WorldWideScience

Sample records for larger core radii

  1. Rotating neutron stars with exotic cores: masses, radii, stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haensel, P.; Bejger, M.; Fortin, M.; Zdunik, L. [Polish Academy of Sciences, N. Copernicus Astronomical Center, Warszawa (Poland)

    2016-03-15

    A set of theoretical mass-radius relations for rigidly rotating neutron stars with exotic cores, obtained in various theories of dense matter, is reviewed. Two basic observational constraints are used: the largest measured rotation frequency (716Hz) and the maximum measured mass (2M {sub CircleDot}). The present status of measuring the radii of neutron stars is described. The theory of rigidly rotating stars in general relativity is reviewed and limitations of the slow rotation approximation are pointed out. Mass-radius relations for rotating neutron stars with hyperon and quark cores are illustrated using several models. Problems related to the non-uniqueness of the crust-core matching are mentioned. Limits on rigid rotation resulting from the mass-shedding instability and the instability with respect to the axisymmetric perturbations are summarized. The problem of instabilities and of the back-bending phenomenon are discussed in detail. Metastability and instability of a neutron star core in the case of a first-order phase transition, both between pure phases, and into a mixed-phase state, are reviewed. The case of two disjoint families (branches) of rotating neutron stars is discussed and generic features of neutron-star families and of core-quakes triggered by the instabilities are considered. (orig.)

  2. LARGER PLANET RADII INFERRED FROM STELLAR ''FLICKER'' BRIGHTNESS VARIATIONS OF BRIGHT PLANET-HOST STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastien, Fabienne A.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Pepper, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Most extrasolar planets have been detected by their influence on their parent star, typically either gravitationally (the Doppler method) or by the small dip in brightness as the planet blocks a portion of the star (the transit method). Therefore, the accuracy with which we know the masses and radii of extrasolar planets depends directly on how well we know those of the stars, the latter usually determined from the measured stellar surface gravity, log g. Recent work has demonstrated that the short-timescale brightness variations ( f licker ) of stars can be used to measure log g to a high accuracy of ∼0.1-0.2 dex. Here, we use flicker measurements of 289 bright (Kepmag < 13) candidate planet-hosting stars with T eff = 4500-6650 K to re-assess the stellar parameters and determine the resulting impact on derived planet properties. This re-assessment reveals that for the brightest planet-host stars, Malmquist bias contaminates the stellar sample with evolved stars: nearly 50% of the bright planet-host stars are subgiants. As a result, the stellar radii, and hence the radii of the planets orbiting these stars, are on average 20%-30% larger than previous measurements had suggested

  3. Charge radii and electromagnetic moments of Li and Be isotopes from the ab initio no-core shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forssen, C.; Caurier, E.; Navratil, P.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, charge radii and ground-state electromagnetic moments of Li and Be isotopes were measured precisely. We have performed large-scale ab initio no-core shell model calculations for these isotopes using high-precision nucleon-nucleon potentials. The isotopic trends of our computed charge radii and quadrupole and magnetic-dipole moments are in good agreement with experimental results with the exception of the 11 Li charge radius. The magnetic moments are in particular well described, whereas the absolute magnitudes of the quadrupole moments are about 10% too small. The small magnitude of the 6 Li quadrupole moment is reproduced, and with the CD-Bonn NN potential, also its correct sign

  4. Radii of nuclei off stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Kenzo

    1982-01-01

    An experiment is proposed to determine systematically the radii of the nuclei produced through the projectile fragmentation process in high energy heavy-ion collision. The measurement of total reaction cross section using the projectile fragments of a single nuclide on a target give information about nuclear radii. The production cross section of the fragments is appreciable for many nuclides. Therefore, it is possible to map systematically the reaction radii of the nuclei which can be produced as the projectile fragments. In an experiment using the projectile fragments as the incident beam, the cross section can be expressed as a function of the radii of a projectile and a target. An experiment with He-8 produced by the fragmentation of C-12 is proposed. The He-8 has four neutrons in the p-3/2 orbit outside the He-4 core. Proton and neutron distributions for He isotopes were calculated on the basis of the Hartree-Fock method. The information related to this kind of distribution can be obtained by the proposed experiment. The nuclear structure effect is seen in the nuclear radii of other unstable nuclei. The experimental examples of the isotope shift measurement and the excitation energy are presented. (Kato, T.)

  5. Systematics of experimental charge radii of elements and elementary particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antony, M.S.; Britz, J.

    1987-02-01

    The systematics of experimental charge radii of elements and elementary particles ..pi../sup -/, K/sup -/, K/sup 0/, p and n is discussed. The root-meansquare charge radius of a quark core in nucleous derived from the systematics is estimated to be 0.3 fm. Charge radii evaluated from Coulomb displacement energies are also tabulated.

  6. On the odd-even effect in the charge radii of isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talmi, I.

    1984-01-01

    Core polarization by valence neutrons is suggested as a possible mechanism for producing odd-even variation in the charge radii of isotopes. The nuclei considered have closed proton shells and neutrons in states with lowest seniority or generalized seniority. Simple expressions are derived for jsup(n) neutron configurations and various multipole terms of the pn interaction. The resulting expressions give a good fit to the radii of calcium isotopes and also of lead isotopes for which these expressions are only approximate. (orig.)

  7. The Observational and Theoretical Tidal Radii of Globular Clusters in M87

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Jeremy J.; Sills, Alison; Harris, William E.

    2012-02-01

    Globular clusters have linear sizes (tidal radii) which theory tells us are determined by their masses and by the gravitational potential of their host galaxy. To explore the relationship between observed and expected radii, we utilize the globular cluster population of the Virgo giant M87. Unusually deep, high signal-to-noise images of M87 are used to measure the effective and limiting radii of approximately 2000 globular clusters. To compare with these observations, we simulate a globular cluster population that has the same characteristics as the observed M87 cluster population. Placing these simulated clusters in the well-studied tidal field of M87, the orbit of each cluster is solved and the theoretical tidal radius of each cluster is determined. We compare the predicted relationship between cluster size and projected galactocentric distance to observations. We find that for an isotropic distribution of cluster velocities, theoretical tidal radii are approximately equal to observed limiting radii for R gc < 10 kpc. However, the isotropic simulation predicts a steep increase in cluster size at larger radii, which is not observed in large galaxies beyond the Milky Way. To minimize the discrepancy between theory and observations, we explore the effects of orbital anisotropy on cluster sizes, and suggest a possible orbital anisotropy profile for M87 which yields a better match between theory and observations. Finally, we suggest future studies which will establish a stronger link between theoretical tidal radii and observed radii.

  8. THE OBSERVATIONAL AND THEORETICAL TIDAL RADII OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IN M87

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, Jeremy J.; Sills, Alison; Harris, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Globular clusters have linear sizes (tidal radii) which theory tells us are determined by their masses and by the gravitational potential of their host galaxy. To explore the relationship between observed and expected radii, we utilize the globular cluster population of the Virgo giant M87. Unusually deep, high signal-to-noise images of M87 are used to measure the effective and limiting radii of approximately 2000 globular clusters. To compare with these observations, we simulate a globular cluster population that has the same characteristics as the observed M87 cluster population. Placing these simulated clusters in the well-studied tidal field of M87, the orbit of each cluster is solved and the theoretical tidal radius of each cluster is determined. We compare the predicted relationship between cluster size and projected galactocentric distance to observations. We find that for an isotropic distribution of cluster velocities, theoretical tidal radii are approximately equal to observed limiting radii for R gc < 10 kpc. However, the isotropic simulation predicts a steep increase in cluster size at larger radii, which is not observed in large galaxies beyond the Milky Way. To minimize the discrepancy between theory and observations, we explore the effects of orbital anisotropy on cluster sizes, and suggest a possible orbital anisotropy profile for M87 which yields a better match between theory and observations. Finally, we suggest future studies which will establish a stronger link between theoretical tidal radii and observed radii.

  9. In situ accretion of gaseous envelopes on to planetary cores embedded in evolving protoplanetary discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Gavin A. L.; Papaloizou, John C. B.; Nelson, Richard P.

    2017-09-01

    The core accretion hypothesis posits that planets with significant gaseous envelopes accreted them from their protoplanetary discs after the formation of rocky/icy cores. Observations indicate that such exoplanets exist at a broad range of orbital radii, but it is not known whether they accreted their envelopes in situ, or originated elsewhere and migrated to their current locations. We consider the evolution of solid cores embedded in evolving viscous discs that undergo gaseous envelope accretion in situ with orbital radii in the range 0.1-10 au. Additionally, we determine the long-term evolution of the planets that had no runaway gas accretion phase after disc dispersal. We find the following. (I) Planets with 5 M⊕ cores never undergo runaway accretion. The most massive envelope contained 2.8 M⊕ with the planet orbiting at 10 au. (II) Accretion is more efficient on to 10 M⊕ and 15 M⊕ cores. For orbital radii ap ≥ 0.5 au, 15 M⊕ cores always experienced runaway gas accretion. For ap ≥ 5 au, all but one of the 10 M⊕ cores experienced runaway gas accretion. No planets experienced runaway growth at ap = 0.1 au. (III) We find that, after disc dispersal, planets with significant gaseous envelopes cool and contract on Gyr time-scales, the contraction time being sensitive to the opacity assumed. Our results indicate that Hot Jupiters with core masses ≲15 M⊕ at ≲0.1 au likely accreted their gaseous envelopes at larger distances and migrated inwards. Consistently with the known exoplanet population, super-Earths and mini-Neptunes at small radii during the disc lifetime, accrete only modest gaseous envelopes.

  10. Cepheid radii and effective temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernley, J.A.; Skillen, I.; Jameson, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    New infrared photometry for the Cepheid variables T Vul, δ Cephei and XCyg is presented. Combining this with published infrared photometry of T Vul, ηAql, S Sge and XCyg and published optical photometry we use the infrared flux method to determine effective temperatures and angular radii at all phases of the pulsation cycle. These angular radii combined with published radial velocity curves then give the radii of the stars. Knowing the radii and effective temperatures we obtain the absolute magnitudes. (author)

  11. CHARACTERIZATIONS ON BENDING EFFECT ON CUSTOMIZED SPLITTERS USING VARIOUS RADII OF ELLIPTICAL-SHAPED BLOCKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. SUPIAN

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Macro-bending effect unto polymer optical fiber (POF based splitters study is done to analyse the performance and characterizations using several bending radii of geometrical blocks that hold a customized prepared polymer fiber splitter. A pair of etched fibers with similar core diameters are attached to the ellipse-shaped blocks built using matching refractive index material where the blocks were built with various bending radii. The tapered fibers were lapped closely with some forces exerted upon them in order to stimulate the splitting of modes between the two fibers. This study is done by experimental set-up where each of the splitter ports is connected with optical power meter to measure the power output while pressure is exerted. Characterization is executed in order to investigate and analyse which bending radius gives the most optimize splitting ratio with considerable low loss for the particular splitter prepared. As for normal force of 0.3 lbF, the optimum splitting ratio with low loss is specified having bending radius, Rc, of 13 mm whilst for external force of 3.0 lbF, bending radius is found to be 19 mm. Small bending radius stimulates the radiation of rays into the second fiber while larger Rc gives longer coupling length that optimize the splitting ratios. Efficiencies between simulated values and experimental values are also analysed.

  12. Benign core biopsy of probably benign breast lesions 2 cm or larger: correlation with excisional biopsy and long-term follow-up

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Hyun Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Eun-Kyung

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of benign core biopsy of probably benign breast lesions (category 3) 2 cm or larger on the basis of excisional biopsy and long-term follow-up. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 146 category 3 lesions in 146 patients 2 cm or larger which were diagnosed as benign by ultrasound (US)-guided core biopsy. Patients were initially diagnosed as benign at core needle biopsy and then followed up with excisional biopsy (surgical excision, n=91; US-guided vacuum assist...

  13. Radii of radioactive nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittig, W.; Plagnol, E.; Schutz, Y.

    1989-11-01

    A new simple direct method for the measurement of the total reaction cross section (σ R ) for several light radioactive nuclei (A≤40) is developed. From that, the reduced strong absorption radii (r o 2 ) are obtained. A comparison is made with data obtained by other techniques. A strong isospin dependence of the nuclear radii is observed. (L.C.) [pt

  14. Magnetic Inflation and Stellar Mass. II. On the Radii of Single, Rapidly Rotating, Fully Convective M-Dwarf Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesseli, Aurora Y.; Muirhead, Philip S.; Mann, Andrew W.; Mace, Greg

    2018-06-01

    Main-sequence, fully convective M dwarfs in eclipsing binaries are observed to be larger than stellar evolutionary models predict by as much as 10%–15%. A proposed explanation for this discrepancy involves effects from strong magnetic fields, induced by rapid rotation via the dynamo process. Although, a handful of single, slowly rotating M dwarfs with radius measurements from interferometry also appear to be larger than models predict, suggesting that rotation or binarity specifically may not be the sole cause of the discrepancy. We test whether single, rapidly rotating, fully convective stars are also larger than expected by measuring their R\\sin i distribution. We combine photometric rotation periods from the literature with rotational broadening (v\\sin i) measurements reported in this work for a sample of 88 rapidly rotating M dwarf stars. Using a Bayesian framework, we find that stellar evolutionary models underestimate the radii by 10 % {--}15{ % }-2.5+3, but that at higher masses (0.18 theory is 13%–18%, and we argue that the discrepancy is unlikely to be due to effects from age. Furthermore, we find no statistically significant radius discrepancy between our sample and the handful of M dwarfs with interferometric radii. We conclude that neither rotation nor binarity are responsible for the inflated radii of fully convective M dwarfs, and that all fully convective M dwarfs are larger than models predict.

  15. The magnetic field of the equatorial magnetotail - AMPTE/CCE observations at R less than 8.8 earth radii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairfield, D. H.; Acuna, M. H.; Zanetti, L. J.; Potemra, T. A.

    1987-01-01

    The MPTE/CCE magnetic field experiment has been used to obtain a quantitative evaluation of the frequency and extent of magnetic field distortion in the near-tail region at less than 8.8 earth radii. The variation of this distortion with Kp, radial distance, longitude, and near-equatorial latitude is reported. It has been found that taillike distortions from the dipole field direction may reach 80 deg near the MPTE/CE apogee of 8.8 earth radii. The Bz field component in dipole coordinates was always positive within 0.5 earth radii of the equatorial current sheet, indicating the neutral lines were never seen inside of 8.8 earth radii. Fields were most taillike near midnight and during times of high Kp. At 8.5 earth radii the equatorial field magnitude depressions were roughly half the dipole field strength of 51 nT. These depressions are larger at lesser distances, reaching -40 nT at 3.4 earth radii for Kp of 2- or less and -80 nT and Kp of 3+ and greater.

  16. Benign core biopsy of probably benign breast lesions 2 cm or larger: correlation with excisional biopsy and long-term follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Hyun Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Eun Kyung

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of benign core biopsy of probably benign breast lesions (category 3) 2 cm or larger on the basis of excisional biopsy and long-term follow-up. We retrospectively reviewed 146 category 3 lesions in 146 patients 2 cm or larger which were diagnosed as benign by ultrasound (US)-guided core biopsy. Patients were initially diagnosed as benign at core needle biopsy and then followed up with excisional biopsy (surgical excision, n=91; US-guided vacuum assisted excision, n=35) or breast ultrasonography (n=20). Of the 126 patients who underwent surgical excision or US-guided vacuum-assisted excision, 114 patients were diagnosed with benign lesions, 10 patients with borderline lesions (benign phyllodes tumor), and two patients with malignant phyllodes tumors. The probabilities of lesions being benign, borderline and malignant were 91.8% (134/146), 6.8% (10/146), and 1.4% (2/146), respectively. Of 13 patients who had growing masses on follow-up ultrasonography, three (23.1%) were non-benign (two benign phyllodes tumors and one malignant phyllodes tumor). US-guided core needle biopsy of probably benign breast mass 2 cm or larger was accurate (98.6%) enough to rule out malignancy. But, it was difficult to rule out borderline lesions even when they were diagnosed as benign.

  17. The inflated radii of M dwarfs in the Pleiades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, R. J.; Deliyannis, Constantine P.; Jeffries, R. D.

    2018-05-01

    Rotation periods obtained with the Kepler satellite have been combined with precise measurements of projected rotation velocity from the WIYN 3.5-m telescope to determine the distribution of projected radii for several hundred low-mass (0.1 ≤ M/M⊙ ≤ 0.8), fast-rotating members of the Pleiades cluster. A maximum likelihood modelling technique, that takes account of observational uncertainties, selection effects and censored data, and considers the effects of differential rotation and unresolved binarity, has been used to find that the average radius of these stars is 14 ± 2 per cent larger at a given luminosity than predicted by current evolutionary models of Dotter et al. and Baraffe et al. The same models are a reasonable match to the interferometric radii of older, magnetically inactive field M dwarfs, suggesting that the over-radius may be associated with the young, magnetically active nature of the Pleiades objects. No evidence is found for any change in this over-radius above and below the boundary marking the transition to full convection. Published evolutionary models that incorporate either the effects of magnetic inhibition of convection or the blocking of flux by dark star-spots do not individually explain the radius inflation, but a combination of the two effects might. The distribution of projected radii is consistent with the adopted hypothesis of a random spatial orientation of spin axes; strong alignments of the spin vectors into cones with an opening semi-angle <30° can be ruled out. Any plausible but weaker alignment would increase the inferred over-radius.

  18. Theoretical Calculation of Absolute Radii of Atoms and Ions. Part 1. The Atomic Radii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raka Biswas

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. A set of theoretical atomic radii corresponding to the principal maximum in the radial distribution function, 4πr2R2 for the outermost orbital has been calculated for the ground state of 103 elements of the periodic table using Slater orbitals. The set of theoretical radii are found to reproduce the periodic law and the Lother Meyer’s atomic volume curve and reproduce the expected vertical and horizontal trend of variation in atomic size in the periodic table. The d-block and f-block contractions are distinct in the calculated sizes. The computed sizes qualitatively correlate with the absolute size dependent properties like ionization potentials and electronegativity of elements. The radii are used to calculate a number of size dependent periodic physical properties of isolated atoms viz., the diamagnetic part of the atomic susceptibility, atomic polarizability and the chemical hardness. The calculated global hardness and atomic polarizability of a number of atoms are found to be close to the available experimental values and the profiles of the physical properties computed in terms of the theoretical atomic radii exhibit their inherent periodicity. A simple method of computing the absolute size of atoms has been explored and a large body of known material has been brought together to reveal how many different properties correlate with atomic size.

  19. RADII OF RAPIDLY ROTATING STARS, WITH APPLICATION TO TRANSITING-PLANET HOSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Timothy M.

    2010-01-01

    The currently favored method for estimating radii and other parameters of transiting-planet host stars is to match theoretical models to observations of the stellar mean density ρ * , the effective temperature T eff , and the composition parameter [Z]. This explicitly model-dependent approach is based on readily available observations, and results in small formal errors. Its performance will be central to the reliability of results from ground-based transit surveys such as TrES, HAT, and SuperWASP, as well as to the space-borne missions MOST, CoRoT, and Kepler. Here, I use two calibration samples of stars (eclipsing binaries (EBs) and stars for which asteroseismic analyses are available) having well-determined masses and radii to estimate the accuracy and systematic errors inherent in the ρ * method. When matching to the Yonsei-Yale stellar evolution models, I find the most important systematic error results from selection bias favoring rapidly rotating (hence probably magnetically active) stars among the EB sample. If unaccounted for, this bias leads to a mass-dependent underestimate of stellar radii by as much as 4% for stars of 0.4 M sun , decreasing to zero for masses above about 1.4 M sun . Relative errors in estimated stellar masses are three times larger than those in radii. The asteroseismic sample suggests (albeit with significant uncertainty) that systematic errors are small for slowly rotating, inactive stars. Systematic errors arising from failings of the Yonsei-Yale models of inactive stars probably exist, but are difficult to assess because of the small number of well-characterized comparison stars having low mass and slow rotation. Poor information about [Z] is an important source of random error, and may be a minor source of systematic error as well. With suitable corrections for rotation, it is likely that systematic errors in the ρ * method can be comparable to or smaller than the random errors, yielding radii that are accurate to about 2% for

  20. On radii of neutron distributions in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varma, G.K.; Zamick, L.

    1978-01-01

    The analyses of the differences between rms radii (Δ=rsub(n) - rsub(p) of neutron and proton distributions are considered in a wide variety of nuclei. It is noted that apart from its own intrinsic interest, the quantity Δ is of importance for isotope shifts, core polarization contributions to the Coulomb energy difference of mirror pairs (Nolen-Schiffer anomaly) and the renormalization of the effective interaction. For example, if Δ were very small in 48 Ca then the Nolen-Schiffer anomaly could be explained by a core polarization mechanism. The various methods of determining Δ are considered critically and it is concluded that at present probably the most reliable method is high energy (approximately 1 GeV) proton-nucleon scattering. The different theoretical analyses based upon, e.g. the multiple diffraction theory (where Glauber amplitude is the leading term) or the optical potential (KMT) formalisms appear to be converging to essentially the same answer when analyzing the same data. High energy α-particles and medium energy pions can also become useful sources of information if higher order optical potentials are treated with care. It is found that Δ is rather large in 48 Ca, i.e. there is a neutron skin, so that the Nolen-Schiffer anomaly cannot be explained by a core polarization mechanism. The results of high energy proton-nucleus scattering are in excellent agreement with current density dependent Hartree-Fock calculation. (Auth.)

  1. Nuclear moments and charge radii of argon isotopes between the neutron-shell closures N=20 and N=28

    CERN Document Server

    Blaum, K; Lassen, J; Lievens, P; Marinova, K; Neugart, R

    2008-01-01

    We report the measurement of optical isotope shifts for $^{40-44}\\!$Ar relative to $^{38}$Ar from which changes in the mean square nuclear charge radii across the 1$\\scriptstyle{f}_{7/2}$ neutron shell are deduced. In addition, the hyperfine structure of $^{41\\!}$Ar and $^{43}$Ar yields the spins, magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments, in particular the spin $\\,\\scriptstyle\\textrm{I}$ = 5/2 for $\\,^{43}\\!$Ar. The investigations were carried out by fast-beam collinear laser spectroscopy using highly sensitive detection based on optical pumping and state-selective collisional ionization. Mean square charge radii are now known from $^{32}$Ar to $^{46}$Ar, covering sd-shell as well as $\\scriptstyle{f}_{7/2}$-shell nuclei. They are discussed in the framework of spherical SGII Skyrme-type Hartree-Fock calculations, semi-empirically corrected for quadrupole core polarization. The Zamick-Talmi formula excellently describes the charge radii across the $\\scriptstyle{f}_{7/2}$ neutron shell, as it does for the...

  2. Consistent van der Waals radii for the whole main group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantina, Manjeera; Chamberlin, Adam C; Valero, Rosendo; Cramer, Christopher J; Truhlar, Donald G

    2009-05-14

    Atomic radii are not precisely defined but are nevertheless widely used parameters in modeling and understanding molecular structure and interactions. The van der Waals radii determined by Bondi from molecular crystals and data for gases are the most widely used values, but Bondi recommended radius values for only 28 of the 44 main-group elements in the periodic table. In the present Article, we present atomic radii for the other 16; these new radii were determined in a way designed to be compatible with Bondi's scale. The method chosen is a set of two-parameter correlations of Bondi's radii with repulsive-wall distances calculated by relativistic coupled-cluster electronic structure calculations. The newly determined radii (in A) are Be, 1.53; B, 1.92; Al, 1.84; Ca, 2.31; Ge, 2.11; Rb, 3.03; Sr, 2.49; Sb, 2.06; Cs, 3.43; Ba, 2.68; Bi, 2.07; Po, 1.97; At, 2.02; Rn, 2.20; Fr, 3.48; and Ra, 2.83.

  3. Freeze-out radii extracted from three-pion cumulants in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Abelev, Betty Bezverkhny; Adamova, Dagmar; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agostinelli, Andrea; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ahn, Sang Un; Ahn, Sul-Ah; Aimo, Ilaria; Aiola, Salvatore; Ajaz, Muhammad; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alexandre, Didier; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arbor, Nicolas; Arcelli, Silvia; Armesto Perez, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Aronsson, Tomas; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Awes, Terry; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Baumann, Christoph Heinrich; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont Moreno, Ernesto; Belmont Iii, Ronald John; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Berger, Martin Emanuel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blanco, Fernando; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Bogolyubskiy, Mikhail; Boehmer, Felix Valentin; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Bossu, Francesco; Botje, Michiel; Botta, Elena; Boettger, Stefan; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Broker, Theo Alexander; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calero Diaz, Liliet; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Catanescu, Vasile Ioan; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Chochula, Peter; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortese, Pietro; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Albino, Rigoberto; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dainese, Andrea; Dang, Ruina; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Kushal; Das, Supriya; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; Delagrange, Hugues; Deloff, Andrzej; Denes, Ervin Sandor; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; De Rooij, Raoul Stefan; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Divia, Roberto; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Liberto, Sergio; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Domenicis Gimenez, Diogenes; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Dorheim, Sverre; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Dutt Mazumder, Abhee Kanti; Ehlers Iii, Raymond James; Elia, Domenico; Engel, Heiko; Erazmus, Barbara Ewa; Erdal, Hege Austrheim; Eschweiler, Dominic; Espagnon, Bruno; Esposito, Marco; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Falchieri, Davide; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Fehlker, Dominik; Feldkamp, Linus; Felea, Daniel; Feliciello, Alessandro; Feofilov, Grigory; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Figiel, Jan; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Floratos, Emmanouil; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoeje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago Medina, Alberto Martin; Gallio, Mauro; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Garabatos Cuadrado, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo Javier; Gargiulo, Corrado; Garishvili, Irakli; Gerhard, Jochen; Germain, Marie; Gheata, Andrei George; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghidini, Bruno; Ghosh, Premomoy; Ghosh, Sanjay Kumar; Gianotti, Paola; Giubellino, Paolo; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez Ramirez, Andres; Gonzalez Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Gorlich, Lidia Maria; Gotovac, Sven; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoryev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grynyov, Borys; Grion, Nevio; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grossiord, Jean-Yves; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Guilbaud, Maxime Rene Joseph; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gulkanyan, Hrant; Gumbo, Mervyn; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Khan, Kamal; Haake, Rudiger; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Haiduc, Maria; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hanratty, Luke David; Hansen, Alexander; Harris, John William; Hartmann, Helvi; Harton, Austin Vincent; Hatzifotiadou, Despina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Heide, Markus Ansgar; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hippolyte, Boris; Hladky, Jan; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Huang, Meidana; Humanic, Thomas; Hutter, Dirk; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ilkaev, Radiy; Ilkiv, Iryna; Inaba, Motoi; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Ionita, Costin; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Jacholkowski, Adam Wlodzimierz; Jacobs, Peter Martin; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jang, Haeng Jin; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Pahula Hewage, Sandun; Jena, Satyajit; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jung, Hyungtaik; Jusko, Anton; Kalcher, Sebastian; Kalinak, Peter; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kamin, Jason Adrian; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Khan, Mohammed Mohisin; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Beomkyu; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Jinsook; Kim, Mimae; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Kiss, Gabor; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Boesing, Christian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Kofarago, Monika; Kohler, Markus Konrad; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolozhvari, Anatoly; Kondratev, Valerii; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Konevskikh, Artem; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Kox, Serge; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kral, Jiri; Kralik, Ivan; Kramer, Frederick; Kravcakova, Adela; Krelina, Michal; Kretz, Matthias; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kucera, Vit; Kucheryaev, Yury; Kugathasan, Thanushan; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paulus Gerardus; Kulakov, Igor; Kumar, Jitendra; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, Alexander; Kurepin, Alexey; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; Ladron De Guevara, Pedro; Lagana Fernandes, Caio; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lara Martinez, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Lattuca, Alessandra; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Lea, Ramona; Lee, Graham Richard; Legrand, Iosif; Lehnert, Joerg Walter; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenti, Vito; Leogrande, Emilia; Leoncino, Marco; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Levai, Peter; Li, Shuang; Lien, Jorgen Andre; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Ljunggren, Hans Martin; Lodato, Davide Francesco; Lonne, Per-Ivar; Loggins, Vera Renee; Loginov, Vitaly; Lohner, Daniel; Loizides, Constantinos; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lu, Xianguo; Luettig, Philipp Johannes; Lunardon, Marcello; Luparello, Grazia; Luzzi, Cinzia; Ma, Rongrong; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahapatra, Durga Prasad; Mahmood, Sohail Musa; Maire, Antonin; Majka, Richard Daniel; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Liudmila; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manceau, Loic Henri Antoine; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martashvili, Irakli; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-Garcia, Gines; Martin Blanco, Javier; Martynov, Yevgen; Mas, Alexis Jean-Michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel Anthony; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Meddi, Franco; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Meninno, Elisa; Mercado-Perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Miake, Yasuo; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz Czeslaw; Mitra, Jubin; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mlynarz, Jocelyn; Mohammadi, Naghmeh; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Molnar, Levente; Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel; Montes Prado, Esther; Morando, Maurizio; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhlheim, Daniel Michael; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Muller, Hans; Gameiro Munhoz, Marcelo; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Nattrass, Christine; Nayak, Kishora; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Nilsen, Bjorn Steven; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Nyanin, Alexander; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Oh, Sun Kun; Okatan, Ali; Olah, Laszlo; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Onderwaater, Jacobus; Oppedisano, Chiara; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Sahoo, Pragati; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pachr, Milos; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Painke, Florian; Pajares Vales, Carlos; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Palmeri, Armando; Pant, Divyash; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Pareek, Pooja; Park, Woojin; Parmar, Sonia; Passfeld, Annika; Patalakha, Dmitry; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Paul, Biswarup; Pawlak, Tomasz Jan; Peitzmann, Thomas; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, Elienos; Peresunko, Dmitry Yurevich; Perez Lara, Carlos Eugenio; Pesci, Alessandro; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petran, Michal; Petris, Mariana; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Planinic, Mirko; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Pohjoisaho, Esko Heikki Oskari; Polishchuk, Boris; Poljak, Nikola; Pop, Amalia; Porteboeuf, Sarah Julie; Porter, R Jefferson; Potukuchi, Baba; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puccio, Maximiliano; Puddu, Giovanna; Pujahari, Prabhat Ranjan; Punin, Valery; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Raha, Sibaji; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Rauf, Aamer Wali; Razazi, Vahedeh; Read, Kenneth Francis; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Redlich, Krzysztof; Reed, Rosi Jan; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick Simon; Reicher, Martijn; Reidt, Felix; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Rettig, Felix Vincenz; Revol, Jean-Pierre; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riabov, Viktor; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva Ora Herenui; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Rivetti, Angelo; Rocco, Elena; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Rodriguez Manso, Alis; Roeed, Ketil; Rogochaya, Elena; Sharma, Rohni; Rohr, David Michael; Roehrich, Dieter; Romita, Rosa; Ronchetti, Federico; Ronflette, Lucile; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossi, Andrea; Roukoutakis, Filimon; Roy, Ankhi; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Ryabov, Yury; Rybicki, Andrzej; Sadovskiy, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Sahlmuller, Baldo; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakai, Shingo; Salgado Lopez, Carlos Alberto; Salzwedel, Jai Samuel Nielsen; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sanchez Castro, Xitzel; Sanchez Rodriguez, Fernando Javier; Sandor, Ladislav; Sandoval, Andres; Sano, Masato; Santagati, Gianluca; Sarkar, Debojit; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schulc, Martin; Schuster, Tim Robin; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Rebecca Michelle; Segato, Gianfranco; Seger, Janet Elizabeth; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Seo, Jeewon; Serradilla Rodriguez, Eulogio; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shabratova, Galina; Shahoyan, Ruben; Shangaraev, Artem; Sharma, Natasha; Sharma, Satish; Shigaki, Kenta; Shtejer Diaz, Katherin; Sibiryak, Yury; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, Catherine Micaela; Simatovic, Goran; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singha, Subhash; Singhal, Vikas; Sinha, Bikash; Sarkar - Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Skjerdal, Kyrre; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Soegaard, Carsten; Soltz, Ron Ariel; Song, Jihye; Song, Myunggeun; Soramel, Francesca; Sorensen, Soren Pontoppidan; Spacek, Michal; Sputowska, Iwona Anna; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, Martha; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stefanek, Grzegorz; Steinpreis, Matthew Donald; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Steyn, Gideon Francois; Stiller, Johannes Hendrik; Stocco, Diego; Stolpovskiy, Mikhail; Strmen, Peter; Alarcon Do Passo Suaide, Alexandre; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Suleymanov, Mais Kazim Oglu; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Susa, Tatjana; Symons, Timothy; Szabo, Alexander; Szanto De Toledo, Alejandro; Szarka, Imrich; Szczepankiewicz, Adam; Szymanski, Maciej Pawel; Takahashi, Jun; Tangaro, Marco-Antonio; Tapia Takaki, Daniel Jesus; Tarantola Peloni, Attilio; Tarazona Martinez, Alfonso; Tarzila, Madalina-Gabriela; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terrevoli, Cristina; Thaeder, Jochen Mathias; Thomas, Deepa; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Timmins, Anthony Robert; Toia, Alberica; Torii, Hisayuki; Trubnikov, Victor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ulery, Jason Glyndwr; Ullaland, Kjetil; Uras, Antonio; Usai, Gianluca; Vajzer, Michal; Vala, Martin; Valencia Palomo, Lizardo; Vallero, Sara; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Vannucci, Luigi; Van Der Maarel, Jasper; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Van Leeuwen, Marco; Diozcora Vargas Trevino, Aurora; Vargyas, Marton; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veldhoen, Misha; Velure, Arild; Venaruzzo, Massimo; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara Limon, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Vickovic, Linda; Viesti, Giuseppe; Viinikainen, Jussi Samuli; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Vinogradov, Yury; Virgili, Tiziano; Vislavicius, Vytautas; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; Von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Vyushin, Alexey; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Jan; Wagner, Vladimir; Wang, Mengliang; Wang, Yifei; Watanabe, Daisuke; Weber, Michael; Weber, Steffen Georg; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Westerhoff, Uwe; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilde, Martin Rudolf; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilkinson, Jeremy John; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Winn, Michael Andreas; Xiang, Changzhou; Yaldo, Chris G; Yamaguchi, Yorito; Yang, Hongyan; Yang, Ping; Yang, Shiming; Yano, Satoshi; Yasnopolskiy, Stanislav; Yi, Jungyu; Yin, Zhongbao; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yushmanov, Igor; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zach, Cenek; Zaman, Ali; Zampolli, Chiara; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Zhao, Chengxin; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, Fengchu; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zoccarato, Yannick Denis; Zyzak, Maksym

    2014-12-12

    In high-energy collisions, the spatio-temporal size of the particle production region can be measured using the Bose-Einstein correlations of identical bosons at low relative momentum. The source radii are typically extracted using two-pion correlations, and characterize the system at the last stage of interaction, called kinetic freeze-out. In low-multiplicity collisions, unlike in high-multiplicity collisions, two-pion correlations are substantially altered by background correlations, e.g. mini-jets. Such correlations can be suppressed using three-pion cumulant correlations. We present the first measurements of the size of the system at freeze-out extracted from three-pion cumulant correlations in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC with ALICE. At similar multiplicity, the invariant radii extracted in p-Pb collisions are found to be 5-15% larger than those in pp, while those in Pb-Pb are 35-55% larger than those in p-Pb. Our measurements disfavor models which incorporate substantially stronger collecti...

  4. ALMA Survey of Lupus Protoplanetary Disks. II. Gas Disk Radii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansdell, M.; Williams, J. P.; Trapman, L.; van Terwisga, S. E.; Facchini, S.; Manara, C. F.; van der Marel, N.; Miotello, A.; Tazzari, M.; Hogerheijde, M.; Guidi, G.; Testi, L.; van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2018-05-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/Sub-Millimeter Array (ALMA) Band 6 observations of a complete sample of protoplanetary disks in the young (∼1–3 Myr) Lupus star-forming region, covering the 1.33 mm continuum and the 12CO, 13CO, and C18O J = 2–1 lines. The spatial resolution is ∼0.″25 with a medium 3σ continuum sensitivity of 0.30 mJy, corresponding to M dust ∼ 0.2 M ⊕. We apply Keplerian masking to enhance the signal-to-noise ratios of our 12CO zero-moment maps, enabling measurements of gas disk radii for 22 Lupus disks; we find that gas disks are universally larger than millimeter dust disks by a factor of two on average, likely due to a combination of the optically thick gas emission and the growth and inward drift of the dust. Using the gas disk radii, we calculate the dimensionless viscosity parameter, α visc, finding a broad distribution and no correlations with other disk or stellar parameters, suggesting that viscous processes have not yet established quasi-steady states in Lupus disks. By combining our 1.33 mm continuum fluxes with our previous 890 μm continuum observations, we also calculate the millimeter spectral index, α mm, for 70 Lupus disks; we find an anticorrelation between α mm and millimeter flux for low-mass disks (M dust ≲ 5), followed by a flattening as disks approach α mm ≈ 2, which could indicate faster grain growth in higher-mass disks, but may also reflect their larger optically thick components. In sum, this work demonstrates the continuous stream of new insights into disk evolution and planet formation that can be gleaned from unbiased ALMA disk surveys.

  5. Core expansion in young star clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elson, R.A.W.; Freeman, K.C.; Lauer, T.R.

    1989-01-01

    The core radii of 18 rich star clusters in the LMC with ages from 10 Myr to 1 Gyr. Data for an additional 17 clusters with ages from 1 Myr to 10 Gyr are available in the literature. The combined sample shows that the core radii increase from about 0 to about 5 pc between about 1 Myr and 1 Gyr, and then begin to decrease again. The expansion of the cores is probably driven by mass loss from evolving stars. Models of cluster evolution show that the rate of increase in core radius is sensitive to the slope of the initial mass function. The observed core radius-age relation for the LMC clusters favors an intial mass function with slope slightly flatter than the Salpeter value. 20 refs

  6. Diquark correlations from nucleon charge radii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, Carl E.; Carone, Christopher D.; Kwee, Herry J.; Lebed, Richard F.

    2006-01-01

    We argue that precise measurements of charge and magnetic radii can meaningfully constrain diquark models of the nucleon. We construct properly symmetrized, nonrelativistic three-quark wave functions that interpolate between the limits of a pointlike diquark pair and no diquark correlation. We find that good fits to the data can be obtained for a wide range of diquark sizes, provided that the diquark wave functions are close to those that reduce to a purely scalar state in the pointlike limit. A modest improvement in the experimental uncertainties will render a fit to the charge radii a more telling diagnostic for the presence of spatially correlated quark pairs within the nucleon

  7. Radii of Redox Components from Absolute Redox Potentials Compared with Covalent and Aqueous Ionic Radii

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heyrovská, Raji

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 9 (2010), s. 903-907 ISSN 1040-0397 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Electrochemistry * Absolute redox potentials * Radii of redox components Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.721, year: 2010

  8. Interaction cross-sections and matter radii of A = 20 isobars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chulkov, L.; Bochkarev, O.; Geissel, H.; Golovkov, M.; Janas, Z.; Keller, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Muenzenberg, G.; Nickel, F.; Ogloblin, A.; Patra, S.; Piechaczek, A.; Roeckl, E.; Schwab, W.; Suemmerer, K.; Suzuki, T.; Tanihata, I.; Yoshida, K.

    1995-11-01

    High-energy interaction cross-sections of A=20 nuclei ( 20 N, 20 O, 20 F, 20 Ne, 20 Na, 20 Mg) on carbon were measured with accuracies of ∼1%. The nuclear matter rms radii derived from the measured cross-sections show an irregular dependence on isospin projection. The largest difference in radii, which amounts to approximately 0.2 fm, has been obtained for the mirror nuclei 20 O and 20 Mg. The influenc of nuclear deformation and binding energy on the radii is discussed. By evaluating the difference in rms radii of neutron and proton distributions, evidence has been found for the existence of a proton skin for 20 Mg and of a neutron skin for 20 N. (orig.)

  9. The radii and masses of dwarf Cepheids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernley, J.A.; Jameson, R.F.; Sherrington, M.R.; Skillen, I.

    1987-01-01

    The authors present VJK photometry for the dwarf Cepheids CY Aqr, YZ Boo and VZ Cnc, and a radial velocity curve for CY Aqr. Using these data, plus radial velocity curves taken from the literature, Wesselink-type radii, and hence absolute magnitudes and masses, are derived for the three stars. Using these results, plus previously published work, a mean 'pulsation' mass for dwarf Cepheids of 1.2 +-0.3M solar mass is determined. If dwarf Cepheids are early post-main-sequence stars this is less than their 'evolutionary' mass by the ratio Msub(puls)/Msub(evol)approx.0.75. Previously published data on period changes show an order of magnitude larger than predicted by early post-main-sequence evolutionary tracks. The possibility that these stars are at a more advanced evolutionary state is briefly discussed. The properties of fundamental and possible/probable overtone pulsators are compared. Finally attention is drawn to the small cycle-to-cycle variations in dwarf Cepheid light curves noted by many observers and the possible link between these variations and delta Scuti behaviour. (author)

  10. Table of nuclear root mean square charge radii. Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paviotti-Corcuera, R.; McLaughlin, P.K.

    1999-01-01

    This document describes a table of nuclear root-mean-square (rms) charge radii evaluated by two different procedures. The data are available from the IAEA Nuclear Data Section via INTERNET or on PC diskettes upon request. This document supersedes the previous IAEA-NDS-163, 1990, 'Nuclear Charge Radii'. (author)

  11. Interaction cross sections and matter radii of oxygen isotopes using the Glauber model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Suhel; Usmani, A. A.; Ahmad, Shakeb; Khan, Z. A.

    2017-05-01

    Using the Coulomb modified correlation expansion for the Glauber model S matrix, we calculate the interaction cross sections of oxygen isotopes (O-2616) on 12C at 1.0 GeV/nucleon. The densities of O-2616 are obtained using (i) the Slater determinants consisting of the harmonic oscillator single-particle wave functions (SDHO) and (ii) the relativistic mean-field approach (RMF). Retaining up to the two-body density term in the correlation expansion, the calculations are performed employing the free as well as the in-medium nucleon-nucleon (N N ) scattering amplitude. The in-medium N N amplitude considers the effects arising due to phase variation, higher momentum transfer components, and Pauli blocking. Our main focus in this work is to reveal how could one make the best use of SDHO densities with reference to the RMF one. The results demonstrate that the SDHO densities, along with the in-medium N N amplitude, are able to provide satisfactory explanation of the experimental data. It is found that, except for O,2423, the predicted SDHO matter rms radii of oxygen isotopes closely agree with those obtained using the RMF densities. However, for O,2423, our results require reasonably larger SDHO matter rms radii than the RMF values, thereby predicting thicker neutron skins in 23O and 24O as compared to RMF ones. In conclusion, the results of the present analysis establish the utility of SDHO densities in predicting fairly reliable estimates of the matter rms radii of neutron-rich nuclei.

  12. A wide and collimated radio jet in 3C84 on the scale of a few hundred gravitational radii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannini, G.; Savolainen, T.; Orienti, M.; Nakamura, M.; Nagai, H.; Kino, M.; Giroletti, M.; Hada, K.; Bruni, G.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Anderson, J. M.; D'Ammando, F.; Hodgson, J.; Honma, M.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Lee, S.-S.; Lico, R.; Lisakov, M. M.; Lobanov, A. P.; Petrov, L.; Sohn, B. W.; Sokolovsky, K. V.; Voitsik, P. A.; Zensus, J. A.; Tingay, S.

    2018-04-01

    Understanding the formation of relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei remains an elusive problem1. This is partly because observational tests of jet formation models suffer from the limited angular resolution of ground-based very-long-baseline interferometry that has thus far been able to probe the structure of the jet acceleration and collimation region in only two sources2,3. Here, we report observations of 3C84 (NGC 1275)—the central galaxy of the Perseus cluster—made with an interferometric array including the orbiting radio telescope of the RadioAstron4 mission. The data transversely resolve the edge-brightened jet in 3C84 only 30 μas from the core, which is ten times closer to the central engine than was possible in previous ground-based observations5 and allows us to measure the jet collimation profile from 102 to 104 gravitational radii (rg) from the black hole. The previously found5, almost cylindrical jet profile on scales larger than a few thousand rg is seen to continue at least down to a few hundred rg from the black hole, and we find a broad jet with a transverse radius of ≳250 rg at only 350 rg from the core. This implies that either the bright outer jet layer goes through a very rapid lateral expansion on scales ≲102 rg or it is launched from the accretion disk.

  13. Isotope shift measurements in the 2s(1/2) -> 2p(3/2) transition of Be+ and extraction of the nuclear charge radii for Be-7,Be-10,Be-11

    CERN Document Server

    Zakova, M; Yordanov, D T; Lochmann, M; Drake, G W F; Yan, Z-C; Neugart, R; Kowalska, M; Blaum, K; Andjelkovic, Z; Kraemer, J; Bissell, M L; Neff, T; Schmidt-Kaler, F; Sanchez, R; Noertershaeuser, W; Geppert, Ch; Tiedemann, D; Zimmermann, C

    2010-01-01

    We have performed isotope shift measurements in the 2s(1/2) -> 2p(3/2) transition of Be+ ions using advanced collinear laser spectroscopy with two counter-propagating laser beams. Measurements involving a frequency comb for laser stabilization and absolute frequency determination allowed us to determine the isotope shifts with an accuracy of 2 MHz. From the isotope shifts between Be-9 and Be-7,Be-10,Be-11, high-accuracy mass shift calculations and the charge radius of the reference isotope Be-9 we determined nuclear charge radii for the isotopes Be-7,Be-10 and the one-neutron halo nucleus Be-11. The results are compared to nuclear-structure calculations using the fermionic molecular dynamics model which reproduce well the general trend of the radii. Decreasing charge radii from Be-7 to Be-10 are explained by the cluster structure of the nuclei. The increase from Be-10 to Be-11 is mainly caused by the halo neutron by which the Be-10 core moves relative to the center of mass. Polarization of the Be-10 core has ...

  14. 2-LP mode few-mode fiber amplifier employing ring-core erbium-doped fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Hirotaka; Hosokawa, Tsukasa; Ichii, Kentaro; Matsuo, Shoichiro; Nasu, Hitoshi; Yamada, Makoto

    2015-10-19

    A fiber amplifier supporting 2 LP modes that employs a ring-core erbium-doped fiber (RC-EDF) is investigated to reduce differential modal gain (DMG). The inner and outer radii of the ring-core of the RC-EDF are clarified for 2-LP mode operation of the amplifier, and are optimized to reduce the DMG. It is shown that using the overlap integral between the erbium-doped core area and the signal power mode distribution is a good way to optimize the inner and outer radii of the ring-core of the RC-EDF and thus minimize the DMG. A fabricated RC-EDF and a constructed 2-LP mode EDFA are described and a small DMG of around 1 dB is realized for LP01, LP11 and LP21 pumping.

  15. Small radii of neutron stars as an indication of novel in-medium effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Wei-Zhou; Li, Bao-An; Fattoyev, F.J.

    2015-01-01

    At present, neutron star radii from both observations and model predictions remain very uncertain. Whereas different models can predict a wide range of neutron star radii, it is not possible for most models to predict radii that are smaller than about 10 km, thus if such small radii are established in the future they will be very difficult to reconcile with model estimates. By invoking a new term in the equation of state that enhances the energy density, but leaves the pressure unchanged we simulate the current uncertainty in the neutron star radii. This new term can be possibly due to the exchange of the weakly interacting light U-boson with appropriate in-medium parameters, which does not compromise the success of the conventional nuclear models. The validity of this new scheme will be tested eventually by more precise measurements of neutron star radii. (orig.)

  16. Dense Cores in Galaxies Out to z = 2.5 in SDSS, UltraVISTA, and the Five 3D-HST/CANDELS Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Bezanson, Rachel; van der Wel, Arjen; Nelson, Erica June; Momcheva, Ivelina; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Brammer, Gabriel; Conroy, Charlie; Förster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Fumagalli, Mattia; Kriek, Mariska; Labbé, Ivo; Leja, Joel; Marchesini, Danilo; Muzzin, Adam; Oesch, Pascal; Wuyts, Stijn

    2014-08-01

    The dense interiors of massive galaxies are among the most intriguing environments in the universe. In this paper,we ask when these dense cores were formed and determine how galaxies gradually assembled around them. We select galaxies that have a stellar mass >3 × 1010 M ⊙ inside r = 1 kpc out to z = 2.5, using the 3D-HST survey and data at low redshift. Remarkably, the number density of galaxies with dense cores appears to have decreased from z = 2.5 to the present. This decrease is probably mostly due to stellar mass loss and the resulting adiabatic expansion, with some contribution from merging. We infer that dense cores were mostly formed at z > 2.5, consistent with their largely quiescent stellar populations. While the cores appear to form early, the galaxies in which they reside show strong evolution: their total masses increase by a factor of 2-3 from z = 2.5 to z = 0 and their effective radii increase by a factor of 5-6. As a result, the contribution of dense cores to the total mass of the galaxies in which they reside decreases from ~50% at z = 2.5 to ~15% at z = 0. Because of their early formation, the contribution of dense cores to the total stellar mass budget of the universe is a strong function of redshift. The stars in cores with M 1 kpc > 3 × 1010 M ⊙ make up ~0.1% of the stellar mass density of the universe today but 10%-20% at z ~ 2, depending on their initial mass function. The formation of these cores required the conversion of ~1011 M ⊙ of gas into stars within ~1 kpc, while preventing significant star formation at larger radii.

  17. The measurement of dynamic radii for passenger car tyre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghelache, G.; Moisescu, R.

    2017-10-01

    The tyre dynamic rolling radius is an extremely important parameter for vehicle dynamics, for operation of safety systems as ESP, ABS, TCS, etc., for road vehicle research and development, as well as for validation or as an input parameter of automotive simulations and models. The paper investigates the dynamic rolling radii of passenger car tyre and the influence of rolling speed and inflation pressure on their magnitude. The measurement of dynamic rolling radii has been performed on a chassis dynamometer test rig. The dynamic rolling radii have been measured indirectly, using longitudinal rolling speed and angular velocity of wheel. Due to the subtle effects that the parameters have on rolling radius magnitude, very accurate equipment has to be used. Two different methods have been chosen for measuring the wheel angular velocity: the stroboscopic lamp and the incremental rotary encoder. The paper shows that the stroboscopic lamp has an insufficient resolution, therefore it was no longer used for experimental investigation. The tyre dynamic rolling radii increase with rolling speed and with tyre inflation pressure, but the effect of pressure is more significant. The paper also makes considerations on the viability of simplified formulae from literature for calculating the tyre dynamic rolling radius.

  18. Testing asteroseismic radii of dwarfs and subgiants with Kepler and Gaia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahlholdt, C. L.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Casagrande, L.; Mosumgaard, J. R.; Bojsen-Hansen, M.

    2018-05-01

    We test asteroseismic radii of Kepler main-sequence and subgiant stars by deriving their parallaxes which are compared with those of the first Gaia data release. We compute radii based on the asteroseismic scaling relations as well as by fitting observed oscillation frequencies to stellar models for a subset of the sample, and test the impact of using effective temperatures from either spectroscopy or the infrared flux method. An offset of 3 per cent, showing no dependency on any stellar parameters, is found between seismic parallaxes derived from frequency modelling and those from Gaia. For parallaxes based on radii from the scaling relations, a smaller offset is found on average; however, the offset becomes temperature dependent which we interpret as problems with the scaling relations at high stellar temperatures. Using the hotter infrared flux method temperature scale, there is no indication that radii from the scaling relations are inaccurate by more than about 5 per cent. Taking the radii and masses from the modelling of individual frequencies as reference values, we seek to correct the scaling relations for the observed temperature trend. This analysis indicates that the scaling relations systematically overestimate radii and masses at high temperatures, and that they are accurate to within 5 per cent in radius and 13 per cent in mass for main-sequence stars with temperatures below 6400 K. However, further analysis is required to test the validity of the corrections on a star-by-star basis and for more evolved stars.

  19. The 3H–3He Charge Radii Difference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myers L. S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The upcoming E12-14-009 [1] experiment at Jefferson Lab will determine the ratio of the electric form factors for the A=3 mirror nuclei 3He and 3H. The measurement will use a 1.1 GeV electron beam, a special collimator plate to allow for simultaneous optics measurements, and the low-activity tritium target being prepared for Jefferson Lab. By observing the dependence of the form factor ratio as a function of Q2 over 0.05–0.09 GeV2, the dependence of the radii extraction on the shape of the form factors is minimized. As a result, we anticipate the uncertainty of the extracted charge radii difference to be 0.03 fm, a reduction of 70% from the current measurement. Using precise measurements of the 3He charge radius from isotopic shift or μHe measurements [2–4], we can deduce the absolute 3H charge radius. The results will provide a direct comparison to recent calculations of the charge radii.

  20. Measurements of interaction cross sections and nuclear radii of Li isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanihata, I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hashimoto, O.; Shida, Y.; Yoshikawa, N.; Sugimoto, K.; Yamakawa, O.; Kobayashi, T.; Takahashi, N.

    1985-08-01

    Interaction cross sections(σ sub(I)) for all known Li isotopes ( 6 Li - 11 Li) and 9 Be on targets Be, C, and Al have been measured at 790 MeV/nucleon. Nuclear radii(R sub(I)) of these isotopes have been deduced from the σ sub(I). The differences of radii among isobars( 6 He - 6 Li, 8 He - 8 Li, and 9 Li - 9 Be) have been found for the first time. A comparison of R sub(I) with the rms radii obtained from electron-scattering is presented. (author)

  1. Testing Asteroseismic Radii of Dwarfs and Subgiants with Kepler and Gaia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahlholdt, C. L.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Casagrande, L.

    2018-01-01

    We test asteroseismic radii of Kepler main-sequence and subgiant stars by deriving their parallaxes which are compared with those of the first Gaia data release. We compute radii based on the asteroseismic scaling relations as well as by fitting observed oscillation frequencies to stellar models...... overestimate radii and masses at high temperatures, and that they are accurate to within 5% in radius and 13% in mass for main-sequence stars with temperatures below 6400 K. However, further analysis is required to test the validity of the corrections on a star-by-star basis and for more evolved stars....

  2. Nuclear charge radii of 8,9Li determined by laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewald, G.; Dax, A.; Goette, S.; Kirchner, R.; Kluge, H.J.; Kuehl, T.; Sanchez, R.; Wojtaszek, A.; Noertershaeuser, W.; Drake, G.W.F.; Yan, Z.C.; Zimmermann, C.

    2004-06-01

    The 2S → 3S transition of 6,7,8,9 Li was studied by high-resolution laser spectroscopy using two-photon Doppler-free excitation and resonance-ionization detection. The hyperfine structure splitting and the isotope shift were determined with precision at the 100 kHz level. Combined with recent theoretical work, the changes in nuclear charge radii of 8,9 Li were determined. These are now the lightest short-lived isotopes for which the charge radii have been measured. It is found that the charge radii monotonically decrease with increasing neutron number from 6 Li to 9 Li. (orig.)

  3. Variation of nuclear radii in the drip line regions

    CERN Document Server

    Beiner, M; Mas, D

    1976-01-01

    The authors are concerned with predictions of the energy density method with respect to the nuclear sizes (RMS radii). It is known that the commonly accepted A/sup 1/3/-type laws are only approximative and deviations are expected to grow significantly as one goes away from the beta -stability region. Particular attention is paid to the variation of nuclear radii in the drip line regions. Implications of the resulting large total Coulomb energy variations between neighbouring nuclei will be emphasized.

  4. On the Radii of Close-in Giant Planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows; Guillot; Hubbard; Marley; Saumon; Lunine; Sudarsky

    2000-05-01

    The recent discovery that the close-in extrasolar giant planet HD 209458b transits its star has provided a first-of-its-kind measurement of the planet's radius and mass. In addition, there is a provocative detection of the light reflected off of the giant planet tau Bootis b. Including the effects of stellar irradiation, we estimate the general behavior of radius/age trajectories for such planets and interpret the large measured radii of HD 209458b and tau Boo b in that context. We find that HD 209458b must be a hydrogen-rich gas giant. Furthermore, the large radius of a close-in gas giant is not due to the thermal expansion of its atmosphere but to the high residual entropy that remains throughout its bulk by dint of its early proximity to a luminous primary. The large stellar flux does not inflate the planet but retards its otherwise inexorable contraction from a more extended configuration at birth. This implies either that such a planet was formed near its current orbital distance or that it migrated in from larger distances (>/=0.5 AU), no later than a few times 107 yr of birth.

  5. Charge radii of neutron-deficient Ca isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A. J.; Minamisono, K.; Klose, A.; Everett, N.; Kalman, C.; Powel, R. C.; Watkins, J.; Garand, D.; Sumithrarachchi, C.; Krämer, J.; Maa, B.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Rossi, D. M.; Kujawa, C.; Pineda, S.; Lantis, J.; Liu, Y.; Mantica, P. F.; Pearson, M. R.

    2017-09-01

    Nucleon shell closures are generally associated with a local minimum in mean-square charge radii, 〈r2 〉 , along an isotopic chain. The 〈r2 〉 of 18Ar and 19K isotopes, however, do not show this signature at the N = 20 neutron shell closure. To gain a microscopic understanding of this abnormal behavior, measurements of 〈r2 〉 of neutron-deficient Ca isotopes below N = 20 have been proposed at the BEam COoling and LAser spectroscopy (BECOLA) facility at NSCL/MSU. Preliminary results will be presented and the deduced charge radii will be compared to theoretical calculations and the trends in the nearby isotopic chains. Work supported in part by NSF Grant PHY-15-65546, U.S. DOE Grant DE-NA0002924 and by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft through Grant SFB 1245.

  6. Mass Distribution in Galaxy Cluster Cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, M. T.; McNamara, B. R.; Pulido, F.; Vantyghem, A. N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Nulsen, P. E. J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Russell, H. R. [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Edge, A. C. [Centre for Extragalactic Astronomy, Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Main, R. A., E-mail: m4hogan@uwaterloo.ca [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2017-03-01

    Many processes within galaxy clusters, such as those believed to govern the onset of thermally unstable cooling and active galactic nucleus feedback, are dependent upon local dynamical timescales. However, accurate mapping of the mass distribution within individual clusters is challenging, particularly toward cluster centers where the total mass budget has substantial radially dependent contributions from the stellar ( M {sub *}), gas ( M {sub gas}), and dark matter ( M {sub DM}) components. In this paper we use a small sample of galaxy clusters with deep Chandra observations and good ancillary tracers of their gravitating mass at both large and small radii to develop a method for determining mass profiles that span a wide radial range and extend down into the central galaxy. We also consider potential observational pitfalls in understanding cooling in hot cluster atmospheres, and find tentative evidence for a relationship between the radial extent of cooling X-ray gas and nebular H α emission in cool-core clusters. At large radii the entropy profiles of our clusters agree with the baseline power law of K ∝ r {sup 1.1} expected from gravity alone. At smaller radii our entropy profiles become shallower but continue with a power law of the form K ∝ r {sup 0.67} down to our resolution limit. Among this small sample of cool-core clusters we therefore find no support for the existence of a central flat “entropy floor.”.

  7. Uniform spatial distribution of collagen fibril radii within tendon implies local activation of pC-collagen at individual fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutenberg, Andrew D.; Brown, Aidan I.; Kreplak, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    Collagen fibril cross-sectional radii show no systematic variation between the interior and the periphery of fibril bundles, indicating an effectively constant rate of collagen incorporation into fibrils throughout the bundle. Such spatially homogeneous incorporation constrains the extracellular diffusion of collagen precursors from sources at the bundle boundary to sinks at the growing fibrils. With a coarse-grained diffusion equation we determine stringent bounds, using parameters extracted from published experimental measurements of tendon development. From the lack of new fibril formation after birth, we further require that the concentration of diffusing precursors stays below the critical concentration for fibril nucleation. We find that the combination of the diffusive bound, which requires larger concentrations to ensure homogeneous fibril radii, and lack of nucleation, which requires lower concentrations, is only marginally consistent with fully processed collagen using conservative bounds. More realistic bounds may leave no consistent concentrations. Therefore, we propose that unprocessed pC-collagen diffuses from the bundle periphery followed by local C-proteinase activity and subsequent collagen incorporation at each fibril. We suggest that C-proteinase is localized within bundles, at fibril surfaces, during radial fibrillar growth. The much greater critical concentration of pC-collagen, as compared to fully processed collagen, then provides broad consistency between homogeneous fibril radii and the lack of fibril nucleation during fibril growth.

  8. LACK OF INFLATED RADII FOR KEPLER GIANT PLANET CANDIDATES RECEIVING MODEST STELLAR IRRADIATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demory, Brice-Olivier; Seager, Sara

    2011-01-01

    The most irradiated transiting hot Jupiters are characterized by anomalously inflated radii, sometimes exceeding Jupiter's size by more than 60%. While different theoretical explanations have been applied, none of them provide a universal resolution to this observation, despite significant progress in the past years. We refine the photometric transit light curve analysis of 115 Kepler giant planet candidates based on public Q0-Q2 photometry. We find that 14% of them are likely false positives, based on their secondary eclipse depth. We report on planet radii versus stellar flux. We find an increase in planet radii with increased stellar irradiation for the Kepler giant planet candidates, in good agreement with existing hot Jupiter systems. We find that in the case of modest irradiation received from the stellar host, giant planets do not have inflated radii, and appear to have radii independent of the host star incident flux. This finding suggests that the physical mechanisms inflating hot Jupiters become ineffective below a given orbit-averaged stellar irradiation level of ∼2 × 10 8 erg s –1 cm –2 .

  9. A differential equation for the Generalized Born radii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogolari, Federico; Corazza, Alessandra; Esposito, Gennaro

    2013-06-28

    The Generalized Born (GB) model offers a convenient way of representing electrostatics in complex macromolecules like proteins or nucleic acids. The computation of atomic GB radii is currently performed by different non-local approaches involving volume or surface integrals. Here we obtain a non-linear second-order partial differential equation for the Generalized Born radius, which may be solved using local iterative algorithms. The equation is derived under the assumption that the usual GB approximation to the reaction field obeys Laplace's equation. The equation admits as particular solutions the correct GB radii for the sphere and the plane. The tests performed on a set of 55 different proteins show an overall agreement with other reference GB models and "perfect" Poisson-Boltzmann based values.

  10. Spins, moments and charge radii beyond $^{48}$Ca

    CERN Multimedia

    Neyens, G; Rajabali, M M; Hammen, M; Blaum, K; Froemmgen, N E; Garcia ruiz, R F; Kreim, K D; Budincevic, I

    Laser spectroscopy of $^{49-54}$Ca is proposed as a continuation of the experimental theme initiated with IS484 “Ground-state properties of K-isotopes from laser and $\\beta$-NMR spectroscopy” and expanded in INTC-I-117 “Moments, Spins and Charge Radii Beyond $^{48}$Ca.” It is anticipated that the charge radii of these isotopes can show strong evidence for the existence of a sub-shell closure at N=32 and could provide a first tentative investigation into the existence of a shell effect at N=34. Furthermore the proposed experiments will simultaneously provide model-independent measurements of the spins, magnetic moments and quadrupole moments of $^{51,53}$Ca permitting existing and future excitation spectra to be pinned to firm unambiguous ground states.

  11. Neutron star radii, universal relations, and the role of prior distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, A.W. [University of Tennessee, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Physics Division, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lattimer, J.M. [Stony Brook University, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Brown, E.F. [Michigan State University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, East Lansing, MI (United States); Michigan State University, The Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics-Center for the Evolution of the Elements, East Lansing, MI (United States); Michigan State University, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2016-02-15

    We investigate constraints on neutron star structure arising from the assumptions that neutron stars have crusts, that recent calculations of pure neutron matter limit the equation of state of neutron star matter near the nuclear saturation density, that the high-density equation of state is limited by causality and the largest high-accuracy neutron star mass measurement, and that general relativity is the correct theory of gravity. We explore the role of prior assumptions by considering two classes of equation of state models. In a first, the intermediate- and high-density behavior of the equation of state is parameterized by piecewise polytropes. In the second class, the high-density behavior of the equation of state is parameterized by piecewise continuous line segments. The smallest density at which high-density matter appears is varied in order to allow for strong phase transitions above the nuclear saturation density. We critically examine correlations among the pressure of matter, radii, maximum masses, the binding energy, the moment of inertia, and the tidal deformability, paying special attention to the sensitivity of these correlations to prior assumptions about the equation of state. It is possible to constrain the radii of 1.4M {sub CircleDot} neutron stars to be larger than 10 km, even without consideration of additional astrophysical observations, for example, those from photospheric radius expansion bursts or quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries. We are able to improve the accuracy of known correlations between the moment of inertia and compactness as well as the binding energy and compactness. We also demonstrate the existence of a correlation between the neutron star binding energy and the moment of inertia. (orig.)

  12. Mass-radius relations and core-envelope decompositions of super-Earths and sub-Neptunes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, Alex R.; Burrows, Adam [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Verne, Wesley, E-mail: arhowe@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: burrows@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Computer Science, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Many exoplanets have been discovered with radii of 1-4 R {sub ⊕}, between that of Earth and Neptune. A number of these are known to have densities consistent with solid compositions, while others are 'sub-Neptunes' likely to have significant H{sub 2}-He envelopes. Future surveys will no doubt significantly expand these populations. In order to understand how the measured masses and radii of such planets can inform their structures and compositions, we construct models both for solid layered planets and for planets with solid cores and gaseous envelopes, exploring a range of core masses, H{sub 2}-He envelope masses, and associated envelope entropies. For planets in the super-Earth/sub-Neptune regime for which both radius and mass are measured, we estimate how each is partitioned into a solid core and gaseous envelope, associating a specific core mass and envelope mass with a given exoplanet. We perform this decomposition for both ''Earth-like'' rock-iron cores and pure ice cores, and find that the necessary gaseous envelope masses for this important sub-class of exoplanets must range very widely from zero to many Earth masses, even for a given core mass. This result bears importantly on exoplanet formation and envelope evaporation processes.

  13. Mass-radius relations and core-envelope decompositions of super-Earths and sub-Neptunes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, Alex R.; Burrows, Adam; Verne, Wesley

    2014-01-01

    Many exoplanets have been discovered with radii of 1-4 R ⊕ , between that of Earth and Neptune. A number of these are known to have densities consistent with solid compositions, while others are 'sub-Neptunes' likely to have significant H 2 -He envelopes. Future surveys will no doubt significantly expand these populations. In order to understand how the measured masses and radii of such planets can inform their structures and compositions, we construct models both for solid layered planets and for planets with solid cores and gaseous envelopes, exploring a range of core masses, H 2 -He envelope masses, and associated envelope entropies. For planets in the super-Earth/sub-Neptune regime for which both radius and mass are measured, we estimate how each is partitioned into a solid core and gaseous envelope, associating a specific core mass and envelope mass with a given exoplanet. We perform this decomposition for both ''Earth-like'' rock-iron cores and pure ice cores, and find that the necessary gaseous envelope masses for this important sub-class of exoplanets must range very widely from zero to many Earth masses, even for a given core mass. This result bears importantly on exoplanet formation and envelope evaporation processes.

  14. Testing the white dwarf mass-radius relationship with eclipsing binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, S. G.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Marsh, T. R.; Ashley, R. P.; Bours, M. C. P.; Breedt, E.; Burleigh, M. R.; Copperwheat, C. M.; Dhillon, V. S.; Green, M.; Hardy, L. K.; Hermes, J. J.; Irawati, P.; Kerry, P.; Littlefair, S. P.; McAllister, M. J.; Rattanasoon, S.; Rebassa-Mansergas, A.; Sahman, D. I.; Schreiber, M. R.

    2017-10-01

    We present high-precision, model-independent, mass and radius measurements for 16 white dwarfs in detached eclipsing binaries and combine these with previously published data to test the theoretical white dwarf mass-radius relationship. We reach a mean precision of 2.4 per cent in mass and 2.7 per cent in radius, with our best measurements reaching a precision of 0.3 per cent in mass and 0.5 per cent in radius. We find excellent agreement between the measured and predicted radii across a wide range of masses and temperatures. We also find the radii of all white dwarfs with masses less than 0.48 M⊙ to be fully consistent with helium core models, but they are on average 9 per cent larger than those of carbon-oxygen core models. In contrast, white dwarfs with masses larger than 0.52 M⊙ all have radii consistent with carbon-oxygen core models. Moreover, we find that all but one of the white dwarfs in our sample have radii consistent with possessing thick surface hydrogen envelopes (10-5 ≥ MH/MWD ≥ 10-4), implying that the surface hydrogen layers of these white dwarfs are not obviously affected by common envelope evolution.

  15. The radii of the Wolf-Rayet stars and the extent of their chromosphere-corona formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahade, J [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, Buenos Aires, Argentina; Zorec, J [College de France, Paris, France

    1981-03-01

    The radii of 14 Wolf-Rayet stars are computed on the basis of previously reported absolute fluxes in the region from 4150 to 8000 A for 10 WN stars and from 3650 to 8000 A for four WC stars. For comparison, the radii of 11 Of stars are also calculated. The Wolf-Rayet radii are found to range from about 10 to 35 solar radii, values that do not appear to provide supporting evidence for the hypothesis that Of stars evolve into late WN stars. Available UV observations of Gamma-2 Vel are used to investigate the extent of the chromosphere-corona structure in Wolf-Rayet stars. It is suggested that the second electron-temperature maximum in a recently proposed model for the extended envelopes of Wolf-Rayet stars should be further than about 300 solar radii from the center of a star.

  16. Distribution of correlation radii in disordered ferroelectrics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Glinchuk, M. D.; Eliseev, E. A.; Stepanovich, V. A.; Jastrabík, Lubomír

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 25 (2002), s. 4808-4810 ISSN 0003-6951 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A015 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : disordered ferroelectrics * distribution of correlation radii * polar nanoregions Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.207, year: 2002

  17. Isospin dependence of nuclear charge radii and its microscopic demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Yian; Zeng Jinyan

    2007-01-01

    The analysis of experimental nuclear charge radii R c indicates that R c deviates systematically from the A 1/3 law, i.e., R c /A 1/3 gradually decreases with increasing A, whereas R c /Z 1/3 remains almost a constant. This statement is also supported by the analysis of a large amount of experimental nuclear giant monopole resonance energy data E x ∝R -1 . The deviation of nuclear charge radii from the A 1/3 law is basically caused by the isospin independence of A 1/3 law, and the isospin dependence has been partly included in Z 1/3 law. In the frame of nuclear shell model, a microscopic demonstration of the Z 1/3 law is given. The difference in the harmonic oscillator potential strength between proton and neutron (ω p and ω n ) can be accounted for by the Z 1/3 law. Similar to Wigner's nuclear isobaric multiplet mass equation (IMME), a modified Z 1/3 law for nuclear charge radii is proposed. (authors)

  18. Fitted HBT radii versus space-time variances in flow-dominated models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisa, Mike; Frodermann, Evan; Heinz, Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    The inability of otherwise successful dynamical models to reproduce the 'HBT radii' extracted from two-particle correlations measured at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is known as the 'RHIC HBT Puzzle'. Most comparisons between models and experiment exploit the fact that for Gaussian sources the HBT radii agree with certain combinations of the space-time widths of the source which can be directly computed from the emission function, without having to evaluate, at significant expense, the two-particle correlation function. We here study the validity of this approach for realistic emission function models some of which exhibit significant deviations from simple Gaussian behaviour. By Fourier transforming the emission function we compute the 2-particle correlation function and fit it with a Gaussian to partially mimic the procedure used for measured correlation functions. We describe a novel algorithm to perform this Gaussian fit analytically. We find that for realistic hydrodynamic models the HBT radii extracted from this procedure agree better with the data than the values previously extracted from the space-time widths of the emission function. Although serious discrepancies between the calculated and measured HBT radii remain, we show that a more 'apples-to-apples' comparison of models with data can play an important role in any eventually successful theoretical description of RHIC HBT data. (author)

  19. Dependences of optical properties of spherical two-layered nanoparticles on parameters of gold core and material shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustovalov, V.K.; Astafyeva, L.G.; Zharov, V.P.

    2013-01-01

    Modeling of nonlinear dependences of optical properties of spherical two-layered gold core and some material shell nanoparticles (NPs) placed in water on parameters of core and shell was carried out on the basis of the extended Mie theory. Efficiency cross-sections of absorption, scattering and extinction of radiation with wavelength 532 nm by core–shell NPs in the ranges of core radii r 00 =5–40 nm and of relative NP radii r 1 /r 00 =1–8 were calculated (r 1 —radius of two-layered nanoparticle). Shell materials were used with optical indexes in the ranges of refraction n 1 =0.2–1.5 and absorption k 1 =0–3.5 for the presentation of optical properties of wide classes of shell materials (including dielectrics, metals, polymers, vapor shell around gold core). Results show nonlinear dependences of optical properties of two-layered NPs on optical indexes of shell material, core r 00 and relative NP r 1 /r 00 radii. Regions with sharp decrease and increase of absorption, scattering and extinction efficiency cross-sections with changing of core and shell parameters were investigated. These dependences should be taken into account for applications of two-layered NPs in laser nanomedicine and optical diagnostics of tissues. The results can be used for experimental investigation of shell formation on NP core and optical determination of geometrical parameters of core and shell of two-layered NPs. -- Highlights: • Absorption, scattering and extinction of two-layered nanoparticles are studied. • Shell materials change in wide regions of materials (metals, dielectrics, vapor). • Effect of sharp decrease and increase of optical characteristics is established. • Explanation of sharp decreasing and increasing optical characteristics is presented

  20. The magnetic field of the equatorial magnetotail from 10 to 40 earth radii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairfield, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    A statistical study of IMP 6, 7, and 8 magnetotail magnetic field measurements near the equatorial plane reveals new information about various aspects of magnetospheric structure. More magnetic flux crosses the equatorial plane on the dawn and dusk flanks of the tail than near midnight, but no evidence is found for a dependence on the interplanetary magnetic field sector polarity. Field magnitudes within 3 earth radii of the equatorial plane near dawn are more than twice as large as those near dusk for Xsm = -20 to -10 earth radii. The frequency of occurrence of southward fields is greatest near midnight, and such fields are seen almost twice as often for Xsm = -20 to -10 earth radii as for Xsm beyond -20 earth radii. This latter result supports the idea that the midnight region of the tail between 10 and 20 is a special location where neutral lines are particularly apt to form. Such a neutral line will approach nearest the earth in the midnight and premidnight region, where substorms are thought to have their onset.

  1. Observational constraints on neutron star masses and radii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman Miller, M. [University of Maryland, Department of Astronomy and Joint Space-Science Institute, College Park, MD (United States); Lamb, Frederick K. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Center for Theoretical Astrophysics and Department of Physics, Urbana, IL (United States); University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Astronomy, Urbana, IL (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Precise and reliable measurements of the masses and radii of neutron stars with a variety of masses would provide valuable guidance for improving models of the properties of cold matter with densities above the saturation density of nuclear matter. Several different approaches for measuring the masses and radii of neutron stars have been tried or proposed, including analyzing the X-ray fluxes and spectra of the emission from neutron stars in quiescent low-mass X-ray binary systems and thermonuclear burst sources; fitting the energy-dependent X-ray waveforms of rotation-powered millisecond pulsars, burst oscillations with millisecond periods, and accretion-powered millisecond pulsars; and modeling the gravitational radiation waveforms of coalescing double neutron star and neutron star - black hole binary systems. We describe the strengths and weaknesses of these approaches, most of which currently have substantial systematic errors, and discuss the prospects for decreasing the systematic errors in each method. (orig.)

  2. Charge radii and electromagnetic moments of At-211195

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubiss, J. G.; Barzakh, A. E.; Seliverstov, M. D.; Andreyev, A. N.; Andel, B.; Antalic, S.; Ascher, P.; Atanasov, D.; Beck, D.; Bieroń, J.; Blaum, K.; Borgmann, Ch.; Breitenfeldt, M.; Capponi, L.; Cocolios, T. E.; Day Goodacre, T.; Derkx, X.; De Witte, H.; Elseviers, J.; Fedorov, D. V.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Fritzsche, S.; Gaffney, L. P.; George, S.; Ghys, L.; Heßberger, F. P.; Huyse, M.; Imai, N.; Kalaninová, Z.; Kisler, D.; Köster, U.; Kowalska, M.; Kreim, S.; Lane, J. F. W.; Liberati, V.; Lunney, D.; Lynch, K. M.; Manea, V.; Marsh, B. A.; Mitsuoka, S.; Molkanov, P. L.; Nagame, Y.; Neidherr, D.; Nishio, K.; Ota, S.; Pauwels, D.; Popescu, L.; Radulov, D.; Rapisarda, E.; Revill, J. P.; Rosenbusch, M.; Rossel, R. E.; Rothe, S.; Sandhu, K.; Schweikhard, L.; Sels, S.; Truesdale, V. L.; Van Beveren, C.; Van den Bergh, P.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Van Duppen, P.; Wendt, K. D. A.; Wienholtz, F.; Whitmore, B. W.; Wilson, G. L.; Wolf, R. N.; Zuber, K.

    2018-05-01

    Hyperfine-structure parameters and isotope shifts of At-211195 have been measured for the first time at CERN-ISOLDE, using the in-source resonance-ionization spectroscopy method. The hyperfine structures of isotopes were recorded using a triad of experimental techniques for monitoring the photo-ion current. The Multi-Reflection Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer, in connection with a high-resolution electron multiplier, was used as an ion-counting setup for isotopes that either were affected by strong isobaric contamination or possessed a long half-life; the ISOLDE Faraday cups were used for cases with high-intensity beams; and the Windmill decay station was used for short-lived, predominantly α -decaying nuclei. The electromagnetic moments and changes in the mean-square charge radii of the astatine nuclei have been extracted from the measured hyperfine-structure constants and isotope shifts. This was only made possible by dedicated state-of-the-art large-scale atomic computations of the electronic factors and the specific mass shift of atomic transitions in astatine that are needed for these extractions. By comparison with systematics, it was possible to assess the reliability of the results of these calculations and their ascribed uncertainties. A strong deviation in the ground-state mean-square charge radii of the lightest astatine isotopes, from the trend of the (spherical) lead isotopes, is interpreted as the result of an onset of deformation. This behavior bears a resemblance to the deviation observed in the isotonic polonium isotopes. Cases for shape coexistence have been identified in At,199197, for which a significant difference in the charge radii for ground (9 /2- ) and isomeric (1 /2+ ) states has been observed.

  3. Nuclear charge radii of light isotopes based on frequency comb measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakova, Monika

    2010-01-01

    Optical frequency comb technology has been used in this work for the first time to investigate the nuclear structure of light radioactive isotopes. Therefore, three laser systems were stabilized with different techniques to accurately known optical frequencies and used in two specialized experiments. Absolute transition frequency measurements of lithium and beryllium isotopes were performed with accuracy on the order of 10 -10 . Such a high accuracy is required for the light elements since the nuclear volume effect has only a 10 -9 contribution to the total transition frequency. For beryllium, the isotope shift was determined with an accuracy that is sufficient to extract information about the proton distribution inside the nucleus. A Doppler-free two-photon spectroscopy on the stable lithium isotopes 6,7 Li was performed in order to determine the absolute frequency of the 2S → 3S transition. The achieved relative accuracy of 2 x 10 -10 is improved by one order of magnitude compared to previous measurements. The results provide an opportunity to determine the nuclear charge radius of the stable and short-lived isotopes in a pure optical way but this requires an improvement of the theoretical calculations by two orders of magnitude. The second experiment presented here was performed at ISOLDE/CERN, where the absolute transition frequencies of the D 1 and D 2 lines in beryllium ions for the isotopes 7,9,10,11 Be were measured with an accuracy of about 1 MHz. Therefore, an advanced collinear laser spectroscopy technique involving two counter-propagating frequency-stabilized laser beams with a known absolute frequency was developed. The extracted isotope shifts were combined with recent accurate mass shift calculations and the root-mean square nuclear charge radii of 7,10 Be and the one-neutron halo nucleus 11 Be were determined. Obtained charge radii are decreasing from 7 Be to 10 Be and increasing again for 11 Be. While the monotone decrease can be explained by a

  4. Precise Masses & Radii of the Planets Orbiting K2-3 and GJ3470

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosiarek, Molly; Crossfield, Ian; Hardegree-Ullman, Kevin; Livingston, John; Howard, Andrew; Fulton, Benjamin; Hirsch, Lea; Isaacson, Howard; Petigura, Erik; Sinukoff, Evan; Weiss, Lauren; Knutson, Heather; Bonfils, Xavier; Benneke, Björn; Beichman, Charles; Dressing, Courtney

    2018-01-01

    We report improved masses, radii, and densities for two planetary systems, K2-3 and GJ3470, derived from a combination of new radial velocity and transit observations. Both stars are nearby, early M dwarfs. K2-3 hosts three super-Earth planets between 1.5 and 2 Earth-radii at orbital periods between 10 and 45 days, while GJ 3470 hosts one 4 Earth-radii planet with a period of 3.3 days. Furthermore, we confirmed GJ3470's rotation period through multi-year ground-based photometry; RV analysis must account for this rotation signature. Due to the planets' low densities (all stars, they are among the best candidates for transmission spectroscopy with JWST and HST in order to characterize their atmospheric compositions.

  5. Moments and mean square charge radii of short-lived argon isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, A; Georg, U; Keim, M; Lievens, P; Neugart, R; Neuroth, M; Silverans, R E; Vermeeren, L

    1996-01-01

    We report on the measurement of optical isotope shifts for $^{32-40}$Ar and for $^{46}$Ar from which the changes in mean square nuclear charge radii across the N = 20 neutron shell closure are deducted. The investigations were carried out by collinear laser spectroscopy in fast beams of neutral argon atoms. The ultra-sensitive detection combines optical pumping, state-selective collisional ionization and counting of $\\beta$-radioactivity. By reaching far into the sd-shell, the results add new information to the systematics of radii in the calcium region (Z $\\approx$ 20). Contrary to all major neutron shell closures with N $\\geq$ 28, the N = 20 shell closure causes no significant slope change in the development of the radii. Information from the hyperfine structure of the odd-A isotopes includes includes the magnetic moments of $^{33}$Ar (I=1/2) and $^{39}$Ar (I=7/2), and the quadrupole moments of $^{35}$Ar, $^{37}$Ar (I=3/2) and $^{39}$Ar. The electromagnetic moments are compared to shell-model predictions fo...

  6. Hvad enhver kordreng skal kunne. Betragtning af motetten Ut Phebi radiis af Josquin Desprez

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter Woetmann

    2003-01-01

    Josquin Desprez, Ut Phebi radiis, motet, prayer mode, hexachord, Ockeghem, Brumel, Isaac, Compère, sound, udtryk......Josquin Desprez, Ut Phebi radiis, motet, prayer mode, hexachord, Ockeghem, Brumel, Isaac, Compère, sound, udtryk...

  7. Magnetic Modeling of Inflated Low-mass Stars Using Interior Fields No Larger than ˜10 kG

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, James; Mullan, D. J.

    2017-11-01

    We have previously reported on models of low-mass stars in which the presence of inflated radii is ascribed to magnetic fields that impede the onset of convection. Some of our magneto-convection models have been criticized because, when they were first reported by Mullan & MacDonald, the deep interior fields were found to be very large (50-100 MG). Such large fields are now known to be untenable. For example, Browning et al. used stability arguments to suggest that interior fields in low-mass stars cannot be larger than ˜1 MG. Moreover, 3D models of turbulent stellar dynamos suggest that fields generated in low-mass interiors may be not much stronger than 10-20 kG. In the present paper, we present magneto-convective models of inflated low-mass stars in which the interior fields are not permitted to be stronger than 10 kG. These models are used to fit empirical data for 15 low-mass stars for which precise masses and radii have been measured. We show that our 10 kG magneto-convective models can replicate the empirical radii and effective temperatures for 14 of the stars. In the case of the remaining star (in the Praesepe cluster), two different solutions have been reported in the literature. We find that one of these solutions can be fitted well with our model using the nominal age of Praesepe (800 Myr). However, the second solution cannot be fitted unless the star’s age is assumed to be much younger (˜150 Myr).

  8. Influence of piezoceramic to fused silica plate thickness on the radii of curvature of piezoelectric bimorph mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libu, M.; Susanth, S.; Vasanthakumari, K. G.; Dileep Kumar, C. J.; Raghu, N.

    2012-01-01

    Piezoelectric based bimorph mirrors (PBM) find extensive use in focusing of x-ray beams. Many optical instruments require use of PBM whose radii of curvature can be tuned precisely. The 100 mm and 300 mm PBMs were fabricated with varying piezoelectric to fused silica plate thicknesses. The radii of curvature of free standing mirrors were measured as a function of voltage and it was found to decrease with increasing voltage. For a given piezoelectric plate thickness, as the fused silica thickness increases, the radii of curvature was found to increase owing to increase in stiffness of the mirror. On the other hand, for a given fused silica plate thickness, when the piezoelectric plate thickness is increased, the radii of curvature are decreased for a given electric field, due to increase in generated force. This study brings out the influence of piezoceramic to fused silica plate thickness on the radii of curvature of PBM.

  9. Form factors and charge radii in a quantum chromodynamics ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tic form factors and charge radii of D, Ds,B,Bs and Bc mesons in a quantum chromodynamics. (QCD)-inspired ... as pointed out in [12,13], one can expect a similar success here too. .... 0 were large and the formalism failed to account for large ...

  10. Unexpectedly large charge radii of neutron-rich calcium isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia Ruiz, R F; Blaum, K; Ekström, A; Frömmgen, N; Hagen, G; Hammen, M; Hebeler, K; Holt, J D; Jansen, G R; Kowalska, M; Kreim, K; Nazarewicz, W; Neugart, R; Neyens, G; Nörtershäuser, W; Papenbrock, T; Papuga, J; Schwenk, A; Simonis, J; Wendt, K A; Yordanov, D T

    2016-01-01

    Despite being a complex many-body system, the atomic nucleus exhibits simple structures for certain ‘magic’ numbers of protons and neutrons. The calcium chain in particular is both unique and puzzling: evidence of doubly magic features are known in 40,48Ca, and recently suggested in two radioactive isotopes, 52,54Ca. Although many properties of experimentally known calcium isotopes have been successfully described by nuclear theory, it is still a challenge to predict the evolution of their charge radii. Here we present the first measurements of the charge radii of 49,51,52Ca, obtained from laser spectroscopy experiments at ISOLDE, CERN. The experimental results are complemented by state-of-the-art theoretical calculations. The large and unexpected increase of the size of the neutron-rich calcium isotopes beyond N = 28 challenges the doubly magic nature of 52Ca and opens new intriguing questions on the evolution of nuclear sizes away from stability, which are of importance for our understanding of neutron-...

  11. THE CASE AGAINST WARM OR SELF-INTERACTING DARK MATTER AS EXPLANATIONS FOR CORES IN LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Martinez, Gregory D.; Bullock, James S.; Kaplinghat, Manoj

    2010-01-01

    Warm dark matter (WDM) and self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) are often motivated by the inferred cores in the dark matter halos of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies. We test thermal WDM, non-thermal WDM, and SIDM using high-resolution rotation curves of nine LSB galaxies. We fit these dark matter models to the data and determine the halo core radii and central densities. While the minimum core size in WDM models is predicted to decrease with halo mass, we find that the inferred core radii increase with halo mass and also cannot be explained with a single value of the primordial phase-space density. Moreover, if the core size is set by WDM particle properties, then even the smallest cores we infer would require primordial phase-space density values that are orders of magnitude smaller than lower limits obtained from the Lyα forest power spectra. We also find that the dark matter halo core densities vary by a factor of about 30 from system to system while showing no systematic trend with the maximum rotation velocity of the galaxy. This strongly argues against the core size being directly set by large self-interactions (scattering or annihilation) of dark matter. We therefore conclude that the inferred cores do not provide motivation to prefer WDM or SIDM over other dark matter models.

  12. Systematics of nuclear RMS charge radii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, B.A.; Bronk, C.; Hodgson, P.E.

    1984-01-01

    The experimental RMS charge radii of isotopic sequences of nuclei are compared with calculations based on the spherical droplet model and spherical single-particle potential models. Harmonic-oscillator, Woods-Saxon and Skyrme Hartree-Fock single-particle potentials are considered. Deviations between experiment and theory are discussed in terms of the model parameters and in terms of the fundamental inadequacies of the models. The experimental B(E2) values connecting the ground states to the lowest 2 + states are used to estimate the increase in RMS radius due to the effects of deformation and zero-point vibrational motion. (author)

  13. Nuclear charge radii of light isotopes based on frequency comb measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakova, Monika

    2010-02-11

    Optical frequency comb technology has been used in this work for the first time to investigate the nuclear structure of light radioactive isotopes. Therefore, three laser systems were stabilized with different techniques to accurately known optical frequencies and used in two specialized experiments. Absolute transition frequency measurements of lithium and beryllium isotopes were performed with accuracy on the order of 10{sup -10}. Such a high accuracy is required for the light elements since the nuclear volume effect has only a 10{sup -9} contribution to the total transition frequency. For beryllium, the isotope shift was determined with an accuracy that is sufficient to extract information about the proton distribution inside the nucleus. A Doppler-free two-photon spectroscopy on the stable lithium isotopes {sup 6,7}Li was performed in order to determine the absolute frequency of the 2S {yields} 3S transition. The achieved relative accuracy of 2 x 10{sup -10} is improved by one order of magnitude compared to previous measurements. The results provide an opportunity to determine the nuclear charge radius of the stable and short-lived isotopes in a pure optical way but this requires an improvement of the theoretical calculations by two orders of magnitude. The second experiment presented here was performed at ISOLDE/CERN, where the absolute transition frequencies of the D{sub 1} and D{sub 2} lines in beryllium ions for the isotopes {sup 7,9,10,11}Be were measured with an accuracy of about 1 MHz. Therefore, an advanced collinear laser spectroscopy technique involving two counter-propagating frequency-stabilized laser beams with a known absolute frequency was developed. The extracted isotope shifts were combined with recent accurate mass shift calculations and the root-mean square nuclear charge radii of {sup 7,10}Be and the one-neutron halo nucleus {sup 11}Be were determined. Obtained charge radii are decreasing from {sup 7}Be to {sup 10}Be and increasing again for

  14. Fitted Hanbury-Brown Twiss radii versus space-time variances in flow-dominated models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frodermann, Evan; Heinz, Ulrich; Lisa, Michael Annan

    2006-04-01

    The inability of otherwise successful dynamical models to reproduce the Hanbury-Brown Twiss (HBT) radii extracted from two-particle correlations measured at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is known as the RHIC HBT Puzzle. Most comparisons between models and experiment exploit the fact that for Gaussian sources the HBT radii agree with certain combinations of the space-time widths of the source that can be directly computed from the emission function without having to evaluate, at significant expense, the two-particle correlation function. We here study the validity of this approach for realistic emission function models, some of which exhibit significant deviations from simple Gaussian behavior. By Fourier transforming the emission function, we compute the two-particle correlation function, and fit it with a Gaussian to partially mimic the procedure used for measured correlation functions. We describe a novel algorithm to perform this Gaussian fit analytically. We find that for realistic hydrodynamic models the HBT radii extracted from this procedure agree better with the data than the values previously extracted from the space-time widths of the emission function. Although serious discrepancies between the calculated and the measured HBT radii remain, we show that a more apples-to-apples comparison of models with data can play an important role in any eventually successful theoretical description of RHIC HBT data.

  15. Fitted Hanbury-Brown-Twiss radii versus space-time variances in flow-dominated models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frodermann, Evan; Heinz, Ulrich; Lisa, Michael Annan

    2006-01-01

    The inability of otherwise successful dynamical models to reproduce the Hanbury-Brown-Twiss (HBT) radii extracted from two-particle correlations measured at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is known as the RHIC HBT Puzzle. Most comparisons between models and experiment exploit the fact that for Gaussian sources the HBT radii agree with certain combinations of the space-time widths of the source that can be directly computed from the emission function without having to evaluate, at significant expense, the two-particle correlation function. We here study the validity of this approach for realistic emission function models, some of which exhibit significant deviations from simple Gaussian behavior. By Fourier transforming the emission function, we compute the two-particle correlation function, and fit it with a Gaussian to partially mimic the procedure used for measured correlation functions. We describe a novel algorithm to perform this Gaussian fit analytically. We find that for realistic hydrodynamic models the HBT radii extracted from this procedure agree better with the data than the values previously extracted from the space-time widths of the emission function. Although serious discrepancies between the calculated and the measured HBT radii remain, we show that a more apples-to-apples comparison of models with data can play an important role in any eventually successful theoretical description of RHIC HBT data

  16. ELLIPTICAL GALAXY MASSES OUT TO FIVE EFFECTIVE RADII: THE REALM OF DARK MATTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deason, A. J; Belokurov, V.; Evans, N. W.; McCarthy, I. G.

    2012-01-01

    We estimate the masses of elliptical galaxies out to five effective radii using planetary nebulae and globular clusters as tracers. A sample of 15 elliptical galaxies with a broad variation in mass is compiled from the literature. A distribution function-maximum likelihood analysis is used to estimate the overall potential slope, normalization, and velocity anisotropy of the tracers. We assume power-law profiles for the potential and tracer density and a constant velocity anisotropy. The derived potential power-law indices lie in between the isothermal and Keplerian regime and vary with mass: there is tentative evidence that the less massive galaxies have steeper potential profiles than the more massive galaxies. We use stellar mass-to-light ratios appropriate for either a Chabrier/KTG (Kroupa, Tout and Gilmore) or Salpeter initial mass function to disentangle the stellar and dark matter components. The fraction of dark matter within five effective radii increases with mass, in agreement with several other studies. We employ simple models to show that a combination of star formation efficiency and baryon extent are able to account for this trend. These models are in good agreement with both our measurements out to five effective radii and recent Sloan Lens ACS Survey measurements within one effective radii when a universal Chabrier/KTG initial mass function is adopted.

  17. Average configuration of the distant (less than 220-earth-radii) magnetotail - Initial ISEE-3 magnetic field results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, J. A.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Smith, E. J.; Jones, D. E.; Sibeck, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Magnetic field measurements from the first two passes of the ISEE-3 GEOTAIL Mission have been used to study the structure of the trans-lunar tail. Good agreement was found between the ISEE-3 magnetopause crossings and the Explorer 33, 35 model of Howe and Binsack (1972). Neutral sheet location was well ordered by the hinged current sheet models based upon near earth measurements. Between X = -20 and -120 earth radii the radius of the tail increases by about 30 percent while the lobe field strength decreases by approximately 60 percent. Beyond X = -100 to -1200 earth radii the tail diameter and lobe field magnitude become nearly constant at terminal values of approximately 60 earth radii and 9 nT, respectively. The distance at which the tail was observed to cease flaring, 100-120 earth radii, is in close agreement with the predictions of the analytic tail model of Coroniti and Kennel (1972). Overall, the findings of this study suggest that the magnetotail retains much of its near earth structure out to X = -220 earth radii.

  18. OBJECTS IN KEPLER'S MIRROR MAY BE LARGER THAN THEY APPEAR: BIAS AND SELECTION EFFECTS IN TRANSITING PLANET SURVEYS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaidos, Eric; Mann, Andrew W.

    2013-01-01

    Statistical analyses of large surveys for transiting planets such as the Kepler mission must account for systematic errors and biases. Transit detection depends not only on the planet's radius and orbital period, but also on host star properties. Thus, a sample of stars with transiting planets may not accurately represent the target population. Moreover, targets are selected using criteria such as a limiting apparent magnitude. These selection effects, combined with uncertainties in stellar radius, lead to biases in the properties of transiting planets and their host stars. We quantify possible biases in the Kepler survey. First, Eddington bias produced by a steep planet radius distribution and uncertainties in stellar radius results in a 15%-20% overestimate of planet occurrence. Second, the magnitude limit of the Kepler target catalog induces Malmquist bias toward large, more luminous stars and underestimation of the radii of about one-third of candidate planets, especially those larger than Neptune. Third, because metal-poor stars are smaller, stars with detected planets will be very slightly (<0.02 dex) more metal-poor than the target average. Fourth, uncertainties in stellar radii produce correlated errors in planet radius and stellar irradiation. A previous finding, that highly irradiated giants are more likely to have 'inflated' radii, remains significant, even accounting for this effect. In contrast, transit depth is negatively correlated with stellar metallicity even in the absence of any intrinsic correlation, and a previous claim of a negative correlation between giant planet transit depth and stellar metallicity is probably an artifact.

  19. Accurate Masses, Radii, and Temperatures for the Eclipsing Binary V2154 Cyg, and Tests of Stellar Evolution Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Jane; Torres, Guillermo

    2018-01-01

    We report new spectroscopic observations of the F-type triple system V2154 Cyg, in which two of the stars form an eclipsing binary with a period of 2.6306303 ± 0.0000038 days. We combine the results from our spectroscopic analysis with published light curves in the uvby Strömgren passbands to derive the first reported absolute dimensions of the stars in the eclipsing binary. The masses and radii are measured with high accuracy to better than 1.5% precision. For the primary and secondary respectively, we find that the masses are 1.269 ± 0.017 M⊙ and 0.7542 ± 0.0059 M⊙, the radii are 1.477 ± 0.012 R⊙ and 0.7232 ± 0.0091R⊙, and the temperatures are 6770 ± 150 K and 5020 ± 150 K. Current models of stellar evolution agree with the measured properties of the primary, but the secondary is larger than predicted. This may be due to activity in the secondary, as has been shown for other systems with a star of similar mass with this same discrepancy.The SAO REU program is funded by the National Science Foundation REU and Department of Defense ASSURE programs under NSF Grant AST-1659473, and by the Smithsonian Institution. GT acknowledges partial support for this work from NSF grant AST-1509375.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Tidal radii of 7 globular clusters (Lehmann+ 1997)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, I.; Scholz, R.-D.

    1998-02-01

    We present new tidal radii for seven Galactic globular clusters using the method of automated star counts on Schmidt plates of the Tautenburg, Palomar and UK telescopes. The plates were fully scanned with the APM system in Cambridge (UK). Special account was given to a reliable background subtraction and the correction of crowding effects in the central cluster region. For the latter we used a new kind of crowding correction based on a statistical approach to the distribution of stellar images and the luminosity function of the cluster stars in the uncrowded area. The star counts were correlated with surface brightness profiles of different authors to obtain complete projected density profiles of the globular clusters. Fitting an empirical density law (King 1962AJ.....67..471K) we derived the following structural parameters: tidal radius rt, core radius rc and concentration parameter c. In the cases of NGC 5466, M 5, M 12, M 13 and M 15 we found an indication for a tidal tail around these objects (cf. Grillmair et al., 1995AJ....109.2553G). (1 data file).

  1. THE INNERMOST COLLIMATION STRUCTURE OF THE M87 JET DOWN TO ∼10 SCHWARZSCHILD RADII

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hada, Kazuhiro; Giroletti, Marcello; Giovannini, Gabriele [INAF Istituto di Radioastronomia, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Kino, Motoki; Doi, Akihiro [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo, Sagamihara 252-5210 (Japan); Nagai, Hiroshi; Honma, Mareki; Hagiwara, Yoshiaki; Kawaguchi, Noriyuki [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2013-09-20

    We investigated the detailed inner jet structure of M87 using Very Long Baseline Array data at 2, 5, 8.4, 15, 23.8, 43, and 86 GHz, especially focusing on the multi-frequency properties of the radio core at the jet base. First, we measured the size of the core region transverse to the jet axis, defined as W{sub c}, at each frequency ν, and found a relation between W{sub c} and ν: W{sub c}(ν)∝ν{sup –0.71±0.05}. Then, by combining W{sub c}(ν) and the frequency dependence of the core position r{sub c}(ν), which was obtained in our previous study, we constructed a collimation profile of the innermost jet W{sub c}(r) down to ∼10 Schwarzschild radii (R{sub s}) from the central black hole. We found that W{sub c}(r) smoothly connects with the width profile of the outer edge-brightened, parabolic jet and then follows a similar radial dependence down to several tens of R{sub s}. Closer to the black hole, the measured radial profile suggests a possible change in the jet collimation shape from the outer parabolic one, where the jet shape tends to become more radially oriented. This result could be related to a magnetic collimation process or/and interactions with surrounding materials at the jet base. The present results shed light on the importance of higher-sensitivity/resolution imaging studies of M87 at 86, 43, and 22 GHz; these studies should be examined more rigorously.

  2. ON THE RADII OF BROWN DWARFS MEASURED WITH AKARI NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorahana, S.; Yamamura, I.; Murakami, H.

    2013-01-01

    We derive the radii of 16 brown dwarfs observed by AKARI using their parallaxes and the ratios of observed to model fluxes. We find that the brown dwarf radius ranges between 0.64-1.13 R J with an average radius of 0.83 R J . We find a trend in the relation between radii and T eff ; the radius is at a minimum at T eff ∼ 1600 K, which corresponds to the spectral types of mid- to late-L. The result is interpreted by a combination of radius-mass and radius-age relations that are theoretically expected for brown dwarfs older than 10 8 yr.

  3. Centrality dependence of pion freeze-out radii in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{\\mathbf{s_{NN}}}$=2.76 TeV

    OpenAIRE

    Adam, Jaroslav; Adamova, Dagmar; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahn, Sang Un; Aimo, Ilaria; Aiola, Salvatore; Ajaz, Muhammad; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    We report on the measurement of freeze-out radii for pairs of identical-charge pions measured in Pb--Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}=2.76$ TeV as a function of collision centrality and the average transverse momentum of the pair $k_{\\rm T}$. Three-dimensional sizes of the system (femtoscopic radii), as well as direction-averaged one-dimensional radii are extracted. The radii decrease with $k_{\\rm T}$, following a power-law behavior. This is qualitatively consistent with expectations from ...

  4. Centrality dependence of pion freeze-out radii in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{\\mathbf{s_{NN}}}$=2.76 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, Jaroslav; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahn, Sang Un; Aimo, Ilaria; Aiola, Salvatore; Ajaz, Muhammad; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alexandre, Didier; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Millan Almaraz, Jesus Roberto; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Armesto Perez, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Audurier, Benjamin; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbano, Anastasia Maria; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartalini, Paolo; Barth, Klaus; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Bartsch, Esther; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batista Camejo, Arianna; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bello Martinez, Hector; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont Iii, Ronald John; Belmont Moreno, Ernesto; Belyaev, Vladimir; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Biswas, Rathijit; Biswas, Saikat; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blair, Justin Thomas; Blanco, Fernando; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Borri, Marcello; Bossu, Francesco; Botta, Elena; Boettger, Stefan; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Broker, Theo Alexander; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brucken, Erik Jens; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Bashir Butt, Jamila; Buxton, Jesse Thomas; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calero Diaz, Liliet; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carnesecchi, Francesca; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castro, Andrew John; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Cerkala, Jakub; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Chartier, Marielle; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chelnokov, Volodymyr; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Chochula, Peter; Choi, Kyungeon; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Zhang, Chunhui; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Albino, Rigoberto; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dahms, Torsten; Dainese, Andrea; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Deisting, Alexander; Deloff, Andrzej; Denes, Ervin Sandor; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Dillenseger, Pascal; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Domenicis Gimenez, Diogenes; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Drozhzhova, Tatiana; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Ehlers Iii, Raymond James; Elia, Domenico; Engel, Heiko; Erazmus, Barbara Ewa; Erdemir, Irem; Erhardt, Filip; Eschweiler, Dominic; Espagnon, Bruno; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Eum, Jongsik; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabbietti, Laura; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Feldkamp, Linus; Felea, Daniel; Feliciello, Alessandro; Feofilov, Grigorii; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Feuillard, Victor Jose Gaston; Figiel, Jan; Araujo Silva Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Fleck, Martin Gabriel; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Furs, Artur; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoeje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago Medina, Alberto Martin; Gallio, Mauro; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Gao, Chaosong; Garabatos Cuadrado, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo Javier; Gargiulo, Corrado; Gasik, Piotr Jan; Germain, Marie; Gheata, Andrei George; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghosh, Premomoy; Ghosh, Sanjay Kumar; Gianotti, Paola; Giubellino, Paolo; Giubilato, Piero; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez Coral, Diego Mauricio; Gomez Ramirez, Andres; Gonzalez Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Gorlich, Lidia Maria; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Graham, Katie Leanne; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoryev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grynyov, Borys; Grion, Nevio; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grossiord, Jean-Yves; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gulkanyan, Hrant; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Haake, Rudiger; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Haiduc, Maria; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hansen, Alexander; Harris, John William; Hartmann, Helvi; Harton, Austin Vincent; Hatzifotiadou, Despina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Heide, Markus Ansgar; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hilden, Timo Eero; Hillemanns, Hartmut; Hippolyte, Boris; Hosokawa, Ritsuya; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Huang, Meidana; Humanic, Thomas; Hussain, Nur; Hussain, Tahir; Hutter, Dirk; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ilkaev, Radiy; Ilkiv, Iryna; Inaba, Motoi; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Izucheev, Vladimir; Jacobs, Peter Martin; Jadlovska, Slavka; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jang, Haeng Jin; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Pahula Hewage, Sandun; Jena, Chitrasen; Jena, Satyajit; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jung, Hyungtaik; Jusko, Anton; Kalinak, Peter; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kamin, Jason Adrian; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karayan, Lilit; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Keijdener, Darius Laurens; Keil, Markus; Khan, Kamal; Khan, Mohammed Mohisin; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Beomkyu; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Hyeonjoong; Kim, Jinsook; Kim, Mimae; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Kiss, Gabor; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Carsten; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Boesing, Christian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kobayashi, Taiyo; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Kofarago, Monika; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolozhvari, Anatoly; Kondratev, Valerii; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Kondratyuk, Evgeny; Konevskikh, Artem; Kopcik, Michal; Kour, Mandeep; Kouzinopoulos, Charalampos; Kovalenko, Oleksandr; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kral, Jiri; Kralik, Ivan; Kravcakova, Adela; Krelina, Michal; Kretz, Matthias; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kubera, Andrew Michael; Kucera, Vit; Kugathasan, Thanushan; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paulus Gerardus; Kulakov, Igor; Kumar, Ajay; Kumar, Jitendra; Lokesh, Kumar; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, Alexander; Kurepin, Alexey; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Lagana Fernandes, Caio; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lara Martinez, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Lattuca, Alessandra; Laudi, Elisa; Lea, Ramona; Leardini, Lucia; Lee, Graham Richard; Lee, Seongjoo; Legrand, Iosif; Lehas, Fatiha; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenti, Vito; Leogrande, Emilia; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Leoncino, Marco; Levai, Peter; Li, Shuang; Li, Xiaomei; Lien, Jorgen Andre; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Ljunggren, Hans Martin; Lodato, Davide Francesco; Lonne, Per-Ivar; Loginov, Vitaly; Loizides, Constantinos; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lowe, Andrew John; Luettig, Philipp Johannes; Lunardon, Marcello; Luparello, Grazia; Ferreira Natal Da Luz, Pedro Hugo; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahajan, Sanjay; Mahmood, Sohail Musa; Maire, Antonin; Majka, Richard Daniel; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Liudmila; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Margutti, Jacopo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martin Blanco, Javier; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-Garcia, Gines; Martinez Pedreira, Miguel; Martynov, Yevgen; Mas, Alexis Jean-Michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Masui, Hiroshi; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel Anthony; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Mcdonald, Daniel; Meddi, Franco; Melikyan, Yuri; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Meninno, Elisa; Mercado-Perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Miake, Yasuo; Mieskolainen, Matti Mikael; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Minervini, Lazzaro Manlio; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz Czeslaw; Mitra, Jubin; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mohammadi, Naghmeh; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Molnar, Levente; Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel; Montes Prado, Esther; Morando, Maurizio; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhlheim, Daniel Michael; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Mulligan, James Declan; Gameiro Munhoz, Marcelo; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Naru, Muhammad Umair; Nattrass, Christine; Nayak, Kishora; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Nellen, Lukas; Ng, Fabian; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Niedziela, Jeremi; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Cabanillas Noris, Juan Carlos; Norman, Jaime; Nyanin, Alexander; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Oh, Sun Kun; Ohlson, Alice Elisabeth; Okatan, Ali; Okubo, Tsubasa; Olah, Laszlo; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Oliver, Michael Henry; Onderwaater, Jacobus; Oppedisano, Chiara; Orava, Risto; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Ozdemir, Mahmut; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Pajares Vales, Carlos; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Pan, Jinjin; Pandey, Ashutosh Kumar; Pant, Divyash; Papcun, Peter; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Pareek, Pooja; Park, Woojin; Parmar, Sonia; Passfeld, Annika; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Patra, Rajendra Nath; Paul, Biswarup; Peitzmann, Thomas; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, Elienos; Peresunko, Dmitry Yurevich; Perez Lara, Carlos Eugenio; Perez Lezama, Edgar; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petrov, Viacheslav; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Planinic, Mirko; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polishchuk, Boris; Poljak, Nikola; Poonsawat, Wanchaloem; Pop, Amalia; Porteboeuf, Sarah Julie; Porter, R Jefferson; Pospisil, Jan; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puccio, Maximiliano; Puddu, Giovanna; Pujahari, Prabhat Ranjan; Punin, Valery; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Raha, Sibaji; Rajput, Sonia; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Read, Kenneth Francis; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Redlich, Krzysztof; Reed, Rosi Jan; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick Simon; Reidt, Felix; Ren, Xiaowen; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Rettig, Felix Vincenz; Revol, Jean-Pierre; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riabov, Viktor; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva Ora Herenui; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Ristea, Catalin-Lucian; Rivetti, Angelo; Rocco, Elena; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Rodriguez Manso, Alis; Roeed, Ketil; Rogochaya, Elena; Rohr, David Michael; Roehrich, Dieter; Romita, Rosa; Ronchetti, Federico; Ronflette, Lucile; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossi, Andrea; Roukoutakis, Filimon; Roy, Ankhi; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Ryabov, Yury; Rybicki, Andrzej; Sadovskiy, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Sahlmuller, Baldo; Sahoo, Pragati; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahoo, Sarita; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakai, Shingo; Saleh, Mohammad Ahmad; Salgado Lopez, Carlos Alberto; Salzwedel, Jai Samuel Nielsen; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sanchez Castro, Xitzel; Sandor, Ladislav; Sandoval, Andres; Sano, Masato; Sarkar, Debojit; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schulc, Martin; Schuster, Tim Robin; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Rebecca Michelle; Seger, Janet Elizabeth; Sekiguchi, Yuko; Sekihata, Daiki; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Senosi, Kgotlaesele; Seo, Jeewon; Serradilla Rodriguez, Eulogio; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabanov, Arseniy; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shadura, Oksana; Shahoyan, Ruben; Shangaraev, Artem; Sharma, Ankita; Sharma, Mona; Sharma, Monika; Sharma, Natasha; Shigaki, Kenta; Shtejer Diaz, Katherin; Sibiryak, Yury; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Sielewicz, Krzysztof Marek; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, Catherine Micaela; Simatovic, Goran; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singha, Subhash; Singhal, Vikas; Sinha, Bikash; Sarkar - Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Slupecki, Maciej; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Snellman, Tomas Wilhelm; Soegaard, Carsten; Soltz, Ron Ariel; Song, Jihye; Song, Myunggeun; Song, Zixuan; Soramel, Francesca; Sorensen, Soren Pontoppidan; Spacek, Michal; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Sputowska, Iwona Anna; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, Martha; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stefanek, Grzegorz; Steinpreis, Matthew Donald; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Steyn, Gideon Francois; Stiller, Johannes Hendrik; Stocco, Diego; Strmen, Peter; Alarcon Do Passo Suaide, Alexandre; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Suleymanov, Mais Kazim Oglu; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Symons, Timothy; Szabo, Alexander; Szanto De Toledo, Alejandro; Szarka, Imrich; Szczepankiewicz, Adam; Szymanski, Maciej Pawel; Takahashi, Jun; Tambave, Ganesh Jagannath; Tanaka, Naoto; Tangaro, Marco-Antonio; Tapia Takaki, Daniel Jesus; Tarantola Peloni, Attilio; Tarhini, Mohamad; Tariq, Mohammad; Tarzila, Madalina-Gabriela; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terasaki, Kohei; Terrevoli, Cristina; Teyssier, Boris; Thaeder, Jochen Mathias; Thomas, Deepa; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Timmins, Anthony Robert; Toia, Alberica; Trogolo, Stefano; Trubnikov, Victor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ullaland, Kjetil; Uras, Antonio; Usai, Gianluca; Utrobicic, Antonija; Vajzer, Michal; Vala, Martin; Valencia Palomo, Lizardo; Vallero, Sara; Van Der Maarel, Jasper; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Van Leeuwen, Marco; Vanat, Tomas; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Varga, Dezso; Diozcora Vargas Trevino, Aurora; Vargyas, Marton; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vauthier, Astrid; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veen, Annelies Marianne; Veldhoen, Misha; Velure, Arild; Venaruzzo, Massimo; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara Limon, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Verweij, Marta; Vickovic, Linda; Viesti, Giuseppe; Viinikainen, Jussi Samuli; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Vinogradov, Yury; Virgili, Tiziano; Vislavicius, Vytautas; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; Von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Vyushin, Alexey; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Jan; Wang, Hongkai; Wang, Mengliang; Wang, Yifei; Watanabe, Daisuke; Watanabe, Yosuke; Weber, Michael; Weber, Steffen Georg; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Westerhoff, Uwe; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilde, Martin Rudolf; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilkinson, Jeremy John; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Winn, Michael Andreas; Yaldo, Chris G; Yang, Hongyan; Yang, Ping; Yano, Satoshi; Yin, Zhongbao; Yokoyama, Hiroki; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yurchenko, Volodymyr; Yushmanov, Igor; Zaborowska, Anna; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zaman, Ali; Zampolli, Chiara; Correia Zanoli, Henrique Jose; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zardoshti, Nima; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Zhao, Chengxin; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zyzak, Maksym

    2016-02-04

    We report on the measurement of freeze-out radii for pairs of identical-charge pions measured in Pb--Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}=2.76$ TeV as a function of collision centrality and the average transverse momentum of the pair $k_{\\rm T}$. Three-dimensional sizes of the system (femtoscopic radii), as well as direction-averaged one-dimensional radii are extracted. The radii decrease with $k_{\\rm T}$, following a power-law behavior. This is qualitatively consistent with expectations from a collectively expanding system, produced in hydrodynamic calculations. The radii also scale linearly with $\\left^{1/3}$. This behaviour is compared to world data on femtoscopic radii in heavy-ion collisions. While the dependence is qualitatively similar to results at smaller $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$, a decrease in the $R_{\\rm out}/R_{\\rm side}$ ratio is seen, which is in qualitative agreement with specific predictions from hydrodynamic models. The results provide further evidence for the production of a collective, strongly c...

  5. Optimized surface-slab excited-state muffin-tin potential and surface core level shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rundgren, J.

    2003-01-01

    An optimized muffin-tin (MT) potential for surface slabs with preassigned surface core-level shifts (SCLS's) is presented. By using the MT radii as adjustable parameters the model is able to conserve the definition of the SCLS with respect to the bulk and concurrently to generate a potential that is continuous at the MT radii. The model is conceived for elastic electron scattering in a surface slab with exchange-correlation interaction described by the local density approximation. The model employs two data bases for the self-energy of the signal electron (after Hedin and Lundqvist or Sernelius). The potential model is discussed in detail with two surface structures Be(101-bar0), for which SCLS's are available, and Cu(111)p(2x2)Cs, in which the close-packed radii of the atoms are extremely different. It is considered plausible that tensor LEED based on an optimized MT potential can be used for determining SCLS's

  6. Reanalysis of the radii of the Benchmark eclipsing binary V578 Mon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, E. V.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Torres, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    V578 Mon is an eclipsing binary system in which both stars have masses above 10 M ☉ determined with an accuracy better than 3%. It is one of only five such massive eclipsing binaries known that also possess eccentric orbits and measured apsidal motions, thus making it an important benchmark for theoretical stellar evolution models. However, recently reported determinations of the radii of V578 Mon differ significantly from previously reported values. We reanalyze the published data for V578 Mon and trace the discrepancy to the use of an incorrect formulation for the stellar potentials in the most recent analysis. Here we report corrected radii for this important benchmark eclipsing binary.

  7. Sub-coulomb transfer method of a nucleon for measure orbital radii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilera R, E.F.; Murillo, G.; Ramirez, J.; Avila, O.

    1986-04-01

    The neutron transfer method is revised to measure neutron orbital radii and possible interest systems to apply it are determined. Its were carried out DWBA preliminary calculations for the system 209 Bi(d,t) 208 Bi. (Author)

  8. Spins, moments and radii of Cd isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    , the electric quadrupole moments, spins and changes in mean square charge radii are extracted. The obtained data reveal among other features an extremely linear behaviour of the quadrupole moments of the I=11/2 - isomeric states and a parabolic development in differences in mean square nuclear charge radii between ground and isomeric state. The development of charge radii between the shell closures is smooth, exposes a regular odd-even staggering and can be described and interpreted in the model of Zamick and Thalmi.

  9. Spins, moments and radii of Cd isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammen, Michael

    2013-10-30

    recorded and the magnetic dipole moments, the electric quadrupole moments, spins and changes in mean square charge radii are extracted. The obtained data reveal among other features an extremely linear behaviour of the quadrupole moments of the I=11/2{sup -} isomeric states and a parabolic development in differences in mean square nuclear charge radii between ground and isomeric state. The development of charge radii between the shell closures is smooth, exposes a regular odd-even staggering and can be described and interpreted in the model of Zamick and Thalmi.

  10. On the Sizes of the North Atlantic Basin Tropical Cyclones Based on 34- and 64-kt Wind Radii Data, 2004-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    At end of the 2012 hurricane season the National Hurricane Center retired the original HURDAT dataset and replaced it with the newer version HURDAT2, which reformatted the original data and included additional information, in particular, estimates of the 34-, 50, and 64-kt wind radii for the interval 2004-2013. During the brief 10-year interval, some 164 tropical cyclones are noted to have formed in the North Atlantic basin, with 77 becoming hurricanes. Hurricane Sandy (2012) stands out as being the largest individual storm that occurred in the North Atlantic basin during the 2004 -2013 timeframe, both in terms of its 34- and 64-kt wind radii and wind areas, having maximum 34- and 64-kt wind radii, maximum wind areas, and average wind areas each more than 2 standard deviations larger than the corresponding means. In terms of the largest yearly total 34-kt wind area (i.e., the sum of all individual storm 34-kt wind areas during the year), the year 2010 stands out as being the largest (about 423 × 10(exp 6) nmi(exp 2)), compared to the mean of about 174 × 10(exp 6) nmi(exp 2)), surpassing the year 2005 (353 x 10(exp 6) nmi(exp 2)) that had the largest number of individual storms (28). However, in terms of the largest yearly total 64-kt wind area, the year 2005 was the largest (about 9 × 10(exp 6) nmi(exp 2)), compared to the mean of about 3 × 106 nmi(exp 2)). Interesting is that the ratio of total 64-kt wind area to total 34-kt wind area has decreased over time, from 0.034 in 2004 to 0.008 in 2013.

  11. Theoretical study of the electrostatic lens aberrations of a negative ion accelerator for a neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Kenji; Hatayama, Akiyoshi

    2009-01-01

    Aberrations due to the electrostatic lenses of a negative ion accelerator for a neutral beam injector and the space charge effect are theoretically investigated. A multi-stage extractor/accelerator is modeled and the aberration coefficients are numerically calculated using the eikonal method, which is conventionally used in electron optics. The aberrations are compared with the radii of a beam core with good beam divergence and a beam halo with poor beam divergence. H - beamlet profile measurements give the 1/e radii of the beam core and beam halo of 5.8 mm (beam divergence angel: 6 mrad) and 11.5 mm (beam divergence angel: 12 mrad), respectively. When the beam divergence angle of the beam core is 5 mrad and the beam energy is 406 keV, the aberrations due to the electrostatic lenses are less than a few millimeters, thus are less than the radii of the beam core and beam halo. The geometrical aberrations due to te space charge effect (negative ion current density: 10 mA/cm 2 ), however, are estimated to be much larger than the radius of the beam halo. Although the aperture radii of the grids are not taken into account in this estimation, the results indicate that the space charge effect is an important factor in the aberration or beam halo in a negative ion accelerator. (author)

  12. Variation of diffusivity with the cation radii in molten salts of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A molecular dynamics study of the dependence of diffusivity of the cation on ionic radii in molten. AgI is reported. ... potential) to carry out molecular dynamics simulations on α-AgI. ..... There is no clustering of these ions. The anionic.

  13. Coupling between core and cladding modes in a helical core fiber with large core offset

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napiorkowski, Maciej; Urbanczyk, Waclaw

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the effect of resonant coupling between core and cladding modes in a helical core fiber with large core offset using the fully vectorial method based on the transformation optics formalism. Our study revealed that the resonant couplings to lower order cladding modes predicted by perturbative methods and observed experimentally in fibers with small core offsets are in fact prohibited for larger core offsets. This effect is related to the lack of phase matching caused by elongation of the optical path of the fundamental modes in the helical core. Moreover, strong couplings to the cladding modes of the azimuthal modal number much higher than predicted by perturbative methods may be observed for large core offsets, as the core offset introduces higher order angular harmonics in the field distribution of the fundamental modes. Finally, in contrast to previous studies, we demonstrate the existence of spectrally broad polarization sensitive couplings to the cladding modes suggesting that helical core fibers with large core offsets may be used as broadband circular polarizers. (paper)

  14. The axial dipole moment of two intersecting spheres of equal radii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAllister, Iain Wilson

    1988-01-01

    The use of a finite number of image charges to solve electrostatic problems associated with two conducting spheres intersecting at an angle of pi/n (n an integer) has been known for over a century. If, however, only spheres of equal radii are considered, it is possible to extend the permissible...

  15. Investigation of the Effects of Expectation Values for Radii on the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mation (NCA) wave functions to calculate expectation values of radii. The transition probability ... 1. Introduction. The optical properties of carbon, nitrogen and oxygen atoms are important in both atmospheric and ...... Zheng, N. W. 1988a, A new outline of atomic theory (Jiang Su Education Press). Zheng, N. W. 1988b, Chin.

  16. Nuclear charge radii from X-ray transitions in muonic C, O and N

    CERN Document Server

    Dubler, T; Schellenberg, L; Schneuwly, H; Vuilleumier, J L; Walter, H K

    1973-01-01

    Energies of muonic X-rays permit an almost model independent determination of nuclear root mean square (rms) radii for light and medium nuclei, which can be compared to those obtained from elastic electron scattering experiments at low momentum transfer. In the present experiment the X-ray energies of the K series of C, N and O up to the 6p-1s transition are determined with an accuracy of +or-15 eV from which rms radii are deduced comparable in precision to the electron scattering data. Muons from the CERN muon channel were stopped in a target, which contained 70 gr dimethylglyoxim (C/sub 4/H /sub 8/N/sub 2/O/sub 2/) and 18 gr rhodium powder. (0 refs).

  17. One-speed neutron transport in spheres with totally absorbing cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoestrand, N.G.

    1988-01-01

    Stationary and time-dependent transport of neutrons of one speed has been studied in spheres with totally absorbing cores. For stationary, critical reactors the number of secondaries per collision has been calculated numerically for various inner and outer radii. In the time-dependent case, the decay constant has been calculated for spherical shells of different inner radii and thicknesses. For a fixed ratio between shell thickness and inner radius, the curve of the decay constant versus shell thickness crosses the Corngold limit in the same way as the curve for a homogeneous sphere. When the ratio goes to zero the curve approaches that for an infinite slab. The behaviour is discussed in view of a new result from collision theory, viz. that the following condition must be fulfilled for a body at the point where the decay constant curve crosses the Corngold limit: the average exit distance of the neutrons is equal to the mean free path for scattering

  18. Empirically Calibrated Asteroseismic Masses and Radii for Red Giants in the Kepler Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsonneault, Marc; Elsworth, Yvonne; Silva Aguirre, Victor; Chaplin, William J.; Garcia, Rafael A.; Hekker, Saskia; Holtzman, Jon; Huber, Daniel; Johnson, Jennifer; Kallinger, Thomas; Mosser, Benoit; Mathur, Savita; Serenelli, Aldo; Shetrone, Matthew; Stello, Dennis; Tayar, Jamie; Zinn, Joel; APOGEE Team, KASC Team, APOKASC Team

    2018-01-01

    We report on the joint asteroseismic and spectroscopic properties of a sample of 6048 evolved stars in the fields originally observed by the Kepler satellite. We use APOGEE spectroscopic data taken from Data Release 13 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, combined with asteroseismic data analyzed by members of the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium. With high statistical significance, the different pipelines do not have relative zero points that are the same as the solar values, and red clump stars do not have the same empirical relative zero points as red giants. We employ theoretically motivated corrections to the scaling relation for the large frequency spacing, and adjust the zero point of the frequency of maximum power scaling relation to be consistent with masses and radii for members of star clusters. The scatter in calibrator masses is consistent with our error estimation. Systematic and random mass errors are explicitly separated and identified. The measurement scatter, and random uncertainties, are three times larger for red giants where one or more technique failed to return a value than for targets where all five methods could do so, and this is a substantial fraction of the sample (20% of red giants and 25% of red clump stars). Overall trends and future prospects are discussed.

  19. Spectral and Photometric Diagnostics of Giant Planet Formation Scenarios

    OpenAIRE

    Spiegel, David S.; Burrows, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Gas-giant planets that form via core accretion might have very different characteristics from those that form via disk-instability. Disk-instability objects are typically thought to have higher entropies, larger radii, and (generally) higher effective temperatures than core-accretion objects. We provide a large set of models exploring the observational consequences of high-entropy (hot) and low-entropy (cold) initial conditions, in the hope that this will ultimately help to distinguish betwee...

  20. Gradients in giant branch morphology in the core of 47 Tucanae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailyn, Charles D.

    1994-01-01

    I describe an algorithm which uses the high spatial resolution of the Hubble Space Telescope to complement the high spatial-to-noise, approximately symmetric point response function, relatively large spatial coverage, and standard filters available from ground based images of crowded fields. Applying this technique to the central regions of the globular cluster 47 Tucanae, I find that the morphology of the giant branch in the core is significantly different from that in more distant regions (r approximately equals 5 to 10 core radii) of the cluster. In particular, there appear to be fewer bright giants in the core, along with an enhanced `asymptotic giant branch' (AGB) sequence. Depletion of giants has been observed in the cores of other dense clusters, and may be due to `stripping' of large stars by stellar encounters and/or mass transfer in binary systems. Central concentrations of true asymptotic giant branch stars are not expected to result from dynamical processes; possibly some of these stars may be evolved blue stragglers.

  1. Laser-spectroscopy measurements of 72-96Kr spins, moments and charge radii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keim, M.

    1995-01-01

    The spins, moments and radii of krypton isotopes have been investigated by collinear fast-beam laser spectroscopy in combination with ultra-sensitive collisional ionization detection. The sequence of isotopes under study ranges from the neutron-deficient N=Z=36 isotope 72 Kr to the neutron-rich 96 Kr (N=60). The mean-square charge radii in the neighbourhood of the N=50 neutron-shell closure exhibit a pronounced shell effect which has recently been explained in the framework of relativistic mean-field theory. The results for the neutron-deficient nuclei are related to the shape coexistence of strongly prolate and near-spherical states which is known from nuclear spectroscopy. Here, an inversion of the odd-even staggering is observed below the neutron number N=45. The neutron-rich transitional nuclei are influenced by the N=56 subshell closure. In contrast to the N=60 isotones 97 Rb, 98 Sr and 100 Zr, the new isotope 96 Kr is not strongly deformed. ((orig.))

  2. Resonance contributions to Hanbury-Brown endash Twiss correlation radii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedemann, U.A.; Heinz, U.

    1997-01-01

    We study the effect of resonance decays on intensity interferometry for heavy ion collisions. Collective expansion of the source leads to a dependence of the two-particle correlation function on the pair momentum K. This opens the possibility to reconstruct the dynamics of the source from the K dependence of the measured Hanburg-Brown endash Twiss (HBT) radii. Here we address the question to what extent resonance decays can fake such a flow signal. Within a simple parametrization for the emission function we present a comprehensive analysis of the interplay of flow and resonance decays on the one- and two-particle spectra. We discuss in detail the non-Gaussian features of the correlation function introduced by long-lived resonances and the resulting problems in extracting meaningful HBT radii. We propose to define them in terms of the second-order q moments of the correlator C(q,K). We show that this yields a more reliable characterisation of the correlator in terms of its width and the correlation strength λ than other commonly used fit procedures. The normalized fourth-order q moments (kurtosis) provide a quantitative measure for the non-Gaussian features of the correlator. At least for the class of models studied here, the kurtosis helps separating effects from expansion flow and resonance decays, and provides the cleanest signal to distinguish between scenarios with and without transverse flow. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  3. Early Hydrodynamic Escape Limits Rocky Planets to Less Than or Equal to 1.6 Earth Radii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmer, O. R.; Catling, D. C.

    2017-01-01

    In the past decade thousands of exoplanet candidates and hundreds of confirmed exoplanets have been found. For sub-Neptune-sized planets, those less than approx. 10 Earth masses, we can separate planets into two broad categories: predominantly rocky planets, and gaseous planets with thick volatile sheaths. Observations and subsequent analysis of these planets show that rocky planets are only found with radii less than approx. 1.6 Earth radii. No rocky planet has yet been found that violates this limit. We propose that hydrodynamic escape of hydrogen rich protoatmospheres, accreted by forming planets, explains the limit in rocky planet size. Following the hydrodynamic escape model employed by Luger et al. (2015), we modelled the XUV driven escape from young planets (less than approx.100 Myr in age) around a Sun-like star. With a simple, first-order model we found that the rocky planet radii limit occurs consistently at approx. 1.6 Earth radii across a wide range of plausible parameter spaces. Our model shows that hydrodynamic escape can explain the observed cutoff between rocky and gaseous planets. Fig. 1 shows the results of our model for rocky planets between 0.5 and 10 Earth masses that accrete 3 wt. % H2/He during formation. The simulation was run for 100 Myr, after that time the XUV flux drops off exponentially and hydrodynamic escape drops with it. A cutoff between rocky planets and gaseous ones is clearly seen at approx. 1.5-1.6 Earth radii. We are only interested in the upper size limit for rocky planets. As such, we assumed pure hydrogen atmospheres and the highest possible isothermal atmospheric temperatures, which will produce an upper limit on the hydrodynamic loss rate. Previous work shows that a reasonable approximation for an upper temperature limit in a hydrogen rich protoatmosphere is 2000-3000 K, consistent with our assumptions. From these results, we propose that the observed dichotomy between mini-Neptunes and rocky worlds is simply explained by

  4. On the extended and Allan spectra and topological radii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Arizmendi-Peimbert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we prove that the extended spectrum \\(\\Sigma(x\\, defined by W. Żelazko, of an element \\(x\\ of a pseudo-complete locally convex unital complex algebra \\(A\\ is a subset of the spectrum \\(\\sigma_A(x\\, defined by G.R. Allan. Furthermore, we prove that they coincide when \\(\\Sigma(x\\ is closed. We also establish some order relations between several topological radii of \\(x\\, among which are the topological spectral radius \\(R_t(x\\ and the topological radius of boundedness \\(\\beta_t(x\\.

  5. A study on the service radii and accessibility to health facilities in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Government policies over the years has centered on the provision and delivery of healthcare to all. Spatial distribution of health facilities is subject to a number of social and commercial influences and healthcare needs of the population. The objective of this paper analyzed the service radii and accessibility of health ...

  6. Early Dynamics of the Moon's Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuk, Matija; Hamilton, Douglas; Stewart, Sarah T.

    2018-04-01

    The Moon has a small molten iron core (Williams et al. 2006). Remanent magnetization in lunar rocks likely derives from a past lunar dynamo (Wieczorek 2018 and references therein), which may have been powered by differential precession between the mantle and the core. The rotations of the lunar mantle and core were largely decoupled for much of lunar history, with a large mutual offset during the Cassini State Transition (Meyer and Wisdom, 2011). It is likely that the past work underestimated lunar obliquities, and therefore core offsets, during early lunar history (Cuk et al. 2016). Here we investigate the dynamics of the lunar core and mantle using a Lie-Poisson numerical integrator (Touma and Wisdom 2001) which includes interactions between triaxial core and mantle, as well as all gravitational and tidal effects included in the model of Cuk et al. (2016). Since we assume a rigid triaxial mantle, this model is applicable to the Moon only once it has acquired its current shape, which probably happened before the Moon reached 25 Earth radii. While some details of the core dynamics depend on our assumptions about the shape of the lunar core-mantle boundary, we can report some robust preliminary findings. The presence of the core does not change significantly the evolutionary scenario of Cuk et al. (2016). The core and mantle are indeed decoupled, with the core having a much smaller obliquity to the ecliptic than the mantle for almost all of the lunar history. The core was largely in an equivalent of Cassini State 2, with the vernal equinoxes (wrt the ecliptic) of the core and the mantle being anti-aligned. The core-mantle spin axis offset has been very large during the Moon's first billion years (this is true both in canonical and high-inclination tidal evolution), causing the lunar core to be sub-synchronous. If the ancient lunar magnetic dipole was rotating around the core axis that was inclined to the Moon's spin axis, then the magnetic poles would move across

  7. Thermal correction of the radii of curvature of mirrors for GEO 600

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lueck, H; Freise, A; Gossler, S; Hild, S; Kawabe, K; Danzmann, K

    2004-01-01

    A mismatch of the radii of curvature of the mirrors in the arms of an interferometric gravitational-wave detector can be partly compensated by creating a thermal gradient inside the mirror. This paper shows how the interference quality at the output of the German/British GEO 600 gravitational-wave detector could be improved with a simple ring heater

  8. Mechanism of equalization of proton and neutron radii and the Coulomb anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caurier, E.; Poves, A.; Zuker, A.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that a one parameter modification of the effective forces allows to resolve the Coulomb energy anomalies in the Ca region within the framework of Hartree Fock (HF) and isospin projected Hartree Fock (IPHF) theories. A simple microscopic mechanism of equalization of neutron and proton radii is invoked to produce results consistent with available data

  9. Corrections for hydrostatic atmospheric models: radii and effective temperatures of Wolf Rayet stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loore, C. de; Hellings, P.; Lamers, H.J.G.L.M.

    1982-01-01

    With the assumption of plane-parallel hydrostatic atmospheres, used generally for the computation of evolutionary models, the radii of WR stars are seriously underestimated. The true atmospheres may be very extended, due to the effect of the stellar wind. Instead of these hydrostatic atmospheres the authors consider dynamical atmospheres adopting a velocity law. The equation of the optical depth is integrated outwards using the equation of continuity. The ''hydrostatic'' radii are to be multiplied with a factor 2 to 8, and the effective temperatures with a factor 0.8 to 0.35 when Wolf Rayet characteristics for the wind are considered, and WR mass loss rates are used. With these corrections the effective temperatures of the theoretical models, which are helium burning Roche lobe overflow remnants, range between 30,000 K and 50,000 K. Effective temperatures calculated in the hydrostatic hypothesis can be as high as 150,000 K for helium burning RLOF-remnants with WR mass loss rates. (Auth.)

  10. Calculation of the radii of neutron rich light exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charagi, S.K.; Gupta, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    The interaction cross section of a few unstable neutron rich nuclei have been measured using exotic isotope beams produced through the projectile fragmentation process in high energy heavy-ion collisions. Interaction cross section of He, Li, Be and B isotope projectiles with Be, C and Al targets have thus been measured at 790 MeV/nucleon. We have made a comprehensive analysis of the data on the interaction cross section, to extract the radii of these neutron rich light nuclei. 7 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  11. Design configuration of GCFR core assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaBar, M.P.; Lee, G.E.; Meyer, R.J.

    1980-05-01

    The current design configurations of the core assemblies for the gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) demonstration plant reactor core conceptual design are described. Primary emphasis is placed upon the design innovations that have been incorporated in the design of the core assemblies since the establishment of the initial design of an upflow GCFR core. A major feature of the design configurations is that they are prototypical of core assemblies for use in commercial plants; a larger number of the same assemblies would be used in a commercial plant

  12. Development of coring, consolidating, subterrene penetrators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, H.D.; Neudecker, J.W.; Cort, G.E.; Turner, W.C.; McFarland, R.D.; Griggs, J.E.

    1976-02-01

    Coring penetrators offer two advantages over full face-melting penetrators, i.e., formation of larger boreholes with no increase in power and the production of glass-lined, structurally undisturbed cores which can be recovered with conventional core-retrieval systems. These cores are of significant value in geological exploratory drilling programs. The initial design details and fabrication features of a 114-mm-diam coring penetrator are discussed; significant factors for design optimization are also presented. Results of laboratory testing are reported and compared with performance predictions, and an initial field trial is described

  13. Systematics of interaction and strong absorption radii determined from heavy-ion elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birkelund, J.R.; Huizenga, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    Various methods for determining the strong absorption radius for light and intermediate mass nuclei are discussed. It is found that this determination in terms of the half-density radii of the target and projectile is more accurate over the whole range of available data than the other simple parametrizations. 62 references

  14. A new perspective on charge radii around Z = 82

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cocolios, T. E., E-mail: thomas.cocolios@kuleuven.be [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica (Belgium)

    2017-11-15

    In the last 35 years, a large amount of data on the changes in the mean-square charge radii, δ〈r{sup 2}〉, around the lead region has been gathered. Isotopic chains are often normalised and compared to reduce the impact of systematic uncertainties of the extracted δ〈r{sup 2}〉 from the isotope shifts. However, this biased picture can obscure other interesting effects that are apparent in absolute scale. In this contribution, we review the extent of the knowledge on the δ〈r{sup 2}〉 in the lead region in addition to observations on the absolute scale.

  15. The dynamical fingerprint of core scouring in massive elliptical galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.; Saglia, R. P.; Bender, R.; Erwin, P.; Fabricius, M.

    2014-01-01

    The most massive elliptical galaxies have low-density centers or cores that differ dramatically from the high-density centers of less massive ellipticals and bulges of disk galaxies. These cores have been interpreted as the result of mergers of supermassive black hole binaries, which depopulate galaxy centers by gravitationally slingshotting central stars toward large radii. Such binaries naturally form in mergers of luminous galaxies. Here, we analyze the population of central stellar orbits in 11 massive elliptical galaxies that we observed with the integral field spectrograph SINFONI at the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope. Our dynamical analysis is orbit-based and includes the effects of a central black hole, the mass distribution of the stars, and a dark matter halo. We show that the use of integral field kinematics and the inclusion of dark matter is important to conclude on the distribution of stellar orbits in galaxy centers. Six of our galaxies are core galaxies. In these six galaxies, but not in the galaxies without cores, we detect a coherent lack of stars on radial orbits in the core region and a uniform excess of radial orbits outside of it: when scaled by the core radius r b , the radial profiles of the classical anisotropy parameter β(r) are nearly identical in core galaxies. Moreover, they quantitatively match the predictions of black hole binary simulations, providing the first convincing dynamical evidence for core scouring in the most massive elliptical galaxies.

  16. Research on Flow Pattern of Nitrogen Tetroxide Liquid in the Different Bend Radii Pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Pengfei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available N2O4 is a common rocket fuel propellants, it has the characteristics of low boiling point and a large viscosity , the friction between viscosity fluids and pipeline dramatic leads to a huge sticky heat, therefore, the vaporization phenomenon often occurs in the pipeline, particularly in bending of the viscous heat. For this reason, the research of the different bending radii vaporized fluid conditions for optimizing the piping and precise the filling flow is significant. In this paper, the MIXTURE mixed flow model is used to achieve the numerical simulation the pipelines filling of the three different bending radii, it still have not solved the mass transfer problem between the different phases. Therefore, the custom functions are needed to define the mass transfer problems from the liquid phase to the vapor phase. Though the contrast among the volume phase cloud of six different elbow models , we have the following conclusions: 1 In the entire pipeline transportation, the distribution vaporization rate from the inlet pipe to the outlet pipe follows the distribution of the first increasing and then decreasing, the gas rates of the elbow area is highest; 2Analyzing the sticky heat for different bend radii, we have the conclusion that the lowest bending vaporization the of the optimal radius is 0.45m. The above conclusions are drawn in good agreement with the actual law, can effectively guide the engineering practice, have important significance for the future design for the optimization of the fuel pipeline transportation.

  17. Laser measurements of radii and moments of barium nuclei near the proton drip line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eastham; Smith, J.R.H.; Groves, J.

    1987-01-01

    A new technique of laser spectroscopy has been used to measure the magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moment of /sup 121/Ba, and the r.m.s. charge radii of /sup 120,121/Ba. The results are discussed in terms of the unified model

  18. SHOULD ONE USE THE RAY-BY-RAY APPROXIMATION IN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA SIMULATIONS?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, M. Aaron; Burrows, Adam; Dolence, Joshua C.

    2016-01-01

    We perform the first self-consistent, time-dependent, multi-group calculations in two dimensions (2D) to address the consequences of using the ray-by-ray+ transport simplification in core-collapse supernova simulations. Such a dimensional reduction is employed by many researchers to facilitate their resource-intensive calculations. Our new code (Fornax) implements multi-D transport, and can, by zeroing out transverse flux terms, emulate the ray-by-ray+ scheme. Using the same microphysics, initial models, resolution, and code, we compare the results of simulating 12, 15, 20, and 25 M ⊙ progenitor models using these two transport methods. Our findings call into question the wisdom of the pervasive use of the ray-by-ray+ approach. Employing it leads to maximum post-bounce/pre-explosion shock radii that are almost universally larger by tens of kilometers than those derived using the more accurate scheme, typically leaving the post-bounce matter less bound and artificially more “explodable.” In fact, for our 25 M ⊙ progenitor, the ray-by-ray+ model explodes, while the corresponding multi-D transport model does not. Therefore, in two dimensions, the combination of ray-by-ray+ with the axial sloshing hydrodynamics that is a feature of 2D supernova dynamics can result in quantitatively, and perhaps qualitatively, incorrect results.

  19. MAGNETOROTATIONAL CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE IN THREE DIMENSIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mösta, Philipp; Richers, Sherwood; Ott, Christian D.; Haas, Roland; Piro, Anthony L.; Boydstun, Kristen; Abdikamalov, Ernazar; Reisswig, Christian [TAPIR, Mailcode 350-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Schnetter, Erik, E-mail: pmoesta@tapir.caltech.edu [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    2014-04-20

    We present results of new three-dimensional (3D) general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of rapidly rotating strongly magnetized core collapse. These simulations are the first of their kind and include a microphysical finite-temperature equation of state and a leakage scheme that captures the overall energetics and lepton number exchange due to postbounce neutrino emission. Our results show that the 3D dynamics of magnetorotational core-collapse supernovae are fundamentally different from what was anticipated on the basis of previous simulations in axisymmetry (2D). A strong bipolar jet that develops in a simulation constrained to 2D is crippled by a spiral instability and fizzles in full 3D. While multiple (magneto-)hydrodynamic instabilities may be present, our analysis suggests that the jet is disrupted by an m = 1 kink instability of the ultra-strong toroidal field near the rotation axis. Instead of an axially symmetric jet, a completely new, previously unreported flow structure develops. Highly magnetized spiral plasma funnels expelled from the core push out the shock in polar regions, creating wide secularly expanding lobes. We observe no runaway explosion by the end of the full 3D simulation 185 ms after bounce. At this time, the lobes have reached maximum radii of ∼900 km.

  20. MAGNETOROTATIONAL CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE IN THREE DIMENSIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mösta, Philipp; Richers, Sherwood; Ott, Christian D.; Haas, Roland; Piro, Anthony L.; Boydstun, Kristen; Abdikamalov, Ernazar; Reisswig, Christian; Schnetter, Erik

    2014-01-01

    We present results of new three-dimensional (3D) general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of rapidly rotating strongly magnetized core collapse. These simulations are the first of their kind and include a microphysical finite-temperature equation of state and a leakage scheme that captures the overall energetics and lepton number exchange due to postbounce neutrino emission. Our results show that the 3D dynamics of magnetorotational core-collapse supernovae are fundamentally different from what was anticipated on the basis of previous simulations in axisymmetry (2D). A strong bipolar jet that develops in a simulation constrained to 2D is crippled by a spiral instability and fizzles in full 3D. While multiple (magneto-)hydrodynamic instabilities may be present, our analysis suggests that the jet is disrupted by an m = 1 kink instability of the ultra-strong toroidal field near the rotation axis. Instead of an axially symmetric jet, a completely new, previously unreported flow structure develops. Highly magnetized spiral plasma funnels expelled from the core push out the shock in polar regions, creating wide secularly expanding lobes. We observe no runaway explosion by the end of the full 3D simulation 185 ms after bounce. At this time, the lobes have reached maximum radii of ∼900 km

  1. Relativistic calculations of screening parameters and atomic radii of neutral atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, M.; Amaro, P.; Santos, J. P.; Indelicato, P.

    2017-09-01

    Calculations of the effective nuclear charge for elements with 1 ≤ Z ≤ 118 have been performed in a Dirac-Fock approach including all relativistic effects as well as contributions from quantum electrodynamics. Maximum charge density for every subshell of every element in the periodic table was also computed in the same framework as well as atomic radii based on the total charge density. Results were compared with the extensively cited works of Clementi et al., obtained in the 1960s with Roothan's self-consistent-field method.

  2. Design of reactor internals in larger high-temperature reactors with spherical fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elter, C.

    1981-01-01

    In his paper, the author analyzes and summarizes the present state of the art with emphasis on the prototype reactor THTR 300 MWe, because in addition to spherical fuel elements, this type includes other features of future HTR design such as the same flow direction of cooland gas through the core. The paper on hand also elaborates design guidelines for reactor internals applicable with large HTR's of up to 1200 MWe. Proved designs will be altered so as to meet the special requirements of larger cores with spherical elements to be reloaded according to the OTTO principle. This paper is furthermore designed as a starting point for selective and swift development of reactor internals for large HTR's to be refuelled according to the OTTO principle. (orig./GL) [de

  3. Radio core dominance of Fermi blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Zhi-Yuan; Fan, Jun-Hui; Liu, Yi; Yuan, Yi-Hai; Cai, Wei; Xiao, Hu-Bing; Lin, Chao; Yang, Jiang-He

    2016-07-01

    During the first 4 years of mission, Fermi/LAT detected 1444 blazars (3FGL) (Ackermann et al. in Astrophys. J. 810:14, 2015). Fermi/LAT observations of blazars indicate that Fermi blazars are luminous and strongly variable with variability time scales, for some cases, as short as hours. Those observations suggest a strong beaming effect in Fermi/LAT blazars. In the present work, we will investigate the beaming effect in Fermi/LAT blazars using a core-dominance parameter, R = S_{core}/ S_{ext.}, where S_{core} is the core emission, while S_{ext.} is the extended emission. We compiled 1335 blazars with available core-dominance parameter, out of which 169 blazars have γ-ray emission (from 3FGL). We compared the core-dominance parameters, log R, between the 169 Fermi-detected blazars (FDBs) and the rest non-Fermi-detected blazars (non-FDBs), and we found that the averaged values are R+(2.25±0.10), suggesting that a source with larger log R has larger V.I. value. Thirdly, we compared the mean values of radio spectral index for FDBs and non-FDBs, and we obtained < α_{radio}rangle =0.06±0.35 for FDBs and < α_{radio}rangle =0.57±0.46 for non-FDBs. If γ-rays are composed of two components like radio emission (core and extended components), then we can expect a correlation between log R and the γ-ray spectral index. When we used the radio core-dominance parameter, log R, to investigate the relationship, we found that the spectral index for the core component is α_{γ}|_{core} = 1.11 (a photon spectral index of α_{γ}^{ph}|_{core} = 2.11) and that for the extended component is α_{γ}|_{ext.} = 0.70 (a photon spectral index of α_{γ}^{ph}|_{ext.} = 1.70). Some discussions are also presented.

  4. Commissioning of a new photon detection system for charge radii measurements of neutron-deficient Ca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, J.; Garand, D.; Miller, A. J.; Minamisono, K.; Everett, N.; Powel, R. C.; Maaß, B.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Kalman, C.; Lantis, J.; Kujawa, C.; Mantica, P.

    2017-09-01

    Calcium is unique for its possession of two stable isotopes of ``doubly magic'' nuclei at proton and neutron numbers (Z , N) = (20 , 20) and (20 , 28) . Recent charge radii measurements of neutron-rich calcium isotopes yielded an upward trend beyond current theoretical predictions. At the BECOLA facility at NSCL/MSU, Ca charge radii measurements will be extended to the neutron-deficient regime using collinear laser spectroscopy. A new photon detection system with an ellipsoidal reflector and a compound parabolic concentrator has been commissioned for the experiment. The system increases the signal-to-noise ratio by reducing background, which is critical for the low production rates of the Ca experiment. Details of the system and results of the characterization tests will be discussed. Work supported in part by NSF Grant PHY-15-65546, U.S. DOE Grant DE-NA0002924 and by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft Grant SFB 1245.

  5. On the uncertain nature of the core of α Cen A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazot, M.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Gizon, L.; Benomar, O.

    2016-08-01

    High-quality astrometric, spectroscopic, interferometric and, importantly, asteroseismic observations are available for α Cen A, which is the closest binary star system to earth. Taking all these constraints into account, we study the internal structure of the star by means of theoretical modelling. Using the Aarhus STellar Evolution Code (ASTEC) and the tools of Computational Bayesian Statistics, in particular a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm, we perform statistical inferences for the physical characteristics of the star. We find that α Cen A has a probability of approximately 40 per cent of having a convective core. This probability drops to few per cent if one considers reduced rates for the 14N(p,γ)15O reaction. These convective cores have fractional radii less than 8 per cent when overshoot is neglected. Including overshooting also leads to the possibility of a convective core mostly sustained by the ppII chain energy output. We finally show that roughly 30 per cent of the stellar models describing α Cen A are in the subgiant regime.

  6. Core and shell sizing of small silver-coated nanospheres by optical extinction spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schinca, D C; Scaffardi, L B

    2008-01-01

    Silver metal nanoparticles (Nps) are extensively used in different areas of research and technology due to their interesting optical, thermal and electric properties, especially for bare core and core-shell nanostructures with sizes smaller than 10 nm. Since these properties are core-shell size-dependent, size measurement is important in manipulating their potential functionalization and applications. Bare and coated small silver Nps fabricated by physical and chemical methods present specific characteristics in their extinction spectra that are potentially useful for sizing purposes. This work presents a novel procedure to size mean core radius smaller than 10 nm and mean shell thickness of silver core-shell Nps based on a comparative study of the characteristics in their optical extinction spectra in different media as a function of core radii, shell thickness and coating refractive index. From the regularities derived from these relationships, it can be concluded that plasmon full width at half-maximum (FWHM) is sensitive to core size but not to coating thickness, while plasmon resonance wavelength (PRW) is related to shell thickness and mostly independent of core radius. These facts, which allow sizing simultaneously both mean core radius and shell thickness, can also be used to size bare silver Nps as a special case of core-shell Nps with zero shell thickness. The proposed method was applied to size experimental samples and the results show good agreement with conventional TEM microscopy.

  7. The distribution of masses and radii of white-dwarf stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipman, H.L.

    1978-01-01

    The status of determinations of white dwarf radii by model atmosphere methods is reviewed. The results are that (i) the mean radius of a sample of 95 hydrogen-rich stars with parallaxes is 0.0131 R(Sun); (ii) the mean radius of a sample of 13 helium-rich stars is 0.011 R(Sun), indistinguishably different from the radius of the hydrogen-rich stars; and (iii) that the most serious limitation on our knowledge of the mean radius of white dwarfs is the influence of selection effects. An estimate of the selection effects indicates that the true mean white dwarf radius is near 0.011 R(Sun). (Auth.)

  8. Charge radii and moments of tin nuclei by laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anselment, M.; Bekk, K.; Hanser, A.; Hoeffgen, H.; Meisel, G.; Goering, S.; Rebel, H.; Schatz, G.

    1986-04-01

    The isotope shift and hyperfine structure of the optical Sn I resonance transition 5p 2 3 P 0 ->5p6s 3 P 1 at lambda=286.3 nm have been studied for 18 Sn nuclei including 2 isomers. Laser induced resonance fluorescence from a collimated atomic beam of tin was observed using a tunable cw dye laser with frequency doubler. The electromagnetic nuclear moments and changes of the mean square charge radii of the nuclear charge distributions were determined. The results are discussed with respect to the information they provide on the nuclear structure of the nuclei investigated; they are compared with various theoretical models. (orig.) [de

  9. Emittance increase caused by core depletion in collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, R

    2009-01-01

    A new effect is presented, which changes the emittance during colliding-beam operation in circular colliders. If the initial transverse distribution is Gaussian, the collision probability is much higher for particles in the core of the beam than in the tails. When small-amplitude particles are removed, the remaining ones therefore have a larger transverse emittance. This effect, called core depletion, may cause a decrease in luminosity. An approximate analytic model is developed to study the effect and benchmarked against a multiparticle tracking simulation. Finally, the time evolution of the intensity and emittances of a Pb bunch in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is calculated, taking into account also other processes than collisions. The results show that integrated luminosity drops by 3--4% if core depletion is taken into account. It is also found that core depletion causes the transverse emittance to be larger when more experiments are active. This observation could be checked against experimenta...

  10. SHOULD ONE USE THE RAY-BY-RAY APPROXIMATION IN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA SIMULATIONS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, M. Aaron; Burrows, Adam [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Dolence, Joshua C., E-mail: burrows@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: askinner@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: jdolence@lanl.gov [CCS-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    We perform the first self-consistent, time-dependent, multi-group calculations in two dimensions (2D) to address the consequences of using the ray-by-ray+ transport simplification in core-collapse supernova simulations. Such a dimensional reduction is employed by many researchers to facilitate their resource-intensive calculations. Our new code (Fornax) implements multi-D transport, and can, by zeroing out transverse flux terms, emulate the ray-by-ray+ scheme. Using the same microphysics, initial models, resolution, and code, we compare the results of simulating 12, 15, 20, and 25 M {sub ⊙} progenitor models using these two transport methods. Our findings call into question the wisdom of the pervasive use of the ray-by-ray+ approach. Employing it leads to maximum post-bounce/pre-explosion shock radii that are almost universally larger by tens of kilometers than those derived using the more accurate scheme, typically leaving the post-bounce matter less bound and artificially more “explodable.” In fact, for our 25 M {sub ⊙} progenitor, the ray-by-ray+ model explodes, while the corresponding multi-D transport model does not. Therefore, in two dimensions, the combination of ray-by-ray+ with the axial sloshing hydrodynamics that is a feature of 2D supernova dynamics can result in quantitatively, and perhaps qualitatively, incorrect results.

  11. Form factors and charge radii in a quantum chromodynamics-inspired potential model using variationally improved perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazarika, Bhaskar Jyoti; Choudhury, D.K.

    2015-01-01

    We use variationally improved perturbation theory (VIPT) for calculating the elastic form factors and charge radii of D, D s , B, B s and B c mesons in a quantum chromodynamics (QCD)-inspired potential model. For that, we use linear-cum-Coulombic potential and opt the Coulombic part first as parent and then the linear part as parent. The results show that charge radii and form factors are quite small for the Coulombic parent compared to the linear parent. Also, the analysis leads to a lower as well as upper bounds on the four-momentum transfer Q 2 , hinting at a workable range of Q 2 within this approach, which may be useful in future experimental analyses. Comparison of both the options shows that the linear parent is the better option. (author)

  12. Consequences of the proposed near equality of neutron and proton radii in the calcium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamick, L.

    1976-01-01

    If the difference in neutron and proton radii in the Calcium Isotopes is much less than has up to now been calculated, one does have a mechanism for solving the Nolen-Schiffer anomaly; but then one runs into difficulty with other quantities such as the renormalized effective interaction between identical nucleons. (B.G.)

  13. A new version of PIRK (elastic pion-nucleus scattering) to handle differing proton and neutron radii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funsten, H.O.

    1979-01-01

    This program is a modification of the Eisenstein-Miller program (1974) for calculating elastic pion-nucleus differential cross sections using free π-N scattering amplitudes. This revision permits the use of separate proton and neutron radii for the nuclear density function rho(r). (Auth.)

  14. DNA compaction by poly (amido amine) dendrimers of ammonia cored and ethylene diamine cored

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamhieh, K.; Al-Shawwa, J.

    2017-06-01

    The complexes build-up of DNA and soft particles poly amidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers of ammonia cored of generations (G1-G6) and ethylenediamine cored of generations (G1-G10) have been studied, using a new theoretical model developed by Qamhieh and coworkers. The model describes the interaction between linear polyelectrolyte (LPE) chain and ion-penetrable spheres. Many factors affecting LPE/dendrimer complex have been investigated such as dendrimer generation, the Bjerrum length, salt concentration, and rigidity of the LPE chain represented by the persistence length. It is found that the wrapping chain length around dendrimer increases by increasing dendrimer`s generation, Bjerrum length, and salt concentration, while decreases by increasing the persistence length of the LPE chain. Also we can conclude that the wrapping length of LPE chain around ethylenediamine cored dendrimers is larger than its length around ammonia cored dendrimers.

  15. Equation of state fits to the lower mantle and outer core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, R.; Anderson, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    The lower mantle and outer core are subjected to tests for homogeneity and adiabaticity. An earth model is used which is based on the inversion of body waves and Q-corrected normal-mode data. Homogeneous regions are found at radii between 5125 and 4825 km, 4600 and 3850 km, and 3200 and 2200 km. The lower mantle and outer core are inhomogeneous on the whole and are only homogeneous in the above local regions. Finite-strain and atomistic equations of state are fit to the homogeneous regions. The apparent convergence of the finite-strain relations is examined to judge their applicability to a given region. In some cases the observed pressure derivatives of the elastic moduli are used as additional constraints. The effect of minor deviations from adiabaticity on the extrapolations is also considered. An ensemble of zero-pressure values of the density and seismic velocities are found for these regions. The range of extrapolated values from these several approaches provides a measure of uncertainties involved.

  16. Analysis of transverse mass dependence of Bose-Einstein correlation radii using the DELPHI data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loerstad, B.; Smirnova, O.G.

    1997-01-01

    The study of the directional dependence of two-particle correlations in the hadronic decays of the Z boson is performed, using the data collected by the DELPHI experiment. Investigation of the dependence of correlation radii on the transverse mass reveals a behaviour similar to that in heavy ion collisions, namely, an approximate 1/√m t dependence. Comparison to a simple Monte Carlo model shows a similar tendency

  17. Visualization and Quantification of Rotor Tip Vortices in Helicopter Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, David L.; Ahmad, Jasim U.; Holst, Terry L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an automated approach for effective extraction, visualization, and quantification of vortex core radii from the Navier-Stokes simulations of a UH-60A rotor in forward flight. We adopt a scaled Q-criterion to determine vortex regions and then perform vortex core profiling in these regions to calculate vortex core radii. This method provides an efficient way of visualizing and quantifying the blade tip vortices. Moreover, the vortices radii are displayed graphically in a plane.

  18. Empirical Accurate Masses and Radii of Single Stars with TESS and Gaia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stassun, Keivan G.; Corsaro, Enrico; Pepper, Joshua A.; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2018-01-01

    We present a methodology for the determination of empirical masses of single stars through the combination of three direct observables with Gaia and Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS): (i) the surface gravity via granulation-driven variations in the TESS light curve, (ii) the bolometric flux at Earth via the broadband spectral energy distribution, and (iii) the distance via the Gaia parallax. We demonstrate the method using 525 Kepler stars for which these measures are available in the literature, and show that the stellar masses can be measured with this method to a precision of ∼25%, limited by the surface-gravity precision of the granulation “flicker” method (∼0.1 dex) and by the parallax uncertainties (∼10% for the Kepler sample). We explore the impact of expected improvements in the surface gravity determinations—through the application of granulation background fitting and the use of recently published granulation-metallicity relations—and improvements in the parallaxes with the arrival of the Gaia second data release. We show that the application of this methodology to stars that will be observed by TESS should yield radii good to a few percent and masses good to ≈10%. Importantly, the method does not require the presence of an orbiting, eclipsing, or transiting body, nor does it require spatial resolution of the stellar surface. Thus, we can anticipate the determination of fundamental, accurate stellar radii and masses for hundreds of thousands of bright single stars—across the entire sky and spanning the Hertzsprung–Russell diagram—including those that will ultimately be found to host planets.

  19. YOUNG STARLESS CORES EMBEDDED IN THE MAGNETICALLY DOMINATED PIPE NEBULA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frau, P.; Girart, J. M.; Alves, F. O.; Beltran, M. T.; Morata, O.; Masque, J. M.; Busquet, G.; Sanchez-Monge, A.; Estalella, R.; Franco, G. A. P.

    2010-01-01

    The Pipe Nebula is a massive, nearby dark molecular cloud with a low star formation efficiency which makes it a good laboratory in which to study the very early stages of the star formation process. The Pipe Nebula is largely filamentary and appears to be threaded by a uniform magnetic field at scales of a few parsecs, perpendicular to its main axis. The field is only locally perturbed in a few regions, such as the only active cluster-forming core B59. The aim of this study is to investigate primordial conditions in low-mass pre-stellar cores and how they relate to the local magnetic field in the cloud. We used the IRAM 30 m telescope to carry out a continuum and molecular survey at 3 and 1 mm of early- and late-time molecules toward four selected starless cores inside the Pipe Nebula. We found that the dust continuum emission maps trace the densest regions better than previous Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) extinction maps, while 2MASS extinction maps trace the diffuse gas better. The properties of the cores derived from dust emission show average radii of ∼0.09 pc, densities of ∼1.3x10 5 cm -3 , and core masses of ∼2.5 M sun . Our results confirm that the Pipe Nebula starless cores studied are in a very early evolutionary stage and present a very young chemistry with different properties that allow us to propose an evolutionary sequence. All of the cores present early-time molecular emission with CS detections in the whole sample. Two of them, cores 40 and 109, present strong late-time molecular emission. There seems to be a correlation between the chemical evolutionary stage of the cores and the local magnetic properties that suggests that the evolution of the cores is ruled by a local competition between the magnetic energy and other mechanisms, such as turbulence.

  20. Center-of-mass correction and confinement radii of the composite vector bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadic, D.; Tadic, G.

    1985-01-01

    Describing a composite W boson by a center-of-mass--corrected bag model one finds a relation R/sub W/ 3 M/sub W/ 3 / f/sub W/ 2 approx. =R/sub rho/ 3 m/sub rho/ 3 / f/sub rho/ 2 for the confinement radii (R), masses, and coupling constants (f) of W and rho bosons. Using experimental values for f/sub rho/, m/sub rho/, and M/sub W/ and with f/sub W/ = 0.66, one obtains R/sub W//R/sub rho/approx. =2 x 10 -3 . f/sub rho/, f/sub W/, and masses can be calculated separately

  1. A benefit assessment of using in-core neutron detector signals in core protection calculator system (CPCS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, S.; Park, S.J.; Seong, P.H.

    1997-01-01

    A Core Protection Calculator System (CPCS) is a digital computer based safety system generating trip signals based on the calculation of Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio (DNBR) and Local Power Density (LPD). Currently, CPCS uses ex-core detector signals for core power calculation and it has some uncertainties. In this study, in-core detector signals which directly measure inside flux of core are applied to CPCS to get more accurate power distribution profile, DNBR and LPD. In order to improve axial power distribution calculation, piece-wise cubic Spline method is applied; from the 40 nodes of expanded signals, more accurate and detailed core information can be provided. Simulation is carried out to verify its applicability to power distribution calculation. Simulation result shows that the improved method reduces the calculational uncertainties significantly and it allows larger operational margin. It is also expected that no power reduction is required while Core Operating Limit Supervisory System (COLSS) is out-of-service due to reduced uncertainties when the improved method is applied. In this study, a quantitative economic benefit assessment of using in-core neutron detector signals is also carried out. (authors)

  2. A benefit assessment of using in-core neutron detector signals in core protection calculator system(CPCS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Seung

    1996-02-01

    A Core Protection Calculator System(CPCS) is a digital computer based safety system generating trip signals based on the calculation of Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio(DNBR) and Local Power Density(LPD). Currently, CPCS uses ex-core detector signals for core power calculation and it has some uncertainties. In this study, In-core detector signals which directly measure inside flux of core are applied to CPCS to get more accurate power distribution profile, DNBR and LPD. In order to improve axial power distribution calculation, piecewise cubic spline method is applied: From the 40 nodes of expanded signals, more accurate and detailed core information can be provided. Simulation is carried out to verify its applicability to power distribution calculation. Simulation result shows that the improved method reduces the calculational uncertainties significantly and it allows larger operational margin. It is also expected that no power reduction is required while Core Operating Limit Supervisory System(COLSS) is out-of-service due to reduced uncertainties when the improved method is applied. In this study, a quantitative economic benefit assessment of using in-core neutron detector signals is also carried out

  3. Influence of Core Permeability on Accropode Armour Layer Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Christensen, M.; Jensen, T.

    1998-01-01

    Hedar and van der Meer studied the influence of core permeability on the stability of two layer rock armour. In both cases a significant influence was found. However, it is to be expected that for single layer armour there will be an even larger influence on the core permeability. This is because...... the dissipation of wave energy in single layer armour will e smaller than in double layer armour, thus giving room for larger flow velocities in and over armour layer On this background a laboratory stud of single layer Accropode stability was undertaken at Aalborg University in 1995. The test results as well...

  4. Study of low-velocity impact response of sandwich panels with shear-thickening gel cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunpeng; Gong, Xinglong; Xuan, Shouhu

    2018-06-01

    The low-velocity impact response of sandwich panels with shear-thickening gel cores was studied. The impact tests indicated that the sandwich panels with shear-thickening gel cores showed excellent properties of energy dissipation and stress distribution. In comparison to the similar sandwich panels with chloroprene rubber cores and ethylene-propylene-diene monomer cores, the shear-thickening gel cores led to the obviously smaller contact forces and the larger energy absorptions. Numerical modelling with finite element analysis was used to investigate the stress distribution of the sandwich panels with shear-thickening gel cores and the results agreed well with the experimental results. Because of the unique mechanical property of the shear-thickening gel, the concentrated stress on the front facesheets were distributed to larger areas on the back facesheets and the peak stresses were reduced greatly.

  5. Numerical solution of diffusion equation to study fast neutrons flux distribution for variant radii of nuclear fuel pin and moderator regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousavi Shirazi, Seyed Alireza [Islamic Azad Univ. (I.A.U.), Dept. of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    In this symbolic investigation, a cylindrical cell in a LWR, which consists of one fuel pin and moderator (water), is considered. The width of this cylindrical cell is divided into 100 equal units. Since the neutron flux in a cylindrical fuel pin is resulting from the diffusion equation: -(1)/(r)(d)/(dr)Dr(d)/(dr)φ(r) + Σ{sub a}φ(r) = S(r), the amount of fast neutron fluxes are obtained on the basis of the numeric solution of this equation, and the applied boundary conditions are considered: φ'(0) = φ'(1) = 0. This differential equation is solved by the tridiagonal method for variant enrichments of uranium. Neutron fluxes are obtained in variant radii of fuel pin and moderator and are finally compared with each other. There are some interesting outcomes resulting from this investigation. It can be inferred that because of the fuel enrichment increment, the fast neutron flux increases significantly at the centre of core, while many of the fast neutrons produced are absorbed after entering the water region, moderation of lots of them causes the reduced neutron flux to get improved in this region.

  6. CONSTRAINING CLUSTER PHYSICS WITH THE SHAPE OF X-RAY CLUSTERS: COMPARISON OF LOCAL X-RAY CLUSTERS VERSUS ΛCDM CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, Erwin T.; Nagai, Daisuke; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Vikhlinin, Alexey; Zentner, Andrew R.

    2012-01-01

    Recent simulations of cluster formation have demonstrated that condensation of baryons into central galaxies during cluster formation can drive the shape of the gas distribution in galaxy clusters significantly rounder out to their virial radius. These simulations generally predict stellar fractions within cluster virial radii that are ∼2-3 times larger than the stellar masses deduced from observations. In this paper, we compare ellipticity profiles of simulated clusters performed with varying input physics (radiative cooling, star formation, and supernova feedback) to the cluster ellipticity profiles derived from Chandra and ROSAT observations, in an effort to constrain the fraction of gas that cools and condenses into the central galaxies within clusters. We find that local relaxed clusters have an average ellipticity of ε = 0.18 ± 0.05 in the radial range of 0.04 ≤ r/r 500 ≤ 1. At larger radii r > 0.1r 500 , the observed ellipticity profiles agree well with the predictions of non-radiative simulations. In contrast, the ellipticity profiles of simulated clusters that include dissipative gas physics deviate significantly from the observed ellipticity profiles at all radii. The dissipative simulations overpredict (underpredict) ellipticity in the inner (outer) regions of galaxy clusters. By comparing simulations with and without dissipative gas physics, we show that gas cooling causes the gas distribution to be more oblate in the central regions, but makes the outer gas distribution more spherical. We find that late-time gas cooling and star formation are responsible for the significantly oblate gas distributions in cluster cores, but the gas shapes outside of cluster cores are set primarily by baryon dissipation at high redshift (z ≥ 2). Our results indicate that the shapes of X-ray emitting gas in galaxy clusters, especially at large radii, can be used to place constraints on cluster gas physics, making it potential probes of the history of baryonic

  7. Risks of Being Malignant or High Risk and Their Characteristics in Breast Lesions 20 mm or Larger After Benign Results on Ultrasonography-Guided 14-Gauge Core Needle Biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hee Jung; Kim, Min Jung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Kim, Eun-Kyung

    2016-06-01

    The malignancy risk, risk of being high-risk lesions after benign results on ultrasonography-guided 14-gauge core needle biopsies (US-CNBs), and their characteristics in breast lesions of 20 mm or greater were investigated. Eight hundred forty-seven breast lesions with benign results on US-CNB were classified as benign, high risk, and malignant through excision and clinical follow-up. The risks of being malignant or high risk were analyzed in all lesions, lesions 20 to 29 mm, and lesions 30 mm or greater. Their clinicopathological characteristics were evaluated. Of 847, 18 (2.1%) were malignant, 53 (6.3%) were high-risk lesions, and 776 (91.6%) were benign. Of 18 malignancies, 6 (33.3%) were malignant phyllodes tumors and 12 (66.7%) were carcinomas. In benign lesions 20 to 29 mm, risks of being malignant or high risk were 1.6% (9 of 566) and 4.4% (25 of 566). In 281 lesions 30 mm or greater, the risks of being malignant or high risk were 3.2% and 10%. The risk of being high risk in lesions 30 mm or greater was 10%, significantly higher than 4.4% of lesions 20 to 29 mm (P = 0.002). Excision can be considered in lesions measuring 20 mm or larger because of the 2.1% malignancy risk and the 6.3% risk of being high-risk lesions despite benign results on US-CNB. Excision should be considered in lesions measuring 30 mm or larger because of the 3.2% malignancy risk and the 10% risk of being high-risk lesions.

  8. Measurement of Moments and Radii of Light Nuclei by Collinear Fast-Beam Laser Spectroscopy and $\\beta$-NMR Spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Marinova, K P

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear Moments and radii of light unstable isotopes are investigated by applying different high-sensitivity and high-resolution techniques based on collinear fast-beam laser spectroscopy. A study of nuclear structure in the sd shell is performed on neon isotopes in the extended chain of $^{17-28}$Ne, in particular on the proton-halo candidate $^{17}$Ne. Measurements of hyperfine structure and isotope shift have become possible by introducing an ultra-sensitive non-optical detection method which is based on optical pumping, state-selective collisional ionization and $\\beta$-activity counting. The small effect of nuclear radii on the optical isotope shifts of light elements requires very accurate measurements. The errors are dominated by uncertainties of the Doppler shifts which are conventionally determined from precisely measured acceleration voltages. These uncertainties are removed by measuring the beam energy with simultaneous excitation of two optical lines in parallel / antiparallel beam configuration. ...

  9. DARK MATTER HEATING AND EARLY CORE FORMATION IN DWARF GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madau, Piero; Shen, Sijing; Governato, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    We present more results from a fully cosmological ΛCDM simulation of a group of isolated dwarf galaxies that has been shown to reproduce the observed stellar mass and cold gas content, resolved star formation histories, and metallicities of dwarfs in the Local Volume. Here we investigate the energetics and timetable of the cusp-core transformation. As suggested by previous work, supernova-driven gas outflows remove dark matter (DM) cusps and create kiloparsec-size cores in all systems having a stellar mass M * > 10 6 M ☉ . The D M core mass removal efficiency — dark mass ejected per unit stellar mass—ranges today from a few to a dozen, and increases with decreasing host mass. Because dwarfs form the bulk of their stars prior to redshift 1 and the amount of work required for DM heating and core formation scales approximately as M vir 5/3 , the unbinding of the DM cusp starts early and the formation of cored profiles is not as energetically onerous as previously claimed. DM particles in the cusp typically migrate to 2-3 core radii after absorbing a few percent of the energy released by supernovae. The present-day slopes of the inner DM mass profiles, Γ ≡ dlog M/dlog R ≅ 2.5-3, of the simulated ''Bashful'' and ''Doc'' dwarfs are similar to those measured in the luminous Fornax and Sculptor dwarf spheroidals. None of the simulated galaxies has a circular velocity profile exceeding 20 km s –1 in the inner 1 kpc, implying that supernova feedback is key to solve the ''too-big-to-fail'' problem for Milky Way subhalos

  10. The historical town core and traffic in Novo mesto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilijana Jankovič

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The historical town core of Novo mesto is subject to intolerable traffic conditions. Individual car use is suffocating the town core, but simultaneously good access is essential for shopkeepers and other inhabitants since buses don’t go there. The project proposes changes to the traffic regime, its basic goals are to redesign the town square into a pedestrian place and to eliminate transitory traffic by rerouting vehicles to less burdened side roads. It introduces short-term parking, smaller parking garages in the core and larger parking spaces on the edge and routes the buses through the town core.

  11. Multi-core processing and scheduling performance in CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Commodity hardware is going many-core. We might soon not be able to satisfy the job memory needs per core in the current single-core processing model in High Energy Physics. In addition, an ever increasing number of independent and incoherent jobs running on the same physical hardware not sharing resources might significantly affect processing performance. It will be essential to effectively utilize the multi-core architecture. CMS has incorporated support for multi-core processing in the event processing framework and the workload management system. Multi-core processing jobs share common data in memory, such us the code libraries, detector geometry and conditions data, resulting in a much lower memory usage than standard single-core independent jobs. Exploiting this new processing model requires a new model in computing resource allocation, departing from the standard single-core allocation for a job. The experiment job management system needs to have control over a larger quantum of resource since multi-...

  12. Symmetric aluminum-wire arrays generate high-quality Z pinches at large array radii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, T.W.; Mock, R.C.; Spielman, R.B.; Peterson, D.L.; Mosher, D.; Roderick, N.F.

    1998-01-01

    A Saturn-accelerator study of annular, aluminum-wire array, Z-pinch implosions, in the calculated high-wire-number plasma-shell regime [Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 5063 (1996)], shows that the radiated x-ray pulse width increases from about 4 nsec to about 7 nsec, when the radius of the array is increased from 8.75 to 20 mm at a fixed array mass of 0.6 mg. Eulerian radiation- magnetohydrodynamic code (E-RMHC) simulations in the r-z plane suggest that this pulse-width increase with radius is due to the faster growth of the shell thickness (that arises from a two-stage development in the magnetic Rayleigh - Taylor instability) relative to the increase in the shell implosion velocity. Over the array radii explored, the measured peak total x-ray power of ∼40 TW and energy of ∼325 kJ show little change outside of a ±15% shot-to-shot fluctuation and are consistent with the E-RMHC simulations. Similarly, the measured peak K-shell (lines plus continuum) power of ∼8 TW and energy of ∼70 kJ show little change with radius. The minimal change in K-shell yield is in agreement with simple K-shell radiation scaling models that assume a fixed radial compression for all initial array radii. These results suggest that the improved uniformity provided by the large number of wires in the initial array reduces the disruptive effects of the Rayleigh - Taylor instability observed in small-wire-number imploding loads. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  13. Symmetric aluminum-wire arrays generate high-quality Z pinches at large array radii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, T. W. L.; Mock, R. C.; Spielman, R. B.; Peterson, D. L.; Mosher, D.; Roderick, N. F.

    1998-10-01

    A Saturn-accelerator study of annular, aluminum-wire array, Z-pinch implosions, in the calculated high-wire-number plasma-shell regime [Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 5063 (1996)], shows that the radiated x-ray pulse width increases from about 4 nsec to about 7 nsec, when the radius of the array is increased from 8.75 to 20 mm at a fixed array mass of 0.6 mg. Eulerian radiation- magnetohydrodynamic code (E-RMHC) simulations in the r-z plane suggest that this pulse-width increase with radius is due to the faster growth of the shell thickness (that arises from a two-stage development in the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability) relative to the increase in the shell implosion velocity. Over the array radii explored, the measured peak total x-ray power of ˜40 TW and energy of ˜325 kJ show little change outside of a ±15% shot-to-shot fluctuation and are consistent with the E-RMHC simulations. Similarly, the measured peak K-shell (lines plus continuum) power of ˜8 TW and energy of ˜70 kJ show little change with radius. The minimal change in K-shell yield is in agreement with simple K-shell radiation scaling models that assume a fixed radial compression for all initial array radii. These results suggest that the improved uniformity provided by the large number of wires in the initial array reduces the disruptive effects of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability observed in small-wire-number imploding loads.

  14. Role of ligand-ligand vs. core-core interactions in gold nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milowska, Karolina Z; Stolarczyk, Jacek K

    2016-05-14

    The controlled assembly of ligand-coated gold nanoclusters (NCs) into larger structures paves the way for new applications ranging from electronics to nanomedicine. Here, we demonstrate through rigorous density functional theory (DFT) calculations employing novel functionals accounting for van der Waals forces that the ligand-ligand interactions determine whether stable assemblies can be formed. The study of NCs with different core sizes, symmetry forms, ligand lengths, mutual crystal orientations, and in the presence of a solvent suggests that core-to-core van der Waals interactions play a lesser role in the assembly. The dominant interactions originate from combination of steric effects, augmented by ligand bundling on NC facets, and related to them changes in electronic properties induced by neighbouring NCs. We also show that, in contrast to standard colloidal theory approach, DFT correctly reproduces the surprising experimental trends in the strength of the inter-particle interaction observed when varying the length of the ligands. The results underpin the importance of understanding NC interactions in designing gold NCs for a specific function.

  15. Molecular single-bond covalent radii for elements 1-118.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyykkö, Pekka; Atsumi, Michiko

    2009-01-01

    A self-consistent system of additive covalent radii, R(AB)=r(A) + r(B), is set up for the entire periodic table, Groups 1-18, Z=1-118. The primary bond lengths, R, are taken from experimental or theoretical data corresponding to chosen group valencies. All r(E) values are obtained from the same fit. Both E-E, E-H, and E-CH(3) data are incorporated for most elements, E. Many E-E' data inside the same group are included. For the late main groups, the system is close to that of Pauling. For other elements it is close to the methyl-based one of Suresh and Koga [J. Phys. Chem. A 2001, 105, 5940] and its predecessors. For the diatomic alkalis MM' and halides XX', separate fits give a very high accuracy. These primary data are then absorbed with the rest. The most notable exclusion are the transition-metal halides and chalcogenides which are regarded as partial multiple bonds. Other anomalies include H(2) and F(2). The standard deviation for the 410 included data points is 2.8 pm.

  16. Application of the method of maximum likelihood to the determination of cepheid radii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balona, L.A.

    1977-01-01

    A method is described whereby the radius of any pulsating star can be obtained by applying the Principle of Maximum Likelihood. The relative merits of this method and of the usual Baade-Wesselink method are discussed in an Appendix. The new method is applied to 54 well-observed cepheids which include a number of spectroscopic binaries and two W Vir stars. An empirical period-radius relation is constructed and discussed in terms of two recent period-luminosity-colour calibrations. It is shown that the new method gives radii with an error of no more than 10 per cent. (author)

  17. Nonlinear thermo-optical properties of two-layered spherical system of gold nanoparticle core and water vapor shell during initial stage of shell expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astafyeva Liudmila

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nonlinear thermo-optical properties of two-layered spherical system of gold nanoparticle core and water vapor shell, created under laser heating of nanoparticle in water, were theoretically investigated. Vapor shell expansion leads to decreasing up to one to two orders of magnitude in comparison with initial values of scattering and extinction of the radiation with wavelengths 532 and 633 nm by system while shell radius is increased up to value of about two radii of nanoparticle. Subsequent increasing of shell radius more than two radii of nanoparticle leads to rise of scattering and extinction properties of system over initial values. The significant decrease of radiation scattering and extinction by system of nanoparticle-vapor shell can be used for experimental detection of the energy threshold of vapor shell formation and investigation of the first stages of its expansion. PACS: 42.62.BE. 78.67. BF

  18. Minimum Q Electrically Small Spherical Magnetic Dipole Antenna - Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinbjerg, Olav; Kim, Oleksiy S.

    2009-01-01

    The stored energies, radiated power, and quality factor of a magnetic-dipole antenna, consisting of a spherical electrical surface current density enclosing a magnetic core, is obtained through direct spatial integration of the internally and externally radiated field expressed in terms...... of spherical vector waves. The obtained quality factor agrees with that of Wheeler and Thal for vanishing free-space electric radius but holds also for larger radii and facilitates the optimal choice of permeability in the presence of the resonances....

  19. The internal core catcher in Super Phenix 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Rigoleur, C.; Kayser, G.; Maurin, G.; Magnon, B.

    1982-07-01

    The internal core catcher in SUPER PHENIX 1 is described here in some detail. The fuel retention capabilities are presented for situations of increasing severity. The first situation corresponds to the core catcher design. It relates to a hypothetical subassembly accident that would cause a limited quantity of fuel, corresponding to the mass of seven subassemblies, to be deposited on the core catcher. For this situation and at all levels of the analysis, the most conservative assumptions are made in order to prove the integrity of the core catcher. The second situation corresponds to a hypothetical larger core melt accident. In this case, for some of the parameters, assumptions are made that correspond to the most likely situations based on engineering considerations. Then the maximum retention capabilities are presented

  20. Self-consistent theory of finite Fermi systems and radii of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saperstein, E. E.; Tolokonnikov, S. V.

    2011-01-01

    Present-day self-consistent approaches in nuclear theory were analyzed from the point of view of describing distributions of nuclear densities. The generalized method of the energy density functional due to Fayans and his coauthors (this is the most successful version of the self-consistent theory of finite Fermi systems) was the first among the approaches under comparison. The second was the most successful version of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock method with the HFB-17 functional due to Goriely and his coauthors. Charge radii of spherical nuclei were analyzed in detail. Several isotopic chains of deformed nuclei were also considered. Charge-density distributions ρ ch (r) were calculated for several spherical nuclei. They were compared with model-independent data extracted from an analysis of elastic electron scattering on nuclei.

  1. Evaluation report on CCTF Core-II reflood test C2-1 (Run 55)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iguchi, Tadashi; Sugimoto, Jun; Akimoto, Hajime; Okubo, Tsutomu; Murao, Yoshio

    1991-10-01

    A high pressure test (0.42 MPa) on the reflood phenomena was performed with the CCTF. The result of the test was compared with the experimental result of the base case test (0.2 MPa). (1) The overall flow characteristics in the high pressure test were qualitatively similar to that of the base case test. Any qualitatively different phenomena were not recognized during reflood phase. This indicates that it is reasonable to utilize the physical reflood model developed from the result of the base case test to the high pressure condition at least up to 0.42 MPa for prediction of reflood behavior of PWRs. (2) On the other hand, following quantitative influence of high pressure on reflood phenomena was observed. The core cooling was better, and the mass flow rate of the steam generated in the core was larger. However, the steam velocity was smaller due to higher density of the steam. Therefore, the steam discharge through loops was easier and hence the so-called steam binding effect was weaker. And, the water accumulation rate in the core was larger. Consequently the core flooding mass flow rate was larger. Since the core cooling was better, the maximum core temperature was lower and the last quenching was earlier. This result was the same as that previously observed in CCTF tests in the scope of the pressure upto 0.3 MPa. (3) The higher pressure leads to the better core cooling, and hence the safety margin increases with the increase in the pressure. (author)

  2. Effect of Nanoparticle Core Size on Polymer-Coated Gold Nanoparticle Location in Block Copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, J. D.; Fredrickson, G. H.; Kramer, E. J.

    2009-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles modified by short chain polymer thiols [Au-PS] can be designed to strongly localize either in the PS domains of a polystyrene-b-poly(2-vinylpyridine) [PS-PVP] block copolymer or at the interface. The P2VP block has a stronger attractive interaction with bare gold than the PS block. Thus, when the areal chain density σ of end-attached PS chains falls below a critical areal chain density σc the Au-PS nanoparticles adsorb to the PS-b-P2VP interface. The effect of the polymer ligand molecular weight on the σc has been shown to scale as σc˜ ((R + Rg)/(R*Rg))̂2, where R is the curvature of the Au nanoparticle core radius. To test this scaling relation for σc further we are synthesizing gold nanoparticles with different core radii and will present preliminary results on σc as a function of R.

  3. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Ken.

    1989-01-01

    In PWR type reactors, a cooling water spray portion of emergency core cooling pipelines incorporated into pipelines on high temperature side is protruded to the inside of an upper plenum. Upon rupture of primary pipelines, pressure in a pressure vessel is abruptly reduced to generate a great amount of steams in the reactor core, which are discharged at a high flow rate into the primary pipelines on high temperature side. However, since the inside of the upper plenum has a larger area and the steam flow is slow, as compared with that of the pipelines on the high temperature side, ECCS water can surely be supplied into the reactor core to promote the re-flooding of the reactor core and effectively cool the reactor. Since the nuclear reactor can effectively be cooled to enable the promotion of pressure reduction and effective supply of coolants during the period of pressure reduction upon LOCA, the capacity of the pressure accumulation vessel can be decreased. Further, the re-flooding time for the reactor is shortened to provide an effect contributing to the improvement of the safety and the reduction of the cost. (N.H.)

  4. Powered bone marrow biopsy procedures produce larger core specimens, with less pain, in less time than with standard manual devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry J. Miller

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow sampling remains essential in the evaluation of hematopoietic and many non-hematopoietic disorders. One common limitation to these procedures is the discomfort experienced by patients. To address whether a Powered biopsy system could reduce discomfort while providing equivalent or better results, we performed a randomized trial in adult volunteers. Twenty-six subjects underwent bilateral biopsies with each device. Core samples were obtained in 66.7% of Manual insertions; 100% of Powered insertions (P=0.002. Initial mean biopsy core lengths were 11.1±4.5 mm for the Manual device; 17.0±6.8 mm for the Powered device (P<0.005. Pathology assessment for the Manual device showed a mean length of 6.1±5.6 mm, width of 1.0±0.7 mm, and volume of 11.0±10.8 mm3. Powered device measurements were mean length of 15.3±6.1 mm, width of 2.0±0.3 mm, and volume of 49.1±21.5 mm3 (P<0.001. The mean time to core ejection was 86 seconds for Manual device; 47 seconds for the Powered device (P<0.001. The mean second look overall pain score was 33.3 for the Manual device; 20.9 for the Powered (P=0.039. We conclude that the Powered biopsy device produces superior sized specimens, with less overall pain, in less time.

  5. Polarization effects on spectra of spherical core/shell nanostructures: Perturbation theory against finite difference approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibral, Asmaa; Zouitine, Asmaa; Assaid, El Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Poisson equation is solved analytically in the case of a point charge placed anywhere in a spherical core/shell nanostructure, immersed in aqueous or organic solution or embedded in semiconducting or insulating matrix. Conduction and valence band-edge alignments between core and shell are described by finite height barriers. Influence of polarization charges induced at the surfaces where two adjacent materials meet is taken into account. Original expressions of electrostatic potential created everywhere in the space by a source point charge are derived. Expressions of self-polarization potential describing the interaction of a point charge with its own image–charge are deduced. Contributions of double dielectric constant mismatch to electron and hole ground state energies as well as nanostructure effective gap are calculated via first order perturbation theory and also by finite difference approach. Dependencies of electron, hole and gap energies against core to shell radii ratio are determined in the case of ZnS/CdSe core/shell nanostructure immersed in water or in toluene. It appears that finite difference approach is more efficient than first order perturbation method and that the effect of polarization charge may in no case be neglected as its contribution can reach a significant proportion of the value of nanostructure gap

  6. Polarization effects on spectra of spherical core/shell nanostructures: Perturbation theory against finite difference approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibral, Asmaa [Equipe d' Optique et Electronique du Solide, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Chouaïb Doukkali, B. P. 20 El Jadida principale, El Jadida, Royaume du Maroc (Morocco); Laboratoire d' Instrumentation, Mesure et Contrôle, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Chouaïb Doukkali, B. P. 20 El Jadida principale, El Jadida, Royaume du Maroc (Morocco); Zouitine, Asmaa [Département de Physique, Ecole Nationale Supérieure d' Enseignement Technique, Université Mohammed V Souissi, B. P. 6207 Rabat-Instituts, Rabat, Royaume du Maroc (Morocco); Assaid, El Mahdi, E-mail: eassaid@yahoo.fr [Equipe d' Optique et Electronique du Solide, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Chouaïb Doukkali, B. P. 20 El Jadida principale, El Jadida, Royaume du Maroc (Morocco); Laboratoire d' Instrumentation, Mesure et Contrôle, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Chouaïb Doukkali, B. P. 20 El Jadida principale, El Jadida, Royaume du Maroc (Morocco); and others

    2015-02-01

    Poisson equation is solved analytically in the case of a point charge placed anywhere in a spherical core/shell nanostructure, immersed in aqueous or organic solution or embedded in semiconducting or insulating matrix. Conduction and valence band-edge alignments between core and shell are described by finite height barriers. Influence of polarization charges induced at the surfaces where two adjacent materials meet is taken into account. Original expressions of electrostatic potential created everywhere in the space by a source point charge are derived. Expressions of self-polarization potential describing the interaction of a point charge with its own image–charge are deduced. Contributions of double dielectric constant mismatch to electron and hole ground state energies as well as nanostructure effective gap are calculated via first order perturbation theory and also by finite difference approach. Dependencies of electron, hole and gap energies against core to shell radii ratio are determined in the case of ZnS/CdSe core/shell nanostructure immersed in water or in toluene. It appears that finite difference approach is more efficient than first order perturbation method and that the effect of polarization charge may in no case be neglected as its contribution can reach a significant proportion of the value of nanostructure gap.

  7. Measurement of nuclear moments and radii by collinear laser spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Geithner, W R; Lievens, P; Kotrotsios, G; Silverans, R; Kappertz, S

    2002-01-01

    %IS304 %title\\\\ \\\\Collinear laser spectroscopy on a fast beam has proven to be a widely applicable and very efficient tool for measurements of changes in mean square nuclear charge radii, nuclear spins, magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments. Recent developments of extremely sensitive non-optical detection schemes enabled for some elements the extension of the measurements towards the very short-lived isotopes in the far wings of the ISOLDE production curves. The gain in sensitivity opens up new perspectives, particularly for measurements on lighter nuclei whose ground-state properties can be interpreted by large scale microscopic calculations instead of the more phenomenologic models used for heavier nuclei.\\\\ \\\\ For the sequence of argon isotopes $^{32-40}$Ar and $^{46}$Ar isotope shifts and nuclear moments were measured by optical pumping followed by state selective collisional ionization and detection of the $\\beta$-decay. Similarly, the low-background $\\alpha$-detection was used to extend earlie...

  8. Tidal radii of the globular clusters M 5, M 12, M 13, M 15, M 53, NGC 5053 and NGC 5466 from automated star counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, I.; Scholz, R.-D.

    1997-04-01

    We present new tidal radii for seven Galactic globular clusters using the method of automated star counts on Schmidt plates of the Tautenburg, Palomar and UK telescopes. The plates were fully scanned with the APM system in Cambridge (UK). Special account was given to a reliable background subtraction and the correction of crowding effects in the central cluster region. For the latter we used a new kind of crowding correction based on a statistical approach to the distribution of stellar images and the luminosity function of the cluster stars in the uncrowded area. The star counts were correlated with surface brightness profiles of different authors to obtain complete projected density profiles of the globular clusters. Fitting an empirical density law (King 1962) we derived the following structural parameters: tidal radius r_t_, core radius r_c_ and concentration parameter c. In the cases of NGC 5466, M 5, M 12, M 13 and M 15 we found an indication for a tidal tail around these objects (cf. Grillmair et al. 1995).

  9. Symmetric aluminum-wire arrays generate high-quality Z pinches at large array radii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanford, T.W.; Mock, R.C.; Spielman, R.B. [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Peterson, D.L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-0010 (United States); Mosher, D. [Naval Research Laboratory, Pulsed Power Physics Branch, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Roderick, N.F. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

    1998-10-01

    A Saturn-accelerator study of annular, aluminum-wire array, Z-pinch implosions, in the calculated high-wire-number plasma-shell regime [Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 77}, 5063 (1996)], shows that the radiated x-ray pulse width increases from about 4 nsec to about 7 nsec, when the radius of the array is increased from 8.75 to 20 mm at a fixed array mass of 0.6 mg. Eulerian radiation- magnetohydrodynamic code (E-RMHC) simulations in the r-z plane suggest that this pulse-width increase with radius is due to the faster growth of the shell thickness (that arises from a two-stage development in the magnetic Rayleigh{endash}Taylor instability) relative to the increase in the shell implosion velocity. Over the array radii explored, the measured peak total x-ray power of {approximately}40 TW and energy of {approximately}325 kJ show little change outside of a {plus_minus}15{percent} shot-to-shot fluctuation and are consistent with the E-RMHC simulations. Similarly, the measured peak {ital K}-shell (lines plus continuum) power of {approximately}8 TW and energy of {approximately}70 kJ show little change with radius. The minimal change in {ital K}-shell yield is in agreement with simple {ital K}-shell radiation scaling models that assume a fixed radial compression for all initial array radii. These results suggest that the improved uniformity provided by the large number of wires in the initial array reduces the disruptive effects of the Rayleigh{endash}Taylor instability observed in small-wire-number imploding loads. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Fuel requirements for experimental devices in MTR reactors. A perturbation model for reactor core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beeckmans de West-Meerbeeck, A.

    1991-01-01

    Irradiation in neutron absorbing devices, requiring high fast neutron fluxes in the core or high thermal fluxes in the reflector and flux traps, lead to higher density fuel and larger core dimensions. A perturbation model of the reactor core helps to estimate the fuel requirements. (orig.)

  11. Freeze-out radii extracted from three-pion cumulants in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belmont, R.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Böhmer, F. V.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A R; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, T. O.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dørheim, S.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Esposito, M.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A S; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J. Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gumbo, M.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, T. O.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hippolyte, B.; Hladky, J.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Innocenti, G. M.; Ionita, C.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Jachołkowski, A.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H S Y; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kadyshevskiy, V.; Kalcher, S.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Khan, M. M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskikh, A.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kravčáková, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kučera, V.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Lea, R.; Lee, G. R.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; Leoncino, M.; León Monzón, I.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lu, X. G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Luzzi, C.; Ma, R.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martashvili, I.; Martin, N. A.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Okatan, A.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Sahoo, P.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Palmeri, A.; Pant, D.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Pesci, A.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L M; Poghosyan, M. G.; Pohjoisaho, E. H O; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Rauf, A. W.; Razazi, V.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Reidt, F.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J. P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rivetti, A.; Rocco, E.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohni, S.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Sánchez Rodríguez, F. J.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seo, J.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, N.; Sharma, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J M; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Spacek, M.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A P; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Susa, T.; Symons, T. J M; Szabo, A.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tarantola Peloni, A.; Tarazona Martinez, A.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terrevoli, C.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Torii, H.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ulery, J.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Vannucci, L.; Van Der Maarel, J.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wagner, V.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, D.; Weber, M.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C S; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Xiang, C.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yang, S.; Yano, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yoo, I. K.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaccolo, V.; Zach, C.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, F.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2014-01-01

    In high-energy collisions, the spatio-temporal size of the particle production region can be measured using the Bose-Einstein correlations of identical bosons at low relative momentum. The source radii are typically extracted using two-pion correlations, and characterize the system at the last stage

  12. Inner core tilt and polar motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumberry, Mathieu; Bloxham, Jeremy

    2002-11-01

    A tilted inner core permits exchange of angular momentum between the core and the mantle through gravitational and pressure torques and, as a result, changes in the direction of Earth's axis of rotation with respect to the mantle. We have developed a model to calculate the amplitude of the polar motion that results from an equatorial torque at the inner core boundary which tilts the inner core out of alignment with the mantle. We specifically address the issue of the role of the inner core tilt in the decade polar motion known as the Markowitz wobble. We show that a decade polar motion of the same amplitude as the observed Markowitz wobble requires a torque of 1020 N m which tilts the inner core by 0.07 degrees. This result critically depends on the viscosity of the inner core; for a viscosity less than 5 × 1017 Pa s, larger torques are required. We investigate the possibility that a torque of 1020 N m with decadal periodicity can be produced by electromagnetic coupling between the inner core and torsional oscillations of the flow in the outer core. We demonstrate that a radial magnetic field at the inner core boundary of 3 to 4 mT is required to obtain a torque of such amplitude. The resulting polar motion is eccentric and polarized, in agreement with the observations. Our model suggests that equatorial torques at the inner core boundary might also excite the Chandler wobble, provided there exists a physical mechanism that can generate a large torque at a 14 month period.

  13. The NuSTAR spectrum of Mrk 335: extreme relativistic effects within two gravitational radii of the event horizon?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parker, M. L.; Wilkins, D. R.; Fabian, A. C.

    2014-01-01

    gravitational radii (R-G) of the event horizon. The reflection fraction decreases sharply with increasing flux, consistent with a point source moving up to above 10 R-G as the source brightens. We constrain the spin parameter to greater than 0.9 at the 3 sigma confidence level. By adding a spin-dependent upper...

  14. The influence of core bypass flow during SBLOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maselj, A.; Jurkovic, M.

    1996-01-01

    Many parameters affect the behaviour of a NPP during a Small Break Loss of Coolant Accident (SBLOCA). The bypass flow between the core side and the downcomer is one of them. Different PWRs have different values of core bypass flow. In spite of the complexity of the real situation in the primary system during SBLOCA, some fundamental details of the phenomena can be explained with simplified mathematical models, which relate on basic parameters of the primary coolant. These models define the conditions for loop seal clearance and final results are confirmed with measured values. The analysis presented in the paper refers to Bethsy Test 9.1.b SB LOCA scenario, with variation of core bypass flow. Basic RELAP5 input model calculation results show very good agreement with the experimental data. The core liquid level depression before loop seal clearance is lower in case of smaller core bypass flow. This affects the fuel clad temperature because of different heat transfer mechanisms. Time of loop seal clearance is delayed with larger core bypass flow and consequently lower differential pressure between downcomer and core. (author)

  15. Radiation pattern of open ended waveguide in air core surrounded by annular plasma column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, D.R.; Verma, J.S.

    1977-01-01

    Radiation pattern of open ended waveguide excited in circular symmetric mode (TM 01 ) in an air core having central conductor and surrounded by an annular plasma column is studied. The field distribution at the open end of the waveguide is considered to be equivalent to the vector sum of magnetic current rings of various radii, ranging from the outer radius of the inner conductor to the inner radius of the outer conductor of the waveguide at the open end. The radiation field is obtained as a vector sum of field components due to individual rings of current. Such a configuration gives rise to multiple narrow radiation beams away from the critical angle. (author)

  16. Influence of core NA on thermal-induced mode instabilities in high power fiber amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, Rumao; Ma, Pengfei; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu; Liu, Zejin

    2015-01-01

    We report on the influence of core NA on thermal-induced mode instabilities (MI) in high power fiber amplifiers. The influence of core NA and the V-parameter on MI has been investigated numerically. It shows that core NA has a larger influence on MI for fibers with a smaller core-cladding-ratio, and the influence of core NA on the threshold is more obvious when the amplifiers are pumped at 915 nm. The dependence of the threshold on the V-parameter revealed that the threshold increases linearly as the V-parameter decreases when the V-parameter is larger than 3.5, and the threshold shows an exponential increase as the V-parameter decreases when the V-parameter is less than 3.5. We also discussed the effect of linewidth on MI, which indicates that the influence of linewidth can be neglected for a linewidth smaller than 1 nm when the fiber core NA is smaller than 0.07 and the fiber length is shorter than 20 m. Fiber amplifiers with different core NA were experimentally analyzed, which agreed with the theoretical predictions. (letter)

  17. Xenon oscillation tests in four-loop PWR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Norihiko; Osaka, Kenichi; Shimada, Shoichiro; Tochihara, Hiroshi; Machii, Seigo

    1980-01-01

    The Kansai Electric Power Co.'s OHI Unit 1 and 2 are the first 4-loop PWRs in Japan which use 17 x 17 fuel assemblies and have essentially the same plant parameters. A 4-loop core has larger core radius and higher power density than those of 2- or 3-loop cores, and is less stable for Xe oscillation. It is therefore important to confirm that Xe oscillations in radial direction are sufficiently stable in a 4-loop core. Radial and axial Xe oscillation tests were performed during the startup physics tests of OHI Unit 1 and 2; Xe oscillation was induced by perturbation of control rods and the Xe effect on power distribution observed periodically. The test results show that the transverse Xe oscillation in the 4-loop core is sufficiently stable and that the agreement between the measurement and the calculated prediction is good. (author)

  18. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    formation comprised of coarse, large-grain sand in ice. Results with this core showed that the viscosity of the drilling fluid must also be carefully controlled. When coarse sand was being cored, the core barrel became stuck because the drilling fluid was not viscous enough to completely remove the large grains of sand. These tests were very valuable to the project by showing the difficulties in coring permafrost or hydrates in a laboratory environment (as opposed to a field environment where drilling costs are much higher and the potential loss of equipment greater). Among the conclusions reached from these simulated hydrate coring tests are the following: Frozen hydrate core samples can be recovered successfully; A spring-finger core catcher works best for catching hydrate cores; Drilling fluid can erode the core and reduces its diameter, making it more difficult to capture the core; Mud must be designed with proper viscosity to lift larger cuttings; and The bottom 6 inches of core may need to be drilled dry to capture the core successfully.

  19. Engineered inorganic core/shell nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mélinon, Patrice, E-mail: patrice.melinon@univ-lyon1.fr [Institut Lumière matière Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 et CNRS et OMNT, Domaine Scientifique de la Doua, Bâtiment Léon Brillouin, 43 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, F 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Begin-Colin, Sylvie [IPCMS et OMNT, 23 rue du Loess BP 43, 67034 STRASBOURG Cedex 2 (France); Duvail, Jean Luc [IMN UMR 6502 et OMNT Campus Sciences : 2 rue de la Houssinire, BP32229, 44322 Nantes Cedex3 (France); Gauffre, Fabienne [SPM et OMNT : Institut des sciences chimiques de Rennes - UMR 6226, 263 Avenue du General Leclerc, CS 74205, 35042 RENNES Cedex (France); Boime, Nathalie Herlin [IRAMIS-NIMBE, Laboratoire Francis Perrin (CEA CNRS URA 2453) et OMNT, Bat 522, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Ledoux, Gilles [Institut Lumière Matière Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 et CNRS et OMNT, Domaine Scientifique de la Doua, Bâtiment Alfred Kastler 43 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918 F 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Plain, Jérôme [Universit de technologie de Troyes LNIO-ICD, CNRS et OMNT 12 rue Marie Curie - CS 42060 - 10004 Troyes cedex (France); Reiss, Peter [CEA Grenoble, INAC-SPrAM, UMR 5819 CEA-CNRS-UJF et OMNT, Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Silly, Fabien [CEA, IRAMIS, SPEC, TITANS, CNRS 2464 et OMNT, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Warot-Fonrose, Bénédicte [CEMES-CNRS, Université de Toulouse et OMNT, 29 rue Jeanne Marvig F 31055 Toulouse (France)

    2014-10-20

    It has been for a long time recognized that nanoparticles are of great scientific interest as they are effectively a bridge between bulk materials and atomic structures. At first, size effects occurring in single elements have been studied. More recently, progress in chemical and physical synthesis routes permitted the preparation of more complex structures. Such structures take advantages of new adjustable parameters including stoichiometry, chemical ordering, shape and segregation opening new fields with tailored materials for biology, mechanics, optics magnetism, chemistry catalysis, solar cells and microelectronics. Among them, core/shell structures are a particular class of nanoparticles made with an inorganic core and one or several inorganic shell layer(s). In earlier work, the shell was merely used as a protective coating for the core. More recently, it has been shown that it is possible to tune the physical properties in a larger range than that of each material taken separately. The goal of the present review is to discuss the basic properties of the different types of core/shell nanoparticles including a large variety of heterostructures. We restrict ourselves on all inorganic (on inorganic/inorganic) core/shell structures. In the light of recent developments, the applications of inorganic core/shell particles are found in many fields including biology, chemistry, physics and engineering. In addition to a representative overview of the properties, general concepts based on solid state physics are considered for material selection and for identifying criteria linking the core/shell structure and its resulting properties. Chemical and physical routes for the synthesis and specific methods for the study of core/shell nanoparticle are briefly discussed.

  20. Core design study on reduced-moderation water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiroshi, Akie; Yoshihiro, Nakano; Toshihisa, Shirakawa; Tsutomu, Okubo; Takamichi, Iwamura

    2002-01-01

    The conceptual core design study of reduced-moderation water reactors (RMWRs) with tight-pitched MOX-fuelled lattice has been carried out at JAERI. Several different RMWR core concepts based on both BWR and PWR have been proposed. All the core concepts meet with the aim to achieve both a conversion ratio of 1.0 or larger and negative void reactivity coefficient. As one of these RMWR concepts, the ABWR compatible core is also proposed. Although the conversion ratio of this core is 1.0 and the void coefficient is negative, the discharge burn-up of the fuel was about 25 GWd/t. By adopting a triangular fuel pin lattice for the reduction of moderator volume fraction and modifying axial Pu enrichment distribution, it was aimed to extend the discharge burn-up of ABWR compatible type RMWR. By using a triangular fuel lattice of smaller moderator volume fraction, discharge burn-up of 40 GWd/t seems achievable, keeping the high conversion ratio and the negative void coefficient. (authors)

  1. ULTRA-COMPACT DWARFS IN THE CORE OF THE COMA CLUSTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madrid, Juan P.; Graham, Alister W.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Spitler, Lee R.; Harris, William E.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Ferguson, Henry C.; Carter, David; Blakeslee, John P.

    2010-01-01

    We have discovered both a red and a blue subpopulation of ultra-compact dwarf (UCD) galaxy candidates in the Coma galaxy cluster. We analyzed deep F475W (Sloan g) and F814W (I) Hubble Space Telescope images obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys Wide Field Channel as part of the Coma Cluster Treasury Survey and have fitted the light profiles of ∼5000 point-like sources in the vicinity of NGC 4874, one of the two central dominant galaxies of the Coma Cluster. Although almost all of these sources are globular clusters that remain unresolved, we found that 52 objects have effective radii between ∼10 and 66 pc, in the range spanned by dwarf globular transition objects (DGTOs) and UCDs. Of these 52 compact objects, 25 are brighter than M V ∼ -11 mag, a magnitude conventionally thought to separate UCDs and globular clusters. The UCD/DGTO candidates have the same color and luminosity distribution as the most luminous globular clusters within the red and blue subpopulations of the immensely rich NGC 4874 globular cluster system. Unlike standard globular clusters, blue and red UCD/DGTO subpopulations have the same median effective radius. The spatial distribution of UCD/DGTO candidates reveals that they congregate toward NGC 4874 and are not uniformly distributed. We find a relative deficit of UCD/DGTOs compared with globular clusters in the inner 15 kpc around NGC 4874; however, at larger radii UCD/DGTO and globular clusters follow the same spatial distribution.

  2. Basic criticality relations for gas core design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    Minimum critical fissile concentrations are calculated for U-233, U-235, Pu-239, and Am-242m mixed homogeneously with hydrogen at temperatures to 15,000K. Minimum critical masses of the same mixtures in a 1000 liter sphere are also calculated. It is shown that propellent efficiencies of a gas core fizzler engine using Am-242m as fuel would exceed those in a solid core engine as small as 1000L operating at 100 atmospheres pressure. The same would be true for Pu-239 and possibly U-233 at pressures of 1000 atm. or at larger volumes

  3. Cathode fall thickness of abnormal glow discharges between parallel-plane electrodes in different radii at low pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Yangyang; Luo, Haiyun; Zou, Xiaobing; Wang, Xinxin, E-mail: wangxx@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Electrical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-02-15

    In order to investigate the influence of electrode radius on the characteristics of cathode fall thickness, experiments of low-pressure (20 Pa ≤ p ≤ 30 Pa) abnormal glow discharge were carried out between parallel-plane electrodes in different radii keeping gap distance unchanged. Axial distributions of light intensity were obtained from the discharge images captured using a Charge Coupled Device camera. The assumption that the position of the negative glow peak coincides with the edge of cathode fall layer was verified based on a two-dimensional model, and the cathode fall thicknesses, d{sub c}, were calculated from the axial distributions of light intensity. It was observed that the position of peak emission shifts closer to the cathode as current or pressure grows. The dependence of cathode fall thickness on the gas pressure and normalized current J/p{sup 2} was presented, and it was found that for discharges between electrodes in large radius the curves of pd{sub c} against J/p{sup 2} were superimposed on each other, however, this phenomenon will not hold for discharges between the smaller electrodes. The reason for this phenomenon is that the transverse diffusions of charged particles are not the same in two gaps between electrodes with different radii.

  4. Feasibility study of full-reactor gas core demonstration test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunze, J. F.; Lofthouse, J. H.; Shaffer, C. J.; Macbeth, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    Separate studies of nuclear criticality, flow patterns, and thermodynamics for the gas core reactor concept have all given positive indications of its feasibility. However, before serious design for a full scale gas core application can be made, feasibility must be shown for operation with full interaction of the nuclear, thermal, and hydraulic effects. A minimum sized, and hence minimum expense, test arrangement is considered for a full gas core configuration. It is shown that the hydrogen coolant scattering effects dominate the nuclear considerations at elevated temperatures. A cavity diameter of somewhat larger than 4 ft (122 cm) will be needed if temperatures high enough to vaporize uranium are to be achieved.

  5. Collinear Laser Spectroscopy of Potassium Nuclear Charge Radii beyond N = 28

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2078903; Jochim, Selim

    Nuclear ground-state properties, such as spin, charge radius, and magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments are important quantities to describe the nucleus. The comparison of experimental data to shell-model calculations gives insight in the underlying nuclear structure and composition of ground-state wave functions. Spins and charge radii can also be used to test the predictions of state-of-the-art microscopic models. This work contributes to these studies providing new measurements in the region of the nuclear chart around the magic proton number Z = 20. The data have been obtained at the collinear laser spectroscopy setup COLLAPS located at the radioactive-ion-beam facility ISOLDE at CERN. Using bunched-beam laser spectroscopy hyperne structure spectra of the potassium isotopes with mass number A = 48 51 could be recorded for the first time. Ground-state spins and isotope shifts could be deduced for 4851K contributing to the evolution of the d3=2 orbital beyond the shell closure at the magi...

  6. Single-mode fiber laser based on core-cladding mode conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shigeru; Schülzgen, Axel; Peyghambarian, N

    2008-02-15

    A single-mode fiber laser based on an intracavity core-cladding mode conversion is demonstrated. The fiber laser consists of an Er-doped active fiber and two fiber Bragg gratings. One Bragg grating is a core-cladding mode converter, and the other Bragg grating is a narrowband high reflector that selects the lasing wavelength. Coupling a single core mode and a single cladding mode by the grating mode converter, the laser operates as a hybrid single-mode laser. This approach for designing a laser cavity provides a much larger mode area than conventional large-mode-area step-index fibers.

  7. Pump absorption in coiled and twisted double-clad hexagonal fiber: effect of launching conditions and core location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalidet, Romain; Peterka, Pavel; Doya, Valérie; Aubrecht, Jan; Koška, Pavel

    2018-02-01

    Ever extending applications of fiber lasers require energy efficient, high-power, small footprint and reliable fiber lasers and laser wavelength versatility. To meet these demands, next generation of active fibers for high-power fiber lasers is coming out that will eventually offer tailored spectroscopic properties, high robustness and reduced cooling requirements and improved efficiency through tailored pump absorption. We report on numerical modelling of the efficiency of the pump absorption in double clad active fibers with hexagonal shape of the inner cladding cross section and rare-earth-doped core. We analyze both the effect of different radii of the spool on which the fiber is coiled and different fiber twisting rates. Two different launching conditions were investigated: the Gaussian input pump beam and a speckle pattern that mimics the output of the pump laser diode pigtail. We have found that by asymmetric position of the rare-earth-doped core we can significantly improve the pump absorption.

  8. Development of advanced BWR fuel bundle with spectral shift rod (3) -transient analysis of ABWR core with SSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikegawa, T.; Chaki, M.; Ohga, Y.; Abe, M.

    2010-01-01

    The spectral shift rod (SSR) is a new type of water rod, utilized instead of the conventional water rod, in which a water level develops during core operation. The water level can be changed according to the fuel channel flow rate. In this study, ABWR plant performance with SSR fuel bundles under transient conditions has been evaluated using the TRACG code. The TRACG code, which can treat three-dimensional hydrodynamic calculations in a reactor pressure vessel, is well suited for evaluating the reactor transient performance with the SSR fuel bundles because it can calculate the water levels in the SSR at each channel grouping and therefore evaluate the core reactivity according to the water level changes in the SSR. 'Generator load rejection with total turbine bypass failure' and 'Recirculation flow control failure with increasing flow' were selected as cases which may increase the reactivity with the increasing water level in the SSR. It was found that the absolute value of the void reactivity coefficient in the SSR core was larger than that in the conventional water rod core because the core averaged void fraction in the SSR core, which has the vapor region above the water level in the SSR, was larger than that in the conventional water rod core. Therefore, AMCPR for the SSR core was a little larger than that for the conventional water rod core; however, the difference was smaller than 0.02 because the inlet of the SSR ascending path was designed to be small enough to prevent the rapid water level increase in the SSR. (authors)

  9. Different timing features in brain processing of core and moral disgust pictures: an event-related potentials study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyi Zhang

    Full Text Available Disgust, an emotion motivating withdrawal from offensive stimuli, protects us from the risk of biological pathogens and sociomoral violations. Homogeneity of its two types, namely, core and moral disgust has been under intensive debate. To examine the dynamic relationship between them, we recorded event-related potentials (ERPs for core disgust, moral disgust and neutral pictures while participants performed a modified oddball task. ERP analysis revealed that N1 and P2 amplitudes were largest for the core disgust pictures, indicating automatic processing of the core disgust-evoking pictures. N2 amplitudes were higher for pictures evoking moral disgust relative to core disgust and neutral pictures, reflecting a violation of social norms. The core disgust pictures elicited larger P3 and late positive potential (LPP amplitudes in comparison with the moral disgust pictures which, in turn, elicited larger P3 and LPP amplitudes when compared to the neutral pictures. Taken together, these findings indicated that core and moral disgust pictures elicited different neural activities at various stages of information processing, which provided supporting evidence for the heterogeneity of disgust.

  10. Different timing features in brain processing of core and moral disgust pictures: an event-related potentials study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangyi; Guo, Qi; Zhang, Youxue; Lou, Liandi; Ding, Daoqun

    2015-01-01

    Disgust, an emotion motivating withdrawal from offensive stimuli, protects us from the risk of biological pathogens and sociomoral violations. Homogeneity of its two types, namely, core and moral disgust has been under intensive debate. To examine the dynamic relationship between them, we recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) for core disgust, moral disgust and neutral pictures while participants performed a modified oddball task. ERP analysis revealed that N1 and P2 amplitudes were largest for the core disgust pictures, indicating automatic processing of the core disgust-evoking pictures. N2 amplitudes were higher for pictures evoking moral disgust relative to core disgust and neutral pictures, reflecting a violation of social norms. The core disgust pictures elicited larger P3 and late positive potential (LPP) amplitudes in comparison with the moral disgust pictures which, in turn, elicited larger P3 and LPP amplitudes when compared to the neutral pictures. Taken together, these findings indicated that core and moral disgust pictures elicited different neural activities at various stages of information processing, which provided supporting evidence for the heterogeneity of disgust.

  11. X-ray core states, atomic size and Moseley's law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.Y.; Karstens, William

    2000-01-01

    Vinti's dipolar sum-rule for the spatial extent of quantum states was tested on atomic K-shell and ns valence states. Agreement between radii derived from absorption spectra and from atomic-structure calculations is excellent, provided Pauli-principle-prohibited transitions are accounted for. These many-electron corrections to the single-electron sum-rule contributed less than 20% to the radii, which supports application of single-electron rules to electron-excess defects as a first approximation. We found the oscillator strength for K-shell excitations decreases rapidly with atomic number because of strength transfer to higher-lying p states. Hence, K-shell contributions to radiation damage decrease with increasing atomic number. A new interpretation of Moseley's law for the X-ray K edge in terms of K-shell radii is described

  12. Multi-core processing and scheduling performance in CMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernández, J M; Evans, D; Foulkes, S

    2012-01-01

    Commodity hardware is going many-core. We might soon not be able to satisfy the job memory needs per core in the current single-core processing model in High Energy Physics. In addition, an ever increasing number of independent and incoherent jobs running on the same physical hardware not sharing resources might significantly affect processing performance. It will be essential to effectively utilize the multi-core architecture. CMS has incorporated support for multi-core processing in the event processing framework and the workload management system. Multi-core processing jobs share common data in memory, such us the code libraries, detector geometry and conditions data, resulting in a much lower memory usage than standard single-core independent jobs. Exploiting this new processing model requires a new model in computing resource allocation, departing from the standard single-core allocation for a job. The experiment job management system needs to have control over a larger quantum of resource since multi-core aware jobs require the scheduling of multiples cores simultaneously. CMS is exploring the approach of using whole nodes as unit in the workload management system where all cores of a node are allocated to a multi-core job. Whole-node scheduling allows for optimization of the data/workflow management (e.g. I/O caching, local merging) but efficient utilization of all scheduled cores is challenging. Dedicated whole-node queues have been setup at all Tier-1 centers for exploring multi-core processing workflows in CMS. We present the evaluation of the performance scheduling and executing multi-core workflows in whole-node queues compared to the standard single-core processing workflows.

  13. Parameters of oscillation generation regions in open star cluster models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, V. M.; Putkov, S. I.

    2017-07-01

    We determine the masses and radii of central regions of open star cluster (OCL) models with small or zero entropy production and estimate the masses of oscillation generation regions in clustermodels based on the data of the phase-space coordinates of stars. The radii of such regions are close to the core radii of the OCL models. We develop a new method for estimating the total OCL masses based on the cluster core mass, the cluster and cluster core radii, and radial distribution of stars. This method yields estimates of dynamical masses of Pleiades, Praesepe, and M67, which agree well with the estimates of the total masses of the corresponding clusters based on proper motions and spectroscopic data for cluster stars.We construct the spectra and dispersion curves of the oscillations of the field of azimuthal velocities v φ in OCL models. Weak, low-amplitude unstable oscillations of v φ develop in cluster models near the cluster core boundary, and weak damped oscillations of v φ often develop at frequencies close to the frequencies of more powerful oscillations, which may reduce the non-stationarity degree in OCL models. We determine the number and parameters of such oscillations near the cores boundaries of cluster models. Such oscillations points to the possible role that gradient instability near the core of cluster models plays in the decrease of the mass of the oscillation generation regions and production of entropy in the cores of OCL models with massive extended cores.

  14. Conductive core of radiation-resistant high-pressure electric bushing, especially for nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajic, V.

    1981-01-01

    A radiation-resistant high-pressure electric bushing was developed featuring a conductive core consisting of a hollow moulding. At the point of attachment to the bushing insulator the core moulding is widened, thus forming a ring support of a diameter larger by at least 10% than the diameter of the conductive core cylindrical section. On the outer side of the pressure body the core cavity is narrowed and tightly closed with the conductor. On the side facing the medium of higher pressure, the conductive core is provided with a thread. Core manufacture and connection of the conductor to the bushing is very simple. The bushing can be used for an environment with pressures exceeding 10 MPa. (J.B.)

  15. Conductive core of radiation-resistant high-pressure electric bushing, especially for nuclear technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zajic, V

    1981-09-01

    A radiation-resistant high-pressure electric bushing was developed featuring a conductive core consisting of a hollow moulding. At the point of attachment to the bushing insulator the core moulding is widened, thus forming a ring support of a diameter larger by at least 10% than the diameter of the conductive core cylindrical section. On the outer side of the pressure body the core cavity is narrowed and tightly closed with the conductor. On the side facing the medium of higher pressure, the conductive core is provided with a thread. Core manufacture and connection of the conductor to the bushing is very simple. The bushing can be used for an environment with pressures exceeding 10 MPa.

  16. Core Characteristics Deterioration due to Plastic Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaido, Chikara; Arai, Satoshi

    This paper discusses the effect of plastic deformation at core manufacturing on the characteristics of cores where non-oriented electrical steel sheets are used as core material. Exciting field and iron loss increase proportionally to plastic deformation in the case of rPeddy currents increase because plastic deformations of crystalline grains are distributed and then the flux distribution is induced. In the case of rP>20, the deterioration tend to saturate, and the increases in magnetic field and iron loss are 1000 to 1500A/m and 2 to 4W/kg. They are related to grain size, and high grade with larger grain may have lager field increase and smaller iron loss increase. Anomalous eddy current losses scarcely increase in this region. In actual motors, the plastic deformation affects iron loss increase although exciting current increases a little.

  17. Uniformity of cylindrical imploding underwater shockwaves at very small radii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanuka, D.; Rososhek, A.; Bland, S. N.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2017-11-01

    We compare the convergent shockwaves generated from underwater, cylindrical arrays of copper wire exploded by multiple kilo-ampere current pulses on nanosecond and microsecond scales. In both cases, the pulsed power devices used for the experiments had the same stored energy (˜500 J) and the wire mass was adjusted to optimize energy transfer to the shockwave. Laser backlit framing images of the shock front were achieved down to the radius of 30 μm. It was found that even in the case of initial azimuthal non-symmetry, the shock wave self-repairs in the final stages of its motion, leading to a highly uniform implosion. In both these and previous experiments, interference fringes have been observed in streak and framing images as the shockwave approached the axis. We have been able to accurately model the origin of the fringes, which is due to the propagation of the laser beam diffracting off the uniform converging shock front. The dynamics of the shockwave and its uniformity at small radii indicate that even with only 500 J stored energies, this technique should produce pressures above 1010 Pa on the axis, with temperatures and densities ideal for warm dense matter research.

  18. DEEP JHKs AND SPITZER IMAGING OF FOUR ISOLATED MOLECULAR CLOUD CORES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, Nicholas L.; Mundy, Lee G.

    2009-01-01

    We present observations in eight wavebands from 1.25 to 24 μm of four dense cores: L204C-2, L1152, L1155C-2, and L1228. Our goals are to study the young stellar object (YSO) population of these cores and to measure the mid-infrared extinction law. With our combined near-infrared and Spitzer photometry, we classify each source in the cores as, among other things, background stars, galaxies, or embedded YSOs. L1152 contains three YSOs and L1228 has seven, but neither L204C-2 nor L1155C-2 appear to contain any YSOs. We estimate an upper limit of 7 x 10 -5 to 5 x 10 -4 L sun for any undiscovered YSOs in our cores. We also compute the line-of-sight extinction law toward each background star. These measurements are averaged spatially, to create χ 2 maps of the changes in the mid-infrared extinction law throughout our cores, and also in different ranges of extinction. From the χ 2 maps, we identify two small regions in L1152 and L1228 where the outflows in those cores appear to be destroying the larger dust grains, thus altering the extinction law in those regions. On average, however, our extinction law is relatively flat from 3.6 to 24 μm for all ranges of extinction and in all four cores. From 3.6 to 8 μm, this law is consistent with a dust model that includes larger dust grains than the diffuse interstellar medium, which suggests grain growth has occurred in our cores. At 24 μm, our extinction law is two to four times higher than predicted by dust models. However, it is similar to other empirical measurements.

  19. Porous Core-Shell Nanostructures for Catalytic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewers, Trevor David

    Porous core-shell nanostructures have recently received much attention for their enhanced thermal stability. They show great potential in the field of catalysis, as reactant gases can diffuse in and out of the porous shell while the core particle is protected from sintering, a process in which particles coalesce to form larger particles. Sintering is a large problem in industry and is the primary cause of irreversible deactivation. Despite the obvious advantages of high thermal stability, porous core-shell nanoparticles can be developed to have additional interactive properties from the combination of the core and shell together, rather than just the core particle alone. This dissertation focuses on developing new porous core-shell systems in which both the core and shell take part in catalysis. Two types of systems are explored; (1) yolk-shell nanostructures with reducible oxide shells formed using the Kirkendall effect and (2) ceramic-based porous oxide shells formed using sol-gel chemistry. Of the Kirkendall-based systems, Au FexOy and Cu CoO were synthesized and studied for catalytic applications. Additionally, ZnO was explored as a potential shelling material. Sol-gel work focused on optimizing synthetic methods to allow for coating of small gold particles, which remains a challenge today. Mixed metal oxides were explored as a shelling material to make dual catalysts in which the product of a reaction on the core particle becomes a reactant within the shell.

  20. Neutronic Design of KALIMER-600 Core with Moderator Rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ser Gi Hong; Sang Ji Kim; Hoon Song; Yeong Il Kim

    2004-01-01

    Recently, the liquid-metal reactor research team of the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) designed a 600 MWe sodium-cooled, metallic fueled fast reactor meeting the goals of Generation-IV, such as economics and proliferation resistance. In this paper, the core design analysis and its performance are reported. The core is designed to have a conversion ratio slightly larger than unity with no blanket assemblies in order not to produce an excess amount of high grade plutonium and to have no need for external feeds of fissile materials. To mitigate the sodium void reactivity of the fuel-self-sufficient core with no blanket assemblies, several design changes from a reference core are tried; reduction of the active core height, annular type cores with central dummy assemblies, and the use of moderator (BeO or ZrH 2 ) rods. As a result of the analysis, it is found that of the considered designs the use of moderator rods for the softening of the core neutron spectrum is the best choice for reducing the sodium void worth with the smallest changes from the reference fuel and assembly designs. The core analysis shows that the sodium void reactivity is reduced by ∼2$ in comparison with the reference core and the core has a much more negative fuel temperature reactivity feedback in comparison with the reference core. (authors)

  1. Effect of Ligand Molecular Weight and Nanoparticle Core Size on Polymer-Coated Gold Nanoparticle Location in Block Copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Joshua; Kim, Bumjoon; Fredrickson, Glenn; Kramer, Ed

    2008-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles modified by short chain polymer thiols [Au-PS] can be designed to strongly localize in either domain of a polystyrene-b-poly(2-vinylpyridine) [PS-PVP] block copolymer or at the interface. The P2VP block has a stronger attractive interaction with bare gold than the PS block. Thus, when the areal chain density σ of end-attached PS chains falls below a critical areal chain density σc the Au-PS nanoparticles adsorb to the PS-b-P2VP interface. The effect of the polymer ligand molecular weight on the σchas been shown to scale as σc˜ ((R+Rg)/(R*Rg))̂2, where R is the curvature of the Au nanoparticle core radius. To test this scaling relation for σc further we are synthesizing gold nanoparticles with different core radii and will present preliminary results on σcas a function of R.

  2. Multi-core System Architecture for Safety-critical Control Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Gang

    and size, and high power consumption. Increasing the frequency of a processor is becoming painful now due to the explosive power consumption. Furthermore, components integrated into a single-core processor have to be certified to the highest SIL, due to that no isolation is provided in a traditional single...... certification cost. Meanwhile, hardware platforms with improved processing power are required to execute the applications of larger size. To tackle the two issues mentioned above, the state of the art approaches are using more Electronic Control Units (ECU) in a federated architecture or increasing......-core processor. A promising alternative to improve processing power and provide isolation is to adopt a multi-core architecture with on-chip isolation. In general, a specific multi-core architecture can facilitate the development and certification of safety-related systems, due to its physical isolation between...

  3. Influence of core design, production technique, and material selection on fracture behavior of yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal fixed dental prostheses produced using different multilayer techniques: split-file, over-pressing, and manually built-up veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Deyar Jallal Hadi; Linderoth, Ewa H; Wennerberg, Ann; Vult Von Steyern, Per

    2016-01-01

    To investigate and compare the fracture strength and fracture mode in eleven groups of currently, the most commonly used multilayer three-unit all-ceramic yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) with respect to the choice of core material, veneering material area, manufacturing technique, design of connectors, and radii of curvature of FDP cores. A total of 110 three-unit Y-TZP FDP cores with one intermediate pontic were made. The FDP cores in groups 1-7 were made with a split-file design, veneered with manually built-up porcelain, computer-aided design-on veneers, and over-pressed veneers. Groups 8-11 consisted of FDPs with a state-of-the-art design, veneered with manually built-up porcelain. All the FDP cores were subjected to simulated aging and finally loaded to fracture. There was a significant difference (Pdesigns, but not between the different types of Y-TZP materials. The split-file designs with VITABLOCS(®) (1,806±165 N) and e.max(®) ZirPress (1,854±115 N) and the state-of-the-art design with VITA VM(®) 9 (1,849±150 N) demonstrated the highest mean fracture values. The shape of a split-file designed all-ceramic reconstruction calls for a different dimension protocol, compared to traditionally shaped ones, as the split-file design leads to sharp approximal indentations acting as fractural impressions, thus decreasing the overall strength. The design of a framework is a crucial factor for the load bearing capacity of an all-ceramic FDP. The state-of-the-art design is preferable since the split-file designed cores call for a cross-sectional connector area at least 42% larger, to have the same load bearing capacity as the state-of-the-art designed cores. All veneering materials and techniques tested in the study, split-file, over-press, built-up porcelains, and glass-ceramics are, with a great safety margin, sufficient for clinical use both anteriorly and posteriorly. Analysis of the fracture pattern shows

  4. Influence of Shell Thickness on the Colloidal Stability of Magnetic Core-Shell Particle Suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Frances; Moreno-Atanasio, Roberto

    2018-01-01

    We present a Discrete Element study of the behavior of magnetic core-shell particles in which the properties of the core and the shell are explicitly defined. Particle cores were considered to be made of pure iron and thus possessed ferromagnetic properties, while particle shells were considered to be made of silica. Core sizes ranged between 0.5 and 4.0 μm with the actual particle size of the core-shell particles in the range between 0.6 and 21 μm. The magnetic cores were considered to have a magnetization of one tenth of the saturation magnetization of iron. This study aimed to understand how the thickness of the shell hinders the formation of particle chains. Chain formation was studied with different shell thicknesses and particle sizes in the presence and absence of an electrical double layer force in order to investigate the effect of surface charge density on the magnetic core-shell particle interactions. For core sizes of 0.5 and 4.0 μm the relative shell thicknesses needed to hinder the aggregation process were approximately 0.4 and 0.6 respectively, indicating that larger core sizes are detrimental to be used in applications in which no flocculation is needed. In addition, the presence of an electrical double layer, for values of surface charge density of less than 20 mC/m 2 , could stop the contact between particles without hindering their vertical alignment. Only when the shell thickness was considerably larger, was the electrical double layer able to contribute to the full disruption of the magnetic flocculation process.

  5. Three regimes of extrasolar planet radius inferred from host star metallicities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchhave, Lars A; Bizzarro, Martin; Latham, David W; Sasselov, Dimitar; Cochran, William D; Endl, Michael; Isaacson, Howard; Juncher, Diana; Marcy, Geoffrey W

    2014-05-29

    Approximately half of the extrasolar planets (exoplanets) with radii less than four Earth radii are in orbits with short periods. Despite their sheer abundance, the compositions of such planets are largely unknown. The available evidence suggests that they range in composition from small, high-density rocky planets to low-density planets consisting of rocky cores surrounded by thick hydrogen and helium gas envelopes. Here we report the metallicities (that is, the abundances of elements heavier than hydrogen and helium) of more than 400 stars hosting 600 exoplanet candidates, and find that the exoplanets can be categorized into three populations defined by statistically distinct (∼4.5σ) metallicity regions. We interpret these regions as reflecting the formation regimes of terrestrial-like planets (radii less than 1.7 Earth radii), gas dwarf planets with rocky cores and hydrogen-helium envelopes (radii between 1.7 and 3.9 Earth radii) and ice or gas giant planets (radii greater than 3.9 Earth radii). These transitions correspond well with those inferred from dynamical mass estimates, implying that host star metallicity, which is a proxy for the initial solids inventory of the protoplanetary disk, is a key ingredient regulating the structure of planetary systems.

  6. On the Role of Dissolved Gases in the Atmosphere Retention of Low-mass Low-density Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chachan, Yayaati; Stevenson, David J.

    2018-02-01

    Low-mass low-density planets discovered by Kepler in the super-Earth mass regime typically have large radii for their inferred masses, implying the presence of H2–He atmospheres. These planets are vulnerable to atmospheric mass loss due to heating by the parent star’s XUV flux. Models coupling atmospheric mass loss with thermal evolution predicted a bimodal distribution of planetary radii, which has gained observational support. However, a key component that has been ignored in previous studies is the dissolution of these gases into the molten core of rock and iron that constitute most of their mass. Such planets have high temperatures (>2000 K) and pressures (∼kbars) at the core-envelope boundary, ensuring a molten surface and a subsurface reservoir of hydrogen that can be 5–10 times larger than the atmosphere. This study bridges this gap by coupling the thermal evolution of the planet and the mass loss of the atmosphere with the thermodynamic equilibrium between the dissolved H2 and the atmospheric H2 (Henry’s law). Dissolution in the interior allows a planet to build a larger hydrogen repository during the planet formation stage. We show that the dissolved hydrogen outgasses to buffer atmospheric mass loss. The slow cooling of the planet also leads to outgassing because solubility decreases with decreasing temperature. Dissolution of hydrogen in the interior therefore increases the atmosphere retention ability of super-Earths. The study highlights the importance of including the temperature- and pressure-dependent solubility of gases in magma oceans and coupling outgassing to planetary evolution models.

  7. Sub-coulomb transfer method of a nucleon for measure orbital radii; Metodo de transferencia sub-coulombiana de un nucleon para medir radios orbitales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilera R, E.F.; Murillo, G.; Ramirez, J.; Avila, O. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    1986-04-15

    The neutron transfer method is revised to measure neutron orbital radii and possible interest systems to apply it are determined. Its were carried out DWBA preliminary calculations for the system {sup 209} Bi(d,t) {sup 208} Bi. (Author)

  8. Construction of 3D Arrays of Cylindrically Hierarchical Structures with ZnO Nanorods Hydrothermally Synthesized on Optical Fiber Cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weixuan Jing

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With ZnO nanorods hydrothermally synthesized on manually assembled arrays of optical fiber cores, 3D arrays of ZnO nanorod-based cylindrically hierarchical structures with nominal pitch 250 μm or 375 μm were constructed. Based on micrographs of scanning electron microscopy and image processing operators of MATLAB software, the 3D arrays of cylindrically hierarchical structures were quantitatively characterized. The values of the actual diameters, the actual pitches, and the parallelism errors suggest that the process capability of the manual assembling is sufficient and the quality of the 3D arrays of cylindrically hierarchical structures is acceptable. The values of the characteristic parameters such as roughness, skewness, kurtosis, correlation length, and power spectrum density show that the surface morphologies of the cylindrically hierarchical structures not only were affected significantly by Zn2+ concentration of the growth solution but also were anisotropic due to different curvature radii of the optical fiber core at side and front view.

  9. Excitation strengths and transition radii differences of one-phonon quadrupole excitations from electron scattering on {sup 92,94}Zr and {sup 94}Mo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheikh Obeid, Abdulrahman

    2014-11-01

    In the framework of this thesis electron scattering experiments on low-energy excitations of {sup 92}Zr and {sup 94}Zr were performed at the S-DALINAC in a momentum transfer range q=0.3-0.6 fm{sup -1}. The nature of one-phonon symmetric and mixed-symmetric 2{sup +} and 3{sup -} states of {sup 92}Zr was investigated by comparison with predictions of the quasi-particle phonon model (QPM). Theoretical (e,e') cross sections have been calculated within the distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) to account for Coulomb distortion effects. The reduced strengths of the one-quadrupole phonon states and the one-octupole phonon state have been extracted. The similarity of the momentum-transfer dependence of the form factors between the 2{sup +} states supports the one-phonon nature of the 2{sup +}{sub 2} state of {sup 92}Zr. A new method based on the Plane Wave Born Approximation (PWBA) for a model-independent determination of the ratio of the E2 transition strengths of fully symmetric (FSS) and mixed-symmetry (MSS) one-phonon excitations of heavy vibrational nuclei is introduced. Due to the sensitivity of electron scattering to charge distributions, the charge transition-radii difference can be determined. The basic assumptions (independence from the ratio of Coulomb corrections and from absolute values of transition radii) are tested within the Tassie model, which makes no specific assumptions about the structure of the states other than collectivity. It is shown that a PWBA analysis of the form factors, which usually fails for heavy nuclei, can nevertheless be applied in a relative analysis. This is a new promising approach to determine the ground state transition strength of the 2{sup +} MSS of vibrational nuclei with a precision limited only by the experimental information about the B(E2;2{sup +}{sub 1}→0{sup +}{sub 1}) strength. The PWBA approach furthermore provides information about differences of the proton transition radii of the respective states

  10. Evaluation report on SCTF Core-II test S2-08

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuki, Akira; Iwamura, Takamichi; Abe, Yutaka; Murao, Yoshio; Adachi, Hiromichi.

    1991-01-01

    The present report investigates the effects of the difference of the core inlet subcooling during reflood in a PWR-LOCA on the thermal-hydraulic behaviors including two-dimensional behaviors in the pressure vessel in the Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF) Core-II tests under gravity feed mode. The following test results are examined: Tests S2-02 (Reference test) and Test S2-08 (High subcooling test). The degree of the difference of the subcooling between the two tests was about 20 to 35 K in the LPCI period. The following conclusions were obtained from this study: (1) Higher the subcooling gave larger amount of water accumulation in the core and gave better core cooling. These tendencies were also recognized in comparisons under the same distance from the quench front. Since the same tendencies can be predicted in the analyses with REFLA code because of the lower steam generation rate below quench front in the high subcooling test, the differences in the tests are supposed to be caused by the same reason. (2) Higher the subcooling gave larger amount of water accumulation in upper plenum. The carry-over liquid mass into hot leg became smaller in the later period in the higher subcooling test. These differences for carry-over and de-entrainment characteristics can be explained by the differences of quench velocity and of steam mass flow rate generated in the core. (3) No significant influence of the different degree of the subcooling was observed on the two-dimensional thermal-hydraulic behaviors in the pressure vessel. Namely, radial differences of sectional void fraction, heat transfer coefficient and the pressure among bundles at the same elevation were almost the same amount for the two tests. Radial differences of liquid levels in the upper plenum was also almost the same amount for the two tests. (J.P.N.)

  11. Particle-number fluctuations and neutron-proton pairing effects on proton and neutron radii of even-even N Almost-Equal-To Z nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douici, M.; Allal, N. H.; Fellah, M.; Benhamouda, N.; Oudih, M. R. [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Faculte de Physique, USTHB BP 32 El-Alia, 16111 Bab-Ezzouar, Alger (Algeria) and Institut des Sciences et Technologie, Centre Universitaire de Khemis Miliana, Route de Theniet-El-Had, 44225 Khemis-Milia (Algeria); Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Faculte de Physique, USTHB BP 32 El-Alia, 16111 Bab-Ezzouar, Alger (Algeria) and Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, COMENA, BP399 Alger-Gare, Alger (Algeria); Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Faculte de Physique, USTHB BP 32 El-Alia, 16111 Bab-Ezzouar, Alger (Algeria)

    2012-10-20

    The particle-number fluctuation effect on the root-mean-square (rms) proton and neutron radii of even-even N Almost-Equal-To Z nuclei is studied in the isovector neutron-proton (np) pairing case using an exact particle-number projection method and the Woods-Saxon model.

  12. Retrievals and Comparisons of Various MODIS-Spectrum Inferred Water Cloud Droplet Effective Radii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu-Lung, Chang; Minnis, Patrick; Lin, Bin; Sunny, Sun-Mack; Khaiyer, Mandana M.

    2007-01-01

    Cloud droplet effective radius retrievals from different Aqua MODIS nearinfrared channels (2.1- micrometer, 3.7- micrometer, and 1.6- micrometer) show considerable differences even among most confident QC pixels. Both Collection 004 and Collection 005 MOD06 show smaller mean effective radii at 3.7- micrometer wavelength than at 2.1- micrometer and 1.6- micrometer wavelengths. Differences in effective radius retrievals between Collection 004 and Collection 005 may be affected by cloud top height/temperature differences, which mainly occur for optically thin clouds. Changes in cloud top height and temperature for thin clouds have different impacts on the effective radius retrievals from 2.1- micrometer, 3.7- micrometer, and 1.6- micrometer channels. Independent retrievals (this study) show, on average, more consistency in the three effective radius retrievals. This study is for Aqua MODIS only.

  13. A new version of DWPI (inelastic pion-nucleus scattering) to incorporate microscopic form factors and differing proton and neutron radii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funsten, H.O.

    1979-01-01

    This is a modification of the Eisenstein-Miller program for calculation of collective inelastic pion-nucleus differential cross sections using free π-N scattering amplitudes. This revision permits the additional use of microscopic (shell model) proton and neutron form factors. It also incorporates separate proton and neutron radii for the nuclear density rho(r) generating the distorted wave optical potential. (Auth.)

  14. New design on air-core resistive NMR imaging magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yan; Mingwu, Fan; Yixin, Miao

    1984-08-01

    A new type of NMR imaging air-core resistive magnet is designed. Based on the BIM Magnetostatic calculation the resultant four equiradial coils structure with optimized shapes of cross section possesses a larger spherical working volume obviously, comparing with the common four-coils imaging magnet. The manufacturing tolerance is also calculated.

  15. Tunable rotary orbits of matter-wave nonlinear modes in attractive Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Y J; Wang, H Z; Malomed, Boris A; Mihalache, Dumitru

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate that by spatially modulating the Bessel optical lattice where a Bose-Einstein condensate is loaded, we get tunable rotary orbits of nonlinear lattice modes. We show that the radially expanding or shrinking Bessel lattice can drag the nonlinear localized modes to orbits of either larger or smaller radii and the rotary velocity of nonlinear modes can be changed accordingly. The localized modes can even be transferred to the Bessel lattice core when the localized modes' rotations are stopped. Effects beyond the quasi-particle approximation such as destruction of the nonlinear modes by nonadiabatic dragging are also explored

  16. Vibration mode and vibration shape under excitation of a three phase model transformer core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Seiji; Ishigaki, Yusuke; Omura, Takeshi

    2018-04-01

    Structural vibration characteristics and vibration shapes under three-phase excitation of a archetype transformer core were investigated to consider their influences on transformer noise. Acoustic noise and vibration behavior were measured in a three-limb model transformer core. Experimental modal analysis by impact test was performed. The vibration shapes were measured by a laser scanning vibrometer at different exciting frequencies. Vibration amplitude of the core in out-of-plane direction were relatively larger than those in other two in-plane directions. It was consistent with the result that the frequency response function of the core in out-of-plane direction was larger by about 20 dB or more than those in in-plane directions. There were many vibration modes having bending deformation of limbs in out-of-plane direction. The vibration shapes of the core when excited at 50 Hz and 60 Hz were almost the same because the fundamental frequencies of the vibration were not close to the resonance frequencies. When excitation frequency was 69 Hz which was half of one of the resonance frequencies, the vibration shape changed to the one similar to the resonance vibration mode. Existence of many vibration modes in out-of-plane direction of the core was presumed to be a reason why frequency characteristics of magnetostriction and transformer noise do not coincide.

  17. Development of small, fast reactor core designs using lead-based coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahalan, J. E.; Hill, R. N.; Khalil, H. S.; Wade, D. C.

    1999-01-01

    A variety of small (100 MWe) fast reactor core designs are developed, these include compact configurations, long-lived (15-year fuel lifetime) cores, and derated, natural circulation designs. Trade studies are described which identify key core design issues for lead-based coolant systems. Performance parameters and reactivity feedback coefficients are compared for lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) and sodium-cooled cores of consistent design. The results of these studies indicate that the superior neutron reflection capability of lead alloys reduces the enrichment and burnup swing compared to conventional sodium-cooled systems; however, the discharge fluence is significantly increased. The size requirement for long-lived systems is constrained by reactivity loss considerations, not fuel burnup or fluence limits. The derated lead-alloy cooled natural circulation cores require a core volume roughly eight times greater than conventional compact systems. In general, reactivity coefficients important for passive safety performance are less favorable for the larger, derated configurations

  18. Evolution of the Internet and its cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Guoqing; Zhang Guoqiang; Yang Qingfeng; Cheng Suqi [Institute of Computing Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhou Tao [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)], E-mail: gqzhang@ict.ac.cn, E-mail: zhutou@ustc.edu

    2008-12-15

    In this paper, we empirically study the evolution of large scale Internet topology at the autonomous system (AS) level. The network size grows in an exponential form, obeying the famous Moore's law. We theoretically predict that the size of the AS-level Internet will double every 5.32 years. We apply the k-core decomposition method on the real Internet, and find that the size of a k-core with larger k is nearly stable over time. In addition, the maximal coreness is very stable after 2003. In contrast to the predictions of most previous models, the maximal degree of the Internet is also relatively stable versus time. We use the edge-exchange operation to obtain the randomized networks with the same degree sequence. A systematical comparison is drawn, indicating that the real Internet is more loosely connected, and both the full Internet and the nucleus are more disassortative than their randomized versions.

  19. Evolution of the Internet and its cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guoqing; Zhang Guoqiang; Yang Qingfeng; Cheng Suqi; Zhou Tao

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we empirically study the evolution of large scale Internet topology at the autonomous system (AS) level. The network size grows in an exponential form, obeying the famous Moore's law. We theoretically predict that the size of the AS-level Internet will double every 5.32 years. We apply the k-core decomposition method on the real Internet, and find that the size of a k-core with larger k is nearly stable over time. In addition, the maximal coreness is very stable after 2003. In contrast to the predictions of most previous models, the maximal degree of the Internet is also relatively stable versus time. We use the edge-exchange operation to obtain the randomized networks with the same degree sequence. A systematical comparison is drawn, indicating that the real Internet is more loosely connected, and both the full Internet and the nucleus are more disassortative than their randomized versions.

  20. Symmetry dependence of rms charge radii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angeli, I.

    2000-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The nucleon number dependence of rms charge radii is often approximated by some simple formula containing the mass number A only, R(A) = r(A) x A 1/3 where r(A) is a slowly varying function of A e.g. r(A) = r 0 + r 1 A -2/3 + r 2 A -4/3 ; r 0 , r 1 and r 2 are determined from a fit to experimental data. These simple mass-dependent formulae R(A) may be useful for nuclei along the valley of stability. However, for nuclei of the stability line, the mass number A = N + Z in itself is not enough to characterise the dependence of the R(Z,N) radius surface of the nucleon numbers Z and N. Changing a neutron to a proton a change in the charge radius can be expected, although A remains constant. In the present work, to extend the traditional radius formula, an additional term has been included, depending on the symmetry parameter I = (N-Z)/A. Several parametrisations were tried, using weighted least-squares (minimum χ 2 ) procedures for the fit to present-day data base (1). The best fit (with χ 2 /n'∼16) was found for R b (A,I) = r(A) x A 1/3 + b(I-I st ), where I st = (N st -Z st )/A is the value of the symmetry parameter of the stable isobar with the given mass number A, and b = -0.83. The alternative formula R a (A,I) = [r(A) + a(I-I st ) x A 1/3 is only slightly inferior to the previous one; here a = -0.20 and χ 2 /n'∼18. These results are practically independent of the ways of minimum search: fixing the parameters r 0 , r 1 and r 2 and varying teh parameter b (a) or varying the radius parameters r 0 , r 1 and r 2 and b (a) simultaneously. The main difficulty in determining the right parametrisation is caused by the fact that the experimental surface R exp (A,I) is not smooth. On the contrary, there are significant shell- and deformation effects (2,3) and isolated irregular points that may strongly affect the result of the fit. In order to avoid the effect of these strong deviations on the smooth symmetry dependence, more than

  1. Charge radii of magnesium isotopes by laser spectroscopy a structural study over the $sd$ shell

    CERN Multimedia

    Schug, M; Krieger, A R

    We propose to study the evolution of nuclear sizes and shapes over the magnesium chain by measuring the root-mean-square charge radii of $^{21 - 32}$Mg, essentially covering the entire $\\textit{sd}$ shell. Our goal is to detect the structural changes, which in the neutron-deficient isotopes may originate from clustering, in a way similar to neon, and on the neutron-rich side would characterize the transition to the "island of inversion". We will combine, for the first time, the sensitive $\\beta$-detection technique with traditional fluorescence spectroscopy for isotope-shift measurements and in such a way gain access to the exotic species near the ${N}$ = 8 and ${N}$ = 20 shell closures.

  2. VR-SCOSMO: A smooth conductor-like screening model with charge-dependent radii for modeling chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuechler, Erich R; Giese, Timothy J; York, Darrin M

    2016-04-28

    To better represent the solvation effects observed along reaction pathways, and of ionic species in general, a charge-dependent variable-radii smooth conductor-like screening model (VR-SCOSMO) is developed. This model is implemented and parameterized with a third order density-functional tight binding quantum model, DFTB3/3OB-OPhyd, a quantum method which was developed for organic and biological compounds, utilizing a specific parameterization for phosphate hydrolysis reactions. Unlike most other applications with the DFTB3/3OB model, an auxiliary set of atomic multipoles is constructed from the underlying DFTB3 density matrix which is used to interact the solute with the solvent response surface. The resulting method is variational, produces smooth energies, and has analytic gradients. As a baseline, a conventional SCOSMO model with fixed radii is also parameterized. The SCOSMO and VR-SCOSMO models shown have comparable accuracy in reproducing neutral-molecule absolute solvation free energies; however, the VR-SCOSMO model is shown to reduce the mean unsigned errors (MUEs) of ionic compounds by half (about 2-3 kcal/mol). The VR-SCOSMO model presents similar accuracy as a charge-dependent Poisson-Boltzmann model introduced by Hou et al. [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 6, 2303 (2010)]. VR-SCOSMO is then used to examine the hydrolysis of trimethylphosphate and seven other phosphoryl transesterification reactions with different leaving groups. Two-dimensional energy landscapes are constructed for these reactions and calculated barriers are compared to those obtained from ab initio polarizable continuum calculations and experiment. Results of the VR-SCOSMO model are in good agreement in both cases, capturing the rate-limiting reaction barrier and the nature of the transition state.

  3. A system for obtaining an optimized pre design of nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mai, L.A.

    1989-01-01

    This work proposes a method for obtaing a first design of nuclear reactor cores. It takes into consideration the objectives of the project, physical limits, economical limits and the reactor safety. For this purpose, some simplifications were made in the reactor model: one-energy-group, unidimensional and homogeneous core. The adopted model represents a typical PWR core and the optimized parameters are the fuel thickness, refletor thickness, enrichement and moderating ratio. The objective is to gain a larger residual reactivity at the end of the cycle. This work also presents results for a PWR core. From the results, many conclusions are established: system efficiency, limitations and problems. Also some suggestions are proposed to improve the system performance for futures works. (author) [pt

  4. Korrelasjon mellom core styrke, core stabilitet og utholdende styrke i core

    OpenAIRE

    Berg-Olsen, Andrea Marie; Fugelsøy, Eivor; Maurstad, Ann-Louise

    2010-01-01

    Formålet med studien var å se hvilke korrelasjon det er mellom core styrke, core stabilitet og utholdende styrke i core. Testingen bestod av tre hoveddeler hvor vi testet core styrke, core stabilitet og utholdende styrke i core. Innenfor core styrke og utholdende styrke i core ble tre ulike tester utført. Ved måling av core stabilitet ble det gjennomført kun en test. I core styrke ble isometrisk abdominal fleksjon, isometrisk rygg ekstensjon og isometrisk lateral fleksjon testet. Sit-ups p...

  5. Graphite core design in UK reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, M.W.

    1996-01-01

    The cores in the first power producing Magnox reactors in the UK were designed with only a limited amount of information available regarding the anisotropic dimensional change behaviour of Pile Grade graphite. As more information was gained it was necessary to make modifications to the design, some minor, some major. As the cores being built became larger, and with the switch to the Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR) with its much higher power density, additional problems had to be overcome such as increased dimensional change and radiolytic oxidation by the carbon dioxide coolant. For the AGRs a more isotropic graphite was required, with a lower initial open pore volume and higher strength. Gilsocarbon graphite was developed and was selected for all the AGRs built in the UK. Methane bearing coolants are used to limit radiolytic oxidation. (author). 5 figs

  6. Three regimes of extrasolar planet radius inferred from host star metallicities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchhave, Lars A.; Bizzarro, Martin; Latham, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately half of the extrasolar planets (exoplanets) with radii less than four Earth radii are in orbits with short periods. Despite their sheer abundance, the compositions of such planets are largely unknown. The available evidence suggests that they range in composition from small, high......-density rocky planets to low-density planets consisting of rocky cores surrounded by thick hydrogen and helium gas envelopes. Here we report the metallicities (that is, the abundances of elements heavier than hydrogen and helium) of more than 400 stars hosting 600 exoplanet candidates, and find...... that the exoplanets can be categorized into three populations defined by statistically distinct (~4.5σ) metallicity regions. We interpret these regions as reflecting the formation regimes of terrestrial-like planets (radii less than 1.7 Earth radii), gas dwarf planets with rocky cores and hydrogen-helium envelopes...

  7. Detection of Intrinsic Source Structure at ∼3 Schwarzschild Radii with Millimeter-VLBI Observations of SAGITTARIUS A*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ru-Sen; Krichbaum, Thomas P.; Roy, Alan L.; Fish, Vincent L.; Doeleman, Sheperd S.; Johnson, Michael D.; Akiyama, Kazunori; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Alef, Walter; Asada, Keiichi; Beaudoin, Christopher; Bertarini, Alessandra; Blackburn, Lindy; Blundell, Ray; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Brinkerink, Christiaan; Broderick, Avery E.; Cappallo, Roger; Crew, Geoffrey B.; Dexter, Jason; Dexter, Matt; Falcke, Heino; Freund, Robert; Friberg, Per; Greer, Christopher H.; Gurwell, Mark A.; Ho, Paul T. P.; Honma, Mareki; Inoue, Makoto; Kim, Junhan; Lamb, James; Lindqvist, Michael; Macmahon, David; Marrone, Daniel P.; Martí-Vidal, Ivan; Menten, Karl M.; Moran, James M.; Nagar, Neil M.; Plambeck, Richard L.; Primiani, Rurik A.; Rogers, Alan E. E.; Ros, Eduardo; Rottmann, Helge; SooHoo, Jason; Spilker, Justin; Stone, Jordan; Strittmatter, Peter; Tilanus, Remo P. J.; Titus, Michael; Vertatschitsch, Laura; Wagner, Jan; Weintroub, Jonathan; Wright, Melvyn; Young, Ken H.; Zensus, J. Anton; Ziurys, Lucy M.

    2018-05-01

    We report results from very long baseline interferometric (VLBI) observations of the supermassive black hole in the Galactic center, Sgr A*, at 1.3 mm (230 GHz). The observations were performed in 2013 March using six VLBI stations in Hawaii, California, Arizona, and Chile. Compared to earlier observations, the addition of the APEX telescope in Chile almost doubles the longest baseline length in the array, provides additional uv coverage in the N–S direction, and leads to a spatial resolution of ∼30 μas (∼3 Schwarzschild radii) for Sgr A*. The source is detected even at the longest baselines with visibility amplitudes of ∼4%–13% of the total flux density. We argue that such flux densities cannot result from interstellar refractive scattering alone, but indicate the presence of compact intrinsic source structure on scales of ∼3 Schwarzschild radii. The measured nonzero closure phases rule out point-symmetric emission. We discuss our results in the context of simple geometric models that capture the basic characteristics and brightness distributions of disk- and jet-dominated models and show that both can reproduce the observed data. Common to these models are the brightness asymmetry, the orientation, and characteristic sizes, which are comparable to the expected size of the black hole shadow. Future 1.3 mm VLBI observations with an expanded array and better sensitivity will allow more detailed imaging of the horizon-scale structure and bear the potential for a deep insight into the physical processes at the black hole boundary.

  8. Pre-cometary ice composition from hot core chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornow, Carmen; Kührt, Ekkehard; Motschmann, Uwe

    2005-10-01

    Pre-cometary ice located around star-forming regions contains molecules that are pre-biotic compounds or pre-biotic precursors. Molecular line surveys of hot cores provide information on the composition of the ice since it sublimates near these sites. We have combined a hydrostatic hot core model with a complex network of chemical reactions to calculate the time-dependent abundances of molecules, ions, and radicals. The model considers the interaction between the ice and gas phase. It is applied to the Orion hot core where high-mass star formation occurs, and to the solar-mass binary protostar system IRAS 16293-2422. Our calculations show that at the end of the hot core phase both star-forming sites produce the same prebiotic CN-bearing molecules. However, in the Orion hot core these molecules are formed in larger abundances. A comparison of the calculated values with the abundances derived from the observed line data requires a chemically unprocessed molecular cloud as the initial state of hot core evolution. Thus, it appears that these objects are formed at a much younger cloud stage than previously thought. This implies that the ice phase of the young clouds does not contain CN-bearing molecules in large abundances before the hot core has been formed. The pre-biotic molecules synthesized in hot cores cause a chemical enrichment in the gas phase and in the pre-cometary ice. This enrichment is thought to be an important extraterrestrial aspect of the formation of life on Earth and elsewhere.

  9. Tilt and shift mode stability in a spheromak with a flux core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finn, J.M.; Jardin, S.C.

    1984-07-01

    The stability of spheromak equilibria with a flux core, or reversal coil, is studied by means of an ideal MHD code. Results depend critically upon whether the flux hole region (the current free area just inside the separatrix) is treated as perfectly conducting plasma or as vacuum. This indicates that the tilt and shift modes persist as resistive instabilities if they are stable in ideal MHD. Specifically, for nonoptimally shaped equilibria, the flux core must nearly touch the current channel if the flux hole is vacuum, whereas the core may be slightly outside the separatrix if the flux hole has conducting plasma. A larger margin exists for optimally shaped equilibria.

  10. Operational characteristics of hybrid-type SFCL with closed and open cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Y.S.; Lee, N.Y.; Choi, H.S.; Chung, D.C.; Lim, S.H.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the operational characteristics of the hybrid-type superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) with the closed and the open cores, which induced the variation of the magnetic flux between the primary and the secondary windings. The experimental set-up of the hybrid-type SFCL with the closed and the open cores were prepared and the experimental analyses for the current limiting characteristics were performed. The peak value of the fault current in the hybrid-type SFCL with the open core was higher than that of the closed core at the first cycle after fault occurrence. However, in the case of the hybrid-type SFCL with the open core, the limiting current level after fault occurrence was decreased less than that of the hybrid-type SFCL with the closed core, because the magnetic leakage reluctance of the open core was higher than that of the closed core. The quench time (T q ) and the arrival time (T a ) for the peak voltage (V SC ) in the hybrid-type SFCL with the closed core were faster than that of the hybrid-type SFCL with the open core due to the increase of the mutual flux. We verified that the consumption power in the hybrid-type SFCL with the open core was larger owing to the increase of leakage flux by the reduction of mutual inductance between primary and secondary windings

  11. High moderation MOX cores for effective use of plutonium in LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamamoto, Kazuko; Kanagawa, Takashi; Hiraiwa, Koji; Sakurada, Koichi; Moriwaki, Masanao; Aoyama, Motoo; Yamamoto, Toru; Ueji, Masao

    2001-01-01

    Conceptual design studies have been performed for high moderation full MOX cores aiming at increasing fissile Pu consumption rate (ratio of the consumed to the loaded fissile Pu) and reducing residual Pu in discharged MOX fuel. The BWR cores studied have hydrogen to heavy metal ratio(H/HM) of 5.9 with increasing water rods and 7.0 with reducing a fuel rod diameter based on a reference 9x9 fuel (H/HM=4.9) of ABWR. The PWR cores studied have H/HM of 5.0 and 6.0 with reducing a fuel rod diameter based on a reference 17x17 fuel (H/HM=4.0) of APWR. Equilibrium core design and plant safety analyses showed that those high moderation cores have compatibility with ABWR and APWR. The fissile Pu consumption rate is 22% larger than the full MOX cores with reference fuel of ABWR and 50% for APWR. The core performance and compatibility has been also evaluated in the condition of multi-recycle of Pu in these high moderation cores. Study has been conducted to evaluate the effect of introducing these high moderation cores in the fuel cycle of Japan. It shows that the high moderation cores produce 26% more cumulative electricity and reduce 22% stock of the fissile Pu by 2050 than the reference cores. (author)

  12. Fluid Core Size of Mars from Detection of the Solar Tide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, C. F.; Konopliv, A. S.; Yuan, D. N.; Standish, E. M.; Folkner, W. M.

    2003-04-01

    The solar tidal deformation of Mars, measured by its k2 potential Love number, has been obtained from an analysis of Mars Global Surveyor radio tracking. The observed k2 of 0.153 +/- 0.017 is large enough to rule out a solid iron core and so indicates that at least the outer part of the core is liquid. The inferred core radius is between 1520 and 1840 kilometers and is independent of many interior properties, although partial melt of the mantle is one factor that could reduce core size. Ice-cap mass changes can be deduced from the seasonal variations in air pressure and the odd gravity harmonic J3, given knowledge of cap mass distribution with latitude. The south cap seasonal mass change is about 30 to 40% larger than that of the north cap.

  13. Nuclear Charge Radii in the Region of Shape Isomerism at Z $\\leq$ 80

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The determination of isotope shifts in the isotopic chain of Hg has led to quite a number of unexpected observations as the transition from slightly oblate to strongly prolate deformation below A~=~186, the shape coexistence in |1|8|5Hg and a huge odd-even staggering of the charge radii in the region 181~@$<$~ Until now it is quite open if the observed instability of the nuclear shape is an isolated and unique feature of the light Hg isotopes and how it changes with Z and depends on the shell and pairing energies.\\\\ \\\\ Therefore we propose to carry out a study of the isotope shifts in the neighbouring isotopes of the elements Au and Pt which can be obtained at ISOLDE as daughters of a primary Hg beam. Resonance ionization spectroscopy will be applied as a novel technique at ISOLDE. The time of flight of the photo ionized Au (or Pt) isotope in a drift tube will be used to get rid of any background events.

  14. Theoretical assessment of the disparity in the electrostatic forces between two point charges and two conductive spheres of equal radii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolikov, Kiril

    2016-11-01

    The Coulomb's formula for the force FC of electrostatic interaction between two point charges is well known. In reality, however, interactions occur not between point charges, but between charged bodies of certain geometric form, size and physical structure. This leads to deviation of the estimated force FC from the real force F of electrostatic interaction, thus imposing the task to evaluate the disparity. In the present paper the problem is being solved theoretically for two charged conductive spheres of equal radii and arbitrary electric charges. Assessment of the deviation is given as a function of the ratio of the distance R between the spheres centers to the sum of their radii. For the purpose, relations between FC and F derived in a preceding work of ours, are employed to generalize the Coulomb's interactions. At relatively short distances between the spheres, the Coulomb force FC, as estimated to be induced by charges situated at the centers of the spheres, differ significantly from the real force F of interaction between the spheres. In the case of zero and non-zero charge we prove that with increasing the distance between the two spheres, the force F decrease rapidly, virtually to zero values, i.e. it appears to be short-acting force.

  15. CoreFlow: Enriching Bro security events using network traffic monitoring data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, R.; Buraglio, N.; de Laat, C.; Grosso, P.

    Attacks against network infrastructures can be detected by Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS). Still reaction to these events are often limited by the lack of larger contextual information in which they occurred. In this paper we present CoreFlow, a framework for the correlation and enrichment of IDS

  16. Fossil hominin radii from the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene site (Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Laura; Carretero, José Miguel; García-González, Rebeca; Lorenzo, Carlos; Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Quam, Rolf; Martínez, Ignacio; Gracia-Téllez, Ana; Arsuaga, Juan Luis

    2016-01-01

    Complete radii in the fossil record preceding recent humans and Neandertals are very scarce. Here we introduce the radial remains recovered from the Sima de los Huesos (SH) site in the Sierra de Atapuerca between 1976 and 2011 and which have been dated in excess of 430 ky (thousands of years) ago. The sample comprises 89 specimens, 49 of which are attributed to adults representing a minimum of seven individuals. All elements are described anatomically and metrically, and compared with other fossil hominins and recent humans in order to examine the phylogenetic polarity of certain radial features. Radial remains from SH have some traits that differentiate them from those of recent humans and make them more similar to Neandertals, including strongly curved shafts, anteroposterior expanded radial heads and both absolutely and relatively long necks. In contrast, the SH sample differs from Neandertals in showing a high overall gracility as well as a high frequency (80%) of an anteriorly oriented radial tuberosity. Thus, like the cranial and dental remains from the SH site, characteristic Neandertal radial morphology is not present fully in the SH radii. We also analyzed the cross-sectional properties of the SH radial sample at two different levels: mid-shaft and at the midpoint of the neck length. When standardized by shaft length, no difference in the mid-shaft cross-sectional properties were found between the SH hominins, Neandertals and recent humans. Nevertheless, due to their long neck length, the SH hominins show a higher lever efficiency than either Neandertals or recent humans. Functionally, the SH radial morphology is consistent with more efficient pronation-supination and flexion-extension movements. The particular trait composition in the SH sample and Neandertals resembles more closely morphology evident in recent human males. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. An examination of impact damage in glass-phenolic and aluminum honeycomb core composite panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, A. T.; Lance, D. G.; Hodge, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    An examination of low velocity impact damage to glass-phenolic and aluminum core honeycomb sandwich panels with carbon-epoxy facesheets is presented. An instrumented drop weight impact test apparatus was utilized to inflict damage at energy ranges between 0.7 and 4.2 joules. Specimens were checked for extent of damage by cross sectional examination. The effect of core damage was assessed by subjecting impact-damaged beams to four-point bend tests. Skin-only specimens (facings not bonded to honeycomb) were also tested for comparison purposes. Results show that core buckling is the first damage mode, followed by delaminations in the facings, matrix cracking, and finally fiber breakage. The aluminum honeycomb panels exhibited a larger core damage zone and more facing delaminations than the glass-phenolic core, but could withstand more shear stress when damaged than the glass-phenolic core specimens.

  18. A system to obtain an optimized first design of a nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mai, L.A.

    1988-01-01

    This work proposes a method for obtaining a first design of nuclear reactor cores. It takes into consideration the objectives of the project, physical limits, economical limits and the reactor safety. For this purpose, some simplifications were made in the reactor model: one energy-group, one-dimensional and homogeneous core. The adopted model represents a typical PWR core and the optimized parameters are the fuel thickness, reflector thickness, enrichment and moderating ratio. The objective is to gain a larger residual reactivity at the end of the cycle. This work also presents results for a PWR core. From the results, many conclusions are established: system efficiency, limitations and problems. Also some suggestions are proposed to improve the system performance for future works. (autor)

  19. Silica hollow core microstructured fibers for beam delivery in industrial and medical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Dale Shephard

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this review is our recent work to develop microstructured hollow core fibers for two applications where the flexible delivery of a single mode beam is desired. Also, a review of other fiber based solutions is included.High power, short-pulsed lasers are widely used for micro-machining, providing high precision and high quality. However, the lack of truly flexible beam delivery systems limits their application to the processing of relatively small planar components. To address this, we developed hollow-core optical fibers for the 1 μm and green wavelength ranges. The hollow core overcomes the power delivery limitations of conventional silica fibers arising from nonlinear effects and material damage in the solid core. We have characterized such fibers in terms of power handling capability, damage threshold, bend loss and dispersion, and practically demonstrated delivery of high peak power pulses from the nanosecond to the femtosecond regime. Such fibers are ideal candidates for industrial laser machining applications.In laser surgical applications, meanwhile, an Er:YAG laser (2.94 μm is frequently the laser of choice because the water contained in tissue strongly absorbs this wavelength. If this laser beam is precisely delivered damage to surrounding tissue can be minimized. A common delivery method of surgical lasers, for use in the operating theatre, is articulated arms that are bulky, cumbersome and unsuitable for endoscopic procedures. To address this need for flexible mid-IR delivery we developed silica based hollow core fibers. By minimizing the overlap of the light with glass it is possible to overcome the material absorption limits of silica and achieve low attenuation. Additionally, it is possible to deliver pulse energies suitable for the ablation of both hard and soft tissue even with very small bend radii. The flexibility and small physical size of systems based on these fibers will enable new minimally invasive surgical

  20. Experimental root mean square charge radii, isotope shifts, ground state magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments of 1≤A≤ 239 nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antony, M.S.; Britz, J.

    1986-01-01

    A compilation of experimental root-mean square radii, isotope shifts, ground-state magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments of nuclei 1≤A≤239 is presented. Shell, sub-subshell closures and changes in nuclear deformations discernible from data are displayed graphically. The nuclear charge distribution, for 1≤A≤ 239 nuclei deduced from Coulomb displacement energies is shown for comparison

  1. Evaluation report on CCTF Core-II reflood tests C2-AC1 (run 51) and C2-4 (run 62)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Jun; Iguchi, Tadashi; Murao, Yoshio

    1984-02-01

    A reflood test program has been conducted at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) using large scale test facilities named Cylindrical Core Test Facility (CCTF) and Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF). The present report describes the effect of the initial clad temperature i.e., the initial stored energy on reflood phenomena observed in CCTF Core-II tests C2-ACl and C2-4. The peak clad temperatures of tests C2-ACl and C2-4 were 863 K and 1069 K, respectively at reflood initiation. With higher initial clad temperature, obtained were lower water accumulation in the core and upper plenum, and higher loop mass flow rate in an early reflood transient due to larger heat release of the stored energy in the core. Core inlet flow conditions were only affected shortly after the reflood initiation, causing the suppressed flooding rate and the larger U-tube flow oscillation between the core and the downcomer. In the core, with higher initial clad temperature, slower quench front propagation and higher turnaround temperature were observed. Responses to a higher initial clad temperature were similar to those observed in CCTF Core-I and FLECHT tests. Thus, the lower temperature rise with higher initial clad temperature was experimentally confirmed. The importance of higher flooding rate at initial period was analytically shown for further decreasing the temperature rise. (author)

  2. Editorial Commentary: The Larger Holes or Larger Number of Holes We Drill in the Coracoid, the Weaker the Coracoid Becomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Paul

    2016-06-01

    The larger holes or larger number of holes we drill in the coracoid, the weaker the coracoid becomes. Thus, minimizing bone holes (both size and number) is required to lower risk of coracoid process fracture, in patients in whom transosseous shoulder acromioclavicular joint reconstruction is indicated. A single 2.4-mm-diameter tunnel drilled through both the clavicle and the coracoid lowers the risk of fracture, but the risk cannot be entirely eliminated. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Ionic bonding of lanthanides, as influenced by d- and f-atomic orbitals, by core-shells and by relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Wen-Xin; Xu, Wei; Schwarz, W H Eugen; Wang, Shu-Guang

    2015-03-15

    Lanthanide trihalide molecules LnX3 (X = F, Cl, Br, I) were quantum chemically investigated, in particular detail for Ln = Lu (lutetium). We applied density functional theory (DFT) at the nonrelativistic and scalar and SO-coupled relativistic levels, and also the ab initio coupled cluster approach. The chemically active electron shells of the lanthanide atoms comprise the 5d and 6s (and 6p) valence atomic orbitals (AO) and also the filled inner 4f semivalence and outer 5p semicore shells. Four different frozen-core approximations for Lu were compared: the (1s(2) -4d(10) ) [Pd] medium core, the [Pd+5s(2) 5p(6) = Xe] and [Pd+4f(14) ] large cores, and the [Pd+4f(14) +5s(2) 5p(6) ] very large core. The errors of LuX bonding are more serious on freezing the 5p(6) shell than the 4f(14) shell, more serious upon core-freezing than on the effective-core-potential approximation. The LnX distances correlate linearly with the AO radii of the ionic outer shells, Ln(3+) -5p(6) and X(-) -np(6) , characteristic for dominantly ionic Ln(3+) -X(-) binding. The heavier halogen atoms also bind covalently with the Ln-5d shell. Scalar relativistic effects contract and destabilize the LuX bonds, spin orbit coupling hardly affects the geometries but the bond energies, owing to SO effects in the free atoms. The relativistic changes of bond energy BE, bond length Re , bond force k, and bond stretching frequency vs do not follow the simple rules of Badger and Gordy (Re ∼BE∼k∼vs ). The so-called degeneracy-driven covalence, meaning strong mixing of accidentally near-degenerate, nearly nonoverlapping AOs without BE contribution is critically discussed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Effect of dipole polarizability on positron binding by strongly polar molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gribakin, G F; Swann, A R

    2015-01-01

    A model for positron binding to polar molecules is considered by combining the dipole potential outside the molecule with a strongly repulsive core of a given radius. Using existing experimental data on binding energies leads to unphysically small core radii for all of the molecules studied. This suggests that electron–positron correlations neglected in the simple model play a large role in determining the binding energy. We account for these by including the polarization potential via perturbation theory and non-perturbatively. The perturbative model makes reliable predictions of binding energies for a range of polar organic molecules and hydrogen cyanide. The model also agrees with the linear dependence of the binding energies on the polarizability inferred from the experimental data (Danielson et al 2009 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 42 235203). The effective core radii, however, remain unphysically small for most molecules. Treating molecular polarization non-perturbatively leads to physically meaningful core radii for all of the molecules studied and enables even more accurate predictions of binding energies to be made for nearly all of the molecules considered. (paper)

  5. CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA EQUATIONS OF STATE BASED ON NEUTRON STAR OBSERVATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, A. W.; Hempel, M.; Fischer, T.

    2013-01-01

    Many of the currently available equations of state for core-collapse supernova simulations give large neutron star radii and do not provide large enough neutron star masses, both of which are inconsistent with some recent neutron star observations. In addition, one of the critical uncertainties in the nucleon-nucleon interaction, the nuclear symmetry energy, is not fully explored by the currently available equations of state. In this article, we construct two new equations of state which match recent neutron star observations and provide more flexibility in studying the dependence on nuclear matter properties. The equations of state are also provided in tabular form, covering a wide range in density, temperature, and asymmetry, suitable for astrophysical simulations. These new equations of state are implemented into our spherically symmetric core-collapse supernova model, which is based on general relativistic radiation hydrodynamics with three-flavor Boltzmann neutrino transport. The results are compared with commonly used equations of state in supernova simulations of 11.2 and 40 M ☉ progenitors. We consider only equations of state which are fitted to nuclear binding energies and other experimental and observational constraints. We find that central densities at bounce are weakly correlated with L and that there is a moderate influence of the symmetry energy on the evolution of the electron fraction. The new models also obey the previously observed correlation between the time to black hole formation and the maximum mass of an s = 4 neutron star

  6. Lattice parameters and stability of the spinel compounds in relation to the ionic radii and electronegativities of constituting chemical elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brik, Mikhail G; Suchocki, Andrzej; Kamińska, Agata

    2014-05-19

    A thorough consideration of the relation between the lattice parameters of 185 binary and ternary spinel compounds, on one side, and ionic radii and electronegativities of the constituting ions, on the other side, allowed for establishing a simple empirical model and finding its linear equation, which links together the above-mentioned quantities. The derived equation gives good agreement between the experimental and modeled values of the lattice parameters in the considered group of spinels, with an average relative error of about 1% only. The proposed model was improved further by separate consideration of several groups of spinels, depending on the nature of the anion (oxygen, sulfur, selenium/tellurium, nitrogen). The developed approach can be efficiently used for prediction of lattice constants for new isostructural materials. In particular, the lattice constants of new hypothetic spinels ZnRE2O4, CdRE2S4, CdRE2Se4 (RE = rare earth elements) are predicted in the present Article. In addition, the upper and lower limits for the variation of the ionic radii, electronegativities, and their certain combinations were established, which can be considered as stability criteria for the spinel compounds. The findings of the present Article offer a systematic overview of the structural properties of spinels and can serve as helpful guides for synthesis of new spinel compounds.

  7. Single-mode annular chirally-coupled core fibers for fiber lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haitao; Hao, He; He, Linlu; Gong, Mali

    2018-03-01

    Chirally-coupled core (CCC) fiber can transmit single fundamental mode and effectively suppresses higher-order mode (HOM) propagation, thus improve the beam quality. However, the manufacture of CCC fiber is complicated due to its small side core. To decrease the manufacture difficulty in China, a novel fiber structure is presented, defined as annular chirally-coupled core (ACCC) fiber, replacing the small side core by a larger side annulus. In this paper, we designed the fiber parameters of this new structure, and demonstrated that the new structure has a similar property of single mode with traditional CCC fiber. Helical coordinate system was introduced into the finite element method (FEM) to analyze the mode field in the fiber, and the beam propagation method (BPM) was employed to analyze the influence of the fiber parameters on the mode loss. Based on the result above, the fiber structure was optimized for efficient single-mode transmission, in which the core diameter is 35 μm with beam quality M2 value of 1.04 and an optical to optical conversion efficiency of 84%. In this fiber, fundamental mode propagates in an acceptable loss, while the HOMs decay rapidly.

  8. SPECTRAL AND PHOTOMETRIC DIAGNOSTICS OF GIANT PLANET FORMATION SCENARIOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiegel, David S.; Burrows, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Gas-giant planets that form via core accretion might have very different characteristics from those that form via disk instability. Disk-instability objects are typically thought to have higher entropies, larger radii, and (generally) higher effective temperatures than core-accretion objects. In this paper, we provide a large set of models exploring the observational consequences of high-entropy (hot) and low-entropy (cold) initial conditions, in the hope that this will ultimately help to distinguish between different physical mechanisms of planet formation. However, the exact entropies and radii of newly formed planets due to these two modes of formation cannot, at present, be precisely predicted. It is possible that the distribution of properties of core-accretion-formed planets and the distribution of properties of disk-instability-formed planets overlap. We, therefore, introduce a broad range of 'warm-start' gas-giant planet models. Between the hottest and the coldest models that we consider, differences in radii, temperatures, luminosities, and spectra persist for only a few million to a few tens of millions of years for planets that are a few times Jupiter's mass or less. For planets that are ∼five times Jupiter's mass or more, significant differences between hottest-start and coldest-start models persist for on the order of 100 Myr. We find that out of the standard infrared bands (J, H, K, L', M, N) the K and H bands are the most diagnostic of the initial conditions. A hottest-start model can be from ∼4.5 mag brighter (at Jupiter's mass) to ∼9 mag brighter (at 10 times Jupiter's mass) than a coldest-start model in the first few million years. In more massive objects, these large differences in luminosity and spectrum persist for much longer than in less massive objects. Finally, we consider the influence of atmospheric conditions on spectra, and find that the presence or absence of clouds, and the metallicity of an atmosphere, can affect an object

  9. Nuclear charge radius of 11Li

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Rodolfo; Noertershaeuser, Wilfried; Dax, Andreas; Ewald, Guido; Goette, Stefan; Kirchner, Reinhard; Kluge, H.-Juergen; Kuehl, Thomas; Wojtaszek, Agnieszka; Bushaw, Bruce A.; Drake, Gordon W. F.; Yan Zongchao; Zimmermann, Claus; Albers, Daniel; Behr, John; Bricault, Pierre; Dilling, Jens; Dombsky, Marik; Lassen, Jens; Phil Levy, C. D.

    2006-01-01

    We have determined the nuclear charge radius of 11 Li by high-precision laser spectroscopy. The experiment was performed at the TRIUMF-ISAC facility where the 7 Li- 11 Li isotope shift (IS) was measured in the 2s → 3s electronic transition using Doppler-free two-photon spectroscopy with a relative accuracy better than 10 -5 . The accuracy for the IS of the other lithium isotopes was also improved. IS's are mainly caused by differences in nuclear mass, but changes in proton distribution also give small contributions. Comparing experimentally measured IS with advanced atomic calculation of purely mass-based shifts, including QED and relativistic effects, allows derivation of the nuclear charge radii. The radii are found to decrease monotonically from 6 Li to 9 Li, and then increase with 11 Li about 11% larger than 9 Li. These results are a benchmark for the open question as to whether nuclear core excitation by halo neutrons is necessary to explain the large nuclear matter radius of 11 Li; thus, the results are compared with a number of nuclear structure models.

  10. Highly Sensitive Liquid Core Temperature Sensor Based on Multimode Interference Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Fuentes-Fuentes

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel fiber optic temperature sensor based on a liquid-core multimode interference device is demonstrated. The advantage of such structure is that the thermo-optic coefficient (TOC of the liquid is at least one order of magnitude larger than that of silica and this, combined with the fact that the TOC of silica and the liquid have opposite signs, provides a liquid-core multimode fiber (MMF highly sensitive to temperature. Since the refractive index of the liquid can be easily modified, this allows us to control the modal properties of the liquid-core MMF at will and the sensor sensitivity can be easily tuned by selecting the refractive index of the liquid in the core of the device. The maximum sensitivity measured in our experiments is 20 nm/°C in the low-temperature regime up to 60 °C. To the best of our knowledge, to date, this is the largest sensitivity reported for fiber-based MMI temperature sensors.

  11. Hypersonic vibrations of Ag@SiO2 (cubic core)-shell nanospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing Ya; Wang, Zhi Kui; Lim, Hock Siah; Ng, Ser Choon; Kuok, Meng Hau; Tran, Toan Trong; Lu, Xianmao

    2010-12-28

    The intriguing optical and catalytic properties of metal-silica core-shell nanoparticles, inherited from their plasmonic metallic cores together with the rich surface chemistry and increased stability offered by their silica shells, have enabled a wide variety of applications. In this work, we investigate the confined vibrational modes of a series of monodisperse Ag@SiO(2) (cubic core)-shell nanospheres synthesized using a modified Stöber sol-gel method. The particle-size dependence of their mode frequencies has been mapped by Brillouin light scattering, a powerful tool for probing hypersonic vibrations. Unlike the larger particles, the observed spheroidal-like mode frequencies of the smaller ones do not scale with inverse diameter. Interestingly, the onset of the deviation from this linearity occurs at a smaller particle size for higher-energy modes than for lower-energy ones. Finite element simulations show that the mode displacement profiles of the Ag@SiO(2) core-shells closely resemble those of a homogeneous SiO(2) sphere. Simulations have also been performed to ascertain the effects that the core shape and the relative hardness of the core and shell materials have on the vibrations of the core-shell as a whole. As the vibrational modes of a particle have a bearing on its thermal and mechanical properties, the findings would be of value in designing core-shell nanostructures with customized thermal and mechanical characteristics.

  12. Two-dimensional vertical model seismic test and analysis for HTGR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikushima, Takeshi; Honma, Toshiaki.

    1983-02-01

    The resistance against earthquakes of high-temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) core with block-type fuels is not fully ascertained yet. Seismic studies must be made if such a reactor plant is to be installed in areas with frequent earthquakes. In the paper the test results of seismic behavior of a half-scale two-dimensional vertical slice core model and analysis are presented. The following results were obtained: (1) With soft spring support of the fixed side reflector structure, the relative column displacement is larger than that for hand support but the impact reaction force is smaller. (2) In the case of hard spring support the dowel force is smaller than for soft support. (3) The relative column displacement is larger in the core center than at the periphery. The impact acceleration (force) in the center is smaller than at the periphery. (4) The relative column displacement and impact reaction force are smaller with the gas pressure simulation spring than without. (5) With decreasing gap width between the top blocks of columns, the relative column displacement and impact reaction force decrease. (6) The column damping ratio was estimated as 4 -- 10% of critical. (7) The maximum impact reaction force for random waves such as seismic was below 60% that for a sinusoidal wave. (8) Vibration behavior and impact response are in good agreement between test and analysis. (author)

  13. SMART core preliminary nuclear design-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Chan; Ji, Seong Kyun; Chang, Moon Hee

    1997-06-01

    Three loading patterns for 330 MWth SMART core are constructed for 25, 33 and 29 CRDMs, and one loading pattern for larger 69-FA core with 45 CRDMs is also constructed for comparison purpose. In this study, the core consists of 57 reduced height Korean Optimized Fuel Assemblies (KOFAs) developed by KAERI. The enrichment of fuel is 4.95 w/o. As a main burnable poison, 35% B-10 enriched B{sub 4}C-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} shim is used. To control stuck rod worth, some gadolinia bearing fuel rods are used. The U-235 enrichment of the gadolinia bearing fuel rods is 1.8 w/o as used in KOFA. All patterns return cycle length of about 3 years. Three loading patterns except 25-CRDM pattern satisfy cold shutdown condition of keff {<=} 0.99 without soluble boron. These three patterns also satisfy the refueling condition of keff {<=} 0.95. In addition to the construction of loading pattern, an editing module of MASTER PPI files for rod power history generation is developed and rod power histories are generated for 29-CRDM loading pattern. Preliminary Fq design limit is suggested as 3.71 based on KOFA design experience. (author). 9 tabs., 45 figs., 16 refs.

  14. Why have microsaccades become larger?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dan Witzner; Nyström, Marcus; Andersson, Richard

    2014-01-01

    -trackers compared to the systems used in the classical studies, in combination with the lack of a systematic algorithmic treatment of the overshoot. We hope that awareness of these discrepancies in microsaccade dynamics across eye structures will lead to more generally accepted definitions of microsaccades....... experts. The main reason was that the overshoots were not systematically detected by the algorithm and therefore not accurately accounted for. We conclude that one reason to why the reported size of microsaccades has increased is due to the larger overshoots produced by the modern pupil-based eye...

  15. Degraded core studies at INEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buescher, B.J.; Howe, T.M.; Miller, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    During 1980, planning of prototypical severe fuel damage tests to be conducted in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) to investigate fuel behavior in severe accidents up to temperatures of 2400 0 K was initiated. This first series of tests is designated Phase I. Also, a code development effort was initiated to provide a reliable predictive tool for core behavior during severe accidents. During 1981, an assessment of capabilities and preliminary planning were begun for an in-pile experimental program to investigate the behavior of larger arrays of previously irradiated fuel rods at temperatures through UO 2 melting. This latter series of tests is designated Phase II

  16. ON THE COAGULATION AND SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF PRESSURE CONFINED CORES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Xu; Zhou Tingtao; Lin, D. N. C.

    2013-01-01

    Observations of the Pipe Nebula have led to the discovery of dense starless cores. The mass of most cores is too small for their self-gravity to hold them together. Instead, they are thought to be pressure confined. The observed dense cores' mass function (CMF) matches well with the initial mass function of stars in young clusters. Similar CMFs are observed in other star forming regions such as the Aquila Nebula, albeit with some dispersion. The shape of these CMF provides important clues to the competing physical processes which lead to star formation and its feedback on the interstellar media. In this paper, we investigate the dynamical origin of the mass function of starless cores which are confined by a warm, less dense medium. In order to follow the evolution of the CMF, we construct a numerical method to consider the coagulation between the cold cores and their ablation due to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability induced by their relative motion through the warm medium. We are able to reproduce the observed CMF among the starless cores in the Pipe Nebula. Our results indicate that in environment similar to the Pipe Nebula: (1) before the onset of their gravitational collapse, the mass distribution of the progenitor cores is similar to that of the young stars, (2) the observed CMF is a robust consequence of dynamical equilibrium between the coagulation and ablation of cores, and (3) a break in the slope of the CMF is due to the enhancement of collisional cross section and suppression of ablation for cores with masses larger than the cores' Bonnor-Ebert mass.

  17. FULLY GENERAL RELATIVISTIC SIMULATIONS OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE WITH AN APPROXIMATE NEUTRINO TRANSPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, Takami; Kotake, Kei [Division of Theoretical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Takiwaki, Tomoya [Center for Computational Astrophysics, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2012-08-10

    We present results from the first generation of multi-dimensional hydrodynamic core-collapse simulations in full general relativity (GR) that include an approximate treatment of neutrino transport. Using an M1 closure scheme with an analytic variable Eddington factor, we solve the energy-independent set of radiation energy and momentum based on the Thorne's momentum formalism. Our newly developed code is designed to evolve the Einstein field equation together with the GR radiation hydrodynamic equations. We follow the dynamics starting from the onset of gravitational core collapse of a 15 M{sub Sun} star, through bounce, up to about 100 ms postbounce in this study. By computing four models that differ according to 1D to 3D and by switching from special relativistic (SR) to GR hydrodynamics, we study how the spacial multi-dimensionality and GR would affect the dynamics in the early postbounce phase. Our 3D results support the anticipation in previous 1D results that the neutrino luminosity and average neutrino energy of any neutrino flavor in the postbounce phase increase when switching from SR to GR hydrodynamics. This is because the deeper gravitational well of GR produces more compact core structures, and thus hotter neutrino spheres at smaller radii. By analyzing the residency timescale to the neutrino-heating timescale in the gain region, we show that the criterion to initiate neutrino-driven explosions can be most easily satisfied in 3D models, irrespective of SR or GR hydrodynamics. Our results suggest that the combination of GR and 3D hydrodynamics provides the most favorable condition to drive a robust neutrino-driven explosion.

  18. [Needs assessment of a core curriculum for residency training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyo-Jin; Lee, Young-Mee; Chang, Hyung-Joo; Kim, Ae-Ri

    2015-09-01

    The core curriculum in graduate medical education (GME) is an educational program that covers the minimum body of knowledge and skills that is required of all residents, regardless of their specialty. This study examined the opinions of stakeholders in GME regarding the core curriculum. A questionnaire was administered at three tertiary hospitals that were affiliated with one university; 192 residents and 61 faculty members and attending physicians participated in the survey. The questionnaire comprised six items on physician competency and the needs for a core curriculum. Questions on subjects or topics and adequate training years for each topics were asked only to residents. Most residents (78.6%) and faculty members (86.9%) chose "medical expertise" as the "doctor's role in the 21st century." In contrast, communicator, manager, and collaborator were recognized by less than 30% of all participants. Most residents (74.1%) responded that a core curriculum is "necessary but not feasible," whereas 68.3% of faculty members answered that it is "absolutely needed." Regarding subjects that should be included in the core curriculum, residents and faculty members had disparate preferences- residents preferred more "management of a private clinic" and "financial management," whereas faculty members desired "medical ethics" and "communication skills." Residents and faculty members agree that residents should develop a wide range of competencies in their training. However, the perception of the feasibility and opinions on the contents of the core curriculum differed between groups. Further studies with larger samples should be conducted to define the roles and professional competencies of physicians and the needs for a core curriculum in GME.

  19. Variations of nuclear charge radii in mercury isotopes with A = 198, 199, 200, 201, 202, and 204 from x-ray isotope shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, P.L.; Boehm, F.; Hahn, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    The isotope shifts of atomic K x rays were measured for pairs of the six mercury isotopes with A = 198, 199, 200, 201, 202, and 204, using a curved crystal spectrometer. The changes of the nuclear charge radii were derived in terms of delta 2 > and deltaR/sub k/ and compared with optical an muonic isotope shift data. From our results, a renormalization of the optical data was obtained

  20. Applications of liquid state physics to the earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    New results derived for application to the earth's outer core using the modern theory of liquids and the hard-sphere model of liquid structure are presented. An expression derived in terms of the incompressibility and pressure is valid for a high-pressure liquid near its melting point, provided that the pressure is derived from a strongly repulsive pair potential; a relation derived between the melting point and density leads to a melting curve law of essentially the same form as Lindemann's law. Finally, it is shown that the 'core paradox' of Higgins and Kennedy (1971) can occur only if the Gruneisen parameter is smaller than 2/3, and this constant is larger than this value in any liquid for which the pair potential is strongly repulsive.

  1. Scaling gysela code beyond 32K-cores on bluegene/Q***

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bigot J.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Gyrokinetic simulations lead to huge computational needs. Up to now, the semi- Lagrangian code Gysela performed large simulations using a few thousands cores (8k cores typically. Simulation with finer resolutions and with kinetic electrons are expected to increase those needs by a huge factor, providing a good example of applications requiring Exascale machines. This paper presents our work to improve Gysela in order to target an architecture that presents one possible way towards Exascale: the Blue Gene/Q. After analyzing the limitations of the code on this architecture, we have implemented three kinds of improvement: computational performance improvements, memory consumption improvements and disk i/o improvements. As a result, we show that the code now scales beyond 32k cores with much improved performances. This will make it possible to target the most powerful machines available and thus handle much larger physical cases.

  2. Influence of core design, production technique, and material selection on fracture behavior of yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal fixed dental prostheses produced using different multilayer techniques: split-file, over-pressing, and manually built-up veneers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood DJH

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Deyar Jallal Hadi Mahmood, Ewa H Linderoth, Ann Wennerberg, Per Vult Von Steyern Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden Aim: To investigate and compare the fracture strength and fracture mode in eleven groups of currently, the most commonly used multilayer three-unit all-ceramic yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP fixed dental prostheses (FDPs with respect to the choice of core material, veneering material area, manufacturing technique, design of connectors, and radii of curvature of FDP cores. Materials and methods: A total of 110 three-unit Y-TZP FDP cores with one intermediate pontic were made. The FDP cores in groups 1–7 were made with a split-file design, veneered with manually built-up porcelain, computer-aided design-on veneers, and over-pressed veneers. Groups 8–11 consisted of FDPs with a state-of-the-art design, veneered with manually built-up porcelain. All the FDP cores were subjected to simulated aging and finally loaded to fracture. Results: There was a significant difference (P<0.05 between the core designs, but not between the different types of Y-TZP materials. The split-file designs with VITABLOCS® (1,806±165 N and e.max® ZirPress (1,854±115 N and the state-of-the-art design with VITA VM® 9 (1,849±150 N demonstrated the highest mean fracture values. Conclusion: The shape of a split-file designed all-ceramic reconstruction calls for a different dimension protocol, compared to traditionally shaped ones, as the split-file design leads to sharp approximal indentations acting as fractural impressions, thus decreasing the overall strength. The design of a framework is a crucial factor for the load bearing capacity of an all-ceramic FDP. The state-of-the-art design is preferable since the split-file designed cores call for a cross-sectional connector area at least 42% larger, to have the same load bearing capacity as the state-of-the-art designed

  3. Effect of core burnup on the dynamic behavior of fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilberg, D.; Saphier, D.; Yiftah, S.

    1977-01-01

    Performance of a dynamic analysis, taking burnup changes into account, requires fission-product nuclear data of relatively small uncertainty, suitable burnup calculation models, and dynamic computer programs. These were prepared and used with the following results: (1) Significant changes in static and dynamic parameters were observed when investigating the effect of burnup. These changes were found to be larger than differences introduced by the uncertainty of the fission-product nuclear data. (2) A one-dimensional burnup computer program was prepared. It was found that a burnup model based on the generalized radioactive decay scheme is suitable for accurate fast reactor calculations. (3) Space-time dynamic calculations of fast reactors having different burnup levels were performed. The stability difference between ''clean'' and high burnup cores is greater when local rather than uniform perturbations are inserted along the entire core length. The magnitude by which the ''end-of-life'' core increases the transient excursion over that of the clean core depends on the particular region in which the perturbation is inserted. The end-of-life core will magnify the transient excursion more than the clean core whenever the perturbation is inserted into a region having a higher adjoint flux level than that of the clean core. However, when a reactor safety system operates successfully, the difference in the temperature transient of the clean and end-of-life cores will be relatively small. It is suggested that only the analysis of large local perturbations be performed for end-of-life cores as well as for clean cores in the safety evaluation of fast reactors

  4. Nuclear charge radii of the 1fsub(7/2) shell nuclei from muonic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohlfahrt, H.D.

    1979-01-01

    Muonic X-ray of medium-weight nuclei have been performed in recent years by the Los Alamos muonic X-ray group, using the high intensity muon beam available at the LAMPF 800 MeV proton accelerator. These studies, which together include all stable 1fsub(7/2) neutron shell nuclei, provide information about the proton core polarization due to the successive addition of neutrons for the proton cores Z = 20 (Ca), 22 (Ti), 24(Cr), 26(Fe) and 28(Ni). In addition, these studies, which represent the first systematic investigations of isotone shifts, provide the opportunity to compare the core polarization caused by protons with core polarization caused by neutrons in the same (1fsub(7/2)) shell. (KBE)

  5. Temporary core liquid level depression during cold-leg small-break LOCA effect of break size and power level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Y.; Kumamaru, H.; Mimura, Y.; Kukita, Y.; Tasaka, K.

    1989-01-01

    Cold-leg small break LOCA experiments (0.5-10% break) were conducted at the large scale test facility (LSTF), a volumetrically-scaled (1/48) simulator of a PWR, of the ROSA-IV Program. When a break area was less than 2.5% of the scaled cold-leg flow area, the core liquid level was temporarily further depressed to the bottom elevation of the crossover leg during the loop seal clearing early in the transient only by the manometric pressure balance since no coolant remained in the upper portion of the primary system. When the break size was larger than 5%, the core liquid level was temporarily further depressed lower than the bottom elevation of the crossover leg during the loop seal clearing since coolant remained at the upper portion of the primary system; the steam generator (SG) U-tube upflow side and the SG inlet plenum, due to counter current flow limiting by updrafting steam while the coolant drained. The amount of coolant trapped there was dependent on the vapor velocity (core power); the larger the core power, the lower the minimum core liquid level. The RELAP5/MOD2 code reasonable predicted phenomena observed in the experiments. (orig./DG)

  6. Nuclear moments and isotopic variation of the mean square charge radii of strontium nuclei by atomic beam laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chongkum, S.

    1987-10-01

    Hyperfine structure and optical isotope shift measurements have been performed on a series of stable and radioactive strontium isotopes (A = 80 to 90), including two isomers 85m and 87m. The spectroscopy applied continuous wave dye laser induced fluorescence of free atoms at λ=293.2 nm in a well collimated atomic beam. The 293.2 nm ultraviolet light was generated by frequency doubling the output of a dye laser in either a temperature tuned Ammonium Dihydrogen Arsenate (ADA) crystal or an angle tuned Lithium Iodate crystal. A special radio frequency (rf) technique was used to tune the dye laser frequency with long term stability. Radioactive Sr isotopes were produced either by neutron capture of stable strontium or by (α,xn) reactions from krypton gas. The samples were purified by an electromagnetic mass separator and their sizes were of order 100 pg, which corresponds to 10 11 atoms. The observed results of the hyperfine structure components are evaluated in terms of nuclear magnetic dipole moments and electric quadrupole moments. Changes in mean square charge radii of strontium nuclei which were extracted from the isotope shift measurements, exhibit a distinct shell effect at the neutron magic number N=50. The experimental data are analysed and compared with some theoretical nuclear model predictions. The strong increase of the nuclear charge radii with decreasing neutron number of isotopes below N=50 is in agreement with the variation of the mean square deformation extracted from measured B(E2) values. (orig.) [de

  7. Controlling Initial and Final Radii to Achieve a Low-Complexity Sphere Decoding Technique in MIMO Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Eshagh Hosseini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to apply sphere decoding algorithm in multiple-input multiple-output communication systems and to make it feasible for real-time applications, its computational complexity should be decreased. To achieve this goal, this paper provides some useful insights into the effect of initial and the final sphere radii and estimating them effortlessly. It also discusses practical ways of initiating the algorithm properly and terminating it before the normal end of the process as well as the cost of these methods. Besides, a novel algorithm is introduced which utilizes the presented techniques according to a threshold factor which is defined in terms of the number of transmit antennas and the noise variance. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm offers a desirable performance and reasonable complexity satisfying practical constraints.

  8. Reactive effects of core fermion excitations on the inertial mass of a vortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simanek, E.

    1995-01-01

    The time-dependent Schroedinger equation for a fermion two-dimensional superfluid containing a moving vortex is solved using the adiabatic approximation. The expectation value of the linear momentum of the vortex is found dominated by core fermion excitations. The resulting inertial vortex mass, obtained in the adiabatic limit, is larger than the standard core mass by a factor of (k F ξ) 2 where ξ is the coherence length at T=0. Anamalous velocity dependence of the mass, associated with the breakdown of the adiabatic approximation, is predicted

  9. Enhanced charge storage capability of Ge/GeO2 core/shell nanostructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, C L; Lee, P S

    2008-01-01

    A Ge/GeO 2 core/shell nanostructure embedded in an Al 2 O 3 gate dielectrics matrix was produced. A larger memory window with good data retention was observed in the fabricated metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) capacitor for Ge/GeO 2 core/shell nanoparticles compared to Ge nanoparticles only, which is due to the high percentage of defects located on the surface and grain boundaries of the GeO 2 shell. We believe that the findings presented here provide physical insight and offer useful guidelines to controllably modify the charge storage properties of indirect semiconductors through defect engineering

  10. Enhanced charge storage capability of Ge/GeO(2) core/shell nanostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, C L; Lee, P S

    2008-09-03

    A Ge/GeO(2) core/shell nanostructure embedded in an Al(2)O(3) gate dielectrics matrix was produced. A larger memory window with good data retention was observed in the fabricated metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) capacitor for Ge/GeO(2) core/shell nanoparticles compared to Ge nanoparticles only, which is due to the high percentage of defects located on the surface and grain boundaries of the GeO(2) shell. We believe that the findings presented here provide physical insight and offer useful guidelines to controllably modify the charge storage properties of indirect semiconductors through defect engineering.

  11. DIANA Code: Design and implementation of an analytic core calculus code by two group, two zone diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochi, Ignacio

    2005-01-01

    The principal parameters of nuclear reactors are determined in the conceptual design stage.For that purpose, it is necessary to have flexible calculation tools that represent the principal dependencies of such parameters.This capability is of critical importance in the design of innovative nuclear reactors.In order to have a proper tool that could assist the conceptual design of innovative nuclear reactors, we developed and implemented a neutronic core calculus code: DIANA (Diffusion Integral Analytic Neutron Analysis).To calculate the required parameters, this code generates its own cross sections using an analytic two group, two zones diffusion scheme based only on a minimal set of data (i.e. 2200 m/s and fission averaged microscopic cross sections, Wescott factors and Effective Resonance Integrals).Both to calculate cross sections and core parameters, DIANA takes into account heterogeneity effects that are included when it evaluates each zone.Among them lays the disadvantage factor of each energy group.DIANA was totally implemented through Object Oriented Programming using C++ language. This eases source code understanding and would allow a quick expansion of its capabilities if needed.The final product is a versatile and easy-to-use code that allows core calculations with a minimal amount of data.It also contains the required tools needed to perform many variational calculations such as the parameterisation of effective multiplication factors for different radii of the core.The diffusion scheme s simplicity allows an easy following of the involved phenomena, making DIANA the most suitable tool to design reactors whose physics lays beyond the parameters of present reactors.All this reasons make DIANA a good candidate for future innovative reactor analysis

  12. Integration of uniform design and quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization to the robust design for a railway vehicle suspension system under different wheel conicities and wheel rolling radii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yung-Chang; Lee, Cheng-Kang

    2017-10-01

    This paper proposes a systematic method, integrating the uniform design (UD) of experiments and quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO), to solve the problem of a robust design for a railway vehicle suspension system. Based on the new nonlinear creep model derived from combining Hertz contact theory, Kalker's linear theory and a heuristic nonlinear creep model, the modeling and dynamic analysis of a 24 degree-of-freedom railway vehicle system were investigated. The Lyapunov indirect method was used to examine the effects of suspension parameters, wheel conicities and wheel rolling radii on critical hunting speeds. Generally, the critical hunting speeds of a vehicle system resulting from worn wheels with different wheel rolling radii are lower than those of a vehicle system having original wheels without different wheel rolling radii. Because of worn wheels, the critical hunting speed of a running railway vehicle substantially declines over the long term. For safety reasons, it is necessary to design the suspension system parameters to increase the robustness of the system and decrease the sensitive of wheel noises. By applying UD and QPSO, the nominal-the-best signal-to-noise ratio of the system was increased from -48.17 to -34.05 dB. The rate of improvement was 29.31%. This study has demonstrated that the integration of UD and QPSO can successfully reveal the optimal solution of suspension parameters for solving the robust design problem of a railway vehicle suspension system.

  13. Influence of strain on dislocation core in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzagalli, L.; Godet, J.; Brochard, S.

    2018-05-01

    First principles, density functional-based tight binding and semi-empirical interatomic potentials calculations are performed to analyse the influence of large strains on the structure and stability of a 60? dislocation in silicon. Such strains typically arise during the mechanical testing of nanostructures like nanopillars or nanoparticles. We focus on bi-axial strains in the plane normal to the dislocation line. Our calculations surprisingly reveal that the dislocation core structure largely depends on the applied strain, for strain levels of about 5%. In the particular case of bi-axial compression, the transformation of the dislocation to a locally disordered configuration occurs for similar strain magnitudes. The formation of an opening, however, requires larger strains, of about 7.5%. Furthermore, our results suggest that electronic structure methods should be favoured to model dislocation cores in case of large strains whenever possible.

  14. Slowing down tail enhanced, neoclassical and classical alpha particle fluxes in tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catto, P.J.; Tessarotto, M.

    1988-01-01

    The classical and neoclassical particle and energy fluxes associated with a slowing down tail, alpha particle distribution function are evaluated for arbitrary aspect ratio ε -1 , cross section, and poloidal magnetic field. The retention of both electron and ion drag and pitch angle scattering by the background ions results in a large diffusive neoclassical heat flux in the plasma core. This flux remains substantial at larger radii only if the characteristic speed associated with pitch angle scattering, v/sub b/, is close enough to the alpha birth speed v 0 so that ε(v 0 /v/sub b/) 3 remains less than some order unity critical value which is not determined by the methods herein. The enhanced neoclassical losses would only have a serious impact on ignition if the critical value of ε(v 0 /v/sub b/) 3 is found to be somewhat larger than unity

  15. Strain-Driven Stacking Faults in CdSe/CdS Core/Shell Nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demortière, Arnaud; Leonard, Donovan N; Petkov, Valeri; Chapman, Karena; Chattopadhyay, Soma; She, Chunxing; Cullen, David A; Shibata, Tomohiro; Pelton, Matthew; Shevchenko, Elena V

    2018-04-19

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals are commonly grown with a shell of a second semiconductor material to obtain desired physical properties, such as increased photoluminescence quantum yield. However, the growth of a lattice-mismatched shell results in strain within the nanocrystal, and this strain has the potential to produce crystalline defects. Here, we study CdSe/CdS core/shell nanorods as a model system to investigate the influence of core size and shape on the formation of stacking faults in the nanocrystal. Using a combination of high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy and pair-distribution-function analysis of synchrotron X-ray scattering, we show that growth of the CdS shell on smaller, spherical CdSe cores results in relatively small strain and few stacking faults. By contrast, growth of the shell on larger, prolate spheroidal cores leads to significant strain in the CdS lattice, resulting in a high density of stacking faults.

  16. Mars Internal Structure: Seismic Predictions for Core Phase Arrivals in Anticipation of the InSight Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, R. C.; Banerdt, W. B.; Lognonne, P. H.; Hempel, S.; Panning, M. P.; Schmerr, N. C.; Garcia, R.; Shiro, B.; Gudkova, T.

    2016-12-01

    We present a methodology to constrain the seismic structure of the Martian core in preparation for the return of data from the InSight mission. Expected amplitudes for marsquakes assuming a medium seismicity model support the likely observation of core reflections of P and S energy for events with magnitude greater than MW 4.5. For the mission duration, we would expect to record on the order of 10 events of at least this magnitude. Our method predicts the ray density of core reflected (PcP, ScS) and transmitted (PKP, SKS) phases for various core sizes with core-mantle boundary depths between 1650 and 2100 km. Ray density is defined as the fraction of rays in a small source-receiver interval normalized by the total number of rays over a great circle slice through the planet. The ray density of a given phase is scaled by predicted amplitudes calculated considering attenuation, geometric spreading and reflection/transmission coefficients at discontinuities along the ray path. Maximum PcP/ScS amplitudes are expected at epicentral distances of 40-100 degrees. Thus, if present, strong seismicity in the Hellas and Tharsis region may facilitate core detection. For events with MW above 4.5, ScS and SKS signals are expected to lie above the lander noise, but PcP and PKP signals may barely be visible. The resolution of these phases can be improved by applying stacking techniques to account for expected background noise, scattering, and interfering seismic phases. These techniques were successfully applied to Apollo seismograms to infer the radial structure of the lunar core. Even if source depth and location have large uncertainties during a single-station mission to Mars, different phases can be distinguished by their slownesses. Prior to the summation of the traces of individual events, signals are aligned to a reference phase, e.g. the PcP onset assuming various core radii. A maximum in signal coherency corresponds to the best fitting core radius. In the case of lunar

  17. Energy transfer in aggregated CuInS2/ZnS core-shell quantum dots deposited as solid films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardelis, S; Georgiadou, D; Travlos, A; Nassiopoulou, A G; Fakis, M; Droseros, N

    2017-01-01

    We report on the morphology and optical properties of CuInS 2 /ZnS core-shell quantum dots in solid films by means of AFM, SEM, HRTEM, steady state and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The amount of aggregation of the CuInS 2 /ZnS QDs was controlled by changing the preparation conditions of the films. A red-shift of the PL spectrum of CuInS 2 /ZnS core-shell quantum dots, deposited as solid films on silicon substrates, is observed upon increasing the amount of aggregation. The presence of larger aggregates was found to lead to a larger PL red-shift. Besides, as the degree of aggregation increased, the PL decay became slower. We attribute the observed PL red-shift to energy transfer from the smaller to the larger dots within the aggregates, with the emission being realized via a long decay recombination mechanism (100–200 ns), the origin of which is discussed. (paper)

  18. A universal empirical relation for the variation of Ksub(eff) with core dimensions of bare and reflected small fast systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, A.; Srinivasan, M.; Basu, T.K.; Subba Rao, K.

    1978-01-01

    A number of 26 group Ssub(4) transport theory calculations in spherical geometry were carried out to study the variation of Ksub(eff) with core radius of bars and reflected small fast systems. For each system Ksub(eff) was calculated for various core radii keeping reflector thickness and density constant. A plot of Ksub(eff) vs R/Rsub(e) gave an almost universal curve independent of core material, density and reflector properties. An empirical relation of the form Ksub(eff)=Ksub(infinity)sup(*)[1-esup(-(THETA R/Rsub(c))] could be fitted to the Ksub(eff) vs R/Rsub(c) plot where Rsub(c) is the critical radius, and the constants Ksub(infinity) and THETA are related through THETA =ln(Ksub(infinity)sup(*)/Ksub(infinity)sup(*)-1). Thus the Ksub(eff) vs R/Rsub(c) relation is found to be governed by a single constant Ksub(infinity(sup(*)), valid for both bare and reflected systems. The agreement between DTF-IV calculated Ksub(eff) values and that given by the empirical relation is better than 3% except in the highly subcritical domain where the discrepency is a bit higher. The physical interpretation of the form of the relation, its regions of validity are discussed. An attempt is made to extend it to non-spherical geometries also. (author)

  19. Development of Core Design Technology for LMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeong Il; Hong, S. G.; Jang, J. W. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    This report describes the contents of core design technology and computer code system development performed during 2005 and 2006 on the objects of nuclear proliferation resistant core and nuclear fuel basic key technology development security. Also, it is including the future application plans for the results and the developed methodology, important information and the materials acquired in this period. Two core designs with single enrichment were considered for the KALIMER-600 during the first year : 1) the first core uses the non-fuel rods such as B4C, ZrH1.8, and dummy rods, 2) the core using different cladding thickness for each core region (inner, middle, and outer cores) without non-fuel rods to flatten the power distribution. In particular, the latter design was intended to simplify the fuel assembly design by eliminating the heterogeneity. It was found that the proposed design satisfy all of the Gen IV SFR design goals on the cycle length longer than 18 EFPM, fuel discharge burnup larger than 80GWd/t, sodium void worth, conversion ratio, reactivity burnup swing and so on. For this object reactor, the structure integrity outside of reactor is confirmed for the radiation exposure during the plant life according to the result of shielding design and evaluation. The transmutation capability and the core characteristics of sodium cooled fast reactor was also evaluated according to the change of MA amount. The reactivity coefficients for the BN-600 reactor with MA fueled are calculated and the results are compared and evaluated with other participants results. Even though the discrepancies between the results of participants are somewhat large but the K-CORE results are close to the average within a standard deviation. To have the capability of 3-dimensional core dynamic analysis such as analyzing power distribution and reactivity variations according to the asymmetric insertion/withdrawal of control rods, the calculation module for core dynamic parameters was

  20. Formation of massive, dense cores by cloud-cloud collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahira, Ken; Shima, Kazuhiro; Habe, Asao; Tasker, Elizabeth J.

    2018-05-01

    We performed sub-parsec (˜ 0.014 pc) scale simulations of cloud-cloud collisions of two idealized turbulent molecular clouds (MCs) with different masses in the range of (0.76-2.67) × 104 M_{⊙} and with collision speeds of 5-30 km s-1. Those parameters are larger than in Takahira, Tasker, and Habe (2014, ApJ, 792, 63), in which study the colliding system showed a partial gaseous arc morphology that supports the NANTEN observations of objects indicated to be colliding MCs using numerical simulations. Gas clumps with density greater than 10-20 g cm-3 were identified as pre-stellar cores and tracked through the simulation to investigate the effects of the mass of colliding clouds and the collision speeds on the resulting core population. Our results demonstrate that the smaller cloud property is more important for the results of cloud-cloud collisions. The mass function of formed cores can be approximated by a power-law relation with an index γ = -1.6 in slower cloud-cloud collisions (v ˜ 5 km s-1), and is in good agreement with observation of MCs. A faster relative speed increases the number of cores formed in the early stage of collisions and shortens the gas accretion phase of cores in the shocked region, leading to the suppression of core growth. The bending point appears in the high-mass part of the core mass function and the bending point mass decreases with increase in collision speed for the same combination of colliding clouds. The higher-mass part of the core mass function than the bending point mass can be approximated by a power law with γ = -2-3 that is similar to the power index of the massive part of the observed stellar initial mass function. We discuss implications of our results for the massive-star formation in our Galaxy.

  1. Spontaneous stabilization of HTGRs without reactor scram and core cooling—Safety demonstration tests using the HTTR: Loss of reactivity control and core cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamatsu, Kuniyoshi, E-mail: takamatsu.kuniyoshi@jaea.go.jp; Yan, Xing L.; Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Sakaba, Nariaki; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    2014-05-01

    It is well known that a High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) has superior safety characteristics; for example, an HTGR has a self-control system that uses only physical phenomena against various accidents. Moreover, the large heat capacity and low power density of the core result in very slow temperature transients. Therefore, an HTGR serves inherently safety features against loss of core cooling accidents such as the Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. (TEPCO)’s Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (NPS) disaster. Herein we would like to demonstrate the inherent safety features using the High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). The HTTR is the first HTGR in Japan with a thermal power of 30 MW and a maximum reactor outlet coolant temperature of 950 °C; it was built at the Oarai Research and Development Center of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). In this study, an all-gas-circulator trip test was analyzed as a loss of forced cooling (LOFC) test with an initial reactor power of 9 MW to demonstrate LOFC accidents. The analytical results indicate that reactor power decreases from 9 MW to 0 MW owing to the negative reactivity feedback effect of the core, even if the reactor shutdown system is not activated. The total reactivity decreases for 2–3 h and then gradually increases in proportion to xenon reactivity; therefore, the HTTR achieves recritical after an elapsed time of 6–7 h, which is different from the elapsed time at reactor power peak occurrence. After the reactor power peak occurs, the total reactivity oscillates several times because of the negative reactivity feedback effect and gradually decreases to zero. Moreover, the new conclusions are as follows: the greater the amount of residual heat removed from the reactor core, the larger the stable reactor power after recriticality owing to the heat balance of the reactor system. The minimum reactor power and the reactor power peak occurrence are affected by the neutron source. The greater the

  2. The Role of Body Crystallization in Asteroidal Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, J. T.

    1993-07-01

    Large fractionations (factors of 2000-6000) in Ir/Ni and other ratios demonstrate that the magmatic groups of iron meteorites formed by fractional crystallization, and thus that the residual liquid remained well stirred during core crystallization. Past models have relied on solidification at the base or the top of the core, but body crystallization offers an attractive alternative. The simplest of the earlier models involved convective maxing induced by the liberation of heat and light elements (especially S) during upward crystallization from the center of the core. Other models involving downward crystallization from the core-mantle interface are based on the fact that temperatures at this location are slightly lower than those at the center; no whole-core stirring mechanism is provided by these models. Haack and Scott recently published a variant of the downward crystallization model involving the growth of giant (kilometer-scale) dendrites. Because crystallization creates a boundary layer enriched in S that does not participate in the convection, these models require several K of supercooling to induce crystallization (this undercooling is much greater than the temperature difference between the center of the core and the core-mantle interface). Buoyant forces will occasionally remove droplets of the basal boundary fluid; thus it was thinner and its degree of undercooling less than in that at the ceiling of the magma chamber. Homogeneous nucleation of metals is difficult to achieve; generally 200-300 K of undercooling is required, much more than could possibly occur in an asteroidal core. Crystals could, however, nucleate in the magma body on chromite, probably the first liquidus phase (A. Kracher, personal communication, notes that this is required to explain why Cr behaved like a compatible element despite having a solid/liquid D crystallize. The rate of core crystallization is limited by the rate of heat transport across the core-mantle interface. If

  3. Observation of magnetic diffusion in the Earth's outer core from Magsat, Orsted, and CHAMP data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chulliat, A.; Olsen, Nils

    2010-01-01

    The frozen flux assumption consists in neglecting magnetic diffusion in the core. It has been widely used to compute core flows from geomagnetic observations. Here we investigate the validity of this assumption over the time interval 1980-2005, using high-precision magnetic data from the Magsat......, Orsted, and CHAMP satellites. A detectable change of magnetic fluxes through patches delimited by curves of zero radial magnetic field at the core-mantle boundary is associated with a failure of the frozen flux assumption. For each epoch (1980 and 2005), we calculate spatially regularized models...... of the core field which we use to investigate the change of reversed magnetic flux at the core surface. The largest and most robust change of reversed flux is observed for two patches: one located under St. Helena Island (near 20 degrees S, 15 degrees E); the other, much larger, is located under the South...

  4. High Power Spark Delivery System Using Hollow Core Kagome Lattice Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciprian Dumitrache

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the use of the recently developed hollow core kagome lattice fibers for delivery of high power laser pulses. Compared to other photonic crystal fibers (PCFs, the hollow core kagome fibers have larger core diameter (~50 µm, which allows for higher energy coupling in the fiber while also maintaining high beam quality at the output (M2 = 1.25. We have conducted a study of the maximum deliverable energy versus laser pulse duration using a Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm. Pulse energies as high as 30 mJ were transmitted for 30 ns pulse durations. This represents, to our knowledge; the highest laser pulse energy delivered using PCFs. Two fiber damage mechanisms were identified as damage at the fiber input and damage within the bulk of the fiber. Finally, we have demonstrated fiber delivered laser ignition on a single-cylinder gasoline direct injection engine.

  5. Optimization of multi-phase compressible lattice Boltzmann codes on massively parallel multi-core systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biferale, L.; Mantovani, F.; Pivanti, M.; Pozzati, F.; Sbragaglia, M.; Schifano, S.F.; Toschi, F.; Tripiccione, R.

    2011-01-01

    We develop a Lattice Boltzmann code for computational fluid-dynamics and optimize it for massively parallel systems based on multi-core processors. Our code describes 2D multi-phase compressible flows. We analyze the performance bottlenecks that we find as we gradually expose a larger fraction of

  6. Effective temperatures, angular diameters, distances and linear radii for 160 O and B stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underhill, A.B.; Divan, L.; Prevot-Burnichon, M.L.; Doazan, V.

    1979-01-01

    The significance is explained of the effective temperatures, angular diameters, distances and linear diameters which have been found from published ultraviolet spectrophotometry, visible and near infrared intermediate-band photometry and model-atmosphere fluxes for 160 O and B stars using a method which is fully explained and evaluated in the full paper which is reproduced on Microfiche MN 189/1. An appendix to the full paper presents BCD spectrophotometry for 77 of the program stars. The angular diameters are systematically the same as those measured previously, and the flux effective temperatures of the main-sequence and giant stars reproduce well the relationship established by other authors, for main-sequence and giant O and B stars. The O8 - B9 supergiants have systematically lower temperatures than do main-sequence stars of the same subtype. The Beta Cephei stars and most Be stars have the same effective temperature as normal stars of the same spectral type. The radii of O and B stars increase from main-sequence to supergiant. The late B supergiants are about twice as large as the O9 supergiants. (author)

  7. Globular clusters and galaxy halos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Den Bergh, S.

    1984-01-01

    Using semipartial correlation coefficients and bootstrap techniques, a study is made of the important features of globular clusters with respect to the total number of galaxy clusters and dependence of specific galaxy cluster on parent galaxy type, cluster radii, luminosity functions and cluster ellipticity. It is shown that the ellipticity of LMC clusters correlates significantly with cluster luminosity functions, but not with cluster age. The cluter luminosity value above which globulars are noticeably flattened may differ by a factor of about 100 from galaxy to galaxy. Both in the Galaxy and in M31 globulars with small core radii have a Gaussian distribution over luminosity, whereas clusters with large core radii do not. In the cluster systems surrounding the Galaxy, M31 and NGC 5128 the mean radii of globular clusters was found to increase with the distance from the nucleus. Central galaxies in rich clusters have much higher values for specific globular cluster frequency than do other cluster ellipticals, suggesting that such central galaxies must already have been different from normal ellipticals at the time they were formed

  8. Characteristics of fast reactor core designs and closed fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poplavsky, V.M.; Eliseev, V.A.; Matveev, V.I.; Khomyakov, Y.S.; Tsyboulya, A.M.; Tsykunov, A.G.; Chebeskov, A.N.

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of the results of recent studies, preliminary basic requirements related to characteristics of fast reactor core and nuclear fuel cycle were elaborated. Decreasing reactivity margin due to approaching breeding ratio to 1, requirements to support non-proliferation of nuclear weapons, and requirements to decrease amount of radioactive waste are under consideration. Several designs of the BN-800 reactor core have been studied. In the case of MOX fuel it is possible to reach a breeding ratio about 1 due to the use of larger size of fuel elements with higher fuel density. Keeping low axial fertile blanket that would be reprocessed altogether with the core, it is possible to set up closed fuel cycle with the use of own produced plutonium only. Conceptual core designs of advanced commercial reactor BN-1800 with MOX and nitride fuel are also under consideration. It has been shown that it is expedient to use single enrichment fuel core design in this reactor in order to reach sufficient flattening and stability of power rating in the core. The main feature of fast reactor fuel cycle is a possibility to utilize plutonium and minor actinides which are the main contributors to the long-living radiotoxicity in irradiated nuclear fuel. The results of comparative analytical studies on the risk of plutonium proliferation in case of open and closed fuel cycle of nuclear power are also presented in the paper. (authors)

  9. Analysis of Doppler effect measurement in FCA cores using JENDL-3.2 library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okajima, Shigeaki

    1996-01-01

    For the evaluation of the calculation accuracy of the 238 U Doppler effect using JENDL-3.2 library, the previously measured Doppler reactivity worths in the FCA were systematically analyzed. In the analysis the Doppler reactivity worth was calculated by a first order perturbation theory. The calculated results were compared with those using JENDL-3.1 library. The JENDL-3.2 calculation in MOX fuel mock-up cores agrees well with the experimental values within the experimental error. In U-235/Pu fuel cores, the JENDL-3.2 calculation gives 12-15% larger Doppler reactivity worths than the JENDL-3.1 calculation. (author)

  10. Core Hunter 3: flexible core subset selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Beukelaer, Herman; Davenport, Guy F; Fack, Veerle

    2018-05-31

    Core collections provide genebank curators and plant breeders a way to reduce size of their collections and populations, while minimizing impact on genetic diversity and allele frequency. Many methods have been proposed to generate core collections, often using distance metrics to quantify the similarity of two accessions, based on genetic marker data or phenotypic traits. Core Hunter is a multi-purpose core subset selection tool that uses local search algorithms to generate subsets relying on one or more metrics, including several distance metrics and allelic richness. In version 3 of Core Hunter (CH3) we have incorporated two new, improved methods for summarizing distances to quantify diversity or representativeness of the core collection. A comparison of CH3 and Core Hunter 2 (CH2) showed that these new metrics can be effectively optimized with less complex algorithms, as compared to those used in CH2. CH3 is more effective at maximizing the improved diversity metric than CH2, still ensures a high average and minimum distance, and is faster for large datasets. Using CH3, a simple stochastic hill-climber is able to find highly diverse core collections, and the more advanced parallel tempering algorithm further increases the quality of the core and further reduces variability across independent samples. We also evaluate the ability of CH3 to simultaneously maximize diversity, and either representativeness or allelic richness, and compare the results with those of the GDOpt and SimEli methods. CH3 can sample equally representative cores as GDOpt, which was specifically designed for this purpose, and is able to construct cores that are simultaneously more diverse, and either are more representative or have higher allelic richness, than those obtained by SimEli. In version 3, Core Hunter has been updated to include two new core subset selection metrics that construct cores for representativeness or diversity, with improved performance. It combines and outperforms the

  11. Is Parental Involvement Lower at Larger Schools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Parents who volunteer, or who lobby for improvements in school quality, are generally seen as providing a school-wide public good. If so, straightforward public-good theory predicts that free-riding will reduce average involvement at larger schools. This study uses longitudinal data to follow families over time, as their children move from middle…

  12. Turbulence-induced heat transfer in PBMR core using LES and RANS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung-Jae; Yoon, Su-Jong; Park, Goon-Cherl; Lee, Won-Jae

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces the results of numerical simulations on flow fields and relevant heat transfer in the pebble bed reactor (PBR) core, since the coolant passes a highly complicated random flow path with a high Reynolds number, an appropriate treatment of the turbulence is required. A set of simple experiments for the flow over a circular cylinder with heat transfer was conducted to finally select the large eddy simulation (LES) and k-ω model among the considering Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models for PBR application. Using these models, the PBR cores, whose geometries were simplified to the body-centered cubical (BCC) and face-centered cubical (FCC) structures, were simulated. A larger pressure drop, a more random flow field, a higher vorticity magnitude and a higher temperature at the local hot spots on the pebble surface were found in the results of the LES than in those of RANS for both geometries. In cases of the LES, the flow structures were resolved up to the grid scales. Irregular distributions of the flow and local heat transfer were found in the BCC core, while relatively regular distributions for the FCC core. The turbulent nature of the coolant flow in the pebble core evidently affected the fuel surface temperature distribution. (author)

  13. The Properties of Planck Galactic Cold Clumps in the L1495 Dark Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Mengyao; Liu, Tie; Qin, Sheng-Li; Kim, Kee-Tae; Wu, Yuefang; Tatematsu, Ken’ichi; Yuan, Jinghua; Wang, Ke; Parsons, Harriet; Koch, Patrick M.; Sanhueza, Patricio; Ward-Thompson, D.; Tóth, L. Viktor; Soam, Archana; Lee, Chang Won; Eden, David; Di Francesco, James; Rawlings, Jonathan; Rawlings, Mark G.; Montillaud, Julien; Zhang, Chuan-Peng; Cunningham, M. R.

    2018-04-01

    Planck Galactic Cold Clumps (PGCCs) possibly represent the early stages of star formation. To understand better the properties of PGCCs, we studied 16 PGCCs in the L1495 cloud with molecular lines and continuum data from Herschel, JCMT/SCUBA-2, and the PMO 13.7 m telescope. Thirty dense cores were identified in 16 PGCCs from 2D Gaussian fitting. The dense cores have dust temperatures of T d = 11–14 K, and H2 column densities of {N}{{{H}}2} = (0.36–2.5) × 1022 cm‑2. We found that not all PGCCs contain prestellar objects. In general, the dense cores in PGCCs are usually at their earliest evolutionary stages. All the dense cores have non-thermal velocity dispersions larger than the thermal velocity dispersions from molecular line data, suggesting that the dense cores may be turbulence-dominated. We have calculated the virial parameter α and found that 14 of the dense cores have α 2. This suggests that some of the dense cores are not bound in the absence of external pressure and magnetic fields. The column density profiles of dense cores were fitted. The sizes of the flat regions and core radii decrease with the evolution of dense cores. CO depletion was found to occur in all the dense cores, but is more significant in prestellar core candidates than in protostellar or starless cores. The protostellar cores inside the PGCCs are still at a very early evolutionary stage, sharing similar physical and chemical properties with the prestellar core candidates.

  14. Universal empirical relation for the variation of ksub(eff) with core dimensions of bare and reflected small fast systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, A; Srinivasan, M; Basu, T K; Subba Rao, K [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Neutron Physics Section

    1977-01-01

    A number of 26-group, S/sub 4/, transport theory calculations in spherical geometry were carried out to study the variation of ksub(eff) with core radius of bare and reflected small hard spectrum fast assemblies. For each system ksub(eff) was calculated for various core radii keeping reflector thickness and density constant. A plot of ksub(eff) vs. R/Rsub(c) gave an almost universal curve independent of core material, density and reflector properties. An empirical relation of the form ksub(eff) = k infinitely* (1 - exp(-Theta R/Rsub(c))) could be fitted to the ksub(eff) vs. R/Rsub(c) plot where Rsub(c) is the critical radius, and the constants k infinitely* and Theta are related through Theta = ln(k infinitely*/(k infinitely* - 1)). Thus the ksub(eff) vs. R/Rsub(c) relation is found to be governed by a single constant k infinitely*, valid for both bare and reflected systems. The agreement between DTF-IV calculated ksub(eff) values and that given by the empirical relation is better than 3% except in the highly subcritical domain where the discrepancy is a bit higher. The best fit value of k infinitely* for Pu 239 systems is found to be 2.88 and for U 235 systems 2.224. The paper discusses the physical interpretation of the form of the relation, its region of validity and makes an attempt to extend it to non-spherical geometries also.

  15. A study of HANARO core conversion using high density U-Mo fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.H.; Lee, C.S.; Lee, B.C.; Park, S.J.; Kim, H.; Kim, C.K.

    2002-01-01

    Currently, HANARO is using 3.15gU/cc U3Si/Al as a driver fuel. HANARO has seven vertical irradiation holes in the core region. Three of them including a central trap are located in the inner region of the core and mainly being used for material irradiation tests. Four of them are located in the reflector tank but cooled by primary coolant. They are used for fuel irradiation tests or radioisotope development tests. For minimum core modification using high density U-Mo fuels, no dimension change is assumed in the current fuel rods and the cladding thickness remains the same in this study. The high density U-Mo fuel will have up to about twice the linear uranium loading of a current HANARO driver fuel. Using this high density fuel 8 fuel sites can be replaced with irradiation sites. Three kinds of conceptual cores are considered using 5 gU/cc U-7Mo/Al and 16 gU/cc U-7Mo. The increase of the linear heat generation rate due to the decrease of total fuel length can be overcome by more uniform radial and axial power distribution using different uranium densities and different fuel meat diameters are introduced into those cores. The new core has 4.54 times larger surface-to-volume ratio than the reference core. The core uranium loading, linear heat generation rate, excess reactivity, and control rod worth as well as the neutron spectra are analysed for each core. (author)

  16. DART Core/Combustor-Noise Initial Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Devin K.; Henderson, Brenda S.; Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2017-01-01

    Contributions from the combustor to the overall propulsion noise of civilian transport aircraft are starting to become important due to turbofan design trends and advances in mitigation of other noise sources. Future propulsion systems for ultra-efficient commercial air vehicles are projected to be of increasingly higher bypass ratio from larger fans combined with much smaller cores, with ultra-clean burning fuel-flexible combustors. Unless effective noise-reduction strategies are developed, combustor noise is likely to become a prominent contributor to overall airport community noise in the future. The new NASA DGEN Aero0propulsion Research Turbofan (DART) is a cost-efficient testbed for the study of core-noise physics and mitigation. This presentation gives a brief description of the recently completed DART core combustor-noise baseline test in the NASA GRC Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory (AAPL). Acoustic data was simultaneously acquired using the AAPL overhead microphone array in the engine aft quadrant far field, a single midfield microphone, and two semi-infinite-tube unsteady pressure sensors at the core-nozzle exit. An initial assessment shows that the data is of high quality and compares well with results from a quick 2014 feasibility test. Combustor noise components of measured total-noise signatures were educed using a two-signal source-separation method an dare found to occur in the expected frequency range. The research described herein is aligned with the NASA Ultra-Efficient Commercial Transport strategic thrust and is supported by the NASA Advanced Air Vehicle Program, Advanced Air Transport Technology Project, under the Aircraft Noise Reduction Subproject.

  17. SME routes for innovation collaboration with larger enterprises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brink, Tove

    2017-01-01

    The research in this paper reveals how Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs) can contribute to industry competiveness through collaboration with larger enterprises. The research is based on a longitudinal qualitative case study starting in 2011 with 10 SME offshore wind farm suppliers...... and follow-up interviews in 2013. The research continued with a second approach in 2014 within operation and maintenance (O&M) through focus group interviews and subsequent individual interviews with 20 enterprises and a seminar in May 2015. The findings reveal opportunities and challenges for SMEs according...... to three different routes for cooperation and collaboration with larger enterprises: demand-driven cooperation, supplier-driven cooperation and partnerdriven collaboration. The SME contribution to innovation and competiveness is different within the three routes and ranges from providing specific knowledge...

  18. The Extragalactic Lens VLBI Imaging Survey (ELVIS): Investigating galaxy cores and black holes with gravitational lens central images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Edward R.

    This thesis describes the Extragalactic Lens VLBI Imaging Survey (ELVIS), a search for central images in gravitational lenses. We present the first four ELVIS targets, for which we have radio VLBI observations with resolutions of a few milli-arcseconds and sensitivities of 15 - 38mJy. For PMN J1838-3427, CLASS B0739+366 and CLASS B0445+123 we have not detected any central images, but have set stringent upper limits on their flux densities. For CLASS B2319+051 we have made a tentative detection of a third radio source, which may be either a central image or radio emission from the lens galaxy. Using the upper limits on the central image flux densities, we gain new information about the matter distributions in the lens galaxies of these systems. We fit a broken power law model for the matter profile, and constrain the allowed break radii and inner index of this model. To demagnify the central images to the observed level the matter profiles must be slightly shallower than or steeper than isothermal, which is consistent with previous studies of early type galaxy profiles. The presence of a super-massive black hole weakens the constraints somewhat, but the profiles are still close to isothermal. Relative to previous work, we reduce the maximum sizes of shallow cores by factors of 2 to 3, and raise the indices of r 0( r -g central cusps by g = 0.05 - 0.35. If we take the source in B2319+051 to be a central image, then we select a narrow band of allowed break radii and inner indices, finding that a constant density core has size 150--380 pc, and a pure power law has index g = 1.5 - 1.67. Our constraints still allow sufficiently shallow profiles that some super-massive black holes may form central image pairs rather than eliminating the central image, and these image pairs may be detected with future instruments. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  19. Regional surface geometry of the rat stomach based on three-dimensional curvature analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao Donghua [Center of Excellence in Visceral Biomechanics and Pain, Aalborg Hospital, DK-9100 Aalborg (Denmark); Zhao Jingbo [Center of Excellence in Visceral Biomechanics and Pain, Aalborg Hospital, DK-9100 Aalborg (Denmark); Gregersen, Hans [Center of Excellence in Visceral Biomechanics and Pain, Aalborg Hospital, DK-9100 Aalborg (Denmark)

    2005-01-21

    A better understanding of gastric accommodation and gastric perception requires knowledge of regional gastric geometry and local gastric tension throughout the stomach. An analytic method based on medical imaging data was developed in this study to describe the three-dimensional (3D) rat stomach geometry and tension distribution. The surface principal radii of curvatures were simulated and the surface tension was calculated in the glandular and non-glandular region of the stomach at pressures from 0 Pa to 800 Pa. The radii of curvature and tension distribution in the stomach were non-homogeneous. The radii of curvature in the glandular stomach were larger than those in the non-glandular region at pressures less than 100 Pa (P < 0.001). When the pressure increased to more than 200 Pa, the radii of curvature in the non-glandular stomach was larger than in the glandular stomach (P < 0.05). The curvature and tension distribution mapping using medical imaging technology and 3D models can be used to characterize and distinguish the physical behaviour in separate regions of the stomach.

  20. Regional surface geometry of the rat stomach based on three-dimensional curvature analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Donghua; Zhao Jingbo; Gregersen, Hans

    2005-01-01

    A better understanding of gastric accommodation and gastric perception requires knowledge of regional gastric geometry and local gastric tension throughout the stomach. An analytic method based on medical imaging data was developed in this study to describe the three-dimensional (3D) rat stomach geometry and tension distribution. The surface principal radii of curvatures were simulated and the surface tension was calculated in the glandular and non-glandular region of the stomach at pressures from 0 Pa to 800 Pa. The radii of curvature and tension distribution in the stomach were non-homogeneous. The radii of curvature in the glandular stomach were larger than those in the non-glandular region at pressures less than 100 Pa (P < 0.001). When the pressure increased to more than 200 Pa, the radii of curvature in the non-glandular stomach was larger than in the glandular stomach (P < 0.05). The curvature and tension distribution mapping using medical imaging technology and 3D models can be used to characterize and distinguish the physical behaviour in separate regions of the stomach

  1. Analysis Of Core Management For The Transition Cores Of RSG-GAS Reactor To Full-Silicide Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malem Sembiring, Tagor; Suparlina, Lily; Tukiran

    2001-01-01

    The core conversion of RSG-GAS reactor from oxide to silicide core with meat density of 2.96 g U/cc is still doing. At the end of 2000, the reactor has been operated for 3 transition cores which is the mixed core of oxide-silicide. Based on previous work, the calculated core parameter for the cores were obtained and it is needed 10 transition cores to achieve a full-silicide core. The objective of this work is to acquire the effect of the increment of the number of silicide fuel on the core parameters such as excess reactivity and shutdown margin. The measurement of the core parameters was carried out using the method of compensation of couple control rods. The experiment shows that the excess reactivity trends lower with the increment of the number of silicide fuel in the core. However, the shutdown margin is not change with the increment of the number of silicide fuel. Therefore, the transition cores can be operated safety to a full-silicide core

  2. A dendritic solidification experiment under large gravity - implications for the Earth's inner core solidification regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguen, R.; Alboussière, T.; Brito, D.; La Rizza, P.; Masson, J.

    2009-05-01

    The Earth's inner core solidification regime is usually thought to be dendritic, which should results in the formation of a mushy layer at the inner core boundary, possibly extending deep in the inner core. The release of latent heat and solute associated with crystallization provides an important boyancy source to drive thermo- chemical convection in the core. In the laboratory, two modes of convection associated with the crystallization of mushy layers have been observed. One is a boundary layer mode originating from the destabilisation of the chemical boundary layer present at the mush-liquid interface; the second is the so-called 'mushy layer mode' which involves the whole mushy layer. In the mushy layer mode, convection usually takes the form of narrow plumes rising through crystal free conduits called chimneys. One particularity of inner core crystallization is its extremely small solidification rate compared to typical outer core convective timescales. We have designed and build an experiment devoted to the study of crystallization under a large gravity field, using a centrifuge, of an aqueous solution of ammonium chloride, which is a good analogue to metallic alloys. The large gravity field allows to reach Rayleigh numbers much larger than in typical solidification experiments. Under large gravity fields, we observe the disappearance of chimney convection and show that the large gravity field promotes the boundary layer convection mode at the expent of the mushy layer mode. As the gravitationnal forcing is increased, convective heat and solute transport are significantly enhanced, which results in larger solid fraction directly below the mush-liquid interface. The increase in solid fraction results in a dramatic decrease of the permeability in the mushy layer, which eventually becomes subcritical in respect to the mushy layer mode. Because of the very slow solidification rate of the inner core, convective transport of heat and solute from the ICB is

  3. A study of the required Rayleigh number to sustain dynamo with various inner core radius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Y.; Katoh, Y.; Matsui, H.; Kumamoto, A.

    2017-12-01

    It is widely accepted that the geomagnetic field is sustained by thermal and compositional driven convections of a liquid iron alloy in the outer core. The generation process of the geomagnetic field has been studied by a number of MHD dynamo simulations. Recent studies of the ratio of the Earth's core evolution suggest that the inner solid core radius ri to the outer liquid core radius ro changed from ri/ro = 0 to 0.35 during the last one billion years. There are some studies of dynamo in the early Earth with smaller inner core than the present. Heimpel et al. (2005) revealed the Rayleigh number Ra of the onset of dynamo process as a function of ri/ro from simulation, while paleomagnetic observation shows that the geomagnetic field has been sustained for 3.5 billion years. While Heimpel and Evans (2013) studied dynamo processes taking into account the thermal history of the Earth's interior, there were few cases corresponding to the early Earth. Driscoll (2016) performed a series of dynamo based on a thermal evolution model. Despite a number of dynamo simulations, dynamo process occurring in the interior of the early Earth has not been fully understood because the magnetic Prandtl numbers in these simulations are much larger than that for the actual outer core.In the present study, we performed thermally driven dynamo simulations with different aspect ratio ri/ro = 0.15, 0.25 and 0.35 to evaluate the critical Ra for the thermal convection and required Ra to maintain the dynamo. For this purpose, we performed simulations with various Ra and fixed the other control parameters such as the Ekman, Prandtl, and magnetic Prandtl numbers. For the initial condition and boundary conditions, we followed the dynamo benchmark case 1 by Christensen et al. (2001). The results show that the critical Ra increases with the smaller aspect ratio ri/ro. It is confirmed that larger amplitude of buoyancy is required in the smaller inner core to maintain dynamo.

  4. Melting and solidification behavior of Cu/Al and Ti/Al bimetallic core/shell nanoparticles during additive manufacturing by molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Farzin; Jeon, Jungmin; Jiang, Shan; Nouranian, Sasan

    2018-05-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to investigate the role of core volume fraction and number of fusing nanoparticles (NPs) on the melting and solidification of Cu/Al and Ti/Al bimetallic core/shell NPs during a superfast heating and slow cooling process, roughly mimicking the conditions of selective laser melting (SLM). One recent trend in the SLM process is the rapid prototyping of nanoscopically heterogeneous alloys, wherein the precious core metal maintains its particulate nature in the final manufactured part. With this potential application in focus, the current work reveals the fundamental role of the interface in the two-stage melting of the core/shell alloy NPs. For a two-NP system, the melting zone gets broader as the core volume fraction increases. This effect is more pronounced for the Ti/Al system than the Cu/Al system because of a larger difference between the melting temperatures of the shell and core metals in the former than the latter. In a larger six-NP system (more nanoscopically heterogeneous), the melting and solidification temperatures of the shell Al roughly coincide, irrespective of the heating or cooling rate, implying that in the SLM process, the part manufacturing time can be reduced due to solidification taking place at higher temperatures. The nanostructure evolution during the cooling of six-NP systems is further investigated. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  5. Core-to-core uniformity improvement in multi-core fiber Bragg gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindley, Emma; Min, Seong-Sik; Leon-Saval, Sergio; Cvetojevic, Nick; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Lawrence, Jon; Gris-Sanchez, Itandehui; Birks, Tim; Haynes, Roger; Haynes, Dionne

    2014-07-01

    Multi-core fiber Bragg gratings (MCFBGs) will be a valuable tool not only in communications but also various astronomical, sensing and industry applications. In this paper we address some of the technical challenges of fabricating effective multi-core gratings by simulating improvements to the writing method. These methods allow a system designed for inscribing single-core fibers to cope with MCFBG fabrication with only minor, passive changes to the writing process. Using a capillary tube that was polished on one side, the field entering the fiber was flattened which improved the coverage and uniformity of all cores.

  6. The Triumphant Triumvirate: Synergistically Realizing the Purposes of a University through a Core Management Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Eric H.

    2017-01-01

    Core management courses bear a particularly challenging curricular as well as pedagogical burden insofar as they are typically the sole or primary vehicle for integrating management principles with larger university and school objectives. Compounding the challenge is that these very objectives are neither universally clear nor necessarily…

  7. Preparation and characterization of water-soluble ZnSe:Cu/ZnS core/shell quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lei; Cao, Lixin, E-mail: caolixin@ouc.edu.cn; Su, Ge; Liu, Wei; Xia, Chenghui; Zhou, Huajian

    2013-09-01

    The synthesis and luminescent properties of water-soluble ZnSe:Cu/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) with different shell thickness are reported in this paper. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) studies present that the ZnSe:Cu/ZnS core/shell QDs with different shell thickness have a cubic zinc-blende structure. The tests of transmission electron microscope (TEM) pictures exhibit that the QDs obtained are spherical-shaped particles and the average grain size increased from 2.7 to 3.8 nm with the growth of ZnS shell. The emission peak position of QDs has a small redshift from 461 to 475 nm with the growth of ZnS shell within the blue spectral window. The photoluminescence (PL) emission intensity and stability of the ZnSe:Cu core d-dots are both enhanced by coating ZnS shell on the surface of core d-dots. The largest PL intensity of the core/shell QDs is almost 3 times larger than that of Cu doped ZnSe quantum dots (ZnSe:Cu d-dots). The redshift of core/shell QDs compared with the core QDs are observed in both the absorption and the photoluminescence excitation spectra.

  8. Nuclear charge radius of {sup 11}Li

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Rodolfo, E-mail: R.Sanchez@GSI.de; Noertershaeuser, Wilfried [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (Germany); Dax, Andreas [CERN(Switzerland); Ewald, Guido; Goette, Stefan; Kirchner, Reinhard; Kluge, H.-Juergen; Kuehl, Thomas [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (Germany); Wojtaszek, Agnieszka [Swietokrzyska Academy, Institute of Physics (Poland); Bushaw, Bruce A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (United States); Drake, Gordon W. F. [University of Windsor, Department of Physics (Canada); Yan Zongchao [University of New Brunswick, Department of Physics (Canada); Zimmermann, Claus [Physikalisches Institut, Eberhard Karls Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Albers, Daniel; Behr, John; Bricault, Pierre; Dilling, Jens; Dombsky, Marik; Lassen, Jens; Phil Levy, C. D. [Tri-University Meson Facility (Canada)

    2006-07-15

    We have determined the nuclear charge radius of {sup 11}Li by high-precision laser spectroscopy. The experiment was performed at the TRIUMF-ISAC facility where the {sup 7}Li-{sup 11}Li isotope shift (IS) was measured in the 2s{yields}3s electronic transition using Doppler-free two-photon spectroscopy with a relative accuracy better than 10{sup -5}. The accuracy for the IS of the other lithium isotopes was also improved. IS's are mainly caused by differences in nuclear mass, but changes in proton distribution also give small contributions. Comparing experimentally measured IS with advanced atomic calculation of purely mass-based shifts, including QED and relativistic effects, allows derivation of the nuclear charge radii. The radii are found to decrease monotonically from {sup 6}Li to {sup 9}Li, and then increase with {sup 11}Li about 11% larger than {sup 9}Li. These results are a benchmark for the open question as to whether nuclear core excitation by halo neutrons is necessary to explain the large nuclear matter radius of {sup 11}Li; thus, the results are compared with a number of nuclear structure models.

  9. DNBR calculation in digital core protection system by a subchannel analysis code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In, W. K.; Yoo, Y. J.; Hwang, T. H.; Ji, S. K.

    2001-01-01

    The DNBR calculation uncertainty and DNBR margin were evaluated in digital core protection system by a thermal-hydrualic subchannel analysis code MATRA. A simplified thermal-hydraulic code CETOP is used to calculate on-line DNBR in core protection system at a digital PWR. The DNBR tuning process against a best-estimate subchannel analysis code is required for CETOP to ensure accurate and conservative DNBR calculation but not necessary for MATRA. The DNBR calculations by MATRA and CETOP were performed for a large number of operating condition in Yonggwang nulcear units 3-4 where the digitial core protection system is initially implemented in Korea. MATRA resulted in a less negative mean value (i.e., reduce the overconservatism) and a somewhat larger standard deviation of the DNBR error. The uncertainty corrected minimum DNBR by MATRA was shown to be higher by 1.8% -9.9% that the CETOP DNBR

  10. Rocky Worlds Limited to ∼1.8 Earth Radii by Atmospheric Escape during a Star’s Extreme UV Saturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmer, Owen R.; Catling, David C., E-mail: info@lehmer.us [Dept. Earth and Space Sciences, Box 351310, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2017-08-20

    Recent observations and analysis of low-mass (<10 M {sub ⊕}) exoplanets have found that rocky planets only have radii up to 1.5–2 R {sub ⊕}. Two general hypotheses exist for the cause of the dichotomy between rocky and gas-enveloped planets (or possible water worlds): either low-mass planets do not necessarily form thick atmospheres of a few wt.%, or the thick atmospheres on these planets easily escape, driven by X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) emissions from young parent stars. Here, we show that a cutoff between rocky and gas-enveloped planets due to hydrodynamic escape is most likely to occur at a mean radius of 1.76 ± 0.38 (2 σ ) R {sub ⊕} around Sun-like stars. We examine the limit in rocky planet radii predicted by hydrodynamic escape across a wide range of possible model inputs, using 10,000 parameter combinations drawn randomly from plausible parameter ranges. We find a cutoff between rocky and gas-enveloped planets that agrees with the observed cutoff. The large cross-section available for XUV absorption in the extremely distended primitive atmospheres of low-mass planets results in complete loss of atmospheres during the ∼100 Myr phase of stellar XUV saturation. In contrast, more-massive planets have less-distended atmospheres and less escape, and so retain thick atmospheres through XUV saturation—and then indefinitely as the XUV and escape fluxes drop over time. The agreement between our model and exoplanet data leads us to conclude that hydrodynamic escape plausibly explains the observed upper limit on rocky planet size and few planets (a “valley”, or “radius gap”) in the 1.5–2 R {sub ⊕} range.

  11. Out-of-core detectors experiments in IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Alfredo Y.; Fuga, Rinaldo; Mendonca, Arlindo Gilson; Moreira, Joao M.L.; Angioletto, Elcio; Fanaro, Leda Cristina C.B.; Jerez, Rogerio; Coelho, Paulo R. Pinto; Santos, Adimir dos; Silva, Graciete S. de A. e; Diniz, Ricardo

    2000-01-01

    In order to study the response of out-of-core detectors, 16 stainless steel plates, with 0.5 cm thickness, were placed at the core-reflector interface of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor. BF 3 , 10 B and Au foil detectors were localized beyond the stainless steel plates in 7 different positions, one of them outside the moderator tank of the reactor for simulating a true PWR out-of-core detector. Calculations were performed for comparison with the experimental results with the TORT code, a three-dimensional transport theory discrete ordinate code. The experiment model utilized 16 energy groups, X-Y Z geometry, S 16 discrete ordinates and P 3 cross-sections. The obtained results showed a good agreement between measured and calculated reaction rates in Au foils. The larger discrepancy occurred for the case with 16 stainless steel with a 2,2% deviation. For position 7, outside of the moderator tank, the neutron flux was so low that it could not active the Au foils for the reaction rate measurements. (author)

  12. Evaluation of In-Core Fuel Management for the Transition Cores of RSG-GAS Reactor to Full-Silicide Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S, Tukiran; MS, Tagor; P, Surian

    2003-01-01

    The core conversion of RSG-GAS reactor from oxide to silicide core with meat density of 2.96 gU/cc has been done. The core-of RSG-GAS reactor has been operated full core of silicide fuels which is started with the mixed core of oxide-silicide start from core 36. Based on previous work, the calculated core parameter for the cores were obtained and it is needed 9 transition cores (core 36 - 44) to achieve a full-silicide core (core 45). The objective of this work is to acquire the effect of the increment of the number of silicide fuel on the core parameters. Conversion core was achieved by transition cores mixed oxide-silicide fuels. Each transition core is calculated and measured core parameter such as, excess reactivity and shutdown margin. Calculation done by Batan-EQUIL-2D code and measurement of the core parameters was carried out using the method of compensation of couple control rods. The results of calculation and experiment shows that the excess reactivity trends lower with the increment of the number of silicide fuel in the core. However, the shutdown margin is not change with the increment of the number of silicide fuel. Therefore, the transition cores can be operated safely to a full-silicide core

  13. Radioimmunoassay and enzyme-linked immunoassay of antibodies directed against lymphadenopathy-associated virus (LAV) proteins larger than the core protein (P24)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neurath, A.R.; Strick, N.; Lee, Y.S.; Nilsen, T.; Baker, L.; Sproul, P.; Rubinstein, P.; Taylor, P.; Stevens, C.E.; Gold, J.W.M.

    1985-01-01

    Molecular exclusion chromatography of crude LAV antigen preparations allows separation of most of P24 from larger proteins of LAV (PL). PL and 125 I- or beta-lactamase-labeled anti-LAV were used as reagents for radioimmunoassay (RIA) - or enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) - inhibition tests to detect antibodies directed predominantly against PL (anti-PL). Among 257 individuals belonging to groups at high risk of developing AIDS, 117 (45.5%) were positive for anti-PL and 108 (42%) for anti-P24, respectively. The 2 individuals among 600 random blood donors found to be anti-P24-positive in the preceding study also had anti-PL in their serum. Sera from 500 additional blood donors were screened for anti-PL and 1 of these was positive. The implication of these findings for screening of blood donors is discussed. (Auth.)

  14. Empirical Bolometric Fluxes and Angular Diameters of 1.6 Million Tycho-2 Stars and Radii of 350,000 Stars with Gaia DR1 Parallaxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Daniel J.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2017-12-01

    We present bolometric fluxes and angular diameters for over 1.6 million stars in the Tycho-2 catalog, determined using previously determined empirical color-temperature and color-flux relations. We vet these relations via full fits to the full broadband spectral energy distributions for a subset of benchmark stars and perform quality checks against the large set of stars for which spectroscopically determined parameters are available from LAMOST, RAVE, and/or APOGEE. We then estimate radii for the 355,502 Tycho-2 stars in our sample whose Gaia DR1 parallaxes are precise to ≲ 10 % . For these stars, we achieve effective temperature, bolometric flux, and angular diameter uncertainties of the order of 1%-2% and radius uncertainties of order 8%, and we explore the effect that imposing spectroscopic effective temperature priors has on these uncertainties. These stellar parameters are shown to be reliable for stars with {T}{eff} ≲ 7000 K. The over half a million bolometric fluxes and angular diameters presented here will serve as an immediate trove of empirical stellar radii with the Gaia second data release, at which point effective temperature uncertainties will dominate the radius uncertainties. Already, dwarf, subgiant, and giant populations are readily identifiable in our purely empirical luminosity-effective temperature (theoretical) Hertzsprung-Russell diagrams.

  15. KVANE - a Kvanefjeld drill core database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund Clausen, F.

    1980-01-01

    A database KVANE containing all drill core information from the drilling programme carried out in 1958, 1962, 1969 and 1977 at the uranium deposit in Kvanefjeld, Southwest Greenland has been made. The applicaTion software ''Statistical Analysis System (SAS)'' was used as the programming tool. It is shown how this software, usually used for other purposes, satisfy a demand of easy storing of larger data amounts. The paper describes how KVANE was made and organized and how data can be picked out of the database. A short introduction to the SAS system is also given. The database has been implemented at the Northern European University Computing Center (NEUCC) at the Technical University of Denmark. (author)

  16. Comparative study for minor actinide transmutation in various fast reactor core concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohki, S.

    2001-01-01

    A comparative evaluation of minor actinide (MA) transmutation property was performed for various fast reactor core concepts. The differences of MA transmutation property were classified by the variations of fuel type (oxide, nitride, metal), coolant type (sodium, lead, carbon dioxide) and design philosophy. Both nitride and metal fuels bring about 10% larger MA transmutation amount compared with oxide fuel. The MA transmutation amount is almost unchanged by the difference between sodium and lead coolants, while carbon dioxide causes a reduction by about 10% compared with those. The changes of MA transmutation property by fuel and coolant types are comparatively small. The effects caused by the difference of core design are rather significant. (author)

  17. Highly active dealloyed Cu@Pt core-shell electrocatalyst towards 2-propanol electrooxidation in acidic solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poochai, Chatwarin, E-mail: p_chatwarin@yahoo.com

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • This is the first report on electrooxidation of 2-propanol in acidic media on dealloyed Cu@Pt/CP core-shell electrocatalyst. • The dealloyed Cu@Pt/CP is prepared using cyclic co-electrodeposition and selective Cu dealloying (CCEd-sCuD). • The structure of dealloyed Cu@Pt/CP is core-shell structure with Cu-rich core and Pt-rich surface. • The dealloyed Cu@Pt/CP shows high activity and great stability towards 2-propanol electrooxidation in acidic media. - Abstract: Dealloyed Cu@Pt core-shell electrocatalyst was fabricated by cyclic co-electrodeposition and selective Cu dealloying (CCEd-sCuD) on carbon paper (CP), namely Cu@Pt/CP. The Cu@Pt/CP exhibited a core-shell structure comprising with a Cu-rich core and a Pt-rich shell. The crystalline phases of Pt/CP and Cu@Pt/CP were a face-centered cubic (fcc). The compressive lattice strain approximately 0.85% was found in the Cu@Pt/CP owing to a lattice mismatch between a core and a shell region. In the core-region, Cu was formed Pt-Cu alloy as major and copper oxide and also metallic copper as minor. The morphology and grain size of the Cu@Pt/CP displayed a porous spherical shape with 100 nm in diameter, while those of Pt/CP seemed to be a cubic shape with smaller diameter of 40 nm. In electrochemical and catalytic activity, the surface of Cu@Pt/CP had a larger electrochemical active surface area (ECSA) than that of Pt/CP due to a porous formation caused by Cu dealloying. It is not surprising that the Cu@Pt/CP showed higher catalytic activity and greater stability towards 0.5 M 2-propanol electrooxidation in 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in terms of peak current density (j{sub p}), peak potential (E{sub p}), onset potential (E{sub onset}), diffusion coefficient (D), and charge transfer resistance (R{sub ct}) which were caused by electronic structure modification, higher compressive lattice strain, and larger ECSA, compared with Pt/CP.

  18. Structure factor of blends of solvent-free nanoparticle-organic hybrid materials: density-functional theory and small angle X-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hsiu-Yu; Srivastava, Samanvaya; Archer, Lynden A; Koch, Donald L

    2014-12-07

    We investigate the static structure factor S(q) of solvent-free nanoparticle-organic hybrid materials consisting of silica nanocores and space-filling polyethylene glycol coronas using a density-functional theory and small angle X-ray scattering measurements. The theory considers a bidisperse suspension of hard spheres with different radii and tethered bead-spring oligomers with different grafting densities to approximate the polydispersity effects in experiments. The experimental systems studied include pure samples with different silica core volume fractions and the associated mean corona grafting densities, and blends with different mixing ratios of the pure samples, in order to introduce varying polydispersity of corona grafting density. Our scattering experiments and theory show that, compared to the hard-sphere suspension with the same core volume fraction, S(q) for pure samples exhibit both substantially smaller values at small q and stronger particle correlations corresponding to a larger effective hard core at large q, indicating that the tethered incompressible oligomers enforce a more uniform particle distribution, and the densely grafted brush gives rise to an additional exclusionary effect between the nanoparticles. According to the theory, polydispersity in the oligomer grafting density controls the deviation of S(q) from the monodisperse system at smaller q, and the interplay of the enhanced effective core size and the entropic attraction among the particles is responsible for complex variations in the particle correlations at larger q. The successful comparison between the predictions and the measurements for the blends further suggests that S(q) can be used to assess the uniformity of grafting density in polymer-grafted nanoparticle materials.

  19. Earth's inner core: Innermost inner core or hemispherical variations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lythgoe, K. H.; Deuss, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412396610; Rudge, J. F.; Neufeld, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of Earth's deep inner core has important implications for core evolution, since it is thought to be related to the early stages of core formation. Previous studies have suggested that there exists an innermost inner core with distinct anisotropy relative to the rest of the inner core.

  20. Dependence of Core and Extended Flux on Core Dominance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Based on two extragalactic radio source samples, the core dominance parameter is calculated, and the correlations between the core/extended flux density and core dominance parameter are investi- gated. When the core dominance parameter is lower than unity, it is linearly correlated with the core flux density, ...

  1. New radiofrequency device to reduce bleeding after core needle biopsy: Experimental study in a porcine liver model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Sang Hyeok; Rhim, Hyun Chul; Lee, Min Woo; Song, Kyoung Doo; Kang, Tae Wook; Kim, Young Sun; Lim, Hyo Keun

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the in vivo efficiency of the biopsy tract radiofrequency ablation for hemostasis after core biopsy of the liver in a porcine liver model, including situations with bleeding tendency and a larger (16-gauge) core needle. A preliminary study was performed using one pig to determine optimal ablation parameters. For the main experiment, four pigs were assigned to different groups according to heparinization use and biopsy needle caliber. In each pig, 14 control (without tract ablation) and 14 experimental (tract ablation) ultrasound-guided core biopsies were performed using either an 18- or 16-gauge needle. Post-biopsy bleeding amounts were measured by soaking up the blood for five minutes. The results were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. The optimal parameters for biopsy tract ablation were determined as a 2-cm active tip electrode set at 40-watt with a tip temperature of 70–80℃. The bleeding amounts in all experimental groups were smaller than those in the controls; however they were significant in the non-heparinized pig biopsied with an 18-gauge needle and in two heparinized pigs (p < 0.001). In the heparinized pigs, the mean blood loss in the experimental group was 3.5% and 13.5% of the controls biopsied with an 18- and 16-gauge needle, respectively. Radiofrequency ablation of hepatic core biopsy tract ablation may reduce post-biopsy bleeding even under bleeding tendency and using a larger core needle, according to the result from in vivo porcine model experiments

  2. New radiofrequency device to reduce bleeding after core needle biopsy: Experimental study in a porcine liver model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang Hyeok; Rhim, Hyun Chul; Lee, Min Woo; Song, Kyoung Doo; Kang, Tae Wook; Kim, Young Sun; Lim, Hyo Keun [Dept. of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    To evaluate the in vivo efficiency of the biopsy tract radiofrequency ablation for hemostasis after core biopsy of the liver in a porcine liver model, including situations with bleeding tendency and a larger (16-gauge) core needle. A preliminary study was performed using one pig to determine optimal ablation parameters. For the main experiment, four pigs were assigned to different groups according to heparinization use and biopsy needle caliber. In each pig, 14 control (without tract ablation) and 14 experimental (tract ablation) ultrasound-guided core biopsies were performed using either an 18- or 16-gauge needle. Post-biopsy bleeding amounts were measured by soaking up the blood for five minutes. The results were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. The optimal parameters for biopsy tract ablation were determined as a 2-cm active tip electrode set at 40-watt with a tip temperature of 70–80℃. The bleeding amounts in all experimental groups were smaller than those in the controls; however they were significant in the non-heparinized pig biopsied with an 18-gauge needle and in two heparinized pigs (p < 0.001). In the heparinized pigs, the mean blood loss in the experimental group was 3.5% and 13.5% of the controls biopsied with an 18- and 16-gauge needle, respectively. Radiofrequency ablation of hepatic core biopsy tract ablation may reduce post-biopsy bleeding even under bleeding tendency and using a larger core needle, according to the result from in vivo porcine model experiments.

  3. On-line core monitoring with CORE MASTER / PRESTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindahl, S.O.; Borresen, S.; Ovrum, S.

    1986-01-01

    Advanced calculational tools are instrumental in improving reactor plant capacity factors and fuel utilization. The computer code package CORE MASTER is an integrated system designed to achieve this objective. The system covers all main activities in the area of in-core fuel management for boiling water reactors; design, operation support, and on-line core monitoring. CORE MASTER operates on a common data base, which defines the reactor and documents the operating history of the core and of all fuel bundles ever used

  4. 2S-4S spectroscopy in hydrogen atom: The new value for the Rydberg constant and the proton charge radius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolachevsky, N.; Beyer, A.; Maisenbacher, L.; Matveev, A.; Pohl, R.; Khabarova, K.; Grinin, A.; Lamour, T.; Yost, D. C.; Haensch, T. W.; Udem, Th.

    2018-02-01

    The core of the "proton radius puzzle" is the discrepancy of four standard deviations between the proton root mean square charge radii (rp) determined from regular hydrogen (H), and the muonic hydrogen atom (μp). We have measured the 2S-4P transition frequency in H, utilizing a cryogenic beam of H and directly demonstrate that quantum interference of neighboring atomic resonances can lead to line shifts much larger than the proton radius discrepancy. Using an asymmetric fit function we obtain rp = 0.8335(95) fm and the Rydberg constant R∞ = 10 973 731.568 076 (96) m-1. The new value for rp is 3.3 combined standard deviations smaller than the latest CODATA value, but in good agreement with the value from μp.

  5. Radioimmunoassay and enzyme-linked immunoassay of antibodies directed against lymphadenopathy-associated virus (LAV) proteins larger than the core protein (P24)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neurath, A R; Strick, N; Lee, Y S; Nilsen, T; Baker, L; Sproul, P; Rubinstein, P; Taylor, P; Stevens, C E; Gold, J W.M.

    1985-10-01

    Molecular exclusion chromatography of crude LAV antigen preparations allows separation of most of P24 from larger proteins of LAV (PL). PL and /sup 125/I- or beta-lactamase-labeled anti-LAV were used as reagents for radioimmunoassay (RIA) - or enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) - inhibition tests to detect antibodies directed predominantly against PL (anti-PL). Among 257 individuals belonging to groups at high risk of developing AIDS, 117 (45.5%) were positive for anti-PL and 108 (42%) for anti-P24, respectively. The 2 individuals among 600 random blood donors found to be anti-P24-positive in the preceding study also had anti-PL in their serum. Sera from 500 additional blood donors were screened for anti-PL and 1 of these was positive. The implication of these findings for screening of blood donors is discussed. 17 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 table.

  6. Advanced BWR core component designs and the implications for SFD analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, L.J.

    1997-01-01

    Prior to the DF-4 boiling water reactor (BWR) severe fuel damage (SFD) experiment conducted at the Sandia National Laboratories in 1986, no experimental data base existed for guidance in modeling core component behavior under postulated severe accident conditions in commercial BWRs. This paper will present the lessons learned from the DF-4 experiment (and subsequent German CORA BWR SFD tests) and the impact on core models in the current generation of SFD codes. The DF-4 and CORA BWR test assemblies were modeled on the core component designs circa 1985; that is, the 8 x 8 fuel assembly with two water rods and a cruciform control blade constructed of B 4 C-filled tubelets. Within the past ten years, the state-of-the-art with respect to BWR core component development has out-distanced the current SFD experimental data base and SFD code capabilities. For example, modern BWR control blade design includes hafnium at the tips and top of each control blade wing for longer blade operating lifetimes; also water rods have been replaced by larger water channels for better neutronics economy; and fuel assemblies now contain partial-length fuel rods, again for better neutronics economy. This paper will also discuss the implications of these advanced fuel assembly and core component designs on severe accident progression and on the current SFD code capabilities

  7. Restraint system for core elements of a reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Class, G.

    1975-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor, a core element bundle formed of a plurality of side-by-side arranged core elements is surrounded by restraining elements that exert a radially inwardly directly restraining force generating friction forces between the core elements in a restraining plane that is transverse to the core element axes. The adjoining core elements are in rolling contact with one another in the restraining plane by virtue of rolling-type bearing elements supported in the core elements. (Official Gazette)

  8. Introgression of a Rare Haplotype from Southeastern Africa to Breed California Blackeyes with Larger Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell R Lucas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Seed size distinguishes most crops from their wild relatives and is an important quality trait for the grain legume cowpea. In order to breed cowpea varieties with larger seeds we introgressed a rare haplotype associated with large seeds at the Css-1 locus from an African buff seed type cultivar, IT82E-18 (18.5g/100 seeds, into a blackeye seed type cultivar, CB27 (22g/100 seed. Four RILs derived from these two parents were chosen for marker-assisted breeding based on SNP genotyping with a goal of stacking large seed haplotypes into a CB27 background. Foreground and background selection were performed during two cycles of backcrossing based on genome-wide SNP markers. The average seed size of introgression lines homozygous for haplotypes associated with large seeds was 28.7g/100 seed and 24.8g/100 seed for cycles 1 and 2, respectively. One cycle 1 introgression line with desirable seed quality was selfed for two generations to make families with very large seeds (28-35g/100 seeds. Field-based performance trials helped identify breeding lines that not only have large seeds but are also desirable in terms of yield, maturity, and plant architecture when compared to industry standards. A principal component analysis was used to explore the relationships between the parents relative to a core set of landraces and improved varieties based on high-density SNP data. The geographic distribution of haplotypes at the Css-1 locus suggest the haplotype associated with large seeds is unique to accessions collected from Southeastern Africa. Therefore this QTL has a strong potential to develop larger seeded varieties for other growing regions which is demonstrated in this work using a California pedigree.

  9. Statistical radii associated with amino acids to determine the contact map: fixing the structure of a type I cohesin domain in the Clostridium thermocellum cellulosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chwastyk, Mateusz; Poma Bernaola, Adolfo; Cieplak, Marek

    2015-07-01

    We propose to improve and simplify protein refinement procedures through consideration of which pairs of amino acid residues should form native contacts. We first consider 11 330 proteins from the CATH database to determine statistical distributions of contacts associated with a given type of amino acid. The distributions are set across the distances between the α-C atoms that are in contact. Based on this data, we determine typical radii of effective spheres that can be placed on the α-C atoms in order to reconstruct the distribution of the contact lengths. This is done by checking for overlaps with enlarged van der Waals spheres associated with heavy atoms on other amino acids. The resulting contacts can be used to identify non-native contacts that may arise during the time evolution of structure-based models. Here, the radii are used to guide reconstruction of nine missing side chains in a type I cohesin domain with the Protein Data Bank code 1AOH. We first identify the likely missing contacts and then sculpt the corresponding side chains by standard refinement tools to achieve consistency with the expected contact map. One ambiguity in refinement is resolved by determining all-atom conformational energies.

  10. Magnetic susceptibility measurements of boring cores obtained from regional hydrological study project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Ken

    2010-02-01

    We measured the magnetic susceptibility of boring cores obtained from the Regional Hydrological Study Project to interpret the aeromagnetic survey data which was carried out in Tono area with about 40km square surrounding Tono Geoscience Center. The result of measurements indicates that the magnetic susceptibility of the Toki Granite is not distributed uniformly and the maximum value becomes two orders in magnitude larger than its minimum value. (author)

  11. The EDC3 chronology for the EPICA Dome C ice core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Parrenin

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The EPICA (European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica Dome C drilling in East Antarctica has now been completed to a depth of 3260 m, at only a few meters above bedrock. Here we present the new EDC3 chronology, which is based on the use of 1 a snow accumulation and mechanical flow model, and 2 a set of independent age markers along the core. These are obtained by pattern matching of recorded parameters to either absolutely dated paleoclimatic records, or to insolation variations. We show that this new time scale is in excellent agreement with the Dome Fuji and Vostok ice core time scales back to 100 kyr within 1 kyr. Discrepancies larger than 3 kyr arise during MIS 5.4, 5.5 and 6, which points to anomalies in either snow accumulation or mechanical flow during these time periods. We estimate that EDC3 gives accurate event durations within 20% (2σ back to MIS11 and accurate absolute ages with a maximum uncertainty of 6 kyr back to 800 kyr.

  12. Outcrop - core correlation and seismic modeling of the Athabasca Oil Sands Deposit, Fort McMurray area, northeast Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hein, F.J. [Alberta Geological Survey, Calgary, AB (Canada); Langenberg, C.W.; Cotterill, D.C.; Berhane, H. [Alberta Geological Survey, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Lawton, D.; Cunningham, J. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    1999-11-01

    A joint study between the Alberta Geological Survey and the University of Calgary was conducted which involved a detailed facies analysis of cores and outcrops from the Athabasca Oil Sands Deposit in Alberta`s Steepbank area. A unified facies classification for the deposit was developed. Larger scale facies associations were also determined, as well as proxy sonic logs for outcrops used in seismic modeling. The cores which were displayed exhibited detailed sedimentological and stratigraphic analysis of 10 outcrops in the area. 7 refs.

  13. Defining the Core Genome of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium for Genomic Surveillance and Epidemiological Typing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Songzhe; Octavia, Sophie; Tanaka, Mark M.; Sintchenko, Vitali

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is the most common Salmonella serovar causing foodborne infections in Australia and many other countries. Twenty-one S. Typhimurium strains from Salmonella reference collection A (SARA) were analyzed using Illumina high-throughput genome sequencing. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 21 SARA strains ranged from 46 to 11,916 SNPs, with an average of 1,577 SNPs per strain. Together with 47 strains selected from publicly available S. Typhimurium genomes, the S. Typhimurium core genes (STCG) were determined. The STCG consist of 3,846 genes, a set that is much larger than that of the 2,882 Salmonella core genes (SCG) found previously. The STCG together with 1,576 core intergenic regions (IGRs) were defined as the S. Typhimurium core genome. Using 93 S. Typhimurium genomes from 13 epidemiologically confirmed community outbreaks, we demonstrated that typing based on the S. Typhimurium core genome (STCG plus core IGRs) provides superior resolution and higher discriminatory power than that based on SCG for outbreak investigation and molecular epidemiology of S. Typhimurium. STCG and STCG plus core IGR typing achieved 100% separation of all outbreaks compared to that of SCG typing, which failed to separate isolates from two outbreaks from background isolates. Defining the S. Typhimurium core genome allows standardization of genes/regions to be used for high-resolution epidemiological typing and genomic surveillance of S. Typhimurium. PMID:26019201

  14. Surface core level shifts of clean and oxygen covered Ir(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchi, M; Cassese, D; Cavallin, A; Comin, R; Orlando, F; Postregna, L [Universita degli Studi di Trieste, Via A Valerio 2, 34127, Trieste (Italy); Golfetto, E; Baraldi, A [Dipartimento di Fisica e CENMAT, Universita degli Studi di Trieste, Via A Valerio 2, 34127, Trieste (Italy); Lizzit, S [Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., S.S. 14 Km 163.5, 34012 Trieste (Italy)], E-mail: alessandro.baraldi@elettra.trieste.it

    2009-06-15

    We present the results of high resolution core level photoelectron spectroscopy employed to investigate the electronic structure of clean and oxygen covered Ir(111) surface. Ir 4f{sub 7/2} core level spectra are shown to be very sensitive to the local atomic environment. For the clean surface we detected two distinct components shifted by 550 meV, originated by surface and bulk atoms. The larger Gaussian width of the bulk component is explained as due to experimentally unresolved subsurface components. In order to determine the relevance of the phonon contribution we examined the thermal behaviour of the core level lineshape using the Hedin-Rosengren theory. From the phonon-induced spectral broadening we found the Debye temperature of bulk and surface atoms to be 298 and 181 K, respectively, which confirms the softening of the vibrational modes at the surface. Oxygen adsorption leads to the appearance of new surface core level components at -200 meV and +230 meV, which are interpreted as due to first-layer Ir atoms differently coordinated with oxygen. The coverage dependence of these components demonstrates that the oxygen saturation corresponds to 0.38 ML, in good agreement with recent density functional theory calculations.

  15. MAKE SUPER-EARTHS, NOT JUPITERS: ACCRETING NEBULAR GAS ONTO SOLID CORES AT 0.1 AU AND BEYOND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eve J.; Chiang, Eugene; Ormel, Chris W., E-mail: evelee@berkeley.edu, E-mail: echiang@astro.berkeley.edu, E-mail: ormel@berkeley.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States)

    2014-12-20

    Close-in super-Earths having radii 1-4 R {sub ⊕} may possess hydrogen atmospheres comprising a few percent by mass of their rocky cores. We determine the conditions under which such atmospheres can be accreted by cores from their parent circumstellar disks. Accretion from the nebula is problematic because it is too efficient: we find that 10 M {sub ⊕} cores embedded in solar metallicity disks tend to undergo runaway gas accretion and explode into Jupiters, irrespective of orbital location. The threat of runaway is especially dire at ∼0.1 AU, where solids may coagulate on timescales orders of magnitude shorter than gas clearing times; thus nascent atmospheres on close-in orbits are unlikely to be supported against collapse by planetesimal accretion. The time to runaway accretion is well approximated by the cooling time of the atmosphere's innermost convective zone, whose extent is controlled by where H{sub 2} dissociates. Insofar as the temperatures characterizing H{sub 2} dissociation are universal, timescales for core instability tend not to vary with orbital distance—and to be alarmingly short for 10 M {sub ⊕} cores. Nevertheless, in the thicket of parameter space, we identify two scenarios, not mutually exclusive, that can reproduce the preponderance of percent-by-mass atmospheres for super-Earths at ∼0.1 AU, while still ensuring the formation of Jupiters at ≳ 1 AU. Scenario (a): planets form in disks with dust-to-gas ratios that range from ∼20× solar at 0.1 AU to ∼2× solar at 5 AU. Scenario (b): the final assembly of super-Earth cores from mergers of proto-cores—a process that completes quickly at ∼0.1 AU once begun—is delayed by gas dynamical friction until just before disk gas dissipates completely. Both scenarios predict that the occurrence rate for super-Earths versus orbital distance, and the corresponding rate for Jupiters, should trend in opposite directions, as the former population is transformed into the latter: as

  16. Edge-core interaction revealed with dynamic transport experiment in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, N.; Ida, K.; Inagaki, S.

    2010-11-01

    Large scale coherent structures in electron heat transport of both core and edge plasmas are clearly found in plasma with a nonlocal transport phenomenon (NTP, a core electron temperature rise in response to an edge cooling) on Large Helical Device (LHD). At the onset of the NTP, a first order transition of the electron heat transport, which is characterized by a discontinuity of electron temperature gradient, is found to take place over a wide region (at least 6 cm wide) in the periphery of the plasma. At about the same time, over a wide region (about 10 cm wide) of the plasma core, a second order transition of the electron heat transport, which is characterized by a discontinuity of the time derivative of the electron temperature gradient, appears. The both large scale coherent structures are of a scale larger than a typical micro-turbulent eddy size (a few mm in this case). In order to assess dynamic characteristics of the electron heat transport state in the core region during the NTP, a transit time distribution analysis is applied to the temporal behaviors of the electron temperature gradient. The analysis results more clearly show the existence of the large coherent structures in electron heat transport. Thus the NTP observed in LHD is considered to be invoked by the interaction of those structures. (author)

  17. Inner Core Tilt and Polar Motion: Probing the Dynamics Deep Inside the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumberry, M.; Bloxham, J.

    2003-12-01

    A tilted inner core permits exchange of angular momentum between the core and the mantle through gravitational and pressure torques and, as a result, changes in the direction of Earth's axis of rotation with respect to the mantle. Some of the observed variations in the direction of Earth's rotation could then be caused by equatorial torques on the inner core which tilt the latter out of its alignment with the mantle. In this work, we investigate whether such a scenario could explain the decade polar motion known as the Markowitz wobble. We show that a decade polar motion of the same amplitude as the observed Markowitz wobble requires a torque of 1020 N m which tilts the inner core by 0.07 degrees. This result critically depends on the viscosity of the inner core; for a viscosity less than 5 x 1017 Pa s, larger torques are required. A torque of 1020 N m with decadal periodicity can perhaps be produced by electromagnetic coupling between the inner core and a component of the flow in the outer core known as torsional oscillations, provided that the radial magnetic field at the inner core boundary is on the order of 3 to 4 mT and satisfies certain geometrical constraints. The resulting polar motion thus produced is eccentric and polarized, in agreement with the observations. Our model suggests that equatorial torques at the inner core boundary might also excite the Chandler wobble, provided shorter wavelength torsional oscillations with higher natural frequencies have enough power or provided there exists another physical mechanism that can generate a large torque at a 14 month period.

  18. Basal and prism dislocation cores in magnesium: comparison of first-principles and embedded-atom-potential methods predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasi, J A; Nogaret, T; Curtin, W A; Trinkle, D R; Qi, Y; Hector, L G Jr

    2009-01-01

    The core structures of screw and edge dislocations on the basal and prism planes in Mg, and the associated gamma surfaces, were studied using an ab initio method and the embedded-atom-method interatomic potentials developed by Sun et al and Liu et al. The ab initio calculations predict that the basal plane dislocations dissociate into partials split by 16.7 Å (edge) and 6.3 Å (screw), as compared with 14.3 Å and 12.7 Å (Sun and Liu edge), and 6.3 Å and 1.4 Å (Sun and Liu screw), with the Liu screw dislocation being metastable. In the prism plane, the screw and edge cores are compact and the edge core structures are all similar, while ab initio does not predict a stable prismatic screw in stress-free conditions. These results are qualitatively understood through an examination of the gamma surfaces for interplanar sliding on the basal and prism planes. The Peierls stresses at T = 0 K for basal slip are a few megapascals for the Sun potential, in agreement with experiments, but are ten times larger for the Liu potential. The Peierls stresses for prism slip are 10–40 MPa for both potentials. Overall, the dislocation core structures from ab initio are well represented by the Sun potential in all cases while the Liu potential shows some notable differences. These results suggest that the Sun potential is preferable for studying other dislocations in Mg, particularly the (c + a) dislocations, for which the core structures are much larger and not accessible by ab initio methods

  19. When the proton becomes larger

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    The TOTEM experiment at the LHC has just confirmed that, at high energy, protons behave as if they were becoming larger. In more technical terms, their total cross-section – a parameter linked to the proton-proton interaction probability – increases with energy. This phenomenon, expected from previous measurements performed at much lower energy, has now been confirmed for the first time at the LHC’s unprecedented energy.   One arm of a TOTEM T2 detector during its installation at interaction point 5. A composite particle like the proton is a complex system that in no way resembles a static Lego construction: sub-components move inside and interactions keep the whole thing together, but in a very dynamic way. This partly explains why even the very common proton can still be hiding secrets about its nature, decades after its discovery. One way of studying the inner properties of protons is to observe how they interact with each other, which, in technical terms, i...

  20. Optical extinction spectroscopy used to characterize metallic nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaffardi, L B; Lester, M; Skigin, D; Tocho, J O

    2007-01-01

    We present a method for sizing metallic nanowires through the analysis of the extinction spectra of the scattered light when the wires are illuminated alternatively with p- and s-polarization waves. The method is applied to isolated silver nanowires in air or immersed in index matching oil. The dielectric function of silver is affected by the size of the cylinders, and its influence on the extinction spectra near the plasmon resonance or near the dip position is considered. Due to the size of the nanocylinders, it is necessary to include two different permittivities in the electromagnetic model to analyse the behaviour of the material under different polarization incidences. This introduces anisotropy in the system, which comprises isotropic cylinders. The behaviour of the extinction spectra for p-waves allows us to determine the wire radii, taking into account the plasmon peak position for radii larger than 7 nm, or alternatively, by using the contrast between maximum and minimum intensity near the plasmon frequency, for radii lower than 5 nm. For s-waves, although no plasmon peak appears, we can determine the radii by analysing the contrast between the ridge of the spectra near 260-275 nm and the minimum near 320-330 nm for radii larger than 10 nm, or analysing the slope in the spectra over 350 nm, for radii below 10 nm. The present study shows that spectral extinction is a very simple and inexpensive technique that can be useful for characterizing the radius of nanocylinders when electron microscopy (TEM or SEM) is not available

  1. Impact of the dynamical core on the direct simulation of tropical cyclones in a high-resolution global model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, K. A.

    2015-01-01

    Our paper examines the impact of the dynamical core on the simulation of tropical cyclone (TC) frequency, distribution, and intensity. The dynamical core, the central fluid flow component of any general circulation model (GCM), is often overlooked in the analysis of a model's ability to simulate TCs compared to the impact of more commonly documented components (e.g., physical parameterizations). The Community Atmosphere Model version 5 is configured with multiple dynamics packages. This analysis demonstrates that the dynamical core has a significant impact on storm intensity and frequency, even in the presence of similar large-scale environments. In particular, the spectral element core produces stronger TCs and more hurricanes than the finite-volume core using very similar parameterization packages despite the latter having a slightly more favorable TC environment. Furthermore, these results suggest that more detailed investigations into the impact of the GCM dynamical core on TC climatology are needed to fully understand these uncertainties. Key Points The impact of the GCM dynamical core is often overlooked in TC assessments The CAM5 dynamical core has a significant impact on TC frequency and intensity A larger effort is needed to better understand this uncertainty

  2. Hydrogenation properties of Mg1-xM1xCu2 (M1=La and Nd) with larger interstitial sites than MgCu2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsushio, Y.

    1998-01-01

    The hydrogenation properties of C15 compounds are controlled by crystal structure, the size of the interstitial hole being an especially important factor. Its effect on the hydrogenation properties of MgCu 2 substituted with rare earth elements of various radii is discussed and the limit in controlling the crystal structure by conventional substitution is explained. (orig.)

  3. Larger men have larger prostates: Detection bias in epidemiologic studies of obesity and prostate cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundle, Andrew; Wang, Yun; Sadasivan, Sudha; Chitale, Dhananjay A; Gupta, Nilesh S; Tang, Deliang; Rybicki, Benjamin A

    2017-06-01

    Obesity is associated with risk of aggressive prostate cancer (PCa), but not with over-all PCa risk. However, obese men have larger prostates which may lower biopsy accuracy and cause a systematic bias toward the null in epidemiologic studies of over-all risk. Within a cohort of 6692 men followed-up after a biopsy or transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) with benign findings, a nested case-control study was conducted of 495 prostate cancer cases and controls matched on age, race, follow-up duration, biopsy versus TURP, and procedure date. Data on body mass index and prostate volume at the time of the initial procedure were abstracted from medical records. Prior to consideration of differences in prostate volume, overweight (OR = 1.41; 95%CI 1.01, 1.97), and obese status (OR = 1.59; 95%CI 1.09, 2.33) at the time of the original benign biopsy or TURP were associated with PCa incidence during follow-up. Prostate volume did not significantly moderate the association between body-size and PCa, however it did act as an inverse confounder; adjustment for prostate volume increased the effect size for overweight by 22% (adjusted OR = 1.52; 95%CI 1.08, 2.14) and for obese status by 23% (adjusted OR = 1.77; 95%CI 1.20, 2.62). Larger prostate volume at the time of the original benign biopsy or TURP was inversely associated with PCa incidence during follow-up (OR = 0.92 per 10 cc difference in volume; 95%CI 0.88, 0.97). In analyses that stratified case-control pairs by tumor aggressiveness of the case, prostate volume acted as an inverse confounder in analyses of non-aggressive PCa but not in analyses of aggressive PCa. In studies of obesity and PCa, differences in prostate volume cause a bias toward the null, particularly in analyses of non-aggressive PCa. A pervasive underestimation of the association between obesity and overall PCa risk may exist in the literature. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Earth's Paleomagnetosphere and Planetary Habitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarduno, J. A.; Blackman, E. G.; Oda, H.; Bono, R. K.; Carroll-Nellenback, J.; Cottrell, R. D.; Nimmo, F.

    2017-12-01

    The geodynamo is thought to play an important role in protecting Earth's hydrosphere, vital for life as we know it, from loss due to the erosive potential of the solar wind. Here we consider the mechanisms and history of this shielding. A larger core dynamo magnetic field strength provides more pressure to abate the solar wind dynamic pressure, increasing the magnetopause radius. However, the larger magnetopause also implies a larger collecting area for solar wind flux during phases of magnetic reconnection. The important variable is not mass capture but energy transfer, which does not scale linearly with magnetosphere size. Moreover, the ordered field provides the magnetic topology for recapturing atmospheric components in the opposite hemisphere such that the net global loss might not be greatly affected. While a net protection role for magnetospheres is suggested, forcing by the solar wind will change with stellar age. Paleomagnetism utilizing the single silicate crystal approach, defines a relatively strong field some 3.45 billion years ago (the Paleoarchean), but with a reduced magnetopause of 5 Earth radii, implying the potential for some atmospheric loss. Terrestrial zircons from the Jack Hills (Western Australia) and other localities host magnetic inclusions, whose magnetization has now been recorded by a new generation of ultra-sensitive 3-component SQUID magnetometer (U. Rochester) and SQUID microscope (GSJ/AIST). Paleointensity data suggest the presence of a terrestrial dynamo and magnetic shielding for Eoarchean to Hadean times, at ages as old as 4.2 billion years ago. However, the magnetic data suggest that for intervals >100,000 years long, magnetopause standoff distances may have reached 3 to 4 Earth radii or less. The early inception of the geodynamo, which probably occurred shortly after the lunar-forming impact, its continuity, and an early robust hydrosphere, appear to be key ingredients for Earth's long-term habitability.

  5. Core lifter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlov, N G; Edel' man, Ya A

    1981-02-15

    A core lifter is suggested which contains a housing, core-clamping elements installed in the housing depressions in the form of semirings with projections on the outer surface restricting the rotation of the semirings in the housing depressions. In order to improve the strength and reliability of the core lifter, the semirings have a variable transverse section formed from the outside by the surface of the rotation body of the inner arc of the semiring aroung the rotation axis and from the inner a cylindrical surface which is concentric to the outer arc of the semiring. The core-clamping elements made in this manner have the possibility of freely rotating in the housing depressions under their own weight and from contact with the core sample. These semirings do not have weakened sections, have sufficient strength, are inserted into the limited ring section of the housing of the core lifter without reduction in its through opening and this improve the reliability of the core lifter in operation.

  6. Side core lifter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelman, Ya A

    1982-01-01

    A side core lifter is proposed which contains a housing with guide slits and a removable core lifter with side projections on the support section connected to the core receiver. In order to preserve the structure of the rock in the core sample by means of guaranteeing rectilinear movement of the core lifter in the rock, the support and core receiver sections are hinged. The device is equipped with a spring for angular shift in the core-reception part.

  7. Core mechanics and configuration behavior of advanced LMFBR core restraint concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, J.N.; Wei, B.C.

    1978-02-01

    Core restraint systems in LMFBRs maintain control of core mechanics and configuration behavior. Core restraint design is complex due to the close spacing between adjacent components, flux and temperature gradients, and irradiation-induced material property effects. Since the core assemblies interact with each other and transmit loads directly to the core restraint structural members, the core assemblies themselves are an integral part of the core restraint system. This paper presents an assessment of several advanced core restraint system and core assembly concepts relative to the expected performance of currently accepted designs. A recommended order for the development of the advanced concepts is also presented

  8. Understanding variability of the Southern Ocean overturning circulation in CORE-II models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downes, S. M.; Spence, P.; Hogg, A. M.

    2018-03-01

    The current generation of climate models exhibit a large spread in the steady-state and projected Southern Ocean upper and lower overturning circulation, with mechanisms for deep ocean variability remaining less well understood. Here, common Southern Ocean metrics in twelve models from the Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiment Phase II (CORE-II) are assessed over a 60 year period. Specifically, stratification, surface buoyancy fluxes, and eddies are linked to the magnitude of the strengthening trend in the upper overturning circulation, and a decreasing trend in the lower overturning circulation across the CORE-II models. The models evolve similarly in the upper 1 km and the deep ocean, with an almost equivalent poleward intensification trend in the Southern Hemisphere westerly winds. However, the models differ substantially in their eddy parameterisation and surface buoyancy fluxes. In general, models with a larger heat-driven water mass transformation where deep waters upwell at the surface ( ∼ 55°S) transport warmer waters into intermediate depths, thus weakening the stratification in the upper 2 km. Models with a weak eddy induced overturning and a warm bias in the intermediate waters are more likely to exhibit larger increases in the upper overturning circulation, and more significant weakening of the lower overturning circulation. We find the opposite holds for a cool model bias in intermediate depths, combined with a more complex 3D eddy parameterisation that acts to reduce isopycnal slope. In summary, the Southern Ocean overturning circulation decadal trends in the coarse resolution CORE-II models are governed by biases in surface buoyancy fluxes and the ocean density field, and the configuration of the eddy parameterisation.

  9. Listing of nuclear power plant larger than 100 MWe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, B.

    1976-03-01

    This report contains a list of all nuclear power plants larger than 100 MWe, printed out from the Argus Data Bank at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden. The plants are listed by NSSS supply. (M.S.)

  10. Magnetized Converging Flows toward the Hot Core in the Intermediate/High-mass Star-forming Region NGC 6334 V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juárez, Carmen; Girart, Josep M.; Zamora-Avilés, Manuel; Palau, Aina; Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier; Tang, Ya-Wen; Koch, Patrick M.; Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Zhang, Qizhou; Qiu, Keping

    2017-01-01

    We present Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations at 345 GHz toward the intermediate/high-mass cluster-forming region NGC 6334 V. From the dust emission we spatially resolve three dense condensations, the brightest one presenting the typical chemistry of a hot core. The magnetic field (derived from the dust polarized emission) shows a bimodal converging pattern toward the hot core. The molecular emission traces two filamentary structures at two different velocities, separated by 2 km s −1 , converging to the hot core and following the magnetic field distribution. We compare the velocity field and the magnetic field derived from the SMA observations with magnetohydrodynamic simulations of star-forming regions dominated by gravity. This comparison allows us to show how the gas falls in from the larger-scale extended dense core (∼0.1 pc) of NGC 6334 V toward the higher-density hot core region (∼0.02 pc) through two distinctive converging flows dragging the magnetic field, whose strength seems to have been overcome by gravity.

  11. How cores grow by pebble accretion. I. Direct core growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwers, M. G.; Vazan, A.; Ormel, C. W.

    2018-03-01

    Context. Planet formation by pebble accretion is an alternative to planetesimal-driven core accretion. In this scenario, planets grow by the accretion of cm- to m-sized pebbles instead of km-sized planetesimals. One of the main differences with planetesimal-driven core accretion is the increased thermal ablation experienced by pebbles. This can provide early enrichment to the planet's envelope, which influences its subsequent evolution and changes the process of core growth. Aims: We aim to predict core masses and envelope compositions of planets that form by pebble accretion and compare mass deposition of pebbles to planetesimals. Specifically, we calculate the core mass where pebbles completely evaporate and are absorbed before reaching the core, which signifies the end of direct core growth. Methods: We model the early growth of a protoplanet by calculating the structure of its envelope, taking into account the fate of impacting pebbles or planetesimals. The region where high-Z material can exist in vapor form is determined by the temperature-dependent vapor pressure. We include enrichment effects by locally modifying the mean molecular weight of the envelope. Results: In the pebble case, three phases of core growth can be identified. In the first phase (Mcore mixes outwards, slowing core growth. In the third phase (Mcore > 0.5M⊕), the high-Z inner region expands outwards, absorbing an increasing fraction of the ablated material as vapor. Rainout ends before the core mass reaches 0.6 M⊕, terminating direct core growth. In the case of icy H2O pebbles, this happens before 0.1 M⊕. Conclusions: Our results indicate that pebble accretion can directly form rocky cores up to only 0.6 M⊕, and is unable to form similarly sized icy cores. Subsequent core growth can proceed indirectly when the planet cools, provided it is able to retain its high-Z material.

  12. Influence of New Sol-gel Refractory Coating on the Casting Properties of Cold Box and Furan Cores for Grey Cast iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nwaogu, Ugochukwu Chibuzoh; Poulsen, T.; Bischoff, C

    2010-01-01

    New Sol-Gel coated sand cores made from coldbox and furan binder systems were investigated. The idea of the coating was to improve the surface quality of castings. Grey iron was cast on the cores in a sand casting process. The effect of the high temperature of the melt on the cores was assessed...... by measuring the heating curves. The viscosity of the coating, moisture content and the permeability of the cores were evaluated. The surface quality of the castings was investigated using SEM and OM. The results show that the moisture content of the cores affected the permeability. In furan cores the vapour...... transport zone (VTZ) when in contact with the melt is larger than it is in a coldbox which means the furan cores have higher moisture content. The new sol-gel coating has the potential for improving the surface quality of castings without negative effects on the graphite distribution. The surface...

  13. An Extended Two-Phase Method for Accessing Sections of Out-of-Core Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Thakur

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of applications on parallel computers deal with very large data sets that cannot fit in main memory. In such applications, data must be stored in files on disks and fetched into memory during program execution. Parallel programs with large out-of-core arrays stored in files must read/write smaller sections of the arrays from/to files. In this article, we describe a method for accessing sections of out-of-core arrays efficiently. Our method, the extended two-phase method, uses collective l/O: Processors cooperate to combine several l/O requests into fewer larger granularity requests, to reorder requests so that the file is accessed in proper sequence, and to eliminate simultaneous l/O requests for the same data. In addition, the l/O workload is divided among processors dynamically, depending on the access requests. We present performance results obtained from two real out-of-core parallel applications – matrix multiplication and a Laplace's equation solver – and several synthetic access patterns, all on the Intel Touchstone Delta. These results indicate that the extended two-phase method significantly outperformed a direct (noncollective method for accessing out-of-core array sections.

  14. Comparison of facility characteristics between SCTF Core-I and Core-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Hiromichi; Iwamura, Takamichi; Sobajima, Makoto; Ohnuki, Akira; Abe, Yutaka; Murao, Yoshio.

    1990-08-01

    The Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF) was constructed to investigate two-dimensional thermal-hydraulics in the core and fluid behavior of carryover water out of the core including its feed-back effect to the core behavior mainly during the reflood phase of a large break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Since three simulated cores are used in the SCTF Test Program and the design of these three cores are slightly different one by one, repeatability test is required to justify a direct comparison of data obtained with different cores. In the present report, data of Test S2-13 (Run 618) obtained with SCTF Core-II were compared with those of Test S1-05 (Run 511) obtained with the Core-I, which were performed under the forced-flooding condition. Thermal-hydraulic behaviors in these two tests showed quite similar characteristics of both system behavior and two-dimensional core behaviors. Therefore, the test data obtained from the two cores can be compared directly with each other. After the turnaround of clad temperatures, however, some differences were found in upper plenum water accumulation and resultant two-dimensional core cooling behaviors such as quench front propagation from bottom to top of the core. (author)

  15. Soliton-based ultrafast multi-wavelength nonlinear switching in dual-core photonic crystal fibre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stajanca, P; Pysz, D; Michalka, M; Bugar, I; Andriukaitis, G; Balciunas, T; Fan, G; Baltuska, A

    2014-01-01

    Systematic experimental study of ultrafast multi-wavelength all-optical switching performance in a dual-core photonic crystal fibre is presented. The focus is on nonlinearly induced switching between the two output ports at non-excitation wavelengths, which are generated during nonlinear propagation of femtosecond pulses in the anomalous dispersion region of a dual-core photonic crystal fibre made of multicomponent glass. Spatial and spectral characteristics of the fibre output radiation were measured separately for both fibre cores under various polarization and intensity conditions upon selective, individual excitation of each fibre core. Polarization-controlled nonlinear switching performance at multiple non-excitation wavelengths was demonstrated in the long-wavelength optical communication bands and beyond. Depending on the input pulse polarization, narrowband switching operation at 1560 nm and 1730 nm takes place with double core extinction ratio contrasts of 9 dB and 14.5 dB, respectively. Moreover, our approach allows switching with simultaneous wavelength shift from 1650 to 1775 nm with extinction ratio contrast larger than 18 dB. In addition, non-reciprocal behaviour of the soliton fission process under different fibre core excitations was observed and its effect on the multi-wavelength nonlinear switching performance was explained, taking into account the slight dual-core structure asymmetry. The obtained results represent ultrafast all-optical switching with an extended dimension of wavelength shift, controllable with both the input radiation intensity and the polarization by simple propagation along a 14 mm long fibre. (paper)

  16. Why borrowers pay premiums to larger lenders: Empirical evidence from sovereign syndicated loans

    OpenAIRE

    Hallak, Issam

    2002-01-01

    All other terms being equal (e.g. seniority), syndicated loan contracts provide larger lending compensations (in percentage points) to institutions funding larger amounts. This paper explores empirically the motivation for such a price design on a sample of sovereign syndicated loans in the period 1990-1997. I find strong evidence that a larger premium is associated with higher renegotiation probability and information asymmetries. It hardly has any impact on the number of lenders though. Thi...

  17. Annual spatiotemporal migration schedules in three larger insectivorous birds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Lars Bo; Jensen, Niels Odder; Willemoes, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    Background: Knowledge of spatiotemporal migration patterns is important for our understanding of migration ecology and ultimately conservation of migratory species. We studied the annual migration schedules of European nightjar, a large nocturnal insectivore and compared it with two other larger ...

  18. Temporal Change of Seismic Earth's Inner Core Phases: Inner Core Differential Rotation Or Temporal Change of Inner Core Surface?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, J.; Tian, D.; Sun, L.; Wen, L.

    2017-12-01

    Since Song and Richards [1996] first reported seismic evidence for temporal change of PKIKP wave (a compressional wave refracted in the inner core) and proposed inner core differential rotation as its explanation, it has generated enormous interests in the scientific community and the public, and has motivated many studies on the implications of the inner core differential rotation. However, since Wen [2006] reported seismic evidence for temporal change of PKiKP wave (a compressional wave reflected from the inner core boundary) that requires temporal change of inner core surface, both interpretations for the temporal change of inner core phases have existed, i.e., inner core rotation and temporal change of inner core surface. In this study, we discuss the issue of the interpretation of the observed temporal changes of those inner core phases and conclude that inner core differential rotation is not only not required but also in contradiction with three lines of seismic evidence from global repeating earthquakes. Firstly, inner core differential rotation provides an implausible explanation for a disappearing inner core scatterer between a doublet in South Sandwich Islands (SSI), which is located to be beneath northern Brazil based on PKIKP and PKiKP coda waves of the earlier event of the doublet. Secondly, temporal change of PKIKP and its coda waves among a cluster in SSI is inconsistent with the interpretation of inner core differential rotation, with one set of the data requiring inner core rotation and the other requiring non-rotation. Thirdly, it's not reasonable to invoke inner core differential rotation to explain travel time change of PKiKP waves in a very small time scale (several months), which is observed for repeating earthquakes in Middle America subduction zone. On the other hand, temporal change of inner core surface could provide a consistent explanation for all the observed temporal changes of PKIKP and PKiKP and their coda waves. We conclude that

  19. Fe-based nanocrystalline powder cores with ultra-low core loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiangyue, E-mail: wangxiangyue1986@163.com [China Iron and Steel Research Institute Group, Beijing 100081 (China); Center of Advanced Technology and Materials Co., Ltd., Beijing 100081 (China); Lu, Zhichao; Lu, Caowei; Li, Deren [China Iron and Steel Research Institute Group, Beijing 100081 (China); Center of Advanced Technology and Materials Co., Ltd., Beijing 100081 (China)

    2013-12-15

    Melt-spun amorphous Fe{sub 73.5}Cu{sub 1}Nb{sub 3}Si{sub 15.5}B{sub 7} alloy strip was crushed to make flake-shaped fine powders. The passivated powders by phosphoric acid were mixed with organic and inorganic binder, followed by cold compaction to form toroid-shaped bonded powder-metallurgical magnets. The powder cores were heat-treated to crystallize the amorphous structure and to control the nano-grain structure. Well-coated phosphate-oxide insulation layer on the powder surface decreased the the core loss with the insulation of each powder. FeCuNbSiB nanocrystalline alloy powder core prepared from the powder having phosphate-oxide layer exhibits a stable permeability up to high frequency range over 2 MHz. Especially, the core loss could be reduced remarkably. At the other hand, the softened inorganic binder in the annealing process could effectively improve the intensity of powder cores. - Highlights: • Fe-based nanocrystalline powder cores were prepared with low core loss. • Well-coated phosphate-oxide insulation layer on the powder surface decreased the core loss. • Fe-based nanocrystalline powder cores exhibited a stable permeability up to high frequency range over 2 MHz. • The softened inorganic binder in the annealing process could effectively improve the intensity of powder cores.

  20. Efficient implementation of core-excitation Bethe-Salpeter equation calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, K.; Vinson, John; Shirley, E. L.; Prendergast, D.; Pemmaraju, C. D.; Kas, J. J.; Vila, F. D.; Rehr, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    We present an efficient implementation of the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE) method for obtaining core-level spectra including X-ray absorption (XAS), X-ray emission (XES), and both resonant and non-resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectra (N/RIXS). Calculations are based on density functional theory (DFT) electronic structures generated either by ABINIT or QuantumESPRESSO, both plane-wave basis, pseudopotential codes. This electronic structure is improved through the inclusion of a GW self energy. The projector augmented wave technique is used to evaluate transition matrix elements between core-level and band states. Final two-particle scattering states are obtained with the NIST core-level BSE solver (NBSE). We have previously reported this implementation, which we refer to as OCEAN (Obtaining Core Excitations from Ab initio electronic structure and NBSE) (Vinson et al., 2011). Here, we present additional efficiencies that enable us to evaluate spectra for systems ten times larger than previously possible; containing up to a few thousand electrons. These improvements include the implementation of optimal basis functions that reduce the cost of the initial DFT calculations, more complete parallelization of the screening calculation and of the action of the BSE Hamiltonian, and various memory reductions. Scaling is demonstrated on supercells of SrTiO3 and example spectra for the organic light emitting molecule Tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum (Alq3) are presented. The ability to perform large-scale spectral calculations is particularly advantageous for investigating dilute or non-periodic systems such as doped materials, amorphous systems, or complex nano-structures.

  1. Structure factor of blends of solvent-free nanoparticle–organic hybrid materials: density-functional theory and small angle X-ray scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Hsiu-Yu

    2014-09-15

    © the Partner Organisations 2014. We investigate the static structure factor S(q) of solvent-free nanoparticle-organic hybrid materials consisting of silica nanocores and space-filling polyethylene glycol coronas using a density-functional theory and small angle X-ray scattering measurements. The theory considers a bidisperse suspension of hard spheres with different radii and tethered bead-spring oligomers with different grafting densities to approximate the polydispersity effects in experiments. The experimental systems studied include pure samples with different silica core volume fractions and the associated mean corona grafting densities, and blends with different mixing ratios of the pure samples, in order to introduce varying polydispersity of corona grafting density. Our scattering experiments and theory show that, compared to the hard-sphere suspension with the same core volume fraction, S(q) for pure samples exhibit both substantially smaller values at small q and stronger particle correlations corresponding to a larger effective hard core at large q, indicating that the tethered incompressible oligomers enforce a more uniform particle distribution, and the densely grafted brush gives rise to an additional exclusionary effect between the nanoparticles. According to the theory, polydispersity in the oligomer grafting density controls the deviation of S(q) from the monodisperse system at smaller q, and the interplay of the enhanced effective core size and the entropic attraction among the particles is responsible for complex variations in the particle correlations at larger q. The successful comparison between the predictions and the measurements for the blends further suggests that S(q) can be used to assess the uniformity of grafting density in polymer-grafted nanoparticle materials. This journal is

  2. THE JCMT GOULD BELT SURVEY: A FIRST LOOK AT DENSE CORES IN ORION B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, H.; Francesco, J. Di; Johnstone, D.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Hatchell, J.; Sadavoy, S.; Mottram, J. C.; Buckle, J.; Salji, C.; Berry, D. S.; Currie, M. J.; Jenness, T.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Fich, M.; Tisi, S.; Nutter, D.; Quinn, C.; Pattle, K.; Pineda, J. E.; Hogerheijde, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    We present a first look at the SCUBA-2 observations of three sub-regions of the Orion B molecular cloud: LDN 1622, NGC 2023/2024, and NGC 2068/2071, from the JCMT Gould Belt Legacy Survey. We identify 29, 564, and 322 dense cores in L1622, NGC 2023/2024, and NGC 2068/2071 respectively, using the SCUBA-2 850 μm map, and present their basic properties, including their peak fluxes, total fluxes, and sizes, and an estimate of the corresponding 450 μm peak fluxes and total fluxes, using the FellWalker source extraction algorithm. Assuming a constant temperature of 20 K, the starless dense cores have a mass function similar to that found in previous dense core analyses, with a Salpeter-like slope at the high-mass end. The majority of cores appear stable to gravitational collapse when considering only thermal pressure; indeed, most of the cores which have masses above the thermal Jeans mass are already associated with at least one protostar. At higher cloud column densities, above 1–2 × 10 23 cm −2 , most of the mass is found within dense cores, while at lower cloud column densities, below 1 × 10 23 cm −2 , this fraction drops to 10% or lower. Overall, the fraction of dense cores associated with a protostar is quite small (<8%), but becomes larger for the densest and most centrally concentrated cores. NGC 2023/2024 and NGC 2068/2071 appear to be on the path to forming a significant number of stars in the future, while L1622 has little additional mass in dense cores to form many new stars

  3. In-core Instrument Subcritical Verification (INCISV) - Core Design Verification Method - 358

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prible, M.C.; Heibel, M.D.; Conner, S.L.; Sebastiani, P.J.; Kistler, D.P.

    2010-01-01

    According to the standard on reload startup physics testing, ANSI/ANS 19.6.1, a plant must verify that the constructed core behaves sufficiently close to the designed core to confirm that the various safety analyses bound the actual behavior of the plant. A large portion of this verification must occur before the reactor operates at power. The INCISV Core Design Verification Method uses the unique characteristics of a Westinghouse Electric Company fixed in-core self powered detector design to perform core design verification after a core reload before power operation. A Vanadium self powered detector that spans the length of the active fuel region is capable of confirming the required core characteristics prior to power ascension; reactivity balance, shutdown margin, temperature coefficient and power distribution. Using a detector element that spans the length of the active fuel region inside the core provides a signal of total integrated flux. Measuring the integrated flux distributions and changes at various rodded conditions and plant temperatures, and comparing them to predicted flux levels, validates all core necessary core design characteristics. INCISV eliminates the dependence on various corrections and assumptions between the ex-core detectors and the core for traditional physics testing programs. This program also eliminates the need for special rod maneuvers which are infrequently performed by plant operators during typical core design verification testing and allows for safer startup activities. (authors)

  4. Waves in the core and mechanical core-mantle interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jault, D.; Finlay, Chris

    2015-01-01

    This Chapter focuses on time-dependent uid motions in the core interior, which can beconstrained by observations of the Earth's magnetic eld, on timescales which are shortcompared to the magnetic diusion time. This dynamics is strongly inuenced by the Earth's rapid rotation, which rigidies...... the motions in the direction parallel to the Earth'srotation axis. This property accounts for the signicance of the core-mantle topography.In addition, the stiening of the uid in the direction parallel to the rotation axis gives riseto a magnetic diusion layer attached to the core-mantle boundary, which would...... otherwisebe dispersed by Alfven waves. This Chapter complements the descriptions of large-scaleow in the core (8.04), of turbulence in the core (8.06) and of core-mantle interactions(8.12), which can all be found in this volume. We rely on basic magnetohydrodynamictheory, including the derivation...

  5. A core design study for 'zero-sodium-void-worth' cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Masao; Hill, R.N.

    1992-01-01

    Recently, a number of low sodium-void-worth metal-fueled core design concepts have been proposed; to provide for flexibility in transuranic nuclide management strategy, core designs which exhibit a wide range of breeding characteristics have been developed. Two core concepts, a flat annular (transuranic burning) core and an absorber-type parfait (transuranic self-sufficient) core, are selected for this study. In this paper, the excess reactivity management schemes applied in the two designs are investigated in detail. In addition, the transient effect of reactivity insertions on the parfait core design is assessed. The upper and lower core regions in the parfait design are neutronically decoupled; however, the common coolant channel creates thermalhydraulic coupling. This combination of neutronic and thermalhydraulic characteristics leads to unique behavior in anticipated transient overpower events. (author)

  6. Complex permeability and core loss of soft magnetic Fe-based nanocrystalline powder cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Füzerová, Jana, E-mail: jana.fuzerova@tuke.sk [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University, Letná 1, 042 00 Košice (Slovakia); Füzer, Ján; Kollár, Peter [Institute of Physics, P.J. Šafárik University, Park Angelinum 9, 040 23 Košice (Slovakia); Bureš, Radovan; Fáberová, Mária [Institute of Materials Research, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Watsonova 47, 043 53 Košice (Slovakia)

    2013-11-15

    Rapidly quenched ribbons of Fe{sub 73}Cu{sub 1}Nb{sub 3}Si{sub 16}B{sub 7} were ball milled and cryomilled to get powder and warm consolidated to get bulk compacts. The data presented here are relative to different experimental procedures, one corresponding to milling at room temperature (sample R1) and the other corresponding to cryomilling at temperature of liquid nitrogen (sample L1). It was found that the properties of the initial powder influenced the density, the electrical resistivity and electromagnetic properties of the resulting bulk alloys. Permeability and core loss are structure sensitive and depend on factors such as powder size and shape, porosity, purity, and internal stress. Permeability spectra of sample R1 decreases with increasing the frequency and its values are larger than that for sample L1 at low frequencies. On the other hand the permeability of sample L1 remains steady up to 1 kHz and at certain frequency is larger than that for sample R1. Also there are different frequency dependences of the imaginary parts of permeability and loss factor, respectively. The cryomilling of the amorphous ribbon positively influences on the AC magnetic properties at higher frequencies (above 100 Hz) of resulting bulk sample. - Highlights: • We prepared two different amorphous powder vitroperm samples. • We have examined changes in the properties of the bulk samples prepared by compaction. • It was found that properties of the initial powder influence the density, the electrical resistivity and electromagnetic properties of the resulting bulk alloys.

  7. k-core covers and the core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Rodriguez, E.; Borm, Peter; Estevez-Fernandez, A.; Fiestras-Janeiro, G.; Mosquera, M.A.

    This paper extends the notion of individual minimal rights for a transferable utility game (TU-game) to coalitional minimal rights using minimal balanced families of a specific type, thus defining a corresponding minimal rights game. It is shown that the core of a TU-game coincides with the core of

  8. Pd@Au core-shell nanocrystals with concave cubic shapes: kinetically controlled synthesis and electrocatalytic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Niu, Wenxin; Zhao, Jianming; Zhu, Shuyun; Yuan, Yali; Hua, Lianzhe; Xu, Guobao

    2013-01-01

    A new type of concave cubic Pd@Au core-shell nanocrystals is synthesized through a kinetically controlled growth process. Pd nanocubes of 56 nm are used as the inner core, and CTAC and Br(-) are used as the capping agent and selective adsorbent, respectively. A suitable ratio of HAuCl4 and cubic Pd seeds and the presence of Br(-) anions are critical to the growth of the concave cubic Pd@Au core-shell nanocrystals. The fast deposition rate on the corners of the cubic Pd seeds promotes the overgrowth of the Au outer shell along the direction, leading to the formation of concave cubic nanostructures. The reduction process is monitored by the surface plasmon resonance spectra of the nanocrystals, and the extinction band became broader and red shifted as the nanocrystals became larger. The electrocatalytic properties of the concave cubic Pd@Au core-shell nanocrystals were investigated with the cathodic electrochemiluminescence reaction of luminol and H2O2. A possible electrocatalytic mechanism was proposed and analyzed.

  9. Core-powered mass-loss and the radius distribution of small exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginzburg, Sivan; Schlichting, Hilke E.; Sari, Re'em

    2018-05-01

    Recent observations identify a valley in the radius distribution of small exoplanets, with planets in the range 1.5-2.0 R⊕ significantly less common than somewhat smaller or larger planets. This valley may suggest a bimodal population of rocky planets that are either engulfed by massive gas envelopes that significantly enlarge their radius, or do not have detectable atmospheres at all. One explanation of such a bimodal distribution is atmospheric erosion by high-energy stellar photons. We investigate an alternative mechanism: the luminosity of the cooling rocky core, which can completely erode light envelopes while preserving heavy ones, produces a deficit of intermediate sized planets. We evolve planetary populations that are derived from observations using a simple analytical prescription, accounting self-consistently for envelope accretion, cooling and mass-loss, and demonstrate that core-powered mass-loss naturally reproduces the observed radius distribution, regardless of the high-energy incident flux. Observations of planets around different stellar types may distinguish between photoevaporation, which is powered by the high-energy tail of the stellar radiation, and core-powered mass-loss, which depends on the bolometric flux through the planet's equilibrium temperature that sets both its cooling and mass-loss rates.

  10. The Larger Linear N-Heteroacenes

    KAUST Repository

    Bunz, Uwe H. F.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. ConspectusThe close structural and chemical relationship of N-heteroacenes to pentacene suggests their broad applicability in organic electronic devices, such as thin-film transistors. The superb materials science properties of azaacenes result from their improved resistance toward oxidation and their potential for electron transport, both of which have been demonstrated recently. The introduction of nitrogen atoms into the aromatic perimeter of acenes stabilizes their frontier molecular orbitals and increases their electron affinity. The HOMO-LUMO gaps in azaacenes in which the nitrogen atoms are symmetrically placed are similar to those of the acenes. The judiciously placed nitrogen atoms induce an "umpolung" of the electronic behavior of these pentacene-like molecules, i.e., instead of hole mobility in thin-film transistors, azaacenes are electron-transporting materials. The fundamental synthetic approaches toward larger azaacenes are described and discussed. Several synthetic methodologies have been exploited, and some have been newly developed to assemble substituted azaacenes. The oldest methods are condensation-based. Aromatic o-diamines are coupled with o-dihydroxyarenes in the melt without solvent. This method works well for unsubstituted azaacenes only. The attachment of substituents to the starting materials renders these "fire and sword" methods less useful. The starting materials decompose under these conditions. The direct condensation of substituted o-diamines with o-quinones proceeds well in some cases. Fluorinated benzene rings next to a pyrazine unit are introduced by nucleophilic aromatic substitution employing hexafluorobenzene. However, with these well-established synthetic methodologies, a number of azaacene topologies cannot be synthesized. The Pd-catalyzed coupling of aromatic halides and aromatic diamines has therefore emerged as versatile tool for azaacene synthesis. Now substituted diaza- and

  11. The Larger Linear N-Heteroacenes

    KAUST Repository

    Bunz, Uwe H. F.

    2015-06-16

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. ConspectusThe close structural and chemical relationship of N-heteroacenes to pentacene suggests their broad applicability in organic electronic devices, such as thin-film transistors. The superb materials science properties of azaacenes result from their improved resistance toward oxidation and their potential for electron transport, both of which have been demonstrated recently. The introduction of nitrogen atoms into the aromatic perimeter of acenes stabilizes their frontier molecular orbitals and increases their electron affinity. The HOMO-LUMO gaps in azaacenes in which the nitrogen atoms are symmetrically placed are similar to those of the acenes. The judiciously placed nitrogen atoms induce an "umpolung" of the electronic behavior of these pentacene-like molecules, i.e., instead of hole mobility in thin-film transistors, azaacenes are electron-transporting materials. The fundamental synthetic approaches toward larger azaacenes are described and discussed. Several synthetic methodologies have been exploited, and some have been newly developed to assemble substituted azaacenes. The oldest methods are condensation-based. Aromatic o-diamines are coupled with o-dihydroxyarenes in the melt without solvent. This method works well for unsubstituted azaacenes only. The attachment of substituents to the starting materials renders these "fire and sword" methods less useful. The starting materials decompose under these conditions. The direct condensation of substituted o-diamines with o-quinones proceeds well in some cases. Fluorinated benzene rings next to a pyrazine unit are introduced by nucleophilic aromatic substitution employing hexafluorobenzene. However, with these well-established synthetic methodologies, a number of azaacene topologies cannot be synthesized. The Pd-catalyzed coupling of aromatic halides and aromatic diamines has therefore emerged as versatile tool for azaacene synthesis. Now substituted diaza- and

  12. The Fornax Cluster VLT Spectroscopic Survey II - Planetary Nebulae kinematics within 200 kpc of the cluster core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiniello, C.; Napolitano, N. R.; Arnaboldi, M.; Tortora, C.; Coccato, L.; Capaccioli, M.; Gerhard, O.; Iodice, E.; Spavone, M.; Cantiello, M.; Peletier, R.; Paolillo, M.; Schipani, P.

    2018-06-01

    We present the largest and most spatially extended planetary nebulae (PNe) catalogue ever obtained for the Fornax cluster. We measured velocities of 1452 PNe out to 200 kpc in the cluster core using a counter-dispersed slitless spectroscopic technique with data from FORS2 on the Very Large Telescope (VLT). With such an extended spatial coverage, we can study separately the stellar haloes of some of the cluster main galaxies and the intracluster light. In this second paper of the Fornax Cluster VLT Spectroscopic Survey, we identify and classify the emission-line sources, describe the method to select PNe, and calculate their coordinates and velocities from the dispersed slitless images. From the PN 2D velocity map, we identify stellar streams that are possibly tracing the gravitational interaction of NGC 1399 with NGC 1404 and NGC 1387. We also present the velocity dispersion profile out to ˜200 kpc radii, which shows signatures of a superposition of the bright central galaxy and the cluster potential, with the latter clearly dominating the regions outside R ˜ 1000 arcsec (˜100 kpc).

  13. Bayesian Analysis of Hot-Jupiter Radius Anomalies: Evidence for Ohmic Dissipation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorngren, Daniel P.; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2018-05-01

    The cause of hot-Jupiter radius inflation, where giant planets with {T}eq} > 1000 K are significantly larger than expected, is an open question and the subject of many proposed explanations. Many of these hypotheses postulate an additional anomalous power that heats planets’ convective interiors, leading to larger radii. Rather than examine these proposed models individually, we determine what anomalous powers are needed to explain the observed population’s radii, and consider which models are most consistent with this. We examine 281 giant planets with well-determined masses and radii and apply thermal evolution and Bayesian statistical models to infer the anomalous power as a fraction of (and varying with) incident flux ɛ(F) that best reproduces the observed radii. First, we observe that the inflation of planets below about M = 0.5 M J appears very different than their higher-mass counterparts, perhaps as the result of mass loss or an inefficient heating mechanism. As such, we exclude planets below this threshold. Next, we show with strong significance that ɛ(F) increases with {T}eq} toward a maximum of ∼2.5% at T eq ≈ 1500 K, and then decreases as temperatures increase further, falling to ∼0.2% at T eff = 2500 K. This high-flux decrease in inflation efficiency was predicted by the Ohmic dissipation model of giant planet inflation but not other models. We also show that the thermal tides model predicts far more variance in radii than is observed. Thus, our results provide evidence for the Ohmic dissipation model and a functional form for ɛ(F) that any future theories of hot-Jupiter radii can be tested against.

  14. Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor Cores using Uranium-Free Metallic Fuels for Maximizing TRU Support Ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, WuSeung; Hong, Ser Gi

    2014-01-01

    The depleted uranium plays important roles in the SFR burner cores because it substantially contributes to the inherent safety of the core through the negative Doppler coefficient and large delayed neutron. However, the use of depleted uranium as a diluent nuclide leads to a limited value of TRU support ratio due to the generation of TRUs through the breeding. In this paper, we designed sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) cores having uranium-free fuels 3,4 for maximization of TRU consumption rate. However, the uranium-free fuelled burner cores can be penalized by unacceptably small values of the Doppler coefficient and small delayed neutron fraction. In this work, metallic fuels of TRU-(W or Ni)-Zr are considered to improve the performances of the uranium-free cores. The objective of this work is to consistently compare the neutronic performances of uranium-free sodium cooled fast reactor cores having TRU-Zr metallic fuels added with Ni or W and also to clarify what are the problematic features to be resolved. In this paper, a consistent comparative study of 400MWe sodium cooled burner cores having uranium-based fuels and uranium-free fuels was done to analyze the relative core neutronic features. Also, we proposed a uranium-free metallic fuel based on Nickel. From the results, it is found that tungsten-based uranium-free metallic fuel gives large negative Doppler coefficient due to high resonance of tungsten isotopes but this core has large sodium void worth and small effective delayed neutron fraction while the nickel-based uranium-free metallic fuelled core has less negative Doppler coefficient but smaller sodium void worth and larger effective delayed neutron fraction than the tungsten-based one. On the other hand, the core having TRU-Zr has very high burnup reactivity swing which may be problematic in compensating it using control rods and the least negative Doppler coefficient

  15. Collision cascades and sputtering induced by larger cluster ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigmund, P.

    1988-01-01

    Recent experimental work on larger cluster impact on solid surfaces suggests large deviations from the standard case of additive sputter yields both in the nuclear and electronic stopping regime. The paper concentrates on elastic collision cascades. In addition to very pronounced spike effects, two phenomena are pointed out that are specific to cluster bombardment. Multiple hits of cluster atoms on one and the same target atom may result in recoil atoms that move faster than the maximum recoil speed for monomer bombardment at the same projectile speed. This effect is important when the atomic mass of a beam atom is less than that of a target atom, M 1 2 . In the opposite case, M 1 >> M 2 , collisions between beam particles may accelerate some beam particles and slow down others. Some consequences are mentioned. Remarks on the nuclear stopping power of larger clusters and on electronic sputtering by cluster bombardment conclude the paper. 38 refs., 2 figs

  16. Core catcher for nuclear reactor core meltdown containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Driscoll, M.J.; Bowman, F.L.

    1978-01-01

    A bed of graphite particles is placed beneath a nuclear reactor core outside the pressure vessel but within the containment building to catch the core debris in the event of failure of the emergency core cooling system. Spray cooling of the debris and graphite particles together with draining and flooding of coolant fluid of the graphite bed is provided to prevent debris slump-through to the bottom of the bed

  17. Concordance of DNA methylation profiles between breast core biopsy and surgical excision specimens containing ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Youdinghuan; Marotti, Jonathan D; Jenson, Erik G; Onega, Tracy L; Johnson, Kevin C; Christensen, Brock C

    2017-08-01

    The utility and reliability of assessing molecular biomarkers for translational applications on pre-operative core biopsy specimens assume consistency of molecular profiles with larger surgical specimens. Whether DNA methylation in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), measured in core biopsy and surgical specimens are similar, remains unclear. Here, we compared genome-scale DNA methylation measured in matched core biopsy and surgical specimens from DCIS, including specific DNA methylation biomarkers of subsequent invasive cancer. DNA was extracted from guided 2mm cores of formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) specimens, bisulfite-modified, and measured on the Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. DNA methylation profiles of core biopsies exhibited high concordance with matched surgical specimens. Within-subject variability in DNA methylation was significantly lower than between-subject variability (all Pcore biopsy and surgical specimens, 15%, and a pathway analysis of these CpGs indicated enrichment for genes related with wound healing. Our results indicate that DNA methylation measured in core biopsies are representative of the matched surgical specimens and suggest that DCIS biomarkers measured in core biopsies can inform clinical decision-making. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Dispersal, phenology and predicted abundance of the larger grain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The phenology and dispersal of the larger grain borer (LGB) in Africa is described, and comparisons are made between prediction of LGB numbers from laboratory studies and predictions from multiple linear models derived from trapping data in the field. The models were developed in Mexico and Kenya, using ...

  19. Translation and convection of Earth's inner core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnereau, M.; Calvet, M.; Margerin, L.; Mizzon, H.; Souriau, A.

    2012-12-01

    The image of the inner core growing slowly at the center of the Earth by gradual cooling and solidification of the surrounding liquid outer core is being replaced by the more vigorous image of a ``deep foundry'', where melting and crystallization rates exceed by many times the net growth rate. Recently, a particular mode of convection, called translation, has been put forward as an important mode of inner core dynamics because this mechanism is able to explain the observed East-West asymmetry of P-wave velocity and attenuation (Monnereau et al. 2010). Translation is a pure solid displacement of the inner core material (solid iron) within its envelop, implying crystallization of entering iron on one side of the inner core and melting on the opposite side. Translation is consistent with multiple scattering models of wave propagation. If they do not experience deformation, iron crystals grow as they transit from one hemisphere to the other. Larger crystals constituting a faster and more attenuating medium, a translation velocity of some cm/yr (about ten times the growth rate) is enough to account for the superficial asymmetry observed for P-wave velocity and attenuation, with grains of a few hundred meters on the crystallizing side (West) growing up to a few kilometers before melting on the East side, and a drift direction located in the equatorial plane. Among all hypotheses that have been proposed to account for the seismic asymmetry, translation is the only one based on a demonstrated link between the seismic data and the proposed dynamics, notably through a model of seismic wave propagation. This mechanism was also proposed to be responsible for the formation of a dense layer at the bottom of the outer core, since the high rate of melting and crystallization would release a liquid depleted in light elements at the surface of the inner core (Alboussiere et al 2010). This would explain the anomalously low gradient of P wave velocity in the lowermost 200 km of the

  20. THE DEPENDENCE OF PRESTELLAR CORE MASS DISTRIBUTIONS ON THE STRUCTURE OF THE PARENTAL CLOUD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parravano, Antonio; Sánchez, Néstor; Alfaro, Emilio J.

    2012-01-01

    The mass distribution of prestellar cores is obtained for clouds with arbitrary internal mass distributions using a selection criterion based on the thermal and turbulent Jeans mass and applied hierarchically from small to large scales. We have checked this methodology by comparing our results for a log-normal density probability distribution function with the theoretical core mass function (CMF) derived by Hennebelle and Chabrier, namely a power law at large scales and a log-normal cutoff at low scales, but our method can be applied to any mass distributions representing a star-forming cloud. This methodology enables us to connect the parental cloud structure with the mass distribution of the cores and their spatial distribution, providing an efficient tool for investigating the physical properties of the molecular clouds that give rise to the prestellar core distributions observed. Simulated fractional Brownian motion (fBm) clouds with the Hurst exponent close to the value H = 1/3 give the best agreement with the theoretical CMF derived by Hennebelle and Chabrier and Chabrier's system initial mass function. Likewise, the spatial distribution of the cores derived from our methodology shows a surface density of companions compatible with those observed in Trapezium and Ophiucus star-forming regions. This method also allows us to analyze the properties of the mass distribution of cores for different realizations. We found that the variations in the number of cores formed in different realizations of fBm clouds (with the same Hurst exponent) are much larger than the expected root N statistical fluctuations, increasing with H.

  1. Steady thermal stress and strain rates in a rotating circular cylinder under steady state temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Thakur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal stress and strain rates in a thick walled rotating cylinder under steady state temperature has been derived by using Seth’s transition theory. For elastic-plastic stage, it is seen that with the increase of temperature, the cylinder having smaller radii ratios requires lesser angular velocity to become fully plastic as compared to cylinder having higher radii ratios The circumferential stress becomes larger and larger with the increase in temperature. With increase in thickness ratio stresses must be decrease. For the creep stage, it is seen that circumferential stresses for incompressible materials maximum at the internal surface as compared to compressible material, which increase with the increase in temperature and measure n.

  2. Optimum radii and heights of U-shaped baffles in a square duct heat exchanger using surrogate-assisted optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kittinan Wansasueb

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, optimum U-shaped baffles in a square channel heat exchanger using air as a working fluid were developed using surrogate-assisted optimization. The design problem is set to maximize heat transfer performance and simultaneously minimize pressure loss across the channel. Design variables determine the radii and heights of the baffles, whereas the optimization problem is treated as box-constrained optimization. The work in this paper is aimed at finding an appropriate surrogate model for designing such a heat exchanger system. Function evaluations are performed by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD. The computations are based on the finite volume method and are carried out at a Reynolds number of 4000. It has been found that the use of U-shaped baffles as heat transfer enhancement devices improves the thermal performance of the heat exchanger. Comparative results reveal that the Kriging model is the most accurate surrogate model, however, the surrogate model giving the best result is support vector regression.

  3. THE JCMT GOULD BELT SURVEY: A FIRST LOOK AT DENSE CORES IN ORION B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, H.; Francesco, J. Di; Johnstone, D. [NRC Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Rd, Victoria, BC, V9E 2E7 (Canada); Duarte-Cabral, A.; Hatchell, J. [Physics and Astronomy, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Sadavoy, S.; Mottram, J. C. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Buckle, J.; Salji, C. [Astrophysics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Berry, D. S.; Currie, M. J.; Jenness, T. [Joint Astronomy Centre, 660 N. A‘ohōkū Place, University Park, Hilo, Hawaii 96720 (United States); Broekhoven-Fiene, H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, V8P 1A1 (Canada); Fich, M.; Tisi, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Nutter, D.; Quinn, C. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, The Parade, Cardiff, CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Pattle, K. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, Lancashire, PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Pineda, J. E. [European Southern Observatory (ESO), Garching (Germany); Hogerheijde, M. R. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); and others

    2016-02-01

    We present a first look at the SCUBA-2 observations of three sub-regions of the Orion B molecular cloud: LDN 1622, NGC 2023/2024, and NGC 2068/2071, from the JCMT Gould Belt Legacy Survey. We identify 29, 564, and 322 dense cores in L1622, NGC 2023/2024, and NGC 2068/2071 respectively, using the SCUBA-2 850 μm map, and present their basic properties, including their peak fluxes, total fluxes, and sizes, and an estimate of the corresponding 450 μm peak fluxes and total fluxes, using the FellWalker source extraction algorithm. Assuming a constant temperature of 20 K, the starless dense cores have a mass function similar to that found in previous dense core analyses, with a Salpeter-like slope at the high-mass end. The majority of cores appear stable to gravitational collapse when considering only thermal pressure; indeed, most of the cores which have masses above the thermal Jeans mass are already associated with at least one protostar. At higher cloud column densities, above 1–2 × 10{sup 23} cm{sup −2}, most of the mass is found within dense cores, while at lower cloud column densities, below 1 × 10{sup 23} cm{sup −2}, this fraction drops to 10% or lower. Overall, the fraction of dense cores associated with a protostar is quite small (<8%), but becomes larger for the densest and most centrally concentrated cores. NGC 2023/2024 and NGC 2068/2071 appear to be on the path to forming a significant number of stars in the future, while L1622 has little additional mass in dense cores to form many new stars.

  4. Pramana – Journal of Physics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hyperspherical harmonics expansion method is applied to a three-body model of two neutron halo nuclei. Convergence of the expansion has been ensured. A repulsive part is introduced in the interaction between the core and the extra-core neutron, to simulate Pauli principle. Two neutron separation energy, r.m.s. radii, ...

  5. Microhabitat Conditions in Wyoming's Sage-Grouse Core Areas: Effects on Nest Site Selection and Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinkins, Jonathan B; Smith, Kurt T; Beck, Jeffrey L; Kirol, Christopher P; Pratt, Aaron C; Conover, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to identify microhabitat characteristics of greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) nest site selection and survival to determine the quality of sage-grouse habitat in 5 regions of central and southwest Wyoming associated with Wyoming's Core Area Policy. Wyoming's Core Area Policy was enacted in 2008 to reduce human disturbance near the greatest densities of sage-grouse. Our analyses aimed to assess sage-grouse nest selection and success at multiple micro-spatial scales. We obtained microhabitat data from 928 sage-grouse nest locations and 819 random microhabitat locations from 2008-2014. Nest success was estimated from 924 nests with survival data. Sage-grouse selected nests with greater sagebrush cover and height, visual obstruction, and number of small gaps between shrubs (gap size ≥0.5 m and sage-grouse were selecting different nest sites in Core Areas relative to areas outside of Core. The Kaplan-Meier nest success estimate for a 27-day incubation period was 42.0% (95% CI: 38.4-45.9%). Risk of nest failure was negatively associated with greater rock and more medium-sized gaps between shrubs (gap size ≥2.0 m and <3.0 m). Within our study areas, Wyoming's Core Areas did not have differing microhabitat quality compared to outside of Core Areas. The close proximity of our locations within and outside of Core Areas likely explained our lack of finding differences in microhabitat quality among locations within these landscapes. However, the Core Area Policy is most likely to conserve high quality habitat at larger spatial scales, which over decades may have cascading effects on microhabitat quality available between areas within and outside of Core Areas.

  6. Determination of the charge radii of several light nuclei from precision, high-energy electron elastic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabir, Al Amin [Kent State Univ., Kent, OH (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Analysis of high-energy electron scattering has been used to determine the charge radii of nuclei for several decades. Recent analysis of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen found an r.m.s. radius significantly different than the electron scattering result. To understand this puzzle we have analyzed the "LEDEX" data for the (e, e'p) reaction. This experiment includes measurements on several light nuclei, hydrogen, deuterium, lithium, boron, and carbon. To test our ability to measure absolute cross sections, as well as our ability to extract the charge radius, we tested our technique against the extremely well-measured carbon case and found excellent agreement using the Fourier-Bessel parametrization. We then extended the procedure to boron and lithium, which show nice agreement with the latest theoretical calculations. For hydrogen, we see clearly the limits of this technique and therefore, the charge radius is determined from the traditional extrapolation to q2 = 0. We will show that there is a model dependence in extracting the charge radius of hydrogen and its unambiguous determination is very difficult with available electron-scattering measurements.

  7. Stellar kinematics and populations out to 1.5 effective radii in the elliptical galaxy NGC 4636

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pu Shibi; Han Zhanwen

    2011-01-01

    We present high quality long slit spectra along the major and minor axes out to 1.5 effective radii of the massive galaxy NGC 4636 taken by the Hobby-Eberly Telescope. Using the Fourier Correlation Quotient method, we measured the stellar line-of-sight velocity distribution along the axes. Furthermore, six Lick/IDS indices (Hβ, Mgb, Fe 5015 , Fe 5270 , Fe 5335 , Fe 5406 ) are derived from the clean spectrum. By comparing the measured absorption line strengths with the predictions of Simple Stellar Population (SSP) models, we derived ages, total metallicity and α abundance profiles of the galaxy. This galaxy presents old and [α/Fe] overabundant stellar populations. Indeed, using the SSP model, we obtained the broadband color profiles. The theoretical colors match well with the measured colors and present red sharp peaks at the galaxy center. The sharp peaks of the colors are mainly shaped by the high metallicity in the galaxy's center. Interestingly, the galaxy has steep negative metallicity gradients, but the trend flattens outwards. This result likely suggests that the center and outer regions of the galaxy formed through different formation processes.

  8. Magnetized Converging Flows toward the Hot Core in the Intermediate/High-mass Star-forming Region NGC 6334 V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juárez, Carmen; Girart, Josep M. [Institut de Ciències de l’Espai, (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, Carrer de Can Magrans, S/N, E-08193 Cerdanyola del Vallès, Catalonia (Spain); Zamora-Avilés, Manuel; Palau, Aina; Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier [Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, P.O. Box 3-72, 58090, Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Tang, Ya-Wen; Koch, Patrick M.; Liu, Hauyu Baobab [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei, 10617, Taiwan (China); Zhang, Qizhou [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Qiu, Keping, E-mail: juarez@ice.cat [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, 163 Xianlin Avenue, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2017-07-20

    We present Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations at 345 GHz toward the intermediate/high-mass cluster-forming region NGC 6334 V. From the dust emission we spatially resolve three dense condensations, the brightest one presenting the typical chemistry of a hot core. The magnetic field (derived from the dust polarized emission) shows a bimodal converging pattern toward the hot core. The molecular emission traces two filamentary structures at two different velocities, separated by 2 km s{sup −1}, converging to the hot core and following the magnetic field distribution. We compare the velocity field and the magnetic field derived from the SMA observations with magnetohydrodynamic simulations of star-forming regions dominated by gravity. This comparison allows us to show how the gas falls in from the larger-scale extended dense core (∼0.1 pc) of NGC 6334 V toward the higher-density hot core region (∼0.02 pc) through two distinctive converging flows dragging the magnetic field, whose strength seems to have been overcome by gravity.

  9. Nuclear moments and charge radii of magnesium isotopes from N=8 up to (and beyond) N=20

    CERN Multimedia

    Mattolat, C F; Mallion, S N; Himpe, P

    2002-01-01

    We propose to measure the nuclear monopole, dipole and quadrupole moments of magnesium isotopes from the neutron deficient nuclei near the N=8 shell closure ($^{21}$Mg), up to the neutron rich Mg nuclei beyond N=20 ($^{33}$Mg). The physics issues that will be addressed in this project are related to: \\begin{itemize} \\item The properties of mirror nuclei (e.g. $^{21}$Mg - $^{21}$F being members of a T=3/2 multiplet) \\item The evolution of shell structure and deformation with isospin. \\item Changes in the shell structure in the "island of inversion" around $^{32}$Mg and along the N=9 isotones. \\end{itemize} Radioactive beams of Mg isotopes will be produced by the RILlS ion source. The Mg isotopes will be resonantly polarized at the COLLAPS set-up. With $\\beta$-NMR techniques, precision measurements of g-factors and quadrupole moments of the radioactive $^{21,23}$Mg and $^{29,31,33}$Mg isotopes will be performed. Isotope shifts, thus changes in mean square charge radii, will be deduced from hyperfine spectra mea...

  10. Role of 'core' and 'halo' solar electrons in ionization of the interstellar medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askew, S.D.; Kunc, J.A.; University of Southern California, Los Angeles

    1984-01-01

    The probability of the interstellar wind atoms (H and He) to survive ionization by solar wind electrons is presented. For the first time a dual temperature electron distribution is used to model the effects of ''core'' (10 eV) and ''halo'' (60 eV) solar electrons on the probabilities. Survival probability distributions as a function of heliocentric distance were calculated for variations in the electron temperature, solar radiation force, and the interstellar wind flow velocity. These probabilities are important in determining the radial density distributions of the interstellar atoms. It has been found that the interstellar wind has a distinctively higher probability of surviving ''halo'' rather than ''core'' electron ionization only at heliocentric distances, rho, smaller than about 0.5 a.u. For distances larger than 0.5 a.u., the probabilities of surviving ''halo'' electrons are close to the probabilities of surviving ''core'' electrons. Also, the probabilities for both ''core'' and ''halo'' electrons are relatively insensitive to changes in μsub(proportional to) (interstellar wind velocity at infinity), μ(the solar ratio of radiation to gravitational force) and α (a model parameter for solar electron temperature) for rho > 0.5. For distances smaller than that, the sensitivity increases significantly. (author)

  11. Mergers and mass accretion for infalling halos both end well outside cluster virial radii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behroozi, Peter S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Lu, Yu; Busha, Michael T.; Hahn, Oliver; Klypin, Anatoly; Primack, Joel R.

    2014-01-01

    We find that infalling dark matter halos (i.e., the progenitors of satellite halos) begin losing mass well outside the virial radius of their eventual host halos. The peak mass occurs at a range of clustercentric distances, with median and 68th percentile range of 1.8 −1.0 +2.3 R vir,host for progenitors of z = 0 satellites. The peak circular velocity for infalling halos occurs at significantly larger distances (3.7 −2.2 +3.3 R vir,host at z = 0). This difference arises because different physical processes set peak circular velocity (typically, ∼1:5 and larger mergers which cause transient circular velocity spikes) and peak mass (typically, smooth accretion) for infalling halos. We find that infalling halos also stop having significant mergers well before they enter the virial radius of their eventual hosts. Mergers larger than a 1:40 ratio in halo mass end for infalling halos at similar clustercentric distances (∼1.9 R vir, host ) as the end of overall mass accretion. However, mergers larger than 1:3 typically end for infalling halos at more than four virial radial away from their eventual hosts. This limits the ability of mergers to affect quenching and morphology changes in clusters. We also note that the transient spikes which set peak circular velocity may lead to issues with abundance matching on that parameter, including unphysical galaxy stellar mass growth profiles near clusters; we propose a simple observational test to check if a better halo proxy for galaxy stellar mass exists.

  12. Mergers and mass accretion for infalling halos both end well outside cluster virial radii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behroozi, Peter S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Lu, Yu; Hahn, Oliver; Busha, Michael T.; Klypin, Anatoly; Primack, Joel R.

    2014-05-14

    We find that infalling dark matter halos (i.e., the progenitors of satellite halos) begin losing mass well outside the virial radius of their eventual host halos. The peak mass occurs at a range of clustercentric distances, with median and 68th percentile range of $1.8^{+2.3}_{-1.0} \\,R_\\mathrm{vir,host}$ for progenitors of z = 0 satellites. The peak circular velocity for infalling halos occurs at significantly larger distances ($3.7^{+3.3}_{-2.2} \\,R_\\mathrm{vir,host}$ at z = 0). This difference arises because different physical processes set peak circular velocity (typically, ~1:5 and larger mergers which cause transient circular velocity spikes) and peak mass (typically, smooth accretion) for infalling halos. We find that infalling halos also stop having significant mergers well before they enter the virial radius of their eventual hosts. Mergers larger than a 1:40 ratio in halo mass end for infalling halos at similar clustercentric distances (~1.9 R vir, host) as the end of overall mass accretion. However, mergers larger than 1:3 typically end for infalling halos at more than four virial radial away from their eventual hosts. This limits the ability of mergers to affect quenching and morphology changes in clusters. We also note that the transient spikes which set peak circular velocity may lead to issues with abundance matching on that parameter, including unphysical galaxy stellar mass growth profiles near clusters; we propose a simple observational test to check if a better halo proxy for galaxy stellar mass exists.

  13. 29 CFR 779.232 - Franchise or other arrangements which create a larger enterprise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Franchise or other arrangements which create a larger... Apply; Enterprise Coverage Leased Departments, Franchise and Other Business Arrangements § 779.232 Franchise or other arrangements which create a larger enterprise. (a) In other instances, franchise...

  14. Drilling equipment for difficult coring conditions: a new type of core lifter and triple tube core barrel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, J B

    1968-08-01

    Although considerable improvements in diamond drilling equipment have been made since the early 1950's, deficiencies in existing equipment led to the development of a new type core lifter and special 20 ft triple tube core barrel designed to operate in bad coring conditions. It is claimed that although developed essentially for coal drilling, the new equipment could be adapted to other fields of diamond drilling with the cost advantage of increased life of the core lifter.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of ZnSe:Fe/ZnSe core/shell nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Lin; Zhu, Jianguo, E-mail: yanglin_1028@163.com; Xiao, Dingquan

    2014-04-15

    High-quality ZnSe:Fe/ZnSe core/shell nanocrystals were prepared via a hydrothermal microemulsion technique. Effective surface passivation of monodisperse ZnSe:Fe nanocrystals is achieved by overcoating them with a ZnSe shell. The samples were characterized by means of XRD, EDX, TEM, PSD, XPS, photoluminescence, and Raman spectrum. The results show that the as-synthesized nanocrystals are cubic zinc blende ZnSe structure with high purity and the average particle size of ZnSe:Fe/ZnSe core/shell nanocrystal is larger than that of ZnSe:Fe core. The growth of ZnSe shell causes a small red shift in PL spectra, and then the PL quantum yield (QY) increases from 16% before shell growth to the maximum of 37% after increasing shell thickness up to 1.2 monolayers (ML). Moreover, both transverse optic (TO) and longitudinal optic (LO) phonon modes of ZnSe are shifted toward lower frequency as compared with the reported ones. -- Highlights: • ZnSe:Fe/ZnSe core/shell QDs were prepared by a hydrothermal microemulsion method. • ZnSe shell efficiently passivates surface defects by serving as a physical barrier. • The particle size and PL properties can be turned with the growth of ZnSe shell. • The luminescence efficiency and stability of QDs could be improved in this manner.

  16. Plasmon-resonant nanoparticles and nanostars with magnetic cores: synthesis and magnetomotive imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyon-Min; Wei, Qingshan; Ong, Quy K; Wei, Alexander

    2010-09-28

    Plasmon-resonant gold nanostars (NSTs) with magnetic cores were synthesized by a multistep sequence from superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) and evaluated as optical contrast agents under magnetomotive (MM) imaging conditions. Core-shell Fe3O4@Au NPs were prepared in nonpolar organic solvents with nanometer control over shell thickness and with good epitaxy to the Fe3O4 surface. Anisotropic growth was performed in micellar solutions of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) under mildly reducing conditions, resulting in NSTs with physical features similar to those produced from colloidal gold seeds. NSTs could be produced below 100 nm from tip to tip, but seed size had a significant impact on growth habit, with larger seed particles producing submicrometer-sized "morning stars". Both NSTs and aggregated core-shell NPs are responsive to in-plane magnetic field gradients and can provide enhanced near-infrared (NIR) contrast under MM conditions, but do so by different mechanisms. NSTs can modulate polarized NIR scattering with minimal translational motion, giving the appearance of a periodic but stationary "blinking", whereas core-shell NP aggregates require lateral displacement for signal modulation. The polarization-sensitive MM imaging modality offers the dual advantage of enhanced signal quality and reduced background signal and can be applied toward the detection of magnetomotive NSTs in heterogeneous biological samples, as illustrated by their detection inside of granular cells such as macrophages.

  17. Aroma: a larger than life experience?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine DE SWARDT

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aroma is today an essential part of our diet. Often used to reinforce the initial neutral taste of the food produced on an industrial scale, it is sometimes the main course, at the core of many edible products. First thought as accessory, it now takes the lead. From this observation and through the review of examples of the food industry, this article puts forward the hypothesis that the aroma supplants the food –in the relation of resemblance between the original model and its representation, which falls under the inculcation – and eclipses it. Potentially strong on the palate, it is a promise of intense experience. This is particularly true in the case of flavors without pre-established references. Pure abstract aromatic constructions allow greater freedom of projection, and foster discursive emphasis. In these cases, the taste alone, uncorrelated with prerogatives of nutrition, becomes the support of a hyperesthesic experience.

  18. [Research progress of larger flexion gap than extension gap in total knee arthroplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weisong; Hao, Dingjun

    2017-05-01

    To summarize the progress of larger flexion gap than extension gap in total knee arthro-plasty (TKA). The domestic and foreign related literature about larger flexion gap than extension gap in TKA, and its impact factors, biomechanical and kinematic features, and clinical results were summarized. During TKA, to adjust the relations of flexion gap and extension gap is one of the key factors of successful operation. The biomechanical, kinematic, and clinical researches show that properly larger flexion gap than extension gap can improve both the postoperative knee range of motion and the satisfaction of patients, but does not affect the stability of the knee joint. However, there are also contrary findings. So adjustment of flexion gap and extension gap during TKA is still in dispute. Larger flexion gap than extension gap in TKA is a new joint space theory, and long-term clinical efficacy, operation skills, and related complications still need further study.

  19. Metal-silicate Partitioning and Its Role in Core Formation and Composition on Super-Earths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Laura; Petaev, M. I.; Sasselov, Dimitar D. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Jacobsen, Stein B.; Remo, John L., E-mail: lschaefer@asu.edu [Harvard University, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, 20 Oxford St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2017-02-01

    We use a thermodynamic framework for silicate-metal partitioning to determine the possible compositions of metallic cores on super-Earths. We compare results using literature values of the partition coefficients of Si and Ni, as well as new partition coefficients calculated using results from laser shock-induced melting of powdered metal-dunite targets at pressures up to 276 GPa, which approaches those found within the deep mantles of super-Earths. We find that larger planets may have little to no light elements in their cores because the Si partition coefficient decreases at high pressures. The planet mass at which this occurs will depend on the metal-silicate equilibration depth. We also extrapolate the equations of state (EOS) of FeO and FeSi alloys to high pressures, and present mass–radius diagrams using self-consistent planet compositions assuming equilibrated mantles and cores. We confirm the results of previous studies that the distribution of elements between mantle and core will not be detectable from mass and radius measurements alone. While observations may be insensitive to interior structure, further modeling is sensitive to compositionally dependent properties, such as mantle viscosity and core freeze-out properties. We therefore emphasize the need for additional high pressure measurements of partitioning as well as EOSs, and highlight the utility of the Sandia Z-facilities for this type of work.

  20. Impact of larger rare earth Pr{sup 3+} ions on the physical properties of chemically derived Pr{sub x}CoFe{sub 2−x}O{sub 4} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pachpinde, A.M.; Langade, M.M. [Department of Chemistry, Jawahar Art Science and Commerce College Andur, Osmanabad, MS (India); Lohar, K.S.; Patange, S.M. [Materials Research Laboratory, Srikrishna Mahavidyalaya Gunjoti, Omerga, Osmanabad 413 613, MS (India); Shirsath, Sagar E., E-mail: shirsathsagar@hotmail.com [Spin Device Technology Center, Department of Information Engineering, Shinshu University, Nagano 380 8553 (Japan)

    2014-01-31

    Highlights: • Rare earth Pr{sup 3+} substituted CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. • Sol–gel auto combustion synthesis. • XRD and IR spectra reveal the spinel structure. • Magnetization and coercivity increased with Pr{sup 3+} substitution. - Abstract: Rare earth Pr{sup 3+} ions with its larger ionic radii substituted CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles with x ranging from 0.0 to 0.1 were synthesized by sol–gel auto-combustion chemical method. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) were employed to characterize the physical properties of these ferrite nanoparticles. XRD pattern reveals the formation of cubic spinel ferrite with the signature of PrFeO{sub 3} phases for x ⩾ 0.05. SEM images show that the synthesized samples are in good homogeneity with uniformly distributed grain. The results of IR spectroscopy analysis indicated that the functional groups of cobalt spinel ferrite were formed during the sol–gel process. The cations distribution between the tetrahedral (A-site) and octahedral sites (B-site) has been estimated by XRD analysis. Room temperature magnetic measurement shows saturation magnetization and coercivity increased from 54.7 to 64.2 emu/g and 644 to 1013 Oe, respectively with the increasing Pr{sup 3+} substitution.

  1. Listing of nuclear power plant larger than 100 MWe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, B.

    1975-06-01

    This report contains a list of all nuclear power plants larger than 100 MWe, printed out from the Argus Data Bank at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden. The plants are listed alphabetically. The report contains also a plant ranking list, where the plants are listed by the load factor (12 months) (M.S.)

  2. Listing of nuclear power plant larger than 100 MWe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, B.

    1975-12-01

    This report contains a list of all nuclear power plants larger than 100 MWe, printed out from the Argus Data Bank at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden. The plants are listed by country. The report contains also a plant ranking list, where the plants are listed by the load factor (12 months). (M.S.)

  3. Integrated liquid-core optical fibers for ultra-efficient nonlinear liquid photonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieu, K; Schneebeli, L; Norwood, R A; Peyghambarian, N

    2012-03-26

    We have developed a novel integrated platform for liquid photonics based on liquid core optical fiber (LCOF). The platform is created by fusion splicing liquid core optical fiber to standard single-mode optical fiber making it fully integrated and practical - a major challenge that has greatly hindered progress in liquid-photonic applications. As an example, we report here the realization of ultralow threshold Raman generation using an integrated CS₂ filled LCOF pumped with sub-nanosecond pulses at 532 nm and 1064 nm. The measured energy threshold for the Stokes generation is 1nJ, about three orders of magnitude lower than previously reported values in the literature for hydrogen gas, a popular Raman medium. The integrated LCOF platform opens up new possibilities for ultralow power nonlinear optics such as efficient white light generation for displays, mid-IR generation, slow light generation, parametric amplification, all-optical switching and wavelength conversion using liquids that have orders of magnitude larger optical nonlinearities compared with silica glass.

  4. Countermeasures to cope with issues for the FBR cycle system and transitional core during FBR introductory period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimura, Koji; Sasahira, Akira; Yamashita, Junichi; Fukasawa, Tetsuo; Hoshino, Kuniyoshi

    2007-01-01

    The introduction of fast breeder reactors (FBRs) requires Pu be recovered from light water reactors (LWRs) spent fuel. The 'Flexible Fuel Cycle Initiative (FFCI)' can supply enough Pu and holds no surplus Pu, while responding flexibly to future technical and social uncertainties. In this paper, the potential of FFCI to increase economy of the fuel cycle system was investigated. On the other hand, during the FBR introductory period, Pu from LWR spent fuel is used for startup of FBRs. But the FBR core being loaded with Pu from LWR spent fuel has a larger burnup reactivity than the core being loaded with Pu from the FBR multi-recycling core. The increased burnup reactivity may reduce the cycle length of the FBR core. In this paper, an FBR transitional core concept to handle the issues of the FBR introductory period was investigated. The results obtained through this study are as follows. (1) The FFCI has a potential to flatten the reprocessing amount of LWR spent fuel and to increase economy of the next fuel cycle system. (2) Minor actinides - mixed FBR transitional core has a potential to maintain the operation cycle length even supposing use of Pu from LWR spent fuel. (author)

  5. Characterizing the Core via K-Core Covers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez, S.M.; Borm, P.E.M.; Estevez, A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper extends the notion of individual minimal rights for a transferable utility game (TU-game) to coalitional minimal rights using minimal balanced families of a specific type, thus defining a corresponding minimal rights game. It is shown that the core of a TU-game coincides with the core of

  6. Determination of PWR core water level using ex-core detectors signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernal, Alvaro; Abarca, Agustin; Miro, Rafael; Verdu, Gumersindo

    2013-01-01

    The core water level provides relevant neutronic and thermalhydraulic information of the reactor such as power, k eff and cooling ability; in fact, core water level monitoring could be used to predict LOCA and cooling reduction which may deal with core damage. Although different detection equipment is used to monitor several parameters such as the power, core water level monitoring is not an evident task. However, ex-core detectors can measure the fast neutrons leaking the core and several studies demonstrate the existence of a relationship between fast neutron leakage and core water level due to the shielding effect of the water. In addition, new ex-core detectors are being developed, such as silicon carbide semiconductor radiation detectors, monitoring the neutron flux with higher accuracy and in higher temperatures conditions. Therefore, a methodology to determine this relationship has been developed based on a Monte Carlo calculation using MCNP code and applying variance reduction with adjoint functions based on the adjoint flux obtained with the discrete ordinates code TORT. (author)

  7. Mergers and mass accretion for infalling halos both end well outside cluster virial radii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behroozi, Peter S. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Wechsler, Risa H.; Lu, Yu; Busha, Michael T. [Physics Department, Stanford University, Department of Particle and Particle Astrophysics, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Hahn, Oliver [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zurich, 8093-CH Zurich (Switzerland); Klypin, Anatoly [Astronomy Department, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Primack, Joel R., E-mail: behroozi@stsci.edu [Department of Physics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    We find that infalling dark matter halos (i.e., the progenitors of satellite halos) begin losing mass well outside the virial radius of their eventual host halos. The peak mass occurs at a range of clustercentric distances, with median and 68th percentile range of 1.8{sub −1.0}{sup +2.3} R{sub vir,host} for progenitors of z = 0 satellites. The peak circular velocity for infalling halos occurs at significantly larger distances (3.7{sub −2.2}{sup +3.3} R{sub vir,host} at z = 0). This difference arises because different physical processes set peak circular velocity (typically, ∼1:5 and larger mergers which cause transient circular velocity spikes) and peak mass (typically, smooth accretion) for infalling halos. We find that infalling halos also stop having significant mergers well before they enter the virial radius of their eventual hosts. Mergers larger than a 1:40 ratio in halo mass end for infalling halos at similar clustercentric distances (∼1.9 R {sub vir,} {sub host}) as the end of overall mass accretion. However, mergers larger than 1:3 typically end for infalling halos at more than four virial radial away from their eventual hosts. This limits the ability of mergers to affect quenching and morphology changes in clusters. We also note that the transient spikes which set peak circular velocity may lead to issues with abundance matching on that parameter, including unphysical galaxy stellar mass growth profiles near clusters; we propose a simple observational test to check if a better halo proxy for galaxy stellar mass exists.

  8. Characterization of magnetic core-shell nanoparticles by fluxgate magnetorelaxometry, ac susceptibility, transmission electron microscopy and photon correlation spectroscopy-A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, Frank; Heim, Erik; Schilling, Meinhard

    2009-01-01

    We have compared the structure parameters of magnetic core-shell nanoparticles determined from fluxgate magnetorelaxometry measurements applying the moment superposition model with the results from other methods. For the characterization of the magnetic cores, the nanoparticles are immobilized by freeze-drying. The core size distribution estimated for superparamagnetic Fe 3 O 4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with polyacrylic acid shell agrees well with that from transmission electron microscopy measurements. The distribution of hydrodynamic diameters of nanoparticle suspensions estimated from magnetorelaxometry measurements is in good agreement with that obtained from ac susceptibility and photon correlation spectroscopy measurements. Advantages of magnetorelaxometry compared to the other two integral techniques are that it is fast and the signal is less dominated by larger particles.

  9. Self-similarity of temperature profiles in distant galaxy clusters: the quest for a universal law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldi, A.; Ettori, S.; Molendi, S.; Gastaldello, F.

    2012-09-01

    Context. We present the XMM-Newton temperature profiles of 12 bright (LX > 4 × 1044 erg s-1) clusters of galaxies at 0.4 high-redshift clusters, to investigate their properties, and to define a universal law to describe the temperature radial profiles in galaxy clusters as a function of both cosmic time and their state of relaxation. Methods: We performed a spatially resolved spectral analysis, using Cash statistics, to measure the temperature in the intracluster medium at different radii. Results: We extracted temperature profiles for the clusters in our sample, finding that all profiles are declining toward larger radii. The normalized temperature profiles (normalized by the mean temperature T500) are found to be generally self-similar. The sample was subdivided into five cool-core (CC) and seven non cool-core (NCC) clusters by introducing a pseudo-entropy ratio σ = (TIN/TOUT) × (EMIN/EMOUT)-1/3 and defining the objects with σ ratio σ is detected by fitting a function of r and σ, showing an indication that the outer part of the profiles becomes steeper for higher values of σ (i.e. transitioning toward the NCC clusters). No significant evidence of redshift evolution could be found within the redshift range sampled by our clusters (0.4 high-z sample with intermediate clusters at 0.1 0.4 has been attempted. We were able to define the closest possible relation to a universal law for the temperature profiles of galaxy clusters at 0.1 < z < 0.9, showing a dependence on both the relaxation state of the clusters and the redshift. Appendix A is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  10. Chemical resistance of core-shell particles (PS/PMMA) polymerized by seeded suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Luiz Fernando Belchior; Machado, Ricardo Antonio Francisco, E-mail: ricardo.machado@ufsc.br [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais; Gonçalves, Odinei Hess [Universidade Técnológica Federal do Paraná(UTFPR), Campo Mourão, PR (Brazil); Marangoni, Cintia [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Blumenau, SC (Brazil); Motz, Günter [Lehrstuhl Keramische Werkstoffe, Universität Bayreuth (Germany)

    2017-07-01

    Core-shell particles were produced on seeded suspension polymerization by using polystyrene (PS) as polymer core, or seed, and methyl methacrylate (MMA) as the shell forming monomer. Two synthesis routes were evaluated by varying the PS seed conversion before MMA addition. The main purpose of this work was to investigate the influence of synthesis routes on the morphology and chemical resistance of the resulting particles. {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy showed that the use of PS seeds with lower conversion led to the formation of higher amount of poly(styrene-co-MMA). The copolymer acted as a compatibilizer, decreasing the interfacial energy between both homopolymers. As a consequence, a larger amount of reduced PMMA cluster were formed, as was revealed by TEM measurements. Samples in this system showed enhanced resistance to cyclohexane attack compared with pure PS, with a PS extraction of only 37% after 54 hours test. (author)

  11. Chemical resistance of core-shell particles (PS/PMMA polymerized by seeded suspension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fernando Belchior Ribeiro

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Core-shell particles were produced on seeded suspension polymerization by using polystyrene (PS as polymer core, or seed, and methyl methacrylate (MMA as the shell forming monomer. Two synthesis routes were evaluated by varying the PS seed conversion before MMA addition. The main purpose of this work was to investigate the influence of synthesis routes on the morphology and chemical resistance of the resulting particles. 1H NMR spectroscopy showed that the use of PS seeds with lower conversion led to the formation of higher amount of poly(styrene-co-MMA. The copolymer acted as a compatibilizer, decreasing the interfacial energy between both homopolymers. As a consequence, a larger amount of reduced PMMA cluster were formed, as was revealed by TEM measurements. Samples in this system showed enhanced resistance to cyclohexane attack compared with pure PS, with a PS extraction of only 37% after 54 hours test.

  12. Preparation and recognition of surface molecularly imprinted core-shell microbeads for protein in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yan; Yan Changling; Gao Shuyan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a surface molecular imprinting technique was reported for preparing core-shell microbeads of protein imprinting, and bovine hemoglobin or bovine serum albumin were used as model proteins for studying the imprinted core-shell microbeads. 3-Aminophenylboronic acid (APBA) was polymerized onto the surface of polystyrene microbead in the presence of the protein templates to create protein-imprinted core-shell microbeads. The various samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) methods. The effect of pH on rebinding of the template hemoglobin, the specific binding and selective recognition were studied for the imprinted microbeads. The results show that the bovine hemoglobin-imprinted core-shell microbeads were successfully created. The shell was a sort of imprinted thin films with porous structure and larger surface areas. The imprinted microbeads have good selectivity for templates and high stability. Due to the recognition sites locating at or closing to the surface, these imprinted microbeads have good property of mass-transport. Unfortunately, the imprint technology was not successfully applied to imprinting bovine serum albumin (BSA).

  13. Preparation and recognition of surface molecularly imprinted core-shell microbeads for protein in aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Yan, E-mail: yanlu2001@sohu.com [College of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Henan Normal University, 46 Jlanshe Road, Xinxiang 453007 (China); Yan Changling; Gao Shuyan [College of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Henan Normal University, 46 Jlanshe Road, Xinxiang 453007 (China)

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, a surface molecular imprinting technique was reported for preparing core-shell microbeads of protein imprinting, and bovine hemoglobin or bovine serum albumin were used as model proteins for studying the imprinted core-shell microbeads. 3-Aminophenylboronic acid (APBA) was polymerized onto the surface of polystyrene microbead in the presence of the protein templates to create protein-imprinted core-shell microbeads. The various samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) methods. The effect of pH on rebinding of the template hemoglobin, the specific binding and selective recognition were studied for the imprinted microbeads. The results show that the bovine hemoglobin-imprinted core-shell microbeads were successfully created. The shell was a sort of imprinted thin films with porous structure and larger surface areas. The imprinted microbeads have good selectivity for templates and high stability. Due to the recognition sites locating at or closing to the surface, these imprinted microbeads have good property of mass-transport. Unfortunately, the imprint technology was not successfully applied to imprinting bovine serum albumin (BSA).

  14. Rotary core drills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1967-11-30

    The design of a rotary core drill is described. Primary consideration is given to the following component parts of the drill: the inner and outer tube, the core bit, an adapter, and the core lifter. The adapter has the form of a downward-converging sleeve and is mounted to the lower end of the inner tube. The lifter, extending from the adapter, is split along each side so that it can be held open to permit movement of a core. It is possible to grip a core by allowing the lifter to assume a closed position.

  15. Metallic nanoshells with semiconductor cores: optical characteristics modified by core medium properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Rizia; Grady, Nathaniel K; Ali, Tamer; Halas, Naomi J

    2010-10-26

    It is well-known that the geometry of a nanoshell controls the resonance frequencies of its plasmon modes; however, the properties of the core material also strongly influence its optical properties. Here we report the synthesis of Au nanoshells with semiconductor cores of cuprous oxide and examine their optical characteristics. This material system allows us to systematically examine the role of core material on nanoshell optical properties, comparing Cu(2)O core nanoshells (ε(c) ∼ 7) to lower core dielectric constant SiO(2) core nanoshells (ε(c) = 2) and higher dielectric constant mixed valency iron oxide nanoshells (ε(c) = 12). Increasing the core dielectric constant increases nanoparticle absorption efficiency, reduces plasmon line width, and modifies plasmon energies. Modifying the core medium provides an additional means of tailoring both the near- and far-field optical properties in this unique nanoparticle system.

  16. Proteomics Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in a...

  17. Kepler-62: a five-planet system with planets of 1.4 and 1.6 Earth radii in the habitable zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borucki, William J; Agol, Eric; Fressin, Francois; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Rowe, Jason; Isaacson, Howard; Fischer, Debra; Batalha, Natalie; Lissauer, Jack J; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Fabrycky, Daniel; Désert, Jean-Michel; Bryson, Stephen T; Barclay, Thomas; Bastien, Fabienne; Boss, Alan; Brugamyer, Erik; Buchhave, Lars A; Burke, Chris; Caldwell, Douglas A; Carter, Josh; Charbonneau, David; Crepp, Justin R; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Christiansen, Jessie L; Ciardi, David; Cochran, William D; DeVore, Edna; Doyle, Laurance; Dupree, Andrea K; Endl, Michael; Everett, Mark E; Ford, Eric B; Fortney, Jonathan; Gautier, Thomas N; Geary, John C; Gould, Alan; Haas, Michael; Henze, Christopher; Howard, Andrew W; Howell, Steve B; Huber, Daniel; Jenkins, Jon M; Kjeldsen, Hans; Kolbl, Rea; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery; Latham, David W; Lee, Brian L; Lopez, Eric; Mullally, Fergal; Orosz, Jerome A; Prsa, Andrej; Quintana, Elisa V; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Sasselov, Dimitar; Seader, Shawn; Shporer, Avi; Steffen, Jason H; Still, Martin; Tenenbaum, Peter; Thompson, Susan E; Torres, Guillermo; Twicken, Joseph D; Welsh, William F; Winn, Joshua N

    2013-05-03

    We present the detection of five planets--Kepler-62b, c, d, e, and f--of size 1.31, 0.54, 1.95, 1.61 and 1.41 Earth radii (R⊕), orbiting a K2V star at periods of 5.7, 12.4, 18.2, 122.4, and 267.3 days, respectively. The outermost planets, Kepler-62e and -62f, are super-Earth-size (1.25 R⊕ planet radius ≤ 2.0 R⊕) planets in the habitable zone of their host star, respectively receiving 1.2 ± 0.2 times and 0.41 ± 0.05 times the solar flux at Earth's orbit. Theoretical models of Kepler-62e and -62f for a stellar age of ~7 billion years suggest that both planets could be solid, either with a rocky composition or composed of mostly solid water in their bulk.

  18. More 'altruistic' punishment in larger societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, Frank W; Berbesque, J Colette

    2008-03-07

    If individuals will cooperate with cooperators, and punish non-cooperators even at a cost to themselves, then this strong reciprocity could minimize the cheating that undermines cooperation. Based upon numerous economic experiments, some have proposed that human cooperation is explained by strong reciprocity and norm enforcement. Second-party punishment is when you punish someone who defected on you; third-party punishment is when you punish someone who defected on someone else. Third-party punishment is an effective way to enforce the norms of strong reciprocity and promote cooperation. Here we present new results that expand on a previous report from a large cross-cultural project. This project has already shown that there is considerable cross-cultural variation in punishment and cooperation. Here we test the hypothesis that population size (and complexity) predicts the level of third-party punishment. Our results show that people in larger, more complex societies engage in significantly more third-party punishment than people in small-scale societies.

  19. Analysis of fuel options for the breakeven core configuration of the Advanced Recycling Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stauff, N.E.; Klim, T.K.; Taiwo, T.A. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Fiorina, C. [Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy); Franceschini, F. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC., Cranberry Township, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-07-01

    A trade-off study is performed to determine the impacts of various fuel forms on the core design and core physics characteristics of the sodium-cooled Toshiba- Westinghouse Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR). The fuel forms include oxide, nitride, and metallic forms of U and Th. The ARR core configuration is redesigned with driver and blanket regions in order to achieve breakeven fissile breeding performance with the various fuel types. State-of-the-art core physics tools are used for the analyses. In addition, a quasi-static reactivity balance approach is used for a preliminary comparison of the inherent safety performances of the various fuel options. Thorium-fueled cores exhibit lower breeding ratios and require larger blankets compared to the U-fueled cores, which is detrimental to core compactness and increases reprocessing and manufacturing requirements. The Th cores also exhibit higher reactivity swings through each cycle, which penalizes reactivity control and increases the number of control rods required. On the other hand, using Th leads to drastic reductions in void and coolant expansion coefficients of reactivity, with the potential for enhancing inherent core safety. Among the U-fueled ARR cores, metallic and nitride fuels result in higher breeding ratios due to their higher heavy metal densities. On the other hand, oxide fuels provide a softer spectrum, which increases the Doppler effect and reduces the positive sodium void worth. A lower fuel temperature is obtained with the metallic and nitride fuels due to their higher thermal conductivities and compatibility with sodium bonds. This is especially beneficial from an inherent safety point of view since it facilitates the reactor cool-down during loss of power removal transients. The advantages in terms of inherent safety of nitride and metallic fuels are maintained when using Th fuel. However, there is a lower relative increase in heavy metal density and in breeding ratio going from oxide to metallic

  20. The Effects of Earth's Outer Core's Viscosity on Geodynamo Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, C.; Jiao, L.; Zhang, H.

    2017-12-01

    Geodynamo process is controlled by mathematic equations and input parameters. To study effects of parameters on geodynamo system, MoSST model has been used to simulate geodynamo outputs under different outer core's viscosity ν. With spanning ν for nearly three orders when other parameters fixed, we studied the variation of each physical field and its typical length scale. We find that variation of ν affects the velocity field intensely. The magnetic field almost decreases monotonically with increasing of ν, while the variation is no larger than 30%. The temperature perturbation increases monotonically with ν, but by a very small magnitude (6%). The averaged velocity field (u) of the liquid core increases with ν as a simple fitted scaling relation: u∝ν0.49. The phenomenon that u increases with ν is essentially that increasing of ν breaks the Taylor-Proudman constraint and drops the critical Rayleigh number, and thus u increases under the same thermal driving force. Forces balance is analyzed and balance mode shifts with variation of ν. When compared with former studies of scaling laws, this study supports the conclusion that in a certain parameter range, the magnetic field strength doesn't vary much with the viscosity, but opposes to the assumption that the velocity field has nothing to do with the outer core viscosity.

  1. A core performance study on an actinide recycling 'zero-sodium-void worth' core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, M.; Nakagawa, M.; Yamaoka, M.; Kasahara, F.

    1994-01-01

    A core performance study was made for an absorber-type parfait core (A-APC) as one of 'Zero-sodium-void-worth' core concepts. This evaluation study pursued different two aspects; one for transuranic (TRU) management strategy, and another for a loss-of-coolant anticipated transient behavior considering the unique core configuration. The results indicated that this core has a large flexibility for actinide recycling in terms of self-sufficiency and minor actinide burning. The result also showed that this core has kept a large mitigation potential for ULOF events as well as a simple flat core concept, reflecting detailed three dimensional core bowing behavior for the A-APC configuration. (author)

  2. Preliminaries on core image analysis using fault drilling samples; Core image kaiseki kotohajime (danso kussaku core kaisekirei)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazaki, T; Ito, H [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    This paper introduces examples of image data analysis on fault drilling samples. The paper describes the following matters: core samples used in the analysis are those obtained from wells drilled piercing the Nojima fault which has moved in the Hygoken-Nanbu Earthquake; the CORESCAN system made by DMT Corporation, Germany, used in acquiring the image data consists of a CCD camera, a light source and core rotation mechanism, and a personal computer, its resolution being about 5 pixels/mm in both axial and circumferential directions, and 24-bit full color; with respect to the opening fractures in core samples collected by using a constant azimuth coring, it was possible to derive values of the opening width, inclination angle, and travel from the image data by using a commercially available software for the personal computer; and comparison of this core image with the BHTV record and the hydrophone VSP record (travel and inclination obtained from the BHTV record agree well with those obtained from the core image). 4 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Application of acoustic agglomerators for emergency use in liquid-metal fast breeder reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, D.T.; Rajendran, N.

    1979-01-01

    The use of acoustic agglomerators for the suppression of sodium-fire aerosols in the case of a hypothetical core disruptive accident of a liquid-metal fast breeder reactor is discussed. The basic principle for the enhancement of agglomeration of airborne particles under the influence of an acoustic field is first discussed, followed by theoretical predictions of the optimum operating conditions for such application. It is found that with an acoustic intensity of 160 dB (approx. 1 W/cm 2 ), acoustic agglomeration is expected to be several hundred times more effective than gravitational agglomeration. For particles with a radius larger than approx. 2 μm, hydrodynamic interaction becomes more important than the inertial capture. For radii between 0.5 and 2 μm, both mechanisms have to included in the theoretical predictions of the acoustic agglomeration rate

  4. Nuclear moments, spins and charge radii of copper isotopes from N=28 to N=50 by collinear fast-beam laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    We aim at establishing an unambiguous spin determination of the ground and isomeric states in the neutron rich Cu-isotopes from A=72 up to A=78 and to measure the magnetic and quadrupole moments between the N=28 and N=50 shell closures. This study will provide information on the double-magicity of $^{56}$Ni and $^{78}$Ni, both at the extremes of nuclear stability. It will provide evidence on the suggested inversion of ground state spin around A$\\approx$74, due to the monopole migration of the $\\pi f_{5/2}$ level. The collinear laser spectroscopy technique will be used, which furthermore provides information on the changes in mean square charge radii between both neutron shell closures, probing a possible onset of deformation in this region.

  5. Sidewall coring shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelman, Ya A; Konstantinov, L P; Martyshin, A N

    1966-12-12

    A sidewall coring shell consists of a housing and a detachable core catcher. The core lifter is provided with projections, the ends of which are situated in another plane, along the longitudinal axis of the lifter. The chamber has corresponding projections.

  6. Anomalous top layer in the inner core beneath the eastern hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, W.; Wen, L.; Niu, F.

    2003-12-01

    Recent studies reported hemispheric variations in seismic velocity and attenuation in the top of the inner core. It, however, remains unclear how the inner core hemisphericity extends deep in the inner core. Here, we analyze PKPbc-PKIKP and PKiKP-PKIKP waveforms collected from the Global Seismographic Network (GSN), regional recordings from the German Regional Seismic Network (GRSN) and Graefenberg (GRF) sampling along the equatorial path (the ray path whose ray angle is larger than 35o from the Earth's rotation axis). The observed global and regional PKPbc-PKIKP differential traveltimes and PKIKP/PKPbc amplitude ratios suggest a simple W2 model (Wen/Niu:2002) in the western hemisphere with a constant velocity gradient of 0.049(km/sec)/100km and a Q value of 600 in the top 400 km of the inner core. In the eastern hemisphere, the data require a change of velocity gradient and Q value at about 235 km below the inner core boundary (ICB). Based on forward modeling, we construct radial velocity and attenuation models in the eastern hemisphere which can explain both the PKiKP-PKIKP and PKPbc-PKIKP observations. The inner core in the eastern hemisphere has a flat velocity gradient extending to about 235 km below the ICB. We test two solutions for the velocity models in the deeper portion of the inner core, with one having a first-order discontinuity at 235 km below the ICB with a velocity jump of 0.07(km/sec) followed by the PREM gradient, and the other having a gradual velocity transition with 0.1(km/sec)/100km gradient extended from 235 km to 375 km below the ICB followed by the PREM gradient. The observed traveltimes exclude the sharp discontinuity velocity model, as it predicts a kink in differential traveltimes at distance of 151o-152o which is not observed in the global and regional datasets. The observed PKIKP/PKPbc amplitude ratios can be best explained by a step function of attenuation with a Q value of 250 at the top 300 km and a Q value of 600 at 300-400 km

  7. A contribution to radiotherapy of the larger-celled bronchial carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoubie, I.

    1982-01-01

    This work consists of a retrospective definition of disease courses of 859 patients with lung tumors and the definition of the survival curves in their dependence on histology, radiation dose and sex. With 721 larger-celled bronchial carcinomas the ratio of men to women was 12:1. The age peak lay between 60 and 70 years. The one/five year survival rate of all included larger-celled bronchial carcinomas (n=701) was, independent from the therapy form, 35.7, resp. 4.78%. The one year/five year survival rates were for the squamous epithelia 31.08/0.58%, for the undifferentiated carcinomas 25.34/3.41%, and for the lung tumors without histology 35.4/5.14%. Lobectomized patients with squamous epithelium carcinoma had in comparison to pneumonectomized patients a clearly higher survival chance. A clearly sex-dependent predisposition for a certain type of carcinoma was not present. (TRV) [de

  8. Low-temperature behavior of core-softened models: Water and silica behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagla, E. A.

    2001-01-01

    A core-softened model of a glass forming fluid is numerically studied in the limit of very low temperatures. The model shows two qualitatively different behaviors depending on the strength of the attraction between particles. For no or low attraction, the changes of density as a function of pressure are smooth, although hysteretic due to mechanical metastabilities. For larger attraction, sudden changes of density upon compressing and decompressing occur. This global mechanical instability is correlated to the existence of a thermodynamic first-order amorphous-amorphous transition. The two different behaviors obtained correspond qualitatively to the different phenomenology observed in silica and water

  9. Electromagnetically driven westward drift and inner-core superrotation in Earth's core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livermore, Philip W; Hollerbach, Rainer; Jackson, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    A 3D numerical model of the earth's core with a viscosity two orders of magnitude lower than the state of the art suggests a link between the observed westward drift of the magnetic field and superrotation of the inner core. In our model, the axial electromagnetic torque has a dominant influence only at the surface and in the deepest reaches of the core, where it respectively drives a broad westward flow rising to an axisymmetric equatorial jet and imparts an eastward-directed torque on the solid inner core. Subtle changes in the structure of the internal magnetic field may alter not just the magnitude but the direction of these torques. This not only suggests that the quasi-oscillatory nature of inner-core superrotation [Tkalčić H, Young M, Bodin T, Ngo S, Sambridge M (2013) The shuffling rotation of the earth's inner core revealed by earthquake doublets. Nat Geosci 6:497-502.] may be driven by decadal changes in the magnetic field, but further that historical periods in which the field exhibited eastward drift were contemporaneous with a westward inner-core rotation. The model further indicates a strong internal shear layer on the tangent cylinder that may be a source of torsional waves inside the core.

  10. Improving the calculated core stability by the core nuclear design optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partanen, P.

    1995-01-01

    Three different equilibrium core loadings for TVO II reactor have been generated in order to improve the core stability properties at uprated power level. The reactor thermal power is assumed to be uprated from 2160 MW th to 2500 MW th , which moves the operating point after a rapid pump rundown where the core stability has been calculated from 1340 MW th and 3200 kg/s to 1675 MW th and 4000 kg/s. The core has been refuelled with ABB Atom Svea-100 -fuel, which has 3,64% w/o U-235 average enrichment in the highly enriched zone. PHOENIX lattice code has been used to provide the homogenized nuclear constants. POLCA4 static core simulator has been used for core loadings and cycle simulations and RAMONA-3B program for simulating the dynamic response to the disturbance for which the stability behaviour has been evaluated. The core decay ratio has been successfully reduced from 0,83 to 0,55 mainly by reducing the power peaking factors. (orig.) (7 figs., 1 tab.)

  11. Core Values | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Core Values Core Values NREL's core values are rooted in a safe and supportive work environment guide our everyday actions and efforts: Safe and supportive work environment Respect for the rights physical and social environment Integrity Maintain the highest standard of ethics, honesty, and integrity

  12. Harnessing Petaflop-Scale Multi-Core Supercomputing for Problems in Space Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, B. J.; Yin, L.; Bowers, K. J.; Daughton, W.; Bergen, B.; Kwan, T. J.

    2008-12-01

    The particle-in-cell kinetic plasma code VPIC has been migrated successfully to the world's fastest supercomputer, Roadrunner, a hybrid multi-core platform built by IBM for the Los Alamos National Laboratory. How this was achieved will be described and examples of state-of-the-art calculations in space science, in particular, the study of magnetic reconnection, will be presented. With VPIC on Roadrunner, we have performed, for the first time, plasma PIC calculations with over one trillion particles, >100× larger than calculations considered "heroic" by community standards. This allows examination of physics at unprecedented scale and fidelity. Roadrunner is an example of an emerging paradigm in supercomputing: the trend toward multi-core systems with deep hierarchies and where memory bandwidth optimization is vital to achieving high performance. Getting VPIC to perform well on such systems is a formidable challenge: the core algorithm is memory bandwidth limited with low compute-to-data ratio and requires random access to memory in its inner loop. That we were able to get VPIC to perform and scale well, achieving >0.374 Pflop/s and linear weak scaling on real physics problems on up to the full 12240-core Roadrunner machine, bodes well for harnessing these machines for our community's needs in the future. Many of the design considerations encountered commute to other multi-core and accelerated (e.g., via GPU) platforms and we modified VPIC with flexibility in mind. These will be summarized and strategies for how one might adapt a code for such platforms will be shared. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by the LANS LLC Los Alamos National Laboratory. Dr. Bowers is a LANL Guest Scientist; he is presently at D. E. Shaw Research LLC, 120 W 45th Street, 39th Floor, New York, NY 10036.

  13. Seismic core shroud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puri, A.; Mullooly, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    A core shroud is provided, comprising: a coolant boundary, following the shape of the core boundary, for channeling the coolant through the fuel assemblies; a cylindrical band positioned inside the core barrel and surrounding the coolant boundary; and support members extending from the coolant boundary to the band, for transferring load from the coolant boundary to the band. The shroud may be assembled in parts using automated welding techniques, and it may be adjusted to fit the reactor core easily

  14. Core heat transfer analysis during a BWR LOCA simulation experiment at ROSA-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonomoto, T.; Koizumi, Y.; Tasaka, K.

    1987-01-01

    The ROSA-III test facility is a 1/424-th volumetrically scaled BWR/6 simulator with an electrically heated core to study the thermal-hydraulic response during a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). Heat transfer analyses for 5, 15, 50 and 200% break tests were conducted to understand the basic heat transfer behavior in the core under BWR LOCA conditions and to obtain a data base of post-critical heat flux (CHF) heat transfer coefficients and quench temperature. The results show that the convective heat transfer coefficient of dried-out rods at the core midplane during a steam cooling period is less than approximately 120 W/m 2 K. It is larger than existing data measured at lower pressures during a spray cooling period. Bottom-up quench temperatures are given by a simple equations: The sum of the saturation temperature and a constant of 262 K. Then the heat transfer model in the RELAP4/MOD6/U4/J3 code was revised using the present results. The rod surface temperature behavior in the 200% break test was calculated better by using the revised model although the model is very simple. (orig.)

  15. [caCORE: core architecture of bioinformation on cancer research in America].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qin; Zhang, Yan-lei; Xie, Zhi-yun; Zhang, Qi-peng; Hu, Zhang-zhi

    2006-04-18

    A critical factor in the advancement of biomedical research is the ease with which data can be integrated, redistributed and analyzed both within and across domains. This paper summarizes the Biomedical Information Core Infrastructure built by National Cancer Institute Center for Bioinformatics in America (NCICB). The main product from the Core Infrastructure is caCORE--cancer Common Ontologic Reference Environment, which is the infrastructure backbone supporting data management and application development at NCICB. The paper explains the structure and function of caCORE: (1) Enterprise Vocabulary Services (EVS). They provide controlled vocabulary, dictionary and thesaurus services, and EVS produces the NCI Thesaurus and the NCI Metathesaurus; (2) The Cancer Data Standards Repository (caDSR). It provides a metadata registry for common data elements. (3) Cancer Bioinformatics Infrastructure Objects (caBIO). They provide Java, Simple Object Access Protocol and HTTP-XML application programming interfaces. The vision for caCORE is to provide a common data management framework that will support the consistency, clarity, and comparability of biomedical research data and information. In addition to providing facilities for data management and redistribution, caCORE helps solve problems of data integration. All NCICB-developed caCORE components are distributed under open-source licenses that support unrestricted usage by both non-profit and commercial entities, and caCORE has laid the foundation for a number of scientific and clinical applications. Based on it, the paper expounds caCORE-base applications simply in several NCI projects, of which one is CMAP (Cancer Molecular Analysis Project), and the other is caBIG (Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid). In the end, the paper also gives good prospects of caCORE, and while caCORE was born out of the needs of the cancer research community, it is intended to serve as a general resource. Cancer research has historically

  16. Optimizing the Performance of Reactive Molecular Dynamics Simulations for Multi-core Architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aktulga, Hasan Metin [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Coffman, Paul [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Shan, Tzu-Ray [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Knight, Chris [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jiang, Wei [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Hybrid parallelism allows high performance computing applications to better leverage the increasing on-node parallelism of modern supercomputers. In this paper, we present a hybrid parallel implementation of the widely used LAMMPS/ReaxC package, where the construction of bonded and nonbonded lists and evaluation of complex ReaxFF interactions are implemented efficiently using OpenMP parallelism. Additionally, the performance of the QEq charge equilibration scheme is examined and a dual-solver is implemented. We present the performance of the resulting ReaxC-OMP package on a state-of-the-art multi-core architecture Mira, an IBM BlueGene/Q supercomputer. For system sizes ranging from 32 thousand to 16.6 million particles, speedups in the range of 1.5-4.5x are observed using the new ReaxC-OMP software. Sustained performance improvements have been observed for up to 262,144 cores (1,048,576 processes) of Mira with a weak scaling efficiency of 91.5% in larger simulations containing 16.6 million particles.

  17. "Functional" Inspiratory and Core Muscle Training Enhances Running Performance and Economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Tomas K; McConnell, Alison K; Lin, Hua; Nie, Jinlei; Zhang, Haifeng; Wang, Jiayuan

    2016-10-01

    Tong, TK, McConnell, AK, Lin, H, Nie, J, Zhang, H, and Wang, J. "Functional" inspiratory and core muscle training enhances running performance and economy. J Strength Cond Res 30(10): 2942-2951, 2016-We compared the effects of two 6-week high-intensity interval training interventions. Under the control condition (CON), only interval training was undertaken, whereas under the intervention condition (ICT), interval training sessions were followed immediately by core training, which was combined with simultaneous inspiratory muscle training (IMT)-"functional" IMT. Sixteen recreational runners were allocated to either ICT or CON groups. Before the intervention phase, both groups undertook a 4-week program of "foundation" IMT to control for the known ergogenic effect of IMT (30 inspiratory efforts at 50% maximal static inspiratory pressure [P0] per set, 2 sets per day, 6 days per week). The subsequent 6-week interval running training phase consisted of 3-4 sessions per week. In addition, the ICT group undertook 4 inspiratory-loaded core exercises (10 repetitions per set, 2 sets per day, inspiratory load set at 50% post-IMT P0) immediately after each interval training session. The CON group received neither core training nor functional IMT. After the intervention phase, global inspiratory and core muscle functions increased in both groups (p ≤ 0.05), as evidenced by P0 and a sport-specific endurance plank test (SEPT) performance, respectively. Compared with CON, the ICT group showed larger improvements in SEPT, running economy at the speed of the onset of blood lactate accumulation, and 1-hour running performance (3.04% vs. 1.57%, p ≤ 0.05). The changes in these variables were interindividually correlated (r ≥ 0.57, n = 16, p ≤ 0.05). Such findings suggest that the addition of inspiratory-loaded core conditioning into a high-intensity interval training program augments the influence of the interval program on endurance running performance and that this may be

  18. Suitability of magnetic single- and multi-core nanoparticles to detect protein binding with dynamic magnetic measurement techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remmer, Hilke; Dieckhoff, Jan; Schilling, Meinhard; Ludwig, Frank

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the binding of biotinylated proteins to various streptavidin functionalized magnetic nanoparticles with different dynamic magnetic measurement techniques to examine their potential for homogeneous bioassays. As particle systems, single-core nanoparticles with a nominal core diameter of 30 nm as well as multi-core nanoparticles with hydrodynamic sizes varying between nominally 60 nm and 100 nm were chosen. As experimental techniques, fluxgate magnetorelaxometry (MRX), complex ac susceptibility (ACS) and measurements of the phase lag between rotating field and sample magnetization are applied. MRX measurements are only suited for the detection of small analytes if the multivalency of functionalized nanoparticles and analytes causes cross-linking, thus forming larger aggregates. ACS measurements showed for all nanoparticle systems a shift of the imaginary part's maximum towards small frequencies. In rotating field measurements only the single-core nanoparticle systems with dominating Brownian mechanism exhibit an increase of the phase lag upon binding in the investigated frequency range. The coexistence of Brownian and Néel relaxation processes can cause a more complex phase lag change behavior, as demonstrated for multi-core nanoparticle systems. - Highlights: • Cealization of homogeneous magnetic bioassays using different magnetic techniques. • Comparison of single- and multi-core nanoparticle systems. • ac Susceptibility favorable for detection of small analytes. • Magnetorelaxometry favorable for detection of large analytes or cross-linking assays

  19. Improvement of core monitoring code cecor by the virtual segmentation of the self powered neutron detector loaded at Korean Standard Nuclear Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, T.; Jung, Y.S.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Full text: Korean Standard Nuclear Plant uses Self Powered Neutron Detectors (SPNDs) to measure the neutron flux in the reactor core. The SPND's height is 40 cm and is located axially at the five different positions and 45 radial places. The design code simulated a reactor core is calculated by segmentation of the core. The segmentation is called as 'node', of which size is normally 20 cm. The axial height of the detector is larger than that of the node, and the larger detector's height maybe product some error on the axially complex shape. The analysis with the detector's signals showed some errors at the non-cosine axial flux shape. In order to reduce the errors for the shape, we tried to divide the detector by introducing the virtual boundary in the detector. Then, each axially 5 detectors had two virtual segmentations respectively and the detector's signal was divided by the inputs. So the more virtual detector's signals were gotten, the more accurate axial shape was produced. The result with virtual segmentations in a detector gave less deviation than the case without virtual segmentation (the current model). After the middle of cycle at the initial core specially, the axial neutron flux shape is changed to the saddle type one. The current model gave some error in Root Mean Square (RMS) between the measured value and the calculated one. The virtual segmentation model gave the better agreement at that time

  20. Analysis of core and core barrel heat-up under conditions simulating severe reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chellaiah, S.; Viskanta, R.; Ranganathan, P.; Anand, N.K.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a model for estimating the temperature distributions in the reactor core, core barrel, thermal shield and reactor pressure vessel of a PWR during an undercooling transient. A number of numerical calculations simulating the core uncovering of the TMI-2 reactor and the subsequent heat-up of the core have been performed. The results of the calculations show that the exothermic heat release due to Zircaloy oxidation contributes to the sharp heat-up of the core. However, the core barrel temperature rise which is driven by the temperature increase of the edge of the core (e.g., the core baffle) is very modest. The maximum temperature of the core barrel never exceeded 610 K (at a system pressure of 68 bar) after a 75 minute simulation following the start of core uncovering

  1. Overview of core designs and requirements/criteria for core restraint systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, W.H.

    1984-09-01

    The requirements and lifetime criteria for the design of a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) Core Restraint System are presented. A discussion of the three types of core restraint systems used in LMFBR core design is given. Details of the core restraint system selected for FFTF are presented and the reasons for this selection given. Structural analysis procedures being used to manage the FFTF assembly irradiations are discussed. Efforts that are ongoing to validate the calculational methods and lifetime criteria are presented

  2. The Kinematics of Molecular Cloud Cores in the Presence of Driven and Decaying Turbulence: Comparisons with Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Offner, S R; Krumholz, M R; Klein, R I; McKee, C F

    2008-04-18

    In this study we investigate the formation and properties of prestellar and protostellar cores using hydrodynamic, self-gravitating Adaptive Mesh Refinement simulations, comparing the cases where turbulence is continually driven and where it is allowed to decay. We model observations of these cores in the C{sup 18}O(2 {yields} 1), NH{sub 3}(1,1), and N{sub 2}H{sup +} (1 {yields} 0) lines, and from the simulated observations we measure the linewidths of individual cores, the linewidths of the surrounding gas, and the motions of the cores relative to one another. Some of these distributions are significantly different in the driven and decaying runs, making them potential diagnostics for determining whether the turbulence in observed star-forming clouds is driven or decaying. Comparing our simulations with observed cores in the Perseus and {rho} Ophiuchus clouds shows reasonably good agreement between the observed and simulated core-to-core velocity dispersions for both the driven and decaying cases. However, we find that the linewidths through protostellar cores in both simulations are too large compared to the observations. The disagreement is noticeably worse for the decaying simulation, in which cores show highly supersonic infall signatures in their centers that decrease toward their edges, a pattern not seen in the observed regions. This result gives some support to the use of driven turbulence for modeling regions of star formation, but reaching a firm conclusion on the relative merits of driven or decaying turbulence will require more complete data on a larger sample of clouds as well as simulations that include magnetic fields, outflows, and thermal feedback from the protostars.

  3. Theoretical Investigation of Inter-core Crosstalk Properties in Homogeneous Trench-Assisted Multi-Core Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Feihong; Morioka, Toshio; Tu, Jiajing

    2014-01-01

    We derive analytical expressions for inter-core crosstalk, its dependence on core pitch and wavelength in homogeneous trench-assisted multi-core fibers. They are in excellent agreement with numerical simulation results.......We derive analytical expressions for inter-core crosstalk, its dependence on core pitch and wavelength in homogeneous trench-assisted multi-core fibers. They are in excellent agreement with numerical simulation results....

  4. THE MASSIVE PROTOSTELLAR CLUSTER NGC 6334I AT 220 au RESOLUTION: DISCOVERY OF FURTHER MULTIPLICITY, DIVERSITY, AND A HOT MULTI-CORE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brogan, C. L.; Hunter, T. R.; Indebetouw, R. [NRAO, 520 Edgemont Rd, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Cyganowski, C. J. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, North Haugh, St. Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Chandler, C. J. [NRAO, P.O. Box 0, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Friesen, R., E-mail: cbrogan@nrao.edu [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3H4 (Canada)

    2016-12-01

    We present Very Large Array and Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array imaging of the deeply embedded protostellar cluster NGC 6334I from 5 cm to 1.3 mm at angular resolutions as fine as 0.″17 (220 au). The dominant hot core MM1 is resolved into seven components at 1.3 mm, clustered within a radius of 1000 au. Four of the components have brightness temperatures >200 K, radii ∼300 au, minimum luminosities ∼10{sup 4} L {sub ⊙}, and must be centrally heated. We term this new phenomenon a “hot multi-core.” Two of these objects also exhibit compact free–free emission at longer wavelengths, consistent with a hypercompact H ii region (MM1B) and a jet (MM1D). The spatial kinematics of the water maser emission centered on MM1D are consistent with it being the origin of the high-velocity bipolar molecular outflow seen in CO. The close proximity of MM1B and MM1D (440 au) suggests a proto-binary or a transient bound system. Several components of MM1 exhibit steep millimeter spectral energy distributions indicative of either unusual dust spectral properties or time variability. In addition to resolving MM1 and the other hot core (MM2) into multiple components, we detect five new millimeter and two new centimeter sources. Water masers are detected for the first time toward MM4A, confirming its membership in the protocluster. With a 1.3 mm brightness temperature of 97 K coupled with a lack of thermal molecular line emission, MM4A appears to be a highly optically thick 240  L {sub ⊙} dust core, possibly tracing a transient stage of massive protostellar evolution. The nature of the strongest water maser source CM2 remains unclear due to its combination of non-thermal radio continuum and lack of dust emission.

  5. Microhabitat Conditions in Wyoming's Sage-Grouse Core Areas: Effects on Nest Site Selection and Success.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan B Dinkins

    Full Text Available The purpose of our study was to identify microhabitat characteristics of greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus nest site selection and survival to determine the quality of sage-grouse habitat in 5 regions of central and southwest Wyoming associated with Wyoming's Core Area Policy. Wyoming's Core Area Policy was enacted in 2008 to reduce human disturbance near the greatest densities of sage-grouse. Our analyses aimed to assess sage-grouse nest selection and success at multiple micro-spatial scales. We obtained microhabitat data from 928 sage-grouse nest locations and 819 random microhabitat locations from 2008-2014. Nest success was estimated from 924 nests with survival data. Sage-grouse selected nests with greater sagebrush cover and height, visual obstruction, and number of small gaps between shrubs (gap size ≥0.5 m and <1.0 m, while selecting for less bare ground and rock. With the exception of more small gaps between shrubs, we did not find any differences in availability of these microhabitat characteristics between locations within and outside of Core Areas. In addition, we found little supporting evidence that sage-grouse were selecting different nest sites in Core Areas relative to areas outside of Core. The Kaplan-Meier nest success estimate for a 27-day incubation period was 42.0% (95% CI: 38.4-45.9%. Risk of nest failure was negatively associated with greater rock and more medium-sized gaps between shrubs (gap size ≥2.0 m and <3.0 m. Within our study areas, Wyoming's Core Areas did not have differing microhabitat quality compared to outside of Core Areas. The close proximity of our locations within and outside of Core Areas likely explained our lack of finding differences in microhabitat quality among locations within these landscapes. However, the Core Area Policy is most likely to conserve high quality habitat at larger spatial scales, which over decades may have cascading effects on microhabitat quality available

  6. Diatom paleoecology Pass Key core 37, Everglades National Park, Florida Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, Laura; Cooper, S.R.; Huvane, J.K.

    1998-01-01

    During the 20th century, there have been large-scale anthropogenic modifications to the South Florida ecosystem. The effects of these changes on Florida Bay and its biological communities are currently of political and scientific interest. This study is part of a larger effort to reconstruct the history of environmental changes in the bay, using paleoecological techniques. We are using diatom indicators preserved in Florida Bay sediments to infer long-term water quality, productivity, nutrient, and salinity changes. We are also obtaining information concerning the natural variability of the ecosystem. Diatoms are microscopic algae, the remains of which are generally well preserved in sediments, and their distributions are closely linked to water quality. Diatoms were extracted from a 70-cm sediment core collected from the Pass Key mudbank of Florida Bay by the U.S. Geological Survey. Between 300-500 diatom valves from each of 15 core samples were identified and counted. Estimates of absolute abundance, species richness, Shannon-Wiener diversity, and centric:pennate ratios were calculated for each sample that was counted. Information on the ecology of the diatom species is presented, and changes in diatom community composition are evaluated. Samples contained an average of four million diatom valves per gram of sediment. Major changes in the diatom community are evident down core. These include increases in the percent abundance of marine diatoms in the time period represented by the core, probably the result of increasing salinity at Pass Key. Benthic diatoms become less abundant in the top half of the core. This may be related to a number of factors including the die-off of sea grass beds or increased turbidity of the water column. Once the chronology of the Pass Key core 37 is established, these down-core changes can be related to historical events and compared with other indicators in the sedimentary record that are currently being investigated by U.S Geological

  7. Neutronic design of mixed oxide-silicide cores for the core conversion of rsg-gas reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sembiring, Tagor Malem; Tukiran; Pinem surian; Febrianto

    2001-01-01

    The core conversion of rsg-gas reactor from an all-oxide (U 3 O 8 -Al) core, through a series of mixed oxide-silicide core, to an all-silicide (U 3 Si 2 -Al) core for the same meat density of 2.96 g U/cc is in progress. The conversion is first step of the step-wise conversion and will be followed by the second step that is the core conversion from low meat density of silicide core, through a series of mixed lower-higher density of silicide core, to an all-higher meat density of 3.55 g/cc core. Therefore, the objectives of this work is to design the mixed cores on the neutronic performance to achieve safety a first full-silicide core for the reactor with the low uranium meat density of 2.96gU/cc. The neutronic design of the mixed cores was performed by means of Batan-EQUIL-2D and Batan-3DIFF computer codes for 2 and 3 dimension diffusion calculation, respectively. The result shows that all mixed oxide-silicide cores will be feasible to achieve safety a fist full-silicide core. The core performs the same neutronic core parameters as those of the equilibrium silicide core. Therefore, the reactor availability and utilization during the core conversion is not changed

  8. Overview of core designs and requirements/criteria for core restraint systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, W.H.

    1984-01-01

    The requirements and lifetime criteria for the design of a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) Core Restraint System is presented. A discussion of the three types of core restraint systems used in LMFBR core design is given. Details of the core restraint system selected for FFTF are presented and the reasons for this selection given. Structural analysis procedures being used to manage the FFTF assembly irradiations are discussed. Efforts that are ongoing to validate the calculational methods and lifetime criteria are presented. (author)

  9. Nuclear reactor core flow baffling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berringer, R.T.

    1979-01-01

    A flow baffling arrangement is disclosed for the core of a nuclear reactor. A plurality of core formers are aligned with the grids of the core fuel assemblies such that the high pressure drop areas in the core are at the same elevations as the high pressure drop areas about the core periphery. The arrangement minimizes core bypass flow, maintains cooling of the structure surrounding the core, and allows the utilization of alternative beneficial components such as neutron reflectors positioned near the core

  10. Radii and refractive index changes in γ-irradiated optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolotti, M.; Ferrari, A; Scudieri, F.; Serra, A.

    1979-01-01

    Radiation effects in bulk glasses have received great attention in the last few years. In optical fibers the parameters studied have been the optical attenuation at different wavelengths and the luminescence generated by irradiation. A report is presented on some preliminary experiments showing that sensible changes in both dimensions and refractive indices occur even in the case of simple defect introduction, as it is for γ-rays, and even at relatively low irradiation doses (e.g. 1 Krad). Moreover the effects anneal out at room temperature in a few days. The measurements have been made with an optical interferometric technique in which a comparison is made between an unirradiated reference fiber sample and the irradiated specimen. The fiber examined was a Pb-silicate core/borosilicate clad fiber. (U.K.)

  11. Larger groups of passerines are more efficient problem solvers in the wild

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morand-Ferron, Julie; Quinn, John L.

    2011-01-01

    Group living commonly helps organisms face challenging environmental conditions. Although a known phenomenon in humans, recent findings suggest that a benefit of group living in animals generally might be increased innovative problem-solving efficiency. This benefit has never been demonstrated in a natural context, however, and the mechanisms underlying improved efficiency are largely unknown. We examined the problem-solving performance of great and blue tits at automated devices and found that efficiency increased with flock size. This relationship held when restricting the analysis to naive individuals, demonstrating that larger groups increased innovation efficiency. In addition to this effect of naive flock size, the presence of at least one experienced bird increased the frequency of solving, and larger flocks were more likely to contain experienced birds. These findings provide empirical evidence for the “pool of competence” hypothesis in nonhuman animals. The probability of success also differed consistently between individuals, a necessary condition for the pool of competence hypothesis. Solvers had a higher probability of success when foraging with a larger number of companions and when using devices located near rather than further from protective tree cover, suggesting a role for reduced predation risk on problem-solving efficiency. In contrast to traditional group living theory, individuals joining larger flocks benefited from a higher seed intake, suggesting that group living facilitated exploitation of a novel food source through improved problem-solving efficiency. Together our results suggest that both ecological and social factors, through reduced predation risk and increased pool of competence, mediate innovation in natural populations. PMID:21930936

  12. Espaço de cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Feitosa-Santana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available O artigo apresenta definições para os termos espaço de cores e sistemas de cores; classifica, de acordo com David Brainard (2003, os sistemas de cores em dois grupos: aparência de cores e diferenças de cores. Dentre os diversos sistemas de cores existentes, o artigo descreve dois deles: o sistema de cores Munsell &– um dos mais utilizados entre os sistemas de aparência de cores &– e a descrição do sistema de cores CIE 1931 &– um dos mais utilizados dentre os sistemas de diferença de cores. Faz-se uma retrospectiva histórica da busca por espaços de cores que representem a percepção de cores humana assim como as diversas reconstruções de espaços de cores por métodos eletrofisiológicos ou psicofísicos. Muitas dessas reconstruções utilizam a escala multidimensional (mds. O artigo também introduz a possibilidade da reconstrução dos espaços de cores de pacientes com discromatopsia adquirida como uma distorção do espaço de indivíduos tricromatas normais.

  13. Core antigen and circulating anti-core antibody in hepatitis B infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, C R; Zuckerman, A J [London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (UK)

    1977-02-01

    Core antigen was obtained from the sera of persistent chronic carriers of hepatitis B virus by centrifugation and treatment with Nonidet P40 and 2-mercaptoethanol. The separated core antigen was radiolabelled and identified as a nucleoprotein structure of buoyant density 1.36 g/cm/sup 3/ and possessing an isoelectric point of 4.4. This material was employed in a radioimmnoassay procedure of high sensitivity for the detection of core antibody. In a series of sera from patients with acute type B hepatitis, core antibody was demonstrated 2 to 3 weeks after the onset of jaundice during the period of surface antigenaemia. The presence of core antibody may therefore provide an accurate serological marker for the detection of active or recent virus replication in future epidemiological studies of hepatitis B infection.

  14. Internal core tightener

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brynsvold, G.V.; Snyder, H.J. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    An internal core tightener is disclosed which is a linear actuated (vertical actuation motion) expanding device utilizing a minimum of moving parts to perform the lateral tightening function. The key features are: (1) large contact areas to transmit loads during reactor operation; (2) actuation cam surfaces loaded only during clamping and unclamping operation; (3) separation of the parts and internal operation involved in the holding function from those involved in the actuation function; and (4) preloaded pads with compliant travel at each face of the hexagonal assembly at the two clamping planes to accommodate thermal expansion and irradiation induced swelling. The latter feature enables use of a ''fixed'' outer core boundary, and thus eliminates the uncertainty in gross core dimensions, and potential for rapid core reactivity changes as a result of core dimensional change. 5 claims, 12 drawing figures

  15. Preferential flow through intact soil cores: Effects of matrix head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langner, H.W.; Gaber, H.M.; Wraith, J.M.; Huwe, B.; Inskeep, W.P.

    1999-12-01

    Continuous soil pores may act as pathways for preferential flow depending on their size and water status (filled or drained), the latter being largely controlled by the soil matrix head (h). The literature contains a wide range of proposed minimal pore sizes that may contribute to preferential flow. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between h (and corresponding pore sizes) and preferential solute transport in a naturally structured soil. Tracer ({sup 3}H{sub 2}O and pentafluorobenzoic acid, [PFBA]) miscible displacement experiments were performed at several h values in intact soil cores (15-cm diameter, 30-cm length) using an apparatus especially suited to maintain constant h while collecting large effluent volumes. To test for the occurrence of preferential flow, observed breakthrough curves (BTCs) were evaluated for physical nonequilibrium (PNE) using a comparison between fitted local equilibrium (PNE) and PNE models. Fitting results of the observed BTCs indicated absence of PNE in all solute transport experiments at h {le} {minus}10 cm. Experiments at h {ge} {minus}5 cm consistently exhibited PNE conditions, indicating the presence of preferential flow. These results suggest that soil pores with effective radii of 150 {micro}m and smaller (water-filled at h = {minus}10 cm) do not contribute to preferential flow. Observed pore water velocities were not indicative of the presence or absence of preferential flow conditions. Continuous measurements of soil water content ({theta}) using time domain reflectometry (TDR) revealed that at h = {minus}10 cm, <2% of the soil volume had drained.

  16. Rare-earth nuclei: Radii, isotope-shifts and deformation properties in the relativistic mean-field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalazissis, G.A.; Ring, P.

    1996-01-01

    A systematic study of the ground-state properties of even-even rare earth nuclei has been performed in the framework of the Relativistic Mean-Field (RMF) theory using the parameter set NL-SH. Nuclear radii, isotope shifts and deformation properties of the heavier rare-earth nuclei have been obtained, which encompass atomic numbers ranging from Z=60 to Z=70 and include a large range of isospin. It is shown that RMF theory is able to provide a good and comprehensive description of the empirical binding energies of the isotopic chains. At the same time the quadrupole deformations β 2 obtained in the RMF theory are found to be in good agreement with the available empirical values. The theory predicts a shape transition from prolate to oblate for nuclei at neutron number N=78 in all the chains. A further addition of neutrons up to the magic number 82 brings about the spherical shape. For nuclei above N=82, the RMF theory predicts the well-known onset of prolate deformation at about N=88, which saturates at about N=102. The deformation properties display an identical behaviour for all the nuclear chains. A good description of the above deformation transitions in the RMF theory in all the isotopic chains leads to a successful reproduction of the anomalous behaviour of the empirical isotopic shifts of the rare-earth nuclei. The RMF theory exhibits a remarkable success in providing a unified and microscopic description of various empirical data. (orig.)

  17. Application Service Providers (ASP Adoption in Core and Non-Core Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aman Y.M. Chan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available With the further improvement in internet bandwidth, connection stability and data transmission security, a new wave of Application Service Providers (ASP is on his way. The recent booming on some models such as Software Application as Service (SaaS and On-Demand in 2008, has led to emergence of ASP model in core business functions. The traditional IS outsourcing covers the non-core business functions that are not critical to business performance and competitive advantages. Comparing with traditional IS outsourcing, ASP is a new phenomenon that can be considered as an emerging innovation as it covers both core and non-core business functions. Most of the executives do not comprehend the difference and similarity between traditional IS outsourcing and ASP mode. Hence, we propose to conduct a research so as to identify the determinants (cost benefit, gap in IS capability complementing the company's strategic goal, and trust to ASP's service and security level and moderating factors (management's attitude in ownership & control, and company aggressiveness of ASP adoption decision in both core and non-core business functions.

  18. Reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azekura, Kazuo; Kurihara, Kunitoshi.

    1992-01-01

    In a BWR type reactor, a great number of pipes (spectral shift pipes) are disposed in the reactor core. Moderators having a small moderating cross section (heavy water) are circulated in the spectral shift pipes to suppress the excess reactivity while increasing the conversion ratio at an initial stage of the operation cycle. After the intermediate stage of the operation cycle in which the reactor core reactivity is lowered, reactivity is increased by circulating moderators having a great moderating cross section (light water) to extend the taken up burnup degree. Further, neutron absorbers such as boron are mixed to the moderator in the spectral shift pipe to control the concentration thereof. With such a constitution, control rods and driving mechanisms are no more necessary, to simplify the structure of the reactor core. This can increase the fuel conversion ratio and control great excess reactivity. Accordingly, a nuclear reactor core of high conversion and high burnup degree can be attained. (I.N.)

  19. Electromagnetically driven westward drift and inner-core superrotation in Earth’s core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livermore, Philip W.; Hollerbach, Rainer; Jackson, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    A 3D numerical model of the earth’s core with a viscosity two orders of magnitude lower than the state of the art suggests a link between the observed westward drift of the magnetic field and superrotation of the inner core. In our model, the axial electromagnetic torque has a dominant influence only at the surface and in the deepest reaches of the core, where it respectively drives a broad westward flow rising to an axisymmetric equatorial jet and imparts an eastward-directed torque on the solid inner core. Subtle changes in the structure of the internal magnetic field may alter not just the magnitude but the direction of these torques. This not only suggests that the quasi-oscillatory nature of inner-core superrotation [Tkalčić H, Young M, Bodin T, Ngo S, Sambridge M (2013) The shuffling rotation of the earth’s inner core revealed by earthquake doublets. Nat Geosci 6:497–502.] may be driven by decadal changes in the magnetic field, but further that historical periods in which the field exhibited eastward drift were contemporaneous with a westward inner-core rotation. The model further indicates a strong internal shear layer on the tangent cylinder that may be a source of torsional waves inside the core. PMID:24043841

  20. [MATCHE: Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking Education.] Consumer Approach Strand: Core. Module I-A-3: Consumer Rights and Responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sharman

    This competency-based preservice home economics teacher education module on consumer rights and responsibilities is the third in a set of four core curriculum modules on consumer approach to homemaking education. (This set is part of a larger series of sixty-seven on the Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking Education…

  1. Compact sodium cooled nuclear power plant with fast core (KNK II- Karlsruhe), Safety Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    After the operation of the KNK plant with a thermal core (KNK I), the installation of a fast core (KNK II) had been realized. The planning of the core and the necessary reconstruction work was done by INTERATOM. Owner and customer was the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe (KfK), while the operating company was the Kernkraftwerk-Betriebsgesellschaft mbH (KBG) Karlsruhe. The main goals of the KNK II project and its special experimental test program were to gather experience for the construction, the licensing and operation of future larger plants, to develop and to test fuel and absorber assemblies and to further develop the sodium technology and the associated components. The present safety report consists of three parts. Part 1 contains the description of the nuclear plant. Hereby, the reactor and its components, the handling facilities, the instrumentation with the plant protection, the design of the plant including the reactor core and the nominal operation processes are described. Part 2 contains the safety related investigation and measures. This concerns the reactivity accidents, local cooling perturbations, radiological consequences with the surveillance measures and the justification of the choice of structural materials. Part three finally is the appendix with the figures, showing the different buildings, the reactor and its components, the heat transfer systems and the different auxiliary facilities [de

  2. Inner Core Rotation from Geomagnetic Westward Drift and a Stationary Spherical Vortex in Earth's Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhies, C. V.

    1999-01-01

    The idea that geomagnetic westward drift indicates convective leveling of the planetary momentum gradient within Earth's core is pursued in search of a differentially rotating mean state, upon which various oscillations and secular effects might be superimposed. The desired state conforms to roughly spherical boundary conditions, minimizes dissipative interference with convective cooling in the bulk of the core, yet may aide core cooling by depositing heat in the uppermost core and lower mantle. The variational calculus of stationary dissipation applied to a spherical vortex within the core yields an interesting differential rotation profile akin to spherical Couette flow bounded by thin Hartmann layers. Four boundary conditions are required. To concentrate shear induced dissipation near the core-mantle boundary, these are taken to be: (i) no-slip at the core-mantle interface; (ii) geomagnetically estimated bulk westward flow at the base of the core-mantle boundary layer; (iii) no-slip at the inner-outer core interface; and, to describe magnetic locking of the inner core to the deep outer core, (iv) hydrodynamically stress-free at the inner-outer core boundary. By boldly assuming the axial core angular momentum anomaly to be zero, the super-rotation of the inner core is calculated to be at most 1.5 degrees per year.

  3. The Time-Dependent Wavelet Spectrum of HH 1 and 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raga, A. C.; Reipurth, B.; Esquivel, A.; González-Gómez, D.; Riera, A.

    2018-04-01

    We have calculated the wavelet spectra of four epochs (spanning ≍20 yr) of Hα and [S II] HST images of HH 1 and 2. From these spectra we calculated the distribution functions of the (angular) radii of the emission structures. We found that the size distributions have maxima (corresponding to the characteristic sizes of the observed structures) with radii that are logarithmically spaced with factors of ≍2→3 between the successive peaks. The positions of these peaks generally showed small shifts towards larger sizes as a function of time. This result indicates that the structures of HH 1 and 2 have a general expansion (seen at all scales), and/or are the result of a sequence of merging events resulting in the formation of knots with larger characteristic sizes.

  4. A model for the north coronal hole observed at the 1973 eclipse, between 1.3 and 3.2 solar radii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crifo, F.; Picat, J.-P.

    1980-01-01

    At the 1973 eclipse, several pictures of the white-light corona were obtained using polarizers and a radially-compensated filter. These pictures provide a very good opportunity for studying the large coronal hole at the north polar cap; this hole has been extensively studied during the Skylab period. On the plates reliable intensities between 1.3 and 3.2 solar radii could be recorded. The absolute calibration was made using the stars observed in the field at the same time. This method allows a direct comparison of well-exposed objects on a same plate and must therefore be highly reliable. The northern hole was very dark and from the synoptic maps and the X-ray pictures, one can conclude that probably no high-latitude streamers were projected over the hole in the plane of the sky. Intensities in the radial and tangential directions of polarization were recorded in the darkest part of the hole between the visible plumes. (Auth.)

  5. Epistemology and ontology in core ontologies: FOLaw and LRI-Core, two core ontologies for law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breukers, J.A.P.J.; Hoekstra, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    For more than a decade constructing ontologies for legal domains, we, at the Leibniz Center for Law, felt really the need to develop a core ontology for law that would enable us to re-use the common denominator of the various legal domains. In this paper we present two core ontologies for law. The

  6. Larger error signals in major depression are associated with better avoidance learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James F eCavanagh

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC is particularly reactive to signals of error, punishment, and conflict in the service of behavioral adaptation and it is consistently implicated in the etiology of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD. This association makes conceptual sense, given that MDD has been associated with hyper-reactivity in neural systems associated with punishment processing. Yet in practice, depression-related variance in measures of mPFC functioning often fails to relate to performance. For example, neuroelectric reflections of mediofrontal error signals are often found to be larger in MDD, but a deficit in post-error performance suggests that these error signals are not being used to rapidly adapt behavior. Thus, it remains unknown if depression-related variance in error signals reflects a meaningful alteration in the use of error or punishment information. However, larger mediofrontal error signals have also been related to another behavioral tendency: increased accuracy in avoidance learning. The integrity of this error-avoidance system remains untested in MDD. In this study, EEG was recorded as 21 symptomatic, drug-free participants with current or past MDD and 24 control participants performed a probabilistic reinforcement learning task. Depressed participants had larger mPFC EEG responses to error feedback than controls. The direct relationship between error signal amplitudes and avoidance learning accuracy was replicated. Crucially, this relationship was stronger in depressed participants for high conflict lose-lose situations, demonstrating a selective alteration of avoidance learning. This investigation provided evidence that larger error signal amplitudes in depression are associated with increased avoidance learning, identifying a candidate mechanistic model for hypersensitivity to negative outcomes in depression.

  7. Alkali Metal Variation and Twisting of the FeNNFe Core in Bridging Diiron Dinitrogen Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Sean F; Rodgers, Kenton R; Lukat-Rodgers, Gudrun; Mercado, Brandon Q; Grubel, Katarzyna; Holland, Patrick L

    2016-03-21

    Alkali metal cations can interact with Fe-N2 complexes, potentially enhancing back-bonding or influencing the geometry of the iron atom. These influences are relevant to large-scale N2 reduction by iron, such as in the FeMoco of nitrogenase and the alkali-promoted Haber-Bosch process. However, to our knowledge there have been no systematic studies of a large range of alkali metals regarding their influence on transition metal-dinitrogen complexes. In this work, we varied the alkali metal in [alkali cation]2[LFeNNFeL] complexes (L = bulky β-diketiminate ligand) through the size range from Na(+) to K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+). The FeNNFe cores have similar Fe-N and N-N distances and N-N stretching frequencies despite the drastic change in alkali metal cation size. The two diketiminates twist relative to one another, with larger dihedral angles accommodating the larger cations. In order to explain why the twisting has so little influence on the core, we performed density functional theory calculations on a simplified LFeNNFeL model, which show that the two metals surprisingly do not compete for back-bonding to the same π* orbital of N2, even when the ligand planes are parallel. This diiron system can tolerate distortion of the ligand planes through compensating orbital energy changes, and thus, a range of ligand orientations can give very similar energies.

  8. Investigation of activity release during light water reactor core meltdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht, H.; Matschoss, V.; Wild, H.

    1978-01-01

    A test facility was developed for the determination of activity release and of aerosol characteristics under realistic light water reactor core melting conditions. It is composed of a high-frequency induction furnace, a ThO 2 crucible system, and a collection apparatus consisting of membrane and particulate filters. Thirty-gram samples of a representative core material mixture (corium) were melted under air, argon, or steam at 0.8 to 2.2 bar. In air at 2700 0 C, for example, the relative release was 0.4 to 0.7% for iron, chromium, and cobalt and 4 to 11% for tin, antimony, and manganese. Higher release values of 20 to 40% at lower temperatures (2150 0 C, air) were found for selenium, cadmium, tellurium, and cesium. The size distribution of the aerosol particles was trimodal with maxima at diameters of 0.17, 0.30, and 0.73 μm. The result of a qualitative x-ray microanalysis was that the main elements of the melt were contained in each aerosol particle. Further investigations will include larger melt masses and the additional influence of concrete on the release and aerosol behavior

  9. Correction for Delay and Dispersion Results in More Accurate Cerebral Blood Flow Ischemic Core Measurement in Acute Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Longting; Bivard, Andrew; Kleinig, Timothy; Spratt, Neil J; Levi, Christopher R; Yang, Qing; Parsons, Mark W

    2018-04-01

    This study aimed to assess how the ischemic core measured by perfusion computed tomography (CTP) was affected by the delay and dispersion effect. Ischemic stroke patients having CTP performed within 6 hours of onset were included. The CTP data were processed twice, generating standard cerebral blood flow (sCBF) and delay- and dispersion-corrected CBF (ddCBF), respectively. Ischemic core measured by the sCBF and ddCBF was then compared at the relative threshold core were used: acute diffusion-weighted imaging or 24-hour diffusion-weighted imaging in patients with complete recanalization. Difference of core volume between CTP and diffusion-weighted imaging was estimated by Mann-Whitney U test and limits of agreement. Patients were also classified into favorable and unfavorable CTP patterns. The imaging pattern classification by sCBF and ddCBF was compared by the χ 2 test; their respective ability to predict good clinical outcome (3-month modified Rankin Scale score) was tested in logistic regression. Fifty-five patients were included in this study. Median sCBF ischemic core volume was 38.5 mL (12.4-61.9 mL), much larger than the median core volume of 17.2 mL measured by ddCBF (interquartile range, 5.5-38.8; P core much closer to diffusion-weighted imaging core references, with the mean volume difference of -0.1 mL (95% limits of agreement, -25.4 to 25.2; P =0.97) and 16.7 mL (95% limits of agreement, -21.7 to 55.2; P core measurement on CTP. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. An Ocean Sediment Core-Top Calibration of Foraminiferal (Cibicides) Stable Carbon Isotope Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmittner, A.; Mix, A. C.; Lisiecki, L. E.; Peterson, C.; Mackensen, A.; Cartapanis, O. A.

    2015-12-01

    Stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) measured on calcium carbonate shells of benthic foraminifera (cibicides) from late Holocene sediments (δ13CCib) are compiled and compared with newly updated datasets of contemporary water-column δ13C observations of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC) as the initial core-top calibration of the international Ocean Circulation and CarbonCycling (OC3) project. Using selection criteria based on the spatial distance between samples we find high correlation between δ13CCib and natural (pre-industrial) δ13CDIC, confirming earlier work. However, our analysis reveals systematic differences such as higher (lower) δ13CCib values in the Atlantic (Indian and Pacific) oceans. Regression analyses are impacted by anthropogenic carbon and suggest significant carbonate ion, temperature, and pressure effects, consistent with lab experiments with planktonic foraminifera and theory. The estimated standard error of core-top sediment data is generally σ ~= 0.25 ‰, whereas modern foram data from the South Atlantic indicate larger errors (σ ~= 0.4 ‰).

  11. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2008-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  12. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2010-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  13. Structure and size of ions electrochemically doped in conducting polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneto, Keiichi; Hata, Fumito; Uto, Sadahito

    2018-05-01

    Among electroactive polymers (EAPs) for softactuators, conducting polymers have been intensively studied because of the large strain and stress caused by a low voltage operation. A larger deformation is desirable to extend their cycle life by reducing the operation voltage, and this is advantageous for their potential use in wider applications. The deformation is generated by the insertion of ions by electrochemical oxidation; hence, the magnitude of the strain depends on the bulkiness of the ions in the electrolytes. It is important, therefore, to clarify the structure and size of the ions during the electrochemical cycle, in order to achieve better performance of actuation. Anion and cation sizes (radii) in polypyrrole (PPy) film have been estimated using the precise measurement of strain against the amount of charge injected during the electrochemical cycles, assuming isotropic deformation of the film. The anion size was estimated using an anion-drive film, which was electrodeposited in TBABF4/methyl benzoate. The film was electrochemically cycled in sodium electrolytes, and the strain was measured simultaneously using a laser displacement meter. The cation size was obtained using a cation-drive film, being electropolymerized in aqueous dodecylbenzene sulfonic (DBS) acid. The cation-drive film was cycled in chloride electrolytes and measured the strain. The Cl-, Br-, NO3- , BF4- , and ClO4- radii were found to be approximately 235, 245, 250, 270 and 290 pm, respectively. The radii of K+, Na+ and Li+ were approximately 230, 237 and 274 pm, respectively. The results were discussed and took the crystalline ion radius and hydrated ion radius (Stokes radius) into consideration. It was found that the structure and size of the anions were slightly larger than the crystalline ion radius. Contrary to the anions, the cation radii were close to the hydrated ion radius, being larger than the crystalline ion radius.

  14. [Core muscle chains activation during core exercises determined by EMG-a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogan, Slavko; Riesen, Jan; Taeymans, Jan

    2014-10-15

    Good core muscles strength is essential for daily life and sports activities. However, the mechanism how core muscles may be effectively triggered by exercises is not yet precisely described in the literature. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the rate of activation as measured by electromyography of the ventral, lateral and dorsal core muscle chains during core (trunk) muscle exercises. A total of 16 studies were included. Exercises with a vertical starting position, such as the deadlift or squat activated significantly more core muscles than exercises in the horizontal initial position.

  15. Risk reduction of core-melt accidents in advaned CAPRA burner cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maschek, W.; Struwe, D.; Eigemann, M.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the CAPRA Program (Consommation Accrue de Plutonium dans les RApides) the feasibility of fast reactors is investigated to burn plutonium and also to destruct minor actinides. The design of CAPRA cores shows significant differences compared to conventional cores. Especially the high Pu-enrichment has an important influence on the core melt-down behavior and the associated recriticality risk. To cope with this risk, inherent design features and special measures/devices are investigated for their potential of early fuel discharge to reduce the criticality of the reactor core. An assessment of such measures/devices is given and experimental needs are formulated. 11 refs., 5 figs

  16. Proper Motions and Structural Parameters of the Galactic Globular Cluster M71

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadelano, M.; Dalessandro, E.; Ferraro, F. R.; Miocchi, P.; Lanzoni, B.; Pallanca, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Massari, D. [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2017-02-20

    By exploiting two ACS/ HST data sets separated by a temporal baseline of ∼7 years, we have determined the relative stellar proper motions (PMs; providing membership) and the absolute PM of the Galactic globular cluster M71. The absolute PM has been used to reconstruct the cluster orbit within a Galactic, three-component, axisymmetric potential. M71 turns out to be in a low-latitude disk-like orbit inside the Galactic disk, further supporting the scenario in which it lost a significant fraction of its initial mass. Since large differential reddening is known to affect this system, we took advantage of near-infrared, ground-based observations to re-determine the cluster center and density profile from direct star counts. The new structural parameters turn out to be significantly different from the ones quoted in the literature. In particular, M71 has a core and a half-mass radii almost 50% larger than previously thought. Finally, we estimate that the initial mass of M71 was likely one order of magnitude larger than its current value, thus helping to solve the discrepancy with the observed number of X-ray sources.

  17. Investigation on Guided-Mode Characteristics of Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fibre at Near-Infrared Wavelengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin-Hui, Yuan; Chong-Xiu, Yu; Xin-Zhu, Sang; Wen-Jing, Li; Gui-Yao, Zhou; Shu-Guang, Li; Lan-Tian, Hou

    2009-01-01

    Guided-mode characteristics of hollow-core photonic crystal fibre (HC-PCF) are experimentally and theoretically investigated. The transmission spectrum in the range from 755 to 845 nm is observed and the loss is measured to be 0.12 dB/m at 800 nm by cut-back method. Based on the full-vector beam propagation method and the full-vector plane-wave method, the characteristics of mode field over propagation distance 1 m are simulated, and the results show that the propagation efficiency can be above 80%. Compared with the fundamental guided mode well confined in air core within shorter propagation distance, the second-order guided mode leaks into the cladding region and gradually attenuates due to larger refractive index difference. The primary loss factors in HC-PCF and the corresponding solutions are elementarily discussed. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  18. Recent Developments in No-Core Shell-Model Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navratil, P.; Quaglioni, S.; Stetcu, I.; Barrett, B.R.

    2009-01-01

    We present an overview of recent results and developments of the no-core shell model (NCSM), an ab initio approach to the nuclear many-body problem for light nuclei. In this aproach, we start from realistic two-nucleon or two- plus three-nucleon interactions. Many-body calculations are performed using a finite harmonic-oscillator (HO) basis. To facilitate convergence for realistic inter-nucleon interactions that generate strong short-range correlations, we derive effective interactions by unitary transformations that are tailored to the HO basis truncation. For soft realistic interactions this might not be necessary. If that is the case, the NCSM calculations are variational. In either case, the ab initio NCSM preserves translational invariance of the nuclear many-body problem. In this review, we, in particular, highlight results obtained with the chiral two- plus three-nucleon interactions. We discuss efforts to extend the applicability of the NCSM to heavier nuclei and larger model spaces using importance-truncation schemes and/or use of effective interactions with a core. We outline an extension of the ab initio NCSM to the description of nuclear reactions by the resonating group method technique. A future direction of the approach, the ab initio NCSM with continuum, which will provide a complete description of nuclei as open systems with coupling of bound and continuum states is given in the concluding part of the review.

  19. Recent Developments in No-Core Shell-Model Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navratil, P; Quaglioni, S; Stetcu, I; Barrett, B R

    2009-03-20

    We present an overview of recent results and developments of the no-core shell model (NCSM), an ab initio approach to the nuclear many-body problem for light nuclei. In this aproach, we start from realistic two-nucleon or two- plus three-nucleon interactions. Many-body calculations are performed using a finite harmonic-oscillator (HO) basis. To facilitate convergence for realistic inter-nucleon interactions that generate strong short-range correlations, we derive effective interactions by unitary transformations that are tailored to the HO basis truncation. For soft realistic interactions this might not be necessary. If that is the case, the NCSM calculations are variational. In either case, the ab initio NCSM preserves translational invariance of the nuclear many-body problem. In this review, we, in particular, highlight results obtained with the chiral two- plus three-nucleon interactions. We discuss efforts to extend the applicability of the NCSM to heavier nuclei and larger model spaces using importance-truncation schemes and/or use of effective interactions with a core. We outline an extension of the ab initio NCSM to the description of nuclear reactions by the resonating group method technique. A future direction of the approach, the ab initio NCSM with continuum, which will provide a complete description of nuclei as open systems with coupling of bound and continuum states is given in the concluding part of the review.

  20. Calculation and analysis of the source term of the reactor core based on different data libraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Haiying; Zhang Chunming; Wang Shaowei; Lan Bing; Liu Qiaofeng; Han Jingru

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear fuel in reactor core produces large amount of radioactive nuclides in the fission process. ORIGEN-S can calculate the accumulation and decay of radioactive nuclides in the core by using various forms of data libraries, including card-image library, binary library and ORIGEN-S cross section library generated by ARP through interpolation method. In this paper, the information of each data library was described, and the reactor core inventory was calculated by using Card-image library and ARP library. The radioactivity concentration of typical nuclides with the change of fuel burnup was analyzed. The results showed that the influence of data libraries on the calculation of nuclide radioactivity was various. Compared to Card-image library, the radioactivity of a small part of nuclides calculated by ARP library were larger and the radioactivity of "1"3"4Cs, "1"3"6Cs were calculated smaller by about 15%. For some typical nuclides, with the deepening of fuel burnup, the difference of nuclide radioactivity calculated by the two libraries increased. However, the changes of the ratio of nuclide radioactivity were different. (authors)

  1. Larger miliolids of the Late Cretaceous and Paleogene seen through space and time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlasta Ćosović

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Spatial and temporal occurrences of the larger (complex miliolids are discussed to give more light on biostratigraphy and paleobiogeographic provinces distribution. Seven generaand 47 species from the Late Cretaceous to Oligocene inhabited shallow marine settings in the Indo-Pacific, Tethyan and Caribbean regions. Of all genera only four (Idalina, Periloculina, Pseudolacazina, Lacazina widespread throughout Tethys in theLate Cretaceous and Paleogene. Single occurrence of Lacazina was recorded further to east (Moluccas. By now the Late Cretaceous genus Adrahentina is known only from the Spain. The newcomer’s Eocene genera were Fabularia and Lacazinella. Fabularia reachedhigh diversity in species term in the Central and Western Tethys and occured as unique genus in Caribbean realm, too. Conversely, during the same period, Lacazinella spread over the southern border of Neo-Tethys reaching New Guinea.On the Adriatic – Dinaric Carbonate Platform, larger miliolids occurred from the Late Cretaceous to Cuisian, having the same biostratigraphically trends and distribution as contemporaneous larger miliolids from the Tethys.

  2. Effects of Ambient Temperature and Forced-air Warming on Intraoperative Core Temperature: A Factorial Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Lijian; Huang, Yuguang; Xu, Yiyao; Zheng, Yongchang; Sang, Xinting; Zhou, Xiaoyun; Li, Shanqing; Mao, Guangmei; Mascha, Edward J; Sessler, Daniel I

    2018-05-01

    The effect of ambient temperature, with and without active warming, on intraoperative core temperature remains poorly characterized. The authors determined the effect of ambient temperature on core temperature changes with and without forced-air warming. In this unblinded three-by-two factorial trial, 292 adults were randomized to ambient temperatures 19°, 21°, or 23°C, and to passive insulation or forced-air warming. The primary outcome was core temperature change between 1 and 3 h after induction. Linear mixed-effects models assessed the effects of ambient temperature, warming method, and their interaction. A 1°C increase in ambient temperature attenuated the negative slope of core temperature change 1 to 3 h after anesthesia induction by 0.03 (98.3% CI, 0.01 to 0.06) °Ccore/(h°Cambient) (P ambient temperature with passive insulation, but was unaffected by ambient temperature during forced-air warming (0.02 [98.3% CI, -0.04 to 0.09] °Ccore/°Cambient; P = 0.40). After an average of 3.4 h of surgery, core temperature was 36.3° ± 0.5°C in each of the forced-air groups, and ranged from 35.6° to 36.1°C in passively insulated patients. Ambient intraoperative temperature has a negligible effect on core temperature when patients are warmed with forced air. The effect is larger when patients are passively insulated, but the magnitude remains small. Ambient temperature can thus be set to comfortable levels for staff in patients who are actively warmed.

  3. Large-scale fluid motion in the earth's outer core estimated from non-dipole magnetic field data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushima, Masaki; Honkura, Yoshimori

    1989-01-01

    Fluid motions in the Earth's outer core can be estimated from magnetic field data at the Earth's surface based on some assumptions. The basic standpoint here is that the non-dipole magnetic field is generated by the interaction between a strong toroidal magnetic field, created by differential rotation, and the convective motion in the outer core. Large-scale convective motions are studied to express them in terms of the poloidal velocity field expanded into a series of spherical harmonics. The radial distribution of differential rotation is estimated from the balance between the effective couple due to angular momentum transfer and the electromagnetic couple. Then the radial dependence of the toroidal magnetic field is derived from the interaction between the differential rotation thus estimated and the dipole magnetic field within the outer core. Magnetic field data are applied to a secular variation model which takes into account the fluctuations of the standing and drifting parts of the non-zonal magnetic field. The velocity field in the outer core is estimated for two cases. It is revealed that the pattern of convective motions is generally characterized by large-scale motions in the quasi-steady case. In the non-steady case, the magnitude of the velocity field is much larger, indicating a more dynamic feature. (N.K.)

  4. Animal MRI Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Animal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Core develops and optimizes MRI methods for cardiovascular imaging of mice and rats. The Core provides imaging expertise,...

  5. Error Analysis of High Frequency Core Loss Measurement for Low-Permeability Low-Loss Magnetic Cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niroumand, Farideh Javidi; Nymand, Morten

    2016-01-01

    in magnetic cores is B-H loop measurement where two windings are placed on the core under test. However, this method is highly vulnerable to phase shift error, especially for low-permeability, low-loss cores. Due to soft saturation and very low core loss, low-permeability low-loss magnetic cores are favorable...... in many of the high-efficiency high power-density power converters. Magnetic powder cores, among the low-permeability low-loss cores, are very attractive since they possess lower magnetic losses in compared to gapped ferrites. This paper presents an analytical study of the phase shift error in the core...... loss measuring of low-permeability, low-loss magnetic cores. Furthermore, the susceptibility of this measurement approach has been analytically investigated under different excitations. It has been shown that this method, under square-wave excitation, is more accurate compared to sinusoidal excitation...

  6. Core debris cooling with flooded vessel or core-catcher. Heat exchange coefficients under natural convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouge, S.; Seiler, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    External cooling by natural water circulation is necessary for molten core retention in LWR lower head or in a core-catcher. Considering the expected heat flux levels (between 0.2 to 1.5 MW/m 2 ) film boiling should be avoided. This rises the question of the knowledge of the level of the critical heat flux for the considered geometries and flow paths. The document proposes a state of the art of the research in this field. Mainly small scale experiments have been performed in a very recent past. These experiments are not sufficient to extrapolate to large scale reactor structures. Limited large scale experimental results exist. These results together with some theoretical investigations show that external cooling by natural water circulation may be considered as a reasonable objective of severe accident R and D. Recently (in fact since the beginning of 1994) new results are available from large scale experiments (CYBL, ULPU 2000, SULTAN). These results indicate that CHF larger