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Sample records for large-amplitude collective motion

  1. Quantum theory of dynamical collective subspace for large-amplitude collective motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakata, Fumihiko; Marumori, Toshio; Ogura, Masanori.

    1986-03-01

    By placing emphasis on conceptual correspondence to the ''classical'' theory which has been developed within the framework of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory, a full quantum theory appropriate for describing large-amplitude collective motion is proposed. A central problem of the quantum theory is how to determine an optimal representation called a dynamical representation; the representation is specific for the collective subspace where the large-amplitude collective motion is replicated as satisfactorily as possible. As an extension of the classical theory where the concept of an approximate integral surface plays an important role, the dynamical representation is properly characterized by introducing a concept of an approximate invariant subspace of the Hamiltonian. (author)

  2. Dynamic response function and large-amplitude dissipative collective motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xizhen; Zhuo Yizhong; Li Zhuxia; Sakata, Fumihiko.

    1993-05-01

    Aiming at exploring microscopic dynamics responsible for the dissipative large-amplitude collective motion, the dynamic response and correlation functions are introduced within the general theory of nuclear coupled-master equations. The theory is based on the microscopic theory of nuclear collective dynamics which has been developed within the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory for disclosing complex structure of the TDHF-manifold. A systematic numerical method for calculating the dynamic response and correlation functions is proposed. By performing numerical calculation for a simple model Hamiltonian, it is pointed out that the dynamic response function gives an important information in understanding the large-amplitude dissipative collective motion which is described by an ensemble of trajectories within the TDHF-manifold. (author)

  3. Microscopic theory of dynamical subspace for large amplitude collective motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakata, Fumihiko; Marumori, Toshio; Ogura, Masanori.

    1986-01-01

    A full quantum theory appropriate for describing large amplitude collective motion is proposed by exploiting the basic idea of the semi-classical theory so far developed within the time-depedent Hartree-Fock theory. A central problem of the quantum theory is how to determine an optimal representation called a dynamical representation specific for the collective subspace where the large amplitude collective motion is replicated as precisely as possible. As an extension of the semi-classical theory where the concept of an approximate integral surface played an important role, the collective subspace is properly characterized by introducing a concept of an approximate invariant subspace of the Hamiltonian. (author)

  4. Field theory of large amplitude collective motion. A schematic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhardt, H.

    1978-01-01

    By using path integral methods the equation for large amplitude collective motion for a schematic two-level model is derived. The original fermion theory is reformulated in terms of a collective (Bose) field. The classical equation of motion for the collective field coincides with the time-dependent Hartree-Fock equation. Its classical solution is quantized by means of the field-theoretical generalization of the WKB method. (author)

  5. Optimum collective submanifold in resonant cases by the self-consistent collective-coordinate method for large-amplitude collective motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Y.; Marumori, T.; Sakata, F.

    1987-01-01

    With the purpose of clarifying characteristic difference of the optimum collective submanifolds in nonresonant and resonant cases, we develop an improved method of solving the basic equations of the self-consistent collective-coordinate (SCC) method for large-amplitude collective motion. It is shown that, in the resonant cases, there inevitably arise essential coupling terms which break the maximal-decoupling property of the collective motion, and we have to extend the optimum collective submanifold so as to properly treat the degrees of freedom which bring about the resonances

  6. Geometry of the self-consistent collective-coordinate method for the large-amplitude collective motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakata, Fumihiko; Marumori, Toshio; Hashimoto, Yukio; Une, Tsutomu.

    1983-05-01

    The geometry of the self-consistent collective-coordinate (SCC) method formulated within the framework of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory is investigated by associating the variational parameters with a symplectic manifold (a TDHF manifold). With the use of a canonical-variables parametrization, it is shown that the TDHF equation is equivalent to the canonical equations of motion in classical mechanics in the TDHF manifold. This enables us to investigate geometrical structure of the SCC method in the language of the classical mechanics. The SCC method turns out to give a prescription how to dynamically extract a ''maximally-decoupled'' collective submanifold (hypersurface) out of the TDHF manifold, in such a way that a certain kind of trajectories corresponding to the large-amplitude collective motion under consideration can be reproduced on the hypersurface as precisely as possible. The stability of the hypersurface at each point on it is investigated, in order to see whether the hypersurface obtained by the SCC method is really an approximate integral surface in the TDHF manifold or not. (author)

  7. Equations-of-motion approach to a quantum theory of large-amplitude collective motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, A.

    1984-01-01

    The equations-of-motion approach to large-amplitude collective motion is implemented both for systems of coupled bosons, also studied in a previous paper, and for systems of coupled fermions. For the fermion case, the underlying formulation is that provided by the generalized Hartree-Fock approximation (or generalized density matrix method). To obtain results valid in the semi-classical limit, as in most previous work, we compute the Wigner transform of quantum matrices in the representation in which collective coordinates are diagonal and keep only the leading contributions. Higher-order contributions can be retained, however, and, in any case, there is no ambiguity of requantization. The semi-classical limit is seen to comprise the dynamics of time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory (TDHF) and a classical canonicity condition. By utilizing a well-known parametrization of the manifold of Slater determinants in terms of classical canonical variables, we are able to derive and understand the equations of the adiabatic limit in full parallelism with the boson case. As in the previous paper, we can thus show: (i) to zero and first order in the adiabatic limit the physics is contained in Villar's equations; (ii) to second order there is consistency and no new conditions. The structure of the solution space (discussed thoroughly in the previous paper) is summarized. A discussion of associated variational principles is given. A form of the theory equivalent to self-consistent cranking is described. A method of solution is illustrated by working out several elementary examples. The relationship to previsous work, especially that of Zelevinsky and Marumori and coworkers is discussed briefly. Three appendices deal respectively with the equations-of-motion method, with useful properties of Slater determinants, and with some technical details associated with the fermion equations of motion. (orig.)

  8. Application of a self-consistent theory of large amplitude collective motion to the generalized Meshkov-Glick-Lipkin model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umar, A.S.; Klein, A.

    1986-01-01

    A recent formulation of the theory of large amplitude collective motion in the adiabatic limit is applied to a generalized monopole shell model. Numerical calculations are carried out for the three-level model, approximately equivalent to a classical system with two degrees of freedom. Our results go somewhat beyond previous treatments of this system and provide substantiation for the validity of the method, in suitable parameter ranges, as a way of recognizing and decoupling the collective and the non-collective degrees of freedom. (orig.)

  9. The Dynamics of Large-Amplitude Motion in Energized Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, David S. [Univ. of Akron, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2016-05-27

    Chemical reactions involve large-amplitude nuclear motion along the reaction coordinate that serves to distinguish reactants from products. Some reactions, such as roaming reactions and reactions proceeding through a loose transition state, involve more than one large-amplitude degree of freedom. Because of the limitation of exact quantum nuclear dynamics to small systems, one must, in general, define the active degrees of freedom and separate them in some way from the other degrees of freedom. In this project, we use large-amplitude motion in bound model systems to investigate the coupling of large-amplitude degrees of freedom to other nuclear degrees of freedom. This approach allows us to use the precision and power of high-resolution molecular spectroscopy to probe the specific coupling mechanisms involved, and to apply the associated theoretical tools. In addition to slit-jet spectra at the University of Akron, the current project period has involved collaboration with Michel Herman and Nathalie Vaeck of the Université Libre de Bruxelles, and with Brant Billinghurst at the Canadian Light Source (CLS).

  10. Large amplitude oscillatory motion along a solar filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vršnak, B.; Veronig, A. M.; Thalmann, J. K.; Žic, T.

    2007-08-01

    Context: Large amplitude oscillations of solar filaments is a phenomenon that has been known for more than half a century. Recently, a new mode of oscillations, characterized by periodical plasma motions along the filament axis, was discovered. Aims: We analyze such an event, recorded on 23 January 2002 in Big Bear Solar Observatory Hα filtergrams, to infer the triggering mechanism and the nature of the restoring force. Methods: Motion along the filament axis of a distinct buldge-like feature was traced, to quantify the kinematics of the oscillatory motion. The data were fitted by a damped sine function to estimate the basic parameters of the oscillations. To identify the triggering mechanism, morphological changes in the vicinity of the filament were analyzed. Results: The observed oscillations of the plasma along the filament were characterized by an initial displacement of 24 Mm, an initial velocity amplitude of 51 km s-1, a period of 50 min, and a damping time of 115 min. We interpret the trigger in terms of poloidal magnetic flux injection by magnetic reconnection at one of the filament legs. The restoring force is caused by the magnetic pressure gradient along the filament axis. The period of oscillations, derived from the linearized equation of motion (harmonic oscillator) can be expressed as P=π√{2}L/v_Aϕ≈4.4L/v_Aϕ, where v_Aϕ =Bϕ0/√μ_0ρ represents the Alfvén speed based on the equilibrium poloidal field Bϕ0. Conclusions: Combination of our measurements with some previous observations of the same kind of oscillations shows good agreement with the proposed interpretation. Movie to Fig. 1 is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  11. Origin of inertia in large-amplitude collective motion in finite Fermi ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    There is a tacit assumption that the collective variables (shape) determine the internal structure and state of the nucleus. A detailed derivation of eq. (2) based on the principle of least action is given in [16]. During collec- tive motion, the eigenstate does not change leading thereby to adiabatic approximation, and we shall ...

  12. Theoretical research in nuclear collective motion. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Progress is summarized on the following research projects: generalized density matrix method, large amplitude collective motion, boson mappings for the Interacting Boson Model, and semi-classical method for testing IBM hypothesis

  13. The influence of large-amplitude librational motion on the hydrogen bond energy for alcohol–water complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jonas; Heimdal, J.; Larsen, René Wugt

    2015-01-01

    is a superior hydrogen bond acceptor. The class of large-amplitude donor OH librational motion is shown to account for up to 5.1 kJ mol-1 of the destabilizing change of vibrational zero-point energy upon intermolecular OH...O hydrogen bond formation. The experimental findings are supported by complementary...

  14. Single-particle motion in large-amplitude quadrupole shape transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Kazuya

    1991-01-01

    The microscopic structure of the single-particle motion for the spherical-deformed transitional nuclei is analysed by using the self-consistent collective-coordinate method (SCC method). The single-particle motion in the moving-frame of reference called the collective vibrating coordinate frame is introduced by the generalized Bogoliubov transformation depending on the collective coordinate. The numerical calculations of the single-particle (quasi-particle) energy level diagrams and their occupation probabilities for the static deformation are carried out for the Sm isotopes. A clear change of the single-particle distribution structure appears in the course of deformation. (author)

  15. An adiabatic time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory of collective motion in finite systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranger, M.; Veneroni, M.

    1977-11-01

    It is shown how to derive the parameters of a phenomenological collective model from a microscopic theory. The microscopic theory is Hartree-Fock, and one starts from the time-dependent Hartree-Fock equation. To this, the adiabatic approximation is added, and the energy in powers of an adiabatic parameter is expanded, which results in a collective kinetic energy quadratic in the velocities, with coefficients depending on the coordinates, as in the phenomenological models. The adiabatic equations of motion are derived in different ways and their analogy with classical mechanics is stressed. The role of the adiabatic hypothesis and its range of validity, are analyzed in detail. It assumes slow motion, but not small amplitude, and is therefore suitable for large-amplitude collective motion. The RPA is obtained as the limiting case where the amplitude is also small. The translational mass is correctly given and the moment of inertia under rotation is that of Thouless and Valatin

  16. Self-consistent collective coordinate method for large amplitude collective motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakata, F.; Hashimoto, Y.; Marumori, T.; Une, T.

    1982-01-01

    A recent development of the self-consistent collective coordinate method is described. The self-consistent collective coordinate method was proposed on the basis of the fundamental principle called the invariance principle of the Schroedinger equation. If this is formulated within a framework of the time dependent Hartree Fock (TDHF) theory, a classical version of the theory is obtained. A quantum version of the theory is deduced by formulating it within a framework of the unitary transformation method with auxiliary bosons. In this report, the discussion is concentrated on a relation between the classical theory and the quantum theory, and an applicability of the classical theory. The aim of the classical theory is to extract a maximally decoupled collective subspace out of a huge dimensional 1p - 1h parameter space introduced by the TDHF theory. An intimate similarity between the classical theory and a full quantum boson expansion method (BEM) was clarified. Discussion was concentrated to a simple Lipkin model. Then a relation between the BEM and the unitary transformation method with auxiliary bosons was discussed. It became clear that the quantum version of the theory had a strong relation to the BEM, and that the BEM was nothing but a quantum analogue of the present classical theory. The present theory was compared with the full TDHF calculation by using a simple model. (Kato, T.)

  17. Breaking of separability condition for dynamical collective subspace; Onset of quantum chaos in large-amplitude collective motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakata, Fumihiko [Tokyo Univ., Tanashi (Japan). Inst. for Nuclear Study; Yamamoto, Yoshifumi; Marumori, Toshio; Iida, Shinji; Tsukuma, Hidehiko

    1989-11-01

    It is the purpose of the present paper to study 'global structure' of the state space of an N-body interacting fermion system, which exhibits regular, transient and stochastic phases depending on strength of the interaction. An optimum representation called a dynamical representation plays an essential role in this investigation. The concept of the dynamical representation has been introduced in the quantum theory of dynamical subspace in our previous paper, in order to determine self-consistently an optimum collective subspace as well as an optimum collective Hamiltonian. In the theory, furthermore, dynamical conditions called separability and stability conditions have been provided in order to identify the optimum collective subspace as an approximate invariant subspace of the Hamiltonian. Physical meaning of these conditions are clarified from a viewpoint to relate breaking of them with bifurcation of the collectivity and an onset of quantum chaos from the regular collective motion, by illustrating the general idea with numerical results obtained for a simple soluble model. It turns out that the onset of the stochastic phase is associated with dissolution of the quantum numbers to specify the collective subspace and this dissolution is induced by the breaking of the separability condition in the dynamical representation. (author).

  18. String-like collective motion in the α- and β-relaxation of a coarse-grained polymer melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazmiño Betancourt, Beatriz A.; Starr, Francis W.; Douglas, Jack F.

    2018-03-01

    Relaxation in glass-forming liquids occurs as a multi-stage hierarchical process involving cooperative molecular motion. First, there is a "fast" relaxation process dominated by the inertial motion of the molecules whose amplitude grows upon heating, followed by a longer time α-relaxation process involving both large-scale diffusive molecular motion and momentum diffusion. Our molecular dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained glass-forming polymer melt indicate that the fast, collective motion becomes progressively suppressed upon cooling, necessitating large-scale collective motion by molecular diffusion for the material to relax approaching the glass-transition. In each relaxation regime, the decay of the collective intermediate scattering function occurs through collective particle exchange motions having a similar geometrical form, and quantitative relationships are derived relating the fast "stringlet" collective motion to the larger scale string-like collective motion at longer times, which governs the temperature-dependent activation energies associated with both thermally activated molecular diffusion and momentum diffusion.

  19. Microscopic theories for collective motions of large amplitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza Cruz, F.F. de.

    1986-01-01

    The many proposals of ''Collective Paths'' that have appeared in literature, were derived through a local analysis of the Time Dependent Hartree Fock dynamics. Those proposals were compared and validity conditions obtained for Semiclassical Hamiltonians which have only quadratic terms in momenta. A careful analysis of the parametrization of Slater Determinants allowed us to exploit the geometrical features of the Time Dependent Hartree Fock Theory and construct the Paths in a covariant way. The analysis was applied to a three level model (Su(3)). (author) [pt

  20. Large amplitude dynamics of micro-/nanomechanical resonators actuated with electrostatic pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juillard, J.; Bonnoit, A.; Avignon, E.; Hentz, S.; Colinet, E.

    2010-01-01

    In the field of resonant nano-electro-mechanical system (NEMS) design, it is a common misconception that large-amplitude motion, and thus large signal-to-noise ratio, can only be achieved at the risk of oscillator instability. In the present paper, we show that very simple closed-loop control schemes can be used to achieve stable large-amplitude motion of a resonant structure even when jump resonance (caused by electrostatic softening or Duffing hardening) is present in its frequency response. We focus on the case of a resonant accelerometer sensing cell, consisting of a nonlinear clamped-clamped beam with electrostatic actuation and detection, maintained in an oscillation state with pulses of electrostatic force that are delivered whenever the detected signal (the position of the beam) crosses zero. We show that the proposed feedback scheme ensures the stability of the motion of the beam much beyond the critical Duffing amplitude and that, if the parameters of the beam are correctly chosen, one can achieve almost full-gap travel range without incurring electrostatic pull-in. These results are illustrated and validated with transient simulations of the nonlinear closed-loop system.

  1. Large amplitude nuclear collective motion and the quantized ATDHF theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Provoost, D.

    1986-03-01

    It is the aim of the present work to present some numerical results obtained within the ATDHF formalism. Both approaches have been considered, the construction of the collective Hamiltonian as well as the solution of the Griffin-Hill-Wheeler equation, both using the ATDHF collective path. We show that a fully selfconsistent microscopic description of nuclear phemomena using general many-body techniques can be treated on the numerical level. We considered several different systems to indicate as much as possible the present possibilities and limits of the theory as well as of the numerical techniques. (orig./HSI)

  2. Theoretical research in nuclear structure and nuclear collective motion: Progress report for the period March 1, 1988--February 29, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the following topics: Large amplitude collective motion; Boson mappings of shell model algebras; Semiclassical approximations, TDHF, and heavy ion scattering; New approach to effective interactions; and Bound states in quantum electrodynamics

  3. Detection of cardiac wall motion defects with combined amplitude/phase analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacharach, S.L.; Green, M.V.; Bonow, R.O.; Pace, L.; Brunetti, A.; Larson, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    Fourier phase images have been used with some success to detect and quantify left ventricular (LV) wall motion defects. In abnormal regions of the LV, wall motion asynchronies often cause the time activity curve (TAC) to be shifted in phase. Such regional shifts are detected by analysis of the distribution function of phase values over the LV. However, not all wall motion defects result in detectable regional phase abnormalities. Such abnormalities may cause a reduction in the magnitude of contraction (and hence TAC amplitude) without any appreciable change in TAC shape(and hence phase). In an attempt to improve the sensitivity of the Fourier phase method for the detection of wall motion defects the authors analyzed the distribution function of Fourier amplitude as well as phase. 26 individuals with normal cardiac function and no history of cardiac disease served as controls. The goal was to detect and quantify wall motion as compared to the consensus of 3 independent observers viewing the scintigraphic cines. 26 subjects with coronary artery disease and mild wall motion defects (22 with normal EF) were studied ate rest. They found that analysis of the skew of thew amplitude distribution function improved the sensitivity for the detection of wall motion abnormalities at rest in the group from 65% to 85% (17/26 detected by phase alone, 22/26 by combined phase and amplitude analysis) while retaining a 0 false positive rate in the normal group. The authors conclude that analysis of Fourier amplitude distribution functions can significantly increase the sensitivity of phase imaging for detection of wall motion abnormalities

  4. Large amplitude nuclear collective motion and the quantized ATDHF theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Provoost, D.

    1986-01-01

    Several nuclear systems are studied within the quantized ATDHF theory. For the α- 16 O system, after construction of the wave functions along the collective path, a collective Schroedinger equation, including quantum corrections, is derived in the Gaussian Overlap Approximation and solved for scattering and bound states. The elastic scattering cross sections agree well with experiment at low energies. An alternative possibility is to perform angular momentum projections on the wave functions and to insert the Hamilton- and normkernels in the Griffin-Hill-Wheeler equation. The widths of the resonances are extracted from the poles of the S-matrix in the complex energy plane. Good agreement is obtained for the energies of even-parity levels but the odd-parity levels are shifted in energy as compared with experiment. The origin of this discrepancy is to be found in the BKN interaction which is not able to reproduce the binding energies of α, 16 O and 20 Ne. For the α- 12 C system, with a deformed fragment, the agreement with experiment is poor. One difficulty is the problem of how to link the different paths of the different configurations which are possible for the α- 12 C system. All calculations have been performed on a three-dimensional lattice. (MCB)

  5. Time-domain hybrid method for simulating large amplitude motions of ships advancing in waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukui Liu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Typical results obtained by a newly developed, nonlinear time domain hybrid method for simulating large amplitude motions of ships advancing with constant forward speed in waves are presented. The method is hybrid in the way of combining a time-domain transient Green function method and a Rankine source method. The present approach employs a simple double integration algorithm with respect to time to simulate the free-surface boundary condition. During the simulation, the diffraction and radiation forces are computed by pressure integration over the mean wetted surface, whereas the incident wave and hydrostatic restoring forces/moments are calculated on the instantaneously wetted surface of the hull. Typical numerical results of application of the method to the seakeeping performance of a standard containership, namely the ITTC S175, are herein presented. Comparisons have been made between the results from the present method, the frequency domain 3D panel method (NEWDRIFT of NTUA-SDL and available experimental data and good agreement has been observed for all studied cases between the results of the present method and comparable other data.

  6. The time dependent Hartree-Fock-theory for collective nuclear motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeke, K.

    1976-11-01

    The time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory (TDHF) approximately solves the Schroedinger equation by a variational method in the space of the time-dependent Slater determinants. As the TDHF wave function, similar to the exact solution has the property of being determined completely for all times by the nucleon-nucleon interaction and by assuming initial conditions. TDHF is expected to describe collective motion of nuclei with large amplitudes, too. The subject of this paper is to formulate the TDHF theory and its adiabatic limiting case (ATDHF) suited for setting up a collective Schroedinger equation, to investigate the relations with other theories, and to show the applicability for solving practical problems. (orig./WL) [de

  7. Adiabatic time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory of collective motion in finite systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranger, M.; Veneroni, M.

    1978-01-01

    We show how to derive the parameters of a phenomenological collective model from a microscopic theory. The microscopic theory is Hartree-Fock, and we start from the time-dependent Hartree-Fock equation. To this we add the adiabatic approximation, which results in a collective kinetic energy quadratic in the velocities, with coefficients depending on the coordinates, as in the phenomenological models. The crucial step is the decomposition of the single-particle density matrix p in the form exp(i/sub chi/) rho/sub omicron/exp(-i/sub chi/), where rho/sub omicron/ represents a time-even Slater determinant and plays the role of coordinate. Then chi plays the role of momentum, and the adiabatic assumption is that chi is small. The energy is expanded in powers of chi, the zeroth-order being the collective potential energy. The analogy with classical mechanics is stressed and studied. The same adiabatic equations of motion are derived in three different ways (directly, from the Lagrangian, from the Hamiltonian), thus proving the consistency of the theory. The dynamical equation is not necessary for writing the energy or for the subsequent quantization which leads to a Schroedinger equation, but it must be used to check the validity of various approximation schemes, particularly to reduce the problem to a few degrees of freedom. The role of the adiabatic hypothesis, its definition, and range of validity, are analyzed in great detail. It assumes slow motion, but not small amplitude, and is therefore suitable for large-amplitude collective motion. The RPA is obtained as the limiting case where the amplitude is also small. The translational mass is correctly given, and the moment of inertia under rotation is that of Thouless and Valatin. For a quadrupole two-body force, the Baranger-Kumar formalism is recovered. The self-consistency brings additional terms to the Inglis cranking formula. Comparison is also made with generator coordinate methods

  8. Large-scale motions in the universe: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burstein, D.

    1990-01-01

    The expansion of the universe can be retarded in localised regions within the universe both by the presence of gravity and by non-gravitational motions generated in the post-recombination universe. The motions of galaxies thus generated are called 'peculiar motions', and the amplitudes, size scales and coherence of these peculiar motions are among the most direct records of the structure of the universe. As such, measurements of these properties of the present-day universe provide some of the severest tests of cosmological theories. This is a review of the current evidence for large-scale motions of galaxies out to a distance of ∼5000 km s -1 (in an expanding universe, distance is proportional to radial velocity). 'Large-scale' in this context refers to motions that are correlated over size scales larger than the typical sizes of groups of galaxies, up to and including the size of the volume surveyed. To orient the reader into this relatively new field of study, a short modern history is given together with an explanation of the terminology. Careful consideration is given to the data used to measure the distances, and hence the peculiar motions, of galaxies. The evidence for large-scale motions is presented in a graphical fashion, using only the most reliable data for galaxies spanning a wide range in optical properties and over the complete range of galactic environments. The kinds of systematic errors that can affect this analysis are discussed, and the reliability of these motions is assessed. The predictions of two models of large-scale motion are compared to the observations, and special emphasis is placed on those motions in which our own Galaxy directly partakes. (author)

  9. Finite amplitude, horizontal motion of a load symmetrically supported between isotropic hyperelastic springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Millard F; Young, Todd R

    2012-03-01

    The undamped, finite amplitude horizontal motion of a load supported symmetrically between identical incompressible, isotropic hyperelastic springs, each subjected to an initial finite uniaxial static stretch, is formulated in general terms. The small amplitude motion of the load about the deformed static state is discussed; and the periodicity of the arbitrary finite amplitude motion is established for all such elastic materials for which certain conditions on the engineering stress and the strain energy function hold. The exact solution for the finite vibration of the load is then derived for the classical neo-Hookean model. The vibrational period is obtained in terms of the complete Heuman lambda-function whose properties are well-known. Dependence of the period and hence the frequency on the physical parameters of the system is investigated and the results are displayed graphically.

  10. Large amplitude collective nuclear motion and soliton concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kartavenko, V.G.; Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna

    1993-01-01

    An application of a soliton theory methods to some nonlinear problems in low and intermediate energies (E ∼ 10--100MeV/nucleon) nucleus - nucleus collisions are presented. Linear and nonlinear excitations of the nuclear density are investigated in the framework of nuclear hydrodynamics. The problem of dynamical instability and clusterization phenomena in a breakup of excited nuclear systems are considered from the points of view of a soliton concept

  11. Survey of large-amplitude flapping motions in the midtail current sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Sergeev

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available We surveyed fast current sheet crossings (flapping motions over the distance range 10–30 RE in the magnetotail covered by the Geotail spacecraft. Since the local tilts of these dynamic sheets are large and variable in these events, we compare three different methods of evaluating current sheet normals using 4-s/c Cluster data and define the success criteria for the single-spacecraft-based method (MVA to obtain the reliable results. Then, after identifying more than ~1100 fast CS crossings over a 3-year period of Geotail observations in 1997–1999, we address their parameters, spatial distribution and activity dependence. We confirm that over the entire distance covered and LT bins, fast crossings have considerable tilts in the YZ plane (from estimated MVA normals which show a preferential appearance of one (YZ kink-like mode that is responsible for these severe current sheet perturbations. Their occurrence is highly inhomogeneous; it sharply increases with radial distance and has a peak in the tail center (with some duskward shift, resembling the occurrence of the BBFs, although there is no one-to-one local correspondence between these two phenomena. The crossing durations typically spread around 1 min and decrease significantly where the high-speed flows are registered. Based on an AE index superposed epoch study, the flapping motions prefer to appear during the substorm expansion phase, although a considerable number of events without any electrojet and auroral activity were also observed. We also present statistical distributions of other parameters and briefly discuss what could be possible mechanisms to generate the flapping motions.

  12. Cosmophysical Factors in the Fluctuation Amplitude Spectrum of Brownian Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaminsky A. V.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Phenomenon of the regular variability of the fine structure of the fluctuation in the amplitude distributions (shapes of related histograms for the case of Brownian motion was investigated. We took an advantage of the dynamic light scattering method (DLS to get a stochastically fluctuated signal determined by Brownian motion. Shape of the histograms is most likely to vary, synchronous, in two proximally located independent cells containing Brownian particles. The synchronism persists in the cells distant at 2m from each other, and positioned meridionally. With a parallel-wise positioning of the cells, high probability of the synchronous variation in the shape of the histograms by local time has been observed. This result meets the previous conclusion about the dependency of histogram shapes ("fluctuation amplitudes" of the spectra of stochastic processes upon rotation of the Earth.

  13. Toward yrast spectroscopy in soft vibrational nuclei. A microscopic theory of the large amplitude collective motion of soft nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marumori, Toshio; Kuriyama, Atsushi; Sakata, Fumihiko

    1980-01-01

    In a formally parallel way with that exciting progress has been recently achieved in understanding the yrast spectra of the rotational nuclei in terms of the quasi-particle motion in the rotating frame, an attempt to understand the yrast spectra of the vibrational nuclei in terms of the quasi-particle motion is proposed. The essential idea is to introduce the quasi-particle motion in a generalized vibrating frame, which can be regarded as a rotating frame in the gauge space of 'physical' phonons where the number of the physical phonons plays the role of the angular momentum. On the basis of a simple fundamental principle called as the 'invariance principle of the Schroedinger equation', which leads us to the 'maximal decoupling' between the physical phonon and the intrinsic modes, it is shown that the vibrational frame as well as the physical-phonon-number operator represented by the quasi-particles can be self-consistently determined. A new scope toward the yrast spectroscopy of the vibrational nuclei in terms of the quasi-particle motion is discussed

  14. Large amplitude ion-acoustic solitons in dusty plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, R. S.; Jain, S. L.; Mishra, M. K.

    2011-01-01

    Characteristics of ion-acoustic soliton in dusty plasma, including the dynamics of heavily charged massive dust grains, are investigated following the Sagdeev Potential formalism. Retaining fourth order nonlinearities of electric potential in the expansion of the Sagdeev Potential in the energy equation for a pseudo particle and integrating the resulting energy equation, large amplitude soliton solution is determined. Variation of amplitude (A), half width (W) at half maxima and the product P = AW 2 of the Korteweg-deVries (KdV), dressed and large amplitude soliton as a function of wide range of dust concentration are numerically studied for recently observed parameters of dusty plasmas. We have also presented the region of existence of large amplitude ion-acoustic soliton in the dusty plasma by analyzing the structure of the pseudo potential. It is found that in the presence of positively charged dust grains, system supports only compressive solitons, on the other hand, in the presence of negatively charged dust grains, the system supports compressive solitons up to certain critical concentration of dust grains and above this critical concentration, the system can support rarefactive solitons also. The effects of dust concentration, charge, and mass of the dust grains, on the characteristics of KdV, dressed and large amplitude the soliton, i.e., amplitude (A), half width at half maxima (W), and product of amplitude (A) and half width at half maxima (P = AW 2 ), are discussed in detail

  15. Dephasing due to Nuclear Spins in Large-Amplitude Electric Dipole Spin Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesi, Stefano; Yang, Li-Ping; Loss, Daniel

    2016-02-12

    We analyze effects of the hyperfine interaction on electric dipole spin resonance when the amplitude of the quantum-dot motion becomes comparable or larger than the quantum dot's size. Away from the well-known small-drive regime, the important role played by transverse nuclear fluctuations leads to a Gaussian decay with characteristic dependence on drive strength and detuning. A characterization of spin-flip gate fidelity, in the presence of such additional drive-dependent dephasing, shows that vanishingly small errors can still be achieved at sufficiently large amplitudes. Based on our theory, we analyze recent electric dipole spin resonance experiments relying on spin-orbit interactions or the slanting field of a micromagnet. We find that such experiments are already in a regime with significant effects of transverse nuclear fluctuations and the form of decay of the Rabi oscillations can be reproduced well by our theory.

  16. Jump phenomena. [large amplitude responses of nonlinear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, E. L.

    1980-01-01

    The paper considers jump phenomena composed of large amplitude responses of nonlinear systems caused by small amplitude disturbances. Physical problems where large jumps in the solution amplitude are important features of the response are described, including snap buckling of elastic shells, chemical reactions leading to combustion and explosion, and long-term climatic changes of the earth's atmosphere. A new method of rational functions was then developed which consists of representing the solutions of the jump problems as rational functions of the small disturbance parameter; this method can solve jump problems explicitly.

  17. Competition Between Two Large-Amplitude Motion Models: New Hybrid Hamiltonian Versus Old Pure-Tunneling Hamiltonian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiner, Isabelle; Hougen, Jon T.

    2017-06-01

    In this talk we report on our progress in trying to make the hybrid Hamiltonian competitive with the pure-tunneling Hamiltonian for treating large-amplitude motions in methylamine. A treatment using the pure-tunneling model has the advantages of: (i) requiring relatively little computer time, (ii) working with relatively uncorrelated fitting parameters, and (iii) yielding in the vast majority of cases fits to experimental measurement accuracy. These advantages are all illustrated in the work published this past year on a gigantic v_{t} = 1 data set for the torsional fundamental band in methyl amine. A treatment using the hybrid model has the advantages of: (i) being able to carry out a global fit involving both v_{t} = 0 and v_{t} = 1 energy levels and (ii) working with fitting parameters that have a clearer physical interpretation. Unfortunately, a treatment using the hybrid model has the great disadvantage of requiring a highly correlated set of fitting parameters to achieve reasonable fitting accuracy, which complicates the search for a good set of molecular fitting parameters and a fit to experimental accuracy. At the time of writing this abstract, we have been able to carry out a fit with J up to 15 that includes all available infrared data in the v_{t} = 1-0 torsional fundamental band, all ground-state microwave data with K up to 10 and J up to 15, and about a hundred microwave lines within the v_{t} = 1 torsional state, achieving weighted root-mean-square (rms) deviations of about 1.4, 2.8, and 4.2 for these three categories of data. We will give an update of this situation at the meeting. I. Gulaczyk, M. Kreglewski, V.-M. Horneman, J. Mol. Spectrosc., in Press (2017).

  18. Recent progress in the microscopic description of small and large amplitude collective motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacroix, D., E-mail: lacroix@ipno.in2p3.fr; Tanimura, Y. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, IN2P3-CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Ayik, S. [Physics Department, Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, Tennessee 38505 (United States); Scamps, G. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Simenel, C. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 2601 (Australia); Yilmaz, B. [Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences, Ankara University, 06100, Ankara (Turkey)

    2015-10-15

    Dynamical mean-field theory has recently attracted much interests to provide a unified framework for the description of many aspects of nuclear dynamics [1, 2, 3, 4, 5] (for recent reviews see [6, 7]). In particular, the inclusion of pairing correlation has opened new perspectives [8, 9, 10, 11, 12]. A summary of recent applications including giant resonances and transfer reactions will be made in this talk [13, 14, 15, 16]. While new progresses have been made with the use of sophisticated effective interactions and the development of symmetry unrestricted applications, mean-field dynamics suffer from the poor treatment of quantum fluctuations in collective space. As a consequence, these theories are successful in describing average properties of many different experimental observations but generally fail to account realistically for the width of experimental distribution. The increase of predictive power of dynamical mean-field theory is facing the difficulty of going beyond the independent particle or quasi-particle picture. Nevertheless, in the last decade, novel methods have been proposed to prepare the next generation of microscopic mean-field codes able to account for both average properties and fluctuations around the average. A review of recent progresses in this direction as well as recent applications to heavy-ion collisions will be given [17, 18].

  19. Nonlinear model and attitude dynamics of flexible spacecraft with large amplitude slosh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Mingle; Yue, Baozeng

    2017-04-01

    This paper is focused on the nonlinearly modelling and attitude dynamics of spacecraft coupled with large amplitude liquid sloshing dynamics and flexible appendage vibration. The large amplitude fuel slosh dynamics is included by using an improved moving pulsating ball model. The moving pulsating ball model is an equivalent mechanical model that is capable of imitating the whole liquid reorientation process. A modification is introduced in the capillary force computation in order to more precisely estimate the settling location of liquid in microgravity or zero-g environment. The flexible appendage is modelled as a three dimensional Bernoulli-Euler beam and the assumed modal method is employed to derive the nonlinear mechanical model for the overall coupled system of liquid filled spacecraft with appendage. The attitude maneuver is implemented by the momentum transfer technique, and a feedback controller is designed. The simulation results show that the liquid sloshing can always result in nutation behavior, but the effect of flexible deformation of appendage depends on the amplitude and direction of attitude maneuver performed by spacecraft. Moreover, it is found that the liquid sloshing and the vibration of flexible appendage are coupled with each other, and the coupling becomes more significant with more rapid motion of spacecraft. This study reveals that the appendage's flexibility has influence on the liquid's location and settling time in microgravity. The presented nonlinear system model can provide an important reference for the overall design of the modern spacecraft composed of rigid platform, liquid filled tank and flexible appendage.

  20. Ground motion: frequency of occurrence versus amplitude of disturbing transient events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, K.L.

    1983-01-01

    Successful collider operation requires that ground motion not exceed certain tolerances. In this note it is pointed out that on occasion these tolerances are exceeded. The frequency of such events and their amplitudes, measured as a function of time of day, have been measured. An examination of the data leads one to conclude that most events are of cultural (i.e., man-made) origin. 2 references, 20 figures

  1. SU-E-J-115: Correlation of Displacement Vector Fields Calculated by Deformable Image Registration Algorithms with Motion Parameters of CT Images with Well-Defined Targets and Controlled-Motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaskowiak, J; Ahmad, S; Ali, I [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Alsbou, N [Ohio Northern University, Ada, OH (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate correlation of displacement vector fields (DVF) calculated by deformable image registration algorithms with motion parameters in helical axial and cone-beam CT images with motion artifacts. Methods: A mobile thorax phantom with well-known targets with different sizes that were made from water-equivalent material and inserted in foam to simulate lung lesions. The thorax phantom was imaged with helical, axial and cone-beam CT. The phantom was moved with a cyclic motion with different motion amplitudes and frequencies along the superior-inferior direction. Different deformable image registration algorithms including demons, fast demons, Horn-Shunck and iterative-optical-flow from the DIRART software were used to deform CT images for the phantom with different motion patterns. The CT images of the mobile phantom were deformed to CT images of the stationary phantom. Results: The values of displacement vectors calculated by deformable image registration algorithm correlated strongly with motion amplitude where large displacement vectors were calculated for CT images with large motion amplitudes. For example, the maximal displacement vectors were nearly equal to the motion amplitudes (5mm, 10mm or 20mm) at interfaces between the mobile targets lung tissue, while the minimal displacement vectors were nearly equal to negative the motion amplitudes. The maximal and minimal displacement vectors matched with edges of the blurred targets along the Z-axis (motion-direction), while DVF’s were small in the other directions. This indicates that the blurred edges by phantom motion were shifted largely to match with the actual target edge. These shifts were nearly equal to the motion amplitude. Conclusions: The DVF from deformable-image registration algorithms correlated well with motion amplitude of well-defined mobile targets. This can be used to extract motion parameters such as amplitude. However, as motion amplitudes increased, image artifacts increased

  2. Quasielastic neutron scattering study of large amplitude motions in molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bee, M.

    1996-01-01

    This lecture aims at giving some illustrations of the use of Incoherent Quasielastic Neutron Scattering in the investigation of motions of atoms or molecules in phases with dynamical disorder. The general incoherent scattering function is first recalled. Then the Elastic Incoherent Structure Factor is introduced. It is shown how its determination permits to deduce a particular dynamical model. Long-range translational diffusion is illustrated by some experiments carried out with liquids or with different chemical species intercalated in porous media. Examples of rotational motions are provided by solid phases where an orientational disorder of the molecules exists. The jump model is the most commonly used and yields simple scattering laws which can be easily handled. Highly disordered crystals require a description in terms of the isotropic rotational diffusion model. Many of the present studies are concerned with rather complicated systems. Considerable help is obtained either by using selectively deuterated samples or by carrying out measurements with semi-oriented samples. (author) 5 figs., 14 refs

  3. Collective motion in behaviorally heterogeneous systems

    OpenAIRE

    Copenhagen, Katherine

    2017-01-01

    Collective motion is a widespread phenomenon in nature where individuals actively propel themselves, gather together and move as a group. Some examples of collective motion are bird flocks, fish schools, bacteria swarms, cell clusters, and crowds of people. Many models seek to understand the effects of activity in collective systems including things such as environmental disorder, density, and interaction details primarily at infinite size limits and with uniform populations. In this disserta...

  4. Weak decay amplitudes in large N/sub c/ QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardeen, W.A.

    1988-10-01

    A systematic analysis of nonleptonic decay amplitudes is presented using the large N/sub c/ expansion of quantum chromodynamics. In the K-meson system, this analysis is applied to the calculation of the weak decay amplitudes, weak mixing and CP violation. 10 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Fault-tolerant quantum cryptographic protocols with collective detection over the collective amplitude damping channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Wei; Su, Qi; Li, Yan-Bing; Sun, Ying

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a quantum key distribution (QKD) protocol, which can be immune to collective amplitude damping noise, is proposed with collective detection strategy. Then a multi-party quantum secret sharing (MQSS) protocol and a quantum private comparison (QPC) protocol are introduced as two applications of the proposed QKD protocol. Except for one participant who is responsible for preparing and measuring quantum states, the rest of the users in each of these protocols only need to perform certain unitary operations due to the utilization of collective detection. Therefore, in addition to the advantage of being secure against collective amplitude damping noise, the proposed protocols still have the advantages of higher qubit efficiency and lower cost for implementation. Moreover, the security of these protocols is guaranteed by theorems on quantum operation discrimination. (papers)

  6. Large amplitude waves and fields in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelis, U. de; Naples Univ.

    1990-02-01

    In this review, based mostly on the results of the recent workshop on ''Large Amplitude Waves and Fields in Plasmas'' held at ICTP (Trieste, Italy) in May 1989 during the Spring College on Plasma Physics, I will mostly concentrate on underdense, cold, homogeneous plasmas, discussing some of the alternative (to fusion) uses of laser-plasma interaction. In Part I an outline of some basic non-linear processes is given, together with some recent experimental results. The processes are chosen because of their relevance to the applications or because new interesting developments have been reported at the ICTP workshop (or both). In Part II the excitation mechanisms and uses of large amplitude plasma waves are presented: these include phase-conjugation in plasmas, plasma based accelerators (beat-wave, plasma wake-field and laser wake-field), plasma lenses and plasma wigglers for Free Electron Lasers. (author)

  7. Analysis of Lung Tumor Motion in a Large Sample: Patterns and Factors Influencing Precise Delineation of Internal Target Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knybel, Lukas [Department of Oncology, University Hospital Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic); VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic); Cvek, Jakub, E-mail: Jakub.cvek@fno.cz [Department of Oncology, University Hospital Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic); Molenda, Lukas; Stieberova, Natalie; Feltl, David [Department of Oncology, University Hospital Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose/Objective: To evaluate lung tumor motion during respiration and to describe factors affecting the range and variability of motion in patients treated with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Log file analysis from online respiratory tumor tracking was performed in 145 patients. Geometric tumor location in the lungs, tumor volume and origin (primary or metastatic), sex, and tumor motion amplitudes in the superior-inferior (SI), latero-lateral (LL), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions were recorded. Tumor motion variability during treatment was described using intrafraction/interfraction amplitude variability and tumor motion baseline changes. Tumor movement dependent on the tumor volume, position and origin, and sex were evaluated using statistical regression and correlation analysis. Results: After analysis of >500 hours of data, the highest rates of motion amplitudes, intrafraction/interfraction variation, and tumor baseline changes were in the SI direction (6.0 ± 2.2 mm, 2.2 ± 1.8 mm, 1.1 ± 0.9 mm, and −0.1 ± 2.6 mm). The mean motion amplitudes in the lower/upper geometric halves of the lungs were significantly different (P<.001). Motion amplitudes >15 mm were observed only in the lower geometric quarter of the lungs. Higher tumor motion amplitudes generated higher intrafraction variations (R=.86, P<.001). Interfraction variations and baseline changes >3 mm indicated tumors contacting mediastinal structures or parietal pleura. On univariate analysis, neither sex nor tumor origin (primary vs metastatic) was an independent predictive factor of different movement patterns. Metastatic lesions in women, but not men, showed significantly higher mean amplitudes (P=.03) and variability (primary, 2.7 mm; metastatic, 4.9 mm; P=.002) than primary tumors. Conclusion: Online tracking showed significant irregularities in lung tumor movement during respiration. Motion amplitude was significantly lower in upper lobe

  8. Spectroscopic identification of ethanol-water conformers by large-amplitude hydrogen bond librational modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jonas; Heimdal, J.; Larsen, René Wugt

    2015-01-01

    ⋯HO hydrogen bond acceptor in the two most stable conformations. In the most stable conformation, the water subunit forces the ethanol molecule into its less stable gauche configuration upon dimerization owing to a cooperative secondary weak O⋯HC hydrogen bondinteraction evidenced by a significantly blue......-shift of the low-frequency in-plane donor OH librational band origin. The strong correlation between the low-frequency in-plane donor OH librational motion and the secondary intermolecular O⋯HC hydrogen bond is demonstrated by electronic structure calculations. The experimental findings are further supported...... by CCSD(T)-F12/aug-cc-pVQZ calculations of the conformationalenergy differences together with second-order vibrational perturbation theory calculations of the large-amplitude donor OH librational band origins....

  9. Analysis of Lung Tumor Motion in a Large Sample: Patterns and Factors Influencing Precise Delineation of Internal Target Volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knybel, Lukas; Cvek, Jakub; Molenda, Lukas; Stieberova, Natalie; Feltl, David

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To evaluate lung tumor motion during respiration and to describe factors affecting the range and variability of motion in patients treated with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Log file analysis from online respiratory tumor tracking was performed in 145 patients. Geometric tumor location in the lungs, tumor volume and origin (primary or metastatic), sex, and tumor motion amplitudes in the superior-inferior (SI), latero-lateral (LL), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions were recorded. Tumor motion variability during treatment was described using intrafraction/interfraction amplitude variability and tumor motion baseline changes. Tumor movement dependent on the tumor volume, position and origin, and sex were evaluated using statistical regression and correlation analysis. Results: After analysis of >500 hours of data, the highest rates of motion amplitudes, intrafraction/interfraction variation, and tumor baseline changes were in the SI direction (6.0 ± 2.2 mm, 2.2 ± 1.8 mm, 1.1 ± 0.9 mm, and −0.1 ± 2.6 mm). The mean motion amplitudes in the lower/upper geometric halves of the lungs were significantly different (P 15 mm were observed only in the lower geometric quarter of the lungs. Higher tumor motion amplitudes generated higher intrafraction variations (R=.86, P 3 mm indicated tumors contacting mediastinal structures or parietal pleura. On univariate analysis, neither sex nor tumor origin (primary vs metastatic) was an independent predictive factor of different movement patterns. Metastatic lesions in women, but not men, showed significantly higher mean amplitudes (P=.03) and variability (primary, 2.7 mm; metastatic, 4.9 mm; P=.002) than primary tumors. Conclusion: Online tracking showed significant irregularities in lung tumor movement during respiration. Motion amplitude was significantly lower in upper lobe tumors; higher interfraction amplitude variability indicated tumors in contact

  10. On the role of memory effects for dissipation and diffusion in slow collective nuclear motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassing, W.; Noerenberg, W.

    1983-01-01

    The energy dissipation in slow collective nuclear motion is viewed as a combined effect of a diabatic production of particle-hole excitations, leading to a conservative storage of collective energy, and a subsequent equilibration due to residual two-body collisions. The effective equation of motion for the collective degree of freedom turns out to be nonlocal in time due to the large mean free path of the nucleons and allows for a simultaneous description of two different attitudes of nuclear matter. The elastic response of heavy nuclei for ''fast'' collective motion switches over to pure friction for very slow collective motion. The time development of the fluctuations in the velocities may show oscillations for times comparable to the local equilibration time and hence, is qualitatively different from the classical limit. A first application of the diabatic dynamical approach is made for the quadrupole motion within a diabatic deformed harmonic oscillator basis. (orig.)

  11. Formation of large-amplitude dust ion-acoustic shocks in dusty plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliasson, B.; Shukla, P.K.

    2005-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical studies of self-steepening and shock formation of large-amplitude dust ion-acoustic waves in dusty plasmas are presented. A comparison is made between the nondispersive two fluid model, which predicts the formation of large-amplitude compressive and rarefactive dust ion-acoustic shocks, Vlasov simulations, and recent laboratory experiments

  12. Damping and Frequency Shift of Large Amplitude Electron Plasma Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kenneth; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1983-01-01

    The initial evolution of large-amplitude one-dimensional electron waves is investigated by applying a numerical simulation. The initial wave damping is found to be strongly enhanced relative to the linear damping and it increases with increasing amplitude. The temporal evolution of the nonlinear...

  13. The exact equation of motion of a simple pendulum of arbitrary amplitude: a hypergeometric approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, M I; Rafat, M; Azad, S Ismail

    2010-01-01

    The motion of a simple pendulum of arbitrary amplitude is usually treated by approximate methods. By using generalized hypergeometric functions, it is however possible to solve the problem exactly. In this paper, we provide the exact equation of motion of a simple pendulum of arbitrary amplitude. A new and exact expression for the time of swinging of a simple pendulum from the vertical position to an arbitrary angular position θ is given by equation (3.10). The time period of such a pendulum is also exactly expressible in terms of hypergeometric functions. The exact expressions thus obtained are used to plot the graphs that compare the exact time period T(θ 0 ) with the time period T(0) (based on simple harmonic approximation). We also compare the relative difference between T(0) and T(θ 0 ) found from the exact equation of motion with the usual perturbation theory estimate. The treatment is intended for graduate students, who have acquired some familiarity with the hypergeometric functions. This approach may also be profitably used by specialists who encounter during their investigations nonlinear differential equations similar in form to the pendulum equation. Such nonlinear differential equations could arise in diverse fields, such as acoustic vibrations, oscillations in small molecules, turbulence and electronic filters, among others.

  14. Locust Collective Motion and Its Modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Ariel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, technological advances in experimental and animal tracking techniques have motivated a renewed theoretical interest in animal collective motion and, in particular, locust swarming. This review offers a comprehensive biological background followed by comparative analysis of recent models of locust collective motion, in particular locust marching, their settings, and underlying assumptions. We describe a wide range of recent modeling and simulation approaches, from discrete agent-based models of self-propelled particles to continuous models of integro-differential equations, aimed at describing and analyzing the fascinating phenomenon of locust collective motion. These modeling efforts have a dual role: The first views locusts as a quintessential example of animal collective motion. As such, they aim at abstraction and coarse-graining, often utilizing the tools of statistical physics. The second, which originates from a more biological perspective, views locust swarming as a scientific problem of its own exceptional merit. The main goal should, thus, be the analysis and prediction of natural swarm dynamics. We discuss the properties of swarm dynamics using the tools of statistical physics, as well as the implications for laboratory experiments and natural swarms. Finally, we stress the importance of a combined-interdisciplinary, biological-theoretical effort in successfully confronting the challenges that locusts pose at both the theoretical and practical levels.

  15. Dissipation and nuclear collective motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, Helmut; Jensen, A.S.; Ngo, Christian; Siemens, P.J.; California Univ., Berkeley

    1979-01-01

    This contribution is intended to give a brief summary of a forthcoming paper which shall review extensively the linear response theory for dissipation and statistical fluctuations as well as its application to heavy-ion collisions. It shall contain new results on the following subjects: numerical computations of response functions and transport coefficients; dissipation in a self-consistent treatment of harmonic vibrations; introduction of collective variables within a quantum theory. The method used consists of an extended version of the Bohm and Pines treatment of the electron gas. It allows to deduce a quantum Hamiltonian for the collective and intrinsic motion including coupling terms; discussion and solution of a quantal Master equation for non-linear collective motion. Additionally, a somewhat elaborate discussion of the problems of irreversibility is given, especially in connection to a treatment within the moving basis

  16. Frustration-guided motion planning reveals conformational transitions in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budday, Dominik; Fonseca, Rasmus; Leyendecker, Sigrid; van den Bedem, Henry

    2017-10-01

    Proteins exist as conformational ensembles, exchanging between substates to perform their function. Advances in experimental techniques yield unprecedented access to structural snapshots of their conformational landscape. However, computationally modeling how proteins use collective motions to transition between substates is challenging owing to a rugged landscape and large energy barriers. Here, we present a new, robotics-inspired motion planning procedure called dCC-RRT that navigates the rugged landscape between substates by introducing dynamic, interatomic constraints to modulate frustration. The constraints balance non-native contacts and flexibility, and instantaneously redirect the motion towards sterically favorable conformations. On a test set of eight proteins determined in two conformations separated by, on average, 7.5 Å root mean square deviation (RMSD), our pathways reduced the Cα atom RMSD to the goal conformation by 78%, outperforming peer methods. We then applied dCC-RRT to examine how collective, small-scale motions of four side-chains in the active site of cyclophilin A propagate through the protein. dCC-RRT uncovered a spatially contiguous network of residues linked by steric interactions and collective motion connecting the active site to a recently proposed, non-canonical capsid binding site 25 Å away, rationalizing NMR and multi-temperature crystallography experiments. In all, dCC-RRT can reveal detailed, all-atom molecular mechanisms for small and large amplitude motions. Source code and binaries are freely available at https://github.com/ExcitedStates/KGS/. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Application of the adiabatic self-consistent collective coordinate method to a solvable model of prolate-oblate shape coexistence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayasi, Masato; Matsuyanagi, Kenichi; Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Matsuo, Masayuki

    2003-01-01

    The adiabatic self-consistent collective coordinate method is applied to an exactly solvable multi-O(4) model that is designed to describe nuclear shape coexistence phenomena. The collective mass and dynamics of large amplitude collective motion in this model system are analyzed, and it is shown that the method yields a faithful description of tunneling motion through a barrier between the prolate and oblate local minima in the collective potential. The emergence of the doublet pattern is clearly described. (author)

  18. Superposed epoch analysis applied to large-amplitude travelling convection vortices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Lühr

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available For the six months from 1 October 1993 to 1 April 1994 the recordings of the IMAGE magnetometer network have been surveyed in a search for large-amplitude travelling convection vortices (TCVs. The restriction to large amplitudes (>100 nT was chosen to ensure a proper detection of evens also during times of high activity. Readings of all stations of the northern half of the IMAGE network were employed to check the consistency of the ground signature with the notation of a dual-vortex structure moving in an azimuthal direction. Applying these stringent selection criteria we detected a total of 19 clear TCV events. The statistical properties of our selection resemble the expected characteristics of large-amplitude TCVs. New and unexpected results emerged from the superposed epoch analysis. TCVs tend to form during quiet intervals embedded in moderately active periods. The occurrence of events is not randomly distributed but rather shows a clustering around a few days. These clusters recur once or twice every 27 days. Within a storm cycle they show up five to seven days after the commencement. With regard to solar wind conditions, we see the events occurring in the middle of the IMF sector structure. Large-amplitude TCVs seem to require certain conditions to make solar wind transients 'geoeffective', which have the tendency to recur with the solar rotation period.Key words. Ionosphere (Aural ionosphere; Ionosphere- magnetosphere interactions · Magnetospheric Physics (current system

  19. Light Diffraction by Large Amplitude Ultrasonic Waves in Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Laszlo; Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    2016-01-01

    Light diffraction from ultrasound, which can be used to investigate nonlinear acoustic phenomena in liquids, is reported for wave amplitudes larger than that typically reported in the literature. Large amplitude waves result in waveform distortion due to the nonlinearity of the medium that generates harmonics and produces asymmetries in the light diffraction pattern. For standing waves with amplitudes above a threshold value, subharmonics are generated in addition to the harmonics and produce additional diffraction orders of the incident light. With increasing drive amplitude above the threshold a cascade of period-doubling subharmonics are generated, terminating in a region characterized by a random, incoherent (chaotic) diffraction pattern. To explain the experimental results a toy model is introduced, which is derived from traveling wave solutions of the nonlinear wave equation corresponding to the fundamental and second harmonic standing waves. The toy model reduces the nonlinear partial differential equation to a mathematically more tractable nonlinear ordinary differential equation. The model predicts the experimentally observed cascade of period-doubling subharmonics terminating in chaos that occurs with increasing drive amplitudes above the threshold value. The calculated threshold amplitude is consistent with the value estimated from the experimental data.

  20. The strong motion amplitudes from Himalayan earthquakes and a pilot study for the deterministic first order microzonation of Delhi City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvez, Imtiyaz A.; Panza, G.F.; Gusev, A.A.; Vaccari, F.

    2001-09-01

    The interdependence among the strong-motion amplitude, earthquake magnitude and hypocentral distance has been established (Parvez et al. 2001) for the Himalayan region using the dataset of six earthquakes, two from Western and four from Eastern Himalayas (M w =5.2-7.2) recorded by strong-motion networks in the Himalayas. The level of the peak strong motion amplitudes in the Eastern Himalayas is three fold larger than that in the Western Himalayas, in terms of both peak acceleration and peak velocities. In the present study, we include the strong motion data of Chamoli earthquake (M w =6.5) of 1999 from the western sub-region to see whether this event supports the regional effects and we find that the new result fits well with our earlier prediction in the Western Himalayas. The minimum estimates of peak acceleration for the epicentral zone of M w =7.5-8.5 events is A peak =0.25-0.4 g for the Western Himalayas and as large as A peak =1.0-1.6 g for the Eastern Himalayas. Similarly, the expected minimum epicentral values of V peak for M w =8 are 35 cm/s for Western and 112 cm/s for Eastern Himalayas. The presence of unusually high levels of epicentral amplitudes for the eastern subregion also agrees well with the macroseismic evidence (Parvez et al. 2001). Therefore, these results represent systematic regional effects, and may be considered as a basis for future regionalized seismic hazard assessment in the Himalayan region. Many metropolitan and big cities of India are situated in the severe hazard zone just south of the Himalayas. A detailed microzonation study of these sprawling urban centres is therefore urgently required for gaining a better understanding of ground motion and site effects in these cities. An example of the study of site effects and microzonation of a part of metropolitan Delhi is presented based on a detailed modelling along a NS cross sections from the Inter State Bus Terminal (ISBT) to Sewanagar. Full synthetic strong motion waveforms have been

  1. Large Amplitude Oscillatory Extension of Soft Polymeric Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bejenariu, Anca Gabriela; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2010-01-01

    sing a filament stretching rheometer (FSR) surrounded by a thermostatic chamber and equipped with a micrometric laser it is possible to measure large amplitude oscillatory elongation (LAOE) on elastomeric based networks with no base flow as in the LAOE method for polymer melts. Poly(dimethylsilox...

  2. Large amplitude ion-acoustic waves in a plasma with an electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nejoh, Y.; Sanuki, H.

    1995-01-01

    The nonlinear wave structures of large amplitude ion-acoustic waves are studied in a plasma with an electron beam, by the pseudopotential method. The region of the existence of large amplitude ion-acoustic waves is examined, showing that the condition of the existence sensitively depends on the parameters such as the electron beam temperature, the ion temperature, the electrostatic potential, and the concentration of the electron beam density. It turns out that the region of the existence spreads as the beam temperature increases but the effect of the electron beam velocity is relatively small. New findings of large amplitude ion-acoustic waves in a plasma with an electron beam are predicted. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  3. The two Josephson junction flux qubit with large tunneling amplitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shnurkov, V.I.; Soroka, A.A.; Mel'nik, S.I.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we discuss solid-state nanoelectronic realizations of Josephson flux qubits with large tunneling amplitude between the two macroscopic states. The latter can be controlled via the height and form of the potential barrier, which is determined by quantum-state engineering of the flux qubit circuit. The simplest circuit of the flux qubit is a superconducting loop interrupted by a Josephson nanoscale tunnel junction. The tunneling amplitude between two macroscopically different states can be increased substantially by engineering of the qubit circuit if the tunnel junction is replaced by a ScS contact. However, only Josephson tunnel junctions are particularly suitable for large-scale integration circuits and quantum detectors with present-day technology. To overcome this difficulty we consider here a flux qubit with high energy-level separation between the 'ground' and 'excited' states, consisting of a superconducting loop with two low-capacitance Josephson tunnel junctions in series. We demonstrate that for real parameters of resonant superposition between the two macroscopic states the tunneling amplitude can reach values greater than 1 K. Analytical results for the tunneling amplitude obtained within the semiclassical approximation by the instanton technique show good correlation with a numerical solution

  4. Very low luminosity stars with very large amplitude flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, B.E.

    1990-01-01

    CCD frames of CZ Cnc, KY Cep, the gamma-ray burster optical transient, and NSV 12006 are analyzed. Also studied are 549 archival photographic plates of the CZ Cnc field. These observations are compared with the data of Lovas (1976). Flare events on CZ Cnc are examined. Based on the data it is noted that CZ Cnc is a main-sequence star, has a magnitude of 16.1, a distance of 100 pc, occasional large-amplitude flares, and frequent flares with amplitudes greater than 4 mag. 36 refs

  5. Two-level systems driven by large-amplitude fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nori, F.; Ashhab, S.; Johansson, J. R.; Zagoskin, A. M.

    2009-03-01

    We analyze the dynamics of a two-level system subject to driving by large-amplitude external fields, focusing on the resonance properties in the case of driving around the region of avoided level crossing. In particular, we consider three main questions that characterize resonance dynamics: (1) the resonance condition, (2) the frequency of the resulting oscillations on resonance, and (3) the width of the resonance. We identify the regions of validity of different approximations. In a large region of the parameter space, we use a geometric picture in order to obtain both a simple understanding of the dynamics and quantitative results. The geometric approach is obtained by dividing the evolution into discrete time steps, with each time step described by either a phase shift on the basis states or a coherent mixing process corresponding to a Landau-Zener crossing. We compare the results of the geometric picture with those of a rotating wave approximation. We also comment briefly on the prospects of employing strong driving as a useful tool to manipulate two-level systems. S. Ashhab, J.R. Johansson, A.M. Zagoskin, F. Nori, Two-level systems driven by large-amplitude fields, Phys. Rev. A 75, 063414 (2007). S. Ashhab et al, unpublished.

  6. Concept of a collective subspace associated with the invariance principle of the Schroedinger equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marumori, Toshio; Hayashi, Akihisa; Tomoda, Toshiaki; Kuriyama, Atsushi; Maskawa, Toshihide

    1980-01-01

    The aim of this series of papers is to propose a microscopic theory to go beyond the situations where collective motions are described by the random phase approximation, i.e., by small amplitude harmonic oscillations about equilibrium. The theory is thus appropriate for the microscopic description of the large amplitude collective motion of soft nuclei. The essential idea is to develop a method to determine the collective subspace (or submanifold) in the many-particle Hilbert space in an optimal way, on the basis of a fundamental principle called the invariance principle of the Schroedinger equation. By using the principle within the framework of the Hartree-Fock theory, it is shown that the theory can clarify the structure of the so-called ''phonon-bands'' by self-consistently deriving the collective Hamiltonian where the number of the ''physical phonon'' is conserved. The purpose of this paper is not to go into detailed quantitative discussion, but rather to develop the basic idea. (author)

  7. GAIA: A WINDOW TO LARGE-SCALE MOTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nusser, Adi [Physics Department and the Asher Space Science Institute-Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Branchini, Enzo [Department of Physics, Universita Roma Tre, Via della Vasca Navale 84, 00146 Rome (Italy); Davis, Marc, E-mail: adi@physics.technion.ac.il, E-mail: branchin@fis.uniroma3.it, E-mail: mdavis@berkeley.edu [Departments of Astronomy and Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2012-08-10

    Using redshifts as a proxy for galaxy distances, estimates of the two-dimensional (2D) transverse peculiar velocities of distant galaxies could be obtained from future measurements of proper motions. We provide the mathematical framework for analyzing 2D transverse motions and show that they offer several advantages over traditional probes of large-scale motions. They are completely independent of any intrinsic relations between galaxy properties; hence, they are essentially free of selection biases. They are free from homogeneous and inhomogeneous Malmquist biases that typically plague distance indicator catalogs. They provide additional information to traditional probes that yield line-of-sight peculiar velocities only. Further, because of their 2D nature, fundamental questions regarding vorticity of large-scale flows can be addressed. Gaia, for example, is expected to provide proper motions of at least bright galaxies with high central surface brightness, making proper motions a likely contender for traditional probes based on current and future distance indicator measurements.

  8. Master equations in the microscopic theory of nuclear collective dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, M.; Sakata, F.; Marumori, T.; Zhuo, Y.

    1988-07-01

    In the first half of this paper, the authors describe briefly a recent theoretical approach where the mechanism of the large-amplitude dissipative collective motions can be investigated on the basis of the microscopic theory of nuclear collective dynamics. Namely, we derive the general coupled master equations which can disclose, in the framework of the TDHF theory, not only non-linear dynamics among the collective and the single-particle modes of motion but also microscopic dynamics responsible for the dissipative processes. In the latter half, the authors investigate, without relying on any statistical hypothesis, one possible microscopic origin which leads us to the transport equation of the Fokker-Planck type so that usefullness of the general framework is demonstrated. (author)

  9. Relativistic effects on large amplitude nonlinear Langmuir waves in a two-fluid plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nejoh, Yasunori

    1994-07-01

    Large amplitude relativistic nonlinear Langmuir waves are analyzed by the pseudo-potential method. The existence conditions for nonlinear Langmuir waves are confirmed by considering relativistic high-speed electrons in a two-fluid plasma. The significant feature of this investigation is that the propagation of nonlinear Langmuir waves depends on the ratio of the electron streaming velocity to the velocity of light, the normalized potential and the ion mass to electron mass ratio. The constant energy is determined by the specific range of the relativistic effect. In the non-relativistic limit, large amplitude relativistic Langmuir waves do not exist. The present investigation predicts new findings of large amplitude nonlinear Langmuir waves in space plasma phenomena in which relativistic electrons are important. (author)

  10. Large proper motions in the Orion nebula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cudworth, K.M.; Stone, R.C.

    1977-01-01

    Several nebular features, as well as one faint star, with large proper motions were identified within the Orion nebula. The measured proper motions correspond to tangential velocities of up to approximately 70 km sec -1 . One new probable variable star was also found

  11. Large amplitude forced vibration analysis of cross-beam system ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Large amplitude forced vibration behaviour of cross-beam system under harmonic excitation is studied, incorporating the effect of geometric non-linearity. The forced vibration analysis is carried out in an indirect way, in which the dynamic system is assumed to satisfy the force equilibrium condition at peak load value, thus ...

  12. Shape matters: Near-field fluid mechanics dominate the collective motions of ellipsoidal squirmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyoya, K; Matsunaga, D; Imai, Y; Omori, T; Ishikawa, T

    2015-12-01

    Microswimmers show a variety of collective motions. Despite extensive study, questions remain regarding the role of near-field fluid mechanics in collective motion. In this paper, we describe precisely the Stokes flow around hydrodynamically interacting ellipsoidal squirmers in a monolayer suspension. The results showed that various collective motions, such as ordering, aggregation, and whirls, are dominated by the swimming mode and the aspect ratio. The collective motions are mainly induced by near-field fluid mechanics, despite Stokes flow propagation over a long range. These results emphasize the importance of particle shape in collective motion.

  13. Trend-Centric Motion Visualization: Designing and Applying a New Strategy for Analyzing Scientific Motion Collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, David; Korsakov, Fedor; Knipe, Carissa Mai-Ping; Thorson, Lauren; Ellingson, Arin M; Nuckley, David; Carlis, John; Keefe, Daniel F

    2014-12-01

    In biomechanics studies, researchers collect, via experiments or simulations, datasets with hundreds or thousands of trials, each describing the same type of motion (e.g., a neck flexion-extension exercise) but under different conditions (e.g., different patients, different disease states, pre- and post-treatment). Analyzing similarities and differences across all of the trials in these collections is a major challenge. Visualizing a single trial at a time does not work, and the typical alternative of juxtaposing multiple trials in a single visual display leads to complex, difficult-to-interpret visualizations. We address this problem via a new strategy that organizes the analysis around motion trends rather than trials. This new strategy matches the cognitive approach that scientists would like to take when analyzing motion collections. We introduce several technical innovations making trend-centric motion visualization possible. First, an algorithm detects a motion collection's trends via time-dependent clustering. Second, a 2D graphical technique visualizes how trials leave and join trends. Third, a 3D graphical technique, using a median 3D motion plus a visual variance indicator, visualizes the biomechanics of the set of trials within each trend. These innovations are combined to create an interactive exploratory visualization tool, which we designed through an iterative process in collaboration with both domain scientists and a traditionally-trained graphic designer. We report on insights generated during this design process and demonstrate the tool's effectiveness via a validation study with synthetic data and feedback from expert musculoskeletal biomechanics researchers who used the tool to analyze the effects of disc degeneration on human spinal kinematics.

  14. Inviscid evolution of large amplitude filaments in a uniform gravity field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angus, J. R. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Krasheninnikov, S. I. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); National Research Nuclear University “MEPhl” Kashirskoe sh., 31, 115563 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15

    The inviscid evolution of localized density stratifications under the influence of a uniform gravity field in a homogeneous, ambient background is studied. The fluid is assumed to be incompressible, and the stratification, or filament, is assumed to be initially isotropic and at rest. It is shown that the center of mass energy can be related to the center of mass position in a form analogous to that of a solid object in a gravity field g by introducing an effective gravity field g{sub eff}, which is less than g due to energy that goes into the background and into non-center of mass motion of the filament. During the early stages of the evolution, g{sub eff} is constant in time and can be determined from the solution of a 1D differential equation that depends on the initial, radially varying density profile of the filament. For small amplitude filaments such that ρ{sub 0} ≪ 1, where ρ{sub 0} is the relative amplitude of the filament to the background, the early stage g{sub eff} scales linearly with ρ{sub 0}, but as ρ{sub 0}→∞, g{sub eff}→g and is thus independent of ρ{sub 0}. Fully nonlinear simulations are performed for the evolution of Gaussian filaments, and it is found that the time t{sub max}, which is defined as the time for the center of mass velocity to reach its maximum value U{sub max}, occurs very soon after the constant acceleration phase and so U{sub max}≈g{sub eff}(t=0)t{sub max}. The simulation results show that U{sub max}∼1/t{sub max}∼√(ρ{sub 0}) for ρ{sub 0} ≪ 1, in agreement with theory and results from previous authors, but that U{sub max} and t{sub max} both scale approximately with √(ρ{sub 0}) for ρ{sub 0} ≫ 1. The fact that U{sub max} and t{sub max} have the same scaling with ρ{sub 0} for large amplitude filaments is in agreement with the theory presented in this paper.

  15. Nuclear collective motion within the O(N-1) invariant dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerkaski, M.; Mikhailov, I.N.

    1990-08-01

    Assuming the O(N-1) symmetry for the interaction term in the N-body Hamiltonian we find a closed subsystem of equations describing the collective motion in a classical way. Within the model, the nucleons move along trajectories determined by a one-body time-dependent harmonic potential depending on the collective variables. The relation of the equations for the collective motion to the system of equations found elsewhere for the second order moments of the Wigner distribution function is discussed. The problem of finding stationary solutions to the collective equations of motion leads to the cranking model with the selfconsistency relations depending on the O(N-1) scalar part of the potential. 52 refs. (author)

  16. Collective Motion in Behaviorally Heterogeneous Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copenhagen, Katherine

    Collective motion is a widespread phenomenon in nature where individuals actively propel themselves, gather together and move as a group. Some examples of collective motion are bird flocks, fish schools, bacteria swarms, cell clusters, and crowds of people. Many models seek to understand the effects of activity in collective systems including things such as environmental disorder, density, and interaction details primarily at infinite size limits and with uniform populations. In this dissertation I investigate the effects of finite sizes and behavioral heterogeneity as it exists in nature. Behavioral heterogeneity can originate from several different sources. Mixed populations of individuals can have inherently different behaviors such as mutant bacteria, injured fish, or agents that prefer individualistic behavior over coordinated motion. Alternatively, agents may modify their own behavior based on some local environmental dependency, such as local substrate, or density. In cases such as mutant cheaters in bacteria or malfunctioning drones in swarms, mixed populations of behaviorally heterogeneous agents can be modelled as arising in the form of aligning and non-aligning agents. When this kind of heterogeneity is introduced, there is a critical carrying capacity of non-aligners above which the system is unable to form a cohesive ordered group. However, if the cohesion of the group is relaxed to allow for fracture, the system will actively sort out non-aligning agents the system will exist at a critical non-aligner fraction. A similar heterogeneity could result in a mixture of high and low noise individuals. In this case there is also a critical carry capacity beyond which the system is unable to reach an ordered state, however the nature of this transition depends on the model details. Agents which are part of an ordered collective may vary their behavior as the group changes environments such as a flock of birds flying into a cloud. Using a unique model of a

  17. Quantification of mouse in vivo whole-body vibration amplitude from motion-blur using x-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Zhengyi; Yuan, Xunhua; Pollmann, Steven I; Nikolov, Hristo N; Holdsworth, David W; Welch, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal effects of whole-body vibration on animals and humans have become an intensely studied topic recently, due to the potential of applying this method as a non-pharmacological therapy for strengthening bones. It is relatively easy to quantify the transmission of whole-body mechanical vibration through the human skeletal system using accelerometers. However, this is not the case for small-animal pre-clinical studies because currently available accelerometers have a large mass, relative to the mass of the animals, which causes the accelerometers themselves to affect the way vibration is transmitted. Additionally, live animals do not typically remain motionless for long periods, unless they are anesthetized, and they are required to maintain a static standing posture during these studies. These challenges provide the motivation for the development of a method to quantify vibrational transmission in small animals. We present a novel imaging technique to quantify whole-body vibration transmission in small animals using 280 μm diameter tungsten carbide beads implanted into the hind limbs of mice. Employing time-exposure digital x-ray imaging, vibrational amplitude is quantified based on the blurring of the implanted beads caused by the vibrational motion. Our in vivo results have shown this technique is capable of measuring vibration amplitudes as small as 0.1 mm, with precision as small as  ±10 μm, allowing us to distinguish differences in the transmitted vibration at different locations on the hindlimbs of mice. (paper)

  18. Quantification of mouse in vivo whole-body vibration amplitude from motion-blur using x-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhengyi; Welch, Ian; Yuan, Xunhua; Pollmann, Steven I.; Nikolov, Hristo N.; Holdsworth, David W.

    2015-08-01

    Musculoskeletal effects of whole-body vibration on animals and humans have become an intensely studied topic recently, due to the potential of applying this method as a non-pharmacological therapy for strengthening bones. It is relatively easy to quantify the transmission of whole-body mechanical vibration through the human skeletal system using accelerometers. However, this is not the case for small-animal pre-clinical studies because currently available accelerometers have a large mass, relative to the mass of the animals, which causes the accelerometers themselves to affect the way vibration is transmitted. Additionally, live animals do not typically remain motionless for long periods, unless they are anesthetized, and they are required to maintain a static standing posture during these studies. These challenges provide the motivation for the development of a method to quantify vibrational transmission in small animals. We present a novel imaging technique to quantify whole-body vibration transmission in small animals using 280 μm diameter tungsten carbide beads implanted into the hind limbs of mice. Employing time-exposure digital x-ray imaging, vibrational amplitude is quantified based on the blurring of the implanted beads caused by the vibrational motion. Our in vivo results have shown this technique is capable of measuring vibration amplitudes as small as 0.1 mm, with precision as small as  ±10 μm, allowing us to distinguish differences in the transmitted vibration at different locations on the hindlimbs of mice.

  19. Synchronization and collective motion of globally coupled Brownian particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, Francisco J; Heiblum-Robles, Alexandro; Dossetti, Victor

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we study a system of passive Brownian (non-self-propelled) particles in two dimensions, interacting only through a social-like force (velocity alignment in this case) that resembles Kuramoto's coupling among phase oscillators. We show that the kinematical stationary states of the system go from a phase in thermal equilibrium with no net flux of particles, to far-from-equilibrium phases exhibiting collective motion by increasing the coupling among particles. The mechanism that leads to the instability of the equilibrium phase relies on the competition between two time scales, namely, the mean collision time of the Brownian particles in a thermal bath and the time it takes for a particle to orient its direction of motion along the direction of motion of the group. Our results show a clear connection between collective motion and the Kuramoto model for synchronization, in our case, for the direction of motion of the particles. (paper)

  20. Pedestrian collective motion in competitive room evacuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcimartín, A; Pastor, J M; Martín-Gómez, C; Parisi, D; Zuriguel, I

    2017-09-07

    When a sizable number of people evacuate a room, if the door is not large enough, an accumulation of pedestrians in front of the exit may take place. This is the cause of emerging collective phenomena where the density is believed to be the key variable determining the pedestrian dynamics. Here, we show that when sustained contact among the individuals exists, density is not enough to describe the evacuation, and propose that at least another variable -such as the kinetic stress- is required. We recorded evacuation drills with different degrees of competitiveness where the individuals are allowed to moderately push each other in their way out. We obtain the density, velocity and kinetic stress fields over time, showing that competitiveness strongly affects them and evidencing patterns which have been never observed in previous (low pressure) evacuation experiments. For the highest competitiveness scenario, we detect the development of sudden collective motions. These movements are related to a notable increase of the kinetic stress and a reduction of the velocity towards the door, but do not depend on the density.

  1. Collective motion in quantum many-body systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haemmerling, Jens

    2011-06-07

    We study the emergence of collective dynamics in the integrable Hamiltonian system of two finite ensembles of coupled harmonic oscillators. After identification of a collective degree of freedom, the Hamiltonian is mapped onto a model of Caldeira-Leggett type, where the collective coordinate is coupled to an internal bath of phonons. In contrast to the usual Caldeira-Leggett model, the bath in the present case is part of the system. We derive an equation of motion for the collective coordinate which takes the form of a damped harmonic oscillator. We show that the distribution of quantum transition strengths induced by the collective mode is determined by its classical dynamics. This allows us to derive the spreading for the collective coordinate from first principles. After that we study the interplay between collective and incoherent single-particle motion in a model of two chains of particles whose interaction comprises a non-integrable part. In the perturbative regime, but for a general form of the interaction, we calculate the Fourier transform of the time correlation for the collective coordinate. We obtain the remarkable result that it always has a unique semi-classical interpretation. We show this by a proper renormalization procedure which also allows us to map the non-integrable system to the integrable model of Caldeira-Leggett-type considered previously in which the bath is part of the system.

  2. Modulated convection at high frequencies and large modulation amplitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swift, J.B.; Hohenberg, P.C.

    1987-01-01

    Modulated Rayleigh-Benard convection is analyzed for high frequencies and large modulation amplitudes. The linear theory of Gershuni and Zhukhovitskii is generalized to the nonlinear domain, and a subcritical bifurcation to convection is found in agreement with the experiments of Niemela and Donnelly. The crossover between the high-frequency (''Stokes layer'') regime and the low-frequency regime studied previously is analyzed

  3. Large amplitude ion-acoustic solitary waves and double layers in multicomponent plasma with positrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabry, R.

    2009-01-01

    A finite amplitude theory for ion-acoustic solitary waves and double layers in multicomponent plasma consisting of hot positrons, cold ions, and electrons with two-electron temperature distributions is presented. Conditions are obtained under which large amplitude stationary ion-acoustic solitary waves and double layers can exist. For the physical parameters of interest, the ion-acoustic solitary wave (double layers) profiles and the relationship between the maximum soliton (double layers) amplitude and the Mach number are found. Also, we have presented the region of existence of the large amplitude ion-acoustic waves by analyzing the structure of the pseudopotential. For the selected range of parameters, it is found that only positive solitary waves and double layers can exist. An analysis for the small amplitude limit through the Sagdeev pseudopotential analysis and the reductive perturbation theory shows the existence of positive and negative ion-acoustic solitary waves and double layers. The effects of positron concentration and temperature ratio on the characteristics of the solitary ion-acoustic waves and double layers (namely, the amplitude and width) are discussed in detail. The relevance of this investigation to space and laboratory plasmas is pointed out.

  4. Self-consistent collective-coordinate method for ''maximally-decoupled'' collective subspace and its boson mapping: Quantum theory of ''maximally-decoupled'' collective motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marumori, T.; Sakata, F.; Maskawa, T.; Une, T.; Hashimoto, Y.

    1983-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to develop a full quantum theory, which is capable by itself of determining a ''maximally-decoupled'' collective motion. The paper is divided into two parts. In the first part, the motivation and basic idea of the theory are explained, and the ''maximal-decoupling condition'' on the collective motion is formulated within the framework of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory, in a general form called the invariance principle of the (time-dependent) Schrodinger equation. In the second part, it is shown that when the author positively utilize the invariance principle, we can construct a full quantum theory of the ''maximally-decoupled'' collective motion. This quantum theory is shown to be a generalization of the kinematical boson-mapping theories so far developed, in such a way that the dynamical ''maximal-decoupling condition'' on the collective motion is automatically satisfied

  5. Effects of Cervical High-Velocity Low-Amplitude Techniques on Range of Motion, Strength Performance, and Cardiovascular Outcomes: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindez-Ibarbengoetxea, Xabier; Setuain, Igor; Andersen, Lars L; Ramírez-Velez, Robinson; González-Izal, Miriam; Jauregi, Andoni; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2017-09-01

    Cervical high-velocity low-amplitude (HVLA) manipulation technique is among the oldest and most frequently used chiropractic manual therapy, but the physiologic and biomechanics effects were not completely clear. This review aims to describe the effects of cervical HVLA manipulation techniques on range of motion, strength, and cardiovascular performance. A systematic search was conducted of the electronic databases from January 2000 to August 2016: PubMed (n = 131), ScienceDirect (n = 101), Scopus (n = 991), PEDro (n = 33), CINAHL (n = 884), and SciELO (n = 5). Two independent reviewers conducted the screening process to determine article eligibility. The intervention that included randomized controlled trials was thrust, or HVLA, manipulative therapy directed to the cervical spine. Methodological quality was assessed using the Cochrane risk-of-bias tool. The initial search rendered 2145 articles. After screening titles and abstracts, 11 articles remained for full-text review. The review shows that cervical HVLA manipulation treatment results in a large effect size (d > 0.80) on increasing cervical range of motion and mouth opening. In patients with lateral epicondylalgia, cervical HVLA manipulation resulted in increased pain-free handgrip strength, with large effect sizes (1.44 and 0.78, respectively). Finally, in subjects with hypertension the blood pressure seemed to decrease after cervical HVLA manipulation. Higher quality studies are needed to develop a stronger evidence-based foundation for HVLA manipulation techniques as a treatment for cervical conditions.

  6. Observation and analysis of high-speed human motion with frequent occlusion in a large area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yuru; Liu, Jiafeng; Liu, Guojun; Tang, Xianglong; Liu, Peng

    2009-01-01

    The use of computer vision technology in collecting and analyzing statistics during sports matches or training sessions is expected to provide valuable information for tactics improvement. However, the measurements published in the literature so far are either unreliably documented to be used in training planning due to their limitations or unsuitable for studying high-speed motion in large area with frequent occlusions. A sports annotation system is introduced in this paper for tracking high-speed non-rigid human motion over a large playing area with the aid of motion camera, taking short track speed skating competitions as an example. The proposed system is composed of two sub-systems: precise camera motion compensation and accurate motion acquisition. In the video registration step, a distinctive invariant point feature detector (probability density grads detector) and a global parallax based matching points filter are used, to provide reliable and robust matching across a large range of affine distortion and illumination change. In the motion acquisition step, a two regions' relationship constrained joint color model and Markov chain Monte Carlo based joint particle filter are emphasized, by dividing the human body into two relative key regions. Several field tests are performed to assess measurement errors, including comparison to popular algorithms. With the help of the system presented, the system obtains position data on a 30 m × 60 m large rink with root-mean-square error better than 0.3975 m, velocity and acceleration data with absolute error better than 1.2579 m s −1 and 0.1494 m s −2 , respectively

  7. Observation and analysis of high-speed human motion with frequent occlusion in a large area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuru; Liu, Jiafeng; Liu, Guojun; Tang, Xianglong; Liu, Peng

    2009-12-01

    The use of computer vision technology in collecting and analyzing statistics during sports matches or training sessions is expected to provide valuable information for tactics improvement. However, the measurements published in the literature so far are either unreliably documented to be used in training planning due to their limitations or unsuitable for studying high-speed motion in large area with frequent occlusions. A sports annotation system is introduced in this paper for tracking high-speed non-rigid human motion over a large playing area with the aid of motion camera, taking short track speed skating competitions as an example. The proposed system is composed of two sub-systems: precise camera motion compensation and accurate motion acquisition. In the video registration step, a distinctive invariant point feature detector (probability density grads detector) and a global parallax based matching points filter are used, to provide reliable and robust matching across a large range of affine distortion and illumination change. In the motion acquisition step, a two regions' relationship constrained joint color model and Markov chain Monte Carlo based joint particle filter are emphasized, by dividing the human body into two relative key regions. Several field tests are performed to assess measurement errors, including comparison to popular algorithms. With the help of the system presented, the system obtains position data on a 30 m × 60 m large rink with root-mean-square error better than 0.3975 m, velocity and acceleration data with absolute error better than 1.2579 m s-1 and 0.1494 m s-2, respectively.

  8. Temperature oscillation and the sloshing motion of the large-scale circulation in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Heng-Dong; Chen, Xin; Xia, Ke-Qing

    2017-11-01

    We report an experimental study of the temperature oscillation and the sloshing motion of the large-scale circulation (LSC) in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection in water. Temperature measurements were made in aspect ratio one cylindrical cell by probes put in fluid and embedded in the sidewall simultaneously, and located at the 1/4, 1/2 and 3/4 heights of the convection cell. The results show that the temperature measured in fluid contains information of both the LSC and the signature of the hot and cold plumes, while the temperature measured in sidewall only contains information of the LSC. It is found that the sloshing motion of the LSC can be measured by both the temperatures in fluid and in sidewall. We also studies the effect of cell tilting on the temperature oscillation and sloshing motion of the LSC. It is found that both the amplitude and the frequency of the temperature oscillation (and the sloshing motion) increase when the tilt angle increases, while the off-center distance of the sloshing motion of the LSC remains unchanged. This work is supported by the NSFC of China (Grant Nos. 11472094 and U1613227), the RGC of Hong Kong SAR (Grant No. 403712) and the 111 project of China (Grant No. B17037).

  9. Charge transport properties of poly(dA)-poly(dT) DNA in variation of backbone disorder and amplitude of base-pair twisting motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahmi, Kinanti Aldilla, E-mail: kinanti.aldilla@ui.ac.id; Yudiarsah, Efta [Physics Department, FMIPA, Universitas Indonesia, Kampus UI Depok (Indonesia)

    2016-04-19

    By using tight binding Hamiltonian model, charge transport properties of poly(dA)-poly(dT) DNA in variation of backbone disorder and amplitude of base-pair twisting motion is studied. The DNA chain used is 32 base pairs long poly(dA)-poly(dT) molecule. The molecule is contacted to electrode at both ends. The influence of environment on charge transport in DNA is modeled as variation of backbone disorder. The twisting motion amplitude is taking into account by assuming that the twisting angle distributes following Gaussian distribution function with zero average and standard deviation proportional to square root of temperature and inversely proportional to the twisting motion frequency. The base-pair twisting motion influences both the onsite energy of the bases and electron hopping constant between bases. The charge transport properties are studied by calculating current using Landauer-Buttiker formula from transmission probabilities which is calculated by transfer matrix methods. The result shows that as the backbone disorder increases, the maximum current decreases. By decreasing the twisting motion frequency, the current increases rapidly at low voltage, but the current increases slower at higher voltage. The threshold voltage can increase or decrease with increasing backbone disorder and increasing twisting frequency.

  10. Hadronic processes with large transfer momenta and quark counting rules in multiparticle dual amplitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akkelin, S.V.; Kobylinskij, N.A.; Martynov, E.S.

    1989-01-01

    A dual N-particle amplitude satisfying the quark counting rules for the processes with large transfer momenta is constructed. The multiparticle channels are shown to give an essential contribution to the amplitude decreasing power in a hard kinematic limit. 19 refs.; 9 figs

  11. Flat-Cladding Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors for Large Strain Amplitude Fatigue Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xijia Gu

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We have successfully developed a flat-cladding fiber Bragg grating sensor for large cyclic strain amplitude tests of up to ±8,000 με. The increased contact area between the flat-cladding fiber and substrate, together with the application of a new bonding process, has significantly increased the bonding strength. In the push-pull fatigue tests of an aluminum alloy, the plastic strain amplitudes measured by three optical fiber sensors differ only by 0.43% at a cyclic strain amplitude of ±7,000 με and 1.9% at a cyclic strain amplitude of ±8,000 με. We also applied the sensor on an extruded magnesium alloy for evaluating the peculiar asymmetric hysteresis loops. The results obtained were in good agreement with those measured from the extensometer, a further validation of the sensor.

  12. Global Well-Posedness of the Boltzmann Equation with Large Amplitude Initial Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Renjun; Huang, Feimin; Wang, Yong; Yang, Tong

    2017-07-01

    The global well-posedness of the Boltzmann equation with initial data of large amplitude has remained a long-standing open problem. In this paper, by developing a new {L^∞_xL^1v\\cap L^∞_{x,v}} approach, we prove the global existence and uniqueness of mild solutions to the Boltzmann equation in the whole space or torus for a class of initial data with bounded velocity-weighted {L^∞} norm under some smallness condition on the {L^1_xL^∞_v} norm as well as defect mass, energy and entropy so that the initial data allow large amplitude oscillations. Both the hard and soft potentials with angular cut-off are considered, and the large time behavior of solutions in the {L^∞_{x,v}} norm with explicit rates of convergence are also studied.

  13. Atto-second control of collective electron motion in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borot, Antonin; Malvache, Arnaud; Chen, Xiaowei; Jullien, Aurelie; Lopez-Martens, Rodrigo; Geindre, Jean-Paul; Audebert, Patrick; Mourou, Gerard; Quere, Fabien

    2012-01-01

    Today, light fields of controlled and measured waveform can be used to guide electron motion in atoms and molecules with atto-second precision. Here, we demonstrate atto-second control of collective electron motion in plasmas driven by extreme intensity (approximate to 10 18 W cm -2 ) light fields. Controlled few-cycle near-infrared waves are tightly focused at the interface between vacuum and a solid-density plasma, where they launch and guide sub-cycle motion of electrons from the plasma with characteristic energies in the multi-kilo-electron-volt range-two orders of magnitude more than has been achieved so far in atoms and molecules. The basic spectroscopy of the coherent extreme ultraviolet radiation emerging from the light-plasma interaction allows us to probe this collective motion of charge with sub-200 as resolution. This is an important step towards atto-second control of charge dynamics in laser-driven plasma experiments. (authors)

  14. Measurement of time delays in gated radiotherapy for realistic respiratory motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chugh, Brige P.; Quirk, Sarah; Conroy, Leigh; Smith, Wendy L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Gated radiotherapy is used to reduce internal motion margins, escalate target dose, and limit normal tissue dose; however, its temporal accuracy is limited. Beam-on and beam-off time delays can lead to treatment inefficiencies and/or geographic misses; therefore, AAPM Task Group 142 recommends verifying the temporal accuracy of gating systems. Many groups use sinusoidal phantom motion for this, under the tacit assumption that use of sinusoidal motion for determining time delays produces negligible error. The authors test this assumption by measuring gating time delays for several realistic motion shapes with increasing degrees of irregularity. Methods: Time delays were measured on a linear accelerator with a real-time position management system (Varian TrueBeam with RPM system version 1.7.5) for seven motion shapes: regular sinusoidal; regular realistic-shape; large (40%) and small (10%) variations in amplitude; large (40%) variations in period; small (10%) variations in both amplitude and period; and baseline drift (30%). Film streaks of radiation exposure were generated for each motion shape using a programmable motion phantom. Beam-on and beam-off time delays were determined from the difference between the expected and observed streak length. Results: For the system investigated, all sine, regular realistic-shape, and slightly irregular amplitude variation motions had beam-off and beam-on time delays within the AAPM recommended limit of less than 100 ms. In phase-based gating, even small variations in period resulted in some time delays greater than 100 ms. Considerable time delays over 1 s were observed with highly irregular motion. Conclusions: Sinusoidal motion shapes can be considered a reasonable approximation to the more complex and slightly irregular shapes of realistic motion. When using phase-based gating with predictive filters even small variations in period can result in time delays over 100 ms. Clinical use of these systems for patients

  15. Measurement of time delays in gated radiotherapy for realistic respiratory motions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chugh, Brige P.; Quirk, Sarah; Conroy, Leigh; Smith, Wendy L., E-mail: Wendy.Smith@albertahealthservices.ca [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N2 (Canada)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Gated radiotherapy is used to reduce internal motion margins, escalate target dose, and limit normal tissue dose; however, its temporal accuracy is limited. Beam-on and beam-off time delays can lead to treatment inefficiencies and/or geographic misses; therefore, AAPM Task Group 142 recommends verifying the temporal accuracy of gating systems. Many groups use sinusoidal phantom motion for this, under the tacit assumption that use of sinusoidal motion for determining time delays produces negligible error. The authors test this assumption by measuring gating time delays for several realistic motion shapes with increasing degrees of irregularity. Methods: Time delays were measured on a linear accelerator with a real-time position management system (Varian TrueBeam with RPM system version 1.7.5) for seven motion shapes: regular sinusoidal; regular realistic-shape; large (40%) and small (10%) variations in amplitude; large (40%) variations in period; small (10%) variations in both amplitude and period; and baseline drift (30%). Film streaks of radiation exposure were generated for each motion shape using a programmable motion phantom. Beam-on and beam-off time delays were determined from the difference between the expected and observed streak length. Results: For the system investigated, all sine, regular realistic-shape, and slightly irregular amplitude variation motions had beam-off and beam-on time delays within the AAPM recommended limit of less than 100 ms. In phase-based gating, even small variations in period resulted in some time delays greater than 100 ms. Considerable time delays over 1 s were observed with highly irregular motion. Conclusions: Sinusoidal motion shapes can be considered a reasonable approximation to the more complex and slightly irregular shapes of realistic motion. When using phase-based gating with predictive filters even small variations in period can result in time delays over 100 ms. Clinical use of these systems for patients

  16. Vlasov simulation of the relativistic effect on the breaking of large amplitude plasma waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Hui; Sheng Zhengming; Zhang Jie

    2007-01-01

    The influence of relativistic and thermal effects on plasma wave breaking has been studied by solving the coupled Vlasov-Poisson equations. When the relativistic effect is not considered, the wave breaking will not occur, provided the initial perturbation is less than certain value as predicted previously, and the largest amplitude of the plasma wave will decrease with the increase of the initial temperature. When the relativistic effect is considered, wave breaking always occurs during the time evolution, irrespective of the initial perturbation amplitude. Yet the smaller the initial perturbation amplitude is, the longer is the time for wave breaking to occur. With large initial perturbations, wave breaking can always occur with the without the relativistic effect. However, the results are significantly different in the two cases. The thermal effects of electrons decrease the threshold value to initial amplitude for wave breaking and large phase velocity makes the nonlinear phenomenon occur more easily. (authors)

  17. Obliquely propagating large amplitude solitary waves in charge neutral plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Verheest

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals in a consistent way with the implications, for the existence of large amplitude stationary structures in general plasmas, of assuming strict charge neutrality between electrons and ions. With the limit of pair plasmas in mind, electron inertia is retained. Combining in a fluid dynamic treatment the conservation of mass, momentum and energy with strict charge neutrality has indicated that nonlinear solitary waves (as e.g. oscillitons cannot exist in electron-ion plasmas, at no angle of propagation with respect to the static magnetic field. Specifically for oblique propagation, the proof has turned out to be more involved than for parallel or perpendicular modes. The only exception is pair plasmas that are able to support large charge neutral solitons, owing to the high degree of symmetry naturally inherent in such plasmas. The nonexistence, in particular, of oscillitons is attributed to the breakdown of the plasma approximation in dealing with Poisson's law, rather than to relativistic effects. It is hoped that future space observations will allow to discriminate between oscillitons and large wave packets, by focusing on the time variability (or not of the phase, since the amplitude or envelope graphs look very similar.

  18. Attitude tracking control of flexible spacecraft with large amplitude slosh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Mingle; Yue, Baozeng

    2017-12-01

    This paper is focused on attitude tracking control of a spacecraft that is equipped with flexible appendage and partially filled liquid propellant tank. The large amplitude liquid slosh is included by using a moving pulsating ball model that is further improved to estimate the settling location of liquid in microgravity or a zero-g environment. The flexible appendage is modelled as a three-dimensional Bernoulli-Euler beam, and the assumed modal method is employed. A hybrid controller that combines sliding mode control with an adaptive algorithm is designed for spacecraft to perform attitude tracking. The proposed controller has proved to be asymptotically stable. A nonlinear model for the overall coupled system including spacecraft attitude dynamics, liquid slosh, structural vibration and control action is established. Numerical simulation results are presented to show the dynamic behaviors of the coupled system and to verify the effectiveness of the control approach when the spacecraft undergoes the disturbance produced by large amplitude slosh and appendage vibration. Lastly, the designed adaptive algorithm is found to be effective to improve the precision of attitude tracking.

  19. A quantal transport theory for nuclear collective motion: the merits of a locally harmonic approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, H.

    1997-01-01

    A transport theory is developed for collective motion of systems such as an atomic nucleus, which may be considered as a typical representative of a self-bound micro-system. Albeit for pragmatic reasons, collective variables are introduced as shape parameters, self-consistency with respect to the nucleonic degrees of freedom has been implemented at various important stages. This feature leads to subsidiary conditions which are obeyed locally for both the average motion as well as for the quantized Hamiltonian constructed through a Bohm-Pines procedure. Furthermore, self-consistency governs the definition of the transport coefficients appearing in the equations for collective motion. The latter is associated to the time evolution of the density in collective phase space, for which the concept of the Wigner function is employed. Global motion is described by propagating the system in successive time laps which are macroscopically small, but microscopically large. This enables one to exploit linearization procedures and to take advantage of the benefits of linear response theory. A microscopic damping mechanism is introduced by dressing the energies of the independent particle model by complex self-energies, the parameters of which are determined from optical model considerations. Numerical evaluations of transport coefficients are described and tested for the case of fission in the light of recent experimental findings. The theory allows one to extend both Kramers' picture of this process as well as his equation for the density distribution into the quantum regime. (orig.)

  20. Corrections to the large-angle scattering amplitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goloskokov, S.V.; Kudinov, A.V.; Kuleshov, S.P.

    1979-01-01

    High-energy behaviour of scattering amplitudes is considered within the frames of Logunov-Tavchelidze quasipotential approach. The representation of scattering amplitude of two scalar particles, convenient for the study of its asymptotic properties is given. Obtained are corrections of the main value of scattering amplitude of the first and the second orders in 1/p, where p is the pulse of colliding particles in the system of the inertia centre. An example of the obtained formulas use for a concrete quasipotential is given

  1. Collective motion of active Brownian particles with polar alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Gómez, Aitor; Levis, Demian; Díaz-Guilera, Albert; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio

    2018-04-04

    We present a comprehensive computational study of the collective behavior emerging from the competition between self-propulsion, excluded volume interactions and velocity-alignment in a two-dimensional model of active particles. We consider an extension of the active brownian particles model where the self-propulsion direction of the particles aligns with the one of their neighbors. We analyze the onset of collective motion (flocking) in a low-density regime (10% surface area) and show that it is mainly controlled by the strength of velocity-alignment interactions: the competition between self-propulsion and crowding effects plays a minor role in the emergence of flocking. However, above the flocking threshold, the system presents a richer pattern formation scenario than analogous models without alignment interactions (active brownian particles) or excluded volume effects (Vicsek-like models). Depending on the parameter regime, the structure of the system is characterized by either a broad distribution of finite-sized polar clusters or the presence of an amorphous, highly fluctuating, large-scale traveling structure which can take a lane-like or band-like form (and usually a hybrid structure which is halfway in between both). We establish a phase diagram that summarizes collective behavior of polar active brownian particles and propose a generic mechanism to describe the complexity of the large-scale structures observed in systems of repulsive self-propelled particles.

  2. Effects of large pressure amplitude low frequency noise in the parotid gland perivasculo-ductal connective tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Pedro; Brito, José; Mendes, João; da Fonseca, Jorge; Águas, Artur; Martins dos Santos, José

    2013-01-01

    In tissues and organs exposed to large pressure amplitude low frequency noise fibrosis occurs in the absence of inflammatory signs, which is thought to be a protective response. In the parotid gland the perivasculo-ductal connective tissue surrounds arteries, veins and the ductal tree. Perivasculo-ductal connective tissue is believed to function as a mechanical stabilizer of the glandular tissue. In order to quantify the proliferation of perivasculo-ductal connective tissue in large pressure amplitude low frequency noise-exposed rats we used sixty Wistar rats which were equally divided into 6 groups. One group kept in silence, and the remaining five exposed to continuous large pressure amplitude low frequency noise: g1-168h (1 week); g2-504h (3 weeks); g3-840h (5 weeks); g4-1512h (9 weeks); and g5-2184h (13 weeks). After exposure, parotid glands were removed and the perivasculo-ductal connective tissue area was measured in all groups. We applied ANOVA statistical analysis, using SPSS 13.0. The global trend is an increase in the average perivasculo-ductal connective tissue areas, that develops linearly and significantly with large pressure amplitude low frequency noise exposure time (p connective tissue. Hence, these results show that in response to large pressure amplitude low frequency noise exposure, rat parotid glands increase their perivasculo-ductal connective tissue.

  3. A motion algorithm to extract physical and motion parameters of mobile targets from cone-beam computed tomographic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsbou, Nesreen; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Ali, Imad

    2016-05-17

    A motion algorithm has been developed to extract length, CT number level and motion amplitude of a mobile target from cone-beam CT (CBCT) images. The algorithm uses three measurable parameters: Apparent length and blurred CT number distribution of a mobile target obtained from CBCT images to determine length, CT-number value of the stationary target, and motion amplitude. The predictions of this algorithm are tested with mobile targets having different well-known sizes that are made from tissue-equivalent gel which is inserted into a thorax phantom. The phantom moves sinusoidally in one-direction to simulate respiratory motion using eight amplitudes ranging 0-20 mm. Using this motion algorithm, three unknown parameters are extracted that include: Length of the target, CT number level, speed or motion amplitude for the mobile targets from CBCT images. The motion algorithm solves for the three unknown parameters using measured length, CT number level and gradient for a well-defined mobile target obtained from CBCT images. The motion model agrees with the measured lengths which are dependent on the target length and motion amplitude. The gradient of the CT number distribution of the mobile target is dependent on the stationary CT number level, the target length and motion amplitude. Motion frequency and phase do not affect the elongation and CT number distribution of the mobile target and could not be determined. A motion algorithm has been developed to extract three parameters that include length, CT number level and motion amplitude or speed of mobile targets directly from reconstructed CBCT images without prior knowledge of the stationary target parameters. This algorithm provides alternative to 4D-CBCT without requirement of motion tracking and sorting of the images into different breathing phases. The motion model developed here works well for tumors that have simple shapes, high contrast relative to surrounding tissues and move nearly in regular motion pattern

  4. Multi-point observations of large-amplitude electric fields during substorms obtained by THEMIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, K.; Kasaba, Y.; Nishimura, Y.; Hori, T.; Takada, T.; Miyashita, Y.; Angelopoulos, V.; Bonnell, J. W.; McFadden, J. P.

    2009-12-01

    Large-amplitude electric fields over 100 mV/m have been observed around the equatorial magnetosphere. These electric fields may contribute to energy transport and particle acceleration in the magnetosphere [e.g., Wygant et al., 2000, 2002], and seem to be related to fast plasma flows with a size of a few Re [Nakamura et al., 2001]. In order to understand their macroscopic characteristics and the effects to magnetic activities, it is important to observe both fields and particles simultaneously at multiple locations within several Re. Five THEMIS probes can frequently provide such chances. In this paper, we show the several events with large-amplitude electric fields during substorms obtained by THEMIS. One of the events is found in 05:50-06:00 UT on 11 March 2008, when TH-D (Xsm=-10.7 Re, Ysm=4.8 Re) and TH-E (Xsm=-10.3 Re, Ysm=5.6 Re) observed intense electric fields. At 05:54 UT, THEMIS GBO-s clearly showed the auroral onset signature. The great intensification was near the SNKQ station, and this structure moved westward with the speed of ~6 km/s. It corresponds to ~200 km/s, as mapped to the TH-D/E location. The footprints of TH-A (Xsm=-6.8 Re, Ysm=-0.4 Re), D, and E were close to the site of the aurora. The location of TH-D was beside that of TH-E, and TH-A was located earthward and eastward from the former two. The enhanced electric fields observed by TH-D and E were associated with magnetic dipolarization and earthward high-speed plasma flow. They were also associated with the depletion of electron density estimated by the spacecraft potential. These features are consistent with the model of plasma bubbles [e.g., Pontius and Wolf, 1990]. The Y components of plasma flows were 200-300 km/s, roughly consistent with the westward auroral motion as mapped to the equatorial magnetosphere. Also, we found that Poynting flux of low frequency was efficient to illuminate the auroral emissions. This fact suggests that electromagnetic energy is transported to the

  5. PET Motion Compensation for Radiation Therapy Using a CT-Based Mid-Position Motion Model: Methodology and Clinical Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruis, Matthijs F.; Kamer, Jeroen B. van de; Houweling, Antonetta C.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Belderbos, José S.A.; Herk, Marcel van

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional positron emission tomography (4D PET) imaging of the thorax produces sharper images with reduced motion artifacts. Current radiation therapy planning systems, however, do not facilitate 4D plan optimization. When images are acquired in a 2-minute time slot, the signal-to-noise ratio of each 4D frame is low, compromising image quality. The purpose of this study was to implement and evaluate the construction of mid-position 3D PET scans, with motion compensated using a 4D computed tomography (CT)-derived motion model. Methods and Materials: All voxels of 4D PET were registered to the time-averaged position by using a motion model derived from the 4D CT frames. After the registration the scans were summed, resulting in a motion-compensated 3D mid-position PET scan. The method was tested with a phantom dataset as well as data from 27 lung cancer patients. Results: PET motion compensation using a CT-based motion model improved image quality of both phantoms and patients in terms of increased maximum SUV (SUV max ) values and decreased apparent volumes. In homogenous phantom data, a strong relationship was found between the amplitude-to-diameter ratio and the effects of the method. In heterogeneous patient data, the effect correlated better with the motion amplitude. In case of large amplitudes, motion compensation may increase SUV max up to 25% and reduce the diameter of the 50% SUV max volume by 10%. Conclusions: 4D CT-based motion-compensated mid-position PET scans provide improved quantitative data in terms of uptake values and volumes at the time-averaged position, thereby facilitating more accurate radiation therapy treatment planning of pulmonary lesions

  6. Integrable spin chains and scattering amplitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartels, J.; Prygarin, A. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Lipatov, L.N. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Sankt-Peterburgskij Univ., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2011-04-15

    In this review we show that the multi-particle scattering amplitudes in N=4 SYM at large N{sub c} and in the multi-Regge kinematics for some physical regions have the high energy behavior appearing from the contribution of the Mandelstam cuts in the complex angular momentum plane of the corresponding t-channel partial waves. These Mandelstam cuts or Regge cuts are resulting from gluon composite states in the adjoint representation of the gauge group SU(N{sub c}). In the leading logarithmic approximation (LLA) their contribution to the six point amplitude is in full agreement with the known two-loop result. The Hamiltonian for the Mandelstam states constructed from n gluons in LLA coincides with the local Hamiltonian of an integrable open spin chain. We construct the corresponding wave functions using the integrals of motion and the Baxter-Sklyanin approach. (orig.)

  7. Short Large-Amplitude Magnetic Structures (SLAMS) at Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinson, G. A.; Wilson, L. B.; Sibeck, D. G.; Shane, N.; Zhang, T. L.; Moore, T. E.; Coates, A. J.; Barabash, S.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first observation of magnetic fluctuations consistent with Short Large-Amplitude Magnetic Structures (SLAMS) in the foreshock of the planet Venus. Three monolithic magnetic field spikes were observed by the Venus Express on the 11th of April 2009. The structures were approx.1.5->11s in duration, had magnetic compression ratios between approx.3->6, and exhibited elliptical polarization. These characteristics are consistent with the SLAMS observed at Earth, Jupiter, and Comet Giacobini-Zinner, and thus we hypothesize that it is possible SLAMS may be found at any celestial body with a foreshock.

  8. Simplified Methods Applied to Nonlinear Motion of Spar Platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haslum, Herbjoern Alf

    2000-07-01

    Simplified methods for prediction of motion response of spar platforms are presented. The methods are based on first and second order potential theory. Nonlinear drag loads and the effect of the pumping motion in a moon-pool are also considered. Large amplitude pitch motions coupled to extreme amplitude heave motions may arise when spar platforms are exposed to long period swell. The phenomenon is investigated theoretically and explained as a Mathieu instability. It is caused by nonlinear coupling effects between heave, surge, and pitch. It is shown that for a critical wave period, the envelope of the heave motion makes the pitch motion unstable. For the same wave period, a higher order pitch/heave coupling excites resonant heave response. This mutual interaction largely amplifies both the pitch and the heave response. As a result, the pitch/heave instability revealed in this work is more critical than the previously well known Mathieu's instability in pitch which occurs if the wave period (or the natural heave period) is half the natural pitch period. The Mathieu instability is demonstrated both by numerical simulations with a newly developed calculation tool and in model experiments. In order to learn more about the conditions for this instability to occur and also how it may be controlled, different damping configurations (heave damping disks and pitch/surge damping fins) are evaluated both in model experiments and by numerical simulations. With increased drag damping, larger wave amplitudes and more time are needed to trigger the instability. The pitch/heave instability is a low probability of occurrence phenomenon. Extreme wave periods are needed for the instability to be triggered, about 20 seconds for a typical 200m draft spar. However, it may be important to consider the phenomenon in design since the pitch/heave instability is very critical. It is also seen that when classical spar platforms (constant cylindrical cross section and about 200m draft

  9. Large-amplitude internal tides, solitary waves, and turbulence in the central Bay of Biscay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, X. H.; Cuypers, Y.; Bouruet-Aubertot, P.; Ferron, B.; Pichon, A.; LourençO, A.; Cortes, N.

    2013-06-01

    and fine-scale measurements collected in the central Bay of Biscay during the MOUTON experiment are analyzed to investigate the dynamics of internal waves and associated mixing. Large-amplitude internal tides (ITs) that excite internal solitary waves (ISWs) in the thermocline are observed. ITs are dominated by modes 3 and 4, while ISWs projected on mode 1 that is trapped in the thermocline. Therein, ITs generate a persistent narrow shear band, which is strongly correlated with the enhanced dissipation rate in the thermocline. This strong dissipation rate is further reinforced in the presence of ISWs. Dissipation rates during the period without ISWs largely agree with the MacKinnon-Gregg scaling proposed for internal wavefields dominated by a low-frequency mode, while they show poor agreement with the Gregg-Henyey parameterization valid for internal wavefields close to the Garrett-Munk model. The agreement with the MacKinnon-Gregg scaling is consistent with the fact that turbulent mixing here is driven by the low-frequency internal tidal shear.

  10. Large-amplitude double layers in a dusty plasma with an arbitrary ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Formation of large-amplitude double layers in a dusty plasma whose constituents are electrons, ions, warm dust grains and positive ion beam are studied using Sagdeev's pseudopotential technique. Existence of double layers is investigated. It is found that both the temperature of dust particles and ion beam temperature ...

  11. Behavior of the hadron potential at large distances and properties of the hadron spin-flip amplitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Predazzi, E.; Selyugin, O.V.

    2002-01-01

    The impact of the form of the hadron potential at large distances on the behavior of the hadron spin-flip amplitude at small angles is examined. The t-dependence of the spin-flip amplitude of high-energy hadron elastic scattering is analyzed under different assumptions on the hadron interaction. It is shown that the long tail of the nonGaussian form of the hadron potential of the hadron interaction in the impact parameter representation leads to a large value of the slope of the spin-flip amplitude (without the kinematical factor √(vertical stroke t vertical stroke)) as compared with the slope of the spin-nonflip amplitude. This effect can explain the form of the differential cross-section and the analyzing power at small transfer momenta. The methods for the definition of the spin-dependent part of the hadron scattering amplitude are presented. A possibility to investigate the structure of the hadron spin-flip amplitude from the accurate measure of the differential cross-section and the spin correlation parameters is shown. (orig.)

  12. Disappearance of Anisotropic Intermittency in Large-amplitude MHD Turbulence and Its Comparison with Small-amplitude MHD Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liping; Zhang, Lei; He, Jiansen; Tu, Chuanyi; Li, Shengtai; Wang, Xin; Wang, Linghua

    2018-03-01

    Multi-order structure functions in the solar wind are reported to display a monofractal scaling when sampled parallel to the local magnetic field and a multifractal scaling when measured perpendicularly. Whether and to what extent will the scaling anisotropy be weakened by the enhancement of turbulence amplitude relative to the background magnetic strength? In this study, based on two runs of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence simulation with different relative levels of turbulence amplitude, we investigate and compare the scaling of multi-order magnetic structure functions and magnetic probability distribution functions (PDFs) as well as their dependence on the direction of the local field. The numerical results show that for the case of large-amplitude MHD turbulence, the multi-order structure functions display a multifractal scaling at all angles to the local magnetic field, with PDFs deviating significantly from the Gaussian distribution and a flatness larger than 3 at all angles. In contrast, for the case of small-amplitude MHD turbulence, the multi-order structure functions and PDFs have different features in the quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular directions: a monofractal scaling and Gaussian-like distribution in the former, and a conversion of a monofractal scaling and Gaussian-like distribution into a multifractal scaling and non-Gaussian tail distribution in the latter. These results hint that when intermittencies are abundant and intense, the multifractal scaling in the structure functions can appear even if it is in the quasi-parallel direction; otherwise, the monofractal scaling in the structure functions remains even if it is in the quasi-perpendicular direction.

  13. A Hybrid Ground-Motion Prediction Equation for Earthquakes in Western Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spriggs, N.; Yenier, E.; Law, A.; Moores, A. O.

    2015-12-01

    Estimation of ground-motion amplitudes that may be produced by future earthquakes constitutes the foundation of seismic hazard assessment and earthquake-resistant structural design. This is typically done by using a prediction equation that quantifies amplitudes as a function of key seismological variables such as magnitude, distance and site condition. In this study, we develop a hybrid empirical prediction equation for earthquakes in western Alberta, where evaluation of seismic hazard associated with induced seismicity is of particular interest. We use peak ground motions and response spectra from recorded seismic events to model the regional source and attenuation attributes. The available empirical data is limited in the magnitude range of engineering interest (M>4). Therefore, we combine empirical data with a simulation-based model in order to obtain seismologically informed predictions for moderate-to-large magnitude events. The methodology is two-fold. First, we investigate the shape of geometrical spreading in Alberta. We supplement the seismic data with ground motions obtained from mining/quarry blasts, in order to gain insights into the regional attenuation over a wide distance range. A comparison of ground-motion amplitudes for earthquakes and mining/quarry blasts show that both event types decay at similar rates with distance and demonstrate a significant Moho-bounce effect. In the second stage, we calibrate the source and attenuation parameters of a simulation-based prediction equation to match the available amplitude data from seismic events. We model the geometrical spreading using a trilinear function with attenuation rates obtained from the first stage, and calculate coefficients of anelastic attenuation and site amplification via regression analysis. This provides a hybrid ground-motion prediction equation that is calibrated for observed motions in western Alberta and is applicable to moderate-to-large magnitude events.

  14. Theoretical treatment of high-frequency, large-amplitude ac voltammetry applied to ideal surface-confined redox systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, Christopher G.; Anastassiou, Costas A.; O’Hare, Danny; Parker, Kim H.; Siggers, Jennifer H.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Theory of ac voltammetry on ideal surface-confined redox systems. ► Analytical description of the harmonics and transient of the current response. ► Solution valid for high frequency, large-amplitude sinusoidal input voltage. ► Protocol for determining system parameters from experimental current responses. - Abstract: Large-amplitude ac voltammetry, where the applied voltage is a large-amplitude sinusoidal waveform superimposed onto a dc ramp, is a powerful method for investigating the reaction kinetics of surface-confined redox species. Here we consider the large-amplitude ac voltammetric current response of a quasi-reversible, ideal, surface-confined redox system, for which the redox reaction is described by Butler–Volmer theory. We derive an approximate analytical solution, which is valid whenever the angular frequency of the sine-wave is much larger than the rate of the dc ramp and the standard kinetic rate constant of the redox reaction. We demonstrate how the third harmonic and the initial transient of the current response can be used to estimate parameters of the electrochemical system, namely the kinetic rate constant, the electron transfer coefficient, the adsorption formal potential, the initial proportion of oxidised molecules and the linear double-layer capacitance.

  15. Microscopic boson approach to nuclear collective motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchta, R.

    1989-01-01

    A quantum mechanical approach to the maximally decoupled nuclear collective motion is proposed. The essential idea is to transcribe the original shell-model Hamiltonian in terms of boson operators, then to isolate the collective one-boson eigenstates of the mapped Hamiltonian and to perform a canonical transformation which eliminates (up to the two-body terms) the coupling between the collective and noncollective bosons. Unphysical states arising due to the violtion of the Pauli principle in the boson space are identified and removed within a suitable approximation. The method is applied to study the low-lying collective states of nuclei which are successfully described by the exactly solvable multilevel pairing Hamiltonian (Sn, Ni, Pb). 75 refs.; 8 figs

  16. MotionExplorer: exploratory search in human motion capture data based on hierarchical aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Jürgen; Wilhelm, Nils; Krüger, Björn; May, Thorsten; Schreck, Tobias; Kohlhammer, Jörn

    2013-12-01

    We present MotionExplorer, an exploratory search and analysis system for sequences of human motion in large motion capture data collections. This special type of multivariate time series data is relevant in many research fields including medicine, sports and animation. Key tasks in working with motion data include analysis of motion states and transitions, and synthesis of motion vectors by interpolation and combination. In the practice of research and application of human motion data, challenges exist in providing visual summaries and drill-down functionality for handling large motion data collections. We find that this domain can benefit from appropriate visual retrieval and analysis support to handle these tasks in presence of large motion data. To address this need, we developed MotionExplorer together with domain experts as an exploratory search system based on interactive aggregation and visualization of motion states as a basis for data navigation, exploration, and search. Based on an overview-first type visualization, users are able to search for interesting sub-sequences of motion based on a query-by-example metaphor, and explore search results by details on demand. We developed MotionExplorer in close collaboration with the targeted users who are researchers working on human motion synthesis and analysis, including a summative field study. Additionally, we conducted a laboratory design study to substantially improve MotionExplorer towards an intuitive, usable and robust design. MotionExplorer enables the search in human motion capture data with only a few mouse clicks. The researchers unanimously confirm that the system can efficiently support their work.

  17. Large-scale Motion of Solar Filaments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Large-scale Motion of Solar Filaments. Pavel Ambrož, Astronomical Institute of the Acad. Sci. of the Czech Republic, CZ-25165. Ondrejov, The Czech Republic. e-mail: pambroz@asu.cas.cz. Alfred Schroll, Kanzelhöehe Solar Observatory of the University of Graz, A-9521 Treffen,. Austria. e-mail: schroll@solobskh.ac.at.

  18. A hybrid method for the estimation of ground motion in sedimentary basins: Quantitative modelling for Mexico City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faeh, D.; Suhadolc, P.; Mueller, S.; Panza, G.F.

    1994-04-01

    To estimate the ground motion in two-dimensional, laterally heterogeneous, anelastic media, a hybrid technique has been developed which combines modal summation and the finite difference method. In the calculation of the local wavefield due to a seismic event, both for small and large epicentral distances, it is possible to take into account the sources, path and local soil effects. As practical application we have simulated the ground motion in Mexico City caused by the Michoacan earthquake of September 19, 1985. By studying the one-dimensional response of the two sedimentary layers present in Mexico City, it is possible to explain the difference in amplitudes observed between records for receivers inside and outside the lake-bed zone. These simple models show that the sedimentary cover produces the concentration of high-frequency waves (0.2-0.5 Hz) on the horizontal components of motion. The large amplitude coda of ground motion observed inside the lake-bed zone, and the spectral ratios between signals observed inside and outside the lake-bed zone, can only be explained by two-dimensional models of the sedimentary basin. In such models, the ground motion is mainly controlled by the response of the uppermost clay layer. The synthetic signals explain the major characteristics (relative amplitudes, spectral ratios, and frequency content) of the observed ground motion. The large amplitude coda of the ground motion observed in the lake-bed zone can be explained as resonance effects and the excitation of local surface waves in the laterally heterogeneous clay layer. Also, for the 1985 Michoacan event, the energy contributions of the three subevents are important to explain the observed durations. (author). 39 refs, 15 figs, 1 tab

  19. Large amplitude solitary waves in a multicomponent plasma with negative ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Tsukabayashi, I.; Ludwig, G.O.; Ferreira, J.L.

    1987-09-01

    When the concentration of negative ions is larger than a critical value, a small compressive pulse evolves into a subsonic wave train and a large pulse develops into a solitary wave. The threshold amplitude and velocity of the solitary waves are measured and compared with predictions using the pseudopotential method. (author) [pt

  20. Ground motion predictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loux, P C [Environmental Research Corporation, Alexandria, VA (United States)

    1969-07-01

    Nuclear generated ground motion is defined and then related to the physical parameters that cause it. Techniques employed for prediction of ground motion peak amplitude, frequency spectra and response spectra are explored, with initial emphasis on the analysis of data collected at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). NTS postshot measurements are compared with pre-shot predictions. Applicability of these techniques to new areas, for example, Plowshare sites, must be questioned. Fortunately, the Atomic Energy Commission is sponsoring complementary studies to improve prediction capabilities primarily in new locations outside the NTS region. Some of these are discussed in the light of anomalous seismic behavior, and comparisons are given showing theoretical versus experimental results. In conclusion, current ground motion prediction techniques are applied to events off the NTS. Predictions are compared with measurements for the event Faultless and for the Plowshare events, Gasbuggy, Cabriolet, and Buggy I. (author)

  1. Ground motion predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loux, P.C.

    1969-01-01

    Nuclear generated ground motion is defined and then related to the physical parameters that cause it. Techniques employed for prediction of ground motion peak amplitude, frequency spectra and response spectra are explored, with initial emphasis on the analysis of data collected at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). NTS postshot measurements are compared with pre-shot predictions. Applicability of these techniques to new areas, for example, Plowshare sites, must be questioned. Fortunately, the Atomic Energy Commission is sponsoring complementary studies to improve prediction capabilities primarily in new locations outside the NTS region. Some of these are discussed in the light of anomalous seismic behavior, and comparisons are given showing theoretical versus experimental results. In conclusion, current ground motion prediction techniques are applied to events off the NTS. Predictions are compared with measurements for the event Faultless and for the Plowshare events, Gasbuggy, Cabriolet, and Buggy I. (author)

  2. Prompt muon-induced fission: A probe for nuclear friction in large-amplitude collective motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberacker, V.E.; Umar, A.S.; Wells, J.C.; Strayer, M.R.; Maruhn, J.A.; Reinhard, P.G.

    1998-01-01

    Excited muonic atoms in the actinide region may induce prompt fission by inverse internal conversion, i.e. the excitation energy of the muonic atom is transferred to the nucleus. The authors solve the time dependent Dirac equation for the muonic spinor wave function in the Coulomb field of the fissioning nucleus on a 3-dimensional lattice and demonstrate that the muon attachment probability to the light fission fragment is a measure of the nuclear energy dissipation between the outer fission barrier and the scission point

  3. Large-amplitude dust acoustic shocklets in non-Maxwellian dusty plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, S.; Naeem, Ismat; Mirza, Arshad M.

    2017-10-01

    The formation and propagation of fully nonlinear dust-acoustic (DA) waves and shocks are studied in a non-Maxwellian thermal dusty plasma which is composed of Maxwellian electrons and nonthermal energetic ions with a neutralizing background of negatively charged dust grains. For this purpose, we have solved dust dynamical equations along with quasineutrality equation by using a diagonalization matrix technique. A set of two characteristic wave equations is obtained, which admits both analytical and numerical solutions. Taylor expansion in the small-amplitude limit ( Φ ≪ 1 ) leads to nonlinear effective phase and shock speeds accounting for nonthermal energetic ions. It is numerically shown that DA pulses can be developed into DA shocklets involving the negative electrostatic potential, dust fluid velocity, and dust number density. These structures are significantly influenced by the ion-nonthermality, dust thermal correction, and temporal variations. However, the amplitudes of solitary and shock waves are found smaller in case of Cairns-distributed ions as compared to Kappa-distributed ions due to smaller linear and nonlinear effective phase speeds that cause smaller nonlinearity effects. The present results should be useful for understanding the nonlinear characteristics of large-amplitude DA excitations and nonstationary shocklets in a laboratory non-Maxwellian dusty plasma, where nonthermal energetic ions are present in addition to Maxwellian electrons.

  4. Control Strategies for Guided Collective Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-27

    J.K. Parrish , “Oscillator models and collective motion,” IEEE Control Systems Magzine, Vol. 27, 2007, pp. 89-105. [18] S. H. Strogatz , “From Kuramoto...Automatic Control, 54(2), 2009, pp. 353-357. [21] H. Hong and S. H. Strogatz , “Kuramoto Model of Coupled Oscillators with Positive and Negative...2013) provided similar results by utilizing a modified Kuramoto model ( Strogatz (2000)). Paley (2008) proposed a Lyapunov-based design methodology to

  5. A microscopic theory of the nuclear collective motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranger, M.

    1975-01-01

    A microscopic theory of the nuclear collective model is reviewed, discussions being concentrated, mainly, on the shape motion. An adiabatic time dependent Hartree-Fock method is used. Kinetic energy using the cranking model is obtained. The generator coordinate method is discussed [pt

  6. Excitation of large-amplitude parametric resonance by the mechanical stiffness modulation of a microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krylov, Slava; Gerson, Yuval; Nachmias, Tali; Keren, Uri

    2010-01-01

    In this work we report on an approach allowing efficient parametric excitation of large-amplitude stable oscillations of a microstructure operated by a parallel-plate electrode, and present results of a theoretical and experimental investigation of the device. The frame-type structure, fabricated from a silicon on insulator (SOI) substrate using deep reactive ion etching (DRIE), consists a pair of cantilever-type suspensions connected at their ends by a link. The time-varying electrostatic force applied to the link by a parallel-plate electrode is transformed into a periodic tension of the beams, resulting in the modulation of their flexural stiffness and consequently the mechanical parametric excitation of the structure. The lateral compliance of the beams allows for large-amplitude in-plane oscillations in the direction parallel to the electrode while high axial stiffness prevents undesirable instabilities. The lumped model of the device, considered as an assembly of geometrically nonlinear massless flexures and a rigid massive link and built using the Rayleigh–Ritz method, predicted the feasibility of the excitation approach. The fabricated devices were operated in ambient air conditions by a combination of a steady (dc) and time-dependent (ac) components of voltage and the large-amplitude responses, up to 75 µm, in the vicinity of the principal parametric and primary resonances were registered by means of video acquisition and image processing. The shapes of the experimental resonant curves were consistent with those predicted by the model. The location and size of the instability regions on the frequency–voltage plane (parametric tongues) were quantitatively in good agrement with the model results. Theoretical and experimental results indicate that the suggested approach can be efficiently used for excitation of various types of microdevices where stable resonant operation combined with robustness and large vibrational amplitudes are desirable

  7. Microscopic theory of nuclear collective dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakata, Fumihiko; Marumori, Toshio; Hashimoto, Yukio; Tsukuma, Hidehiko; Yamamoto, Yoshifumi; Iwasawa, Kazuo.

    1990-10-01

    A recent development of the INS-TSUKUBA joint research project on large-amplitude collective motion is summarized by putting special emphasis on an inter-relationship between quantum chaos and nuclear spectroscopy. Aiming at introducing various concepts used in this lecture, we start with recapitulating the semi-classical theory of nuclear collective dynamics formulated within the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory. The central part of the semi-classical theory is provided by the self-consistent collective coordinate (SCC) method which has been developed to properly take account of the non-linear dynamics specific for the finite many-body quantum system. A decisive role of the level crossing dynamics on the order-to-chaos transition of collective motion is discussed in detail. Extending the basic idea of the semi-classical theory, we discuss a full quantum theory of nuclear collective dynamics which allows us to properly define a concept of the quantum integrability as well as the quantum chaoticity for each eigenfunction. The lecture is arranged so as to clearly show the similar structure between the semi-classical and quantum theories of nuclear collective dynamics. Using numerical calculations, we illustrate what the quantum chaos for each eigenfunction means and relate it to the usual definition of quantum chaos for nearest neighbor level spacing statistics based on the random matrix theory. (author)

  8. The Influence of Second Harmonic Phase and Amplitude Variation in Cyclically Pitching Wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culler, Ethan; Farnsworth, John

    2017-11-01

    From wind tunnel testing of a cyber-physical wing model, it has been found that the pitch trajectory for stall flutter is described by an array of higher harmonic frequencies with decaying energy content. These frequencies distort the stall flutter motion from that of a pure sinusoidal oscillation in pitch and can have a significant effect on the resulting force production. In order to understand how these higher harmonic frequencies contribute to the overall pitching moment characteristics of a wing in stall flutter, a rigid finite span wing model, with aspect ratio four, was pitched in the wind tunnel. The prescribed motion of the pitch cycle was varied by changing the amplitude ratio and phase of the second harmonic of the oscillation frequency. The second harmonic represents the second highest energy mode in the pitching cycle spectra. Pitching moment and planar particle image velocimetry data was collected. From these pitching trajectories, a significant dependence of pitching moment on both the phase and amplitude of the prescribed waveforms was found. Specifically, for the same amplitude ratio, variations in the phase produced changes of approximately 30 percent in the phase averaged pitching moment.

  9. Large-amplitude and narrow-band vibration phenomenon of a foursquare fix-supported flexible plate in a rigid narrow channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Lifang, E-mail: liu_lifang1106@yahoo.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Zhuxinzhuang, Dewai, Beijing 102206 (China); Lu Daogang, E-mail: ludaogang@ncepu.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Zhuxinzhuang, Dewai, Beijing 102206 (China); Li Yang, E-mail: qinxiuyi@sina.com [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Zhuxinzhuang, Dewai, Beijing 102206 (China); Zhang Pan, E-mail: zhangpan@ncepu.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Zhuxinzhuang, Dewai, Beijing 102206 (China); Niu Fenglei, E-mail: niufenglei@ncepu.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Zhuxinzhuang, Dewai, Beijing 102206 (China)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > FIV of a foursquare fix-supported flexible plate exposed to axial flow was studied. > Special designed test section and advanced measuring equipments were adopted. > The narrow-band vibration phenomenon with large amplitude was observed. > Line of plate's vibration amplitude and flow rate was investigated. > The phenomenon and the measurement error were analyzed. - Abstract: An experiment was performed to analyze the flow-induced vibration behavior of a foursquare fix-supported flexible plate exposed to the axial flow within a rigid narrow channel. The large-amplitude and narrow-band vibration phenomenon was observed in the experiment when the flow velocity varied with the range of 0-5 m/s. The occurring condition and some characteristics of the large-amplitude and narrow-band vibrations were investigated.

  10. Two-level systems driven by large-amplitude fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashhab, S.; Johansson, J. R.; Zagoskin, A. M.; Nori, Franco

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the dynamics of a two-level system subject to driving by large-amplitude external fields, focusing on the resonance properties in the case of driving around the region of avoided level crossing. In particular, we consider three main questions that characterize resonance dynamics: (1) the resonance condition (2) the frequency of the resulting oscillations on resonance, and (3) the width of the resonance. We identify the regions of validity of different approximations. In a large region of the parameter space, we use a geometric picture in order to obtain both a simple understanding of the dynamics and quantitative results. The geometric approach is obtained by dividing the evolution into discrete time steps, with each time step described by either a phase shift on the basis states or a coherent mixing process corresponding to a Landau-Zener crossing. We compare the results of the geometric picture with those of a rotating wave approximation. We also comment briefly on the prospects of employing strong driving as a useful tool to manipulate two-level systems

  11. Landau damping due to tune spreads in betatron amplitude and momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Tran, P.; Weng, W.T.

    1989-01-01

    Due to the large space charge transverse impedance in a low energy synchrotron, the coherent tune shift causes the Landau damping to be ineffective in damping the transverse coherent motion. We analyze the effect of Landau damping that is caused by the tune spreads of the betatron amplitude (space charge and/or octupole) and momentum. We find that the Landau damping becomes more significant in our two dimensional analysis. 5 refs

  12. Simultaneous computation of intrabunch and interbunch collective beam motions in storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skripka, Galina, E-mail: galina.skripka@maxlab.lu.se [MAX IV Laboratory, Lund University, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden); Nagaoka, Ryutaro, E-mail: ryutaro.nagaoka@synchrotron-soleil.fr [Synchrotron SOLEIL, Saint Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Klein, Marit; Cullinan, Francis [Synchrotron SOLEIL, Saint Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Tavares, Pedro F. [MAX IV Laboratory, Lund University, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden)

    2016-01-11

    We present the multibunch tracking code mbtrack developed to simulate, in 6-dimensional phase space, single- and multibunch collective instabilities driven by short- and long-range wakefields in storage rings. Multiple bunches, each composed of a large number of macroparticles, are tracked, allowing simulation of both intra- and interbunch motions. Besides analytical impedance models, the code allows employment of numerical wake potentials computed with electromagnetic (EM) field solvers. The corresponding impedances are fitted to a number of known analytical functions and the coefficients obtained in the fit are used as an input to the code. mbtrack performs a dynamic treatment of long-range resistive-wall and harmonic cavity fields, which are likely to be the two major factors impacting multibunch collective motions in many present and future ring-based light sources. Furthermore, it is capable of simulating beam-ion interactions as well as transverse bunch-by-bunch feedback. We describe the physical effects considered in the code and their implementation, which makes use of parallel processing to significantly shorten the computation time. mbtrack is benchmarked against other codes and applied to the MAX IV 3 GeV ring as an example, where the importance of the interplay of various physical effects as well as coupling among different degrees of freedom is demonstrated. - Highlights: • A new 6D multibunch multiparticle tracking code is developed. • The code employs numerical impedance computed for realistic vacuum components. • Effects of passive harmonic cavity and resistive wall are treated. • A method to model interplay between intra- and interbunch motions is developed.

  13. A heating mechanism of ions due to large amplitude coherent ion acoustic wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yajima, Nobuo; Kawai, Yoshinobu; Kogiso, Ken.

    1978-05-01

    Ion heating mechanism in a plasma with a coherent ion acoustic wave is studied experimentally and numerically. Ions are accelerated periodically in the electrostatic potential of the coherent wave and their oscillation energy is converted into the thermal energy of ions through the collision with the neutral atoms in plasma. The Monte Carlo calculation is applied to obtain the ion temperature. The amplitude of the electrostatic potential, the mean number of collisions and the mean life time of ions are treated as parameters in the calculation. The numerical results are compared with the experiments and both of them agree well. It is found that the ion temperature increases as the amplitude of the coherent wave increases and the high energy tail in the distribution function of ions are observed for the case of large wave-amplitude. (author)

  14. Self-consistent transport coefficients for average collective motion at moderately high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaji, Shuhei; Hofmann, H.; Samhammer, R.

    1987-01-01

    Linear response theory is applied to compute the coefficients for inertia, friction and local stiffness for slow, large scale nuclear collective motion. It is shown how these coefficients can be defined within a locally harmonic approximation. The latter allows to study the implications arising from a finite local collective frequency. It is only for temperatures around 2 MeV that the zero frequency limit becomes a fair approximation. Friction is found to have a marked temperature dependence. The numerical computations are performed on the basis of a two-center shell model, but allowing the particles and holes to become dressed through effects of the medium. The dependence of the transport coefficients on the parameters of these self-energies is studied. It is argued that the uncertainties are smaller than a factor of 2. (orig.)

  15. Inner core tilt and polar motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumberry, Mathieu; Bloxham, Jeremy

    2002-11-01

    A tilted inner core permits exchange of angular momentum between the core and the mantle through gravitational and pressure torques and, as a result, changes in the direction of Earth's axis of rotation with respect to the mantle. We have developed a model to calculate the amplitude of the polar motion that results from an equatorial torque at the inner core boundary which tilts the inner core out of alignment with the mantle. We specifically address the issue of the role of the inner core tilt in the decade polar motion known as the Markowitz wobble. We show that a decade polar motion of the same amplitude as the observed Markowitz wobble requires a torque of 1020 N m which tilts the inner core by 0.07 degrees. This result critically depends on the viscosity of the inner core; for a viscosity less than 5 × 1017 Pa s, larger torques are required. We investigate the possibility that a torque of 1020 N m with decadal periodicity can be produced by electromagnetic coupling between the inner core and torsional oscillations of the flow in the outer core. We demonstrate that a radial magnetic field at the inner core boundary of 3 to 4 mT is required to obtain a torque of such amplitude. The resulting polar motion is eccentric and polarized, in agreement with the observations. Our model suggests that equatorial torques at the inner core boundary might also excite the Chandler wobble, provided there exists a physical mechanism that can generate a large torque at a 14 month period.

  16. A strong-motion hot spot of the 2016 Meinong, Taiwan, earthquake (Mw = 6.4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroo Kanamori

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite a moderate magnitude, Mw = 6.4, the 5 February 2016 Meinong, Taiwan, earthquake caused significant damage in Tainan City and the surrounding areas. Several seismograms display an impulsive S-wave velocity pulse with an amplitude of about 1 m s-1, which is similar to large S-wave pulses recorded for the past several larger damaging earthquakes, such as the 1995 Kobe, Japan, earthquake (Mw = 6.9 and the 1994 Northridge, California, earthquake (Mw = 6.7. The observed PGV in the Tainan area is about 10 times larger than the median PGV of Mw = 6.4 crustal earthquakes in Taiwan. We investigate the cause of the localized strong ground motions. The peak-to-peak ground-motion displacement at the basin sites near Tainan is about 35 times larger than that at a mountain site with a similar epicentral distance. At some frequency bands (0.9 - 1.1 Hz, the amplitude ratio is as large as 200. Using the focal mechanism of this earthquake, typical “soft” and “hard” crustal structures, and directivity inferred from the observed waveforms and the slip distribution, we show that the combined effect yields an amplitude ratio of 17 to 34. The larger amplitude ratios at higher frequency bands can be probably due to the effects of complex 3-D basin structures. The result indicates that even from a moderate event, if these effects simultaneously work together toward amplifying ground motions, the extremely large ground motions as observed in Tainan can occur. Such occurrences should be taken into consideration in hazard mitigation measures in the place with frequent moderate earthquakes.

  17. A few methods for the theory of collective motions and collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, B.G.

    1984-01-01

    In this series of lectures the time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory of nuclear motions and collisions are treated for collective motion only. For the theory of collisions a representation, the boosted shell model, is proposed in which matrix elements of the T-matrix are easier to evaluate via a variational principle

  18. Description of nuclear collective motion by Wigner function moments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balbutsev, E.B.

    1996-01-01

    The method is presented in which the collective motion is described by the dynamic equations for the nuclear integral characteristics. The 'macroscopic' dynamics is formulated starting from the equations of the microscopic theory. This is done by taking the phase space moments of the Wigner function equation. The theory is applied to the description of collective excitations with multipolarities up to λ=5. (author)

  19. Principles for selecting earthquake motions in engineering design of large dams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krinitzsky, E.L.; Marcuson, William F.

    1983-01-01

    This report gives a synopsis of the various tools and techniques used in selecting earthquake ground motion parameters for large dams. It presents 18 charts giving newly developed relations for acceleration, velocity, and duration versus site earthquake intensity for near- and far-field hard and soft sites and earthquakes having magnitudes above and below 7. The material for this report is based on procedures developed at the Waterways Experiment Station. Although these procedures are suggested primarily for large dams, they may also be applicable for other facilities. Because no standard procedure exists for selecting earthquake motions in engineering design of large dams, a number of precautions are presented to guide users. The selection of earthquake motions is dependent on which one of two types of engineering analyses are performed. A pseudostatic analysis uses a coefficient usually obtained from an appropriate contour map; whereas, a dynamic analysis uses either accelerograms assigned to a site or specified respunse spectra. Each type of analysis requires significantly different input motions. All selections of design motions must allow for the lack of representative strong motion records, especially near-field motions from earthquakes of magnitude 7 and greater, as well as an enormous spread in the available data. Limited data must be projected and its spread bracketed in order to fill in the gaps and to assure that there will be no surprises. Because each site may have differing special characteristics in its geology, seismic history, attenuation, recurrence, interpreted maximum events, etc., as integrated approach gives best results. Each part of the site investigation requires a number of decisions. In some cases, the decision to use a 'least ork' approach may be suitable, simply assuming the worst of several possibilities and testing for it. Because there are no standard procedures to follow, multiple approaches are useful. For example, peak motions at

  20. Research on mechanism of the large-amplitude and narrow-band vibration of a flexible flat plate in the rectangular channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Lifang, E-mail: liu_lifang1106@yahoo.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Zhuxinzhuang, Dewai, Beijing 102206 (China); State Nuclear Power Software Development Center, Building 1, Compound No. 29, North Third Ring Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100029 (China); Lu Daogang [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Zhuxinzhuang, Dewai, Beijing 102206 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The large amplitude and narrow-band vibration experiment was performed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The added mass theory was used to analyze the test plates' natural vibration characteristics in static water. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The occurring condition of the large amplitude and narrow band vibration was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The large amplitude and narrow-band vibration mechanism was investigated. - Abstract: Further experiments and theoretical analysis were performed to investigate mechanism of the large-amplitude and narrow-band vibration behavior of a flexible flat plate in a rectangular channel. Test plates with different thicknesses were adopted in the FIV experiments. The natural vibration characteristics of the flexible flat plates in air were tested, and the added mass theory of column was used to analyze the flexible flat plates' natural vibration characteristics in static water. It was found that the natural vibration frequency of a certain test plate in static water is approximately within the main vibration frequency band of the plate when it was induced to vibrate with the large-amplitude and narrow-band in the rectangular channel. It can be concluded that the harmonic between the flowing fluid and the vibrating plate is one of the key reasons to induce the large-amplitude and narrow-band vibration phenomenon. The occurring condition of the phenomenon and some important narrow-band vibration characteristics of a foursquare fix-supported flexible flat plate were investigated.

  1. Collective motion of cells mediates segregation and pattern formation in co-cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elod Méhes

    Full Text Available Pattern formation by segregation of cell types is an important process during embryonic development. We show that an experimentally yet unexplored mechanism based on collective motility of segregating cells enhances the effects of known pattern formation mechanisms such as differential adhesion, mechanochemical interactions or cell migration directed by morphogens. To study in vitro cell segregation we use time-lapse videomicroscopy and quantitative analysis of the main features of the motion of individual cells or groups. Our observations have been extensive, typically involving the investigation of the development of patterns containing up to 200,000 cells. By either comparing keratocyte types with different collective motility characteristics or increasing cells' directional persistence by the inhibition of Rac1 GTP-ase we demonstrate that enhanced collective cell motility results in faster cell segregation leading to the formation of more extensive patterns. The growth of the characteristic scale of patterns generally follows an algebraic scaling law with exponent values up to 0.74 in the presence of collective motion, compared to significantly smaller exponents in case of diffusive motion.

  2. Response of ENSO amplitude to global warming in CESM large ensemble: uncertainty due to internal variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiao-Tong; Hui, Chang; Yeh, Sang-Wook

    2018-06-01

    El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the dominant mode of variability in the coupled ocean-atmospheric system. Future projections of ENSO change under global warming are highly uncertain among models. In this study, the effect of internal variability on ENSO amplitude change in future climate projections is investigated based on a 40-member ensemble from the Community Earth System Model Large Ensemble (CESM-LE) project. A large uncertainty is identified among ensemble members due to internal variability. The inter-member diversity is associated with a zonal dipole pattern of sea surface temperature (SST) change in the mean along the equator, which is similar to the second empirical orthogonal function (EOF) mode of tropical Pacific decadal variability (TPDV) in the unforced control simulation. The uncertainty in CESM-LE is comparable in magnitude to that among models of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5), suggesting the contribution of internal variability to the intermodel uncertainty in ENSO amplitude change. However, the causations between changes in ENSO amplitude and the mean state are distinct between CESM-LE and CMIP5 ensemble. The CESM-LE results indicate that a large ensemble of 15 members is needed to separate the relative contributions to ENSO amplitude change over the twenty-first century between forced response and internal variability.

  3. Ground-based transmission line conductor motion sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, M.L.; Milano, U.

    1988-01-01

    A ground-based-conductor motion-sensing apparatus is provided for remotely sensing movement of electric-power transmission lines, particularly as would occur during the wind-induced condition known as galloping. The apparatus is comprised of a motion sensor and signal-generating means which are placed underneath a transmission line and will sense changes in the electric field around the line due to excessive line motion. The detector then signals a remote station when a conditioning of galloping is sensed. The apparatus of the present invention is advantageous over the line-mounted sensors of the prior art in that it is easier and less hazardous to install. The system can also be modified so that a signal will only be given when particular conditions, such as specific temperature range, large-amplitude line motion, or excessive duration of the line motion, are occurring

  4. Microstructure and nonlinear signatures of yielding in a heterogeneous colloidal gel under large amplitude oscillatory shear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Juntae; Helgeson, Matthew E., E-mail: helgeson@engineering.ucsb.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Merger, Dimitri; Wilhelm, Manfred [Institute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2014-09-01

    We investigate yielding in a colloidal gel that forms a heterogeneous structure, consisting of a two-phase bicontinuous network of colloid-rich domains of fractal clusters and colloid-poor domains. Combining large amplitude oscillatory shear measurements with simultaneous small and ultra-small angle neutron scattering (rheo-SANS/USANS), we characterize both the nonlinear mechanical processes and strain amplitude-dependent microstructure underlying yielding. We observe a broad, three-stage yielding process that evolves over an order of magnitude in strain amplitude between the onset of nonlinearity and flow. Analyzing the intracycle response as a sequence of physical processes reveals a transition from elastic straining to elastoplastic thinning (which dominates in region I) and eventually yielding (which evolves through region II) and flow (which saturates in region III), and allows quantification of instantaneous nonlinear parameters associated with yielding. These measures exhibit significant strain rate amplitude dependence above a characteristic frequency, which we argue is governed by poroelastic effects. Correlating these results with time-averaged rheo-USANS measurements reveals that the material passes through a cascade of structural breakdown from large to progressively smaller length scales. In region I, compression of the fractal domains leads to the formation of large voids. In regions II and III, cluster-cluster correlations become increasingly homogeneous, suggesting breakage and eventually depercolation of intercluster bonds at the yield point. All significant structural changes occur on the micron-scale, suggesting that large-scale rearrangements of hundreds or thousands of particles, rather than the homogeneous rearrangement of particle-particle bonds, dominate the initial yielding of heterogeneous colloidal gels.

  5. Selfconsistent diabatic approach to dissipative collective nuclear motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niita, K.; Wang, S.J.; Noerenberg, W.; Technische Hochschule Darmstadt

    1986-09-01

    Within a selfconsistent description for the one- and two-body density matrices collective variables are introduced via scaling diabatic states. Equations of collective motion coupled to a collision integral for the single-particle occupation probabilities are derived from the randomness of the two-body interaction matrix elements and from an additional time smoothing procedure. For a linear approximation to the time-dependence of the single-particle energies the collision term conserves energy all by itself, i.e. the time-smoothed time derivative of the correlation energy vanishes. (orig.)

  6. A Comparison of Amplitude-Based and Phase-Based Positron Emission Tomography Gating Algorithms for Segmentation of Internal Target Volumes of Tumors Subject to Respiratory Motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jani, Shyam S.; Robinson, Clifford G.; Dahlbom, Magnus; White, Benjamin M.; Thomas, David H.; Gaudio, Sergio; Low, Daniel A.; Lamb, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively compare the accuracy of tumor volume segmentation in amplitude-based and phase-based respiratory gating algorithms in respiratory-correlated positron emission tomography (PET). Methods and Materials: List-mode fluorodeoxyglucose-PET data was acquired for 10 patients with a total of 12 fluorodeoxyglucose-avid tumors and 9 lymph nodes. Additionally, a phantom experiment was performed in which 4 plastic butyrate spheres with inner diameters ranging from 1 to 4 cm were imaged as they underwent 1-dimensional motion based on 2 measured patient breathing trajectories. PET list-mode data were gated into 8 bins using 2 amplitude-based (equal amplitude bins [A1] and equal counts per bin [A2]) and 2 temporal phase-based gating algorithms. Gated images were segmented using a commercially available gradient-based technique and a fixed 40% threshold of maximum uptake. Internal target volumes (ITVs) were generated by taking the union of all 8 contours per gated image. Segmented phantom ITVs were compared with their respective ground-truth ITVs, defined as the volume subtended by the tumor model positions covering 99% of breathing amplitude. Superior-inferior distances between sphere centroids in the end-inhale and end-exhale phases were also calculated. Results: Tumor ITVs from amplitude-based methods were significantly larger than those from temporal-based techniques (P=.002). For lymph nodes, A2 resulted in ITVs that were significantly larger than either of the temporal-based techniques (P<.0323). A1 produced the largest and most accurate ITVs for spheres with diameters of ≥2 cm (P=.002). No significant difference was shown between algorithms in the 1-cm sphere data set. For phantom spheres, amplitude-based methods recovered an average of 9.5% more motion displacement than temporal-based methods under regular breathing conditions and an average of 45.7% more in the presence of baseline drift (P<.001). Conclusions: Target volumes in images generated

  7. Dynamics of a nonlinear oscillator and a low-amplitude frequency-modulated wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.C.; McNamara, B.

    1987-01-01

    When the frequency of a small amplitude plane wave is varied slowly over a large enough bandwidth and this wave is incident upon a nonlinear oscillator, the resulting perturbed motion can exhibit stochastic behavior. Applications for the study of this system are wide and varied. We apply Lie-transform perturbation theory and mapping techniques in the analysis of the stochastic transition and the consequent induced diffusion in the oscillator phase space. A constant of the motion to the first order in a peturbation parameter is calculated, a mapping approximation is derived, and diffusion calculations from the mapping are given. Copyright 1987 Academic Press, Inc

  8. Padé approximant for normal stress differences in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poungthong, P.; Saengow, C.; Giacomin, A. J.; Kolitawong, C.; Merger, D.; Wilhelm, M.

    2018-04-01

    Analytical solutions for the normal stress differences in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow (LAOS), for continuum or molecular models, normally take the inexact form of the first few terms of a series expansion in the shear rate amplitude. Here, we improve the accuracy of these truncated expansions by replacing them with rational functions called Padé approximants. The recent advent of exact solutions in LAOS presents an opportunity to identify accurate and useful Padé approximants. For this identification, we replace the truncated expansion for the corotational Jeffreys fluid with its Padé approximants for the normal stress differences. We uncover the most accurate and useful approximant, the [3,4] approximant, and then test its accuracy against the exact solution [C. Saengow and A. J. Giacomin, "Normal stress differences from Oldroyd 8-constant framework: Exact analytical solution for large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow," Phys. Fluids 29, 121601 (2017)]. We use Ewoldt grids to show the stunning accuracy of our [3,4] approximant in LAOS. We quantify this accuracy with an objective function and then map it onto the Pipkin space. Our two applications illustrate how to use our new approximant reliably. For this, we use the Spriggs relations to generalize our best approximant to multimode, and then, we compare with measurements on molten high-density polyethylene and on dissolved polyisobutylene in isobutylene oligomer.

  9. Group theoretic approaches to nuclear and hadronic collective motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biedenharn, L.C.

    1982-01-01

    Three approaches to nuclear and hadronic collective motion are reviewed, compared and contrasted: the standard symmetry approach as typified by the Interacting Boson Model, the kinematic symmetry group approach of Gell-Mann and Tomonaga, and the recent direct construction by Buck. 50 references

  10. Group theoretic approaches to nuclear and hadronic collective motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biedenharn, L.C.

    1982-01-01

    Three approaches to nuclear and hadronic collective motion are reviewed, compared and contrasted: the standard symmetry approach as typified by the Interacting Boson Model, the kinematic symmetry group approach of Gell-Mann and Tomonaga, and the recent direct construction by Buck. 50 references.

  11. Longitudinal tracking with phase and amplitude modulated rf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caussyn, D.D.; Ball, M.; Brabson, B.

    1993-06-01

    Synchrotron motion was induced by phase shifting the rf of the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) cooler-synchrotron. The resulting coherent-bunch motion was tracked in longitudinal phase space for as many as 700,000 turns, or for over 350 synchrotron oscillations. Results of recent experimental studies of longitudinal motion in which the rf phase and amplitude were harmonically modulated are also presented. Comparisons of experimental data with numerical simulations, assuming independent particle motion, are made. Observed multiparticle effects are also discussed

  12. Self-consistent treatment of nuclear collective motion with an application to the giant-dipole resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liran, S.; Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa. Dept. of Physics)

    1977-01-01

    This paper extends the recent theory of Liran, Scheefer, Scheid and Greiner on non-adiabatic cranking and nuclear collective motion. In the present work we show the self-consistency conditions for the collective motion, which are indicated by appropriate time-dependent Lagrange multipliers, can be treated explicitly. The energy conservation and the self-consistency condition in the case of one collective degree of freedom are expressed in differential form. This leads to a set of coupled differential equations in time for the many-body wave function, for the collective variable and for the Lagrange multiplier. An iteration procedure similar to that of the previous work is also presented. As an illustrative example, we investigate Brink's single-particle description of the giant-dipole resonance. In this case, the important role played by non-adiabaticity and self-consistency in determining the collective motion is demonstrated and discussed. We also consider the fact that in this example of a fast collective motion, the adiabatic cranking model of Inglis gives the correct mass parameter. (orig.) [de

  13. SU-E-J-252: A Motion Algorithm to Extract Physical and Motion Parameters of a Mobile Target in Cone-Beam Computed Tomographic Imaging Retrospective to Image Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, I; Ahmad, S [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Alsbou, N [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ada, OH (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A motion algorithm was developed to extract actual length, CT-numbers and motion amplitude of a mobile target imaged with cone-beam-CT (CBCT) retrospective to image-reconstruction. Methods: The motion model considered a mobile target moving with a sinusoidal motion and employed three measurable parameters: apparent length, CT number level and gradient of a mobile target obtained from CBCT images to extract information about the actual length and CT number value of the stationary target and motion amplitude. The algorithm was verified experimentally with a mobile phantom setup that has three targets with different sizes manufactured from homogenous tissue-equivalent gel material embedded into a thorax phantom. The phantom moved sinusoidal in one-direction using eight amplitudes (0–20mm) and a frequency of 15-cycles-per-minute. The model required imaging parameters such as slice thickness, imaging time. Results: This motion algorithm extracted three unknown parameters: length of the target, CT-number-level, motion amplitude for a mobile target retrospective to CBCT image reconstruction. The algorithm relates three unknown parameters to measurable apparent length, CT-number-level and gradient for well-defined mobile targets obtained from CBCT images. The motion model agreed with measured apparent lengths which were dependent on actual length of the target and motion amplitude. The cumulative CT-number for a mobile target was dependent on CT-number-level of the stationary target and motion amplitude. The gradient of the CT-distribution of mobile target is dependent on the stationary CT-number-level, actual target length along the direction of motion, and motion amplitude. Motion frequency and phase did not affect the elongation and CT-number distributions of mobile targets when imaging time included several motion cycles. Conclusion: The motion algorithm developed in this study has potential applications in diagnostic CT imaging and radiotherapy to extract

  14. Trampoline effect in extreme ground motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoi, Shin; Kunugi, Takashi; Fujiwara, Hiroyuki

    2008-10-31

    In earthquake hazard assessment studies, the focus is usually on horizontal ground motion. However, records from the 14 June 2008 Iwate-Miyagi earthquake in Japan, a crustal event with a moment magnitude of 6.9, revealed an unprecedented vertical surface acceleration of nearly four times gravity, more than twice its horizontal counterpart. The vertical acceleration was distinctly asymmetric; the waveform envelope was about 1.6 times as large in the upward direction as in the downward direction, which is not explained by existing models of the soil response. We present a simple model of a mass bouncing on a trampoline to account for this asymmetry and the large vertical amplitude. The finding of a hitherto-unknown mode of strong ground motion may prompt major progress in near-source shaking assessments.

  15. Boson models of quadrupole collective motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelevinskij, V.G.

    1985-01-01

    The subject of the lecture is the low-lying excitations of even-even (e-e) spherical nuclei. The predominant role of the quadrupole mode, which determines the structure of spectra and transitions, is obvious on the background of shell periodicity and pair correlations. Typical E2-transitions are strengthened Ω ∼ A 2/3 times in comparison with single particle evaluations. Together with the regularity of the whole picture it gives evidence about collectivization of quadrupole motion. The collective states are combined in bands, where the transition probability are especially great; frequencies ω of the strengthened transitions are small in comparison with pair separation energies of 2 E-bar ∼ 2 MeV. Thus, the description of low-lying excitations of spherical nuclei has to be based on three principles: collectivity (Ω >> 1), adiabaticity (τ ≡ ω/2E-bar << 1) and quadrupole symmetry

  16. Large Amplitude Low Frequency Waves in a Magnetized Nonuniform Electron-Positron-Ion Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Q. Haque; H. Saleem

    2004-01-01

    @@ It is shown that the large amplitude low-frequency electromagnetic drift waves in electron-positron-ion plasmas might give rise to dipolar vortices. A linear dispersion relation of several coupled electrostatic and electromagnetic low-frequency modes is obtained. The relevance of this work to both laboratory and astrophysical situations is pointed out.

  17. Raman scattering evidence for a cascade-like evolution of the charge-density-wave collective amplitude mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eiter, Hans-Martin; Tassini, Leonardo; Muschler, Bernhard; Hackl, Rudi [Walther Meissner Institute, Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities, 85748 Garching (Germany); Lavagnini, Michela; Degiorgi, Leonardo [Laboratorium fuer Festkoerperphysik, ETH - Zuerich, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Chu, Jiun-Haw; Ru, Nancy; Fisher, Ian R. [GLAM, Stanford University, CA 94304 (United States)

    2010-07-01

    We report results of Raman scattering experiments as a function of temperature on the charge-density-wave (CDW) systems DyTe{sub 3} and on LaTe{sub 3} at 6 GPa applied pressure. We clearly identify the unidirectional collective CDW amplitude excitation and follow their temperature dependence in the range from 6 K to 311 K. Surprisingly, we discover that the amplitude mode develops as a succession of two mean-field, BCS-like transitions at two different temperatures. Tri-tellurides with heavier rare-earth atoms (i.e. Tm, Er, Ho, Dy) undergo another phase transition to a bidirectional CDW at low temperatures. In DyTe{sub 3} we find spectroscopic evidence for the amplitude mode excitation associated with the bidirectional CDW occuring below 50 K.

  18. Stable amplitude chimera states in a network of locally coupled Stuart-Landau oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premalatha, K.; Chandrasekar, V. K.; Senthilvelan, M.; Lakshmanan, M.

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the occurrence of collective dynamical states such as transient amplitude chimera, stable amplitude chimera, and imperfect breathing chimera states in a locally coupled network of Stuart-Landau oscillators. In an imperfect breathing chimera state, the synchronized group of oscillators exhibits oscillations with large amplitudes, while the desynchronized group of oscillators oscillates with small amplitudes, and this behavior of coexistence of synchronized and desynchronized oscillations fluctuates with time. Then, we analyze the stability of the amplitude chimera states under various circumstances, including variations in system parameters and coupling strength, and perturbations in the initial states of the oscillators. For an increase in the value of the system parameter, namely, the nonisochronicity parameter, the transient chimera state becomes a stable chimera state for a sufficiently large value of coupling strength. In addition, we also analyze the stability of these states by perturbing the initial states of the oscillators. We find that while a small perturbation allows one to perturb a large number of oscillators resulting in a stable amplitude chimera state, a large perturbation allows one to perturb a small number of oscillators to get a stable amplitude chimera state. We also find the stability of the transient and stable amplitude chimera states and traveling wave states for an appropriate number of oscillators using Floquet theory. In addition, we also find the stability of the incoherent oscillation death states.

  19. Collective motion of groups of self-propelled particles following interacting leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdinandy, B.; Ozogány, K.; Vicsek, T.

    2017-08-01

    In order to keep their cohesiveness during locomotion gregarious animals must make collective decisions. Many species boast complex societies with multiple levels of communities. A common case is when two dominant levels exist, one corresponding to leaders and the other consisting of followers. In this paper we study the collective motion of such two-level assemblies of self-propelled particles. We present a model adapted from one originally proposed to describe the movement of cells resulting in a smoothly varying coherent motion. We shall use the terminology corresponding to large groups of some mammals where leaders and followers form a group called a harem. We study the emergence (self-organization) of sub-groups within a herd during locomotion by computer simulations. The resulting processes are compared with our prior observations of a Przewalski horse herd (Hortobágy, Hungary) which we use as results from a published case study. We find that the model reproduces key features of a herd composed of harems moving on open ground, including fights for followers between leaders and bachelor groups (group of leaders without followers). One of our findings, however, does not agree with the observations. While in our model the emerging group size distribution is normal, the group size distribution of the observed herd based on historical data have been found to follow lognormal distribution. We argue that this indicates that the formation (and the size) of the harems must involve a more complex social topology than simple spatial-distance based interactions.

  20. Large-scale influences in near-wall turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Nicholas; Marusic, Ivan

    2007-03-15

    Hot-wire data acquired in a high Reynolds number facility are used to illustrate the need for adequate scale separation when considering the coherent structure in wall-bounded turbulence. It is found that a large-scale motion in the log region becomes increasingly comparable in energy to the near-wall cycle as the Reynolds number increases. Through decomposition of fluctuating velocity signals, it is shown that this large-scale motion has a distinct modulating influence on the small-scale energy (akin to amplitude modulation). Reassessment of DNS data, in light of these results, shows similar trends, with the rate and intensity of production due to the near-wall cycle subject to a modulating influence from the largest-scale motions.

  1. SU-E-J-150: Four-Dimensional Cone-Beam CT Algorithm by Extraction of Physical and Motion Parameter of Mobile Targets Retrospective to Image Reconstruction with Motion Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, I; Ahmad, S; Alsbou, N

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop 4D-cone-beam CT (CBCT) algorithm by motion modeling that extracts actual length, CT numbers level and motion amplitude of a mobile target retrospective to image reconstruction by motion modeling. Methods: The algorithm used three measurable parameters: apparent length and blurred CT number distribution of a mobile target obtained from CBCT images to determine actual length, CT-number value of the stationary target, and motion amplitude. The predictions of this algorithm were tested with mobile targets that with different well-known sizes made from tissue-equivalent gel which was inserted into a thorax phantom. The phantom moved sinusoidally in one-direction to simulate respiratory motion using eight amplitudes ranging 0–20mm. Results: Using this 4D-CBCT algorithm, three unknown parameters were extracted that include: length of the target, CT number level, speed or motion amplitude for the mobile targets retrospective to image reconstruction. The motion algorithms solved for the three unknown parameters using measurable apparent length, CT number level and gradient for a well-defined mobile target obtained from CBCT images. The motion model agreed with measured apparent lengths which were dependent on the actual target length and motion amplitude. The gradient of the CT number distribution of the mobile target is dependent on the stationary CT number level, actual target length and motion amplitude. Motion frequency and phase did not affect the elongation and CT number distribution of the mobile target and could not be determined. Conclusion: A 4D-CBCT motion algorithm was developed to extract three parameters that include actual length, CT number level and motion amplitude or speed of mobile targets directly from reconstructed CBCT images without prior knowledge of the stationary target parameters. This algorithm provides alternative to 4D-CBCT without requirement to motion tracking and sorting of the images into different breathing phases

  2. SU-E-J-150: Four-Dimensional Cone-Beam CT Algorithm by Extraction of Physical and Motion Parameter of Mobile Targets Retrospective to Image Reconstruction with Motion Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, I; Ahmad, S [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Alsbou, N [Ohio Northern University, Ada, OH (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop 4D-cone-beam CT (CBCT) algorithm by motion modeling that extracts actual length, CT numbers level and motion amplitude of a mobile target retrospective to image reconstruction by motion modeling. Methods: The algorithm used three measurable parameters: apparent length and blurred CT number distribution of a mobile target obtained from CBCT images to determine actual length, CT-number value of the stationary target, and motion amplitude. The predictions of this algorithm were tested with mobile targets that with different well-known sizes made from tissue-equivalent gel which was inserted into a thorax phantom. The phantom moved sinusoidally in one-direction to simulate respiratory motion using eight amplitudes ranging 0–20mm. Results: Using this 4D-CBCT algorithm, three unknown parameters were extracted that include: length of the target, CT number level, speed or motion amplitude for the mobile targets retrospective to image reconstruction. The motion algorithms solved for the three unknown parameters using measurable apparent length, CT number level and gradient for a well-defined mobile target obtained from CBCT images. The motion model agreed with measured apparent lengths which were dependent on the actual target length and motion amplitude. The gradient of the CT number distribution of the mobile target is dependent on the stationary CT number level, actual target length and motion amplitude. Motion frequency and phase did not affect the elongation and CT number distribution of the mobile target and could not be determined. Conclusion: A 4D-CBCT motion algorithm was developed to extract three parameters that include actual length, CT number level and motion amplitude or speed of mobile targets directly from reconstructed CBCT images without prior knowledge of the stationary target parameters. This algorithm provides alternative to 4D-CBCT without requirement to motion tracking and sorting of the images into different breathing phases

  3. Experimental control of Stewart's theoretical model of large amplitude moving striations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berge, G. van den; Vanmarcke, M.

    1977-01-01

    The longitudinal variation of the electron concentration in large amplitude moving striations, computed theoretically by Stewart, has been tested experimentally. The measurements are carried out by means of a sampling probe technique in the glow discharge of neon (I = 105 mA, 2R = 5.6 cm, p 0 = 0.79 torr) and of argon (I = 75 mA, 2R = 5.7 cm, p 0 = 0.46 torr). It is found that the measured dependence of the concentration is not consistent with the theory. (Auth.)

  4. Registration of Large Motion Blurred CMOS Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-28

    raju@ee.iitm.ac.in - Institution : Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Madras, India - Mailing Address : Room ESB 307c, Dept. of Electrical ...AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0066 Registration of Large Motion Blurred CMOS Images Ambasamudram Rajagopalan INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY MADRAS Final...NUMBER 5f.  WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY MADRAS SARDAR PATEL ROAD Chennai, 600036

  5. From schooling to shoaling: patterns of collective motion in zebrafish (Danio rerio.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noam Miller

    Full Text Available Animal groups on the move can take different configurations. For example, groups of fish can either be 'shoals' or 'schools': shoals are simply aggregations of individuals; schools are shoals exhibiting polarized, synchronized motion. Here we demonstrate that polarization distributions of groups of zebrafish (Danio rerio are bimodal, showing two distinct modes of collective motion corresponding to the definitions of shoaling and schooling. Other features of the group's motion also vary consistently between the two modes: zebrafish schools are faster and less dense than zebrafish shoals. Habituation to an environment can also alter the proportion of time zebrafish groups spend schooling or shoaling. Models of collective motion suggest that the degree and stability of group polarization increases with the group's density. Examining zebrafish groups of different sizes from 5 to 50, we show that larger groups are less polarized than smaller groups. Decreased fearfulness in larger groups may function similarly to habituation, causing them to spend more time shoaling than schooling, contrary to most models' predictions.

  6. Modeling magnetic field and TEC signatures of large-amplitude acoustic and gravity waves generated by natural hazard events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettergren, M. D.; Snively, J. B.; Inchin, P.; Komjathy, A.; Verkhoglyadova, O. P.

    2017-12-01

    Ocean and solid earth responses during earthquakes are a significant source of large amplitude acoustic and gravity waves (AGWs) that perturb the overlying ionosphere-thermosphere (IT) system. IT disturbances are routinely detected following large earthquakes (M > 7.0) via GPS total electron content (TEC) observations, which often show acoustic wave ( 3-4 min periods) and gravity wave ( 10-15 min) signatures with amplitudes of 0.05-2 TECU. In cases of very large earthquakes (M > 8.0) the persisting acoustic waves are estimated to have 100-200 m/s compressional velocities in the conducting ionospheric E and F-regions and should generate significant dynamo currents and magnetic field signatures. Indeed, some recent reports (e.g. Hao et al, 2013, JGR, 118, 6) show evidence for magnetic fluctuations, which appear to be related to AGWs, following recent large earthquakes. However, very little quantitative information is available on: (1) the detailed spatial and temporal dependence of these magnetic fluctuations, which are usually observed at a small number of irregularly arranged stations, and (2) the relation of these signatures to TEC perturbations in terms of relative amplitudes, frequency, and timing for different events. This work investigates space- and time-dependent behavior of both TEC and magnetic fluctuations following recent large earthquakes, with the aim to improve physical understanding of these perturbations via detailed, high-resolution, two- and three-dimensional modeling case studies with a coupled neutral atmospheric and ionospheric model, MAGIC-GEMINI (Zettergren and Snively, 2015, JGR, 120, 9). We focus on cases inspired by the large Chilean earthquakes from the past decade (viz., the M > 8.0 earthquakes from 2010 and 2015) to constrain the sources for the model, i.e. size, frequency, amplitude, and timing, based on available information from ocean buoy and seismometer data. TEC data are used to validate source amplitudes and to constrain

  7. Illusory motion reveals velocity matching, not foveation, drives smooth pursuit of large objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zheng; Watamaniuk, Scott N J; Heinen, Stephen J

    2017-10-01

    When small objects move in a scene, we keep them foveated with smooth pursuit eye movements. Although large objects such as people and animals are common, it is nonetheless unknown how we pursue them since they cannot be foveated. It might be that the brain calculates an object's centroid, and then centers the eyes on it during pursuit as a foveation mechanism might. Alternatively, the brain merely matches the velocity by motion integration. We test these alternatives with an illusory motion stimulus that translates at a speed different from its retinal motion. The stimulus was a Gabor array that translated at a fixed velocity, with component Gabors that drifted with motion consistent or inconsistent with the translation. Velocity matching predicts different pursuit behaviors across drift conditions, while centroid matching predicts no difference. We also tested whether pursuit can segregate and ignore irrelevant local drifts when motion and centroid information are consistent by surrounding the Gabors with solid frames. Finally, observers judged the global translational speed of the Gabors to determine whether smooth pursuit and motion perception share mechanisms. We found that consistent Gabor motion enhanced pursuit gain while inconsistent, opposite motion diminished it, drawing the eyes away from the center of the stimulus and supporting a motion-based pursuit drive. Catch-up saccades tended to counter the position offset, directing the eyes opposite to the deviation caused by the pursuit gain change. Surrounding the Gabors with visible frames canceled both the gain increase and the compensatory saccades. Perceived speed was modulated analogous to pursuit gain. The results suggest that smooth pursuit of large stimuli depends on the magnitude of integrated retinal motion information, not its retinal location, and that the position system might be unnecessary for generating smooth velocity to large pursuit targets.

  8. A novel smart rotor support with shape memory alloy metal rubber for high temperatures and variable amplitude vibrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Yanhong; Zhang, Qicheng; Zhang, Dayi; Hong, Jie; Scarpa, Fabrizio; Liu, Baolong

    2014-01-01

    The work describes the design, manufacturing and testing of a smart rotor support with shape memory alloy metal rubber (SMA-MR) elements, able to provide variable stiffness and damping characteristics with temperature, motion amplitude and excitation frequency. Differences in damping behavior and nonlinear stiffness between SMA-MR and more traditional metal rubber supports are discussed. The mechanical performance shown by the prototype demonstrates the feasibility of using the SMA-MR concept for active vibration control in rotordynamics, in particular at high temperatures and large amplitude vibrations. (paper)

  9. On expansion of scattering amplitude at large momentum transfers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edneral, V.F.; Troshin, S.M.; Tyurin, N.E.

    1979-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to construct an iterative approximation for hadronic scattering amplitude and to search for the related small parameters. The expansion of the amplitude is obtained. A series is derived where the role of the small parameter is played by the quantity dependent on the momentum transfer. The appearance of the small parameter is directly related to the growth of total cross section. For the case g 2 not equal to 0 in the framework of the strong interaction theory model, based on the solution of three-domensional dynamical equation an expression is obtained for scattering amplitude in the form of a series over the quantity decreasing with the growth of momentum transfer

  10. Contrast gain control in first- and second-order motion perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Z L; Sperling, G

    1996-12-01

    A novel pedestal-plus-test paradigm is used to determine the nonlinear gain-control properties of the first-order (luminance) and the second-order (texture-contrast) motion systems, that is, how these systems' responses to motion stimuli are reduced by pedestals and other masking stimuli. Motion-direction thresholds were measured for test stimuli consisting of drifting luminance and texture-contrast-modulation stimuli superimposed on pedestals of various amplitudes. (A pedestal is a static sine-wave grating of the same type and same spatial frequency as the moving test grating.) It was found that first-order motion-direction thresholds are unaffected by small pedestals, but at pedestal contrasts above 1-2% (5-10 x pedestal threshold), motion thresholds increase proportionally to pedestal amplitude (a Weber law). For first-order stimuli, pedestal masking is specific to the spatial frequency of the test. On the other hand, motion-direction thresholds for texture-contrast stimuli are independent of pedestal amplitude (no gain control whatever) throughout the accessible pedestal amplitude range (from 0 to 40%). However, when baseline carrier contrast increases (with constant pedestal modulation amplitude), motion thresholds increase, showing that gain control in second-order motion is determined not by the modulator (as in first-order motion) but by the carrier. Note that baseline contrast of the carrier is inherently independent of spatial frequency of the modulator. The drastically different gain-control properties of the two motion systems and prior observations of motion masking and motion saturation are all encompassed in a functional theory. The stimulus inputs to both first- and second-order motion process are normalized by feedforward, shunting gain control. The different properties arise because the modulator is used to control the first-order gain and the carrier is used to control the second-order gain.

  11. Simulated earthquake ground motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanmarcke, E.H.; Gasparini, D.A.

    1977-01-01

    The paper reviews current methods for generating synthetic earthquake ground motions. Emphasis is on the special requirements demanded of procedures to generate motions for use in nuclear power plant seismic response analysis. Specifically, very close agreement is usually sought between the response spectra of the simulated motions and prescribed, smooth design response spectra. The features and capabilities of the computer program SIMQKE, which has been widely used in power plant seismic work are described. Problems and pitfalls associated with the use of synthetic ground motions in seismic safety assessment are also pointed out. The limitations and paucity of recorded accelerograms together with the widespread use of time-history dynamic analysis for obtaining structural and secondary systems' response have motivated the development of earthquake simulation capabilities. A common model for synthesizing earthquakes is that of superposing sinusoidal components with random phase angles. The input parameters for such a model are, then, the amplitudes and phase angles of the contributing sinusoids as well as the characteristics of the variation of motion intensity with time, especially the duration of the motion. The amplitudes are determined from estimates of the Fourier spectrum or the spectral density function of the ground motion. These amplitudes may be assumed to be varying in time or constant for the duration of the earthquake. In the nuclear industry, the common procedure is to specify a set of smooth response spectra for use in aseismic design. This development and the need for time histories have generated much practical interest in synthesizing earthquakes whose response spectra 'match', or are compatible with a set of specified smooth response spectra

  12. When is respiratory management necessary for partial breast intensity modulated radiotherapy: A respiratory amplitude escalation treatment planning study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quirk, Sarah; Conroy, Leigh; Smith, Wendy L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The impact of typical respiratory motion amplitudes (∼2 mm) on partial breast irradiation (PBI) is minimal; however, some patients have larger respiratory amplitudes that may negatively affect dose homogeneity. Here we determine at what amplitude respiratory management may be required to maintain plan quality. Methods and Materials: Ten patients were planned with PBI IMRT. Respiratory motion (2–20 mm amplitude) probability density functions were convolved with static plan fluence to estimate the delivered dose. Evaluation metrics included target coverage, ipsilateral breast hotspot, homogeneity, and uniformity indices. Results: Degradation of dose homogeneity was the limiting factor in reduction of plan quality due to respiratory motion, not loss of coverage. Hotspot increases were observed even at typical motion amplitudes. At 2 and 5 mm, 2/10 plans had a hotspot greater than 107% and at 10 mm this increased to 5/10 plans. Target coverage was only compromised at larger amplitudes: 5/10 plans did not meet coverage criteria at 15 mm amplitude and no plans met minimum coverage at 20 mm. Conclusions: We recommend that if respiratory amplitude is greater than 10 mm, respiratory management or alternative radiotherapy should be considered due to an increase in the hotspot in the ipsilateral breast and a decrease in dose homogeneity

  13. Sequential multipoint motion of the tympanic membrane measured by laser Doppler vibrometry: preliminary results for normal tympanic membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunimoto, Yasuomi; Hasegawa, Kensaku; Arii, Shiro; Kataoka, Hideyuki; Yazama, Hiroaki; Kuya, Junko; Kitano, Hiroya

    2014-04-01

    Numerous studies have reported sound-induced motion of the tympanic membrane (TM). To demonstrate sequential motion characteristics of the entire TM by noncontact laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV), we have investigated multipoint TM measurement. A laser Doppler vibrometer was mounted on a surgical microscope. The velocity was measured at 33 points on the TM using noncontact LDV without any reflectors. Measurements were performed with tonal stimuli of 1, 3, and 6 kHz. Amplitudes were calculated from these measurements, and time-dependent changes in TM motion were described using a graphics application. TM motions were detected more clearly and stably at 1 and 3 kHz than at other frequencies. This is because the external auditory canal acted as a resonant tube near 3 kHz. TM motion displayed 1 peak at 1 kHz and 2 peaks at 3 kHz. Large amplitudes were detected in the posterosuperior quadrant (PSQ) at 1 kHz and in the PSQ and anteroinferior quadrant (AIQ) at 3 kHz. The entire TM showed synchronized movement centered on the PSQ at 1 kHz, with phase-shifting between PSQ and AIQ movement at 3 kHz. Amplitude was smaller at the umbo than at other parts. In contrast, amplitudes at high frequencies were too small and complicated to detect any obvious peaks. Sequential multipoint motion of the tympanic membrane showed that vibration characteristics of the TM differ according to the part and frequency.

  14. Acoustic Measurement Of Periodic Motion Of Levitated Object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, John L.; Barmatz, Martin B.

    1992-01-01

    Some internal vibrations, oscillations in position, and rotations of acoustically levitated object measured by use of microphone already installed in typical levitation chamber for tuning chamber to resonance and monitoring operation. Levitating acoustic signal modulated by object motion of lower frequency. Amplitude modulation detected and analyzed spectrally to determine amplitudes and frequencies of motions.

  15. Motion induced interplay effects for VMAT radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edvardsson, Anneli; Nordström, Fredrik; Ceberg, Crister; Ceberg, Sofie

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a method to simulate breathing motion induced interplay effects for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), to verify the proposed method with measurements, and to use the method to investigate how interplay effects vary with different patient- and machine specific parameters. VMAT treatment plans were created on a virtual phantom in a treatment planning system (TPS). Interplay effects were simulated by dividing each plan into smaller sub-arcs using an in-house developed software and shifting the isocenter for each sub-arc to simulate a sin6 breathing motion in the superior–inferior direction. The simulations were performed for both flattening-filter (FF) and flattening-filter free (FFF) plans and for different breathing amplitudes, period times, initial breathing phases, dose levels, plan complexities, CTV sizes, and collimator angles. The resulting sub-arcs were calculated in the TPS, generating a dose distribution including the effects of motion. The interplay effects were separated from dose blurring and the relative dose differences to 2% and 98% of the CTV volume (ΔD98% and ΔD2%) were calculated. To verify the simulation method, measurements were carried out, both static and during motion, using a quasi-3D phantom and a motion platform. The results of the verification measurements during motion were comparable to the results of the static measurements. Considerable interplay effects were observed for individual fractions, with the minimum ΔD98% and maximum ΔD2% being  ‑16.7% and 16.2%, respectively. The extent of interplay effects was larger for FFF compared to FF and generally increased for higher breathing amplitudes, larger period times, lower dose levels, and more complex treatment plans. Also, the interplay effects varied considerably with the initial breathing phase, and larger variations were observed for smaller CTV sizes. In conclusion, a method to simulate motion induced interplay effects was

  16. Motion induced interplay effects for VMAT radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edvardsson, Anneli; Nordström, Fredrik; Ceberg, Crister; Ceberg, Sofie

    2018-04-19

    The purpose of this study was to develop a method to simulate breathing motion induced interplay effects for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), to verify the proposed method with measurements, and to use the method to investigate how interplay effects vary with different patient- and machine specific parameters. VMAT treatment plans were created on a virtual phantom in a treatment planning system (TPS). Interplay effects were simulated by dividing each plan into smaller sub-arcs using an in-house developed software and shifting the isocenter for each sub-arc to simulate a sin 6 breathing motion in the superior-inferior direction. The simulations were performed for both flattening-filter (FF) and flattening-filter free (FFF) plans and for different breathing amplitudes, period times, initial breathing phases, dose levels, plan complexities, CTV sizes, and collimator angles. The resulting sub-arcs were calculated in the TPS, generating a dose distribution including the effects of motion. The interplay effects were separated from dose blurring and the relative dose differences to 2% and 98% of the CTV volume (ΔD 98% and ΔD 2% ) were calculated. To verify the simulation method, measurements were carried out, both static and during motion, using a quasi-3D phantom and a motion platform. The results of the verification measurements during motion were comparable to the results of the static measurements. Considerable interplay effects were observed for individual fractions, with the minimum ΔD 98% and maximum ΔD 2% being  -16.7% and 16.2%, respectively. The extent of interplay effects was larger for FFF compared to FF and generally increased for higher breathing amplitudes, larger period times, lower dose levels, and more complex treatment plans. Also, the interplay effects varied considerably with the initial breathing phase, and larger variations were observed for smaller CTV sizes. In conclusion, a method to simulate motion induced interplay effects was

  17. Air motions accompanying the development of a planetary wave critical layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salby, Murry L.; O'Sullivan, Donal; Callaghan, Patrick; Garcia, Rolando R.

    1990-01-01

    The horizontal air motions accompanying the development of a planetary wave critical layer are presently investigated on the sphere, in terms of wave amplitude, the characteristics of the zonal flow, and dissipation. While attention is given to adiabatic motions, which should furnish an upper bound on the redistribution of conserved quantities by eddy stirring, nonconservative processes may be important in determining how large a role eddy stirring actually plays in the redistribution of atmospheric constituents. Nonconservative processes may also influence tracer distributions by directly affecting dynamics.

  18. Effects of Age and Gender on Hand Motion Tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wing Lok Au

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Wearable and wireless motion sensor devices have facilitated the automated computation of speed, amplitude, and rhythm of hand motion tasks. The aim of this study is to determine if there are any biological influences on these kinematic parameters. Methods. 80 healthy subjects performed hand motion tasks twice for each hand, with movements measured using a wireless motion sensor device (Kinesia, Cleveland Medical Devices Inc., Cleveland, OH. Multivariate analyses were performed with age, gender, and height added into the model. Results. Older subjects performed poorer in finger tapping (FT speed (r=0.593, p<0.001, hand-grasp (HG speed (r=0.517, p<0.001, and pronation-supination (PS speed (r=0.485, p<0.001. Men performed better in FT rhythm p<0.02, HG speed p<0.02, HG amplitude p<0.02, and HG rhythm p<0.05. Taller subjects performed better in the speed and amplitude components of FT p<0.02 and HG tasks p<0.02. After multivariate analyses, only age and gender emerged as significant independent factors influencing the speed but not the amplitude and rhythm components of hand motion tasks. Gender exerted an independent influence only on HG speed, with better performance in men p<0.05. Conclusions. Age, gender, and height are not independent factors influencing the amplitude and rhythm components of hand motion tasks. The speed component is affected by age and gender differences.

  19. Motion monitoring during a course of lung radiotherapy with anchored electromagnetic transponders. Quantification of inter- and intrafraction motion and variability of relative transponder positions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, Daniela [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology (NCRO), Heidelberg Institute for Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology (NCRO), Heidelberg Institute for Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Heidelberg (Germany); The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Joint Department of Physics, London (United Kingdom); Roeder, Falk [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Clinical Cooperation Unit Molecular Radiooncology, Heidelberg (Germany); University of Munich (LMU), Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Gompelmann, Daniela; Herth, Felix [University of Heidelberg, Pneumology and Critical Care Medicine, Thoraxklinik, Heidelberg (Germany); German Center for Lung Research, Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-10-15

    Anchored electromagnetic transponders for tumor motion monitoring during lung radiotherapy were clinically evaluated. First, intrafractional motion patterns were analyzed as well as their interfractional variations. Second, intra- and interfractional changes of the geometric transponder positions were investigated. Intrafractional motion data from 7 patients with an upper or middle lobe tumor and three implanted transponders each was used to calculate breathing amplitudes, overall motion amount and motion midlines in three mutual perpendicular directions and three-dimensionally (3D) for 162 fractions. For 6 patients intra- and interfractional variations in transponder distances and in the size of the triangle defined by the transponder locations over the treatment course were determined. Mean 3D values of all fractions were up to 4.0, 4.6 and 3.4 mm per patient for amplitude, overall motion amount and midline deviation, respectively. Intrafractional transponder distances varied with standard deviations up to 3.2 mm, while a maximal triangle shrinkage of 36.5% over 39 days was observed. Electromagnetic real-time motion monitoring was feasible for all patients. Detected respiratory motion was on average modest in this small cohort without lower lobe tumors, but changes in motion midline were of the same size as the amplitudes and greater midline motion can be observed in some fractions. Intra- and interfractional variations of the geometric transponder positions can be large, so for reliable motion management correlation between transponder and tumor motion needs to be evaluated per patient. (orig.) [German] Verankerte, elektromagnetische Transponder fuer die Bewegungserkennung des Tumors waehrend der Strahlentherapie der Lunge wurden klinisch evaluiert. Dafuer wurden intrafraktionelle Bewegungsmuster und ihre interfraktionellen Variationen analysiert und intra- und interfraktionelle Veraenderungen der geometrischen Transponderpositionen untersucht. Intrafraktionelle

  20. Variational principles for collective motion: Relation between invariance principle of the Schroedinger equation and the trace variational principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, A.; Tanabe, K.

    1984-01-01

    The invariance principle of the Schroedinger equation provides a basis for theories of collective motion with the help of the time-dependent variational principle. It is formulated here with maximum generality, requiring only the motion of intrinsic state in the collective space. Special cases arise when the trial vector is a generalized coherent state and when it is a uniform superposition of collective eigenstates. The latter example yields variational principles uncovered previously only within the framework of the equations of motion method. (orig.)

  1. Collective circular motion in synchronized and balanced formations with second-order rotational dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anoop; Ghose, Debasish

    2018-01-01

    This paper considers collective circular motion of multi-agent systems in which all the agents are required to traverse different circles or a common circle at a prescribed angular velocity. It is required to achieve these collective motions with the heading angles of the agents synchronized or balanced. In synchronization, the agents and their centroid have a common velocity direction, while in balancing, the movement of agents causes the location of the centroid to become stationary. The agents are initially considered to move at unit speed around individual circles at different angular velocities. It is assumed that the agents are subjected to limited communication constraints, and exchange relative information according to a time-invariant undirected graph. We present suitable feedback control laws for each of these motion coordination tasks by considering a second-order rotational dynamics of the agent. Simulations are given to illustrate the theoretical findings.

  2. Amplitude-Mode Dynamics of Polariton Condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brierley, R. T.; Littlewood, P. B.; Eastham, P. R.

    2011-01-01

    We study the stability of collective amplitude excitations in nonequilibrium polariton condensates. These excitations correspond to renormalized upper polaritons and to the collective amplitude modes of atomic gases and superconductors. They would be present following a quantum quench or could be created directly by resonant excitation. We show that uniform amplitude excitations are unstable to the production of excitations at finite wave vectors, leading to the formation of density-modulated phases. The physical processes causing the instabilities can be understood by analogy to optical parametric oscillators and the atomic Bose supernova.

  3. Data analysis for seismic motion characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimaru, Tsuneari; Kohriya, Yorihide

    2002-10-01

    This data analysis is aimed at studying the characteristics of amplification of acceleration amplitude from deep underground to the surface, and is one of several continuous studies on the effects of earthquake motion. Seismic wave records were observed via a center array located in Shibata-cho, Miyagi Prefecture, which is part of the Kumagai-Gumi Array System for Strong Earthquake Motion (KASSEM) located on the Pacific coast in Miyagi and Fukushima Prefectures. Using acceleration waves obtained from earthquake observations, the amplification ratios of maximum acceleration amplitude and of root mean square acceleration amplitude which were based on the deepest observation point were estimated. Comparison between the seismic motion amplification characteristics of this study were made with the analyzed data at the Kamaishi-Mine (Kamaishi Miyagi Prefecture). The obtained results are as follows. The amplification ratios estimated from maximum acceleration amplitude and root mean square acceleration amplitude are almost constant in soft rock formations. However, amplification ratios at the surface in diluvium and alluvium are about three to four times larger than the ratios in soft rock formations. The amplification ratios estimated from root mean square acceleration amplitude are less dispersed than the ratios estimated from maximum acceleration amplitude. Comparing the results of this analysis with the results obtained at the Kamaishi-Mine, despite the difference in the rock types and the geologic formations at the observation points, there is a tendency for the amplification ratios at both points to be relatively small in the rock foundation and gradually increase toward the ground surface. (author)

  4. Long-period Ground Motion Simulation in the Osaka Basin during the 2011 Great Tohoku Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, T.; Kubo, H.; Asano, K.; Sato, K.; Aoi, S.

    2014-12-01

    Large amplitude long-period ground motions (1-10s) with long duration were observed in the Osaka sedimentary basin during the 2011 Tohoku earthquake (Mw9.0) and its aftershock (Ibaraki-Oki, Mw7.7), which is about 600 km away from the source regions. Sato et al. (2013) analyzed strong ground motion records from the source region to the Osaka basin and showed the following characteristics. (1) In the period range of 1 to 10s, the amplitude of horizontal components of the ground motion at the site-specific period is amplified in the Osaka basin sites. The predominant period is about 7s in the bay area where the largest pSv were observed. (2) The velocity Fourier amplitude spectra with their predominant period of around 7s are observed at the bedrock sites surrounding the Osaka basin. Those characteristics were observed during both of the mainshock and the largest aftershock. Therefore, large long-period ground motions in the Osaka basin are generated by the combination of propagation-path and basin effects. They simulated ground motions due to the largest aftershock as a simple point source model using three-dimensional FDM (GMS; Aoi and Fujiwara, 1999). They used a three-dimensional velocity structure based on the Japan Integrated Velocity Structure Model (JIVSM, Koketsu et al., 2012), with the minimum effective period of the computation of 3s. Their simulation result reproduced the observation characteristics well and it validates the applicability of the JIVSM for the long period ground motion simulation. In this study, we try to simulate long-period ground motions during the mainshock. The source model we used for the simulation is based on the SMGA model obtained by Asano and Iwata (2012). We succeed to simulate long-period ground motion propagation from Kanto area to the Osaka basin fairly well. The long-period ground motion simulations with the several Osaka basin velocity structure models are done for improving the model applicability. We used strong motion

  5. Consistent microscopic theory of collective motion in the framework of an ATDHF approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeke, K.; Reinhard, P.

    1978-01-01

    Based on merely two assumptions, namely the existence of a collective Hamiltonian and that the collective motion evolves along Slater determinants, we first derive a set of adiabatic time-dependent Hartree-Fock equations (ATDHF) which determine the collective path, the mass and the potential, second give a unique procedure for quantizing the resulting classical collective Hamiltonian, and third explain how to use the collective wavefunctions, which are eigenstates of the quantized Hamiltonian

  6. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Lorazepam to Reduce Liver Motion in Patients Receiving Upper Abdominal Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsang, Derek S.; Voncken, Francine E.M.; Tse, Regina V. [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Sykes, Jenna [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Wong, Rebecca K.S.; Dinniwell, Rob E.; Kim, John; Ringash, Jolie; Brierley, James D.; Cummings, Bernard J.; Brade, Anthony [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Dawson, Laura A., E-mail: laura.dawson@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Reduction of respiratory motion is desirable to reduce the volume of normal tissues irradiated, to improve concordance of planned and delivered doses, and to improve image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). We hypothesized that pretreatment lorazepam would lead to a measurable reduction of liver motion. Methods and Materials: Thirty-three patients receiving upper abdominal IGRT were recruited to a double-blinded randomized controlled crossover trial. Patients were randomized to 1 of 2 study arms: arm 1 received lorazepam 2 mg by mouth on day 1, followed by placebo 4 to 8 days later; arm 2 received placebo on day 1, followed by lorazepam 4 to 8 days later. After tablet ingestion and daily radiation therapy, amplitude of liver motion was measured on both study days. The primary outcomes were reduction in craniocaudal (CC) liver motion using 4-dimensional kV cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and the proportion of patients with liver motion ≤5 mm. Secondary endpoints included motion measured with cine magnetic resonance imaging and kV fluoroscopy. Results: Mean relative and absolute reduction in CC amplitude with lorazepam was 21% and 2.5 mm respectively (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-3.9, P=.001), as assessed with CBCT. Reduction in CC amplitude to ≤5 mm residual liver motion was seen in 13% (95% CI 1%-25%) of patients receiving lorazepam (vs 10% receiving placebo, P=NS); 65% (95% CI 48%-81%) had reduction in residual CC liver motion to ≤10 mm (vs 52% with placebo, P=NS). Patients with large respiratory movement and patients who took lorazepam ≥60 minutes before imaging had greater reductions in liver CC motion. Mean reductions in liver CC amplitude on magnetic resonance imaging and fluoroscopy were nonsignificant. Conclusions: Lorazepam reduces liver motion in the CC direction; however, average magnitude of reduction is small, and most patients have residual motion >5 mm.

  7. Increase in the Amplitude of Line-of-sight Velocities of the Small-scale Motions in a Solar Filament before Eruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, Daikichi; Isobe, Hiroaki [Graduate School of Advanced Integrated Studies in Human Survivability, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8306 (Japan); Otsuji, Kenichi; Ishii, Takako T.; Sakaue, Takahito; Hirose, Kumi, E-mail: seki@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan)

    2017-07-10

    We present a study on the evolution of the small-scale velocity field in a solar filament as it approaches the eruption. The observation was carried out by the Solar Dynamics Doppler Imager (SDDI) that was newly installed on the Solar Magnetic Activity Research Telescope at Hida Observatory. The SDDI obtains a narrowband full-disk image of the Sun at 73 channels from H α − 9.0 Å to H α + 9.0 Å, allowing us to study the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity of the filament before and during the eruption. The observed filament is a quiescent filament that erupted on 2016 November 5. We derived the LOS velocity at each pixel in the filament using the Becker’s cloud model, and made the histograms of the LOS velocity at each time. The standard deviation of the LOS velocity distribution can be regarded as a measure for the amplitude of the small-scale motion in the filament. We found that the standard deviation on the previous day of the eruption was mostly constant around 2–3 km s{sup −1}, and it slightly increased to 3–4 km s{sup −1} on the day of the eruption. It shows a further increase, with a rate of 1.1 m s{sup −2}, about three hours before eruption, and another increase, with a rate of 2.8 m s{sup −2}, about an hour before eruption. From this result we suggest that the increase in the amplitude of the small-scale motions in a filament can be regarded as a precursor of the eruption.

  8. Dendro-dendritic interactions between motion-sensitive large-field neurons in the fly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Juergen; Borst, Alexander

    2002-04-15

    For visual course control, flies rely on a set of motion-sensitive neurons called lobula plate tangential cells (LPTCs). Among these cells, the so-called CH (centrifugal horizontal) cells shape by their inhibitory action the receptive field properties of other LPTCs called FD (figure detection) cells specialized for figure-ground discrimination based on relative motion. Studying the ipsilateral input circuitry of CH cells by means of dual-electrode and combined electrical-optical recordings, we find that CH cells receive graded input from HS (large-field horizontal system) cells via dendro-dendritic electrical synapses. This particular wiring scheme leads to a spatial blur of the motion image on the CH cell dendrite, and, after inhibiting FD cells, to an enhancement of motion contrast. This could be crucial for enabling FD cells to discriminate object from self motion.

  9. Responses of Medullary Lateral Line Units of the Goldfish, Carassius auratus, to Amplitude-Modulated Sinusoidal Wave Stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramadan Ali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the responses of brainstem lateral line units in goldfish, Carassius auratus, to constant-amplitude and to amplitude-modulated sinusoidal water motions. If stimulated with constant-amplitude sinusoidal water motions, units responded with phasic (50% or with sustained (50% increases in dicharge rate. Based on isodisplacement curves, units preferred low (33 Hz, 12.5%, mid (50 Hz, 10% and 100 Hz, 30% or high (200 Hz, 47.5% frequencies. In most units, responses were weakly phase locked to the carrier frequency. However, at a carrier frequency of 50 Hz or 100 Hz, a substantial proportion of the units exhibited strong phase locking. If stimulated with amplitude-modulated water motions, units responded with a burst of discharge to each modulation cycle, that is, units phase locked to the amplitude modulation frequency. Response properties of brainstem units were in many respects comparable to those of midbrain units, suggesting that they emerge first in the lateral line brainstem.

  10. Autoregressive harmonic analysis of the earth's polar motion using homogeneous international latitude service data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong Chao, B.

    1983-12-01

    The homogeneous set of 80-year-long (1900-1979) International Latitude Service (ILS) polar motion data is analyzed using the autoregressive method (Chao and Gilbert, 1980) which resolves and produces estimates for the complex frequency (or frequency and Q) and complex amplitude (or amplitude and phase) of each harmonic component in the data. Principal conclusion of this analysis are that (1) the ILS data support the multiple-component hypothesis of the Chandler wobble (it is found that the Chandler wobble can be adequately modeled as a linear combination of four (coherent) harmonic components, each of which represents a steady, nearly circular, prograte motion, a behavior that is inconsistent with the hypothesis of a single Chandler period excited in a temporally and/or spatially random fashion). (2) the four-component Chandler wobble model ``explains'' the apparent phase reversal during 1920-1940 and the pre-1950 empirical period-amplitude relation, (3) the annual wobble is shown to be rather stationary over the years both in amplitude and in phase and no evidence is found to support the large variations reported by earlier investigations. (4) the Markowitz wobble is found to support the large variations reported by earlier investigations. (4) the Markowitz wobble is found to be marginally retrograde and appears to have a complicated behavior which cannot be resolved because of the shortness of the data set.

  11. An extended numerical calibration method for an electrochemical probe in thin wavy flow with large amplitude waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Ki Yong; No, Hee Cheon [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-31

    The calibrating method for an electrochemical probe, neglecting the effect of the normal velocity on the mass transport, can cause large errors when applied to the measurement of wall shear rates in thin wavy flow with large amplitude waves. An extended calibrating method is developed to consider the contributions of the normal velocity. The inclusion of the turbulence-induced normal velocity term is found to have a negligible effect on the mass transfer coefficient. The contribution of the wave-induced normal velocity can be classified on the dimensionless parameter, V. If V is above a critical value of V, V{sub crit}, the effects of the wave-induced normal velocity become larger with an increase in V. While its effects negligible for inversely. The present inverse method can predict the unknown shear rate more accurately in thin wavy flow with large amplitude waves than the previous method. 18 refs., 8 figs. (Author)

  12. An extended numerical calibration method for an electrochemical probe in thin wavy flow with large amplitude waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Ki Yong; No, Hee Cheon [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    The calibrating method for an electrochemical probe, neglecting the effect of the normal velocity on the mass transport, can cause large errors when applied to the measurement of wall shear rates in thin wavy flow with large amplitude waves. An extended calibrating method is developed to consider the contributions of the normal velocity. The inclusion of the turbulence-induced normal velocity term is found to have a negligible effect on the mass transfer coefficient. The contribution of the wave-induced normal velocity can be classified on the dimensionless parameter, V. If V is above a critical value of V, V{sub crit}, the effects of the wave-induced normal velocity become larger with an increase in V. While its effects negligible for inversely. The present inverse method can predict the unknown shear rate more accurately in thin wavy flow with large amplitude waves than the previous method. 18 refs., 8 figs. (Author)

  13. Phase Coherence of Large Amplitude MHD Waves in the Earth's Foreshock: Geotail Observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hada, Tohru; Koga, Daiki; Yamamoto, Eiko

    2003-01-01

    Large amplitude MHD turbulence is commonly found in the earth's foreshock region. It can be represented as a superposition of Fourier modes with characteristic frequency, amplitude, and phase. Nonlinear interactions between the Fourier modes are likely to produce finite correlation among the wave phases. For discussions of various transport processes of energetic particles, it is fundamentally important to determine whether the wave phases are randomly distributed (as assumed in quasi-linear theories) or they have a finite coherence. However, naive inspection of wave phases does not reveal anything, as the wave phase is sensitively related to the choice of origin of the coordinate, which should be arbitrary. Using a method based on a surrogate data technique and a fractal analysis, we analyzed Geotail magnetic field data to evaluate the phase coherence among the MHD waves in the earth's foreshock region. We show that the correlation of wave phases does exist, indicating that the nonlinear interactions between the waves is in progress. Furthermore, by introducing an index to represent the degree of the phase coherence, we discuss that the wave phases become more coherent as the turbulence amplitude increases, and also as the propagation angle of the most dominant wave mode becomes oblique. Details of the analysis as well as implications of the present results to transport processes of energetic particles will be discussed

  14. Realistic respiratory motion margins for external beam partial breast irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conroy, Leigh; Quirk, Sarah [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N2 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Smith, Wendy L., E-mail: wendy.smith@albertahealthservices.ca [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N2 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: Respiratory margins for partial breast irradiation (PBI) have been largely based on geometric observations, which may overestimate the margin required for dosimetric coverage. In this study, dosimetric population-based respiratory margins and margin formulas for external beam partial breast irradiation are determined. Methods: Volunteer respiratory data and anterior–posterior (AP) dose profiles from clinical treatment plans of 28 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) PBI patient plans were used to determine population-based respiratory margins. The peak-to-peak amplitudes (A) of realistic respiratory motion data from healthy volunteers were scaled from A = 1 to 10 mm to create respiratory motion probability density functions. Dose profiles were convolved with the respiratory probability density functions to produce blurred dose profiles accounting for respiratory motion. The required margins were found by measuring the distance between the simulated treatment and original dose profiles at the 95% isodose level. Results: The symmetric dosimetric respiratory margins to cover 90%, 95%, and 100% of the simulated treatment population were 1.5, 2, and 4 mm, respectively. With patient set up at end exhale, the required margins were larger in the anterior direction than the posterior. For respiratory amplitudes less than 5 mm, the population-based margins can be expressed as a fraction of the extent of respiratory motion. The derived formulas in the anterior/posterior directions for 90%, 95%, and 100% simulated population coverage were 0.45A/0.25A, 0.50A/0.30A, and 0.70A/0.40A. The differences in formulas for different population coverage criteria demonstrate that respiratory trace shape and baseline drift characteristics affect individual respiratory margins even for the same average peak-to-peak amplitude. Conclusions: A methodology for determining population-based respiratory margins using real respiratory motion patterns and dose profiles in the AP direction was

  15. Realistic respiratory motion margins for external beam partial breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conroy, Leigh; Quirk, Sarah; Smith, Wendy L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Respiratory margins for partial breast irradiation (PBI) have been largely based on geometric observations, which may overestimate the margin required for dosimetric coverage. In this study, dosimetric population-based respiratory margins and margin formulas for external beam partial breast irradiation are determined. Methods: Volunteer respiratory data and anterior–posterior (AP) dose profiles from clinical treatment plans of 28 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) PBI patient plans were used to determine population-based respiratory margins. The peak-to-peak amplitudes (A) of realistic respiratory motion data from healthy volunteers were scaled from A = 1 to 10 mm to create respiratory motion probability density functions. Dose profiles were convolved with the respiratory probability density functions to produce blurred dose profiles accounting for respiratory motion. The required margins were found by measuring the distance between the simulated treatment and original dose profiles at the 95% isodose level. Results: The symmetric dosimetric respiratory margins to cover 90%, 95%, and 100% of the simulated treatment population were 1.5, 2, and 4 mm, respectively. With patient set up at end exhale, the required margins were larger in the anterior direction than the posterior. For respiratory amplitudes less than 5 mm, the population-based margins can be expressed as a fraction of the extent of respiratory motion. The derived formulas in the anterior/posterior directions for 90%, 95%, and 100% simulated population coverage were 0.45A/0.25A, 0.50A/0.30A, and 0.70A/0.40A. The differences in formulas for different population coverage criteria demonstrate that respiratory trace shape and baseline drift characteristics affect individual respiratory margins even for the same average peak-to-peak amplitude. Conclusions: A methodology for determining population-based respiratory margins using real respiratory motion patterns and dose profiles in the AP direction was

  16. Measurement of inter and intra fraction organ motion in radiotherapy using cone beam CT projection images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchant, T E; Amer, A M; Moore, C J

    2008-01-01

    A method is presented for extraction of intra and inter fraction motion of seeds/markers within the patient from cone beam CT (CBCT) projection images. The position of the marker is determined on each projection image and fitted to a function describing the projection of a fixed point onto the imaging panel at different gantry angles. The fitted parameters provide the mean marker position with respect to the isocentre. Differences between the theoretical function and the actual projected marker positions are used to estimate the range of intra fraction motion and the principal motion axis in the transverse plane. The method was validated using CBCT projection images of a static marker at known locations and of a marker moving with known amplitude. The mean difference between actual and measured motion range was less than 1 mm in all directions, although errors of up to 5 mm were observed when large amplitude motion was present in an orthogonal direction. In these cases it was possible to calculate the range of motion magnitudes consistent with the observed marker trajectory. The method was shown to be feasible using clinical CBCT projections of a pancreas cancer patient

  17. Ground-motion prediction from tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltay, Annemarie S.; Beroza, Gregory C.

    2013-01-01

    The widespread occurrence of tremor, coupled with its frequency content and location, provides an exceptional opportunity to test and improve strong ground-motion attenuation relations for subduction zones. We characterize the amplitude of thousands of individual 5 min tremor events in Cascadia during three episodic tremor and slip events to constrain the distance decay of peak ground acceleration (PGA) and peak ground velocity (PGV). We determine the anelastic attenuation parameter for ground-motion prediction equations (GMPEs) to a distance of 150 km, which is sufficient to place important constraints on ground-motion decay. Tremor PGA and PGV show a distance decay that is similar to subduction-zone-specific GMPEs developed from both data and simulations; however, the massive amount of data present in the tremor observations should allow us to refine distance-amplitude attenuation relationships for use in hazard maps, and to search for regional variations and intrasubduction zone differences in ground-motion attenuation.

  18. SU-F-J-119: Pilot Study On the Location-Based Lung Motion Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, TK [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Ewald, A [McLaren Cancer Institute, Flint, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In most of lung treatment cases with various radiotherapy beam modalities, 4DCT images are obtained in order to define ITV. ITV is defined with the signal from motion monitoring system, e.g. RPM. However, the signal is not consistent with tumor motion because it varies with location, its size, age, gender, etc. In the present study, the location-based motion assessment is presented. Methods: 4DCT images of 70 patients were reviewed: 28-left-lung and 42-right-lung patients; 36-female and 34-male patients; the age range of 51.2–89.9; tumor-size range of 0.75–9.50cm with 25% of these adherent to bony-anatomy. Philips Big-Bore Simulation CT and RPM systems were used. The study was performed as follows. First, RPM signal and tumor motion in superior-inferior direction was compared. Second, the tumor size and its motion amplitude in all directions were measured at multiple locations. Third, the average tumor motion was calculated to assess general motion amplitudes at various locations. Results: RPM amplitude is not consistent with lung tumor motion amplitude. The tumors of similar sizes at similar location present various motion amplitude up to 1.1cm difference, but in average, the standard deviation was <0.5cm. Almost regardless of tumor sizes, the tumor motion was greatest at lower lobe location (>=1.0cm), and the smallest at upper lobe location and when adherent to bony-anatomy (<=0.5cm). Conclusion: The tumor size affects the motion amplitude less than does the tumor location. However, as the study results indicate that tumor motion has noticeable variation and so further study with more patient cases is needed. Also, for the same patient, the RPM signal presents instability of breathing, and clinically the patient with the instability of RPM breathing of <=10% is selected for respiratory-gated radiotherapy and ∼25% of patients under current study was treated. Patient-specific motion-uncertainty margins are considered to be added following further

  19. Modified Clemmow-Mullaly-Allis diagram for large-amplitude electromagnetic waves in magnetoplasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, K.; Mori, Y.; Takeda, S.

    1975-02-01

    A possible modification to the well known Clemmow- Mullaly-Allis diagram is analysed taking into account the radiation pressure force due to a large-amplitude electromagnetic field E in magnetoplasmas. We restrict ourselves here to the propagations parallel (the right and left-hand circularly polarized waves) and/or perpendicular (the ordinary and extraordinary modes) to the static magnetic field Bsub(o). We analyse electromagnetic waves incident normally on a semi-infinite uniform plasma, on which Bsub(o) is applied parallel and/or perpendicular to the surface. Considerations are limited to a cold collisionless plasma where the incident waves are evanescent. Simple expressions are obtained for the cut-off conditions of the waves except the extraordinary mode. In the latter case, the cut-off condition is calculated numerically solving an integral equation. The results are demonstrated in the usual Clemmow-Mullaly-Allis diagram for the various values of b=2Esub(i) 2 e 2 /mω 2 kappaTsub(e') where Esub(i) and ω are, respectively, the amplitude and the angular frequency of the incident wave. The cut-off lines are shown to move towards the higher densities with increasing b. (auth.)

  20. Propagation of large amplitude Alfven waves in the solar wind current sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malara, Francesco; Primavera, Leonardo; Veltri, Pierluigi

    1996-01-01

    The time evolution of Alfvenic perturbations in the Solar Wind current sheet is studied by using numerical simulations of the compressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. The simulations show that the interaction between the large amplitude Alfvenic pertubation and the solar wind current sheet decreases the correlation between velocity and magnetic field fluctuations and produces compressive fluctuations. The characteristics of these compressive fluctuations compare rather well with spatial observations. The behavior of the correlation between density and magnetic field intensity fluctuations and of the their spectra are well reproduced so that the physical mechanisms giving rise to these behaviors can be identified

  1. Observation of large-amplitude ion acoustic wave in microwave-plasma interaction experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yugami, Noboru; Nishida, Yasushi

    1997-01-01

    Large amplitude ion acoustic wave, which is not satisfied with a linear dispersion relationship of ion acoustic wave, is observed in microwave-plasma interaction experiments. This ion acoustic wave is excited around critical density layer and begins to propagate to underdense region with a phase velocity one order faster than sound velocity C s , which is predicted by the linear theory, the phase velocity and the wave length of the wave decreases as it propagates. Finally, it converges to C s and strongly dumps. Diagnostic by the Faraday cup indicates that this ion acoustic wave is accompanied with a hot ion beam. (author)

  2. Large-amplitude superexchange of high-spin fermions in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jürgensen, Ole; Heinze, Jannes; Lühmann, Dirk-Sören

    2013-01-01

    We show that fermionic high-spin systems with spin-changing collisions allow one to monitor superexchange processes in optical superlattices with large amplitudes and strong spin fluctuations. By investigating the non-equilibrium dynamics, we find a superexchange dominated regime at weak interactions. The underlying mechanism is driven by an emerging tunneling-energy gap in shallow few-well potentials. As a consequence, the interaction-energy gap that is expected to occur only for strong interactions in deep lattices is re-established. By tuning the optical lattice depth, a crossover between two regimes with negligible particle number fluctuations is found: firstly, the common regime with vanishing spin-fluctuations in deep lattices and, secondly, a novel regime with strong spin fluctuations in shallow lattices. We discuss the possible experimental realization with ultracold 40 K atoms and observable quantities in double wells and two-dimensional plaquettes. (paper)

  3. Off-shell two-particle scattering amplitude in the P-matrix approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babenko, V.A.; Petrov, N.M.

    1988-01-01

    A generalization of the P-matrix approach which makes it possible to describe the interaction of two particles off the energy shell is proposed. Explicit separation in the wave function of a part corresponding to free motion yields a compact expression for the off-shell scattering amplitude and gives directly a method for separable expansion of the amplitude

  4. The importance of stimulus noise analysis for self-motion studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Nesti

    Full Text Available Motion simulators are widely employed in basic and applied research to study the neural mechanisms of perception and action during inertial stimulation. In these studies, uncontrolled simulator-introduced noise inevitably leads to a disparity between the reproduced motion and the trajectories meticulously designed by the experimenter, possibly resulting in undesired motion cues to the investigated system. Understanding actual simulator responses to different motion commands is therefore a crucial yet often underestimated step towards the interpretation of experimental results. In this work, we developed analysis methods based on signal processing techniques to quantify the noise in the actual motion, and its deterministic and stochastic components. Our methods allow comparisons between commanded and actual motion as well as between different actual motion profiles. A specific practical example from one of our studies is used to illustrate the methodologies and their relevance, but this does not detract from its general applicability. Analyses of the simulator's inertial recordings show direction-dependent noise and nonlinearity related to the command amplitude. The Signal-to-Noise Ratio is one order of magnitude higher for the larger motion amplitudes we tested, compared to the smaller motion amplitudes. Simulator-introduced noise is found to be primarily of deterministic nature, particularly for the stronger motion intensities. The effect of simulator noise on quantification of animal/human motion sensitivity is discussed. We conclude that accurate recording and characterization of executed simulator motion are a crucial prerequisite for the investigation of uncertainty in self-motion perception.

  5. THEMIS Observations of the Magnetopause Electron Diffusion Region: Large Amplitude Waves and Heated Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiangwei; Cattell, Cynthia; Dombeck, John; Dai, Lei; Wilson, Lynn B. III; Breneman, Aaron; Hupack, Adam

    2013-01-01

    We present the first observations of large amplitude waves in a well-defined electron diffusion region based on the criteria described by Scudder et al at the subsolar magnetopause using data from one Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) satellite. These waves identified as whistler mode waves, electrostatic solitary waves, lower hybrid waves, and electrostatic electron cyclotron waves, are observed in the same 12 s waveform capture and in association with signatures of active magnetic reconnection. The large amplitude waves in the electron diffusion region are coincident with abrupt increases in electron parallel temperature suggesting strong wave heating. The whistler mode waves, which are at the electron scale and which enable us to probe electron dynamics in the diffusion region were analyzed in detail. The energetic electrons (approx. 30 keV) within the electron diffusion region have anisotropic distributions with T(sub e(right angle))/T(sub e(parallel)) > 1 that may provide the free energy for the whistler mode waves. The energetic anisotropic electrons may be produced during the reconnection process. The whistler mode waves propagate away from the center of the "X-line" along magnetic field lines, suggesting that the electron diffusion region is a possible source region of the whistler mode waves.

  6. Oscillations of non-isothermal N/S boundary with a high frequency and large amplitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezuglyj, A.I.; Shklovskij, V.A.

    2016-01-01

    Within the framework of the phenomenological approach based on the heat balance equation and the dependence of the critical temperature of the superconductor on the current value theoretically investigated the impact of high-frequency current of high amplitude and arbitrary shape on the non-isothermal balance of the oscillating N/S interface in a long superconductor. We introduce a self-consistent average temperature field of rapidly oscillating non-isothermal N/S boundary (heat kink), which allows to go beyond the well-known concept of mean-square heating and consider the impact of current waveform. With regard to experiments on the effects of microwave high-power radiation on the current-voltage characteristics (CVC) of superconducting films, we give the classification of the families of the CVC for inhomogeneous superconductors which carry a current containing a high frequency component of large amplitude. Several characteristics have hysteresis of thermal nature.

  7. Study of light collection uniformity dependence on reflector type in a large scintillation counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astvatsaturov, R.G.; Ivanov, V.I.; Knapik, E.; Kramarenko, V.A.; Malakhov, A.I.; Khachaturyan, M.N.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation of the way to improve uniformity of light collection onto photoelectric multiplier photocathode, for the 100x10x2 cm scintillation counter, has been undertaken. Pulse amplitude versus the point, particles strike a scintillator, relationship, has been demonstrated for several types of reflectors. Used as reflectors were: white papar, aluminium foil, black papar and a combination of above reflectors. Experimental data analysis shows, that the combination of reflectors with different reflection coefficient, provides a means for 1,5 time improvement of counter light collection uniformity, with no impairment of amplitude characteristics

  8. Collective motions and non-polynomial lagrangians in Fokker-Planck dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spina, A.; Vucetich, H.

    1986-04-01

    A method based on the ideas of collective motion is applied to Fokker-Planck dynamics. The usual diagramatic techniques used in stochastic dynamics are enlarged in order to deal with the non-polynomial Lagrangians that appear in the theory. The technique is tested and applied to the case of a self-sustained sinusoidal oscillator whose statistical behaviour is well understood: the Poincare oscillator. (author)

  9. Exploring the onset of collective motion in self-organised trails of social organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigatti, E.; Hernández, A.

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the emergence of self-organised trails between two specific target areas in collective motion of social organisms by means of an agent-based model. We present numerical evidences that an increase in the efficiency of navigation, in dependence of the colony size, exists. Moreover, the shift, from the diffusive to the directed motion can be quantitatively characterised, identifying and measuring a well defined crossover point. This point corresponds to the minimal number of individuals necessary for the onset of collective cooperation. Finally, by means of a finite-size scaling analysis, we describe its scaling behaviour as a function of the environment size. This last result can be of particular interest for interpreting empirical observations or for the design of artificial swarms.

  10. Assessing the Utility of Strong Motion Data to Determine Static Ground Displacements During Great Megathrust Earthquakes: Tohoku and Iquique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, M. W.; Furlong, K. P.; Hayes, G. P.; Benz, H.

    2014-12-01

    Strong motion accelerometers can record large amplitude shaking on-scale in the near-field of large earthquake ruptures; however, numerical integration of such records to determine displacement is typically unstable due to baseline changes (i.e., distortions in the zero value) that occur during strong shaking. We use datasets from the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku earthquake to assess whether a relatively simple empirical correction scheme (Boore et al., 2002) can return accurate displacement waveforms useful for constraining details of the fault slip. The coseismic deformation resulting from the Tohoku earthquake was recorded by the Kiban Kyoshin network (KiK-net) of strong motion instruments as well as by a dense network of high-rate (1 Hz) GPS instruments. After baseline correcting the KiK-net records and integrating to displacement, over 85% of the KiK-net borehole instrument waveforms and over 75% of the KiK-net surface instrument waveforms match collocated 1 Hz GPS displacement time series. Most of the records that do not match the GPS-derived displacements following the baseline correction have large, systematic drifts that can be automatically identified by examining the slopes in the first 5-10 seconds of the velocity time series. We apply the same scheme to strong motion records from the 2014 Mw 8.2 Iquique earthquake. Close correspondence in both direction and amplitude between coseismic static offsets derived from the integrated strong motion time series and those predicted from a teleseismically-derived finite fault model, as well as displacement amplitudes consistent with InSAR-derived results, suggest that the correction scheme works successfully for the Iquique event. In the absence of GPS displacements, these strong motion-derived offsets provide constraints on the overall distribution of slip on the fault. In addition, the coseismic strong motion-derived displacement time series (50-100 s long) contain a near-field record of the temporal evolution of the

  11. How to: Using Mode Analysis to Quantify, Analyze, and Interpret the Mechanisms of High-Density Collective Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna Bottinelli

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available While methods from statistical mechanics were some of the earliest analytical tools used to understand collective motion, the field has substantially expanded in scope beyond phase transitions and fluctuating order parameters. In part, this expansion is driven by the increasing variety of systems being studied, which in turn, has increased the need for innovative approaches to quantify, analyze, and interpret a growing zoology of collective behaviors. For example, concepts from material science become particularly relevant when considering the collective motion that emerges at high densities. Here, we describe methods originally developed to study inert jammed granular materials that have been borrowed and adapted to study dense aggregates of active particles. This analysis is particularly useful because it projects difficult-to-analyze patterns of collective motion onto an easier-to-interpret set of eigenmodes. Carefully viewed in the context of non-equilibrium systems, mode analysis identifies hidden long-range motions and localized particle rearrangements based solely on the knowledge of particle trajectories. In this work, we take a “how to” approach and outline essential steps, diagnostics, and know-how used to apply this analysis to study densely-packed active systems.

  12. New trends in nuclear collective dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Yasuhisa; Horiuchi, Hisashi; Matsuyanagi, Kenichi

    1992-01-01

    New Trends in Nuclear Collective Dynamics comprises reviews by well-known researchers from international centers of nuclear physics. This overview of recent advances concentrates on - order amd chaos in finite quantum systems - dissipation in heavy-ion collions - collective motion in warm nuclei - time-dependent mean-field theory with collision terms - nuclear fission and multi-dimensional tunneling - large scale collective motion see hints under the relevent topics. (orig.) With 90 figs

  13. Correlated motion of protein subdomains and large-scale conformational flexibility of RecA protein filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Garmay; A, Shvetsov; D, Karelov; D, Lebedev; A, Radulescu; M, Petukhov; V, Isaev-Ivanov

    2012-02-01

    Based on X-ray crystallographic data available at Protein Data Bank, we have built molecular dynamics (MD) models of homologous recombinases RecA from E. coli and D. radiodurans. Functional form of RecA enzyme, which is known to be a long helical filament, was approximated by a trimer, simulated in periodic water box. The MD trajectories were analyzed in terms of large-scale conformational motions that could be detectable by neutron and X-ray scattering techniques. The analysis revealed that large-scale RecA monomer dynamics can be described in terms of relative motions of 7 subdomains. Motion of C-terminal domain was the major contributor to the overall dynamics of protein. Principal component analysis (PCA) of the MD trajectories in the atom coordinate space showed that rotation of C-domain is correlated with the conformational changes in the central domain and N-terminal domain, that forms the monomer-monomer interface. Thus, even though C-terminal domain is relatively far from the interface, its orientation is correlated with large-scale filament conformation. PCA of the trajectories in the main chain dihedral angle coordinate space implicates a co-existence of a several different large-scale conformations of the modeled trimer. In order to clarify the relationship of independent domain orientation with large-scale filament conformation, we have performed analysis of independent domain motion and its implications on the filament geometry.

  14. Behavioral analysis of signals that guide learned changes in the amplitude and dynamics of the vestibulo-ocular reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, J. L.; Lisberger, S. G.

    1996-01-01

    We characterized the dependence of motor learning in the monkey vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) on the duration, frequency, and relative timing of the visual and vestibular stimuli used to induce learning. The amplitude of the VOR was decreased or increased through training with paired head and visual stimulus motion in the same or opposite directions, respectively. For training stimuli that consisted of simultaneous pulses of head and target velocity 80-1000 msec in duration, brief stimuli caused small changes in the amplitude of the VOR, whereas long stimuli caused larger changes in amplitude as well as changes in the dynamics of the reflex. When the relative timing of the visual and vestibular stimuli was varied, brief image motion paired with the beginning of a longer vestibular stimulus caused changes in the amplitude of the reflex alone, but the same image motion paired with a later time in the vestibular stimulus caused changes in the dynamics as well as the amplitude of the VOR. For training stimuli that consisted of sinusoidal head and visual stimulus motion, low-frequency training stimuli induced frequency-selective changes in the VOR, as reported previously, whereas high-frequency training stimuli induced changes in the amplitude of the VOR that were more similar across test frequency. The results suggest that there are at least two distinguishable components of motor learning in the VOR. One component is induced by short-duration or high-frequency stimuli and involves changes in only the amplitude of the reflex. A second component is induced by long-duration or low-frequency stimuli and involves changes in the amplitude and dynamics of the VOR.

  15. Molecular dynamics based enhanced sampling of collective variables with very large time steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pei-Yang; Tuckerman, Mark E.

    2018-01-01

    Enhanced sampling techniques that target a set of collective variables and that use molecular dynamics as the driving engine have seen widespread application in the computational molecular sciences as a means to explore the free-energy landscapes of complex systems. The use of molecular dynamics as the fundamental driver of the sampling requires the introduction of a time step whose magnitude is limited by the fastest motions in a system. While standard multiple time-stepping methods allow larger time steps to be employed for the slower and computationally more expensive forces, the maximum achievable increase in time step is limited by resonance phenomena, which inextricably couple fast and slow motions. Recently, we introduced deterministic and stochastic resonance-free multiple time step algorithms for molecular dynamics that solve this resonance problem and allow ten- to twenty-fold gains in the large time step compared to standard multiple time step algorithms [P. Minary et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 150201 (2004); B. Leimkuhler et al., Mol. Phys. 111, 3579-3594 (2013)]. These methods are based on the imposition of isokinetic constraints that couple the physical system to Nosé-Hoover chains or Nosé-Hoover Langevin schemes. In this paper, we show how to adapt these methods for collective variable-based enhanced sampling techniques, specifically adiabatic free-energy dynamics/temperature-accelerated molecular dynamics, unified free-energy dynamics, and by extension, metadynamics, thus allowing simulations employing these methods to employ similarly very large time steps. The combination of resonance-free multiple time step integrators with free-energy-based enhanced sampling significantly improves the efficiency of conformational exploration.

  16. Modification of large-scale motions in a turbulent pipe flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senshu, Kohei; Shinozaki, Hiroaki; Sakakibara, Jun

    2017-11-01

    We performed experiments to modify the flow structures in a fully developed turbulent flow in a straight round pipe. The modification of the flow was achieved by installing a short coaxial inner pipe. The inner pipe has ability to add continuous suction or blowing disturbance through its outer surface. The experiments were conducted at a Reynolds number of 44,000 with seven different disturbance patterns. The wall static pressure was measured and pipe friction coefficient was evaluated. The velocity distribution was measured with PIV and very large scale motions (VLSMs) were visualized. Pipe friction coefficient was increased by installing the inner pipe, while turbulence intensities over the cross section were reduced. Slight change of the friction was observed if the disturbance was added. We decomposed fluctuating velocity field in the azimuthal direction by a Fourier series expansion. As a result, we obtained that contribution of lower azimuthal mode numbers (m = 2, 3, 4) reduced while the higher modes increased. This was consistent with the observation of visualized very large scale motions.

  17. Collective Motion of Micro-organisms from Field Theoretical Viewpoint

    OpenAIRE

    Nojiri, Shin'ichi; Kawamura, Masako; Sugamoto, Akio

    1995-01-01

    We analyze the collective motion of micro-organisms in the fluid and consider the problem of the red tide. The red tide is produced by the condensation of the micro-organisms, which might be a similar phenomenon to the condensation of the strings. We propose a model of the generation of the red tide. By considering the interaction between the micro- organisms mediated by the velocity fields in the fluid, we derive the Van der Waals type equation of state, where the generation of the red tide ...

  18. Collective cell motion in endothelial monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabó, A; Ünnep, R; Méhes, E; Czirók, A; Twal, W O; Argraves, W S; Cao, Y

    2010-01-01

    Collective cell motility is an important aspect of several developmental and pathophysiological processes. Despite its importance, the mechanisms that allow cells to be both motile and adhere to one another are poorly understood. In this study we establish statistical properties of the random streaming behavior of endothelial monolayer cultures. To understand the reported empirical findings, we expand the widely used cellular Potts model to include active cell motility. For spontaneous directed motility we assume a positive feedback between cell displacements and cell polarity. The resulting model is studied with computer simulations and is shown to exhibit behavior compatible with experimental findings. In particular, in monolayer cultures both the speed and persistence of cell motion decreases, transient cell chains move together as groups and velocity correlations extend over several cell diameters. As active cell motility is ubiquitous both in vitro and in vivo, our model is expected to be a generally applicable representation of cellular behavior

  19. Modelling large motion events in fMRI studies of patients with epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemieux, Louis; Salek-Haddadi, Afraim; Lund, Torben E

    2007-01-01

    -positive activation. Head motion can lead to severe image degradation and result in false-positive activation and is usually worse in patients than in healthy subjects. We performed general linear model fMRI data analysis on simultaneous EEG-fMRI data acquired in 34 cases with focal epilepsy. Signal changes...... associated with large inter-scan motion events (head jerks) were modelled using modified design matrices that include 'scan nulling' regressors. We evaluated the efficacy of this approach by mapping the proportion of the brain for which F-tests across the additional regressors were significant. In 95......% of cases, there was a significant effect of motion in 50% of the brain or greater; for the scan nulling effect, the proportion was 36%; this effect was predominantly in the neocortex. We conclude that careful consideration of the motion-related effects in fMRI studies of patients with epilepsy is essential...

  20. Characterization of a subset of large amplitude noise events in VIRGO science run 1 (VSR1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Prete, M

    2009-01-01

    We report about a characterization study of a subset of large amplitude noise events present in the main data channel of the VIRGO detector. The main motivation of this study is the identification of auxiliary channels which can be used to define veto procedures. We characterized large amplitude events both in the time and in the frequency domain. We found evidence of coincidences among these and disturbances detected by magnetometer's sensors or inside the main power supply. In some cases the disturbances were produced by events in the VIRGO environment such as lightnings, main power supply glitches and airplane traffic. We have found two auxiliary channels that can be used to veto events generated by main power supply glitches or lightnings. A procedure to clean the main channel based on them has been successfully tested. We have also identified two auxiliary channels which are useful for the identification of events generated by airplane traffic. These can be used to implement a vetoing procedure both in the time and in the frequency domain.

  1. Characterization of a subset of large amplitude noise events in VIRGO science run 1 (VSR1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Prete, M [Universita di Pisa, Lungarno Pacinotti, 43, 56126 Pisa Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare sez. di Pisa, ED C polo Fibonacci, Via F Buonarroti 2, 56127, Pisa (Italy)

    2009-10-21

    We report about a characterization study of a subset of large amplitude noise events present in the main data channel of the VIRGO detector. The main motivation of this study is the identification of auxiliary channels which can be used to define veto procedures. We characterized large amplitude events both in the time and in the frequency domain. We found evidence of coincidences among these and disturbances detected by magnetometer's sensors or inside the main power supply. In some cases the disturbances were produced by events in the VIRGO environment such as lightnings, main power supply glitches and airplane traffic. We have found two auxiliary channels that can be used to veto events generated by main power supply glitches or lightnings. A procedure to clean the main channel based on them has been successfully tested. We have also identified two auxiliary channels which are useful for the identification of events generated by airplane traffic. These can be used to implement a vetoing procedure both in the time and in the frequency domain.

  2. Large-Amplitude Long-Wave Instability of a Supersonic Shear Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messiter, A. F.

    1995-01-01

    For sufficiently high Mach numbers, small disturbances on a supersonic vortex sheet are known to grow in amplitude because of slow nonlinear wave steepening. Under the same external conditions, linear theory predicts slow growth of long-wave disturbances to a thin supersonic shear layer. An asymptotic formulation is given here which adds nonzero shear-layer thickness to the weakly nonlinear formulation for a vortex sheet. Spatial evolution is considered, for a spatially periodic disturbance having amplitude of the same order, in Reynolds number, as the shear-layer thickness. A quasi-equilibrium inviscid nonlinear critical layer is found, with effects of diffusion and slow growth appearing through nonsecularity condition. Other limiting cases are also considered, in an attempt to determine a relationship between the vortex-sheet limit and the long-wave limit for a thin shear layer; there appear to be three special limits, corresponding to disturbances of different amplitudes at different locations along the shear layer.

  3. Experimental investigation of irregular motion impact on 4D PET-based particle therapy monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Y; Stützer, K; Enghardt, W; Priegnitz, M; Helmbrecht, S; Fiedler, F; Bert, C

    2016-01-01

    Particle therapy positron emission tomography (PT-PET) is an in vivo and non-invasive imaging technique to monitor treatment delivery in particle therapy. The inevitable patient respiratory motion during irradiation causes artefacts and inaccurate activity distribution in PET images. Four-dimensional (4D) maximum likelihood expectation maximisation (4D MLEM) allows for a compensation of these effects, but has up to now been restricted to regular motion for PT-PET investigations. However, intra-fractional motion during treatment might differ from that during acquisition of the 4D-planning CT (e.g. amplitude variation, baseline drift) and therefore might induce inaccurate 4D PET reconstruction results. This study investigates the impact of different irregular analytical one-dimensional (1D) motion patterns on PT-PET imaging by means of experiments with a radioactive source and irradiated moving phantoms. Three sorting methods, namely phase sorting, equal amplitude sorting and event-based amplitude sorting, were applied to manage the PET list-mode data. The influence of these sorting methods on the motion compensating algorithm has been analysed. The event-based amplitude sorting showed a superior performance and it is applicable for irregular motions with  ⩽4 mm amplitude elongation and drift. For motion with 10 mm baseline drift, the normalised root mean square error was as high as 10.5% and a 10 mm range deviation was observed. (note)

  4. Experimental investigation of irregular motion impact on 4D PET-based particle therapy monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Y.; Stützer, K.; Enghardt, W.; Priegnitz, M.; Helmbrecht, S.; Bert, C.; Fiedler, F.

    2016-01-01

    Particle therapy positron emission tomography (PT-PET) is an in vivo and non-invasive imaging technique to monitor treatment delivery in particle therapy. The inevitable patient respiratory motion during irradiation causes artefacts and inaccurate activity distribution in PET images. Four-dimensional (4D) maximum likelihood expectation maximisation (4D MLEM) allows for a compensation of these effects, but has up to now been restricted to regular motion for PT-PET investigations. However, intra-fractional motion during treatment might differ from that during acquisition of the 4D-planning CT (e.g. amplitude variation, baseline drift) and therefore might induce inaccurate 4D PET reconstruction results. This study investigates the impact of different irregular analytical one-dimensional (1D) motion patterns on PT-PET imaging by means of experiments with a radioactive source and irradiated moving phantoms. Three sorting methods, namely phase sorting, equal amplitude sorting and event-based amplitude sorting, were applied to manage the PET list-mode data. The influence of these sorting methods on the motion compensating algorithm has been analysed. The event-based amplitude sorting showed a superior performance and it is applicable for irregular motions with  ⩽4 mm amplitude elongation and drift. For motion with 10 mm baseline drift, the normalised root mean square error was as high as 10.5% and a 10 mm range deviation was observed.

  5. Energetics and Structural Characterization of the large-scale Functional Motion of Adenylate Kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formoso, Elena; Limongelli, Vittorio; Parrinello, Michele

    2015-02-01

    Adenylate Kinase (AK) is a signal transducing protein that regulates cellular energy homeostasis balancing between different conformations. An alteration of its activity can lead to severe pathologies such as heart failure, cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. A comprehensive elucidation of the large-scale conformational motions that rule the functional mechanism of this enzyme is of great value to guide rationally the development of new medications. Here using a metadynamics-based computational protocol we elucidate the thermodynamics and structural properties underlying the AK functional transitions. The free energy estimation of the conformational motions of the enzyme allows characterizing the sequence of events that regulate its action. We reveal the atomistic details of the most relevant enzyme states, identifying residues such as Arg119 and Lys13, which play a key role during the conformational transitions and represent druggable spots to design enzyme inhibitors. Our study offers tools that open new areas of investigation on large-scale motion in proteins.

  6. On complex periodic motions and bifurcations in a periodically forced, damped, hardening Duffing oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Yu; Luo, Albert C.J.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, analytically predicted are complex periodic motions in the periodically forced, damped, hardening Duffing oscillator through discrete implicit maps of the corresponding differential equations. Bifurcation trees of periodic motions to chaos in such a hardening Duffing oscillator are obtained. The stability and bifurcation analysis of periodic motion in the bifurcation trees is carried out by eigenvalue analysis. The solutions of all discrete nodes of periodic motions are computed by the mapping structures of discrete implicit mapping. The frequency-amplitude characteristics of periodic motions are computed that are based on the discrete Fourier series. Thus, the bifurcation trees of periodic motions are also presented through frequency-amplitude curves. Finally, based on the analytical predictions, the initial conditions of periodic motions are selected, and numerical simulations of periodic motions are carried out for comparison of numerical and analytical predictions. The harmonic amplitude spectrums are also given for the approximate analytical expressions of periodic motions, which can also be used for comparison with experimental measurement. This study will give a better understanding of complex periodic motions in the hardening Duffing oscillator.

  7. U(6)-phonon model of nuclear collective motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganev, H.G.

    2015-01-01

    The U(6)-phonon model of nuclear collective motion with the semi-direct product structure [HW(21)]U(6) is obtained as a hydrodynamic (macroscopic) limit of the fully microscopic proton–neutron symplectic model (PNSM) with Sp(12, R) dynamical group. The phonon structure of the [HW(21)]U(6) model enables it to simultaneously include the giant monopole and quadrupole, as well as dipole resonances and their coupling to the low-lying collective states. The U(6) intrinsic structure of the [HW(21)]U(6) model, from the other side, gives a framework for the simultaneous shell-model interpretation of the ground state band and the other excited low-lying collective bands. It follows then that the states of the whole nuclear Hilbert space which can be put into one-to-one correspondence with those of a 21-dimensional oscillator with an intrinsic (base) U(6) structure. The latter can be determined in such a way that it is compatible with the proton–neutron structure of the nucleus. The macroscopic limit of the Sp(12, R) algebra, therefore, provides a rigorous mechanism for implementing the unified model ideas of coupling the valence particles to the core collective degrees of freedom within a fully microscopic framework without introducing redundant variables or violating the Pauli principle. (author)

  8. Observation of large-amplitude ion acoustic solitary waves in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yoshiharu

    1987-01-01

    Propagation of nonlinear ion acoustic waves in a multi-component plasma with negative ions is investigated in a double-plasma device. When the density of negative ions is larger than a critical value, a broad negative pulse evolves to rarefactive solitons, and a positive pulse whose amplitude is less than a certain threshold value becomes a subsonic wave train. In the same plasma, a positive pulse whose amplitude is larger than the threshold develops into a solitary wave. The critical amplitude is measured as a function of the density of negative ions and compared with predictions of the pseudo-potential method. The energy distribution of electrons in the solitary wave is also measured. (author)

  9. Image quality of cone beam CT on respiratory motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ke; Li Minghui; Dai Jianrong; Wang Shi

    2011-01-01

    In this study,the influence of respiratory motion on Cone Beam CT (CBCT) image quality was investigated by a motion simulating platform, an image quality phantom, and a kV X-ray CBCT. A total of 21 motion states in the superior-inferior direction and the anterior-posterior direction, separately or together, was simulated by considering different respiration amplitudes, periods and hysteresis. The influence of motion on CBCT image quality was evaluated with the quality indexes of low contrast visibility, geometric accuracy, spatial resolution and uniformity of CT values. The results showed that the quality indexes were affected by the motion more prominently in AP direction than in SI direction, and the image quality was affected by the respiration amplitude more prominently than the respiration period and the hysteresis. The CBCT image quality and its characteristics influenced by the respiration motion, and may be exploited in finding solutions. (authors)

  10. Speed and amplitude of lung tumor motion precisely detected in four-dimensional setup and in real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirato, Hiroki; Suzuki, Keishiro; Sharp, Gregory C.; Fujita, Katsuhisa R.T.; Onimaru, Rikiya; Fujino, Masaharu; Kato, Norio; Osaka, Yasuhiro; Kinoshita, Rumiko; Taguchi, Hiroshi; Onodera, Shunsuke; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    2006-01-01

    Background: To reduce the uncertainty of registration for lung tumors, we have developed a four-dimensional (4D) setup system using a real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy system. Methods and Materials: During treatment planning and daily setup in the treatment room, the trajectory of the internal fiducial marker was recorded for 1 to 2 min at the rate of 30 times per second by the real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy system. To maximize gating efficiency, the patient's position on the treatment couch was adjusted using the 4D setup system with fine on-line remote control of the treatment couch. Results: The trajectory of the marker detected in the 4D setup system was well visualized and used for daily setup. Various degrees of interfractional and intrafractional changes in the absolute amplitude and speed of the internal marker were detected. Readjustments were necessary during each treatment session, prompted by baseline shifting of the tumor position. Conclusion: The 4D setup system was shown to be useful for reducing the uncertainty of tumor motion and for increasing the efficiency of gated irradiation. Considering the interfractional and intrafractional changes in speed and amplitude detected in this study, intercepting radiotherapy is the safe and cost-effective method for 4D radiotherapy using real-time tracking technology

  11. Exploiting Performance of Different Low-Cost Sensors for Small Amplitude Oscillatory Motion Monitoring: Preliminary Comparisons in View of Possible Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Benedetti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We address the problem of low amplitude oscillatory motion detection through different low-cost sensors: a LIS3LV02DQ MEMS accelerometer, a Microsoft Kinect v2 range camera, and a uBlox 6 GPS receiver. Several tests were performed using a one-direction vibrating table with different oscillation frequencies (in the range 1.5–3 Hz and small challenging amplitudes (0.02 m and 0.03 m. A Mikrotron EoSens high-resolution camera was used to give reference data. A dedicated software tool was developed to retrieve Kinect v2 results. The capabilities of the VADASE algorithm were employed to process uBlox 6 GPS receiver observations. In the investigated time interval (in the order of tens of seconds the results obtained indicate that displacements were detected with the resolution of fractions of millimeters with MEMS accelerometer and Kinect v2 and few millimeters with uBlox 6. MEMS accelerometer displays the lowest noise but a significant bias, whereas Kinect v2 and uBlox 6 appear more stable. The results suggest the possibility of sensor integration both for indoor (MEMS accelerometer + Kinect v2 and for outdoor (MEMS accelerometer + uBlox 6 applications and seem promising for structural monitoring applications.

  12. Correlated motions are a fundamental property of β-sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenwick, R. Bryn; Orellana, Laura; Esteban-Martín, Santi; Orozco, Modesto; Salvatella, Xavier

    2014-06-01

    Correlated motions in proteins can mediate fundamental biochemical processes such as signal transduction and allostery. The mechanisms that underlie these processes remain largely unknown due mainly to limitations in their direct detection. Here, based on a detailed analysis of protein structures deposited in the protein data bank, as well as on state-of-the art molecular simulations, we provide general evidence for the transfer of structural information by correlated backbone motions, mediated by hydrogen bonds, across β-sheets. We also show that the observed local and long-range correlated motions are mediated by the collective motions of β-sheets and investigate their role in large-scale conformational changes. Correlated motions represent a fundamental property of β-sheets that contributes to protein function.

  13. On very-large-scale motions (VLSMs) and long-wavelength patterns in turbine wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Önder, Asim; Meyers, Johan

    2017-11-01

    It is now widely accepted that very-large-scale motions (VLSMs) are a prominent feature of thermally-neutral atmospheric boundary layers (ABL). Up to date, the influence of these very long active motions on wind-energy harvesting is not sufficiently explored. This work is an effort in this direction. We perform large-eddy simulation of a turbine row operating under neutral conditions. The ABL data is produced separately in a very long domain of 240 δ . VLSMs are isolated from smaller-scale ABL and wake motions using a spectral cutoff at streamwise wavelength λx = 3.125 δ . Reynolds-averaging of low-pass filtered fields shows that the interaction of VLSMs and turbines produce very-long-wavelength motions in the wake region, which contain about 20 % of the Reynolds-shear stress, and 30 % of the streamwise kinetic energy. A conditional analysis of filtered fields further reveals that these long-wavelength wakes are produced by modification of very long velocity streaks in ABL. In particular, the turbine row acts as a sharp boundary between low and high velocity streaks, and accompanying roller structures remain relatively unaffected. This reorganization creates a two-way flux towards the wake region, which elucidates the side-way domination in turbulent transport. The authors acknowledg funding from ERC Grant No 306471.

  14. Influence of Continuous Table Motion on Patient Breathing Patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilbert, Juergen; Baier, Kurt; Richter, Anne; Herrmann, Christian; Ma Lei; Flentje, Michael; Guckenberger, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the influence of continuous table motion on patient breathing patterns for compensation of moving targets by a robotic treatment couch. Methods and Materials: Fifteen volunteers were placed on a robotic treatment couch, and the couch was moved on different breathing-correlated and -uncorrelated trajectories. External abdominal breathing motion of the patients was measured using an infrared camera system. The influence of table motion on breathing range and pattern was analyzed. Results: Continuous table motion was tolerated well by all test persons. Volunteers reacted differently to table motion. Four test persons showed no change of breathing range and pattern. Increased irregular breathing was observed in 4 patients; however, irregularity was not correlated with table motion. Only 4 test persons showed an increase in mean breathing amplitude of more than 2mm during motion of the couch. The mean cycle period decreased by more than 1 s for 2 test persons only. No abrupt changes in amplitude or cycle period could be observed. Conclusions: The observed small changes in breathing patterns support the application of motion compensation by a robotic treatment couch.

  15. Self-adapted and tunable graphene strain sensors for detecting both subtle and large human motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Lu-Qi; Wang, Dan-Yang; Tian, He; Ju, Zhen-Yi; Liu, Ying; Pang, Yu; Chen, Yuan-Quan; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2017-06-22

    Conventional strain sensors rarely have both a high gauge factor and a large strain range simultaneously, so they can only be used in specific situations where only a high sensitivity or a large strain range is required. However, for detecting human motions that include both subtle and large motions, these strain sensors can't meet the diverse demands simultaneously. Here, we come up with laser patterned graphene strain sensors with self-adapted and tunable performance for the first time. A series of strain sensors with either an ultrahigh gauge factor or a preferable strain range can be fabricated simultaneously via one-step laser patterning, and are suitable for detecting all human motions. The strain sensors have a GF of up to 457 with a strain range of 35%, or have a strain range of up to 100% with a GF of 268. Most importantly, the performance of the strain sensors can be easily tuned by adjusting the patterns of the graphene, so that the sensors can meet diverse demands in both subtle and large motion situations. The graphene strain sensors show significant potential in applications such as wearable electronics, health monitoring and intelligent robots. Furthermore, the facile, fast and low-cost fabrication method will make them possible and practical to be used for commercial applications in the future.

  16. Motion-Blur-Free High-Speed Video Shooting Using a Resonant Mirror

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiaki Inoue

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a novel concept of actuator-driven frame-by-frame intermittent tracking for motion-blur-free video shooting of fast-moving objects. The camera frame and shutter timings are controlled for motion blur reduction in synchronization with a free-vibration-type actuator vibrating with a large amplitude at hundreds of hertz so that motion blur can be significantly reduced in free-viewpoint high-frame-rate video shooting for fast-moving objects by deriving the maximum performance of the actuator. We develop a prototype of a motion-blur-free video shooting system by implementing our frame-by-frame intermittent tracking algorithm on a high-speed video camera system with a resonant mirror vibrating at 750 Hz. It can capture 1024 × 1024 images of fast-moving objects at 750 fps with an exposure time of 0.33 ms without motion blur. Several experimental results for fast-moving objects verify that our proposed method can reduce image degradation from motion blur without decreasing the camera exposure time.

  17. Motion Interplay as a Function of Patient Parameters and Spot Size in Spot Scanning Proton Therapy for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassberger, Clemens; Dowdell, Stephen; Lomax, Antony; Sharp, Greg; Shackleford, James; Choi, Noah; Willers, Henning; Paganetti, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Quantify the impact of respiratory motion on the treatment of lung tumors with spot scanning proton therapy. Methods and Materials 4D Monte Carlo simulations were used to assess the interplay effect, which results from relative motion of the tumor and the proton beam, on the dose distribution in the patient. Ten patients with varying tumor sizes (2.6-82.3cc) and motion amplitudes (3-30mm) were included in the study. We investigated the impact of the spot size, which varies between proton facilities, and studied single fractions and conventionally fractionated treatments. The following metrics were used in the analysis: minimum/maximum/mean dose, target dose homogeneity and 2-year local control rate (2y-LC). Results Respiratory motion reduces the target dose homogeneity, with the largest effects observed for the highest motion amplitudes. Smaller spot sizes (σ≈3mm) are inherently more sensitive to motion, decreasing target dose homogeneity on average by a factor ~2.8 compared to a larger spot size (σ≈13mm). Using a smaller spot size to treat a tumor with 30mm motion amplitude reduces the minimum dose to 44.7% of the prescribed dose, decreasing modeled 2y-LC from 87.0% to 2.7%, assuming a single fraction. Conventional fractionation partly mitigates this reduction, yielding a 2y-LC of 71.6%. For the large spot size, conventional fractionation increases target dose homogeneity and prevents a deterioration of 2y-LC for all patients. No correlation with tumor volume is observed. The effect on the normal lung dose distribution is minimal: observed changes in mean lung dose and lung V20 are interplay using a large spot size and conventional fractionation. For treatments employing smaller spot sizes and/or in the delivery of single fractions, interplay effects can lead to significant deterioration of the dose distribution and lower 2y-LC. PMID:23462423

  18. Motion Interplay as a Function of Patient Parameters and Spot Size in Spot Scanning Proton Therapy for Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassberger, Clemens; Dowdell, Stephen; Lomax, Antony; Sharp, Greg; Shackleford, James; Choi, Noah; Willers, Henning; Paganetti, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the impact of respiratory motion on the treatment of lung tumors with spot scanning proton therapy. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations were used to assess the interplay effect, which results from relative motion of the tumor and the proton beam, on the dose distribution in the patient. Ten patients with varying tumor sizes (2.6-82.3 cc) and motion amplitudes (3-30 mm) were included in the study. We investigated the impact of the spot size, which varies between proton facilities, and studied single fractions and conventionally fractionated treatments. The following metrics were used in the analysis: minimum/maximum/mean dose, target dose homogeneity, and 2-year local control rate (2y-LC). Results: Respiratory motion reduces the target dose homogeneity, with the largest effects observed for the highest motion amplitudes. Smaller spot sizes (σ ≈ 3 mm) are inherently more sensitive to motion, decreasing target dose homogeneity on average by a factor 2.8 compared with a larger spot size (σ ≈ 13 mm). Using a smaller spot size to treat a tumor with 30-mm motion amplitude reduces the minimum dose to 44.7% of the prescribed dose, decreasing modeled 2y-LC from 87.0% to 2.7%, assuming a single fraction. Conventional fractionation partly mitigates this reduction, yielding a 2y-LC of 71.6%. For the large spot size, conventional fractionation increases target dose homogeneity and prevents a deterioration of 2y-LC for all patients. No correlation with tumor volume is observed. The effect on the normal lung dose distribution is minimal: observed changes in mean lung dose and lung V 20 are <0.6 Gy(RBE) and <1.7%, respectively. Conclusions: For the patients in this study, 2y-LC could be preserved in the presence of interplay using a large spot size and conventional fractionation. For treatments using smaller spot sizes and/or in the delivery of single fractions, interplay effects can lead to significant deterioration of the

  19. Residual motion of lung tumors in end-of-inhale respiratory gated radiotherapy based on external surrogates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berbeco, Ross I.; Nishioka, Seiko; Shirato, Hiroki; Jiang, Steve B.

    2006-01-01

    It has been noted that some lung tumors exhibit large periodic motion due to respiration. To limit the amount of dose to healthy lung tissues, many clinics have begun gating radiotherapy treatment using externally placed surrogates. It has been observed by several institutions that the end-of-exhale (EOE) tumor position is more reproducible than other phases of the breathing cycle, so the gating window is often set there. From a treatment planning perspective, end-of-inhale (EOI) phase might be preferred for gating because the expanded lungs will further decrease the healthy tissue within the treatment field. We simulate gated treatment at the EOI phase, using a set of recently measured internal/external anatomy patient data. This paper attempts to answer three questions: (1) How much is the tumor residual motion when we use an external surrogate gating window at EOI? (2) How could we reduce the residual motion in the EOI gating window? (3) Is there a preference for amplitude- versus phase-based gating at EOI? We found that under free breathing conditions the residual motion of the tumors is much larger for EOI phase than for EOE phase. The mean values of residual motion at EOI were found to be 2.2 and 2.7 mm for amplitude- and phase-based gating, respectively, and, at EOE, 1.0 and 1.2 mm for amplitude- and phase-based gating, respectively. However, we note that the residual motion in the EOI gating window is correlated well with the reproducibility of the external surface position in the EOI phase. Using the results of a published breath-coaching study, we deduce that the residual motion of a lung tumor at EOI would approach that at EOE, with the same duty cycle (30%), under breath-coaching conditions. Additionally, we found that under these same conditions, phase-based gating approaches the same residual motion as amplitude-based gating, going from a 28% difference to 11%, for the patient with the largest difference between the two gating modalities. We conclude

  20. Constraining lowermost mantle structure with PcP/P amplitude ratios from large aperture arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventosa, S.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of weak short-period teleseismic body waves help to resolve lowermost mantle structure at short wavelengths, which is essential for understanding mantle dynamics and the interactions between the mantle and core. Their limited amount and uneven distribution are however major obstacles to solve for volumetric structure of the D" region, topography of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) and D" discontinuity, and the trade-offs among them. While PcP-P differential travel times provide important information, there are trade-offs between velocity structure and core-mantle boundary topography, which PcP/P amplitude ratios can help resolve, as long as lateral variations in attenuation and biases due to focusing are small or can be corrected for. Dense broadband seismic networks help to improve signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the target phases and signal-to-interference ratio (SIR) of other mantle phases when the slowness difference is large enough. To improve SIR and SNR of teleseismic PcP data, we have introduced the slant-stacklet transform to define coherent-guided filters able to separate and enhance signals according to their slowness, time of arrival and frequency content. We thus obtain optimal PcP/P amplitude ratios in the least-square sense using two short sliding windows to match the P signal with a candidate PcP signal. This method allows us to dramatically increase the amount of high-quality observations of short-period PcP/P amplitude ratios by allowing for smaller events and wider epicentral distance and depth ranges.We present the results of measurement of PcP/P amplitude ratios, sampling regions around the Pacific using dense arrays in North America and Japan. We observe that short-period P waves traveling through slabs are strongly affected by focusing, in agreement with the bias we have observed and corrected for due to mantle heterogeneities on PcP-P travel time differences. In Central America, this bias is by far the stronger anomaly we observe

  1. Large Amplitude Oscillatory Shear (LAOS) of Acrylic Emulsion-Based Pressure Sensitive Adhesives (PSAs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sipei; Nakatani, Alan; Griffith, William

    Large Amplitude Oscillatory Shear (LAOS) testing has recently taken on renewed interest in the rheological community. It is a very useful tool to probe the viscoelastic response of materials in the non-linear regime. Much of the discussion on polymers in the LAOS field has focused on melts in or near the terminal flow regime. Here we present a LAOS study conducted on a commercial rheometer for acrylic emulsion-based pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) films in the plateau regime. The films behaved qualitatively similar over an oscillation frequency range of 0.5-5 rad/s. From Fourier transform analysis, the fifth or even the seventh order harmonic could be observed at large applied strains. From stress decomposition analysis or Lissajous curves, inter-cycle elastic softening, or type I behavior, was observed for all films as the strain increases, while intra-cycle strain hardening occurred at strains in the LAOS regime. Overall, as acid content increases, it was found that the trend in elasticity under large applied strains agreed very well with the trend in cohesive strength of the films.

  2. Observations of large-amplitude MHD waves in Jupiter's foreshock in connection with a quasi-perpendicular shock structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavassano-Cattaneo, M. B.; Moreno, G.; Scotto, M. T.; Acuna, M.

    1987-01-01

    Plasma and magnetic field observations performed onboard the Voyager 2 spacecraft have been used to investigate Jupiter's foreshock. Large-amplitude waves have been detected in association with the quasi-perpendicular structure of the Jovian bow shock, thus proving that the upstream turbulence is not a characteristic signature of the quasi-parallel shock.

  3. Large amplitude parallel propagating electromagnetic oscillitons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cattaert, Tom; Verheest, Frank

    2005-01-01

    Earlier systematic nonlinear treatments of parallel propagating electromagnetic waves have been given within a fluid dynamic approach, in a frame where the nonlinear structures are stationary and various constraining first integrals can be obtained. This has lead to the concept of oscillitons that has found application in various space plasmas. The present paper differs in three main aspects from the previous studies: first, the invariants are derived in the plasma frame, as customary in the Sagdeev method, thus retaining in Maxwell's equations all possible effects. Second, a single differential equation is obtained for the parallel fluid velocity, in a form reminiscent of the Sagdeev integrals, hence allowing a fully nonlinear discussion of the oscilliton properties, at such amplitudes as the underlying Mach number restrictions allow. Third, the transition to weakly nonlinear whistler oscillitons is done in an analytical rather than a numerical fashion

  4. A dual-Kinect approach to determine torso surface motion for respiratory motion correction in PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heß, Mirco; Büther, Florian; Dawood, Mohammad; Schäfers, Klaus P.; Gigengack, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    to be stronger with abdominal signals than with thoracic signals (average Pearson correlation coefficients of 0.74 ± 0.17 and 0.45 ± 0.23, respectively). In all cases, except one, the abdominal respiratory motion preceded the thoracic motion—a maximum delay of approximately 600 ms was detected. Conclusions: The method provides motion information with sufficiently high spatial and temporal resolution. Thus, it enables meaningful analysis in the form of comparisons between amplitudes and phase shifts of signals from different regions. In combination with a large field-of-view, as given by combining the data of two Kinect cameras, it yields surface representations that might be useful in the context of motion correction and motion modeling

  5. A dual-Kinect approach to determine torso surface motion for respiratory motion correction in PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heß, Mirco, E-mail: mirco.hess@uni-muenster.de; Büther, Florian; Dawood, Mohammad; Schäfers, Klaus P. [European Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of Münster, Münster 48149 (Germany); Gigengack, Fabian [European Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of Münster, Münster 48149, Germany and Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Münster, Münster 48149 (Germany)

    2015-05-15

    found to be stronger with abdominal signals than with thoracic signals (average Pearson correlation coefficients of 0.74 ± 0.17 and 0.45 ± 0.23, respectively). In all cases, except one, the abdominal respiratory motion preceded the thoracic motion—a maximum delay of approximately 600 ms was detected. Conclusions: The method provides motion information with sufficiently high spatial and temporal resolution. Thus, it enables meaningful analysis in the form of comparisons between amplitudes and phase shifts of signals from different regions. In combination with a large field-of-view, as given by combining the data of two Kinect cameras, it yields surface representations that might be useful in the context of motion correction and motion modeling.

  6. Cosmophysical Factors in the Fluctuation Amplitude Spectrum of Brownian Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaminsky A. V.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Phenomenon of the regular variability of the fine structure of the fluctuation in the am- plitude distributions (shapes of related histograms for the case of Brownian motion was investigated. We took an advantage of the dynamic light scattering method (DLS to get a stochastically fluctuated signal determined by Brownian motion. Shape of the histograms is most likely to vary, synchronous, in two proximally located independent cells containing Brownian particles. The synchronism persists in the cells distant at 2 m from each other, and positioned meridionally. With a parallel-wise positioning of the cells, high probability of the synchronous variation in the shape of the histograms by local time has been observed. This result meets the previous conclusion about the dependency of histogram shapes (“fluctuation amplitudes” of the spectra of stochastic processes upon rotation of the Earth.

  7. The role of large scale motions on passive scalar transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmarathne, Suranga; Araya, Guillermo; Tutkun, Murat; Leonardi, Stefano; Castillo, Luciano

    2014-11-01

    We study direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulent channel flow at Reτ = 394 to investigate effect of large scale motions on fluctuating temperature field which forms a passive scalar field. Statistical description of the large scale features of the turbulent channel flow is obtained using two-point correlations of velocity components. Two-point correlations of fluctuating temperature field is also examined in order to identify possible similarities between velocity and temperature fields. The two-point cross-correlations betwen the velocity and temperature fluctuations are further analyzed to establish connections between these two fields. In addition, we use proper orhtogonal decompotion (POD) to extract most dominant modes of the fields and discuss the coupling of large scale features of turbulence and the temperature field.

  8. Collective nuclear dynamics. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrosimov, V.I.; Kolomietz, V.M.

    1994-01-01

    The fourth International school on nuclear physics was help on 29 Aug - 7 Sep, 1994 in Ukraine. The specialists discussed following subjects: liquid drop and the shell correction method; nuclear deformation energy and fission; nuclear structure at high spins, superdeformed states, structure of excited and exotic nuclei; nuclear fluid dynamics and large scale collective motion; order and chaos as they relate to the collective motion; quantum and interference phenomena in nuclear collisions; quasi-fission and multinucleon fragmentation effects; shell effects in non-nuclear systems; new nuclear facilities

  9. Collective nuclear dynamics. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanyuk, F.A.

    1994-01-01

    The Fourth International school on nuclear physics was help on 29 Aug - 7 Sep, 1994 in Ukraine. The specialists discussed following subjects:liquid drop and the shell correction method; nuclear deformation energy and fission; nuclear structure at high spins, superdeformed states, structure of excited and exotic nuclei; nuclear fluid dynamics and large scale collective motion; order and chaos as they relate to the collective motion; quantum and interference phenomena in nuclear collisions; quasi-fission and multinucleon fragmentation effects; shell effects in non-nuclear systems; new nuclear facilities

  10. Collective nuclear dynamics. Proceedings.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanyuk, F A [eds.

    1994-12-31

    The Fourth International school on nuclear physics was help on 29 Aug - 7 Sep, 1994 in Ukraine. The specialists discussed following subjects:liquid drop and the shell correction method; nuclear deformation energy and fission; nuclear structure at high spins, superdeformed states, structure of excited and exotic nuclei; nuclear fluid dynamics and large scale collective motion; order and chaos as they relate to the collective motion; quantum and interference phenomena in nuclear collisions; quasi-fission and multinucleon fragmentation effects; shell effects in non-nuclear systems; new nuclear facilities.

  11. Non-unitary boson mapping and its application to nuclear collective motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Kenjiro

    2001-01-01

    First, the general theory of boson mapping for even-number many-fermion systems is surveyed. In order to overcome the confusion concerning the so-called unphysical or spurious states in the boson mapping, the correct concept of the unphysical states is precisely given in a clear-cut way. Next, a method to apply the boson mapping to a truncated many-fermion Hilbert space consisting of collective phonons is proposed, by putting special emphasis on the Dyson-type non-unitary boson mapping. On the basis of this method, it becomes possible for the first time to apply the Dyson-type boson mapping to analyses of collective motions in realistic nuclei. This method is also extended to be applicable to odd-number-fermion systems. As known well, the Dyson-type boson mapping is a non-unitary transformation and it gives a non-Hermitian boson Hamiltonian. It is not easy (but not impossible) to solve the eigenstates of the non-Hermitian Hamiltonian. A Hermitian treatment of this non-Hermitian eigenvalue problem is discussed and it is shown that this treatment is a very good approximation. using this Hermitian treatment, we can obtain the normal-ordered Holstein-Primakoff-type boson expansion in the multi-collective-phonon subspace. Thereby the convergence of the boson expansion can be tested. Some examples of application of the Dyson-type non-unitary boson mapping to simplified models and realistic nuclei are also shown, and we can see that it is quite useful for analysis of the collective motions in realistic nuclei. In contrast to the above-mentioned ordinary type of boson mapping, which may be called a a 'static' boson mapping, the Dyson-type non-unitary self-consistent-collective-coordinate method is discussed. The latter is, so to speak, a 'dynamical' boson mapping, which is a dynamical extension of the ordinary boson mapping to be capable to include the coupling effects from the non-collective degrees of freedom self-consistently.Thus all of the Dyson-type non-unitary boson

  12. Amplitudes and time scales of picosecond-to-microsecond motion in proteins studied by solid-state NMR: a critical evaluation of experimental approaches and application to crystalline ubiquitin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, Jens D.; Schanda, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Solid-state NMR provides insight into protein motion over time scales ranging from picoseconds to seconds. While in solution state the methodology to measure protein dynamics is well established, there is currently no such consensus protocol for measuring dynamics in solids. In this article, we perform a detailed investigation of measurement protocols for fast motions, i.e. motions ranging from picoseconds to a few microseconds, which is the range covered by dipolar coupling and relaxation experiments. We perform a detailed theoretical investigation how dipolar couplings and relaxation data can provide information about amplitudes and time scales of local motion. We show that the measurement of dipolar couplings is crucial for obtaining accurate motional parameters, while systematic errors are found when only relaxation data are used. Based on this realization, we investigate how the REDOR experiment can provide such data in a very accurate manner. We identify that with accurate rf calibration, and explicit consideration of rf field inhomogeneities, one can obtain highly accurate absolute order parameters. We then perform joint model-free analyses of 6 relaxation data sets and dipolar couplings, based on previously existing, as well as new data sets on microcrystalline ubiquitin. We show that nanosecond motion can be detected primarily in loop regions, and compare solid-state data to solution-state relaxation and RDC analyses. The protocols investigated here will serve as a useful basis towards the establishment of a routine protocol for the characterization of ps–μs motions in proteins by solid-state NMR

  13. Amplitudes and time scales of picosecond-to-microsecond motion in proteins studied by solid-state NMR: a critical evaluation of experimental approaches and application to crystalline ubiquitin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haller, Jens D.; Schanda, Paul, E-mail: paul.schanda@ibs.fr [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Institut de Biologie Structurale (IBS) (France)

    2013-10-09

    Solid-state NMR provides insight into protein motion over time scales ranging from picoseconds to seconds. While in solution state the methodology to measure protein dynamics is well established, there is currently no such consensus protocol for measuring dynamics in solids. In this article, we perform a detailed investigation of measurement protocols for fast motions, i.e. motions ranging from picoseconds to a few microseconds, which is the range covered by dipolar coupling and relaxation experiments. We perform a detailed theoretical investigation how dipolar couplings and relaxation data can provide information about amplitudes and time scales of local motion. We show that the measurement of dipolar couplings is crucial for obtaining accurate motional parameters, while systematic errors are found when only relaxation data are used. Based on this realization, we investigate how the REDOR experiment can provide such data in a very accurate manner. We identify that with accurate rf calibration, and explicit consideration of rf field inhomogeneities, one can obtain highly accurate absolute order parameters. We then perform joint model-free analyses of 6 relaxation data sets and dipolar couplings, based on previously existing, as well as new data sets on microcrystalline ubiquitin. We show that nanosecond motion can be detected primarily in loop regions, and compare solid-state data to solution-state relaxation and RDC analyses. The protocols investigated here will serve as a useful basis towards the establishment of a routine protocol for the characterization of ps–μs motions in proteins by solid-state NMR.

  14. Deformations and Rotational Ground Motions Inferred from Downhole Vertical Array Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graizer, V.

    2017-12-01

    Only few direct reliable measurements of rotational component of strong earthquake ground motions are obtained so far. In the meantime, high quality data recorded at downhole vertical arrays during a number of earthquakes provide an opportunity to calculate deformations based on the differences in ground motions recorded simultaneously at different depths. More than twenty high resolution strong motion downhole vertical arrays were installed in California with primary goal to study site response of different geologic structures to strong motion. Deformation or simple shear strain with the rate γ is the combination of pure shear strain with the rate γ/2 and rotation with the rate of α=γ/2. Deformations and rotations were inferred from downhole array records of the Mw 6.0 Parkfield 2004, the Mw 7.2 Sierra El Mayor (Mexico) 2010, the Mw 6.5 Ferndale area in N. California 2010 and the two smaller earthquakes in California. Highest amplitude of rotation of 0.60E-03 rad was observed at the Eureka array corresponding to ground velocity of 35 cm/s, and highest rotation rate of 0.55E-02 rad/s associated with the S-wave was observed at a close epicentral distance of 4.3 km from the ML 4.2 event in Southern California at the La Cienega array. Large magnitude Sierra El Mayor earthquake produced long duration rotational motions of up to 1.5E-04 rad and 2.05E-03 rad/s associated with shear and surface waves at the El Centro array at closest fault distance of 33.4km. Rotational motions of such levels, especially tilting can have significant effect on structures. High dynamic range well synchronized and properly oriented instrumentation is necessary for reliable calculation of rotations from vertical array data. Data from the dense Treasure Island array near San Francisco demonstrate consistent change of shape of rotational motion with depth and material. In the frequency range of 1-15 Hz Fourier amplitude spectrum of vertical ground velocity is similar to the scaled tilt

  15. Chain dynamics and nanoparticle motion in attractive polymer nanocomposites subjected to large deformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senses, Erkan; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Natarajan, Bharath; Narayanan, Suresh; Faraone, Antonio

    2017-11-08

    The effect of large deformation on the chain dynamics in attractive polymer nanocomposites was investigated using neutron scattering techniques. Quasi-elastic neutron backscattering measurements reveal a substantial reduction of polymer mobility in the presence of attractive, well-dispersed nanoparticles. In addition, large deformations are observed to cause a further slowing down of the Rouse rates at high particle loadings, where the interparticle spacings are slightly smaller than the chain dimensions, i.e. in the strongly confined state. No noticeable change, however, was observed for a lightly confined system. The reptation tube diameter, measured by neutron spin echo, remained unchanged after shear, suggesting that the level of chain-chain entanglements is not significantly affected. The shear-induced changes in the interparticle bridging reflect the slow nanoparticle motion measured by X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. These results provide a first step for understanding how large shear can significantly affect the segmental motion in nanocomposites and open up new opportunities for designing mechanically responsive soft materials.

  16. The application of large amplitude oscillatory stress in a study of fully formed fibrin clots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamer, T. F.; Thomas, B. R.; Curtis, D. J.; Badiei, N.; Williams, P. R.; Hawkins, K.

    2017-12-01

    The suitability of controlled stress large amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOStress) for the characterisation of the nonlinear viscoelastic properties of fully formed fibrin clots is investigated. Capturing the rich nonlinear viscoelastic behaviour of the fibrin network is important for understanding the structural behaviour of clots formed in blood vessels which are exposed to a wide range of shear stresses. We report, for the first time, that artefacts due to ringing exist in both the sample stress and strain waveforms of a LAOStress measurement which will lead to errors in the calculation of nonlinear viscoelastic properties. The process of smoothing the waveforms eliminates these artefacts whilst retaining essential rheological information. Furthermore, we demonstrate the potential of LAOStress for characterising the nonlinear viscoelastic properties of fibrin clots in response to incremental increases of applied stress up to the point of fracture. Alternating LAOStress and small amplitude oscillatory shear measurements provide detailed information of reversible and irreversible structural changes of the fibrin clot as a consequence of elevated levels of stress. We relate these findings to previous studies involving large scale deformations of fibrin clots. The LAOStress technique may provide useful information to help understand why some blood clots formed in vessels are stable (such as in deep vein thrombosis) and others break off (leading to a life threatening pulmonary embolism).

  17. A note on probabilistic computation of earthquake response spectrum amplitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.G.; Trifunac, M.D.

    1979-01-01

    This paper analyzes a method for computation of Pseudo Relative Velocity (PSV) spectrum and Absolute Acceleration (SA) spectrum so that the amplitudes and the shapes of these spectra reflect the geometrical characteristics of the seismic environment of the site. The estimated spectra also incorporate the geologic characteristics at the site, direction of ground motion and the probability of exceeding these motions. An example of applying this method in a realistic setting is presented and the uncertainties of the results are discussed. (Auth.)

  18. Coupled large eddy simulation and discrete element model of bedload motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furbish, D.; Schmeeckle, M. W.

    2011-12-01

    We combine a three-dimensional large eddy simulation of turbulence to a three-dimensional discrete element model of turbulence. The large eddy simulation of the turbulent fluid is extended into the bed composed of non-moving particles by adding resistance terms to the Navier-Stokes equations in accordance with the Darcy-Forchheimer law. This allows the turbulent velocity and pressure fluctuations to penetrate the bed of discrete particles, and this addition of a porous zone results in turbulence structures above the bed that are similar to previous experimental and numerical results for hydraulically-rough beds. For example, we reproduce low-speed streaks that are less coherent than those over smooth-beds due to the episodic outflow of fluid from the bed. Local resistance terms are also added to the Navier-Stokes equations to account for the drag of individual moving particles. The interaction of the spherical particles utilizes a standard DEM soft-sphere Hertz model. We use only a simple drag model to calculate the fluid forces on the particles. The model reproduces an exponential distribution of bedload particle velocities that we have found experimentally using high-speed video of a flat bed of moving sand in a recirculating water flume. The exponential distribution of velocity results from the motion of many particles that are nearly constantly in contact with other bed particles and come to rest after short distances, in combination with a relatively few particles that are entrained further above the bed and have velocities approaching that of the fluid. Entrainment and motion "hot spots" are evident that are not perfectly correlated with the local, instantaneous fluid velocity. Zones of the bed that have recently experienced motion are more susceptible to motion because of the local configuration of particle contacts. The paradigm of a characteristic saltation hop length in riverine bedload transport has infused many aspects of geomorphic thought, including

  19. Thesaurus-based search in large heterogeneous collections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wielemaker, J.; Hildebrand, M.; van Ossenbruggen, J.; Schreiber, G.

    2008-01-01

    In cultural heritage, large virtual collections are coming into existence. Such collections contain heterogeneous sets of metadata and vocabulary concepts, originating from multiple sources. In the context of the E-Culture demonstrator we have shown earlier that such virtual collections can be

  20. Scattering Amplitudes via Algebraic Geometry Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Mads

    Feynman diagrams. The study of multiloop scattering amplitudes is crucial for the new era of precision phenomenology at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Loop-level scattering amplitudes can be reduced to a basis of linearly independent integrals whose coefficients are extracted from generalized...

  1. Effects of equilibrium point displacement in limit cycle oscillation amplitude, critical frequency and prediction of critical input angular velocity in minimal brake system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganji, Hamed Faghanpour; Ganji, Davood Domiri

    2017-04-01

    In the present paper, brake squeal phenomenon as a noise resource in automobiles was studied. In most cases, the modeling work is carried out assuming that deformations were small; thus, equilibrium point is set zero and linearization is performed at this point. However, the equilibrium point under certain circumstances is not zero; therefore, huge errors in prediction of brake squeal may occur. In this work, large motion domains with respect to linearization importance were subjected to investigation. Nonlinear equations of motion were considered and behavior of system for COF's model was analyzed by studying amplitude and frequency of limited cycle oscillation.

  2. Physics of microswimmers—single particle motion and collective behavior: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elgeti, J; Winkler, R G; Gompper, G

    2015-01-01

    Locomotion and transport of microorganisms in fluids is an essential aspect of life. Search for food, orientation toward light, spreading of off-spring, and the formation of colonies are only possible due to locomotion. Swimming at the microscale occurs at low Reynolds numbers, where fluid friction and viscosity dominates over inertia. Here, evolution achieved propulsion mechanisms, which overcome and even exploit drag. Prominent propulsion mechanisms are rotating helical flagella, exploited by many bacteria, and snake-like or whip-like motion of eukaryotic flagella, utilized by sperm and algae. For artificial microswimmers, alternative concepts to convert chemical energy or heat into directed motion can be employed, which are potentially more efficient. The dynamics of microswimmers comprises many facets, which are all required to achieve locomotion. In this article, we review the physics of locomotion of biological and synthetic microswimmers, and the collective behavior of their assemblies. Starting from individual microswimmers, we describe the various propulsion mechanism of biological and synthetic systems and address the hydrodynamic aspects of swimming. This comprises synchronization and the concerted beating of flagella and cilia. In addition, the swimming behavior next to surfaces is examined. Finally, collective and cooperate phenomena of various types of isotropic and anisotropic swimmers with and without hydrodynamic interactions are discussed. (report on progress)

  3. Amplitude saturation of MEMS resonators explained by autoparametric resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Avoort, C; Bontemps, J J M; Steeneken, P G; Le Phan, K; Van Beek, J T M; Van der Hout, R; Hulshof, J; Fey, R H B

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a phenomenon that limits the power handling of MEMS resonators. It is observed that above a certain driving level, the resonance amplitude becomes independent of the driving level. In contrast to previous studies of power handling of MEMS resonators, it is found that this amplitude saturation cannot be explained by nonlinear terms in the spring constant or electrostatic force. Instead we show that the amplitude in our experiments is limited by nonlinear terms in the equation of motion which couple the in-plane length-extensional resonance mode to one or more out-of-plane (OOP) bending modes. We present experimental evidence for the autoparametric excitation of these OOP modes using a vibrometer. The measurements are compared to a model that can be used to predict a power-handling limit for MEMS resonators

  4. Amplitude saturation of MEMS resonators explained by autoparametric resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Avoort, C; Bontemps, J J M; Steeneken, P G; Le Phan, K; Van Beek, J T M [NXP Research, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Van der Hout, R; Hulshof, J [Department of Mathematics, VU University—Faculty of Sciences, De Boelelaan 1081a, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Fey, R H B, E-mail: cas.van.der.avoort@nxp.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2010-10-15

    This paper describes a phenomenon that limits the power handling of MEMS resonators. It is observed that above a certain driving level, the resonance amplitude becomes independent of the driving level. In contrast to previous studies of power handling of MEMS resonators, it is found that this amplitude saturation cannot be explained by nonlinear terms in the spring constant or electrostatic force. Instead we show that the amplitude in our experiments is limited by nonlinear terms in the equation of motion which couple the in-plane length-extensional resonance mode to one or more out-of-plane (OOP) bending modes. We present experimental evidence for the autoparametric excitation of these OOP modes using a vibrometer. The measurements are compared to a model that can be used to predict a power-handling limit for MEMS resonators.

  5. MO-FG-BRA-07: Intrafractional Motion Effect Can Be Minimized in Tomotherapy Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, A; Chang, S; Matney, J; Wang, A; Lian, J [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Chao, E [Accuray Incorporated, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Tomotherapy has unique challenges in handling intrafractional motion compared to conventional LINAC. In this study, we analyzed the impact of intrafractional motion on cumulative dosimetry using actual patient motion data and investigated real time jaw/MLC compensation approaches to minimize the motion-induced dose discrepancy in Tomotherapy SBRT treatment. Methods: Intrafractional motion data recorded in two CyberKnife lung treatment cases through fiducial tracking and two LINAC prostate cases through Calypso tracking were used in this study. For each treatment site, one representative case has an average motion (6mm) and one has a large motion (10mm for lung and 15mm for prostate). The cases were re-planned on Tomotherapy for SBRT. Each case was planned with 3 different jaw settings: 1cm static, 2.5cm dynamic, and 5cm dynamic. 4D dose accumulation software was developed to compute dose with the recorded motions and theoretically compensate motions by modifying original jaw and MLC to track the trajectory of the tumor. Results: PTV coverage in Tomotherapy SBRT for patients with intrafractional motion depends on motion type, amplitude and plan settings. For the prostate patient with large motion, PTV coverage changed from 97.2% (motion-free) to 47.1% (target motion-included), 96.6% to 58.5% and 96.3% to 97.8% for the 1cm static jaw, 2.5cm dynamic jaw and 5cm dynamic jaw setting, respectively. For the lung patient with large motion, PTV coverage discrepancies showed a similar trend of change. When the jaw and MLC compensation program was engaged, the motion compromised PTV coverage was recovered back to >95% for all cases and plans. All organs at risk (OAR) were spared with < 5% increase from original motion-free plans. Conclusion: Tomotherapy SBRT is less motion-impacted when 5cm dynamic jaw is used. Once the motion pattern is known, the jaw and MLC compensation program can largely minimize the compromised target coverage and OAR sparing.

  6. MO-FG-BRA-07: Intrafractional Motion Effect Can Be Minimized in Tomotherapy Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, A; Chang, S; Matney, J; Wang, A; Lian, J; Chao, E

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Tomotherapy has unique challenges in handling intrafractional motion compared to conventional LINAC. In this study, we analyzed the impact of intrafractional motion on cumulative dosimetry using actual patient motion data and investigated real time jaw/MLC compensation approaches to minimize the motion-induced dose discrepancy in Tomotherapy SBRT treatment. Methods: Intrafractional motion data recorded in two CyberKnife lung treatment cases through fiducial tracking and two LINAC prostate cases through Calypso tracking were used in this study. For each treatment site, one representative case has an average motion (6mm) and one has a large motion (10mm for lung and 15mm for prostate). The cases were re-planned on Tomotherapy for SBRT. Each case was planned with 3 different jaw settings: 1cm static, 2.5cm dynamic, and 5cm dynamic. 4D dose accumulation software was developed to compute dose with the recorded motions and theoretically compensate motions by modifying original jaw and MLC to track the trajectory of the tumor. Results: PTV coverage in Tomotherapy SBRT for patients with intrafractional motion depends on motion type, amplitude and plan settings. For the prostate patient with large motion, PTV coverage changed from 97.2% (motion-free) to 47.1% (target motion-included), 96.6% to 58.5% and 96.3% to 97.8% for the 1cm static jaw, 2.5cm dynamic jaw and 5cm dynamic jaw setting, respectively. For the lung patient with large motion, PTV coverage discrepancies showed a similar trend of change. When the jaw and MLC compensation program was engaged, the motion compromised PTV coverage was recovered back to >95% for all cases and plans. All organs at risk (OAR) were spared with < 5% increase from original motion-free plans. Conclusion: Tomotherapy SBRT is less motion-impacted when 5cm dynamic jaw is used. Once the motion pattern is known, the jaw and MLC compensation program can largely minimize the compromised target coverage and OAR sparing.

  7. Comparison of Flight Simulators Based on Human Motion Perception Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente Pais, Ana R.; Correia Gracio, Bruno J.; Kelly, Lon C.; Houck, Jacob A.

    2015-01-01

    In flight simulation, motion filters are used to transform aircraft motion into simulator motion. When looking for the best match between visual and inertial amplitude in a simulator, researchers have found that there is a range of inertial amplitudes, rather than a single inertial value, that is perceived by subjects as optimal. This zone, hereafter referred to as the optimal zone, seems to correlate to the perceptual coherence zones measured in flight simulators. However, no studies were found in which these two zones were compared. This study investigates the relation between the optimal and the coherence zone measurements within and between different simulators. Results show that for the sway axis, the optimal zone lies within the lower part of the coherence zone. In addition, it was found that, whereas the width of the coherence zone depends on the visual amplitude and frequency, the width of the optimal zone remains constant.

  8. Harmonic pulsed excitation and motion detection of a vibrating reflective target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Matthew W; Greenleaf, James F

    2008-01-01

    Elasticity imaging is an emerging medical imaging modality. Methods involving acoustic radiation force excitation and pulse-echo ultrasound motion detection have been investigated to assess the mechanical response of tissue. In this work new methods for dynamic radiation force excitation and motion detection are presented. The theory and model for harmonic motion detection of a vibrating reflective target are presented. The model incorporates processing of radio frequency data acquired using pulse-echo ultrasound to measure harmonic motion with amplitudes ranging from 100 to 10,000 nm. A numerical study was performed to assess the effects of different parameters on the accuracy and precision of displacement amplitude and phase estimation and showed how estimation errors could be minimized. Harmonic pulsed excitation is introduced as a multifrequency radiation force excitation method that utilizes ultrasound tonebursts repeated at a rate f(r). The radiation force, consisting of frequency components at multiples of f(r), is generated using 3.0 MHz ultrasound, and motion detection is performed simultaneously with 9.0 MHz pulse-echo ultrasound. A parameterized experimental analysis showed that displacement can be measured with small errors for motion with amplitudes as low as 100 nm. The parameterized numerical and experimental analyses provide insight into how to optimize acquisition parameters to minimize measurement errors.

  9. Scattering Amplitudes via Algebraic Geometry Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Søgaard, Mads; Damgaard, Poul Henrik

    This thesis describes recent progress in the understanding of the mathematical structure of scattering amplitudes in quantum field theory. The primary purpose is to develop an enhanced analytic framework for computing multiloop scattering amplitudes in generic gauge theories including QCD without Feynman diagrams. The study of multiloop scattering amplitudes is crucial for the new era of precision phenomenology at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Loop-level scattering amplitudes can be reduced to a basis of linearly independent integrals whose coefficients are extracted from generalized unitarity cuts. We take advantage of principles from algebraic geometry in order to extend the notion of maximal cuts to a large class of two- and three-loop integrals. This allows us to derive unique and surprisingly compact formulae for the coefficients of the basis integrals. Our results are expressed in terms of certain linear combinations of multivariate residues and elliptic integrals computed from products of ...

  10. Large-scale ground motion simulation using GPGPU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoi, S.; Maeda, T.; Nishizawa, N.; Aoki, T.

    2012-12-01

    Huge computation resources are required to perform large-scale ground motion simulations using 3-D finite difference method (FDM) for realistic and complex models with high accuracy. Furthermore, thousands of various simulations are necessary to evaluate the variability of the assessment caused by uncertainty of the assumptions of the source models for future earthquakes. To conquer the problem of restricted computational resources, we introduced the use of GPGPU (General purpose computing on graphics processing units) which is the technique of using a GPU as an accelerator of the computation which has been traditionally conducted by the CPU. We employed the CPU version of GMS (Ground motion Simulator; Aoi et al., 2004) as the original code and implemented the function for GPU calculation using CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture). GMS is a total system for seismic wave propagation simulation based on 3-D FDM scheme using discontinuous grids (Aoi&Fujiwara, 1999), which includes the solver as well as the preprocessor tools (parameter generation tool) and postprocessor tools (filter tool, visualization tool, and so on). The computational model is decomposed in two horizontal directions and each decomposed model is allocated to a different GPU. We evaluated the performance of our newly developed GPU version of GMS on the TSUBAME2.0 which is one of the Japanese fastest supercomputer operated by the Tokyo Institute of Technology. First we have performed a strong scaling test using the model with about 22 million grids and achieved 3.2 and 7.3 times of the speed-up by using 4 and 16 GPUs. Next, we have examined a weak scaling test where the model sizes (number of grids) are increased in proportion to the degree of parallelism (number of GPUs). The result showed almost perfect linearity up to the simulation with 22 billion grids using 1024 GPUs where the calculation speed reached to 79.7 TFlops and about 34 times faster than the CPU calculation using the same number

  11. Interaction and collective effects in classical-equations-of-motion calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodmer, A.R.

    1981-01-01

    We discuss results obtained with the classical-equations-of-motion (CEOM) approach, with particular reference to interaction (potential energy) and collective effects in central collisions of equal mass nuclei. The essence of the CEOM approach is the classical calculation of all A = A/sub P/ + A/sub T/ trajectories using a 2-body potential V between all pairs of nucleons; V = V/sub short/ + V/sub long/ has a short range repulsion and a longer range attractive tail. In contrast to hydrodynamics, the CEOM approach is microscopic and includes transparency and nonequilibrium effects

  12. Interacting sp-boson model with isospin: an unified description of giant multipole resonances and other collective motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.H.-T.

    1980-10-01

    A unified description of the following classes of nuclear collective states in terms of an interacting sp-boson model is proposed: (i) Low-lying collective states in the light nuclei, both odd-odd and even-even; (ii) Giant multipole resonances (GMR), and (iii) pairing collective motions. (Author) [pt

  13. The impact of respiratory motion on tumor quantification and delineation in static PET/CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chi; Pierce II, Larry A; Alessio, Adam M; Kinahan, Paul E

    2009-01-01

    Our aim is to investigate the impact of respiratory motion on tumor quantification and delineation in static PET/CT imaging using a population of patient respiratory traces. A total of 1295 respiratory traces acquired during whole body PET/CT imaging were classified into three types according to the qualitative shape of their signal histograms. Each trace was scaled to three diaphragm motion amplitudes (6 mm, 11 mm and 16 mm) to drive a whole body PET/CT computer simulation that was validated with a physical phantom experiment. Three lung lesions and one liver lesion were simulated with diameters of 1 cm and 2 cm. PET data were reconstructed using the OS-EM algorithm with attenuation correction using CT images at the end-expiration phase and respiratory-averaged CT. The errors of the lesion maximum standardized uptake values (SUV max ) and lesion volumes between motion-free and motion-blurred PET/CT images were measured and analyzed. For respiration with 11 mm diaphragm motion and larger quiescent period fraction, respiratory motion can cause a mean lesion SUV max underestimation of 28% and a mean lesion volume overestimation of 130% in PET/CT images with 1 cm lesions. The errors of lesion SUV max and volume are larger for patient traces with larger motion amplitudes. Smaller lesions are more sensitive to respiratory motion than larger lesions for the same motion amplitude. Patient respiratory traces with relatively larger quiescent period fraction yield results less subject to respiratory motion than traces with long-term amplitude variability. Mismatched attenuation correction due to respiratory motion can cause SUV max overestimation for lesions in the lower lung region close to the liver dome. Using respiratory-averaged CT for attenuation correction yields smaller mismatch errors than those using end-expiration CT. Respiratory motion can have a significant impact on static oncological PET/CT imaging where SUV and/or volume measurements are important. The impact

  14. Motion Tree Delineates Hierarchical Structure of Protein Dynamics Observed in Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Moritsugu

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics (MD simulations of proteins provide important information to understand their functional mechanisms, which are, however, likely to be hidden behind their complicated motions with a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. A straightforward and intuitive analysis of protein dynamics observed in MD simulation trajectories is therefore of growing significance with the large increase in both the simulation time and system size. In this study, we propose a novel description of protein motions based on the hierarchical clustering of fluctuations in the inter-atomic distances calculated from an MD trajectory, which constructs a single tree diagram, named a "Motion Tree", to determine a set of rigid-domain pairs hierarchically along with associated inter-domain fluctuations. The method was first applied to the MD trajectory of substrate-free adenylate kinase to clarify the usefulness of the Motion Tree, which illustrated a clear-cut dynamics picture of the inter-domain motions involving the ATP/AMP lid and the core domain together with the associated amplitudes and correlations. The comparison of two Motion Trees calculated from MD simulations of ligand-free and -bound glutamine binding proteins clarified changes in inherent dynamics upon ligand binding appeared in both large domains and a small loop that stabilized ligand molecule. Another application to a huge protein, a multidrug ATP binding cassette (ABC transporter, captured significant increases of fluctuations upon binding a drug molecule observed in both large scale inter-subunit motions and a motion localized at a transmembrane helix, which may be a trigger to the subsequent structural change from inward-open to outward-open states to transport the drug molecule. These applications demonstrated the capabilities of Motion Trees to provide an at-a-glance view of various sizes of functional motions inherent in the complicated MD trajectory.

  15. Multi-modal vibration amplitudes of taut inclined cables due to direct and/or parametric excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, J. H. G.

    2016-02-01

    Cables are often prone to potentially damaging large amplitude vibrations. The dynamic excitation may be from external loading or motion of the cable ends, the latter including direct excitation, normally from components of end motion transverse to the cable, and parametric excitation induced by axial components of end motion causing dynamic tension variations. Geometric nonlinearity can be important, causing stiffening behaviour and nonlinear modal coupling. Previous analyses of the vibrations, often neglecting sag, have generally dealt with direct and parametric excitation separately or have reverted to numerical solutions of the responses. Here a nonlinear cable model is adopted, applicable to taut cables such as on cable-stayed bridges, that allows for cable inclination, small sag (such that the vibration modes are similar to those of a taut string), multiple modes in both planes and end motion and/or external forcing close to any natural frequency. Based on the method of scaling and averaging it is found that, for sinusoidal inputs and positive damping, non-zero steady state responses can only occur in the modes in each plane with natural frequencies close to the excitation frequency and those with natural frequencies close to half this frequency. Analytical solutions, in the form of non-dimensional polynomial equations, are derived for the steady state vibration amplitudes in up to three modes simultaneously: the directly excited mode, the corresponding nonlinearly coupled mode in the orthogonal plane and a parametrically excited mode with half the natural frequency. The stability of the solutions is also identified. The outputs of the equations are consistent with previous results, where available. Example results from the analytical solutions are presented for a typical inclined bridge cable subject to vertical excitation of the lower end, and they are validated by numerical integration of the equations of motion and against some previous experimental

  16. Rapid, topology-based particle tracking for high-resolution measurements of large complex 3D motion fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mohak; Leggett, Susan E; Landauer, Alexander K; Wong, Ian Y; Franck, Christian

    2018-04-03

    Spatiotemporal tracking of tracer particles or objects of interest can reveal localized behaviors in biological and physical systems. However, existing tracking algorithms are most effective for relatively low numbers of particles that undergo displacements smaller than their typical interparticle separation distance. Here, we demonstrate a single particle tracking algorithm to reconstruct large complex motion fields with large particle numbers, orders of magnitude larger than previously tractably resolvable, thus opening the door for attaining very high Nyquist spatial frequency motion recovery in the images. Our key innovations are feature vectors that encode nearest neighbor positions, a rigorous outlier removal scheme, and an iterative deformation warping scheme. We test this technique for its accuracy and computational efficacy using synthetically and experimentally generated 3D particle images, including non-affine deformation fields in soft materials, complex fluid flows, and cell-generated deformations. We augment this algorithm with additional particle information (e.g., color, size, or shape) to further enhance tracking accuracy for high gradient and large displacement fields. These applications demonstrate that this versatile technique can rapidly track unprecedented numbers of particles to resolve large and complex motion fields in 2D and 3D images, particularly when spatial correlations exist.

  17. Manipulation and controlled amplification of Brownian motion of microcantilever sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, Adosh; Cherian, Suman; Hedden, David; Thundat, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    Microcantilevers, such as those used in atomic force microscopy, undergo Brownian motion due to mechanical thermal noise. The root mean square amplitude of the Brownian motion of a cantilever typically ranges from 0.01--0.1 nm, which limits its use in practical applications. Here we describe a technique by which the Brownian amplitude and the Q factor in air and water can be amplified by three and two orders of magnitude, respectively. This technique is similar to a positive feedback oscillator, wherein the Brownian motion of the vibrating cantilever controls the frequency output of the oscillator. This technique can be exploited to improve sensitivity of microcantilever-based chemical and biological sensors, especially for sensors in liquid environments

  18. Correlations for reduced-width amplitudes in 49V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, B.H.; Mitchell, G.E.; Bilpuch, E.G.; Westerfeldt, C.R.

    1980-01-01

    Measurement of the relative sign of inelastic proton-channel amplitudes permits the determination of amplitude correlations. Data were obtained for 45 5/2 + resonances in 49 V. Although the reduced widths in each channel followed a Porter-Thomas distribution, large amplitude correlations were observed. The results are compared with the reduced-width--amplitude distribution of Krieger and Porter. This is the first direct test of the Krieger-Porter distribution

  19. Collective motions of globally coupled oscillators and some probability distributions on circle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaćimović, Vladimir [Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, University of Montenegro, Cetinjski put, bb., 81000 Podgorica (Montenegro); Crnkić, Aladin, E-mail: aladin.crnkic@hotmail.com [Faculty of Technical Engineering, University of Bihać, Ljubijankićeva, bb., 77000 Bihać, Bosnia and Herzegovina (Bosnia and Herzegovina)

    2017-06-28

    In 2010 Kato and Jones described a new family of probability distributions on circle, obtained as Möbius transformation of von Mises distribution. We present the model demonstrating that these distributions appear naturally in study of populations of coupled oscillators. We use this opportunity to point out certain relations between Directional Statistics and collective motion of coupled oscillators. - Highlights: • We specify probability distributions on circle that arise in Kuramoto model. • We study how the mean-field coupling affects the shape of distribution of phases. • We discuss potential applications in some experiments on cell cycle. • We apply Directional Statistics to study collective dynamics of coupled oscillators.

  20. Thesaurus-based search in large heterogeneous collections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Wielemaker (Jan); M. Hildebrand (Michiel); J.R. van Ossenbruggen (Jacco); G. Schreiber (Guus); A. Sheth; not CWI et al

    2008-01-01

    htmlabstractIn cultural heritage, large virtual collections are coming into existence. Such collections contain heterogeneous sets of metadata and vocabulary concepts, originating from multiple sources. In the context of the E-Culture demonstrator we have shown earlier that such virtual

  1. Large-scale fluid motion in the earth's outer core estimated from non-dipole magnetic field data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushima, Masaki; Honkura, Yoshimori

    1989-01-01

    Fluid motions in the Earth's outer core can be estimated from magnetic field data at the Earth's surface based on some assumptions. The basic standpoint here is that the non-dipole magnetic field is generated by the interaction between a strong toroidal magnetic field, created by differential rotation, and the convective motion in the outer core. Large-scale convective motions are studied to express them in terms of the poloidal velocity field expanded into a series of spherical harmonics. The radial distribution of differential rotation is estimated from the balance between the effective couple due to angular momentum transfer and the electromagnetic couple. Then the radial dependence of the toroidal magnetic field is derived from the interaction between the differential rotation thus estimated and the dipole magnetic field within the outer core. Magnetic field data are applied to a secular variation model which takes into account the fluctuations of the standing and drifting parts of the non-zonal magnetic field. The velocity field in the outer core is estimated for two cases. It is revealed that the pattern of convective motions is generally characterized by large-scale motions in the quasi-steady case. In the non-steady case, the magnitude of the velocity field is much larger, indicating a more dynamic feature. (N.K.)

  2. Verification of Fourier phase and amplitude values from simulated heart motion using a hydrodynamic cardiac model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yiannikas, J; Underwood, D A; Takatani, Setsuo; Nose, Yukihiko; MacIntyre, W J; Cook, S A; Go, R T; Golding, L; Loop, F D

    1986-02-01

    Using pusher-plate-type artificial hearts, changes in the degree of synchrony and stroke volume were compared to phase and amplitude calculations from the first Fourier component of individual-pixel time-activity curves generated from gated radionuclide images (RNA) of these hearts. In addition, the ability of Fourier analysis to quantify paradoxical volume shifts was tested using a ventricular aneurysm model by which the Fourier amplitude was correlated to known increments of paradoxical volume. Predetermined phase-angle differences (incremental increases in asynchrony) and the mean phase-angle difference calculated from RNAs showed an agreement of -7/sup 0/ +- 4.4/sup 0/ (mean +- SD). A strong correlation was noted between stroke volume and Fourier amplitude as well as between the paradoxical volume accepted by the 'aneurysm' and the Fourier amplitude. The degree of asynchrony and changes in stroke volume were accurately reflected by the Fourier phase and amplitude values, respectively. In the specific case of ventricular aneurysms, the data demonstrate that using this method, the paradoxically moving areas may be localized, and the expansile volume within these regions can be quantified. (orig.).

  3. Collective coordinate models of domain wall motion in perpendicularly magnetized systems under the spin hall effect and longitudinal fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasseri, S. Ali, E-mail: ali.nasseri@isi.it [ISI Foundation - Via Alassio 11/c –10126 Torino (Italy); Politecnico di Torino - Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Moretti, Simone; Martinez, Eduardo [University of Salamanca - Cardenal Plá y Deniel, 22, 37008 Salamanca (Spain); Serpico, Claudio [ISI Foundation - Via Alassio 11/c –10126 Torino (Italy); University of Naples Federico II - Via Claudio 21, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Durin, Gianfranco [ISI Foundation - Via Alassio 11/c –10126 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRIM) - Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy)

    2017-03-15

    Recent studies on heterostructures of ultrathin ferromagnets sandwiched between a heavy metal layer and an oxide have highlighted the importance of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and broken inversion symmetry in domain wall (DW) motion. Specifically, chiral DWs are stabilized in these systems due to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI). SOC can also lead to enhanced current induced DW motion, with the Spin Hall effect (SHE) suggested as the dominant mechanism for this observation. The efficiency of SHE driven DW motion depends on the internal magnetic structure of the DW, which could be controlled using externally applied longitudinal in-plane fields. In this work, micromagnetic simulations and collective coordinate models are used to study current-driven DW motion under longitudinal in-plane fields in perpendicularly magnetized samples with strong DMI. Several extended collective coordinate models are developed to reproduce the micromagnetic results. While these extended models show improvements over traditional models of this kind, there are still discrepancies between them and micromagnetic simulations which require further work. - Highlights: • Moving DWs in PMA material maintain their structure under longitudinal in-plane fields. • As a result of longitudinal fields, magnetization in the domains becomes canted. • A critical longitudinal field was identified and correlated with the DMI strength. • A canted collective coordinate model was developed for DW motion under in-plane fields.

  4. Direct amplitude detuning measurement with ac dipole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. White

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In circular machines, nonlinear dynamics can impact parameters such as beam lifetime and could result in limitations on the performance reach of the accelerator. Assessing and understanding these effects in experiments is essential to confirm the accuracy of the magnetic model and improve the machine performance. A direct measurement of the machine nonlinearities can be obtained by characterizing the dependency of the tune as a function of the amplitude of oscillations (usually defined as amplitude detuning. The conventional technique is to excite the beam to large amplitudes with a single kick and derive the tune from turn-by-turn data acquired with beam position monitors. Although this provides a very precise tune measurement it has the significant disadvantage of being destructive. An alternative, nondestructive way of exciting large amplitude oscillations is to use an ac dipole. The perturbation Hamiltonian in the presence of an ac dipole excitation shows a distinct behavior compared to the free oscillations which should be correctly taken into account in the interpretation of experimental data. The use of an ac dipole for direct amplitude detuning measurement requires careful data processing allowing one to observe the natural tune of the machine; the feasibility of such a measurement is demonstrated using experimental data from the Large Hadron Collider. An experimental proof of the theoretical derivations based on measurements performed at injection energy is provided as well as an application of this technique at top energy using a large number of excitations on the same beam.

  5. Insights into Ground-Motion Processes from Intensity Data (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, G. M.

    2009-12-01

    Analysis of intensity data gathered from the on-line “Did You Feel It?” (DYFI) questionnaire program (Wald et al., 1999, Seism. Res. L.) provides new insights into both contemporary and historical ground-motion processes; this is particularly important for sparsely-instrumented regions. The value of the DYFI data lies in their vast quantities and large spatial coverage. With thousands to tens of thousands of respondents providing information on the felt and damage characteristics of widely-felt earthquakes, DYFI intensity data provide surprisingly high resolution of ground-motion features. The large data quantities allow techniques such as binning to be used to bring out these features in a statistically-stable way (Atkinson and Wald, 2007, Seism. Res. L.), while correlations of the statistics of DYFI intensities with instrumental ground motions provide the link between intensity and engineering ground-motion parameters (Wald et al., 1999, Earthquake Spectra). This link is largely independent of region if its dependence on earthquake magnitude and distance is taken into account (Kaka and Atkinson, 2007, BSSA). Thus DYFI data provide a valuable tool with which ground motions can be estimated, if their felt and damage effects have been reported. This is useful both for understanding contemporary events in sparsely-instrumented regions, and for re-evaluating historical events, for which only intensity data are available. By using calibrated intensity observations, a number of ground-motion processes can be investigated based on DYFI and/or historical intensity data. For example, intensity data shed light on source scaling issues, and whether source parameters vary regionally. They can also be used to document regional attenuation features, such as the attenuation rate and its variation with distance (Atkinson and Wald, 2007). A key uncertainty in these investigations concerns the effect of spectral shape on intensity; the spectral shape is influenced by site

  6. Visualization of the collective vortex-like motions in liquid argon and water: Molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anikeenko, A. V.; Malenkov, G. G.; Naberukhin, Yu. I.

    2018-03-01

    We propose a new measure of collectivity of molecular motion in the liquid: the average vector of displacement of the particles, ⟨ΔR⟩, which initially have been localized within a sphere of radius Rsph and then have executed the diffusive motion during a time interval Δt. The more correlated the motion of the particles is, the longer will be the vector ⟨ΔR⟩. We visualize the picture of collective motions in molecular dynamics (MD) models of liquids by constructing the ⟨ΔR⟩ vectors and pinning them to the sites of the uniform grid which divides each of the edges of the model box into equal parts. MD models of liquid argon and water have been studied by this method. Qualitatively, the patterns of ⟨ΔR⟩ vectors are similar for these two liquids but differ in minor details. The most important result of our research is the revealing of the aggregates of ⟨ΔR⟩ vectors which have the form of extended flows which sometimes look like the parts of vortices. These vortex-like clusters of ⟨ΔR⟩ vectors have the mesoscopic size (of the order of 10 nm) and persist for tens of picoseconds. Dependence of the ⟨ΔR⟩ vector field on parameters Rsph, Δt, and on the model size has been investigated. This field in the models of liquids differs essentially from that in a random-walk model.

  7. Motion-induced dose artifacts in helical tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bryan; Chen, Jeff; Battista, Jerry [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON (Canada); Kron, Tomas [Peter MacCallum Cancer Center, Melbourne (Australia)], E-mail: bryan.kim@lhsc.on.ca

    2009-10-07

    Tumor motion is a particular concern for a complex treatment modality such as helical tomotherapy, where couch position, gantry rotation and MLC leaf opening all change with time. In the present study, we have investigated the impact of tumor motion for helical tomotherapy, which could result in three distinct motion-induced dose artifacts, namely (1) dose rounding, (2) dose rippling and (3) IMRT leaf opening asynchronization effect. Dose rounding and dose rippling effects have been previously described, while the IMRT leaf opening asynchronization effect is a newly discovered motion-induced dose artifact. Dose rounding is the penumbral widening of a delivered dose distribution near the edges of a target volume along the direction of tumor motion. Dose rippling is a series of periodic dose peaks and valleys observed within the target region along the direction of couch motion, due to an asynchronous interplay between the couch motion and the longitudinal component of tumor motion. The IMRT leaf opening asynchronization effect is caused by an asynchronous interplay between the temporal patterns of leaf openings and tumor motion. The characteristics of each dose artifact were investigated individually as functions of target motion amplitude and period for both non-IMRT and IMRT helical tomotherapy cases, through computer simulation modeling and experimental verification. The longitudinal dose profiles generated by the simulation program agreed with the experimental data within {+-}0.5% and {+-}1.5% inside the PTV region for the non-IMRT and IMRT cases, respectively. The dose rounding effect produced a penumbral increase up to 20.5 mm for peak-to-peak target motion amplitudes ranging from 1.0 cm to 5.0 cm. Maximum dose rippling magnitude of 25% was calculated, when the target motion period approached an unusually high value of 10 s. The IMRT leaf opening asynchronization effect produced dose differences ranging from -29% to 7% inside the PTV region. This information

  8. Validation of strong-motion stochastic model using observed ground motion records in north-east India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipok K. Bora

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We focused on validation of applicability of semi-empirical technique (spectral models and stochastic simulation for the estimation of ground-motion characteristics in the northeastern region (NER of India. In the present study, it is assumed that the point source approximation in far field is valid. The one-dimensional stochastic point source seismological model of Boore (1983 (Boore, DM. 1983. Stochastic simulation of high frequency ground motions based on seismological models of the radiated spectra. Bulletin of Seismological Society of America, 73, 1865–1894. is used for modelling the acceleration time histories. Total ground-motion records of 30 earthquakes of magnitudes lying between MW 4.2 and 6.2 in NER India from March 2008 to April 2013 are used for this study. We considered peak ground acceleration (PGA and pseudospectral acceleration (response spectrum amplitudes with 5% damping ratio at three fundamental natural periods, namely: 0.3, 1.0, and 3.0 s. The spectral models, which work well for PGA, overestimate the pseudospectral acceleration. It seems that there is a strong influence of local site amplification and crustal attenuation (kappa, which control spectral amplitudes at different frequencies. The results would allow analysing regional peculiarities of ground-motion excitation and propagation and updating seismic hazard assessment, both the probabilistic and deterministic approaches.

  9. Optical twists in phase and amplitude

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daria, Vincent R.; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    where both phase and amplitude express a helical profile as the beam propagates in free space. Such a beam can be accurately referred to as an optical twister. We characterize optical twisters and demonstrate their capacity to induce spiral motion on particles trapped along the twisters’ path. Unlike LG...... beams, the far field projection of the twisted optical beam maintains a high photon concentration even at higher values of topological charge. Optical twisters have therefore profound applications to fundamental studies of light and atoms such as in quantum entanglement of the OAM, toroidal traps...

  10. Interfractional variability of respiration-induced esophageal tumor motion quantified using fiducial markers and four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Peng; Hulshof, Maarten C C M; van Wieringen, Niek; Bel, Arjan; Alderliesten, Tanja

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the interfractional variability of respiration-induced esophageal tumor motion using fiducial markers and four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4D-CBCT) and assess if a 4D-CT is sufficient for predicting the motion during the treatment. Twenty-four patients with 63 markers visible in the retrospectively reconstructed 4D-CBCTs were included. For each marker, we calculated the amplitude and trajectory of the respiration-induced motion. Possible time trends of the amplitude over the treatment course and the interfractional variability of amplitudes and trajectory shapes were assessed. Further, the amplitudes measured in the 4D-CT were compared to those in the 4D-CBCTs. The amplitude was largest in the cranial-caudal direction of the distal esophagus (mean: 7.1mm) and proximal stomach (mean: 7.8mm). No time trend was observed in the amplitude over the treatment course. The interfractional variability of amplitudes and trajectory shapes was limited (mean: ≤1.4mm). Moreover, small and insignificant deviation was found between the amplitudes quantified in the 4D-CT and in the 4D-CBCT (mean absolute difference: ≤1.0mm). The limited interfractional variability of amplitudes and trajectory shapes and small amplitude difference between 4D-CT-based and 4D-CBCT-based measurements imply that a single 4D-CT would be sufficient for predicting the respiration-induced esophageal tumor motion during the treatment course. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Verification of Fourier phase and amplitude values from simulated heart motion using a hydrodynamic cardiac model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yiannikas, J.; Underwood, D.A.; Takatani, Setsuo; Nose, Yukihiko; MacIntyre, W.J.; Cook, S.A.; Go, R.T.; Golding, L.; Loop, F.D.

    1986-01-01

    Using pusher-plate-type artificial hearts, changes in the degree of synchrony and stroke volume were compared to phase and amplitude calculations from the first Fourier component of individual-pixel time-activity curves generated from gated radionuclide images (RNA) of these hearts. In addition, the ability of Fourier analysis to quantify paradoxical volume shifts was tested using a ventricular aneurysm model by which the Fourier amplitude was correlated to known increments of paradoxical volume. Predetermined phase-angle differences (incremental increases in asynchrony) and the mean phase-angle difference calculated from RNAs showed an agreement of -7 0 +-4.4 0 (mean +-SD). A strong correlation was noted between stroke volume and Fourier amplitude (r=0.98; P<0.0001) as well as between the paradoxical volume accepted by the 'aneurysm' and the Fourier amplitude (r=0.97; P<0.0001). The degree of asynchrony and changes in stroke volume were accurately reflected by the Fourier phase and amplitude values, respectively. In the specific case of ventricular aneurysms, the data demonstrate that using this method, the paradoxically moving areas may be localized, and the expansile volume within these regions can be quantified. (orig.)

  12. Measurement and Quantification of Gross Human Shoulder Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy T. Newkirk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The shoulder girdle plays an important role in the large pointing workspace that humans enjoy. The goal of this work was to characterize the human shoulder girdle motion in relation to the arm. The overall motion of the human shoulder girdle was characterized based on motion studies completed on test subjects during voluntary (natural/unforced motion. The collected data from the experiments were used to develop surface fit equations that represent the position and orientation of the glenohumeral joint for a given humeral pointing direction. These equations completely quantify gross human shoulder girdle motion relative to the humerus. The equations are presented along with goodness-of-fit results that indicate the equations well approximate the motion of the human glenohumeral joint. This is the first time the motion has been quantified for the entire workspace, and the equations provide a reference against which to compare future work.

  13. Examining the time dependence of DAMA's modulation amplitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, Chris; Savage, Christopher; Sandick, Pearl; Freese, Katherine; Gondolo, Paolo

    2018-03-01

    If dark matter is composed of weakly interacting particles, Earth's orbital motion may induce a small annual variation in the rate at which these particles interact in a terrestrial detector. The DAMA collaboration has identified at a 9.3σ confidence level such an annual modulation in their event rate over two detector iterations, DAMA/NaI and DAMA/LIBRA, each with ˜ 7 years of observations. This data is well fit by a constant modulation amplitude for the two iterations of the experiment. We statistically examine the time dependence of the modulation amplitudes, which "by eye" appear to be decreasing with time in certain energy ranges. We perform a chi-squared goodness of fit test of the average modulation amplitudes measured by the two detector iterations which rejects the hypothesis of a consistent modulation amplitude at greater than 80, 96, and 99.6% for the 2-4, 2-5 and 2-6 keVee energy ranges, respectively. We also find that among the 14 annual cycles there are three ≳ 3σ departures from the average in our estimated data in the 5-6 keVee energy range. In addition, we examined several phenomenological models for the time dependence of the modulation amplitude. Using a maximum likelihood test, we find that descriptions of the modulation amplitude as decreasing with time are preferred over a constant modulation amplitude at anywhere between 1σ and 3σ , depending on the phenomenological model for the time dependence and the signal energy range considered. A time dependent modulation amplitude is not expected for a dark matter signal, at least for dark matter halo morphologies consistent with the DAMA signal. New data from DAMA/LIBRA-phase2 will certainly aid in determining whether any apparent time dependence is a real effect or a statistical fluctuation.

  14. Scattering amplitudes in gauge theories

    CERN Document Server

    Henn, Johannes M

    2014-01-01

    At the fundamental level, the interactions of elementary particles are described by quantum gauge field theory. The quantitative implications of these interactions are captured by scattering amplitudes, traditionally computed using Feynman diagrams. In the past decade tremendous progress has been made in our understanding of and computational abilities with regard to scattering amplitudes in gauge theories, going beyond the traditional textbook approach. These advances build upon on-shell methods that focus on the analytic structure of the amplitudes, as well as on their recently discovered hidden symmetries. In fact, when expressed in suitable variables the amplitudes are much simpler than anticipated and hidden patterns emerge.   These modern methods are of increasing importance in phenomenological applications arising from the need for high-precision predictions for the experiments carried out at the Large Hadron Collider, as well as in foundational mathematical physics studies on the S-matrix in quantum ...

  15. Derivation of the Boltzmann Equation for Financial Brownian Motion: Direct Observation of the Collective Motion of High-Frequency Traders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Kiyoshi; Sueshige, Takumi; Takayasu, Hideki; Takayasu, Misako

    2018-03-01

    A microscopic model is established for financial Brownian motion from the direct observation of the dynamics of high-frequency traders (HFTs) in a foreign exchange market. Furthermore, a theoretical framework parallel to molecular kinetic theory is developed for the systematic description of the financial market from microscopic dynamics of HFTs. We report first on a microscopic empirical law of traders' trend-following behavior by tracking the trajectories of all individuals, which quantifies the collective motion of HFTs but has not been captured in conventional order-book models. We next introduce the corresponding microscopic model of HFTs and present its theoretical solution paralleling molecular kinetic theory: Boltzmann-like and Langevin-like equations are derived from the microscopic dynamics via the Bogoliubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon hierarchy. Our model is the first microscopic model that has been directly validated through data analysis of the microscopic dynamics, exhibiting quantitative agreements with mesoscopic and macroscopic empirical results.

  16. Effects on ground motion related to spatial variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanmarcke, E.H.

    1987-01-01

    Models of the spectral content and the space-time correlation structure of strong earthquake ground motion are combined with transient random vibration analysis to yield site-specific response spectra that can account for the effect of local spatial averaging of the ground motion across a rigid foundation of prescribed size. The methodology is presented with reference to sites in eastern North America, although the basic approach is applicable to other seismic regions provided the source and attenuation parameters are regionally adjusted. Parameters in the spatial correlation model are based on data from the SMART-I accelerograph array, and the sensitivity of response spectra reduction factors with respect to these parameters is examined. The starting point of the analysis is the Fourier amplitude spectrum of site displacement expresses as a function of earthquake source parameters and source-to-site distance. The bedrock acceleration spectral density function at a point, derived from the displacement spectrum, is modified to account for anelastic attenuation, and where appropriate, for local soil effects and/or local spatial averaging across a foundation. Transient random vibration analysis yields approximate analytical expressions for median ground motion amplitudes and median response spectra of an earthquake defined in terms of its spectral density function and strong motion duration. The methodology is illustrated for three events characterized by their m b magnitude and epicentral distance. The focus in this paper is on the stochastic response prediction methodology enabling explicit accounting for strong motion duration and the effect of local spatial averaging on response spectra. The numerical examples enable a preliminary assessment of the reduction of response spectral amplitudes attributable to local spatial averaging across rigid foundations of different sizes. 36 refs

  17. Heterogeneous Compression of Large Collections of Evolutionary Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Suzanne J

    2015-01-01

    Compressing heterogeneous collections of trees is an open problem in computational phylogenetics. In a heterogeneous tree collection, each tree can contain a unique set of taxa. An ideal compression method would allow for the efficient archival of large tree collections and enable scientists to identify common evolutionary relationships over disparate analyses. In this paper, we extend TreeZip to compress heterogeneous collections of trees. TreeZip is the most efficient algorithm for compressing homogeneous tree collections. To the best of our knowledge, no other domain-based compression algorithm exists for large heterogeneous tree collections or enable their rapid analysis. Our experimental results indicate that TreeZip averages 89.03 percent (72.69 percent) space savings on unweighted (weighted) collections of trees when the level of heterogeneity in a collection is moderate. The organization of the TRZ file allows for efficient computations over heterogeneous data. For example, consensus trees can be computed in mere seconds. Lastly, combining the TreeZip compressed (TRZ) file with general-purpose compression yields average space savings of 97.34 percent (81.43 percent) on unweighted (weighted) collections of trees. Our results lead us to believe that TreeZip will prove invaluable in the efficient archival of tree collections, and enables scientists to develop novel methods for relating heterogeneous collections of trees.

  18. Forward amplitude in pion deuteron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, E.M.; Munguia, G.A.P.; Rosa, L.P.; Thome, Z.D.

    1979-06-01

    The data on total cross section for πd scattering is analysed in terms of a single scattering calculation with Fermi motion dependence, in order to obtain a criterion to fix the value of the energy entering the two body meson nucleon amplitude. It is found that the prescription derived from the non-relativistic three body kinematics gives reasonable results. The introduction of a shift in the energy value, possibly representing nuclear binding effects, leads to a very good fitting of the data. The results are compared with those obtained in direct calculations of Faddeev equations and with the Brueckner model of fixed scatterers. (Author) [pt

  19. Collection of large and small food particles by Bosmina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleiwas, A.H.; Stokes, P.M.

    1985-01-01

    The rate of collection by Bosmina of large and small food particles was measured with 14 C-labeled algae and checked by visual observation. Bosmina collected and ingested a large alga, Cosmarium, about six times faster than a small one, Chlorella. This is consistent with the observation of DeMott and Kerfoot that Bosmina has two modes of feeding: small-particle filtering and large-particle grasping

  20. Universal current-velocity relation of skyrmion motion in chiral magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Junichi; Mochizuki, Masahito; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2013-03-01

    Current-driven motion of the magnetic domain wall requires large critical current density jc ~109 -1012 A/m2, at which the joule heating is a serious problem. The skyrmions recently discovered in chiral magnets, on the other hand, have much smaller critical current of jc ~105 -106 A/m2. We present a numerical simulation of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, which reveals a remarkably robust and universal current-velocity relation of the slyrmion motion driven by the spin transfer torque unaffected by either impurities or nonadiabatic effect in sharp contrast to the case of domain wall or spin helix (HL). Simulation results are analyzed using a theory based on Thiele's equation, and it is concluded that this surprising behavior is due to the Magnus force and flexible shape-deformation of individual skyrmions and skyrmion crystal (SkX), which enable them to avoid pinning centers and then weaken the net pinning force. Dynamical deformation of SkX leads to the fluctuation of Bragg peak with large amplitude, which can be detected by the recent neutron-scattering experiment.

  1. Descriptions of the equilibration process of the intrinsic degrees of freedom and dissipative process of the nuclear collective motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Renfa; Zhang Jingshang; Ma Zhongyu; Wu Xizhen; Zhuo Yizhong

    1984-01-01

    In this paper the Hamiltonian model is used for studying the nuclear dynamics by taking both the one-body and two-body interaction mechanisms into account. On the basis of the Von Neuman equation the coupling between the collective motion and the single particle degrees of freedom is discussed. Thus, the equations obtained are physically transparent and easy for numerical computations. They may be useful for describing the dissipative process of the nuclear collective motion as well as the equilibration process of the intrinsic degrees of freedom. (Author)

  2. High-resolution synchrotron terahertz investigation of the large-amplitude hydrogen bond librational band of (HCN)2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mihrin, Dmytro; Jakobsen, P. W.; Voute, A.

    2018-01-01

    experimental value for the vibrational zero-point energy of 2.50 ± 0.05 kJ mol−1 arising from the entire class of large-amplitude intermolecular modes. The spectroscopic findings are complemented by CCSD(T)-F12b/aug-cc-pV5Z (electronic energies) and CCSD(T)-F12b/aug-cc-pVQZ (force fields) electronic structure...... calculations, providing a (semi)-experimental value of 17.20 ± 0.20 kJ mol−1 for the dissociation energy D0 of this strictly linear weak intermolecular CH⋯N hydrogen bond....

  3. Multi-frequency response of a cylinder subjected to vortex shedding and support motions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vikestad, Kyrre

    1998-12-31

    This thesis deals with an experimental investigation of vortex induced vibrations of a circular cylinder. The purpose of the experiment was to identify the influence from a controlled disturbance of the cylinder motions on the response caused by vortex shedding. The cylinder investigated is 2 m long and the diameter is 10 cm. The cylinder is elastically mounted in an apparatus using springs, where the foundation of one of the springs can have a harmonic motion. The apparatus is placed on a carriage in a 25 m long towing tank. Towing velocities are varied between 0.140 m/s and 0.655 m/s corresponding to reduced velocity range from 2.8 to 13.2. The still water natural frequency is 0.497 Hz, and the natural frequency in air is 0.634 Hz. The cylinder is only able to oscillate in the cross-flow direction. The support motion frequency was varied between 0.26 Hz and 1.01 Hz, and the force motion amplitude was varied using 2, 4 and 6 cm support amplitudes. Three sets of experiments were carried out: (1) Still water oscillations due to harmonic support motion excitation, support amplitude and frequencies varied, (2) Towing tests with no support motion, the velocity is varied, (3) Combined excitation: Towing tests with support motion. All possible combinations of experiments (1) and (2) are carried out. The two first experiments provide reference values for the combined excitation experiments and for verification purposes. The results reveal the ability of the external disturbance to influence the vortex shedding process both regarding frequency and the resulting response amplitudes. Results for added mass, in-line drag and damping are also obtained. The work may be of use in deep water floating petroleum production. 81 refs., 73 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Stochastic motion due to a single wave in a magnetoplasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    A single electrostatic wave in a magnetoplasma causes stochastic ion motion in several physically different situations. Various magnetic fields (uniform, tokamak, and mirror) and various propagation angles with respect to the field have been studied. A brief review of this work shows that all situations can be understood using the concept of overlapping resonances. Analytical calculations of the wave amplitude necessary for stochasticity have been carried out in some cases and compared with computer and laboratory experiments. In the case of an axisymmetric mirror field the calculations predict stochastic motion of ions with energy below a threshold that depends weakly on the wave amplitude and on the scale lengths of the magnetic field. Studies with an azimuthally asymmetric field show that the asymmetry causes substantial changes in the motion of some ions

  5. Near-inertial motions over a mid-Ocean Ridge; Effects of topography and hydrothermal plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Richard E.; Roth, Sharon E.; Dymond, Jack

    1990-05-01

    We investigate the spatial structure of near-inertial motions in the vicinity of the Endeavour segment of Juan de Fuca Ridge (approximately 48°N, 129°W) in the northeast Pacific Ocean. On the basis of time series current and water property data collected from September 1984 to September 1987, near-inertial motions are ubiquitous features of the 2200-m water column, with root-mean-square (rms) current speeds comparable to those of the dominant M2 tidal currents. Within the lower 1000 m of the water column where most of the observations were obtained, near-inertial oscillations have rms current speeds of O(1 cm/s) and vertical isotherm displacements of O(10 m). The fluctuations are confined to the frequency band 0.966-1.079 f(f is the local Coriolis parameter) and have characteristic event durations of 1 week. Although the spectra of subsurface motions are dominated by the "blue-shifted" superinertial band, significant spectral peaks are found also in the subinertial and inertial frequency bands. Marked alteration of the near-inertial current amplitudes occurs over two well-defined depth zones within the study region. Within the 200-m zone immediately above the 2100-m ridge crest, current amplitudes are amplified by a factor of 1.2-1.7 because of bottom reflection and/or scattering of the downward propagating energy. Evidence that the amplification may be linked to bottom reflection rather than to scattering is provided by flattening and cross-slope rotation of the near-inertial current ellipses with increased proximity to the top of the ridge. Reflection would occur at grazing angles of less than 1° and would be associated with surface-generated waves originating at distances of over 100 km from the observational site. In contrast to the enhanced amplitudes immediately above the top of the ridge, near-inertial currents within the 1600- to 1800-m depth range undergo pronounced attenuation and frequency alteration. Amplitude attenuation is especially pronounced for

  6. Optical surface scanning for respiratory motion monitoring in radiotherapy: a feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekke, Susanne Lise; Mahmood, Faisal; Helt-Hansen, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We evaluated the feasibility of a surface scanning system (Catalyst) for respiratory motion monitoring of breast cancer patients treated with radiotherapy in deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH). DIBH is used to reduce the radiation dose to the heart and lung. In contrast to RPM, a compet......Purpose. We evaluated the feasibility of a surface scanning system (Catalyst) for respiratory motion monitoring of breast cancer patients treated with radiotherapy in deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH). DIBH is used to reduce the radiation dose to the heart and lung. In contrast to RPM...... and 3: the Quasar phantom was used to study if the angle of the monitored surface affects the amplitude of the recorded signal. Results. Experiment 1: we observed comparable period estimates for both systems. The amplitudes were 8 ± 0.1 mm (Catalyst) and 4.9 ± 0.1 mm (RPM). Independent check with in...... 1. Experiment 3: an increased (fixed) surface angle during breathing motion resulted in an overestimated amplitude with RPM, while the amplitude estimated by Catalyst was unaffected. Conclusion. Our study showed that Catalyst can be used as a better alternative to the RPM. With Catalyst...

  7. Nth-powered amplitude squeezing in fan-states

    CERN Document Server

    Duc, T M

    2002-01-01

    Squeezing properties of the Hillery-type N-powered amplitude are investigated in the fan-state vertical bar xi; 2k, f> sub F which is linearly superposed by 2k 2k-quantum nonlinear coherent states in the phase-locked manner. The general expression of squeezing is derived analytically for arbitrary xi, k, N and f showing a multi-directional character of squeezing. For a given k, squeezing may appear to the even power N=2k if f ident to 1 and N>=2k if f not =1 and the number of directions along with the Nth-powered amplitude is squeezed is exactly equal to N, for both f ident to 1 (the light field) and f not =1 (the vibrational motion of the trapped ion). Discussions are also given elucidating the qualitative difference between the cases of f ident to 1 and f not =1.

  8. SU-E-J-175: Comparison of the Treatment Reproducibility of Tumors Affected by Breathing Motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamczyk, M; Piotrowski, T; Adamczyk, S [Medical Physics Department, Greater Poland Cancer Centre, Poznan (Poland)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of the dose distribution simulations was to form a global idea of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) realization, by its comparison to three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) delivery for tumors affected by respiratory motion. Methods: In the group of 10patients both 3DCRT and IMRT plans were prepared.For each field the motion kernel was generated with the largest movement amplitude of 4;6 and 8mm.Additionally,the sets of reference measurements were made in no motion conditions(0 mm).The evaluation of plan delivery,using a diode array placed on moving platform,was based on the Gamma Index analysis with distance to agreement of 3mm and dose difference of 3%. Results: IMRT plans tended to spare doses delivered to lungs compared to 3DCRT.Nonetheless,analyzed volumes showed no significant difference between the static and dynamic techniques,except for the volumes of both lungs receiving 10 and 15Gy.After adding the components associated with the respiratory movement,all IMRT lung parameters evaluated for the ipsilateral,contralateral and both lungs together,revealed considerable differences between the 0vs.6, 0vs.8 and 4vs.8-mm amplitudes.Similar results were obtained for the 3DCRT lung measurements,but without significance between the 0vs.6-mm amplitude.Taking into account the CTV score parameter in 3DCRT and IMRT plans,there was no statistically significant difference between the motion patterns with the smallest amplitudes.The differences were found for the 8-mm amplitude when it was compared both with static conditions and 4-mm amplitude (for 3DCRT) and between 0vs.6, 0vs.8 and 4vs.8-mm amplitudes (for IMRT).All accepted and measured 3DCRT and IMRT doses to spinal cord,esophagus and heart were always below the QUANTEC limits. Conclusion: The application of IMRT technique in lung radiotherapy affords possibilities for reducing the lung doses.For maximal amplitudes of breathing trajectory below 4mm,the disagreement between CTV

  9. Monitoring core barrel motion by neutron noise diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Por, G.

    1985-08-01

    The core barrel motion is detected by ionization chambers located around the reactor vessel. The method is based on the measurement of the neutron flux fluctuations. Calculations to determine the direction and the size of the motion are discussed. The identification of core barrel motion and its connection with the error of one of the main circulating pumps in the Rheinsberg nuclear power plant are described. Core barrel motion of 10 Hz with an amplitude less than 50 μm could be diagnozed at the Paks-1 reactor using the Dutch high accuracy evaluation system. (V.N.)

  10. Necessary conditions for tumbling in the rotational motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Danny H. Z.; Weber, Hans I.

    2012-11-01

    The goal of this work is the investigation of the necessary conditions for the possible existence of tumbling in rotational motion of rigid bodies. In a stable spinning satellite, tumbling may occur by sufficient strong action of external impulses, when the conical movement characteristic of the stable attitude is de-characterized. For this purpose a methodology is chosen to simplify the study of rotational motions with great amplitude, for example free bodies in space, allowing an extension of the analysis to non-conservative systems. In the case of a satellite in space, the projection of the angular velocity along the principal axes of inertia must be known, defining completely the initial conditions of motion for stability investigations. In this paper, the coordinate systems are established according to the initial condition in order to allow a simple analytical work on the equations of motion. Also it will be proposed the definition of a parameter, calling it tumbling coefficient, to measure the intensity of the tumbling and the amplitude of the motion when crossing limits of stability in the concept of Lyapunov. Tumbling in the motion of bodies in space is not possible when this coefficient is positive. Magnus Triangle representation will be used to represent the geometry of the body, establishing regions of stability/instability for possible initial conditions of motion. In the study of nonconservative systems for an oblate body, one sufficient condition will be enough to assure damped motion, and this condition is checked for a motion damped by viscous torques. This paper seeks to highlight the physical understanding of the phenomena and the influence of various parameters that are important in the process.

  11. Amplitude correlations for inelastic proton scattering from 48Ti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, B.H.; Mitchell, G.E.; Bilpuch, E.G.; Westerfeldt, C.R.

    1981-01-01

    The magnitudes and relative signs of inelastic proton channel amplitudes were determined for three decay channels for 45 5/2 + resonances in 49 V. The reduced widths in each channel follow a Porter-Thomas distribution, but extremely large amplitude correlations are observed - for one pair of channel amplitudes the relative sign is positive for 43 of 45 resonances. These results provide the first direct test of the Krieger-Porter reduced width amplitude distribution. (orig.)

  12. Collective motion of macroscopic spheres floating on capillary ripples: Dynamic heterogeneity and dynamic criticality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanli, Ceyda; Saitoh, K.; Luding, Stefan; van der Meer, Roger M.

    2014-01-01

    When a densely packed monolayer of macroscopic spheres floats on chaotic capillary Faraday waves, a coexistence of large scale convective motion and caging dynamics typical for glassy systems is observed. We subtract the convective mean flow using a coarse graining (homogenization) method and reveal

  13. Similar range of motion and function after resurfacing large-head or standard total hip arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penny, Jeannette Østergaard; Ovesen, Ole; Varmarken, Jens-Erik

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Large-size hip articulations may improve range of motion (ROM) and function compared to a 28-mm THA, and the low risk of dislocation allows the patients more activity postoperatively. On the other hand, the greater extent of surgery for resurfacing hip arthroplasty (RHA......° (35), 232° (36), and 225° (30) respectively, but the differences were not statistically significant. The 3 groups were similar regarding Harris hip score, UCLA activity score, step rate, and sick leave. INTERPRETATION: Head size had no influence on range of motion. The lack of restriction allowed...... for large articulations did not improve the clinical and patient-perceived outcomes. The more extensive surgical procedure of RHA did not impair the rehabilitation. This project is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under # NCT01113762....

  14. Empirical recurrence rates for ground motion signals on planetary surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.; Panning, Mark

    2018-03-01

    We determine the recurrence rates of ground motion events as a function of sensed velocity amplitude at several terrestrial locations, and make a first interplanetary comparison with measurements on the Moon, Mars, Venus and Titan. This empirical approach gives an intuitive order-of-magnitude guide to the observed ground motion (including both tectonic and ocean- and atmosphere-forced signals) of these locations as a guide to instrument expectations on future missions, without invoking interior models and specific sources: for example a Venera-14 observation of possible ground motion indicates a microseismic environment mid-way between noisy and quiet terrestrial locations. Quiet terrestrial regions see a peak velocity amplitude in mm/s roughly equal to 0.3*N(-0.7), where N is the number of "events" (half-hour intervals in which a given peak ground motion is exceeded) observed per year. The Apollo data show endogenous seismic signals for a given recurrence rate that are typically about 10,000 times smaller in amplitude than a quiet site on Earth, although local thermally-induced moonquakes are much more common. Viking data masked for low-wind periods appear comparable with a quiet terrestrial site, whereas a Venera observation of microseisms suggests ground motion more similar to a more active terrestrial location. Recurrence rate plots from in-situ measurements provide a context for seismic instrumentation on future planetary missions, e.g. to guide formulation of data compression schemes. While even small geophones can discriminate terrestrial activity rates, observations with guidance accelerometers are typically too insensitive to provide meaningful constraints (i.e. a non-zero number of "events") on actual ground motion observations unless operated for very long periods.

  15. High energy hadron spin-flip amplitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selyugin, O.V.

    2016-01-01

    The high-energy part of the hadron spin-flip amplitude is examined in the framework of the new high-energy general structure (HEGS) model of the elastic hadron scattering at high energies. The different forms of the hadron spin-flip amplitude are compared in the impact parameter representation. It is shown that the existing experimental data of the proton-proton and proton-antiproton elastic scattering at high energy in the region of the diffraction minimum and at large momentum transfer give support in the presence of the energy-independent part of the hadron spin-flip amplitude with the momentum dependence proposed in the works by Galynskii-Kuraev. [ru

  16. Hidden simplicity of gauge theory amplitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drummond, J M, E-mail: drummond@lapp.in2p3.f [LAPTH, Universite de Savoie, CNRS, B.P. 110, F-74941 Annecy-le-Vieux, Cedex (France)

    2010-11-07

    These notes were given as lectures at the CERN Winter School on Supergravity, Strings and Gauge Theory 2010. We describe the structure of scattering amplitudes in gauge theories, focussing on the maximally supersymmetric theory to highlight the hidden symmetries which appear. Using the Britto, Cachzo, Feng and Witten (BCFW) recursion relations we solve the tree-level S-matrix in N=4 super Yang-Mills theory and describe how it produces a sum of invariants of a large symmetry algebra. We review amplitudes in the planar theory beyond tree level, describing the connection between amplitudes and Wilson loops, and discuss the implications of the hidden symmetries.

  17. Seismic tests of a pile-supported structure in liquefiable sand using large-scale blast excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamijo, Naotaka; Saito, Hideaki; Kusama, Kazuhiro; Kontani, Osamu; Nigbor, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Extensive, large-amplitude vibration tests of a pile-supported structure in a liquefiable sand deposit have been performed at a large-scale mining site. Ground motions from large-scale blasting operations were used as excitation forces for vibration tests. A simple pile-supported structure was constructed in an excavated 3 m-deep pit. The test pit was backfilled with 100% water-saturated clean uniform sand. Accelerations were measured on the pile-supported structure, in the sand in the test pit, and in the adjacent free field. Excess pore water pressures in the test pit and strains of one pile were also measured. Vibration tests were performed with six different levels of input motions. The maximum horizontal acceleration recorded at the adjacent ground surface varied from 20 Gals to 1353 Gals. These alternations of acceleration provided different degrees of liquefaction in the test pit. Sand boiling phenomena were observed in the test pit with larger input motions. This paper outlines vibration tests and investigates the test results

  18. Oscillatory-rotational processes in the Earth motion about the center of mass: Interpolation and forecast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akulenko, L. D.; Klimov, D. M.; Markov, Yu. G.; Perepelkin, V. V.

    2012-11-01

    The celestial-mechanics approach (the spatial version of the problem for the Earth-Moon system in the field of gravity of the Sun) is used to construct a mathematical model of the Earth's rotational-oscillatory motions. The fundamental aspects of the processes of tidal inhomogeneity in the Earth rotation and the Earth's pole oscillations are studied. It is shown that the presence of the perturbing component of gravitational-tidal forces, which is orthogonal to the Moon's orbit plane, also allows one to distinguish short-period perturbations in the Moon's motion. The obtained model of rotational-oscillatory motions of the nonrigid Earth takes into account both the basic perturbations of large amplitudes and the more complicated small-scale properties of the motion due to the Moon short-period perturbations with combination frequencies. The astrometric data of the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS) are used to perform numerical simulation (interpolation and forecast) of the Earth rotation parameters (ERP) on various time intervals.

  19. Can mobile phones used in strong motion seismology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Antonino; D'Anna, Giuseppe

    2013-04-01

    Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) accelerometers are electromechanical devices able to measure static or dynamic accelerations. In the 1990s MEMS accelerometers revolutionized the automotive-airbag system industry and are currently widely used in laptops, game controllers and mobile phones. Nowadays MEMS accelerometers seems provide adequate sensitivity, noise level and dynamic range to be applicable to earthquake strong motion acquisition. The current use of 3 axes MEMS accelerometers in mobile phone maybe provide a new means to easy increase the number of observations when a strong earthquake occurs. However, before utilize the signals recorded by a mobile phone equipped with a 3 axes MEMS accelerometer for any scientific porpoise, it is fundamental to verify that the signal collected provide reliable records of ground motion. For this reason we have investigated the suitability of the iPhone 5 mobile phone (one of the most popular mobile phone in the world) for strong motion acquisition. It is provided by several MEMS devise like a three-axis gyroscope, a three-axis electronic compass and a the LIS331DLH three-axis accelerometer. The LIS331DLH sensor is a low-cost high performance three axes linear accelerometer, with 16 bit digital output, produced by STMicroelectronics Inc. We have tested the LIS331DLH MEMS accelerometer using a vibrating table and the EpiSensor FBA ES-T as reference sensor. In our experiments the reference sensor was rigidly co-mounted with the LIS331DHL MEMS sensor on the vibrating table. We assessment the MEMS accelerometer in the frequency range 0.2-20 Hz, typical range of interesting in strong motion seismology and earthquake engineering. We generate both constant and damped sine waves with central frequency starting from 0.2 Hz until 20 Hz with step of 0.2 Hz. For each frequency analyzed we generate sine waves with mean amplitude 50, 100, 200, 400, 800 and 1600 mg0. For damped sine waves we generate waveforms with initial amplitude

  20. Empirical ground-motion relations for subduction-zone earthquakes and their application to Cascadia and other regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, G.M.; Boore, D.M.

    2003-01-01

    Ground-motion relations for earthquakes that occur in subduction zones are an important input to seismic-hazard analyses in many parts of the world. In the Cascadia region (Washington, Oregon, northern California, and British Columbia), for example, there is a significant hazard from megathrust earthquakes along the subduction interface and from large events within the subducting slab. These hazards are in addition to the hazard from shallow earthquakes in the overlying crust. We have compiled a response spectra database from thousands of strong-motion recordings from events of moment magnitude (M) 5-8.3 occurring in subduction zones around the world, including both interface and in-slab events. The 2001 M 6.8 Nisqually and 1999 M 5.9 Satsop earthquakes are included in the database, as are many records from subduction zones in Japan (Kyoshin-Net data), Mexico (Guerrero data), and Central America. The size of the database is four times larger than that available for previous empirical regressions to determine ground-motion relations for subduction-zone earthquakes. The large dataset enables improved determination of attenuation parameters and magnitude scaling, for both interface and in-slab events. Soil response parameters are also better determined by the data. We use the database to develop global ground-motion relations for interface and in-slab earthquakes, using a maximum likelihood regression method. We analyze regional variability of ground-motion amplitudes across the global database and find that there are significant regional differences. In particular, amplitudes in Cascadia differ by more than a factor of 2 from those in Japan for the same magnitude, distance, event type, and National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) soil class. This is believed to be due to regional differences in the depth of the soil profile, which are not captured by the NEHRP site classification scheme. Regional correction factors to account for these differences are

  1. Relationships between Paraspinal Muscle Activity and Lumbar Inter-Vertebral Range of Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alister du Rose

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Control of the lumbar spine requires contributions from both the active and passive sub-systems. Identifying interactions between these systems may provide insight into the mechanisms of low back pain. However, as a first step it is important to investigate what is normal. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between the lumbar inter-vertebral range of motion and paraspinal muscle activity during weight-bearing flexion in healthy controls using quantitative fluoroscopy (QF and surface electromyography (sEMG. Contemporaneous lumbar sEMG and QF motion sequences were recorded during controlled active flexion of 60° using electrodes placed over Longissimus thoracis pars thoracis (TES, Longissimus thoracis pars lumborum (LES, and Multifidus (LMU. Normalised root mean square (RMS sEMG amplitude data were averaged over five epochs, and the change in amplitude between epochs was calculated. The sEMG ratios of LMU/LES LMU/TES and LES/TES were also determined. QF was used to measure the maximum inter-vertebral range of motion from L2-S1, and correlation coefficients were calculated between sEMG amplitude variables and these measurements. Intra- and inter-session sEMG amplitude repeatability was also assessed for all three paraspinal muscles. The sEMG amplitude measurements were highly repeatable, and sEMG amplitude changes correlated significantly with L4-5 and L5-S1 IV-RoMmax (r = −0.47 to 0.59. The sEMG amplitude ratio of LES/TES also correlated with L4-L5 IV-RoMmax (r = −0.53. The relationships found may be important when considering rehabilitation for low back pain.

  2. Relationships between Paraspinal Muscle Activity and Lumbar Inter-Vertebral Range of Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Rose, Alister; Breen, Alan

    2016-01-05

    Control of the lumbar spine requires contributions from both the active and passive sub-systems. Identifying interactions between these systems may provide insight into the mechanisms of low back pain. However, as a first step it is important to investigate what is normal. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between the lumbar inter-vertebral range of motion and paraspinal muscle activity during weight-bearing flexion in healthy controls using quantitative fluoroscopy (QF) and surface electromyography (sEMG). Contemporaneous lumbar sEMG and QF motion sequences were recorded during controlled active flexion of 60° using electrodes placed over Longissimus thoracis pars thoracis (TES), Longissimus thoracis pars lumborum (LES), and Multifidus (LMU). Normalised root mean square (RMS) sEMG amplitude data were averaged over five epochs, and the change in amplitude between epochs was calculated. The sEMG ratios of LMU/LES LMU/TES and LES/TES were also determined. QF was used to measure the maximum inter-vertebral range of motion from L2-S1, and correlation coefficients were calculated between sEMG amplitude variables and these measurements. Intra- and inter-session sEMG amplitude repeatability was also assessed for all three paraspinal muscles. The sEMG amplitude measurements were highly repeatable, and sEMG amplitude changes correlated significantly with L4-5 and L5-S1 IV-RoMmax (r = -0.47 to 0.59). The sEMG amplitude ratio of LES/TES also correlated with L4-L5 IV-RoMmax (r = -0.53). The relationships found may be important when considering rehabilitation for low back pain.

  3. Microscopic analysis of nuclear collective motions in terms of the boson expansion theory. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Hideo; Kishimoto, Teruo

    1988-01-01

    A normal-ordered linked-cluster boson expansion theory, previously worked out by one of the authors (T.K.) and Tamura, has been developed further by reformulating it in a 'physical' quasiparticle subspace which contains no spurious particle-number excitation modes. The expansion coefficients of the collective hamiltonian for low-lying quadrupole motions are determined starting from a microscopic fermion hamiltonian including self-consistent higher-order (many-body) interactions derived in our previous work. The contributions from the non-collective states with all possible non-collective one-boson excitations having I π = 0 + -4 + , which can directly couple to the collective states with one or two phonons, are taken into account in a systematic and compact way. (orig.)

  4. Measurements and simulation of controlled beamfront motion in the Laser Controlled Collective Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, R.L.; Destler, W.W.; Striffler, C.D.; Rodgers, J.; Scgalov, Z.

    1989-01-01

    In the Laser Controlled Collective Accelerator, an intense electron beam is injected at a current above the vacuum space charge limit into an initially evacuated drift tube. A plasma channel, produced by time-sequenced, multiple laser beam ionization of a solid target on the drift tube wall, provides the necessary neutralization to allow for effective beam propagation. By controlling the rate of production of the plasma channel as a function of time down the drift tube, control of the electron beamfront can be achieved. Recent experimental measurements of controlled beamfront motion in this configuration are presented, along with results of ion acceleration experiments conducted using two different accelerating gradients. These results are compared with numerical simulations of the system in which both controlled beamfront motion and ion acceleration is observed consistent with both design expectations and experimental results. 5 refs., 6 figs

  5. Detection of collective motions in dielectric spectra and the meaning of the generalized Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigmatullin, Raoul R.

    2009-01-01

    Based on the reduction property of dielectric spectra associated with the power-law function [∼(jωτ) ±ν ] that appears in the frequency domain, one can develop an effective procedure for detection of different reduced motions (described by the corresponding power-law exponents) in temperature domain. If the power-law exponent ν is related to characteristic relaxation time τ by the relationship ν=ν 0 ln(τ/τ s )/ln(τ/τ 0 ) (here τ s , τ 0 are the characteristic times characterizing a movement over fractal cluster that is defined in Ref. [Ya.E. Ryabov, Yu. Feldman, J. Chem. Phys. 116 (2002) 8610]) and the simple temperature dependence of τ(T)=τ A exp(E/T) obeys the traditional Arrhenius relationship, then one can prove that any extreme point figuring in the complex permittivity ε(jω) spectra (characterized by the values [ω m , y(ω m )]) obeys the generalized Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman (VFT) equation. This important statement confirms the existence of the 'universal' response (UR) (discovered and classified by Jonscher in frequency domain) and opens new possibilities in the detection of the 'hidden' collective motions in temperature region for self-similar (heterogeneous) systems. It gives also the extended interpretation of the VFT equation and allows one to differentiate collective motions passing through an extreme point. This differentiation, in turn, allows one to select the proper fitting function containing one or two (at least) relaxation times for the fitting of the complex permittivity function ε(jω) in the limited frequency domain. This conclusion can allow for the classification of dielectric spectroscopy as the spectroscopy of the reduced (collective) motions, which are described by different power-law exponents on the mesoscale region. The verification of this approach on available DS data (poly(ethylene glycol)-based-single-ion conductors) completely confirms the basic statements of this theory and opens new possibilities in general

  6. Strong motions observed by K-NET and KiK-net during the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Wataru; Aoi, Shin; Kunugi, Takashi; Kubo, Hisahiko; Morikawa, Nobuyuki; Nakamura, Hiromitsu; Kimura, Takeshi; Fujiwara, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    The nationwide strong-motion seismograph network of K-NET and KiK-net in Japan successfully recorded the strong ground motions of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake sequence, which show the several notable characteristics. For the first large earthquake with a JMA magnitude of 6.5 (21:26, April 14, 2016, JST), the large strong motions are concentrated near the epicenter and the strong-motion attenuations are well predicted by the empirical relation for crustal earthquakes with a moment magnitude of 6.1. For the largest earthquake of the sequence with a JMA magnitude of 7.3 (01:25, April 16, 2016, JST), the large peak ground accelerations and velocities extend from the epicentral area to the northeast direction. The attenuation feature of peak ground accelerations generally follows the empirical relation, whereas that for velocities deviates from the empirical relation for stations with the epicentral distance of greater than 200 km, which can be attributed to the large Love wave having a dominant period around 10 s. The large accelerations were observed at stations even in Oita region, more than 70 km northeast from the epicenter. They are attributed to the local induced earthquake in Oita region, whose moment magnitude is estimated to be 5.5 by matching the amplitudes of the corresponding phases with the empirical attenuation relation. The real-time strong-motion observation has a potential for contributing to the mitigation of the ongoing earthquake disasters. We test a methodology to forecast the regions to be exposed to the large shaking in real time, which has been developed based on the fact that the neighboring stations are already shaken, for the largest event of the Kumamoto earthquakes, and demonstrate that it is simple but effective to quickly make warning. We also shows that the interpolation of the strong motions in real time is feasible, which will be utilized for the real-time forecast of ground motions based on the observed shakings.[Figure not available

  7. MRI-based tumor motion characterization and gating schemes for radiation therapy of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heerkens, Hanne D.; Vulpen, Marco van; Berg, Cornelis A.T. van den; Tijssen, Rob H.N.; Crijns, Sjoerd P.M.; Molenaar, Izaak Q.; Santvoort, Hjalmar C. van; Reerink, Onne; Meijer, Gert J.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: To characterize pancreatic tumor motion and to develop a gating scheme for radiotherapy in pancreatic cancer. Materials and methods: Two cine MRIs of 60 s each were performed in fifteen pancreatic cancer patients, one in sagittal direction and one in coronal direction. A Minimum Output Sum of Squared Error (MOSSE) adaptive correlation filter was used to quantify tumor motion in craniocaudal, lateral and anteroposterior directions. To develop a gating scheme, stability of the breathing phases was examined and a gating window assessment was created, incorporating tumor motion, treatment time and motion margins. Results: The largest tumor motion was found in craniocaudal direction, with an average peak-to-peak amplitude of 15 mm (range 6–34 mm). Amplitude of the tumor in the anteroposterior direction was on average 5 mm (range 1–13 mm). The least motion was seen in lateral direction (average 3 mm, range 2–5 mm). The end exhale position was the most stable position in the breathing cycle and tumors spent more time closer to the end exhale position than to the end inhale position. On average, a margin of 25% of the maximum craniocaudal breathing amplitude was needed to achieve full target coverage with a duty cycle of 50%. When reducing the duty cycle to 50%, a margin of 5 mm was sufficient to cover the target in 11 out of 15 patients. Conclusion: Gated delivery for radiotherapy of pancreatic cancer is best performed around the end exhale position as this is the most stable position in the breathing cycle. Considerable margin reduction can be established at moderate duty cycles, yielding acceptable treatment efficiency. However, motion patterns and amplitude do substantially differ between individual patients. Therefore, individual treatment strategies should be considered for radiotherapy in pancreatic cancer

  8. Magnetic dynamics of simple collective modes in a two-sphere plasma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essen, Hanno

    2005-01-01

    A plasma blob is modeled as consisting of two homogeneous spheres of equal radius and equal but opposite charge densities that can move relative to each other. Relative translational and rotational motion are considered separately. Magnetic effects from the current density caused by the relative motion are included. Magnetic interaction is seen to cause an inductive inertia. In the relative translation case the Coulomb attraction, approximately a linear force for small amplitudes, causes an oscillation. For a large number of particles, the corresponding oscillation frequency will not be the Langmuir plasma frequency, because of the large inductive inertia. For rotation an external magnetic field is included and the energy and diamagnetism of the plasma in the model is calculated. Finally, it is noted how the neglect of resistivity is motivated by the results

  9. PVR: Patch-to-Volume Reconstruction for Large Area Motion Correction of Fetal MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alansary, Amir; Rajchl, Martin; McDonagh, Steven G; Murgasova, Maria; Damodaram, Mellisa; Lloyd, David F A; Davidson, Alice; Rutherford, Mary; Hajnal, Joseph V; Rueckert, Daniel; Kainz, Bernhard

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we present a novel method for the correction of motion artifacts that are present in fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the whole uterus. Contrary to current slice-to-volume registration (SVR) methods, requiring an inflexible anatomical enclosure of a single investigated organ, the proposed patch-to-volume reconstruction (PVR) approach is able to reconstruct a large field of view of non-rigidly deforming structures. It relaxes rigid motion assumptions by introducing a specific amount of redundant information that is exploited with parallelized patchwise optimization, super-resolution, and automatic outlier rejection. We further describe and provide an efficient parallel implementation of PVR allowing its execution within reasonable time on commercially available graphics processing units, enabling its use in the clinical practice. We evaluate PVR's computational overhead compared with standard methods and observe improved reconstruction accuracy in the presence of affine motion artifacts compared with conventional SVR in synthetic experiments. Furthermore, we have evaluated our method qualitatively and quantitatively on real fetal MRI data subject to maternal breathing and sudden fetal movements. We evaluate peak-signal-to-noise ratio, structural similarity index, and cross correlation with respect to the originally acquired data and provide a method for visual inspection of reconstruction uncertainty. We further evaluate the distance error for selected anatomical landmarks in the fetal head, as well as calculating the mean and maximum displacements resulting from automatic non-rigid registration to a motion-free ground truth image. These experiments demonstrate a successful application of PVR motion compensation to the whole fetal body, uterus, and placenta.

  10. A study on the characteristics of strong ground motions in southern Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, Chang Eob; Lee, Kie Hwa; Kang, Tae Seob

    2001-12-01

    Ground motion characteristics in southern Korea are analyzed such as the variations of ground motion durations depending on the hypocentral distance, the earthquake magnitude and the frequency contents of the motion, and the predominant frequency of the maximum ground motion, the ratio of the horizontal to the vertical component amplitudes, the frequency dependence of the Coda Q values, the local distribution of Lg Q values using recorded data sets

  11. A study on the characteristics of strong ground motions in southern Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Chang Eob; Lee, Kie Hwa; Kang, Tae Seob [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-15

    Ground motion characteristics in southern Korea are analyzed such as the variations of ground motion durations depending on the hypocentral distance, the earthquake magnitude and the frequency contents of the motion, and the predominant frequency of the maximum ground motion, the ratio of the horizontal to the vertical component amplitudes, the frequency dependence of the Coda Q values, the local distribution of Lg Q values using recorded data sets.

  12. Domain-walls motion in glass-coated CoFeSiB amorphous microwires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonov, A.S. E-mail: as.antonov@mtu-net.ru; Buznikov, N.A.; Granovsky, A.B.; Joura, A.V.; Rakhmanov, A.L.; Yakunin, A.M

    2002-08-01

    A method for observation of domain-walls motion in amorphous microwires with circular magnetic anisotropy is proposed. Using the method, the magnetization reversal of glass-coated Co-based microwires induced by current pulses of high amplitude is studied. The magnetization reversal is shown to occur due to the nucleation of the domain walls at the sample ends and their subsequent motion along the microwire. The dependencies of the domain-wall velocity on the current pulse amplitude and a longitudinal DC magnetic field are measured. A model describing main features of experimental data is presented.

  13. Domain-walls motion in glass-coated CoFeSiB amorphous microwires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonov, A.S.; Buznikov, N.A.; Granovsky, A.B.; Joura, A.V.; Rakhmanov, A.L.; Yakunin, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    A method for observation of domain-walls motion in amorphous microwires with circular magnetic anisotropy is proposed. Using the method, the magnetization reversal of glass-coated Co-based microwires induced by current pulses of high amplitude is studied. The magnetization reversal is shown to occur due to the nucleation of the domain walls at the sample ends and their subsequent motion along the microwire. The dependencies of the domain-wall velocity on the current pulse amplitude and a longitudinal DC magnetic field are measured. A model describing main features of experimental data is presented

  14. Interpretation of seismic section by acoustic modeling. Study of large amplitude events; Hadoba modeling ni yoru jishin tansa danmen no kaishaku. Kyoshinhaba event ni taisuru kosatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamagawa, T; Matsuoka, T; Sato, T [Japan Petroleum Exploration Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Minegishi, M; Tsuru, T [Japan National Oil Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    A large amplitude event difficult to interpret was discovered in the overlap section in offset data beyond 10km targeting at deep structures, and the event was examined. A wave field modeling was carried out by use of a simplified synclinal structure model because it had been estimated that the large amplitude event had something to do with a synclinal structure. A pseudospectral program was used for modeling the wave field on the assumption that the synclinal structure model would be an acoustic body and that the surface would contain free boundaries and multiple reflection. It was found as the result that a discontinuous large amplitude event is mapped out in the synclinal part of the overlap section when a far trace is applied beyond the structure during a CMP overlap process. This can be attributed to the concentration of energy produced by multiple reflection in the synclinal part and by the reflection waves beyond the critical angle. Accordingly, it is possible that phenomena similar to those encountered in the modeling process are emerging during actual observation. 2 refs., 8 figs.

  15. Initial frequency shift of large amplitude plasma wave, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, K.; Sugihara, R.; Ohsawa, Y.; Kamimura, T.

    1979-07-01

    A nonlinear complex frequency shift of the ion acoustic wave in the initial phase defined by 0 0 and ωsub(s)/k as long as ωsub(s) >> γsub( l), where phi 0 , ωsub(s), γsub( l) and t sub(c) are the initial value of the potential, the frequency of the wave, the linear Landau damping coefficient and the time for the first minimum of the amplitude oscillation, respectively. A simulation study is also carried out. The results confirm the validity of the theory. (author)

  16. Joint Inversion of Phase and Amplitude Data of Surface Waves for North American Upper Mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, K.; Yoshizawa, K.

    2015-12-01

    For the reconstruction of the laterally heterogeneous upper-mantle structure using surface waves, we generally use phase delay information of seismograms, which represents the average phase velocity perturbation along a ray path, while the amplitude information has been rarely used in the velocity mapping. Amplitude anomalies of surface waves contain a variety of information such as anelastic attenuation, elastic focusing/defocusing, geometrical spreading, and receiver effects. The effects of elastic focusing/defocusing are dependent on the second derivative of phase velocity across the ray path, and thus, are sensitive to shorter-wavelength structure than the conventional phase data. Therefore, suitably-corrected amplitude data of surface waves can be useful for improving the lateral resolution of phase velocity models. In this study, we collect a large-number of inter-station phase velocity and amplitude ratio data for fundamental-mode surface waves with a non-linear waveform fitting between two stations of USArray. The measured inter-station phase velocity and amplitude ratios are then inverted simultaneously for phase velocity maps and local amplification factor at receiver locations in North America. The synthetic experiments suggest that, while the phase velocity maps derived from phase data only reflect large-scale tectonic features, those from phase and amplitude data tend to exhibit better recovery of the strength of velocity perturbations, which emphasizes local-scale tectonic features with larger lateral velocity gradients; e.g., slow anomalies in Snake River Plain and Rio Grande Rift, where significant local amplification due to elastic focusing are observed. Also, the spatial distribution of receiver amplification factor shows a clear correlation with the velocity structure. Our results indicate that inter-station amplitude-ratio data can be of help in reconstructing shorter-wavelength structures of the upper mantle.

  17. Institute for Nuclear Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haxton, W.; Bertsch, G.; Henley, E.M.

    1993-01-01

    This report briefly discussion the following programs of the Institute for Nuclear Theory: fundamental interactions in nuclei; strangeness in hadrons and nuclei; microscopic nuclear structure theory; nuclear physics in atoms and molecules; phenomenology and lattice QCD; and large amplitude collective motion

  18. Microscopical approach of the shape coexistence phenomenon using Adiabatic SCC method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinohara, Nobuo

    2005-01-01

    Using the multi-O(4) model as a simple model of oblate-prolate shape coexistence, we show that contribution from time-old components of mean field to mass parameter (inertia function) is very important for large amplitude collective motion. (author)

  19. Confirmation, refinement, and extension of a study in intrafraction motion interplay with sliding jaw motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kissick, Michael W.; Boswell, Sarah A.; Jeraj, Robert; Mackie, T. Rockwell

    2005-01-01

    The interplay between a constant scan speed and intrafraction oscillatory motion produces interesting fluence intensity modulations along the axis of motion that are sensitive to the motion function, as originally shown in a classic paper by Yu et al. [Phys. Med. Biol. 43, 91-104 (1998)]. The fluence intensity profiles are explored in this note for an intuitive understanding, then compared with Yu et al., and finally further explored for the effects of low scan speed and random components of both intrafraction and interfraction motion. At slow scan speeds typical of helical tomotherapy, these fluence intensity modulations are only a few percent. With the addition of only a small amount of cycle-to-cycle randomness in frequency and amplitude, the fluence intensity profiles change dramatically. It is further shown that after a typical 30-fraction treatment, the sensitivities displayed in the single fraction fluence intensity profiles greatly diminish

  20. Landau damping dynamic aperture and octupole in LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Gareyte, Jacques; Ruggiero, F

    1997-01-01

    Maximization of the dynamic aperture and Landau damping of the collective instabilities are partly conflicting requirements. On the one hand, the non-linearities of the lattice must be minimized at large oscillation amplitude to guarantee the stability of the single particle motion. On the other hand, a spread of the betatron frequencies is necessary to guarantee the stability of the collective motion of bunches of particles; this requires the introduction of non-linearities effective at small amplitudes. We show in this note that the `natural' spread of betatron tunes due to the field imperfections is inadequate or Landau damping. An octupole scheme is required to provide collective stability at high energy. At low energy it may be used to find the optimum between the correction of the octupolar field imperfections and Landau damping. The solution of the stability problem taking into account the two degrees of freedom of the transverse motion allows a significant saving in octupole strength: 144 octupoles wi...

  1. A microscopic derivation of nuclear collective rotation-vibration model and its application to nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulshani, P., E-mail: matlap@bell.net [NUTECH Services, 3313 Fenwick Crescent, Mississauga, Ontario, L5L 5N1 (Canada)

    2016-07-07

    We derive a microscopic version of the successful phenomenological hydrodynamic model of Bohr-Davydov-Faessler-Greiner for collective rotation-vibration motion of an axially symmetric deformed nucleus. The derivation is not limited to small oscillation amplitude. The nuclear Schrodinger equation is canonically transformed to collective co-ordinates, which is then linearized using a constrained variational method. The associated constraints are imposed on the wavefunction rather than on the particle co-ordinates. The approach yields three self-consistent, time-reversal invariant, cranking-type Schrodinger equations for the rotation-vibration and intrinsic motions, and a self-consistency equation. For harmonic oscillator mean-field potentials, these equations are solved in closed forms for excitation energy, cut-off angular momentum, and other nuclear properties for the ground-state rotational band in some deformed nuclei. The results are compared with measured data.

  2. Differential Motion Between Mediastinal Lymph Nodes and Primary Tumor in Radically Irradiated Lung Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaake, Eva E.; Rossi, Maddalena M.G.; Buikhuisen, Wieneke A.; Burgers, Jacobus A.; Smit, Adrianus A.J.; Belderbos, José S.A.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: In patients with locally advanced lung cancer, planning target volume margins for mediastinal lymph nodes and tumor after a correction protocol based on bony anatomy registration typically range from 1 to 1.5 cm. Detailed information about lymph node motion variability and differential motion with the primary tumor, however, is lacking from large series. In this study, lymph node and tumor position variability were analyzed in detail and correlated to the main carina to evaluate possible margin reduction. Methods and Materials: Small gold fiducial markers (0.35 × 5 mm) were placed in the mediastinal lymph nodes of 51 patients with non-small cell lung cancer during routine diagnostic esophageal or bronchial endoscopic ultrasonography. Four-dimensional (4D) planning computed tomographic (CT) and daily 4D cone beam (CB) CT scans were acquired before and during radical radiation therapy (66 Gy in 24 fractions). Each CBCT was registered in 3-dimensions (bony anatomy) and 4D (tumor, marker, and carina) to the planning CT scan. Subsequently, systematic and random residual misalignments of the time-averaged lymph node and tumor position relative to the bony anatomy and carina were determined. Additionally, tumor and lymph node respiratory amplitude variability was quantified. Finally, required margins were quantified by use of a recipe for dual targets. Results: Relative to the bony anatomy, systematic and random errors ranged from 0.16 to 0.32 cm for the markers and from 0.15 to 0.33 cm for the tumor, but despite similar ranges there was limited correlation (0.17-0.71) owing to differential motion. A large variability in lymph node amplitude between patients was observed, with an average motion of 0.56 cm in the cranial-caudal direction. Margins could be reduced by 10% (left-right), 27% (cranial-caudal), and 10% (anteroposterior) for the lymph nodes and −2%, 15%, and 7% for the tumor if an online carina registration protocol replaced a

  3. Flux motion and dissipation in high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinkham, M.

    1991-01-01

    Two quite different motivations spark the study of flux motion and resistance in the new high-temperature superconductors. Achievement of usefully low resistance at usefully large current densities is the key to most practical applications, but conceptual understanding of the idealized resistive behavior in the O current limit motivates much theoretical work. Some analyses emphasize the pinning of individual flux lines to inhomogeneities in the underlying material; others emphasize the collective aspects of the interacting flux lines, whether liquid, solid, crystalline, or glassy; still others emphasize the concept of percolative Josephson coupling between grains. In this paper an overview is given of these various approaches, their interrelation, and the experiment evidence, including some new results on flux motion in large SNS arrays, treated as a model system

  4. The crossover from collective motion to periphery diffusion for two-dimensional adatom-islands on Cu(111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karim, Altaf; Kara, Abdelkader; Rahman, Talat S; Trushin, Oleg

    2011-01-01

    The diffusion of two-dimensional adatom-islands (up to 100 atoms) on Cu(111) has been studied, using the self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo method (Trushin et al 2005 Phys. Rev. B 72 115401). A variety of multiple- and single-atom processes are revealed in the simulations, and the size dependences of the diffusion coefficients and effective diffusion barriers are calculated for each. From the tabulated frequencies of events found in the simulation, we show a crossover from diffusion due to the collective motion of the island to a regime in which the island diffuses through periphery-dominated mass transport. This crossover occurs for island sizes between 13 and 19 atoms. For islands containing 19-100 atoms the scaling exponent is 1.5, which is in good agreement with previous work. The diffusion of islands containing 2-13 atoms can be explained primarily on the basis of a linear increase of the barrier for the collective motion with the size of the island. (fast track communication)

  5. Parallel Motion Simulation of Large-Scale Real-Time Crowd in a Hierarchical Environmental Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a parallel real-time crowd simulation method based on a hierarchical environmental model. A dynamical model of the complex environment should be constructed to simulate the state transition and propagation of individual motions. By modeling of a virtual environment where virtual crowds reside, we employ different parallel methods on a topological layer, a path layer and a perceptual layer. We propose a parallel motion path matching method based on the path layer and a parallel crowd simulation method based on the perceptual layer. The large-scale real-time crowd simulation becomes possible with these methods. Numerical experiments are carried out to demonstrate the methods and results.

  6. The application of the sinusoidal model to lung cancer patient respiratory motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, R.; Vedam, S.S.; Chung, T.D.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Keall, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    Accurate modeling of the respiratory cycle is important to account for the effect of organ motion on dose calculation for lung cancer patients. The aim of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of a respiratory model for lung cancer patients. Lujan et al. [Med. Phys. 26(5), 715-720 (1999)] proposed a model, which became widely used, to describe organ motion due to respiration. This model assumes that the parameters do not vary between and within breathing cycles. In this study, first, the correlation of respiratory motion traces with the model f(t) as a function of the parameter n(n=1,2,3) was undertaken for each breathing cycle from 331 four-minute respiratory traces acquired from 24 lung cancer patients using three breathing types: free breathing, audio instruction, and audio-visual biofeedback. Because cos 2 and cos 4 had similar correlation coefficients, and cos 2 and cos 1 have a trigonometric relationship, for simplicity, the cos 1 value was consequently used for further analysis in which the variations in mean position (z 0 ), amplitude of motion (b) and period (τ) with and without biofeedback or instructions were investigated. For all breathing types, the parameter values, mean position (z 0 ), amplitude of motion (b), and period (τ) exhibited significant cycle-to-cycle variations. Audio-visual biofeedback showed the least variations for all three parameters (z 0 , b, and τ). It was found that mean position (z 0 ) could be approximated with a normal distribution, and the amplitude of motion (b) and period (τ) could be approximated with log normal distributions. The overall probability density function (pdf) of f(t) for each of the three breathing types was fitted with three models: normal, bimodal, and the pdf of a simple harmonic oscillator. It was found that the normal and the bimodal models represented the overall respiratory motion pdfs with correlation values from 0.95 to 0.99, whereas the range of the simple harmonic oscillator pdf correlation

  7. Bottom boundary layer forced by finite amplitude long and short surface waves motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsafty, H.; Lynett, P.

    2018-04-01

    A multiple-scale perturbation approach is implemented to solve the Navier-Stokes equations while including bottom boundary layer effects under a single wave and under two interacting waves. In this approach, fluid velocities and the pressure field are decomposed into two components: a potential component and a rotational component. In this study, the two components are exist throughout the entire water column and each is scaled with appropriate length and time scales. A one-way coupling between the two components is implemented. The potential component is assumed to be known analytically or numerically a prior, and the rotational component is forced by the potential component. Through order of magnitude analysis, it is found that the leading-order coupling between the two components occurs through the vertical convective acceleration. It is shown that this coupling plays an important role in the bottom boundary layer behavior. Its effect on the results is discussed for different wave-forcing conditions: purely harmonic forcing and impurely harmonic forcing. The approach is then applied to derive the governing equations for the bottom boundary layer developed under two interacting wave motions. Both motions-the shorter and the longer wave-are decomposed into two components, potential and rotational, as it is done in the single wave. Test cases are presented wherein two different wave forcings are simulated: (1) two periodic oscillatory motions and (2) short waves interacting with a solitary wave. The analysis of the two periodic motions indicates that nonlinear effects in the rotational solution may be significant even though nonlinear effects are negligible in the potential forcing. The local differences in the rotational velocity due to the nonlinear vertical convection coupling term are found to be on the order of 30% of the maximum boundary layer velocity for the cases simulated in this paper. This difference is expected to increase with the increase in wave

  8. Collective versus single-particle motion in quantum many-body systems from the perspective of an integrable model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haemmerling, Jens; Gutkin, Boris; Guhr, Thomas, E-mail: jens.haemmerling@uni-due.d [Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, Lotharstrasse 1, 47048 Duisburg (Germany)

    2010-07-02

    We study the emergence of collective dynamics in the integrable Hamiltonian system of two finite ensembles of coupled harmonic oscillators. After identification of a collective degree of freedom, the Hamiltonian is mapped onto a model of Caldeira-Leggett type, where the collective coordinate is coupled to an internal bath of phonons. In contrast to the usual Caldeira-Leggett model, the bath in the present case is part of the system. We derive an equation of motion for the collective coordinate which takes the form of a damped harmonic oscillator. We show that the distribution of quantum transition strengths induced by the collective mode is determined by its classical dynamics.

  9. Collective versus single-particle motion in quantum many-body systems from the perspective of an integrable model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haemmerling, Jens; Gutkin, Boris; Guhr, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We study the emergence of collective dynamics in the integrable Hamiltonian system of two finite ensembles of coupled harmonic oscillators. After identification of a collective degree of freedom, the Hamiltonian is mapped onto a model of Caldeira-Leggett type, where the collective coordinate is coupled to an internal bath of phonons. In contrast to the usual Caldeira-Leggett model, the bath in the present case is part of the system. We derive an equation of motion for the collective coordinate which takes the form of a damped harmonic oscillator. We show that the distribution of quantum transition strengths induced by the collective mode is determined by its classical dynamics.

  10. SU-D-BRE-01: A Realistic Breathing Phantom of the Thorax for Testing New Motion Mitigation Techniques with Scanning Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrin, R; Peroni, M; Bernatowicz, K; Zakova, M; Knopf, A; Safai, S [Paul Scherrer Institut, Psi-villigen, Aargau (Switzerland); Parkel, T [CSEM, Swiss Centre of Electronics and Microtechnology, Landquart, Graubunden (Switzerland)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A prototype breathing phantom (named LuCa) has been developed which simulates the anatomy and motion of a patient thorax.In this work, we describe the results of the first commissioning tests with LuCa. Methods: The phantom provides a close representation of the human thorax. The lungs,contained within a tissue-equivalent ribcage and skin,are made from a polymer foam,which is inflated and deflated using a custommade ventilator. A tumor is simulated using a wooden ball with cutplanes for placing GafChromic films. The ventilator,controlled with Labview software,simulates a full range of breathing motion types.Commissioning tests were performed to assess its performance using imaging (CT and radiographic) and film dosimetry as follows:i)maximum Tumor excursion at acceptable pressure ranges, ii)tumor Motion repeatability between breathing periods,iii)reproducibility between measurement days,iv)tumor-to-surface motion correlation and v)reproducibility of film positioning in phantom. Results: The phantom can generate repeatable motion patterns with sin{sup 4},sin,breath-hold (tumor amplitude repeatability <0.5mm over 10min),aswell as patient-specific motion types. Maximum excursions of the tumor are 20mm and 14mm for the large and small tumor inserts respectively. Amplitude reproducibility (Coefficient of Variation) averaged at 16% for the workable pressure range over 2 months. Good correlation between tumor and surface motion was found with R{sup 2}=0.92. Reproducibility of film positioning within the thorax was within 0.9mm, and maximum 3° error from the coronal plane. Film measurements revealed that the film repositioning error yields relative errors in the mean dose over the planned target volume (PTV) of up to 2.5% and 4.5% for films at the center and on the edge of the PTV respectively. Conclusion: Commissioning tests have shown that the LuCa phantom can produce tumor motion with excellent repeatability. However,a poorer performance in reproducibility of

  11. Strong motion modeling at the Paducah Diffusion Facility for a large New Madrid earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, R.B.

    1991-01-01

    The Paducah Diffusion Facility is within 80 kilometers of the location of the very large New Madrid earthquakes which occurred during the winter of 1811-1812. Because of their size, seismic moment of 2.0 x 10 27 dyne-cm or moment magnitude M w = 7.5, the possible recurrence of these earthquakes is a major element in the assessment of seismic hazard at the facility. Probabilistic hazard analysis can provide uniform hazard response spectra estimates for structure evaluation, but a deterministic modeling of a such a large earthquake can provide strong constraints on the expected duration of motion. The large earthquake is modeled by specifying the earthquake fault and its orientation with respect to the site, and by specifying the rupture process. Synthetic time histories, based on forward modeling of the wavefield, from each subelement are combined to yield a three component time history at the site. Various simulations are performed to sufficiently exercise possible spatial and temporal distributions of energy release on the fault. Preliminary results demonstrate the sensitivity of the method to various assumptions, and also indicate strongly that the total duration of ground motion at the site is controlled primarily by the length of the rupture process on the fault

  12. Calibration and fluctuation of the secular frequency peak amplitude versus initial condition distribution of the ion cloud confined into a three-dimensional quadrupole ion trap using a fourier transform operating mode and a steady ion flow injection mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janulyte, A.; Andre, J.; Carette, M.; Mercury, M.; Reynard, C; Zerega, Y.

    2009-01-01

    A specific Fourier transform operating mode is applied to a 3-dimensional quadrupolar ion trap for mass analysis (Fourier Transform Quadrupolar Ion Trap (FTQIT) Operating Mode or Mass Spectrometer). With this operating mode, an image signal, which is representative of the collective motion of simultaneously confined ions, is made up from a set of recorded time-of-flight histograms. In an ion trap, the secular frequency of ion motion depends on m/Z ratio of the ion. By Fourier transformation of the image signal, one observes the frequency peak of each confined ionic species. When only one ionic species is confined, the peak amplitude is proportional to the maximal amplitude of the image signal. The maximal amplitude of the image signal is expressed according to the operating parameters, the initial conditions of the ions and the number of ions. Simulation tools lead to fluctuation calculation of the maximal amplitude of the image signal. Two origins are explored: (1) the fluctuation of the numbers of ions according to the steady ion flow injection mode (SIFIM) used with this operating mode and (2) the distribution fluctuation of the initial positions and velocities. Initial confinement conditions, obtained with SIFIM injection mode, lead to optimal detection with small fluctuations of the peak amplitude for Fourier transform operating mode applied to an ion trap. (authors)

  13. Arbitrary amplitude nucleus-acoustic solitons in multi-ion quantum plasmas with relativistically degenerate electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, S.; Schlickeiser, R.

    2018-02-01

    A three component degenerate relativistic quantum plasma (consisting of relativistically degenerate electrons, nondegenerate inertial light nuclei, and stationary heavy nuclei) is considered to model the linear wave and also the electrostatic solitary waves in the light nuclei-scale length. A well-known normal mode analysis is employed to investigate the linear wave properties. A mechanical-motion analog (Sagdeev-type) pseudo-potential approach, which reveals the existence of large amplitude solitary excitations, is adopted to study the nonlinear wave properties. Only the positive potential solitary excitations are found to exist in the plasma medium under consideration. The basic properties of the arbitrary amplitude electrostatic acoustic modes in the light nuclei-scale length and their existence domain in terms of soliton speed (Mach number) are examined. The modifications of solitary wave characteristics and their existence domain with the variation of different key plasma configuration parameters (e.g., electrons degeneracy parameter, inertial light nuclei number density, and degenerate electron number density) are also analyzed. Our results, which may be helpful to explain the basic features of the nonlinear wave propagation in multi-component degenerate quantum plasmas, in connection with astrophysical compact objects (e.g., white dwarfs) are briefly discussed.

  14. Effect of ion suprathermality on arbitrary amplitude dust acoustic waves in a charge varying dusty plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tribeche, Mouloud; Mayout, Saliha; Amour, Rabia

    2009-01-01

    Arbitrary amplitude dust acoustic waves in a high energy-tail ion distribution are investigated. The effects of charge variation and ion suprathermality on the large amplitude dust acoustic (DA) soliton are then considered. The correct suprathermal ion charging current is rederived based on the orbit motion limited approach. In the adiabatic case, the variable dust charge is expressed in terms of the Lambert function and we take advantage of this transcendental function to show the existence of rarefactive variable charge DA solitons involving cusped density humps. The dust charge variation leads to an additional enlargement of the DA soliton, which is less pronounced as the ions evolve far away from Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. In the nonadiabatic case, the dust charge fluctuation may provide an alternate physical mechanism causing anomalous dissipation the strength of which becomes important and may prevail over that of dispersion as the ion spectral index κ increases. Our results may provide an explanation for the strong spiky waveforms observed in auroral electric field measurements by Ergun et al.[Geophys. Res. Lett. 25, 2025 (1998)].

  15. Combining collective, MSW, and turbulence effects in supernova neutrino flavor evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Tina; Kneller, James P.

    2013-07-01

    ) density resonance channel and the nonresonant channels—begin to develop turbulence signatures. Large amplitude turbulent motions in the outer layers of more massive, iron core-collapse supernovae may obscure the most obvious fingerprints of collective and shock wave effects in the neutrino signal but cannot remove them completely, and additionally bring about new features in the signal.

  16. Two-point active microrheology in a viscous medium exploiting a motional resonance excited in dual-trap optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Shuvojit; Kumar, Randhir; Banerjee, Ayan

    2018-04-01

    Two-point microrheology measurements from widely separated colloidal particles approach the bulk viscosity of the host medium more reliably than corresponding single-point measurements. In addition, active microrheology offers the advantage of enhanced signal to noise over passive techniques. Recently, we reported the observation of a motional resonance induced in a probe particle in dual-trap optical tweezers when the control particle was driven externally [Paul et al., Phys. Rev. E 96, 050102(R) (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevE.96.050102]. We now demonstrate that the amplitude and phase characteristics of the motional resonance can be used as a sensitive tool for active two-point microrheology to measure the viscosity of a viscous fluid. Thus, we measure the viscosity of viscous liquids from both the amplitude and phase response of the resonance, and demonstrate that the zero crossing of the phase response of the probe particle with respect to the external drive is superior compared to the amplitude response in measuring viscosity at large particle separations. We compare our viscosity measurements with those using a commercial rheometer and obtain an agreement ˜1 % . The method can be extended to viscoelastic material where the frequency dependence of the resonance may provide further accuracy for active microrheological measurements.

  17. Spring-like motion caused large anisotropic thermal expansion in nonporous M(eim)2 (M = Zn, Cd).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhanning; Liu, Chenxi; Li, Qiang; Chen, Jun; Xing, Xianran

    2017-09-20

    Two nonporous coordination polymers were found to possess large anisotropic thermal expansion, which was derived from the flexible structures. A "spring-like" thermal motion was proposed to illustrate the mechanism. Compound Cd(eim) 2 (eim = 2-ethylimidazole) possesses large linear and reversible thermal expansion properties and the emission intensity shows a linear decrease with temperature, making it a candidate for thermo-responsive materials.

  18. First order correction to quasiclassical scattering amplitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuz'menko, A.V.

    1978-01-01

    First order (with respect to h) correction to quasiclassical with the aid of scattering amplitude in nonrelativistic quantum mechanics is considered. This correction is represented by two-loop diagrams and includes the double integrals. With the aid of classical equations of motion, the sum of the contributions of the two-loop diagrams is transformed into the expression which includes one-dimensional integrals only. The specific property of the expression obtained is that the integrand does not possess any singularities in the focal points of the classical trajectory. The general formula takes much simpler form in the case of one-dimensional systems

  19. PRISM software—Processing and review interface for strong-motion data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jeanne M.; Kalkan, Erol; Stephens, Christopher D.; Ng, Peter

    2017-11-28

    Rapidly available and accurate ground-motion acceleration time series (seismic recordings) and derived data products are essential to quickly providing scientific and engineering analysis and advice after an earthquake. To meet this need, the U.S. Geological Survey National Strong Motion Project has developed a software package called PRISM (Processing and Review Interface for Strong-Motion data). PRISM automatically processes strong-motion acceleration records, producing compatible acceleration, velocity, and displacement time series; acceleration, velocity, and displacement response spectra; Fourier amplitude spectra; and standard earthquake-intensity measures. PRISM is intended to be used by strong-motion seismic networks, as well as by earthquake engineers and seismologists.

  20. Deriving motion from megavoltage localization cone beam computed tomography scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfredo C Siochi, R

    2009-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) projection data consist of views of a moving point (e.g. diaphragm apex). The point is selected in identification views of extreme motion (two inhale, two exhale). The room coordinates of the extreme points are determined by source-to-view ray tracing intersections. Projected to other views, these points become opposite corners of a motion-bounding box. The view coordinates of the point, relative to the box, are used to interpolate between extreme room coordinates. Along with the views' time stamps, this provides the point's room coordinates as a function of time. CBCT-derived trajectories of a tungsten pin, moving 3 cm cranio-caudally and 1 cm elsewhere, deviate from expected ones by at most 1.06 mm. When deviations from the ideal imaging geometry are considered, mean errors are less than 0.2 mm. While CBCT-derived cranio-caudal positions are insensitive to the choice of identification views, the bounding box determination requires view separations between 15 and 163 deg. Inhale views with the two largest amplitudes should be used, though corrections can account for different amplitudes. The information could be used to calibrate motion surrogates, adaptively define phase triggers immediately before gated radiotherapy and provide phase and amplitude sorting for 4D CBCT.

  1. Ground motion input in seismic evaluation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sewell, R.T.; Wu, S.C.

    1996-07-01

    This report documents research pertaining to conservatism and variability in seismic risk estimates. Specifically, it examines whether or not artificial motions produce unrealistic evaluation demands, i.e., demands significantly inconsistent with those expected from real earthquake motions. To study these issues, two types of artificial motions are considered: (a) motions with smooth response spectra, and (b) motions with realistic variations in spectral amplitude across vibration frequency. For both types of artificial motion, time histories are generated to match target spectral shapes. For comparison, empirical motions representative of those that might result from strong earthquakes in the Eastern U.S. are also considered. The study findings suggest that artificial motions resulting from typical simulation approaches (aimed at matching a given target spectrum) are generally adequate and appropriate in representing the peak-response demands that may be induced in linear structures and equipment responding to real earthquake motions. Also, given similar input Fourier energies at high-frequencies, levels of input Fourier energy at low frequencies observed for artificial motions are substantially similar to those levels noted in real earthquake motions. In addition, the study reveals specific problems resulting from the application of Western U.S. type motions for seismic evaluation of Eastern U.S. nuclear power plants

  2. Design and construction of a planar motion mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanasovici, Gilberto [Protemaq Engenharia e Projetos, Santo Andre, SP (Brazil); Fucatu, Carlos H. [Technomar Engenharia Ltda., Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Tannuri, Eduardo A. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica. Dept. de Engenharia Mecatronica; Umeda, Carlos H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnologicas (IPT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes the design and construction of a PMM (Planar Motion Mechanism) towed by the IPT-SP main carriage. The IPT towing tank no. 2 is 220 m length and 6.6 m wide. The PMM provides a forced sway and/or yaw oscillation on a ship or other marine structure scaled model.. The maximum sway amplitude (transversal motion) is {+-}1 m, and the maximum sway velocity is 1.0 m/s, with a maximum carrying load of 1000 N. The maximum yaw velocity (rotation motion) is 36 deg/s. High-precision components were used in the construction, and the final estimated accuracy in the sway axis is 0.02 mm and approximately 0.1 deg for yaw motions. Finite Element Analysis and Structural Optimization techniques were used during the design stage. The PMM structure total mass is less than 1 ton, lighter than similar mechanisms in other institutions. A Man-Machine Interface was developed, and the operator is able to define the period and amplitude of sway and yaw motions, as well as the fade-in and fade-out time. An integral 3-component force load cell is installed in the end of the support axis, which measures the hydrodynamic loads on the captive model at low speed tests. This novel laboratorial facility allows the IPT to execute new kinds of experimental procedures, related to evaluation of hydrodynamic loads acting on ship hulls and offshore structures. (author)

  3. The amplitude of the deep solar convection and the origin of the solar supergranulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rast, Mark

    2017-11-01

    Recent observations and models have raised questions about our understanding of the dynamics of the deep solar convection. In particular, the amplitude of low wavenumber convective motions appears to be too high in both local area radiative magnetohydrodynamic and global spherical shell magnetohydrodynamic simulations. In global simulations this results in weaker than needed rotational constraints and consequent non solar-like differential rotation profiles. In deep local area simulations it yields strong horizontal flows in the photosphere on scales much larger than the observed supergranulation. We have undertaken numerical studies that suggest that solution to this problem is closely related to the long standing question of the origin of the solar supergranulation. Two possibilities have emerged. One suggests that small scale photospherically driven motions dominate convecive transport even at depth, descending through a very nearly adiabatic interior (more more nearly adiabatic than current convection models achieve). Convection of this form can meet Rossby number constraints set by global scale motions and implies that the solar supergranulation is the largest buoyantly driven scale of motion in the Sun. The other possibility is that large scale convection driven deeep in the Sun dynamically couples to the near surface shear layer, perhaps as its origin. In this case supergranulation would be the largest non-coupled convective mode, or only weakly coupled and thus potentially explaining the observed excess power in the prograde direction. Recent helioseismic results lend some support to this. We examind both of these possibilities using carefully designed numerical experiments, and weigh thier plausibilities in light of recent observations.

  4. The use of vestibular models for design and evaluation of flight simulator motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussolari, Steven R.; Young, Laurence R.; Lee, Alfred T.

    1989-01-01

    Quantitative models for the dynamics of the human vestibular system are applied to the design and evaluation of flight simulator platform motion. An optimal simulator motion control algorithm is generated to minimize the vector difference between perceived spatial orientation estimated in flight and in simulation. The motion controller has been implemented on the Vertical Motion Simulator at NASA Ames Research Center and evaluated experimentally through measurement of pilot performance and subjective rating during VTOL aircraft simulation. In general, pilot performance in a longitudinal tracking task (formation flight) did not appear to be sensitive to variations in platform motion condition as long as motion was present. However, pilot assessment of motion fidelity by means of a rating scale designed for this purpose, were sensitive to motion controller design. Platform motion generated with the optimal motion controller was found to be generally equivalent to that generated by conventional linear crossfeed washout. The vestibular models are used to evaluate the motion fidelity of transport category aircraft (Boeing 727) simulation in a pilot performance and simulator acceptability study at the Man-Vehicle Systems Research Facility at NASA Ames Research Center. Eighteen airline pilots, currently flying B-727, were given a series of flight scenarios in the simulator under various conditions of simulator motion. The scenarios were chosen to reflect the flight maneuvers that these pilots might expect to be given during a routine pilot proficiency check. Pilot performance and subjective rating of simulator fidelity was relatively insensitive to the motion condition, despite large differences in the amplitude of motion provided. This lack of sensitivity may be explained by means of the vestibular models, which predict little difference in the modeled motion sensations of the pilots when different motion conditions are imposed.

  5. Algebraic evaluation of rational polynomials in one-loop amplitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binoth, Thomas; Guillet, Jean-Philippe; Heinrich, Gudrun

    2007-01-01

    One-loop amplitudes are to a large extent determined by their unitarity cuts in four dimensions. We show that the remaining rational terms can be obtained from the ultraviolet behaviour of the amplitude, and determine universal form factors for these rational parts by applying reduction techniques to the Feynman diagrammatic representation of the amplitude. The method is valid for massless and massive internal particles. We illustrate this method by evaluating the rational terms of the one-loop amplitudes for gg→H, γγ→γγ, gg→gg,γγ→ggg and γγ→γγγγ

  6. Strain amplitude-dependent anelasticity in Cu-Ni solid solution due to thermally activated and athermal dislocation-point obstacle interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustov, S.; Gremaud, G.; Benoit, W.; Golyandin, S.; Sapozhnikov, K.; Nishino, Y.; Asano, S.

    1999-02-01

    Experimental investigations of the internal friction and the Young's modulus defect in single crystals of Cu-(1.3-7.6) at. % Ni have been performed for 7-300 K over a wide range of oscillatory strain amplitudes. Extensive data have been obtained at a frequency of vibrations around 100 kHz and compared with the results obtained for the same crystals at a frequency of ˜1 kHz. The strain amplitude dependence of the anelastic strain amplitude and the average friction stress acting on a dislocation due to solute atoms are also analyzed. Several stages in the strain amplitude dependence of the internal friction and the Young's modulus defect are revealed for all of the alloy compositions, at different temperatures and in different frequency ranges. For the 100 kHz frequency, low temperatures and low strain amplitudes (˜10-7-10-5), the amplitude-dependent internal friction and the Young's modulus defect are essentially temperature independent, and are ascribed to a purely hysteretic internal friction component. At higher strain amplitudes, a transition stage and a steep strain amplitude dependence of the internal friction and the Young's modulus defect are observed, followed by saturation at the highest strain amplitudes employed. These stages are temperature and frequency dependent and are assumed to be due to thermally activated motion of dislocations. We suggest that the observed regularities in the entire strain amplitude, temperature and frequency ranges correspond to a motion of dislocations in a two-component system of obstacles: weak but long-range ones, due to the elastic interaction of dislocations with solute atoms distributed in the bulk of the crystal; and strong short-range ones, due to the interaction of dislocations with solute atoms distributed close to dislocation glide planes. Based on these assumptions, a qualitative explanation is given for the variety of experimental observations.

  7. Dynamic Analysis and Vibration Attenuation of Cable-Driven Parallel Manipulators for Large Workspace Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingli Du

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cable-driven parallel manipulators are one of the best solutions to achieving large workspace since flexible cables can be easily stored on reels. However, due to the negligible flexural stiffness of cables, long cables will unavoidably vibrate during operation for large workspace applications. In this paper a finite element model for cable-driven parallel manipulators is proposed to mimic small amplitude vibration of cables around their desired position. Output feedback of the cable tension variation at the end of the end-effector is utilized to design the vibration attenuation controller which aims at attenuating the vibration of cables by slightly varying the cable length, thus decreasing its effect on the end-effector. When cable vibration is attenuated, motion controller could be designed for implementing precise large motion to track given trajectories. A numerical example is presented to demonstrate the dynamic model and the control algorithm.

  8. Large scale vibration tests on pile-group effects using blast-induced ground motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsuichirou Hijikata; Hideo Tanaka; Takayuki Hashimoto; Kazushige Fujiwara; Yuji Miyamoto; Osamu Kontani

    2005-01-01

    Extensive vibration tests have been performed on pile-supported structures at a large-scale mining site. Ground motions induced by large-scale blasting operations were used as excitation forces for vibration tests. The main objective of this research is to investigate the dynamic behavior of pile-supported structures, in particular, pile-group effects. Two test structures were constructed in an excavated 4 m deep pit. Their test-structures were exactly the same. One structure had 25 steel piles and the other had 4 piles. The test pit was backfilled with sand of appropriate grain size distributions to obtain good compaction, especially between the 25 piles. Accelerations were measured at the structures, in the test pit and in the adjacent free field, and pile strains were measured. Dynamic modal tests of the pile-supported structures and PS measurements of the test pit were performed before and after the vibration tests to detect changes in the natural frequencies of the soil-pile-structure systems and the soil stiffness. The vibration tests were performed six times with different levels of input motions. The maximum horizontal acceleration recorded at the adjacent ground surface varied from 57 cm/s 2 to 1,683 cm/s 2 according to the distances between the test site and the blast areas. (authors)

  9. Electrophysiological correlates of learning-induced modulation of visual motion processing in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Gál

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Training on a visual task leads to increased perceptual and neural responses to visual features that were attended during training as well as decreased responses to neglected distractor features. However, the time course of these attention-based modulations of neural sensitivity for visual features has not been investigated before. Here we measured event related potentials (ERP in response to motion stimuli with different coherence levels before and after training on a speed discrimination task requiring object-based attentional selection of one of the two competing motion stimuli. We found that two peaks on the ERP waveform were modulated by the strength of the coherent motion signal; the response amplitude associated with motion directions that were neglected during training was smaller than the response amplitude associated with motion directions that were attended during training. The first peak of motion coherence-dependent modulation of the ERP responses was at 300 ms after stimulus onset and it was most pronounced over the occipitotemporal cortex. The second peak was around 500 ms and was focused over the parietal cortex. A control experiment suggests that the earlier motion coherence-related response modulation reflects the extraction of the coherent motion signal whereas the later peak might index accumulation and readout of motion signals by parietal decision mechanisms. These findings suggest that attention-based learning affects neural responses both at the sensory and decision processing stages.

  10. How to use body tilt for the simulation of linear self motion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, E.L.; Bles, W.

    2004-01-01

    We examined to what extent body tilt may augment the perception of visually simulated linear self acceleration. Fourteen subjects judged visual motion profiles of fore-aft motion at four different frequencies between 0.04-0.33 Hz, and at three different acceleration amplitudes (0.44, 0.88 and 1.76

  11. Discovery of Fast, Large-amplitude Optical Variability of V648 Car (=SS73-17)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeloni, R.; Di Mille, F.; Ferreira Lopes, C. E.; Masetti, N.

    2012-09-01

    We report on the discovery of large-amplitude flickering from V648 Car (= SS73-17), a poorly studied object listed among the very few hard X-ray-emitting symbiotic stars. We performed millimagnitude precision optical photometry with the Swope Telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory, Chile, and found that V648 Car shows large U-band variability over timescales of minutes. To our knowledge, it exhibits some of the largest flickering of a symbiotic star ever reported. Our finding supports the hypothesis that symbiotic white dwarfs producing hard X-rays are predominantly powered by accretion, rather than quasi-steady nuclear burning, and have masses close to the Chandrasekhar limit. No significant periodicity is evident from the flickering light curve. The All Sky Automated Survey long-term V light curve suggests the presence of a tidally distorted giant accreting via Roche lobe overflow, and a binary period of ~520 days. On the basis of the outstanding physical properties of V648 Car as hinted at by its fast and long-term optical variability, as well as by its nature as a hard X-ray emitter, we therefore call for simultaneous follow-up observations in different bands, ideally combined with time-resolved optical spectroscopy.

  12. DISCOVERY OF FAST, LARGE-AMPLITUDE OPTICAL VARIABILITY OF V648 Car (=SS73-17)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angeloni, R.; Di Mille, F.; Ferreira Lopes, C. E.; Masetti, N.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the discovery of large-amplitude flickering from V648 Car (= SS73-17), a poorly studied object listed among the very few hard X-ray-emitting symbiotic stars. We performed millimagnitude precision optical photometry with the Swope Telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory, Chile, and found that V648 Car shows large U-band variability over timescales of minutes. To our knowledge, it exhibits some of the largest flickering of a symbiotic star ever reported. Our finding supports the hypothesis that symbiotic white dwarfs producing hard X-rays are predominantly powered by accretion, rather than quasi-steady nuclear burning, and have masses close to the Chandrasekhar limit. No significant periodicity is evident from the flickering light curve. The All Sky Automated Survey long-term V light curve suggests the presence of a tidally distorted giant accreting via Roche lobe overflow, and a binary period of ∼520 days. On the basis of the outstanding physical properties of V648 Car as hinted at by its fast and long-term optical variability, as well as by its nature as a hard X-ray emitter, we therefore call for simultaneous follow-up observations in different bands, ideally combined with time-resolved optical spectroscopy.

  13. Inference of core barrel motion from neutron noise spectral density. [PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, J.C.; Shahrokhi, F.; Kryter, R.C.

    1977-03-15

    A method was developed for inference of core barrel motion from the following statistical descriptors: cross-power spectral density, autopower spectral density, and amplitude probability density. To quantify the core barrel motion in a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR), a scale factor was calculated in both one- and two-dimensional geometries using forward, variational, and perturbation methods of discrete ordinates neutron transport. A procedure for selection of the proper frequency band limits for the statistical descriptors was developed. It was found that although perturbation theory is adequate for the calculation of the scale factor, two-dimensional geometric effects are important enough to rule out the use of a one-dimensional approximation for all but the crudest calculations. It was also found that contributions of gamma rays can be ignored and that the results are relatively insensitive to the cross-section set employed. The proper frequency band for the statistical descriptors is conveniently determined from the coherence and phase information from two ex-core power range neutron monitors positioned diametrically across the reactor vessel. Core barrel motion can then be quantified from the integral of the band-limited cross-power spectral density of two diametrically opposed ex-core monitors or, if the coherence between the pair is greater than or equal to 0.7, from a properly band-limited amplitude probability density function. Wide-band amplitude probability density functions were demonstrated to yield erroneous estimates for the magnitude of core barrel motion.

  14. Well-posedness of the Cauchy problem for models of large amplitude internal waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guyenne, Philippe; Lannes, David; Saut, Jean-Claude

    2010-01-01

    We consider in this paper the 'shallow-water/shallow-water' asymptotic model obtained in Choi and Camassa (1999 J. Fluid Mech. 396 1–36), Craig et al (2005 Commun. Pure. Appl. Math. 58 1587–641) (one-dimensional interface) and Bona et al (2008 J. Math. Pures Appl. 89 538–66) (two-dimensional interface) from the two-layer system with rigid lid, for the description of large amplitude internal waves at the interface of two layers of immiscible fluids of different densities. For one-dimensional interfaces, this system is of hyperbolic type and its local well-posedness does not raise serious difficulties, although other issues (blow-up, loss of hyperbolicity, etc) turn out to be delicate. For two-dimensional interfaces, the system is nonlocal. Nevertheless, we prove that it conserves some properties of 'hyperbolic type' and show that the associated Cauchy problem is locally well posed in suitable Sobolev classes provided some natural restrictions are imposed on the data. These results are illustrated by numerical simulations with emphasis on the formation of shock waves

  15. Generating tree amplitudes in N = 4 SYM and N = 8 SG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi, Massimo; Elvang, Henriette; Freedman, Daniel Z.

    2008-01-01

    We study n-point tree amplitudes of N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory and N = 8 supergravity for general configurations of external particles of the two theories. We construct generating functions for n-point MHV and NMHV amplitudes with general external states. Amplitudes derived from them obey SUSY Ward identities, and the generating functions characterize and count amplitudes in the MHV and NMHV sectors. The MHV generating function provides an efficient way to perform the intermediate state helicity sums required to obtain loop amplitudes from trees. The NMHV generating functions rely on the MHV-vertex expansion obtained from recursion relations associated with a 3-line shift of external momenta involving a reference spinor |X]. When the shifted amplitude vanishes for large z for all |X], the sum of MHV-vertex diagrams is independent of |X] and gives the correct amplitude. If the shifted amplitude does not vanish for large z, Cauchy's theorem includes a term at infinity. Examples show that special choices of |X] eliminate this term and the MHV vertex expansion becomes valid at these values. We show that the MHV-vertex expansion of the n-graviton NMHV amplitude for n = 5,6,...,11 is independent of |X] and exhibits the asymptotic behavior z n-12 . Generating functions show how the symmetries of supergravity can be implemented in the quadratic map between supergravity and gauge theory embodied in the KLT and other similar relations between amplitudes in the two theories.

  16. Numerical study of turbulent channel flow perturbed by spanwise topographic heterogeneity: Amplitude and frequency modulation within low- and high-momentum pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Ankit; Anderson, William

    2018-04-01

    We have studied the effects of topographically driven secondary flows on inner-outer interaction in turbulent channel flow. Recent studies have revealed that large-scale motions in the logarithmic region impose an amplitude and frequency modulation on the dynamics of small-scale structures near the wall. This led to development of a predictive model for near-wall dynamics, which has practical relevance for large-eddy simulations. Existing work on amplitude modulation has focused on smooth-wall flows; however, Anderson [J. Fluid Mech. 789, 567 (2016), 10.1017/jfm.2015.744] addressed the problem of rough-wall turbulent channel flow in which the correlation profiles for amplitude modulation showed trends similar to those reported by Mathis et al. [Phys. Fluids 21, 111703 (2009), 10.1063/1.3267726]. For the present study, we considered flow over surfaces with a prominent spanwise heterogeneity, such that domain-scale turbulent secondary flows in the form of counter-rotating vortices are sustained within the flow. (We also show results for flow over a homogeneous roughness, which serves as a benchmark against the spanwise-perturbed cases.) The vortices are anchored to the topography such that prominent upwelling and downwelling occur above the low and high roughness, respectively. We have quantified the extent to which such secondary flows disrupt the distribution of spectral density across constituent wavelengths throughout the depth of the flow, which has direct implications for the existence of amplitude and frequency modulation. We find that the distinct outer peak associated with large-scale motions—the "modulators"—is preserved within the upwelling zone but vanishes in the downwelling zone. Within the downwelling zones, structures are steeper and shorter. Single- and two-point correlations for inner-outer amplitude and frequency modulation demonstrate insensitivity to resolution across cases. We also show a pronounced crossover between the single- and two

  17. Flapping motion and force generation in a viscoelastic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normand, Thibaud; Lauga, Eric

    2008-12-01

    In a variety of biological situations, swimming cells have to move through complex fluids. Similarly, mucociliary clearance involves the transport of polymeric fluids by beating cilia. Here, we consider the extent to which complex fluids could be exploited for force generation on small scales. We consider a prototypical reciprocal motion (i.e., identical under time-reversal symmetry): the periodic flapping of a tethered semi-infinite plane. In the Newtonian limit, such motion cannot be used for force generation according to Purcell’s scallop theorem. In a polymeric fluid (Oldroyd-B, and its generalization), we show that this is not the case and calculate explicitly the forces on the flapper for small-amplitude sinusoidal motion. Three setups are considered: a flapper near a wall, a flapper in a wedge, and a two-dimensional scalloplike flapper. In all cases, we show that at quadratic order in the oscillation amplitude, the tethered flapping motion induces net forces, but no average flow. Our results demonstrate therefore that the scallop theorem is not valid in polymeric fluids. The reciprocal component of the movement of biological appendages such as cilia can thus generate nontrivial forces in polymeric fluid such as mucus, and normal-stress differences can be exploited as a pure viscoelastic force generation and propulsion method.

  18. Scattering amplitudes in super-renormalizable gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donà, Pietro; Giaccari, Stefano; Modesto, Leonardo; Rachwał, Lesław; Zhu, Yiwei

    2015-01-01

    We explicitly compute the tree-level on-shell four-graviton amplitudes in four, five and six dimensions for local and weakly nonlocal gravitational theories that are quadratic in both, the Ricci and scalar curvature with form factors of the d’Alembertian operator inserted between. More specifically we are interested in renormalizable, super-renormalizable or finite theories. The scattering amplitudes for these theories turn out to be the same as the ones of Einstein gravity regardless of the explicit form of the form factors. As a special case the four-graviton scattering amplitudes in Weyl conformal gravity are identically zero. Using a field redefinition, we prove that the outcome is correct for any number of external gravitons (on-shell n−point functions) and in any dimension for a large class of theories. However, when an operator quadratic in the Riemann tensor is added in any dimension (with the exception of the Gauss-Bonnet term in four dimensions) the result is completely altered, and the scattering amplitudes depend on all the form factors introduced in the action.

  19. ICLIC : interactive categorization of large image collections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Corput, Paul; van Wijk, Jarke J.

    2016-01-01

    We present a new approach for the analysis of large image collections. We argue that categorization plays an important role in this process, not only to label images as end result, but also during exploration. Furthermore, to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of the categorization process we

  20. Near-Field Ground Motion Modal versus Wave Propagation Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Cichowicz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The response spectrum generally provides a good estimate of the global displacement and acceleration demand of far-field ground motion on a structure. However, it does not provide accurate information on the local shape or internal deformation of the response of the structure. Near-field pulse-like ground motion will propagate through the structure as waves, causing large, localized deformation. Therefore, the response spectrum alone is not a sufficient representation of near-field ground motion features. Results show that the drift-response technique based on a continuous shear-beam model has to be employed here to estimate structure-demand parameters when structure is exposed to the pulse like ground motion. Conduced modeling shows limited applicability of the drift spectrum based on the SDOF approximation. The SDOF drift spectrum approximation can only be applied to structures with smaller natural periods than the dominant period of the ground motion. For periods larger than the dominant period of ground motion the SDOF drift spectra model significantly underestimates maximum deformation. Strong pulse-type motions are observed in the near-source region of large earthquakes; however, there is a lack of waveforms collected from small earthquakes at very close distances that were recorded underground in mines. The results presented in this paper are relevant for structures with a height of a few meters, placed in an underground excavation. The strong ground motion sensors recorded mine-induced earthquakes in a deep gold mine, South Africa. The strongest monitored horizontal ground motion was caused by an event of magnitude 2 at a distance of 90 m with PGA 123 m/s2, causing drifts of 0.25%–0.35%. The weak underground motion has spectral characteristics similar to the strong ground motion observed on the earth's surface; the drift spectrum has a maximum value less than 0.02%.

  1. The onset collectivity in {sup 196}Po

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, L A; Cizewski, J A; Jin, H Q; Henry, R G; Farris, L P [Rutgers--the State Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Khoo, T L; Carpenter, M P; Janssens, R V.F.; Lauritsen, T [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Bearden, I G [Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (United States); Ye, D [Notre Dame Univ., IN (United States)

    1992-08-01

    We have studied the in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of {sup 196}Po, which is the first Po isotope to exhibit collective vibrational structure. The onset of collective motion occurs in this isotope because of the large overlap between valence protons in h{sub 9/2} and valence neutrons in i{sub 13/2} orbitals. (author). 7 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  2. Analytical modeling of large amplitude free vibration of non-uniform beams carrying a both transversely and axially eccentric tip mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaeke, Hasan; Moeenfard, Hamid

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this paper is to study large amplitude flexural-extensional free vibration of non-uniform cantilever beams carrying a both transversely and axially eccentric tip mass. The effects of variable axial force is also taken into account. Hamilton's principle is utilized to obtain the partial differential equations governing the nonlinear vibration of the system as well as the corresponding boundary conditions. A numerical finite difference scheme is proposed to find the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the system which is validated specifically for a beam with linearly varying cross section. Using a single mode approximation in conjunction with the Lagrange method, the governing equations are reduced to a set of two nonlinear ordinary differential equations in terms of end displacement components of the beam which are coupled due to the presence of the transverse eccentricity. These temporal coupled equations are then solved analytically using the multiple time scales perturbation technique. The obtained analytical results are compared with the numerical ones and excellent agreement is observed. The qualitative and quantitative knowledge resulting from this research is expected to enable the study of the effects of eccentric tip mass and non-uniformity on the large amplitude flexural-extensional vibration of beams for improved dynamic performance.

  3. Colour decompositions of multi-quark one-loop QCD amplitudes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ita, Harald; Ozeren, Kemal

    2012-01-01

    We describe the decomposition of one-loop QCD amplitudes in terms of colour-ordered building blocks. We give new expressions for the coefficients of QCD colour structures in terms of ordered objects called primitive amplitudes, for processes with up to seven partons. These results are needed in c...... to the cross section for W+4-jet production at the Large Hadron Collider, and verify that it is very well approximated by keeping only the leading terms in an expansion around the formal limit of a large number of colours....

  4. Unusual motions of a vibrating string

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Roger J.

    2003-10-01

    The actual motions of a sinusoidally driven vibrating string can be very complex due to nonlinear effects resulting from varying tension and longitudinal motion not included in simple linear theory. Commonly observed effects are: generation of motion perpendicular to the driving force, sudden jumps in amplitude, hysteresis, and generation of higher harmonics. In addition, these effects are profoundly influenced by wire asymmetries which in a brass harpsichord wire can cause a small splitting of each natural frequency of free vibration into two closely spaced frequencies (relative separation ~0.2% to 2%), each associated with transverse motion along two orthogonal characteristic wire axes. Some unusual resulting patterns of complex motions of a point on the wire are exhibited on videotape. Examples include: sudden changes of harmonic content, generation of subharmonics, and motion which appears nearly chaotic but which has a pattern period of over 10 s. Another unusual phenomenon due to entirely different causes can occur when a violin string is bowed with a higher than normal force resulting in sounds ranging from about a musical third to a twelfth lower than the sound produced when the string is plucked.

  5. A Comprehensive Motion Estimation Technique for the Improvement of EIS Methods Based on the SURF Algorithm and Kalman Filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xuemin; Hao, Qun; Xie, Mengdi

    2016-04-07

    Video stabilization is an important technology for removing undesired motion in videos. This paper presents a comprehensive motion estimation method for electronic image stabilization techniques, integrating the speeded up robust features (SURF) algorithm, modified random sample consensus (RANSAC), and the Kalman filter, and also taking camera scaling and conventional camera translation and rotation into full consideration. Using SURF in sub-pixel space, feature points were located and then matched. The false matched points were removed by modified RANSAC. Global motion was estimated by using the feature points and modified cascading parameters, which reduced the accumulated errors in a series of frames and improved the peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) by 8.2 dB. A specific Kalman filter model was established by considering the movement and scaling of scenes. Finally, video stabilization was achieved with filtered motion parameters using the modified adjacent frame compensation. The experimental results proved that the target images were stabilized even when the vibrating amplitudes of the video become increasingly large.

  6. Dynamics of the nuclear one-body density: small amplitude regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemes, M.C.; Toledo Piza, A.F.R. de.

    1984-01-01

    A microscopic treatment for the small amplitude limite of the equations of motion for the nuclear one-body density is presented. These were derived previously by means of projection techniques, and allow for the explicit separation of mean-field and collision effects which result from the dynamics of many-body correlations. The form of the nuclear response in the presence of collision effects is derived. An illustrative application to a soluble model is discussed. (Author) [pt

  7. Ground Motion Characteristics of Induced Earthquakes in Central North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, G. M.; Assatourians, K.; Novakovic, M.

    2017-12-01

    The ground motion characteristics of induced earthquakes in central North America are investigated based on empirical analysis of a compiled database of 4,000,000 digital ground-motion records from events in induced-seismicity regions (especially Oklahoma). Ground-motion amplitudes are characterized non-parametrically by computing median amplitudes and their variability in magnitude-distance bins. We also use inversion techniques to solve for regional source, attenuation and site response effects. Ground motion models are used to interpret the observations and compare the source and attenuation attributes of induced earthquakes to those of their natural counterparts. Significant conclusions are that the stress parameter that controls the strength of high-frequency radiation is similar for induced earthquakes (depth of h 5 km) and shallow (h 5 km) natural earthquakes. By contrast, deeper natural earthquakes (h 10 km) have stronger high-frequency ground motions. At distances close to the epicenter, a greater focal depth (which increases distance from the hypocenter) counterbalances the effects of a larger stress parameter, resulting in motions of similar strength close to the epicenter, regardless of event depth. The felt effects of induced versus natural earthquakes are also investigated using USGS "Did You Feel It?" reports; 400,000 reports from natural events and 100,000 reports from induced events are considered. The felt reports confirm the trends that we expect based on ground-motion modeling, considering the offsetting effects of the stress parameter versus focal depth in controlling the strength of motions near the epicenter. Specifically, felt intensity for a given magnitude is similar near the epicenter, on average, for all event types and depths. At distances more than 10 km from the epicenter, deeper events are felt more strongly than shallow events. These ground-motion attributes imply that the induced-seismicity hazard is most critical for facilities in

  8. Development of a Shipboard Remote Control and Telemetry Experimental System for Large-Scale Model's Motions and Loads Measurement in Realistic Sea Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Jialong; Ren, Huilong; Adenya, Christiaan Adika; Chen, Chaohe

    2017-10-29

    Wave-induced motion and load responses are important criteria for ship performance evaluation. Physical experiments have long been an indispensable tool in the predictions of ship's navigation state, speed, motions, accelerations, sectional loads and wave impact pressure. Currently, majority of the experiments are conducted in laboratory tank environment, where the wave environments are different from the realistic sea waves. In this paper, a laboratory tank testing system for ship motions and loads measurement is reviewed and reported first. Then, a novel large-scale model measurement technique is developed based on the laboratory testing foundations to obtain accurate motion and load responses of ships in realistic sea conditions. For this purpose, a suite of advanced remote control and telemetry experimental system was developed in-house to allow for the implementation of large-scale model seakeeping measurement at sea. The experimental system includes a series of technique sensors, e.g., the Global Position System/Inertial Navigation System (GPS/INS) module, course top, optical fiber sensors, strain gauges, pressure sensors and accelerometers. The developed measurement system was tested by field experiments in coastal seas, which indicates that the proposed large-scale model testing scheme is capable and feasible. Meaningful data including ocean environment parameters, ship navigation state, motions and loads were obtained through the sea trial campaign.

  9. On the Relationship between Fourier and Response Spectra: Implications for the Adjustment of Empirical Ground-Motion Prediction Equations (GMPEs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora, Sanjay; Scherbaum, Frank; Kuehn, Nicolas; Stafford, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Often, scaling of response spectral amplitudes, (e.g., spectral acceleration) obtained from empirical ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs), with respect to commonly used seismological parameters such as magnitude, distance and site condition is assumed/referred to be representing a similar scaling of Fourier spectral amplitudes. For instance, the distance scaling of response spectral amplitudes is related with the geometrical spreading of seismic waves. Such comparison of scaling of response spectral amplitudes with that of corresponding Fourier spectral amplitudes is motivated by that, the functional forms of response spectral GMPEs are often derived using the concepts borrowed from Fourier spectral modeling of ground motion. As these GMPEs are subsequently calibrated with empirical observations, this may not appear to pose any major problems in the prediction of ground motion for a particular earthquake scenario. However, the assumption that the Fourier spectral concepts persist for response spectra can lead to undesirable consequences when it comes to the adjustment of response spectral GMPEs to represent conditions not covered in the original empirical data set. In this context, a couple of important questions arise, e.g., what are the distinctions and/or similarities between Fourier and response spectra of ground-motions? And, if they are different, then what is the mechanism responsible for such differences and how do adjustments that are made to FAS manifest in response spectra? We explore the relationship between the Fourier and response spectrum of ground motion by using random vibration theory (RVT). With a simple Brune (1970, 1971) source model, RVT-generated acceleration spectra for a fixed magnitude and distance scenario are used. The RVT analyses reveal that the scaling of low oscillator-frequency response spectral ordinates can be treated as being equivalent to the scaling of the corresponding Fourier spectral ordinates. However, the high

  10. SU-E-J-219: Quantitative Evaluation of Motion Effects On Accuracy of Image-Guided Radiotherapy with Fiducial Markers Using CT Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, I; Oyewale, S; Ahmad, S; Algan, O [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Alsbou, N [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ada, OH (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate quantitatively patient motion effects on the localization accuracy of image-guided radiation with fiducial markers using axial CT (ACT), helical CT (HCT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT) using modeling and experimental phantom studies. Methods: Markers with different lengths (2.5 mm, 5 mm, 10 mm, and 20 mm) were inserted in a mobile thorax phantom which was imaged using ACT, HCT and CBCT. The phantom moved with sinusoidal motion with amplitudes ranging 0–20 mm and a frequency of 15 cycles-per-minute. Three parameters that include: apparent marker lengths, center position and distance between the centers of the markers were measured in the different CT images of the mobile phantom. A motion mathematical model was derived to predict the variations in the previous three parameters and their dependence on the motion in the different imaging modalities. Results: In CBCT, the measured marker lengths increased linearly with increase in motion amplitude. For example, the apparent length of the 10 mm marker was about 20 mm when phantom moved with amplitude of 5 mm. Although the markers have elongated, the center position and the distance between markers remained at the same position for different motion amplitudes in CBCT. These parameters were not affected by motion frequency and phase in CBCT. In HCT and ACT, the measured marker length, center and distance between markers varied irregularly with motion parameters. The apparent lengths of the markers varied with inverse of the phantom velocity which depends on motion frequency and phase. Similarly the center position and distance between markers varied inversely with phantom speed. Conclusion: Motion may lead to variations in maker length, center position and distance between markers using CT imaging. These effects should be considered in patient setup using image-guided radiation therapy based on fiducial markers matching using 2D-radiographs or volumetric CT imaging.

  11. SU-E-J-219: Quantitative Evaluation of Motion Effects On Accuracy of Image-Guided Radiotherapy with Fiducial Markers Using CT Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, I; Oyewale, S; Ahmad, S; Algan, O; Alsbou, N

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate quantitatively patient motion effects on the localization accuracy of image-guided radiation with fiducial markers using axial CT (ACT), helical CT (HCT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT) using modeling and experimental phantom studies. Methods: Markers with different lengths (2.5 mm, 5 mm, 10 mm, and 20 mm) were inserted in a mobile thorax phantom which was imaged using ACT, HCT and CBCT. The phantom moved with sinusoidal motion with amplitudes ranging 0–20 mm and a frequency of 15 cycles-per-minute. Three parameters that include: apparent marker lengths, center position and distance between the centers of the markers were measured in the different CT images of the mobile phantom. A motion mathematical model was derived to predict the variations in the previous three parameters and their dependence on the motion in the different imaging modalities. Results: In CBCT, the measured marker lengths increased linearly with increase in motion amplitude. For example, the apparent length of the 10 mm marker was about 20 mm when phantom moved with amplitude of 5 mm. Although the markers have elongated, the center position and the distance between markers remained at the same position for different motion amplitudes in CBCT. These parameters were not affected by motion frequency and phase in CBCT. In HCT and ACT, the measured marker length, center and distance between markers varied irregularly with motion parameters. The apparent lengths of the markers varied with inverse of the phantom velocity which depends on motion frequency and phase. Similarly the center position and distance between markers varied inversely with phantom speed. Conclusion: Motion may lead to variations in maker length, center position and distance between markers using CT imaging. These effects should be considered in patient setup using image-guided radiation therapy based on fiducial markers matching using 2D-radiographs or volumetric CT imaging

  12. Constructing QCD one-loop amplitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forde, D

    2008-01-01

    In the context of constructing one-loop amplitudes using a unitarity bootstrap approach we discuss a general systematic procedure for obtaining the coefficients of the scalar bubble and triangle integral functions of one-loop amplitudes. Coefficients are extracted after examining the behavior of the cut integrand as the unconstrained parameters of a specifically chosen parameterization of the cut loop momentum approach infinity. Measurements of new physics at the forthcoming experimental program at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will require a precise understanding of processes at next-to-leading order (NLO). This places increased demands for the computation of new one-loop amplitudes. This in turn has spurred recent developments towards improved calculational techniques. Direct calculations using Feynman diagrams are in general inefficient. Developments of more efficient techniques have usually centered around unitarity techniques [1], where tree amplitudes are effectively 'glued' together to form loops. The most straightforward application of this method, in which the cut loop momentum is in D = 4, allows for the computation of 'cut-constructible' terms only, i.e. (poly)logarithmic containing terms and any related constants. QCD amplitudes contain, in addition to such terms, rational pieces which cannot be derived using such cuts. These 'missing' rational parts can be extracted using cut loop momenta in D = 4-2 (var e psilon). The greater difficulty of such calculations has restricted the application of this approach, although recent developments [3, 4] have provided new promise for this technique. Recently the application of on-shell recursion relations [5] to obtaining the 'missing' rational parts of one-loop processes [6] has provided an alternative very promising solution to this problem. In combination with unitarity methods an 'on-shell bootstrap' approach provides an efficient technique for computing complete one-loop QCD amplitudes [7]. Additionally

  13. Kinematic analysis of basic rhythmic movements of hip-hop dance: motion characteristics common to expert dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Nahoko; Nunome, Hiroyuki; Ikegami, Yasuo

    2015-02-01

    In hip-hop dance contests, a procedure for evaluating performances has not been clearly defined, and objective criteria for evaluation are necessary. It is assumed that most hip-hop dance techniques have common motion characteristics by which judges determine the dancer's skill level. This study aimed to extract motion characteristics that may be linked to higher evaluations by judges. Ten expert and 12 nonexpert dancers performed basic rhythmic movements at a rate of 100 beats per minute. Their movements were captured using a motion capture system, and eight judges evaluated the performances. Four kinematic parameters, including the amplitude of the body motions and the phase delay, which indicates the phase difference between two joint angles, were calculated. The two groups showed no significant differences in terms of the amplitudes of the body motions. In contrast, the phase delay between the head motion and the other body parts' motions of expert dancers who received higher scores from the judges, which was approximately a quarter cycle, produced a loop-shaped motion of the head. It is suggested that this slight phase delay was related to the judges' evaluations and that these findings may help in constructing an objective evaluation system.

  14. Impact of respiratory motion correction and spatial resolution on lesion detection in PET: a simulation study based on real MR dynamic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polycarpou, Irene; Tsoumpas, Charalampos; King, Andrew P.; Marsden, Paul K.

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of respiratory motion correction and spatial resolution on lesion detectability in PET as a function of lesion size and tracer uptake. Real respiratory signals describing different breathing types are combined with a motion model formed from real dynamic MR data to simulate multiple dynamic PET datasets acquired from a continuously moving subject. Lung and liver lesions were simulated with diameters ranging from 6 to 12 mm and lesion to background ratio ranging from 3:1 to 6:1. Projection data for 6 and 3 mm PET scanner resolution were generated using analytic simulations and reconstructed without and with motion correction. Motion correction was achieved using motion compensated image reconstruction. The detectability performance was quantified by a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis obtained using a channelized Hotelling observer and the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was calculated as the figure of merit. The results indicate that respiratory motion limits the detectability of lung and liver lesions, depending on the variation of the breathing cycle length and amplitude. Patients with large quiescent periods had a greater AUC than patients with regular breathing cycles and patients with long-term variability in respiratory cycle or higher motion amplitude. In addition, small (less than 10 mm diameter) or low contrast (3:1) lesions showed the greatest improvement in AUC as a result of applying motion correction. In particular, after applying motion correction the AUC is improved by up to 42% with current PET resolution (i.e. 6 mm) and up to 51% for higher PET resolution (i.e. 3 mm). Finally, the benefit of increasing the scanner resolution is small unless motion correction is applied. This investigation indicates high impact of respiratory motion correction on lesion detectability in PET and highlights the importance of motion correction in order to benefit from the increased resolution of future

  15. Impact of respiratory motion correction and spatial resolution on lesion detection in PET: a simulation study based on real MR dynamic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycarpou, Irene; Tsoumpas, Charalampos; King, Andrew P; Marsden, Paul K

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of respiratory motion correction and spatial resolution on lesion detectability in PET as a function of lesion size and tracer uptake. Real respiratory signals describing different breathing types are combined with a motion model formed from real dynamic MR data to simulate multiple dynamic PET datasets acquired from a continuously moving subject. Lung and liver lesions were simulated with diameters ranging from 6 to 12 mm and lesion to background ratio ranging from 3:1 to 6:1. Projection data for 6 and 3 mm PET scanner resolution were generated using analytic simulations and reconstructed without and with motion correction. Motion correction was achieved using motion compensated image reconstruction. The detectability performance was quantified by a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis obtained using a channelized Hotelling observer and the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was calculated as the figure of merit. The results indicate that respiratory motion limits the detectability of lung and liver lesions, depending on the variation of the breathing cycle length and amplitude. Patients with large quiescent periods had a greater AUC than patients with regular breathing cycles and patients with long-term variability in respiratory cycle or higher motion amplitude. In addition, small (less than 10 mm diameter) or low contrast (3:1) lesions showed the greatest improvement in AUC as a result of applying motion correction. In particular, after applying motion correction the AUC is improved by up to 42% with current PET resolution (i.e. 6 mm) and up to 51% for higher PET resolution (i.e. 3 mm). Finally, the benefit of increasing the scanner resolution is small unless motion correction is applied. This investigation indicates high impact of respiratory motion correction on lesion detectability in PET and highlights the importance of motion correction in order to benefit from the increased resolution of future

  16. Implementation and verification of a four-probe motion error measurement system for a large-scale roll lathe used in hybrid manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yuan-Liu; Niu, Zengyuan; Matsuura, Daiki; Lee, Jung Chul; Shimizu, Yuki; Gao, Wei; Oh, Jeong Seok; Park, Chun Hong

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a four-probe measurement system is implemented and verified for the carriage slide motion error measurement of a large-scale roll lathe used in hybrid manufacturing where a laser machining probe and a diamond cutting tool are placed on two sides of a roll workpiece for manufacturing. The motion error of the carriage slide of the roll lathe is composed of two straightness motion error components and two parallelism motion error components in the vertical and horizontal planes. Four displacement measurement probes, which are mounted on the carriage slide with respect to four opposing sides of the roll workpiece, are employed for the measurement. Firstly, based on the reversal technique, the four probes are moved by the carriage slide to scan the roll workpiece before and after a 180-degree rotation of the roll workpiece. Taking into consideration the fact that the machining accuracy of the lathe is influenced by not only the carriage slide motion error but also the gravity deformation of the large-scale roll workpiece due to its heavy weight, the vertical motion error is thus characterized relating to the deformed axis of the roll workpiece. The horizontal straightness motion error can also be synchronously obtained based on the reversal technique. In addition, based on an error separation algorithm, the vertical and horizontal parallelism motion error components are identified by scanning the rotating roll workpiece at the start and the end positions of the carriage slide, respectively. The feasibility and reliability of the proposed motion error measurement system are demonstrated by the experimental results and the measurement uncertainty analysis. (paper)

  17. Implementation and verification of a four-probe motion error measurement system for a large-scale roll lathe used in hybrid manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan-Liu; Niu, Zengyuan; Matsuura, Daiki; Lee, Jung Chul; Shimizu, Yuki; Gao, Wei; Oh, Jeong Seok; Park, Chun Hong

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, a four-probe measurement system is implemented and verified for the carriage slide motion error measurement of a large-scale roll lathe used in hybrid manufacturing where a laser machining probe and a diamond cutting tool are placed on two sides of a roll workpiece for manufacturing. The motion error of the carriage slide of the roll lathe is composed of two straightness motion error components and two parallelism motion error components in the vertical and horizontal planes. Four displacement measurement probes, which are mounted on the carriage slide with respect to four opposing sides of the roll workpiece, are employed for the measurement. Firstly, based on the reversal technique, the four probes are moved by the carriage slide to scan the roll workpiece before and after a 180-degree rotation of the roll workpiece. Taking into consideration the fact that the machining accuracy of the lathe is influenced by not only the carriage slide motion error but also the gravity deformation of the large-scale roll workpiece due to its heavy weight, the vertical motion error is thus characterized relating to the deformed axis of the roll workpiece. The horizontal straightness motion error can also be synchronously obtained based on the reversal technique. In addition, based on an error separation algorithm, the vertical and horizontal parallelism motion error components are identified by scanning the rotating roll workpiece at the start and the end positions of the carriage slide, respectively. The feasibility and reliability of the proposed motion error measurement system are demonstrated by the experimental results and the measurement uncertainty analysis.

  18. GDC 2: Compression of large collections of genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deorowicz, Sebastian; Danek, Agnieszka; Niemiec, Marcin

    2015-06-25

    The fall of prices of the high-throughput genome sequencing changes the landscape of modern genomics. A number of large scale projects aimed at sequencing many human genomes are in progress. Genome sequencing also becomes an important aid in the personalized medicine. One of the significant side effects of this change is a necessity of storage and transfer of huge amounts of genomic data. In this paper we deal with the problem of compression of large collections of complete genomic sequences. We propose an algorithm that is able to compress the collection of 1092 human diploid genomes about 9,500 times. This result is about 4 times better than what is offered by the other existing compressors. Moreover, our algorithm is very fast as it processes the data with speed 200 MB/s on a modern workstation. In a consequence the proposed algorithm allows storing the complete genomic collections at low cost, e.g., the examined collection of 1092 human genomes needs only about 700 MB when compressed, what can be compared to about 6.7 TB of uncompressed FASTA files. The source code is available at http://sun.aei.polsl.pl/REFRESH/index.php?page=projects&project=gdc&subpage=about.

  19. One-loop Higgs plus four gluon amplitudes. Full analytic results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badger, Simon; Nigel Glover, E.W.; Williams, Ciaran; Mastrolia, Pierpaolo

    2009-10-01

    We consider one-loop amplitudes of a Higgs boson coupled to gluons in the limit of a large top quark mass. We treat the Higgs as the real part of a complex field φ that couples to the self-dual field strengths and compute the one-loop corrections to the φ-NMHV amplitude, which contains one gluon of positive helicity whilst the remaining three have negative helicity. We use four-dimensional unitarity to construct the cut-containing contributions and a hybrid of Feynman diagram and recursive based techniques to determine the rational piece. Knowledge of the φ-NMHV contribution completes the analytic calculation of the Higgs plus four gluon amplitude. For completeness we also include expressions for the remaining helicity configurations which have been calculated elsewhere. These amplitudes are relevant for Higgs plus jet production via gluon fusion in the limit where the top quark is large compared to all other scales in the problem. (orig.)

  20. Frequency filtering based analysis on the cardiac induced lung tumor motion and its impact on the radiotherapy management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Ting; Qin, Songbing; Xu, Xiaoting; Jabbour, Salma K.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Yue, Ning J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/objectives: Lung tumor motion may be impacted by heartbeat in addition to respiration. This study seeks to quantitatively analyze heart-motion-induced tumor motion and to evaluate its impact on lung cancer radiotherapy. Methods/materials: Fluoroscopy images were acquired for 30 lung cancer patients. Tumor, diaphragm, and heart were delineated on selected fluoroscopy frames, and their motion was tracked and converted into temporal signals based on deformable registration propagation. The clinical relevance of heart impact was evaluated using the dose volumetric histogram of the redefined target volumes. Results: Correlation was found between tumor and cardiac motion for 23 patients. The heart-induced motion amplitude ranged from 0.2 to 2.6 mm. The ratio between heart-induced tumor motion and the tumor motion was inversely proportional to the amplitude of overall tumor motion. When the heart motion impact was integrated, there was an average 9% increase in internal target volumes for 17 patients. Dose coverage decrease was observed on redefined planning target volume in simulated SBRT plans. Conclusions: The tumor motion of thoracic cancer patients is influenced by both heart and respiratory motion. The cardiac impact is relatively more significant for tumor with less motion, which may lead to clinically significant uncertainty in radiotherapy for some patients

  1. Rotation sequence to report humerothoracic kinematics during 3D motion involving large horizontal component: application to the tennis forehand drive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creveaux, Thomas; Sevrez, Violaine; Dumas, Raphaël; Chèze, Laurence; Rogowski, Isabelle

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the respective aptitudes of three rotation sequences (Y t X f 'Y h '', Z t X f 'Y h '', and X t Z f 'Y h '') to effectively describe the orientation of the humerus relative to the thorax during a movement involving a large horizontal abduction/adduction component: the tennis forehand drive. An optoelectronic system was used to record the movements of eight elite male players, each performing ten forehand drives. The occurrences of gimbal lock, phase angle discontinuity and incoherency in the time course of the three angles defining humerothoracic rotation were examined for each rotation sequence. Our results demonstrated that no single sequence effectively describes humerothoracic motion without discontinuities throughout the forehand motion. The humerothoracic joint angles can nevertheless be described without singularities when considering the backswing/forward-swing and the follow-through phases separately. Our findings stress that the sequence choice may have implications for the report and interpretation of 3D joint kinematics during large shoulder range of motion. Consequently, the use of Euler/Cardan angles to represent 3D orientation of the humerothoracic joint in sport tasks requires the evaluation of the rotation sequence regarding singularity occurrence before analysing the kinematic data, especially when the task involves a large shoulder range of motion in the horizontal plane.

  2. Dual-component model of respiratory motion based on the periodic autoregressive moving average (periodic ARMA) method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCall, K C; Jeraj, R

    2007-01-01

    A new approach to the problem of modelling and predicting respiration motion has been implemented. This is a dual-component model, which describes the respiration motion as a non-periodic time series superimposed onto a periodic waveform. A periodic autoregressive moving average algorithm has been used to define a mathematical model of the periodic and non-periodic components of the respiration motion. The periodic components of the motion were found by projecting multiple inhale-exhale cycles onto a common subspace. The component of the respiration signal that is left after removing this periodicity is a partially autocorrelated time series and was modelled as an autoregressive moving average (ARMA) process. The accuracy of the periodic ARMA model with respect to fluctuation in amplitude and variation in length of cycles has been assessed. A respiration phantom was developed to simulate the inter-cycle variations seen in free-breathing and coached respiration patterns. At ±14% variability in cycle length and maximum amplitude of motion, the prediction errors were 4.8% of the total motion extent for a 0.5 s ahead prediction, and 9.4% at 1.0 s lag. The prediction errors increased to 11.6% at 0.5 s and 21.6% at 1.0 s when the respiration pattern had ±34% variations in both these parameters. Our results have shown that the accuracy of the periodic ARMA model is more strongly dependent on the variations in cycle length than the amplitude of the respiration cycles

  3. Effects of positron density and temperature on large amplitude ion-acoustic waves in an electron-positron-ion plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nejoh, Y.N.

    1997-01-01

    The nonlinear wave structures of large amplitude ion-acoustic waves are studied in a plasma with positrons. We have presented the region of existence of the ion-acoustic waves by analysing the structure of the pseudopotential. The region of existence sensitively depends on the positron to electron density ratio, the ion to electron mass ratio and the positron to electron temperature ratio. It is shown that the maximum Mach number increases as the positron temperature increases and the region of existence of the ion-acoustic waves spreads as the positron temperature increases. 12 refs., 6 figs

  4. Initial frequency shift of large amplitude plasma wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugihara, Ryo; Yamanaka, Kaoru.

    1979-04-01

    A distribution function which is an exact solution to the collisionless Boltzmann equation is obtained in an expansion form in terms of the potential phi(x, t). A complex nonlinear frequency shift ωsub( n)(t) is obtained by use of the Poisson equation and the expansion. The theory is valid for arbitrary phi 0 and v sub(p) as long as ωsub(p) >> γsub( l), and in the initial phase defined by 0 0 , v sub(p), ωsub(p), γsub( l) and t sub(c) are the initial value of phi, the phase velocity, the Langmuir frequency, the linear Landau damping coefficient and the time for the first minimum of the amplitude oscillation. The ωsub( n)(0) does not vanish and Reωsub( n)(0)/γsub( l) > 1 holds even for e phi 0 /T 1 in the initial phase for v sub( p) > v sub( t). The theory reproduces main features of experimental results and that of simulations. (author)

  5. Real-time motion-adaptive-optimization (MAO) in TomoTherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Weiguo; Chen Mingli; Ruchala, Kenneth J; Chen Quan; Olivera, Gustavo H [TomoTherapy Inc., 1240 Deming Way, Madison, WI (United States); Langen, Katja M; Kupelian, Patrick A [MD Anderson Cancer Center-Orlando, Orlando, FL (United States)], E-mail: wlu@tomotherapy.com

    2009-07-21

    IMRT delivery follows a planned leaf sequence, which is optimized before treatment delivery. However, it is hard to model real-time variations, such as respiration, in the planning procedure. In this paper, we propose a negative feedback system of IMRT delivery that incorporates real-time optimization to account for intra-fraction motion. Specifically, we developed a feasible workflow of real-time motion-adaptive-optimization (MAO) for TomoTherapy delivery. TomoTherapy delivery is characterized by thousands of projections with a fast projection rate and ultra-fast binary leaf motion. The technique of MAO-guided delivery calculates (i) the motion-encoded dose that has been delivered up to any given projection during the delivery and (ii) the future dose that will be delivered based on the estimated motion probability and future fluence map. These two pieces of information are then used to optimize the leaf open time of the upcoming projection right before its delivery. It consists of several real-time procedures, including 'motion detection and prediction', 'delivered dose accumulation', 'future dose estimation' and 'projection optimization'. Real-time MAO requires that all procedures are executed in time less than the duration of a projection. We implemented and tested this technique using a TomoTherapy (registered) research system. The MAO calculation took about 100 ms per projection. We calculated and compared MAO-guided delivery with two other types of delivery, motion-without-compensation delivery (MD) and static delivery (SD), using simulated 1D cases, real TomoTherapy plans and the motion traces from clinical lung and prostate patients. The results showed that the proposed technique effectively compensated for motion errors of all test cases. Dose distributions and DVHs of MAO-guided delivery approached those of SD, for regular and irregular respiration with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 3 cm, and for medium and large

  6. Real-time motion-adaptive-optimization (MAO) in TomoTherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Weiguo; Chen Mingli; Ruchala, Kenneth J; Chen Quan; Olivera, Gustavo H; Langen, Katja M; Kupelian, Patrick A

    2009-01-01

    IMRT delivery follows a planned leaf sequence, which is optimized before treatment delivery. However, it is hard to model real-time variations, such as respiration, in the planning procedure. In this paper, we propose a negative feedback system of IMRT delivery that incorporates real-time optimization to account for intra-fraction motion. Specifically, we developed a feasible workflow of real-time motion-adaptive-optimization (MAO) for TomoTherapy delivery. TomoTherapy delivery is characterized by thousands of projections with a fast projection rate and ultra-fast binary leaf motion. The technique of MAO-guided delivery calculates (i) the motion-encoded dose that has been delivered up to any given projection during the delivery and (ii) the future dose that will be delivered based on the estimated motion probability and future fluence map. These two pieces of information are then used to optimize the leaf open time of the upcoming projection right before its delivery. It consists of several real-time procedures, including 'motion detection and prediction', 'delivered dose accumulation', 'future dose estimation' and 'projection optimization'. Real-time MAO requires that all procedures are executed in time less than the duration of a projection. We implemented and tested this technique using a TomoTherapy (registered) research system. The MAO calculation took about 100 ms per projection. We calculated and compared MAO-guided delivery with two other types of delivery, motion-without-compensation delivery (MD) and static delivery (SD), using simulated 1D cases, real TomoTherapy plans and the motion traces from clinical lung and prostate patients. The results showed that the proposed technique effectively compensated for motion errors of all test cases. Dose distributions and DVHs of MAO-guided delivery approached those of SD, for regular and irregular respiration with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 3 cm, and for medium and large prostate motions. The results conceptually

  7. Modeling Nonlinear Site Response Uncertainty in Broadband Ground Motion Simulations for the Los Angeles Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assimaki, D.; Li, W.; Steidl, J. M.; Schmedes, J.

    2007-12-01

    The assessment of strong motion site response is of great significance, both for mitigating seismic hazard and for performing detailed analyses of earthquake source characteristics. There currently exists, however, large degree of uncertainty concerning the mathematical model to be employed for the computationally efficient evaluation of local site effects, and the site investigation program necessary to evaluate the nonlinear input model parameters and ensure cost-effective predictions; and while site response observations may provide critical constraints on interpretation methods, the lack of a statistically significant number of in-situ strong motion records prohibits statistical analyses to be conducted and uncertainties to be quantified based entirely on field data. In this paper, we combine downhole observations and broadband ground motion synthetics for characteristic site conditions the Los Angeles Basin, and investigate the variability in ground motion estimation introduced by the site response assessment methodology. In particular, site-specific regional velocity and attenuation structures are initially compiled using near-surface geotechnical data collected at downhole geotechnical arrays, inverse low-strain velocity and attenuation profiles at these sites obtained by inversion of weak motion records and the crustal velocity structure at the corresponding locations obtained from the Southern California Earthquake Centre Community Velocity Model. Successively, broadband ground motions are simulated by means of a hybrid low/high-frequency finite source model with correlated random parameters for rupture scenaria of weak, medium and large magnitude events (M =3.5-7.5). Observed estimates of site response at the stations of interest are first compared to the ensemble of approximate and incremental nonlinear site response models. Parametric studies are next conducted for each fixed magnitude (fault geometry) scenario by varying the source-to-site distance and

  8. Analysis of Blood Flow Through a Viscoelastic Artery using the Cosserat Continuum with the Large-Amplitude Oscillatory Shear Deformation Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sedaghatizadeh, N.; Atefi, G.; Fardad, A. A.

    2011-01-01

    In this investigation, semiempirical and numerical studies of blood flow in a viscoelastic artery were performed using the Cosserat continuum model. The large-amplitude oscillatory shear deformation model was used to quantify the nonlinear viscoelastic response of blood flow. The finite differenc...... method was used to solve the governing equations, and the particle swarm optimization algorithm was utilized to identify the non-Newtonian coefficients (kυ and γυ). The numerical results agreed well with previous experimental results....

  9. Gravitational torque on the inner core and decadal polar motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumberry, Mathieu

    2008-03-01

    A decadal polar motion with an amplitude of approximately 25 milliarcsecs (mas) is observed over the last century, a motion known as the Markowitz wobble. The origin of this motion remains unknown. In this paper, we investigate the possibility that a time-dependent axial misalignment between the density structures of the inner core and mantle can explain this signal. The longitudinal displacement of the inner core density structure leads to a change in the global moment of inertia of the Earth. In addition, as a result of the density misalignment, a gravitational equatorial torque leads to a tilt of the oblate geometric figure of the inner core, causing a further change in the global moment of inertia. To conserve angular momentum, an adjustment of the rotation vector must occur, leading to a polar motion. We develop theoretical expressions for the change in the moment of inertia and the gravitational torque in terms of the angle of longitudinal misalignment and the density structure of the mantle. A model to compute the polar motion in response to time-dependent axial inner core rotations is also presented. We show that the polar motion produced by this mechanism can be polarized about a longitudinal axis and is expected to have decadal periodicities, two general characteristics of the Markowitz wobble. The amplitude of the polar motion depends primarily on the Y12 spherical harmonic component of mantle density, on the longitudinal misalignment between the inner core and mantle, and on the bulk viscosity of the inner core. We establish constraints on the first two of these quantities from considerations of the axial component of this gravitational torque and from observed changes in length of day. These constraints suggest that the maximum polar motion from this mechanism is smaller than 1 mas, and too small to explain the Markowitz wobble.

  10. Video repairing under variable illumination using cyclic motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Jiaya; Tai, Yu-Wing; Wu, Tai-Pang; Tang, Chi-Keung

    2006-05-01

    This paper presents a complete system capable of synthesizing a large number of pixels that are missing due to occlusion or damage in an uncalibrated input video. These missing pixels may correspond to the static background or cyclic motions of the captured scene. Our system employs user-assisted video layer segmentation, while the main processing in video repair is fully automatic. The input video is first decomposed into the color and illumination videos. The necessary temporal consistency is maintained by tensor voting in the spatio-temporal domain. Missing colors and illumination of the background are synthesized by applying image repairing. Finally, the occluded motions are inferred by spatio-temporal alignment of collected samples at multiple scales. We experimented on our system with some difficult examples with variable illumination, where the capturing camera can be stationary or in motion.

  11. Ground Motion Relations While TBM Drilling in Unconsolidated Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grund, Michael; Ritter, Joachim R. R.; Gehrig, Manuel

    2016-05-01

    The induced ground motions due to the tunnel boring machine (TBM), which has been used for the drilling of the urban metro tunnel in Karlsruhe (SW Germany), has been studied using the continuous recordings of seven seismological monitoring stations. The drilling has been undertaken in unconsolidated sediments of the Rhine River system, relatively close to the surface at 6-20 m depth and in the vicinity of many historic buildings. Compared to the reference values of DIN 4150-3 (1-80 Hz), no exceedance of the recommended peak ground velocity (PGV) limits (3-5 mm/s) was observed at the single recording site locations on building basements during the observation period between October 2014 and February 2015. Detailed analyses in the time and frequency domains helped with the detection of the sources of several specific shaking signals in the recorded time series and with the comparison of the aforementioned TBM-induced signals. The amplitude analysis allowed for the determination of a PGV attenuation relation (quality factor Q ~ 30-50) and the comparison of the TBM-induced ground motion with other artificially induced and natural ground motions of similar amplitudes.

  12. Secure communication based on multi-input multi-output chaotic system with large message amplitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, G.; Boutat, D.; Floquet, T.; Barbot, J.P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of secure communication based on multi-input multi-output (MIMO) chaotic systems. Single input secure communication based on chaos can be easily extended to multiple ones by some combinations technologies, however all the combined inputs possess the same risk to be broken. In order to reduce this risk, a new secure communication scheme based on chaos with MIMO is discussed in this paper. Moreover, since the amplitude of messages in traditional schemes is limited because it would affect the quality of synchronization, the proposed scheme is also improved into an amplitude-independent one.

  13. Modeling of earthquake ground motion in the frequency domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrainsson, Hjortur

    In recent years, the utilization of time histories of earthquake ground motion has grown considerably in the design and analysis of civil structures. It is very unlikely, however, that recordings of earthquake ground motion will be available for all sites and conditions of interest. Hence, there is a need for efficient methods for the simulation and spatial interpolation of earthquake ground motion. In addition to providing estimates of the ground motion at a site using data from adjacent recording stations, spatially interpolated ground motions can also be used in design and analysis of long-span structures, such as bridges and pipelines, where differential movement is important. The objective of this research is to develop a methodology for rapid generation of horizontal earthquake ground motion at any site for a given region, based on readily available source, path and site characteristics, or (sparse) recordings. The research includes two main topics: (i) the simulation of earthquake ground motion at a given site, and (ii) the spatial interpolation of earthquake ground motion. In topic (i), models are developed to simulate acceleration time histories using the inverse discrete Fourier transform. The Fourier phase differences, defined as the difference in phase angle between adjacent frequency components, are simulated conditional on the Fourier amplitude. Uniformly processed recordings from recent California earthquakes are used to validate the simulation models, as well as to develop prediction formulas for the model parameters. The models developed in this research provide rapid simulation of earthquake ground motion over a wide range of magnitudes and distances, but they are not intended to replace more robust geophysical models. In topic (ii), a model is developed in which Fourier amplitudes and Fourier phase angles are interpolated separately. A simple dispersion relationship is included in the phase angle interpolation. The accuracy of the interpolation

  14. Statistical macrodynamics of large dynamical systems. Case of a phase transition in oscillator communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuramoto, Y.; Nishikawa, I.

    1987-01-01

    A model dynamical system with a great many degrees of freedom is proposed for which the critical condition for the onset of collective oscillations, the evolution of a suitably defined order parameter, and its fluctuations around steady states can be studied analytically. This is a rotator model appropriate for a large population of limit cycle oscillators. It is assumed that the natural frequencies of the oscillators are distributed and that each oscillator interacts with all the others uniformly. An exact self-consistent equation for the stationary amplitude of the collective oscillation is derived and is extended to a dynamical form. This dynamical extension is carried out near the transition point where the characteristic time scales of the order parameter and of the individual oscillators become well separated from each other. The macroscopic evolution equation thus obtained generally involves a fluctuating term whose irregular temporal variation comes from a deterministic torus motion of a subpopulation. The analysis of this equation reveals order parameter behavior qualitatively different from that in thermodynamic phase transitions, especially in that the critical fluctuations in the present system are extremely small

  15. Optimizing estimates of annual variations and trends in geocenter motion and J2 from a combination of GRACE data and geophysical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu; Riva, Riccardo; Ditmar, Pavel

    2016-11-01

    The focus of the study is optimizing the technique for estimating geocenter motion and variations in J2 by combining data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission with output from an Ocean Bottom Pressure model and a Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) model. First, we conduct an end-to-end numerical simulation study. We generate input time-variable gravity field observations by perturbing a synthetic Earth model with realistically simulated errors. We show that it is important to avoid large errors at short wavelengths and signal leakage from land to ocean, as well as to account for self-attraction and loading effects. Second, the optimal implementation strategy is applied to real GRACE data. We show that the estimates of annual amplitude in geocenter motion are in line with estimates from other techniques, such as satellite laser ranging (SLR) and global GPS inversion. At the same time, annual amplitudes of C10 and C11 are increased by about 50% and 20%, respectively, compared to estimates based on Swenson et al. (2008). Estimates of J2 variations are by about 15% larger than SLR results in terms of annual amplitude. Linear trend estimates are dependent on the adopted GIA model but still comparable to some SLR results.

  16. Long-period Ground Motion Characteristics Inside and Outside of the Osaka Basin during the 2011 Great Tohoku Earthquake and Its Largest Aftershock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, K.; Iwata, T.; Asano, K.; Kubo, H.; Aoi, S.

    2013-12-01

    The 2011 great Tohoku earthquake (Mw 9.0) occurred on March 11, 2011, and the largest aftershock (Mw 7.7) at the region adjacent to south boundary of the mainshock's source region. Long-period ground motions (1-10s) of large amplitude were observed in the Osaka sedimentary basin about 550-800km away from the source regions during both events. We studied propagation and site characteristics of these ground motions, and found some common features between these two events in the Osaka basin. (1) The amplitude of horizontal components of the ground motion at the site-specific period is amplified at each sedimentary station. The predominant period is around 7s in the bayside area where the largest pSv were observed. (2) The velocity Fourier spectra have their peak values around 7s at the bedrock sites surrounding the Osaka basin. (3) Two remarkable wave packets separated by 30s propagating from stations around the Nobi plain to the bedrock sites near the Osaka basin were seen in the pasted-up velocity waveforms from the source regions to the Osaka basin for both events (Sato et al., 2012). Therefore, large long-period ground motions in the Osaka basin are generated by the combination of propagation-path and basin effects. Firstly, we simulate ground motions due to the largest aftershock using three-dimensional FDM (GMS; Aoi and Fujiwara, 1999). The reason we focus on the largest aftershock is that this event has a relatively small rupture area and simple rupture process compared to the mainshock. The source model is based on the model estimated by Kubo et al. (2013). The velocity structure model is a three-dimensional velocity structure based on the Japan Integrated Velocity Structure Model (Koketsu et al., 2012) and the layer of Vs 350m/s in this model is replaced with one of Vs 500m/s. The minimum effective period in this computation is 3s. Then, we compare synthetic waveforms with observed ones. At CHBH14, the nearest station to the source and 60km away from the

  17. Mapping Pn amplitude spreading and attenuation in Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaoning [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Phillips, William S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stead, Richard J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-06

    Pn travels most of its path in the mantle lid. Mapping the lateral variation of Pn amplitude attenuation sheds light on material properties and dynamics of the uppermost region of the mantle. Pn amplitude variation depends on the wavefront geometric spreading as well as material attenuation. We investigated Pn geometric spreading, which is much more complex than a traditionally assumed power-law spreading model, using both synthetic and observed amplitude data collected in Asia. We derived a new Pn spreading model based on the formulation that was proposed previously to account for the spherical shape of the Earth (Yang et. al., BSSA, 2007). New parameters derived for the spreading model provide much better correction for Pn amplitudes in terms of residual behavior. Because we used observed Pn amplitudes to construct the model, the model incorporates not only the effect of the Earth's spherical shape, but also the effect of potential upper-mantle velocity gradients in the region. Using the new spreading model, we corrected Pn amplitudes measured at 1, 2, 4 and 6 Hz and conducted attenuation tomography. The resulting Pn attenuation model correlates well with the regional geology. We see high attenuation in regions such as northern Tibetan Plateau and the western Pacific subduction zone, and low attenuation for stable blocks such as Sichuan and Tarim basins.

  18. Chimera distribution amplitudes for the pion and the longitudinally polarized ρ-meson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanis, N.G., E-mail: stefanis@tp2.ruhr-uni-bochum.de [Institut für Theoretische Physik II, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Pimikov, A.V., E-mail: pimikov@theor.jinr.ru [Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, JINR, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, 730000 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Using QCD sum rules with nonlocal condensates, we show that the distribution amplitude of the longitudinally polarized ρ-meson may have a shorttailed platykurtic profile in close analogy to our recently proposed platykurtic distribution amplitude for the pion. Such a chimera distribution de facto amalgamates the broad unimodal profile of the distribution amplitude, obtained with a Dyson–Schwinger equations-based computational scheme, with the suppressed tails characterizing the bimodal distribution amplitudes derived from QCD sum rules with nonlocal condensates. We argue that pattern formation, emerging from the collective synchronization of coupled oscillators, can provide a single theoretical scaffolding to study unimodal and bimodal distribution amplitudes of light mesons without recourse to particular computational schemes and the reasons for them.

  19. Stiffness of sphere–plate contacts at MHz frequencies: dependence on normal load, oscillation amplitude, and ambient medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Vlachová

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The stiffness of micron-sized sphere–plate contacts was studied by employing high frequency, tangential excitation of variable amplitude (0–20 nm. The contacts were established between glass spheres and the surface of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM, where the resonator surface had been coated with either sputtered SiO2 or a spin-cast layer of poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA. The results from experiments undertaken in the dry state and in water are compared. Building on the shifts in the resonance frequency and resonance bandwidth, the instrument determines the real and the imaginary part of the contact stiffness, where the imaginary part quantifies dissipative processes. The method is closely analogous to related procedures in AFM-based metrology. The real part of the contact stiffness as a function of normal load can be fitted with the Johnson–Kendall–Roberts (JKR model. The contact stiffness was found to increase in the presence of liquid water. This finding is tentatively explained by the rocking motion of the spheres, which couples to a squeeze flow of the water close to the contact. The loss tangent of the contact stiffness is on the order of 0.1, where the energy losses are associated with interfacial processes. At high amplitudes partial slip was found to occur. The apparent contact stiffness at large amplitude depends linearly on the amplitude, as predicted by the Cattaneo–Mindlin model. This finding is remarkable insofar, as the Cattaneo–Mindlin model assumes Coulomb friction inside the sliding region. Coulomb friction is typically viewed as a macroscopic concept, related to surface roughness. An alternative model (formulated by Savkoor, which assumes a constant frictional stress in the sliding zone independent of the normal pressure, is inconsistent with the experimental data. The apparent friction coefficients slightly increase with normal force, which can be explained by nanoroughness. In other words, contact splitting

  20. Human sensitivity to vertical self-motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesti, Alessandro; Barnett-Cowan, Michael; Macneilage, Paul R; Bülthoff, Heinrich H

    2014-01-01

    Perceiving vertical self-motion is crucial for maintaining balance as well as for controlling an aircraft. Whereas heave absolute thresholds have been exhaustively studied, little work has been done in investigating how vertical sensitivity depends on motion intensity (i.e., differential thresholds). Here we measure human sensitivity for 1-Hz sinusoidal accelerations for 10 participants in darkness. Absolute and differential thresholds are measured for upward and downward translations independently at 5 different peak amplitudes ranging from 0 to 2 m/s(2). Overall vertical differential thresholds are higher than horizontal differential thresholds found in the literature. Psychometric functions are fit in linear and logarithmic space, with goodness of fit being similar in both cases. Differential thresholds are higher for upward as compared to downward motion and increase with stimulus intensity following a trend best described by two power laws. The power laws' exponents of 0.60 and 0.42 for upward and downward motion, respectively, deviate from Weber's Law in that thresholds increase less than expected at high stimulus intensity. We speculate that increased sensitivity at high accelerations and greater sensitivity to downward than upward self-motion may reflect adaptations to avoid falling.

  1. Leveraging High Performance Computing for Managing Large and Evolving Data Collections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritu Arora

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The process of developing a digital collection in the context of a research project often involves a pipeline pattern during which data growth, data types, and data authenticity need to be assessed iteratively in relation to the different research steps and in the interest of archiving. Throughout a project’s lifecycle curators organize newly generated data while cleaning and integrating legacy data when it exists, and deciding what data will be preserved for the long term. Although these actions should be part of a well-oiled data management workflow, there are practical challenges in doing so if the collection is very large and heterogeneous, or is accessed by several researchers contemporaneously. There is a need for data management solutions that can help curators with efficient and on-demand analyses of their collection so that they remain well-informed about its evolving characteristics. In this paper, we describe our efforts towards developing a workflow to leverage open science High Performance Computing (HPC resources for routinely and efficiently conducting data management tasks on large collections. We demonstrate that HPC resources and techniques can significantly reduce the time for accomplishing critical data management tasks, and enable a dynamic archiving throughout the research process. We use a large archaeological data collection with a long and complex formation history as our test case. We share our experiences in adopting open science HPC resources for large-scale data management, which entails understanding usage of the open source HPC environment and training users. These experiences can be generalized to meet the needs of other data curators working with large collections.

  2. Effects of Accretionary Prisms on 3-D Long-Period Ground Motion Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Y.; Koketsu, K.; Miyake, H.

    2014-12-01

    The accretionary prism along the subduction zones such as the Middle America trench or the Nankai trough is considered as an important factor affecting the generation and propagation of long-period ground motions. In Japan, the great earthquake along the Nankai subduction zone which is expected to occur in the near future can generate large long-period ground motions in the metropolitan areas such as Osaka, Nagoya and Tokyo. To investigate the effect of accretionary prism on long-period ground motions, we performed simulations of long-period ground motions for the event (Mw 7.1) that occurred off the Kii peninsula, Japan, at 10:07 on 5 September 2004 (UTC). Our simulation model ranged from the Kinki region to the Kanto region, and included the Osaka, Nobi and Kanto basin. We calculated long-period ground motions for four types of 3-D velocity structure models: (a) model with the accretionary prism (reference model), (b) model where accretionary prism has different 3-D geometry from the reference model, (c) model with the accretionary prism whose velocity, density and Q-value are shifted, (d) model without the accretionary prism. We compared the waveforms calculated for these models and concluded that the accretionary prism along the Nankai subduction zone plays roles in reducing the amplitude of direct waves and extending the duration of coda waves. This is attributed to the trap effect of accretionary prism. Our simulation also suggested that, the edge geometry along the landward side of accretionary prism has major effects on the processes of generation and propagation of long-period ground motions.

  3. Spatiotemporal seismic velocity change in the Earth's subsurface associated with large earthquake: contribution of strong ground motion and crustal deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawazaki, K.

    2016-12-01

    It is well known that seismic velocity of the subsurface medium changes after a large earthquake. The cause of the velocity change is roughly attributed to strong ground motion (dynamic strain change), crustal deformation (static strain change), and fracturing around the fault zone. Several studies have revealed that the velocity reduction down to several percent concentrates at the depths shallower than several hundred meters. The amount of velocity reduction correlates well with the intensity of strong ground motion, which indicates that the strong motion is the primary cause of the velocity reduction. Although some studies have proposed contributions of coseismic static strain change and fracturing around fault zone to the velocity change, separation of their contributions from the site-related velocity change is usually difficult. Velocity recovery after a large earthquake is also widely observed. The recovery process is generally proportional to logarithm of the lapse time, which is similar to the behavior of "slow dynamics" recognized in laboratory experiments. The time scale of the recovery is usually months to years in field observations, while it is several hours in laboratory experiments. Although the factor that controls the recovery speed is not well understood, cumulative strain change due to post-seismic deformation, migration of underground water, mechanical and chemical reactions on the crack surface could be the candidate. In this study, I summarize several observations that revealed spatiotemporal distribution of seismic velocity change due to large earthquakes; especially I focus on the case of the M9.0 2011 Tohoku earthquake. Combining seismograms of Hi-net (high-sensitivity) and KiK-net (strong motion), geodetic records of GEONET and the seafloor GPS/Acoustic ranging, I investigate contribution of the strong ground motion and crustal deformation to the velocity change associated with the Tohoku earthquake, and propose a gross view of

  4. Visual motion detection and habitat preference in Anolis lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, David S; Leal, Manuel

    2016-11-01

    The perception of visual stimuli has been a major area of inquiry in sensory ecology, and much of this work has focused on coloration. However, for visually oriented organisms, the process of visual motion detection is often equally crucial to survival and reproduction. Despite the importance of motion detection to many organisms' daily activities, the degree of interspecific variation in the perception of visual motion remains largely unexplored. Furthermore, the factors driving this potential variation (e.g., ecology or evolutionary history) along with the effects of such variation on behavior are unknown. We used a behavioral assay under laboratory conditions to quantify the visual motion detection systems of three species of Puerto Rican Anolis lizard that prefer distinct structural habitat types. We then compared our results to data previously collected for anoles from Cuba, Puerto Rico, and Central America. Our findings indicate that general visual motion detection parameters are similar across species, regardless of habitat preference or evolutionary history. We argue that these conserved sensory properties may drive the evolution of visual communication behavior in this clade.

  5. An analysis of plasma ion toroidal rotation during large amplitude MHD activity in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snipes, J.A.; Esch, H.P.L. de; Lazzaro, E.; Stork, D.; Hellermann, M. von; Galvao, R.; Hender, T.C.; Zasche, D.

    1989-01-01

    A detailed study of plasma ion toroidal rotation in JET during large amplitude MHD activity has revealed a strong viscous force that couples plasma ions to MHD modes. Depending on the MHD modes present, this force can couple across all of the plasma cross section, across only the central region, roughly within the q=1 surface, or across only the outer region outside the q=1.5 surface. The force acts to flatten the ion toroidal rotation frequency profile, measured by the JET active charge exchange spectroscopy diagnostic, across the coupled region of plasma. The frequency of rotation in this region agrees with the MHD oscillation frequency measured by magnetic pick-up coils at the wall. The strength of the force between the ions and modes becomes evident during high power NBI when the mode locks and drags the ion toroidal rotation frequency to zero, within the errors of the measurements. The present theories of plasma rotation either ignore MHD effects entirely, consider only moderate n toroidal field ripple, or low n ripple effects. (author) 7 refs., 3 figs

  6. Metadata-Assisted Global Motion Estimation for Medium-Altitude Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Video Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongguang Li

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Global motion estimation (GME is a key technology in unmanned aerial vehicle remote sensing (UAVRS. However, when a UAV’s motion and behavior change significantly or the image information is not rich, traditional image-based methods for GME often perform poorly. Introducing bottom metadata can improve precision in a large-scale motion condition and reduce the dependence on unreliable image information. GME is divided into coarse and residual GME through coordinate transformation and based on the study hypotheses. In coarse GME, an auxiliary image is built to convert image matching from a wide baseline condition to a narrow baseline one. In residual GME, a novel information and contrast feature detection algorithm is proposed for big-block matching to maximize the use of reliable image information and ensure that the contents of interest are well estimated. Additionally, an image motion monitor is designed to select the appropriate processing strategy by monitoring the motion scales of translation, rotation, and zoom. A medium-altitude UAV is employed to collect three types of large-scale motion datasets. Peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR and motion scale are computed. This study’s result is encouraging and applicable to other medium- or high-altitude UAVs with a similar system structure.

  7. Enhancing ejection fraction measurement through 4D respiratory motion compensation in cardiac PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing; Wang, Xinhui; Gao, Xiangzhen; Segars, W. Paul; Lodge, Martin A.; Rahmim, Arman

    2017-06-01

    ECG gated cardiac PET imaging measures functional parameters such as left ventricle (LV) ejection fraction (EF), providing diagnostic and prognostic information for management of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Respiratory motion degrades spatial resolution and affects the accuracy in measuring the LV volumes for EF calculation. The goal of this study is to systematically investigate the effect of respiratory motion correction on the estimation of end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), and EF, especially on the separation of normal and abnormal EFs. We developed a respiratory motion incorporated 4D PET image reconstruction technique which uses all gated-frame data to acquire a motion-suppressed image. Using the standard XCAT phantom and two individual-specific volunteer XCAT phantoms, we simulated dual-gated myocardial perfusion imaging data for normally and abnormally beating hearts. With and without respiratory motion correction, we measured the EDV, ESV, and EF from the cardiac-gated reconstructed images. For all the phantoms, the estimated volumes increased and the biases significantly reduced with motion correction compared with those without. Furthermore, the improvement of ESV measurement in the abnormally beating heart led to better separation of normal and abnormal EFs. The simulation study demonstrated the significant effect of respiratory motion correction on cardiac imaging data with motion amplitude as small as 0.7 cm. The larger the motion amplitude the more improvement respiratory motion correction brought about on the EF measurement. Using data-driven respiratory gating, we also demonstrated the effect of respiratory motion correction on estimating the above functional parameters from list mode patient data. Respiratory motion correction has been shown to improve the accuracy of EF measurement in clinical cardiac PET imaging.

  8. First amplitude analysis of resonant structures in the 5-pion continuum at COMPASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neubert, Sebastian

    2012-07-06

    The study of hadronic scattering amplitudes and in particular the spectroscopy of light mesons provide a unique tool to investigate the strong interaction. At very lowenergies the meson spectrum is governed by the spontaneous breakdown of the chiral symmetry of the QCD vacuum. At higher masses a series of resonances appears. Their origin and their relation to chiral symmetry breaking is only partly understood. In particular for masses above {proportional_to} 1.6 GeV/c{sup 2} while a large number of states have been reported they are still poorly known experimentally. One complication are multi-body final states into which heavy mesons can decay. In this thesis a method for the amplitude analysis of the {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} system is being developed. The COMPASS experiment at CERN uses the diffractive dissociation of a 190 GeV pion beam as a source of meson resonances up to masses of about 3 GeV/c{sup 2}. A partial wave decomposition of the 5{pi} system is presented here which for the first time allows to search for mesonic 5-body resonances. A novel technique based on an evolutionary algorithm is developed to solve the problem of finding a reliable truncation of the partial wave expansion of the hadronic amplitude. The method for the first time allows the investigation of systematic uncertainties introduced by the use truncated isobar model amplitudes. The well known {pi}{sub 2}(1670) and {pi}(1800) states are found with good agreement to measurements in other channels. In addition there is evidence for several other resonant contributions, among them the controversial {pi}{sub 2}(1880) which is being discussed as a hybrid-meson candidate. In the course of the analysis a new software-framework for amplitude analysis has been developed, which is now being used by the COMPASS collaboration for the analysis of several hadronic channels. Future experiments in particle physics will have to collect large amounts of data in order to

  9. First amplitude analysis of resonant structures in the 5-pion continuum at COMPASS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neubert, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    The study of hadronic scattering amplitudes and in particular the spectroscopy of light mesons provide a unique tool to investigate the strong interaction. At very lowenergies the meson spectrum is governed by the spontaneous breakdown of the chiral symmetry of the QCD vacuum. At higher masses a series of resonances appears. Their origin and their relation to chiral symmetry breaking is only partly understood. In particular for masses above ∝ 1.6 GeV/c 2 while a large number of states have been reported they are still poorly known experimentally. One complication are multi-body final states into which heavy mesons can decay. In this thesis a method for the amplitude analysis of the π - π + π - π + π - system is being developed. The COMPASS experiment at CERN uses the diffractive dissociation of a 190 GeV pion beam as a source of meson resonances up to masses of about 3 GeV/c 2 . A partial wave decomposition of the 5π system is presented here which for the first time allows to search for mesonic 5-body resonances. A novel technique based on an evolutionary algorithm is developed to solve the problem of finding a reliable truncation of the partial wave expansion of the hadronic amplitude. The method for the first time allows the investigation of systematic uncertainties introduced by the use truncated isobar model amplitudes. The well known π 2 (1670) and π(1800) states are found with good agreement to measurements in other channels. In addition there is evidence for several other resonant contributions, among them the controversial π 2 (1880) which is being discussed as a hybrid-meson candidate. In the course of the analysis a new software-framework for amplitude analysis has been developed, which is now being used by the COMPASS collaboration for the analysis of several hadronic channels. Future experiments in particle physics will have to collect large amounts of data in order to search for the subtle effects that would indicate new physics beyond the

  10. Dimensionality reduction of collective motion by principal manifolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajamannage, Kelum; Butail, Sachit; Porfiri, Maurizio; Bollt, Erik M.

    2015-01-01

    While the existence of low-dimensional embedding manifolds has been shown in patterns of collective motion, the current battery of nonlinear dimensionality reduction methods is not amenable to the analysis of such manifolds. This is mainly due to the necessary spectral decomposition step, which limits control over the mapping from the original high-dimensional space to the embedding space. Here, we propose an alternative approach that demands a two-dimensional embedding which topologically summarizes the high-dimensional data. In this sense, our approach is closely related to the construction of one-dimensional principal curves that minimize orthogonal error to data points subject to smoothness constraints. Specifically, we construct a two-dimensional principal manifold directly in the high-dimensional space using cubic smoothing splines, and define the embedding coordinates in terms of geodesic distances. Thus, the mapping from the high-dimensional data to the manifold is defined in terms of local coordinates. Through representative examples, we show that compared to existing nonlinear dimensionality reduction methods, the principal manifold retains the original structure even in noisy and sparse datasets. The principal manifold finding algorithm is applied to configurations obtained from a dynamical system of multiple agents simulating a complex maneuver called predator mobbing, and the resulting two-dimensional embedding is compared with that of a well-established nonlinear dimensionality reduction method.

  11. Sequential motion of the ossicular chain measured by laser Doppler vibrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunimoto, Yasuomi; Hasegawa, Kensaku; Arii, Shiro; Kataoka, Hideyuki; Yazama, Hiroaki; Kuya, Junko; Fujiwara, Kazunori; Takeuchi, Hiromi

    2017-12-01

    In order to help a surgeon make the best decision, a more objective method of measuring ossicular motion is required. A laser Doppler vibrometer was mounted on a surgical microscope. To measure ossicular chain vibrations, eight patients with cochlear implants were investigated. To assess the motions of the ossicular chain, velocities at five points were measured with tonal stimuli of 1 and 3 kHz, which yielded reproducible results. The sequential amplitude change at each point was calculated with phase shifting from the tonal stimulus. Motion of the ossicular chain was visualized from the averaged results using the graphics application. The head of the malleus and the body of the incus showed synchronized movement as one unit. In contrast, the stapes (incudostapedial joint and posterior crus) moved synchronously in opposite phase to the malleus and incus. The amplitudes at 1 kHz were almost twice those at 3 kHz. Our results show that the malleus and incus unit and the stapes move with a phase difference.

  12. Walking on a moving surface: energy-optimal walking motions on a shaky bridge and a shaking treadmill can reduce energy costs below normal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Varun; Srinivasan, Manoj

    2015-02-08

    Understanding how humans walk on a surface that can move might provide insights into, for instance, whether walking humans prioritize energy use or stability. Here, motivated by the famous human-driven oscillations observed in the London Millennium Bridge, we introduce a minimal mathematical model of a biped, walking on a platform (bridge or treadmill) capable of lateral movement. This biped model consists of a point-mass upper body with legs that can exert force and perform mechanical work on the upper body. Using numerical optimization, we obtain energy-optimal walking motions for this biped, deriving the periodic body and platform motions that minimize a simple metabolic energy cost. When the platform has an externally imposed sinusoidal displacement of appropriate frequency and amplitude, we predict that body motion entrained to platform motion consumes less energy than walking on a fixed surface. When the platform has finite inertia, a mass- spring-damper with similar parameters to the Millennium Bridge, we show that the optimal biped walking motion sustains a large lateral platform oscillation when sufficiently many people walk on the bridge. Here, the biped model reduces walking metabolic cost by storing and recovering energy from the platform, demonstrating energy benefits for two features observed for walking on the Millennium Bridge: crowd synchrony and large lateral oscillations.

  13. Mapping the upper mantle beneath North American continent with joint inversion of surface-wave phase and amplitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, K.; Hamada, K.

    2017-12-01

    A new 3-D S-wave model of the North American upper mantle is constructed from a large number of inter-station phase and amplitude measurements of surface waves. A fully nonlinear waveform fitting method by Hamada and Yoshizawa (2015, GJI) is applied to USArray for measuring inter-station phase speeds and amplitude ratios of the fundamental-mode Rayleigh and Love waves. We employed the seismic events from 2007 - 2014 with Mw 6.0 or greater, and collected a large-number of inter-station phase speed data (about 130,000 for Rayleigh and 85,000 for Love waves) and amplitude ratio data (about 75,000 for Rayleigh waves) in a period range from 30 to 130 s for fundamental-mode surface waves. Typical inter-station distances are mostly in a range between 300 and 800 km, which can be of help in enhancing the lateral resolution of a regional tomography model. We first invert Rayleigh-wave phase speeds and amplitudes simultaneously for phase speed maps as well as local amplification factors at receiver locations. The isotropic 3-D S-wave model constructed from these phase speed maps incorporating both phase and amplitude data exhibits better recovery of the strength of velocity perturbations. In particular, local tectonic features characterized by strong velocity gradients, such as Rio Grande Rift, Colorado Plateau and New Madrid Seismic Zone, are more enhanced than conventional models derived from phase information only. The results indicate that surface-wave amplitude, which is sensitive to the second derivative of phase speeds, can be of great help in retrieving small-scale heterogeneity in the upper mantle. We also obtain a radial anisotropy model from the simultaneous inversions of Rayleigh and Love waves (without amplitude information). The model has shown faster SH wave speed anomalies than SV above the depth of 100 km, particularly in tectonically active regions in the western and central U.S., representing the effects of current and former tectonic processes on

  14. Scattering amplitudes in gauge theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henn, Johannes M. [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States). School of Natural Sciences; Plefka, Jan C. [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik

    2014-03-01

    First monographical text on this fundamental topic. Course-tested, pedagogical and self-contained exposition. Includes exercises and solutions. At the fundamental level, the interactions of elementary particles are described by quantum gauge field theory. The quantitative implications of these interactions are captured by scattering amplitudes, traditionally computed using Feynman diagrams. In the past decade tremendous progress has been made in our understanding of and computational abilities with regard to scattering amplitudes in gauge theories, going beyond the traditional textbook approach. These advances build upon on-shell methods that focus on the analytic structure of the amplitudes, as well as on their recently discovered hidden symmetries. In fact, when expressed in suitable variables the amplitudes are much simpler than anticipated and hidden patterns emerge. These modern methods are of increasing importance in phenomenological applications arising from the need for high-precision predictions for the experiments carried out at the Large Hadron Collider, as well as in foundational mathematical physics studies on the S-matrix in quantum field theory. Bridging the gap between introductory courses on quantum field theory and state-of-the-art research, these concise yet self-contained and course-tested lecture notes are well-suited for a one-semester graduate level course or as a self-study guide for anyone interested in fundamental aspects of quantum field theory and its applications. The numerous exercises and solutions included will help readers to embrace and apply the material presented in the main text.

  15. Scattering amplitudes in gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henn, Johannes M.; Plefka, Jan C.

    2014-01-01

    First monographical text on this fundamental topic. Course-tested, pedagogical and self-contained exposition. Includes exercises and solutions. At the fundamental level, the interactions of elementary particles are described by quantum gauge field theory. The quantitative implications of these interactions are captured by scattering amplitudes, traditionally computed using Feynman diagrams. In the past decade tremendous progress has been made in our understanding of and computational abilities with regard to scattering amplitudes in gauge theories, going beyond the traditional textbook approach. These advances build upon on-shell methods that focus on the analytic structure of the amplitudes, as well as on their recently discovered hidden symmetries. In fact, when expressed in suitable variables the amplitudes are much simpler than anticipated and hidden patterns emerge. These modern methods are of increasing importance in phenomenological applications arising from the need for high-precision predictions for the experiments carried out at the Large Hadron Collider, as well as in foundational mathematical physics studies on the S-matrix in quantum field theory. Bridging the gap between introductory courses on quantum field theory and state-of-the-art research, these concise yet self-contained and course-tested lecture notes are well-suited for a one-semester graduate level course or as a self-study guide for anyone interested in fundamental aspects of quantum field theory and its applications. The numerous exercises and solutions included will help readers to embrace and apply the material presented in the main text.

  16. Study of inelastic decay of amplitudes in 49V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, B.H.

    1980-01-01

    Inelastic decay amplitudes from d-wave resonances in 49 V were obtained for 80 resonances in the proton energy range 2.2 to 3.1 MeV. With the 3 MV Van de Graaff accelerator and high resolution system at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, an overall resolution of 350 eV was obtained. The experiment consisted of measurements of the angular distributions of the inelastically scattered protons and the subsequent deexcitation gamma rays. Forty five resonances were assigned J/sup π/ = 5/2 + , while thirty five resonances were assigned 3/2 + . The magnitudes of three inelastic decay amplitudes and the relative signs between these three amplitudes were determined. Large amplitude correlations were observed; the data are in the striking disagreement with the extreme statistical model. The present results provide the first explicit test of the multivariate reduced width amplitude distribution of Krieger and Porter; the agreement is excellent. The physical origin of these channel correlations has not yet been explained

  17. Control of Respiratory Motion by Hypnosis Intervention during Radiotherapy of Lung Cancer I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongmao Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The uncertain position of lung tumor during radiotherapy compromises the treatment effect. To effectively control respiratory motion during radiotherapy of lung cancer without any side effects, a novel control scheme, hypnosis, has been introduced in lung cancer treatment. In order to verify the suggested method, six volunteers were selected with a wide range of distribution of age, weight, and chest circumference. A set of experiments have been conducted for each volunteer, under the guidance of the professional hypnotist. All the experiments were repeated in the same environmental condition. The amplitude of respiration has been recorded under the normal state and hypnosis, respectively. Experimental results show that the respiration motion of volunteers in hypnosis has smaller and more stable amplitudes than in normal state. That implies that the hypnosis intervention can be an alternative way for respiratory control, which can effectively reduce the respiratory amplitude and increase the stability of respiratory cycle. The proposed method will find useful application in image-guided radiotherapy.

  18. Control of Respiratory Motion by Hypnosis Intervention during Radiotherapy of Lung Cancer I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jie; Xie, Yaoqin

    2013-01-01

    The uncertain position of lung tumor during radiotherapy compromises the treatment effect. To effectively control respiratory motion during radiotherapy of lung cancer without any side effects, a novel control scheme, hypnosis, has been introduced in lung cancer treatment. In order to verify the suggested method, six volunteers were selected with a wide range of distribution of age, weight, and chest circumference. A set of experiments have been conducted for each volunteer, under the guidance of the professional hypnotist. All the experiments were repeated in the same environmental condition. The amplitude of respiration has been recorded under the normal state and hypnosis, respectively. Experimental results show that the respiration motion of volunteers in hypnosis has smaller and more stable amplitudes than in normal state. That implies that the hypnosis intervention can be an alternative way for respiratory control, which can effectively reduce the respiratory amplitude and increase the stability of respiratory cycle. The proposed method will find useful application in image-guided radiotherapy. PMID:24093100

  19. A novel respiratory motion compensation strategy combining gated beam delivery and mean target position concept - A compromise between small safety margins and long duty cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guckenberger, Matthias; Kavanagh, Anthony; Webb, Steve; Brada, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a novel respiratory motion compensation strategy combining gated beam delivery with the mean target position (MTP) concept for pulmonary stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Materials and methods: Four motion compensation strategies were compared for 10 targets with motion amplitudes between 6 mm and 31 mm: the internal target volume concept (plan ITV ); the MTP concept where safety margins were adapted based on 4D dose accumulation (plan MTP ); gated beam delivery without margins for motion compensation (plan gated ); a novel approach combining gating and the MTP concept (plan gated and MTP ). Results: For 5/10 targets with an average motion amplitude of 9 mm, the differences in the mean lung dose (MLD) between plan gated and plan MTP were gated and MTP . Despite significantly shorter duty cycles, plan gated reduced the MLD by gated and MTP . The MLD was increased by 18% in plan MTP compared to that of plan gated and MTP . Conclusions: For pulmonary targets with motion amplitudes >10-15 mm, the combination of gating and the MTP concept allowed small safety margins with simultaneous long duty cycles.

  20. Observation of terrestrial orbital motion using the cosmic-ray Compton-Getting effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutler, D.J.; Groom, D.E.

    1986-01-01

    Using underground observations, the authors have found a small diurnal amplitude modulation of the cosmic-ray muon intensity which agrees in amplitude and phase with a first-order relativistic effect due to the Earth's motion, as discussed by Compton and Getting :1935, Phys. Rev., 47, 817:. Analysis of the arrival times of 5x10 8 muons during a period of 5.4 yr yields a fractional amplitude variation of 2.5sub(-0.6) sup(+0.7) x 10 -4 , with a maximum near dawn, at 08:18+-1.0 h local mean solar time (LT). The expected amplitude is 3.40 x 10 -4 , with the maximum at 06:00LT. (author)

  1. Assessment of the Global and Regional Land Hydrosphere and Its Impact on the Balance of the Geophysical Excitation Function of Polar Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wińska, Małgorzata; Nastula, Jolanta; Kołaczek, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    The impact of continental hydrological loading from land water, snow and ice on polar motion excitation, calculated as hydrological angular momentum (HAM), is difficult to estimate, and not as much is known about it as about atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) and oceanic angular momentum (OAM). In this paper, regional hydrological excitations to polar motion are investigated using monthly terrestrial water storage data derived from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission and from the five models of land hydrology. The results show that the areas where the variance shows large variability are similar for the different models of land hydrology and for the GRACE data. Areas which have a small amplitude on the maps make an important contribution to the global hydrological excitation function of polar motion. The comparison of geodetic residuals and global hydrological excitation functions of polar motion shows that none of the hydrological excitation has enough energy to significantly improve the agreement between the observed geodetic excitation and geophysical ones.

  2. Nuclear spectroscopy and quantum chaos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakata, Fumihiko; Marumori, Toshio; Hashimoto, Yukio; Yamamoto, Yoshifumi; Tsukuma, Hidehiko; Iwasawa, Kazuo.

    1990-05-01

    In this paper, a recent development of INS-TSUKUBA joint research project on large-amplitude collective motion is summerized. The classical theory of nuclear collective dynamics formulated within the time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory is recapitulated and decisive role of the level crossing in the single-particle dynamics on the order-to-chaos transition of collective motion is discussed in detail. Extending the basic idea of the classical theory, we discuss a quantum theory of nuclear collective dynamics which allows us to properly define a concept of quantum chaos for each eigenfunction. By using numerical calculation, we illustrate what the quantum chaos for each eigenfunction means and its relation to usual definition based on the random matrix theory. (author)

  3. Robust automated classification of first-motion polarities for focal mechanism determination with machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Z. E.; Meier, M. A.; Hauksson, E.

    2017-12-01

    Accurate first-motion polarities are essential for determining earthquake focal mechanisms, but are difficult to measure automatically because of picking errors and signal to noise issues. Here we develop an algorithm for reliable automated classification of first-motion polarities using machine learning algorithms. A classifier is designed to identify whether the first-motion polarity is up, down, or undefined by examining the waveform data directly. We first improve the accuracy of automatic P-wave onset picks by maximizing a weighted signal/noise ratio for a suite of candidate picks around the automatic pick. We then use the waveform amplitudes before and after the optimized pick as features for the classification. We demonstrate the method's potential by training and testing the classifier on tens of thousands of hand-made first-motion picks by the Southern California Seismic Network. The classifier assigned the same polarity as chosen by an analyst in more than 94% of the records. We show that the method is generalizable to a variety of learning algorithms, including neural networks and random forest classifiers. The method is suitable for automated processing of large seismic waveform datasets, and can potentially be used in real-time applications, e.g. for improving the source characterizations of earthquake early warning algorithms.

  4. Development of a Shipboard Remote Control and Telemetry Experimental System for Large-Scale Model’s Motions and Loads Measurement in Realistic Sea Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jialong Jiao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Wave-induced motion and load responses are important criteria for ship performance evaluation. Physical experiments have long been an indispensable tool in the predictions of ship’s navigation state, speed, motions, accelerations, sectional loads and wave impact pressure. Currently, majority of the experiments are conducted in laboratory tank environment, where the wave environments are different from the realistic sea waves. In this paper, a laboratory tank testing system for ship motions and loads measurement is reviewed and reported first. Then, a novel large-scale model measurement technique is developed based on the laboratory testing foundations to obtain accurate motion and load responses of ships in realistic sea conditions. For this purpose, a suite of advanced remote control and telemetry experimental system was developed in-house to allow for the implementation of large-scale model seakeeping measurement at sea. The experimental system includes a series of technique sensors, e.g., the Global Position System/Inertial Navigation System (GPS/INS module, course top, optical fiber sensors, strain gauges, pressure sensors and accelerometers. The developed measurement system was tested by field experiments in coastal seas, which indicates that the proposed large-scale model testing scheme is capable and feasible. Meaningful data including ocean environment parameters, ship navigation state, motions and loads were obtained through the sea trial campaign.

  5. Large Amplitude Motions in Polyatomic Molecule Spectra: Intramolecular Vibrational Redistribution and Isomerization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Field, Robert

    1997-01-01

    Through Stimulated Emission Pumping (SEP) studies of highly excited vibrational levels of the electronic ground state of HCP, the spectroscopic signatures of bond breaking isomer/atom (HCP right arrow HPC...

  6. Seismic design technology for breeder reactor structures. Volume 1. Special topics in earthquake ground motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, D.P.

    1983-04-01

    This report is divided into twelve chapters: seismic hazard analysis procedures, statistical and probabilistic considerations, vertical ground motion characteristics, vertical ground response spectrum shapes, effects of inclined rock strata on site response, correlation of ground response spectra with intensity, intensity attenuation relationships, peak ground acceleration in the very mean field, statistical analysis of response spectral amplitudes, contributions of body and surface waves, evaluation of ground motion characteristics, and design earthquake motions

  7. Charmless B{sub (s)} → VV decays in factorization-assisted topological-amplitude approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Qi-An [CAS, Institute of High Energy Physics, P.O. Box 918, Beijing (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, School of Physics, Beijing (China); Li, Ying [Yantai University, Department of Physics, Yantai (China); CAS, State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Beijing (China); Lue, Cai-Dian [CAS, Institute of High Energy Physics, P.O. Box 918, Beijing (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, School of Physics, Beijing (China); CAS, State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Beijing (China)

    2017-05-15

    Within the factorization-assisted topological-amplitude approach, we studied the 33 charmless B{sub (s)} → VV decays, where V stands for a light vector meson. According to the flavor flows, the amplitude of each process can be decomposed into eight different topologies. In contrast to the conventional flavor diagrammatic approach, we further factorize each topological amplitude into decay constant, form factors and unknown universal parameters. By χ{sup 2} fitting 46 experimental observables, we extracted 10 theoretical parameters with χ{sup 2} per degree of freedom around 2. Using the fitted parameters, we calculated the branching fractions, polarization fractions, CP asymmetries and relative phases between polarization amplitudes of each decay mode. The decay channels dominated by tree diagram have large branching fractions and large longitudinal polarization fraction. The branching fractions and longitudinal polarization fractions of color-suppressed decays become smaller. Current experimental data of large transverse polarization fractions in the penguin dominant decay channels can be explained by only one transverse amplitude of penguin annihilation diagram. Our predictions of the not yet measured channels can be tested in the ongoing LHCb experiment and the Belle-II experiment in the future. (orig.)

  8. Two Simon tasks with different sources of conflict: an ERP study of motion- and location-based compatibility effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galashan, Daniela; Wittfoth, Matthias; Fehr, Thorsten; Herrmann, Manfred

    2008-07-01

    Behavioral and electrophysiological correlates of two Simon tasks were examined using comparable stimuli but different task-irrelevant and conflict-inducing stimulus features. Whereas target shape was always the task-relevant stimulus attribute, either target location (location-based task) or motion direction within the target stimuli (motion-based task) was used as a source of conflict. Data from ten healthy participants who performed both tasks are presented. In the motion-based task the incompatible condition showed smaller P300 amplitudes at Pz than the compatible condition and the location-based task yielded a trend towards a reduced P300 amplitude in the incompatible condition. For both tasks, no P300 latency differences between the conditions were found at Pz. The results suggest that the motion-based task elicits behavioral and electrophysiological effects comparable with regular Simon tasks. As all stimuli in the motion-based Simon task were presented centrally the present data strongly argue against the attention-shifting account as an explanatory approach.

  9. The wrinkle-like N-solitons for the thermophoretic motion equation through graphene sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yu-Lan; Li, Bang-Qing

    2018-03-01

    The main work is focused on the thermophoretic motion equation, which was derived from wrinkle wave motions in substrate-supported graphene sheets. Via the bilinear method, a class of wrinkle-like N-soliton solutions is constructed. The one-soliton, two-soliton and three-soliton are observed graphically. The shape, amplitude, open direction and width of the N-solitons are controllable through certain parameters.

  10. Brain Image Motion Correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl; Benjaminsen, Claus; Larsen, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    The application of motion tracking is wide, including: industrial production lines, motion interaction in gaming, computer-aided surgery and motion correction in medical brain imaging. Several devices for motion tracking exist using a variety of different methodologies. In order to use such devices...... offset and tracking noise in medical brain imaging. The data are generated from a phantom mounted on a rotary stage and have been collected using a Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph for positron emission tomography. During acquisition the phantom was tracked with our latest tracking prototype...

  11. The quantum mechanical measuring process as a scattering phenomenon inducing a collective coherent motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Requardt, M.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper we want to discuss the quantum mechanical measuring process within the realm of many body quantum theory. Our starting point is to consider this process as a special scattering phenomenon where within one of the partners, i.e. the many body measuring device, a collective coherent motion is induced by the interaction with the microobject. We start our investigation with the many body system having a large but finite number N of degrees of freedom which is the real situation. We then study in detail what will happen in the limit N->infinite, however emphasizing that this transition is actually only performed in the mind of the observer. This implies that certain tail events together with their phase correlations have to be truncated. We show that the dichotomy 'pure state' versus 'mixture' as outgoing scattering states will vanish in this limit in so far as it has no observable consequences provided one is only interested in the state of the microobject. Furthermore, we discuss the role of the observer, the notion of 'event', the relation between single preparation and ensemble picture, and the so-called 'reduction of the wave function' in the light of our approach, i.e. explaining the phenomena accompanying the measuring process in terms of many body quantum theory. (orig.)

  12. Scaling laws and accurate small-amplitude stationary solution for the motion of a planar vortex filament in the Cartesian form of the local induction approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gorder, Robert A

    2013-04-01

    We provide a formulation of the local induction approximation (LIA) for the motion of a vortex filament in the Cartesian reference frame (the extrinsic coordinate system) which allows for scaling of the reference coordinate. For general monotone scalings of the reference coordinate, we derive an equation for the planar solution to the derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equation governing the LIA. We proceed to solve this equation perturbatively in small amplitude through an application of multiple-scales analysis, which allows for accurate computation of the period of the planar vortex filament. The perturbation result is shown to agree strongly with numerical simulations, and we also relate this solution back to the solution obtained in the arclength reference frame (the intrinsic coordinate system). Finally, we discuss nonmonotone coordinate scalings and their application for finding self-intersections of vortex filaments. These self-intersecting vortex filaments are likely unstable and collapse into other structures or dissipate completely.

  13. Comparison of Nonlinear Model Results Using Modified Recorded and Synthetic Ground Motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spears, Robert E.; Wilkins, J. Kevin

    2011-01-01

    A study has been performed that compares results of nonlinear model runs using two sets of earthquake ground motion time histories that have been modified to fit the same design response spectra. The time histories include applicable modified recorded earthquake ground motion time histories and synthetic ground motion time histories. The modified recorded earthquake ground motion time histories are modified from time history records that are selected based on consistent magnitude and distance. The synthetic ground motion time histories are generated using appropriate Fourier amplitude spectrums, Arias intensity, and drift correction. All of the time history modification is performed using the same algorithm to fit the design response spectra. The study provides data to demonstrate that properly managed synthetic ground motion time histories are reasonable for use in nonlinear seismic analysis.

  14. Cosmological constraints on the amplitude of relic gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novosyadlij, B.; Apunevich, S.

    2005-01-01

    The evolution of the amplitude of relic gravitational waves (RGW) generated in early Universe has been analyzed. The analytical approximation is presented for angular power spectrum of cosmic microwave background anisotropies caused by gravitational waves through Sachs-Wolfe effect. The estimate of the most probable value for this amplitude was obtained on the basis of observation data on cosmic microwave background anisotropies from COBE, WMAP and BOOMERanG experiments along with large-scale structure observations

  15. Unbound motion on a Schwarzschild background: Practical approaches to frequency domain computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Seth

    2018-03-01

    Gravitational perturbations due to a point particle moving on a static black hole background are naturally described in Regge-Wheeler gauge. The first-order field equations reduce to a single master wave equation for each radiative mode. The master function satisfying this wave equation is a linear combination of the metric perturbation amplitudes with a source term arising from the stress-energy tensor of the point particle. The original master functions were found by Regge and Wheeler (odd parity) and Zerilli (even parity). Subsequent work by Moncrief and then Cunningham, Price and Moncrief introduced new master variables which allow time domain reconstruction of the metric perturbation amplitudes. Here, I explore the relationship between these different functions and develop a general procedure for deriving new higher-order master functions from ones already known. The benefit of higher-order functions is that their source terms always converge faster at large distance than their lower-order counterparts. This makes for a dramatic improvement in both the speed and accuracy of frequency domain codes when analyzing unbound motion.

  16. Coupling dynamics in speech gestures: amplitude and rate influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lieshout, Pascal H H M

    2017-08-01

    Speech is a complex oral motor function that involves multiple articulators that need to be coordinated in space and time at relatively high movement speeds. How this is accomplished remains an important and largely unresolved empirical question. From a coordination dynamics perspective, coordination involves the assembly of coordinative units that are characterized by inherently stable coupling patterns that act as attractor states for task-specific actions. In the motor control literature, one particular model formulated by Haken et al. (Biol Cybern 51(5):347-356, 1985) or HKB has received considerable attention in the way it can account for changes in the nature and stability of specific coordination patterns between limbs or between limbs and external stimuli. In this model (and related versions), movement amplitude is considered a critical factor in the formation of these patterns. Several studies have demonstrated its role for bimanual coordination and similar types of tasks, but for speech motor control such studies are lacking. The current study describes a systematic approach to evaluate the impact of movement amplitude and movement duration on coordination stability in the production of bilabial and tongue body gestures for specific vowel-consonant-vowel strings. The vowel combinations that were used induced a natural contrast in movement amplitude at three speaking rate conditions (slow, habitual, fast). Data were collected on ten young adults using electromagnetic articulography, recording movement data from lips and tongue with high temporal and spatial precision. The results showed that with small movement amplitudes there is a decrease in coordination stability, independent from movement duration. These findings were found to be robust across all individuals and are interpreted as further evidence that principles of coupling dynamics operate in the oral motor control system similar to other motor systems and can be explained in terms of coupling

  17. Spatio-temporal characteristics of large scale motions in a turbulent boundary layer from direct wall shear stress measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabon, Rommel; Barnard, Casey; Ukeiley, Lawrence; Sheplak, Mark

    2016-11-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) and fluctuating wall shear stress experiments were performed on a flat plate turbulent boundary layer (TBL) under zero pressure gradient conditions. The fluctuating wall shear stress was measured using a microelectromechanical 1mm × 1mm floating element capacitive shear stress sensor (CSSS) developed at the University of Florida. The experiments elucidated the imprint of the organized motions in a TBL on the wall shear stress through its direct measurement. Spatial autocorrelation of the streamwise velocity from the PIV snapshots revealed large scale motions that scale on the order of boundary layer thickness. However, the captured inclination angle was lower than that determined using the classic method by means of wall shear stress and hot-wire anemometry (HWA) temporal cross-correlations and a frozen field hypothesis using a convection velocity. The current study suggests the large size of these motions begins to degrade the applicability of the frozen field hypothesis for the time resolved HWA experiments. The simultaneous PIV and CSSS measurements are also used for spatial reconstruction of the velocity field during conditionally sampled intense wall shear stress events. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1315138.

  18. Internal friction of flux motion in Hg-system high-Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, W.; Zhu, J.S.; Shao, H.M.; Li, J.; Wang, Y.N.

    1996-01-01

    The internal friction(IF) and modulus as functions of temperature were measured for several Hg-system high-Tc superconductors(Hg1201, Hg1223, Hg1223 doped with Fe and Pb), under the applied magnetic field, with vibrating reed technique. An IF peak associated with flux motion can be found below Tc for all samples. The temperature of the IF peak increases with reducing vibrating amplitude. This amplitude dependence of IF indicates that the flux motion is characterized by nonlinear behavior. No apparent shift of IF peak position can be detected by varying the frequency in the range from 10 2 Hz to 10 3 Hz. Furthermore, the IF peak height satisfies a scaling law Q -1 ∝ω -n . This may be originated from phase transition of flux line lattice(FLL) rather than a thermally activated diffusion process. (orig.)

  19. Assessment of potential strong ground motions in the city of Rome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Malagnini

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available A methodology is used which combines stochastic generation of random series with a finite-difference technique to estimate the expected horizontal ground motion for the city of Rome as induced by a large earthquake in the Central Apennines. In this approach, source properties and long-path propagation are modelled through observed spectra of ground motion in the region, while the effects of the near-surface geology in the city are simulated by means of a finite-difference technique applied to 2-D models including elastic and anelastic properties of geologic materials and topographic variations. The parameters commonly used for earthquake engineering purposes are estimated from the simulated time histories of horizontal ground motion. We focus our attention on peak ground acceleration and velocity, and on the integral of the squared acceleration and velocity (that are proportional to the Arias intensity and seismic energy flux, respectively. Response spectra are analyzed as well. Parameter variations along 2-D profiles visualize the effects of the small-scale geological heterogeneities and topography irregularities on ground motion in the case of a strong earthquake. Interestingly, the largest amplification of peak ground acceleration and Arias intensity does not necessarily occur at the same sites where peak ground velocity and flux of seismic energy reach their highest values, depending on the frequency band of amplification. A magnitude 7 earthquake at a distance of 100 km results in peak ground accelerations ranging from 30 to 70 gals while peak ground velocities are estimated to vary from 5 to 7 cm/s; moreover, simulated time histories of horizontal ground motion yield amplitudes of 5% damped pseudovelocity response spectra as large as 15-20 cm/s for frequencies from 1to 3 Hz. In this frequency band, the mean value is 7 cm/s for firm sites and ranges from 10 to 13 cm/s for soil sites. All these results are in good agreement with predictions

  20. Wobbling motion in high spin states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Naoki

    1982-01-01

    By generalizing the cranking model, interwoven motions of collective and non-collective rotation of nuclei are treated as three dimensional non-uniform rotations including precession and wobbling. Classical trajectories are obtained for the + j vector + = 30 h/2π sphere. A method of quantization for wobbling motions is discussed and is applied to estimate excitation energies. (author)

  1. Large-scale Vertical Motions, Intensity Change and Precipitation Associated with Land falling Hurricane Katrina over the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, S. R.; Kwembe, T.; Zhang, Z.

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the possible relationship between the large- scale heat fluxes and intensity change associated with the landfall of Hurricane Katrina. After reaching the category 5 intensity on August 28th , 2005 over the central Gulf of Mexico, Katrina weekend to category 3 before making landfall (August 29th , 2005) on the Louisiana coast with the maximum sustained winds of over 110 knots. We also examined the vertical motions associated with the intensity change of the hurricane. The data for Convective Available Potential Energy for water vapor (CAPE), sea level pressure and wind speed were obtained from the Atmospheric Soundings, and NOAA National Hurricane Center (NHC), respectively for the period August 24 to September 3, 2005. We also computed vertical motions using CAPE values. The study showed that the large-scale heat fluxes reached maximum (7960W/m2) with the central pressure 905mb. The Convective Available Potential Energy and the vertical motions peaked 3-5 days before landfall. The large atmospheric vertical motions associated with the land falling hurricane Katrina produced severe weather including thunderstorm, tornadoes, storm surge and floods Numerical model (WRF/ARW) with data assimilations have been used for this research to investigate the model's performances on hurricane tracks and intensities associated with the hurricane Katrina, which began to strengthen until reaching Category 5 on 28 August 2005. The model was run on a doubly nested domain centered over the central Gulf of Mexico, with grid spacing of 90 km and 30 km for 6 hr periods, from August 28th to August 30th. The model output was compared with the observations and is capable of simulating the surface features, intensity change and track associated with hurricane Katrina.

  2. Visual motion transforms visual space representations similarly throughout the human visual hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Ben M; Dumoulin, Serge O

    2016-02-15

    Several studies demonstrate that visual stimulus motion affects neural receptive fields and fMRI response amplitudes. Here we unite results of these two approaches and extend them by examining the effects of visual motion on neural position preferences throughout the hierarchy of human visual field maps. We measured population receptive field (pRF) properties using high-field fMRI (7T), characterizing position preferences simultaneously over large regions of the visual cortex. We measured pRFs properties using sine wave gratings in stationary apertures, moving at various speeds in either the direction of pRF measurement or the orthogonal direction. We find direction- and speed-dependent changes in pRF preferred position and size in all visual field maps examined, including V1, V3A, and the MT+ map TO1. These effects on pRF properties increase up the hierarchy of visual field maps. However, both within and between visual field maps the extent of pRF changes was approximately proportional to pRF size. This suggests that visual motion transforms the representation of visual space similarly throughout the visual hierarchy. Visual motion can also produce an illusory displacement of perceived stimulus position. We demonstrate perceptual displacements using the same stimulus configuration. In contrast to effects on pRF properties, perceptual displacements show only weak effects of motion speed, with far larger speed-independent effects. We describe a model where low-level mechanisms could underlie the observed effects on neural position preferences. We conclude that visual motion induces similar transformations of visuo-spatial representations throughout the visual hierarchy, which may arise through low-level mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Longitudinal collective echoes in coasting particle beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Al-Khateeb

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Longitudinal ballistic and collective beam echoes with diffusion effects are investigated theoretically. In the presence of the space-charge impedance, the collective echo amplitude is obtained as a closed form expression. In contrast to the ballistic case, the collective echo amplitude consists of one maximum at time t_{echo}. The echo amplitude grows up and damps down with a rate proportional to the Landau damping rate of space-charge waves. The effect of weak diffusion is found to modify the ballistic and the collective echo amplitudes in the same manner. This effect of diffusion was confirmed using a “noiseless,” grid-based simulation code. As a first application the amount of numerical diffusion in our simulation code was determined using the echo effect.

  4. SU-F-T-636: Comprehensive Approach to Motion Assessment for Liver and Pancreas SBRT Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halvorsen, P; Iftimia, I; Hunter, K [Lahey Hospital and Medical Center, Burlington, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Our past practice for liver and pancreas SBRT consisted of free breathing (FB) with gated treatment delivery using a 30-70% phase window. We have recently adopted an assessment method leading to individualized motion management to minimize target motion. We present our results from 47 patients treated with this new approach. Methods: We perform an initial patient coaching and assessment session in our conventional simulator suite to observe the motion of the implanted fiducials with FB anterior and lateral 20-second cine acquisitions. The physician decides whether to attempt inhale or exhale breath-hold (BH). The patient is coached while observing with cine to ascertain their ability to achieve the desired BH mode for long periods as needed for treatment delivery. If the patient cannot comply, a FB approach is adopted using gating or simple ITV method (for patients without fiducials). After achieving a patient-specific motion management mode, we perform CT-simulation using the Varian RPM system to reproduce the chosen mode and record a reference session for treatment delivery. For pre-treatment imaging, the fiducials are observed under fluoro while coaching the patient. Results: Of 47 SBRT cases analyzed, 32 were liver and 15 were pancreas. The chosen techniques were: 32 exhale BH (12 with abdominal compression), 7 FB gated, 4 inhale BH, and 4 FB ITV. Maximum fiducial motion amplitude was 5 mm for the FB gated patients, and less than 5 mm for all BH patients with most able to achieve a maximum amplitude of 3 mm. Conclusion: This study showed that an individualized motion management approach can reduce the target volume and, therefore, the volume of irradiated healthy tissue from liver or pancreas SBRT. Effective coaching is essential in achieving consistent BH with 3 mm amplitude. The fluoro/cine session is helpful in establishing the right coaching approach for each patient.

  5. SU-F-T-636: Comprehensive Approach to Motion Assessment for Liver and Pancreas SBRT Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halvorsen, P; Iftimia, I; Hunter, K

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Our past practice for liver and pancreas SBRT consisted of free breathing (FB) with gated treatment delivery using a 30-70% phase window. We have recently adopted an assessment method leading to individualized motion management to minimize target motion. We present our results from 47 patients treated with this new approach. Methods: We perform an initial patient coaching and assessment session in our conventional simulator suite to observe the motion of the implanted fiducials with FB anterior and lateral 20-second cine acquisitions. The physician decides whether to attempt inhale or exhale breath-hold (BH). The patient is coached while observing with cine to ascertain their ability to achieve the desired BH mode for long periods as needed for treatment delivery. If the patient cannot comply, a FB approach is adopted using gating or simple ITV method (for patients without fiducials). After achieving a patient-specific motion management mode, we perform CT-simulation using the Varian RPM system to reproduce the chosen mode and record a reference session for treatment delivery. For pre-treatment imaging, the fiducials are observed under fluoro while coaching the patient. Results: Of 47 SBRT cases analyzed, 32 were liver and 15 were pancreas. The chosen techniques were: 32 exhale BH (12 with abdominal compression), 7 FB gated, 4 inhale BH, and 4 FB ITV. Maximum fiducial motion amplitude was 5 mm for the FB gated patients, and less than 5 mm for all BH patients with most able to achieve a maximum amplitude of 3 mm. Conclusion: This study showed that an individualized motion management approach can reduce the target volume and, therefore, the volume of irradiated healthy tissue from liver or pancreas SBRT. Effective coaching is essential in achieving consistent BH with 3 mm amplitude. The fluoro/cine session is helpful in establishing the right coaching approach for each patient.

  6. Whole study of nuclear matter collective motion in central collisions of heavy ions of the FOPI detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendarag, A.

    1999-01-01

    In this work we study the collective phenomena in the central collisions of heavy ions for the Au + Au, Xe + CsI and Ni + Ni systems at incident energies from 150 to 400 MeV/nucleon with the data of the FOPI detector. In order to describe completely the flow of the nuclear matter, we fit the double differential momentum distributions with two-dimensional Gaussian. We study the characteristic parameters of the collective flow (flow range, aspect ratios, flow parameter) versus the charge and the mass of the fragments as well as the incident energy and the centrality of the collisions. The transverse energy is used for selecting the central collisions. The method of the Gaussian fits requires also to reconstruct the reaction plane of the event. Then we correct the parameters for the finite number of particles effects and account for the influence of the acceptance of the detector. We confirm the importance of the thermal motion for the light charge or mass fragments and, conversely, the predominance of the collective motion for the heavy fragments. A common flow angle for all the types of particles is highlighted for the first time, demonstrating the power of the method of the Gaussian fits; The evolution of the other parameters confirms the observations done with other methods of flow analysis. These results should contribute to put constraints on the collision models and to enlarge our knowledge of the properties of the nuclear matter. (author)

  7. Color guided amplitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broedel, Johannes [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Dixon, Lance J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Amplitudes in gauge thoeries obtain contributions from color and kinematics. While these two parts of the amplitude seem to exhibit different symmetry structures, it turns out that they can be reorganized in a way to behave equally, which leads to the so-called color-kinematic dual representations of amplitudes. Astonishingly, the existence of those representations allows squaring to related gravitational theories right away. Contrary to the Kawaii-Levellen-Tye relations, which have been used to relate gauge theories and gravity previously, this method is applicable not only to tree amplitudes but also at loop level. In this talk, the basic technique is introduced followed by a discussion of the existence of color-kinematic dual representations for amplitudes derived from gauge theory actions which are deformed by higher-operator insertions. In addition, it is commented on the implications for deformed gravitational theories.

  8. Measuring Accurate Body Parameters of Dressed Humans with Large-Scale Motion Using a Kinect Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidan Du

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-contact human body measurement plays an important role in surveillance, physical healthcare, on-line business and virtual fitting. Current methods for measuring the human body without physical contact usually cannot handle humans wearing clothes, which limits their applicability in public environments. In this paper, we propose an effective solution that can measure accurate parameters of the human body with large-scale motion from a Kinect sensor, assuming that the people are wearing clothes. Because motion can drive clothes attached to the human body loosely or tightly, we adopt a space-time analysis to mine the information across the posture variations. Using this information, we recover the human body, regardless of the effect of clothes, and measure the human body parameters accurately. Experimental results show that our system can perform more accurate parameter estimation on the human body than state-of-the-art methods.

  9. MO-G-18C-03: Evaluation of Deformable Image Registration for Lung Motion Estimation Using Hyperpolarized Gas Tagging MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Q; Zhang, Y; Liu, Y; Hu, L; Yin, F; Cai, J; Miller, W

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Hyperpolarized gas (HP) tagging MRI is a novel imaging technique for direct measurement of lung motion during breathing. This study aims to quantitatively evaluate the accuracy of deformable image registration (DIR) in lung motion estimation using HP tagging MRI as references. Methods: Three healthy subjects were imaged using the HP MR tagging, as well as a high-resolution 3D proton MR sequence (TrueFISP) at the end-of-inhalation (EOI) and the end-of-exhalation (EOE). Ground truth of lung motion and corresponding displacement vector field (tDVF) was derived from HP tagging MRI by manually tracking the displacement of tagging grids between EOI and EOE. Seven different DIR methods were applied to the high-resolution TrueFISP MR images (EOI and EOE) to generate the DIR-based DVFs (dDVF). The DIR methods include Velocity (VEL), MIM, Mirada, multi-grid B-spline from Elastix (MGB) and 3 other algorithms from DIRART toolbox (Double Force Demons (DFD), Improved Lucas-Kanade (ILK), and Iterative Optical Flow (IOF)). All registrations were performed by independent experts. Target registration error (TRE) was calculated as tDVF – dDVF. Analysis was performed for the entire lungs, and separately for the upper and lower lungs. Results: Significant differences between tDVF and dDVF were observed. Besides the DFD and IOF algorithms, all other dDVFs showed similarity in deformation magnitude distribution but away from the ground truth. The average TRE for entire lung ranged 2.5−23.7mm (mean=8.8mm), depending on the DIR method and subject's breathing amplitude. Larger TRE (13.3–23.7mm) was found in subject with larger breathing amplitude of 45.6mm. TRE was greater in lower lung (2.5−33.9 mm, mean=12.4mm) than that in upper lung (2.5−11.9 mm, mean=5.8mm). Conclusion: Significant differences were observed in lung motion estimation between the HP gas tagging MRI method and the DIR methods, especially when lung motion is large. Large variation among different

  10. MO-G-18C-03: Evaluation of Deformable Image Registration for Lung Motion Estimation Using Hyperpolarized Gas Tagging MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Q; Zhang, Y [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Liu, Y [Duke University (United States); Hu, L; Yin, F; Cai, J [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Miller, W [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Hyperpolarized gas (HP) tagging MRI is a novel imaging technique for direct measurement of lung motion during breathing. This study aims to quantitatively evaluate the accuracy of deformable image registration (DIR) in lung motion estimation using HP tagging MRI as references. Methods: Three healthy subjects were imaged using the HP MR tagging, as well as a high-resolution 3D proton MR sequence (TrueFISP) at the end-of-inhalation (EOI) and the end-of-exhalation (EOE). Ground truth of lung motion and corresponding displacement vector field (tDVF) was derived from HP tagging MRI by manually tracking the displacement of tagging grids between EOI and EOE. Seven different DIR methods were applied to the high-resolution TrueFISP MR images (EOI and EOE) to generate the DIR-based DVFs (dDVF). The DIR methods include Velocity (VEL), MIM, Mirada, multi-grid B-spline from Elastix (MGB) and 3 other algorithms from DIRART toolbox (Double Force Demons (DFD), Improved Lucas-Kanade (ILK), and Iterative Optical Flow (IOF)). All registrations were performed by independent experts. Target registration error (TRE) was calculated as tDVF – dDVF. Analysis was performed for the entire lungs, and separately for the upper and lower lungs. Results: Significant differences between tDVF and dDVF were observed. Besides the DFD and IOF algorithms, all other dDVFs showed similarity in deformation magnitude distribution but away from the ground truth. The average TRE for entire lung ranged 2.5−23.7mm (mean=8.8mm), depending on the DIR method and subject's breathing amplitude. Larger TRE (13.3–23.7mm) was found in subject with larger breathing amplitude of 45.6mm. TRE was greater in lower lung (2.5−33.9 mm, mean=12.4mm) than that in upper lung (2.5−11.9 mm, mean=5.8mm). Conclusion: Significant differences were observed in lung motion estimation between the HP gas tagging MRI method and the DIR methods, especially when lung motion is large. Large variation among different

  11. Single-particle dynamics in a nonlinear accelerator lattice: attaining a large tune spread with octupoles in IOTA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipov, S. A.; Nagaitsev, S.; Valishev, A.

    2017-04-01

    Fermilab is constructing the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) as the centerpiece of the Accelerator R&D Program towards high-intensity circular machines. One of the factors limiting the beam intensity in present circular accelerators is collective instabilities, which can be suppressed by a spread of betatron frequencies (tunes) through the Landau damping mechanism or by an external damper, if the instability is slow enough. The spread is usually created by octupole magnets, which introduce the tune dependence on the amplitude and, in some cases, by a chromatic spread (tune dependence on particle's momentum). The introduction of octupoles usually has both beneficial (improved Landau damping) and harmful properties, such as a resonant behavior and a reduction of the dynamic aperture. One of the research goals at the IOTA ring is to achieve a large betatron tune spread, while retaining a large dynamic aperture, using conventional octupole magnets in a special but realistic accelerator configuration. The configuration, although not integrable by design, approximates an autonomous 2D Hamiltonian system. In this paper, we present results of computer simulations of an electron beam in the IOTA by particle tracking and the Frequency Map Analysis. The results show that the ring's octupole magnets can be configured to provide a betatron tune shift of 0.08 (for particles at large amplitudes) with the dynamical aperture of over 20 beam sigma for a 150-MeV electron beam. The influence of the synchrotron motion, lattice errors, and magnet imperfections is insignificant for the parameters and levels of tolerances set by the design of the ring. The described octupole insert could be beneficial for enhancing Landau damping in high intensity machines.

  12. Analysis for the amplitude oscillatory movements of the ship in response to the incidence wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiţu, M. G.; Zăgan, R.; Manea, E.

    2015-11-01

    Event of major accident navigation near offshore drilling rigs remains unacceptably high, known as the complications arising from the problematic of the general motions of the ship sailing under real sea. Dynamic positioning system is an effective instrument used on board of the ships operating in the extraction of oil and gas in the continental shelf of the seas and oceans, being essential that the personnel on board of the vessel can maintain position and operating point or imposed on a route with high precision. By the adoption of a strict safety in terms of handling and positioning of the vessel in the vicinity of the drilling platform, the risk of accidents can be reduced to a minimum. Possibilities in anticipation amplitudes of the oscillatory movements of the ships navigating in real sea, is a challenge for naval architects and OCTOPUS software is a tool used increasingly more in this respect, complementing navigational facilities offered by dynamic positioning systems. This paper presents a study on the amplitudes of the oscillations categories of supply vessels in severe hydro meteorological conditions of navigation. The study provides information on the RAO (Response Amplitude Operator) response operator of the ship, for the amplitude of the roll movements, in some incident wave systems, interpreted using the energy spectrum Jonswap and whose characteristics are known (significant height of the wave, wave period, pulsation of the wave). Ship responses are analyzed according to different positioning of the ship in relation to the wave front (incident angle ranging from 10 to 10 degree from 0 to 180), highlighting the value of the ship roll motion amplitude. For the study, was used, as a tool for modeling and simulation, the features offered by OCTOPUS software that allows the study of the computerized behavior of the ship on the waves, in the real conditions of navigation. Program library was used for both the vessel itself and navigation modeling

  13. Ground Motion Prediction Trends For Eastern North America Based on the Next Generation Attenuation East Ground Motion Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, C. H.; Kutliroff, J.; Dangkua, D.

    2010-12-01

    A five-year Next Generation Attenuation (NGA) East project to develop new ground motion prediction equations for stable continental regions (SCRs), including eastern North America (ENA), has begun at the Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research (PEER) Center funded by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the Department of Energy (DOE). The initial effort focused on database design and collection of appropriate M>4 ENA broadband and accelerograph records to populate the database. Ongoing work has focused on adding records from smaller ENA earthquakes and from other SCRs such as Europe, Australia, and India. Currently, over 6500 horizontal and vertical component records from 60 ENA earthquakes have been collected and prepared (instrument response removed, filtering to acceptable-signal band, determining peak and spectral parameter values, quality assurance, etc.) for the database. Geologic Survey of Canada (GSC) strong motion recordings, previously not available, have also been added to the NGA East database. The additional earthquakes increase the number of ground motion recordings in the 10 - 100 km range, particularly from the 2008 M5.2 Mt. Carmel, IL event, and the 2005 M4.7 Riviere du Loup and 2010 M5.0 Val des Bois earthquakes in Quebec, Canada. The goal is to complete the ENA database and make it available in 2011 followed by a SCR database in 2012. Comparisons of ground motion observations from four recent M5 ENA earthquakes with current ENA ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) suggest that current GMPEs, as a group, reasonably agree with M5 observations at short periods, particularly at distances less than 200 km. However, at one second, current GMPEs over predict M5 ground motion observations. The 2001 M7.6 Bhuj, India, earthquake provides some constraint at large magnitudes, as geology and regional attenuation is analogous to ENA. Cramer and Kumar, 2003, have

  14. Analyses of the mechanisms of amplitude modulation of aero-acoustic wind turbine sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Andreas; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Kragh, Knud Abildgaard

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the source mechanism which cause amplitude modulation of the emitted sound of a wind turbine at large distances from the turbine, named as other amplitude modulation. Measurements of the fluctuating surface pressure on a 2.3MW wind turbine showed a considerable variation over...... give further evidence that transient stall is a main mechanism to cause other amplitude modulation. Wind shear was identified as a critical condition to cause angle of attack variations. Dierent control strategies to mitigate other amplitude modulation were proposed....

  15. Harvesting energy from the motion of human limbs: the design and analysis of an impact-based piezoelectric generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renaud, Michael; Fiorini, Paolo; Van Hoof, Chris; Van Schaijk, Rob

    2009-01-01

    Vibration energy harvesters can replace batteries and serve as clean and renewable energy sources in low-consumption wireless applications. Harvesters delivering sufficient power for sensors operating in an industrial environment have been developed, but difficulties are encountered when the devices to be powered are located on the human body. In this case, classical harvester designs (resonant systems) are not adapted to the low-frequency and high-amplitude characteristics of the motion. For this reason, we propose in this paper an alternative design based on the impact of a moving mass on piezoelectric bending structures. A model of the system is presented and analysed in order to determine the parameters influencing the device performances in terms of energy harvesting. A prototype of the impact harvester is experimentally characterized: for a generator occupying approximately 25 cm 3 and weighing 60 g, an output power of 47 µW was measured across a resistive load when the device was rotated by 180° each second. 600 µW were obtained for a 10 Hz frequency and 10 cm amplitude linear motion. Further optimization of the piezoelectric transducer is possible, allowing a large increase in these values, bringing the power density for the two cases respectively to 10 and 120 µW cm −3

  16. Harvesting energy from the motion of human limbs: the design and analysis of an impact-based piezoelectric generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Michael; Fiorini, Paolo; van Schaijk, Rob; van Hoof, Chris

    2009-03-01

    Vibration energy harvesters can replace batteries and serve as clean and renewable energy sources in low-consumption wireless applications. Harvesters delivering sufficient power for sensors operating in an industrial environment have been developed, but difficulties are encountered when the devices to be powered are located on the human body. In this case, classical harvester designs (resonant systems) are not adapted to the low-frequency and high-amplitude characteristics of the motion. For this reason, we propose in this paper an alternative design based on the impact of a moving mass on piezoelectric bending structures. A model of the system is presented and analysed in order to determine the parameters influencing the device performances in terms of energy harvesting. A prototype of the impact harvester is experimentally characterized: for a generator occupying approximately 25 cm3 and weighing 60 g, an output power of 47 µW was measured across a resistive load when the device was rotated by 180° each second. 600 µW were obtained for a 10 Hz frequency and 10 cm amplitude linear motion. Further optimization of the piezoelectric transducer is possible, allowing a large increase in these values, bringing the power density for the two cases respectively to 10 and 120 µW cm-3.

  17. Fault-tolerant linear optical quantum computing with small-amplitude coherent States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, A P; Ralph, T C; Haselgrove, H L

    2008-01-25

    Quantum computing using two coherent states as a qubit basis is a proposed alternative architecture with lower overheads but has been questioned as a practical way of performing quantum computing due to the fragility of diagonal states with large coherent amplitudes. We show that using error correction only small amplitudes (alpha>1.2) are required for fault-tolerant quantum computing. We study fault tolerance under the effects of small amplitudes and loss using a Monte Carlo simulation. The first encoding level resources are orders of magnitude lower