-time and short-time motion tracking; an uncorrelated random process, mainly due to wideband electronic noise, including quantization noise. Autoregressive-moving average (ARMA) system identification techniques are used to capture the correlation structure of the piecewise stationary GM component, and to estimate its standard deviation, together with the standard deviation of the uncorrelated component. M-point moving average filters used alone or in combination with whitening filters learnt from ARMA model parameters are further tested in few dynamic motion experiments and discussed for their capability of short-time tracking small-amplitude, low-frequency motions.

  17. Laser Sounder for Measuring Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations: Progress Toward Ascends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, J. B.; Kawa, S. R.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Sun, X.; Stephen, M. A.; Wilson, E.; Burris, J. F.; Mao, J.

    2008-01-01

    The next generation of space-based, active remote sensing instruments for measurement of tropospheric CO2 promises a capability to quantify global carbon sources and sinks at regional scales. Active (laser) methods will extend CO2 measurement coverage in time, space, and perhaps precision such that the underlying mechanisms for carbon exchange at the surface can be understood with .sufficient detail to confidently project the future of carbon-climate interaction and the influence of remediative policy actions. The recent Decadal Survey for Earth Science by the US National Research Council has recommended such a mission called the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) for launch in 2013-2016. We have been developing a laser technique for measurement of tropospheric CO2 for a number of years. Our immediate goal is to develop and demonstrate the method and instrument technology that will permit measurements of the CO2 column abundance over a horizontal path and from aircraft at the few-ppmv level. Our longer-term goal is to demonstrate the required capabilities of the technique, develop a space mission approach, and design the instrument for an ASCENDS-type mission. Our approach is to use a dual channel laser absorption spectrometer (i.e., differential absorption in altimeter mode), which continuously measures from a near-polar circular orbit. We use several co-aligned tunable fiber laser transmitters allowing simultaneous measurement of the absorption from a CO2 line in the 1570 nm band, O2 extinction in the oxygen A-band (near 765 nm), and aerosol backscatter in the same measurement path. We measure the energy of the laser echoes at nadir reflected from land and water surfaces, day and night. The lasers have spectral widths much narrower than the gas absorption lines and are turned on and off the selected CO2 and O2 lines at kHz rates. The gas extinction and column densities for the CO2 and O2 gases are estimated from the ratio of

  18. Dynamics of laser-driven proton acceleration exhibited by measured laser absorptivity and reflectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin, J. H.; Allinger, K.; Khrennikov, K.; Karsch, S.; Bolton, P. R.; Schreiber, J.

    2017-01-01

    Proton acceleration from nanometer thin foils with intense laser pulses is investigated experimentally. We analyzed the laser absorptivity by parallel monitoring of laser transmissivity and reflectivity with different laser intensities when moving the targets along the laser axis. A direct correlation between laser absorptivity and maximum proton energy is observed. Experimental results are interpreted in analytical estimation, exhibiting a coexistence of plasma expansion and light-sail form of radiation pressure acceleration (RPA-LS) mechanisms during the entire proton acceleration process based on the measured laser absorptivity and reflectivity. PMID:28272471

  19. Laser measurements for experiments on the TROLL accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogeland, S.

    1992-06-01

    Propagation of an electron beam over long distances can be accomplished by using a laser produced plasma channel. In experiments at the EPOCH Laboratory, a krypton/fluoride laser, lasing at 248 nm, is used to ionize trimethylamine gas to create a 91 m long channel. The laser radius was measured as 2.4 cm. Laser energy was measured and ranged from 0.5 to 6 J.

  20. A revised calibration of the interferometric mode of the CryoSat-2 radar altimeter improves ice height and height change measurements in western Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Laurence; Burgess, David; Copland, Luke; Dunse, Thorben; Langley, Kirsty; Moholdt, Geir

    2017-05-01

    We compare geocoded heights derived from the interferometric mode (SARIn) of CryoSat to surface heights from calibration-validation sites on Devon Ice Cap and western Greenland. Comparisons are included for both the heights derived from the first return (the point-of-closest-approach or POCA) and heights derived from delayed waveform returns (swath processing). While swath-processed heights are normally less precise than edited POCA heights, e.g. standard deviations of ˜ 3 and ˜ 1.5 m respectively for the western Greenland site, the increased coverage possible with swath data complements the POCA data and provides useful information for both system calibration and improving digital elevation models (DEMs). We show that the pre-launch interferometric baseline coupled with an additional roll correction ( ˜ 0.0075° ± 0.0025°), or equivalent phase correction ( ˜ 0.0435 ± 0.0145 radians), provides an improved calibration of the interferometric SARIn mode. We extend the potential use of SARIn data by showing the influence of surface conditions, especially melt, on the return waveforms and that it is possible to detect and measure the height of summer supraglacial lakes in western Greenland. A supraglacial lake can provide a strong radar target in the waveform, stronger than the initial POCA return, if viewed at near-normal incidence. This provides an ideal situation for swath processing and we demonstrate a height precision of ˜ 0.5 m for two lake sites, one in the accumulation zone and one in the ablation zone, which were measured every year from 2010 or 2011 to 2016. Each year the lake in the ablation zone was viewed in June by ascending passes and then 5.5 days later by descending passes, which allows an approximate estimate of the filling rate. The results suggest that CryoSat waveform data and measurements of supraglacial lake height change could complement the use of optical satellite imagery and be helpful as proxy indicators for surface melt around

  1. Precise Measurement of Laser Power using an Optomechanical System

    CERN Document Server

    Agatsuma, Kazuhiro; Ballmer, Stefan; DeSalvo, Giulia; Sakata, Shihori; Nishida, Erina; Kawamura, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    This paper shows a novel method to precisely measure the laser power using an optomechanical system. By measuring a mirror displacement caused by the reflection of an amplitude modulated laser beam, the number of photons in the incident continuous-wave laser can be precisely measured. We have demonstrated this principle by means of a prototype experiment uses a suspended 25 mg mirror as an mechanical oscillator coupled with the radiation pressure and a Michelson interferometer as the displacement sensor. A measurement of the laser power with an uncertainty of less than one percent (1 sigma) is achievable.

  2. Index of Refraction Measurements Using a Laser Distance Meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Romulo; Fiorillo, Richard; Ochoa, Cris

    2014-01-01

    We present a simple method to determine the refractive indices of transparent media using a laser distance meter. Indices of refraction have been obtained by measuring the speed of light in materials. Some speed of light techniques use time-of-flight measurements in which pulses are emitted by lasers and the time interval is measured for the pulse…

  3. Index of Refraction Measurements Using a Laser Distance Meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Romulo; Fiorillo, Richard; Ochoa, Cris

    2014-01-01

    We present a simple method to determine the refractive indices of transparent media using a laser distance meter. Indices of refraction have been obtained by measuring the speed of light in materials. Some speed of light techniques use time-of-flight measurements in which pulses are emitted by lasers and the time interval is measured for the pulse…

  4. High Density GEOSAT/GM Altimeter Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The high density Geosat/GM altimeter data south of 30 S have finally arrived. In addition, ERS-1 has completed more than 6 cycles of its 35-day repeat track. These...

  5. Sea-Ice Freeboard Retrieval Using Digital Photon-Counting Laser Altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Sinead L.; Brunt, Kelly M.; Ruth, Julia M.; Kuhn, John M.; Connor, Laurence N.; Walsh, Kaitlin M.

    2015-01-01

    Airborne and spaceborne altimeters provide measurements of sea-ice elevation, from which sea-ice freeboard and thickness may be derived. Observations of the Arctic ice pack by satellite altimeters indicate a significant decline in ice thickness, and volume, over the last decade. NASA's Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) is a next-generation laser altimeter designed to continue key sea-ice observations through the end of this decade. An airborne simulator for ICESat-2, the Multiple Altimeter Beam Experimental Lidar (MABEL), has been deployed to gather pre-launch data for mission development. We present an analysis of MABEL data gathered over sea ice in the Greenland Sea and assess the capabilities of photon-counting techniques for sea-ice freeboard retrieval. We compare freeboard estimates in the marginal ice zone derived from MABEL photon-counting data with coincident data collected by a conventional airborne laser altimeter. We find that freeboard estimates agree to within 0.03m in the areas where sea-ice floes were interspersed with wide leads, and to within 0.07m elsewhere. MABEL data may also be used to infer sea-ice thickness, and when compared with coincident but independent ice thickness estimates, MABEL ice thicknesses agreed to within 0.65m or better.

  6. Estimates of forest height in the Amazon basin using radar altimeter data of SARIN mode onboard Cryosat-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L.; Sun, G.; Liu, Q.

    2013-12-01

    Forest height is an important parameter for global carbon cycle studies. New technologies are required since the end of the operation ofGeoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) onboard The Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (IceSat) in 2009. CryoSat-2 is a European Space Agencyenvironmental research satellite which was launched in April 2010.The SIRAL (SAR Interferometer Radar Altimeter) on board CryoSat-2 provides three operational modes for different observational requirements. Before the launch of Icesat2 around July 2016, CryoSat data represents a unique source of information on regional-to-global scale forest canopy height.We propose to use radar altimetry waveforms from the synthetic aperture/interferometric (SARin) mode to estimate canopy height in the Amazon basin. To understand the relation between canopy structure and the SIRAL waveform in Ku band, a 3D model was developed and implemented based on a Lidar model by introducingthe scattering items from crown, trunk and ground surface at Ku band. The vertical distribution of tree crown volume within a SIRAL footprint was calculated from its 3-D stand model by summing the volumes of all tree crown cells at the same height from the ground. The preliminary comparisons between simulated and measured SIRAL waveforms show that the model captures the major characteristics of the SIRAL signature. Cryosat waveform data of SARin mode and from June, 2011 to June, 2012 (cycle 04) is used to retrieve canopy height at Amazon basin under Cryosat groundtrack. The canopy height is derived by extracting the key points of vegetation and ground returns after noise estimation. Because of lack of field tree height measurement in 2012 at Amazon, we validated the results using the field measurements at four areas (the km 67 camp, the km 77 camp, Ruropolis, the Taoajos river) of Tapajos National Forest, Brazil in November 1999, and compared the results with the canopy height estimation from previous studies using Laser

  7. Laser vibrometer measurements and middle ear prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flock, Stephen T.; Dornhoffer, John; Ferguson, Scott

    1997-05-01

    One of us has developed an improved partial ossicular replacement prosthesis that is easier to implant and, based on pilot clinical measurements, results in better high-frequency hearing as compared to patients receiving one of the alternative prostheses. It is hypothesized that the primary reason for this is because of the relatively light weight (about 25 mg) and low compliance of the prosthesis, which could conceivably result in better high frequency vibrational characteristics. The purpose of our initial work was to develop an instrument suitable for objectively testing the vibrational characteristics of prostheses. We have developed a laser based device suitable for measuring the vibrational characteristics of the oval window or other structures of the middle ear. We have tested this device using a piezoelectric transducer excited at audio frequencies, as well as on the oval window in human temporal bones harvested from cadavers. The results illustrate that it is possible to non-invasively monitor the vibrational characteristics of anatomic structures with a very inexpensive photonic device.

  8. Geodetic Mobil Solar Spectrometer for JASON Altimeter Satellite Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somieski, A.; Buerki, B.; Geiger, A.; Kahle, H.-G.; Becker-Ross, H.; Florek, S.; Okruss, M.

    Atmospheric water vapor is a crucial factor in achieving highest accuracies for space geodetic measurements. Water vapor causes a delay of the propagation time of the altimeter satellite signal, which propagates into errors for the determination of surface heights. Knowledge of the precipitable water vapor (PW) enables a tropospheric correction of the satellite signal. Therefore, different remote sensing techniques have been pursued to measure the PW continuously. The prototype Geodetic Mobil Solar Spectrometer (GEMOSS) was developed at the Geodesy and Geodynamics Laboratory (GGL, ETH Zurich) in cooperation with the Institute of Spectrochemistry and Applied Spectroscopy (ISAS) (Berlin, Germany). A new optical approach allows the simultaneous measurement of numerous single absorption lines of water vapor in the wide range between 728 nm and 915 nm. The large number of available absorption lines increases the accuracy of the absolute PW retrievals considerably. GEMOSS has been deployed during two campaigns in Greece in the framework of the EU-project GAVDOS, which deals with the calibration of the altimeter satellite JASON. During the overfly of JASON, the ground-based determination of PW enables the correction of the satellite measurements due to tropospheric water vapor. Comparisons with radiometer and radiosondes data allow to assess the accuracy and reliability of GEMOSS. The instrumental advancement of GEMOSS is presented together with the results of the campaigns carried out.

  9. Laser-fluorescence measurement of marine algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browell, E. V.

    1980-01-01

    Progress in remote sensing of algae by laser-induced fluorescence is subject of comprehensive report. Existing single-wavelength and four-wavelength systems are reviewed, and new expression for power received by airborne sensor is derived. Result differs by as much as factor of 10 from those previously reported. Detailed error analysis evluates factors affecting accuracy of laser-fluorosensor systems.

  10. Arterial compliance measurement using a noninvasive laser Doppler measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hast, Jukka T.; Myllylae, Risto A.; Sorvoja, Hannu; Nissilae, Seppo M.

    2000-11-01

    The aim of this study was to study the elasticity of the arterial wall using a non-invasive laser Doppler measurement system. The elasticity of the arterial wall is described by its compliance factor, which can be determined when both blood pressure and the radial velocity of the arterial wall are known. To measure radical velocity we used a self- mixing interferometer. The compliance factors were measured from six healthy volunteers, whose ages were varied from 21 to 32. Although a single volunteer's compliance factor is presented as an example, this paper treated the volunteers as a group. First, the elastic modulus, which is inversely proportional to the compliance factor, was determined. Then, an exponential curve was fitted into the measured data and a characteristic equation for the elastic modulus of the arterial wall was determined. The elastic modulus was calculated at different pressures and the results were compared to the static incremental modulus of a dog's femoral artery. The results indicate that there is a correlation between human elastic and canine static incremental modulus for blood pressures varying from 60 to 110 mmHg.

  11. GEOS-3 ocean current investigation using radar altimeter profiling. [Gulf Stream surface topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitao, C. D.; Huang, N. E.; Parra, C. G.

    1978-01-01

    Both quasi-stationary and dynamic departures from the marine geoid were successfully detected using altitude measurements from the GEOS-3 radar altimeter. The quasi-stationary departures are observed either as elevation changes in single pass profiles across the Gulf Stream or at the crowding of contour lines at the western and northern areas of topographic maps generated using altimeter data spanning one month or longer. Dynamic features such as current meandering and spawned eddies can be monitored by comparing monthly mean maps. Comparison of altimeter inferred eddies with IR detected thermal rings indicates agreement of the two techniques. Estimates of current velocity are made using derived slope estimates in conjunction with the geostrophic equation.

  12. Transient Infrared Measurement of Laser Absorption Properties of Porous Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marynowicz Andrzej

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The infrared thermography measurements of porous building materials have become more frequent in recent years. Many accompanying techniques for the thermal field generation have been developed, including one based on laser radiation. This work presents a simple optimization technique for estimation of the laser beam absorption for selected porous building materials, namely clinker brick and cement mortar. The transient temperature measurements were performed with the use of infrared camera during laser-induced heating-up of the samples’ surfaces. As the results, the absorbed fractions of the incident laser beam together with its shape parameter are reported.

  13. Transient Infrared Measurement of Laser Absorption Properties of Porous Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marynowicz, Andrzej

    2016-06-01

    The infrared thermography measurements of porous building materials have become more frequent in recent years. Many accompanying techniques for the thermal field generation have been developed, including one based on laser radiation. This work presents a simple optimization technique for estimation of the laser beam absorption for selected porous building materials, namely clinker brick and cement mortar. The transient temperature measurements were performed with the use of infrared camera during laser-induced heating-up of the samples' surfaces. As the results, the absorbed fractions of the incident laser beam together with its shape parameter are reported.

  14. Mechanical impedance measurement and damage detection using noncontact laser ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeonseok; Lim, Hyeong Uk; Hong, Jung-Wuk; Sohn, Hoon

    2014-06-01

    This Letter proposes a mechanical impedance (MI) measurement technique using noncontact laser ultrasound. The ultrasound is generated by shooting a pulse laser beam onto a target structure, and its response is measured using a laser vibrometer. Once ultrasound propagation converges to structural vibration, MI is formed over the entire structure. Because noncontact lasers are utilized, this technique is applicable in harsh environments, free of electromagnetic interference, and able to perform wide-range scanning. The formation of MI and its feasibility for damage detection are verified through thermo-mechanical finite element analysis and lab-scale experiments.

  15. Picosecond pulse measurements using the active laser medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardin, James P.; Lawandy, N. M.

    1990-01-01

    A simple method for measuring the pulse lengths of synchronously pumped dye lasers which does not require the use of an external nonlinear medium, such as a doubling crystal or two-photon fluorescence cell, to autocorrelate the pulses is discussed. The technique involves feeding the laser pulses back into the dye jet, thus correlating the output pulses with the intracavity pulses to obtain pulse length signatures in the resulting time-averaged laser power. Experimental measurements were performed using a rhodamine 6G dye laser pumped by a mode-locked frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser. The results agree well with numerical computations, and the method proves effective in determining lengths of picosecond laser pulses.

  16. Thrust Measurement of Laser Detonation Thruster with a Pulsed Glass Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Han, Taro; Michigami, Keisuke; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    2011-11-01

    Experimental studies were carried out for measuring the laser propulsion thrust with using of a Q-switched Nd:Glass laser. In the tests, a laser beam with 33 ns FWHM pulse width was focused to generate breakdown in the cone-shaped nozzle of aluminum thrusters which were fixed at the end of a ballistic pendulum. The pulse energy used was 1.0 J and the focusing number is 6.27, which gave the highest energy conversion efficiency from laser energy to that of induced blast wave as found in previous research. The momentum coupling coefficient Cm dependency on nozzle apex angles, 30°, 45° and 60°, were investigated with carefully controlling of the laser ignition positions. Results show that, solid-state laser could be a candidate to suffice laser propulsion missions in term of Cm it can achieve.

  17. Measurement Uncertainty of Microscopic Laser Triangulation on Technical Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Thomas; Poesch, Andreas; Reithmeier, Eduard

    2015-12-01

    Laser triangulation is widely used to measure three-dimensional structure of surfaces. The technique is suitable for macroscopic and microscopic surface measurements. In this paper, the measurement uncertainty of laser triangulation is investigated on technical surfaces for microscopic measurement applications. Properties of technical surfaces are, for example, reflectivity, surface roughness, and the presence of scratches and pores. These properties are more influential in the microscopic laser triangulation than in the macroscopic one. In the Introduction section of this paper, the measurement uncertainty of laser triangulation is experimentally investigated for 13 different specimens. The measurements were carried out with and without a laser speckle reducer. In the Materials and Methods section of this paper, the surfaces of the 13 specimens are characterized in order to be able to find correlations between the surface properties and the measurement uncertainty. The last section of this paper describes simulations of the measurement uncertainty, which allow for the calculation of the measurement uncertainty with only one source of uncertainty present. The considerations in this paper allow for the assessment of the measurement uncertainty of laser triangulation on any technical surface when some surface properties, such as roughness, are known.

  18. Towards Polarization Measurements of Laser-accelerated Helium-3 Ions

    OpenAIRE

    Engin, Ilhan

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of this thesis, preparatory investigations for the spin-polarization measurement of 3He ions from laser-induced plasmas have been performed.Therefore, experiments aiming at an efficient laser-induced ion acceleration out of a 4He gas target were carried out at two high-intensity laser facilities: the Arcturus laser at Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf as well as PHELIX at GSI Darmstadt. The scientific goal of both experiments was to investigate the ion-acceleration proces...

  19. Measuring the Virgo area tilt noise with a laser gyroscope

    CERN Document Server

    Belfi, Jacopo; Bosi, Filippo; Carelli, Giorgio; Di Virgilio, Angela; Maccioni, Enrico; Stefani, Fabio

    2011-01-01

    We report on the measurements of tilt noise performed at the Virgo site with a ring laser gyroscope. The apparatus is a He-Ne laser operating in a square cavity mounted on a vertical plane perpendicular to the north-south arm of the inteferometer. We discuss the possibility of using the ring laser signal to improve the performances of the control system of the Virgo seismic suspensions. The comparison between the ring laser signal and the control signals for the longitudinal translations of the inverted pendulum (IP) shows remarkable coherence in the frequency range 20-200 mHz.

  20. Calorimetric Measurements of Laser Energy and Power - 1977 Supplement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-10-10

    body is in the form of a shallow, slant-bottomed electro - formed copper cup of square cross section. The first absorber is cemented to the bottom of...Actinom- eter for Laser Intensity Measurement in Lasers in Physical Chemistry and Biophysics, J. Joussot- Dubin , Ed. (Elsevier, Amsterdam* 1975). 254. J

  1. Laser scanning dynamic measurement of the curved surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xin; Zheng, Wenxue

    1996-10-01

    A new measurement of the curved surface has been developed. The paper provides an effective, real time and dynamic optical measurement which is suitable for the measurement of airfoil, turbine blade, car and tank's curved surface. The system consists of a laser probe, a charge couple device (CCD), a computer, three servomotors. Consideration is also given to the design of the laser probe and CCD driving circuit.

  2. Laser Measurement Of Convective-Heat-Transfer Coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porro, A. Robert; Hingst, Warren R.; Chriss, Randall M.; Seablom, Kirk D.; Keith, Theo G., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Coefficient of convective transfer of heat at spot on surface of wind-tunnel model computed from measurements acquired by developmental laser-induced-heat-flux technique. Enables non-intrusive measurements of convective-heat-transfer coefficients at many points across surfaces of models in complicated, three-dimensional, high-speed flows. Measurement spot scanned across surface of model. Apparatus includes argon-ion laser, attenuator/beam splitter electronic shutter infrared camera, and subsystem.

  3. A Sodium laser guide star coupling efficiency measurement method

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Feng; Xue, Suijian; Li, Yang-Peng; Jin, Kai; Otarola, Angel; Bo, Yong; Zuo, Jun-Wei; Bian, Qi; Wei, Kai; Hu, Jing-Yao

    2016-01-01

    Large telescope's adaptive optics (AO) system requires one or several bright artificial laser guide stars to improve its sky coverage. The recent advent of high power sodium laser is perfect for such application. However, besides the output power, other parameters of the laser also have significant impact on the brightness of the generated sodium laser guide star mostly in non-linear relationships. When tuning and optimizing these parameters it is necessary to tune based on a laser guide star generation performance metric. Although return photon flux is widely used, variability of atmosphere and sodium layer make it difficult to compare from site to site even within short time period for the same site. A new metric, coupling efficiency is adopted in our field tests. In this paper, we will introduce our method for measuring the coupling efficiency of a 20W class pulse sodium laser for AO application during field tests that were conducted during 2013-2015.

  4. Calibration of Laser Beam Direction for Inner Diameter Measuring Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongyu Yang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The laser triangulation method is one of the most advanced methods for large inner diameter measurement. Our research group proposed a kind of inner diameter measuring device that is principally composed of three laser displacement sensors known to be fixed in the same plane measurement position. It is necessary to calibrate the direction of the laser beams that are emitted by laser displacement sensors because they do not meet the theoretical model accurately. For the purpose of calibrating the direction of laser beams, a calibration method and mathematical model were proposed. The inner diameter measuring device is equipped with the spindle of the machine tool. The laser beams rotate and translate in the plane and constitute the rotary rays which are driven to scan the inner surface of the ring gauge. The direction calibration of the laser beams can be completed by the sensors’ distance information and corresponding data processing method. The corresponding error sources are analyzed and the validity of the method is verified. After the calibration, the measurement error of the inner diameter measuring device reduced from ± 25 μ m to ± 15 μ m and the relative error was not more than 0.011%.

  5. Laser triangulation measurements of scoliotic spine curvatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čelan, Dušan; Jesenšek Papež, Breda; Poredoš, Primož; Možina, Janez

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this research was to develop a new method for differentiating between scoliotic and healthy subjects by analysing the curvatures of their spines in the cranio-caudal view. The study included 247 subjects with physiological curvatures of the spine and 28 subjects with clinically confirmed scoliosis. The curvature of the spine was determined by a computer analysis of the surface of the back, measured with a non-invasive, 3D, laser-triangulation system. The determined spinal curve was represented in the transversal plane, which is perpendicular to the line segment that was defined by the initial point and the end point of the spinal curve. This was achieved using a rotation matrix. The distances between the extreme points in the antero-posterior (AP) and left-right (LR) views were calculated in relation to the length of the spine as well as the quotient of these two values LR/AP. All the measured parameters were compared between the scoliotic and control groups using the Student's t-Test in case of normal data and Kruskal-Wallis test in case of non-normal data. Besides, a comprehensive diagram representing the distances between the extreme points in the AP and LR views was introduced, which clearly demonstrated the direction and the size of the thoracic and lumbar spinal curvatures for each individual subject. While the distances between the extreme points of the spine in the AP view were found to differ only slightly between the groups (p = 0.1), the distances between the LR extreme points were found to be significantly greater in the scoliosis group, compared to the control group (p < 0.001). The quotient LR/AP was statistically significantly different in both groups (p < 0.001). The main innovation of the presented method is the ability to differentiate a scoliotic subject from a healthy subject by assessing the curvature of the spine in the cranio-caudal view. Therefore, the proposed method could be useful for human posture

  6. Ocean state indicators from MyOcean altimeter products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Bessières

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The European MyOcean project (http://www.myocean.eu.org provides observations of the ocean dynamic topography from altimeter measurements. Three specific indicators have been developed, based on altimeter data only, in order to monitor the ocean state. The first ocean indicator observes the positive and negative phases of the ENSO events in the tropical Pacific, the El Niño/La Niña events, since 1992. The second ocean indicator tracks the contracted or extended state of the Kuroshio Extension. The last ocean indicator is dedicated to the Ionian Basin in the Mediterranean Sea and permits separation of "zonal-cyclonic" state (1998–2005 and since 2011 up to now from the "anticyclonic" state (1993–1996 usually discussed in the literature. In addition, it allows identifying a third state in which both the anticyclonic circulation around the northern part of the basin and the strong zonal Mid-Ionian Jet co-exist (2008–2010.

  7. Study on Atmospheric Refraction Delay Correction for Satellite Laser Altimeter System%星载激光测高系统的大气折射延迟改正模型研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李松; 肖建明; 马跃; 周辉; 郭想

    2013-01-01

    星载激光测高仪通过测量从卫星平台发射的激光脉冲在卫星与地面激光脚点之间的渡越时间计算两者之间的距离.由于光束经过大气层时发生的折射,导致卫星激光测高系统典型的与大气延迟相关的测距误差在数米量级.讨论了大气折射延迟修正的理论与方法,分析比较了各种大气折射率模型,以全球首个对地观测星载激光测高仪系统GLAS系统为例,给出了各种折射率模型的计算偏差,发现在常见温度和湿度范围内Owens375模型是一种精度较高的简化折射率模型;计算了GLAS系统高度角偏离天顶方向不超过10°的情况下,使用简单映射函数与CfA2.2映射函数模型的值,发现其差异不超过0.5 mm.%Satellite laser altimetry system(SLR) measures the distance between the satellite and the surface of the earth by figuring out the transit time of laser pulse. The characteristics ranging error is few meters for a SLR because of the atmospheric refraction delay. The theory and method of atmospheric refraction delay correction are discussed. The various models of atmospheric refraction are analyzed and compared. The atmospheric refraction delay based on different models by using GLAS's parameters is calculated. It shows that the model of Owens 375 is with great precise and simplified in most temperature and humidity conditions. The refraction delay corrections in the condition that altitude angle within 10?are calculated by using a simplified mapping function and CfA2. 2, and diffrences between them is only 0. 5 mm.

  8. GPS Survey of the salar de Uyuni, Bolivia, for Satellite Altimeter Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsa, A. A.; Fricker, H. A.; Bills, B. G.; Carabajal, C. C.; Quinn, K.; Minster, J. B.; Schutz, B.

    2002-12-01

    The salar de Uyuni, a 100km x 100km salt flat in the Andean Altiplano of southern Bolivia, is the largest dry lake on Earth. The size, high albedo and remarkable flatness of the salar make it an ideal reference surface for satellite-based altimeters - in particular, the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) to be flown on the Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) - especially with regard to range measurements and waveform analysis of return signals. A simple reference surface such as the salar can be mapped by ground-based surveying, although the sheer size of the area requires adaptations to standard survey techniques. We describe a survey of the salar de Uyuni carried out with car-mounted kinematic GPS over a seven-day period in September 2002. We divided the salar surface into a number of survey grids that were driven in multiple directions to yield redundant measurements and corresponding error statistics at grid crossover points. Adjacent grids were overlapped so we could also determine errors between grids and over multi-day time periods. In addition, we set up five fixed GPS sites on the salar to serve as local survey control in post-processing. These fixed sites will be used to map ionospheric effects and interpolate them to the roving GPS receivers. If successful, this will allow reprocessing of GPS solutions using L1 data only, with a corresponding reduction in noise compared to solutions using the standard ionosphere-free LC combination. We present our surveyed topography of the eastern half of the salar de Uyuni, comparing it to previously-published elevation measurements and to the best geoid model available for the region. We show the close relationship between the topography of the salar and the shape of the geoid, a result we had expected since the salar is flooded each austral summer to an almost uniform depth. We also demonstrate knowledge of the surface height of the salar to within the measurement error specified for the GLAS

  9. Laser alignment measurement model with double beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Changtao; Zhang, Lili; Hou, Xianglin; Wang, Ming; Lv, Jia; Du, Xin; He, Ping

    2012-10-01

    Double LD-Double PSD schedule.employ a symmetric structure and there are a laser and a PSD receiver on each axis. The Double LD-Double PSD is used, and the rectangular coordinate system is set up by use of the relationship of arbitrary two points coordinates, and then the parameter formula is deduced by the knowledge of solid geometry. Using the data acquisition system and the data processing model of laser alignment meter with double laser beam and two detector , basing on the installation parameter of the computer, we can have the state parameter between the two shafts by more complicated calculation and correction. The correcting data of the four under chassis of the adjusted apparatus moving on the level and the vertical plane can be calculated using the computer. This will instruct us to move the apparatus to align the shafts.

  10. Measurement of Laser Weld Temperatures for 3D Model Input.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagel, Daryl; GROSSETETE, GRANT; Maccallum, Danny O.

    2016-10-01

    Laser welding is a key joining process used extensively in the manufacture and assembly of critical components for several weapons systems. Sandia National Laboratories advances the understanding of the laser welding process through coupled experimentation and modeling. This report summarizes the experimental portion of the research program, which focused on measuring temperatures and thermal history of laser welds on steel plates. To increase confidence in measurement accuracy, researchers utilized multiple complementary techniques to acquire temperatures during laser welding. This data serves as input to and validation of 3D laser welding models aimed at predicting microstructure and the formation of defects and their impact on weld-joint reliability, a crucial step in rapid prototyping of weapons components.

  11. 2-Micron Laser Transmitter for Coherent CO2 DIAL Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong

    2009-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) has been recognized as one of the most important greenhouse gases. It is essential for the study of global warming to accurately measure the CO2 concentration in the atmosphere and continuously record its variation. A high repetition rate, highly efficient, Q-switched 2-micron laser system as the transmitter of a coherent differential absorption lidar for CO2 measurement has been developed in NASA Langley Research Center. This laser system is capable of making a vertical profiling of CO2 from ground and column measurement of CO2 from air and space-borne platform. The transmitter is a master-slave laser system. The master laser operates in a single frequency, either on-line or off-line of a selected CO2 absorption line. The slave laser is a Q-switched ring-cavity Ho:YLF laser which is pumped by a Tm:fiber laser. The repetition rate can be adjusted from a few hundred Hz to 10 kHz. The injection seeding success rate is from 99.4% to 99.95%. For 1 kHz operation, the output pulse energy is 5.5mJ with the pulse length of 50 ns. The optical-to-optical efficiency is 39% when the pump power is 14.5W. A Ho:YLF laser operating in the range of 2.05 micrometers can be tuned over several characteristic lines of CO2 absorption. Experimentally, a diode pumped Ho:Tm:YLF laser has been successfully used as the transmitter of coherent differential absorption lidar for the measurement of CO2 with a repetition rate of 5 Hz and pulse energy of 75 mJ. For coherent detection, high repetition rate is required for speckle averaging to obtain highly precise measurements. However, a diode pumped Ho:Tm:YLF laser can not operate in high repetition rate due to the large heat loading and up-conversion. A Tm:fiber laser pumped Ho:YLF laser with low heat loading can operate in high repetition rate. A theoretical model has been established to simulate the performance of Tm:fiber laser pumped Ho:YLF lasers. For continuous wave (CW) operation, high pump intensity with small beam

  12. Investigation of laser-tissue interaction in medicine by means of laser spectroscopic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lademann, Juergen; Weigmann, Hans-Juergen

    1995-01-01

    Toxic and carcinogenic substances were produced during laser application in medicine for the cutting and evaporation of tissue. The laser smoke presents a danger potential for the medical staff and the patients. The laser tissue interaction process was investigated by means of laser spectroscopic measurements which give the possibility of measuring metastable molecular states directly as a prerequisite to understand and to influence fundamental laser tissue interaction processes in order to reduce the amount of harmful chemicals. Highly excited atomic and molecular states and free radicals (CN, OH, C2, CH, CH2) have been detected applying spontaneous and laser induced fluorescence methods. It was found that the formation of harmful substances in the laser plumes can be reduced significantly by optimization of the surrounding gas atmosphere. A high content of oxygen or water in the interaction zone has been found, in agreement with the results of classical and analytical methods, as a suitable way to decrease pollutant emission. The experimental methods and the principal results are applicable not only in laser medicine but in laser material treatment generally.

  13. Pulse-Width Jitter Measurement for Laser Diode Pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Jun-Hua; WANG Yun-Cai

    2006-01-01

    @@ Theoretical analysis and experimental measurement of pulse-width jitter of diode laser pulses are presented. The expression of pulse power spectra with all amplitude jitter, timing jitter and pulse-width jitter is deduced.

  14. Laser metrology in fluid mechanics granulometry, temperature and concentration measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Boutier, Alain

    2013-01-01

    In fluid mechanics, non-intrusive measurements are fundamental in order to improve knowledge of the behavior and main physical phenomena of flows in order to further validate codes.The principles and characteristics of the different techniques available in laser metrology are described in detail in this book.Velocity, temperature and concentration measurements by spectroscopic techniques based on light scattered by molecules are achieved by different techniques: laser-induced fluorescence, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering using lasers and parametric sources, and absorption sp

  15. Peak intensity measurement of relativistic lasers via nonlinear Thomson scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Har-Shemesh, Omri

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of peak laser intensities exceeding $10^{20}\\;\\text{W/cm$^2$}$ is in general a very challenging task. We suggest a simple method to accurately measure such high intensities up to about $10^{23}\\,\\text{W/cm$^2$}$, by colliding a beam of ultrarelativistic electrons with the laser pulse. The method exploits the specific features of the angular distribution of the radiation emitted by ultrarelativistic electrons via nonlinear Thomson scattering. Initial electron energies well within the reach of laser wake-field accelerators are required, allowing in principle for an all-optical setup. Accuracies of the order of 10% are envisaged.

  16. UV laser spectroscopic measurements in jet engine combustion exit flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirley, J.A. (United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Laser diagnostic measurements, which are excited with a narrowband krypton fluoride laser, have been made at the exit of a jet engine combustor. Spectra of Raman scattering and laser induced fluorescence were measured with a 0.5 meter spectrograph equipped with a diode array detector. For these demonstration tests, the combustor was operated at two flow rates including conditions corresponding to the 90 percent power level, with jet fuel and methane. Nitrogen Raman spectra are free of band interference. However, the signal levels are lower than expected. Sources of signal losses are discussed. 27 refs.

  17. Transient Infrared Measurement of Laser Absorption Properties of Porous Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Marynowicz Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The infrared thermography measurements of porous building materials have become more frequent in recent years. Many accompanying techniques for the thermal field generation have been developed, including one based on laser radiation. This work presents a simple optimization technique for estimation of the laser beam absorption for selected porous building materials, namely clinker brick and cement mortar. The transient temperature measurements were performed with the use of infrared camera du...

  18. Forecasting method in multilateration accuracy based on laser tracker measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguado, Sergio; Santolaria, Jorge; Samper, David; José Aguilar, Juan

    2017-02-01

    Multilateration based on a laser tracker (LT) requires the measurement of a set of points from three or more positions. Although the LTs’ angular information is not used, multilateration produces a volume of measurement uncertainty. This paper presents two new coefficients from which to determine whether the measurement of a set of points, before performing the necessary measurements, will improve or worsen the accuracy of the multilateration results, avoiding unnecessary measurement, and reducing the time and economic cost required. The first specific coefficient measurement coefficient (MCLT) is unique for each laser tracker. It determines the relationship between the radial and angular laser tracker measurement noise. Similarly, the second coefficient is related with specific conditions of measurement β. It is related with the spatial angle between the laser tracker positions α and its effect on error reduction. Both parameters MCLT and β are linked in error reduction limits. Beside these, a new methodology to determine the multilateration reduction limit according to the multilateration technique of an ideal laser tracker distribution and a random one are presented. It provides general rules and advice from synthetic tests that are validated through a real test carried out in a coordinate measurement machine.

  19. Using laser to measure stem thickness and cut weed stems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heisel, T.; Schou, Jørgen; Andreasen, C.

    2002-01-01

    Stem thickness of the weed Solanum nigrum and the crop sugarbeet was determined with a He-Ne laser using a novel non-destructive technique measuring stem shadow. Thereafter, the stems were cut close to the soil surface with a CO2 laser. Treatments were carried out on pot plants, grown...... in the greenhouse, at two different growth stages, and plant dry matter was measured 2-5 weeks after treatment. The relationship between plant dry weight and laser energy was analysed using two different non-linear dose-response regression models; one model included stem thickness as a variable, the other did not....... A binary model was also tested. The non-linear model incorporating stem thickness described the data best, indicating that it would be possible to optimize laser cutting by measuring stem thickness before cutting. The general tendency was that more energy was needed the thicker the stem. Energy uses...

  20. Remote sensing of Gulf Stream using GEOS-3 radar altimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitao, C. D.; Huang, N. E.; Parra, C. G.

    1978-01-01

    Radar altimeter measurements from the GEOS-3 satellite to the ocean surface indicated the presence of expected geostrophic height differences across the the Gulf Stream. Dynamic sea surface heights were found by both editing and filtering the raw sea surface heights and then referencing these processed data to a 5 minute x 5 minute geoid. Any trend between the processed data and the geoid was removed by subtracting out a linear fit to the residuals in the open ocean. The mean current velocity of 107 + or - 29 cm/sec calculated from the dynamic heights for all orbits corresponded with velocities obtained from hydrographic methods. Also, dynamic topographic maps were produced for August, September, and October 1975. Results pointed out limitations in the accuracy of the geoid, height anomaly deteriorations due to filtering, and lack of dense time and space distribution of measurements.

  1. Measurements of DSD Second Moment Based on Laser Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, John E.; Jones, Linwood; Kasparis, Takis C.; Metzger, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Using a technique recently developed for estimating the density of surface dust dispersed during a rocket landing, measuring the extinction of a laser passing through rain (or dust in the rocket case) yields an estimate of the 2nd moment of the particle cloud, and rainfall drop size distribution (DSD) in the terrestrial meteorological case. With the exception of disdrometers, instruments that measure rainfall make in direct measurements of the DSD. Most common of these instruments are the rainfall rate gauge measuring the 1 1/3 th moment, (when using a D(exp 2/3) dependency on terminal velocity). Instruments that scatter microwaves off of hydrometeors, such as the WSR-880, vertical wind profilers, and microwave disdrometers, measure the 6th moment of the DSD. By projecting a laser onto a target, changes in brightness of the laser spot against the target background during rain, yield a measurement of the DSD 2nd moment, using the Beer-Lambert law. In order to detect the laser attenuation within the 8-bit resolution of most camera image arrays, a minimum path length is required, depending on the intensity of the rainfall rate. For moderate to heavy rainfall, a laser path length of 100 m is sufficient to measure variations in optical extinction using a digital camera. A photo-detector could replace the camera, for automated installations. In order to spatially correlate the 2nd moment measurements to a collocated disdrometer or tipping bucket, the laser's beam path can be reflected multiple times using mirrors to restrict the spatial extent of the measurement. In cases where a disdrometer is not available, complete DSD estimates can be produced by parametric fitting of DSD model to the 2nd moment data in conjunction with tipping bucket data. In cases where a disdrometer is collocated, the laser extinction technique may yield a significant improvement to insitu disdrometer validation and calibration strategies

  2. Airborne Measurements of Atmospheric Methane Using Pulsed Laser Transmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Kenji; Riris, Haris; Wu, Stewart; Gonzalez, Brayler; Rodriguez, Michael; Hasselbrack, William; Fahey, Molly; Yu, Anthony; Stephen, Mark; Mao, Jianping; Kawa, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric methane (CH4) is the second most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas with approximately 25 times the radiative forcing of carbon dioxide (CO2) per molecule. At NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) we have been developing a laser-based technology needed to remotely measure CH4 from orbit. We report on our development effort for the methane lidar, especially on our laser transmitters and recent airborne demonstration. Our lidar transmitter is based on an optical parametric process to generate near infrared laser radiation at 1651 nanometers, coincident with a CH4 absorption. In an airborne flight campaign in the fall of 2015, we tested two kinds of laser transmitters --- an optical parametric amplifier (OPA) and an optical parametric oscillator (OPO). The output wavelength of the lasers was rapidly tuned over the CH4 absorption by tuning the seed laser to sample the CH4 absorption line at several wavelengths. This approach uses the same Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) technique we have used for our CO2 lidar for ASCENDS. The two laser transmitters were successfully operated in the NASAs DC-8 aircraft, measuring methane from 3 to 13 kilometers with high precision.

  3. Simulation of the satellite radar altimeter sea ice thickness retrieval uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. T. Tonboe

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Although it is well known that radar waves penetrate into snow and sea ice, the exact mechanisms for radar-altimeter scattering and its link to the depth of the effective scattering surface from sea ice are still unknown. Previously proposed mechanisms linked the snow ice interface, i.e. the dominating scattering horizon, directly with the depth of the effective scattering surface. However, simulations using a multilayer radar scattering model show that the effective scattering surface is affected by snow-cover and ice properties. With the coming Cryosat-2 (planned launch 2009 satellite radar altimeter it is proposed that sea ice thickness can be derived by measuring its freeboard. In this study we evaluate the radar altimeter sea ice thickness retrieval uncertainty in terms of floe buoyancy, radar penetration and ice type distribution using both a scattering model and ''Archimedes' principle''. The effect of the snow cover on the floe buoyancy and the radar penetration and on the ice cover spatial and temporal variability is assessed from field campaign measurements in the Arctic and Antarctic. In addition to these well known uncertainties we use high resolution RADARSAT SAR data to simulate errors due to the variability of the effective scattering surface as a result of the sub-footprint spatial backscatter and elevation distribution sometimes called preferential sampling. In particular in areas where ridges represent a significant part of the ice volume (e.g. the Lincoln Sea the simulated altimeter thickness estimate is lower than the real average footprint thickness. This means that the errors are large, yet manageable if the relevant quantities are known a priori. A discussion of the radar altimeter ice thickness retrieval uncertainties concludes the paper.

  4. Simulation of the satellite radar altimeter sea ice thickness retrieval uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonboe, R. T.; Pedersen, L. T.; Haas, C.

    2009-07-01

    Although it is well known that radar waves penetrate into snow and sea ice, the exact mechanisms for radar-altimeter scattering and its link to the depth of the effective scattering surface from sea ice are still unknown. Previously proposed mechanisms linked the snow ice interface, i.e. the dominating scattering horizon, directly with the depth of the effective scattering surface. However, simulations using a multilayer radar scattering model show that the effective scattering surface is affected by snow-cover and ice properties. With the coming Cryosat-2 (planned launch 2009) satellite radar altimeter it is proposed that sea ice thickness can be derived by measuring its freeboard. In this study we evaluate the radar altimeter sea ice thickness retrieval uncertainty in terms of floe buoyancy, radar penetration and ice type distribution using both a scattering model and ''Archimedes' principle''. The effect of the snow cover on the floe buoyancy and the radar penetration and on the ice cover spatial and temporal variability is assessed from field campaign measurements in the Arctic and Antarctic. In addition to these well known uncertainties we use high resolution RADARSAT SAR data to simulate errors due to the variability of the effective scattering surface as a result of the sub-footprint spatial backscatter and elevation distribution sometimes called preferential sampling. In particular in areas where ridges represent a significant part of the ice volume (e.g. the Lincoln Sea) the simulated altimeter thickness estimate is lower than the real average footprint thickness. This means that the errors are large, yet manageable if the relevant quantities are known a priori. A discussion of the radar altimeter ice thickness retrieval uncertainties concludes the paper.

  5. Miniature Laser Doppler Velocimeter for Measuring Wall Shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharib, Morteza; Modarress, Darius; Forouhar, Siamak; Fourguette, Dominique; Taugwalder, Federic; Wilson, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    A miniature optoelectronic instrument has been invented as a nonintrusive means of measuring a velocity gradient proportional to a shear stress in a flow near a wall. The instrument, which can be mounted flush with the wall, is a variant of a basic laser Doppler velocimeter. The laser Doppler probe volume can be located close enough to the wall (as little as 100 micron from the surface) to lie within the viscosity-dominated sublayer of a turbulent boundary layer. The instrument includes a diode laser, the output of which is shaped by a diffractive optical element (DOE) into two beams that have elliptical cross sections with very high aspect ratios.

  6. Measurements of laser-hole boring into overdense plasmas using x-ray laser refractometry (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodama, R.; Takahashi, K.; Tanaka, K.A.; Kato, Y. [Institute of Laser Engineering (ILE), Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565 (Japan); Murai, K. [DMP, ONRI, Ikeda, Osaka 563 (Japan); Weber, F.; Barbee, T.W.; DaSilva, L.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    1999-01-01

    We developed a 19.6 nm laser x-ray laser grid-image refractometer (XRL-GIR) to diagnose laser-hole boring into overdense plasmas. The XRL-GIR was optimized to measure two-dimensional electron density perturbation on a scale of a few tens of {mu}m in underdense plasmas. Electron density profiles of laser-produced plasmas were obtained for 10{sup 20}{endash}10{sup 22}thinspcm{sup {minus}3} with the XRL-GIR and for 10{sup 19}{endash}10{sup 20}thinspcm{sup {minus}3} from an ultraviolet interferometer, the profiles of which were compared with those from hydrodynamic simulation. By using this XRL-GIR, we directly observed laser channeling into overdense plasmas accompanied by a bow shock wave showing a Mach cone ascribed to supersonic propagation of the channel front. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Atom lasers: Production, properties and prospects for precision inertial measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robins, N.P., E-mail: nick.robins@anu.edu.au; Altin, P.A.; Debs, J.E.; Close, J.D.

    2013-08-20

    We review experimental progress on atom lasers out-coupled from Bose–Einstein condensates, and consider the properties of such beams in the context of precision inertial sensing. The atom laser is the matter-wave analogue of the optical laser. Both devices rely on Bose-enhanced scattering to produce a macroscopically populated trapped mode that is output-coupled to produce an intense beam. In both cases, the beams often display highly desirable properties such as low divergence, high spectral flux and a simple spatial mode that make them useful in practical applications, as well as the potential to perform measurements at or below the quantum projection noise limit. Both devices display similar second-order correlations that differ from thermal sources. Because of these properties, atom lasers are a promising source for application to precision inertial measurements.

  8. Novel adaptive laser scanning sensor for reverse engineering measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Ji; Ma Zi; Lin Na; Zhu Quanmin

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a series of new techniques are used to optimize typical laser scanning sensor. The integrated prototype is compared with traditional approach to demonstrate the much improved performance. In the research and development, camera calibration is achieved by extracting characteristic points of the laser plane, so that the calibration efficiency is improved significantly. With feedback control of its intensity, the laser is automatically adjusted for different material. A modified algorithm is presented to improve the accuracy of laser stripe extraction. The fusion of data extracted from left and right camera is completed with re-sampling technique. The scanner is integrated with a robot arm and some other machinery for on-line measurement and inspection, which provides a flexible measurement tool for reverse engineering.

  9. Measurement of fuel spray vaporisation by laser techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, A. J.; Seng, C. A.; Felton, P. G.; Ungut, A.; Chigier, N. A.

    1980-01-01

    Comparison of fuel spray structures in heated and in cold environments is made by using a new laser tomographic technique and laser anemometry. The tomography technique is shown to give accurate and rapid 'point' measurements of droplet sizes and concentrations. Experimental results show acceleration of droplets to the local gas velocity, preferential vaporisation of the smallest droplets and the dispersion of droplets by the turbulence.

  10. Applications of laser based measurements to combustion related fluid dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klingmann, J.

    1998-12-01

    This thesis is concerned with laser based techniques for the measurement of fluid dynamical properties and their application to combusting flow fields or flow fields related to combustion. As an introduction, the theory of turbulent flow and combustion is shortly presented. An overview of laser based measuring techniques is given. Next, seven papers are included. The main topic of papers 1 and 2 is the measurements of swirling pipe flows with sudden axi-symmetric expansions. These flow fields are related to the flow fields of gas turbine combustors. Measurements and computations using commercial software are compared. Papers 3 and 7 deal with a laser Doppler anemometry based method for the measurement of the turbulent dissipation rate and its application to an axi-symmetric free jet, respectively. The measurements rely on two-point measurements with high spatial resolution. Also three-component one-point measurements are used to obtain the triple velocity correlations. Together these measurements are sufficient to present the energy balance, if pressure effects are neglected. Papers 4, 5 and 6 are concerned with the turbulent flame speed under premixed conditions. Papers 4 and 5 present flame speed measurements from a stationary burner using methane and Danish natural gas. Particle image velocimetry and one- and two-point Laser Doppler anemometry is used to measure flame speed and turbulent quantities, including integral length scales. Paper 7 presents measurements of flame speed and turbulence parameters in a spark ignition engine. Here heat release analyses from pressure measurements are combined with one- and two-point laser Doppler anemometry to analyze influence of turbulence on flame propagation 50 refs, 25 figs

  11. Analysis and interpretation of Cassini Titan radar altimeter echoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebker, Howard A.; Gim, Yonggyu; Callahan, Philip; Hensley, Scott; Lorenz, Ralph; Cassini Radar Team

    2009-03-01

    The Cassini spacecraft has acquired 25 radar altimeter elevation profiles along Titan's surface as of April 2008, and we have analyzed 18 of these for which there are currently reconstructed ephemeris data. Altimeter measurements were collected at spatial footprint sizes from 6-60 km along ground tracks of length 400-3600 km. The elevation profiles yield topographic information at this resolution with a statistical height accuracy of 35-50 m and kilometer-scale errors several times greater. The data exhibit significant variations in terrain, from flat regions with little topographic expression to very rugged Titanscapes. The bandwidth of the transmitted waveform admits vertical resolution of the terrain height to 35 m at each observed location on the surface. Variations in antenna pointing and changes in surface statistics cause the range-compressed radar echoes to exhibit strong systematic and time-variable biases of hundreds of meters in delay. It is necessary to correct the received echoes for these changes, and we have derived correction algorithms such that the derived echo profiles are accurate at the 100 m level for off-nadir pointing errors of 0.3° and 0.6°, for leading edge and echo centroid estimators, respectively. The leading edge of the echo yields the elevation of the highest points on the surface, which we take to be the peaks of any terrain variation. The mean value of the echo delay is more representative of the mean elevation, so that the difference of these values gives an estimate of any local mountain heights. Finding locations where these values diverge indicates higher-relief terrain. Elevation features are readily seen in the height profiles. Several of the passes show mountains of several hundred m altitude, spread over 10's or even 100's of km in spatial extent, so that slopes are very small. Large expanses of sub-100 m topography are commonplace on Titan, so it is rather smooth in many locations. Other areas exhibit more relief

  12. Plasma Profile Measurements for Laser Fusion Research with the Nike KrF Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaechul; Weaver, J. L.; Serlin, V.; Obenschain, S. P.

    2015-11-01

    The grid image refractometer of the Nike laser facility (Nike-GIR) has demonstrated the capability of simultaneously measuring electron density (ne) and temperature (Te) profiles of coronal plasma. For laser plasma instability (LPI) research, the first Nike-GIR experiment successfully measured the plasma profiles in density regions up to ne ~ 4 ×1021 cm-3 (22% of the critical density for 248 nm light of Nike) using an ultraviolet probe laser (λp = 263 nm). The probe laser has been recently replaced with a shorter wavelength laser (λp = 213 nm, a 5th harmonic of the Nd:YAG laser) to diagnose a higher density region. The Nike-GIR system is being further extended to measure plasma profiles in the on-going experiment using 135°-separated Nike beam arrays for the cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) studies. We present an overview of the extended Nike-GIR arrangements and a new numerical algorithm to extract self-consistant plasma profiles with the measured quantities. Work supported by DoE/NNSA.

  13. Absolute frequency measurement of unstable lasers with optical frequency combs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beverini, N.; Poli, N.; Sutyrin, D.; Wang, F.-Y.; Schioppo, M.; Tarallo, M. G.; Tino, G. M.

    2010-09-01

    Here we report on absolute frequency measurements of a commercial high power CW diode-pumped solid-state laser (Coherent Verdi-V5). This kind of lasers usually presents large frequency jitter (up to 50 MHz) both in the short term (1 ms time scale) and in the long term (>10 s time scale). A precise measurement of absolute frequency deviations in both temporal scales should require a set of different devices (optical cavities, optical wave-meters), each suited for measurements only at a specific integration time. Here we demonstrate how a frequency comb can be used to overcome this difficulty, allowing in a single step a full characterization of both short ( 103 s) absolute frequency jitter with a resolution better than 1 MHz. We demonstrate in this way the flexibility of optical frequency combs for absolute frequency measurements not only of ultra-stable lasers but also of relatively unstable lasers. The absolute frequency calibration of the Verdi laser that we have obtained have been used in order to improve the accuracy of the measurements of the local gravitational acceleration value with 88Sr atoms trapped in 1D vertical lattices.

  14. Electrical derivative measurement of quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dingkai; Cheng, Liwei; Chen, Xing; Choa, Fow-Sen; Fan, Jenyu; Worchesky, Terry

    2011-02-01

    The electrical derivative characteristics of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are investigated to test the QCL threshold, leakage current, and possibly explore carrier transport. QCL thresholds can be identified by searching for the slope peak of the first derivative of the I-V curves and can be further confirmed with its alignment to the peak of the second derivative of the I-V curves. Leakage current in QCLs with oxide-blocked ridge waveguides and buried heterostructure (BH) waveguides are studied and compared. The oxide-blocking structures provide the lowest leakage current although the capped-mesa-BH (CMBH) QCLs provide the toughest durability under highly stressful operations. The leakage current of CMBH QCLs are also compared at different temperatures.

  15. Diode Laser Velocity Measurements by Modulated Filtered Rayleigh Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, J. J.; Varghese, P. L.; Jagodzinski, J. J.

    1999-01-01

    The ability of solid-state lasers to be tuned in operating frequency at MHz rates by input current modulation, while maintaining a relatively narrow line-width, has made them useful for spectroscopic measurements. Their other advantages include low cost, reliability, durability, compact size, and modest power requirements, making them a good choice for a laser source in micro-gravity experiments in drop-towers and in flight. For their size, they are also very bright. In a filtered Rayleigh scattering (FRS) experiment, a diode laser can be used to scan across an atomic or molecular absorption line, generating large changes in transmission at the resonances for very small changes in frequency. The hyperfine structure components of atomic lines of alkali metal vapors are closely spaced and very strong, which makes such atomic filters excellent candidates for sensitive Doppler shift detection and therefore for high-resolution velocimetry. In the work we describe here we use a Rubidium vapor filter, and work with the strong D(sub 2) transitions at 780 nm that are conveniently accessed by near infrared diode lasers. The low power output of infrared laser diodes is their primary drawback relative to other laser systems commonly used for velocimetry. However, the capability to modulate the laser frequency rapidly and continuously helps mitigate this. Using modulation spectroscopy and a heterodyne detection scheme with a lock-in amplifier, one can extract sub-microvolt signals occurring at a specific frequency from a background that is orders of magnitude stronger. The diode laser modulation is simply achieved by adding a small current modulation to the laser bias current. It may also be swept repetitively in wavelength using an additional lower frequency current ramp.

  16. Measuring the linewidth of a stabilized diode laser

    CERN Document Server

    Muanzuala, Lal; Sylvan, Karthik; Natarajan, Vasant

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a straight-forward technique to measure the linewidth of a grating-stabilized diode laser system---known as an external cavity diode laser (ECDL)---by beating the output of two independent ECDLs in a Michelson interferometer, and then taking the Fourier transform of the beat signal. The measured linewidth is the sum of the linewidths of the two laser systems. Assuming that the two are equal, we find that the linewidth of each ECDL measured over a time period of 2 \\textmu s is about 0.3 MHz. This narrow linewidth shows the advantage of using such systems for high-resolution spectroscopy and other experiments in atomic physics.

  17. Interference comparator for laser diode wavelength and wavelength instability measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobosz, Marek; KoŻuchowski, Mariusz

    2016-04-01

    Method and construction of a setup, which allows measuring the wavelength and wavelength instability of the light emitted by a laser diode (or a laser light source with a limited time coherence in general), is presented. The system is based on Twyman-Green interferometer configuration. Proportions of phases of the tested and reference laser's interference fringe obtained for a set optical path difference are a measure of the unknown wavelength. Optical path difference in interferometer is stabilized. The interferometric comparison is performed in vacuum chamber. The techniques of accurate fringe phase measurements are proposed. The obtained relative standard uncertainty of wavelength evaluation in the tested setup is about 2.5 ṡ 10-8. Uncertainty of wavelength instability measurement is an order of magnitude better. Measurement range of the current setup is from 500 nm to 650 nm. The proposed technique allows high accuracy wavelength measurement of middle or low coherence sources of light. In case of the enlarged and complex frequency distribution of the laser, the evaluated wavelength can act as the length master in interferometer for displacement measurement.

  18. Testing relativity again, laser, laser, laser, laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Einstein, A.

    2015-01-01

    laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser,

  19. Measurements of atmospheric transmittance of CO2 laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aref'ev, V. N.

    1991-02-01

    The field measurement of transmission of 12C1602, 12C1802 and 2 13C160 laser at 62 wavelenghts in the 9.2-11.2.~m spectral range are presented. The measurements were made on a O.2-2.0 km horizontal path using a tunable CO laser. The results were compared with the compu- 2 ted molecular absorptions. Mather a good agreement has been found. Under sufficient visibility (disregarding aerozol attenuation ) atmospheric water vapour is the main extinction component within 10-13 tm and in the range of 8-10 im other small constituents are important.

  20. Damage detection technique by measuring laser-based mechanical impedance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyeonseok; Sohn, Hoon [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (Daehak-ro 291, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701) (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-18

    This study proposes a method for measurement of mechanical impedance using noncontact laser ultrasound. The measurement of mechanical impedance has been of great interest in nondestructive testing (NDT) or structural health monitoring (SHM) since mechanical impedance is sensitive even to small-sized structural defects. Conventional impedance measurements, however, have been based on electromechanical impedance (EMI) using contact-type piezoelectric transducers, which show deteriorated performances induced by the effects of a) Curie temperature limitations, b) electromagnetic interference (EMI), c) bonding layers and etc. This study aims to tackle the limitations of conventional EMI measurement by utilizing laser-based mechanical impedance (LMI) measurement. The LMI response, which is equivalent to a steady-state ultrasound response, is generated by shooting the pulse laser beam to the target structure, and is acquired by measuring the out-of-plane velocity using a laser vibrometer. The formation of the LMI response is observed through the thermo-mechanical finite element analysis. The feasibility of applying the LMI technique for damage detection is experimentally verified using a pipe specimen under high temperature environment.

  1. Measurement uncertainty analysis on laser tracker combined with articulated CMM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hui-ning; Yu, Lian-dong; Du, Yun; Zhang, Hai-yan

    2013-10-01

    The combined measurement technology plays an increasingly important role in the digitalized assembly. This paper introduces a combined measurement system consists of a Laser tracker and a FACMM,with the applications in the inspection of the position of the inner parts in a large-scale device. When these measurement instruments are combined, the resulting coordinate data set contains uncertainties that are a function of the base data sets and complex interactions between the measurement sets. Combined with the characteristics of Laser Tracker and Flexible Articulated Coordinate Measuring Machine (FACMM),Monte-Claro simulation mothed is employed in the uncertainty evaluation of combined measurement systems. A case study is given to demonstrate the practical applications of this research.

  2. Fiber Laser for Wind Speed Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Sig

    This PhD thesis evaluates the practical construction and use of a Frequency Stepped Pulse Train modulated coherent Doppler wind lidar (FSPT lidar) for wind speed measurement. The concept of Doppler lidar is introduced as a means to measure line of sight wind speed by the Doppler shift of reflected...... of concept wind speed measurements obtained with the FSPT lidar are shown. This is followed by a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of a FSPT lidar compared to a CW and a pulsed lidar system, and further avenues for evolving the concepts....

  3. Fiber Laser for Wind Speed Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Sig

    This PhD thesis evaluates the practical construction and use of a Frequency Stepped Pulse Train modulated coherent Doppler wind lidar (FSPT lidar) for wind speed measurement. The concept of Doppler lidar is introduced as a means to measure line of sight wind speed by the Doppler shift of reflected...... light from aerosols. Central concepts are introduced and developed, i.a. heterodyne detection, carrier-to-noise ratio, probe length, measuring distance, and velocity precision. On this basis the concepts of a FSPT lidar are introduced and its general setup explained. The Lightwave Synthesized Frequency...... Sweeper (LSFS) is introduced and analyzed as a light source for the FSPT lidar. The setup of the LSFS is discussed, and the necessary concepts for modeling and analyzing LSFS noise are developed. The model and measurements are then used to discuss the growth of optical noise in the LSFS and the impact...

  4. The laser measurement technology of combustion flow field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingdong; Wang, Guangyu; Qu, Dongsheng

    2014-07-01

    The parameters of combustion flow field such as temperature, velocity, pressure and mole-fraction are of significant value in engineering application. The laser spectroscopy technology which has the non-contact and non- interference properties has become the most important method and it has more advantages than conventionally contacting measurement. Planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF/LIF) is provided with high sensibility and resolution. Filtered Rayleigh scattering (FRS) is a good measurement method for complex flow field .Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) is prosperity on development and application. This article introduced the theoretical foundation, technical principle, system structure, merits and shortages. It is helpful for researchers to know about the latest development tendency and do the related research.

  5. Oxygen measurement by multimode diode lasers employing gas correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Xiutao; Somesfalean, Gabriel; Chen, Bin; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2009-02-10

    Multimode diode laser (MDL)-based correlation spectroscopy (COSPEC) was used to measure oxygen in ambient air, thereby employing a diode laser (DL) having an emission spectrum that overlaps the oxygen absorption lines of the A band. A sensitivity of 700 ppm m was achieved with good accuracy (2%) and linearity (R(2)=0.999). For comparison, measurements of ambient oxygen were also performed by tunable DL absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) technique employing a vertical cavity surface emitting laser. We demonstrate that, despite slightly degraded sensitivity, the MDL-based COSPEC-based oxygen sensor has the advantages of high stability, low cost, ease-of-use, and relaxed requirements in component selection and instrument buildup compared with the TDLAS-based instrument.

  6. Torsional and Bending Vibration Measurement on Rotors Using Laser Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    MILES, T. J.; LUCAS, M.; HALLIWELL, N. A.; ROTHBERG, S. J.

    1999-09-01

    Based on the principles of laser Doppler velocimetry, the laser torsional vibrometer (LTV) was developed for non-contact measurement of torsional oscillation of rotating shafts, offering significant advantages over conventional techniques. This paper describes comprehensive theory to account for the sensitivity of the LTV's measurements to shaft motion in all degrees of freedom. The optical geometry of the LTV offers inherent immunity to translational motion of the target shaft, either axial or radial. However, its measurements are sensitive to angular lateral vibration of the shaft. The significance of this sensitivity is compared with the instrument noise floor and typical torsional and lateral vibration levels. Optimum alignments of the instrument are then specified to ensure effective immunity to all lateral motion in typical applications. To overcome this problem more reliably, a new technique is proposed permitting unambiguous measurement of pure torsional vibration in situations where use of a single LTV demonstrates unacceptable sensitivity to angular lateral vibrations. Practical application of this technology is demonstrated with torsional vibration measurements from a diesel engine crankshaft. Simultaneously, previously unattained measurements of shaft bending vibration measurements are made. The first bending mode of the crankshaft was identified and its vibration amplitude and damping estimated. This application of laser vibrometry for non-contact measurements of shaft vibration represents a further step forward in the use of this technology for machinery diagnostics.

  7. Assessment of NASA Airborne Laser Altimetry Data Using Ground-Based GPS Data near Summit Station, Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunt, Kelly M.; Hawley, Robert L.; Lutz, Eric R.; Studinger, Michael; Sonntag, John G.; Hofton, Michelle A.; Andrews, Lauren C.; Neumann, Thomas A.

    2017-01-01

    A series of NASA airborne lidars have been used in support of satellite laser altimetry missions. These airbornelaser altimeters have been deployed for satellite instrument development, for spaceborne data validation, and to bridge the data gap between satellite missions. We used data from ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS) surveys of an 11 km long track near Summit Station, Greenland, to assess the surface elevation bias and measurement precision of three airborne laser altimeters including the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), the Land, Vegetation, and Ice Sensor (LVIS), and the Multiple Altimeter Beam Experimental Lidar (MABEL). Ground-based GPS data from the monthly ground-based traverses, which commenced in 2006, allowed for the assessment of nine airborne lidar surveys associated with ATM and LVIS between 2007 and 2016. Surface elevation biases for these altimeters over the flat, ice-sheet interior are less than 0.12 m, while assessments of measurement precision are 0.09 m or better. Ground-based GPS positions determined both with and without differential post-processing techniques provided internally consistent solutions. Results from the analyses of ground-based and airborne data provide validation strategy guidance for the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite 2 (ICESat-2) elevation and elevation-change data products.

  8. Validation of Chinese HY-2 satellite radar altimeter significant wave height

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Xiaomin; LIN Mingsen; XU Ying

    2015-01-01

    Chinese Haiyang-2(HY-2) satellite is the first Chinese marine dynamic environment satellite. The dual-frequency (Ku and C band) radar altimeter onboard HY-2 has been working effective to provide operational significant wave height (SWH) for more than three years (October 1, 2011 to present).We validated along-track Ku-band SWH data of HY-2 satellite against National Data Buoy Center (NDBC)in-situ measurements over a time period of three years from October 1, 2011 to September 30, 2014, the root mean square error (RMSE) and mean bias of HY-2 SWH is 0.38 m and (–0.13±0.35) m, respectively. We also did cross validation against Jason-2 altimeter SWH data,the RMSE and the mean bias is 0.36m and (–0.22±0.28) m, respectively. In order to compare the statistical results between HY-2 and Jason-2 satellite SWH data, we validated the Jason-2 satellite radar altimeter along-track Ku-band SWH data against NDBC measurements using the same method. The results demonstrate the validation method in this study is scientific and the RMSE and mean bias of Jason-2 SWH data is 0.26 m and (0.00±0.26) m, respectively. We also validated both HY-2 and Jason-2 SWH data every month, the mean bias of Jason-2 SWH data almost equaled to zero all the time, while the mean bias of HY-2 SWH data was no less than –0.31m before April 2013 and dropped to zero after that time. These results indicate that the statistical results for HY-2 altimeter SWH are reliable and HY-2 altimeter along-track SWH data were steady and of high quality in the last three years. The results also indicate that HY-2 SWH data have greatly been improved and have the same accuracy with Jason-2 SWH data after April, 2013. SWH data provided by HY-2 satellite radar altimeter are useful and acceptable for ocean operational applications.

  9. Measurement of gas flow velocities by laser-induced gratings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemmerling, B.; Stampanoni-Panariello, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Kozlov, A.D.N. [General Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1999-08-01

    Time resolved light scattering from laser-induced electrostrictive gratings was used for the determination of flow velocities in air at room temperature. By measuring the velocity profile across the width of a slit nozzle we demonstrated the high spatial resolution (about 200 mm) of this novel technique. (author) 3 figs., 1 ref.

  10. Frequency swept fibre laser for wind speed measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier

    This PhD thesis builds around a light source forming the basis for a novel type of wind measuring lidar. The lidar emits a train of laser pulses with each pulse being separated from its neighbours in frequency, while being closely spaced in time, thus combining the advantages of conventional cont...

  11. Laser phase-detector and counter for fine displacement measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Row, R. T.; Wang, C. P.

    A simple technique for the measurement of fine displacement has been developed. With use of an HeNe laser, an optical phase-detector, and counter, a displacement accuracy of 300 nm has been demonstrated over a range of 2 cm.

  12. Measuring of the maximum measurable velocity for dual-frequency laser interferometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiping Zhang; Zhaogu Cheng; Zhaoyu Qin; Jianqiang Zhu

    2007-01-01

    There is an increasing demand on the measurable velocity of laser interferometer in manufacturing technologies. The maximum measurable velocity is limited by frequency difference of laser source, optical configuration, and electronics bandwidth. An experimental setup based on free falling movement has been demonstrated to measure the maximum easurable velocity for interferometers. Measurement results show that the maximum measurable velocity is less than its theoretical value. Moreover, the effect of kinds of factors upon the measurement results is analyzed, and the results can offer a reference for industrial applications.

  13. Laser application on haptics: Tactile stiffness measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalise, L.; Memeo, M.; Cannella, F.; Valente, M.; Caldwell, D. G.; Tomasini, E. P.

    2012-06-01

    There is a great interest in exploring the proprieties of the sense of the touch, its detailed knowledge in fact is a key issue in the area of robotics, haptics and human-machine interaction. In this paper, the authors focus their attention on a novel measurement method for the assessment of the tactile stiffness based on a original test rig; tactile stiffness is defined as the ratio between force, exerted by the finger, and the displacement of the finger tip operated during the test. To reach this scope, the paper describes a specific experimental test-rig used for the evaluation of subject tactile sensitivity, where finger force applied during tests as well as displacement and velocity of displacement, operated by the subject under investigation, are measured. Results show that tactile stiffness is linear respect to stimuli spatial difference (which is proportional to the difficulty to detect the variation of them). In particular, it has been possible to relate the force and displacement measured during the tests. The relationship between the response of the subject to the grating, velocity and force is determined. These results permit to carry out the further experimental tests on the same subject avoiding the use of a load cell and therefore simplifying the measurement test rig and data post-processing. Indeed, the first aspect (use of a load cell) can be relevant, because the grating positions are different, requiring a specific re-calibration and setting before each trial; while the second aspect allows simplify the test rig complexity and the processing algorithm.

  14. Near-nadir microwave specular returns from the sea surface - Altimeter algorithms for wind and wind stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jin

    1992-01-01

    Two approaches have been adopted to construct altimeter wind algorithms: one is based on the mean-square sea surface slope, and the other is based on the Seasat scatterometer wind. Both types of algorithms are critically reviewed with respect to the mechanism governing near-nadir sea returns and the comparison between altimeter and buoy winds. A new algorithm is proposed; it is deduced on the basis of microwave specular reflection and is finely tuned with buoy-measured winds. On the basis of this algorithm and the formula of the wind-stress coefficient, a simple wind-stress algorithm is also proposed.

  15. CW Yb:YAG LASER FOR PORTABLE MEASURING SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Ivashko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical and experimental results of longitudinally continuous-wave diode-pumped Yb:Y3Al5O12 (YAG laser performance for compact field-condition measuring systems were demonstrated. Optimization of laser setup in terms of operation condition in the range of -40 ˚С – +65 ˚С without active thermal stabilization was carried out. Using Yb (10 ат.%:YAG crystal with the length of 3 mm the maximal output power more than 2 W was obtained in the whole of temperature range.

  16. Diffraction effects in length measurements by laser interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasso, C P; Massa, E; Mana, G

    2016-03-21

    High-accuracy dimensional measurements by laser interferometers require corrections because of diffraction, which makes the effective fringe-period different from the wavelength of a plane (or spherical) wave λ0. By using a combined X-ray and optical interferometer as a tool to investigate diffraction across a laser beam, we observed wavelength variations as large as 10-8λ0. We show that they originate from the wavefront evolution under paraxial propagation in the presence of wavefront- and intensity-profile perturbations.

  17. Diffraction effects in length measurements by laser interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Sasso, Carlo Paolo; Mana, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    High-accuracy dimensional measurements by laser interferometers require corrections because of diffraction, which makes the effective fringe-period different from the wavelength of a plane (or spherical) wave $\\lambda_0$. By using a combined X-ray and optical interferometer as a tool to investigate diffraction across a laser beam, we observed wavelength variations as large as $10^{-8}\\lambda_0$. We show that they originate from the wavefront evolution under paraxial propagation in the presence of wavefront- and intensity-profile perturbations.

  18. Error analysis for a laser differential confocal radius measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Qiu, Lirong; Zhao, Weiqian; Xiao, Yang; Wang, Zhongyu

    2015-02-10

    In order to further improve the measurement accuracy of the laser differential confocal radius measurement system (DCRMS) developed previously, a DCRMS error compensation model is established for the error sources, including laser source offset, test sphere position adjustment offset, test sphere figure, and motion error, based on analyzing the influences of these errors on the measurement accuracy of radius of curvature. Theoretical analyses and experiments indicate that the expanded uncertainty of the DCRMS is reduced to U=0.13  μm+0.9  ppm·R (k=2) through the error compensation model. The error analysis and compensation model established in this study can provide the theoretical foundation for improving the measurement accuracy of the DCRMS.

  19. Emittance Measurements from a Laser Driven Electron Injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, David A

    2003-07-28

    The Gun Test Facility (GTF) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center was constructed to develop an appropriate electron beam suitable for driving a short wavelength free electron laser (FEL) such as the proposed Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). For operation at a wavelength of 1.5 {angstrom}, the LCLS requires an electron injector that can produce an electron beam with approximately 1 {pi} mm-mrad normalized rms emittance with at least 1 nC of charge in a 10 ps or shorter bunch. The GTF consists of a photocathode rf gun, emittance-compensation solenoid, 3 m linear accelerator (linac), drive laser, and diagnostics to measure the beam. The rf gun is a symmetrized 1.6 cell, s-band high gradient, room temperature, photocathode structure. Simulations show that this gun when driven by a temporally and spatially shaped drive laser, appropriately focused with the solenoid, and further accelerated in linac can produce a beam that meets the LCLS requirements. This thesis describes the initial characterization of the laser and electron beam at the GTF. A convolved measurement of the relative timing between the laser and the rf phase in the gun shows that the jitter is less than 2.5 ps rms. Emittance measurements of the electron beam at 35 MeV are reported as a function of the (Gaussian) pulse length and transverse profile of the laser as well as the charge of the electron beam at constant phase and gradient in both the gun and linac. At 1 nC the emittance was found to be {approx} 13 {pi} mm-mrad for 5 ps and 8 ps long laser pulses. At 0.5 nC the measured emittance decreased approximately 20% in the 5 ps case and 40% in the 8 ps case. These measurements are between 40-80% higher than simulations for similar experimental conditions. In addition, the thermal emittance of the electron beam was measured to be 0.5 {pi} mm-mrad.

  20. Laser Plasma Instability (LPI) Driven Light Scattering Measurements with Nike KrF Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, J.; Weaver, J. L.; Kehne, D. M.; Obenschain, S. P.; McLean, E. A.; Lehmberg, R. H.

    2008-11-01

    With the short wavelength (248 nm), large bandwidth (1˜2 THz), and ISI beam smoothing, Nike KrF laser is expected to have higher LPI thresholds than observed at other laser facilities. Previous measurements using the Nike laser [J. L. Weaver et al, Phys. Plasmas 14, 056316 (2007)] showed no LPI evidence from CH targets up to I˜2x10^15 W/cm^2. For further experiments to detect LPI excitation, Nike capabilities have been extended to achieve higher laser intensities by tighter beam focusing and higher power pulses. This talk will present results of a recent LPI experiment with the extended Nike capabilities focusing on light emission data in spectral ranges relevant to the Raman (SRS) and Two-Plasmon Decay (TPD) instabilities. The primary diagnostics were time-resolved spectrometers with an absolute-intensity-calibrated photodiode array in (0.4˜0.8)φ0 and a streak camera near 0.5φ0. The measurements were conducted at laser intensities of 10^15˜10^16 W/cm^2 on planar targets of CH solids and RF foams.

  1. Measurement of Heat Propagation in a Laser Produced Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregori, G; Glenzer, S H; Knight, J; Niemann, C; Price, D; Froula, D H; Edwards, J; Town, R P J; Brantov, A; Bychenkov, V Y; Rozmus, W

    2003-08-22

    We present the observation of a nonlocal heat wave by measuring spatially and temporally resolved electron temperature profiles in a laser produced nitrogen plasma. Absolutely calibrated measurements have been performed by resolving the ion-acoustic wave spectra across the plasma volume with Thomson scattering. We find that the experimental electron temperature profiles disagree with flux-limited models, but are consistent with transport models that account for the nonlocal effects in heat conduction by fast electrons.

  2. Differential interferometer for measurement of displacement of laser resonator mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macúchová, Karolina; Němcová, Šárka; Hošek, Jan

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers a description and a technique of a possible optical method of mode locking within a laser resonator. The measurement system is a part of instrumentation of laser-based experiment OSQAR at CERN. The OSQAR experiment aims at search of axions, axion-like particles and measuring of ultra-fine vacuum magnetic birefringence. It uses a laser resonator to enhance the coupling constant of hypothetical photon-to-axion conversion. The developed locking-in technique is based on differential interferometry. Signal obtained from the measurement provide crucial information for adaptive control of the locking-in of the resonator in real time. In this paper we propose several optical setups used for measurement and analysis of mutual position of the resonator mirrors. We have set up a differential interferometer under our laboratory conditions. We have done measurements with hemi-spherical cavity resonator detuned with piezo crystals. The measurement was set up in a single plane. Laser light was directed through half-wave retarder to a polarizing beam splitter and then converted to circular polarization by lambda/4 plates. After reflection at the mirrors, the beam is recombined in a beam splitter, sent to analyser and non-polarizing beam splitter and then inspected by two detectors with mutually perpendicular polarizers. The 90 degrees phase shift between the two arms allows precise analysis of a mutual distance change of the mirrors. Because our setup was sufficiently stable, we were able to measure the piezo constant and piezo hysteresis. The final goal is to adapt the first prototype to 23 m resonator and measure the displacement in two planes.

  3. Material measurement method based on femtosecond laser plasma shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Dong; Li, Zhongming

    2017-03-01

    The acoustic emission signal of laser plasma shock wave, which comes into being when femtosecond laser ablates pure Cu, Fe, and Al target material, has been detected by using the fiber Fabry-Perot (F-P) acoustic emission sensing probe. The spectrum characters of the acoustic emission signals for three kinds of materials have been analyzed and studied by using Fourier transform. The results show that the frequencies of the acoustic emission signals detected from the three kinds of materials are different. Meanwhile, the frequencies are almost identical for the same materials under different ablation energies and detection ranges. Certainly, the amplitudes of the spectral character of the three materials show a fixed pattern. The experimental results and methods suggest a potential application of the plasma shock wave on-line measurement based on the femtosecond laser ablating target by using the fiber F-P acoustic emission sensor probe.

  4. Thrust Measurements in Ballistic Pendulum Ablative Laser Propulsion Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazolin, H.; Rodrigues, N. A. S.; Minucci, M. A. S.

    2008-04-01

    This paper describes a setup for thrust measurement in ablative laser propulsion experiments, based on a simple ballistic pendulum associated to an imaging system, which is being assembled at IEAv. A light aluminium pendulum holding samples is placed inside a 100 liters vacuum chamber with two optical windows: the first (in ZnSe) for the laser beam and the second (in fused quartz) for the pendulum visualization. A TEA-CO2 laser beam is focused to the samples providing ablation and transferring linear moment to the pendulum as a whole. A CCD video camera captures the oscillatory movement of the pendulum and the its trajectory is obtained by image processing. By fitting the trajectory of the pendulum to a dumped sinusoidal curve is possible to obtain the amplitude of the movement which is directly related to the momentum transfered to the sample.

  5. Measurement of dynamic characteristics of metal sheet under laser shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongbing Yao; Zhusheng Zhou; Bo Xing; Guilin Ding; Yanqun Tong; Jie Ping; Liangwan Li; Yongkang Zhang

    2012-01-01

    A new approach is developed to measure the dynamic characteristics of metal sheet under laser shock,including deformation velocity,strain,and strain rate.The detecting laser beam is partially shaded by the target deformation induced by the laser action.A photodiode transforms the received beam intensity real time into an electrical signal which could record the process of the target deformation.The functional relation between the electrical signal and the deformation of the metal sheet is derived.The deformation curve of a thin aluminum and the velocity curve of its deformation are also obtained during the experiment.The results indicate that the average velocity of the elastic deformation of the target can reach 2.999×103 m/s in the central area.This new method provides an approach in the study of the effect of strain rate on deformation.

  6. Measuring Ganymede's tidal deformation by laser altimetry: application to the GALA Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbrügge, Gregor; Hussmann, Hauke; Stark, Alexander; Oberst, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    Measurements of Ganymede's induced magnetic field suggest a salty water layer under the icy crust (Kivelson et al. 2002), in agreement with thermal models based on heat transfer and energy balance equations (e.g., Spohn and Schubert, 2003). Due to the small density contrast between ice-I and liquid water, interior structure models (e.g. Sohl et al. 2003) consistent with Ganymede's moment of inertia and total mass cannot constrain the ice thickness or ocean depth. In order to reduce the ambiguity of the structural models and to constrain the ice thickness, it has been proposed to measure the dynamic response of Ganymede's ice shell to tidal forces exerted by Jupiter characterized by the Love numbers h2 and k2. Similar strategies have been investigated in application to Europa (Wu 2001, Wahr 2006, Hussmann 2011). The body tide Love number h2 depends on the tidal frequency (main tidal cycle is the 7.15 days period of revolution), the internal structure, and the rheology, in particular on the presence of fluid layers, and the thickness and rigidity of an overlaying ice shell. Combined with measurements of the Love number k2, which can be inferred from radio science experiments, and a simultaneous determination of linear combinations of h2 and k2 the obtained data would significantly reduce the ambiguity in structural models (Wahr et al. 2006). A way to determine tidal effects in Ganymede's topography and therefore the h2 value by a spacecraft in orbit is the crossover method: Different orbit tracks will intersect at certain surface locations at different times so that the tidal signal can be extracted from a differential altimetry measurement. The Ganymede Laser Altimeter GALA is one of the instruments selected for the Jupiter Icy Moon Explorer (JUICE). The GALA instrument will perform globally distributed altitude measurements from a low circular orbit. The main challenges for the determination of the tidal amplitude are Ganymede's high surface roughness and low

  7. X-ray Measurements of Laser Irradiated Foam Filled Liners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patankar, Siddharth; Mariscal, Derek; Goyon, Clement; Baker, Kevin; MacLaren, Stephan; Hammer, Jim; Baumann, Ted; Amendt, Peter; Menapace, Joseph; Berger, Bob; Afeyan, Bedros; Tabak, Max; Dixit, Sham; Kim, Sung Ho; Moody, John; Jones, Ogden

    2016-10-01

    Low-density foam liners are being investigated as sources of efficient x-rays. Understanding the laser-foam interaction is key to modeling and optimizing foam composition and density for x-ray production with reduced backscatter. We report on the experimental results of laser-irradiated foam liners filled with SiO2 and Ta2O5 foams at densities between 2 to 30mg/cc. The foam liners consist of polyimide tubes filled with low-density foams and sealed with a gold foil at one end. The open end of the tube is driven with 250J of 527nm laser light in a 2ns 2-step pulse using the Jupiter Laser Facility at LLNL. A full aperture backscatter system is used to diagnose the coupled energy and losses. A streaked x-ray camera and filtered x-ray pinhole cameras are used to measure laser penetration into the low-density foam for different mass densities. A HOPG crystal spectrometer is used to estimate a thermal electron temperature. Comparisons with beam propagation and x-ray emission simulations are presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, with funding support from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program under project 15.

  8. Crack Offset Measurement With the Projected Laser Target Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The device and associated analysis methodology summarized in this report were developed for the purpose of estimating the size of discontinuities in the surface of the foam that covers the Space Shuttle External Tank. These surface offsets are thought to be due to subsurface cracks in the foam insulation. The mathematical analysis and procedure described here provide a method to quantity the dimensions of the crack offset in a direction perpendicular to the surface, making use of the projected laser target device (PLTD) tool and a laser line projector. The keys to the construction and use of the PLTD are the following geometrical design requirements: Laser dots are on a square grid: length on a side. Laser beams are perpendicular to projected surface. Beams are parallel out to the distance being projected. The PLTD can be used to (1) calibrate fixed cameras of unknown magnification and orientation (far-field solution); (2) provide equivalent calibration to multiple cameras, previously achieved only by the use of known target points, for example, in 3.D foreign-object debris tracking on a fixed launch platform; (3) compute scaling for conventional 2.D images, and depth of field for 3.D images (near-field solution); and (4) in conjunction with a laser line projector, achieve accurate measurements of surface discontinuity (cracks) in a direction perpendicular to the surface.

  9. Atomic-resolution measurements with a new tunable diode laser-based interferometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silver, R.M.; Zou, H.; Gonda, S.;

    2004-01-01

    We develop a new implementation of a Michelson interferometer designed to make measurements with an uncertainty of less than 20 pm. This new method uses a tunable diode laser as the light source, with the diode laser wavelength continuously tuned to fix the number of fringes in the measured optical...... laser Michelson interferometer....... path. The diode laser frequency is measured by beating against a reference laser. High-speed, accurate frequency measurements of the beat frequency signal enables the diode laser wavelength to be measured with nominally 20-pm accuracy for the measurements described. The new interferometer design...

  10. Research and development of the laser tracker measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z. L.; Zhou, W. H.; Lao, D. B.; Yuan, J.; Dong, D. F. F.; Ji, R. Y. Y.

    2013-01-01

    The working principle and system design of the laser tracker measurement system are introduced, as well as the key technologies and solutions in the implementation of the system. The design and implementation of the hardware and configuration of the software are mainly researched. The components of the hardware include distance measuring unit, angle measuring unit, tracking and servo control unit and electronic control unit. The distance measuring devices include the relative distance measuring device (IFM) and the absolute distance measuring device (ADM). The main component of the angle measuring device, the precision rotating stage, is mainly comprised of the precision axis and the encoders which are both set in the tracking head. The data processing unit, tracking and control unit and power supply unit are all set in the control box. The software module is comprised of the communication module, calibration and error compensation module, data analysis module, database management module, 3D display module and the man-machine interface module. The prototype of the laser tracker system has been accomplished and experiments have been carried out to verify the proposed strategies of the hardware and software modules. The experiments showed that the IFM distance measuring error is within 0.15mm, the ADM distance measuring error is within 3.5mm and the angle measuring error is within 3〞which demonstrates that the preliminary prototype can realize fundamental measurement tasks.

  11. Ocean topography mapping, improvement of the marine geoid, and global permanent ocean circulation studies from TOPEX/Poseidon altimeter data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, James G.; Lerch, F. J.; Koblinsky, C. J.; Nerem, R. S.; Klosko, S. M.; Williamson, R. G.

    1991-01-01

    The TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter measurements will be the first global observations of the sea surface with accuracy sufficient to make quantitative determinations of the ocean's general circulation and its variations. These measurements are an important step to understanding global change in the ocean and its impact on the climate. Our investigation will focus on the examination of features in the sea surface elevation at the largest spatial and temporal scales. TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter measurements will be used in conjunction with observations from past satellite-altimeter missions, such as NASA's GEOS-3 and Seasat, the U.S. Navy's Geosat and SALT, and the European Remote Sensing satellite in order to address the following issues: (1) Improve models of the marine geoid, especially at wavelengths needed to understand the basin-scale ocean dynamic topograpy. (2) Measure directly from the altimeter data the expression of the mean global ocean circulation in the sea surface at the largest scales through a simultaneous solution for gravity, orbital, and oceanographic parameters. (3) Examine the sea surface measurements for changes in global ocean mass or volume, interannual variations in the basin-scale ocean circulation, and annual changes in the heating and cooling of the upper ocean.

  12. Angular vibration measurement using grating and laser interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Peng, Jun

    2006-06-01

    Primary angular acceleration calibration standard is developed by CIMM to generate standard rotational angle, angular velocity and angular acceleration, which are traceable to the International System of Units (SI). It can be used to calibrate angular transducers, i.e. angular accelerometer, angular velocity transducer, and rotational angle transducer to obtain amplitude sensitivity and phase shift by sinusoidal vibration. The measurement systems based on grating and laser interferometers are introduced in this paper. The measurement system based on PXI bus instrument is used to control the angular exciter, measure the output signal of the laser interferometers and the transducer to be calibrated synchronously. The methods for calculating the amplitude and phase of sinusoidal angular movement are investigated and high performance has been achieved. It shows the standard can be used in angular movement calibration in the frequency range from 0.1Hz to 200Hz.

  13. Spectrum standardization for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zhe; West, Logan; Li, Zheng; Ni, Weidou

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a spectra normalization method for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) measurements by converting the recorded characteristic line intensity at varying conditions to the intensity under a standard condition with standard plasma temperature, degree of ionization, and total number density of the interested species to reduce the measurement uncertainty. The characteristic line intensities of the interested species are first converted to the intensity at a fixed temperature and standard degree of ionization but varying total number density for each laser pulse analysis. Under this state, if the influence of the variation of plasma morphology is neglected, the sum of multiple spectral line intensities for the measured element can be regarded proportional to the total number density of the specific element, and the fluctuation of the total number density, or the variation of ablation mass, was compensated for by the application of this relationship. In the experiments with 29 brass alloy...

  14. Measurement of Irradiated Pyroprocessing Samples via Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phongikaroon, Supathorn [Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond, VA (United States)

    2016-10-31

    The primary objective of this research is to develop an applied technology and provide an assessment to remotely measure and analyze the real time or near real time concentrations of used nuclear fuel (UNF) dissolute in electrorefiners. Here, Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), in UNF pyroprocessing facilities will be investigated. LIBS is an elemental analysis method, which is based on the emission from plasma generated by focusing a laser beam into the medium. This technology has been reported to be applicable in the media of solids, liquids (includes molten metals), and gases for detecting elements of special nuclear materials. The advantages of applying the technology for pyroprocessing facilities are: (i) Rapid real-time elemental analysis|one measurement/laser pulse, or average spectra from multiple laser pulses for greater accuracy in < 2 minutes; (ii) Direct detection of elements and impurities in the system with low detection limits|element specific, ranging from 2-1000 ppm for most elements; and (iii) Near non-destructive elemental analysis method (about 1 g material). One important challenge to overcome is achieving high-resolution spectral analysis to quantitatively analyze all important fission products and actinides. Another important challenge is related to accessibility of molten salt, which is heated in a heavily insulated, remotely operated furnace in a high radiation environment with an argon atmosphere.

  15. Laser differential confocal ultra-long focal length measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weiqian; Sun, Ruoduan; Qiu, Lirong; Sha, Dingguo

    2009-10-26

    A new laser differential confocal focal-length measurement method is proposed for the measurement of an ultra-long focal-length. The approach proposed uses the property of an axial intensity curve that the absolute zero precisely corresponds to the focus of the objective in a differential confocal focusing system (DCFS) to measure the variation in position of DCFS focus with and without a measured ultra-long focal-length lens (UFL), uses the distance between the two focuses to obtain the UFL focal-length, and thereby achieving the precise measurement of ultra-long focal-length. The method has a high focusing precision, a strong anti-interference capability and a short measurement light-path. The theoretical analyses and preliminary experimental results indicate that the relative measurement error is about 0.01% when the method is used for the measurement of back-focus-distance (BFD).

  16. Measurement of skin temperature after infrared laser stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leandri, M; Saturno, M; Spadavecchia, L; Iannetti, G D; Cruccu, G; Truini, A

    2006-01-01

    Several types of lasers are available for eliciting laser evoked responses (LEPs). In order to understand advantages and drawbacks of each one, and to use it properly, it is important that the pattern of skin heating is known and duly considered. This study was aimed at assessing the skin temperature during and immediately after irradiation with pulses by Nd:YAP and CO(2) lasers. The back of the non-dominant hand was irradiated in 8 subjects. Temperatures were measured by a fast analogical pyrometer (5 ms response time). Stimuli were tested on natural colour (white) and blackened skin. Nd:YAP pulses yielded temperatures that were correlated with pulse energy, but not with pulse duration; much higher temperatures were obtained irradiating blackened skin than white skin (ranges 100-194 degrees C vs 35-46 degrees C). Temperature decay was extremely slow in white skin, reaching its basal value in more than 30 s. CO(2) pulses delivered with power of 3W and 6W yielded temperatures of 69-87 degrees C on white skin, and 138-226 degrees C on blackened skin. Temperature decay was very fast (4-8 ms). Differences in peak temperatures and decay times between lasers and tested conditions depend on energy and volume of heated skin. The highest temperatures are reached with lesser degree of penetration, as in the case of CO(2) laser and blackened skin. Taking into account the temperature decay time of the skin, the minimum interstimulus interval to get reliable LEPs should be no less than 10 s for Nd:YAP and 100 ms for CO(2) laser. Another important practical consequence of the heating pattern is that the Nd:YAP pulses will activate warmth receptors more easily than CO(2).

  17. Full-field laser vibration measurement in NDT techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Kaiduan; Li, Zhongke; Yi, Yaxing; Zhang, Fei

    2008-12-01

    Research of Non Destructive Testing (NDT) methodology has developed rapidly in recent years[1][2]. But it is rarely used for small objects such as Micro-electronic Mechanics System. Due to the small size of the MEMS, the traditional method of contact measurement seriously affects the parameter of the object measured. So a high accuracy non-contact measurement is required for optimization of MEMS designs and improvement of its reliability[3][4]. With recent advances in photonics, electronics, and computer technology, a Non Destructive Testing (NDT) laser time average interferometry is proposed in the paper. Laser interferometry has the advantages of non-contact, high accuracy, full-field and fast speed, so it can be used to detect cracks in MEMS. A time average measurement method of digital speckle pattern interferometry is proposed to measure the vibration mode of the MEMS in the paper. According to the sudden change of amplitude of vibration mode, a crack can be measured. With the speckle average technology, high accuracy phase-shift, continuous phase scanning technology, combined with optical amplification technology, the resolution of the amplitude reaches 1nm, and the resolution of the crack reaches 5μm. The measurement system being full-field, the measuring speed of the measurement system can reach 512*512 points per one minute.

  18. Precise topography assessment of Lop Nur Lake Basin using GLAS altimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Longfei; Gong, Huaze; Shao, Yun

    2014-03-01

    Lop Nur is a dried-up salt lake lying in the eastern part of Tarim basin, which used to be the second largest lagon in China. The "ear" rings in Lop Nur attract many interests and are regarded as the lake shorelines during its recession. The topography of the lake basin is important in understanding the formation of the "ear" rings. In this paper, elevation data along three transects obtained from laser altimeter were taken as the basic material of the topography in Lop Nur. Elevation data of laser altimeter show great consistency between adjacent passes. Orthometric height (OH) derived from altimetry data and the geoid model are used to analyze the elevation characteristic along "ear" rings. The result shows the "ear" rings are basically identical in elevation, supporting the statement that "ear" rings are former lake shorelines. A discrepancy of approximately 1 meter in OH is observed on the same "ear" ring, lower in the north and higher in the south, which is found for the first time. Possible explanations could be deformation of ground surface due to earthquake or tectonic movement after the "ear" rings are formed, or tilt of water surface due to wind stress or lake current during the formation of the rings.

  19. Measuring Spray Droplet Size from Agricultural Nozzles Using Laser Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Bradley K; Hoffmann, W Clint

    2016-09-16

    When making an application of any crop protection material such as an herbicide or pesticide, the applicator uses a variety of skills and information to make an application so that the material reaches the target site (i.e., plant). Information critical in this process is the droplet size that a particular spray nozzle, spray pressure, and spray solution combination generates, as droplet size greatly influences product efficacy and how the spray moves through the environment. Researchers and product manufacturers commonly use laser diffraction equipment to measure the spray droplet size in laboratory wind tunnels. The work presented here describes methods used in making spray droplet size measurements with laser diffraction equipment for both ground and aerial application scenarios that can be used to ensure inter- and intra-laboratory precision while minimizing sampling bias associated with laser diffraction systems. Maintaining critical measurement distances and concurrent airflow throughout the testing process is key to this precision. Real time data quality analysis is also critical to preventing excess variation in the data or extraneous inclusion of erroneous data. Some limitations of this method include atypical spray nozzles, spray solutions or application conditions that result in spray streams that do not fully atomize within the measurement distances discussed. Successful adaption of this method can provide a highly efficient method for evaluation of the performance of agrochemical spray application nozzles under a variety of operational settings. Also discussed are potential experimental design considerations that can be included to enhance functionality of the data collected.

  20. FPGA Sequencer for Radar Altimeter Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkun, Andrew C.; Pollard, Brian D.; Chen, Curtis W.

    2011-01-01

    A sequencer for a radar altimeter provides accurate attitude information for a reliable soft landing of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). This is a field-programmable- gate-array (FPGA)-only implementation. A table loaded externally into the FPGA controls timing, processing, and decision structures. Radar is memory-less and does not use previous acquisitions to assist in the current acquisition. All cycles complete in exactly 50 milliseconds, regardless of range or whether a target was found. A RAM (random access memory) within the FPGA holds instructions for up to 15 sets. For each set, timing is run, echoes are processed, and a comparison is made. If a target is seen, more detailed processing is run on that set. If no target is seen, the next set is tried. When all sets have been run, the FPGA terminates and waits for the next 50-millisecond event. This setup simplifies testing and improves reliability. A single vertex chip does the work of an entire assembly. Output products require minor processing to become range and velocity. This technology is the heart of the Terminal Descent Sensor, which is an integral part of the Entry Decent and Landing system for MSL. In addition, it is a strong candidate for manned landings on Mars or the Moon.

  1. Laser Doppler anemometer measurements using nonorthogonal velocity components: error estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orloff, K L; Snyder, P K

    1982-01-15

    Laser Doppler anemometers (LDAs) that are arranged to measure nonorthogonal velocity components (from which orthogonal components are computed through transformation equations) are more susceptible to calibration and sampling errors than are systems with uncoupled channels. In this paper uncertainty methods and estimation theory are used to evaluate, respectively, the systematic and statistical errors that are present when such devices are applied to the measurement of mean velocities in turbulent flows. Statistical errors are estimated for two-channel LDA data that are either correlated or uncorrelated. For uncorrelated data the directional uncertainty of the measured velocity vector is considered for applications where mean streamline patterns are desired.

  2. Multifunctional optical correlator for picosecond ultraviolet laser pulse measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhman, Abdurahim; Wang, Yang; Garcia, Frances; Long, Cary; Huang, Chunning; Takeda, Yasuhiro; Liu, Yun

    2014-11-01

    A compact multifunctional optical correlator system for pulse width measurement of ultrashort ultraviolet (UV) pulses has been designed and experimentally demonstrated. Both autocorrelation and cross-correlation functions are measured using a single nonlinear crystal, and the switching between two measurements requires no adjustment of phase matching and detector. The system can measure UV pulse widths from sub-picoseconds to 100 ps, and it involves no auxiliary pulse in the measurement. The measurement results on a burst-mode picosecond UV laser show a high-quality performance on speed, accuracy, resolution, and dynamic range. The proposed correlator can be applied to measure any ultrashort UV pulses produced through sum-frequency generation or second-harmonic generation.

  3. Two-Dimensional Fluorescence Spectroscopy for Measuring Uranium Isotopes in Femtosecond Laser Ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Brumfield, Brian E.; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Hartig, Kyle C.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2017-05-30

    We present the first two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy measurements of uranium isotopes in femtosecond laser ablation plasmas. A new method of signal normalization is presented to reduce noise in absorption-based measurements of laser ablation.

  4. OPTIMIZING TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNING MEASUREMENT SET-UP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Soudarissanane

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the main applications of the terrestrial laser scanner is the visualization, modeling and monitoring of man-made structures like buildings. Especially surveying applications require on one hand a quickly obtainable, high resolution point cloud but also need observations with a known and well described quality. To obtain a 3D point cloud, the scene is scanned from different positions around the considered object. The scanning geometry plays an important role in the quality of the resulting point cloud. The ideal set-up for scanning a surface of an object is to position the laser scanner in such a way that the laser beam is near perpendicular to the surface. Due to scanning conditions, such an ideal set-up is in practice not possible. The different incidence angles and ranges of the laser beam on the surface result in 3D points of varying quality. The stand-point of the scanner that gives the best accuracy is generally not known. Using an optimal stand-point of the laser scanner on a scene will improve the quality of individual point measurements and results in a more uniform registered point cloud. The design of an optimum measurement setup is defined such that the optimum stand-points are identified to fulfill predefined quality requirements and to ensure a complete spatial coverage. The additional incidence angle and range constraints on the visibility from a view point ensure that individual scans are not affected by bad scanning geometry effects. A complex and large room that would normally require five view point to be fully covered, would require nineteen view points to obtain full coverage under the range and incidence angle constraints.

  5. Measurement and interpretation of laser accelerated protons at GSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Omari, Husam

    2014-04-28

    This thesis is structured into 7 chapters: - Chapter 2 gives an overview of the ultrashort high intensity laser interaction with matter. The laser interaction with an induced plasma is described, starting from the kinematics of single electron motion, followed by collective electron effects and the ponderamotive motion in the laser focus and the plasma transparency for the laser beam. The three different mechanisms prepared to accelerate and propagate electrons through matter are discussed. The following indirect acceleration of protons is explained by the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) mechanism. Finally some possible applications of laser accelerated protons are explained briefly. - Chapter 3 deals with the modeling of geometry and field mapping of magnetic lens. Initial proton and electron distributions, fitted to PHELIX measured data are generated, a brief description of employed codes and used techniques in simulation is given, and the aberrations at the solenoid focal spot is studied. - Chapter 4 presents a simulation study for suggested corrections to optimize the proton beam as a later beam source. Two tools have been employed in these suggested corrections, an aperture placed at the solenoid focal spot as energy selection tool, and a scattering foil placed in the proton beam to smooth the radial energy beam profile correlation at the focal spot due to chromatic aberrations. Another suggested correction has been investigated, to optimize the beam radius at the focal spot by lens geometry controlling. - Chapter 5 presents a simulation study for the de-neutralization problem in TNSA caused by the fringing fields of pulsed magnetic solenoid and quadrupole. In this simulation, we followed an electrostatic model, where the evolution of both, self and mutual fields through the pulsed magnetic solenoid could be found, which is not the case in the quadrupole and only the growth of self fields could be found. The field mapping of magnetic elements is

  6. Non-Contact Measurement Using A Laser Scanning Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modjarrad, Amir

    1989-03-01

    Traditional high accuracy touch-trigger probing can now be complemented by high speed, non-contact, profile scanning to give another "dimension" to the three-dimensional Co-ordinate Measuring Machines (CMMs). Some of the features of a specially developed laser scanning probe together with the trade-offs involved in the design of inspection systems that use triangulation are examined. Applications of such a laser probe on CMMs are numerous since high speed scanning allows inspection of many different components and surfaces. For example, car body panels, tyre moulds, aircraft wing skins, turbine blades, wax and clay models, plastics, etc. Other applications include in-process surveillance in manufacturing and food processing, robotics vision and many others. Some of these applications are discussed and practical examples, case studies and experimental results are given with particular reference to use on CMMs. In conclusion, future developments and market trends in high speed non-contact measurement are discussed.

  7. Laser diode feedback interferometer for measurement of displacements without ambiguity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donati, S.; Giuliani, G.; Merlo, S. [Univ. di Pavia (Italy). Dipt. di Elettronica

    1995-01-01

    The authors report what, to their knowledge, is the first example of laser feedback interferometer capable of measuring displacements of arbitrary form using a single interferometric channel. With a GaAlAs laser diode they can measure 1.2-m displacements, with interferometric resolution, simply by means of the backreflection from the surface (reflective or diffusive) under test. The operation is performed at moderate (i.e., not very weak) levels of feedback, such that a two-level hysteresis is found in the amplitude modulated signal. This is shown to allow the recovery of displacement without sign ambiguity from a single interferometric signal. Experimental results are reported, which are found to be in good agreement with the underlying theory. Performances of the developed feedback interferometer are finally presented.

  8. Water depth measurement using an airborne pulsed neon laser system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.; Frederick, E. B.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents the water depth measurement using an airborne pulsed neon laser system. The results of initial base-line field test results of NASA airborne oceanographic lidar in the bathymetry mode are given, with water-truth measurements of depth and beam attenuation coefficients by boat taken at the same time as overflights to aid in determining the system's operational performance. The nadir-angle tests and field-of-view data are presented; this laser bathymetry system is an improvement over prior models in that (1) the surface-to-bottom pulse waveform is digitally recorded on magnetic tape, and (2) wide-swath mapping data may be routinely acquired using a 30 deg full-angle conical scanner.

  9. Laser interferometric measurements of a laser-preionization-triggered spark column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, W. D.; Kushner, M. J.; Crawford, E. A.; Byron, S. R.

    1986-06-01

    A KrF laser (248 nm) is used to volume preionization trigger a 40-100 kV, greater than 10-kA, 100-ns spark gap switch. This method of triggering creates reproducible and axisymmetric spark columns having low temperature and spatial jitter. A short pulse (less than 5 ns) tunable dye laser and a Mach-Zehnder interferometer are used to obtain spatial and temporal measurements of the spark column. The spatial resolution of the interferograms is better than 5 microns. The fringe shifts of the interferograms are used to calculate the electron and heavy particle density distributions within the spark column as a function of time during the spark. Results are presented for sparks in 5 percent SF6/20 percent N2/75 percent He and 1 percent Xe/99 percent H2 gas mixtures. dc and pulsed self-breakdown voltages are also measured in order to provide a reference for the laser-triggered results. Data on laser-triggering reliability and spark breakdown delay time are also presented.

  10. Application of Laser Correlation Spectroscopy for Measuring Virus Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforov, V N; Vinogradov, S E; Ivanov, A V; Efremova, E V; Kalnina, L B; Bychenko, A B; Tentsov, Yu Yu; Manykin, A A

    2016-05-01

    Dynamic light scattering method or laser correlation spectroscopy was applied to evaluation of the size of viruses. We measured correlation functions of the light scattered by human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and hepatitis A viruses (HAV) and found that size of HIV-1 (subtype A and B) and HAV virions were 104 nm and 28 nm, respectively. Comparison of these findings with electron microscopy data for fixed samples of the same viruses showed good agreement of the results.

  11. Measuring vacuum polarization with high-power lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.King; T.Heinzl

    2016-01-01

    When exposed to intense electromagnetic fields, the quantum vacuum is expected to exhibit properties of a polarizable medium akin to a weakly nonlinear dielectric material. Various schemes have been proposed to measure such vacuum polarization effects using a combination of high- power lasers. Motivated by several planned experiments, we provide an overview of experimental signatures that have been suggested to confirm this prediction of quantum electrodynamics of real photon–photon scattering.

  12. What Limits an Altimeter's Resolution of Along-Track Geoid Slope? Insights from Saral and Cryosat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W. H. F.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite altimeter data collected along densely spaced ground tracks can map the marine gravity field, revealing the tectonic fabric of the sea floor. This application requires high accuracy of the along-track derivative of sea surface height over distances shorter than 80 km, and so is very sensitive to the instrument's range precision and any factors that produce short-scale along-track correlation of range measurement errors. To date the altimeters that have collected data over a dense network of ground tracks all acquired their largest data sets in Ku band and employing conventional (incoherent) processing. Two new altimeters go beyond conventional Ku instruments. SARAL AltiKa operates as an incoherent altimeter at Ka-band, and CryoSat collects some Ku-band data in a SAR mode to permit coherent processing for aperture synthesis and delay-Doppler calculations. The along-track range noise correlation characteristics of each of these new measurements are different from what has been seen in previous altimeters. SARAL AltiKa has a lower noise floor than pre-Cryosat Ku-band instruments and its noise spectrum shows decorrelation at different wavelengths, in partial agreement with theoretical work on speckle noise decorrelation over homogeneous surfaces. This improved noise performance results in demonstrable improvement in the resolution of geoid anomalies over small seamounts. Retracking of Cryosat's SAR mode multi-looked waveform yields a decorrelation of range errors unlike that found in conventional instruments, such that it doesn't require two-pass retracking to get the best geoid slope resolution. This is due mainly to the waveform's shape, which yields partial derivatives with respect to geophysical parameter estimates that are more nearly orthogonal than in conventional Ku-band Brown model waveforms. Further understanding of the limits on range precision in these instruments will require understanding of the heterogeneities in reflecting surfaces that are

  13. Detailed gravimetric geoid for the GEOS-C altimeter calibration area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, J. G.; Vincent, S.

    1974-01-01

    The GEOS-C spacecraft scheduled for launch in late 1974 will carry a radar altimeter for the purpose of measuring sea surface topography. In order to calibrate and evaluate the performance of the altimeter system, ground truth data are required. In this respect a detailed gravimetric geoid has been computed for the GEOS-C altimeter calibration area in the Atlantic Ocean off the East Coast of the U.S. This geoid is based upon a combination of mean free air surface gravity anomalies and the Goddard Space Flight Center GEM-6 satellite-derived spherical harmonic coefficients. Surface gravity anomalies have been used to provide information on the short wave length undulations of the geoid while the satellite-derived coefficients have provided information on the long wave length components. As part of these analyses, GSFC, SAO and OSU satellite-derived gravity models were used in the computations. Although geoid heights based upon the various satellite models differed by as much as 30 meters in the Southern Hemisphere, the differences in this Atlantic Ocean area were less than 4 meters.

  14. ALTWAVE: Toolbox for use of satellite L2P altimeter data for wave model validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appendini, Christian M.; Camacho-Magaña, Víctor; Breña-Naranjo, José Agustín

    2016-03-01

    To characterize some of the world's ocean physical processes such as its wave height, wind speed and sea surface elevation is a major need for coastal and marine infrastructure planning and design, tourism activities, wave power and storm surge risk assessment, among others. Over the last decades, satellite remote sensing tools have provided quasi-global measurements of ocean altimetry by merging data from different satellite missions. While there is a widely use of altimeter data for model validation, practical tools for model validation remain scarce. Our purpose is to fill this gap by introducing ALTWAVE, a MATLAB user-oriented toolbox for oceanographers and coastal engineers developed to validate wave model results based on visual features and statistical estimates against satellite derived altimetry. Our toolbox uses altimetry information from the GlobWave initiative, and provides a sample application to validate a one year wave hindcast for the Gulf of Mexico. ALTWAVE also offers an effective toolbox to validate wave model results using altimeter data, as well as a guidance for non-experienced satellite data users. This article is intended for wave modelers with no experience using altimeter data to validate their results.

  15. Backscattering measuring system for optimization of intravenous laser irradiation dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusina, Tatyana V.; Popov, V. D.; Melnik, Ivan S.; Dets, Sergiy M.

    1996-11-01

    Intravenous laser blood irradiation as an effective method of biostimulation and physiotherapy becomes a more popular procedure. Optimal irradiation conditions for each patient are needed to be established individually. A fiber optics feedback system combined with conventional intravenous laser irradiation system was developed to control of irradiation process. The system consists of He-Ne laser, fiber optics probe and signal analyzer. Intravenous blood irradiation was performed in 7 healthy volunteers and 19 patients with different diseases. Measurements in vivo were related to in vitro blood irradiation which was performed in the same conditions with force-circulated venous blood. Comparison of temporal variations of backscattered light during all irradiation procedures has shown a strong discrepancy on optical properties of blood in patients with various health disorders since second procedure. The best cure effect was achieved when intensity of backscattered light was constant during at least five minutes. As a result, the optical irradiation does was considered to be equal 20 minutes' exposure of 3 mW He-Ne laser light at the end of fourth procedure.

  16. Development of Software for a Lidar-Altimeter Processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Jacob S.; Trujillo, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    A report describes the development of software for a digital processor that operates in conjunction with a finite-impulse-response (FIR) chip in a spaceborne lidar altimeter. Processing is started by a laser-fire interrupt signal that is repeated at intervals of 25 ms. For the purpose of discriminating between returns from the ground and returns from such things as trees, buildings, and clouds, the software is required to scan digitized lidar-return data in reverse of the acquisition sequence in order to distinguish the last return pulse from within a commanded ground-return range window. The digitized waveform information within this range window is filtered through 6 matched filters, in the hardware electronics, in order to maximize the probability of finding echoes from sloped or rough terrain and minimize the probability of selecting cloud returns. From the data falling past the end of the range window, there is obtained a noise baseline that is used to calculate a threshold value for each filter. The data from each filter is analyzed by a complex weighting scheme and the filter with the greatest weight is selected. A region around the peak of the ground return pulse associated with the selected filter is placed in telemetry, as well as information on its location, height, and other characteristics. The software requires many uplinked parameters as input. Included in the report is a discussion of major software-development problems posed by the design of the FIR chip and the need for the software to complete its process within 20 ms to fit within the overall 25-ms cycle.

  17. A Next Generation Radar Altimeter: The Proposed SWOT Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, L. L.

    2014-12-01

    Conventional nadir-looking radar altimeter is based on pulse-limited footprint approach. Near a coast the pulse limited footprint is contaminated by land within the much larger radar footprint, causing data quality to decay within 10 km from a coast. In the open ocean, the instrument noise limits the detection of dynamic ocean signals to wavelengths longer than 70 km. Using the technique of radar interferometry, the proposed Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) Mission would reduce instrument noise to resolve ocean signals to 15 km in wavelength over most of the open ocean without land contamination in the coastal zone. Sea surface height would be measured in two dimensions over a swath 120 km wide across the satellite's flight path. SWOT is under development as a joint mission of NASA and the French Space Agency, CNES, with contributions from the Canadian Space Agency and the UK Space Agency. The launch is baselined for 2020. An overview of the projected mission performance for oceanographic applications will be presented. SWOT would also measure the elevation of land surface water with hydrological applications.

  18. Advanced wavefront measurement and analysis of laser system modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, C.R.; Auerback, J.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    High spatial resolution measurements of the reflected or transmitted wavefronts of large aperture optical components used in high peak power laser systems is now possible. These measurements are produced by phase shifting interferometry. The wavefront data is in the form of 3-D phase maps that reconstruct the wavefront shape. The emphasis of this work is on the characterization of wavefront features in the mid-spatial wavelength range (from 0.1 to 10.0 mm) and has been accomplished for the first time. Wavefront structure from optical components with spatial wavelengths in this range are of concern because their effects in high peak power laser systems. At high peak power, this phase modulation can convert to large magnitude intensity modulation by non-linear processes. This can lead to optical damage. We have developed software to input the measured phase map data into beam propagation codes in order to model this conversion process. We are analyzing this data to: (1) Characterize the wavefront structure produced by current optical components, (2) Refine our understanding of laser system performance, (3) Develop a database from which future optical component specifications can be derived.

  19. A laser speckle imaging technique for measuring tissue perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Kevin R; Tulip, J; Leonard, C; Stewart, C; Bray, Robert C

    2004-11-01

    Laser Doppler imaging (LDI) has become a standard method for optical measurement of tissue perfusion, but is limited by low resolution and long measurement times. We have developed an analysis technique based on a laser speckle imaging method that generates rapid, high-resolution perfusion images. We have called it laser speckle perfusion imaging (LSPI). This paper investigates LSPI output and compares it to LDI using blood flow models designed to simulate human skin at various levels of pigmentation. Results show that LSPI parameters can be chosen such that the instrumentation exhibits a similar response to changes in red blood cell concentration (0.1%-5%, 200 microL/min) and velocity (0-800 microL/min, 1% concentration) and, given its higher resolution and quicker response time, could provide a significant advantage over LDI for some applications. Differences were observed in the LDI and LSPI response to tissue optical properties. LDI perfusion values increased with increasing tissue absorption, while LSPI perfusion values showed a slight decrease. This dependence is predictable, owing to the perfusion algorithms specific to each instrument, and, if properly compensated for, should not influence each instrument's ability to measure relative changes in tissue perfusion.

  20. Towards absolute laser spectroscopic CO2 isotope ratio measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyangwe Nwaboh, Javis; Werhahn, Olav; Ebert, Volker

    2017-04-01

    Knowledge of isotope composition of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere is necessary to identify sources and sinks of this key greenhouse gas. In the last years, laser spectroscopic techniques such as cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) and tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) have been shown to perform accurate isotope ratio measurements for CO2 and other gases like water vapour (H2O) [1,2]. Typically, isotope ratios are reported in literature referring to reference materials provided by e.g. the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). However, there could be some benefit if field deployable absolute isotope ratio measurement methods were developed to address issues such as exhausted reference material like the Pee Dee Belemnite (PDB) standard. Absolute isotope ratio measurements would be particularly important for situations where reference materials do not even exist. Here, we present CRDS and TDLAS-based absolute isotope ratios (13C/12C ) in atmospheric CO2. We demonstrate the capabilities of the used methods by measuring CO2 isotope ratios in gas standards. We compare our results to values reported for the isotope certified gas standards. Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement (GUM) compliant uncertainty budgets on the CRDS and TDLAS absolute isotope ratio measurements are presented, and traceability is addressed. We outline the current impediments in realizing high accuracy absolute isotope ratio measurements using laser spectroscopic methods, propose solutions and the way forward. Acknowledgement Parts of this work have been carried out within the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP) ENV52 project-HIGHGAS. The EMRP is jointly funded by the EMRP participating countries within EURAMET and the European Union. References [1] B. Kühnreich, S. Wagner, J. C. Habig,·O. Möhler, H. Saathoff, V. Ebert, Appl. Phys. B 119:177-187 (2015). [2] E. Kerstel, L. Gianfrani, Appl. Phys. B 92, 439-449 (2008).

  1. Extracting Information from the Atom-Laser Wave Function UsingInterferometric Measurement with a Laser Standing-Wave Grating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘正东; 武强; 曾亮; 林宇; 朱诗尧

    2001-01-01

    The reconstruction of the atom-laser wave function is performed using an interferometric measurement with a standing-wave grating, and the results of this scheme are studied. The relations between the measurement data and the atomic wave function are also presented. This scheme is quite applicable and effectively avoids the initial random phase problem of the method that employs the laser running wave. The information which is encoded in the atom-laser wave is extracted.

  2. Laser measurement and analysis of reposition error in polishing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weisen; Wang, Junhua; Xu, Min; He, Xiaoying

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, robotic reposition error measurement method based on laser interference remote positioning is presented, the geometric error is analyzed in the polishing system based on robot and the mathematical model of the tilt error is presented. Studies show that less than 1 mm error is mainly caused by the tilt error with small incident angle. Marking spot position with interference fringe enhances greatly the error measurement precision, the measurement precision of tilt error can reach 5 um. Measurement results show that reposition error of the polishing system is mainly from the tilt error caused by the motor A, repositioning precision is greatly increased after polishing system improvement. The measurement method has important applications in the actual error measurement with low cost, simple operation.

  3. Dynamic sea surface topography, gravity, and improved orbit accuracies from the direct evaluation of Seasat altimeter data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, J. G.; Koblinsky, C. J.; Lerch, F.; Klosko, S. M.; Robbins, J. W.

    1990-01-01

    A gravitational model incorporating Seasat altimetry, surface gravimetry, and satellite tracking data has been determined in terms of global spherical harmonics complete to degree and order 50. This model, PGS-3337, uses altimeter data as a dynamic observation of the satellite's height above the sea surface. A solution for the ocean's dynamic topography is recovered simultaneously with the orbit parameters, gravity, and ocean tidal terms. The recovered dynamic topography reveals the global long wavelength circulation of the oceans with a resolution of 2000 km and is very similar to the mean upper ocean dynamic height derived from historical ship observations. The PGS-3337 geoid has an uncertainty of 60 cm rms globally but 25 cm rms over the ocean because of the altimeter measurements. Seasat orbits determined in this solution have an estimated accuracy for the radial position of 20 cm rms. The difference between the altimeter observed sea height and the geoid plus dynamic topography model is 30 cm rms. Contained in these residuals are the sea height variability, as well as errors from the geoid, orbits, tidal models, and altimeter range measurement. This performance level is 2 to 3 times better than that achieved with previous Goddard gravitational models.

  4. Coherent Laser Instrument Would Measure Range and Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Daniel; Cardell, Greg; San Martin, Alejandro; Spiers, Gary

    2005-01-01

    A proposed instrument would project a narrow laser beam that would be frequency-modulated with a pseudorandom noise (PN) code for simultaneous measurement of range and velocity along the beam. The instrument performs these functions in a low mass, power, and volume package using a novel combination of established techniques. Originally intended as a low resource- footprint guidance sensor for descent and landing of small spacecraft onto Mars or small bodies (e.g., asteroids), the basic instrument concept also lends itself well to a similar application guiding aircraft (especially, small unmanned aircraft), and to such other applications as ranging of topographical features and measuring velocities of airborne light-scattering particles as wind indicators. Several key features of the instrument s design contribute to its favorable performance and resource-consumption characteristics. A laser beam is intrinsically much narrower (for the same exit aperture telescope or antenna) than a radar beam, eliminating the need to correct for the effect of sloping terrain over the beam width, as is the case with radar. Furthermore, the use of continuous-wave (CW), erbium-doped fiber lasers with excellent spectral purity (narrow line width) permits greater velocity resolution, while reducing the laser s power requirement compared to a more typical pulsed solid-state laser. The use of CW also takes proper advantage of the increased sensitivity of coherent detection, necessary in the first place for direct measurement of velocity using the Doppler effect. However, measuring range with a CW beam requires modulation to "tag" portions of it for time-of-flight determination; typically, the modulation consists of a PN code. A novel element of the instrument s design is the use of frequency modulation (FM) to accomplish both the PN-modulation and the Doppler-bias frequency shift necessary for signed velocity measurements. This permits the use of a single low-power waveguide electrooptic

  5. Ocular microtremor measurement using laser-speckle metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Emer; Coakley, Davis; Boyle, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    We describe a novel, noninvasive measurement approach for recording a small involuntary tremor of the eye known as ocular microtremor. The method is based on measuring out-of-plane angular displacements of a target by using laser-speckle correlation of images recorded in the Fourier plane of a lens. The system has a dynamic range of 4 to 5000 μrad, resolution of 4 μrad, and a bandwidth of 250 Hz. The design and optimization of the system is presented with an in vitro validation of the system against its specification.

  6. Bunch Length Measurements With Laser/SR Cross-Correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Timothy; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Daranciang, Dan; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Lindenberg, Aaron; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Corbett, Jeff; /SLAC; Fisher, Alan; /SLAC; Goodfellow, John; /SLAC; Huang, Xiaobiao; /SLAC; Mok, Walter; /SLAC; Safranek, James; /SLAC; Wen, Haidan; /SLAC

    2012-07-06

    By operating SPEAR3 in low-{alpha} mode the storage ring can generate synchrotron radiation pulses of order 1ps. Applications include pump-probe x-ray science and the production of THz radiation in the CSR regime. Measurements of the bunch length are difficult, however, because the light intensity is low and streak cameras typically provide resolution of only a few ps. Tests are now underway to resolve the short bunch length using cross-correlation between a 60-fs Ti:Sapphire laser and the visible SR beam in a BBO crystal. In this paper we report on the experimental setup, preliminary measurements and prospects for further improvement.

  7. Shape and alignment measurement of the heliostat by laser deflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenbin; Lu, Zhenwu; Liu, Hua; Zhang, Hongxin; Ni, Zhengguo

    2008-08-01

    In the solar tower thermal power generation system, the precision of the slope angle of the heliostat is the major factor, which influences the efficiency of the system, consequently, this angle should be tested accurately. In this paper, the methods based on laser deflectometry are proposed to measure the shape error of the mirror facet and the connected error of the facets; such apparatus and corresponding software packages are developed. With the help of these two apparatus, the heliostat of 1002, consisting of 55 mirror facets of 1.8182 m2; (hexagon), for the 1MWe solar tower power plant in Beijing are measured and connected successfully.

  8. Bunch Length Measurements With Laser/SR Cross-Correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Timothy; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Daranciang, Dan; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Lindenberg, Aaron; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Corbett, Jeff; /SLAC; Fisher, Alan; /SLAC; Goodfellow, John; /SLAC; Huang, Xiaobiao; /SLAC; Mok, Walter; /SLAC; Safranek, James; /SLAC; Wen, Haidan; /SLAC

    2012-07-06

    By operating SPEAR3 in low-{alpha} mode the storage ring can generate synchrotron radiation pulses of order 1ps. Applications include pump-probe x-ray science and the production of THz radiation in the CSR regime. Measurements of the bunch length are difficult, however, because the light intensity is low and streak cameras typically provide resolution of only a few ps. Tests are now underway to resolve the short bunch length using cross-correlation between a 60-fs Ti:Sapphire laser and the visible SR beam in a BBO crystal. In this paper we report on the experimental setup, preliminary measurements and prospects for further improvement.

  9. Measuring laser power as a force: a new paradigm to accurately monitor optical power during laser-based machining operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Paul; Simonds, Brian; Sowards, Jeffrey; Hadler, Joshua

    2016-03-01

    In laser manufacturing operations, accurate measurement of laser power is important for product quality, operational repeatability, and process validation. Accurate real-time measurement of high-power lasers, however, is difficult. Typical thermal power meters must absorb all the laser power in order to measure it. This constrains power meters to be large, slow and exclusive (that is, the laser cannot be used for its intended purpose during the measurement). To address these limitations, we have developed a different paradigm in laser power measurement where the power is not measured according to its thermal equivalent but rather by measuring the laser beam's momentum (radiation pressure). Very simply, light reflecting from a mirror imparts a small force perpendicular to the mirror which is proportional to the optical power. By mounting a high-reflectivity mirror on a high-sensitivity force transducer (scale), we are able to measure laser power in the range of tens of watts up to ~ 100 kW. The critical parameters for such a device are mirror reflectivity, angle of incidence, and scale sensitivity and accuracy. We will describe our experimental characterization of a radiation-pressure-based optical power meter. We have tested it for modulated and CW laser powers up to 92 kW in the laboratory and up to 20 kW in an experimental laser welding booth. We will describe present accuracy, temporal response, sources of measurement uncertainty, and hurdles which must be overcome to have an accurate power meter capable of routine operation as a turning mirror within a laser delivery head.

  10. Ptychographic measurements of ultrahigh-intensity laser-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, A.; Monchocé, S.; Bourassin-Bouchet, C.; Kahaly, S.; Quéré, F.

    2016-04-01

    The extreme intensities now delivered by femtosecond lasers make it possible to drive and control relativistic motion of charged particles with light, opening a path to compact particle accelerators and coherent X-ray sources. Accurately characterizing the dynamics of ultrahigh-intensity laser-plasma interactions as well as the resulting light and particle emissions is an essential step towards such achievements. This remains a considerable challenge, as the relevant scales typically range from picoseconds to attoseconds in time, and from micrometres to nanometres in space. In these experiments, owing to the extreme prevalent physical conditions, measurements can be performed only at macroscopic distances from the targets, yielding only partial information at these microscopic scales. This letter presents a major advance by applying the concepts of ptychography to such measurements, and thus retrieving microscopic information hardly accessible until now. This paves the way to a general approach for the metrology of extreme laser-plasma interactions on very small spatial and temporal scales.

  11. Laser triangulation measurement of the level in a coal silo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Jiping; Jiang Jing

    2011-01-01

    Laser triangulation theory was used to develop a novel contact-free method for measuring the coal level in a silo under harsh environmental conditions found in coal mines,such as the presence of dense dust,high humidity,and low illumination.A laser source and a camera were mounted at the top of the silo.The laser spot projected into the silo was imaged by the camera.The pinhole imaging principle allows the level to be found from the lateral shift of the spot image on the sensor.A pre-calibrated look-up table of the coal depth versus spot position was used to obtain the depth.The measurement accuracy depends on the step size used during pre-calibration.The actual application of a device designed according to these principles shows that it is easy to implement.The detection of the coal level in a silo at the low illumination level found in coal mines is demonstrated.

  12. High temperature thermographic measurements of laser heated silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elhadj, S; Yang, S T; Matthews, M J; Cooke, D J; Bude, J D; Johnson, M; Feit, M; Draggoo, V; Bisson, S E

    2009-11-02

    In situ spatial and temporal surface temperature profiles of CO{sub 2} laser-heated silica were obtained using a long wave infrared (LWIR) HgCdTe camera. Solutions to the linear diffusion equation with volumetric and surface heating are shown to describe the temperature evolution for a range of beam powers, over which the peak surface temperature scales linearly with power. These solutions were used with on-axis steady state and transient experimental temperatures to extract thermal diffusivity and conductivity for a variety of materials, including silica, spinel, sapphire, and lithium fluoride. Experimentally-derived thermal properties agreed well with reported values and, for silica, thermal conductivity and diffusivity are shown to be approximately independent of temperature between 300 and 2800K. While for silica our analysis based on a temperature independent thermal conductivity is shown to be accurate, for other materials studied this treatment yields effective thermal properties that represent reasonable approximations for laser heating. Implementation of a single-wavelength radiation measurement in the semi-transparent regime is generally discussed, and estimates of the apparent temperature deviation from the actual outer surface temperature are also presented. The experimental approach and the simple analysis presented yield surface temperature measurements that can be used to validate more complex physical models, help discriminate dominant heat transport mechanisms, and to predict temperature distribution and evolution during laser-based material processing.

  13. Measurement of Periodical Contraction of Cultured Muscle Tube with Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Takase

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Periodical contraction of a cultured muscle tube has been measured with laser in vitro. C2C12 (mouse myoblast cell line was cultured with High-glucose Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium on a dish to make muscle tubes. Differentiation from myoblasts to myotubes was induced with an additional horse serum. Repetitive contraction of the tube was generated by electric pulses lower than sixty volts of amplitude with one milli-second of width through the electrodes of platinum, and observed with a phase-contrast microscope. A laser beam of 632.8 nm wavelength was restricted to 0.096 mm diameter, and applied to the muscle tubes on the bottom of the culture dish. Fluctuating intensity of the transmitted laser beam through the periodically contracting muscle tubes was measured, and its spectrum was analyzed. The analyzed data show that the repetitive contraction is synchronized with stimulation of the periodical electric pulses between 0.2 s and 2 s.

  14. High temperature thermographic measurements of laser heated silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhadj, Selim; Yang, Steven T.; Matthews, Manyalibo J.; Cooke, Diane J.; Bude, Jeffrey D.; Johnson, Michael; Feit, Michael; Draggoo, Vaughn; Bisson, Scott E.

    2009-10-01

    In situ spatial and temporal surface temperature profiles of CO2 laser-heated silica were obtained using a long wave infrared (LWIR) HgCdTe camera. Solutions to the linear diffusion equation with volumetric and surface heating are shown to describe the temperature evolution for a range of beam powers, over which the peak surface temperature scales linearly with power. These solutions were used with on-axis steady state and transient experimental temperatures to extract thermal diffusivity and conductivity for a variety of materials, including silica, spinel, sapphire, and lithium fluoride. Experimentally-derived thermal properties agreed well with reported values and, for silica, thermal conductivity and diffusivity are shown to be approximately independent of temperature between 300 and 2800K. While for silica our analysis based on a temperature independent thermal conductivity is shown to be accurate, for other materials studied this treatment yields effective thermal properties that represent reasonable approximations for laser heating. Implementation of a single-wavelength radiation measurement in the semi-transparent regime is generally discussed, and estimates of the apparent temperature deviation from the actual outer surface temperature are also presented. The experimental approach and the simple analysis presented yield surface temperature measurements that can be used to validate more complex physical models, help discriminate dominant heat transport mechanisms, and to predict temperature distribution and evolution during laser-based material processing.

  15. Laser beam complex amplitude measurement by phase diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Védrenne, Nicolas; Mugnier, Laurent M; Michau, Vincent; Velluet, Marie-Thérèse; Bierent, Rudolph

    2014-02-24

    The control of the optical quality of a laser beam requires a complex amplitude measurement able to deal with strong modulus variations and potentially highly perturbed wavefronts. The method proposed here consists in an extension of phase diversity to complex amplitude measurements that is effective for highly perturbed beams. Named camelot for Complex Amplitude MEasurement by a Likelihood Optimization Tool, it relies on the acquisition and processing of few images of the beam section taken along the optical path. The complex amplitude of the beam is retrieved from the images by the minimization of a Maximum a Posteriori error metric between the images and a model of the beam propagation. The analytical formalism of the method and its experimental validation are presented. The modulus of the beam is compared to a measurement of the beam profile, the phase of the beam is compared to a conventional phase diversity estimate. The precision of the experimental measurements is investigated by numerical simulations.

  16. Development of Methods Precision Length Measurement Using Transported Laser Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrov, E. A.; Epikhin, V. M.; Mazur, M. M.; Suddenok, Y. A.; Shorin, V. N.

    The paper shows the results of a comparison of a developed transported laser interferometer (TLI) with a measurement interferometer XL-80 Renishaw at the distance 0-60 meters. Testings of a breadboard model of the TLI showed that a difference between the travel measurements of the two interferometers does not exceed 6 μm. The mean value of the difference of indications between the TLI and a Renishaw travel measurer at the distance near 58 m approximately equals to 0,5 μm. Root-mean square deviation of the indications of the interferometers approximately equals to 3 μm. At comparison of the sections with the same name between the TLI and the Renishaw travel measurer, measured at different days, a repeatability of the results for the sections with the same name is noted.

  17. Laser-induced incandescence: Towards quantitative soot volume fraction measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzannis, A.P.; Wienbeucker, F.; Beaud, P.; Frey, H.-M.; Gerber, T.; Mischler, B.; Radi, P.P. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    Laser-Induced Incandescence has recently emerged as a versatile tool for measuring soot volume fraction in a wide range of combustion systems. In this work we investigate the essential features of the method. LII is based on the acquisition of the incandescence of soot when heated through a high power laser pulse. Initial experiments have been performed on a model laboratory flame. The behaviour of the LII signal is studied experimentally. By applying numerical calculations we investigate the possibility to obtain two-dimensional soot volume fraction distributions. For this purpose a combination of LII with other techniques is required. This part is discussed in some extent and the future work is outlined. (author) 4 figs., 3 refs.

  18. Spatially and temporally resolved temperature measurement in laser media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körner, Jörg; Yue, Fangxin; Hein, Joachim; Kaluza, Malte C

    2016-06-01

    A technique to measure the spatially resolved temperature distribution in a laser medium is presented. It is based on the temperature dependence of the absorption cross section close to the zero-phonon line of the active medium. Since other materials in the beam path exhibit a high (and constant) transmission at this wavelength, the method can easily be applied in realistic amplifier setups. The method was successfully tested on three different samples, which were pumped by a pulsed laser diode with up to 150 W average power: side-cooled Yb:YAG and Yb:fluoride-phosphate glass at room temperature and face-cooled Yb:CaF2 at 120 K.

  19. Time-resolved, local temperature measurements during pulsed laser heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kappes, Ralf S; Li Chen; Butt, Hans-Juergen; Gutmann, Jochen S, E-mail: kappes@mpip-mainz.mpg.d [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, D-55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    To analyse processes during laser heating, one needs to be able to measure temperatures of about 1000 K within one microsecond and with micrometre resolution. To achieve this accuracy, we set up a high-performance optical detection system with a microsecond gated camera in combination with selected interference filters to detect the thermal emission spectrum in the visible range. By fitting the emission spectrum to Planck's law, we are able to collect an area temperature profile for time intervals as short as one microsecond. Thus we can show that a polymer film, which is doped with an organic dye for energy conversion, can reach temperatures of at least 900 K, which is high above its 'normal' decomposition temperature. It is, furthermore, possible to relate the temperature to the effect of the laser beam on the polymer film.

  20. Nearshore Bathymetric Change Resolved by Depth Inversions, Sonic Altimeters, and In-Situ Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodie, K. L.; Palmsten, M. L.; Hesser, T.; Dickhudt, P.; Ladner, H.; Elgar, S.; Raubenheimer, B.; Penko, A.

    2016-12-01

    Video-based remote sensing of shoaling and breaking surface gravity waves combined with a depth-inversion algorithm, cBathy, may be able to provide bathymetry information with high spatial and temporal resolution in the nearshore (Holman et al., 2013, JGR, Vol 118). Although the accuracy of cBathy has been assessed in low-wave conditions when coincident in-situ surveys are available, it has not been tested for many conditions with significant wave height > 1.5 m. During high wave conditions, the use of linear wave theory in the depth-inversion algorithm may result in estimates of water depth that are too deep. Here, measurements from an in-situ array of sonic altimeters and from frequent watercraft surveys are used to assess the ability of cBathy to estimate the spatio-temporal evolution of the seafloor during a range of wave conditions at a micro-tidal sandy beach in Duck, NC. Observations were collected continuously from 14 October to 01 November 2015 with 8 altimeters in 1.5 to 4 m water depth on 2 cross-shore transects separated by 75 m in the alongshore during waves that ranged from 0.5 to 1.0 m. Nearshore bathymetry was alongshore variable, with a crescentic bar that attached to the shoreline along one transect and was 150 m offshore along the other transect. Sand levels changed by as much as 1 m in some locations. Additional measurements were collected with 3 altimeters on a single cross-shore transect for 6 months, with wave heights from 0.3 to 5.0 m and sand level fluctuations of up to 1 m in a single day. Initial comparisons with surveys show cBathy RMSE and bias are of similar magnitude to prior studies. Although cBathy resolves the large-scale spatial morphology of the sandbar, when Hs > 1.3 m cBathy estimates of the sandbar location are 10 to 50 m onshore of the surveyed location. cBathy uncertainty estimates were a poor representation of actual errors when compared with the surveys. Six-month-long time series of altimeter data will be used to assess c

  1. Improved interpretation of satellite altimeter data using genetic algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messa, Kenneth; Lybanon, Matthew

    1992-01-01

    Genetic algorithms (GA) are optimization techniques that are based on the mechanics of evolution and natural selection. They take advantage of the power of cumulative selection, in which successive incremental improvements in a solution structure become the basis for continued development. A GA is an iterative procedure that maintains a 'population' of 'organisms' (candidate solutions). Through successive 'generations' (iterations) the population as a whole improves in simulation of Darwin's 'survival of the fittest'. GA's have been shown to be successful where noise significantly reduces the ability of other search techniques to work effectively. Satellite altimetry provides useful information about oceanographic phenomena. It provides rapid global coverage of the oceans and is not as severely hampered by cloud cover as infrared imagery. Despite these and other benefits, several factors lead to significant difficulty in interpretation. The GA approach to the improved interpretation of satellite data involves the representation of the ocean surface model as a string of parameters or coefficients from the model. The GA searches in parallel, a population of such representations (organisms) to obtain the individual that is best suited to 'survive', that is, the fittest as measured with respect to some 'fitness' function. The fittest organism is the one that best represents the ocean surface model with respect to the altimeter data.

  2. Real-time power measurement and control for high power diode laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Wen-bin; Liu, You-qiang; Cao, Yin-hua; Wang, Zhi-yong

    2011-06-01

    As the continual improvement of technology and beam quality, diode laser, with poor beam quality, no longer just apply to pump solid-state laser. As a kind of implement of laser materials processing, high-power diode laser has been used in manufacture, as a brand new means of laser processing. Due to the influence of inevitable unstable factors, for example, the temperature of water-cooler, the current of power supply, etc, the output power of diode laser will be unstable. And laser output power, as an important parameter, frequently affects the performance of the laser beam and the experimental results of processing, especially in the laser materials processing. Therefore, researching the real-time power measurement and control of high power diode laser has great significance, and for diode laser, it would improve performance of itself. To achieve the purpose of real-time detection, traditional measuring method, placing a power sensor behind the total-reflection mirror of laser resonant cavity, is mainly applied in the system of gas laser and solid-state laser. However, Owing to the high integration level of diode laser, traditional measuring method can't be adopted. A technique for real-time measure output power of high power diode laser is developed to improve quality of the laser in this paper. A lens placed at an angle of 45° in the system was used to sample output light of laser, and a piece of ground glass was used to uniform the beam power density, then the photoelectric detector received an optic signal and converted it into electric signal. This feeble signal was processed by amplification circuit with a filter. Finally, this detected electric signal was applied to accomplish the closed-loop control of power. The performance of power measurement and control system was tested with the 300W diode laser, and the measuring inaccuracy achieved was less than +/-1%.

  3. [Measurement of oxygen concentration using multimode diode laser absorption spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guang-zhen; Cai, Ting-dong; Hu, Bo; Jia, Tian-jun

    2015-01-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) is a widely used technique for high sensitivity, good selectivity and fast response. It is widely used in environment monitoring, industrial process control and biomedical sensing. In order to overcome the drawbacks of TDLAS including high cost, poor stability and center wavelength shift problem. A multi-mode diode laser system based on correlation spectroscopy and wavelength modulation spectroscopy (TMDL-COSPEC-WMS) was used to measure O2 concentration near 760nm at the 1%~30% range of near room temperature. During the experiment, the light is splitter into two beams, respectively through the sample and measuring cell, two receiving optical signal collection containing gas concentration information sent back stage treatment, invert the oxygen concentration through correlation and ratio between measured signal and reference signal, the correlation spectroscopy harmonic detection technique is used to improve the stability of the system and the signal to noise ratio. The result showed that, there was a good linear relationship between the measured oxygen concentration and the actual concentration value. A detection limit of 280 pmm. m in the 1 atmospheric which approved of the same sample. A continuous measurement for oxygen with the standard deviation of 0. 056% in ambient air during approximately 30 minutes confirms the stability and the capability of the system. The design of the system includes soft and hardware can meet the needs of oxygen online monitoring. The experimental device is simple and easy to use, easy to complex environment application.

  4. Measurement of the relaxation time of hot electrons in laser-solid interaction at relativistic laser intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H; Shepherd, R; Chung, H K; Dyer, G; Faenov, A; Fournier, K B; Hansen, S B; Hunter, J; Kemp, A; Pikuz, T; Ping, Y; Widmann, K; Wilks, S C; Beiersdorfer, P

    2006-08-22

    The authors have measured the relaxation time of hot electrons in short pulse laser-solid interactions using a picosecond time-resolved x-ray spectrometer and a time-integrated electron spectrometer. Employing laser intensities of 10{sup 17}, 10{sup 18}, and 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, they find increased laser coupling to hot electrons as the laser intensity becomes relativistic and thermalization of hot electrons at timescales on the order of 10 ps at all laser intensities. They propose a simple model based on collisional coupling and plasma expansion to describe the rapid relaxation of hot electrons. The agreement between the resulting K{sub {alpha}} time-history from this model with the experiments is best at highest laser intensity and less satisfactory at the two lower laser intensities.

  5. Development of the Laser Altimeter (LIDAR) for Hayabusa2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, T.; Kase, T.; Shiina, T.; Mita, M.; Namiki, N.; Senshu, H.; Yamada, R.; Noda, H.; Kunimori, H.; Hirata, N.; Terui, F.; Mimasu, Y.

    2017-07-01

    Hayabusa2 was launched on 3 December 2014 on an H-IIA launch vehicle from the Tanegashima Space Center, and is, at the time of writing, cruising toward asteroid 162137 Ryugu (1999JU3). After reaching the asteroid, it will stay for about 1.5 years to observe the asteroid and collect surface material samples.

  6. Investigations in CO2 laser beam caustics measuring techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming Ove; Bagger, Claus

    2004-01-01

    The performance of an industrial laser is very much depending upon the characteristics of the laser beam. The ISO standards 11146 and 11154 which are describing test methods for laser beam parameters have been approved.......The performance of an industrial laser is very much depending upon the characteristics of the laser beam. The ISO standards 11146 and 11154 which are describing test methods for laser beam parameters have been approved....

  7. Investigations in CO2 laser beam caustics measuring techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming Ove; Bagger, Claus

    2004-01-01

    The performance of an industrial laser is very much depending upon the characteristics of the laser beam. The ISO standards 11146 and 11154 which are describing test methods for laser beam parameters have been approved.......The performance of an industrial laser is very much depending upon the characteristics of the laser beam. The ISO standards 11146 and 11154 which are describing test methods for laser beam parameters have been approved....

  8. Resonant holographic measurements of laser ablation plume expansion in vacuum and argon gas backgrounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindley, R.A. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1993-10-01

    This thesis discusses the following on resonant holographic measurements of laser ablation plume expansion: Introduction to laser ablation; applications of laser ablation; The study of plume expansion; holographic interferometry; resonant holographic interferometry; accounting for finite laser bandwidth; The solution for doppler broadening and finite bandwidth; the main optical table; the lumonics laser spot shape; developing and reconstructing the holograms; plume expansion in RF/Plasma Environments; Determining {lambda}{sub o}; resonant refraction effects; fringe shift interpretation; shot-to-shot consistency; laser ablation in vacuum and low pressure, inert, background gas; theoretically modeling plume expansion in vacuum and low pressure, inert, background gas; and laser ablation in higher pressure, inert, background gas.

  9. Measurement of OH reactivity by laser flash photolysis coupled with laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Daniel; Whalley, Lisa K.; Ingham, Trevor; Edwards, Peter M.; Cryer, Danny R.; Brumby, Charlotte A.; Seakins, Paul W.; Heard, Dwayne E.

    2016-07-01

    OH reactivity (k'OH) is the total pseudo-first-order loss rate coefficient describing the removal of OH radicals to all sinks in the atmosphere, and is the inverse of the chemical lifetime of OH. Measurements of ambient OH reactivity can be used to discover the extent to which measured OH sinks contribute to the total OH loss rate. Thus, OH reactivity measurements enable determination of the comprehensiveness of measurements used in models to predict air quality and ozone production, and, in conjunction with measurements of OH radical concentrations, to assess our understanding of OH production rates. In this work, we describe the design and characterisation of an instrument to measure OH reactivity using laser flash photolysis coupled to laser-induced fluorescence (LFP-LIF) spectroscopy. The LFP-LIF technique produces OH radicals in isolation, and thus minimises potential interferences in OH reactivity measurements owing to the reaction of HO2 with NO which can occur if HO2 is co-produced with OH in the instrument. Capabilities of the instrument for ambient OH reactivity measurements are illustrated by data collected during field campaigns in London, UK, and York, UK. The instrumental limit of detection for k'OH was determined to be 1.0 s-1 for the campaign in London and 0.4 s-1 for the campaign in York. The precision, determined by laboratory experiment, is typically < 1 s-1 for most ambient measurements of OH reactivity. Total uncertainty in ambient measurements of OH reactivity is ˜ 6 %. We also present the coupling and characterisation of the LFP-LIF instrument to an atmospheric chamber for measurements of OH reactivity during simulated experiments, and provide suggestions for future improvements to OH reactivity LFP-LIF instruments.

  10. Measurement of nuclear moments and radii by collinear laser spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Geithner, W R; Lievens, P; Kotrotsios, G; Silverans, R; Kappertz, S

    2002-01-01

    %IS304 %title\\\\ \\\\Collinear laser spectroscopy on a fast beam has proven to be a widely applicable and very efficient tool for measurements of changes in mean square nuclear charge radii, nuclear spins, magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments. Recent developments of extremely sensitive non-optical detection schemes enabled for some elements the extension of the measurements towards the very short-lived isotopes in the far wings of the ISOLDE production curves. The gain in sensitivity opens up new perspectives, particularly for measurements on lighter nuclei whose ground-state properties can be interpreted by large scale microscopic calculations instead of the more phenomenologic models used for heavier nuclei.\\\\ \\\\ For the sequence of argon isotopes $^{32-40}$Ar and $^{46}$Ar isotope shifts and nuclear moments were measured by optical pumping followed by state selective collisional ionization and detection of the $\\beta$-decay. Similarly, the low-background $\\alpha$-detection was used to extend earlie...

  11. System design of welding dynamic displacement measurement using laser ESPI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Based on the advantages of electronic speckle pattern interferometry(ESPI), such as non-contact, high precision, strong parasitic light resistance, and full-field measurement, a system for measuring welding dynamic displacement fields using ESPI was designed. The system consists of a 70mW He-Ne laser source, an optical path system, a computer-assisted frame grabber and a processing system. By measuring dynamic displacement fields on one LY2 aluminum alloy plate during an argon arc point welding, it can be proved that using ESPI to measure welding dynamic displacement fields is fully feasible, and this method can offer a solid experimental base for the structure mechanics.

  12. Radar and Laser Sensors for High Frequency Ocean Wave Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, C. R.

    2016-02-01

    Experimental measurement of air-sea fluxes invariably take place using shipbourne instrumentation and simultaneous measurement of wave height and direction is desired. A number of researchers have shown that range measuring sensors combined with inertial motion compensation can be successful on board stationary or very slowly moving ships. In order to measure wave characteristics from ships moving at moderate to full speed the sensors are required to operate at higher frequency so as to overcome the Doppler shift caused by ship motion. This work presents results from some preliminary testing of laser, radar and ultrasonic range sensors in the laboratory and on board ship. The characteristics of the individual sensors are discussed and comparison of the wave spectra produced by each is presented.

  13. Dead time effects in laser Doppler anemometry measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velte, Clara Marika; Buchhave, Preben; George, William K.

    2014-01-01

    We present velocity power spectra computed by the so-called direct method from burst-type laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) data, both measured in a turbulent round jet and generated in a computer. Using today’s powerful computers, we have been able to study more properties of the computed spectra...... frequency range, starting around the cutoff frequency due to the finite size of the MV. Using computer-generated data mimicking the LDA data, these effects have previously been shown to appear due to the effect of dead time, i.e., the finite time during which the system is not able to acquire new...... measurements. These dead times can be traced back to the fact that the burst-mode LDA cannot measure more than one signal burst at a time. Since the dead time is approximately equal to the residence time for a particle traversing a measurement volume, we are dealing with widely varying dead times, which...

  14. Measurement Axis Searching Model for Terrestrial Laser Scans Registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoxing Hu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, terrestrial Lidar scans can cover rather a large area; the point densities are strongly varied because of the line-of-sight measurement principle in potential overlaps with scans taken from different viewpoints. Most of the traditional methods focus on registration algorithm and ignore searching model. Sometimes the traditional methods are directly used to align two point clouds; a large critically unsolved problem of the large biases will be created in areas distant from the overlaps while the local overlaps are often aligned well. So a novel measurement axis searching model (MASM has been proposed in this paper. The method includes four steps: (1 the principal axis fitting, (2 the measurement axis generation, (3 low-high-precision search, and (4 result generation. The principal axis gives an orientation to the point cloud; the search scope is limited by the measurement axis. The point cloud orientation can be adjusted gradually until the achievement of the global optimum using low- and high-precision search. We perform some experiments with simulated point clouds and real terrestrial laser scans. The results of simulated point clouds have shown the processing steps of our method, and the results of real terrestrial laser scans have shown the sensitivity of the approach with respect to the indoor and outdoor scenes.

  15. Laser trapping of radium for an electric dipole moment measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, P.; Sulai, I. A.; Trimble, W.; Ahmad, I.; Bailey, K.; Bishof, M.; Greene, J. P.; Guest, J. R.; Holt, R. J.; Lu, Z.-T.; O'Connor, T. P.; Gould, H. A.

    2008-05-01

    The best limits on time-reversal violation in the nuclear sector are currently set through electric dipole moment (EDM) searches on the neutron and Hg-199. Recent theoretical calculations predict that atomic EDM measurements of certain octupole-deformed nuclei, e.g., in the radium isotopic chain, are two to three orders of magnitude more sensitive to the underlying time-reversal violation than the one in Hg-199. Ra-225, with nuclear spin 1/2 and a radioactive half-life of 15 days, is a particularly attractive candidate for a tabletop EDM measurement based on a laser-cooling and trapping approach. Towards this end, we have successfully cooled and trapped atoms of Ra-225 and Ra-226 in a magneto-optical trap -- a first for this rare element -- and have identified black-body radiation as a beneficial source of optical repumping. We will present our laser cooling scheme and ongoing measurements of atomic level energies, lifetimes, isotope shifts and hyperfine structure in radium and discuss our progress towards an EDM measurement of Ra-225 based on an optical dipole trap. This work is supported by DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  16. Laser Tracker Calibration - Testing the Angle Measurement System -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gassner, Georg; Ruland, Robert; /SLAC

    2008-12-05

    Physics experiments at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) usually require high accuracy positioning, e. g. 100 {micro}m over a distance of 150 m or 25 {micro}m in a 10 x 10 x 3 meter volume. Laser tracker measurement systems have become one of the most important tools for achieving these accuracies when mapping components. The accuracy of these measurements is related to the manufacturing tolerances of various individual components, the resolutions of measurement systems, the overall precision of the assembly, and how well imperfections can be modeled. As with theodolites and total stations, one can remove the effects of most assembly and calibration errors by measuring targets in both direct and reverse positions and computing the mean to obtain the result. However, this approach does not compensate for errors originating from the encoder system. In order to improve and gain a better understanding of laser tracker angle measurement tolerances we extended our laboratory's capabilities with the addition of a horizontal angle calibration test stand. This setup is based on the use of a high precision rotary table providing an angular accuracy of better than 0.2 arcsec. Presently, our setup permits only tests of the horizontal angle measurement system. A test stand for vertical angle calibration is under construction. Distance measurements (LECOCQ & FUSS, 2000) are compared to an interferometer bench for distances of up to 32 m. Together both tests provide a better understanding of the instrument and how it should be operated. The observations also provide a reasonable estimate of covariance information of the measurements according to their actual performance for network adjustments.

  17. Thermal tests for laser Doppler perfusion measurements in Raynaud's syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacprzak, Michal; Skora, A.; Obidzinska, J.; Zbiec, A.; Maniewski, Roman; Staszkiewicz, W.

    2004-07-01

    The laser Doppler method offers a non-invasive, real time technique for monitoring of blood perfusion in microcirculation. In practical measurements the perfusion index is given only in relative values. Thus, accurate and reproducible results can be only obtained when using a well controlled stimulation test. The aim of this study was evaluation of the thermal stimulation test, which is frequently used to investigate microcirculation in patients with Raynaud's syndrome. Three types of thermal tests, in which air or water with temperature in range 5°C - 40°C were used. Ten normal volunteers and fifteen patients with clinical symptoms of the primary Raynaud's syndrome were enrolled in this study. To estimate skin microcirculation changes during the thermal test, the multichannel laser Doppler system and laser Doppler scanner were used. The obtained results were analyzed from the point of view of the efficiency of these methods and the thermal provocative tests in differentiation of normal subjects and patient with Raynaud's syndrome.

  18. Emittance Measurements from a Laser Driven Electron Injector

    CERN Document Server

    Reis, D

    2003-01-01

    The Gun Test Facility (GTF) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center was constructed to develop an appropriate electron beam suitable for driving a short wavelength free electron laser (FEL) such as the proposed Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). For operation at a wavelength of 1.5 (angstrom), the LCLS requires an electron injector that can produce an electron beam with approximately 1 pi mm-mrad normalized rms emittance with at least 1 nC of charge in a 10 ps or shorter bunch. The GTF consists of a photocathode rf gun, emittance-compensation solenoid, 3 m linear accelerator (linac), drive laser, and diagnostics to measure the beam. The rf gun is a symmetrized 1.6 cell, s-band high gradient, room temperature, photocathode structure. Simulations show that this gun when driven by a temporally and spatially shaped drive laser, appropriately focused with the solenoid, and further accelerated in linac can produce a beam that meets the LCLS requirements. This thesis describes the initial characterization of the ...

  19. Towards polarization measurements of laser-accelerated helium-3 ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engin, Ilhan

    2015-08-28

    In the framework of this thesis, preparatory investigations for the spin-polarization measurement of {sup 3}He ions from laser-induced plasmas have been performed. Therefore, experiments aiming at an efficient laser-induced ion acceleration out of a {sup 4}He gas target were carried out at two high-intensity laser facilities: the Arcturus laser at Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf as well as PHELIX at GSI Darmstadt. The scientific goal of both experiments was to investigate the ion-acceleration process in underdense plasmas by measuring the ion energy spectra and the angular distribution of the ion signal around the gas-jet target. Laser-accelerated MeV-He-ions could successfully be detected. The main acceleration direction at large angles with regard to the laser propagation direction was determined. In a second step, unpolarized {sup 3}He gas was attached in order to cross-check the experimental results with those of {sup 4}He. With the help of the achieved ion yield data, the expected rates of the fusion reaction D({sup 3}He,p){sup 4}He in the polarized case have been estimated: the information regarding the fusion proton yield from this nuclear reaction allows an experimentally based estimation for future experiments with pre-polarized {sup 3}He gas as plasma target. The experimental data is in line with supporting Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations performed on the Juelich supercomputers. For this purpose, the simulated target was defined as a neutral gas. The use of pre-polarized {sup 3}He gas demands a special preparation of a polarized {sup 3}He target for laser-acceleration experiments. This layout includes an (external) homogeneous magnetic holding field (field strength of ∝1.4 mT) for storing the pre-polarized gas for long time durations inside the PHELIX target chamber. For this purpose, a precise Halbach array consisting of horizontally arranged rings with built-in permanent magnets had to be designed, optimized, and constructed to deliver high

  20. A geopotential model from satellite tracking, altimeter, and surface gravity data: GEM-T3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, F. J.; Nerem, R. S.; Putney, B. H.; Felsentreger, T. L.; Sanchez, B. V.; Marshall, J. A.; Klosko, S. M.; Patel, G. B.; Williamson, R. G.; Chinn, D. S.

    1994-01-01

    An improved model of Earth's gravitational field, Goddard Earth Model T-3 (GEM-T3), has been developed from a combination of satellite tracking, satellite altimeter, and surface gravimetric data. GEM-T3 provides a significant improvement in the modeling of the gravity field at half wavelengths of 400 km and longer. This model, complete to degree and order 50, yields more accurate satellite orbits and an improved geoid representation than previous Goddard Earth Models. GEM-T3 uses altimeter data from GEOS 3 (1975-1976), Seasat (1978) and Geosat (1986-1987). Tracking information used in the solution includes more than 1300 arcs of data encompassing 31 different satellites. The recovery of the long-wavelength components of the solution relies mostly on highly precise satellite laser ranging (SLR) data, but also includes Tracking Network (TRANET) Doppler, optical, and satellite-to-satellite tracking acquired between the ATS 6 and GEOS 3 satellites. The main advances over GEM-T2 (beyond the inclusion of altimeter and surface gravity information which is essential for the resolution of the shorter wavelength geoid) are some improved tracking data analysis approaches and additional SLR data. Although the use of altimeter data has greatly enhanced the modeling of the ocean geoid between 65 deg N and 60 deg S latitudes in GEM-T3, the lack of accurate detailed surface gravimetry leaves poor geoid resolution over many continental regions of great tectonic interest (e.g., Himalayas, Andes). Estimates of polar motion, tracking station coordinates, and long-wavelength ocean tidal terms were also made (accounting for 6330 parameters). GEM-T3 has undergone error calibration using a technique based on subset solutions to produce reliable error estimates. The calibration is based on the condition that the expected mean square deviation of a subset gravity solution from the full set values is predicted by the solutions' error covariances. Data weights are iteratively adjusted until

  1. Up Conversion Measurements in Er:YAG; Comparison with 1.6 Micrometer Laser Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Walsh, Brian M.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Reichle, Donald J.; Busch, George E.; Carrion, William A.

    2011-01-01

    Up conversion significantly affects Er:YAG lasers. Measurements performed here for low Er concentration are significantly different than reported high Er concentration. The results obtained here are used to predict laser performance and are compared with experimental results.

  2. Sound Power Estimation by Laser Doppler Vibration Measurement Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.M. Revel

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to propose simple and quick methods for the determination of the sound power emitted by a vibrating surface, by using non-contact vibration measurement techniques. In order to calculate the acoustic power by vibration data processing, two different approaches are presented. The first is based on the method proposed in the Standard ISO/TR 7849, while the second is based on the superposition theorem. A laser-Doppler scanning vibrometer has been employed for vibration measurements. Laser techniques open up new possibilities in this field because of their high spatial resolution and their non-intrusivity. The technique has been applied here to estimate the acoustic power emitted by a loudspeaker diaphragm. Results have been compared with those from a commercial Boundary Element Method (BEM software and experimentally validated by acoustic intensity measurements. Predicted and experimental results seem to be in agreement (differences lower than 1 dB thus showing that the proposed techniques can be employed as rapid solutions for many practical and industrial applications. Uncertainty sources are addressed and their effect is discussed.

  3. Measurement of heat pump processes induced by laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbuny, M.; Henningsen, T.

    1983-01-01

    A series of experiments was performed in which a suitably tuned CO2 laser, frequency doubled by a Tl3AsSe37 crystal, was brought into resonance with a P-line or two R-lines in the fundamental vibration spectrum of CO. Cooling or heating produced by absorption in CO was measured in a gas-thermometer arrangement. P-line cooling and R-line heating could be demonstrated, measured, and compared. The experiments were continued with CO mixed with N2 added in partial pressures from 9 to 200 Torr. It was found that an efficient collisional resonance energy transfer from CO to N2 existed which increased the cooling effects by one to two orders of magnitude over those in pure CO. Temperature reductions in the order of tens of degrees Kelvin were obtained by a single pulse in the core of the irradiated volume. These measurements followed predicted values rather closely, and it is expected that increase of pulse energies and durations will enhance the heat pump effects. The experiments confirm the feasibility of quasi-isentropic engines which convert laser power into work without the need for heat rejection. Of more immediate potential interest is the possibility of remotely powered heat pumps for cryogenic use, such applications are discussed to the extent possible at the present stage.

  4. Mapping of sea bottom topography over western offshore, India using TOPEX/ERS-1 altimeter data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mohanty, K.K.; Majumdar, T.J.; Kunte, P.D.; Srivastava, A.K.

    convolution model using satellite altimeter data over the Indian offshore region. The study used TOPEX/POSEIDON as well as ERS-1 altimeter data, along with National Geophysical Data Centre (NGDC), USA ship-borne bathymetry data. The altimeter range data...

  5. Non-contact Laser-based Human Respiration Rate Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalise, L.; Marchionni, P.; Ercoli, I.

    2011-08-01

    At present the majority of the instrumentation, used in clinical environments, to measure human respiration rate are based on invasive and contact devices. The gold standard instrument is considered the spirometer which is largely used; it needs a direct contact and requires a collaboration by the patient. Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDVi) is an optical, non-contact measurement system for the assessment of a surface velocity and displacement. LDVi has already been used for the measurement of the cardiac activity and for the measurement of the chest-wall displacements. The aims of this work are to select the best measurement point on the thoracic surface for LDVi monitoring of the respiration rate (RR) and to compare measured data with the RR valued provided by the spirometer. The measurement system is composed by a LDV system and a data acquisition board installed on a PC. Tests were made on 10 different point of the thorax for each patient. Patients population was composed by 33 subjects (17 male and 16 female). The optimal measurement point was chosen considering the maximum peak-to-peak value of the displacement measured by LDV. Before extracting RR we have used a special wavelet decomposition for better selection of the expiration peaks. A standard spirometer was used for the validation of the data. From tests it results that the optimal measurement point, namely is located on the inferior part of the thoracic region (left, front side). From our tests we have obtained a close correlation between the RR values measured by the spirometer and those measured by the proposed method: a difference of 14±211 ms on the RR value is reported for the entire population of 33 subjects. Our method allows a no-contact measurement of lungs activity (respiration period), reducing the electric and biological risks. Moreover it allows to measure in critical environment like in RMN or in burned skin where is difficult or impossible to apply electrodes.

  6. Laser Doppler flowmetry to measure changes in cerebral blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Brad A; Rabie, Tamer; Buchan, Alastair M

    2014-01-01

    Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is a method by which relative cerebral blood flow (CBF) of the cortex can be measured. Although the method is easy to employ, LDF only measures relative CBF, while absolute CBF cannot be quantified. LDF is useful for investigating CBF changes in a number of different applications including neurovascular and stroke research. This chapter will prepare the reader for rodent experiments using LDF with two preparations. The closed skull preparation can be used to monitor CBF with an intact skull, but in adult rats, thinning of the skull is required to obtain an accurate cortical CBF signal. The open skull preparation requires a craniotomy to expose the surface of the brain and the LDF probe is held close to the surface to measure cerebral perfusion.

  7. Measuring fast electron spectra and laser absorption in relativistic laser-solid interactions using differential bremsstrahlung photon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, R H H; Perez, F; Streeter, M J V; Davies, J R; Schlenvoigt, H -P; Santos, J J; Hulin, S; Lancaster, K L; Baton, S D; Rose, S J; Norreys, P A

    2013-01-01

    A photon detector suitable for the measurement of bremsstrahlung spectra generated in relativistically-intense laser-solid interactions is described. The Monte Carlo techniques used to back-out the fast electron spectrum and laser energy absorbed into fast electrons are detailed. A relativistically-intense laser-solid experiment using frequency doubled laser light is used to demonstrate the effective operation of the detector. The experimental data was interpreted using the 3-spatial-dimension Monte Carlo code MCNPX (Pelowitz 2008), and the fast electron temperature found to be 125 keV.

  8. Measuring fast electron spectra and laser absorption in relativistic laser-solid interactions using differential bremsstrahlung photon detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, R H H; Clark, E L; Pérez, F; Streeter, M J V; Davies, J R; Schlenvoigt, H-P; Santos, J J; Hulin, S; Lancaster, K L; Baton, S D; Rose, S J; Norreys, P A

    2013-08-01

    A photon detector suitable for the measurement of bremsstrahlung spectra generated in relativistically intense laser-solid interactions is described. The Monte Carlo techniques used to extract the fast electron spectrum and laser energy absorbed into forward-going fast electrons are detailed. A relativistically intense laser-solid experiment using frequency doubled laser light is used to demonstrate the effective operation of the detector. The experimental data were interpreted using the 3-spatial-dimension Monte Carlo code MCNPX [D. Pelowitz, MCNPX User's Manual Version 2.6.0, Los Alamos National Laboratory, 2008], and the fast electron temperature found to be 125 keV.

  9. Non-contact measurement of ocular microtremor using laser speckle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, E.; Coakley, D.; Boyle, G.

    2010-04-01

    The human eye moves continuously even while it appears to be at rest. The involuntary eye movements causing this motion are called fixational eye movements. Ocular Microtremor (OMT) is the smallest (150 - 2500nm amplitude) and fastest (~ 80Hz) of these eye movements. OMT has been proven to provide useful clinical information regarding depth of consciousness and neurological disorders. Most quantitative clinical investigations of OMT have been carried out using an eye-contacting piezoelectric probe. However, this measurement procedure suffers from a number of disadvantages which limit the potential of the technique in the clinical environment. The need for eye contact requires the eye to be anaesthetised and not all subjects can tolerate the procedure. A promising alternative to the piezoelectric technique is speckle metrology. A speckle correlation instrument for measuring OMT was first described by Al-Kalbani et al. The approach presented in this paper is a non contact measurement technique implementing laser speckle correlation and using a highly light sensitive video camera operating at 500Hz. The OMT measurement technique in this paper was investigated using a human subject and an eye movement simulator. Using this system, measurement of speckle on the eye takes only a few minutes, no eye drops are necessary and no discomfort is caused to the subject. The paper describes the preliminary results of capturing speckle from the simulator and from the human eye in-vivo at eye safe laser powers. The effects of tear flow, biospeckle and speckle shifting by larger eye movements on the displacement information carried by the speckle are also discussed.

  10. Minimization of errors in narrowband laser phase noise measurements based on reference measurement channels

    CERN Document Server

    Pnev, A B; Dvoretskiy, D A; Zhirnov, A A; Nesterov, E T; Sazonkin, S G; Chernutsky, A O; Shelestov, D A; Fedorov, A K; Svelto, C; Karasik, V E

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel scheme for laser phase noise measurements with minimized sensitivity to external fluctuations including interferometer vibration, temperature instability, other low-frequency noise, and relative intensity noise. In order to minimize the effect of these external fluctuations, we employ simultaneous measurement of two spectrally separated channels in the scheme. We present an algorithm for selection of the desired signal to extract the phase noise. Experimental results demonstrate potential of the suggested scheme for a wide range of technological applications.

  11. Femtosecond laser electronic excitation tagging for aerodynamic and thermodynamic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Nathan David

    This thesis presents applications of Femtosecond Laser Electronic Excitation Tagging (FLEET) to a variety of aerodynamic and thermodynamic measurements. FLEET tagged line characteristics such as intensity, width and spectral features are investigated in various flow conditions (pressure, temperature, velocity, steadiness, etc.) and environments (gas composition) for both temporally and spatially instantaneous and averaged data. Special attention is drawn to the nature of first and second positive systems of molecular nitrogen and the ramifications on FLEET measurements. Existing laser-based diagnostic techniques are summarized and FLEET is directly compared with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in various low speed flows. Multidimensional velocity, acceleration, vorticity and other flow parameters are extracted in supersonic free jets and within an enclosed in-draft tunnel test section. Probability distribution functions of the mean and standard deviation of critical flow parameters are unveiled by utilizing a Bayesian statistical framework wherein likelihood functions are established from prior and posterior distributions. Advanced image processing techniques based on fuzzy logic are applied to single-shot FLEET images with low signal-to-noise ratio to improve image quality and reduce uncertainty in data processing algorithms. Lastly, FLEET second positive and first negative emission are considered at a wide range of pressures to correct for changes in select rovibrational peak magnitude and shape due to density from which bulk gas temperature may be extracted.

  12. STREAK CAMERA MEASUREMENTS OF THE APS PC GUN DRIVE LASER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooling, J. C.; Lumpkin, A. H.

    2017-06-25

    We report recent pulse-duration measurements of the APS PC Gun drive laser at both second harmonic and fourth harmonic wavelengths. The drive laser is a Nd:Glass-based chirped pulsed amplifier (CPA) operating at an IR wavelength of 1053 nm, twice frequency-doubled to obtain UV output for the gun. A Hamamatsu C5680 streak camera and an M5675 synchroscan unit are used for these measurements; the synchroscan unit is tuned to 119 MHz, the 24th subharmonic of the linac s-band operating frequency. Calibration is accomplished both electronically and optically. Electronic calibration utilizes a programmable delay line in the 119 MHz rf path. The optical delay uses an etalon with known spacing between reflecting surfaces and is coated for the visible, SH wavelength. IR pulse duration is monitored with an autocorrelator. Fitting the streak camera image projected profiles with Gaussians, UV rms pulse durations are found to vary from 2.1 ps to 3.5 ps as the IR varies from 2.2 ps to 5.2 ps.

  13. ILC beam energy measurement by means of laser Compton backscattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muchnoi, N. [Budker Inst. for Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Schreiber, H.J.; Viti, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    A novel, non-invasive method of measuring the beam energy at the International Linear Collider is proposed. Laser light collides head-on with beam particles and either the energy of the Compton scattered electrons near the kinematic end-point is measured or the positions of the Compton backscattered {gamma}-rays, the edge electrons and the unscattered beam particles are recorded. A compact layout for the Compton spectrometer is suggested. It consists of a bending magnet and position sensitive detectors operating in a large radiation environment. Several options for high spatial resolution detectors are discussed. Simulation studies support the use of an infrared or green laser and quartz fiber detectors to monitor the backscattered photons and edge electrons. Employing a cavity monitor, the beam particle position downstream of the magnet can be recorded with submicrometer precision. Such a scheme provides a feasible and promising method to access the incident beam energy with precisions of 10{sup -4} or better on a bunch-to-bunch basis while the electron and positron beams are in collision. (orig.)

  14. Fast automotive diesel exhaust measurement using quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, J.; Brunner, R.; Lambrecht, A.

    2013-12-01

    Step by step, US and European legislations enforce the further reduction of atmospheric pollution caused by automotive exhaust emissions. This is pushing automotive development worldwide. Fuel efficient diesel engines with SCRtechnology can impede NO2-emission by reduction with NH3 down to the ppm range. To meet the very low emission limits of the Euro6 resp. US NLEV (National Low Emission Vehicle) regulations, automotive manufacturers have to optimize continuously all phases of engine operation and corresponding catalytic converters. Especially nonstationary operation holds a high potential for optimizing gasoline consumption and further reducing of pollutant emissions. Test equipment has to cope with demanding sensitivity and speed requirements. In the past Fraunhofer IPM has developed a fast emission analyzer called DEGAS (Dynamic Exhaust Gas Analyzer System), based on cryogenically cooled lead salt lasers. These systems have been used at Volkswagen AG`s test benches for a decade. Recently, IPM has developed DEGAS-Next which is based on cw quantum cascade lasers and thermoelectrically cooled detectors. The system is capable to measure three gas components (i.e. NO, NO2, NH3) in two channels with a time resolution of 20 ms and 1 ppm detection limits. We shall present test data and a comparison with fast FTIR measurements.

  15. Dopamine sensing and measurement using threshold and spectral measurements in random lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan Ismail, Wan Zakiah; Liu, Guozhen; Zhang, Kai; Goldys, Ewa M; Dawes, Judith M

    2016-01-25

    We developed a novel dopamine sensing and measurement technique based on aggregation of gold nanoparticles in random lasers. Dopamine combined with copper ions triggers the aggregation of gold nanoparticles and thus affects the performance of random lasers. Dopamine sensing can be achieved using four parameters which are sensitive to the presence of dopamine, that is emission peak shift, emission linewidth, signal-to-noise ratio (peak emission intensity / noise) and random lasing threshold. The dopamine is most sensitively detected by a change in the emission linewidth with a limit of detection of 1 × 10(-7) M, as well as by an increase in the lasing threshold. The dopamine concentration from 1 × 10(-7) M to 1 × 10(-2) M can be determined by calibrating with the laser threshold.

  16. Validating NASA's Airborne Multikilohertz Microlaser Altimeter (Microaltimeter) by Direct Comparison of Data Taken Over Ocean City, Maryland Against an Existing Digital Elevation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Peter

    2003-01-01

    NASA's Airborne Multikilohertz Microlaser Altimeter (Microaltimeter) is a scanning, photon-counting laser altimeter, which uses a low energy (less than 10 microJuoles), high repetition rate (approximately 10 kHz) laser, transmitting at 532 nm. A 14 cm diameter telescope images the ground return onto a segmented anode photomultiplier, which provides up to 16 range returns for each fire. Multiple engineering flights were made during 2001 and 2002 over the Maryland and Virginia coastal area, all during daylight hours. Post-processing of the data to geolocate the laser footprint and determine the terrain height requires post- detection Poisson filtering techniques to extract the actual ground returns from the noise. Validation of the instrument's ability to produce accurate terrain heights will be accomplished by direct comparison of data taken over Ocean City, Maryland with a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the region produced at Ohio State University (OSU) from other laser altimeter and photographic sources. The techniques employed to produce terrain heights from the Microaltimeter ranges will be shown, along with some preliminary comparisons with the OSU DEM.

  17. Characterizing Far-infrared Laser Emissions and the Measurement of Their Frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Michael; Zink, Lyndon R

    2015-12-18

    The generation and subsequent measurement of far-infrared radiation has found numerous applications in high-resolution spectroscopy, radio astronomy, and Terahertz imaging. For about 45 years, the generation of coherent, far-infrared radiation has been accomplished using the optically pumped molecular laser. Once far-infrared laser radiation is detected, the frequencies of these laser emissions are measured using a three-laser heterodyne technique. With this technique, the unknown frequency from the optically pumped molecular laser is mixed with the difference frequency between two stabilized, infrared reference frequencies. These reference frequencies are generated by independent carbon dioxide lasers, each stabilized using the fluorescence signal from an external, low pressure reference cell. The resulting beat between the known and unknown laser frequencies is monitored by a metal-insulator-metal point contact diode detector whose output is observed on a spectrum analyzer. The beat frequency between these laser emissions is subsequently measured and combined with the known reference frequencies to extrapolate the unknown far-infrared laser frequency. The resulting one-sigma fractional uncertainty for laser frequencies measured with this technique is ± 5 parts in 10(7). Accurately determining the frequency of far-infrared laser emissions is critical as they are often used as a reference for other measurements, as in the high-resolution spectroscopic investigations of free radicals using laser magnetic resonance. As part of this investigation, difluoromethane, CH2F2, was used as the far-infrared laser medium. In all, eight far-infrared laser frequencies were measured for the first time with frequencies ranging from 0.359 to 1.273 THz. Three of these laser emissions were discovered during this investigation and are reported with their optimal operating pressure, polarization with respect to the CO2 pump laser, and strength.

  18. Thermal Conductivity Based on Modified Laser Flash Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bochuan; Ban, Heng; Li, Chao; Scripa, Rosalia N.; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    2005-01-01

    The laser flash method is a standard method for thermal diffusivity measurement. It employs single-pulse heating of one side of a thin specimen and measures the temperature response of the other side. The thermal diffusivity of the specimen can be obtained based on a one-dimensional transient heat transfer analysis. This paper reports the development of a theory that includes a transparent reference layer with known thermal property attached to the back of sample. With the inclusion of heat conduction from the sample to the reference layer in the theoretical analysis, the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of sample can be extracted from the temperature response data. Furthermore, a procedure is established to select two points from the data to calculate these properties. The uncertainty analysis indicates that this method can be used with acceptable levels of uncertainty.

  19. Generation And Measurement Of High Contrast Ultrashort Intense Laser Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Konoplev, O A

    2000-01-01

    In this thesis, the generation and measurement of high contrast, intense, ultrashort pulses have been studied. Various factors affecting the contrast and pulse shape of ultrashort light pulses from a chirped pulse amplification (CPA) laser system are identified. The level of contrast resulting from influence of these factors is estimated. Methods for improving and controlling the pulse shape and increasing the contrast are discussed. Ultrahigh contrast, 1-ps pulses were generated from a CPA system with no temporal structure up to eleven orders of magnitude. This is eight orders of magnitude higher contrast than the original pulse. This contrast boost was achieved using two techniques. One is the optical pulse cleaning based on the nonlinear birefringence of the chirping fiber and applied to the pulses before amplification. The other is the fast saturable absorber. The fast saturable absorber was placed after amplification and compression of the pulse. The measurements of high-contrast, ultrashort pulse with h...

  20. A do-it-yourself altimeter for trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geesink, R.

    1982-01-01

    Commercially available tree altimeters are expensive and heavy, and my personal experience with these instruments is thus minimal. During my last expedition I only used it now and then in the base camp to correct my ’feeling for estimation’. I have little doubt that colleagues will recognize these f

  1. The Importance of Altimeter and Scatterometer Data for Ocean Prediction,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    of water vapour , wind speed and wave height. Nature, 294, 529-532. Cheney, R. E. and J. G. Marsh, 1981: SEASAT altimeter observations of dynamic...E. and J. D. Thompson, 1980: A numerical study of Loop Current intrusions and eddy shedding. J. Phys. Oceanogr., 10, 1611-1651. ’Hurlburt, H. E. and J

  2. High resolved velocity measurements using Laser Cantilever Anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puczylowski, Jaroslaw; Hölling, Michael; Peinke, Joachim

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a new anemometer, namely the 2d-LCA (2d-Laser-Cantilever-Anemometer), that is capable of performing high resolved velocity measurements in fluids. The anemometer uses a micostructured cantilever made of silicon as a sensing element. The specific shape and the small dimensions (about 150µm) of the cantilever allow for precise measurements of two velocity component at a temporal resolution of about 150kHz. The angular acceptance range is 180° in total. The 2d-LCA is a simple to use alternative to x-wires and can be used in many areas of operation including measurements in liquids or in particle-laden flows. Unlike hot-wires, the resolution power of the 2d-LCA does not decrease with increasing flow velocity, making it particularly suitable for measurements in high-speed flows. In the recent past new cantilever designs were implemented with the goal to further improve the angular resolution and increase the stability. In addition, we have designed more robust cantilevers for measurements in rough environments such as offshore areas. Successful comparative measurements with hot-wires have been carried out in order to assess the performance of the 2d-LCA.

  3. Beam splitting target reflector based compensation for angular drift of laser beam in laser autocollimation of measuring small angle deviations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fan; Tan, Jiubin; Cui, Jiwen

    2013-06-01

    Beam splitting target reflector based compensation for the angular drift of laser beam in laser autocollimation is proposed in this article to improve the measurement accuracy and stability of small angle deviations. A beam splitting target reflector is used to replace the plane mirror in laser autocollimation to generate a reference beam when returning the measurement beam. The reference beam and measurement beam have the same angular drift, but have different sensitivities to the rotation angle of the reflector due to the unique characteristics of the reflector. Thus, the angular drift of laser beam in laser autocollimation can be compensated in real time by using the drift of reference beam. Experimental results indicate that an output stability of 0.085 arc sec in 2 h can be achieved after compensation. And a measurement accuracy of ±0.032 arc sec can be obtained over the range of ±1190 arc sec with an effective resolution of 0.006 arc sec. It is confirmed that the compensation method for the angular drift of laser beam is necessary for improving the measurement accuracy and stability in laser autocollimation.

  4. Beam splitting target reflector based compensation for angular drift of laser beam in laser autocollimation of measuring small angle deviations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu Fan; Tan Jiubin; Cui Jiwen [Center of Ultra-precision Optoelectronic Instrument Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China)

    2013-06-15

    Beam splitting target reflector based compensation for the angular drift of laser beam in laser autocollimation is proposed in this article to improve the measurement accuracy and stability of small angle deviations. A beam splitting target reflector is used to replace the plane mirror in laser autocollimation to generate a reference beam when returning the measurement beam. The reference beam and measurement beam have the same angular drift, but have different sensitivities to the rotation angle of the reflector due to the unique characteristics of the reflector. Thus, the angular drift of laser beam in laser autocollimation can be compensated in real time by using the drift of reference beam. Experimental results indicate that an output stability of 0.085 arc sec in 2 h can be achieved after compensation. And a measurement accuracy of {+-}0.032 arc sec can be obtained over the range of {+-}1190 arc sec with an effective resolution of 0.006 arc sec. It is confirmed that the compensation method for the angular drift of laser beam is necessary for improving the measurement accuracy and stability in laser autocollimation.

  5. Evaluation of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness measurement following laser in situ keratomileusis using scanning laser polarimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dada Tanuj

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the effect of laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK on the measurement of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness by scanning laser polarimetry using customized corneal compensation in myopes. Materials and Methods: Scanning laser polarimetry was performed on 54 eyes of 54 healthy patients with myopia using the glaucoma diagnostics variable corneal compensation (GDx VCC instrument (Laser Diagnostic Technologies, San Diego, California before and a week after LASIK. The various parameters were compared using the Student′s t test. Results: No statistically significant change was observed in any of the retinal nerve fiber layer parameters before and after LASIK. Conclusions: While the measurement of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness by scanning laser polarimetry is affected by anterior segment birefringent properties and LASIK would be expected to produce changes in the same, customized corneal compensation using the GDx VCC seems to adequately compensate for these changes.

  6. Laser-Shock Experiments: Calorimetry Measurements to TPa Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanloz, R.

    2012-12-01

    Laser-driven shock experiments are more like calorimetry measurements, characterized by determinations of Hugoniot temperature (TH) as a function of shock velocity (US), rather than the equation-of-state measurements afforded by mechanical-impact experiments. This is because particle velocity (up) is often not accessible to direct measurement in laser-shock experiments, so must be inferred with reference to a material having a well-determined, independently calibrated Hugoniot equation of state (up is obtained from the impact velocity in traditional shock experiments, and the combination of US and up yields the pressure-density equation of state for the sample). Application of a Mie-Grüneisen model shows that the isochoric specific heat for a given phase is: CV = (US - c0)2 {s2US (dTH/dUS) + γ0 c0 s (TH/US)}-1 with US = c0 + s up, and γ0 is the zero-pressure Grüneisen parameter (γ/V = constant is assumed here). This result is a generalization to TH-US variables of the Walsh and Christian (1955) formula for the temperature rise along the Hugoniot of a given phase (identified here with a US - up relation that is locally linear); it can be analytically integrated to give TH(US) in terms of an average value of CV, if no phase transition takes place. Analysis of the TH-US slopes obtained from laser-shock measurements on MgO yields specific-heat values ranging from 1.02 (± 0.05) kJ/kg/K at 320-345 GPa and TH = 7700-9000 K to 1.50 (± 0.05) kJ/kg/K at 350-380 GPa and TH = 8700-9500 K. A fit to the absolute values of TH(US) in this pressure-temperature range gives CV = 1.26 (± 0.10) kJ/kg/K, in good accord with the Dulong-Petit value CV = 1.24 kJ/kg/K.

  7. SIMULATION OF THE Ku-BAND RADAR ALTIMETER SEA ICE EFFECTIVE SCATTERING SURFACE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonboe, Rasmus; Andersen, Søren; Pedersen, Leif Toudal

    2006-01-01

    A radiative transfer model is used to simulate the sea ice radar altimeter effective scattering surface variability as a function of snow depth and density. Under dry snow conditions without layering these are the primary snow parameters affecting the scattering surface variability. The model...... is initialised with in situ data collected during the May 2004 GreenIce ice camp in the Lincoln Sea (73ºW; 85ºN). Our results show that the snow cover is important for the effective scattering surface depth in sea ice and thus for the range measurement, ice freeboard and ice thickness estimation....

  8. GFO and JASON Altimeter Engineering Assessment Report. Update: GFO-Acceptance to End of Mission on October 22, 2008, JASON-Acceptance to September 29, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conger, A. M.; Hancock, D. W., III; Hayne, G. S.; Brooks, R. L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to present and document GEOSAT Follow-On (GFO) performance analyses and results. This is the ninth Assessment Report since the initial report and is our final one. This report extends the performance assessment since acceptance on November 29, 2000 to the end of mission (EOM) on October 22, 2008. Since launch, February 10, 1998 to the EOM, we performed a variety of GFO performance studies; Appendix A provides an accumulative index of those studies. We began the inclusion of analyses of the JASON altimeter after the end of the Topographic Experiment (TOPEX) mission. Prior to this, JASON and TOPEX were compared during our assessment of the TOPEX altimeter. With the end of the TOPEX mission, we developed methods to report on JASON as it related to GFO. It should be noted the GFO altimeter, after operating for over 7 years, was power cycled off to on and on to off approximately 14 times a day for over 18 months in space with no failure. The GFO altimeter proved to be a remarkable instrument providing stable ocean surface measurements for nearly eight years. This report completes our GFO altimeter performance assessment.

  9. Reproducibility of Neonate Ocular Circulation Measurements Using Laser Speckle Flowgraphy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Matsumoto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Measuring the ocular blood flow in neonates may clarify the relationships between eye diseases and ocular circulation abnormalities. However, no method for noninvasively measuring ocular circulation in neonates is established. We used laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG modified for neonates to measure their ocular circulation and investigated whether this method is reproducible. During their normal sleep, we studied 16 subjects (adjusted age of 34–48 weeks whose blood flow could be measured three consecutive times. While the subjects slept in the supine position, three mean blur rate (MBR values of the optic nerve head (ONH were obtained: the MBR-A (mean of all values, MBR-V (vessel mean, and MBR-T (tissue mean, and nine blood flow pulse waveform parameters in the ONH were examined. We analyzed the coefficient of variation (COV and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC for each parameter. The COVs of the MBR values were all ≤10%. The ICCs of the MBR values were all >0.8. Good COVs were observed for the blowout score, blowout time, rising rate, falling rate, and acceleration time index. Although the measurement of ocular circulation in the neonates was difficult, our results exhibited reproducibility, suggesting that this method could be used in clinical research.

  10. Laser velocimeter measurements of multiphase flow of solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadambi, J.R.; Chen, R.C.; Bhunia, S.

    1989-01-01

    A unique refractive index matched facility for studying solid-liquid multiphase flow has been developed. The refractive index matching of the solid and the liquid allows the use of non-intrusive Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) to measure the solid and the liquid velocities. These measurements will be useful in developing a better understanding of solid-liquid flows, especially solid-liquid and solid-solid interactions. Silica gel and 50% sodium iodide solution in water (refractive index {approx}1.443) are used as the refractive index matched solid and liquid respectively. A two color back scatter mode LDV is used for making velocity measurements. Tests were conducted in solid-liquid slurries with volumetric solid concentration levels of 5% and 15% in the Reynolds number (Re) range of 400 to 9200. Silica gel particles of mean diameter 40 microns were used. Measurements included mapping of the solid and liquid velocities and obtaining the pressure drop data. Signal processing technique utilizing histogram of velocity measurements made at a point and signal amplitude discrimination was successfully used for differentiating between solid and liquid velocities. 34 refs., 61 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Deformation Measurement Using Terrestrial Laser Scanner for Cultural Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbesoglu, M. O.; Bakirman, T.; Gokbayrak, O.

    2016-10-01

    Historical structures are one of the most essential element of cultural heritage. They reflect history, lifestyle and tradition of a country and society. However, they are damaged through the years due to human activities and natural hazards. Therefore, digital documentation of structures and monuments is critical for preservation, sustainability and protection of cultural heritage. Terrestrial laser scanner is a widespread used tool for obtaining 3D representation of real world. In this study, we aimed to measure deformation of deformed minaret of a historical mosque using terrestrial laser scanner. In order to represent the geometry of the deformed minaret with high accuracy, 31 horizontal sections were created from the transition segment to the spire of the minaret with 30 cm intervals. The changing curvatures of the minaret were analysed in three parts; cylindrical part, balcony part and upper part. The offsets from the vertical axes for the parts of the minaret were found as 10.14 cm, 13.97 cm and 16.51 cm, respectively.

  12. On determining the spot size for laser fluence measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farkas, B. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 406, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary)]. E-mail: bfarkas@titan.physx.u-szeged.hu; Geretovszky, Zs. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 406, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary)

    2006-04-30

    Energy fluence, defined as pulse energy over irradiated area, is a key parameter of pulsed laser processing. Nevertheless, most of the authors using this term routinely do not realize the problems related to the accurate measurement of the spot size. In the present paper we are aiming to approach this problem by ablating crystalline Si wafers with pulses of a commercial KrF excimer laser ({lambda} = 248 nm, {tau} = 15 ns) both in vacuum and at ambient atmosphere. For any pulse energy, the size of the ablated area monotonously increases with increasing number of pulses. The difference in the ablated area could be as high as a factor of three when 2000 consecutive pulses impinge on the surface. The existence and extent of the gradual lowering of multi-pulse ablation threshold queries the applicability of routinely used procedure of dividing the pulse energy with the size of the ablated area exposed into either carbon-paper or a piece of Si with one or a few pulses when determining the fluence. A more quantitative way is proposed allowing comparison of results originating from different laboratories.

  13. Retinal sensitivity measurement over drusen using scanning laser ophthalmoscope microperimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamine, Y; Shiraki, K; Moriwaki, M; Yasunari, T; Miki, T

    1998-04-01

    Retinal sensitivity over drusen was examined using a scanning laser ophthalmoscope to confirm a previous report of no change in sensitivity over drusen. Microperimetry was performed using a scanning laser ophthalmoscope in 23 eyes of 19 subjects. Subject age ranged from 42 to 86 years (mean 68.5 years). Fifty-four drusen bigger than the diameter of a major retinal vein at the optic disc rim were examined, and drusen were classified as soft drusen and other large drusen. Nine eyes of eight subjects showed a decrease in retinal sensitivity over drusen. The decrease in retinal sensitivity was more than 5 dB less than the sensitivity at a peripheral non-drusen area peripheral to the measurement point. The sensitivity decrease was noted over 15 of 29 large drusen and the decrease was statistically significant (P < 0.02). However, no relationship between the size of the drusen and the amount by which sensitivity decreased was found. Nevertheless, a decrease in retinal sensitivity was not seen over any of 25 soft drusen. Large drusen may influence retinal sensitivity and function.

  14. Influence of HCl pretreatment on laser diffraction measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Philipp; Steininger, Florian; Lockot, Gregori; Lehmkuhl, Frank; Stauch, Georg; Protze, Jens; Fischer, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Sample pretreatment methods in grain size (GS) analyses differ and their influence on GS distributions has been subject of controversial discussions. The standard sample preparation usually comprises the disaggregation into single primary particles. The organic binding material is oxidized by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and the containing carbonates are dissolved by hydrochloric acid (HCl). However, laser diffraction measurements of calcified sediment sequences or sediments with high contents of organic matter show non-reproducible changes in the GS distribution. To investigate variations of the GS distribution, selected samples from two different sections in different stages of weathering and sedimentary genesis were measured using a Beckman Coulter LS13320 laser particle size analyser. A high-resolution Holocene sandy loess-paleosol sequence, the Suohuduo section on the eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau, was investigated. The results were compared with a Pleistocene loess sequence from the Lower Rhine Embayment, the Düsseldorf-Grafenberg section. The entire sample set includes samples of siliciclastic, barely weathered material and sediments from paleosols. The paleosols in the Suohudo section are strongly influenced by steppe fires and are rich in organo-mineral associations and pyrogenic carbon. All samples were pretreated with hydrogen peroxide and sodium pyrophosphate. In order to investigate the influence of HCl on the GS distribution, the samples were subsequently prepared with and without the addition of HCl. The results show that the sample preparation has a significant influence on the detected GS distribution. Hence, prior to the measurement of a sample set, the effectiveness of the pretreatment argents HCl and H2O2 should be evaluated. In order to generate a valid GS distribution, the sample pretreatment must be matched to the aim of the study and the composition of the sample. Paleoclimatic and environmental interpretation based on improper GS

  15. Spectral analysis, digital integration, and measurement of low backscatter in coherent laser radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, J. M.; Callan, R. D.; Bowdle, D. A.; Rothermel, J.

    1989-01-01

    A method of surface acoustic wave (SAW) spectral analysis and digital integration that has been used previously in coherent CW laser work with CO2 lasers at 10.6 microns is described. Expressions are derived for the signal to noise ratio in the measured voltage spectrum with an approximation for the general case and rigorous treatment for the low signal case. The atmospheric backscatter data accumulated by the airborne LATAS (laser true airspeed) coherent laser radar system are analyzed.

  16. [Diagnosis of occlusal caries lesions using laser fluorescence measurements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naphausen, M T P; Riemersma, M; Verdonschot, E H

    2002-01-01

    Recently, a device for detecting occlusal caries lesions (DIAGNOdent) has been introduced. The reproducibility and validity of this laser-fluorescence device were investigated. In the in vivo part of the study, 45 sites at the occlusal surfaces of permanent molar teeth in 13 patients were measured by 2 observers using 2 DIAGNOdent devices, one produced in 1998 and one in 1999. The interobserver reliability between both devices and both observers was established. In the in vitro part of the study, 49 permanent molars were measured by 2 observers using 2 DIAGNOdent devices. In addition, visual inspection was performed. The teeth were sectioned to measure the histological depth and area of the caries lesions. The reproducibility of both DIAGNOdent devices was high, and so was the interobserver reliability. The correlation between DIAGNOdent measurements and the actual depth of the caries lesions was lower than that of visual inspection. The correlation with the enamel part of the lesion exceeded that of the dentine part. It was concluded that the validity of the DIAGNOdent, expressed as the area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve, was not statistically significantly different from that of visual inspection. Because of the high reproducibility, dental practitioners who wish to use the DIAGNOdent for monitoring caries lesions, this investigation indicates that an old device may be replaced by a new one, provided that the same tip will be used.

  17. Recovery Time Measurements of Silicon Photomultipliers Using a Pulsed Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Gruber, L; Curceanu, C; Marton, J; Vidal, A Romero; Scordo, A; Suzuki, K; Doce, O Vazquez

    2015-01-01

    We performed an experimental study to determine the pixel recovery time of various Multi Pixel Photon Counters (MPPCs) in order to characterize their rate capability and double-hit resolution. The recovery time constant and its dependence on the operating voltage has been evaluated by measuring the photosensor response to two consecutive laser pulses with varying relative time differences of a few ns (2-3 ns) up to some 100 ns using a waveform analysis technique. A Monte Carlo simulation tool is being developed to model the MPPC recovery process and interpret experimental data. In this context, the influence of after-pulsing, cross-talk and dark-noise on the recovery process can be studied.

  18. Prediction of absorption coefficients by pulsed laser induced photoacoustic measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priya, Mallika; Satish Rao, B S; Ray, Satadru; Mahato, K K

    2014-06-05

    In the current study, a pulsed laser induced photoacoustic spectroscopy setup was designed and developed, aiming its application in clinical diagnostics. The setup was optimized with carbon black samples in water and with various tryptophan concentrations at 281nm excitations. The sensitivity of the setup was estimated by determining minimum detectable concentration of tryptophan in water at the same excitation, and was found to be 0.035mM. The photoacoustic experiments were also performed with various tryptophan concentrations at 281nm excitation for predicting optical absorption coefficients in them and for comparing the outcomes with the spectrophotometrically-determined absorption coefficients for the same samples. Absorption coefficients for a few serum samples, obtained from some healthy female volunteers, were also determined through photoacoustic and spectrophotometric measurements at the same excitations, which showed good agreement between them, indicating its clinical implications.

  19. Measurement of ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov evolution from laser imprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, D. A.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Delorme, B.; Casner, A.; Masse, L.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B. A.; Olazabal-Loumé, M.

    2017-10-01

    Experiments were performed to investigate the ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability in plastic (CH2) foils. The two-dimensional (2-D) perturbations were created by laser imprinting using a special phase plate with a 2-D single mode, ˜70 μm wavelength sinusoidal intensity pattern on the plastic foil. The growth of imprinted perturbations was measured by face-on, X-ray radiography using Sm and Ta backlighters in 30-μm and 50-μm thick plastic foils, respectively. After the initial imprinting phase, the 2-D perturbations grew due to ablative RM instability before the onset of foil acceleration when they were further amplified by Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Experimental results agree reasonably well with 2-D hydrodynamic simulations and analytic models showing that the modulation growth in areal density is due to ablative RM instability.

  20. Measurements of enlarged blood pump models using Laser Doppler Anemometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, L P; Yu, S C; Leo, H L

    2000-01-01

    In an earlier study (Chua et al., 1998, 1999a), a 5:1 enlarged model of the Kyoto-NTN Magnetically Suspended Centrifugal Blood Pump (Akamatsu et al., 1995) with five different impeller blade profiles was designed and constructed. Their respective flow characteristics with respect to (1) the three different blade profile designs: forward, radial, and backward, (2) the number of blades used, and (3) the rotating speed were investigated. Among the five impeller designs, the results obtained suggested that impellers A and C designs should be adopted if higher head is required. Impellers A and C therefore were selected for the flow in between their blades to be measured using Laser Doppler Anemometer (LDA), so as to have a better understanding of the flow physics with respect to the design parameters.

  1. Validation of Altimeter Data in the Spanish Coasts (Gulf of Cadiz and Strait of Gibraltar): Lessons Learned in the Prospect of Sentinel-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Enri, P.; Vignudelli, S.; Coca, J.; Tejedor, B.; Aboitiz, A.; Munoz, J. J.; Alvarez, O.; Cipollini, P.; Passaro, M.; Villares, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Gulf of Cadiz (Southwestern Iberian Peninsula) and the Strait of Gibraltar (the choke point connecting the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea) are being used to validate altimeter information coming from past (Envisat RA-2) and present (Cryosat-2 SIRAL) European Space Agency (ESA) missions, among others. These regions represent a valuable opportunity to validate future (Sentinel-3 SRAL) altimeter missions too. We present some of the results obtained in the study areas in terms of validation of altimeter-derived sea level data coming from Envisat RA-2 and Cryosat-2 SIRAL against the in-situ measurements, and we discuss the extension of the developed techniques to AltiKa SARAL (ISRO-CNES) and Sentinel-3 SRAL (ESA).

  2. Efficient optical design and measurement technique to six sigma laser processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaggs, Michael; Haas, Gil

    2014-03-01

    A six sigma laser processing system is proposed that utilizes real time measurement of ISO 11146 and ISO 13694 laser beam parameters without disrupting the process beam and with minimal loss. If key laser beam parameters can be measured during a laser process, without a disruption to the process, then a higher level of process control can be realized. The difficulty in achieving this concept to date is that most accepted beam measurement techniques are time averaged and require interruption of the laser beam and therefore have made it impractical for real time measurement which is necessary to consider six sigma process control. Utilizing an all passive optical technique to measure a laser's beam waist and other parameters for both focused and unfocused beams, the direct measurement of the ISO laser beam parameters are realized without disruption to the process and with minimal loss. The technique is simple enough to be applied to low and high power systems well into the multi-kilowatt range. Through careful monitoring of all laser beam parameters via software control of upper and lower limits for these parameters, tighter quality control is possible for achieving a six sigma process. In this paper we describe the optical design for both low and high power laser systems and how six sigma laser processing may be realized.

  3. Error Ellipsoid Analysis for the Diameter Measurement of Cylindroid Components Using a Laser Radar Measurement System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhengchun; Wu, Zhaoyong; Yang, Jianguo

    2016-05-19

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) data in the industrial measurement field is becoming increasingly popular because of the rapid development of laser scanning techniques based on the time-of-flight principle. However, the accuracy and uncertainty of these types of measurement methods are seldom investigated. In this study, a mathematical uncertainty evaluation model for the diameter measurement of standard cylindroid components has been proposed and applied to a 3D laser radar measurement system (LRMS). First, a single-point error ellipsoid analysis for the LRMS was established. An error ellipsoid model and algorithm for diameter measurement of cylindroid components was then proposed based on the single-point error ellipsoid. Finally, four experiments were conducted using the LRMS to measure the diameter of a standard cylinder in the laboratory. The experimental results of the uncertainty evaluation consistently matched well with the predictions. The proposed uncertainty evaluation model for cylindrical diameters can provide a reliable method for actual measurements and support further accuracy improvement of the LRMS.

  4. Residual Stress Determination from a Laser-Based Curvature Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swank, William David; Gavalya, Rick Allen; Wright, Julie Knibloe; Wright, Richard Neil

    2000-05-01

    Thermally sprayed coating characteristics and mechanical properties are in part a result of the residual stress developed during the fabrication process. The total stress state in a coating/substrate is comprised of the quench stress and the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch stress. The quench stress is developed when molten particles impact the substrate and rapidly cool and solidify. The CTE mismatch stress results from a large difference in the thermal expansion coefficients of the coating and substrate material. It comes into effect when the substrate/coating combination cools from the equilibrated deposit temperature to room temperature. This paper describes a laser-based technique for measuring the curvature of a coated substrate and the analysis required to determine residual stress from curvature measurements. Quench stresses were determined by heating the specimen back to the deposit temperature thus removing the CTE mismatch stress. By subtracting the quench stress from the total residual stress at room temperature, the CTE mismatch stress was estimated. Residual stress measurements for thick (>1mm) spinel coatings with a Ni-Al bond coat on 304 stainless steel substrates were made. It was determined that a significant portion of the residual stress results from the quenching stress of the bond coat and that the spinel coating produces a larger CTE mismatch stress than quench stress.

  5. Laser-saturated fluorescence measurements in laminar sooting diffusion flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wey, Changlie

    1993-01-01

    The hydroxyl radical is known to be one of the most important intermediate species in the combustion processes. The hydroxyl radical has also been considered a dominant oxidizer of soot particles in flames. In this investigation the hydroxyl concentration profiles in sooting diffusion flames were measured by the laser-saturated fluorescence (LSF) method. The temperature distributions in the flames were measured by the two-line LSF technique and by thermocouple. In the sooting region the OH fluorescence was too weak to make accurate temperature measurements. The hydroxyl fluorescence profiles for all four flames presented herein show that the OH fluorescence intensities peaked near the flame front. The OH fluorescence intensity dropped sharply toward the dark region of the flame and continued declining to the sooting region. The OH fluorescence profiles also indicate that the OH fluorescence decreased with increasing height in the flames for all flames investigated. Varying the oxidizer composition resulted in a corresponding variation in the maximum OH concentration and the flame temperature. Furthermore, it appears that the maximum OH concentration for each flame increased with increasing flame temperature.

  6. MABEL Photon-Counting Laser Altimetry Data for ICESat-2 Simulations and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunt, K. M.; Neumann, T.; Walsh, K. M.; Markus, T.

    2013-12-01

    Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) is scheduled to launch in 2016 and will carry the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS), which represents a new approach to space-borne determination of surface elevation. Given the new technology of ATLAS, an airborne instrument, the Multiple Altimeter Beam Experimental Lidar (MABEL), was developed to provide data needed for 1) algorithm development and 2) to simulate key elements of this new sampling strategy. Instrument precision is critical to satellite algorithm development. We present precision estimates for MABEL surface elevations associated with 2011-2012 surveys. The greatest changes in elevation in Greenland and Antarctica are happening along the margins of the ice sheets where the surface frequently has significant slopes. For this reason the ICESat-2 mission utilizes pairs of laser altimeter beams that are perpendicular to the flight direction in order to extract slope information in addition to elevation. We present local slopes as determined by MABEL and compare them to those determined by the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) over the same flight lines on the Greenland Ice Sheet. Results from MABEL suggest that 1) MABEL precision is within the design goals aimed at algorithm development and 2) ICESat-2 beam geometry is appropriate for the determination of slope on ~90 m spatial scales, a measurement that will be fundamental to deconvolving the effects of surface slope from the ice-sheet surface change derived from ICESat-2.

  7. The influence of laser clipped by the laser entrance hole on hohlraum radiation measurement on Shenguang-III prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Dong [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); CAS Key Laboratory of Basic Plasma Physics and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Li, Zhichao; Guo, Liang; Li, Sanwei; Yi, Rongqing; Song, Tianming; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Zhebin; Jiang, Xiaohua; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China)

    2014-03-15

    Measuring the x-ray flux exiting the target's laser entrance hole (LEH) is the most common diagnostic that quantifies the x-ray intensity inside the laser-driven hohlraum. However, this signal accounts for only a small portion of the incident laser power and thus is likely to be affected by unwanted x-ray background from non-target area, leading to an overestimation of the hohlraum drive. Unwanted emission might be produced when the laser light is clipped by the LEH (LEH clipping) because of a lack of clearance for laser spot, or with a laser spot comprising of discrete structure, or even with a poor pointing accuracy. Its influence on the hohlraum radiation diagnostic is investigated on Shenguang-III prototype laser facility with the typical 1 ns square pulse. The experiment employed three types of targets to excite the unwanted x-ray background from LEH clipping, unconverted light, and both effects, respectively. This work gives an absolute evaluation of x-ray produced by the LEH clipping, which is measured by flat-response x-ray detectors (FXRD) at multiple view angles. The result indicates that there is little variation in measured emission to various view angles, because the unwanted x-rays are mainly generated at the side face of the LEH lip when laser is obliquely incident. Therefore, the LEH clipping brings more overestimation in hohlraum radiation measurement at larger view angle since the hohlraum LEH as an emitting source viewed by FXRD is decreased as the view angle increases. In our condition, the LEH clipping contributes 2%–3.5% overestimation to the hohlraum flux measurement.

  8. Mode-locking external-cavity laser-diode sensor for displacement measurements of technical surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarske, Jürgen; Möbius, Jasper; Moldenhauer, Karsten

    2005-09-01

    A novel laser sensor for position measurements of technical solid-state surfaces is proposed. An external Fabry-Perot laser cavity is assembled by use of an antireflection-coated laser diode together with the technical surface. Mode locking results from pumping the laser diode synchronously to the mode spacing of the cavity. The laser cavity length, i.e., the distance to the measurement object, is determined by evaluation of the modulation transfer function of the cavity by means of a phase-locked loop. The mode-locking external-cavity laser sensor incorporates a resonance effect that results in highly resolving position and displacement measurements. More than a factor-of-10 higher resolution than with conventional nonresonant sensing principles is achieved. Results of the displacement measurements of various technical surfaces are reported. Experimental and theoretical investigations are in good agreement.

  9. Volume Measurements of Laser-generated Pits for In Situ Geochronology using KArLE (Potassium-Argon Laser Experiment)

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, R. A.; Cohen, B. A.; Miller, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    The Potassium-Argon Laser Experiment( KArLE), is composed of two main instruments: a spectrometer as part of the Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) method and a Mass Spectrometer (MS). The LIBS laser ablates a sample and creates a plasma cloud, generating a pit in the sample. The LIBS plasma is measured for K abundance in weight percent and the released gas is measured using the MS, which calculates Ar abundance in mols. To relate the K and Ar measurements, total mass of the ablated sample is needed but can be difficult to directly measure. Instead, density and volume are used to calculate mass, where density is calculated based on the elemental composition of the rock (from the emission spectrum) and volume is determined by pit morphology. This study aims to reduce the uncertainty for KArLE by analyzing pit volume relationships in several analog materials and comparing methods of pit volume measurements and their associated uncertainties.

  10. Development of high precision laser measurement to Space Debris and Applications in SHAO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongping; Chen, Juping; Xiong, Yaoheng; Han, Xingwei

    2016-07-01

    Artificial space debris has become the focus during the space exploration because of producing the damage for the future active spacecrafts and high precision measurement for space debris are required for debris surveillance and collision avoidance. Laser ranging technology is inherently high accurate and will play an important role in precise orbit determination, accurate catalog of space debris. Shanghai Astronomical Observatory (SHAO) of CAS, has been developing the technology of laser measurement to space debris for several years. According to characteristics of laser echoes from space debris and the experiences of relevant activities, high repetition rate, high power laser system and low dark noise APD detector with high quantum efficiency and high transmissivity of narrow bandwidth spectral filter are applied to laser measurement to space debris in SHAO. With these configurations, great achievements of laser measurement to space debris are made with hundreds of passes of laser data from space debris in the distance between 500km and 2500km with Radar Cross Section (RCS) of more than 10 m^{2} to less than 0.5m^{2} at the measuring precision of less than 1m (RMS). For better application of laser ranging technology, Chinese Space Debris Observation network, consisting of Shanghai, Changchun and Kunming station, has been preliminary developed and the coordinated observation has been performed to increase the measuring efficiency for space debris. It is referred from data that laser ranging technology can be as the essential high accuracy measurement technology in the study of space debris.

  11. Study on Laser Visual Measurement Method for Seamless Steel PipeStraightness Error by Multiple Line-structured Laser Sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈长水; 谢建平; 王佩琳

    2001-01-01

    An original non-contact measurement method using multiple line-structured laser sensors is introduced for seamless steel pipe straightness error is in this paper. An arc appears on the surface of the measured seamless steel pipe against a line-structured laser source. After the image of the arc is accepted by a CCD camera, the coordinates of the center of the pipe cross-section circle containing the arc can be worked out through a certain algorithm. Similarly, multiple line-structured laser sensors are equipped parallel to the pipe. The straightness error of the seamless steel pipe, therefore, can be inferred from the coordinates of multiple cross-section centers obtained from every line-structured laser sernsor .

  12. A second-order autocorrelator for single-shot measurement of femtosecond laser pulse durations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Raghuramaiah; A K Sharma; P A Naik; P D Gupta; R A Ganeev

    2001-12-01

    A second-order autocorrelator for single-shot measurement of ultrashort laser pulse durations has been set up. It is based on recording the spatial profile of non-collinear phase-matched second harmonic generation in a KDP crystal using a CCD camera-framegrabber combination. Performance of the system is described from measurement of 250 femtosecond transform-limited laser pulses from a passively mode-locked, diode pumped Nd:glass laser. It can also be used for measurement of picosecond laser pulses in the multi-shot scanning mode.

  13. The measurement of capillary waves on a weldpool formed by a Nd:YAG laser

    CERN Document Server

    Deam, R T; Harris, J

    2002-01-01

    Experiments were performed using an on-line pyrometer to measure the capillary waves on a weldpool formed by a Nd: YAG laser. The surface temperature measurements taken from the weldpool revealed strong temporal fluctuations. Fourier transform of the pyrometer data revealed distinct peaks, consistent with calculated resonant frequencies for capillary surface waves on the weldpool formed by the laser. The possibility of using on-line measurement of surface temperature fluctuations to control weldpool depth in laser welds is discussed. The work forms part of an on-going programme to develop closed loop control for laser processing at Swinburne University

  14. Wavefront-sensor-based electron density measurements for laser-plasma accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plateau, Guillaume; Matlis, Nicholas; Geddes, Cameron; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; van Mourik, Reinier; Leemans, Wim

    2010-02-20

    Characterization of the electron density in laser produced plasmas is presented using direct wavefront analysis of a probe laser beam. The performance of a laser-driven plasma-wakefield accelerator depends on the plasma wavelength, hence on the electron density. Density measurements using a conventional folded-wave interferometer and using a commercial wavefront sensor are compared for different regimes of the laser-plasma accelerator. It is shown that direct wavefront measurements agree with interferometric measurements and, because of the robustness of the compact commercial device, have greater phase sensitivity, straightforward analysis, improving shot-to-shot plasma-density diagnostics.

  15. [IM/FM phase delay time measurement method of laser for TDLAS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Ma, Wei-Guang

    2014-11-01

    The present paper presents an method of using fiber Michelson interferometer to measure the Intensity-frequency (IM/FM) phase delay change of the laser, it could realize the phase delay time measurement, while modulating the laser. Experimental results show that the laser output signal intensity-frequency (IM/FM) phase delay of the laser has some differences from the theoretical value. The proposed method can be used to compensate for real-time signal strength-frequency (IM/FM) phase delay effect on the gas concentration measurement results.

  16. Assessment of Measurement Error when Using the Laser Spectrum Analyzers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Titov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article dwells on assessment of measurement errors when using the laser spectrum analyzers. It presents the analysis results to show that it is possible to carry out a spectral analysis of both amplitudes and phases of frequency components of signals and to analyze a changing phase of frequency components of radio signals using interferential methods of measurements. It is found that the interferometers with Mach-Zehnder arrangement are most widely used for measurement of signal phase. A possibility to increase resolution when using the combined method as compared to the other considered methods is shown since with its application spatial integration is performed over one coordinate while time integration is done over the other coordinate that is reached by the orthogonal arrangement of modulators relative each other. The article defines a drawback of this method. It is complicatedness and low-speed because of integrator that disables measurement of spectral components of a radio pulse if its width is less than a temporary aperture. There is a proposal to create an advanced option of the spectrum analyzer in which phase is determined through the signal processing. The article presents resolution when using such a spectrum analyzer. It also reviews the possible options for creating devices to measure the phase components of a spectrum depending on the methods applied to measure a phase. The analysis has shown that for phase measurement a time-pulse method is the most perspective. It is found that the known circuits of digital phase-meters using this method cannot be directly used in spectrum analyzers as they are designed for measurement of the phase only of one signal frequency. In this regard a number of circuits were developed to measure the amplitude and phase of frequency components of the radio signal. It is shown that the perspective option of creating a spectrum analyzer is device in which the phase is determined through the signal

  17. Advances in laser-based isotope ratio measurements: selected applications

    OpenAIRE

    Kerstel, E; Gianfrani, L.

    2008-01-01

    Small molecules exhibit characteristic ro-vibrational transitions in the near- and mid-infrared spectral regions, which are strongly influenced by isotopic substitution. This gift of nature has made it possible to use laser spectroscopy for the accurate analysis of the isotopic composition of gaseous samples. Nowadays, laser spectroscopy is clearly recognized as a valid alternative to isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Laser-based instruments are leaving the research laboratory stage and are be...

  18. Uncertainty in velocity measurement based on diode-laser absorption in nonuniform flows

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Fei; Yu, XiLong; Cai, Weiwei; Ma, Lin

    2012-01-01

    This work investigates the error caused by nonuniformities along the line-of-sight in velocity measurement using tunable diode-laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). Past work has demonstrated TDLAS as an attractive diagnostic technique for measuring velocity, which is inferred from the Doppler shift of two absorption features using two crossing laser beams. However, because TDLAS is line-of-sight in nature, the obtained velocity is a spatially averaged value along the probing laser beams. As...

  19. Interstitial Photoacoustic Sensor for the Measurement of Tissue Temperature during Interstitial Laser Phototherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhifang Li; Haiyu Chen; Feifan Zhou; Hui Li; Chen, Wei R

    2015-01-01

    Photothermal therapy is an effective means to induce tumor cell death, since tumor tissue is more sensitive to temperature increases than normal tissue. Biological responses depend on tissue temperature; target tissue temperature needs to be precisely measured and controlled to achieve desired thermal effects. In this work, a unique photoacoustic (PA) sensor is proposed for temperature measurement during interstitial laser phototherapy. A continuous-wave laser light and a pulsed laser light, ...

  20. Thermal conductivity measurements of laser crystals by infrared thermography. Application to Nd:doped crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Didierjean, Julien; Hérault, Emilie; Balembois, François; Georges, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    International audience; We present a thermal conductivity measurement method for laser crystals based on thermal mapping of the crystal face by an infrared camera. Those measurements are performed under end-pumping of the laser crystal and during laser operation. The calculation of the fraction of pump power converted into heat is therefore simplified, and it is possible to link easily the temperature in the crystal to the thermal conductivity. We demonstrate the efficiency of this measuremen...

  1. Measurement of gain and losses of a midinfrared quantum cascade laser by wavelength chirping spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benveniste, E.; Laurent, S.; Vasanelli, A.; Manquest, C.; Sirtori, C.; Teulon, F.; Carras, M.; Marcadet, X.

    2009-02-01

    We present an optimized technique for the measurement of gain and losses of semiconductor lasers. We optically inject the beam of a distributed feedback laser (DFB) inside the cavity of the lasers under study. The DFB laser operates in a pulsed mode and shifts its emission wavelength as a function of time. This frequency chirp creates the Fabry-Pérot fringes of the transmitted intensity that contains all the information on the cavity losses. The setup has been validated by a quantitative study of the losses as a function of the injected current, for a quantum cascade laser emitting at 7.6 μm.

  2. Integration of radar altimeter, precision navigation, and digital terrain data for low-altitude flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenka, Richard E.

    1992-01-01

    Avionic systems that depend on digitized terrain elevation data for guidance generation or navigational reference require accurate absolute and relative distance measurements to the terrain, especially as they approach lower altitudes. This is particularly exacting in low-altitude helicopter missions, where aggressive terrain hugging maneuvers create minimal horizontal and vertical clearances and demand precise terrain positioning. Sole reliance on airborne precision navigation and stored terrain elevation data for above-ground-level (AGL) positioning severely limits the operational altitude of such systems. A Kalman filter is presented which blends radar altimeter returns, precision navigation, and stored terrain elevation data for AGL positioning. The filter is evaluated using low-altitude helicopter flight test data acquired over moderately rugged terrain. The proposed Kalman filter is found to remove large disparities in predicted AGL altitude (i.e., from airborne navigation and terrain elevation data) in the presence of measurement anomalies and dropouts. Previous work suggested a minimum clearance altitude of 220 ft AGL for a near-terrain guidance system; integration of a radar altimeter allows for operation of that system below 50 ft, subject to obstacle-avoidance limitations.

  3. Effect of High-Frequency Sea Waves on Wave Period Retrieval from Radar Altimeter and Buoy Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xifeng Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Wave periods estimated from satellite altimetry data behave differently from those calculated from buoy data, especially in low-wind conditions. In this paper, the geometric mean wave period T a is calculated from buoy data, rather than the commonly used zero-crossing wave period T z . The geometric mean wave period uses the fourth moment of the wave frequency spectrum and is related to the mean-square slope of the sea surface measured using altimeters. The values of T a obtained from buoys and altimeters agree well (root mean square difference: 0.2 s only when the contribution of high-frequency sea waves is estimated by a wavenumber spectral model to complement the buoy data, because a buoy cannot obtain data from waves having wavelengths that are shorter than the characteristic dimension of the buoy.

  4. First Results from Laser-Driven MagLIF Experiments on OMEGA: Backscatter and Transmission Measurements of Laser Preheating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, J. R.; Barnak, D. H.; Betti, R.; Chang, P.-Y.

    2015-11-01

    A laser-driven version of MagLIF (magnetized liner inertial fusion) is being developed on the OMEGA laser. In the first experiment, laser preheating with a single OMEGA beam was studied. Laser energies of 60 to 200 J in 2.5-ns-long pulses were used, with a distributed phase plate giving a Gaussian intensity profile with a 96 μm full width at half maximum. We report on backscatter measurements from gas-filled cylinders and both backscatter and transmission measurements from the 1.84- μm-thick polyimide foils used for the laser entrance windows. Backscatter spectra and energies from both cylinders and foils alone were very similar. Approximately 0.5% of the total incident laser energy was backscattered. Backscattering lasted for little more than 0.5 ns. The fraction of laser energy transmitted through foils within the original beam path increased from 50% to 64% as the laser energy was increased from 60 to 200 J. Up to 10% of the laser energy was sidescattered as the foil started to transmit. Sidescattering of transmitted light lasted ~0.5 ns. The sidescattering might be avoided by using a short prepulse at least 0.5 ns prior to the main pulse. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and by DE-FG02-04ER54786 and DE-FC02-04ER54789 (Fusion Science Center).

  5. Quantitative laser-induced fluorescence measurements of nitric oxide in a heavy-duty Diesel engine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbiezen, K.; Klein-Douwel, R. J. H.; van Viet, A. P.; Donkerbroek, A. J.; Meerts, W. L.; Dam, N. J.; ter Meulen, J. J.

    2007-01-01

    We present quantitative, in-cylinder, UV-laser-induced fluorescence measurements of nitric oxide in a heavy-duty Diesel engine. Processing of the raw fluorescence signals includes a detailed correction, based on additional measurements, for the effect of laser beam and fluorescence attenuation, and

  6. Measurement of depth of burns by laser Doppler perfusion imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droog, E.J.; Droog, E.J.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Sjöberg, F.

    2001-01-01

    Laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI), is a further development in laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Its advantage is that it enables assessment of microvascular blood flow in a predefined skin area rather than, as for LDF, in one place. In many ways this method seems to be more promising than LDF in

  7. Measurement of depth of burns by laser Doppler perfusion imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droog, E.J.; Steenbergen, W.; Sjöberg, F.

    2001-01-01

    Laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI), is a further development in laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Its advantage is that it enables assessment of microvascular blood flow in a predefined skin area rather than, as for LDF, in one place. In many ways this method seems to be more promising than LDF in

  8. COMPLIS: COllinear spectroscopy Measurements using a Pulsed Laser Ion Source

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    A Pulsed Laser spectroscopy experiment has been installed for the study of hyperfine structure and isotope shift of refractory and daughter elements from ISOLDE beams. It includes decelerated ion-implantation, element-selective laser ionization, magnetic and time-of-flight mass separation. The laser spectroscopy has been performed on the desorbed atoms in a set-up at ISOLDE-3 but later on high resolution laser collinear spectroscopy with the secondary pulsed ion beam is planned for the Booster ISOLDE set-up. During the first operation time of ISOLDE-3 we restricted our experiments to Doppler-limited resonant ionization laser and $\\gamma$-$\\gamma$ nuclear spectroscopy on neutron deficient platinum isotopes of even mass number down to A~=~186 and A~=~179 respectively. These isotopes have been produced by implantation of radioactive Hg and their subsequent $\\beta$-decay.

  9. All-optical time-resolved measurement of laser energy modulation in a relativistic electron beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Xiang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We propose and demonstrate an all-optical method to measure laser energy modulation in a relativistic electron beam. In this scheme the time-dependent energy modulation generated from the electron-laser interaction in an undulator is converted into time-dependent density modulation with a chicane, which is measured to infer the laser energy modulation. The method, in principle, is capable of simultaneously providing information on femtosecond time scale and 10^{-5} energy scale not accessible with conventional methods. We anticipate that this method may have wide applications in many laser-based advanced beam manipulation techniques.

  10. Waveform analysis of airborne synthetic aperture radar altimeter over Arctic sea ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zygmuntowska

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Sea ice thickness is one of the most sensitive variables in the Arctic climate system. In order to quantify changes in sea ice thickness, CryoSat was launched in 2010 carrying a Ku-band Radar Altimeter (SIRAL designed to measure sea ice freeboard with a few centimeters accuracy. The instrument uses the synthetic aperture radar technique providing signals with a resolution of about 300 m along track. In this study, airborne Ku-band radar altimeter data over different sea ice types has been analyzed. A set of parameters has been defined to characterize the difference in strength and width of the returned power waveforms. With a Bayesian based method it is possible to classify about 80% of the waveforms by three parameters: maximum of the returned power echo, the trailing edge width and pulse peakiness. Furthermore, the radar power echo maximum can be used to minimize the rate of false detection of leads compared to the widely used Pulse Peakiness parameter. The possibility to distinguish between different ice types and open water allows to improve the freeboard retrieval and the conversion into sea ice thickness where surface type dependent values for the sea ice density and snow load can be used.

  11. A Novel Technique to Measure Gain Spectrum for Fabry-Pérot Semiconductor Lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A novel gain measurement technique based on the integration of the measured amplified spontaneous emission spectrum multiplying a phase function over one longitudinal mode interval is proposed for Fabry-Perot semiconductor lasers.

  12. Precise measurement of the micron-scale spot of ultrashort laser pulse based on film scanning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengtie Wu; Jianrong Zhang; Yunbin Chen; Dongdong Guo

    2008-01-01

    @@ A novel and precise micron-scale nanosecond laser spot measurement based on film-scanning method is presented. The method can be used to measure the spot size, beam profile, and intensity distribution of the pulse.

  13. Ballistic pendula for measuring the momentum of a laser-produced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grun, J.; Ripin, B. H.

    1982-12-01

    We describe the use of a ballistic pendulum array to measure the momentum of a laser-produced plasma. An in situ calibration method is described and the pendulum results are compared to measurements made with other diagnostics.

  14. Measurement of Pipe Slope with Laser Scanning Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D. Y.; Jeon, S. S.; Hong, S. J. [FNC Technology Co., Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, S. C. [Enguard Co., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued Generic Letter (GL) 2008-01 which provides recommendation and guidance to nuclear power plants for managing gas intrusion and accumulation in safety systems such as Emergency Core Cooling (ECC), Decay Heat Removal (DHR) and Containment Spray (CS) systems. Following the GL2008-01, Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) reported NEI 09-10 that gives industry guidance for effective prevention and management of system gas accumulation. The location of gas accumulation is usually a high point of piping systems. The high point of system is easily identified by investigating as-built isometric drawings of the subjected systems. However, the real plant piping configuration such as a slope might be different from as-built drawings. If there is a small slope on pipe which is a horizontal configuration in as-built drawing, gas can be accumulated at the high point in pipes with wrong slope as shown in Fig. 1. This paper demonstrates a feasibility to measure the slope of piping systems by using the laser scanning and presents a simple example

  15. Measurements of erbium laser-ablation efficiency in hard dental tissues under different water cooling conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuščer, Lovro; Diaci, Janez

    2013-10-01

    Laser triangulation measurements of Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG laser-ablated volumes in hard dental tissues are made, in order to verify the possible existence of a "hydrokinetic" effect that has been proposed as an alternative to the "subsurface water expansion" mechanism for hard-tissue laser ablation. No evidence of the hydrokinetic effect could be observed under a broad range of tested laser parameters and water cooling conditions. On the contrary, the application of water spray during laser exposure of hard dental material is observed to diminish the laser-ablation efficiency (AE) in comparison with laser exposure under the absence of water spray. Our findings are in agreement with the generally accepted principle of action for erbium laser ablation, which is based on fast subsurface expansion of laser-heated water trapped within the interstitial structure of hard dental tissues. Our measurements also show that the well-known phenomenon of ablation stalling, during a series of consecutive laser pulses, can primarily be attributed to the blocking of laser light by the loosely bound and recondensed desiccated minerals that collect on the tooth surface during and following laser ablation. In addition to the prevention of tooth bulk temperature buildup, a positive function of the water spray that is typically used with erbium dental lasers is to rehydrate these minerals, and thus sustaining the subsurface expansion ablation process. A negative side effect of using a continuous water spray is that the AE gets reduced due to the laser light being partially absorbed in the water-spray particles above the tooth and in the collected water pool on the tooth surface. Finally, no evidence of the influence of the water absorption shift on the hypothesized increase in the AE of the Er,Cr:YSGG wavelength is observed.

  16. A smart car for the surface shape measurement of large antenna based on laser tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yonggang; Hu, Jing; Jin, Yi; Zhai, Chao

    2012-09-01

    The geometric accuracy of the surface shape of large antenna is an important indicator of antenna’s quality. Currently, high-precision measurement of large antenna surface shape can be performed in two ways: photogrammetry and laser tracker. Photogrammetry is a rapid method, but its accuracy is not enough good. Laser tracker can achieve high precision, but it is very inconvenient to move the reflector (target mirror) on the surface of the antenna by hand during the measurement. So, a smart car is designed to carry the reflector in this paper. The car, controlled by wireless, has a small weight and a strong ability for climbing, and there is a holding bracket gripping the reflector and controlling reflector rise up and drop down on the car. During the measurement of laser tracker, the laser beam between laser tracker and the reflector must not be interrupted, so two high-precision three-dimensional miniature electronic compasses, which can real-time monitor the relative angle between the holding bracket and the laser tracker’s head, are both equipped on the car and the head of laser tracker to achieve automatic alignment between reflector and laser beam. With the aid of the smart car, the measurement of laser tracker has the advantages of high precision and rapidity.

  17. Comparison of Surface Elevation Changes of the Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets from Radar and Laser Altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwally, H. Jay; Brenner, Anita C.; Barbieri, Kristine; DiMarzio, John P.; Li, Jun; Robbins, John; Saba, Jack L.; Yi, Donghui

    2012-01-01

    A primary purpose of satellite altimeter measurements is determination of the mass balances of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets and changes with time by measurement of changes in the surface elevations. Since the early 1990's, important measurements for this purpose have been made by radar altimeters on ERS-l and 2, Envisat, and CryoSat and a laser altimeter on ICESat. One principal factor limiting direct comparisons between radar and laser measurements is the variable penetration depth of the radar signal and the corresponding location of the effective depth of the radar-measured elevation beneath the surface, in contrast to the laser-measured surface elevation. Although the radar penetration depth varies significantly both spatially and temporally, empirical corrections have been developed to account for this effect. Another limiting factor in direct comparisons is caused by differences in the size of the laser and radar footprints and their respective horizontal locations on the surface. Nevertheless, derived changes in elevation, dHldt, and time-series of elevation, H(t), have been shown to be comparable. For comparisons at different times, corrections for elevation changes caused by variations in the rate offrrn compaction have also been developed. Comparisons between the H(t) and the average dH/dt at some specific locations, such as the Vostok region of East Antarctic, show good agreement among results from ERS-l and 2, Envisat, and ICESat. However, Greenland maps of dHidt from Envisat and ICESat for the same time periods (2003-2008) show some areas of significant differences as well as areas of good agreement. Possible causes of residual differences are investigated and described.

  18. Laser Doppler velocimetry measurement of turbulent bubbly channel flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    So, S.; Takagi, S.; Matsumoto, Y. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8656 (Japan); Morikita, H. [Morikita Shuppan Co. Ltd, 1-4-11,Fujimi Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0071 (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    Measurements of the turbulence properties of gas-liquid bubbly flows with mono-dispersed 1-mm-diameter bubbles are reported for upward flow in a rectangular channel. Bubble size and liquid-phase velocity were measured using image-processing and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV), respectively. A description is given of the special arrangements for two-dimensional LDV needed to obtain reliable bubbly flow data, in particular the configuration of the optical system, the distinction of signals from the bubbles and liquid phase. To create the mono-dispersed bubbles, a small amount of surfactant (3-pentanol of 20 ppm) was added to the flow. Whilst this caused a drastic change in bubble size distribution and flow field, it did not affect the turbulence properties of the single-phase flow. In this study, experiments with three different bulk Reynolds numbers (1,350, 4,100, 8,200) were conducted with void fractions less than 1.2%. In all three cases, there was a very high accumulation of bubbles near the wall with bubble slip at the wall. The mean velocity profile of the liquid phase was steeper near the wall owing to the driving force of buoyant bubbles, and the streamwise turbulent intensity in the vicinity of the wall was enhanced. Furthermore the mean velocity profiles of the liquid phase were flattened in the wide region around the channel center. This region was lifted up by the bubble sheet near the wall, giving it a plug-like flow structure. In addition, the turbulent fluctuation and Reynolds stress in the liquid phase are very much suppressed in this region. This strong preferential accumulation near the wall produces the dramatic change of the whole flow structure. (orig.)

  19. Laser Doppler velocimetry measurement of turbulent bubbly channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, S.; Morikita, H.; Takagi, S.; Matsumoto, Y.

    2002-05-01

    Measurements of the turbulence properties of gas-liquid bubbly flows with mono-dispersed 1-mm-diameter bubbles are reported for upward flow in a rectangular channel. Bubble size and liquid-phase velocity were measured using image-processing and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV), respectively. A description is given of the special arrangements for two-dimensional LDV needed to obtain reliable bubbly flow data, in particular the configuration of the optical system, the distinction of signals from the bubbles and liquid phase. To create the mono-dispersed bubbles, a small amount of surfactant (3-pentanol of 20 ppm) was added to the flow. Whilst this caused a drastic change in bubble size distribution and flow field, it did not affect the turbulence properties of the single-phase flow. In this study, experiments with three different bulk Reynolds numbers (1,350, 4,100, 8,200) were conducted with void fractions less than 1.2%. In all three cases, there was a very high accumulation of bubbles near the wall with bubble slip at the wall. The mean velocity profile of the liquid phase was steeper near the wall owing to the driving force of buoyant bubbles, and the streamwise turbulent intensity in the vicinity of the wall was enhanced. Furthermore the mean velocity profiles of the liquid phase were flattened in the wide region around the channel center. This region was lifted up by the bubble sheet near the wall, giving it a plug-like flow structure. In addition, the turbulent fluctuation and Reynolds stress in the liquid phase are very much suppressed in this region. This strong preferential accumulation near the wall produces the dramatic change of the whole flow structure.

  20. Distance measurement using frequency scanning interferometry with mode-hoped laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medhat, M.; Sobee, M.; Hussein, H. M.; Terra, O.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, frequency scanning interferometry is implemented to measure distances up to 5 m absolutely. The setup consists of a Michelson interferometer, an external cavity tunable diode laser, and an ultra-low expansion (ULE) Fabry-Pérot (FP) cavity to measure the frequency scanning range. The distance is measured by acquiring simultaneously the interference fringes from, the Michelson and the FP interferometers, while scanning the laser frequency. An online fringe processing technique is developed to calculate the distance from the fringe ratio while removing the parts result from the laser mode-hops without significantly affecting the measurement accuracy. This fringe processing method enables accurate distance measurements up to 5 m with measurements repeatability ±3.9×10-6 L. An accurate translation stage is used to find the FP cavity free-spectral-range and therefore allow accurate measurement. Finally, the setup is applied for the short distance calibration of a laser distance meter (LDM).

  1. Influence of a laser profile in impedance mismatch techniques applied to carbon EOS measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.Aliverdiev; D.Batani; R.Dezulian

    2013-01-01

    We present a recent numerical analysis of impedance mismatch technique applied to carbon equation of state measurements.We consider high-power laser pulses with a Gaussian temporal profile of different durations.We show that for the laser intensity(≈1014W/cm2)and the target design considered in this paper we need to have laser pulses with rise-time less than 150 ps.

  2. Laser measurement of absolute charge collection efficiency of a silicon detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazant, Pavel; Broz, Jan; Dolezal, Zdenek; Drasal, Zbynek [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Kodys, Peter [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic)], E-mail: peter.kodys@mff.curi.cz; Kvasnicka, Peter; Reznicek, Pavel [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2007-10-21

    A setup for testing silicon position sensitive detectors using a focused pulsed laser beam has been developed. An optical head monitoring the intensity of both incident laser light and reflected light improves long-term stability and reproducibility of measurements. We show that measurements using red (682 nm) laser light are reliable and robust, providing 4% precision for collected charge determination in our studies. Measurements using infrared light (1055 nm) are highly sensitive to fine details of detector material properties, which cannot be easily measured and/or compensated for.

  3. Use of photoelectron laser phase determination method for attosecond measurements with quantum-mechanical calculations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ge Yu-Cheng

    2008-01-01

    This paper calculates quantum-mechanically the photoelectron energy spectra excited by attosecond x-rays in the presence of a few-cycle laser. A photoelectron laser phase determination method is used for precise measurements of the pulse natural properties of x-ray intensity and the instantaneous frequency profiles. As a direct procedure without any previous pulse profile assumptions and time-resolved measurements as well as data fitting analysis, this method can be used to improve the time resolutions of attosecond timing and measurements with metrological precision. The measurement range is half of a laser optical cycle.

  4. New Lidar Laser Configuration for Earth Science Measurements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this STTR Phase 1 program, Fibertek successfully developed and demonstrated a breadboard version of a pulsed fiber laser capable of high-spectral resolution lidar...

  5. Benefits Derived From Laser Ranging Measurements for Orbit Determination of the GPS Satellite Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Bryan W.

    2007-01-01

    While navigation systems for the determination of the orbit of the Global Position System (GPS) have proven to be very effective, the current research is examining methods to lower the error in the GPS satellite ephemerides below their current level. Two GPS satellites that are currently in orbit carry retro-reflectors onboard. One notion to reduce the error in the satellite ephemerides is to utilize the retro-reflectors via laser ranging measurements taken from multiple Earth ground stations. Analysis has been performed to determine the level of reduction in the semi-major axis covariance of the GPS satellites, when laser ranging measurements are supplemented to the radiometric station keeping, which the satellites undergo. Six ground tracking systems are studied to estimate the performance of the satellite. The first system is the baseline current system approach which provides pseudo-range and integrated Doppler measurements from six ground stations. The remaining five ground tracking systems utilize all measurements from the current system and laser ranging measurements from the additional ground stations utilized within those systems. Station locations for the additional ground sites were taken from a listing of laser ranging ground stations from the International Laser Ranging Service. Results show reductions in state covariance estimates when utilizing laser ranging measurements to solve for the satellite s position component of the state vector. Results also show dependency on the number of ground stations providing laser ranging measurements, orientation of the satellite to the ground stations, and the initial covariance of the satellite's state vector.

  6. Plasma dynamics near critical density inferred from direct measurements of laser hole boring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chao; Tochitsky, Sergei Ya; Fiuza, Frederico; Pigeon, Jeremy J; Joshi, Chan

    2016-06-01

    We have used multiframe picosecond optical interferometry to make direct measurements of the hole boring velocity, v_{HB}, of the density cavity pushed forward by a train of CO_{2} laser pulses in a near critical density helium plasma. As the pulse train intensity rises, the increasing radiation pressure of each pulse pushes the density cavity forward and the plasma electrons are strongly heated. After the peak laser intensity, the plasma pressure exerted by the heated electrons strongly impedes the hole boring process and the v_{HB} falls rapidly as the laser pulse intensity falls at the back of the laser pulse train. A heuristic theory is presented that allows the estimation of the plasma electron temperature from the measurements of the hole boring velocity. The measured values of v_{HB}, and the estimated values of the heated electron temperature as a function of laser intensity are in reasonable agreement with those obtained from two-dimensional numerical simulations.

  7. Reducing the error in terrestrial laser scanning by optimizing the measurement set-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soudarissanane, S.S.; Lindenbergh, R.C.; Gorte, B.G.H.

    2008-01-01

    High spatial resolution and fast capturing possibilities make 3D terrestrial laser scanners widely used in engineering applications and cultural heritage recording. Phase based laser scanners can measure distances to object surfaces with a precision in the order of a few millimeters at ranges betwee

  8. A SEMICONDUCTOR-LASER USED FOR DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF THE BLOOD PERFUSION OF TISSUE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEMUL, FFM; KOELINK, MH; WEIJERS, AL; GREVE, J; AARNOUDSE, JG; GRAAFF, R; DASSEL, ACM

    1993-01-01

    An instrument consisting merely of a semiconductor laser in its own housing was used to measure the blood perfusion in tissue. Use is made of the feedback of Doppler-scattered light to the photodiode in the laser housing. A recording perfusion of a finger under occlusion of blood flow in the arm is

  9. Measurement of Hot Electron Spectrum During the Interaction of Ultrashort Pulse UV Laser With Solid Target

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIYe-jun; SHANYu-sheng; ZHANGJi; ZHANGHai-feng; TANGXiu-zhang; WANGLei-jian

    2003-01-01

    The hot electron spectrum was measured using electron magnetic spectrometer through the irradiation of solid Cu target by an intense, UV (248 nm) femtosecond (440 fs) laser pulse with free pre-pulse, and the intensity of laser is 1017 W/cm2. We find the electron spectrum presents two temperatures Maxwellian distribution.

  10. Self-normalizing phase measurement in multimode terahertz spectroscopy based on photomixing of three lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Thirunavukkuarasu, K; Roggenbuck, A; Vidal, E; Schmitz, H; Hemberger, J; Grüninger, M

    2014-01-01

    Photomixing of two near-infrared lasers is well established for continuous-wave terahertz spectroscopy. Photomixing of three lasers allows us to measure at three terahertz frequencies simultaneously. Similar to Fourier spectroscopy, the spectral information is contained in an nterferogram, which is equivalent to the waveform in time-domain spectroscopy. We use one fixed terahertz frequency \

  11. Measurement of Velocity Distribution in Atomic Beam by Diode Laser with Narrow Line width

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jingbiao; WANG Fengzhi; YANG Donghai; WANG YiQiu

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, by using the detecting laser beam interacts with the atomic beam at a sharp angle and the Doppler frequency shift effect, the velocity distribution in cesium atomic beam is measured with a diode laser of narrow linewidth of 1 MHz. The effects of the atomic natural line width and cycling transition detecting factor on the measured results have been analyzed. Finally, the measured results have been compared with the theoretical calculation.

  12. Calibration and characterisation with a new laser-based magnetostriction measurement system

    OpenAIRE

    Rafferty, Aran; Bakir, S.; BRABAZON, Dermot; Prescott, Tim

    2009-01-01

    A laser-based magnet measurement system has been developed to measure the magnetostrictive strain of large cylindrical samples. The measurement system incorporates a solenoid capable of generating a maximum magnetic field intensity of 3000 Oe and a laser displacement sensor. For calibration and evaluation purposes, the positive magnetostrictions of two different types of giant magnetostrictive Tb–Dy–Fe-based materials were accessed with this system. A magnetostrictive strain of 622 ppm was ob...

  13. A comparison of a coaxial focused laser Doppler system in atmospheric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaki, S.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of atmospheric velocities and turbulence with the laser Doppler system were obtained, and the results compared with cup anemometer and hot-wire measurements in the same wind field. The laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) is described along with the test procedures. It was found that mean values determined from the LDV data are within 5% of other anemometer data for long time periods, and the LDV measures higher velocities.

  14. A single laser all fibre based optical sensor and switching system and method for measuring velocity in atmospheric air flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    A system for measuring a velocity of tracer particle motion in a fluid comprising at least one laser emitter configured to emit a continuous wave laser beam and a plur ality of optical devices being configured to alternately receive a laser beam, focusing the laser beam onto a same probe volume c...

  15. Thermal conductivity measurements of laser crystals by infrared thermography. Application to Nd:doped crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didierjean, Julien; Herault, Emilie; Balembois, François; Georges, Patrick

    2008-06-09

    We present a thermal conductivity measurement method for laser crystals based on thermal mapping of the crystal face by an infrared camera. Those measurements are performed under end-pumping of the laser crystal and during laser operation. The calculation of the fraction of pump power converted into heat is therefore simplified, and it is possible to link easily the temperature in the crystal to the thermal conductivity. We demonstrate the efficiency of this measurement method with a Nd:YAG crystal, before using it to compare Nd:YVO(4) and Nd:GdVO(4) crystals.

  16. Measurement of laser absorptivity for operating parameters characteristic of laser drilling regime

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Matthieu; Berthe, Laurent; Fabbro, Rémy; Muller, Maryse

    2008-01-01

    International audience; Laser drilling in the percussion regime is commonly used in the aircraft industry to drill sub-millimetre holes in metallic targets. Characteristic laser intensities in the range of 10 MW cm−2 are typically employed for drilling metallic targets. With these intensities the temperature of the irradiated matter is above the vaporization temperature and the drilling process is led by hydrodynamic effects. Although the main physical processes involved are identified, this ...

  17. Polarization measurement of Cs using the pump laser beam

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Jiancheng; Duan, Lihong; Fan, Wenfeng; Jiang, Liwei

    2015-01-01

    In the optical pumping systems based on the pump-probe arrangement, the spin polarization of the atoms is generally monitored utilizing the probe laser beam, in which way an extra perturbation must be introduced and thus affects the normal operation of the sensors. By investigating the absorption rate of the circularly polarized pump laser, here we demonstrate the feasibility of extracting the electron-spin polarization from the transmitted pump laser intensity. We experimentally validate the method in a spin-exchange relaxation free (SERF) magnetometer and the results are in excellent agreement with the theory. The scheme operates in a silent mode and features a real-time observation. We also study the corresponding magnetic field response of the SERF magnetometer and a term arising from the diffusion effects has been added to the original model to explain the discrepancy of the response.

  18. A next generation altimeter for mapping the sea surface height variability: opportunities and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng; Morrow, Rosemary

    2016-07-01

    The global observations of the sea surface height (SSH) have revolutionized oceanography since the beginning of precision radar altimetry in the early 1990s. For the first time we have continuous records of SSH with spatial and temporal sampling for detecting the global mean sea level rise, the waxing and waning of El Niño, and the ocean circulation from gyres to ocean eddies. The limit of spatial resolution of the present constellation of radar altimeters in mapping SSH variability is approaching 100 km (in wavelength) with 3 or more simultaneous altimetric satellites in orbit. At scales shorter than 100 km, the circulation contains substantial amount of kinetic energy in currents, eddies and fronts that are responsible for the stirring and mixing of the ocean, especially from the vertical exchange of the upper ocean with the deep. A mission currently in development will use the technique of radar interferometry for making high-resolution measurement of the height of water over the ocean as well as on land. It is called Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT), which is a joint mission of US NASA and French CNES, with contributions from Canada and UK. SWOT promises the detection of SSH at scales approaching 15 km, depending on the sea state. SWOT will make SSH measurement over a swath of 120 km with a nadir gap of 20 km in a 21-day repeat orbit. A conventional radar altimeter will provide measurement along the nadir. This is an exploratory mission with applications in oceanography and hydrology. The increased spatial resolution offers an opportunity to study ocean surface processes to address important questions about the ocean circulation. However, the limited temporal sampling poses challenges to map the evolution of the ocean variability that changes rapidly at the small scales. The measurement technique and the development of the mission will be presented with emphasis on its science program with outlook on the opportunities and challenges.

  19. On the measurement of laser-induced plasma breakdown thresholds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brieschenk, Stefan [Centre for Hypersonics, The University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072 (Australia); Kleine, Harald; O' Byrne, Sean [The University of New South Wales Canberra, The Australian Defence Force Academy, Canberra 2600 (Australia)

    2013-09-07

    The breakdown threshold of a gas exposed to intense laser-radiation is a function of gas and laser properties. Breakdown thresholds reported in the literature often vary greatly and these differences can partially be traced back to the method that is typically used to determine breakdown thresholds. This paper discusses the traditional method used to determine breakdown thresholds and the potential errors that can arise using this approach, and presents an alternative method which can yield more accurate data especially when determining breakdown thresholds as functions of gas pressure.

  20. Laser ablation deposition measurements from silver and nickel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Ellegaard, Ole; Schou, Jørgen

    1996-01-01

    The deposition rate for laser ablated metals has been studied in a standard geometry for fluences up to 20 J/cm(2). The rate for silver and nickel is a few percent of a monolayer per pulse at the laser wavelengths 532 nm and 355 nm. The rate for nickel is significantly higher than that for silver...... at 532 nm, whereas the rate for the two metals is similar at 355 nm. This behaviour disagrees with calculations based on the thermal properties at low intensities as well as predictions based on formation of an absorbing plasma at high intensities. The deposition rate falls strongly with increasing...

  1. Indirect measurement of molten steel level in tundish based on laser triangulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Zhiqi; He, Qing, E-mail: heqing@ise.neu.edu.cn; Xie, Zhi [State Key Laboratory of Synthetical Automation for Process Industries, School of Information Science and Engineering, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2016-03-15

    For real-time and precise measurement of molten steel level in tundish during continuous casting, slag level and slag thickness are needed. Among which, the problem of slag thickness measurement has been solved in our previous work. In this paper, a systematic solution for slag level measurement based on laser triangulation is proposed. Being different from traditional laser triangulation, several aspects for measuring precision and robustness have been done. First, laser line is adopted for multi-position measurement to overcome the deficiency of single point laser range finder caused by the uneven surface of the slag. Second, the key parameters, such as installing angle and minimum requirement of the laser power, are analyzed and determined based on the gray-body radiation theory to fulfill the rigorous requirement of measurement accuracy. Third, two kinds of severe noises in the acquired images, which are, respectively, caused by heat radiation and Electro-Magnetic Interference (EMI), are cleaned via morphological characteristic of the liquid slag and color difference between EMI and the laser signals, respectively. Fourth, as false target created by stationary slag usually disorders the measurement, valid signals of the slag are distinguished from the false ones to calculate the slag level. Then, molten steel level is obtained by the slag level minus the slag thickness. The measuring error of this solution is verified by the applications in steel plants, which is ±2.5 mm during steady casting and ±3.2 mm at the end of casting.

  2. Indirect measurement of molten steel level in tundish based on laser triangulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhiqi; He, Qing; Xie, Zhi

    2016-03-01

    For real-time and precise measurement of molten steel level in tundish during continuous casting, slag level and slag thickness are needed. Among which, the problem of slag thickness measurement has been solved in our previous work. In this paper, a systematic solution for slag level measurement based on laser triangulation is proposed. Being different from traditional laser triangulation, several aspects for measuring precision and robustness have been done. First, laser line is adopted for multi-position measurement to overcome the deficiency of single point laser range finder caused by the uneven surface of the slag. Second, the key parameters, such as installing angle and minimum requirement of the laser power, are analyzed and determined based on the gray-body radiation theory to fulfill the rigorous requirement of measurement accuracy. Third, two kinds of severe noises in the acquired images, which are, respectively, caused by heat radiation and Electro-Magnetic Interference (EMI), are cleaned via morphological characteristic of the liquid slag and color difference between EMI and the laser signals, respectively. Fourth, as false target created by stationary slag usually disorders the measurement, valid signals of the slag are distinguished from the false ones to calculate the slag level. Then, molten steel level is obtained by the slag level minus the slag thickness. The measuring error of this solution is verified by the applications in steel plants, which is ±2.5 mm during steady casting and ±3.2 mm at the end of casting.

  3. NODC Standard Product: US Navy Geosat altimeter Crossover Differences (XDRs) for the Geodetic Mission (8 disc set) (NODC Accession 0054498)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains a copy of the NODC eight CD-ROMs product set of the Geosat altimeter Crossover Differences data Records (XDRs) for altimeter data obtained...

  4. Simultaneous streak and frame interferometry for electron density measurements of laser produced plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quevedo, H. J., E-mail: hjquevedo@utexas.edu; McCormick, M.; Wisher, M.; Bengtson, Roger D.; Ditmire, T. [Center for High Energy Density Science, Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    A system of two collinear probe beams with different wavelengths and pulse durations was used to capture simultaneously snapshot interferograms and streaked interferograms of laser produced plasmas. The snapshots measured the two dimensional, path-integrated, electron density on a charge-coupled device while the radial temporal evolution of a one dimensional plasma slice was recorded by a streak camera. This dual-probe combination allowed us to select plasmas that were uniform and axisymmetric along the laser direction suitable for retrieving the continuous evolution of the radial electron density of homogeneous plasmas. Demonstration of this double probe system was done by measuring rapidly evolving plasmas on time scales less than 1 ns produced by the interaction of femtosecond, high intensity, laser pulses with argon gas clusters. Experiments aimed at studying homogeneous plasmas from high intensity laser-gas or laser-cluster interaction could benefit from the use of this probing scheme.

  5. Simultaneous streak and frame interferometry for electron density measurements of laser produced plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo, H. J.; McCormick, M.; Wisher, M.; Bengtson, Roger D.; Ditmire, T.

    2016-01-01

    A system of two collinear probe beams with different wavelengths and pulse durations was used to capture simultaneously snapshot interferograms and streaked interferograms of laser produced plasmas. The snapshots measured the two dimensional, path-integrated, electron density on a charge-coupled device while the radial temporal evolution of a one dimensional plasma slice was recorded by a streak camera. This dual-probe combination allowed us to select plasmas that were uniform and axisymmetric along the laser direction suitable for retrieving the continuous evolution of the radial electron density of homogeneous plasmas. Demonstration of this double probe system was done by measuring rapidly evolving plasmas on time scales less than 1 ns produced by the interaction of femtosecond, high intensity, laser pulses with argon gas clusters. Experiments aimed at studying homogeneous plasmas from high intensity laser-gas or laser-cluster interaction could benefit from the use of this probing scheme.

  6. Measuring evaporation rates of laser-trapped droplets by use of fluorescent morphology-dependent resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastel, R; Struthers, A

    2001-05-20

    Morphology-dependent resonances (MDRs) are used to measure accurately the evaporation rates of laser-trapped 1- to 2-mum droplets of ethylene glycol. Droplets containing 3 x 10(-5) M Rhodamine-590 laser dye are optically trapped in a 20-mum hollow fiber by two counterpropagating 150-mW, 800-nm laser beams. A weaker 532-nm laser excites the dye, and fluorescence emission is observed near 560 nm as the droplet evaporates. A complete series of first-order TE and TM MDRs dominates the fluorescent output. MDR mode identification sizes the droplets and provides accurate evaporation rates. We verify the automated MDR mode identification by counting fringes in a videotape of the experiment. The longitudinal spring constant of the trap, measured by analysis of the videotaped motion of droplets perturbed from the trap center, provides independent verification of the laser's intensity within the trap.

  7. Laser Treatment of HVOF Coating: Modeling and Measurement of Residual Stress in Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, A. F. M.; Yilbas, B. S.

    2008-10-01

    High-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) coating of diamalloy 1005 (similar to Inconel 625 alloy) onto the Ti-6Al-4V alloy is considered and laser-controlled melting of the coating is examined. The residual stress developed after the laser treatment process is modeled using the finite element method (FEM). The experiment is conducted to melt the coating using a laser beam. The residual stress measurement in the coating after the laser treatment process is realized using the XRD technique. The morphological and metallurgical changes in the coating are examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). It is found that the residual stress reduces at the coating-base material interface and the residual stress predicted agrees with the XRD measurements. A compact and crack-free coating is resulted after the laser treatment process.

  8. Acceleration of Sea Level Rise Over Malaysian Seas from Satellite Altimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, A. I. A.; Din, A. H. M.; Khalid, N. F.; Omar, K. M.

    2016-09-01

    Sea level rise becomes our concern nowadays as a result of variously contribution of climate change that cause by the anthropogenic effects. Global sea levels have been rising through the past century and are projected to rise at an accelerated rate throughout the 21st century. Due to this change, sea level is now constantly rising and eventually will threaten many low-lying and unprotected coastal areas in many ways. This paper is proposing a significant effort to quantify the sea level trend over Malaysian seas based on the combination of multi-mission satellite altimeters over a period of 23 years. Eight altimeter missions are used to derive the absolute sea level from Radar Altimeter Database System (RADS). Data verification is then carried out to verify the satellite derived sea level rise data with tidal data. Eight selected tide gauge stations from Peninsular Malaysia, Sabah and Sarawak are chosen for this data verification. The pattern and correlation of both measurements of sea level anomalies (SLA) are evaluated over the same period in each area in order to produce comparable results. Afterwards, the time series of the sea level trend is quantified using robust fit regression analysis. The findings clearly show that the absolute sea level trend is rising and varying over the Malaysian seas with the rate of sea level varies and gradually increase from east to west of Malaysia. Highly confident and correlation level of the 23 years measurement data with an astonishing root mean square difference permits the absolute sea level trend of the Malaysian seas has raised at the rate 3.14 ± 0.12 mm yr-1 to 4.81 ± 0.15 mm yr-1 for the chosen sub-areas, with an overall mean of 4.09 ± 0.12 mm yr-1. This study hopefully offers a beneficial sea level information to be applied in a wide range of related environmental and climatology issue such as flood and global warming.

  9. ACCELERATION OF SEA LEVEL RISE OVER MALAYSIAN SEAS FROM SATELLITE ALTIMETER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. A. Hamid

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sea level rise becomes our concern nowadays as a result of variously contribution of climate change that cause by the anthropogenic effects. Global sea levels have been rising through the past century and are projected to rise at an accelerated rate throughout the 21st century. Due to this change, sea level is now constantly rising and eventually will threaten many low-lying and unprotected coastal areas in many ways. This paper is proposing a significant effort to quantify the sea level trend over Malaysian seas based on the combination of multi-mission satellite altimeters over a period of 23 years. Eight altimeter missions are used to derive the absolute sea level from Radar Altimeter Database System (RADS. Data verification is then carried out to verify the satellite derived sea level rise data with tidal data. Eight selected tide gauge stations from Peninsular Malaysia, Sabah and Sarawak are chosen for this data verification. The pattern and correlation of both measurements of sea level anomalies (SLA are evaluated over the same period in each area in order to produce comparable results. Afterwards, the time series of the sea level trend is quantified using robust fit regression analysis. The findings clearly show that the absolute sea level trend is rising and varying over the Malaysian seas with the rate of sea level varies and gradually increase from east to west of Malaysia. Highly confident and correlation level of the 23 years measurement data with an astonishing root mean square difference permits the absolute sea level trend of the Malaysian seas has raised at the rate 3.14 ± 0.12 mm yr-1 to 4.81 ± 0.15 mm yr-1 for the chosen sub-areas, with an overall mean of 4.09 ± 0.12 mm yr-1. This study hopefully offers a beneficial sea level information to be applied in a wide range of related environmental and climatology issue such as flood and global warming.

  10. 14 CFR 91.411 - Altimeter system and altitude reporting equipment tests and inspections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Altimeter system and altitude reporting equipment tests and inspections. 91.411 Section 91.411 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... RULES Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 91.411 Altimeter system and...

  11. 14 CFR 29.1325 - Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...: Installation § 29.1325 Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case... between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static pressure is not..., when on the alternate static pressure system, differs from the reading of altimeter when on the primary...

  12. Case studies of ERS-1 altimeter data applicating in China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨学联; 季晓阳; 黄润恒; 凌铁军

    2001-01-01

    The impact of ERS-1 altimeter significant wave height on analysis of wave field and wave predictions is tested through analysis of selected cases. Application of the altimeter data may modifg initial field and thus 24-hour prediction of significant wave height. However the variations in initial wave field almost make no effect on 48-hour predictions.

  13. Temporal measures and controls in ultrafast laser domain; Mesures et controles temporels dans le domaine des lasers ultrabrefs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oksenhendler, Th

    2004-12-15

    This work presents the development of a streak camera 'jitter free' sweep unit synchronized on a femtosecond laser. This application of high voltage photoconductive switches ('High voltage Auston switch') yields subpicosecond resolution for accumulated images on streak camera on a few hundreds micro joule femtosecond laser. Two others applications of these photoconductive switches are studied: - ultrafast optical commutation by a Pockels cell directly driven by a photoconductive switch (rising edge < 100 ps and jitter < 2 ps), - laser pulse energy self-stabilization experimentally proving that driving a Pockels cell by a photoconductive switch can increase the stability of the laser pulse energy from 7 % to 0.7 % rms. Additionally, the application of the acoustic-optical programmable dispersive filter (Dazzler) to the self referenced spectral phase measurement is presented. As these measurements require a linear filter combined with a non linear filter, it is possible to replace the complete linear part (generally a complex optical set-up) by the Dazzler leading to new kind of linear filters and new measurements. Thus base band autocorrelation and time-domain SPIDER (SPIDER by Fourier transform spectroscopy) have been demonstrated experimentally for the first time. (author)

  14. Measuring cutaneous thermal nociception in group-housed pigs using laser technique - effects of laser power output

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herskin, Mette S.; Ladevig, Jan; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2009-01-01

    of the metatarsus were examined using 15 gilts kept in one group and tested in individual feeding stalls after feeding. Increasing the power output led to gradually decreasing latency to respond (P ... are available, especially methodology which is applicable for pigs kept in group-housing without disturbing the daily routines of the animals. To validate a laser-based method to measure thermal nociception in group-housed pigs, we performed two experiments observing the behavioural responses toward cutaneous...... nociceptive stimulation from a computer-controlled CO2-laser beam applied to either the caudal part of the metatarsus on the hind legs or the shoulder region of gilts. In Exp. 1, effects of laser power output (0, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 W) on nociceptive responses toward stimulation on the caudal aspects...

  15. Advances in laser-based isotope ratio measurements : selected applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerstel, E.; Gianfrani, L.

    2008-01-01

    Small molecules exhibit characteristic ro-vibrational transitions in the near- and mid-infrared spectral regions, which are strongly influenced by isotopic substitution. This gift of nature has made it possible to use laser spectroscopy for the accurate analysis of the isotopic composition of gaseou

  16. Optimizing terrestrial laser scanning measurement set-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soudarissanane, S.S.; Lindenbergh, R.C.

    2011-01-01

    One of the main applications of the terrestrial laser scanner is the visualization, modeling and monitoring of man-made structures like buildings. Especially surveying applications require on one hand a quickly obtainable, high resolution point cloud but also need observations with a known and well

  17. Active laser radar (lidar) for measurement of corresponding height and reflectance images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froehlich, Christoph; Mettenleiter, M.; Haertl, F.

    1997-08-01

    For the survey and inspection of environmental objects, a non-tactile, robust and precise imaging of height and depth is the basis sensor technology. For visual inspection,surface classification, and documentation purposes, however, additional information concerning reflectance of measured objects is necessary. High-speed acquisition of both geometric and visual information is achieved by means of an active laser radar, supporting consistent 3D height and 2D reflectance images. The laser radar is an optical-wavelength system, and is comparable to devices built by ERIM, Odetics, and Perceptron, measuring the range between sensor and target surfaces as well as the reflectance of the target surface, which corresponds to the magnitude of the back scattered laser energy. In contrast to these range sensing devices, the laser radar under consideration is designed for high speed and precise operation in both indoor and outdoor environments, emitting a minimum of near-IR laser energy. It integrates a laser range measurement system and a mechanical deflection system for 3D environmental measurements. This paper reports on design details of the laser radar for surface inspection tasks. It outlines the performance requirements and introduces the measurement principle. The hardware design, including the main modules, such as the laser head, the high frequency unit, the laser beam deflection system, and the digital signal processing unit are discussed.the signal processing unit consists of dedicated signal processors for real-time sensor data preprocessing as well as a sensor computer for high-level image analysis and feature extraction. The paper focuses on performance data of the system, including noise, drift over time, precision, and accuracy with measurements. It discuses the influences of ambient light, surface material of the target, and ambient temperature for range accuracy and range precision. Furthermore, experimental results from inspection of buildings, monuments

  18. Measurement of laser power for photo-triggered drug delivery in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R.; Zhang, X. L.; Liu, F.; Zhang, Z. L.; Chen, Y. J.; Zhao, E. M.; Liu, L.

    2016-07-01

    Thus far, despite many investigations have been carried out for photo-triggered drug delivery systems, most of them suffer from an intrinsic drawback of without real-time monitoring mechanism. Incident intensity of light is a feasible parameter to monitor the drug release profiles. However, it is difficult to measure the incident laser power irradiated onto the photo-triggered carriers in drug delivery systems during in vivo therapy. We design an online measurement method based on the fluorescence intensity ratio (FIR) technique through upconversion nanoparticles. FIR value varies with temperature of sample due to the thermal effect induced by the incident laser, which validates the laser power measurement. Effects of rare earth doping concentration, as well as experimental conditions including laser spots and wavelengths on the measurement behavior were also investigated.

  19. A 2-Micron Pulsed Laser Transmitter for Direct Detection Column CO2 Measurement from Space Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop a compact, efficient 2µm pulsed laser for a lidar instrument to make accurate, high-resolution atmospheric CO2 column measurements in support of the...

  20. The Measurement of the Speed of Light Using a Laser Pointer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Se-yuen; Yip, Din-yan

    2000-01-01

    Presents a method for measuring the speed of light using a laser pointer with adjustable focus as the signal carrier, a signal generator to modulate the light beam, and a student oscilloscope to detect the phase shift. (Author/CCM)

  1. Femtosecond precision measurement of laser-rf phase jitter in a photocathode rf gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Libing; Zhao, Lingrong; Lu, Chao; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Shengguang; Wang, Rui; Zhu, Pengfei; Xiang, Dao

    2017-03-01

    We report on the measurement of the laser-rf phase jitter in a photocathode rf gun with femtosecond precision. In this experiment four laser pulses with equal separation are used to produce electron bunch trains; then the laser-rf phase jitter is obtained by measuring the variations of the electron bunch spacing with an rf deflector. Furthermore, we show that when the gun and the deflector are powered by the same rf source, it is possible to obtain the laser-rf phase jitter in the gun through measurement of the beam-rf phase jitter in the deflector. Based on these measurements, we propose an effective time-stamping method that may be applied in MeV ultrafast electron diffraction facilities to enhance the temporal resolution.

  2. The Measurement of the Speed of Light Using a Laser Pointer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Se-yuen; Yip, Din-yan

    2000-01-01

    Presents a method for measuring the speed of light using a laser pointer with adjustable focus as the signal carrier, a signal generator to modulate the light beam, and a student oscilloscope to detect the phase shift. (Author/CCM)

  3. MEASUREMENT OF AMMONIA EMISSIONS FROM MECHANICALLY VENTILATED POULTRY HOUSES USING MULTIPATH TUNABLE DIODE LASER SPECTROSCOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammonia emissions from mechanically ventilated poultry operations are an important environmental concern. Open Path Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy has emerged as a robust real-time method for gas phase measurement of ammonia concentrations in agricultural settings. ...

  4. Laser-Hole Boring into Overdense Plasmas Measured with Soft X-Ray Laser Probing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, K. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada Oka 2-6, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, (Japan); Kodama, R. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada Oka 2-6, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, (Japan); Tanaka, K. A. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada Oka 2-6, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, (Japan); Hashimoto, H. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada Oka 2-6, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, (Japan); Kato, Y. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada Oka 2-6, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, (Japan); Mima, K. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada Oka 2-6, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, (Japan); Weber, F. A. [University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Barbee, T. W. Jr. [University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Da Silva, L. B. [University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2000-03-13

    A laser self-focused channel formation into overdense plasmas was observed using a soft x-ray laser probe system with a grid image refractometry (GIR) technique. 1.053 {mu}m laser light with a 100 ps pulse duration was focused onto a preformed plasma at an intensity of 2x10{sup 17} W /cm{sup 2} . Cross sections of the channel were obtained which show a 30 {mu}m diameter in overdense plasmas. The channel width in the overdense region was kept narrow as a result of self-focusing. Conically diverging density ridges were also observed along the channel, indicating a Mach cone created by a shock wave due to the supersonic propagation of the channel front. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  5. Findings toward the miniaturization of a laser speckle contrast device for skin roughness measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Daniel C.; Tchvialeva, Lioudmilla; Zeng, Haishan; Lee, Tim K.

    2017-02-01

    Skin roughness is an important parameter in the characterization of skin and skin lesions, particularly for the purposes of skin cancer detection. Our group had previously constructed a laser speckle device that can detect the roughness in microrelief of the skin. This paper reports on findings made for the further miniaturization of our existing portably-sized device. These findings include the feasibility of adopting a laser diode without temperature control, and the use of a single CCD camera for detection. The coherence length of a laser is a crucial criterion for speckle measurements as it must be within a specific range. The coherence length of a commercial grade 405 nm laser diode was found to be of an appropriate length. Also, after a short warm-up period the coherence length of the laser was found to remain relatively stable, even without temperature control. Although the laser's temperature change during operation may affect its power output and the shape of its spectrum, these are only minor factors in speckle contrast measurements. Our second finding covers a calibration curve to relate speckle measurements to roughness using only parallel polarization from one CCD camera. This was created using experimental data from skin phantoms and tested on in-vivo skin. These improvements are important steps forward in the ongoing development of the laser speckle device, especially towards a clinical device to measure skin roughness and evaluate skin lesions.

  6. Inference of Altimeter Accuracy on Along-track Gravity Anomaly Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Yang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A correlation model between along-track gravity anomaly accuracy, spatial resolution and altimeter accuracy is proposed. This new model is based on along-track gravity anomaly recovery and resolution estimation. Firstly, an error propagation formula of along-track gravity anomaly is derived from the principle of satellite altimetry. Then the mathematics between the SNR (signal to noise ratio and cross spectral coherence is deduced. The analytical correlation between altimeter accuracy and spatial resolution is finally obtained from the results above. Numerical simulation results show that along-track gravity anomaly accuracy is proportional to altimeter accuracy, while spatial resolution has a power relation with altimeter accuracy. e.g., with altimeter accuracy improving m times, gravity anomaly accuracy improves m times while spatial resolution improves m0.4644 times. This model is verified by real-world data.

  7. Pulse energy measurement at the hard x-ray laser in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, M.; Tanaka, T.; Saito, N. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), NMIJ, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan); RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Kurosawa, T. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), NMIJ, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan); Richter, M. [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Abbestrasse 2-12, D-10587 Berlin (Germany); Sorokin, A. A. [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, RAS, Polytekhnicheskaya 26, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Tiedtke, K. [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Kudo, T.; Yabashi, M. [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Tono, K. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Ishikawa, T. [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2012-07-09

    The pulse energies of a free electron laser have accurately been measured in the hard x-ray spectral range. In the photon energy regime from 4.4 keV to 16.8 keV, pulse energies up to 100 {mu}J were obtained at the hard x-ray laser facility SACLA (SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free-electron LAser). Two independent methods, using a cryogenic radiometer and a gas monitor detector, were applied and agreement within 3.3% was achieved. Based on our validated pulse energy measurement, a SACLA online monitor detector could be calibrated for all future experiments.

  8. Beam Emittance Measurement with Laser Wire Scanners in the ILC Beam Delivery System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agapov, I.; /CERN; Blair, G.A.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London; Woodley, M.; /SLAC

    2008-02-01

    Accurate measurement of the beam phase-space is essential for the next generation of electron accelerators. A scheme for beam optics optimization and beam matrix reconstruction algorithms for the diagnostics section of the beam delivery system of the International Linear Collider based on laser-wire beam profile monitors are discussed. Possible modes of operation of the laser-wire system together with their corresponding performance are presented. Based on these results, prospects for reconstructing the ILC beam emittance from representative laser-wire beam size measurements are evaluated.

  9. A simplified algorithm for measuring erythrocyte deformability dispersion by laser ektacytometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitin, S Yu; Yurchuk, Yu S [Department of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-31

    The possibility of measuring the dispersion of red blood cell deformability by laser diffractometry in shear flow (ektacytometry) is analysed theoretically. A diffraction pattern parameter is found, which is sensitive to the dispersion of erythrocyte deformability and to a lesser extent – to such parameters as the level of the scattered light intensity, the shape of red blood cells, the concentration of red blood cells in the suspension, the geometric dimensions of the experimental setup, etc. A new algorithm is proposed for measuring erythrocyte deformability dispersion by using data of laser ektacytometry. (laser applications in medicine)

  10. Measurements of laser generated soft X-ray emission from irradiated gold foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J. S.; Frank, Y.; Raicher, E.; Fraenkel, M.; Keiter, P. A.; Klein, S. R.; Drake, R. P.; Shvarts, D.

    2016-11-01

    Soft x-ray emission from laser irradiated gold foils was measured at the Omega-60 laser system using the Dante photodiode array. The foils were heated with 2 kJ, 6 ns laser pulses and foil thicknesses were varied between 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 μm. Initial Dante analysis indicates peak emission temperatures of roughly 100 eV and 80 eV for the 0.5 μm and 1.0 μm thick foils, respectively, with little measurable emission from the 2.0 μm foils.

  11. Measuring skewness of red blood cell deformability distribution by laser ektacytometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitin, S Yu; Priezzhev, A V; Lugovtsov, A E [International Laser Center, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ustinov, V D [M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Computational Mathematics and Cybernetics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-31

    An algorithm is proposed for measuring the parameters of red blood cell deformability distribution based on laser diffractometry of red blood cells in shear flow (ektacytometry). The algorithm is tested on specially prepared samples of rat blood. In these experiments we succeeded in measuring the mean deformability, deformability variance and skewness of red blood cell deformability distribution with errors of 10%, 15% and 35%, respectively. (laser biophotonics)

  12. Temperature measurement using ultraviolet laser absorption of carbon dioxide behind shock waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehlschlaeger, Matthew A; Davidson, David F; Jeffries, Jay B

    2005-11-01

    A diagnostic for microsecond time-resolved temperature measurements behind shock waves, using ultraviolet laser absorption of vibrationally hot carbon dioxide, is demonstrated. Continuous-wave laser radiation at 244 and 266 nm was employed to probe the spectrally smooth CO2 ultraviolet absorption, and an absorbance ratio technique was used to determine temperature. Measurements behind shock waves in both nonreacting and reacting (ignition) systems were made, and comparisons with isentropic and constant-volume calculations are reported.

  13. Laser application to measure vertical sea temperature and turbidity, design phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschberg, J. G.; Wouters, A. W.; Simon, K. M.; Byrne, J. D.; Deverdun, C. E.

    1976-01-01

    An experiment to test a new method was designed, using backscattered radiation from a laser beam to measure oceanographic parameters in a fraction of a second. Tyndall, Rayleigh, Brillouin, and Raman scattering all are utilized to evaluate the parameters. A beam from a continuous argon ion laser is used together with an interferometer and interference filters to gather the information. The results are checked by direct measurements. Future shipboard and airborne experiments are described.

  14. Laser and acoustic Doppler techniques for the measurement of fluid velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliff, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    An overview of current laser and acoustic Doppler techniques is presented. Results obtained by Doppler anemometry and conventional sensors are compared. Comparisons include simultaneous velocity measurements by hot wire and a three-dimensional laser anemometer made in a gaseous pipe flow as well as direct comparisons of atmospheric velocities measured with propeller and cup anemometry. Scanning techniques are also discussed. Conclusions and recommendations for future work are presented.

  15. High Repetition Rate Pulsed 2-Micron Laser Transmitter for Coherent CO2 DIAL Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Uprendra N.; Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Petzar, Paul J.; Trieu, Bo C.; Lee, Hyung

    2009-01-01

    A high repetition rate, highly efficient, Q-switched 2-micron laser system as the transmitter of a coherent differential absorption lidar for CO2 measurement has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center. Such a laser transmitter is a master-slave laser system. The master laser operates in a single frequency, either on-line or off-line of a selected CO2 absorption line. The slave laser is a Q-switched ring-cavity Ho:YLF laser which is pumped by a Tm:fiber laser. The repetition rate can be adjusted from a few hundred Hz to 10 kHz. The injection seeding success rate is from 99.4% to 99.95%. For 1 kHz operation, the output pulse energy is 5.5mJ with the pulse length of approximately 50 ns. The optical-to-optical efficiency is 39% when the pump power is 14.5W. The measured standard deviation of the laser frequency jitter is about 3 MHz.

  16. Measuring physical traits of primates remotely: the use of parallel lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Jessica M; Chapman, Colin A; Twinomugisha, Dennis; Wasserman, Michael D; Lambert, Joanna E; Goldberg, Tony L

    2008-12-01

    Physical traits, such as body size, and processes like growth can be used as indices of primate health and can add to our understanding of life history and behavior. Accurately measuring physical traits in the wild can be challenging because capture is difficult, disrupts animals, and may cause injury. To measure physical traits of arboreal primates remotely, we adapted a parallel laser technique that has been used with terrestrial and marine mammals. Two parallel lasers separated by a known distance (4 cm) and mounted onto a digital camera are projected onto an animal. When a photograph is taken, the laser projections on the target provide a scale bar. We validated the technique for measuring the physical traits of identifiable red colobus monkeys (Procolobus rufomitratus) in Kibale National Park, Uganda. First, we photographed the tails of monkeys with laser projections and compared these with measurements previously obtained when the animals were captured. Second, we manually measured the distance between two markers placed on tree branches at similar heights to those used by monkeys, and compared them with the measurements obtained through digital photographs of the markers with parallel laser projections. The mean tail length of the monkeys via manual measurements was 63.3+/-4.4 cm, and via remote measurements was 63.0+/-4.1 cm. The mean distance between the markers on tree branches via manual measurements was 13.8+/-3.59 cm, and via remote measurements was 13.9+/-3.58 cm. The mean error using parallel lasers was 1.7% in both cases. Although the needed precision will depend on the question asked, our results suggest that sufficiently precise measurements of physical traits or substrates of arboreal primates can be obtained remotely using parallel lasers.

  17. Large-scale Gulf Stream frontal study using GEOS 3 radar altimeter data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, N. E.; Leitao, C. D.; Parra, C. G.

    1978-01-01

    From data obtained by the GEOS 3 radar altimeter, sea surface heights are found by both editing and filtering the raw sea surface height measurements and then referencing these processed data to a 5 foot by 5 foot geoid. Any trend between the processed data and the geoid is removed by subtracting out a linear fit to the residuals in the open ocean. Data from individual passes are further processed by applying a minimum variance technique at the subsatellite crossing points to produce surface topography maps for the 6 months and an overall mean map which reveal important details about the Gulf Stream system. The differences between the monthly mean and the overall mean are calculated for each of the 6 months to show the temporal and spatial changes of the Gulf Stream front and spawned eddies. The standard deviation map is even more informative and shows preferred locations of Gulf Stream meanders.

  18. Vibration measurement based on the optical cross-correlation technique with femtosecond pulsed laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jibo; Wu, Tengfei; Zhao, Chunbo; Li, Shuyi

    2016-10-01

    Two vibration measurement methods with femtosecond pulsed laser based on the optical cross-correlation technique are presented independently in this paper. The balanced optical cross-correlation technique can reflect the time jitter between the reference pluses and measurement pluses by detecting second harmonic signals using type II phase-matched nonlinear crystal and balanced amplified photo-detectors. In the first method, with the purpose of attaining the vibration displacement, the time difference of the reference pulses relative to the measurement pluses can be measured using single femtosecond pulsed laser. In the second method, there are a couple of femtosecond pulsed lasers with high pulse repetition frequency. Vibration displacement associated with cavity length can be calculated by means of precisely measuring the pulse repetition frequency. The results show that the range of measurement attains ±150μm for a 500fs pulse. These methods will be suited for vibration displacement measurement, including laboratory use, field testing and industrial application.

  19. Interstitial Photoacoustic Sensor for the Measurement of Tissue Temperature during Interstitial Laser Phototherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhifang Li

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Photothermal therapy is an effective means to induce tumor cell death, since tumor tissue is more sensitive to temperature increases than normal tissue. Biological responses depend on tissue temperature; target tissue temperature needs to be precisely measured and controlled to achieve desired thermal effects. In this work, a unique photoacoustic (PA sensor is proposed for temperature measurement during interstitial laser phototherapy. A continuous-wave laser light and a pulsed laser light, for photothermal irradiation and photoacoustic temperature measurement, respectively, were delivered to the target tissue through a fiber coupler. During laser irradiation, the PA amplitude was measured. The Grüneisen parameter and the bioheat equation were used to determine the temperature in strategic positions in the target tissue. Our results demonstrate that the interstitial PA amplitude is a linear function of temperature in the range of 22 to 55 °C, as confirmed by thermocouple measurement. Furthermore, by choosing appropriate laser parameters, the maximum temperature surrounding the active diffuse fiber tip in tissue can be controlled in the range of 41 to 55 °C. Thus, this sensor could potentially be used for fast, accurate, and convenient three-dimensional temperature measurement, and for real-time feedback and control of interstitial laser phototherapy in cancer treatment.

  20. Mean sea surface and geoid gradient comparisons with TOPEX altimeter data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Richard H.; Yi, Yuchan; Wang, Yan Ming

    1994-01-01

    Cycles 4 to 54 of TOPEX data have been analyzed through comparisons with the mean sea surface given on the disturbed geophysical data record (GDR). Two inverted barometer correction procedures were considered for the data reduction. One used a constant atmospheric pressure for all data while the one adopted for use, for most computations, introduced a cycle average pressure. The maximum difference between the two estimates was 3.0 cm with a clear annual signal. With the modified correction the TOPEX sea surface was compared to The Ohio State University (OSU) mean sea surface, given on the GDR, to estimate three translations ( delta x = -2.3 cm; delta y = 25.0 cm; delta z = -0.3 cm) and a bias (43.3 cm) between the two surfaces. The only significant translation is delta y which indicates the reference frame of the TOPEX system differs from that used in the OSU mean sea surface system. The bias between the TOPEX mean sea surface and the OSU mean sea surface was used to estimate an equatorial radius of 6,378,136.55 m based on an 18-cm biased estimate of the TOPEX altimeter. Examination of the average difference, by cycle, between the TOPEX sea surface and the OSU mean sea surface suggested a bias change of 3.1 +/- 2.2 mm/yr with a positive sign indicating the average ocean surface is rising or the altimeter measured distance is decreasing. Models were implemented that solved directly for a bias, bias rate annual/semiannual, and tide correction terms. The computations indicated that a simultaneous solution for this bias, bias rate, and annual/semiannual terms gave the most accurate results. Nonsimultaneous solutions led to slightly different bias rate values. The root mean square difference between the TOPEX sea surface and OSU sea surface, after translation and bias correction, was +/- 17 cm for a typical cycle. Some locations were indentified where the difference could reach 2.3 cm and were repeated over several cycles indicating errors in the mean sea surface. Most

  1. Generation and characterization of biological aerosols for laser measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Yung-Sung; Barr, E.B.

    1995-12-01

    Concerns for proliferation of biological weapons including bacteria, fungi, and viruses have prompted research and development on methods for the rapid detection of biological aerosols in the field. Real-time instruments that can distinguish biological aerosols from background dust would be especially useful. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is developing a laser-based, real-time instrument for rapid detection of biological aerosols, and ITRI is working with SNL scientists and engineers to evaluate this technology for a wide range of biological aerosols. This paper describes methods being used to generate the characterize the biological aerosols for these tests. In summary, a biosafe system has been developed for generating and characterizing biological aerosols and using those aerosols to test the SNL laser-based real-time instrument. Such tests are essential in studying methods for rapid detection of airborne biological materials.

  2. Noise Suppression on the Tunable Laser for Precise Cavity Length Displacement Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šmíd, Radek; Čížek, Martin; Mikel, Břetislav; Hrabina, Jan; Lazar, Josef; Číp, Ondřej

    2016-01-01

    The absolute distance between the mirrors of a Fabry-Perot cavity with a spacer from an ultra low expansion material was measured by an ultra wide tunable laser diode. The DFB laser diode working at 1542 nm with 1.5 MHz linewidth and 2 nm tuning range has been suppressed with an unbalanced heterodyne fiber interferometer. The frequency noise of laser has been suppressed by 40 dB across the Fourier frequency range 30–300 Hz and by 20 dB up to 4 kHz and the linewidth of the laser below 300 kHz. The relative resolution of the measurement was 10−9 that corresponds to 0.3 nm (sub-nm) for 0.178 m long cavity with ability of displacement measurement of 0.5 mm. PMID:27608024

  3. Forward voltage short-pulse technique for measuring high power laser array junction temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Byron L. (Inventor); Amzajerdian, Frazin (Inventor); Barnes, Bruce W. (Inventor); Baker, Nathaniel R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of measuring the temperature of the P-N junction within the light-emitting region of a quasi-continuous-wave or pulsed semiconductor laser diode device. A series of relatively short and low current monitor pulses are applied to the laser diode in the period between the main drive current pulses necessary to cause the semiconductor to lase. At the sufficiently low current level of the monitor pulses, the laser diode device does not lase and behaves similar to an electronic diode. The voltage across the laser diode resulting from each of these low current monitor pulses is measured with a high degree of precision. The junction temperature is then determined from the measured junction voltage using their known linear relationship.

  4. Noise Suppression on the Tunable Laser for Precise Cavity Length Displacement Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radek Šmíd

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The absolute distance between the mirrors of a Fabry-Perot cavity with a spacer from an ultra low expansion material was measured by an ultra wide tunable laser diode. The DFB laser diode working at 1542 nm with 1.5 MHz linewidth and 2 nm tuning range has been suppressed with an unbalanced heterodyne fiber interferometer. The frequency noise of laser has been suppressed by 40 dB across the Fourier frequency range 30–300 Hz and by 20 dB up to 4 kHz and the linewidth of the laser below 300 kHz. The relative resolution of the measurement was 10 − 9 that corresponds to 0.3 nm (sub-nm for 0.178 m long cavity with ability of displacement measurement of 0.5 mm.

  5. Design and simulation of a mixer and phase difference measuring circuitry for laser range finding systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guili; Wang, Yanlin; Liu, Gang

    2006-11-01

    This article focuses on the circuit implementation of a mixer and phase difference measurement for laser range finding systems. It will introduce simply the principle of the laser range finding system, which is the basis of the electronic circuitry design. The modulated laser lights of two different frequencies are mixed and the phase difference is detected in order to measure the range. The method of measuring the range is to use the mixer and the phase difference detector. The new and high precision IC that has a high quality makes the circuit simple and reliable. The circuit of the mixer and the phase difference detector for laser range finding systems is designed using AD608 and AD8302 chips.

  6. Detection of Solid Tides on Europa Through Ground-Tracking of a Low-Altitude, Altimeter- Equipped Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casotto, S.; Padovan, S.; Bardella, M.

    2007-12-01

    The possibility of detecting a global liquid ocean beneath the icy crust of Europa without the use of landers or ice penetrators rests on the measurement of the Love numbers h2 and k2. These are respectively related to the radial deformation of the surface and the consequent tidally-induced variation of the gravitational field of this icy satellite. Depending on the rigidity of the icy crust, the response of the Europan surface to the tidal forces gives an indication of the depth of a possible subsurface ocean. Previous studies in this area have addressed the detection of tidal surface deformations through the analysis of the tidally induced orbital perturbations of a Europan orbiter. As a preliminary study in preparation for future missions to Europa, as in the LAPLACE proposal to the European Space Agency, the approach followed here is to introduce the presence of an onboard altimeter. In this study we then generate synthetic measurements taken from an altimeter-equipped, low-altitude orbiter, supplemented with Earth-based tracking of the orbiter. For simplicity, ground-tracking is simulated as a range data-type. Altimeter measurements are simulated using parameters based on available models for the interior of Europa derived from Galileo mission data. Reference orbits were obtained by numerical investigations of the dynamically unstable near-Europa environment. Orbits were found to be stable over periods of approximately one to three months at altitudes of 100 km and inclinations varying from 75 degrees to 105 degrees. The measurements are consequently simulated over a period of one to two months. Under the hypothesis that Europan gravity field information of sufficient accuracy has been obtained in the first phase of the mission, the simulations address the detection of the solid tide related Love parameters h2 and k2. Results of this sensitivity study will be presented for a variety of orbital configurations with the aim to help in the design of future Europa

  7. Mucosal blood flow measurements using laser Doppler perfusion monitoring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dag Arne Lihaug Hoff; Hans Gregersen; Jan Gunnar Hatlebakk

    2009-01-01

    Perfusion of individual tissues is a basic physiological process that is necessary to sustain oxygenation and nutrition at a cellular level. Ischemia, or the insufficiency of perfusion, is a common mechanism for tissue death or degeneration, and at a lower threshold, a mechanism for the generation of sensory signalling including pain. It is of considerable interest to study perfusion of peripheral abdominal tissues in a variety of circumstances. Microvascular disease of the abdominal organs has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of disorders, including peptic ulcer disease, inflammatory bowel disease and chest pain. The basic principle of laser Doppler perfusion monitoring (LDPM) is to analyze changes in the spectrum of light reflected from tissues as a response to a beam of monochromatic laser light emitted. It reflects the total local microcirculatory blood perfusion, including perfusion in capillaries, arterioles, venules and shunts. During the last 20-25 years, numerous studies have been performed in different parts of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract using LDPM. In recent years we have developed a multi-modal catheter device which includes a laser Doppler probe, with the intent primarily to investigate patients suffering from functional chest pain of presumed oesophageal origin. Preliminary studies show the feasibility of incorporating LDPM into such catheters for performing physiological studies in the GI tract. LDPM has emerged as a research and clinical tool in preference to other methods; but, it is important to be aware of its limitations and account for them when reporting results.

  8. Surface curvature of pelvic joints from three laser scanners: separating anatomy from measurement error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Chiara; Gaudio, Daniel; Cattaneo, Cristina; Buckberry, Jo; Wilson, Andrew S; Lynnerup, Niels

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies have reported that quantifying symphyseal and auricular surface curvature changes on 3D models acquired by laser scanners has a potential for age estimation. However, no tests have been carried out to evaluate the repeatability of the results between different laser scanners. 3D models of the two pelvic joints were generated using three laser scanners (Custom, Faro, and Minolta). The surface curvature, the surface area, and the distance between co-registered meshes were investigated. Close results were found for surface areas (differences between 0.3% and 2.4%) and for distance deviations (average laser scanners, but still showing similar trends with increasing phases/scores. Applying a smoothing factor to the 3D models, it was possible to separate anatomy from the measurement error of each instrument, so that similar curvature values could be obtained (p laser scanner.

  9. Raman shifting of KrF laser radiation for tropospheric ozone measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, William B.; Browell, Edward V.; Higdon, Noah S.; Ismail, Syed

    1991-01-01

    The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurement of tropospheric ozone requires use of high average power UV lasers operating at two appropriate DIAL wavelengths. Laboratory experiments have demonstrated that a KrF excimer laser can be used to generate several wavelengths with good energy conversion efficiencies by stimulated Raman shifting using hydrogen (H2) and deuterium (D2). Computer simulations for an airborne lidar have shown that these laser emissions can be used for the less than 5 percent random error, high resolution measuremment of ozone across the troposphere using the DIAL technique. In the region of strong ozone absorption, laser wavelengths of 277.0 and 291.7 nm were generated using H2 and D2, respectively. In addition, a laser wavelength at 302.0 nm was generated using two cells in series, with the first containing D2 and the second containing H2. The energy conversion efficiency for each wavelength was between 14 and 27 percent.

  10. Measurement of beam characteristics from C{sup 6+} laser ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, A., E-mail: aki.yamag@toshiba.co.jp; Sako, K.; Sato, K. [Toshiba Corporation, Yokohama 230-0045 (Japan); Hayashizaki, N. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Hattori, T. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    We developed a C{sup 6+} laser ion source for a heavy-ion accelerator. A carbon target was irradiated with a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm wavelength, 1.4 J maximum laser energy, 10 ns pulse duration) to generate a high-density plasma. The laser ion source employed a rotating carbon target for continuous operation. Ion beams were extracted from the plasma through a drift space using a direct plasma injection scheme [B. Yu. Sharkov, A. V. Shumshurov, V. P. Dubenkow, O. B. Shamaev, and A. A. Golubev, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 63, 2841 (1992)] up to a maximum voltage of 40 kV. We measured the characteristics of the ion beams from the laser ion source and present the results of experiments here.

  11. Measurement of flow fluctuations in single longitudinal mode pulsed dye laser

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V S Rawat; N Kawade; G Sridhar; Sunita Singh; L M Gantayet

    2014-02-01

    A simple technique had been demonstrated for measuring flow-induced fluctuations in the single longitudinal mode (SLM) pulsed dye laser. Two prominent frequency components of 10.74 Hz and 48.83 Hz were present in the output of the Nd:YAG-pumped SLM dye laser. The flow-induced frequency component of 48.83 Hz was present due to the revolution per minute of the motor attached to the magnetically coupled gear pump. The time average bandwidth of 180 MHz has been obtained for this SLM dye laser. The effect of pump pulse energy on the bandwidth of the SLM dye laser was studied. The bandwidth of the SLM dye laser was increased to 285 MHz from 180 MHz, when the pump pulse energy was increased to 0.75 mJ from 0.15 mJ for a constant dye flow velocity of 0.5 m/s.

  12. Distance Measurement in Air with a Femtosecond Frequency Comb Laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cui, M.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis is about interferometric distance measurement using ultrashort pulses, with linear measurement techniques in a dispersive medium. Several fields of expertise are combined here: ultrashort pulse propagation in dispersive media, distance measurement interefometry and linear measurement tec

  13. Distance Measurement in Air with a Femtosecond Frequency Comb Laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cui, M.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis is about interferometric distance measurement using ultrashort pulses, with linear measurement techniques in a dispersive medium. Several fields of expertise are combined here: ultrashort pulse propagation in dispersive media, distance measurement interefometry and linear measurement tec

  14. Technical Development of the Small Fission Gas Measurement in Fuel Rods using the Laser Puncturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Heemoon; Baik, Seungje; Jin, Younggwan; Jung, Yanghong; Yoo, Boungok; Ahn, Sangbok; Yang, Yongsik; Lee, Byoungoon

    2013-12-15

    Information of fuel cladding tube and expected gas amount were obtained from fuel development department to design chamber volume and specification of laser device. Laser puncturing tests for several tubes were performed to setup power and capability. Laser puncturing tests for several tubes were performed to setup power and capability. Vacuum system with chamber was established. Additionally, QMS(Quadruple Mass Spectrometer in high vacuum state) was installed in vacuum system. The system was installed in hotcell following the preliminary test for the puncturing, pressure measuring and gas content analysis. After system test was installed in hotcell following the preliminary test for the puncturing, pressure measuring and gas content analysis. After system test was completed, SFR fuel rods were punctured to measure total gas amount and each gas content(He, Xe, Kr). The system for laser puncturing and measurement of small fission gas amout in fuel rod was designed with considering hotcell facility and fuel rod condition for first year. Chamber size, laser capability were well operated and the system showed reasonable results. In second year, QMS(Quadruple Mass Spectrometer) was installed in the system for quantitative analysis of gas contents. Thus, Laser puncturing, amount of gas measurement and gas analysis were carried out in one time. The system was activated for SFR fuel rods after installation and preliminary test. 9 SFR fuel rods were tested and produced total gas amounts and gas analysis data(He, Xe, Kr)

  15. Accurate potential drop sheet resistance measurements of laser-doped areas in semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinrich, Martin, E-mail: mh.seris@gmail.com [Solar Energy Research Institute of Singapore, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117574 (Singapore); NUS Graduate School for Integrative Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117456 (Singapore); Kluska, Sven; Binder, Sebastian [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems (ISE), Heidenhofstrasse 2, D-79110 Freiburg (Germany); Hameiri, Ziv [The School of Photovoltaic and Renewable Energy Engineering, The University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052 (Australia); Hoex, Bram [Solar Energy Research Institute of Singapore, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117574 (Singapore); Aberle, Armin G. [Solar Energy Research Institute of Singapore, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117574 (Singapore); NUS Graduate School for Integrative Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117456 (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117456 (Singapore)

    2014-10-07

    It is investigated how potential drop sheet resistance measurements of areas formed by laser-assisted doping in crystalline Si wafers are affected by typically occurring experimental factors like sample size, inhomogeneities, surface roughness, or coatings. Measurements are obtained with a collinear four point probe setup and a modified transfer length measurement setup to measure sheet resistances of laser-doped lines. Inhomogeneities in doping depth are observed from scanning electron microscope images and electron beam induced current measurements. It is observed that influences from sample size, inhomogeneities, surface roughness, and coatings can be neglected if certain preconditions are met. Guidelines are given on how to obtain accurate potential drop sheet resistance measurements on laser-doped regions.

  16. Two Wavelength Ti:sapphire Laser for Ozone DIAL Measurements from Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Situ, Wen; DeYoung, Russel J.

    1998-01-01

    Laser remote sensing of ozone from aircraft has proven to be a valuable technique for understanding the distribution and dynamics of ozone in the atmosphere. Presently the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique, using dual ND:YAG lasers that are doubled to pump dye lasers which in turn are doubled into the UV for the "on" and "off' line lasers, is used on either the NASA DC-8 or P-3 aircraft. Typically, the laser output for each line is 40-mJ and this is split into two beams, one looking up and the other downward, each beam having about 20-mJ. The residual ND:YAG (1.06 micron) and dye laser energies are also transmitted to obtain information on the atmospheric aerosols. While this system has operated well, there are several system characteristics that make the system less than ideal for aircraft operations. The system, which uses separate "on" and "off" line lasers, is quite large and massive requiring valuable aircraft volume and weight. The dye slowly degrades with time requiring replacement. The laser complexity requires a number of technical people to maintain the system performance. There is also the future interest in deploying an ozone DIAL system in an Unpiloted Atmospheric Vehicle (UAV) which would require a total payload mass of less than 150 kg and power requirement of less than 1500 W. A laser technology has emerged that could potentially provide significant enhancements over the present ozone DIAL system. The flashlamp pumped Ti:sapphire laser system is an emerging technology that could reduce the mass and volume over the present system and also provide a system with fewer conversion steps, reducing system complexity. This paper will discuss preliminary results from a flashlamp-pumped Ti:sapphire laser constructed as a radiation source for a UV DIAL system to measure ozone.

  17. A non-contact temperature measurement system for controlling photothermal medical laser treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Ã.-zgür; Gülsoy, Murat

    2016-03-01

    Photothermal medical laser treatments are extremely dependent on the generated tissue temperature. It is necessary to reach a certain temperature threshold to achieve successful results, whereas preventing to exceed an upper temperature value is required to avoid thermal damage. One method to overcome this problem is to use previously conducted dosimetry studies as a reference. Nevertheless, these results are acquired in controlled environments using uniform subjects. In the clinical environment, the optical and thermal characteristics (tissue color, composition and hydration level) vary dramatically among different patients. Therefore, the most reliable solution is to use a closed-loop feedback system that monitors the target tissue temperature to control laser exposure. In this study, we present a compact, non-contact temperature measurement system for the control of photothermal medical laser applications that is cost-efficient and simple to use. The temperature measurement is achieved using a focused, commercially available MOEMS infrared thermocouple sensor embedded in an off-axis arrangement on the laser beam delivery hand probe. The spot size of the temperature sensor is ca. 2.5 mm, reasonably smaller than the laser spot sizes used in photothermal medical laser applications. The temperature readout and laser control is realized using a microcontroller for fast operation. The utilization of the developed system may enable the adaptation of several medical laser treatments that are currently conducted only in controlled laboratory environments into the clinic. Laser tissue welding and cartilage reshaping are two of the techniques that are limited to laboratory research at the moment. This system will also ensure the safety and success of laser treatments aiming hyperthermia, coagulation and ablation, as well as LLLT and PDT.

  18. Laser Vision Measurement System and Assessment Method for SMIC Lead Coplanarity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Changku; QIU Yu; XUE Xiaojie; YE Shenghua

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, a successful application of line-structured laser sensor, involved in SMIC chip lead coplanarity measurement, is presented. With the experimental measurement system and its corresponding mathematics model, a contact-datum-plane assessment of SMIC chip lead coplanarity is developed to provide method for on-line measurement.

  19. Theodolite with CCD Camera for Safe Measurement of Laser-Beam Pointing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooke, Julie A.

    2003-01-01

    The simple addition of a charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera to a theodolite makes it safe to measure the pointing direction of a laser beam. The present state of the art requires this to be a custom addition because theodolites are manufactured without CCD cameras as standard or even optional equipment. A theodolite is an alignment telescope equipped with mechanisms to measure the azimuth and elevation angles to the sub-arcsecond level. When measuring the angular pointing direction of a Class ll laser with a theodolite, one could place a calculated amount of neutral density (ND) filters in front of the theodolite s telescope. One could then safely view and measure the laser s boresight looking through the theodolite s telescope without great risk to one s eyes. This method for a Class ll visible wavelength laser is not acceptable to even consider tempting for a Class IV laser and not applicable for an infrared (IR) laser. If one chooses insufficient attenuation or forgets to use the filters, then looking at the laser beam through the theodolite could cause instant blindness. The CCD camera is already commercially available. It is a small, inexpensive, blackand- white CCD circuit-board-level camera. An interface adaptor was designed and fabricated to mount the camera onto the eyepiece of the specific theodolite s viewing telescope. Other equipment needed for operation of the camera are power supplies, cables, and a black-and-white television monitor. The picture displayed on the monitor is equivalent to what one would see when looking directly through the theodolite. Again, the additional advantage afforded by a cheap black-and-white CCD camera is that it is sensitive to infrared as well as to visible light. Hence, one can use the camera coupled to a theodolite to measure the pointing of an infrared as well as a visible laser.

  20. Measurements of X-ray doses and spectra produced by picosecond laser-irradiated solid targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Qiu, Rui; Yu, Minghai; Jiao, Jinlong; Lu, Wei; Yan, Yonghong; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Zhimeng; Zhou, Weimin; Li, Junli; Zhang, Hui

    2017-02-09

    Experiments have shown that high-intensity laser interaction with a solid target can generate significant X-ray doses. This study was conducted to determine the X-ray doses and spectra produced for picosecond laser-irradiated solid targets. The photon doses and X-ray spectra in the laser forward and side directions were measured using an XG III ps 300 TW laser system. For laser intensities of 7×10(18)-4×10(19)W/cm(2), the maximum photon dose was 16.8 mSv at 50cm with a laser energy of ~153J on a 1-mm Ta target. The photon dose in the forward direction increased more significantly with increasing laser intensity than that in the side direction. For photon energies >300keV, the X-ray spectrum can be fit with an effective temperature distribution of the exponential form, dN/dE = k× exp(-E/Tx). The X-ray temperature Tx increased with the laser intensity in the forward direction with values of 0.46-0.75MeV. Tx was less strongly correlated with the laser intensity in the side direction with values of 0.29-0.32MeV. The escaping electron spectrum was also measured. The measured electron temperature was correlated with the electron temperature predicted by the ponderomotive law. The observations in this experiment were also investigated numerically. A good agreement was observed between the experimental and simulation results.

  1. Phase retrieval and time-frequency methods in the measurement of ultrashort laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLong, K.W.; Fittinghoff, D.N.; Ladera, C.L.; Trebino, R.

    1995-02-01

    Recently several techniques have become available to measure the time- (or frequency-) dependent intensity and phase of ultrashort laser pulses. One of these, Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating (FROG), is rigorous and has achieved single-laser-shot operation. FROG combines the concepts of time-frequency analysis in the form of spectrogram generation (in order to create a two-dimensional problem), and uses a phase-retrieval-based algorithm to invert the experimental data to yield the intensity and phase of the laboratory laser pulse. In FROG it is easy to generate a spectrogram of the unknown signal, and inversion of the spectrogram to recover the signal is the main goal. Because the temporal width of a femtosecond laser pulse is much shorter than anything achievable by electronics, FROG uses the pulse to measure itself. In FROG, the laser pulse is split into two replicas of itself by a partially reflecting beamsplitter, and the two replicas interact with each other in a medium with an instantaneous nonlinear-optical response. This interaction generates a signal field that is then frequency-resolved using a spectrometer. The spectrum of the signal field is measured for all relevant values of the temporal delay between the two pulses. Here, the authors employ FROG and FROG related techniques to measure the time-dependent intensity and phase of an ultrashort laser pulse.

  2. Assimilation of Satellite Altimeter Data With a Four Dimensional Model of the Japan Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Naoki; Ichiro, Fukumori; Jong-Hwan, Yoon

    1999-01-01

    A data assimilation is carried out to detect the variability of the Japan Sea circulation in the range from a few days to several years and from eddy to basin scale. The model applied in this study is the same 1/6 degree GFDL MOM1 as Kim and Yoon (1999) but is driven by ECMWF daily wind stress, heat and fresh water fluxes. The satellite altimeter data of TOPEX/POSEIDON, ERS-1 (phase C and G) and -2 are assimilated by an approximate Kalman filter (Fukumori and M.Rizzoli, 1995). The approximation is made by seeking an asymptotic steady error covariance matrix (Fukumori et al., 1993) and by introducing a coarser grid model for the innovation (data-model misfit). The coarse grid model is defined on 1/2 degree horizontal resolution and consists of the barotropic stream function, first baroclinic displacement and velocity amplitudes. The assimilated estimates explain about 6cm sea level variability of the data (approximately 12cm in the southern part), which is much larger than the previous reduced-gravity model and TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter data assimilation (Hirose et al., 1999). The impacts of the T/P and ERS data on the filtered estimates are comparable. The result also shows high correlation to subsurface water temperatures measured by CTD. Many of the mesoscale eddies/disturbances travel east-northeastward with the advection speed of 1-3cm/s though most of them generated in the western region can not pass over the Oki Spur. The quasi-biennial variability found by Hirose and Ostrovskii (1999) did not show clear propagation pattern. The shallow Oki Spur may work as a "western boundary" to this signal. This is more plausible estimation than by the R-G model which has no bottom topography.

  3. Merging altimeter data with Argo profiles to improve observation of tropical Pacific thermocline circulation and ENSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, D.; Lee, T.; Wang, F.; McPhaden, M. J.; Kessler, W. S.

    2016-12-01

    Meridional thermocline currents play an important role in the recharge and discharge of tropical Pacific warm water during the development and transition of ENSO cycles. Previous analyses have shown large variations of the equatorward meridional thermocline convergence/divergence on ENSO and decadal time scales in the interior ocean. The total convergence/divergence is however unknown due to the lack of long term observation in the western boundary currents. Numerical modelling studies suggested a tendency of compensation between the interior and western boundary currents, but the exact compensation is model dependent. While Argo floats provide reasonable data coverage in the interior ocean, few floats are in the western boundary currents. Recent multi-mission satellite altimeter data and advanced processing techniques have resulted in higher resolution sea surface height anomaly (SSHA) products with better accuracy closer to the coasts. This study utilizes the statistical relationship between Argo dynamic height profiles and altimeter SSHA to calculate geostrophic thermocline currents in both the interior ocean and the western boundary of the tropical Pacific. The derived thermocline currents in the western boundary are validated by a 3.5-year moored Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) measurement in the Mindanao Current and by a series of glider surveys (Davis et al. 2012) in the Solomon Sea. The meridional transport timeseries of the interior and western boundary currents in the thermocline show different lead-lag relationships to the Nino 3.4 index. Results will be discussed in the context of recent 2014-2015 El Nino development and the potential contribution to the Tropical Pacific Observing System (TPOS).

  4. Laser ablation-laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for the measurement of total elemental concentration in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Jhon; López, Sebastian; Jaramillo, Daniel; Hahn, David W; Molina, Alejandro

    2013-04-10

    The performances of traditional laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser ablation-LIBS (LA-LIBS) were compared by quantifying the total elemental concentration of potassium in highly heterogeneous solid samples, namely soils. Calibration curves for a set of fifteen samples with a wide range of potassium concentrations were generated. The LA-LIBS approach produced a superior linear response different than the traditional LIBS scheme. The analytical response of LA-LIBS was tested with a large set of different soil samples for the quantification of the total concentration of Fe, Mn, Mg, Ca, Na, and K. Results showed an acceptable linear response for Ca, Fe, Mg, and K while poor signal responses were found for Na and Mn. Signs of remaining matrix effects for the LA-LIBS approach in the case of soil analysis were found and discussed. Finally, some improvements and possibilities for future studies toward quantitative soil analysis with the LA-LIBS technique are suggested.

  5. Hole boring velocity measurements in near critical density plasmas by a CO2 laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chao; Tochitsky, Sergei; Pigeon, Jeremy; Joshi, Chan

    2014-10-01

    Measurements of plasma dynamics during the interaction of a high-power laser pulse with an above critical density plasma is important for understanding absorption, transport and particle acceleration mechanisms. An important process that affects these mechanisms is hole boring occurring at the critical density because of the radiation pressure of the laser pulse. Yet, no systematic measurements of the hole boring velocity's (vhb) dependence on laser intensity (I) have been made. In this talk, we present experimental results of vhb in near critical density plasmas produced by CO2 laser as a function of I in the range of 1*1015 to 1.6*1016 W/cm2. A novel four frame Mach-Zehnder interferometer using a 1 ps, 532 nm probe laser pulse was developed to record the evolution of the plasma density profile and the motion of the near critical density layer. Using this diagnostic, we observed the motion of the steepened plasma profile due to the incident, time-structured CO2 laser pulse. Experimental results show the hole boring velocity increases from 0.004c to 0.007c as the laser intensity is increased from 1*1015 to 1.6*1016 W/cm2. This work is supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-92-ER40727, NSF grant PHY-0936266 at UCLA.

  6. Laser Plasma Instability (LPI) Driven Light Scattering Measurements with 44 beam-lines of Nike KrF Laser^*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, J.; Weaver, J. L.; Kehne, D. M.; Phillips, L. S.; Obenschain, S. P.; Serlin, V.; McLean, E. A.; Lehmberg, R. H.; Manka, C. K.

    2009-11-01

    With short wavelength (248 nm), large bandwidth (˜1 THz), and ISI beam smoothing, Nike KrF laser provides unique opportunities of LPI research for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion. Previous experiments at intensities (10^15˜10^16 W/cm^2) exceeded two-plasmon decay (TPD) instability threshold using 12 beam-lines of Nike laser.^a,b For further experiments to study LPI excitation in bigger plasma volumes, 44 Nike main beams have been used to produce plasmas with total laser energies up to 1 kJ of ˜350 psec FWHM pulses. This talk will present results of the recent LPI experiment focusing on light emission data in spectral ranges relevant to the Raman (SRS) and TPD instabilities. The primary diagnostics were time-resolved spectrometers with an absolute-intensity-calibrated photodiode array in (0.4˜0.8)φ0 and a streak camera near 0.5φ0. Blackbody temperature and expansion speed measurements of the plasmas were also made. The experiment was conducted at laser intensities of (1˜4)x10^15 W/cm^2 on solid planar CH targets. ^a J. L. Weaver, et al, NO4.14, APS DPP (2008) ^b J. Oh, et al, NO4.15, APS DPP (2008) * Work supported by DoE/NNSA and performed at Naval Research Laboratory.

  7. Laser Doppler flowmetry for bone blood flow measurements: helium-neon laser light attenuation and depth of perfusion assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nötzli, H P; Swiontkowski, M F; Thaxter, S T; Carpenter, G K; Wyatt, R

    1989-01-01

    Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) has been successfully used in clinical and experimental settings to evaluate bone perfusion but unanswered questions regarding its capabilities and limitations still remain. This study was undertaken to determine absorption of He-Ne laser light (632.8 nm) and maximum depth for flow assessment (threshold thickness) under optimal conditions in bone. Light transmittance in bovine bone samples of femora and tibia was measured after each step of grinding and depth of penetration calculated. The threshold thickness was obtained by placing the same samples in a flow chamber where a solution of 2% latex circulated beneath; flow was detected by a laser Doppler probe resting on top of the sample. The results showed a significantly higher depth of penetration for trabecular than for cortical bone. A regression analysis showed a high correlation between the inorganic fraction of the bone and the depth of penetration. The maximum depth at which the laser Doppler probe can evaluate flow in bone conditions was found to be 2.9 +/- 0.2 mm in cortical bone, 3.5 +/- 0.3 mm in bone covered by 1 mm cartilage and 3.5 +/- 0.2 mm in trabecular bone. The study showed the limitations of LDF in bone and their correlations to various bone properties.

  8. Application of Blue Laser Triangulation Sensors for Displacement Measurement Through Fire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehler, Matthew S; Smith, Christopher M

    2016-11-01

    This paper explores the use of blue laser triangulation sensors to measure displacement of a target located behind or in the close proximity of natural gas diffusion flames. This measurement is critical for providing high-quality data in structural fire tests. The position of the laser relative to the flame envelope can significantly affect the measurement scatter, but has little influence on the mean values. We observe that the measurement scatter is normally distributed and increases linearly with the distance of the target from the flame along the beam path. Based on these observations, we demonstrate how time-averaging can be used to achieve a standard uncertainty associated with the displacement error of less than 0.1 mm, which is typically sufficient for structural fire testing applications. Measurements with the investigated blue laser sensors were not impeded by the thermal radiation emitted from the flame or the soot generated from the relatively clean-burning natural gas.

  9. Application of blue laser triangulation sensors for displacement measurement through fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehler, Matthew S.; Smith, Christopher M.

    2016-11-01

    This paper explores the use of blue laser triangulation sensors to measure displacement of a target located behind or in the close proximity of natural gas diffusion flames. This measurement is critical for providing high-quality data in structural fire tests. The position of the laser relative to the flame envelope can significantly affect the measurement scatter, but has little influence on the mean values. We observe that the measurement scatter is normally distributed and increases linearly with the distance of the target from the flame along the beam path. Based on these observations, we demonstrate how time-averaging can be used to achieve a standard uncertainty associated with the displacement error of less than 0.1 mm, which is typically sufficient for structural fire testing applications. Measurements with the investigated blue laser sensors were not impeded by the thermal radiation emitted from the flame or the soot generated from the relatively clean-burning natural gas.

  10. Using Ring Laser Systems to Measure Gravitomagnetic Effects on Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Ruggiero, Matteo Luca

    2013-01-01

    Gravitomagnetic effects originates from the rotation of the source of the gravitational field and from the rotational features of the observers' frame. In recent years, gravitomagnetism has been tested by means of its impact on the precession of LAGEOS orbits and on the precession of spherical gyroscopes in the GP-B experiment. What we suggest here is that light can be used as a probe to test gravitomagnetic effects in an terrestrial laboratory: the proposed detector consists of large ring-lasers arranged along three orthogonal axes.

  11. Measuring maximal eigenvalue distribution of Wishart random matrices with coupled lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Fridman, Moti; Nixon, Micha; Friesem, Asher A; Davidson, Nir

    2010-01-01

    We determined the probability distribution of the combined output power from twenty five coupled fiber lasers and show that it agrees well with the Tracy-Widom and Majumdar-Vergassola distributions of the largest eigenvalue of Wishart random matrices with no fitting parameters. This was achieved with $500,000$ measurements of the combined output power from the fiber lasers, that continuously changes with variations of the fiber lasers lengths. We show experimentally that for small deviations of the combined output power over its mean value the Tracy-Widom distribution is correct, while for large deviations the Majumdar-Vergassola distribution is correct.

  12. Measuring maximal eigenvalue distribution of Wishart random matrices with coupled lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridman, Moti; Pugatch, Rami; Nixon, Micha; Friesem, Asher A; Davidson, Nir

    2012-02-01

    We determined the probability distribution of the combined output power from 25 coupled fiber lasers and show that it agrees well with the Tracy-Widom and Majumdar-Vergassola distributions of the largest eigenvalue of Wishart random matrices with no fitting parameters. This was achieved with 500,000 measurements of the combined output power from the fiber lasers, that continuously changes with variations of the fiber lasers lengths. We show experimentally that for small deviations of the combined output power over its mean value the Tracy-Widom distribution is correct, while for large deviations the Majumdar-Vergassola distribution is correct.

  13. Calibration procedure for 3D surface measurements using stereo vision and laser stripe

    OpenAIRE

    Vilaça, João L.; Fonseca, Jaime C.; Pinho, A. C. Marques de

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes a new stereo vision calibration procedure and laser strip detection for 3D surface measurements. In this calibration procedure the laser plane is the one that matters, only one set of laser-coplanar calibration points is needed for image cameras calibration; and a dead- zone scan area is considered, since the igitalization arm is assembled in a 3 degree-freedom machine PC-based Motion Control with multiple scan paths. It is also presented some algorithms for 3D surface tre...

  14. Methane-based in situ temperature rise measurement in a diode-pumped rubidium laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Yang, Zining; Wang, Hongyan; Xu, Xiaojun

    2017-02-15

    We measured active zone temperature rise of an operational diode-pumped rubidium laser non-perturbatively with methane-based near-infrared tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLAS). For a Rb+ methane diode-pumped alkali laser (DPAL), the temperature rise was obtained. Especially, the temperature differences (∼10  K) between lasing and un-lasing cases were well identified, which demonstrated a high sensitivity of the method. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of extending the methane-based TDLAS method to DPAL study.

  15. Innovative confocal laser method for exact dioptric power measurement of intraocular lens implants Invited Paper

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ilko K. Ilev; Robert W. Faaland; Do-Hyun Kim; Robert H. James; Don Calogero

    2008-01-01

    We present a novel confocal laser method (CLM) for precise testing of the dioptric power of both positive and negative intraocular lens (IOL) implants. The CLM principle is based on a simple fiber-optic confocal laser design including a single-mode fiber coupler that serves simultaneously as a point light source used for formation of a collimated Gaussian laser beam, and as a highly sensitive confocal point receiver. The CLM approach provides an accurate, repeatable, objective, and fast method for IOL dioptric power measurement over the range from 0 D to greater than =t=30 D under both dry and in-situ simulated conditions.

  16. Measurements of Electron Density Profiles of Plasmas Produced by Nike KrF Laser for Laser Plasma Instability (LPI) Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaechul; Weaver, J. L.; Obenschain, S. P.; Schmitt, A. J.; Kehne, D. M.; Karasik, M.; Chan, L.-Y.; Serlin, V.; Phillips, L.

    2013-10-01

    Knowing spatial profiles of electron density (ne) in the underdense coronal region (n Nike LPI experiment, a side-on grid imaging refractometer (GIR) was deployed for measuring the underdense plasma profiles. Plasmas were produced from flat CH targets illuminated by Nike KrF laser with total energies up to 1 kJ of 0.5 ~ 1 nsec FWHM pulses. The GIR resolved ne up to 3 ×1021 /cm3 in space taking 2D snapshot images of probe laser (λ = 263 nm, Δt = 10 ps) beamlets (50 μm spacing) refracted by the plasma at a selected time during the laser illumination. The individual beamlet transmittances were also measured for Te estimation. Time-resolved spectrometers with an absolute-intensity-calibrated photodiode array and a streak camera simultaneously detected light emission from the plasma in spectral ranges relevant to Raman (SRS) and two plasmon decay instabilities. The measured spatial profiles are compared with simulation results from the FAST3D radiation hydrocode and their effects on the LPI observations are investigated. Work supported by DoE/NNSA and performed at Naval Research Laboratory.

  17. RADIATION DOSE MEASUREMENTS FOR HIGH-INTENSITY LASER INTERACTIONS WITH SOLID TARGETS AT SLAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, T; Bauer, J; Cimeno, M; Ferrari, A; Galtier, E; Granados, E; Lee, H J; Liu, J; Nagler, B; Prinz, A; Rokni, S; Tran, H; Woods, M

    2016-12-01

    A systematic study of photon and neutron radiation doses generated in high-intensity laser-solid interactions is underway at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. These laser-solid experiments are being performed using a 25 TW (up to 1 J in 40 fs) femtosecond pulsed Ti:sapphire laser at the Linac Coherent Light Source's (LCLS) Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) facility. Radiation measurements were performed with passive and active detectors deployed at various locations inside and outside the target chamber. Results from radiation dose measurements for laser-solid experiments at SLAC MEC in 2014 with peak intensity between 10(18) and 7.1 × 10(19) W cm(-2) are presented.

  18. A diode laser spectrometer at 634 nm and absolute frequency measurements using optical frequency comb

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Lin; Yuan Jie; Qi Xiang-Hui; Chen Wen-Lan; Zhou Da-Wei; Zhou Tong; Zhou Xiao-Ji; Chen Xu-Zong

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports that two identical external-cavity-diode-laser(ECDL)based spectrometers are constructed at 634 nm referencing on the hyperfine B-X transition a(80)8-4 of 127I2.The lasers are stabilized on the Doppler-free absorption signals using the third-harmonic detection technique.The instability of the stabilized laser is measured to be 2.8×10-12(after 1000 s)by counting the beat note between the two lasers.The absolute optical frequency of the transition is,for the first time,determined to be 472851936189.5 kHz by using an optical frequency comb referenced on the microwave caesium atomic clock.The uncertainty of the measurement is less than 4.9 kHz.

  19. Radiation Dose Measurement for High-Intensity Laser Interactions with Solid Targets at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Taiee [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-09-25

    A systematic study of photon and neutron radiation doses generated in high-intensity laser-solid interactions is underway at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We found that these laser-solid experiments are being performed using a 25 TW (up to 1 J in 40 fs) femtosecond pulsed Ti:sapphire laser at the Linac Coherent Light Source’s (LCLS) Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) facility. Additionally, radiation measurements were performed with passive and active detectors deployed at various locations inside and outside the target chamber. Results from radiation dose measurements for laser-solid experiments at SLAC MEC in 2014 with peak intensity between 1018 to 7.1x1019 W/cm2 are presented.

  20. Pseudo-random noise-continuous-wave laser radar for surface and cloud measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthey, Renaud; Mitev, Valentin

    2005-03-01

    Laser radar (lidar) application may require an instrument with compact size, long life of the components, low consumption and eye-safety. One possibility to achieve these features is to use a continuous-wave (cw) diode laser as lidar transmitter. A practical way to perform range-resolved measurements with a cw laser diode is the pseudo-random noise (PRN) modulation. This paper presents a compact PRN-cw lidar, using a 370-mW cw diode laser and an APD as detector. Daytime measurements of cloud base and topographic surface are demonstrated with the PRN-cw lidar technique, where the range detection exceeds 2 km. The detection of the topographic surface is performed with integration time of some tens of milliseconds during daytime and some tens of microseconds during night-time.

  1. Precise force measurement method by a Y-shaped cavity dual-frequency laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangzong Xiao; Xingwu Long; Bin Zhang; Geng Li

    2011-01-01

    A novel precise force measurement based on a Y-shaped cavity dual-frequency laser is proposed. The principle of force measurement with this method is analyzed, and the analytic relation expression between the input force and the change in the output beat frequency is derived. Experiments using a 632.8-nm Y-shaped cavity He-Ne dual-frequency laser are then performed; they demonstrate that the force measurement is proportional to a high degree over almost five decades of input signal range. The maximum scale factor is observed as 5.02×109 Hz/N, with beat frequency instability equivalent resolution of 10-5 N. By optimizing the optical and geometrical parameters of the laser sensor, a force measurement resolution of 10-6i N could be expected.%A novel precise force measurement based on a Y-shaped cavity dual-frequency laser is proposed.The principle of force measurement with this method is analyzed,and the analytic relation expression between the input force and the change in the output beat frequency is derived.Experiments using a 632.8-nm Y-shaped cavity He-Ne dual-frequency laser are then performed;they demonstrate that the force measurement is proportional to a high degree over almost five decades of input signal range.The maximum scale factor is observed as 5.02× 109 Hz/N,with beat frequency instability equivalent resolution of 10-5 N.By optimizing the optical and geometrical parameters of the laser sensor,a force measurement resolution of 10 -6 N could be expected.Precise measurement of force and force-related nagnitudes,such as acceleration,pressure,and mass,is an often demanded task in modern engineering and science[1-3].In recent decades,some research efforts have been intensified to utilize optical measnrement procedures for obtaining precise force measurement.

  2. A note on radar altimeter signatures of internal solitary waves in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, J. C. B.; Cerqueira, A. L. F.

    2016-10-01

    It is well known that Internal Waves of tidal frequency (i.e. Internal Tides) are successfully detected in seasurface height (SSH) by satellite altimetry [1]. Shorter period Internal Solitary Waves (ISWs), whose periods are an order of magnitude smaller than tidal internal waves, are however generally assumed too small to be detected with standard altimeters (at low sampling rates, i.e. 1 Hz). This is because the Radar Altimeter (RA) footprint is somewhat larger, or of similar size at best, than the ISWs typical wavelengths. Here it will be demonstrated that new generation high sampling rate satellite altimetry data (i.e. 20 Hz) hold a variety of short-period signatures that are consistent with surface manifestations of ISWs in the ocean. Our observational method is based on satellite synergy with imaging sensors such as Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and other high-resolution optical sensors (e.g. 250m resolution MODIS images) with which ISWs are unambiguously recognized. A first order commonly accepted ISW radar imaging mechanism is based on hydrodynamic modulation models [2] [3] in which the straining of surface waves due to ISW orbital currents is known to cause modulation of decimeter-scale surface waves, which have group velocities close to the IW phase velocity. This effect can be readily demonstrated by measurements of wind wave slope variances associated with short-period ISWs, as accomplished in the pioneer work of Hughes and Grant [4]. Mean square slope can be estimated from nadir looking RAs using a geometric optics (specular) scattering model [5][6][7], and directly obtained from normalized backscatter (sigma0) along-track records. We use differential scattering from the dual-band (Ku- and C-bands) microwave pulses of the Jason- 2 high-rate RA to isolate the contribution of small-scale surface waves to mean square slope. The differenced altimeter mean square slope estimate, derived for the nominal wave number range 40-100 rad/m, is then used to detect

  3. Laser vibrometry vibration measurements on vehicle cabins in running conditions: helicopter mock-up application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revel, Gian Marco; Castellini, Paolo; Chiariotti, Paolo; Tomasini, Enrico Primo; Cenedese, Fausto; Perazzolo, Alessandro

    2011-10-01

    The present work deals with the analysis of problems and potentials of laser vibrometer measurements inside vehicle cabins in running conditions, with particular reference to helicopters where interior vibro-acoustic issues are very important. This paper describes the results of a systematic measurement campaign performed on an Agusta A109MKII mock-up. The aim is to evaluate the applicability of scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV) for tests in simulated flying conditions and to understand how performances of the technique are affected when the laser head is placed inside the cabin, thus being subjected to interfering inputs. First a brief description of the performed test cases and the used measuring set-ups are given. Comparative tests between the SLDV and accelerometers are presented, analyzing the achievable performances for the specific application. Results obtained measuring with the SLDV placed inside the helicopter cabin during operative excitation conditions are compared with those performed with the laser lying outside the mock-up, these last being considered as ``reference measurements.'' Finally, in order to give an estimate of the uncertainty level on measured signals, a study linking the admitted percentage of noise content on vibrometer signals due to laser head vibration levels will be introduced.

  4. Measurement of pulse lengthening with pulse energy increase in picosecond Nd:YAG laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutolo, A.; Zeni, L.; Berardi, V.; Bruzzese, R.; Solimeno, S.; Spinelli, N.

    1989-03-15

    Taking advantage of a new technique, we have monitored the relative variations of time duration and mode size as a function of the pulse energy for 30-ps-long Nd:YAG laser pulses. In particular, by carrying out a statistical analysis, we have observed that the pulse time duration is an increasing function of the pulse energy, according to the theoretical modeling of passively mode-locked lasers. The measurements can be easily extended to the femtosecond regime.

  5. Nondestructive thickness measurement system for multiple layers of paint based on femtosecond fiber laser technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudo, Masaaki; Takayanagi, Jun; Ohtake, Hideyuki

    2016-11-01

    Because optical fiber-based optical systems are generally robust against external interference, they can be used as reliable systems in industrial applications in various fields. This paper describes fiber lasers generating femtosecond pulses that use optical fibers as gain media and optical paths. Additionally, the nondestructive paint multilayer thickness measurement of automotive parts using terahertz waves generated and detected by femtosecond fiber laser systems was conducted.

  6. 信息动态%Sound Velocity Measurement of Mesoscale Objects Using Laser Ultrasonics Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    A laser-based ultrasound system was designed and built to measure the sound velocity of mesoscale (tens of micrometer to millimeter-sized) objects. The system uses a Q-switch laser with 6.3 ns pulse width for excitation of broadband ultrasonic waves,and an optical fiber displacement interferometer for detection. The longitudinal acoustic wave velocities of the copper foils with different thicknesses were presented, which exhibit a relatively high degree of accuracy.

  7. Frequency Measurement of the Electric Quadrupole Transition in a Single Laser-Cooled 40Ca+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Qu; HUANG Yao; CAO Jian; OU Bao-Quan; GUO Bin; GUAN Hua; HUANG Xue-Ren; GAO Ke-Lin

    2011-01-01

    The optical frequency of the 4s2S1/2-3d2D5/2 transition in a single trapped and laser-cooled 40Ca+ ion is measured with an optical frequency comb system referenced to a hydrogen maser. A 729-nm laser can be locked to the clock transition about ten hours and the Allan deviation is better than 2 × 10-14/1000s.

  8. Peroxide dental bleaching via laser microchannels and tooth color measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altshuler, Gregory; Belikov, Andrey; Skrypnik, Alexei; Feldchtein, Felix; Pushkareva, Alexandra; Shatilova, Ksenia; Cernavin, Igor; Tuchin, Valery

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to use microchannels drilled by an Er:YAG laser into a human tooth through the enamel into the dentin for direct injection of hydrogen peroxide (HP) to produce a minimally invasive, rapid, tooth bleaching effect. The experiments were conducted in vitro. Five microchannels with a diameter of ˜200 μm and a depth of ˜2 mm were drilled through the palatal side of a human tooth crown using the microbeam of an Er:YAG-laser with a wavelength of 2.94 μm. After injection of an aqueous solution of 31%-HP through the microchannels, the tooth color was evaluated using a VITA shade guide and International Commission on Illumination L*ab color parameters. A tooth model used for the evaluation of the distribution of HP concentration was created and the amount of HP which can be injected into tooth dentin to bleach it safely was estimated. Injection of 1.5±0.1 mm3 of 31%-HP into the tooth led to noticeable bleaching within 3 h and significant improvement of tooth color within 24 h.

  9. Measurement of the figure of merit of indigenously developed Nd-doped phosphate laser glass rods for use in high power lasers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A P Kulkarni; S Jain; M P Kamath; A S Joshi; P A Naik; P D Gupta; K Annapurna; A K Mandal; B Karmakar; R Sen

    2014-01-01

    High energy, high power (HEHP) Nd:glass laser systems are used for inertial confinement fusion and equation of state (EOS) studies of materials at high temperature and pressure. A program has been undertaken for the indigenous development of Nd-doped phosphate laser glass rods and discs for HEHP lasers. In this paper, we report the characterization of the Nd-doped phosphate laser glass rods produced under this program and compare the indigenously developed laser glass to LHG-8 laser glass of M/s Hoya, Japan. We experimentally measured the values of the stimulated emission cross-section () and coefficient of intensity-dependent refractive index (2) and hence the figure of merit = /2 of the indigenous phosphate laser glass rods. This value of figure of merit is found comparable to the reported value of identically doped Nd:glass rods.

  10. The Performance of Altimeter Waveform Retrackers at Lake Baikal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuchan Yi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available At each of five fixed locations along the ground tracks of JASON-1 and ENVISAT, a repeat-track analysis of 1-Hz sea surface height (SSH data has been conducted to assess the performance of waveform retrackers over Lake Baikal in Siberia, Russia. This simple analysis of time series at each point location is needed to minimize the effect of the range correction artifacts in current Geophysical Data Record (GDR data products of radar altimeters in in-land areas. Using the retracked data available in the GDRs as the baseline, two retrackers are evaluated in terms of the number of valid data points produced and the degree of agreement with in-situ data of water level record. The threshold retrackers that are based on the amplitude of the robust OCOG algorithm (Offset Center of Gravity are found to perform the best in Lake Baikal.

  11. Design of A Pentagon Microstrip Antenna for Radar Altimeter Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. RamaDevi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In the navigational applications, radar and satellite requires a device that is a radar altimeter. Theworking frequency of this system is 4.2 to 4.3GHz and also requires less weight, low profile, and high gainantennas. The above mentioned application is possible with microstrip antenna as also known as planarantenna. In this paper, the microstrip antennas are designed at 4.3GHz (C-band in rectangular andcircular shape patch antennas in single element and arrays with parasitic elements placed in H-planecoupling. The performance of all these shapes is analyzed in terms of radiation pattern, half power points,and gain and impedance bandwidth in MATLAB. This work extended here with designed in different shapeslike Rhombic, Pentagon, Octagon and Edges-12 etc. Further these parameters are simulated in ANSOFTHFSSTMV9.0 simulator.

  12. Laboratory measurement verification of laser hazard analysis for miles weapon simulators used in force on force exercises.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2006-08-01

    Due to the change in the batteries used with the Small Arm Laser Transmitters (SALT) from 3-volts dc to 3.6-volts dc and changes to SNL MILES operating conditions, the associated laser hazards of these units required re-evaluation to ensure that the hazard classification of the laser emitters had not changed as well. The output laser emissions of the SNL MILES, weapon simulators and empire guns, used in Force-On-Force (FOF) training exercises, was measured in accordance to the ANSI Standard Z136.4-2005, ''Recommended Practice for Laser Safety Measurements for Hazard Evaluation''. The laser hazard class was evaluated in accordance with the ANSI Standard Z136.1-2000, ''Safe Use of Lasers'', using ''worst'' case conditions associated with these MILES units. Laser safety assessment was conducted in accordance with the ANSI Standard Z136.6-2005, ''Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors''. The laser hazard evaluation of these MILES laser emitters was compared to and supersedes SAND Report SAND2002-0246, ''Laser Safety Evaluation of the MILES and Mini MILES Laser Emitting Components'', which used ''actual'' operating conditions of the laser emitters at the time of its issuance.

  13. Range Resolved CO2 Atmospheric Backscattering Measurements Using Fiber Lasers and RZPN Code Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burris, John

    2011-01-01

    We report the use of a return-to- zero (RZPN) pseudo noise modulation technique for making range resolved measurements of CO2 within the planetary boundary layer (PBL) using commercial, off-the-shelf, components. Conventional, range resolved, DIAL measurements require laser pulse widths that are significantly shorter than the desired spatial resolution and necessitate using pulses whose temporal spacing is such that scattered returns from only a single pulse are observed by the receiver at any one time (for the PBL pulse separations must be greater than approximately 20 microseconds). This imposes significant operational limitations when using currently available fiber lasers because of the resulting low duty cycle (less than approximately 0.0005) and consequent low average laser output power. The RZPN modulation technique enables a fiber laser to operate at much higher duty cycles (approaching 0.04) thereby more effectively utilizing the amplifier's output. This increases the counts received by approximately two orders of magnitude. Our approach involves employing two distributed feedback lasers (DFB), each modulated by a different RPZN code, whose outputs are then amplified by a CW fiber amplifier. One laser is tuned to a CO2 absorption line; the other operates offline thereby permitting the simultaneous acquisition of both on and offline signals using independent RZPN codes. This minimizes the impact of atmospheric turbulence on the measurement. The on and offline signals are retrieved by deconvolving the return signal using the appropriate kernels.

  14. Measuring MEMS vibration with novel quasi-heterodyned laser interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styk, Adam; Lambelet, Patrick; Paris, Roman; Kujawińska, Małgorzata

    2012-06-01

    The paper presents novel interferometric measurement technique applied for MEMS dynamic properties measurements. The method was developed especially for multi-channel interferometer developed under SMARTIEHS EU project. The method employs sinusoidal modulation of light and novel smart-pixel camera detector. The measurement results obtained with developed measurement system and commercial Polytec system, obtained while measuring reference objects, are in good correspondence showing usefulness of proposed method.

  15. The Intelligent Measuring Sub-system in the Computer Integrated and Flexible Laser Processing System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on the computer integrated and flexible laser p rocessing system, we developed an intelligent measuring sub-system. A novel mod el has been built to compensate the deviations of the main frame-structure, and a laser tracker system is applied to calibrate the accuracy of the system. Anal yzing the characteristics of all kind surfaces of automobile outer penal moulds and dies, the surface and border to be measured and processed are classified int o four types. A 2-D adaptive measuring method based ...

  16. Smart Laser Interferometer with Electrically Tunable Lenses for Flow Velocity Measurements through Disturbing Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen W. Czarske

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interferometric velocity measurements are of great importance at flow investigations. However, the laser beams can be distorted at the interfaces between optical media of different refractive indices. Temporal fluctuations of these distortions will cause a deterioration of the laser interferometer signals. We have harnessed the power of programmable photonics devices to eliminate this signal deterioration. Non-invasive flow velocity measurements through a rapidly fluctuating media interface with large strokes of about 100 microns are presented. Our work represents a paradigm shift for interferometric velocity measurement techniques from using static to dynamic optical elements.

  17. Research on the laser tracking system for measuring moving target based on APD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua; Miao, Yinxiao; Gao, Yue

    2016-11-01

    In order to measure the coordinate of moving target, the laser tracking system for moving target was proposed, in which the receiver of four-quadrant APD was adopted as the detector and the DC motor was used to drive the reflector to move in two dimensions. The principle of the measurement system was analyzed first. Then the main part of the system was introduced. The tracking experiment showed that, this system could realized the function of automatic tracking and measuring the coordinate of moving target according to the pulsed laser ranging and angle sensors.

  18. Optical Extinction Measurements of Laser Side-Scatter During Tropical Storm Colin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, John E.; Kasparis, Takis; Metzger, Philip; Michaelides, Silas

    2017-01-01

    A side-scatter imaging (SSI) technique using a 447 nm, 500 mW laser and a Nikon D80 camera was tested at Kennedy Space Center, Florida during the passing of a rain band associated with Tropical Storm Colin. The June 6, 2016, 22:00 GMT rain event was intense but short-lived owing to the strong west-to-east advection of the rain band. An effort to validate the optical extinction measurement was conducted by setting up a line of three tipping rain gauges along an 80 m east-west path and below the laser beam. Differences between tipping bucket measurements were correlated to the extinction coefficient profile along the lasers path, as determined by the SSI measurement. In order to compare the tipping bucket to the optical extinction data, a Marshall-Palmer DSD model was assumed. Since this was a daytime event, the laser beam was difficult to detect in the camera images, pointing out an important limitation of SSI measurements: the practical limit of DSD density that can be effectively detected and analyzed under daylight conditions using this laser and camera, corresponds to a fairly moderate rainfall rate on the order of 20 mmh (night measurements achieve a much improved sensitivity). The SSI analysis model under test produced promising results, but in order to use the SSI method for routine meteorological studies, improvements to the math model will be required.

  19. A robust fibre laser system for electro-optic electron bunch profile measurements at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wissmann, Laurens-Georg

    2012-08-15

    For the electro-optic measurement of electron bunch profiles at FLASH a robust ytterbium doped fibre laser (YDFL) system has been developed consisting of a laser oscillator and a two-staged amplifier. The oscillator is designed to meet the specifications of high reliability and low noise operation. The amplifier makes use of tailored nonlinearity to enhance the spectral bandwidth of the output laser pulses. Active repetition rate control enables sub-picosecond synchronisation of the laser to the accelerator reference RF. Using a two-stage gating scheme the output pulse train repetition rate is adopted to the accelerator repetition rate. An experimental site used for electro-optic electron bunch diagnostics has been redesigned to support single-shot bunch profile measurements based on spectral decoding. An existing bunch profile monitor with a similar laser system was upgraded and electro-optic bunch profile measurements were conducted, allowing for a comparison with measurements done with other longitudinal electron bunch diagnostics and with former measurements.

  20. LASER ULTRASONIC FOR MEASUREMENTS OF VELOCITY DISTRIBUTION IN PIPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Navarrete

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work describes the development of a photoacoustic flowmeter with probe-beam deflection. A pulsedlaser beam produces an acoustic pulse, whose propagation is registered by its deflection effects on two cw probebeams. The acoustic pulse in a flowing fluid is produced by absorption of a laser pulse (30 ns, 1.1 mJ focused overa path flow line. The acoustic propagations, along and against the flow, are monitored by two cw probe beams. Inthe interaction, the probe beam undergoes a transient deflection that is detected by a fast response photodiode.The velocity distribution data profile of a square pipe is obtained by means of the acoustic pulse arrival timemeasured through its cross section applying the cylindrical shockwave model developed by Vlasses. The profilesdetermined with this experimental technique are compared with two turbulent pipe flow models.

  1. Laser induced fluorescence measurements of the mixing of fuel oil with air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, A.; Bombach, R.; Hubschmid, W.; Kaeppeli, B. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    We report on measurements of the mixing of fuel oil with air at atmospheric pressure in an industrial premixed gas turbine burner. The concentration of the vaporized fuel oil was measured with laser induced fluorescence. We reason that the fuel oil concentration can be considered with good accuracy as proportional to the fluorescence intensity. (author) 6 fig., 3 refs.

  2. High-accuracy long-distance measurements in air with a frequency comb laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cui, M.; Zeitouny, M.G.; Bhattacharya, N.; Van den Berg, S.A.; Urbach, H.P.; Braat, J.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that a femtosecond frequency comb laser can be applied as a tool for longdistance measurement in air. Our method is based on the measurement of cross correlation between individual pulses in a Michelson interferometer. From the position of the correlation functions, dis

  3. Laser lever method in the application of young’s modulus measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yingyuan; Qiu, Zhaoyun; Zhao, Renhong

    2017-06-01

    Young’s modulus of solid material is usually measured by tensile test. We adopt a new laser lever to instead of the traditional optical lever in this article. Contrast experiments with two different methods are designed to measure the steel-wire’s Young’s modulus. The results show that the new method is more accurate and efficient than the old one.

  4. Correlation coefficient measurement of the mode-locked laser tones using four-wave mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthur, Aravind P; Panapakkam, Vivek; Vujicic, Vidak; Merghem, Kamel; Lelarge, Francois; Ramdane, Abderrahim; Barry, Liam P

    2016-06-01

    We use four-wave mixing to measure the correlation coefficient of comb tones in a quantum-dash mode-locked laser under passive and active locked regimes. We study the uncertainty in the measurement of the correlation coefficient of the proposed method.

  5. LASER-DOPPLER BLOOD FLOWMETRY USING 2 WAVELENGTHS - MONTE-CARLO SIMULATIONS AND MEASUREMENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KOELINK, MH; DEMUL, FFM; GREVE, J; GRAAFF, R; DASSEL, ACM; AARNOUDSE, JG

    1994-01-01

    A new laser Doppler blood flowmeter for measuring skin perfusion is presented. The flowmeter consists of a probe that uses two different wavelengths and is able to measure at different depths. It may be used to distinguish the superficial microcirculation of the skin providing nutritional flow and t

  6. High-accuracy long-distance measurements in air with a frequency comb laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cui, M.; Zeitouny, M.G.; Bhattacharya, N.; Van den Berg, S.A.; Urbach, H.P.; Braat, J.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that a femtosecond frequency comb laser can be applied as a tool for longdistance measurement in air. Our method is based on the measurement of cross correlation between individual pulses in a Michelson interferometer. From the position of the correlation functions, dis

  7. A Reference Optical System of Laser Doppler Longitudinal Displacement Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张存满; 赵洋; 李达成

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, a new reference optical system is put forward to achieve longitudinal displacement measurement. An optical grating is used for frequency mixing and getting high SNR signals in the measurement. Conditions and methods for getting Doppler beat signals are presented.The experiments indicate that this optical syetem can be used to measure the longitudinal displacement with high accuracy.

  8. Measuring the Thickness of a Transparent Ring with a Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Alfred F.

    2007-01-01

    There seems to be no reasonable way to measure the thickness of a narrow-mouth glass bottle. One can measure the outer and inner diameters of the mouth with a ruler or a pair of calipers and then calculate the thickness. However, this measurement might be interfered with by the threads at the mouth. Furthermore, it is uncertain whether the…

  9. Design of Dual Axis Laser Scanning Diameter Measuring Gauge System with PID Co

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xin-qiu; LI Zhi-wei; LIU Da-jiang

    2009-01-01

    Dual axis laser scanning diameter measuring gauge system(DALSDMGS)with PID controller,which can be used for online non-contact diameter measuring and control on the hose,wire and rod production line,is introduced.The measure principle and implementation of this system are also presented.A PID control module with PID parameters tuning is included in the measuring and control system,which functions as a PID automatic controller of the diameter.

  10. [Study on CO2 measurement using tunable multi-mode diode laser absorption spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guang-Zhen; Chen, Bao-Xue; Hu, Bo; Long, Xiu-Hui; Li, Ai-Ping; Li, Rong

    2013-12-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) technology is a kind of fast time response, large-range, continuous on-line monitoring gas detection technique. It is the mainstream technology of gas detection. In this paper the multimode laser diode was used as light source. Multi-mode laser combined with correlation spectroscopy can improve the test reliability and stability. It can also conquer the problem of the central wavelength change of the single mode diode laser due to thermal or mechanical fluctuations in durable working process. A FP laser was used as the light source in this research. A multi-mode diode laser system based on correlation spectroscopy and wavelength modulation spectroscopy (TMDL-COSPEC-WMS) was used to measure carbon dioxide in ambient air around 1 570 nm. The carbon dioxide concentrations were derived from the relationship between the normalized WMS-2f signal peak heights of the measurement and reference signals which selected based on high signal to noise ratio and correlation coefficient. All measurements were performed with controlled carbon dioxide and nitrogen mixtures in which carbon dioxide concentrations range from 0. 6% to 30%. The calculation results showed that there was a high linear relationship between the measured and actual carbon dioxide concentration, the linearity was 0. 998 7 and the fitted slope was 1. 061+/-0. 016 8 respectively over the tested range. A detection limit of 335 ppm m was achieved. The standard deviation of 0. 036 7% was achieved using 20 successive measurements with each measurement time taking approximately 10 s during 20 minutes, which demonstrated good stability of the system. Good agreements between the measurements of the system and actual values confirm the accuracy and potential utility of the system for carbon dioxide detection.

  11. Automated measurement of the EUREKA EU213 excimer laser pulse-forming line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boardman, Allan D.; Hodgson, Elizabeth M.; Spence, A. J.; Wilkins, M.; Wu, Jian; Ashton, J. A.

    1990-08-01

    This paper describes part of the EUREKA Eurolaser project EU213, to build an excimer laser. The emphasis is on control and monitoring systems. The performance of a test-bed laser built at Salford will be described. In the design discussed, two voltage components are generated separately and combined at the laser head to form a pumping pulse. A "magnetic switch" is used to isolate the two parts of the transmission line'. A theoretical analysis of the sustainer section of the line has been carried out and compared with measurements made using a dummy load in place of the laser head. A control system is discussed that is being developed to monitor the shape of each laser pulse at a high repetition rate. The control system is designed to protect the laser from damage. The construction of various conventional probes, and the progress towards various fibre probes will be reported with emphasis on measuring fast current pulses on the various parts of the line.

  12. Towards jitter-free pump-probe measurements at seeded free electron laser facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danailov, Miltcho B; Bencivenga, Filippo; Capotondi, Flavio; Casolari, Francesco; Cinquegrana, Paolo; Demidovich, Alexander; Giangrisostomi, Erika; Kiskinova, Maya P; Kurdi, Gabor; Manfredda, Michele; Masciovecchio, Claudio; Mincigrucci, Riccardo; Nikolov, Ivaylo P; Pedersoli, Emanuele; Principi, Emiliano; Sigalotti, Paolo

    2014-06-02

    X-ray free electron lasers (FEL) coupled with optical lasers have opened unprecedented opportunities for studying ultrafast dynamics in matter. The major challenge in pump-probe experiments using FEL and optical lasers is synchronizing the arrival time of the two pulses. Here we report a technique that benefits from the seeded-FEL scheme and uses the optical seed laser for nearly jitter-free pump-probe experiments. Timing jitter as small as 6 fs has been achieved and confirmed by measurements of FEL-induced transient reflectivity changes of Si3N4 using both collinear and non-collinear geometries. Planned improvements of the experimental set-up are expected to further reduce the timing jitter between the two pulses down to fs level.

  13. Dentin ablation-rate measurements in endodontics witj HF and CO2 laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Serafetinides, Alexander A.; Khabbaz, Marouan; Sykaras, Sotirios; Tsikrikas, G. N.

    1996-01-01

    Recent studies focused on the ability of the laser light to enlarge the root canal during the endodontic therapy. The aim of this research is the experimental and theoretical study of the ablation rate of two infrared laser wavelengths on dentin. Thirty freshly extracted human teeth were longitudinally sectioned at thicknesses ranged from 0.5 to 2 mm, and irradiated on the root canal dentin. The measured ablation rates in dentinal wall of the root canal showed that the HF laser at 2.9 micrometer can more effectively penetrate into the tissue, whereas the carbon dioxide laser at 10.6 micrometer leads to high thermal damage of the ablation crater surroundings.

  14. Comparison of laser diffraction and image analysis for measurement of Streptomyces coelicolor cell clumps and pellets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønnest, Nanna Petersen; Stocks, Stuart M; Eliasson Lantz, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Morphology is important in industrial processes involving filamentous organisms because it affects the mixing and mass transfer and can be linked to productivity. Image analysis provides detailed information about the morphology but, in practice, it is often laborious including both collection...... of high quality images and image processing. Laser diffraction is rapid and fully automatic and provides a volume-weighted distribution of the particle sizes. However, it is based on a number of assumptions that do not always apply to samples. We have evaluated laser diffraction to measure cell clumps...... and pellets of Streptomyces coelicolor compare to image analysis. Samples, taken five times during fed-batch cultivation, were analyzed by image analysis and laser diffraction. The volume-weighted size distribution was calculated for each sample. Laser diffraction and image analysis yielded similar size...

  15. Direct measurement of the spectral transfer function of a laser based anemometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelou, Nikolas; Mann, Jakob; Sjöholm, Mikael; Courtney, Michael

    2012-03-01

    The effect of a continuous-wave (cw) laser based anemometer's probe volume on the measurement of wind turbulence is studied in this paper. Wind speed time series acquired by both a remote sensing cw laser anemometer, whose line-of-sight was aligned with the wind direction, and by a reference sensor (sonic anemometer) located in the same direction, were used. The spectral transfer function, which describes the attenuation of the power spectral density of the wind speed turbulence, was calculated and found to be in good agreement with the theoretical exponential function, which is based on the properties of the probe volume of a focused Gaussian laser beam. Parameters such as fluctuations of the wind direction, as well as the overestimation of the laser Doppler spectrum threshold, were found to affect the calculation of the spectral transfer function by introducing high frequency noise.

  16. Measurement of ablation threshold of oxide-film-coated aluminium nanoparticles irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chefonov, O V; Ovchinnikov, A V; Il' ina, I V; Agranat, M B [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-31

    We report the results of experiments on estimation of femtosecond laser threshold intensity at which nanoparticles are removed from the substrate surface. The studies are performed with nanoparticles obtained by femtosecond laser ablation of pure aluminium in distilled water. The attenuation (or extinction, i.e. absorption and scattering) spectra of nanoparticles are measured at room temperature in the UV and optical wavelength ranges. The size of nanoparticles is determined using atomic force microscopy. A new method of scanning photoluminescence is proposed to evaluate the threshold of nanoparticle removal from the surface of a glass substrate exposed to IR femtosecond laser pulses with intensities 10{sup 11} – 10{sup 13} W cm{sup -2}. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  17. Tree Height Growth Measurement with Single-Scan Airborne, Static Terrestrial and Mobile Laser Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Lin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the feasibility of applying single-scan airborne, static terrestrial and mobile laser scanning for improving the accuracy of tree height growth measurement. Specifically, compared to the traditional works on forest growth inventory with airborne laser scanning, two issues are regarded: “Can the new technique characterize the height growth for each individual tree?” and “Can this technique refine the minimum growth-discernable temporal interval further?” To solve these two puzzles, the sampling principles of the three laser scanning modes were first examined, and their error sources against the task of tree-top capturing were also analyzed. Next, the three-year growths of 58 Nordic maple trees (Crimson King for test were intermittently surveyed with one type of laser scanning each time and then analyzed by statistics. The evaluations show that the height growth of each individual tree still cannot be reliably characterized even by single-scan terrestrial laser scanning, and statistical analysis is necessary in this scenario. After Gaussian regression, it is found that the minimum temporal interval with distinguishable tree height growths can be refined into one month based on terrestrial laser scanning, far better than the two years deduced in the previous works based on airborne laser scanning. The associated mean growth was detected to be about 0.12 m. Moreover, the parameter of tree height generally under-estimated by airborne and even mobile laser scanning can be relatively revised by means of introducing static terrestrial laser scanning data. Overall, the effectiveness of the proposed technique is primarily validated.

  18. Temperature measurement artefacts of thermocouples and fluoroptic probes during laser irradiation at 810 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, A D; Gertner, M R; Sherar, M D

    2001-06-01

    This study examined the artefact induced in temperature measurements made with thermocouples and Luxtron fluoroptic probes in the presence of infrared radiation. Localized heating was created using a continuous-wave, 810 nm diode laser system emitting 2.0 W from a cylindrical diffusing optical fibre, in air, water and an agar-albumin phantom. The temperature was measured every 1.0 s for 10 to 150 s, with both a thermocouple and a Luxtron fluoroptic probe at distances of 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 mm from the cylindrical diffusing tip. In all cases, the fluoroptic probe recorded a higher temperature than the thermocouple during laser irradiation. The difference in measured temperatures between the Luxtron probe and the thermocouple ranged from 1.6 degrees C to 18.8 degrees C in air, from 0.3 degrees C to 10.2 degrees C in water, and from 1.4 degrees C to 10.1 degrees C in phantom, depending on the distance of the probe from the laser source. The results suggest that in the presence of laser irradiation, self-heating of the Luxtron probe induces a significant artefact in temperature measurements at distances less than 4 mm from the source fibre. As a result, fluoroptic probes may not be suitable for monitoring tissue temperature for treatments when laser irradiation is present if sensors are located close to the fibre tip (<4 mm).

  19. Mobile large scale 3D coordinate measuring system based on network of rotating laser automatic theodolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhigang; Liu, Zhongzheng; Wu, Jianwei; Xu, Yaozhong

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents a mobile 3D coordinate measuring system for large scale metrology. This system is composed of a network of rotating laser automatic theodolites (N-RLATs) and a portable touch probe. In the N-RLAT system, each RLAT consists of two laser fans which rotate about its own Z axis at a constant speed and scan the whole metrology space. The optical sensors mounted on the portable touch probe receive the sweeping laser fans and generate the corresponding pulse signals, which establish a relationship between rotating angle of laser fan and time, and then the space angle measurement is converted into the corresponding peak time precision measurement of pulse signal. The rotating laser fans are modeled mathematically as a time varying parametrical vector in its local framework. A two steps on-site calibration method for solving the parameters of each RLAT and coordinate transformation among the N-RLATs. The portable probe is composed of optical sensors array with specified geometrical features and a touch point, on which the coordinates of optical sensors is determined by the N-RLATs and the touch point is estimated by solving a non-linear system. A prototype mobile 3D coordinate measuring system is developed and experiment results show its validity.

  20. Measurement of laser quantum frequency fluctuations using a Pound-Drever stabilization system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuh-Jen; Mussche, Paul L.; Siegman, Anthony E.

    1994-06-01

    We describe a method for measuring the frequency fluctuation spectrum of a laser oscillator, especially the weak noise contributions in the wings of the spectrum, and apply this method to confirm the existence of large excess quantum frequency fluctuations in a laser oscillator using an unstable optical resonator. Our measurement apparatus uses the Pound-Drever technique, which employs an RF phase modulator and a Fabry-Perot cavity to produce a sensitive high-speed frequency discrimination signal. We show that this signal can also be used to measure the quantum noise contributions to the frequency spectrum of a laser oscillator. Experimental measurements on a miniature diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser using a stable optical cavity closely match the predictions of the usual Schawlow-Townes theory, while the frequency fluctuations in a nearly identical laser employing an unstable optical resonator are approximately 1300 times larger. These much larger fluctuations arise in part from the larger output coupling and cavity bandwidth of the unstable cavity, but they also appear to confirm a predicted excess spontaneous emission factor (Petermann excess noise factor) of approximately = 180 times arising from the nonorthogonal transverse mode properties of the unstable cavity.