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Sample records for large pool lmfbr

  1. Large pool LMFBR design. Final report. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wett, J. F.; Churchill, J. R.

    1979-03-01

    The design effort reported is an extension on past design effort and continuous concentration on those parts of the nuclear island unique to a commercial size pool type LMFBR. In particular, the work covers the reactor vessel, deck, rotating plugs, upper and lower internals, internal plenum separator system, IHX, pumps, cold traps, intermediate system layout, containment/confinement system, plot plan, and residual heat removal systems. Preliminary thermal, hydraulic, stress, and system analyses are also presented.

  2. Large electromagnetic pumps. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilman, G.B.

    1976-01-01

    The development of large electromagnetic pumps for the liquid metal heat transfer systems of fission reactors has progressed for a number of years. Such pumps are now planned for fusion reactors and solar plants as well. The Einstein-Szilard (annular) pump has been selected as the preferred configuration. Some of the reasons that electromagnetic pumps may be preferred over mechanical pumps and why the annular configuration was selected are discussed. A detailed electromagnetic analysis of the annular pump, based on slug flow, is presented. The analysis is then used to explore the implications of large size and power on considerations of electromagnetic skin effect, geometric skin effect and the cylindrical geometry.

  3. Hydraulic characteristics in secondary vessel of double pool LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, Izumi; Naohara, Nobuyuki; Nishi, Yoshihisa [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo (Japan). Komae Research Lab.

    1995-06-01

    CRIEPI made a conceptual design study on Metallic Fueled Double Pool LMFBR from 1990 to 1992. In this study, the configuration of the primary and the secondary vessel, and both arrangement and number of the secondary components were selected to realize the simplification of the structure. Flow field of the coolant in the secondary vessel is depend on this design. The objective of this study is to clarify the hydraulic characteristics in the secondary vessel by 1/7 model of water test and analysis and to confirm the validity of this design. Followings are main results. (1) As a result of the water test, it is confirmed that there is no stagnant region in the secondary vessel and there are sufficient mixing effect under steam generators. (2) As a result of the comparison between flow distribution obtained by water test and that by analysis, good agreements are obtained qualitatively. (3) There is no stagnant region near the free surface in the secondary vessel under reactor condition of normal operation. Therefore, a thermal stratification will not take place. Because of the mixing effect under SG outlet, it is considered that temperature of the coolant in the secondary vessel changes slowly in the case of transient condition Therefore the validity of the design is confirmed. (author).

  4. Sensitivity of the power distribution in large heterogeneous LMFBR designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzanos, C.P.; Barthold, W.P.

    1977-01-01

    In heterogeneous LMFBR designs consisting of consecutive core and blanket zones, the power distribution is very sensitive to enrichment distribution changes in the core zones. The purpose of the paper is to analyze this sensitivity in heterogeneous LMFBR designs of different degrees of coupling among the core zones.

  5. Gas entrainment in scaled model of pool type LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, I.; Chandra, L.; Laxman, D.; Kumar, A.; Gopal, C.A.; Shivakumar, N.S.; Padmakumar, G.; Anand Babu, C.; Vaidyanathan, G. [Fast Reactor Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2007-07-01

    The reactor Thermal hydraulics plays an important role for successful operation of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR), which is under construction at Kalpakkam, India. One of the issues to be resolved in PFBR is argon cover gas entrainment problem from free liquid sodium surface. The entrained cover gas may hinder the normal reactor operation. High free surface velocity along with the presence of various immersed components in the hot pool is the cause of gas entrainment from free surface. To reduce the free surface velocity and hence gas entrainment, ring type baffle plates were considered. Initially the optimum geometry of the baffle plate was arrived through numerical analysis using PHOENICS, a commercial computational fluid dynamics tool. Finally the experiments were conducted in a 1/4 scale water model of PFBR primary circuit with selected baffle plate geometry. It was found that a baffle plate with radial width of 125 mm in the model and located above intermediate heat exchanger is very effective to reduce the gas entrainment problem in PFBR. (authors)

  6. Dynamic simulation of accidental closure of intermediate heat exchanger isolation valve in a pool type LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K., E-mail: natesan@igcar.gov.in [Reactor Engineering Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Kasinathan, N.; Velusamy, K.; Selvaraj, P.; Chellapandi, P.; Chetal, S.C. [Reactor Engineering Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: > Thermal hydraulic analysis closure of sleeve valve in the primary circuit of FBR is discussed. > Numerical modeling of hydraulics in the primary and secondary sodium circuits is presented. > Aspects related to event management are discussed. - Abstract: In a pool type liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), core and other internals such as pumps, heat exchangers are immersed in a pool of sodium. Heat exchange from primary sodium circuit (pool) to secondary sodium circuit (loop) is through four intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) immersed in primary sodium pool. Each IHX is provided with a sleeve valve at its primary sodium inlet window for the purpose of isolating the shell side of IHX from the sodium pool. With such a provision, an inadvertent partial or complete closure of a sleeve valve of one of the IHX during normal operation of the reactor has been considered as a design basis event for the reactor. One dimensional transient thermal hydraulic models of the primary and secondary sodium circuits have been developed to study the thermal hydraulic consequences of such an event. The main areas of concern in the plant and the availability of safety parameters for the detection of the event have been evaluated.

  7. Computational analysis of coolant mixing in subassembly and hot pool of an LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Velusamy, K.; Kasinathan, N.; Clement Ravichandar, S.; Selvaraj, P.; Ghosh, D.; Chellapandi, P.; Chetal, S.C. [Reactor Engineering Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam - 603 102 (India)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The reactor core of a typical Liquid Metal cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) comprises of several fuel, blanket, storage, reflector and shielding subassemblies (SA) arranged in a hexagonal geometry. Each fuel subassembly (FSA) comprises of 217 fuel pins packed with pellets of fissile and fertile materials. The wire wrapped pins are arranged in triangular pitch within a hexagonal wrapper. Due to the non uniform flow resistance across the cross section, sodium velocity is non uniform within SA. This non uniform velocity distribution coupled with radial power profile causes the sodium coolant to come out of the pin bundles of SA with a non uniform temperature profile. From the fuel pin bundle top, sodium flows axially through various regions comprising of a sodium plenum, shielding bundle region and SA head and adapter assembly. These regions contribute in the mixing of sodium in SA. Due to the non uniform temperature distribution at FSA top, the temperature profile at the possible locations of core monitoring thermocouple (TC) would also be non uniform. During a power campaign of core, FSA top drift outwards with respect to TC location due to irradiation bowing. This causes the temperature recorded by the TC to change in accordance with the temperature of sodium stream washing it from time to time during the power campaign. Apart from this, the non uniform temperature at the FSA exits can also lead to fluctuation in the temperature of sodium at TC locations. Knowledge of these phenomena in hot pool is essential in fixing the SCRAM threshold on the parameters that are derived from the measurements made by these TC. Analyses to study the above phenomena have been carried out in three stages. In the first stage, velocity and temperature distributions in the wire wrap bundle region of FSA have been obtained through subchannel analysis using the SUPER ENERGY code. In the second stage, 3D mixing of sodium in FSA in the region above the

  8. Fission product concentration evolution in sodium pool following a fuel subassembly failure in an LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Velusamy, K.; Selvaraj, P.; Kasinathan, N.; Chellapandi, P.; Chetal, S.; Bhoje, S. [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2003-07-01

    During a fuel element failure in a liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor, the fission products originating from the failed pins mix into the sodium pool. Delayed Neutron Detectors (DND) are provided in the sodium pool to detect such failures by way of detection of delayed neutrons emitted by the fission products. The transient evolution of fission product concentration is governed by the sodium flow distribution in the pool. Transient hydraulic analysis has been carried out using the CFD code PHOENICS to estimate fission product concentration evolution in hot pool. k- {epsilon} turbulence model and zero laminar diffusivity for the fission product concentration have been considered in the analysis. Times at which the failures of various fuel subassemblies (SA) are detected by the DND are obtained. It has been found that in order to effectively detect the failure of every fuel SA, a minimum of 8 DND in hot pool are essential.

  9. Large-scale pool fires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinhaus Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A review of research into the burning behavior of large pool fires and fuel spill fires is presented. The features which distinguish such fires from smaller pool fires are mainly associated with the fire dynamics at low source Froude numbers and the radiative interaction with the fire source. In hydrocarbon fires, higher soot levels at increased diameters result in radiation blockage effects around the perimeter of large fire plumes; this yields lower emissive powers and a drastic reduction in the radiative loss fraction; whilst there are simplifying factors with these phenomena, arising from the fact that soot yield can saturate, there are other complications deriving from the intermittency of the behavior, with luminous regions of efficient combustion appearing randomly in the outer surface of the fire according the turbulent fluctuations in the fire plume. Knowledge of the fluid flow instabilities, which lead to the formation of large eddies, is also key to understanding the behavior of large-scale fires. Here modeling tools can be effectively exploited in order to investigate the fluid flow phenomena, including RANS- and LES-based computational fluid dynamics codes. The latter are well-suited to representation of the turbulent motions, but a number of challenges remain with their practical application. Massively-parallel computational resources are likely to be necessary in order to be able to adequately address the complex coupled phenomena to the level of detail that is necessary.

  10. LMFBR type reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwashige, Kengo

    1996-06-21

    In an LMFBR type reactor, partitions are disposed to a coolant channel at positions lower than the free liquid level, and the width of the partitions is adapted to have a predetermined condition. Namely, when low temperature fluid overflowing the wall of the coolant channel, flows down and collided against the free liquid surface in the coolant channel, since the dropping speed thereof is reduced abruptly, large pressure waves are caused by kinetic force of the low temperature fluid. However, if appropriate numbers of partitions having an appropriate shape are formed, the dropping speed of the low temperature fluid is moderated to reduce the pressure waves. In addition, since the pressure waves are dispersed to the circumferential and lateral directions of the coolant flow channel respectively, the propagation of the pressure waves can be prevented effectively. Further, when the flow of the low temperature fluid is changed to the circumferential direction, for example, by earthquakes, since the partitions act as members resisting against the circumferential change of the low temperature fluid, the change of the direction can be suppressed. (N.H.)

  11. A method for improvement of safety features of large fast breeder reactors. Numerical simulation of unprotected loss-of-flow accident in an LMFBR equipped with gas-expansion modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, Masayoshi [Hitachi Engineering Co. Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan); Murakami, Tomoko; Kawashima, Katsuyuki; Watari, Yoshio; Nakao, Noboru; Miura, Masanori

    1995-04-01

    Numerical simulation of an unprotected loss-of-flow (ULOF) accident has been performed for a large liquid-metal-cooled fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) equipped with gas expansion modules (GEMs) in the radial periphery of the reactor core. The effectiveness of the GEMs in small fast reactors was demonstrated already in the passive safety testing in the Fast Flux Test Facility. According to neutronic calculations based on the transport theory, even in large reactors of electrical power 600 to 1,300 MW, the reactivity worth of GEMs, which replace one layer of radial blanket fuel subassemblies, ranges from -1.9$ to -1.4$, depending on the size of the core. A simulation of ULOF transient was performed with a 5.5s flow-halving time in a 600 MWe LMFBR equipped with GEMs of -1.9$ reactivity worth. The result showed that, if 10% of the rated core coolant flow by pony motors was available following the main pump coastdown, the GEM reactivity alone could bring the reactor subcritical and the predicted maximum coolant temperature was substantially lower than the sodium boiling point. The reactivity worth calculations, a modeling of gas expansion behavior, and ULOF simulation together with needs of further development for the GEM application are described. (author).

  12. The Phoenix series large scale LNG pool fire experiments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Richard B.; Jensen, Richard Pearson; Demosthenous, Byron; Luketa, Anay Josephine; Ricks, Allen Joseph; Hightower, Marion Michael; Blanchat, Thomas K.; Helmick, Paul H.; Tieszen, Sheldon Robert; Deola, Regina Anne; Mercier, Jeffrey Alan; Suo-Anttila, Jill Marie; Miller, Timothy J.

    2010-12-01

    The increasing demand for natural gas could increase the number and frequency of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) tanker deliveries to ports across the United States. Because of the increasing number of shipments and the number of possible new facilities, concerns about the potential safety of the public and property from an accidental, and even more importantly intentional spills, have increased. While improvements have been made over the past decade in assessing hazards from LNG spills, the existing experimental data is much smaller in size and scale than many postulated large accidental and intentional spills. Since the physics and hazards from a fire change with fire size, there are concerns about the adequacy of current hazard prediction techniques for large LNG spills and fires. To address these concerns, Congress funded the Department of Energy (DOE) in 2008 to conduct a series of laboratory and large-scale LNG pool fire experiments at Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This report presents the test data and results of both sets of fire experiments. A series of five reduced-scale (gas burner) tests (yielding 27 sets of data) were conducted in 2007 and 2008 at Sandia's Thermal Test Complex (TTC) to assess flame height to fire diameter ratios as a function of nondimensional heat release rates for extrapolation to large-scale LNG fires. The large-scale LNG pool fire experiments were conducted in a 120 m diameter pond specially designed and constructed in Sandia's Area III large-scale test complex. Two fire tests of LNG spills of 21 and 81 m in diameter were conducted in 2009 to improve the understanding of flame height, smoke production, and burn rate and therefore the physics and hazards of large LNG spills and fires.

  13. NSSS capital costs for a mature LMFBR industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaman, S.U.

    1978-10-23

    The conceptual design of a commercial LMFBR (Target Plant) and its NSSS capital cost have been developed in support of the United Engineers and Constructors Contract EN-78-C-02-4954 with the Department of Energy. The objective of this work is to provide the Department of Energy/Office of Program Planning and Analysis - Nuclear Energy Programs with periodic updates of technical, capital cost, fuel cycle cost, and operating and maintenance cost information. This effort supports Task 3B of the UE and C's Phase I Energy Economic Data Base (EEDB) Program. Past estimates of LMFBR capital costs have generally predicted that these costs would be higher than those of a comparably sized LWR, primarily due to the more demanding technology associated wih higher temperatures and the large number of engineered systems. The LMFBR, because of its low fuel cycle costs, can tolerate a capital cost premium relative to thermal reactors. The key issues, therefore, are: the allowable LMFBR cost premium, and the steps necessary to reduce the capital cost below the projected allowable cost premium for a safe and reliable plant.

  14. LMFBR type reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanbe, Mitsuru

    1997-04-04

    An LMFBR type reactor comprises a plurality of reactor cores in a reactor container. Namely, a plurality of pot containing vessels are disposed in the reactor vessel and a plurality of reactor cores are formed in a state where an integrated-type fuel assembly is each inserted to a pot, and a coolant pipeline is connected to each of the pot containing-vessel to cool the reactor core respectively. When fuels are exchanged, the integrated-type fuel assembly is taken out together with the pot from the reactor vessel in a state where the integrated-type fuel assembly is immersed in the coolants in the pot as it is. Accordingly, coolants are supplied to each of the pot containing-vessel connected with the coolant pipeline and circulate while cooling the integrated-type fuel assembly for every pot. Then, when the fuels are exchanged, the integrated type fuel assembly is taken out to the outside of the reactor together with the pot by taking up the pot from the pot-containing vessel. Then, neutron economy is improved to thereby improve reactor power and the breeding ratio. (N.H.)

  15. Computational Flame Characterization of New Large Aircraft Immersed in Hydrocarbon Pool Fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Composite Profile Map of the A380 1 2 The NLA Mockup Engulfed in a JP-8 Pool Fire and After the JP-8 Pool Fire Using Infrared Imagery 2 3 The...Government’s approval or disapproval of its ideas or findings. 2 (a) (b) Figure 2. The NLA Mockup (a) Engulfed in a JP-8 Pool...CFD software suite, and simulation development. The literature survey briefly introduces the physical principles associated with large-scale

  16. Large Core Code Evaluation Working Group Benchmark Problem Four: neutronics and burnup analysis of a large heterogeneous fast reactor. Part 1. Analysis of benchmark results. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan, C.L.; Protsik, R.; Lewellen, J.W. (eds.)

    1984-01-01

    The Large Core Code Evaluation Working Group Benchmark Problem Four was specified to provide a stringent test of the current methods which are used in the nuclear design and analyses process. The benchmark specifications provided a base for performing detailed burnup calculations over the first two irradiation cycles for a large heterogeneous fast reactor. Particular emphasis was placed on the techniques for modeling the three-dimensional benchmark geometry, and sensitivity studies were carried out to determine the performance parameter sensitivities to changes in the neutronics and burnup specifications. The results of the Benchmark Four calculations indicated that a linked RZ-XY (Hex) two-dimensional representation of the benchmark model geometry can be used to predict mass balance data, power distributions, regionwise fuel exposure data and burnup reactivities with good accuracy when compared with the results of direct three-dimensional computations. Most of the small differences in the results of the benchmark analyses by the different participants were attributed to ambiguities in carrying out the regionwise flux renormalization calculations throughout the burnup step.

  17. Sodium-cooled LMFBR cask recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    In April of 1970 a design study to establish the parameters of a shipping cask for LMFBR Spent Fuel Assemblies from FFTF and the first demonstration plant was initiated. The basic criteria presented were that the cask should be limited to 75 tons, and that the cask should be compatible with the FFTF Fuel Assembly design and the first demonstration LMFBR Fuel Assembly design. Several features of the I-(182)-1 cask and their basis are described.

  18. Fast and accurate haplotype frequency estimation for large haplotype vectors from pooled DNA data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iliadis Alexandros

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Typically, the first phase of a genome wide association study (GWAS includes genotyping across hundreds of individuals and validation of the most significant SNPs. Allelotyping of pooled genomic DNA is a common approach to reduce the overall cost of the study. Knowledge of haplotype structure can provide additional information to single locus analyses. Several methods have been proposed for estimating haplotype frequencies in a population from pooled DNA data. Results We introduce a technique for haplotype frequency estimation in a population from pooled DNA samples focusing on datasets containing a small number of individuals per pool (2 or 3 individuals and a large number of markers. We compare our method with the publicly available state-of-the-art algorithms HIPPO and HAPLOPOOL on datasets of varying number of pools and marker sizes. We demonstrate that our algorithm provides improvements in terms of accuracy and computational time over competing methods for large number of markers while demonstrating comparable performance for smaller marker sizes. Our method is implemented in the "Tree-Based Deterministic Sampling Pool" (TDSPool package which is available for download at http://www.ee.columbia.edu/~anastas/tdspool. Conclusions Using a tree-based determinstic sampling technique we present an algorithm for haplotype frequency estimation from pooled data. Our method demonstrates superior performance in datasets with large number of markers and could be the method of choice for haplotype frequency estimation in such datasets.

  19. Calculation of reactivity changes due to bubble collapse. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, T.J.; Petrie, L.M.

    1977-01-01

    Calculations based on Behrens' method indicate that a substantial increase in reactivity may accompany the collapse of a large number of small bubbles in an LMFBR core. More sophisticated transport approaches to this problem have encountered several difficulties: the large number of bubbles requires many mesh points; the desired effect can easily be masked by the movement of fuel to regions of greater (or lesser) importance; the reactivity is desired for a random distribution of spherical bubbles. This paper describes a transport approach to this problem which avoids the above difficulties by using the ''sub-group'' or ''probability table'' method.

  20. LMFBR type reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakami, Hiroto

    1995-02-07

    A reactor container of the present invention has a structure that the reactor container is entirely at the same temperature as that at the inlet of the reactor and, a hot pool is incorporated therein, and the reactor container has is entirely at the same temperature and has substantially uniform temperature follow-up property transiently. Namely, if the temperature at the inlet of the reactor core changes, the temperature of the entire reactor container changes following this change, but no great temperature gradient is caused in the axial direction and no great heat stresses due to axial temperature distribution is caused. Occurrence of thermal stresses caused by the axial temperature distribution can be suppressed to improve the reliability of the reactor container. In addition, since the laying of the reactor inlet pipelines over the inside of the reactor is eliminated, the reactor container is made compact and the heat shielding structures above the reactor and a protection structure of container walls are simplified. Further, secondary coolants are filled to the outside of the reactor container to simplify the shieldings. The combined effects described above can improve economical property and reliability. (N.H.).

  1. CORTRAN code user manual. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheatham, R.L.; Crawford, S.L.; Khan, E.U.

    1981-02-01

    CORTRAN has been developed as a relatively fast running design code for core-wide steady-state and transient analysis of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) cores. The preliminary version of this computer program uses subchannel analysis techniques to compute the velocity and temperature fields on a multiassembly basis for three types of transient forcing functions: total power, total flow, and inlet coolant temperature. Interassembly heat transfer, intra-assembly heat transfer, and intra-assembly flow redistribution due to buoyancy are taken into account. Heat generation within the fuel rods and assembly duct walls is also included. Individual pin radial peaking factors (peak to average for each assembly) can be either read in or calculated from specified normalized neutronic power densities (six per assembly).

  2. Synapse clusters are preferentially formed by synapses with large recycling pool sizes.

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    Oliver Welzel

    Full Text Available Synapses are distributed heterogeneously in neural networks. The relationship between the spatial arrangement of synapses and an individual synapse's structural and functional features remains to be elucidated. Here, we examined the influence of the number of adjacent synapses on individual synaptic recycling pool sizes. When measuring the discharge of the styryl dye FM1-43 from electrically stimulated synapses in rat hippocampal tissue cultures, a strong positive correlation between the number of neighbouring synapses and recycling vesicle pool sizes was observed. Accordingly, vesicle-rich synapses were found to preferentially reside next to neighbours with large recycling pool sizes. Although these synapses with large recycling pool sizes were rare, they were densely arranged and thus exhibited a high amount of release per volume. To consolidate these findings, functional terminals were marked by live-cell antibody staining with anti-synaptotagmin-1-cypHer or overexpression of synaptopHluorin. Analysis of synapse distributions in these systems confirmed the results obtained with FM 1-43. Our findings support the idea that clustering of synapses with large recycling pool sizes is a distinct developmental feature of newly formed neural networks and may contribute to functional plasticity.

  3. Voluntary rewards mediate the evolution of pool punishment for maintaining public goods in large populations

    CERN Document Server

    Sasaki, Tatsuya; Chen, Xiaojie

    2015-01-01

    Punishment is a popular tool when governing commons in situations where free riders would otherwise take over. It is well known that sanctioning systems, such as the police and courts, are costly and thus can suffer from those who free ride on other's efforts to maintain the sanctioning systems (second-order free riders). Previous game-theory studies showed that if populations are very large, pool punishment rarely emerges in public good games, even when participation is optional, because of second-order free riders. Here we show that a matching fund for rewarding cooperation leads to the emergence of pool punishment, despite the presence of second-order free riders. We demonstrate that reward funds can pave the way for a transition from a population of free riders to a population of pool punishers. A key factor in promoting the transition is also to reward those who contribute to pool punishment, yet not abstaining from participation. Reward funds eventually vanish in raising pool punishment, which is sustai...

  4. Voluntary rewards mediate the evolution of pool punishment for maintaining public goods in large populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Tatsuya; Uchida, Satoshi; Chen, Xiaojie

    2015-03-01

    Punishment is a popular tool when governing commons in situations where free riders would otherwise take over. It is well known that sanctioning systems, such as the police and courts, are costly and thus can suffer from those who free ride on other's efforts to maintain the sanctioning systems (second-order free riders). Previous game-theory studies showed that if populations are very large, pool punishment rarely emerges in public good games, even when participation is optional, because of second-order free riders. Here we show that a matching fund for rewarding cooperation leads to the emergence of pool punishment, despite the presence of second-order free riders. We demonstrate that reward funds can pave the way for a transition from a population of free riders to a population of pool punishers. A key factor in promoting the transition is also to reward those who contribute to pool punishment, yet not abstaining from participation. Reward funds eventually vanish in raising pool punishment, which is sustainable by punishing the second-order free riders. This suggests that considering the interdependence of reward and punishment may help to better understand the origins and transitions of social norms and institutions.

  5. Leakage effects on LMFBR cell liners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, C.M.; Gartling, D.K.; Nickell, R.E.

    1978-01-01

    The thermostructural effects of a molten sodium spill onto a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) cell liner are investigated utilizing a geometrically simple finite element model. The sodium spill is considered for various flow rate regimes. Because the actual characteristics of a spill are unknown, a parametric analysis was performed with the size of spill and heat transfer coefficient as variables.

  6. Evaluation of airborne geophysical surveys for large-scale mapping of contaminated mine pools: draft final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammack, R. W. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States). Geosciences Div.

    2006-12-28

    Decades of underground coal mining has left about 5,000 square miles of abandoned mine workings that are rapidly filling with water. The water quality of mine pools is often poor; environmental regulatory agencies are concerned because water from mine pools could contaminate diminishing surface and groundwater supplies. Mine pools are also a threat to the safety of current mining operations. Conversely, mine pools are a large, untapped water resource that, with treatment, could be used for a variety of industrial purposes. Others have proposed using mine pools in conjunction with heat pumps as a source of heating and cooling for large industrial facilities. The management or use of mine pool water requires accurate maps of mine pools. West Virginia University has predicted the likely location and volume of mine pools in the Pittsburgh Coalbed using existing mine maps, structure contour maps, and measured mine pool elevations. Unfortunately, mine maps only reflect conditions at the time of mining, are not available for all mines, and do not always denote the maximum extent of mining. Since 1999, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has been evaluating helicopter-borne, electromagnetic sensing technologies for the detection and mapping of mine pools. Frequency domain electromagnetic sensors are able to detect shallow mine pools (depth < 50 m) if there is sufficient contrast between the conductance of the mine pool and the conductance of the overburden. The mine pools (conductors) most confidently detected by this technology are overlain by thick, resistive sandstone layers. In 2003, a helicopter time domain electromagnetic sensor was applied to mined areas in southwestern Virginia in an attempt to increase the depth of mine pool detection. This study failed because the mine pool targets were thin and not very conductive. Also, large areas of the surveys were degraded or made unusable by excessive amounts of cultural electromagnetic noise that obscured the

  7. Analysis of three-dimensional thermo-hydraulic phenomena in the reactor core of LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, S.; Lee, Y. B.; Jang, W. P.; Ha, K. S.; Jung, H. Y. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    The mismatch between power and flow under the transient condition of LMFBR (Liquid Metal cooled Fast Breeder Reactor) core results in thermal stratification in hot pool. Since the fluid of hot pool enters IHXs, the temperature distribution of hot pool can alter the overall system response, therefore three-dimensional analysis of thermo-hydraulic phenomena is necessary. In this study, the thermo-hydraulic phenomena under normal operating condition and unprotected transient condition of LMFBR is investigated using which is the three-dimensional analysis code, COMMIX-1AR/P. The basic input data is based on the design data of KALIMER-600, which is sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor developed by KAERI. COMMIX-1AR/P code has not a reactivity model and the power and core flowrate must be supplied in the input data. In this study, results of SSC-K calculation is used. The temperature and velocity distributions are calculated and compared with those of SSC-K calculation results. The UTOF(Unprotected Loss Of Flow) accident is calculated using COMMIX-1AR/P and the temperature and velocity distributions in the total reactor core are calculated and the natural circulation mode under this transient condition is investigated.

  8. Suppression of Pool Fire in a Large Enclosure with Water Mist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Lal

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of an experimental study of suppression of pool fires in enclosed spaces using water mist. The main objective of the present study is to understand the mechanisms responsible for the suppression of pool fires using water mists. Experiments were conducted in a large compartment with n-heptane pool fires of different heat release rates. The temperature variations in the compartment were measured using K-type thermocouples fixed at two locations. A multi gas analyzer was used to measure gas concentrations. The test results indicate that the water mist suppresses the diffusion flame in an enclosed space mainly through evaporating cooling and oxygen displacement by water vapors, resulting in inefficient combustion. The fire suppression time decreases with a decrease in droplet diameter. It is much easier to suppress a larger fire due to faster rates of evaporation of water droplets and therefore, the total mist requirement decreases with an increase in the fire size. The results of this study can find application in the design of water mist based fire fighting systems for indoor fires.

  9. LMFBR with booster pump in pumping loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, H.J.

    1975-10-14

    A loop coolant circulation system is described for a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) utilizing a low head, high specific speed booster pump in the hot leg of the coolant loop with the main pump located in the cold leg of the loop, thereby providing the advantages of operating the main pump in the hot leg with the reliability of cold leg pump operation.

  10. LMFBR source term experiments in the Fuel Aerosol Simulant Test (FAST) facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrykowski, J.C.; Longest, A.W.

    1985-01-01

    The transport of uranium dioxide (UO/sub 2/) aerosol through liquid sodium was studied in a series of ten experiments in the Fuel Aerosol Simulant Test (FAST) facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The experiments were designed to provide a mechanistic basis for evaluating the radiological source term associated with a postulated, energetic core disruptive accident (CDA) in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR). Aerosol was generated by capacitor discharge vaporization of UO/sub 2/ pellets which were submerged in a sodium pool under an argon cover gas. Measurements of the pool and cover gas pressures were used to study the transport of aerosol contained by vapor bubbles within the pool. Samples of cover gas were filtered to determine the quantity of aerosol released from the pool. The depth at which the aerosol was generated was found to be the most critical parameter affecting release. The largest release was observed in the baseline experiment where the sample was vaporized above the sodium pool. In the nine ''undersodium'' experiments aerosol was generated beneath the surface of the pool at depths varying from 30 to 1060 mm. The mass of aerosol released from the pool was found to be a very small fraction of the original specimen. It appears that the bulk of aerosol was contained by bubbles which collapsed within the pool. 18 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Experimental determination of a LMFBR seismic equivalent core model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buland, P.; Fegeant, O.; Fontaine, B.; Gantenbein, F.

    1995-12-31

    Seismic analysis of pool type LMFBR requires to perform a finite element calculation of the reactor. Because of fluid structure interaction and non-linearities due to the presence of gaps between subassemblies, it is impossible to include in the reactor vessel finite elements model the real behaviour of the core. It is therefore required to find a linear equivalent core model (LECM) which will give for the reactor vessel the same results. The design of the LECM is based on an experimental test program conducted with the core mock-up RAPSODIE on Vesuve shaking table located at CEA/Saclay center. The tests permitted to validate a linear equivalent model, which characteristics correspond to the modal parameters of the mock-up (masses, elevations, frequencies...). These characteristics were estimated in air and in water, for different level of excitation. They permitted to quantify the added mass ratio (about 15%) which is in a rather good agreement with the computation when the free surface effect is correctly taken into account. (authors). 2 refs., 5 figs., 1 photo.

  12. SPRAY code user's report. [LMFBR sodium pipe leaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shire, P.R.

    1977-03-01

    The SPRAY computer code has been developed to model the effects of postulated sodium spray release from LMFBR piping within containment chambers. The calculation method utilizes gas convection, heat transfer and droplet combustion theory to calculate the pressure and temperature effects within the enclosure. The applicable range is 0-21 mol percent oxygen and .02-.30 inch droplets with or without humidity. Droplet motion and large sodium surface area combine to produce rapid heat release and pressure rise within the enclosed volume.

  13. Reactor control rod timing system. [LMFBR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, P.T.K.

    1980-03-18

    A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system is described for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

  14. Low cycle fatigue of irradiated LMFBR materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackburn, L D

    1976-01-01

    A review of low cycle fatigue data on irradiated LMFBR materials was conducted and extensive graphical representations of available data are presented. Representative postirradiation tensile properties of annealed 304 and 316 SS are selected and employed in several predictive methods to estimate irradiated material fatigue curves. Experimental fatigue data confirm the use of predictive methods for establishing conservative design curves over the range of service conditions relevant to such CRBRP components as core former, fixed radial shielding, core barrel, lower inlet module and upper internals structures. New experimental data on fatigue curves and creep-fatigue interaction in irradiated 20 percent cold worked (CW) 316 SS and Alloy 718 would support the design of removable radial shielding and upper internals in CRBRP. New experimental information on notched fatigue behavior and cyclic stress-strain curves of all these materials in the irradiated condition could provide significant design data.

  15. Airborne effluent control for LMFBR fuel reprocessing plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarbro, O.O.; Groenier, W.S.; Stephenson, M.J.

    1976-01-01

    A significant part of the LMFBR fuel reprocessing development program has been devoted to the development of efficient removal systems for the volatile fission products, including /sup 131/I, krypton, tritium, /sup 129/I, and most recently /sup 14/C. Flowsheet studies have indicated that very significant reductions of radioactive effluents can be achieved by integrating advanced effluent control systems with new concepts of containment and ventilation; however, the feasibility of such has not yet been established, nor have the economics been examined. This paper presents a flowsheet for the application of advanced containment systems to the processing of LMFBR fuels and summarizes the status and applicability of specific fission product removal systems.

  16. Coolant mixing in LMFBR rod bundles and outlet plenum mixing transients. Progress report, September 1, 1980-November 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todreas, N.E.; Golay, M.W.; Wolf, L.

    1981-02-01

    Four tasks are reported: bundle geometry (wrapped and bare rods), subchannel geometry (bare rods), subchannel geometry (bare rods), LMFBR outlet plenum flow mixing, and theoretical determination of local temperature fields in LMFBR fuel rod bundles. (DLC)

  17. Moving hot cell for LMFBR type reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanbe, Mitsuru

    1994-09-16

    A moving hot cell for an LMFBR type reactor is made movable on a reactor operation floor between a position just above the reactor container and a position retreated therefrom. Further, it comprises an overhung portion which can incorporate a spent fuel just thereunder, and a crane for moving a fuel assembly between a spent fuel cask and a reactor container. Further, an opening/closing means having a shielding structure is disposed to the bottom portion and the overhung portion thereof, to provide a sealing structure, in which only the receiving port for the spent fuel cask faces to the inner side, and the cask itself is disposed at the outside. Upon exchange of fuels, the movable hot cell is placed just above the reactor to take out the spent fuels, so that a region contaminated with primary sodium is limited within the hot cell. On the other hand, upon maintenance and repair for equipments, the hot cell is moved, thereby enabling to provide a not contaminated reactor operation floor. (N.H.).

  18. Review of PRA methodology for LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J.E

    1999-02-01

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) has been widely used as a tool to evaluate the safety of NPPs (Nuclear Power Plants), which are in the design stage as well as in operation. Recently, PRA becomes one of the licensing requirements for many existing and new NPPs. KALIMER is a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) being developed by KAERI. Since the design concept of KALIMER is similar to that of the PRISM plant developed by GE, it would be appropriate to review the PRA methodology of PRISM as the first step of KALIMER PRA. Hence, in this report summarizes the PRA methodology of PRISM plant, and the required works for the PSA of KALIMER based on the reviewed results. The PRA technology of PRISM plant consists of following five major tasks: (1) development of initiating event list, (2) development of system event tree, (3) development of core response event tree, (4) development of containment response event tree, and (5) consequences and risk estimation. The estimated individual and societal risk measures show that the risk from a PRISM module is substantially less than the NRC goal. Each task is compared to the PRA methodology of Light Water Reactor (LWR)/Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR). In the report, each task of PRISM PRA methodology is reviewed and compared to the corresponding part of LWR/PHWR PSA performed in Korea. The parts that are not modeled appropriately in PRISM PRA are identified, and the recommendations for KALIMER PRA are stated. (author). 14 refs., 9 tabs., 4 figs.

  19. Coolant mixing in the LMFBR outlet plenum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y.B.; Golay, M.W.

    1977-06-01

    Small scale experiments involving water flows are used to provide mean flow and turbulence field data for LMFBR outlet plenum flows. Measurements are performed at Reynolds Number (Re) values of 33000 and 70000 in a 1/15-scale FFTF geometry and at Re = 35000 in a 3/80-scale CRBR geometry. The experimental behavior is predicted using two different turbulence model computer programs, TEACH-T and VARR-II. It is found that the qualitative nature of the flow field within the plenum depends strongly upon the distribution of the mean inlet velocity field, upon the degree of inlet turbulence, and upon the turbulence momentum exchange model used in the calculations. It is found in the FFTF geometry that the TEACH-T predictions are better than that of VARR-II, and in the CRBR geometry neither code provides a good prediction of the observed behavior. From the sensitivity analysis, it is found that the production and dissipation of turbulence are the dominant terms in the transport equations for turbulent kinetic energy and turbulent energy dissipation rate, and the diffusion terms are relatively small. From the same study a new set of empirical constants for the turbulence model is evolved for the prediction of plenum flows.

  20. Core-seis: a code for LMFBR core seismic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chellapandi, P.; Ravi, R.; Chetal, S.C.; Bhoje, S.B. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Reactor Group

    1995-12-31

    This paper deals with a computer code CORE-SEIS specially developed for seismic analysis of LMFBR core configurations. For demonstrating the prediction capability of the code, results are presented for one of the MONJU reactor core mock ups which deals with a cluster of 37 subassemblies kept in water. (author). 3 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Experimental determination of LMFBR seismic equivalent core model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontaine, B.; Buland, P.; Fegeant, O.; Gantenbein, F. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1995-12-31

    The main phenomena which influence an LMFBR core seismic response are the fluid structure interaction and the impacts between subassemblies. To study the core behaviour seismic tests and calculations have been performed on the core mock-up RAPSODIE in air or in water and for different excitation levels. (author). 2 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Notes on the inherently safe core design meeting with the DOE-RRT, AI, GE, W-ARD, EPRI, and ETEC (at AI, Canoga Park, California, November 7-8, 1978). [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackola, A.S.; Paschall, R.K.

    1978-11-09

    The primary purpose of the meeting was to familiarize large LMFBR design managers with the capabilities of the Inherent Secondary Shutdown Systems (articulated rod and absorber balls) and to obtain inputs from them. The other purpose of the meeting was for the ISSS designers (AI, GE, and WARD) to present current work status, future plans, and schedules for their respective ISSS tasks.

  3. Study on stability of natural circulation flow in an LMFBR. Pt. 2. Stability of core flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koga, Tomonari [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Abiko, Chiba (Japan). Abiko Research Lab.

    1997-11-01

    By using an experimental apparatus with water in which the primary loop and the core of an LMFBR were roughly simulated, stability of natural circulation flows in the core has been experimentally evaluated. The following were clarified as a result of the present study: (1) Though a certain and stable flow occurs in the primary loop under a steady state of natural circulation, a chaotic flow or a variant flow in addition to the steady flow arises in some simulated fuel sub-assemblies. The chaotic flow tends to occur in the range of large Reynolds number and large Richardson number. (2) Estimation of the fluctuation supposed as a chaos revealed that it was a high dimensional chaos. (author)

  4. An analytical tool for PIN contact incident of LMFBR fuel-subassembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyakoshi, Hiroyuki; Haga, Kazuo [Nuclear Power Engineering Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-12-01

    A subchannel computer code COBRA-41 was modified for LMFBR local faults analysis. Calculational results to a pin contact condition were compared with experimental ones and trial calculations were made to an LMFBR fuel-subassembly geometry. 8 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Active accumulation of internal DIC pools reduces transport limitation in large colonies of Nostoc pruniforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raun, Ane-Marie Løvendahl; Borum, Jens; Jensen, Kaj Sand

    2009-01-01

    Nostoc pruniforme is a freshwater cyanobacterium forming large spherical colonies of up to several centimeters in diameter. The size and shape result in low surface area to volume (SA/V) ratios that potentially put severe constraints on resource acquisition. In the present study we have specifica......Nostoc pruniforme is a freshwater cyanobacterium forming large spherical colonies of up to several centimeters in diameter. The size and shape result in low surface area to volume (SA/V) ratios that potentially put severe constraints on resource acquisition. In the present study we have...

  6. BAC-pool sequencing and analysis of large segments of A12 and D12 homoeologous chromosomes in upland cotton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Buyyarapu

    Full Text Available Although new and emerging next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies have reduced sequencing costs significantly, much work remains to implement them for de novo sequencing of complex and highly repetitive genomes such as the tetraploid genome of Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.. Herein we report the results from implementing a novel, hybrid Sanger/454-based BAC-pool sequencing strategy using minimum tiling path (MTP BACs from Ctg-3301 and Ctg-465, two large genomic segments in A12 and D12 homoeologous chromosomes (Ctg. To enable generation of longer contig sequences in assembly, we implemented a hybrid assembly method to process ~35x data from 454 technology and 2.8-3x data from Sanger method. Hybrid assemblies offered higher sequence coverage and better sequence assemblies. Homology studies revealed the presence of retrotransposon regions like Copia and Gypsy elements in these contigs and also helped in identifying new genomic SSRs. Unigenes were anchored to the sequences in Ctg-3301 and Ctg-465 to support the physical map. Gene density, gene structure and protein sequence information derived from protein prediction programs were used to obtain the functional annotation of these genes. Comparative analysis of both contigs with Arabidopsis genome exhibited synteny and microcollinearity with a conserved gene order in both genomes. This study provides insight about use of MTP-based BAC-pool sequencing approach for sequencing complex polyploid genomes with limited constraints in generating better sequence assemblies to build reference scaffold sequences. Combining the utilities of MTP-based BAC-pool sequencing with current longer and short read NGS technologies in multiplexed format would provide a new direction to cost-effectively and precisely sequence complex plant genomes.

  7. Benchmark physics experiment of metallic-fueled LMFBR at FCA. 2; Experiments of FCA assembly XVI-1 and their analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iijima, Susumu; Oigawa, Hiroyuki; Ohno, Akio; Sakurai, Takeshi; Nemoto, Tatsuo; Osugi, Toshitaka; Satoh, Kunio; Hayasaka, Katsuhisa [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Bando, Masaru

    1993-10-01

    An availability of data and method for a design of metallic-fueled LMFBR is examined by using the experiment results of FCA assembly XVI-1. Experiment included criticality and reactivity coefficients such as Doppler, sodium void, fuel shifting and fuel expansion. Reaction rate ratios, sample worth and control rod worth were also measured. Analysis was made by using three-dimensional diffusion calculations and JENDL-2 cross sections. Predictions of assembly XVI-1 reactor physics parameters agree reasonably well with the measured values, but for some reactivity coefficients such as Doppler, large zone sodium void and fuel shifting further improvement of calculation method was need. (author).

  8. LMFBR steam generator systems development program progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    The intent of this program is to investigate methods of producing 2-1/4 Cr-1Mo duplex tubing to meet the structural, thermal/hydraulic and leak detection design requirements of the duplex tube leak detection concept for application on the Demonstration Plant and/or prototype steam generator. The leak detection concept as envisioned for LMFBR steam generator application will be analyzed regarding response to credible leak situations. The results of testing will be used for this analysis. The third fluid system will be conceptually designed including the two plena design adaptations being considered and the advantages and disadvantages of each will be assessed. The test program for the single-tube steam generator model will be developed in accordance with the technical and schedular objectives of the LMFBR duplex tube steam generator development program. A conceptual steam generator configuration will be established for use as a reference in the on-going feasibility studies and Demo Plant system development.

  9. Effect of operating temperature on LMFBR core performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noyes, R.C.; Bergeron, R.J.; di Lauro, G.F.; Kulwich, M.R.; Stuteville, D.W.

    1977-04-11

    The purpose of the study is to provide an engineering evaluation of high and low temperature LMFBR core designs. The study was conducted by C-E supported by HEDL expertise in the areas of materials behavior, fuel performance and fabrication/fuel cycle cost. The evaluation is based primarily on designs and analyses prepared by AI, GE and WARD during Phase I of the PLBR studies.

  10. Study on thermal-hydraulics of natural circulation operation for decay heat removal of LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koga, Tomonari [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Abiko, Chiba (Japan). Abiko Research Lab

    2000-05-01

    Thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the decay heat removal system (DHRS) has been evaluated by both a water test and its computational analysis. The direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS) was studied as a representative DHRS in the LMFBR design. A natural circulation flow of the DRACS is originated from the buoyancy force balanced with the pressure loss within the active core. Hence it appears that the performance of the DRACS could be fully estimated by the thermal-hydraulic study of one fuel sub-assembly under the condition of low flow rate. The inter-wrapper flow occurring in the gap between core sub-assemblies under the natural circulation operation might have a large capacity to cool the core. An inverse flow occurring at the outer region of the core was due to the cooling effect of the inter-wrapper flow. (author)

  11. Thermal-hydraulic characteristics of natural circulation operation for decay heat removal of LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koga, Tomonari [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Abiko, Chiba (Japan); Watanabe, Osamu [Advanced Reactor Technology Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-10-01

    Thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the decay heat removal system (DHRS) has been evaluated by both a water test and its computational analysis. The direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS) was studied as a representative DHRS in the LMFBR design. A natural circulation flow of the DRACS is originated from the buoyancy force balanced with the pressure loss within the active core. Hence it appears that the performance of the DRACS could be fully estimated by the thermal-hydraulic study of one fuel sub-assembly under the condition of low flow rate. The inter-wrapper flow occurring in the gap between core sub-assemblies under the natural circulation operation might have a large capacity to cool the core. An inverse flow occurring at the outer region of the core was due to the cooling effect of the inter-wrapper flow. (author)

  12. Experimental investigation of foam spread and extinguishment of the large-scale methanol pool fire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qinglin; Wang, Lu; Bi, Yixing; Xu, Dajun; Zhi, Huiqiang; Qiu, Peifang

    2015-04-28

    A steel channel with the size of 30m×2 m×1.2m has been made to simulate the full surface fire of a 50,000m(3) methanol tank. Several large-scale methanol fire extinguishment experiments have been conducted under different foam application rates and foam concentrations in order to investigate the flow length, flow velocity and fire extinguishing effectiveness of the alcohol-resistant foam. The result showed that the alcohol-resistant aqueous film forming foam (AFFF/AR) and alcohol-resistant fluoro-protein foam (FP/AR) could flow beyond 30m on the burning methanol surface and extinguish the fire successfully even with the foam application rate of 4Lmin(-1)m(-2). Under the same condition, the fire extinguishing performance of AFFF/AR was better than FP/AR, and the flow velocity of AFFF/AR on the burning methanol surface was 0.203ms(-1), while the value of FP/AR was 0.082ms(-1).

  13. Process, policy, and implementation of pool-wide drawdowns on the Upper Mississippi River: a promising approach for ecological restoration of large impounded rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenow, Kevin P.; Gretchen Benjamin,; Tim Schlagenhaft,; Ruth Nissen,; Mary Stefanski,; Gary Wege,; Scott A. Jutila,; Newton, Teresa J.

    2016-01-01

    The Upper Mississippi River (UMR) has been developed and subsequently managed for commercial navigation by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The navigation pools created by a series of lock and dams initially provided a complex of aquatic habitats that supported a variety of fish and wildlife. However, biological productivity declined as the pools aged. The River Resources Forum, an advisory body to the St. Paul District of the USACE, established a multiagency Water Level Management Task Force (WLMTF) to evaluate the potential of water level management to improve ecological function and restore the distribution and abundance of fish and wildlife habitat. The WLMTF identified several water level management options and concluded that summer growing season drawdowns at the pool scale offered the greatest potential to provide habitat benefits over a large area. Here we summarize the process followed to plan and implement pool-wide drawdowns on the UMR, including involvement of stakeholders in decision making, addressing requirements to modify reservoir operating plans, development and evaluation of drawdown alternatives, pool selection, establishment of a monitoring plan, interagency coordination, and a public information campaign. Three pool-wide drawdowns were implemented within the St. Paul District and deemed successful in providing ecological benefits without adversely affecting commercial navigation and recreational use of the pools. Insights are provided based on more than 17 years of experience in planning and implementing drawdowns on the UMR. 

  14. Pool spacing in forest channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    David R. Montgomery; John M. Buffington; Richard D. Smith; Kevin M. Schmidt; George Pess

    1995-01-01

    Field surveys of stream channels in forested mountain drainage basins in southeast Alaska and Washington reveal that pool spacing depends on large woody debris (LWD) loading and channel type, slope, and width. Mean pool spacing in pool-riffle, plane-bed, and forced pool-riffle channels systematically decreases from greater than 13 channel widths per pool to less than 1...

  15. Advanced thermohydraulic simulation code for pool-type LMFBRs (SSC-P code)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madni, I.K.; Cazzoli, E.G.

    1980-09-01

    Models for components and processes that are needed for simulation of thermohydraulic transient in a pool-type liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) plant are described in this report. A computer code, SSC-P, has been developed as a part of the Super System Code (SSC) development project. A user's manual is being prepared as a separate document. 27 refs., 26 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Validation of Effective Models for Simulation of Thermal Stratification and Mixing Induced by Steam Injection into a Large Pool of Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Effective Heat Source (EHS and Effective Momentum Source (EMS models have been proposed to predict the development of thermal stratification and mixing during a steam injection into a large pool of water. These effective models are implemented in GOTHIC software and validated against the POOLEX STB-20 and STB-21 tests and the PPOOLEX MIX-01 test. First, the EHS model is validated against STB-20 test which shows the development of thermal stratification. Different numerical schemes and grid resolutions have been tested. A 48×114 grid with second order scheme is sufficient to capture the vertical temperature distribution in the pool. Next, the EHS and EMS models are validated against STB-21 test. Effective momentum is estimated based on the water level oscillations in the blowdown pipe. An effective momentum selected within the experimental measurement uncertainty can reproduce the mixing details. Finally, the EHS-EMS models are validated against MIX-01 test which has improved space and time resolution of temperature measurements inside the blowdown pipe. Excellent agreement in averaged pool temperature and water level in the pool between the experiment and simulation has been achieved. The development of thermal stratification in the pool is also well captured in the simulation as well as the thermal behavior of the pool during the mixing phase.

  17. Users' guide to CACECO containment analysis code. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peak, R.D.

    1979-06-01

    The CACECO containment analysis code was developed to predict the thermodynamic responses of LMFBR containment facilities to a variety of accidents. The code is included in the National Energy Software Center Library at Argonne National Laboratory as Program No. 762. This users' guide describes the CACECO code and its data input requirements. The code description covers the many mathematical models used and the approximations used in their solution. The descriptions are detailed to the extent that the user can modify the code to suit his unique needs, and, indeed, the reader is urged to consider code modification acceptable.

  18. LMFBR models for the ORIGEN2 computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croff, A.G.; McAdoo, J.W.; Bjerke, M.A.

    1983-06-01

    Reactor physics calculations have led to the development of nine liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) models for the ORIGEN2 computer code. Four of the models are based on the U-Pu fuel cycle, two are based on the Th-U-Pu fuel cycle, and three are based on the Th-/sup 233/U fuel cycle. The reactor models are based on cross sections taken directly from the reactor physics codes. Descriptions of the reactor models as well as values for the ORIGEN2 flux parameters THERM, RES, and FAST are given.

  19. LMFBR models for the ORIGEN2 computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croff, A.G.; McAdoo, J.W.; Bjerke, M.A.

    1981-10-01

    Reactor physics calculations have led to the development of nine liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) models for the ORIGEN2 computer code. Four of the models are based on the U-Pu fuel cycle, two are based on the Th-U-Pu fuel cycle, and three are based on the Th-/sup 238/U fuel cycle. The reactor models are based on cross sections taken directly from the reactor physics codes. Descriptions of the reactor models as well as values for the ORIGEN2 flux parameters THERM, RES, and FAST are given.

  20. Deposition and removal of radioactive isotopes from LMFBR components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, E.F.; Lutton, J.M.; Maffei, H.P.

    1980-01-01

    The development of an analytical model to describe the production, transport and eventual removal of radioactive materials in the primary sodium of LMFBR's is a continuing Sodium Technology activity sponsored by the Department of Energy. This paper describes studies directed toward obtaining an understanding of the deposition from sodium of fuel cladding activated corrosion products onto stainless steel alloys and the effect of their diffusion into the base metal on the process required to decontaminate it. The objective of the decontamination operation is to reduce the activity to a level allowing hands on maintenance without causing unacceptable damage to the component.

  1. Experimental determination of coolant flow pattern in hot and cold pools of PFBR using a large scale model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Indranil Banerjee; Rajesh, K.; AnandaRaj, M.; Venkata Ramanan, J.; Gopal, C.A.; Padmakumar, G.; Prakash, V.; Vaidyanathan, G. [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The construction of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) to generate 500 MWe has commenced at Kalpakkam, India. PFBR is a liquid sodium cooled pool type reactor with two secondary loops. The primary sodium pool is divided into hot pool and cold pool by means of Inner vessel. Cold sodium at 670 K is pumped through the core subassemblies and after absorbing the fission heat in the core, the sodium comes out and mixes with the hot pool at 820 K. This hot sodium exchanges heat with secondary sodium in Intermediate Heat Exchangers (IHX) which in turn transfers the heat to water in the steam generator leading to production of superheated steam to generate power. All the components like Control Plug (CP), IHX, Decay Heat Exchangers (DHX), Pump etc., are immersed in the primary sodium pool. The presence of these components influence the flow and velocity patterns of the coolant, in the hot and cold pools. The coolant behaviour in the pool is an indicator of the temperature pattern in the pool and the mechanical and thermal stresses induced on the immersed structures during transients is of significance for the safe operation of the reactor, designed for a life span of 40 years. Hence it is essential to understand the pattern of coolant flow and velocity patterns in hot and cold pools, particularly near IHX and Control plug. A 1:4 scale down model in stainless steel is constructed, simulating all the internal structures of the PFBR primary circuit for investigating the various parameters experimentally in water, to enhance the confidence in design of the primary system. The velocity distribution in the hot pool and cold pool at different regions, around the control plug, around the IHX inlet window were studied experimentally. As the coolant flow path is mainly influenced by the gravity force and inertia force, the study is conducted using Froude similitude. The magnitude of the velocity of the fluid at different points on the selected

  2. Effective Momentum and heat flux models for simulation of stratification and mixing in a large pool of water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua Li; Villanueva, W.; Kudinov, P. [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-06-15

    Performance of a boiling water reactor (BWR) containment is mostly determined by reliable operation of pressure suppression pool which serves as a heat sink to cool and condense steam released from the core vessel. Thermal stratification in the pool can significantly impede the pool's pressure suppression capacity. A source of momentum is required in order to break stratification and mix the pool. It is important to have reliable prediction of transient development of stratification and mixing in the pool in different regimes of steam injection. Previously, we have proposed to model the effect of steam injection on the mixing and stratification with the Effective Heat Source (EHS) and the Effective Momentum Source (EMS) models. The EHS model is used to provide thermal effect of steam injection on the pool, preserving heat and mass balance. The EMS model is used to simulate momentum induced by steam injection in different flow regimes. The EMS model is based on the combination of (1) synthetic jet theory, which predicts effective momentum if amplitude and frequency of flow oscillations in the pipe are given, and (2) model proposed by Aya and Nariai for prediction of the amplitude and frequency of oscillations at a given pool temperature and steam mass flux. The complete EHS/EMS models only require the steam mass flux, initial pool bulk temperature, and design-specific parameters, to predict thermal stratification and mixing in a pressure suppression pool. In this work we use EHS/EMS models implemented in containment thermal hydraulic code GOTHIC. The POOLEX/PPOOLEX experiments (Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland) are utilized, to (a) quantify errors due to GOTHIC's physical models and numerical schemes, (b) propose necessary improvements in GOTHIC sub-grid scale modeling, and (c) validate our proposed models. Specifically the data from POOLEX STB-21 and PPOOLEX STR-03 and STR-04 tests are used for validation of the EHS and EMS models in this

  3. D7 debris-bed experiment. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, G W; Ottinger, C A; Lipinski, R J

    1983-08-01

    The D7 experiment investigated heat removal from a shallow, stratified bed of UO/sub 2/ particulate in sodium. The particle diameters ranged from 0.1 to 1.0 mm, with the largest particles at the bottom. The bed thickness was 74 mm and the average porosity was 41%. The incipient dryout power varied from 0.43 W/g to 0.25 W/g as the sodium subcooling (saturation temperature minus overlying pool temperature) was reduced from 390/sup 0/C to 170/sup 0/C. These powers were only slighlty above the incipient boiling powers. Such low dryout powers are believed due to the interaction of capillary force with bed stratification. With a subccoling of 130/sup 0/C several sudden decreases in the saturation temperature occurred. These are believed due to channel formation, which causes a reduction in the capillary pressure in the bed.

  4. Two distinct pools of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels in the somatic plasma membrane of central principal neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, W.A.; Kasugai, Y.; Ferraguti, F.; Storm, J.F.

    2010-01-01

    Although nerve cell membranes are often assumed to be uniform with respect to electrical properties, there is increasing evidence for compartmentalization into subdomains with heterogeneous impacts on the overall cell function. Such microdomains are characterized by specific sets of proteins determining their functional properties. Recently, clustering of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BKCa) channels was shown at sites of subsurface membrane cisterns in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PC), where they likely participate in building a subcellular signaling unit, the 'PLasmERosome'. By applying SDS-digested freeze-fracture replica labeling (SDS-FRL) and postembedding immunogold electron microscopy, we have now studied the spatial organization of somatic BKCa channels in neocortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons, principal neurons of the central and basolateral amygdaloid nuclei, hippocampal pyramidal neurons and dentate gyrus (DG) granule cells to establish whether there is a common organizational principle in the distribution of BKCa channels in central principal neurons. In all cell types analyzed, somatic BKCa channels were found to be non-homogenously distributed in the plasma membrane, forming two pools of channels with one pool consisting of clustered channels and the other of scattered channels in the extrasynaptic membrane. Quantitative analysis by means of SDS-FRL revealed that about two-thirds of BKCa channels belong to the scattered pool and about one-third to the clustered pool in principal cell somata. Overall densities of channels in both pools differed in the different cell types analyzed, although being considerably lower compared to cerebellar PC. Postembedding immunogold labeling revealed association of clustered channels with subsurface membrane cisterns and confirmed extrasynaptic localization of scattered channels. This study indicates a common organizational principle for somatic BKCa channels in central principal neurons with the

  5. Analysis of Pu-Only Partitioning Strategies in LMFBR Fuel Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuel Bays; Gilles Youinou

    2013-02-01

    Sodium cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) have been under consideration for production of electricity, fissile material production, and for destruction of transuranics for decades. The neutron economy of a SFR can be operated in one of two ways. One possibility is to operate the reactor in a transuranic burner mode which has been the focus of active R&D in the last 15 years. However, prior to that the focus was on breeding transuranics. This later mode of managing the neutron economy relies on ensuring the maximum fuel utilization possible in such a way as to maximize the amount of plutonium produced per unit of fission energy in the reactor core. The goal of maximizing plutonium production in this study is as fissile feed stock for the production of MOX fuel to be used in Light Water Reactors (LWR). Throughout the l970’s, this fuel cycle scenario was the focus of much research by the Atomic Energy Commission in the event that uranium supplies would be scarce. To date, there has been sufficient uranium to supply the once through nuclear fuel cycle. However, interest in a synergistic relationship Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBR) and a consumer LWR fleet persists, prompting this study. This study considered LMFBR concepts with varying additions of axial and radial reflectors. Three scenarios were considered in collaboration with a companion study on the LWR-MOX designs based on plutonium nuclide vectors produced by this study. The first scenario is a LMFBR providing fissile material to make MOX fuel where the MOX part of the fuel cycle is operated in a once-through-then-out mode. The second scenario is the same as the first but with the MOX part of the fuel cycle multi-recycling its own plutonium with LMFBR being used for the make-up feed. In these first two scenarios, plutonium partitioning from the minor actinides (MA) was assumed. Also, the plutonium management strategy of the LMFBR ensured that only the high fissile purity plutonium bred from blankets was

  6. Assessing the general safety and tolerability of vildagliptin: value of pooled analyses from a large safety database versus evaluation of individual studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schweizer A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Anja Schweizer1, Sylvie Dejager2, James E Foley3, Wolfgang Kothny31Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, Switzerland; 2Novartis Pharma SAS, Rueil-Malmaison, France; 3Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ, USAAim: Analyzing safety aspects of a drug from individual studies can lead to difficult-to-interpret results. The aim of this paper is therefore to assess the general safety and tolerability, including incidences of the most common adverse events (AEs, of vildagliptin based on a large pooled database of Phase II and III clinical trials.Methods: Safety data were pooled from 38 studies of ≥12 to ≥104 weeks' duration. AE profiles of vildagliptin (50 mg bid; N = 6116 were evaluated relative to a pool of comparators (placebo and active comparators; N = 6210. Absolute incidence rates were calculated for all AEs, serious AEs (SAEs, discontinuations due to AEs, and deaths.Results: Overall AEs, SAEs, discontinuations due to AEs, and deaths were all reported with a similar frequency in patients receiving vildagliptin (69.1%, 8.9%, 5.7%, and 0.4%, respectively and patients receiving comparators (69.0%, 9.0%, 6.4%, and 0.4%, respectively, whereas drug-related AEs were seen with a lower frequency in vildagliptin-treated patients (15.7% vs 21.7% with comparators. The incidences of the most commonly reported specific AEs were also similar between vildagliptin and comparators, except for increased incidences of hypoglycemia, tremor, and hyperhidrosis in the comparator group related to the use of sulfonylureas.Conclusions: The present pooled analysis shows that vildagliptin was overall well tolerated in clinical trials of up to >2 years in duration. The data further emphasize the value of a pooled analysis from a large safety database versus assessing safety and tolerability from individual studies.Keywords: type 2 diabetes, dipeptidyl peptidase-4, edema, safety, vildagliptin

  7. Large scale experiments simulating hydrogen distribution in a spent fuel pool building during a hypothetical fuel uncovery accident scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mignot, Guillaume; Paranjape, Sidharth; Paladino, Domenico; Jaeckel, Bernd; Rydl, Adolf [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)

    2016-08-15

    Following the Fukushima accident and its extended station blackout, attention was brought to the importance of the spent fuel pools' (SFPs) behavior in case of a prolonged loss of the cooling system. Since then, many analytical works have been performed to estimate the timing of hypothetical fuel uncovery for various SFP types. Experimentally, however, little was done to investigate issues related to the formation of a flammable gas mixture, distribution, and stratification in the SFP building itself and to some extent assess the capability for the code to correctly predict it. This paper presents the main outcomes of the Experiments on Spent Fuel Pool (ESFP) project carried out under the auspices of Swissnuclear (Framework 2012–2013) in the PANDA facility at the Paul Scherrer Institut in Switzerland. It consists of an experimental investigation focused on hydrogen concentration build-up into a SFP building during a predefined scaled scenario for different venting positions. Tests follow a two-phase scenario. Initially steam is released to mimic the boiling of the pool followed by a helium/steam mixture release to simulate the deterioration of the oxidizing spent fuel. Results shows that while the SFP building would mainly be inerted by the presence of a high concentration of steam, the volume located below the level of the pool in adjacent rooms would maintain a high air content. The interface of the two-gas mixture presents the highest risk of flammability. Additionally, it was observed that the gas mixture could become stagnant leading locally to high hydrogen concentration while steam condenses. Overall, the experiments provide relevant information for the potentially hazardous gas distribution formed in the SFP building and hints on accident management and on eventual retrofitting measures to be implemented in the SFP building.

  8. Large Scale Experiments Simulating Hydrogen Distribution in a Spent Fuel Pool Building During a Hypothetical Fuel Uncovery Accident Scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Mignot

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the main outcomes of the Experiments on Spent Fuel Pool (ESFP project carried out under the auspices of Swissnuclear (Framework 2012–2013 in the PANDA facility at the Paul Scherrer Institut in Switzerland. It consists of an experimental investigation focused on hydrogen concentration build-up into a SFP building during a predefined scaled scenario for different venting positions. Tests follow a two-phase scenario. Initially steam is released to mimic the boiling of the pool followed by a helium/steam mixture release to simulate the deterioration of the oxidizing spent fuel. Results shows that while the SFP building would mainly be inerted by the presence of a high concentration of steam, the volume located below the level of the pool in adjacent rooms would maintain a high air content. The interface of the two-gas mixture presents the highest risk of flammability. Additionally, it was observed that the gas mixture could become stagnant leading locally to high hydrogen concentration while steam condenses. Overall, the experiments provide relevant information for the potentially hazardous gas distribution formed in the SFP building and hints on accident management and on eventual retrofitting measures to be implemented in the SFP building.

  9. Development of a simple estimation tool for LMFBR construction cost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Kazuo; Kinoshita, Izumi [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo (Japan). Komae Research Lab

    1999-05-01

    A simple tool for estimating the construction costs of liquid-metal-cooled fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs), 'Simple Cost' was developed in this study. Simple Cost is based on a new estimation formula that can reduce the amount of design data required to estimate construction costs. Consequently, Simple cost can be used to estimate the construction costs of innovative LMFBR concepts for which detailed design has not been carried out. The results of test calculation show that Simple Cost provides cost estimations equivalent to those obtained with conventional methods within the range of plant power from 325 to 1500 MWe. Sensitivity analyses for typical design parameters were conducted using Simple Cost. The effects of four major parameters - reactor vessel diameter, core outlet temperature, sodium handling area and number of secondary loops - on the construction costs of LMFBRs were evaluated quantitatively. The results show that the reduction of sodium handling area is particularly effective in reducing construction costs. (author)

  10. Simple LMFBR axial-flow friction-factor correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Y.N.; Todreas, N.E.

    1982-12-01

    Complicated LMFBR axial lead-length averaged friction-factor correlations are reduced to an easy, ready-to-use function of bundle Reynolds number for wire-wrapped bundles. The function together with the power curves to calculate the associated constants are incorporated in a computer preprocessor, EZFRIC. The constants required for the calculation of the subchannels and bundle friction factors are derived and correlated into power curves of geometrical parameters. A computer program, FRIC, which can alternatively be used to accurately calculate these constants is also included. The accurate values of the constants and the corresponding values predicted by the power curves and percentage error of prediction are tabulated for a wide variety of geometries of interest.

  11. Fatigue of LMFBR piping due to flow stratification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, W.S.

    1983-01-01

    Flow stratification due to reverse flow was simulated in a 1/5-scale water model of a LMFBR primary pipe loop. The stratified flow was observed to have a dynamic interface region which oscillated in a wave pattern. The behavior of the interface was characterized in terms of location, local temperature fluctuation and duration for various reverse flow conditions. A structural assessment was performed to determine the effects of stratified flow on the fatigue life of the pipe. Both the static and dynamic aspects of flow stratification were examined. The dynamic interface produces thermal striping on the inside of the pipe wall which is shown to have the most deleterious effect on the pipe wall and produce significant fatigue damage relative to a static interface.

  12. Finite-element formulations for the thermal stress analysis of two- and three-dimensional thin reactor structures. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulak, R.F.; Kennedy, J.M.; Belytschko, T.B.; Schoeberle, D.F.

    1977-01-01

    In several postulated LMFBR subassembly-to-subassembly failure propagation events, it is hypothesized that the duct wall of an accident subassembly fails and deposits molten fuel on the outer wall of an adjacent subassembly. It is therefore necessary to determine if the deposited fuel will fail the adjacent wall and thus propagate the event. This entails a thermal stress analysis, and since at times the adjacent subassembly is internally pressurized, thermomechanical analysis are also of value. Solutions are presented for several elastic plastic thermal problems. Some of these examples are compared to available analytic solutions. In addition, the hypothetical accident of molten fuel deposition on the adjacent hexcan is addressed. Combinations of pressure and thermal loading are considered. It is shown that the principal feature of the response is a large in-plane compressive stress which would undoubtedly cause buckling.

  13. Multiobjective fuel management optimization for self-fuel-providing LMFBR using genetic algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toshinsky, Vladimir G.; Sekimoto, Hiroshi [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, O-Okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Toshinsky, Georgy I. [State Scientific Center, Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    1999-06-01

    One of the conceptual options under consideration for the future of nuclear power is the long-term development without fuel reprocessing. This concept is based on a reactor that requires no plutonium reprocessing for itself, and provides high efficiency of natural uranium utilization, so called Self-Fuel-Providing LMFBR (SFPR). Several design considerations were previously given to this reactor type which, however, suffer from some problems connected with insufficient power flattening, large reactivity swings during burnup cycles, and peak fuel burnup being significantly higher than recent technology experience, which is about 18% for U-10 wt%Zr metallic fuel to be considered. Yet, the mentioned core parameters demonstrate high sensitivity to the fuel management strategy selected for the reactor. Therefore, the aim of this study is to develop a practical tool for the improvement of the core characteristics by fuel management optimization, which is based on advanced optimization techniques such as Genetic Algorithms (GA). The calculation results obtained by a simplified reactor model can serve as estimates of achievable values for mentioned core parameters, which are necessary to make decisions at the preliminary optimization stage.

  14. Effects of governing parameters on steady-state inter-wrapper flow in an LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriya, Shoichi [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Abiko, Chiba (Japan). Abiko Research Lab

    2001-04-01

    Hydraulic experiments were performed using a 1/8th scale rectangular model, based on a Japanese demonstration fast breeder reactor design, in order to study fundamental characteristics of interwrapper flows occurring under steady state conditions in an LMFBR. The steady state interwrapper flow of which direction was downward in the center region and upward in the peripheral region of a core barrel was observed because of the radial static pressure gradient in the upper part of the core barrel, produced by a core blockage effect resulting from an above core structure with a perforated skirt. Thermal stratification phenomena were moreover observed in the interwrapper region, created by the hot steady state interwrapper flow from an upper plenum and the cold leakage flow through the separated plate of the core barrel. The thermal interface was generated in higher part of the core barrel when the core blockage effect was smaller and Richardson number and the leakage flow rate ratio were larger. Significant temperature fluctuations occurred in the peripheral region of the core barrel, when the difference between the interface elevations in the center and peripheral regions of the core barrel was enough large. (author)

  15. Vitamin D Pooling Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers brought together investigators from 10 cohorts to conduct a large prospective epidemiologic study of the association between vitamin D status and seven rarer cancers.

  16. Radiative Transfer Modeling of a Large Pool Fire by Discrete Ordinates, Discrete Transfer, Ray Tracing, Monte Carlo and Moment Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, K. A.; Ripoll, J.-F.; Wray, A. A.; Joseph, D.; ElHafi, M.

    2004-01-01

    Five computational methods for solution of the radiative transfer equation in an absorbing-emitting and non-scattering gray medium were compared on a 2 m JP-8 pool fire. The temperature and absorption coefficient fields were taken from a synthetic fire due to the lack of a complete set of experimental data for fires of this size. These quantities were generated by a code that has been shown to agree well with the limited quantity of relevant data in the literature. Reference solutions to the governing equation were determined using the Monte Carlo method and a ray tracing scheme with high angular resolution. Solutions using the discrete transfer method, the discrete ordinate method (DOM) with both S(sub 4) and LC(sub 11) quadratures, and moment model using the M(sub 1) closure were compared to the reference solutions in both isotropic and anisotropic regions of the computational domain. DOM LC(sub 11) is shown to be the more accurate than the commonly used S(sub 4) quadrature technique, especially in anisotropic regions of the fire domain. This represents the first study where the M(sub 1) method was applied to a combustion problem occurring in a complex three-dimensional geometry. The M(sub 1) results agree well with other solution techniques, which is encouraging for future applications to similar problems since it is computationally the least expensive solution technique. Moreover, M(sub 1) results are comparable to DOM S(sub 4).

  17. PDA: Pooled DNA analyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chin-Yu

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Association mapping using abundant single nucleotide polymorphisms is a powerful tool for identifying disease susceptibility genes for complex traits and exploring possible genetic diversity. Genotyping large numbers of SNPs individually is performed routinely but is cost prohibitive for large-scale genetic studies. DNA pooling is a reliable and cost-saving alternative genotyping method. However, no software has been developed for complete pooled-DNA analyses, including data standardization, allele frequency estimation, and single/multipoint DNA pooling association tests. This motivated the development of the software, 'PDA' (Pooled DNA Analyzer, to analyze pooled DNA data. Results We develop the software, PDA, for the analysis of pooled-DNA data. PDA is originally implemented with the MATLAB® language, but it can also be executed on a Windows system without installing the MATLAB®. PDA provides estimates of the coefficient of preferential amplification and allele frequency. PDA considers an extended single-point association test, which can compare allele frequencies between two DNA pools constructed under different experimental conditions. Moreover, PDA also provides novel chromosome-wide multipoint association tests based on p-value combinations and a sliding-window concept. This new multipoint testing procedure overcomes a computational bottleneck of conventional haplotype-oriented multipoint methods in DNA pooling analyses and can handle data sets having a large pool size and/or large numbers of polymorphic markers. All of the PDA functions are illustrated in the four bona fide examples. Conclusion PDA is simple to operate and does not require that users have a strong statistical background. The software is available at http://www.ibms.sinica.edu.tw/%7Ecsjfann/first%20flow/pda.htm.

  18. Molecular analysis of a large subtelomeric nucleotide-binding-site-leucine-rich-repeat family in two representative genotypes of the major gene pools of Phaseolus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geffroy, Valérie; Macadré, Catherine; David, Perrine; Pedrosa-Harand, Andrea; Sévignac, Mireille; Dauga, Catherine; Langin, Thierry

    2009-02-01

    In common bean, the B4 disease resistance gene cluster is a complex cluster localized at the end of linkage group (LG) B4, containing at least three R specificities to the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum. To investigate the evolution of this R cluster since the divergence of Andean and Mesoamerican gene pools, DNA sequences were characterized from two representative genotypes of the two major gene pools of common bean (BAT93: Mesoamerican; JaloEEP558: Andean). Sequences encoding 29 B4-CC nucleotide-binding-site-leucine-rich-repeat (B4-CNL) genes were determined-12 from JaloEEP558 and 17 from BAT93. Although sequence exchange events were identified, phylogenetic analyses revealed that they were not frequent enough to lead to homogenization of B4-CNL sequences within a haplotype. Genetic mapping based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis separation confirmed that the B4-CNL family is a large family specific to one end of LG B4 and is present at two distinct blocks separated by 26 cM. Fluorescent in situ hybridization on meiotic pachytene chromosomes revealed that two B4-CNL blocks are located in the subtelomeric region of the short arm of chromosome 4 on both sides of a heterochromatic block (knob), suggesting that this peculiar genomic environment may favor the proliferation of a large R gene cluster.

  19. Molecular Analysis of a Large Subtelomeric Nucleotide-Binding-Site–Leucine-Rich-Repeat Family in Two Representative Genotypes of the Major Gene Pools of Phaseolus vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geffroy, Valérie; Macadré, Catherine; David, Perrine; Pedrosa-Harand, Andrea; Sévignac, Mireille; Dauga, Catherine; Langin, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    In common bean, the B4 disease resistance (R) gene cluster is a complex cluster localized at the end of linkage group (LG) B4, containing at least three R specificities to the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum. To investigate the evolution of this R cluster since the divergence of Andean and Mesoamerican gene pools, DNA sequences were characterized from two representative genotypes of the two major gene pools of common bean (BAT93: Mesoamerican; JaloEEP558: Andean). Sequences encoding 29 B4-CC nucleotide-binding-site–leucine-rich-repeat (B4-CNL) genes were determined—12 from JaloEEP558 and 17 from BAT93. Although sequence exchange events were identified, phylogenetic analyses revealed that they were not frequent enough to lead to homogenization of B4-CNL sequences within a haplotype. Genetic mapping based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis separation confirmed that the B4-CNL family is a large family specific to one end of LG B4 and is present at two distinct blocks separated by 26 cM. Fluorescent in situ hybridization on meiotic pachytene chromosomes revealed that two B4-CNL blocks are located in the subtelomeric region of the short arm of chromosome 4 on both sides of a heterochromatic block (knob), suggesting that this peculiar genomic environment may favor the proliferation of a large R gene cluster. PMID:19087965

  20. Vernal Pools

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This is a polygon layer representing existing vernal pool complexes in California's Central Valley, as identified and mapped by Dr. Robert F. Holland. The purpose of...

  1. Multicell slug flow heat transfer analysis of finite LMFBR bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeung, M.K.; Wolf, L.

    1978-12-01

    An analytical two-dimensional, multi-region, multi-cell technique has been developed for the thermal analysis of LMFBR rod bundles. Local temperature fields of various unit cells were obtained for 7, 19, and 37-rod bundles of different geometries and power distributions. The validity of the technique has been verified by its excellent agreement with the THTB calculational result. By comparing the calculated fully-developed circumferential clad temperature distribution with those of the experimental measurements, an axial correction factor has been derived to account for the entrance effect for practical considerations. Moreover, the knowledge of the local temperature field of the rod bundle leads to the determination of the effective mixing lengths L/sub ij/ for adjacent subchannels of various geometries. It was shown that the implementation of the accurately determined L/sub ij/ into COBRA-IIIC calculations has fairly significant effects on intersubchannel mixing. In addition, a scheme has been proposed to couple the 2-D distributed and lumped parameter calculation by COBRA-IIIC such that the entrance effect can be implanted into the distributed parameter analysis. The technique has demonstrated its applicability for a 7-rod bundle and the results of calculation were compared to those of three-dimensional analyses and experimental measurements.

  2. Gravitational agglomeration of post-HCDA LMFBR nonspherical aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, R. F.

    1980-12-01

    A theoretical investigation of collisional dynamics of two particle interactions in a gravitational field is reported. This research is unique in that it is the first attempt at modeling the hydrodynamic interactions between a nonspherical particle and a spherical particle undergoing gravitational collisions in an LMFBR environment. Basic definitions and expressions are developed for nonspherical particles and related to spherical particles by means of shape factors. Using volume equivalent diameter as the defining length in the gravitational collision kernel, the aerodynamic shape factor, k, the density correction factor, alpha, and the gravitational collision shape factor, beta, are used to correct the collision kernel for the case of collisions between aerosol agglomerates. The Navier-Stokes equation in oblate spheroidal coordinates is solved to model a nonspherical particle and then the dynamic equations for two particle motions are developed. A computer program NGCEFF is constructed, the Navier-Stokes equation is solved by the finite difference method, and the dynamical equations are solved by Gear's method. It is concluded that the aerosol gravitational collision shape factor can be determined by further theoretical work based on the concepts and methods developed in this dissertation.

  3. PROSA-1: a probabilistic response-surface analysis code. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaurio, J. K.; Mueller, C.

    1978-06-01

    Techniques for probabilistic response-surface analysis have been developed to obtain the probability distributions of the consequences of postulated nuclear-reactor accidents. The uncertainties of the consequences are caused by the variability of the system and model input parameters used in the accident analysis. Probability distributions are assigned to the input parameters, and parameter values are systematically chosen from these distributions. These input parameters are then used in deterministic consequence analyses performed by mechanistic accident-analysis codes. The results of these deterministic consequence analyses are used to generate the coefficients for analytical functions that approximate the consequences in terms of the selected input parameters. These approximating functions are used to generate the probability distributions of the consequences with random sampling being used to obtain values for the accident parameters from their distributions. A computer code PROSA has been developed for implementing the probabilistic response-surface technique. Special features of the code generate or treat sensitivities, statistical moments of the input and output variables, regionwise response surfaces, correlated input parameters, and conditional distributions. The code can also be used for calculating important distributions of the input parameters. The use of the code is illustrated in conjunction with the fast-running accident-analysis code SACO to provide probability studies of LMFBR hypothetical core-disruptive accidents. However, the methods and the programming are general and not limited to such applications.

  4. Multirecycling of Plutonium from LMFBR Blanket in Standard PWRs Loaded with MOX Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonat Sen; Gilles Youinou

    2013-02-01

    It is now well-known that, from a physics standpoint, Pu, or even TRU (i.e. Pu+M.A.), originating from LEU fuel irradiated in PWRs can be multirecycled also in PWRs using MOX fuel. However, the degradation of the isotopic composition during irradiation necessitates using enriched U in conjunction with the MOX fuel either homogeneously or heterogeneously to maintain the Pu (or TRU) content at a level allowing safe operation of the reactor, i.e. below about 10%. The study is related to another possible utilization of the excess Pu produced in the blanket of a LMFBR, namely in a PWR(MOX). In this case the more Pu is bred in the LMFBR, the more PWR(MOX) it can sustain. The important difference between the Pu coming from the blanket of a LMFBR and that coming from a PWR(LEU) is its isotopic composition. The first one contains about 95% of fissile isotopes whereas the second one contains only about 65% of fissile isotopes. As it will be shown later, this difference allows the PWR fed by Pu from the LMFBR blanket to operate with natural U instead of enriched U when it is fed by Pu from PWR(LEU)

  5. LMFBR safety. 6. Review of current issues and bibliography of literature (1977)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, J.R.; Keilholtz, G.W.

    1978-07-13

    This report discusses the current status of liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) development. Selected bibliographic information on LMFBRs relative to the development and safety of the breeder reactor is presented for the year 1977. The bibliography consists of approximately 198 abstracts covering research and development, operating experience, and design practices. Keyword, author, and permuted-title indexes are included for completeness.

  6. Espacio Pool

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Espacio Pool es un grupo abierto de usuarios vinculados a la Facultad de Bellas Artes UCM que actúa sobre los márgenes que la circundan. Toma su nombre de los estanques vacíos ubicados en los jardines de la cafetería, y elige el término anglosajón por sus connotaciones relativas a lo participativo y autogestionado. Su objetivo es habitar los espacios de “vacuidad” para que sean efectivos y permutadores. Espacio Pool organiza la celebración de encuentros a partir de la construcción de disposit...

  7. Large-scale precipitation tracking and the MJO over the Maritime Continent and Indo-Pacific warm pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerns, Brandon W.; Chen, Shuyi S.

    2016-08-01

    A large-scale precipitation tracking (LPT) method is developed to track convection and precipitation associated with the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) using the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission 3B42 rainfall data from October to March 1998-2015. LPT uses spatially smoothed 3 day rainfall accumulation to identify and track precipitation features in time with a minimum size of 300,000 km2 and time continuity at least 10 days. While not all LPT systems (LPTs) are attributable to the MJO, among the 199 LPTs, there were 42 with a mean eastward propagation of at least 2 m s-1, which are considered to be MJO convective initiation events. These LPTs capture the diversity of the MJO convection, which is not well depicted by the Real-time Multivariate MJO (RMM) index or the outgoing longwave radiation MJO index. During the 17 years, there were 17 instances out of 45 with a MJO signature in the RMM without eastward propagating LPTs. Among the 42 eastward propagating LPTs, 24 propagated across the Maritime Continent (MC), which confirms the MC barrier effect. Among the cases that crossed the MC from the Indian Ocean to the western Pacific (MC crossing), 18 (75%) had a significant MJO signature in the RMM index. In contrast, only six (33%) of the non-MC-crossing cases occurred with a RMM MJO signal. There is a significant seasonal and interannual variability with MC-crossing LPTs occurring in December more commonly than other months. More MC-crossing events were observed during La Niña than El Niño, which is consistent with the observations of stronger and more frequent MJO events identified by RMM during La Niña years.

  8. Liquid metal reactor KALIMER development - Study on the high temperature properties of the steam generator tubing for LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yong Soo; Kim, Soon Tae; Park, Hui Sang; Kim, Soo Han [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Young Sik [Andong National University, Andong (Korea)

    1999-04-01

    This work dealt with the evaluation of super stainless steels for steam generator tubing of LMFBR. The experimental alloys were designed to simulate the elimination of alloying elements, in special, C and N. Regardless of carbon contents, super stainless steels showed the excellent properties (tensile properties and corrosion resistance) than those of 9Cr-1Mo steel. Nitrogen content has affected positively the ultimate tensile strength and yield strength by TT(Thermal Treatment), but the elongation was reduced by TT in case of nitrogen free alloy and the elongation was largely increased by TT in case of nitrogen bearing alloys. In acidic chloride environment, nitrogen has influenced a little on corrosion potential and critical current density, but largely on passive current density, especially, at high potential. However, the trend of corrosion potential and critical current density by nitrogen was similar to the results in acidic solutions, but passive current density was largely affected by nitrogen content of stainless steels. 29 refs., 24 figs., 8 tabs. (Author)

  9. Coupling channel evolution monitoring and RFID tracking in a large, wandering, gravel-bed river: Insights into sediment routing on geomorphic continuity through a riffle-pool sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapuis, Margot; Dufour, Simon; Provansal, Mireille; Couvert, Bernard; de Linares, Matthieu

    2015-02-01

    Bedload transport and bedform mobility in large gravel-bed rivers are not easily monitored, especially during floods. Large reaches present difficulties in bed access during flows for flow measurements. Because of these logistical issues, the current knowledge about bedload transport processes and bedform mobility lacks field-based information, while this missing information would precisely match river management needs. The lack of information linking channel evolution and particle displacements is even more striking in wandering reaches. The Durance River is a large, wandering, gravel-bed river (catchment area: 14,280 km2; mean width: 240 m), located in the southern French Alps and highly impacted by flow diversion and gravel mining. In order to improve current understanding of the link between sediment transport processes and river bed morphodynamics, we set up a sediment particle survey in the channel using Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tracking and topographic surveys (GPS RTK and scour chains) for a 4-year recurrence interval flood. By combining topographic changes before and after a flood, intraflood erosion/deposition patterns from scour chains, differential routing of tracer particles, and spatial distribution of bed shear stress through a complex reach, this paper aims to define the critical shear stress for significant sediment mobility in this setting. Gravel tracking highlights displacement patterns in agreement with bar downstream migration and transport of particles across the riffle within this single flood event. Because no velocity measurements were possible during flood, a TELEMAC three-dimensional model helped interpret particle displacements by estimating spatial distribution of shear stresses and flow directions at peak flow. Although RFID tracking in a large, wandering, gravel-bed river does have some technical limitations (burial, recovery process time-consuming), it provides useful information on sediment routing through a riffle-pool

  10. Experimental study on thermal stratification in a reactor hot plenum of a Japanese demonstration LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koga, Tomonari [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Abiko, Chiba (Japan). Abiko Research Lab.; Yamamoto, K.; Takakuwa, M.; Kajiwara, H.; Watanabe, O.; Akamatsu, K.

    1997-12-31

    Thermal stratification which occurs in a reactor hot plenum after reactor trip has been regarded as one of the most serious phenomena in the thermal-hydraulics of LMFBR. Using a 1/8th scale water model, an experimental study has been conducted to estimate the thermal stratification for a Japanese demonstration LMFBR (DFBR). In the present study, reactor trip was simulated by changing the core outlet temperature with maintaining a constant flow rate. Temperature distribution was measured during the transient and detailed phenomena have been acquired in the study. A severe density interface on structural integrity occurs in a hot plenum under the thermal stratification. Experimental results for temperature gradient and rising speed of the density interface were estimated based on a similarity rule so that an actual condition in the DFBR could be fully discerned. (author)

  11. Thermal performances and melting risk assessment in a LMFBR fuel pin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vettraino, F.; Cacciabue, P. C.; Brunelli, F.

    1985-02-01

    A reliable evaluation of fuel temperature is a key safety requirement in the design of the fuel assembly of a nuclear reactor, especially in the case of a LMFBR whose efficient operation requires high thermal performance fuel. The physico-chemical properties such as density, oxygen to metal ratio and thermal conductivity of a typical LMFBR mixed-oxide fuel, which are known to change in a remarkable way under irradiation, strongly affect the temperature profile within the fuel pellet. A statistical analysis of the temperature values in the fuel of the Italian Fast Reactor PEC, has been performed by means of the RSM code (Response Surface Methodology) coupled to a Monte-Carlo Technique (MUP code), in order to demonstrate that the melting risk is substantially negligible.

  12. Preliminary development of inservice inspection methods for LMFBR's

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spanner, J.C.

    1976-03-01

    Although firm requirements have not yet been established in the United States for inservice inspection of LMFBR's, some initial development work on potentially applicable nondestructive testing methods has been conducted by the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory. The paper contains a synopsis of investigations conducted in each of the following areas: ultrasonic examination of austenitic stainless steel welds, electro-thermal NDT method for stainless steel components, eddy current methods for in-situ examination of heat exchanger tubes, and under-sodium viewing and ranging. Development activities and experimental results obtained to date in each of these areas are highlighted, along with comments on potential applicability for inservice inspection of LMFBR's.

  13. Mechanical properties of transition joint materials in support of LMFBR steam generator design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkman, C.R.; King, J.F.; Strizak, J.P.; Klueh, R.L.; Booker, M.K.

    1977-01-01

    Mechanical data needs are identified for transition joint weldments between austenitic and ferritic structural materials planned for LMFBR service. Since the heat-affected zone in the ferritic material is apparently the critical area, particular attention must be given to behavior in this region. Interim results are given to show differences in mechanical properties of the joint materials with particular emphasis on the ferritic materials.

  14. Optimization of moderated targets loading in LMFBR for minor actinides incineration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Hongchun; Takeda, Toshikazu [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    1999-04-01

    Optimization of moderated targets loading in LMFBR for minor actinides (MAs) incineration has been performed in this paper. Results of many different composition ratios of moderated target mixture were compared. An optimum case was proposed which can offer good core performance and transmute MAs by about 73 percent (386 kg) and incinerate MAs by about 34 percent (181 kg) through 3 years of reactor operation. (author)

  15. Temperature limits for LMFBR fuel cladding under upset and emergency operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govindarajan, S.; Chetal, S.C. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam Tamilnadu (India). Nuclear Systems Division

    1996-07-01

    LMFBR fuel pin cladding tube is subjected to high transient temperatures during incidents such as pump trip, pump to grid plate pipe rupture etc. It is required to know temperature limits under such transient operating conditions for components involved while analyzing such incidents. A methodology for deriving such limits for fuel clad tube is worked out in this paper by making use of the transient damage correlation proposed by W.F. Brizes et. al.

  16. Seismic criteria studies and analyses. Quarterly progress report No. 3. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-01-03

    Information is presented concerning the extent to which vibratory motions at the subsurface foundation level might differ from motions at the ground surface and the effects of the various subsurface materials on the overall Clinch River Breeder Reactor site response; seismic analyses of LMFBR type reactors to establish analytical procedures for predicting structure stresses and deformations; and aspects of the current technology regarding the representation of energy losses in nuclear power plants as equivalent viscous damping.

  17. Ratchetting and creep-fatigue evaluation for nozzle-to-cylinder intersection. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barsoum, R.S.; Loomis, R.W.; Stewart, B.D.

    1976-01-01

    The study is part of an analytical investigation on the applicability of the simplified ratchetting and creep-fatigue rules to LMFBR component geometry. Both the detailed inelastic rules and the simplified elastic rules are applied to the results obtained from a three-dimensional finite element analysis of the nozzle-to-cylinder intersection. The results of both evaluations are compared at several locations on the surface, and an assessment of the degree of conservatism of the simplified methods is discussed.

  18. Effect of reactor size on the breeding economics of LMFBR blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagishi, A.; Driscoll, M.J.

    1975-02-01

    The effect of reactor size on the neutronic and economic performance of LMFBR blankets driven by radially-power-flattened cores has been investigated using both simple models and state-of-the-art computer methods. Reactor power ratings in the range 250 to 3000 MW(e) were considered. Correlations for economic breakeven and optimum irradiation times and blanket thicknesses have been developed for batch-irradiated blankets. It is shown that a given distance from the core-blanket interface the fissile buildup rate per unit volume remains very nearly constant in the radial blanket as (radially-power-flattened, constant-height) core size increases. As a consequence, annual revenue per blanket assembly, and breakeven and optimum irradiation times and optimum blanket dimensions, are the same for all reactor sizes. It is also shown that the peripheral core fissile enrichment, hence neutron leakage spectra, of the (radially-power-flattened, constant-height) cores remains essentially constant as core size increases. Coupled with the preceding observations, this insures that radial blanket breeding performance in demonstration-size LMFBR units will be a good measure of that in much larger commercial LMFBR's.

  19. Diets high in resistent starch and arabinoxylan modulate digestion processes and SCFA pool size in the large intestine and faecal microbial composition in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tina Skau; Lærke, Helle Nygaard; Theil, Peter Kappel

    2014-01-01

    The effects of a high level of dietary fibre (DF) either as arabinoxylan (AX) or resistant starch (RS) on digestion processes, SCFA concentration and pool size in various intestinal segments and on the microbial composition in the faeces were studied in a model experiment with pigs. A total...... of thirty female pigs (body weight 63·1 (sem 4·4) kg) were fed a low-DF, high-fat Western-style control diet (WSD), an AX-rich diet (AXD) or a RS-rich diet (RSD) for 3 weeks. Diet significantly affected the digestibility of DM, protein, fat, NSP and NSP components, and the arabinose:xylose ratio, as well...... as the disappearance of NSP and AX in the large intestine. RS was mainly digested in the caecum. AX was digested at a slower rate than RS. The digesta from AXD-fed pigs passed from the ileum to the distal colon more than twice as fast as those from WSD-fed pigs, with those from RSD-fed pigs being intermediate (P

  20. Pooled Resequencing of 122 Ulcerative Colitis Genes in a Large Dutch Cohort Suggests Population-Specific Associations of Rare Variants in MUC2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visschedijk, Marijn C.; Alberts, Rudi; Mucha, Soren; Deelen, Patrick; de Jong, Dirk J.; Pierik, Marieke; Spekhorst, Lieke M.; Imhann, Floris; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E.; van der Woude, C. Janneke; van Bodegraven, Adriaan A.; Oldenburg, Bas; Löwenberg, Mark; Dijkstra, Gerard; Ellinghaus, David; Schreiber, Stefan; Wijmenga, Cisca; Rivas, Manuel A.; Franke, Andre

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed several common genetic risk variants for ulcerative colitis (UC). However, little is known about the contribution of rare, large effect genetic variants to UC susceptibility. In this study, we performed a deep targeted re-sequencing of 122 genes in Dutch UC patients in order to investigate the contribution of rare variants to the genetic susceptibility to UC. The selection of genes consists of 111 established human UC susceptibility genes and 11 genes that lead to spontaneous colitis when knocked-out in mice. In addition, we sequenced the promoter regions of 45 genes where known variants exert cis-eQTL-effects. Targeted pooled re-sequencing was performed on DNA of 790 Dutch UC cases. The Genome of the Netherlands project provided sequence data of 500 healthy controls. After quality control and prioritization based on allele frequency and pathogenicity probability, follow-up genotyping of 171 rare variants was performed on 1021 Dutch UC cases and 1166 Dutch controls. Single-variant association and gene-based analyses identified an association of rare variants in the MUC2 gene with UC. The associated variants in the Dutch population could not be replicated in a German replication cohort (1026 UC cases, 3532 controls). In conclusion, this study has identified a putative role for MUC2 on UC susceptibility in the Dutch population and suggests a population-specific contribution of rare variants to UC. PMID:27490946

  1. Malaria diagnosis from pooled blood samples: comparative analysis of real-time PCR, nested PCR and immunoassay as a platform for the molecular and serological diagnosis of malaria on a large-scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselle FMC Lima

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Malaria diagnoses has traditionally been made using thick blood smears, but more sensitive and faster techniques are required to process large numbers of samples in clinical and epidemiological studies and in blood donor screening. Here, we evaluated molecular and serological tools to build a screening platform for pooled samples aimed at reducing both the time and the cost of these diagnoses. Positive and negative samples were analysed in individual and pooled experiments using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR, nested PCR and an immunochromatographic test. For the individual tests, 46/49 samples were positive by real-time PCR, 46/49 were positive by nested PCR and 32/46 were positive by immunochromatographic test. For the assays performed using pooled samples, 13/15 samples were positive by real-time PCR and nested PCR and 11/15 were positive by immunochromatographic test. These molecular methods demonstrated sensitivity and specificity for both the individual and pooled samples. Due to the advantages of the real-time PCR, such as the fast processing and the closed system, this method should be indicated as the first choice for use in large-scale diagnosis and the nested PCR should be used for species differentiation. However, additional field isolates should be tested to confirm the results achieved using cultured parasites and the serological test should only be adopted as a complementary method for malaria diagnosis.

  2. Nondestructive evaluation of creep-fatigue damage: an interim report. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickell, R.E.

    1977-02-01

    In view of the uncertainties involved in designing against creep-fatigue failure and the consequences of such failures in Class 1 nuclear components that operate at elevated temperature, the possibility of intermittent or even continuous non-destructive examination of these components has been considered. In this interim report some preliminary results on magnetic force and ultrasonic evaluation of creep-fatigue damage in an LMFBR steam generator material are presented. These results indicate that the non-destructive evaluation of pure creep damage will be extremely difficult. A set of biaxial creep-fatigue tests that are designed to discriminate between various failure theories is also described.

  3. LMFBR safety. 1. Review of current issues and bibliography of literature, 1960--1969

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, J.R.; Keilholtz, G.W.

    1976-08-16

    This report discusses the current status of liquid-metal fast breeder (LMFBR) development and one of the principal safety issues, a hypothetical core-disruptive accident (HCDA). Bibliographic information on worldwide LMFBRs relative to the development of the breeder reactor as a safe source of nuclear power is presented for the period 1960 through 1969. The bibliography consists of 1560 abstracts covering early research and development and operating experiences leading up to the present design practices that are necessary for the licensing of breeder reactors. Key-word, author, and permuted-title indexes are included for completeness.

  4. Coolant mixing in LMFBR rod bundles and outlet plenum mixing transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todreas, N. E.; Cheng, S. K.; Basehore, K.

    1984-08-01

    The thermal hydraulic performance of wire wrapped fuel bundles of LMFBR configuration was investigated. Results obtained included phenomenological models for friction factors, flow split and mixing characteristics; correlations for predicting these characteristics suitable for insertion in design codes; numerical codes for analyzing bundle behavior both of the lumped subchannel and distributed parameter categories and experimental techniques for pressure velocity, flow split, salt conductivity and temperature measurement in water cooled mockups of bundles and subchannels. Flow regimes investigated included laminar, transition and turbulent flow under forced convection and mixed convection conditions. Forced convections conditions are emphasized. Outlet plenum behavior is also investigated.

  5. SUPERENERGY-2: a multiassembly, steady-state computer code for LMFBR core thermal-hydraulic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basehore, K.L.; Todreas, N.E.

    1980-08-01

    Core thermal-hydraulic design and performance analyses for Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs) require repeated detailed multiassembly calculations to determine radial temperature profiles and subchannel outlet temperatures for various core configurations and subassembly structural analyses. At steady-state, detailed core-wide temperature profiles are required for core restraint calculations and subassembly structural analysis. In addition, sodium outlet temperatures are routinely needed for each reactor operating cycle. The SUPERENERGY-2 thermal-hydraulic code was designed specifically to meet these designer needs. It is applicable only to steady-state, forced-convection flow in LMFBR core geometries.

  6. LMFBR safety. 5. Review of current issues and bibliography of literature (1975--1976)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, J.R.; Keilholtz, G.W.

    1977-06-08

    The current status of liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) development and one of the principal safety issues, a hypothetical core-disruptive accident (HCDA), are discussed. Bibliographic information on worldwide LMFBRs relative to the development and safety of the breeder reactor is presented for the period 1975 through 1976. The bibliography consists of approximately 1618 abstracts covering early research and development and operating experiences leading up to the present design practices that are necessary for the licensing of breeder reactors. Keyword, author, and permuted-title indexes are included for completeness.

  7. LMFBR safety. 4. Review of current issues and bibliography of literature (1974--1975)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, J.R.; Keilholtz, G.W.

    1977-03-21

    This report discusses the current status of liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) development and one of the principal safety issues, a hypothetical core-disruptive accident (HCDA). Bibliographic information on worldwide LMFBRs relative to the development of the breeder reactor as a safe source of nuclear power is presented for the period 1974 through 1975. The bibliography consists of approximately 1554 abstracts covering early research and development and operating experiences leading up to the present design practices that are necessary for the licensing of breeder reactors. Key-word, author, and permuted-title indexes are included for completeness.

  8. LMFBR safety. 2. Review of current issues and bibliography of literature, 1970--1972

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, J.R.; Keilholtz, G.W.

    1976-11-22

    This report discusses the current status of liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) development and one of the principal safety issues, a hypothetical core-disruptive accident (HCDA). Bibliographic information on worldwide LMFBRs relative to the development of the breeder reactor as a safe source of nuclear power is presented for the period 1970 through 1972. The bibliography consists of approximately 1620 abstracts covering early research and development and operating experiences leading up to the present design practices that are necessary for the licensing of breeder reactors. Key-word, author, and permuted-title indexes are included for completeness.

  9. LMFBR safety. 3. Review of current issues and bibliography of literature (1972--1974)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, J.R.; Keilholtz, G.W.

    1977-02-24

    The report discusses the current status of liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) development and one of the principal safety issues, a hypothetical core-disruptive accident (HCDA). Bibliographic information on worldwide LMFBRs relative to the development of the breeder reactor as a safe source of nuclear power is presented for the period 1972 through 1974. The bibliography consists of approximately 1380 abstracts covering research and development and operating experiences leading up to the present design practices that are necessary for the licensing of breeder reactors. Key-word, author, and permuted-title indexes are included.

  10. Off-line and on-line noise analysis for core surveillance in French LMFBR 'Anabel'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourdon, J.; Casejuane, R.

    1982-01-01

    Some results concerning noise analysis studies performed in French LMFBR are presented in support to the design of an on-line noise analysis system to be included in the core surveillance and protection system of SUPER-PHENIX. This computerized system is presented: signal processing, block diagram, operating modes.

  11. Hawaii ESI: POOLS (Anchialine Pool Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for anchialine pools in Hawaii. Anchialine pools are small, relatively shallow coastal ponds that occur...

  12. A study on integrity of LMFBR secondary cooling system to hypothetical tube failure propagation in the steam generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshihisa Shindo; Kazuo Haga [Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES) Kamiya-cho MT Bldg., 4-3-20 Toranomon, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0001 (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: A fundamental safety issue of liquid-metal-cooled fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) is to maintain the integrity of the secondary cooling system components against violent chemical sodium-water reaction caused by the water leak from the heat transfer tube of steam generators (SG). The produced sodium-water reaction jet would attack more severely surrounding tubes and would cause other tube failures (tube failure propagation), if it was assumed that the water leak was not detected by function-less detectors and proper operating actions to mitigate the tube failure propagation, such as isolations of the SG from the secondary cooling system and turbine water/steam system, and blowing water and steam inside tubes in the SG, were not taken. This study has been made focusing on the affection of large-scale water leak enlarged due to SG tube failure propagation to the structural integrity of the secondary cooling system because the generated pressure pulse caused by a large-scale sodium-water reaction might break heat transfer tubes of the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). The present work has been made as one part of the study of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) of LMFBR, because if the heat-transfer tubes of IHX were failed, the reactor core may be affected by the pressure pulse and/or by the sodium-water reaction products transported through the primary cooling system. As tools for PSA of the water leak incident of SG, we have developed QUARK-LP Version 4 code that mainly analyzes the high temperature rupture phenomena and estimates the number of failed tubes during the middle-scale water leak. The pressure pulse behavior generated by sodium-water reaction in the failure SG and the pressure propagation in the secondary cooling system are calculated by using the SWAAM-2 code developed by ANL. Furthermore, the quasi-steady state high pressure and temperature of the secondary cooling system in a long term is estimated by using the SWAAM

  13. Development of an annular linear induction electromagnetic pump for the na-coolant circulation of LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hee Reyoung; Lee, Yong Bum; Kim, Yong Kyun; Nam, Ho Yun [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-07-01

    The EM (ElectroMagnetic) pump operated by Lorentz force (J x B) is developed for the sodium coolant circulation of LMFBR (Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors). Design and experimental characterization are carried out on the linear induction EM pump of the narrow annular channel type. The pump which obtains propulsion force resultantly by the three phase symmetric alternating input currents is analyzed by the electrical equivalent circuit method used in the analyses of the induction machines. Then, the equivalent circuit for the pump consists of equivalent variables of primary and secondary resistances and magnetizing and leakage reactances given as functions of pump geometrical and electrical variables by Laithwaithe's standard formulae. Developing pressure-flowrate relation given by pump variables is sought from the balance equation on the circuit. Developing pressure and efficiency of the pump according to the pump variables are analyzed for the pump with a flowrate of 200 l/min. It is shown that pump is mainly characterized by length of the core, diameter of the inner core and channel gap geometrically and by input frequency electrically. Optimum values of pump geometrical and operational variables are determined to maximize the developing force and overall efficiency. The pump has geometrical size of 60 cm in length, 4.27 cm in inner core diameter and electrical input of 6,428 VA and 17 Hz. Optimally designed pump is manufactured by the consideration of material and operational requirements in the chemically-active sodium environment with high temperature of 600 .deg. C. Silicon-iron steel plates with high magnetic permeability in the high temperature are stacked for generation of the high magnetic flux and alumina-dispersion-strengthened-copper bands are used as exciting coils. Each turn of coil is insulated by asbestos band to protect electrical short in the high temperature. Stainless steel which can be compatible with sodium is selected as structural

  14. Model-based temperature noise monitoring methods for LMFBR core anomaly detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamaoki, Tetsuo; Sonoda, Yukio; Sato, Masuo (Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)); Takahashi, Ryoichi

    1994-03-01

    Temperature noise, measured by thermocouples mounted at each core fuel subassembly, is considered to be the most useful signal for detecting and locating local cooling anomalies in an LMFBR core. However, the core outlet temperature noise contains background noise due to fluctuations in the operating parameters including reactor power. It is therefore necessary to reduce this background noise for highly sensitive anomaly detection by subtracting predictable components from the measured signal. In the present study, both a physical model and an autoregressive model were applied to noise data measured in the experimental fast reactor JOYO. The results indicate that the autoregressive model has a higher precision than the physical model in background noise prediction. Based on these results, an 'autoregressive model modification method' is proposed, in which a temporary autoregressive model is generated by interpolation or extrapolation of reference models identified under a small number of different operating conditions. The generated autoregressive model has shown sufficient precision over a wide range of reactor power in applications to artificial noise data produced by an LMFBR noise simulator even when the coolant flow rate was changed to keep a constant power-to-flow ratio. (author).

  15. Power DRAC for rapid LMFBR deployment and consequent CO{sub 2} mitigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenewerk, W.E. [California Nuclear Engineer NU 2272, Los Angeles CA (United States)

    2007-07-01

    A metallic-sodium LMFBR (Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor) can control fuel temperature after a full power SCRAM using natural convection. A 3 percent nominal DRAC (Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling) does this without moving parts. DRAC is promoted from tertiary to primary decay heat removal, resulting in what is referred to as a Power DRAC. Power DRAC operates continuously before and after SCRAM, rejecting 3 per cent pile power. Power DRAC operability is validated by having it reject 75 MWt from a 2500 MWt pile at all times. IHX (Intermediate Heat Exchanger) is not required to be operable for primary, secondary, or tertiary core over-temperature protection. Original DRAC concept (venturi DRAC) was a 1 per cent nominal tertiary decay heat removal system. Tertiary DRAC patent has expired. Power DRAC rejects 75 MWt through its own secondary sodium heat transfer loop to power a 25 MWe air Brayton cycle. Power DRAC eliminates requiring steam plant operability for decay heat removal. Intermediate sodium heat transfer system and steam plant can be optimized for maximum thermal efficiency. 2.5 GWt pile makes 1.0 GWe net power. Power DRAC maintains pile inlet and outlet temperatures while going from power to post-SCRAM conditions. Steam pressure is maintained post-SCRAM to mitigate SCRAM thermal transient. Not requiring steam plant operability for decay heat removal eases licensing and allows early LMFBR deployment. Each GWe atomic power delays CO{sub 2} doubling one week. (author)

  16. Study of rationalized safety design based on the seismic PSA for an LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakai, Ryodai; Yamaguchi, Akira

    1998-12-01

    Seismic PSA was carried out for a typical liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) in order to study the rationalized seismic design, maintaining and/or improving safety during seismic event. The seismic sequence quantification identifies the dominant structures, systems and components (SSCs) to the seismic core damage frequency (CDF). The sensitivity analyses by reducing or increasing the seismic capacity for SSCs are used to examine the optimized seismic design in view of safety and economical aspects. The LMFBR-specific risk-significant SSCs are reactor coolant boundary, decay heat removal coolant path and reactor control rod, which are different from those of light water reactors (LWRs). The electrical power supply system has a minor contribution to the seismic CDF. The sensitivity study shows that passive safety features of LMFBRs are important to maintain and/or enhance seismic capacity. The passive safety includes the decay heat removal capability via natural circulation and safety measures without depending on the support systems such as alternating current (AC) electrical power, for example. On the course of seismic sequence quantification, a methodology to evaluate the probability of seismic-induced multiple failure has been developed and applied to the decay heat removal function. The results suggest the multiplicity of the triply redundant system is to be considered for the significant components such as the decay heat removal path when one considers the difference in the seismic response.

  17. POOL development status and production experience

    CERN Document Server

    Chytracek, R; Frank, M; Girone, M; Govi, G; Moscicki, J T; Papadopoulos, I; Schmücker, H; Karr, K; Malon, D; Vaniachine, A; Tanenbaum, W; Xie, Z; Barrass, T; Cioffi, C; IT

    2005-01-01

    The pool of persistent objects for LHC (POOL) project, part of the large Hadron collider (LHC) computing grid (LCG), is now entering its third year of active development. POOL provides the baseline persistency framework for three LHC experiments. It is based on a strict component model, insulating experiment software from a variety of storage technologies. This paper gives a brief overview of the POOL architecture, its main design principles and the experience gained with integration into LHC experiment frameworks. It also presents recent developments in the POOL works areas of relational database abstraction and object storage into relational database management systems (RDBMS) systems.

  18. An evaluation of passive safety features of the Japanese prototype LMFBR Monju

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomoko Ishizu; Hiroshi Endo; Yoshihisa Shindo; Kazuo Haga [Safety Analysis and Evaluation Div., Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES) Kamiya-cho MT bldg., 4-3-20, Toranomon, Minato-ku, Tokyo, 105-0001 (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization, JNES, has developed a system dynamics analysis code NALAP-II, in order to apply in the safety regulation of liquid-metal-cooled fast breeder reactor (LMFBR). In this study, the heat removal by the coolant natural circulation (NC), which is one of passive safety features of LMFBR, was examined using the code. This paper presents the model verification of the decay heat removal system and the result of trial calculation to the Japanese prototype LMFBR MONJU. In the MONJU plant, the decay heat is removed normally by three loops of the secondary heat transport system (SHTS) coupled with the intermediate reactor auxiliary cooling system (IRACS) as shown in Fig.1. To enable the cooling by NC, the air cooler (AC) of MONJU is installed in a position where the heat-transfer center is higher than that of the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). Verification analyses of the IRACS model of NALAP-II have been carried out, by using the data of a 'natural convection test' conducted as a part of MONJU's performance tests. This test was conducted adding the heat generated by the pump operation in the primary heat transport system (PHTS) instead of the reactor power. The test was started by tripping SHTS pony-motored pump and sodium began to flow by the natural convective force through the air cooling system (ACS) of the IRACS. Figure 2 presents the analytical results of the SHTS transient comparing with the test results. In this test, about 2% of the rated SHTS flow rate was kept by the NC resulting from the balance between the heat input at IHX and the heat removal at IRACS. The calculated results of SHTS flow rate and sodium temperature during NC showed a good agreement with the test results. Then, using the verified NALAP-II, an evaluation of heat removal by NC of MONJU IRACS after the trip at the rated power operation was performed. The result showed that even if only one loop operation of IRACS removes the decay heat

  19. LMFBR fuel cycle studies progress report for August 1972. No. 42

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1972-10-01

    This report continues a series outlining progress in the development of methods for the reprocessing of LMFBR fuels. Development work is reported on problems of irradiated fuel transport to the processing facility, the dissolution of the fuel and the chemical recovery of PuO2-UO2 values, the containment of volatile fission products, product purification, conversion of fuel processing plant product nitrate solutions to solids suitable for shipping and for subsequent fuel fabrication. Pertinent experimental results are presented for the information of those immediately concerned with the field. Detailed description of experimental work and data are included in the topical reports and in the Chemical Technology Division Annual Reports.

  20. Sodium-NaK engineering handbook. Volume III. Sodium systems, safety, handling, and instrumentation. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foust, O J [ed.

    1978-01-01

    The handbook is intended for use by present and future designers in the Liquid Metals Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) Program and by the engineering and scientific community performing other type investigation and exprimentation requiring high-temperature sodium and NaK technology. The arrangement of subject matter progresses from a technological discussion of sodium and sodium--potassium alloy (NaK) to discussions of varius categories and uses of hardware in sodium and NaK systems. Emphasis is placed on sodium and NaK as heat-transport media. Sufficient detail is included for basic understanding of sodium and NaK technology and of technical aspects of sodium and NaK components and instrument systems. Information presented is considered adequate for use in feasibility studies and conceptual design, sizing components and systems, developing preliminary component and system descriptions, identifying technological limitations and problem areas, and defining basic constraints and parameters.

  1. Living PSA program: LIPSAS development for safety management of an LMFBR plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aizawa, Kiyoto [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Nakai, Ryodai [O-arai Engineering Center, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1994-12-31

    During construction and subsequent operation of a nuclear power plant, many changes occur in components, systems and operating procedures, which continuously modify the configuration of the power plant. A living PSA program can assess and manage safety-related operations and plant changes by adequately reproducing plant models and structured databases corresponding to the changes in system configuration. A living PSA system, LIPSAS, has been developed for the Japanese prototype liquid metal-cooled fast-breeder reactor (LMFBR), Monju, which is in the preoperation functional test stage. In order to utilize the LIPSAS as a risk management tool, equations for the schematic time history of the plant risk level and the relative risk criteria have been developed. Experience with LIPSAS shows that this program is a prospective tool to support decisions that affect plant safety, although a continuing and significant resource commitment of the operations staff at the site is still required. (author).

  2. Active acoustic leak detection for LMFBR steam generator. Sound attenuation due to bubbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumagai, Hiromichi; Sakuma, Toshio [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo (Japan). Komae Research Lab.

    1995-06-01

    In the steam generators (SG) of LMFBR, it is necessary to detect the leakage of water from tubes of heat exchangers as soon as it occurs. The active acoustic detection method has drawn general interest owing to its short response time and reduction of the influence of background noise. In this paper, the application of the active acoustic detection method for SG is proposed, and sound attenuation by bubbles is investigated experimentally. Furthermore, using the SG sector model, sound field characteristics and sound attenuation characteristics due to injection of bubbles are studied. It is clarified that the sound attenuation depends upon bubble size as well as void fraction, that the distance attenuation of sound in the SG model containing heat transfer tubes is 6dB for each two-fold increase of distance, and that emitted sound attenuates immediately upon injection of bubbles. (author).

  3. Benchmark experiment for physics parameters of metallic-fueled LMFBR at FCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iijima, S.; Oigawa, H.; Sakurai, T.; Nemoto, T.; Okajima, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1996-09-01

    The calculated prediction for reactor physics parameters in a metallic-fueled LMFBR was tested using the benchmark experiments performed at FCA. The reactivity feedback parameters such as sodium void worth, Doppler reactivity worth and {sup 238}U-capture-to-{sup 239}Pu -fission ratio have been measured. The fuel expansion reactivity has also measured. Direct comparison with the results from similar oxide fuel assembly was made. Analysis was done with the JENDL-2 cross section library and JENDL-3.2. Prediction of reactor physics parameters with JENDL-3.2 in the metallic-fueled core agreed reasonably well with the measured values and showed similar trend to the results in the oxide fuel core. (author)

  4. Evaluation of CDA energetics in the prototype LMFBR with latest knowledge and tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobita, Yoshiharu; Morita, Koji; Kawada, Ken-ichi; Niwa, Hajime; Nonaka, Nobuyuki [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, Oarai Engineering Center, Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    The sequences of an unprotected loss-of-flow accident in the prototype LMFBR has been evaluated, as a part of reactor safety research, reflecting the latest experimental and analytical knowledge on core disruptive accident (CDA). In the evaluation, the event progression scenarios and the major physical parameters were selected, based on the latest experimental knowledge and code validation studies on the transient fuel behavior and material motion during the last decade, such that associated phenomenological uncertainties were well covered within physically reasonable ranges. With the safety research knowledge and advanced accident analysis codes, which have been made available lately, the CDA energetics was assessed to be much more benign in comparison with the former analysis. In other words, we have demonstrated that our former CDA analysis is sufficiently conservative. (author)

  5. Heat transfer and fluid flow aspects of fuel--coolant interactions. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradini, M L

    1978-09-01

    A major portion of the safety analysis effort for the LMFBR is involved in assessing the consequences of a Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accident (HCDA). The thermal interaction of the hot fuel and the sodium coolant during the HCDA is investigated in two areas. A postulated loss of flow transient may produce a two-phase fuel at high pressures. The thermal interaction phenomena between fuel and coolant as the fuel is ejected into the upper plenum are investigated. A postulated transient overpower accident may produce molten fuel being released into sodium coolant in the core region. An energetic coolant vapor explosion for these reactor materials does not seem likely. However, experiments using other materials (e.g., Freon/water, tin/water) have demonstrated the possibility of this phenomenon.

  6. Coolant mixing in LMFBR rod bundles and outlet plenum mixing transients. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todreas, N.E.; Cheng, S.K.; Basehore, K.

    1984-08-01

    This project principally undertook the investigation of the thermal hydraulic performance of wire wrapped fuel bundles of LMFBR configuration. Results obtained included phenomenological models for friction factors, flow split and mixing characteristics; correlations for predicting these characteristics suitable for insertion in design codes; numerical codes for analyzing bundle behavior both of the lumped subchannel and distributed parameter categories and experimental techniques for pressure velocity, flow split, salt conductivity and temperature measurement in water cooled mockups of bundles and subchannels. Flow regimes investigated included laminar, transition and turbulent flow under forced convection and mixed convection conditions. Forced convections conditions were emphasized. Continuing efforts are underway at MIT to complete the investigation of the mixed convection regime initiated here. A number of investigations on outlet plenum behavior were also made. The reports of these investigations are identified.

  7. Collection and evaluation of salt mixing data with the real time data acquisition system. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glazer, S.; Chiu, C.; Todreas, N.E.

    1977-09-01

    A minicomputer based real time data acquisition system was designed and built to facilitate data collection during salt mixing tests in mock ups of LMFBR rod bundles. The system represents an expansion of data collection capabilities over previous equipment. It performs steady state and transient monitoring and recording of up to 512 individual electrical resistance probes. Extensive real time software was written to govern all phases of the data collection procedure, including probe definition, probe calibration, salt mixing test data acquisition and storage, and data editing. Offline software was also written to permit data examination and reduction to dimensionless salt concentration maps. Finally, the computer program SUPERENERGY was modified to permit rapid extraction of parameters from dimensionless salt concentration maps. The document describes the computer system, and includes circuit diagrams of all custom built components. It also includes descriptions and listings of all software written, as well as extensive user instructions.

  8. Analysis of Flow Impedance Phenomena. Final report, June 1, 1978-July 31, 1979. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, A A

    1979-12-01

    Pressure drop data obtained during testing of the MARK I, II and IIA fuel assemblies in the Argonne National Laboratory liquid metal core component loop (CCTL) were analyzed. It is concluded that the previously unexplained pressure drop increase measured across the MARK II and MARK IIA assemblies was caused by metallic particulate fouling; the source was mechanical-chemical wear of the loops pump journal shaft. The implication to liquid metal breeder reactor (LMFBR) operation is that if a continuous source of metallic particles exists upstream of the core, a pressure drop increase can be expected. The size of the deposited particles should be larger than the thickness of laminar sublayer on a fuel rod. It is also concluded that the most probable source of metallic particulates will come from component failure and not from normal corrosion products. A small amount of deposited particulates can produce a relatively high pressure drop increase.

  9. Post-scram Liquid Metal cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) neat transport system dynamics and steam generator control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brukx, J. F. L. M.

    1982-06-01

    Loop type LMFBR heat transport system dynamics after reactor shutdown and during subsequent decay heat removal are considered with emphasis on steam generator dynamics including the development and evaluation of various post-scram steam generator control systems, and natural circulation of the sodium coolant, including the influence of superimposed free convection on forced convection heat transfer and pressure drop. The normal operating and decay heat removal functions of the overall heat transport system are described.

  10. Post-scram Liquid Metal cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) heat transport system dynamics and steam generator control: Figures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brukx, J. F. L. M.

    1982-06-01

    Dynamic modeling of LMFBR heat transport system is discussed. Uncontrolled transient behavior of individual components and of the integrated heat transport system are considered. For each component, results showing specific dynamic features of the component and/or model capability were generated. Controlled dynamic behavior for alternative steam generator control systems during forced and natural sodium coolant circulation was analyzed. Combined free and forced convection of laminar and turbulent vertical pipe flow of liquid metals was investigated.

  11. Bacterial intra-species gene loss occurs in a largely clocklike manner mostly within a pool of less conserved and constrained genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolotin, Evgeni; Hershberg, Ruth

    2016-10-13

    Gene loss is a major contributor to the evolution of bacterial gene content. Gene loss may occur as a result of shifts in environment leading to changes in the intensity and/or directionality of selection applied for the maintenance of specific genes. Gene loss may also occur in a more neutral manner, when gene functions are lost that were not subject to strong selection to be maintained, irrespective of changes to environment. Here, we used a pangenome-based approach to investigate patterns of gene loss across 15 bacterial species. We demonstrate that gene loss tends to occur mostly within a pool of genes that are less constrained within species, even in those strains from which they are not lost, and less conserved across bacterial species. Our results indicate that shifts in selection, resulting from shifts in environment are not required to explain the majority of gene loss events occurring within a diverse collection of bacterial species. Caution should therefore be taken when attributing differences in gene content to differences in environment.

  12. Poole High Street study

    OpenAIRE

    Kilburn, David

    2007-01-01

    A presentation given to key decision makers within Poole to improve the retail offer in Poole High Street and leverage the benefit of improved town planning and the introduction of quality retail companies.

  13. Swimming pool cleaner poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swimming pool cleaner poisoning occurs when someone swallows this type of cleaner, touches it, or breathes in ... The harmful substances in swimming pool cleaner are: Bromine ... copper Chlorine Soda ash Sodium bicarbonate Various mild acids

  14. Swimming Pool Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Swimming Pool Safety Page Content ​What is the best way to keep my child safe around swimming pools? An adult should actively watch children at ...

  15. Swimming pool granuloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001357.htm Swimming pool granuloma To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A swimming pool granuloma is a long-term (chronic) skin ...

  16. The science of pooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, E.

    1995-10-01

    The pooling of data from radon studies is described. Pooling refers to the analysis of original data from several studies, not meta-analysis in which summary measures from published data are analyzed. A main objective for pooling is to reduce uncertainty and to obtain more precise estimates of risk than would be available from any single study.

  17. Multi-scale variation of the meridional movement of the western Pacific warm pool and its associated large-scale climate features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guojun; Yang, Song; Zheng, Dawei

    2017-08-01

    In this study, we investigated variation of the meridional movement of the western Pacific warm pool (WPWP). The variation was measured by the central latitude (Clat) of the WPWP on various time scales. Its relationships with global sea surface temperature (SST), precipitation, and atmospheric circulation were examined by applying several advanced statistical methods. First, the techniques of wavelet analysis and least-square adjustment were used to depict the time-frequency features and the mean dominant oscillating time scales of the Clat. Then, a multi-stage filtering technique was applied to illustrate the related dominant oscillating signals. We also examined the time-frequency characteristics of the relationships between Clat and the leading modes of the Indo-Pacific oceans by employing a cross-covariance function analysis and a multiple moving-window method. The physical mechanisms for the relationships between Clat and the patterns of SST, precipitation, and atmospheric circulation were discussed. Results indicated that there is a weakening trend in the oscillation of Clat mainly because the quasi-annual oscillation of Clat increases in January-March and decreases in July-September. The semi-annual oscillation of Clat closely interacts with the westerly wind over the summer hemisphere of the tropical western Pacific Ocean and with the easterly wind over the winter hemisphere of the ocean. The interannual component of Clat corresponds to El Niño-Southern Oscillation and the Indian Ocean basin-wide warming or cooling with strengthened oscillations in the 1970s, and the lower-frequency component of Clat closely corresponds to the central Pacific type of El Niño from the 1990s.

  18. Multi-scale variation of the meridional movement of the western Pacific warm pool and its associated large-scale climate features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guojun; Yang, Song; Zheng, Dawei

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we investigated variation of the meridional movement of the western Pacific warm pool (WPWP). The variation was measured by the central latitude (Clat) of the WPWP on various time scales. Its relationships with global sea surface temperature (SST), precipitation, and atmospheric circulation were examined by applying several advanced statistical methods. First, the techniques of wavelet analysis and least-square adjustment were used to depict the time-frequency features and the mean dominant oscillating time scales of the Clat. Then, a multi-stage filtering technique was applied to illustrate the related dominant oscillating signals. We also examined the time-frequency characteristics of the relationships between Clat and the leading modes of the Indo-Pacific oceans by employing a cross-covariance function analysis and a multiple moving-window method. The physical mechanisms for the relationships between Clat and the patterns of SST, precipitation, and atmospheric circulation were discussed. Results indicated that there is a weakening trend in the oscillation of Clat mainly because the quasi-annual oscillation of Clat increases in January-March and decreases in July-September. The semi-annual oscillation of Clat closely interacts with the westerly wind over the summer hemisphere of the tropical western Pacific Ocean and with the easterly wind over the winter hemisphere of the ocean. The interannual component of Clat corresponds to El Niño-Southern Oscillation and the Indian Ocean basin-wide warming or cooling with strengthened oscillations in the 1970s, and the lower-frequency component of Clat closely corresponds to the central Pacific type of El Niño from the 1990s.

  19. Maintenance and repair of LMFBR steam generators: specialists` meeting, O-Arai Engineering Center, Japan, 4-8 June 1984. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1984-07-01

    The Specialists` Meeting on "Maintenance and Repair of LMFBR Steam Generators" was held in Oarai, Japan, from 4-8 June 1984. The meeting was sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency on the recommendation of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors and was hosted by the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan. The purpose of the meeting was to review and discuss the experience accumulated in various countries on the general design philosophy of LMFBR steam generators from the view point of maintenance and repair, in-service inspection of steam generator tube bundles, identification and inspection of failed tubes and the cleaning and repairing of failed steam generators. The following main topical areas were discussed by participants: national review presentations on maintenance and repair of LMFBR steam generators - design philosophy for maintenance and repair; research and development work on maintenance and repair; and experience on steam generator maintenance and repair.

  20. Pooled-Peptide Epitope Mapping Strategies Are Efficient and Highly Sensitive: An Evaluation of Methods for Identifying Human T Cell Epitope Specificities in Large-Scale HIV Vaccine Efficacy Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Fiore-Gartland

    Full Text Available The interferon gamma, enzyme-linked immunospot (IFN-γ ELISpot assay is widely used to identify viral antigen-specific T cells is frequently employed to quantify T cell responses in HIV vaccine studies. It can be used to define T cell epitope specificities using panels of peptide antigens, but with sample and cost constraints there is a critical need to improve the efficiency of epitope mapping for large and variable pathogens. We evaluated two epitope mapping strategies, based on group testing, for their ability to identify vaccine-induced T-cells from participants in the Step HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial, and compared the findings to an approach of assaying each peptide individually. The group testing strategies reduced the number of assays required by >7-fold without significantly altering the accuracy of T-cell breadth estimates. Assays of small pools containing 7-30 peptides were highly sensitive and effective at detecting single positive peptides as well as summating responses to multiple peptides. Also, assays with a single 15-mer peptide, containing an identified epitope, did not always elicit a response providing validation that 15-mer peptides are not optimal antigens for detecting CD8+ T cells. Our findings further validate pooling-based epitope mapping strategies, which are critical for characterizing vaccine-induced T-cell responses and more broadly for informing iterative vaccine design. We also show ways to improve their application with computational peptide:MHC binding predictors that can accurately identify the optimal epitope within a 15-mer peptide and within a pool of 15-mer peptides.

  1. Importance of regional species pools and functional traits in colonization processes: predicting re-colonization after large-scale destruction of ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirmer, A.; Tischew, S.; Ozinga, W.A.; Lampe, von M.; Baasch, A.; Groenendael, van J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Large-scale destruction of ecosystems caused by surface mining provides an opportunity for the study of colonization processes starting with primary succession. Surprisingly, over several decades and without any restoration measures, most of these sites spontaneously developed into valuable biotope

  2. Pooled Resequencing of 122 Ulcerative Colitis Genes in a Large Dutch Cohort Suggests Population-Specific Associations of Rare Variants in MUC2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visschedijk, Marijn C; Alberts, Rudi; Mucha, Soren; Deelen, Patrick; de Jong, Dirk J; Pierik, Marieke; Spekhorst, Lieke M; Imhann, Floris; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E; van der Woude, C Janneke; van Bodegraven, Adriaan A; Oldenburg, Bas; Löwenberg, Mark; Dijkstra, Gerard; Ellinghaus, David; Schreiber, Stefan; Wijmenga, Cisca; Rivas, Manuel A; Franke, Andre; van Diemen, Cleo C; Weersma, Rinse K

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed several common genetic risk variants for ulcerative colitis (UC). However, little is known about the contribution of rare, large effect genetic variants to UC susceptibility. In this study, we performed a deep targeted re-sequencing of 122 genes in Dutch

  3. Two distinct pools of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels in the somatic plasma membrane of central principal neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Kaufmann, W.A.; Kasugai, Y.; Ferraguti, F.; Storm, J F

    2010-01-01

    Although nerve cell membranes are often assumed to be uniform with respect to electrical properties, there is increasing evidence for compartmentalization into subdomains with heterogeneous impacts on the overall cell function. Such microdomains are characterized by specific sets of proteins determining their functional properties. Recently, clustering of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BKCa) channels was shown at sites of subsurface membrane cisterns in cerebellar Purkinje cel...

  4. Intermediate-Size Inducer Pump design report. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boardman, T.J.

    1979-06-15

    This report summarizes the mechanical, structural, and hydrodynamic design of the Intermediate-Size Inducer Pump (ISIP). The design was performed under Atomics International's DOE Base Technology Program by the Atomics International and Rocketdyne Divisions of Rockwell International. The pump was designed to utilize the FFTF prototype pump frame as a test vehicle to test the inducer, impeller, and diffuser plus necessary adapter hardware under simulated Large Scale Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor service conditions. The report describes the design requirements including the purpose and objectives, and discusses those design efforts and considerations made to meet the requirements. Included in the report are appendices showing calculative methods and results. Also included are overall assembly and layout drawings plus some details used as illustrations for discussion of the design results and the results of water tests performed on a model of the inducer.

  5. Rotary plug device for use in LMFBR type reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azuma, Kazuhiko; Imayoshi, Sho.

    1988-02-23

    Purpose: To prevent adhesion of sodium in the rotational gap of a rotational plug. Constitution: One of the walls of a cylindrical gap formed between the outer circumference of a small rotary plug and a large rotary plug that constitute a double rotary plug is cooled to lower than the sodium coagulation temperature, while a stater of a linear motor in a cylindrical shape and wound with linear coils around the iron core is attached to the inside of the other of the walls. Then, one of the walls of the gap to which sodium adheres is cooled to less than sodium coagulation temperature, so that sodium is or tends to be deposited to the wall. Then, eddy currents are resulted to sodium by the current supplied to the stater of the linear motor attached to the other of the walls, to produce thrusting force. Sodium on the wall surface is scraped off by this. (Yoshihara, H.).

  6. poolMC: Smart pooling of mRNA samples in microarray experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiefelbein John

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Typically, pooling of mRNA samples in microarray experiments implies mixing mRNA from several biological-replicate samples before hybridization onto a microarray chip. Here we describe an alternative smart pooling strategy in which different samples, not necessarily biological replicates, are pooled in an information theoretic efficient way. Further, each sample is tested on multiple chips, but always in pools made up of different samples. The end goal is to exploit the compressibility of microarray data to reduce the number of chips used and increase the robustness to noise in measurements. Results A theoretical framework to perform smart pooling of mRNA samples in microarray experiments was established and the software implementation of the pooling and decoding algorithms was developed in MATLAB. A proof-of-concept smart pooled experiment was performed using validated biological samples on commercially available gene chips. Differential-expression analysis of the smart pooled data was performed and compared against the unpooled control experiment. Conclusions The theoretical developments and experimental demonstration in this paper provide a useful starting point to investigate smart pooling of mRNA samples in microarray experiments. Although the smart pooled experiment did not compare favorably with the control, the experiment highlighted important conditions for the successful implementation of smart pooling - linearity of measurements, sparsity in data, and large experiment size.

  7. The application of computational fluid dynamics and small-scale physical models to assess the effects of operational practices on the risk to public health within large indoor swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Lowell; Chew, John; Woodley, Iain; Colbourne, Jeni; Pond, Katherine

    2015-12-01

    Swimming pools provide an excellent facility for exercise and leisure but are also prone to contamination from microbial pathogens. The study modelled a 50-m × 20-m swimming pool using both a small-scale physical model and computational fluid dynamics to investigate how water and pathogens move around a pool in order to identify potential risk spots. Our study revealed a number of lessons for pool operators, designers and policy-makers: disinfection reaches the majority of a full-scale pool in approximately 16 minutes operating at the maximum permissible inlet velocity of 0.5 m/s. This suggests that where a pool is designed to have 15 paired inlets it is capable of distributing disinfectant throughout the water body within an acceptable time frame. However, the study also showed that the exchange rate of water is not uniform across the pool tank and that there is potential for areas of the pool tank to retain contaminated water for significant periods of time. 'Dead spots' exist at either end of the pool where pathogens could remain. This is particularly significant if there is a faecal release into the pool by bathers infected with Cryptosporidium parvum, increasing the potential for waterborne disease transmission.

  8. Estimation of post-buckling fatigue damage for LMFBR reactor vessel under seismic load

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogiso, S.; Sasaki, T.; Oooka, Y. [Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan). Nuclear Systems Div.; Nakamura, H. [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Chiba (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    Estimation of fatigue damage caused by buckling deformation is important to evaluate safety margin in a seismic buckling design criterion for LMFBR reactor vessels, in addition to limiting the buckling strength. An advanced buckling design guideline draft including the seismic margin criterion has been proposed under the sponsorship of MITI to date. An ultimate state in this criterion was defined as the condition that the maximum global displacement {delta}{sub max} reaches a critical displacement {delta}{sub u}. The authors have previously proposed an estimation method of the fatigue damage based on the post buckling fatigue tests 304 s.s. cylinders at room temperature. However, adoption of a modified 316 s.s named 316FR s.s is under development as the material of reactor vessel of the updated design of the Demonstration Fast Breeder Reactor. The buckling tests with 316FR s.s cylinders were performed under high temperature to obtain the skeleton curve of the relation between load and displacement. And the buckling behaviors under the cyclic loading were compared with those of 304 s.s. Objectives of the present study are: to apply the proposed estimation method to a reactor vessel made of 316FR s.s., and clarify the correlation between {delta}{sub max} and fatigue failure; to verify structural soundness of the ultimate state derived from the seismic margin criterion against the fatigue failure due to the buckling deformation. (author). 7 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Turbulent flow simulation in a wire-wrap rod bundle of an LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K. [Thermal Hydraulics Section, Reactor Engineering Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Sundararajan, T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Narasimhan, Arunn, E-mail: arunn@iitm.ac.i [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Velusamy, K. [Thermal Hydraulics Section, Reactor Engineering Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)

    2010-05-15

    The pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics of wire-wrapped 19-pin rod bundles in a nuclear reactor subassembly of liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) have been investigated through three-dimensional turbulent flow simulations. The predicted results of eddy viscosity based turbulence models (k-epsilon, k-omega) and the Reynolds stress model are compared with those of experimental correlations for friction factor and Nusselt number. The Re is varied between 50,000 and 150,000 and the ratio of helical pitch of wire wrap to the rod diameter is varied from 15 to 45. All the three turbulence models considered yield similar results. The friction factor increases with reduction in the wire-wrap pitch while the heat transfer coefficient remains almost unaltered. However, reduction in the wire-wrap pitch also enhances the transverse flow velocity in the cross-sectional plane as well as the local turbulence intensity, thereby improving the thermal mixing of coolant. Consequently, the presence of wire wrap reduces temperature variation within each section of the subassembly. The associated reduction in differential thermal expansion of rods is expected to improve the structural integrity of the fuel subassembly.

  10. LMFBR Emergency Deployment Assuming 45 year Time-Delay Excess CO{sub 2} Removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenewerk, William Ernest [5060 San Rafael Avenue, Los Angeles, CA, 90042-3239 (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Atmospheric CO{sub 2} is presently increasing 2.25% per year in proportion to 2.25% per year exponential fossil fuel consumption increase. CO{sub 2} removal is modeled as being proportional to 45-year-earlier CO{sub 2} amount above 280 ppmV-C. This is: Exp (-0.0225/year * 45 years) = 0.36 fraction CO{sub 2} removed from anthropological emissions, apparently by seawater. LMFBRs use 15 year doubling time. Deploying 30000 GWe atomic power by year-2080 results in CO{sub 2} doubling year-2065 if World primary energy consumption continues increasing 2.25% per year. CO{sub 2} remains roughly twice pre-industrial until year-2100. Beginning year-2080, CO{sub 2} declines at 2.25% per year. CO{sub 2} will presumably decline back to roughly the year-2000 value by year-2200 if the 45-year-delay sink remains effective. LMFBR and GCFR fleet expands to 30000 GWe by 2080. 1000 GWe LWR fleet consumes 5 Mt HM (Heavy Metal). Breeder first cores require 1 Mt HM. (author)

  11. Development of the thermal behavior analysis code DIRAD and the fuel design procedure for LMFBR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakae, N.; Tanaka, K.; Nakajima, H.; Matsumoto, M.

    1992-06-01

    It is very important to increase the fuel linear heat rating for improvement of economy in LMFBR without any degradation in safety. A reduction of the design margin is helpful to achieve the high power operation. The development of a fuel design code and a design procedure is effective on the reduction of the design margin. The thermal behavior analysis code DIRAD has been developed with respect to fuel restructuring and gap conductance models. These models have been calibrated and revised using irradiation data of fresh fuel. It is, therefore, found that the code is applicable for the thermal analysis with fresh fuel. The uncertainties in fuel irradiation condition and fuel fabrication tolerance together with the uncertainty of the code prediction have major contributions to the design margin. In the current fuel design the first two uncertainties independently contribute to temperature increment. Another method which can rationally explain the effect of the uncertainties on the temperature increment is adopted here. Then, the design margin may be rationally reduced.

  12. Development of computer code models for analysis of subassembly voiding in the LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinkle, W [ed.

    1979-12-01

    The research program discussed in this report was started in FY1979 under the combined sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (DOE), General Electric (GE) and Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL). The objective of the program is to develop multi-dimensional computer codes which can be used for the analysis of subassembly voiding incoherence under postulated accident conditions in the LMFBR. Two codes are being developed in parallel. The first will use a two fluid (6 equation) model which is more difficult to develop but has the potential for providing a code with the utmost in flexibility and physical consistency for use in the long term. The other will use a mixture (< 6 equation) model which is less general but may be more amenable to interpretation and use of experimental data and therefore, easier to develop for use in the near term. To assure that the models developed are not design dependent, geometries and transient conditions typical of both foreign and US designs are being considered.

  13. Calculation of Doses Due to Accidentally Released Plutonium From An LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fish, B.R.

    2001-08-07

    Experimental data and analytical models that should be considered in assessing the transport properties of plutonium aerosols following a hypothetical reactor accident have been examined. Behaviors of released airborne materials within the reactor containment systems, as well as in the atmosphere near the reactor site boundaries, have been semiquantitatively predicted from experimental data and analytical models. The fundamental chemistry of plutonium as it may be applied in biological systems has been used to prepare models related to the intake and metabolism of plutonium dioxide, the fuel material of interest. Attempts have been made to calculate the possible doses from plutonium aerosols for a typical analyzed release in order to evaluate the magnitude of the internal exposure hazards that might exist in the vicinity of the reactor after a hypothetical LMFBR (Liquid-Metal Fast Breeder Reactor) accident. Intake of plutonium (using data for {sup 239}Pu as an example) and its distribution in the body were treated parametrically without regard to the details of transport pathways in the environment. To the extent possible, dose-response data and models have been reviewed, and an assessment of their adequacy has been made so that recommended or preferred practices could be developed.

  14. Measurement and analysis of flow wall shear stress in an interior subchannel of triangular array rods. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakori-Monazah, M.R.; Todreas, N.E.

    1977-08-01

    A simulated model of triangular array rods with pitch to diameter ratio of 1.10 (as a test section) and air as the fluid flow was used to study the LMFBR hydraulic parameters. The wall shear stress distribution around the rod periphery, friction factors, static pressure distributions and turbulence intensity corresponding to various Reynolds numbers ranging from 4140 to 36170 in the central subchannel were measured. Various approaches for measurement of wall shear stress were compared. The measurement was performed using the Preston tube technique with the probe outside diameter equal to 0.014 in.

  15. Theory and use of GIRAFFE for analysis of decay characteristics of delayed-neutron precursors in an LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, K. C.

    1980-07-01

    The application of the computer code GIRAFFE (General Isotope Release Analysis For Failed Elements) written in FORTRAN IV is described. GIRAFFE was designed to provide parameter estimates of the nonlinear discrete-measurement models that govern the transport and decay of delayed-neutron precursors in a liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR). The code has been organized into a set of small, relatively independent and well-defined modules to facilitate modification and maintenance. The program logic, the numerical techniques, and the methods of solution used by the code are presented, and the functions of the MAIN program and of each subroutine are discussed.

  16. LMFBR (LIQUID METAL FAST BREEDER REACTOR) READTION RATE AND DOSIMETRY 3RD QUARTERLY PROGRESS REPORT DECEMBER 1971 JANUARY FEBRUARY 1972

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCELROY WN

    1972-03-01

    This report was compiled at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company, a subsidiary of Westinghouse Electric Corporation, for the United States Atomic Energy Commission, Division of Reactor Development and Technology, under Contract No. AT (45-1) 2170. It describes technical progress made in the Interlaboratory LMFBR Reaction Rate Program during the reporting period. The Interlaboratory LMFBR Reaction Rate (ILRR) program has been established by USAEC/RDT to develop a capability to accurately measure neutron-induced reaction rates for LMFBR fuels and materials development programs. The initial goal for the principal fission reactions, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, and {sup 239}Pu, is an accuracy to within {+-}5 at the 95% confidence level. Accurate measurement of other fission and non-fission reactions will be required, but to a lesser accuracy, between {+-}5 to 10% at the 95% confidence level. A secondary program objective is improvement in knowledge of the nuclear parameters involved in fuels and materials dosimetry measurements of neutron flux, spectra, fluence, and burnup. These accuracy goals for the ILRR program are severe; measurements of fast-neutron-induced reaction rates have not been rapidly moving toward this level of precision. Using a number of techniques in well established neutron environments of current interest for fast reactor development and critically evaluating the results will help establish existing levels of accuracy and indicate the scale of effort required for improvement. To accomplish the objectives of this program, reliable and documented experimental values of reaction rates and ratios will be determined for various well established and permanent neutron fields. The Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurement Facility (CFRMF) at Aerojet Nuclear Company (ANC) is the first neutron field being studied because of the similarity of its spectrum to that of a fast reactor and the range and reproducibility of

  17. Tensile properties of 11Cr-0.5Mo-2W, V, Nb stainless steel in LMFBR environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uehira, Akihiro; Ukai, Shigeharu; Mizuno, Tomoyasu; Asaga, Takeo; Yoshida, Eiichi [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    2000-09-01

    The tensile strength of ferritic-martensitic 11Cr-0.5Mo-2W, Nb, V stainless steel (PNC-FMS), which had been developed for core component applications in LMFBR by Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, was evaluated for the effects of thermal aging, sodium exposure, and neutron irradiation. The tensile strength of thermal aged specimens ({approx}1,023 K, {approx}12,000 h) decreased at aging conditions above the initial tempering parameter, and the aging effect was considerably enhanced for the wrapper tubes tempered at lower temperatures. The tensile strength of sodium exposed specimens ({approx}973 K, {approx}10,000 h) decreased more than aged specimens due to decarburization, and the effect of decarburization was greater in thin wall cladding tubes. Evaluation of the contribution of both thermal aging and decarburization effects on the tensile strength of cladding tubes irradiated in JOYO ({approx}1,013 K, {approx}6,030 h, {approx}29 dpa) suggested that the radiation showed smaller effect on tensile properties than thermal aging and decarburization. By using the derived correlations for thermal aging and decarburization effects, the tensile strength decrease for PNC-FMS after long period (30,000 h) in LMFBR environment was quantitatively calculated. (author)

  18. Studies on scaled models for gas entrainment in the surge tank of LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramdasu, D.; Shivakumar, N.S.; Padmakumar, G.; Anand Babu, C.; Vaidyanathan, G. [Fast Reactor Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Rammohan, S.; Sreekala, S.K.; Manikandan, S.; Saseendran, S. [Fluid Control Research Institute, Palghat (India)

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents the studies carried out in the different scale models of Surge tank used in the secondary circuit of Liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR). Surge tank acquires importance because of its ability to take care of pressure surges in case of a sodium water reaction in Steam Generators (SG). The blanket of argon cover gas above the sodium free surface in the surge tank acts as a cushion for the surges. At the same time, argon gas is a source of entrainment into the sodium which is undesirable from the consideration of effective heat transfer in Inter mediate Heat Exchanger and SG, cavitation in pumps and operational problems of continuous feed and bleed of cover gas, thus leading to unfavourable reactor operating conditions. To investigate the phenomenon of gas entrainment in surge tank, hydraulic experiments were conducted in water using 1/38, 1/32, 1/22 and 1/12 scale models with Froude similarity. The minimum height of liquid column required to avoid gas entrainment was determined using different types of internal devices. Experiments were carried out in the 5/8 scale model to confirm the results of the smaller scale models. It was found that free surface height to avoid gas entrainment varies for different scale models. The combination of Pepper pot with ring plate was found to be the most effective in avoiding gas entrainment at H/D equals 1.28 where H is the height of liquid column in the tank from tank bottom and D is the inner diameter of surge tank.

  19. Study of thermal influence on tubes due to sodium-water reactions in LMFBR steam generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, H.; Kurihara, A.; Nishimura, M. [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    A study of thermal influence on heat-transfer tubes in sodium-water reactions is carried out to evaluate the tube rupture due to overheating in the water leak accident of an LMFBR steam generator (SG). By assuming the sodium-water reaction jet to be a two-phase flow that consists of sodium and hydrogen, the heat-transfer characteristics are examined and a simple model of effective heat-transfer coefficient (HTC) is proposed for the safety evaluation of the SG. Comparison of the model with experimental data leads to the following conclusions: An upper limit exists in the HTC between reaction jet and tube wall, and it is equivalent in approximation to the HTC of single-phase sodium flow. The HTC can be written in simple form as functions of the HTC of single-phase sodium flow, void fraction and temperatures of sodium, hydrogen and tube wall. Hydrogen provides negligible heating effect, so that the apparent HTC would decrease with increase of the hydrogen temperature that can readily surpass that of sodium. The outer-surface temperature of tube wall would not rise so high beyond the temperature of sodium that is excellent in heat-transfer characteristics, even if tube wall is exposed to the high-temperature hydrogen. The transient heat conduction analysis with the mean value of the data can appropriately evaluate the outer-surface temperature of tube wall by the metallographic observation, while the analysis with the maximum value can conservatively evaluate the tube wall temperature. (authors)

  20. Transmutation of minor actinides discharged from LMFBR spent fuel in a high power density fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uebeyli, Mustafa E-mail: mubeyli@gazi.edu.tr

    2004-12-01

    Significant amounts of nuclear wastes consisting of plutonium, minor actinides and long lived fission products are produced during the operation of commercial nuclear power plants. Therefore, the destruction of these wastes is very important with respect to public health, environment and also the future of nuclear energy. In this study, transmutation of minor actinides (MAs) discharged from LMFBR spent fuel in a high power density fusion reactor has been investigated under a neutron wall load of 10 MW/m{sup 2} for an operation period of 10 years. Also, the effect of MA percentage on the transmutation has been examined. The fuel zone, containing MAs as spheres cladded with W-5Re, has been located behind the first wall to utilize the high neutron flux for transmutation effectively. Helium at 40 atm has been used as an energy carrier. At the end of the operation period, the total burning and transmutation are greater than the total buildups in all investigated cases, and very high burnups (420-470 GWd/tHM) are reached, depending on the MA content. The total transmutation rate values are 906 and 979 kg/GW{sub th} year at startup and decrease to 140 and 178 kg/GW{sub th} year at the end of the operation for fuel with 10% and 20% MA, respectively. Over an operation period of 10 years, the effective half lives decrease from 2.38, 2.21 and 3.08 years to 1.95, 1.80 and 2.59 years for {sup 237}Np, {sup 241}Am and {sup 243}Am, respectively. Total atomic densities decrease exponentially during the operation period. The reductions in the total atomic densities with respect to the initial ones are 79%, 81%, 82%, 83%, 85% and 86% for 10%, 12%, 14%, 16%, 18% and 20% MAs, respectively.

  1. Development of a tritium transport analysis code for the LMFBR system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iizawa, Katsuyuki; Torii, Tatsuo [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tsuruga Head Office, Tsuruga, Fukui (Japan)

    2001-03-01

    A tritium transport analysis code for the LMFBR system, TTT code, has been developed and validated using data from a power rising test conducted at Monju in 1995. The behavior of tritium during future long-term full power operation of Monju has been estimated. The TTT code was created from the tritium and hydrogen transport model devised by R. Kumar and ANL. Actual data from some plants has been used to improve the code. In this study, we used data from Monju to increase the accuracy of the calculated to measured ratio, the C/E ratio. As a result of the study, we were able to: 1. show that the calculated tritium concentration distribution and the change in the primary and secondary sodium, steam and water correlated sufficiently closely with the measured, C/E ratio of 1.1; 2. propose a transport model between sodium and the cover gas system taking into account the mechanisms affecting the partial pressure difference and the isotopic exchange of H and H3; 3. examine the considerable effect of the hydrogen source within the sodium cooling system of Monju on tritium behavior and clarify the characteristics at the initial stage of plant; 4. estimate the tritium transport and distribution for the long-term full power operation of Monju. The tritium release from the core will be 7,400 TBq during 30 years of operation. The primary and secondary cold trap will capture 99% of this and 1% or less will be released to the environment as gaseous radioactive waste from stack and its drainage water from SG; and 5. compare the best fitted tritium source rates from cores in Phenix and Monju and estimate the major release from Monju's helium bond closed type control rods. (author)

  2. The Future of Pooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Peter C.; Fone, Martin

    1997-01-01

    Discusses seven propositions underlying the strategies that insurance pools can, will, and must pursue: (1) risk management versus risk financing; (2) elimination of windfall advantages; (3) the maintenance of market-dominant status; (4) cost leadership; (5) client focus; (6) innovation and diversification; and (7) leadership challenges. A sidebar…

  3. Income pooling within families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonke, Jens; Uldall-Poulsen, Hans

    This paper analyses the phenomenon of income-pooling by applying the Danish household expenditure survey, merged with authoritative register information. Responses to additional questions on income sharing among 1696 couples also allows us to analyses whether the intra-household distribution of r...

  4. Effects of habitat isolation on the recovery of fish assemblages in experimentally defaunated stream pools in Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    David George Lonzarich; Melvin L. Warren; Mary Ruth Elger Lonzrich

    1998-01-01

    The authors removed fish from pools in two Arkansas streams to determine recolonization rates and the effects of isolation (i.e., riffle length, riffle depth, distance to large source pools, and location), pool area, and assemblage size on recovery. To determine pool-specific recovery rates, the authors repeatedly snorkeled 12 pools over a 40-day recovery period....

  5. Prevalence, incidence and mortality from cardiovascular disease in patients with pooled and specific severe mental illness: a large-scale meta-analysis of 3,211,768 patients and 113,383,368 controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correll, Christoph U; Solmi, Marco; Veronese, Nicola; Bortolato, Beatrice; Rosson, Stella; Santonastaso, Paolo; Thapa-Chhetri, Nita; Fornaro, Michele; Gallicchio, Davide; Collantoni, Enrico; Pigato, Giorgio; Favaro, Angela; Monaco, Francesco; Kohler, Cristiano; Vancampfort, Davy; Ward, Philip B; Gaughran, Fiona; Carvalho, André F; Stubbs, Brendon

    2017-06-01

    People with severe mental illness (SMI) - schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder - appear at risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), but a comprehensive meta-analysis is lacking. We conducted a large-scale meta-analysis assessing the prevalence and incidence of CVD; coronary heart disease; stroke, transient ischemic attack or cerebrovascular disease; congestive heart failure; peripheral vascular disease; and CVD-related death in SMI patients (N=3,211,768) versus controls (N=113,383,368) (92 studies). The pooled CVD prevalence in SMI patients (mean age 50 years) was 9.9% (95% CI: 7.4-13.3). Adjusting for a median of seven confounders, patients had significantly higher odds of CVD versus controls in cross-sectional studies (odds ratio, OR=1.53, 95% CI: 1.27-1.83; 11 studies), and higher odds of coronary heart disease (OR=1.51, 95% CI: 1.47-1.55) and cerebrovascular disease (OR=1.42, 95% CI: 1.21-1.66). People with major depressive disorder were at increased risk for coronary heart disease, while those with schizophrenia were at increased risk for coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease and congestive heart failure. Cumulative CVD incidence in SMI patients was 3.6% (95% CI: 2.7-5.3) during a median follow-up of 8.4 years (range 1.8-30.0). Adjusting for a median of six confounders, SMI patients had significantly higher CVD incidence than controls in longitudinal studies (hazard ratio, HR=1.78, 95% CI: 1.60-1.98; 31 studies). The incidence was also higher for coronary heart disease (HR=1.54, 95% CI: 1.30-1.82), cerebrovascular disease (HR=1.64, 95% CI: 1.26-2.14), congestive heart failure (HR=2.10, 95% CI: 1.64-2.70), and CVD-related death (HR=1.85, 95% CI: 1.53-2.24). People with major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia were all at increased risk of CVD-related death versus controls. CVD incidence increased with antipsychotic use (p=0.008), higher body mass index (p=0.008) and higher baseline CVD prevalence (p=0.03) in

  6. The Assessment of Fire-fighting Capabilities under the Pool Fire of Large Crude Oil Storage Tank%大型原油储罐池火灾事故下消防能力的评估

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李庆功; 宋文华; 吕铃钥; 陈阵

    2012-01-01

    以某大型原油储备库为例,采用FDS火灾模拟软件对储罐罐内池火灾进行了数值模拟,得出了火灾发展过程、烟气质量分数分布以及热辐射强度的变化规律,火灾初期烟粒子浓度高的区域分布面积大,且烟粒子分布的面积也比较广,随着反应的进行,烟粒子浓度逐渐降低,火焰逐渐明显,且主要分布在油面附近;热辐射强度随燃烧时间的延长而增强,最高值达35 kW/m2,最终下降并稳定在25 kW/m2左右.最后,对罐区固定消防设施以及移动消防设施的消防能力进行了评估.消防给水系统不能满足储罐罐内池火灾的灭火需求,泡沫灭火系统46 min可以将火扑灭;满足5 min原则的1号超特勤消防站不能满足该储罐发生池火灾所需要的消防车数量、移动泡沫炮数量、泡沫混合液量以及冷却水量.%Using fire simulation software FDS, the pool fire inside the tank is simulated with a large crude oil storage tank area taken for an example. The result of the fire development process, the mass fraction distribution of flue gas and the thermal radiation intensity variation is as follows. In the initial period of fire, the area range of high smoke concentration is wide, and the distribution of smoke particle is relatively wide, with the reaction proceeding, the concentration of smoke particles decreases, the flame becomes clear and is mainly on the surface of oil. The thermal radiation intensity is enhanced as the burning time passes by with the maximum value of 35 kW/m2, and finally declines stabilized at 25 kW/m2 or so. At last, the ability of the fixed and mobile firefighting facilities in the tank area is assessed. The fire-fighting water supply system does not meet the demand for extinguishing the fire, and the foam fire-extinguishing system could put the fire out after 46 min. No. 1 fire station in accordance with 5 min principle does not meet the required number of the mobile foam gun, foam mixture

  7. FMEF profilometry and visual examination feasibility and conceptual design. [Fuels and Materials Examination Facility; LMFBR and GCFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philipp, L.D.; Dilbeck, R.A.; Hartman, J.S.; Hildebrand, B.P.; Reich, F.R.; Swinth, K.L.

    1976-07-01

    The Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) is being scoped to provide postirradiation examination capabilities for FFTF, LMFBR and GCFR fuels and materials. The Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory has requested that the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) complete a feasibility study for the development of equipment to meet the FMEF Measurement Requirements for irradiated fuel pin and absorber rod bow, length, profile and visual examination stations. The purpose of the report is to provide a conceptual design for development of the examination equipment. The design analysis assumes that fuel pins and absorber rods to be examined are in the main cell. The cell's environment will be argon or nitrogen gas at a pressure between --1 and --4 in. of water and at a temperature between 70 and 100/sup 0/F. Oxygen content of the cell gas will normally be controlled between 25 and 50 ppM. Water content will be controlled within the same limits.

  8. Coolant mixing in LMFBR rod bundles and outlet plenum mixing transients. Progress report, March 1, 1978--May 31, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todreas, N.E.; Golay, M.W.; Wolf, L.

    1978-01-01

    An optical technique has been developed for the measurement of the eddy diffusivity of heat in a transparent flowing medium. The method uses a combination of two established measurement tools: a Mach--Zehnder interferometer for the monitoring of turbulently fluctuating temperature and a Laser Doppler Anemometer (LDA) for the measurement of turbulent velocity fluctuations. The technique is applied to the investigation of flow fields characteristic of the LMFBR outlet plenum. The study is accomplished using air as the working fluid in a small scale Plexiglas test section. Flows are introduced into both the 1/15 scale FFTF outlet plenum and the 3/80 scale CRBR geometry plenum at inlet Reynolds numbers of 22,000.

  9. Monte-Carlo Modeling of Parameters of a Subcritical Cascade Reactor Based on MSBR and LMFBR Technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Bznuni, S A; Zhamkochyan, V M; Polanski, A; Sosnin, A N; Khudaverdyan, A H

    2001-01-01

    Parameters of a subcritical cascade reactor driven by a proton accelerator and based on a primary lead-bismuth target, main reactor constructed analogously to the molten salt breeder (MSBR) reactor core and a booster-reactor analogous to the core of the BN-350 liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor (LMFBR). It is shown by means of Monte-Carlo modeling that the reactor under study provides safe operation modes (k_{eff}=0.94-0.98), is apable to transmute effectively radioactive nuclear waste and reduces by an order of magnitude the requirements on the accelerator beam current. Calculations show that the maximal neutron flux in the thermal zone is 10^{14} cm^{12}\\cdot s^_{-1}, in the fast booster zone is 5.12\\cdot10^{15} cm^{12}\\cdot s{-1} at k_{eff}=0.98 and proton beam current I=2.1 mA.

  10. PHOEBUS/UHTREX: a preliminary study of a low-cost facility for transient tests of LMFBR fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, W.L. (comp.)

    1976-08-01

    The results of a brief preliminary design study of a facility for transient nuclear tests of fast breeder reactor fuel are described. The study is based on the use of a reactor building originally built for the UHTREX reactor, and the use of some reactor hardware and reactor design and fabrication technology remaining from the Phoebus-2 reactor of the Rover nulcear rocket propulsion program. The facility is therefore currently identified as the PHOEBUS/UHTREX facility. This facility is believed capable of providing early information regarding fast reactor core accident energetics issues which will be very valuable to the overall LMFBR safety program. Facility performance in conjunction with a reference 127-fuel pin experiment is described. Low cost and early availability of the facility were emphasized in the selection of design features and parameters.

  11. COBRA-WC: a version of COBRA for single-phase multiassembly thermal hydraulic transient analysis. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, T.L.; Basehore, K.L.; Wheeler, C.L.; Prather, W.A.; Masterson, R.E.

    1980-07-01

    The objective of this report is to provide the user of the COBRA-WC (Whole Core) code a basic understanding of the code operation and capabilities. Included in this manual are the equations solved and the assumptions made in their derivations, a general description of the code capabilities, an explanation of the numerical algorithms used to solve the equations, and input instructions for using the code. Also, the auxiliary programs GEOM and SPECSET are described and input instructions for each are given. Input for COBRA-WC sample problems and the corresponding output are given in the appendices. The COBRA-WC code has been developed from the COBRA-IV-I code to analyze liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) assembly transients. It was specifically developed to analyze a core flow coastdown to natural circulation cooling.

  12. How to map your industry's profit pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadiesh, O; Gilbert, J L

    1998-01-01

    Many managers chart strategy without a full understanding of the sources and distribution of profits in their industry. Sometimes they focus their sights on revenues instead of profits, mistakenly assuming that revenue growth will eventually translate into profit growth. In other cases, they simply lack the data or the analytical tools required to isolate and measure variations in profitability. In this Manager's Tool Kit, the authors present a way to think clearly about where the money's being made in any industry. They describe a framework for analyzing how profits are distributed among the activities that form an industry's value chain. Such an analysis can provide a company's managers with a rich understanding of their industry's profit structure--what the authors call its profit pool--enabling them to identify which activities are generating disproportionately large or small shares of profits. Even more important, a profit-pool map opens a window onto the underlying structure of the industry, helping managers see the various forces that are determining the distribution of profits. As such, a profit-pool map provides a solid basis for strategic thinking. Mapping a profit pool involves four steps: defining the boundaries of the pool, estimating the pool's overall size, estimating the size of each value-chain activity in the pool, and checking and reconciling the calculations. The authors briefly describe each step and then apply the process by providing a detailed example of a hypothetical retail bank. They conclude by looking at ways of organizing the data in chart form as a first step toward plotting a profit-pool strategy.

  13. Welding pool measurement using thermal array sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Chia-Hung; Hsieh, Yi-Chen; Chen, Hsin-Yi

    2015-08-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is an additive manufacturing (AM) technology that uses a high-power laser beam to melt metal powder in chamber of inert gas. The process starts by slicing the 3D CAD data as a digital information source into layers to create a 2D image of each layer. Melting pool was formed by using laser irradiation on metal powders which then solidified to consolidated structure. In a selective laser melting process, the variation of melt pool affects the yield of a printed three-dimensional product. For three dimensional parts, the border conditions of the conductive heat transport have a very large influence on the melt pool dimensions. Therefore, melting pool is an important behavior that affects the final quality of the 3D object. To meet the temperature and geometry of the melting pool for monitoring in additive manufacturing technology. In this paper, we proposed the temperature sensing system which is composed of infrared photodiode, high speed camera, band-pass filter, dichroic beam splitter and focus lens. Since the infrared photodiode and high speed camera look at the process through the 2D galvanometer scanner and f-theta lens, the temperature sensing system can be used to observe the melting pool at any time, regardless of the movement of the laser spot. In order to obtain a wide temperature detecting range, 500 °C to 2500 °C, the radiation from the melting pool to be measured is filtered into a plurality of radiation portions, and since the intensity ratio distribution of the radiation portions is calculated by using black-body radiation. The experimental result shows that the system is suitable for melting pool to measure temperature.

  14. Investigation of the physical and numerical foundations of two-fluid representation of sodium boiling with applications to LMFBR experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    No, H.C.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1983-03-01

    This work involves the development of physical models for the constitutive relations of a two-fluid, three-dimensional sodium boiling code, THERMIT-6S. The code is equipped with a fluid conduction model, a fuel pin model, and a subassembly wall model suitable for stimulating LMFBR transient events. Mathematically rigorous derivations of time-volume averaged conservation equations are used to establish the differential equations of THERMIT-6S. These equations are then discretized in a manner identical to the original THERMIT code. A virtual mass term is incorporated in THERMIT-6S to solve the ill-posed problem. Based on a simplified flow regime, namely cocurrent annular flow, constitutive relations for two-phase flow of sodium are derived. The wall heat transfer coefficient is based on momentum-heat transfer analogy and a logarithmic law for liquid film velocity distribution. A broad literature review is given for two-phase friction factors. It is concluded that entrainment can account for some of the discrepancies in the literature. Mass and energy exchanges are modelled by generalization of the turbulent flux concept. Interfacial drag coefficients are derived for annular flows with entrainment. Code assessment is performed by simulating three experiments for low flow-high power accidents and one experiment for low flow/low power accidents in the LMFBR. While the numerical results for pre-dryout are in good agreement with the data, those for post-dryout reveal the need for improvement of the physical models. The benefits of two-dimensional non-equilibrium representation of sodium boiling are studied.

  15. CERN Electronics Pool presentations

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    The CERN Electronics Pool has organised a series of presentations in collaboration with oscilloscope manufacturers. The last one will take place according to the schedule below.   Time will be available at the end of the presentation to discuss your personal needs. The Agilent presentation had to be postponed and will be organised later. -     Lecroy: Thursday, 24 November 2011, in 530-R-030, 14:00 to 16:30.

  16. Swimming Pools and Molluscum Contagiosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Travelers’ Health: Smallpox & Other Orthopoxvirus-Associated Infections Poxvirus Swimming Pools Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir The ... often ask if molluscum virus can spread in swimming pools. There is also concern that it can ...

  17. Intra-patient variability of FDG standardized uptake values in mediastinal blood pool, liver, and myocardium during R-CHOP chemotherapy in patients with diffuse large B- cell lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Soo Jeong; Yi, Hyun Kyung; Lim, Chae Hong; Cho, Young Seok; Choi, Joon Young; Choe, Yeam Seong; Lee, Kyung Han; Moon, Seung Hwan [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT is useful for staging and evaluating treatment response in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). A five-point scale model using the mediastinal blood pool (MBP) and liver as references is a recommended method for interpreting treatment response. We evaluated the variability in standardized uptake values (SUVs) of the MBP, liver, and myocardium during chemotherapy in patients with DLBCL. We analyzed 60 patients with DLBCL who received rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone (R-CHOP) treatment and underwent baseline, interim, and final FDG PET/CT scans. The FDG uptakes of lymphoma lesions, MBP, liver, and myocardium were assessed, and changes in the MBP and liver SUV and possible associated factors were evaluated. The SUV of the liver did not change significantly during the chemotherapy. However, the SUV{sub mean} of MBP showed a significant change though the difference was small (p = 0.019). SUV{sub mean} of MBP and liver at baseline and interim scans was significantly lower in patients with advanced Ann Arbor stage on diagnosis. The SUV{sub mean} of the MBP and liver was negatively correlated with the volumetric index of lymphoma lesions in baseline scans (r = -0.547, p < 0.001; r = -0.502, p < 0.001). Positive myocardial FDG uptake was more frequently observed in interim and final scans than in the baseline scan, but there was no significant association between the MBP and liver uptake and myocardial uptake. The SUV of the liver was not significantly changed during R-CHOP chemotherapy in patients with DLBCL, whereas the MBP SUV of the interim scan decreased slightly. However, the SUV of the reference organs may be affected by tumor burden, and this should be considered when assessing follow-up scans. Although myocardial FDG uptake was more frequently observed after R-CHOP chemotherapy, it did not affect the SUV of the MBP and liver.

  18. Pooling Problems with Polynomial-Time Algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haugland, Dag; Hendrix, Eligius M.T.

    2016-01-01

    The computational challenge offered by many traditional network flow models is modest, and large-scale instances can be solved fast. When the composition of the flow is part of the model, the required computation time may increase substantially. This is in particular true for the pooling problem,

  19. [Pool exercise therapy of rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, E M; Lund, H; Danneskiold-Samsøe, B

    2001-10-01

    Aquatic therapy is a subgroup of balneotherapy and consists of exercises in a hot water pool. It uses the physical properties of water to achieve better mobility for patients whose pain, lack of muscle strength, and joint deformities are inhibiting factors when exercising on land. Pool therapy shows positive effects as part of the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis patients, but too few studies with an acceptable design and a well-defined patient group have been carried out. The documentation available on aquatic therapy indicates that more large clinical, controlled, and randomised studies must be conducted.

  20. Reserve Growth of Alberta Oil Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Mahendra K.; Cook, Troy

    2008-01-01

    This Open-File Report is based on a presentation delivered at the Fourth U.S. Geological Survey Workshop on Reserve Growth on March 10-11, 2008. It summarizes the results of a study of reserve growth of oil pools in Alberta Province, Canada. The study is part of a larger effort involving similar studies of fields in other important petroleum provinces around the world, with the overall objective of gaining a better understanding of reserve growth in fields with different geologic/reservoir parameters and different operating environments. The goals of the study were to: 1. Evaluate historical oil reserve data and assess reserve growth. 2. Develop reserve growth models/functions to help forecast hydrocarbon volumes. 3. Study reserve growth sensitivity to various parameters ? for example, pool size, porosity, oil gravity, and lithology. 4. Compare reserve growth in oil pools/fields of Alberta provinces with those from other large petroleum provinces.

  1. The Productive Ligurian Pool

    CERN Document Server

    Casella, E; Couvelard, X; Caldeira, R M A

    2011-01-01

    In contrast with the behavior of the eddies in the open-ocean, the sub-mesoscale eddies generated in the constricted Ligurian Basin (NW Mediterranean), are unproductive but their combined effect, arranged in a rim-like fashion, contributes to the containment of a Productive Ligurian Pool (PLP). Data de- rived from MODIS satellite sensor showed persistent higher chlorophyll con- centrations in the centre of the basin, concurrent with high EKE values in its surroundings, derived from AVISO altimetry merged products. This sug- gested that this 'productive pool' is maintained by the intense (sub)mesoscale eddy activity in the rim. Numerical realistic experiments, using a Regional Ocean Model System, forced by MERCATOR and by a high-resolution COSMO- l7 atmospheric model, also showed that most of the sub-mesoscale eddies, during 2009 and 2010, are concentrated in the rim surrounding the basin, contributing to the formation of a basin-scale cyclonic gyre. We hypothesized that the interaction between eddies in the r...

  2. IRT Item Parameter Scaling for Developing New Item Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyeon-Ah; Lu, Ying; Chang, Hua-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Increasing use of item pools in large-scale educational assessments calls for an appropriate scaling procedure to achieve a common metric among field-tested items. The present study examines scaling procedures for developing a new item pool under a spiraled block linking design. The three scaling procedures are considered: (a) concurrent…

  3. Next Generation Sequencing of Pooled Samples: Guideline for Variants’ Filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Santosh; Mangano, Eleonora; Barizzone, Nadia; Bordoni, Roberta; Sorosina, Melissa; Clarelli, Ferdinando; Corrado, Lucia; Martinelli Boneschi, Filippo; D’Alfonso, Sandra; De Bellis, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing large number of individuals, which is often needed for population genetics studies, is still economically challenging despite falling costs of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS). Pool-seq is an alternative cost- and time-effective option in which DNA from several individuals is pooled for sequencing. However, pooling of DNA creates new problems and challenges for accurate variant call and allele frequency (AF) estimation. In particular, sequencing errors confound with the alleles present at low frequency in the pools possibly giving rise to false positive variants. We sequenced 996 individuals in 83 pools (12 individuals/pool) in a targeted re-sequencing experiment. We show that Pool-seq AFs are robust and reliable by comparing them with public variant databases and in-house SNP-genotyping data of individual subjects of pools. Furthermore, we propose a simple filtering guideline for the removal of spurious variants based on the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistical test. We experimentally validated our filters by comparing Pool-seq to individual sequencing data showing that the filters remove most of the false variants while retaining majority of true variants. The proposed guideline is fairly generic in nature and could be easily applied in other Pool-seq experiments. PMID:27670852

  4. Analysis and Calculation of the Pool Sodium Fire Accident of LMFBR%钠冷快增殖堆池式钠火事故分析计算

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王学容; 朱继洲

    2000-01-01

    针对钠冷快堆严重事故下可能发生的池式钠火事故,描述了钠火现象,采用池式钠火程序SOFIRE Ⅱ的"一腔室"模型,并在该模型基础上,更客观地模拟池式钠火过程,编制程序POOLFIRE.SOFIRE Ⅱ认为池式钠火过程一开始就生成Na2O和Na2O2的混合物,生成量也不确定.POOLFIRE认为早期生成Na2O,大约30分钟后向Na2O2转变,最后计算得出池式钠火引起的安全壳内温度及压力响应,并与SOFIRE Ⅱ结果进行了比较.

  5. Morphology of drying blood pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laan, Nick; Smith, Fiona; Nicloux, Celine; Brutin, David; D-Blood project Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    Often blood pools are found on crime scenes providing information concerning the events and sequence of events that took place on the scene. However, there is a lack of knowledge concerning the drying dynamics of blood pools. This study focuses on the drying process of blood pools to determine what relevant information can be obtained for the forensic application. We recorded the drying process of blood pools with a camera and measured the weight. We found that the drying process can be separated into five different: coagulation, gelation, rim desiccation, centre desiccation, and final desiccation. Moreover, we found that the weight of the blood pool diminishes similarly and in a reproducible way for blood pools created in various conditions. In addition, we verify that the size of the blood pools is directly related to its volume and the wettability of the surface. Our study clearly shows that blood pools dry in a reproducible fashion. This preliminary work highlights the difficult task that represents blood pool analysis in forensic investigations, and how internal and external parameters influence its dynamics. We conclude that understanding the drying process dynamics would be advancement in timeline reconstitution of events. ANR funded project: D-Blood Project.

  6. Development of two-dimensional hot pool model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Bum; Hahn, H. D

    2000-05-01

    During a normal reactor scram, the heat generation is reduced almost instantaneously while the coolant flow rate follows the pump coast-down. This mismatch between power and flow results in a situation where the core flow entering the hot pool is at a lower temperature than the temperature of the bulk pool sodium. This temperature difference leads to thermal stratification. Thermal stratification can occur in the hot pool region if the entering coolant is colder than the existing hot pool coolant and the flow momentum is not large enough to overcome the negative buoyancy force. Since the fluid of hot pool enters IHX{sub s}, the temperature distribution of hot pool can alter the overall system response. Hence, it is necessary to predict the pool coolant temperature distribution with sufficient accuracy to determine the inlet temperature conditions for the IHX{sub s} and its contribution to the net buoyancy head. Therefore, in this study two-dimensional hot pool model is developed instead of existing one-dimensional model to predict the hot pool coolant temperature and velocity distribution more accurately and is applied to the SSC-K code.

  7. A three-pool model dissecting readily releasable pool replenishment at the calyx of held.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jun; Ge, Jian-long; Hao, Mei; Sun, Zhi-cheng; Wu, Xin-sheng; Zhu, Jian-bing; Wang, Wei; Yao, Pan-tong; Lin, Wei; Xue, Lei

    2015-03-31

    Although vesicle replenishment is critical in maintaining exo-endocytosis recycling, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Previous studies have shown that both rapid and slow endocytosis recycle into a very large recycling pool instead of within the readily releasable pool (RRP), and the time course of RRP replenishment is slowed down by more intense stimulation. This finding contradicts the calcium/calmodulin-dependence of RRP replenishment. Here we address this issue and report a three-pool model for RRP replenishment at a central synapse. Both rapid and slow endocytosis provide vesicles to a large reserve pool (RP) ~42.3 times the RRP size. When moving from the RP to the RRP, vesicles entered an intermediate pool (IP) ~2.7 times the RRP size with slow RP-IP kinetics and fast IP-RRP kinetics, which was responsible for the well-established slow and rapid components of RRP replenishment. Depletion of the IP caused the slower RRP replenishment observed after intense stimulation. These results establish, for the first time, a realistic cycling model with all parameters measured, revealing the contribution of each cycling step in synaptic transmission. The results call for modification of the current view of the vesicle recycling steps and their roles.

  8. The Tropical Western Hemisphere Warm Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C.; Enfield, D. B.

    2002-12-01

    The paper describes and examines variability of the tropical Western Hemisphere warm pool (WHWP) of water warmer than 28.5oC. The WHWP is the second-largest tropical warm pool on Earth. Unlike the Eastern Hemisphere warm pool in the western Pacific, which straddles the equator, the WHWP is entirely north of the equator. At various stages of development the WHWP extends over parts of the eastern North Pacific, the Gulf of Mexico, the Caribbean, and the western tropical North Atlantic. It has a large seasonal cycle and its interannual fluctuations of area and intensity are significant. Surface heat fluxes warm the WHWP through the boreal spring to an annual maximum of SST and WHWP area in the late summer/early fall, associated with eastern North Pacific and Atlantic hurricane activities and rainfall from northern South America to the southern tier of the United States. Observations suggest that a positive ocean-atmosphere feedback operating through longwave radiation and associated cloudiness seems to operate in the WHWP. During winter preceding large warm pool, there is an alteration of the Walker and Hadley circulation cells that serves as a "tropospheric bridge" for transferring Pacific ENSO effects to the Atlantic sector and inducing initial warming of warm pool. Associated with the warm SST anomalies is a decrease in sea level pressure anomalies and an anomalous increase in atmospheric convection and cloudiness. The increase in convective activity and cloudiness results in less net longwave radiation loss from the sea surface, which then reinforces SST anomalies.

  9. The spatial variability of water chemistry and DOC in bog pools: the importance of slope position, diurnal turnover and pool type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Joseph; Turner, Ed; Baird, Andy; Beadle, Jeannie; Billett, Mike; Brown, Lee; Chapman, Pippa; Dinsmore, Kerry; Dooling, Gemma; Grayson, Richard; Moody, Catherine; Gee, Clare

    2017-04-01

    We have previously shown that marine influence is an important factor controlling regional variability of pool water chemistry in blanket peatlands. Here we examine within-site controls on pool water chemistry. We surveyed natural and artificial (restoration sites) bog pools at blanket peatland sites in northern Scotland and Sweden. DOC, pH, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, temperature, cations, anions and absorbance spectra from 220-750nm were sampled. We sampled changes over time but also conducted intensive spatial surveys within individual pools and between pools on the same sampling days at individual study sites. Artificial pools had significantly greater DOC concentrations and different spectral absorbance characteristics when compared to natural pools at all sites studied. Within-pool variability in water chemistry tended to be small, even for very large pools ( 400 m2), except where pools had a layer of loose, mobile detritus on their beds. In these instances rapid changes took place between the overlying water column and the mobile sediment layer wherein dissolved oxygen concentrations dropped from values of around 12-10 mg/L to values less than 0.5 mg/L over just 2-3 cm of the depth profile. Such strong contrasts were not observed for pools which had a hard peat floor and which lacked a significant detritus layer. Strong diurnal turnover occurred within the pools on summer days, including within small, shallow pools (e.g. dissolved oxygen concentrations which originated at the surface and was then cycled downwards as the pool surface waters cooled. Slope location was a significant control on several pool water chemistry variables including pH and DOC concentration with accumulation (higher concentrations) in pools that were located further downslope in both natural and artificial pool systems. These processes have important implications for our interpretation of water chemistry and gas flux data from pool systems, how we design our sampling strategies and

  10. Carbon Residence Times in Pedogenic Carbonate Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monger, H.; Feng, Y.; Karnjanapiboonwang, A.

    2013-12-01

    Soil carbonate is a huge pool of terrestrial carbon that contains at least 930 to 940 Pg C and has influx rates on the order of 1 to 12 g CaCO3/m2/yr. Such large mass to flux ratios yield long mean residence times for carbon (e.g., 85,000 years)--assuming steady state. Like other global carbon pools, the soil carbonate pool has smaller sub-pools with higher influx rates and shorter mean residence times. For example, pedogenic carbonate in coppice dunes known to have formed since 1858 and carbonate formed on lithic artifacts in soils at archaeology sites suggests mean residence times can be as short as 120 years--again assuming steady state. Harder to assess are efflux rates as CO2 emissions or bicarbonate leaching. Some Bowen-ratio studies have nevertheless found evidence for CO2 emissions resulting from carbonate dissolution, and other studies have found evidence for bicarbonate leaching based on dissolution pipes through calcic horizons using soil morphology studies. Since an understanding of mean residence times are prerequisite for a better understanding of soil carbonate in the global carbon cycle, especially in a scenario of an expanding Aridosphere, more influx and efflux measurements are needed to evaluate the possibility of carbon sequestration by soil carbonate in hyperarid, arid, semiarid, or subhumid soils.

  11. Monotherapy with indacaterol once daily reduces the rate of exacerbations in patients with moderate-to-severe COPD: Post-hoc pooled analysis of 6 months data from three large phase III trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Buhl, Roland; Lawrence, David; Young, David

    2015-01-01

    In patients with COPD, exacerbations are associated with poor quality of life and may shorten survival. Prevention of exacerbations is, therefore, a key objective in COPD management. Indacaterol, a once-daily ultra-long-acting β2-agonist, has been shown to reduce exacerbations in various studies. This pooled analysis evaluated the effect of indacaterol on exacerbations versus placebo. Six-month data were pooled from three randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled studies: indacaterol 300 μg versus placebo (1 year); indacaterol 150 μg and 300 μg versus placebo (6 months); and indacaterol 150 μg versus placebo (6 months). All treatments were administered once daily. Data from other treatment groups were excluded. All three studies enrolled patients aged ≥40 years with moderate-to-severe COPD and smoking history ≥20 pack-years. Time to exacerbation and exacerbation rate were analyzed. Overall, the pooled data set included 2716 patients (indacaterol 150 μg [n = 746], indacaterol 300 μg [n = 819], placebo [n = 1151]). Both indacaterol doses 150 and 300 μg significantly reduced the COPD exacerbation rates compared with placebo (Rate ratios, RR [95% Confidence Interval, CI]: 0.69 [0.55-0.87], 0.71 [95% CI: 0.57-0.88] respectively; both p = 0.002). Over 6 months, indacaterol 150 and 300 μg also significantly prolonged the time to first moderate-to-severe exacerbation versus placebo (Hazard ratios, HR [95% CI]: 0.74: [0.59-0.93], p = 0.009; 0.73 [0.59-0.90], p = 0.004, respectively). At months 3 and 6, clinically relevant improvements in lung function versus placebo were observed with indacaterol 150 μg (Least squares mean treatment differences: Month 3 = 170 mL; Month 6 = 160 mL) and 300 μg (170 mL at both time-points; all p indacaterol doses, 150 and 300 μg, were associated with significant reductions in exacerbations and significant improvements in bronchodilation versus placebo. The results suggest once-daily indacaterol is an effective treatment

  12. Development of a water leak detector system for LMFBR steam generator. Pt. 1; Sound attenuation due to bubbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumagai, Hiromichi; Yoshida, Kazuo (Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo (Japan). Komae Research Lab.)

    1994-03-01

    In the steam generators (SG) of LMFBR, it is necessary to detect the leakage of water from tubes of heat exchanger as soon as leakage is occurred. The active acoustic detection method has drawn general interests owing to its short response time and reduction of the influence of background noise. In this paper, in order to study the applicability of active acoustic method for detection of water leakage in the SG, the sound attenuation characteristics due to bubbles are investigated under various bubble conditions and emitted sound conditions. Furthermore, using SG sector model, sound attenuation characteristics due to injection of bubbles are studied. As a result, it is clarified that the sound attenuation due to bubbles varies dependent upon size of bubbles, void fraction and thickness of bubble layer, that the attenuation of sound reaches maximum when bubbles resonate with the emitted frequency. The sound attenuation due to bubbles in the SG model attenuates immediately upon injection of bubbles, and sound attenuation depends upon bubble size as well as void fraction. (author).

  13. Development of ultrasonic thermometry for high-temperature high-resolution temperature profiling applications in LMFBR safety research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, M. E.

    1986-05-01

    Ultrasonic thermometry was developed as a high temperature profiling diagnostic for use in the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) Debris Coolability Program at Sandia National Laboratories. These instruments were used successfully in the DC series experiments and the D10 experiment. Temperatures approaching 3000 C with spatial resolution of 10 mm and indicated temperature gradients of 700 C/cm were measured. Instruments were operated in molten sodium, molten steel, and molten UO2 environments. Up to 14 measurement zones on a single instrument in molten sodium were used with 12 mm and 15 mm spatial resolution. Hermetically sealed units operating at elevated temperatures were used. Post-test examination revealed very little systematic calibration drifts (less than 10 C) with random drifts occuring with less than 40 C standard deviation in a 10 to 12 mm measured zone. The stability of the system varies from +/- 1 C to +/- 15 C depending on the sensor design constraints for a particular application. Doped tungsten sensors were developed to permit operation of total measurement zone length of 30 cm at temperatures above 2500 C.

  14. Rising and boiling of a drop of volatile liquid in a heavier one: application to the LMFBR severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pigny, Sylvain L.; Coste, Pierre F. [DEN/DER/SSTH, CEA/Grenoble, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The rising and, simultaneously the boiling, of a droplet of volatile liquid in a heavier one is computation-ally investigated. Our calculations are performed with the help of the SIMMER code, in which a specific DNS algorithm is developed, to represent surface tension between the different media in an explicit way. This is required to represent the physical contact that occurs between two liquids and the vapor from the lighter one, since interfacial heat transfers, and therefore boiling kinetics, merely depend on it. The behavior of the three fluids system is of interest as a key phenomenon related to the transition phase of LMFBR severe accidents, before the formation of a fully developed bubble column. The driven force due to the boiling of steel drops can play a major role in the relocation, and, consequently, the recriticality of UO{sub 2} fuel. The problem is investigated focusing first on analytical experiments, built-up with simulating materials, and for which accurate experimental results are provided. The dependence of results with regard to thermodynamical and physical properties is underlined. This point is of interest in view of some uncertainties in the knowledge of data concerning the materials present in the reactor at high temperature. The pressure level is a key parameter in the accident scenarios: its influence is uppermost on the volumic mass of the gas. It is also outlined. (authors)

  15. Graphical and tabular summaries of decay characteristics for once-through PWR, LMFBR, and FFTF fuel cycle materials. [Spent fuel, high-level waste fuel can scrap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croff, A.G.; Liberman, M.S.; Morrison, G.W.

    1982-01-01

    Based on the results of ORIGEN2 and a newly developed code called ORMANG, graphical and summary tabular characteristics of spent fuel, high-level waste, and fuel assembly structural material (cladding) waste are presented for a generic pressurized-water reactor (PWR), a liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), and the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The characteristics include radioactivity, thermal power, and toxicity (water dilution volume). Given are graphs and summary tables containing characteristic totals and the principal nuclide contributors as well as graphs comparing the three reactors for a single material and the three materials for a single reactor.

  16. Considerations on a critical experiment program for a large fast breeder reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1980-09-15

    The design studies for large LMFBR in Japan are being continued by PNC and Electric Companies. Both of them have adopted loop-type and 1000 MWe class reactor as the reference design, but main parameters of the core have not yet been fixed. The main core parameters of the present design are shown. Comparing the geometrical properties with those in ZPPR-9 and 10, some of the degrees of mockup are not satisfactory. In addition, there is another difference between a reactor and a mockup critical assembly. Therefore extrapolation is important to apply the results of JUPITER to the core design.

  17. poolHiTS: A Shifted Transversal Design based pooling strategy for high-throughput drug screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woolf Peter J

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A key goal of drug discovery is to increase the throughput of small molecule screens without sacrificing screening accuracy. High-throughput screening (HTS in drug discovery involves testing a large number of compounds in a biological assay to identify active compounds. Normally, molecules from a large compound library are tested individually to identify the activity of each molecule. Usually a small number of compounds are found to be active, however the presence of false positive and negative testing errors suggests that this one-drug one-assay screening strategy can be significantly improved. Pooling designs are testing schemes that test mixtures of compounds in each assay, thereby generating a screen of the whole compound library in fewer tests. By repeatedly testing compounds in different combinations, pooling designs also allow for error-correction. These pooled designs, for specific experiment parameters, can be simply and efficiently created using the Shifted Transversal Design (STD pooling algorithm. However, drug screening contains a number of key constraints that require specific modifications if this pooling approach is to be useful for practical screen designs. Results In this paper, we introduce a pooling strategy called poolHiTS (Pooled High-Throughput Screening which is based on the STD algorithm. In poolHiTS, we implement a limit on the number of compounds that can be mixed in a single assay. In addition, we show that the STD-based pooling strategy is limited in the error-correction that it can achieve. Due to the mixing constraint, we show that it is more efficient to split a large library into smaller blocks of compounds, which are then tested using an optimized strategy repeated for each block. We package the optimal block selection algorithm into poolHiTS. The MATLAB codes for the poolHiTS algorithm and the corresponding decoding strategy are also provided. Conclusion We have produced a practical version

  18. Macroinvertebrate community assembly in pools created during peatland restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lee E; Ramchunder, Sorain J; Beadle, Jeannie M; Holden, Joseph

    2016-11-01

    providing extensive new habitat that is largely equivalent to natural pools. More generally, we suggest that assembly theory could provide new benchmarks for planning and evaluating ecological restoration success.

  19. Rank Pooling for Action Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Basura; Gavves, Efstratios; Oramas M, Jose Oramas; Ghodrati, Amir; Tuytelaars, Tinne

    2017-04-01

    We propose a function-based temporal pooling method that captures the latent structure of the video sequence data - e.g., how frame-level features evolve over time in a video. We show how the parameters of a function that has been fit to the video data can serve as a robust new video representation. As a specific example, we learn a pooling function via ranking machines. By learning to rank the frame-level features of a video in chronological order, we obtain a new representation that captures the video-wide temporal dynamics of a video, suitable for action recognition. Other than ranking functions, we explore different parametric models that could also explain the temporal changes in videos. The proposed functional pooling methods, and rank pooling in particular, is easy to interpret and implement, fast to compute and effective in recognizing a wide variety of actions. We evaluate our method on various benchmarks for generic action, fine-grained action and gesture recognition. Results show that rank pooling brings an absolute improvement of 7-10 average pooling baseline. At the same time, rank pooling is compatible with and complementary to several appearance and local motion based methods and features, such as improved trajectories and deep learning features.

  20. Pooled screening for synergistic interactions subject to blocking and noise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Li

    Full Text Available The complex molecular networks in the cell can give rise to surprising interactions: gene deletions that are synthetically lethal, gene overexpressions that promote stemness or differentiation, synergistic drug interactions that heighten potency. Yet, the number of actual interactions is dwarfed by the number of potential interactions, and discovering them remains a major problem. Pooled screening, in which multiple factors are simultaneously tested for possible interactions, has the potential to increase the efficiency of searching for interactions among a large set of factors. However, pooling also carries with it the risk of masking genuine interactions due to antagonistic influence from other factors in the pool. Here, we explore several theoretical models of pooled screening, allowing for synergy and antagonism between factors, noisy measurements, and other forms of uncertainty. We investigate randomized sequential designs, deriving formulae for the expected number of tests that need to be performed to discover a synergistic interaction, and the optimal size of pools to test. We find that even in the presence of significant antagonistic interactions and testing noise, randomized pooled designs can significantly outperform exhaustive testing of all possible combinations. We also find that testing noise does not affect optimal pool size, and that mitigating noise by a selective approach to retesting outperforms naive replication of all tests. Finally, we show that a Bayesian approach can be used to handle uncertainty in problem parameters, such as the extent of synergistic and antagonistic interactions, resulting in schedules for adapting pool size during the course of testing.

  1. 高大空间池火羽流中心线轴向温度试验研究%Plume centerline temperature distribution of pool fire in the large space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张国维; 朱国庆; 吴维华; 黄丽丽

    2012-01-01

    开展高大空间640 kW及1 080 kW的小功率油池火灾试验,试验测量火源上方4.0~7.5 m处羽流中心线的轴向温度.采用经典McCaffrey模型、Zukoski模型以及Heskestad模型预测羽流中心线轴向温度,并将理论预测值与试验值进行对比.对比结果表明:三种羽流模型预测的羽流中心线轴向温度与真实火场温度基本相吻合.McCaffrey模型预测的羽流中心线轴向温度最高,Heskestad模型次之,Zukoski模型预测温度最低.Heskestad羽流模型较适合于高大空间的小功率油池火灾火场温度的精确预测.火源功率较大时,Zukoshi模型预测结果可能较真实火场温度小.%The plume centerline temperature was researched in two pool fire experiments with low fire power of 640 kW and 1 080 kW. And the temperature was also respectively computedby theory of McCaffrery mode, Zukoski mode and Heskestad mode. Comparing the experiment data with the calculation results, we could make conclusion that the experiment data was basically identical with the calculation results which was computed by those plume modes. The temperature calculated by McCaffrery mode was the highest temperature while the result computed by Zukoski mode was the lowest one, Heskestad mode theory could make the accurate prediction of plume cen terline temperature of pool fire in unconfined space. And the prediction temperature,calculated by Zukoski mode would be lower than the experiment date when the fire power exceeds 1000 kW.

  2. Evaluation of Decontamination Factor of Aerosol in Pool Scrubber according to Bubble Shape and Size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Hyun Joung; Ha, Kwang Soon; Jang, Dong Soon [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The scrubbing pool could play an important role in the wet type FCVS because a large amount of aerosol is captured in the water pool. The pool scrubbing phenomena have been modelled and embedded in several computer codes, such as SPARC (Suppression Pool Aerosol Removal Code), BUSCA (BUbble Scrubbing Algorithm) and SUPRA (Suppression Pool Retention Analysis). These codes aim at simulating the pool scrubbing process and estimating the decontamination factors (DFs) of the radioactive aerosol and iodine gas in the water pool, which is defined as the ratio of initial mass of the specific radioactive material to final massy after passing through the water pool. The pool scrubbing models were reviewed and an aerosol scrubbing code has been prepared to calculate decontamination factor through the pool. The developed code has been verified using the experimental results and parametric studies the decontamination factor according to bubble shape and size. To evaluate the decontamination factor more accurate whole pool scrubber phenomena, the code was improved to consider the variety shape and size of bubbles. The decontamination factor were largely evaluated in ellipsoid bubble rather than in sphere bubble. The pool scrubbing models will be enhanced to apply more various model such as aerosol condensation of hygroscopic. And, it is need to experiment to measure to bubble shape and size distribution in pool to improve bubble model.

  3. Subchannel Model of Analysis Code ATHAS-LMR for LMFBR%钠冷快堆分析程序ATHAS-LMR的子通道模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈选相; 吴攀; 单建强

    2012-01-01

    Based on the subchannel model and the wire wrap distributed resistance model, the subchannel code ATHAS-LMR was developed to analyze the thermal hydraulic performance of the LMFBR (liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor) fuel assemblies. Comparing the results of ATHAS-LMR with those of some foreign experiments and similar subchannel codes, the results show that ATHAS-LMR can predict the experiments very well and is able to analyze the thermal hydraulic performance of the LMFBR fuel assemblies under different conditions, such as normal operation, flow blockage accident.%以子通道模型和绕丝分布式阻力模型为基础,研发了液态金属快中子增殖堆热工水力子通道分析程序ATHAS-LMR,以对液态金属快中子增殖堆燃料组件中的热工水力现象进行分析.与国外知名实验和类似子通道分析程序比较,结果表明:ATHAS-LMR与实验结果及其他子通道分析程序的结果相近,能够完成包括堵流工况的各种工况下液态金属快中子增殖堆组件的热工水力性能分析.

  4. A proposal of benchmark calculation on reactor physics for metallic fueled and MOX fueled LMFBR based upon mack-up experiment at FCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oigawa, Hiroyuki; Iijima, Susumu; Sakurai, Takeshi; Okajima, Shigeaki; Andoh, Masaki; Nemoto, Tatsuo; Kato, Yuichi; Osugi, Toshitaka [Dept. of Nuclear Energy System, Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-02-01

    In order to assess the validity of the cross section library for fast reactor physics, a set of benchmark calculation is proposed. The benchmark calculation is based upon mock-up experiments at three FCA cores with various compositions of central test regions, two of which were mock-ups of metallic fueled LMFBR's, and the other was a mock-up of a mixed oxide fueled LMFBR. One of the metallic cores included enriched uranium in the test region, while the others did not. Physics parameters to be calculated are criticality, reaction rate ratios, plutonium and B{sub 4}C sample worth, sodium void reactivity worth, and Doppler reactivity worth of {sup 238}U. Homogenized atomic number densities and various correction factors are given so that anyone can easily perform diffusion calculation in two-dimensional RZ-model and compare the results with the experiments. The validity of the correction factors are proved by changing the calculation method and used nuclear data file. (author)

  5. Grundfoss: Chlorination of Swimming Pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.; Hogan, John; Andreassen, Viggo

    1998-01-01

    Grundfos asked for a model, describing the problem of mixing chemicals, being dosed into water systems, to be developed. The application of the model should be dedicated to dosing aqueous solution of chlorine into swimming pools.......Grundfos asked for a model, describing the problem of mixing chemicals, being dosed into water systems, to be developed. The application of the model should be dedicated to dosing aqueous solution of chlorine into swimming pools....

  6. Grundfoss: Chlorination of Swimming Pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.; Hogan, John; Andreassen, Viggo

    1998-01-01

    Grundfos asked for a model, describing the problem of mixing chemicals, being dosed into water systems, to be developed. The application of the model should be dedicated to dosing aqueous solution of chlorine into swimming pools.......Grundfos asked for a model, describing the problem of mixing chemicals, being dosed into water systems, to be developed. The application of the model should be dedicated to dosing aqueous solution of chlorine into swimming pools....

  7. 13 CFR 120.1706 - Pool Originator's retained interest in Pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pool Originator's retained interest in Pool. 120.1706 Section 120.1706 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION... Pools § 120.1706 Pool Originator's retained interest in Pool. The Pool Originator must retain...

  8. Simulation of heat and mass transfer processes in molten core debris-concrete systems. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felde, D K

    1979-01-01

    The heat and mass transport phenomena taking place in volumetrically-heated fluids have become of interest in recent years due to their significance in assessments of fast reactor safety and post-accident heat removal (PAHR). Following a hypothetical core disruptive accident (HCDA), the core and reactor internals may melt down. The core debis melting through the reactor vessel and guard vessel may eventually contact the concrete of the reactor cell floor. The interaction of the core debris with the concrete as well as the melting of the debris pool into the concrete will significantly affect efforts to prevent breaching of the containment and the resultant release of radioactive effluents to the environment.

  9. NACOWA experiments on LMFBR cover gas aerosols, heat transfer, and fission product enrichment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minges, J.; Schuetz, W.

    1993-12-01

    Fifteen different NACOWA test series were carried out. The following items were investigated: sodium mass concentration in the cover gas, sodium aerosol particle size, radiative heat transfer across the cover gas, total heat transfer across the cover gas, sodium deposition on the cover plate, temperature profiles across the cover gas, phenomena if the argon cover gas is replaced by helium, enrichment of cesium, iodine, and zinc in the aerosol and in the deposits. The conditions were mainly related to the design parameters of the EFR. According to the first consistent design, a pool temperature of 545 C and a roof temperature of only 120 C were foreseen at a cover gas height of 85 cm. The experiments were carried out in a stainless steel test vessel of 0.6 m diameter and 1.14 m height. Pool temperature (up to 545 C), cover gas height (12.5 cm, 33 cm, and others), and roof temperature (from 110 C to 450 C) were the main parameters. (orig./HP) [Deutsch] Es wurden fuenfzehn verschiedene NACOWA-Versuchsreihen durchgefuehrt. Folgende Themen wurden behandelt: Natrium-Massenkonzentration im Schutzgas, Natriumaerosol-Partikelgroesse, Strahlungswaermeuebergang durch das Schutzgas, Gesamtwaermeuebergang durch das Schutzgas, Natriumablagerung am Deckel, Temperaturprofile im Schutzgas, Phaenomene beim Uebergang von Argon-Schutzgas auf Helium-Schutzgas, Anreicherung von Caesium, Jod und Zink im Aerosol und in den Ablagerungen. Die Versuchsbedingungen wurden hauptsaechlich durch die Auslegungsparameter des EFR bestimmt. Beim `first consistent design` war eine Pooltemperatur von 545 C und eine Dachtemperatur von nur 120 C bei 85 cm Argon-Schutzgashoehe vorgesehen. Die Experimente wurden in einem Edelstahlbehaelter von 0,6 m Durchmesser und 1,14 m Hoehe durchgefuehrt. Pooltemperatur (bis 545 C), Schutzgashoehe (12,5 cm, 33 cm und andere) sowie Deckeltemperatur (von 100 C bis 450 C) waren die wichtigsten experimentellen Parameter. (orig./HP)

  10. Reserve growth in oil pools of Alberta: Model and forecast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, M.; Cook, T.

    2010-01-01

    Reserve growth is recognized as a major component of additions to reserves in most oil provinces around the world, particularly in mature provinces. It takes place as a result of the discovery of new pools/reservoirs and extensions of known pools within existing fields, improved knowledge of reservoirs over time leading to a change in estimates of original oil-in-place, and improvement in recovery factor through the application of new technology, such as enhanced oil recovery methods, horizontal/multilateral drilling, and 4D seismic. A reserve growth study was conducted on oil pools in Alberta, Canada, with the following objectives: 1) evaluate historical oil reserve data in order to assess the potential for future reserve growth; 2) develop reserve growth models/ functions to help forecast hydrocarbon volumes; 3) study reserve growth sensitivity to various parameters (for example, pool size, porosity, and oil gravity); and 4) compare reserve growth in oil pools and fields in Alberta with those from other large petroleum provinces around the world. The reported known recoverable oil exclusive of Athabasca oil sands in Alberta increased from 4.5 billion barrels of oil (BBO) in 1960 to 17 BBO in 2005. Some of the pools that were included in the existing database were excluded from the present study for lack of adequate data. Therefore, the known recoverable oil increased from 4.2 to 13.9 BBO over the period from 1960 through 2005, with new discoveries contributing 3.7 BBO and reserve growth adding 6 BBO. This reserve growth took place mostly in pools with more than 125,000 barrels of known recoverable oil. Pools with light oil accounted for most of the total known oil volume, therefore reflecting the overall pool growth. Smaller pools, in contrast, shrank in their total recoverable volumes over the years. Pools with heavy oil (gravity less than 20o API) make up only a small share (3.8 percent) of the total recoverable oil; they showed a 23-fold growth compared to

  11. Preliminary Calculation on a Spent Fuel Pool Accident using GOTHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jaehwan; Choi, Yu Jung; Hong, Tae Hyub; Kim, Hyeong-Taek [KHNP-CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The probability of an accident happening at the spent fuel pool was believed to be quite low until the 2011 Fukushima accident occurred. Notably, large amount of spent fuel are normally stored in the spent fuel pool for a long time compared to the amount of fuel in the reactor core and the total heat released from the spent fuel is high enough to boil the water of the spent fuel pool when the cooling system does not operate. In addition, the enrichment and the burnup of the fuel have both increased in the past decade and heat generation from the spent fuel thereby has also increased. The failure of the cooling system at the spent fuel pool (hereafter, a loss-of-cooling accident) is one of the principal hypothetical causes of an accident that could occur at the spent fuel pool. In this paper, the preliminary calculation of a loss-of-cooling accident was performed. In this paper, the preliminary calculation of a loss-of cooling accident was performed with GOTHIC. The calculation results show boiling away of water in the spent fuel pool due to the loss-of-cooling accident and similar thermal performance of the spent fuel pool with previous research results.

  12. Addressing data privacy in matched studies via virtual pooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha-Chaudhuri, P; Weinberg, C R

    2017-09-07

    Data confidentiality and shared use of research data are two desirable but sometimes conflicting goals in research with multi-center studies and distributed data. While ideal for straightforward analysis, confidentiality restrictions forbid creation of a single dataset that includes covariate information of all participants. Current approaches such as aggregate data sharing, distributed regression, meta-analysis and score-based methods can have important limitations. We propose a novel application of an existing epidemiologic tool, specimen pooling, to enable confidentiality-preserving analysis of data arising from a matched case-control, multi-center design. Instead of pooling specimens prior to assay, we apply the methodology to virtually pool (aggregate) covariates within nodes. Such virtual pooling retains most of the information used in an analysis with individual data and since individual participant data is not shared externally, within-node virtual pooling preserves data confidentiality. We show that aggregated covariate levels can be used in a conditional logistic regression model to estimate individual-level odds ratios of interest. The parameter estimates from the standard conditional logistic regression are compared to the estimates based on a conditional logistic regression model with aggregated data. The parameter estimates are shown to be similar to those without pooling and to have comparable standard errors and confidence interval coverage. Virtual data pooling can be used to maintain confidentiality of data from multi-center study and can be particularly useful in research with large-scale distributed data.

  13. Mathematical modelling and simulation of the thermal performance of a solar heated indoor swimming pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mančić Marko V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Buildings with indoor swimming pools have a large energy footprint. The source of major energy loss is the swimming pool hall where air humidity is increased by evaporation from the pool water surface. This increases energy consumption for heating and ventilation of the pool hall, fresh water supply loss and heat demand for pool water heating. In this paper, a mathematical model of the swimming pool was made to assess energy demands of an indoor swimming pool building. The mathematical model of the swimming pool is used with the created multi-zone building model in TRNSYS software to determine pool hall energy demand and pool losses. Energy loss for pool water and pool hall heating and ventilation are analyzed for different target pool water and air temperatures. The simulation showed that pool water heating accounts for around 22%, whereas heating and ventilation of the pool hall for around 60% of the total pool hall heat demand. With a change of preset controller air and water temperatures in simulations, evaporation loss was in the range 46-54% of the total pool losses. A solar thermal sanitary hot water system was modelled and simulated to analyze it's potential for energy savings of the presented demand side model. The simulation showed that up to 87% of water heating demands could be met by the solar thermal system, while avoiding stagnation. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 42006: Research and development of energy and environmentally highly effective polygeneration systems based on using renewable energy sources

  14. Synaptic vesicle pools and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabi, AbdulRasheed A; Tsien, Richard W

    2012-08-01

    Synaptic vesicles release neurotransmitter at chemical synapses, thus initiating the flow of information in neural networks. To achieve this, vesicles undergo a dynamic cycle of fusion and retrieval to maintain the structural and functional integrity of the presynaptic terminals in which they reside. Moreover, compelling evidence indicates these vesicles differ in their availability for release and mobilization in response to stimuli, prompting classification into at least three different functional pools. Ongoing studies of the molecular and cellular bases for this heterogeneity attempt to link structure to physiology and clarify how regulation of vesicle pools influences synaptic strength and presynaptic plasticity. We discuss prevailing perspectives on vesicle pools, the role they play in shaping synaptic transmission, and the open questions that challenge current understanding.

  15. 用于池式快堆系统分析的钠池三维模型开发%Development of Three-Dimensional Sodium Pool Model for System Analysis of Pool-Type Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    隋丹婷; 陆道纲; 张盼

    2012-01-01

    由于池式快堆钠池内的热工水力学特性对反应堆的安全运行有重要影响,本文采用基于交错网格的SIMPLE算法开发直角坐标系和柱坐标系下钠池三维计算软件.应用CFX软件进行验证之后,完成了三维流场分析程序与系统分析软件SAC-CFR的耦合,并用耦合后的程序分析日本文殊快堆45%功率稳态运行工况上腔室内的流场分布,初步验证了堆芯上腔三维化的SAC-CFR用于系统分析的有效性,为进一步开发事故模型、非能动余热排出系统模型做准备.%As the thermal-hydraulic characteristic in sodium pool is crucial for safety operation of liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), a three-dimensional sodium pool thermal-hydraulic analysis code was developed based on SIMPLE algorithm on stagger grid under Cartesian coordinates and cylindrical coordinates. After the validation with CFX, coupling between the analysis code and SAC-CFR was completed) and then the coupled code was applied to the flow field analysis in upper plenum of Monju Plant at 45% thermal power steady-state operation condition, which preliminary shows the effectiveness of the system analysis with coupled code and makes preparations for further development of accident analysis model and passive residual heat removal system.

  16. Patent pools: Intellectual property rights and competition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez, V.

    2010-01-01

    Patent pools do not correct all problems associated with patent thickets. In this respect, patent pools might not stop the outsider problem from striking pools. Moreover, patent pools can be expensive to negotiate, can exclude patent holders with smaller numbers of patents or enable a group of major

  17. Patent pools: Intellectual property rights and competition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez, V.

    2010-01-01

    Patent pools do not correct all problems associated with patent thickets. In this respect, patent pools might not stop the outsider problem from striking pools. Moreover, patent pools can be expensive to negotiate, can exclude patent holders with smaller numbers of patents or enable a group of major

  18. Patent pools: Intellectual property rights and competition.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez, V.F.

    2010-01-01

    Patent pools do not correct all problems associated with patent thickets. In this respect, patent pools might not stop the outsider problem from striking pools. Moreover, patent pools can be expensive to negotiate, can exclude patent holders with smaller numbers of patents or enable a group of major

  19. 21 CFR 1250.89 - Swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Swimming pools. 1250.89 Section 1250.89 Food and... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.89 Swimming pools. (a) Fill and draw swimming pools shall not be installed or used. (b) Swimming pools of the recirculation type shall be...

  20. Scalable Pooled Time Series of Big Video Data from the Deep Web

    OpenAIRE

    Mattmann, Chris; Sharan, Madhav

    2016-01-01

    We contribute a scalable implementation of Ryoo et al's Pooled Time Series algorithm from CVPR 2015. The updated algorithm has been evaluated on a large and diverse dataset of approximately 6800 videos collected from a crawl of the deep web related to human trafficking on DARPA's MEMEX effort. We describe the properties of Pooled Time Series and the motivation for using it to relate videos collected from the deep web. We highlight issues that we found while running Pooled Time Series on large...

  1. Hepatitis E viral loads in plasma pools for fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylis, Sally A; Corman, Victor M; Ong, Edgar; Linnen, Jeffrey M; Nübling, C Micha; Blümel, Johannes

    2016-10-01

    It is now recognized that blood donors may be silently infected with hepatitis E virus (HEV) and that plasma pools used in the manufacture of plasma-derived medicinal products may also contain detectable virus RNA. The occurrence of HEV-infected blood and plasma donors can vary considerably depending on local epidemiology. Manufacturing plasma pools from North America, Europe, the Middle East, and Asia were examined for the presence of HEV using transcription-mediated amplification of HEV RNA; confirmatory testing was performed using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and sequencing. A total of 484 pools were tested. Asian pools were most frequently positive for HEV RNA and had higher viral loads, although none exceeding 300 IU/mL, and the sequenced strains (n = 5) clustered with Genotype 4, including one significantly divergent sequence. Only HEV Genotype 3 was identified in North American (n = 5) and European (n = 5) pools. There was no evidence of HEV in any pools tested from the Middle East. HEV was detected in manufacturing plasma pools from three different continents; viral loads were low-consistent with large pool sizes and moderate levels of HEV viremia at the individual donation level-but are nevertheless informative for risk assessment of plasma-derived medicinal products. Where sequencing was possible, analysis confirmed the presence of viruses consistent with locally circulating genotypes in the respective regions. The absence of HEV in Middle Eastern pools is consistent with the low prevalence of HEV in this region, likely due to low pork consumption. © 2016 AABB.

  2. EP BICYCLE POOL - VIGNETTES 2002

    CERN Multimedia

    EP-SMI Help Desk

    2002-01-01

    The vignettes (insurance certificates) for 2002 become obligatory from 1 June. If you have a bicycle from the EP Pool, please bring it to the EP-SMI Help Desk (Building 124) on any working day up to 31 May between 8h.30 - 12h.00 or 13h.30 - 17h.30. EP-SMI Help Desk

  3. Development of a water leak detection system for LMFBR steam generators. Pt. 2; General planning of sensor arrangement for active acoustic method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Kazuo; Kumagai, Hiromichi (Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo (Japan). Komae Research Lab.)

    1994-04-01

    Development of a water leak detection system with short response time and high sensitivity for LMFBR steam generators is required to prevent failure propagation and to maintain structural integrity of steam generators. A new type of leak detection method, active acoustic method, which observes gas bubbles accompanying the leak using sonic waves is being developed. In this study, some series of experiments are carried out to investigate; (1) attenuation of sonic wave in a typical SG structure, (2) suitable method to attach waveguides to the SG shell, and (3) possibility of reflex method. Furthermore, a reference sensor arrangement for active acoustic method is selected based on the experimental results as the basis of future studies. (author).

  4. Development of a water leak detection system for LMFBR steam generator. Pt. 3. Experimental results for detection of bubbles using the SG sector model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumagai, Hiromichi; Yoshida, Kazuo [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo (Japan). Komae Research Lab.

    1995-05-01

    In order to prevent the expansion of tube damages and to maintain structural safety in steam generators (SG) of liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), it is necessary to detect precisely and immediately the leakage of water from tubes of heat exchangers. The active acoustic detection method, which detects the sound attenuation due to bubbles generated at the sodium-water reactions, has drawn general interests owing to its short response time and reduction of the influence of background noise. Sound attenuation is also subjected to structures such as heat transfer tubes and shrouds. Accordingly, it is necessary to evaluate the sound attenuation due to structures. However, studies in these respects are very few. In this paper, using the water bath and SG sector model, the attenuation characteristics of sounds due to flat plates and heat transfer tubes are investigated under various conditions and discussed. (author).

  5. Proceedings of a seminar on the potential for LMFBR boiling detection by acoustic/neutronic monitoring, Argonne, Illinois, April 8--9, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carey, W.M.; Albrecht, R.W.

    1976-06-01

    A seminar involving ten technical presentations by principal investigators was held to assess the current scope of ERDA-sponsored programs to determine the feasibility of sodium-boiling detection in LMFBRs and to establish areas in need of additional research and development. The consensus was that (1) feasibility of boiling detection by acoustic, neutronic, and acoustic/neutronic monitors has been demonstrated in U.S. and European programs; (2) additional research and development is needed in areas of reactor noise, cavitation, and the effects of noncondensible gases on sound source levels and transmission; (3) the role of acoustic/neutronic monitors from the standpoint of reactor surveillance rather than reactor safety is a viable approach to be adapted; and, in particular (4) a need exists for an operational LMFBR demonstration system. Each paper has been separately abstracted and indexed. (DG)

  6. Effect of obesity on disease-free and overall survival in node-positive breast cancer patients in a large French population: a pooled analysis of two randomised trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladoire, Sylvain; Dalban, Cecile; Roché, Henri; Spielmann, Marc; Fumoleau, Pierre; Levy, Christelle; Martin, Anne Laure; Ecarnot, Fiona; Bonnetain, Frank; Ghiringhelli, François

    2014-02-01

    To examine the association between baseline body mass index (BMI), and disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in a large French early-stage breast cancer population included in the UNICANCER Programme d'Action Concerté Sein-01 (PACS01) and PACS04 phase III randomised trials. After a median follow-up of 5.9years, this report analyses 4996 patients with node-positive breast cancer, and randomly assigned to adjuvant anthracycline-based chemotherapy combined or not with taxanes. Univariate analyses were used to study the effects of well known prognostic factors and BMI on DFS and OS. BMI was obtained at baseline, before chemotherapy initiation, and obesity was defined as a BMI⩾30kg/m(2). Cox proportional hazards regression models were secondly used to assess the influence of BMI after adjusting for other factors. Exhaustive analysis of the dose intensity delivered was also studied for comparison between obese and non-obese patients. Obese patients initially present with more advanced disease at diagnosis compared to non-obese patients. By univariate analysis, obesity was moderately associated with poorer DFS (hazard ratio (HR)=1.18 [1.01-1.39] P=0.04), but mostly with poorer OS (HR=1.38 [1.13-1.69] P=0.002). Delivered dose intensity of anthracyclines and taxanes was not significantly different between obese and non-obese patients. After adjustment for disease characteristics, BMI had no influence either on DFS or OS. This report suggests that in a French population, obesity has no impact on breast cancer prognosis when modern adjuvant chemotherapy, at the appropriate dose intensity, is delivered. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Large eddy simulation of the pool fire in a compartment with forced ventilation%强制送风条件下舱室内池火的大涡模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁书生; 王允良; 赵元立; 褚政

    2013-01-01

    Based on the large eddy simulation ( LES) of the smoke flow and the interaction between the space fire spread and the evaporation of fuel oil,the fire in a shipboard compartment with forced ventilation is investigated.The calculated evolutions of the heat release rate,the smoke temperature,the wall temperature,the gas species concentration and the heat flux on the floor agree with the measured test data.When exhaust exit is small,the forced ventilation takes no air to go in at the exit though the air inlet is at the lower position and higher volumetric fraction of oxygen in the ozone close the air supply inlet than other ozone.The flame has stronger trend point to the supply inlet when the air supply rate is less.The wall temperature of all bulkheads close to the supply inlet is higher than other positions.%利用烟气运动的大涡模拟方法和空间火蔓延与液体燃料受热蒸发相互作用,探讨了舱室内池火受强制送风条件的影响,计算出的火灾释热率、室内烟气温度、墙壁温度、烟气组分浓度和地面热流密度随时间的变化与试验符合.当排烟出口面积小时,尽管其位置低,强制送风使得排烟口处不会出现空气卷吸,送风不足时,送风口附近氧气浓度明显比其他区域高,火焰偏向送风口,此处顶棚和侧墙的壁面温度比其他位置要高.

  8. [Infections transmitted in swimming pools].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Suzani, C; Hazeghi, P

    1976-01-01

    Public swimmingpools can be the source of infections due to micro-organism such as mycobacterium balnei, adeno and enteroviruses, the virus of plantar warts and molluscum contagiosum, the TRIC-Agent of swimmingpool-conjonctivitis and pathogenic fungi. The transmission of trichomonas vaginalis is considered unlikely-Water of pools, supposed to present satisfactory qualities by standard controls, was found to contain pathogenic staphylococci and pseudomonas aeruginosa. Effective preventive measures include the continuous recording of the redox-potential of the water, limiting the number of visitors to pool design specifications, better desinfection of sanitary installations, regular maintenance of technical equipment including frequent backwashing of filters and exclusion of visitors with communicable disease.

  9. A Consensual Linear Opinion Pool

    CERN Document Server

    Carvalho, Arthur

    2012-01-01

    We propose a pooling method to aggregate expert opinions. Intuitively, it works as if the experts were continuously updating their opinions in order to accommodate the expertise of others. Each updated opinion takes the form of a linear opinion pool, where the weight that an expert assigns to a peer's opinion is inversely related to the distance between their opinions. In other words, experts are assumed to prefer opinions that are close to their own opinions. We prove that such an updating process leads to consensus, i.e., the experts all converge towards the same opinion. Further, we show that if experts are rewarded using the quadratic scoring rule, then the above mentioned assumption follows naturally. We empirically demonstrate the efficacy of our method using real-world data.

  10. Sustainability of common pool resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timilsina, Raja Rajendra; Kamijo, Yoshio

    2017-01-01

    Sustainability has become a key issue in managing natural resources together with growing concerns for capitalism, environmental and resource problems. We hypothesize that the ongoing modernization of competitive societies, which we refer to as “capitalism,” affects human nature for utilizing common pool resources, thus compromising sustainability. To test this hypothesis, we design and implement a set of dynamic common pool resource games and experiments in the following two types of Nepalese areas: (i) rural (non-capitalistic) and (ii) urban (capitalistic) areas. We find that a proportion of prosocial individuals in urban areas is lower than that in rural areas, and urban residents deplete resources more quickly than rural residents. The composition of proself and prosocial individuals in a group and the degree of capitalism are crucial in that an increase in prosocial members in a group and the rural dummy positively affect resource sustainability by 65% and 63%, respectively. Overall, this paper shows that when societies move toward more capitalistic environments, the sustainability of common pool resources tends to decrease with the changes in individual preferences, social norms, customs and views to others through human interactions. This result implies that individuals may be losing their coordination abilities for social dilemmas of resource sustainability in capitalistic societies. PMID:28212426

  11. Sustainability of common pool resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timilsina, Raja Rajendra; Kotani, Koji; Kamijo, Yoshio

    2017-01-01

    Sustainability has become a key issue in managing natural resources together with growing concerns for capitalism, environmental and resource problems. We hypothesize that the ongoing modernization of competitive societies, which we refer to as "capitalism," affects human nature for utilizing common pool resources, thus compromising sustainability. To test this hypothesis, we design and implement a set of dynamic common pool resource games and experiments in the following two types of Nepalese areas: (i) rural (non-capitalistic) and (ii) urban (capitalistic) areas. We find that a proportion of prosocial individuals in urban areas is lower than that in rural areas, and urban residents deplete resources more quickly than rural residents. The composition of proself and prosocial individuals in a group and the degree of capitalism are crucial in that an increase in prosocial members in a group and the rural dummy positively affect resource sustainability by 65% and 63%, respectively. Overall, this paper shows that when societies move toward more capitalistic environments, the sustainability of common pool resources tends to decrease with the changes in individual preferences, social norms, customs and views to others through human interactions. This result implies that individuals may be losing their coordination abilities for social dilemmas of resource sustainability in capitalistic societies.

  12. Essential vernal pool habitat action plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Vernal pool ecosystem conservation and recovery requires the recovery team to develop methods to determine the distribution of vernal pool types throughout the Great...

  13. Pool power control in remelting systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Rodney L.; Melgaard, David K.; Beaman, Joseph J.

    2011-12-13

    An apparatus for and method of controlling a remelting furnace comprising adjusting current supplied to an electrode based upon a predetermined pool power reference value and adjusting the electrode drive speed based upon the predetermined pool power reference value.

  14. CDC Study Finds Fecal Contamination in Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Communication (404) 639-3286 CDC study finds fecal contamination in pools A study of public pools done ... The E. coli is a marker for fecal contamination. Finding a high percentage of E. coli-positive ...

  15. Hardening Stratum, the Bitcoin Pool Mining Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Recabarren Ruben

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Stratum, the de-facto mining communication protocol used by blockchain based cryptocurrency systems, enables miners to reliably and efficiently fetch jobs from mining pool servers. In this paper we exploit Stratum’s lack of encryption to develop passive and active attacks on Bitcoin’s mining protocol, with important implications on the privacy, security and even safety of mining equipment owners. We introduce StraTap and ISP Log attacks, that infer miner earnings if given access to miner communications, or even their logs. We develop BiteCoin, an active attack that hijacks shares submitted by miners, and their associated payouts. We build BiteCoin on WireGhost, a tool we developed to hijack and surreptitiously maintain Stratum connections. Our attacks reveal that securing Stratum through pervasive encryption is not only undesirable (due to large overheads, but also ineffective: an adversary can predict miner earnings even when given access to only packet timestamps. Instead, we devise Bedrock, a minimalistic Stratum extension that protects the privacy and security of mining participants. We introduce and leverage the mining cookie concept, a secret that each miner shares with the pool and includes in its puzzle computations, and that prevents attackers from reconstructing or hijacking the puzzles.

  16. Active acoustic leak detection for LMFBR steam generators. Pt. 6. Applicability to practical steam generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Kazuo; Kumagai, Hiromichi; Kinoshita, Izumi [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo (Japan). Komae Research Lab.

    1998-03-01

    It is necessary to develop a reliable water leak detection system for steam generators of liquid metal reactors in order to prevent the expansion of damage and to maintain the structural integrity of the steam generators. The concept of the active acoustic method is to detect the change of the ultrasonic field due to the hydrogen gas bubbles generated by a sodium-water reaction. This method has the potential for improved detection performance compared with conventional passive methods, from the viewpoint of sensitivity, response time and tolerance against the background noise. A feasibility study of the active acoustic leak detection system is being carried out. This report predicts the performance of the active acoustic method in the practical steam generators from the results of the large scale in-water experiments. The results shows that the active acoustic system can detect a 10 g/s leak within a few seconds in large-scale steam generators. (author)

  17. Study on core concept for commercial LMFBR plant toward self-consistent nuclear energy system concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toukura, A. [Institute of Applied Energy, Tokyo (Japan); Yamazaki, M. [Toshiba Corp., Fuchu, Tokyo (Japan). Fuchu Works; Ohashi, M. [Hitachi Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan). Hitachi Works; Ikeda, K. [Mitsubishi Atomic Power Industries, Inc., Tokyo (Japan); Saito, M.; Fujiie, Y. [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan). Research Lab. for Nuclear Reactors

    1995-12-31

    Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) is expected to be commercialized in Japan to overcome foreseeable problems such as reactor safety, increasing energy demand, final disposal of high level radioactive waste and fuel resource shortage. We have been studying three FBR core concepts enhancing its potential abilities; ultra-large type, simplified type and friendly to fuel cycle type core. This study is sponsored by Ministry of International Trade and Industry. (author).

  18. Conjugative plasmids: Vessels of the communal gene pool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norman, Anders; Hansen, Lars H.; Sørensen, Søren Johannes

    2009-01-01

    Comparative whole-genome analyses have demonstrated that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) provides a significant contribution to prokaryotic genome innovation. The evolution of specific prokaryotes is therefore tightly linked to the environment in which they live and the communal pool of genes avai...... mechanistic framework for obtaining adaptability and functional diversity that alleviates the need for large genomes of specialized ‘private genes'....

  19. Pooling data for the analysis of dynamic marketing systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horvath, C.; Wieringa, J.E.

    2008-01-01

    Vector autoregressive (VAR) models have become popular in marketing literature for analyzing the behavior of competitive marketing systems. One drawback of these models is that the number of parameters can become very large, potentially leading to estimation problems. Pooling data for multiple cross

  20. 28 CFR 540.64 - Press pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Press pools. 540.64 Section 540.64... PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Contact With News Media § 540.64 Press pools. (a) The Warden may establish a press pool whenever he or she determines that the frequency of requests for interviews and...

  1. 7 CFR 1032.7 - Pool plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Pool plant. 1032.7 Section 1032.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1032.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant, unit of plants, or system of plants as specified in paragraphs (a) through (f) of this section, or a plant specified in paragraph (i) of...

  2. 7 CFR 1033.7 - Pool plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Pool plant. 1033.7 Section 1033.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1033.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant, unit of plants, or system of plants as specified in paragraphs (a) through (f) of this section, or a plant specified in paragraph (j) of...

  3. 7 CFR 1124.7 - Pool plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Pool plant. 1124.7 Section 1124.7 Agriculture... Regulating Handling Definitions § 1124.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant, unit of plants, or a system of plants as specified in paragraphs (a) through (f) of this section, but excluding a plant specified...

  4. 7 CFR 1126.7 - Pool plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Pool plant. 1126.7 Section 1126.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1126.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant specified in paragraphs (a) through (d) of this section, a unit of plants as specified in paragraph (e) of this section, or a plant...

  5. 7 CFR 1131.7 - Pool plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Pool plant. 1131.7 Section 1131.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1131.7 Pool plant. Pool Plant means a plant or unit of plants specified in paragraphs (a) through (e) of this section, but excluding a plant specified in paragraph (g) of this...

  6. 7 CFR 1007.7 - Pool plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Pool plant. 1007.7 Section 1007.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1007.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant specified in paragraphs (a) through (d) of this section, a unit of plants as specified in paragraph (e) of this section, or a plant...

  7. 7 CFR 1005.7 - Pool plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Pool plant. 1005.7 Section 1005.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1005.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant specified in paragraphs (a) through (d) of this section, a unit of plants as specified in paragraph (e) of this section, or a plant...

  8. 7 CFR 1001.7 - Pool plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Pool plant. 1001.7 Section 1001.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1001.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant, unit of plants, or system of plants as specified in paragraphs (a) through (f) of this section, but excluding a plant described in paragraph (h)...

  9. 7 CFR 1006.7 - Pool plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Pool plant. 1006.7 Section 1006.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1006.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant specified in paragraphs (a) through (d) of this section, a unit of plants as specified in paragraph (e) of this section, or a plant...

  10. 7 CFR 1030.7 - Pool plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Pool plant. 1030.7 Section 1030.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1030.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant, unit of plants, or system of plants as specified in paragraphs (a) through (f) of this section, but excluding a plant specified in paragraph (h)...

  11. Simulation of decay heat removal by natural convection in a pool type fast reactor model-ramona-with coupled 1D/2D thermal hydraulic code system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasinathan, N.; Rajakumar, A.; Vaidyanathan, G.; Chetal, S.C. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    1995-09-01

    Post shutdown decay heat removal is an important safety requirement in any nuclear system. In order to improve the reliability of this function, Liquid metal (sodium) cooled fast breeder reactors (LMFBR) are equipped with redundant hot pool dipped immersion coolers connected to natural draught air cooled heat exchangers through intermediate sodium circuits. During decay heat removal, flow through the core, immersion cooler primary side and in the intermediate sodium circuits are also through natural convection. In order to establish the viability and validate computer codes used in making predictions, a 1:20 scale experimental model called RAMONA with water as coolant has been built and experimental simulation of decay heat removal situation has been performed at KfK Karlsruhe. Results of two such experiments have been compiled and published as benchmarks. This paper brings out the results of the numerical simulation of one of the benchmark case through a 1D/2D coupled code system, DHDYN-1D/THYC-2D and the salient features of the comparisons. Brief description of the formulations of the codes are also included.

  12. Combination pipe-rupture mitigator and in-vessel core catcher. [LMFBR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilbrook, R.W.; Markowski, F.J.

    1982-03-09

    A device is described which mitigates against the effects of a failed coolant loop in a nuclear reactor by restricting the outflow of coolant from the reactor through the failed loop and by retaining any particulated debris from a molten core which may result from coolant loss or other cause. The device reduces the reverse pressure drop through the failed loop by limiting the access of coolant in the reactor to the inlet of the failed loop. The device also spreads any particulated core debris over a large area to promote cooling.

  13. Variability and Expansion of the Tropical Ocean Warm Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyos, C. D.; Webster, P. J.

    2007-12-01

    The tropical warm pool plays a determining role in the global climate since it acts as a sorce of thermodynamic forcing for the atmospheric general circulation. The warm pools (SST>28°C) extend from the Indian Ocean, across the Indonesian Archipelago into the western Pacific with a secondary area crossing Central America into the Caribbean and the central Atlantic ocean. The heating in the atmosphere above the warm pool influences climate over wide ranges of the planet. As there are zonal asymmetries in the extent of the warm pool, and hence variations in the locations of total heating of the atmospheric column, the warm pools also create centers of diabatic heating along the equator which set up the position and strength of the east-west Circulations which play integral roles in the coupled ocean-atmosphere tropical climate. In fact, almost all of the global vertically integrated heating resides over waters >27°C. The tropical warm pool is characterized by large-scale variations of SST on time scales that range from intraseasonal to interdecadal, considerably altering the forcing to the atmosphere. In addition to the existence of the large variability of the tropical warm pool SST, there is an upward trend in the tropical warm pool area, which is evident in the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific oceans with the area encompassed by the 28C isotherm groewing by 67% since 1920. Changes in the zonal and meridional circulation associated with the variability and expansion of the warm pool are studied using NCEP-NCAR and ERA40 reanalsysis. It is found that the impacts extend around the tropics and are associated with a slowing down of the Asian monsoon circulation and modulation of the of the equatorial Walker cells. Analysis of the IPCC-CMIP3 models for the 20th century show similar changes in the warm pool extent suggesting that changes that occur under different future emission scenarios may poossess credence. With greenhouse warming it is found that the warm pool

  14. Patent Pools: Intellectual Property Rights and Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Victor

    2010-01-01

    Patent pools do not correct all problems associated with patent thickets. In this respect, patent pools might not stop the outsider problem from striking pools. Moreover, patent pools can be expensive to negotiate, can exclude patent holders with smaller numbers of patents or enable a group of major players to form a cartel that excludes new competitors. For all the above reasons, patent pools are subject to regulatory clearance because they could result in a monopoly. The aim of this article is to present the relationship between patents and competition in a broad context. PMID:20200607

  15. Experimental investigation of particulate debris spreading in a pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konovalenko, A., E-mail: kono@kth.se [Division of Nuclear Power Safety, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) , Roslagstullsbacken 21, Stockholm 106 91 (Sweden); Basso, S., E-mail: simoneb@kth.se [Division of Nuclear Power Safety, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) , Roslagstullsbacken 21, Stockholm 106 91 (Sweden); Kudinov, P., E-mail: pkudinov@kth.se [Division of Nuclear Power Safety, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) , Roslagstullsbacken 21, Stockholm 106 91 (Sweden); Yakush, S.E., E-mail: yakush@ipmnet.ru [Institute for Problems in Mechanics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ave. Vernadskogo 101 Bldg 1, Moscow 119526 (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    Termination of severe accident progression by core debris cooling in a deep pool of water under reactor vessel is considered in several designs of light water reactors. However, success of this accident mitigation strategy is contingent upon the effectiveness of heat removal by natural circulation from the debris bed. It is assumed that a porous bed will be formed in the pool in the process of core melt fragmentation and quenching. Debris bed coolability depends on its properties and system conditions. The properties of the bed, including its geometry are the outcomes of the debris bed formation process. Spreading of the debris particles in the pool by two-phase turbulent flows induced by the heat generated in the bed can affect the shape of the bed and thus influence its coolability. The goal of this work is to provide experimental data on spreading of solid particles in the pool by large-scale two-phase flow. The aim is to provide data necessary for understanding of separate effects and for development and validation of models and codes. Validated codes can be then used for prediction of debris bed formation under prototypic severe accident conditions. In PDS-P (Particulate Debris Spreading in the Pool) experiments, air injection at the bottom of the test section is employed as a means to create large-scale flow in the pool in isothermal conditions. The test section is a rectangular tank with a 2D slice geometry, it has fixed width (72 mm), adjustable length (up to 1.5 m) and allows water filling to the depth of up to 1 m. Variable pool length and depth allows studying two-phase circulating flows of different characteristic sizes and patterns. The average void fraction in the pool is determined by video recording and subsequent image processing. Particles are supplied from the top of the facility above the water surface. Results of several series of PDS-P experiments are reported in this paper. The influence of the gas flow rate, pool dimensions, particle density

  16. Concept of development of nuclear power based on LMFBR operation in open nuclear fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toshinsky, G.I. [Inst. of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    1996-08-01

    The preliminary assessments performed show that it is reasonable to investigate in the future the possibilities of FBR efficient operation with the open NFC. To improve its safety it is expedient to use the lead-bismuth alloy as a coolant. In order to operate with depleted uranium make-up it is necessary to meet a number of requirements providing the reactor criticality due to plutonium build-up and BR > 1. These requirements are as follows: a large core (20--25 m{sup 3}); a high fuel volume fraction (> 60%); utilization of dense metallic fuel; a high fuel burn-up--at a level of 20% of h.a. Making use of these reactors should allow the NP fuel base to be extended more than 10 times without making NFC closed. It provides improving NP safety during a sufficiently long stage of its development.

  17. Composition and pools of humus in natural and agrogenic soils of the Kamchatka Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiseleva, I. V.; Purtova, L. N.; Kostenkov, N. M.

    2016-06-01

    Differentiation of Kamchatka soils with respect to the composition and pools of humus is discussed. Very low and low pools of humus of the fulvate type are typical of the ocherous and stratified ocherous volcanic soils of the eastern coastal zone and the Central Kamchatka Depression. Ocherous volcanic soils of the Western Kamchatka Lowland are characterized by the low and moderate pools of the humate-fulvate humus. Agrogenic soils are characterized by the higher pools of humus in the upper 20 cm in comparison with their natural analogues, which is largely related to changes in the physical properties of the soils under the impact of tillage.

  18. Bacteriological Assessment of Water Quality of Public Swimming Pools in the Accra Metropolis, Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George A. Pesewu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Water is essential for life and in most parts of the world including Ghana it is used for various activities such as drinking, bathing and recreational purposes. The objective of this study was to assess the bacteriological quality of swimming pools’ water in the Accra Metropolis. Five swimming pools were selected randomly and a research team visited the pools to collect water samples and at the same time administer short questionnaires about the characteristics of the pools. The average number of swimmers, swimming bathing loads, average age group of pool users, methods of disinfection, type of chlorine used, recycling, and treatment of the water before and after use were investigated. During the visit, water samples were collected for total coliform, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus counts using the Membrane Filtration (MF method and cultured on chromogenic media. Most (60% of the selected swimming pools had a bathing load≤20 per day. The operators of the pools disinfect their pools’ water with chorine but majority (60% of the pool operators chlorinated their pools manually with powdered chlorine. The 20 water samples investigated show that 48% of swimming pools water was contaminated with S. aureus, 30.4% with Ps. aeruginosa , 20.9% with total coli form and 0.7% with E. coli. The E. coli count found in this study was very low indicating that the selected swimming pools were not feacally polluted at the time of sampling. It is recommended that future studies should use large sample sizes.

  19. Intermediate-scale tests of sodium interactions with calcite and dolomite aggregate concretes. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randich, E.; Acton, R.U.

    1983-09-01

    Two intermediate-scale tests were performed to compare the behavior of calcite and dolomite aggregate concretes when attacked by molten sodium. The tests were performed as part of an interlaboratory comparison between Sandia National Laboratories and Hanford Engineering Development Laboratories. Results of the tests at Sandia National Laboratories are reported here. The results show that both concretes exhibit similar exothermic reactions with molten sodium. The large difference in reaction vigor suggested by thermodynamic considerations of CO/sub 2/ release from calcite and dolomite was not realized. Penetration rates of 1.4 to 1.7 mm/min were observed for short periods of time with reaction zone temperatures in excess of 800/sup 0/C during the energetic attack. The penetration was not uniform over the entire sodium-concrete contact area. Rapid attack may be localized due to inhomogeneities in the concrete. The chemical reaction zone is less then one cm thick for the calcite concrete but is about seven cm thick for the dolomite concrete.

  20. Characteristics of carbonate gas pool and multistage gas pool formation history of Hetianhe gas field, Tarim Basin, Northwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Hetianhe is a big carbonate gas field which is found and demonstrated in the period of "Chinese National Ninth 5-Year Plan". The proved reserve of Hetianhe gas field is over 600×108 m3. Its main producing layers are Carboniferous bioclastic limestone and Ordovician carbonate composed of buried hill. The former is stratified gas pool with water around its side, and the latter is massive gas pool with water in its bottom. The gases in the gas pools belong to dry gases with normal temperature and pressure systems. Based on the correlation of gas and source rock, the gases are mainly generated from Cambrian source rocks. According to the researches on source rock and structure evolution, and the observations on the thin section to reservoir bitumen and the studies on homogenization temperature of fluid inclusions, the gas pool has been identified and divided into three formation periods. The first is Late Caledonian when the oil generated from the Cambrian source rocks and migrated along faults, as a form of liquid facies into Ordovician carbonate reservoir and accumulated there. After that, the crust uplifted, the oil reservoir had been destroyed. The second is Late Hercynian when condensate gases generated from the Cambrian source rocks and migrated into Ordovician reservoir, as a form of liquid facies. Since the fractures had reached P strata, so the trap might have a real poor preservation condition, and the large-scale gas pool formation had not happened. The third gas reservoir formation period occurred in Himalaya. The fractures on both sides of Hetianhe gas field developed violently under the forces of compression, and thus the present fault horst formed. The dry gases generated from Cambrian source rocks and migrated upwards as the form of gas facies into Ordovician and Carboniferous reservoirs, and the large gas pool as discovered at present was formed finally.

  1. Radioisotope Power System Pool Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusick, Jeffrey J.; Bolotin, Gary S.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for NASA deep space science missions have historically used static thermoelectric-based designs because they are highly reliable, and their radioisotope heat sources can be passively cooled throughout the mission life cycle. Recently, a significant effort to develop a dynamic RPS, the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), was conducted by NASA and the Department of Energy, because Stirling based designs offer energy conversion efficiencies four times higher than heritage thermoelectric designs; and the efficiency would proportionately reduce the amount of radioisotope fuel needed for the same power output. However, the long term reliability of a Stirling based design is a concern compared to thermoelectric designs, because for certain Stirling system architectures the radioisotope heat sources must be actively cooled via the dynamic operation of Stirling converters throughout the mission life cycle. To address this reliability concern, a new dynamic Stirling cycle RPS architecture is proposed called the RPS Pool Concept.

  2. Vortical structures in pool fires: Observation, speculation, and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tieszen, S.R.; Nicolette, V.F.; Gritzo, L.A.; Moya, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Holen, J.K. [SINTEF/NTH, Trondheim (Norway). Div. Thermodynamics; Murray, D. [Naval Air Warfare Center, China Lake, CA (United States)

    1996-11-01

    While all fires are complex and involve many phenomena, this report is limited to large, turbulent liquid-hydrocarbon pool fires. Large, liquid-hydrocarbon pool fires present a risk in petrochemical storage and processing facilities and transportation systems that contain large amounts of liquid hydrocarbons. This report describes observations, speculations, and numerical simulations of vortical structures in pool fires. Vortical structures are observed in fires with length scales ranging from those that bend millimeter-thick flame zones to those that entrain air many meters from the edge of the fire to its centerline. The authors propose that baroclinic vorticity generation is primarily responsible for production of rotational motion at small scale and that amalgamation is responsible for the production of large-scale rotational structures from the myriad of small-scale structures. Numerical simulations show that vortical structures having time-mean definitions can be resolved with a Reynolds-Average Navier-Stokes (RANS) approach. However, for vortical structures without time-mean definition, RANS is inappropriate, and another technique, such as Large Eddy Simulation (LES), should be employed. 39 refs., 52 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Theoretical assessment of particle generation from sodium pool fires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, M., E-mail: monica.gmartin@ciemat.es [CIEMAT, Unit of Nuclear Safety Research, Av. Complutense, 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Herranz, L.E., E-mail: luisen.herranz@ciemat.es [CIEMAT, Unit of Nuclear Safety Research, Av. Complutense, 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Kissane, M.P., E-mail: Martin.KISSANE@oecd.org [Nuclear Safety Technology and Regulation Division, OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), 46 quai Alphonse Le Gallo, 92100 Boulogne-Billancourt (France)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Development of particle generation model for sodium-oxides aerosol formation. • Development of partially validated numerical simulations to build up maps of saturation ratio. • Nucleation of supersaturated vapours as relevant source of aerosols over sodium pools. • Prediction of high concentrations of primary particles in the combustion zone. - Abstract: Potential sodium discharge in the containment during postulated Beyond Design Basis Accidents (BDBAs) in Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs) would have major consequences for accident development in terms of energetics and source term. In the containment, sodium vaporization and subsequent oxidation would result in supersaturated oxide vapours that would undergo rapid nucleation creating toxic aerosols. Therefore, modelling this vapour nucleation is essential to proper source term assessment in SFRs. In the frame of the EU-JASMIN project, a particle generation model to calculate the particle generation rate and their primary size during an in-containment sodium pool fire has been developed. Based on a suite of individual models for sodium vaporization, oxygen natural circulation (3D modelling), sodium-oxygen chemical reactions, sodium-oxides-vapour nucleation and condensation, its consistency has been partially validated by comparing with available experimental data. As an outcome, large temperature and vapour concentration gradients set over the sodium pool have been found which result in large particle concentrations in the close vicinity of the pool.

  4. The pool chlorine hypothesis and asthma among boys.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cotter, A

    2012-01-31

    Swimming pool sanitation has largely been concerned with the microbiological quality of pool water, which is normally treated using a number of chlorine products. Recent studies have pointed to the potential hazards of chlorine by-products to the respiratory epithelium, particularly in indoor, poorly ventilated, pools. The aim of our study was to elucidate whether chronic exposure to indoor chlorinated swimming pools was associated with an increased likelihood of the development of asthma in boys. METHODS: The subjects were boys aged between 6 and 12 years. Data was collected by means of parental responses to a standardized asthma questionnaire (ISAAC: International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood), supplemented with additional questions regarding frequency of attendance, number of years attendance, whether the child is a swimming team member. The questionnaire return rate was 71\\/% (n = 121). 23 boys were excluded on the basis that they had asthma before they started swimming (n = 97). There was a significant association between number of years a boy had been swimming and the likelihood of wheezing in the last 12 months (p = 0.009; OR = 1.351; 95% CI = 1.077-1.693) and diagnosed asthma (p = 0.046; OR = 1.299; 95% CI = 1.004-1.506). The greater the number the number of years a boy had been attending an indoor, chlorinated pool, the greater the likelihood of wheezing in the last 12 months or "had asthma". Age, parental smoking habits and being a swimming team member had no association with any of the asthma variables examined. Swimming pool attendance may be a risk factor in asthma in boys.

  5. LMFBR type reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Takeshi; Iida, Masaaki; Moriki, Yasuyuki

    1994-10-18

    A reactor core is divided into a plurality of coolants flowrate regions, and electromagnetic pumps exclusively used for each of the flowrate regions are disposed to distribute coolants flowrates in the reactor core. Further, the flowrate of each of the electromagnetic pumps is automatically controlled depending on signals from a temperature detector disposed at the exit of the reactor core, so that the flowrate of the region can be controlled optimally depending on the burning of reactor core fuels. Then, the electromagnetic pumps disposed for every divided region are controlled respectively, so that the coolants flowrate distribution suitable to each of the regions can be attained. Margin for fuel design is decreased, fuels are used effectively, as well as an operation efficiency can be improved. Moreover, since the electromagnetic pump has less flow resistance compared with a mechanical type pump, and flow resistance of the reactor core flowrate control mechanism is eliminated, greater circulating flowrate can be ensured after occurrence of accident in a natural convection using a buoyancy of coolants utilizable for after-heat removal as a driving force. (N.H.).

  6. Sealing coupling. [LMFBR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardini, J.A.; Brubaker, R.C.; Rusnak, J.J.

    1982-09-20

    Disclosed is a remotely operable releasable sealing coupling which provides fluid-tight joinder of upper and a lower conduit sections. Each conduit section has a concave conical sealing surface adjacent its end portion. A tubular sleeve having convex spherical ends is inserted between the conduit ends to form line contact with the concave conical end portions. An inwardly projecting lip located at one end of the sleeve cooperates with a retaining collar formed on the upper pipe end to provide swivel capture for the sleeve. The upper conduit section also includes a tapered lower end portion which engages the inside surface of the sleeve to limit misalignment of the connected conduit sections.

  7. Vibrating fuel grapple. [LMFBR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertock, A.J.; Fox, J.N.; Weissinger, R.B.

    A reactor refueling method is described which utilizes a vibrating fuel grapple for removing spent fuel assemblies from a reactor core. It incorporates a pneumatic vibrator in the grapple head which allows additional withdrawal capability without exceeding the allowable axial force limit. The only moving part in the vibrator is a steel ball, pneumatically driven by a gas, such as argon, around a track, with centrifugal force created by the ball being transmitted through the grapple to the assembly handling socket.

  8. Code Development of Radioactive Aerosol Scrubbing in Pool-Injection Zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Hyun Joung; Ha, Kwang Soon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Dong Soon [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The pool scrubbing models were reviewed and an aerosol scrubbing code has been prepared to calculate decontamination factor through the injection zone. The developed code has been verified using the experimental results and evaluated parametrically on the input variables. In injection zone, the initial steam condensation was most effective mechanism for the aerosol removal, and the steam fraction and pool temperature were highly affected on the decontamination factor by initial steam condensation. The aerosol scrubbing code will be updated to evaluate the decontamination factor at rise zone and finally whole pool scrubber phenomena. If a severe accident occurs in a nuclear power plant (NPP), the aerosol and gaseous fission products might be produced in the reactor vessel, and then released to the environment after the containment failure. FCVS (Filtered Containment Venting System) is one of the severe accident mitigation systems for retaining the containment integrity by discharging the high-temperature and high-pressure fission products to the environment after passing through the filtration system. In general, the FCVS is categorized into two types, wet and dry types. The scrubbing pool could play an important role in the wet type FCVS because a large amount of aerosol is captured in the water pool. The pool scrubbing phenomena have been modelled and embedded in several computer codes, such as SPARC (Suppression Pool Aerosol Removal Code), BUSCA (BUbble Scrubbing Algorithm) and SUPRA (Suppression Pool Retention Analysis). These codes aim at simulating the pool scrubbing process and estimating the decontamination factors (DFs) of the radioactive aerosol and iodine gas in the water pool, which is defined as the ratio of initial mass of the specific radioactive material to final massy after passing through the water pool. The pool scrubbing models were reviewed and an aerosol scrubbing code has been prepared to calculate decontamination factor through the injection

  9. Numerical investigation on thermal striping conditions for a tee junction of LMFBR coolant pipes. 1. Investigation on velocity ratio between the coolant pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muramatsu, Toshiharu [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1998-02-01

    This report presents numerical results on thermal striping characteristics at a tee junction of LMFBR coolant pipe, carried out using a direct numerical simulation code DINUS-3. In the numerical investigations, it was considered a tee junction system consisted of a main pipe (1.33 cm{sup I.D.}) with a 90deg elbow and a branch pipe having same inner diameter to the main pipe, and five velocity ratio conditions between both the pipes, i.e., (V{sub main}/V{sub branch}) = 0.25; 0.5; 1.0; 2.0 and 4.0. From the numerical investigations the following characteristics were obtained: (1) Temperature fluctuations in the downstream region of the tee junction were formulated by lower frequency components (<7.0 Hz) due to the interactions between main pipe flows and jet flows from the branch pipe, and higher frequency components (>10.0 Hz) generated by the vortex released frequency from the outer edge of the branch pipe jet flows. (2) On the top plane of the main pipe, peak values of the temperature fluctuation amplitude was decreased with increasing flow velocity in the main pipe, and its position was shifted to downstream direction of the main pipe by the increase of the main pipe flow velocity. (3) On the bottom plane of the main pipe, contrary to (2), peak values of the temperature fluctuation amplitude was increased with increasing flow velocity in the main pipe. (author)

  10. Numerical investigation on thermal striping conditions for a tee junction of LMFBR coolant pipes. 3. Investigation on diameter ratio between the coolant pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muramatsu, Toshiharu [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1999-04-01

    This report presents numerical results on thermal striping characteristics at a tee junction of LMFBR coolant pipe, carried out using a direct numerical simulation code DINUS-3. In the numerical investigations, it was considered a tee junction system consisted of a main pipe (1.33 cm{sup I.D.}) with a 90deg elbow and a branch pipe having various inner diameters, and five diameter ratio conditions between both the pipes, i.e., (D{sub main}/D{sub branch}) = 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 5.0 and 10.0. From the numerical investigations, the following characteristics were obtained: (1) Maximum sodium temperature fluctuation amplitude in the downstream region of the tee junction were decreased with increasing of the diameter ratio (decreasing of the branch pipe diameter). One of the main reasons for this behavior was considered to be that the affects of the branch pipe jet for the main pipe flows was decreased with decreasing of the branch pipe diameter. (2) Auto-power spectral density levels were decreased by the increasing of the diameter ratio. It was indicated that coolant mixing characteristics in the downstream region were controlled by locally random turbulence processes. (3) To suppress sodium temperature fluctuations in the downstream region, it is a suitable combination for larger velocity ratio and larger diameter ratio. (author)

  11. Development of finite element analysis code SPOTBOW for prediction of local velocity and temperature fields around distorted fuel pin in LMFBR assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Takeshi [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Lab.

    1996-05-01

    A two-dimensional steady-state distributed parameter code SPOTBOW has been developed for predicting the fine structure of cladding temperature in an liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) fuel assembly where the deformation of fuel pins is induced by irradiation swelling, creep and thermal distortion under high burn-up operating condition. When the deformed fuel pin approaches adjacent pins and wrapper tube and comes in contact with those, the peak temperature, known as the hot spot temperature, can appear somewhere on the outer surface of the cladding. The temperature rise across the film is an important consideration in the cladding temperature analysis. Fully developed turbulent momentum and heat transfer equations based on the empirical turbulent model are solved by using the Galerkin finite element method which is suitable for the problem of the complicated boundary shape, such as the wire-wrapped fuel pin bundle. A new iteration procedure has been developed for solving the above equations by using the rise in coolant temperature, which is obtained with subchannel analysis codes, as a boundary condition. Calculated results are presented for local temperature distribution in normal and bowing pin bundle geometry, as compared with experiments. (author).

  12. GIPP: Geophysical Instrument Pool Potsdam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Haberland

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Geophysical Instrument Pool Potsdam (GIPP consists of field instruments, sensors and equipment for temporary seismological studies (both controlled source and earthquake seismology as well as for magnetotelluric (electromagnetic experiments. These instruments are mainly mobile digital recorders, broadband seis­mometers and short period sensors, and they are used to reveal the subsurface structure and to investigate earth­quakes. Sensors for magnetotellurics include induction coil and fluxgate magnetometers and non-polarizing silver / silver-chloride electrodes. It is operated by the Helmholtz Centre Potsdam GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences. The instru­ment facility is open to all academic applicants, both national and international. Instrument applications are evalu­ated and ranked by an external steering board. Currently, for seismological applications >850 geophysical recorders, >170 broadband seis­mo­meters and >1300 short period geophones are available (among others. Available for magnetotelluric experiments are > 50 real-time data-loggers, >150 induction coils, and >500 electrodes. User guidelines and data policy are in force and data archives are provided (standard exchange formats.

  13. Sulfur cycling in two Dutch moorland pools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marnette, E.C.L.

    1993-01-01

    Due to atmospheric acid deposition, the chemistry of many moorland pools has changed, resulting in changes in their fauna and flora. Most moorland pools are sensitive to acid loading because underlying and surrounding soils are low in chemical buffering capacity. Biological processes in the

  14. 10 CFR 36.33 - Irradiator pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Irradiator pools. 36.33 Section 36.33 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR IRRADIATORS Design and Performance... indicator must be provided in a clearly visible location to indicate if the pool water level is below the...

  15. Sulfur cycling in two Dutch moorland pools.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marnette, E.C.L.

    1993-01-01

    Due to atmospheric acid deposition, the chemistry of many moorland pools has changed, resulting in changes in their fauna and flora. Most moorland pools are sensitive to acid loading because underlying and surrounding soils are low in chemical buffering capacity. Biological processes in the sediment

  16. Warm pool thermodynamics from the Arabian Sea Monsoon Experiment (ARMEX)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sengupta, D.; Parampil, S.R.; Bhat, G.S.; Murty, V.S.N.; RameshBabu, V.; Sudhakar, T.; Premkumar, K.; Pradhan, Y.

    driven upper ocean currents (e.g. Sun and Liu [1996]; Loschnigg and Webster [2000]; Clement et al. [2005]), and (c) enhanced evaporation over warm SST and redistribution of boundary-layer moisture or of elevated latent heating by large scale atmospheric... observations show the presence of shallow mixed layers, barrier layers and temperature inversions (Shenoi et al [2004], Shankar et al [2004]). In addition to salinity effects, the north Indian Ocean warm pool also becomes increasingly stably stratified...

  17. Rebound of continuous droplet streams from an immiscible liquid pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doak, William J.; Laiacona, Danielle M.; German, Guy K.; Chiarot, Paul R.

    2016-05-01

    We report on the rebound of high velocity continuous water droplet streams from the surface of an immiscible oil pool. The droplets have diameters and velocities of less than 90 μm and 15 m/s, respectively, and were created at frequencies up to 60 kHz. The impact and rebound of continuous droplet streams at this scale and velocity have been largely unexplored. This regime bridges the gap between single drop and jet impacts. The impinging droplets create a divot at the surface of the oil pool that had a common characteristic shape across a wide-range of droplet and oil properties. After impact, the reflected droplets maintain the same uniformity and periodicity of the incoming droplets but have significantly lower velocity and kinetic energy. This was solely attributed to the generation of a flow induced in the viscous oil pool by the impacting droplets. Unlike normally directed impact of millimeter-scale droplets with a solid surface, our results show that an air film does not appear to be maintained beneath the droplets during impact. This suggests direct contact between the droplets and the surface of the oil pool. A ballistic failure limit, correlated with the Weber number, was identified where the rebound was suppressed and the droplets were driven through the oil surface. A secondary failure mode was identified for aperiodic incoming streams. Startup effects and early time dynamics of the rebounding droplet stream were also investigated.

  18. Pool scrubbing models for iodine components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, K. [Battelle Ingenieurtechnik GmbH, Eschborn (Germany)

    1996-12-01

    Pool scrubbing is an important mechanism to retain radioactive fission products from being carried into the containment atmosphere or into the secondary piping system. A number of models and computer codes has been developed to predict the retention of aerosols and fission product vapours that are released from the core and injected into water pools of BWR and PWR type reactors during severe accidents. Important codes in this field are BUSCA, SPARC and SUPRA. The present paper summarizes the models for scrubbing of gaseous Iodine components in these codes, discusses the experimental validation, and gives an assessment of the state of knowledge reached and the open questions which persist. The retention of gaseous Iodine components is modelled by the various codes in a very heterogeneous manner. Differences show up in the chemical species considered, the treatment of mass transfer boundary layers on the gaseous and liquid sides, the gas-liquid interface geometry, calculation of equilibrium concentrations and numerical procedures. Especially important is the determination of the pool water pH value. This value is affected by basic aerosols deposited in the water, e.g. Cesium and Rubidium compounds. A consistent model requires a mass balance of these compounds in the pool, thus effectively coupling the pool scrubbing phenomena of aerosols and gaseous Iodine species. Since the water pool conditions are also affected by drainage flow of condensate water from different regions in the containment, and desorption of dissolved gases on the pool surface is determined by the gas concentrations above the pool, some basic limitations of specialized pool scrubbing codes are given. The paper draws conclusions about the necessity of coupling between containment thermal-hydraulics and pool scrubbing models, and proposes ways of further simulation model development in order to improve source term predictions. (author) 2 tabs., refs.

  19. Leidenfrost drops on a heated liquid pool

    CERN Document Server

    Maquet, Laurent; Darbois-Texier, Baptiste; Brandenbourger, Martin; Rednikov, Alexey; Colinet, Pierre; Dorbolo, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    We show that a volatile liquid drop placed at the surface of a non-volatile liquid pool warmer than the boiling point of the drop can experience a Leidenfrost effect even for vanishingly small superheats. Such an observation points to the importance of the substrate roughness, negligible in the case considered here, in determining the threshold Leidenfrost temperature. A theoretical model based on the one proposed by Sobac et al. [Phys. Rev. E 90, 053011 (2014)] is developed in order to rationalize the experimental data. The shapes of the drop and of the substrate are analyzed. The model notably provides scalings for the vapor film thickness. For small drops, these scalings appear to be identical to the case of a Leidenfrost drop on a solid substrate. For large drops, in contrast, they are different and no evidence of chimney formation has been observed either experimentally or theoretically in the range of drop sizes considered in this study. Concerning the evaporation dynamics, the radius is shown to decrea...

  20. Leidenfrost drops on a heated liquid pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maquet, L.; Sobac, B.; Darbois-Texier, B.; Duchesne, A.; Brandenbourger, M.; Rednikov, A.; Colinet, P.; Dorbolo, S.

    2016-09-01

    We show that a volatile liquid drop placed at the surface of a nonvolatile liquid pool warmer than the boiling point of the drop can be held in a Leidenfrost state even for vanishingly small superheats. Such an observation points to the importance of the substrate roughness, negligible in the case considered here, in determining the threshold Leidenfrost temperature. A theoretical model based on the one proposed by Sobac et al. [Phys. Rev. E 90, 053011 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.90.053011] is developed in order to rationalize the experimental data. The shapes of the drop and of the liquid substrate are analyzed. The model notably provides scalings for the vapor film thickness profile. For small drops, these scalings appear to be identical to the case of a Leidenfrost drop on a solid substrate. For large drops, in contrast, they are different, and no evidence of chimney formation has been observed either experimentally or theoretically in the range of drop sizes considered in this study. Concerning the evaporation dynamics, the radius is shown to decrease linearly with time whatever the drop size, which differs from the case of a Leidenfrost drop on a solid substrate. For high superheats, the characteristic lifetime of the drops versus the superheat follows a scaling law that is derived from the model, but, at low superheats, it deviates from this scaling by rather saturating.

  1. SAFETY AND MANAGEMENT OF SWIMING POOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemal GÜNDOĞDU

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study,it was investigated the situation related to the safety and management of swimming pools belongs to municipality This study was planned to determine the present situation related to the safety and management of open,half-olympic and closed swimming pools which are especially used for sports activities,to find out the deficiencies in practise and to overcome these.Our study included totally 80 open,closed,olympic, half-olympic public swimming pools(the pools that belongs to municipality,private administration and university,the colleges connected to the ministry of education, Military schools and police college.In our research,search,natural observation and meeting methods were used.In accordance with this aim the checklist questions,which were prepared for health and safety controls in swimming pools, were tested on the people by face-to-face meeting method. While the statistical evaluation of the available results were being done,frequency and percentage dispersion obtained from checklist was found.It was found that the 52 % of the training and lifeguard choise of the pools in Turkey,64 % of the emergency action equipment,71 % of the signs and signboards for the safety of the pool,75 % of the pool edge and its surroundings are not suitable for the standards and that these threaten the swimmers health importantly.Consequently,we are in the opinion that the pool staff should receive the periodical training about the first aid and using emergency situation equipment.And it is necessary that the Ministry Responsible for sports,Ministry of Interior,Ministry of Health,Ministry of Tourism be cooperate with water sports federations and the related civil society organizationsKey Words: .

  2. LCG POOL development status and production experience

    CERN Document Server

    Chytracek, Radovan; Cioffi, Carmine; Düllmann, Dirk; Frank, Markus; Girone, Maria; Govi, Giacomo; Karr, Kristo; Malon, David; Moscicki, Jakub T; Papadopoulos, Ioannis M; Schmücker, H; Tanenbaum, William; Vaniachine, A; Xie Zhen

    2004-01-01

    The POOL project, as a part of the LHC Computing Grid (LCG), is now entering its third year of active development POOL provides the baseline persistency framework for three LHC experiment and is based on a strict component model, insulating experiment software from a variety of storage technology choices. This paper gives a brief overview of the POOL architecture, its main design principles and the experience gained with integration into LHC experiment frameworks. In also presents recent developments in the area of relational database abstraction and object storage into RDBMS systems.

  3. Airways disorders and the swimming pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougault, Valérie; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2013-08-01

    Concerns have been expressed about the possible detrimental effects of chlorine derivatives in indoor swimming pool environments. Indeed, a controversy has arisen regarding the possibility that chlorine commonly used worldwide as a disinfectant favors the development of asthma and allergic diseases. The effects of swimming in indoor chlorinated pools on the airways in recreational and elite swimmers are presented. Recent studies on the influence of swimming on airway inflammation and remodeling in competitive swimmers, and the phenotypic characteristics of asthma in this population are reviewed. Preventative measures that could potentially reduce the untoward effects of pool environment on airways of swimmers are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Spectrum pooling in MnWave Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boccardi, Federico; Shokri-Ghadikolaei, Hossein; Fodor, Gabor

    2016-01-01

    the benefit of coordination among networks of different operators, study the impact of beamforming at both base stations and user terminals, and analyze the pooling performance at different frequency carriers. We also discuss the enabling spectrum mechanisms, architectures, and protocols required to make...... spectrum pooling work in real networks. Our initial results show that, from a technical perspective, spectrum pooling at mmWave has the potential to use the resources more efficiently than traditional exclusive spectrum allocation to a single operator. However, further studies are needed in order to reach...... a thorough understanding of this matter, and we hope that this article will help stimulate further research in this area....

  5. Weld pool visual sensing without external illumination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jinchao; Fan, Zhun; Olsen, Soren Ingvor

    2011-01-01

    Visual sensing in arc welding has become more and more important, but still remains challenging because of the harsh environment with extremely strong illumination from the arc. This paper presents a low-cost camera-based sensor system, without using external Illumination, but nevertheless able...... to sense and model the weld pool. Central is a carefully selected optical filtering as well as an active contour-based tracking of the weld pool boundary. The system is able to extract the 2D shape of the weld pool in real time. The reported experiments show the feasibility of this approach....

  6. 10 CFR 36.63 - Pool water purity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... § 36.63 Pool water purity. (a) Pool water purification system must be run sufficiently to maintain the conductivity of the pool water below 20 microsiemens per centimeter under normal circumstances. If pool water... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pool water purity. 36.63 Section 36.63 Energy...

  7. 3-dimensional thermohydraulic analysis of KALIMER reactor pool during unprotected accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Bum; Hahn Do Hee

    2003-01-01

    During a normal reactor scram, the heat generation is reduced almost instantaneously while the coolant flow rate follows the pump coastdown. This mismatch between power and flow results in a situation where the core flow entering the hot pool is at a lower temperature than the temperature of the bulk pool sodium. This temperature difference leads to thermal stratification. Thermal stratification can occur in the hot pool region if the entering coolant is colder than the existing hot pool coolant and the flow momentum is not large enough to overcome the negative buoyancy force. Since the fluid of hot pool enters IHXs, the temperature distribution of hot pool can alter the overall system response. Hence, it is necessary to predict the pool coolant temperature distribution with sufficient accuracy to determine the inlet temperature conditions for the IHXs and its contribution to the net buoyancy head. Therefore, two-dimensional hot pool thermohydraulic model named HP2D has been developed. In this report code-to-code comparison analysis between HP2D and COMMIX-1AR/P has been performed in the case of steady-state and UTOP.

  8. Formation Laws of Inorganic Gas Pools in the Northern Jiangsu Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In the Northern Jiangsu basin there are high pure CO2 gas pools, low condensed oil-containing CO2 gas pools, high condensed oil-containing CO2 gas pools and He-containing natural gas pools, with the d 13Cco2 (PDB) values ranging from - 2.87to - 6.50 3He/4He 3.71×10- 6 to 6.42×10- 6, R/Ra 2.64 to 4.5, 40Ar/36Ar 705 to 734, belonging to typical mantle source inorganic gas pools which are related to young magmatic activity. The gas layers occur in two major reservoir-caprock systems, the terrestrial Meso-Cenozoic clastic rock system and the marine Meso-Palaeozoic carbonate rock-clastic rock system. Controlled by the difference in the scale of traps in the two reservoir-caprock systems, large and medium-scale inorganic gas pools are formed in the marine Meso-Palaeozoic Group and only small ones are formed in the terrestrial Meso-Cenozoic strata. Inorganic gas pools in this basin are distributed along the two deep lithospheric faults on the west and south boundaries of the basin. Gas pools are developed at the intersected part of the ENE-trending faults that control the half graben and the E-W tenso-shear faults, mainly distributed near the Es1, Ny1 and Ny2-Q basalt eruption centres.

  9. Doppler method leak detection for LMFBR steam generators. Pt. 2. Detection characteristics of bubble in-water using large scale SG model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumagai, Hiromichi [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo (Japan). Komae Research Lab

    2000-06-01

    To prevent the expansion of tube damage and to maintain structural integrity in the steam generators (SGs) of a fast breeder reactor (FBR), it is necessary to detect precisely and immediately the leakage of water from heat transfer tubes. Therefore, an active acoustic method was developed. Previous studies have revealed that, in practical steam generators, the active acoustic method can detect bubbles of 10 l/s within 10 seconds. However to prevent the expansion of damage to neighboring tubes, it is necessary to detect smaller leakages of water from the heat transfer tubes. The Doppler method is designed to detect small leakages and to find the source of a leak before damage spreads to neighboring tubes. The detection sensitivity of the Doppler method and the influence of background noise were investigated experimentally. In-water experiments were performed using an SG full-sector model that simulates actual SGs. The results show that the Doppler method can detect bubbles of 0.1 l/s (equivalent to a water leak rate of about 0.1 g/s) within a few seconds and that the background noise has little effect on water leak detection performance. The Doppler method thus has great potential for the detection of water leakage in SGs. (author)

  10. Bayesian Calibration of Generalized Pools of Predictive Distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Casarin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Decision-makers often consult different experts to build reliable forecasts on variables of interest. Combining more opinions and calibrating them to maximize the forecast accuracy is consequently a crucial issue in several economic problems. This paper applies a Bayesian beta mixture model to derive a combined and calibrated density function using random calibration functionals and random combination weights. In particular, it compares the application of linear, harmonic and logarithmic pooling in the Bayesian combination approach. The three combination schemes, i.e., linear, harmonic and logarithmic, are studied in simulation examples with multimodal densities and an empirical application with a large database of stock data. All of the experiments show that in a beta mixture calibration framework, the three combination schemes are substantially equivalent, achieving calibration, and no clear preference for one of them appears. The financial application shows that the linear pooling together with beta mixture calibration achieves the best results in terms of calibrated forecast.

  11. Microbial quality of a marine tidal pool

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Genthe, Bettina

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the source of microbial pollution to a tidal pool was investigated. Both adjacent seawater which could contribute to possible faecal pollution and potential direct bather pollution were studied. The microbial quality of the marine...

  12. Ingestion of swimming pool water by recreational

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Swimming pool water ingestion data. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Dufour, A., L. Wymer, M. Magnuson, T. Behymer, and R. Cantu. Ingestion...

  13. Tehas teisel pool Kuud / Gert Kiiler

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kiiler, Gert

    2009-01-01

    Tartu Ülikooli Viljandi kultuuriakadeemia teatrikunsti tudengite seitsmendast lennust kõneleva saate "Tehas teisel pool Kuud" tegemisest. Saade Eesti Televisioonis 3. juunil. Produtsent Kadi Katarina Priske, režissöör Elo Selirand

  14. AE/VCE Confirmed Vernal Pools

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset is derived from a project by the Vermont Center for Ecostudies(VCE) and Arrowwood Environmental(AE) to map vernal pools throughout the state of Vermont....

  15. Robotic cleaning of a spent fuel pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roman, H.T.; Marian, F.A. (PSE and G Research Corp., Newark, NJ (US)); Silverman, E.B.; Barkley, V.P. (ARD Corp., Columbia, MD (US))

    1987-05-01

    Spent fuel pools at nuclear power plants are not cleaned routinely, other than by purifying the water that they contain. Yet, debris can collect on the bottom of a pool and should be removed prior to fuel transfer. At Public Service Electric and Gas Company's Hope Creek Nuclear Power Plant, a submersible mobile robot - ARD Corporation's SCAVENGER - was used to clean the bottom of the spent fuel pool prior to initial fuel loading. The robotic device was operated remotely (as opposed to autonomously) with a simple forward/reverse control, and it cleaned 70-80% of the pool bottom. This paper reports that a simple cost-benefit analysis shows that the robotic device would be less expensive, on a per mission basis, than other cleaning alternatives, especially if it were used for other similar cleaning operations throughout the plant.

  16. Analysis of Bitcoin Pooled Mining Reward Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenfeld, Meni

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we describe the various scoring systems used to calculate rewards of participants in Bitcoin pooled mining, explain the problems each were designed to solve and analyze their respective advantages and disadvantages.

  17. Pooling strategies for St Petersburg gamblers

    OpenAIRE

    Csörgö, Sandor; Simons, Gordon

    2006-01-01

    Peter offers to play exactly one St Petersburg game with each of [math] players, Paul [math] , [math] , Paul [math] , whose conceivable pooling strategies are described by all possible probability distributions [math] . Comparing infinite expectations, we characterize among all [math] those admissible strategies for which the pooled winnings, each distributed as [math] , yield a finite added value for each and every one of Paul [math] , [math] , Paul [math] in comparison with their individual...

  18. Performance Study of Swimming Pool Heaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this report is to perform a controlled laboratory study on the efficiency and emissions of swimming pool heaters based on a limited field investigation into the range of expected variations in operational parameters. Swimming pool heater sales trends have indicated a significant decline in the number of conventional natural gas-fired swimming pool heaters (NGPH). On Long Island the decline has been quite sharp, on the order of 50%, in new installations since 2001. The major portion of the decline has been offset by a significant increase in the sales of electric powered heat pump pool heaters (HPPH) that have been gaining market favor. National Grid contracted with Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to measure performance factors in order to compare the relative energy, environmental and economic consequences of using one technology versus the other. A field study was deemed inappropriate because of the wide range of differences in actual load variations (pool size), geographic orientations, ground plantings and shading variations, number of hours of use, seasonal use variations, occupancy patterns, hour of the day use patterns, temperature selection, etc. A decision was made to perform a controlled laboratory study based on a limited field investigation into the range of expected operational variations in parameters. Critical to this are the frequency of use, temperature selection, and sizing of the heater to the associated pool heating loads. This would be accomplished by installing a limited amount of relatively simple compact field data acquisition units on selected pool installations. This data included gas usage when available and alternately heater power or gas consumption rates were inferred from the manufacturer's specifications when direct metering was not available in the field. Figure 1 illustrates a typical pool heater installation layout.

  19. Profit pools: a fresh look at strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadiesh, O; Gilbert, J L

    1998-01-01

    In charting strategy, many managers focus on revenue growth, assuming that profits will follow. But that approach is dangerous: today's deep revenue pool may become tomorrow's dry hole. To create strategies that result in profitable growth, managers need to look beyond revenues to see the shape of their industry's profit pool. The authors define an industry's profit pool as the total profits earned at all points along the industry's value chain. Although the concept is simple, the structure of a profit pool is usually quite complex. The pool will be deeper in some segments of the value chain than in others, and depths will vary within an individual segment as well. Segment profitability may, for example, vary widely by customer group, product category, geographic market, and distribution channel. Moreover, the pattern of profit concentration in an industry will often be very different from the pattern of revenue concentration. The authors describe how successful companies have gained competitive advantage by developing sophisticated profit-pool strategies. They explain how U-Haul identified new sources of profit in the consumer-truck-rental industry; how Merck reached beyond its traditional value-chain role to protect its profits in the pharmaceuticals industry; how Dell rebounded from a misguided channel decision by refocusing on its traditional source of profit; and how Anheuser-Busch made a series of astute product, pricing, and operating decisions to dominate the beer industry's profit pool. The companies with the best understanding of their industry's profit pool, the authors argue, will be in the best position to thrive over the long term.

  20. Pooling strategies for St Petersburg gamblers

    OpenAIRE

    Csörgö, Sandor; Simons, Gordon

    2006-01-01

    Peter offers to play exactly one St Petersburg game with each of [math] players, Paul [math] , [math] , Paul [math] , whose conceivable pooling strategies are described by all possible probability distributions [math] . Comparing infinite expectations, we characterize among all [math] those admissible strategies for which the pooled winnings, each distributed as [math] , yield a finite added value for each and every one of Paul [math] , [math] , Paul [math] in comparison with their individual...

  1. Leveraging the power of pooled data for cancer outcomes research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kiara Hugh-Yeun; Winson Y. Cheung

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clinical trials continue to be the gold standard for determining the effcacy of novel cancer treatments, but they may also expose participants to the potential risks of unpredictable or severe toxicities. The development of validated tools that better inform patients of the beneifts and risks associated with clinical trial participation can facilitate the informed consent process. The design and validation of such instruments are strengthened when we leverage the power of pooled data analysis for cancer outcomes research. Main body: In a recent study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology entitled“Determinants of early mortal‑ity among 37,568 patients with colon cancer who participated in 25 clinical trials from the adjuvant colon cancer endpoints database,”using a large pooled analysis of over 30,000 study participants who were enrolled in clinical trials of adjuvant therapy for early‑stage colon cancer, we developed and validated a nomogram depicting the predictors of early cancer mortality. This database of pooled individual‑level data allowed for a comprehensive analysis of poor prognostic factors associated with early death;furthermore, it enabled the creation of a nomogram that was able to reliably capture and quantify the beneift‑to‑risk proifle for patients who are considering clinical trial participation. This tool can facilitate treatment decision‑making discussions. Conclusion: As China and other Asian countries continue to conduct oncology clinical trials, efforts to collate patient‑level information from these studies into a large data repository should be strongly considered since pooled data can increase future capacity for cancer outcomes research, which, in turn, can enhance patient‑physician discus‑sions and optimize clinical care.

  2. Numerical investigation on thermal striping conditions for a tee junction of LMFBR coolant pipes. 4. Investigation on second-order moments in coolant mixing region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muramatsu, Toshiharu [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    2000-02-01

    This report presents numerical results on thermal striping characteristics at a tee junction of LMFBR coolant pipe, carried out using a direct numerical simulation code DINUS-3. In the numerical investigations, it was considered a tee junction system consisted of a main pipe (1.33 cm{sup I.D.}) with a 90deg elbow and a brunch pipe, and four parameters, i.e., (1) diameter ratio {alpha} between both the pipes, (2) flow velocity ratio {beta} between both the pipes, (3) angle {gamma} between both the pipes, and (4) Reynolds number Re. From the numerical investigations, the following characteristics were obtained: (1) According to the decreasing of the diameter ratio, significant area of second-order moments was expanded in the fixed condition of {beta}=1.0. (2) Significant second-order moments area was expanded for the increasing of the flow velocity ratio {beta} specified by varying of the main pipe velocity in the case of a {alpha}=1.0 constant condition. On the other hand, the area was expanded for the decreasing of the velocity ratio {beta} defined by varying of the branch pipe velocity in the case of a {alpha}=1.0 constant condition. (3) Maximum second-order moments values were generated in the case of {gamma}=180deg due to the influence of interactions between main pipe flows and jet flows from the branch pipe. (4) According to the increase of Reynolds number, significant area of second-order moments was expanded due to the activation of turbulence mixing in the main pipe. (author)

  3. Poor-quality water in swimming pools associated with a substantial risk of otitis externa due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjartabar, M

    2004-01-01

    There are many large and small public outdoor and indoor swimming pools in Tehran that hundreds of people use, especially on hot summer days. The bacteriological quality of the water of some of these pools was assayed over a period of about one year (2001-2002). To assess if these swimming pools were a health risk to users, eleven public swimming pools, in the east and northeast of the city, were examined, and the exposed people were monitored. Samples of swimming-pool waters were examined for colony counts, Escherichia coli and coliforms. In addition, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from nine (81.8%) of those pools. P. aeruginosa grew in seven (63.6%) of the swimming-pool water samples. In two (18.2%) other samples, in addition to P. aeruginosa, high rates of total bacterial count, total coliforms and faecal coliform counts were also found. At the same time, users of the swimming pools were asked to complete a questionnaire. Ear swabs were collected from 179 users with a history of ear problems during the previous two weeks. An adequate control group was chosen randomly from those who never used the investigated pools. P. aeruginosa was isolated from the ear swabs of 142 (79.3%) of the cases, as well as from 4% of the controls. Results were matched for age, sex, duration of time spent in the pools, place of occurrence and other useful information. Investigation of the contaminated swimming pools revealed that chlorination was often inadequate, especially when high numbers of people led to overuse of the pools. Although the results of this research showed that otitis externa was strongly associated with the swimming pools, due to P. aeruginosa, an extensive follow-up study is needed to determine the other possible health risks associated with public pools.

  4. Recent advances in probabilistic species pool delineations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Nikolaus Karger

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A species pool is the set of species that could potentially colonize and establish within a community. It has been a commonly used concept in biogeography since the early days of MacArthur and Wilson’s work on Island Biogeography. Despite their simple and appealing definition, an operational application of species pools is bundled with a multitude of problems, which have often resulted in arbitrary decisions and workarounds when defining species pools. Two recently published papers address the operational problems of species pool delineations, and show ways of delineating them in a probabilistic fashion. In both papers, species pools were delineated using a process-based, mechanistical approach, which opens the door for a multitude of new applications in biogeography. Such applications include detecting the hidden signature of biotic interactions, disentangling the geographical structure of community assembly processes, and incorporating a temporal extent into species pools. Although similar in their conclusions, both ‘probabilistic approaches’ differ in their implementation and definitions. Here I give a brief overview of the differences and similarities of both approaches, and identify the challenges and advantages in their application.

  5. A Review of Selected International Aircraft Spares Pooling Programs: Lessons Learned for F-35 Spares Pooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    international military aircraft support program using true spares pooling for which we have any detailed and reliable data, and it is the closest current...for all F77 spares . The remaining non-C-17 unique spares are managed by the Defense Logistics Agency and the Air Force Air Logistics Centers .50...C O R P O R A T I O N Research Report A Review of Selected International Aircraft Spares Pooling Programs Lessons Learned for F-35 Spares Pooling

  6. A statistical approach to determining responses to individual peptides from pooled-peptide ELISpot data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ström, Peter; Støer, Nathalie; Borthwick, Nicola; Dong, Tao; Hanke, Tomáš; Reilly, Marie

    2016-08-01

    To investigate in detail the effect of infection or vaccination on the human immune system, ELISpot assays are used to simultaneously test the immune response to a large number of peptides of interest. Scientists commonly use "peptide pools", where, instead of an individual peptide, a test well contains a group of peptides. Since the response from a well may be due to any or many of the peptides in the pool, pooled assays usually need to be followed by confirmatory assays of a number of individual peptides. We present a statistical method that enables estimation of individual peptide responses from pool responses using the Expectation Maximization (EM) algorithm for "incomplete data". We demonstrate the accuracy and precision of these estimates in simulation studies of ELISpot plates with 90 pools of 6 or 7 peptides arranged in three dimensions and three Mock wells for the estimation of background. In analysis of real pooled data from 6 subjects in a HIV-1 vaccine trial, where 199 peptides were arranged in 80 pools if size 9 or 10, our estimates were in very good agreement with the results from individual-peptide confirmatory assays. Compared to the classical approach, we could identify almost all the same peptides with high or moderate response, with less than half the number of confirmatory tests. Our method facilitates efficient use of the information available in pooled ELISpot data to avoid or reduce the need for confirmatory testing. We provide an easy-to-use free online application for implementing the method, where on uploading two spreadsheets with the pool design and pool responses, the user obtains the estimates of the individual peptide responses.

  7. Stade NPP. Dismantling of the reactor pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharf, Daniel; Dziwis, Joachim [E.ON Anlagenservice GmbH Nukleartechnik, Gelsenkirchen (Germany); Kemp, Lutz-Hagen [KKW Stade GmbH und Co. oHG, Stade (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    Within the scope of the 4{sup th} partial decommissioning permission of Stade NPP the activated and contaminated structures of the reactor pool had to be dismantled in order to gain a completely non-radioactive reactor pool area for the subsequent clearance measurement of the reactor building. In order to achieve the aim it was intended to remove the activated pool liner sheets, its activated framework and several contaminated ventilation channels made of stainless steel, the concrete walls of the reactor pool entirely or in parts depending on their activation level, as well as the remaining activated carbon steel structures of the reactor pool bottom. Embedded in the concrete walls there were several highly contaminated excore tubes and the contaminated pool top edge, which were intended to be removed to its full extent. The contract of the Stade NPP initiated reactor pool dismantling project had been awarded to E.ON Anlagenservice GmbH (EAS) and its subsupplier sat. Kerntechnik GmbH for the concrete dismantling works and was performed as follows. In order to minimize the radiation level in the main working area in accordance with the ALARA principle, the liner sheets and middle parts of its framework were removed by means of angle grinders first, as they were the most dose rate relevant parts. As a result the primary average radiation level in the reactor pool (measured in a distance of 500 mm from the walls) was lowered from 40 {mu}Sv/h to less than 2 {mu}Sv/h. After the minimization of the radiation level in the working area the main dismantling step started with the cutting of the reactor pool walls in blocks by means of diamond rope cutters. Once a concrete block was cut out, it was transported into the fuel pool by means of a crane and crane fork, examined radiologically, marked area by area and segmented to debris by means of an electrical excavator with a hydraulic chisel. Afterwards the debris and carbon steel parts were fractioned and packed for further

  8. Vernal Pool Distribution - Central Valley, 2005 [ds650

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — "Great Valley Vernal Pool Distribution", originally mapped by Bob Holland, 2005. This dataset contains vernal pool areas mapped over Califorina's Central Valley,...

  9. Association studies using family pools of outcrossing crops based on allele-frequency estimates from DNA sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashraf, Bilal; Jensen, Just; Asp, Torben

    2014-01-01

    effect from F2-family pools was verified and it was shown that the underestimation of the allele effect is correctly described. The optimal design for an association study when sequencing budget would be fixed is obtained using large sample size and lower sequence depth, and using higher SNP density...... types of family pools and is also directly applicable for association studies in polyploids....

  10. Swimming pool use and birth defect risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agopian, A J; Lupo, Philip J; Canfield, Mark A; Mitchell, Laura E

    2013-09-01

    Swimming during pregnancy is recommended. However, the use of swimming pools is also associated with infection by water-borne pathogens and exposure to water disinfection byproducts, which are 2 mechanisms that are suspected to increase risk for birth defects. Thus, we evaluated the relationship between maternal swimming pool use during early pregnancy and risk for select birth defects in offspring. Data were evaluated for nonsyndromic cases with 1 of 16 types of birth defects (n = 191-1829) and controls (n = 6826) from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study delivered during 2000-2006. Logistic regression analyses were conducted separately for each birth defect type. Separate analyses were conducted to assess any pool use (yes vs no) and frequent use (5 or more occasions in 1 month) during the month before pregnancy through the third month of pregnancy. There was no significant positive association between any or frequent pool use and any of the types of birth defects, even after adjustment for several potential confounders (maternal race/ethnicity, age at delivery, education, body mass index, folic acid use, nulliparity, smoking, annual household income, surveillance center, and season of conception). Frequent pool use was significantly negatively associated with spina bifida (adjusted odds ratio, 0.68; 95% confidence interval, 0.47-0.99). Among offspring of women 20 years old or older, pool use was associated with gastroschisis (adjusted odds ratio, 1.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-1.8), although not significantly so. We observed little evidence suggesting teratogenic effects of swimming pool use. Because swimming is a common and suggested form of exercise during pregnancy, these results are reassuring. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Species pools, community completeness and invasion: disentangling diversity effects on the establishment of native and alien species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Jonathan A; Riibak, Kersti; Kook, Ene; Reier, Ülle; Tamme, Riin; Guillermo Bueno, C; Pärtel, Meelis

    2016-12-01

    Invasion should decline with species richness, yet the relationship is inconsistent. Species richness, however, is a product of species pool size and biotic filtering. Invasion may increase with richness if large species pools represent weaker environmental filters. Measuring species pool size and the proportion realised locally (completeness) may clarify diversity-invasion relationships by separating environmental and biotic effects, especially if species' life-history stage and origin are accounted for. To test these relationships, we added seeds and transplants of 15 native and alien species into 29 grasslands. Species pool size and completeness explained more variation in invasion than richness alone. Although results varied between native and alien species, seed establishment and biotic resistance to transplants increased with species pool size, whereas transplant growth and biotic resistance to seeds increased with completeness. Consequently, species pools and completeness represent multiple independent processes affecting invasion; accounting for these processes improves our understanding of invasion.

  12. The effects of cannibalism on Amazonian poison frog egg and tadpole deposition and survivorship in Heliconia axil pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Kyle

    1999-06-01

    This study investigated the influence of cannibalism on egg and larval mortality, and on the deposition strategies of adults, in a tropical anuran breeding in very small leaf axil pools. Patterns of egg and tadpole deposition and mortality in the Amazonian poison frog, Dendrobates ventrimaculatus, were monitored in rainforest near Pompeya in Sucumbios Province, Ecuador. Oviposition and tadpole deposition typically ocurred in leaf axils of Heliconia plants. Pools typically received more than one oviposition. Egg survivorship was low, and significantly lower when eggs were deposited in pools with large tadpoles, indicating that cannibalism is an important source of mortality. Tadpole survivorship was also associated with the presence of other tadpoles: most pools ended with only one surviving tadpole, regardless of the number of tadpoles deposited in the pool. Egg deposition was signifcantly less likely for pools that had a tadpole in them, suggesting that adults can detect the presence of tadpoles and avoid ovipositing in pools that contain them. This hypothesis was tested with a series of pool choice experiments, which revealed that D. ventrimaculatus avoid placing either eggs or tadpoles into a pool which contains a large tadpole. Several hypotheses which could explain multiple deposition in this species are discussed.

  13. Self-formed waterfall plunge pools in homogeneous rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheingross, Joel S.; Lo, Daniel Y.; Lamb, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    Waterfalls are ubiquitous, and their upstream propagation can set the pace of landscape evolution, yet no experimental studies have examined waterfall plunge pool erosion in homogeneous rock. We performed laboratory experiments, using synthetic foam as a bedrock simulant, to produce self-formed waterfall plunge pools via particle impact abrasion. Plunge pool vertical incision exceeded lateral erosion by approximately tenfold until pools deepened to the point that the supplied sediment could not be evacuated and deposition armored the pool bedrock floor. Lateral erosion of plunge pool sidewalls continued after sediment deposition, but primarily at the downstream pool wall, which might lead to undermining of the plunge pool lip, sediment evacuation, and continued vertical pool floor incision in natural streams. Undercutting of the upstream pool wall was absent, and our results suggest that vertical drilling of successive plunge pools is a more efficient waterfall retreat mechanism than the classic model of headwall undercutting and collapse in homogeneous rock.

  14. Gravity and Heater Size Effects on Pool Boiling Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungho; Raj, Rishi

    2014-01-01

    The current work is based on observations of boiling heat transfer over a continuous range of gravity levels between 0g to 1.8g and varying heater sizes with a fluorinert as the test liquid (FC-72/n-perfluorohexane). Variable gravity pool boiling heat transfer measurements over a wide range of gravity levels were made during parabolic flight campaigns as well as onboard the International Space Station. For large heaters and-or higher gravity conditions, buoyancy dominated boiling and heat transfer results were heater size independent. The power law coefficient for gravity in the heat transfer equation was found to be a function of wall temperature under these conditions. Under low gravity conditions and-or for smaller heaters, surface tension forces dominated and heat transfer results were heater size dependent. A pool boiling regime map differentiating buoyancy and surface tension dominated regimes was developed along with a unified framework that allowed for scaling of pool boiling over a wide range of gravity levels and heater sizes. The scaling laws developed in this study are expected to allow performance quantification of phase change based technologies under variable gravity environments eventually leading to their implementation in space based applications.

  15. Effects of water mist addition on kerosene pool fire

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU XiaoMeng; QIN Jun; LIAO GuangXuan

    2008-01-01

    The use of water mist to extinguish fire is a problem of particular interest since the banning of halo-gen-based agents for environmental reasons. This interest is reflected in the large number of re-searches performed on the main fire-extinguishing mechanisms of water mist: heat extraction, oxygen displacement and attenuation of heat fluxes. In contrast, there are still little known about the chemical and some other aspects of water mist addition on the pool fire. In this paper, a phenomenological study was conducted of the effect of water mist addition on the kerosene pool fire through the measurement of the heat release rate, CO, CO2 and O2 species concentration in combustion. The experimental results show that there is a significant enhancement effect at the beginning stage of water mist addition. Then, the flame size was decreased abruptly. By physical suppression effect combined with chemical effect, the experiments' results are explained especially. The study of effects of water mist on pool fire will be useful for optimizing designation of water mist fire-suppression system, improving the fire suppression efficiency and extending their application field.

  16. In silico pooling of ChIP-seq control experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guannan; Srinivasan, Rajini; Lopez-Anido, Camila; Hung, Holly A; Svaren, John; Keleş, Sündüz

    2014-01-01

    As next generation sequencing technologies are becoming more economical, large-scale ChIP-seq studies are enabling the investigation of the roles of transcription factor binding and epigenome on phenotypic variation. Studying such variation requires individual level ChIP-seq experiments. Standard designs for ChIP-seq experiments employ a paired control per ChIP-seq sample. Genomic coverage for control experiments is often sacrificed to increase the resources for ChIP samples. However, the quality of ChIP-enriched regions identifiable from a ChIP-seq experiment depends on the quality and the coverage of the control experiments. Insufficient coverage leads to loss of power in detecting enrichment. We investigate the effect of in silico pooling of control samples within multiple biological replicates, multiple treatment conditions, and multiple cell lines and tissues across multiple datasets with varying levels of genomic coverage. Our computational studies suggest guidelines for performing in silico pooling of control experiments. Using vast amounts of ENCODE data, we show that pairwise correlations between control samples originating from multiple biological replicates, treatments, and cell lines/tissues can be grouped into two classes representing whether or not in silico pooling leads to power gain in detecting enrichment between the ChIP and the control samples. Our findings have important implications for multiplexing samples.

  17. Genotyping common and rare variation using overlapping pool sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasaniuc Bogdan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent advances in sequencing technologies set the stage for large, population based studies, in which the ANA or RNA of thousands of individuals will be sequenced. Currently, however, such studies are still infeasible using a straightforward sequencing approach; as a result, recently a few multiplexing schemes have been suggested, in which a small number of ANA pools are sequenced, and the results are then deconvoluted using compressed sensing or similar approaches. These methods, however, are limited to the detection of rare variants. Results In this paper we provide a new algorithm for the deconvolution of DNA pools multiplexing schemes. The presented algorithm utilizes a likelihood model and linear programming. The approach allows for the addition of external data, particularly imputation data, resulting in a flexible environment that is suitable for different applications. Conclusions Particularly, we demonstrate that both low and high allele frequency SNPs can be accurately genotyped when the DNA pooling scheme is performed in conjunction with microarray genotyping and imputation. Additionally, we demonstrate the use of our framework for the detection of cancer fusion genes from RNA sequences.

  18. Spatial Pyramid Pooling in Deep Convolutional Networks for Visual Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Kaiming; Zhang, Xiangyu; Ren, Shaoqing; Sun, Jian

    2015-09-01

    Existing deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) require a fixed-size (e.g., 224 × 224) input image. This requirement is "artificial" and may reduce the recognition accuracy for the images or sub-images of an arbitrary size/scale. In this work, we equip the networks with another pooling strategy, "spatial pyramid pooling", to eliminate the above requirement. The new network structure, called SPP-net, can generate a fixed-length representation regardless of image size/scale. Pyramid pooling is also robust to object deformations. With these advantages, SPP-net should in general improve all CNN-based image classification methods. On the ImageNet 2012 dataset, we demonstrate that SPP-net boosts the accuracy of a variety of CNN architectures despite their different designs. On the Pascal VOC 2007 and Caltech101 datasets, SPP-net achieves state-of-the-art classification results using a single full-image representation and no fine-tuning. The power of SPP-net is also significant in object detection. Using SPP-net, we compute the feature maps from the entire image only once, and then pool features in arbitrary regions (sub-images) to generate fixed-length representations for training the detectors. This method avoids repeatedly computing the convolutional features. In processing test images, our method is 24-102 × faster than the R-CNN method, while achieving better or comparable accuracy on Pascal VOC 2007. In ImageNet Large Scale Visual Recognition Challenge (ILSVRC) 2014, our methods rank #2 in object detection and #3 in image classification among all 38 teams. This manuscript also introduces the improvement made for this competition.

  19. SNP calling by sequencing pooled samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raineri Emanuele

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Performing high throughput sequencing on samples pooled from different individuals is a strategy to characterize genetic variability at a small fraction of the cost required for individual sequencing. In certain circumstances some variability estimators have even lower variance than those obtained with individual sequencing. SNP calling and estimating the frequency of the minor allele from pooled samples, though, is a subtle exercise for at least three reasons. First, sequencing errors may have a much larger relevance than in individual SNP calling: while their impact in individual sequencing can be reduced by setting a restriction on a minimum number of reads per allele, this would have a strong and undesired effect in pools because it is unlikely that alleles at low frequency in the pool will be read many times. Second, the prior allele frequency for heterozygous sites in individuals is usually 0.5 (assuming one is not analyzing sequences coming from, e.g. cancer tissues, but this is not true in pools: in fact, under the standard neutral model, singletons (i.e. alleles of minimum frequency are the most common class of variants because P(f ∝ 1/f and they occur more often as the sample size increases. Third, an allele appearing only once in the reads from a pool does not necessarily correspond to a singleton in the set of individuals making up the pool, and vice versa, there can be more than one read – or, more likely, none – from a true singleton. Results To improve upon existing theory and software packages, we have developed a Bayesian approach for minor allele frequency (MAF computation and SNP calling in pools (and implemented it in a program called snape: the approach takes into account sequencing errors and allows users to choose different priors. We also set up a pipeline which can simulate the coalescence process giving rise to the SNPs, the pooling procedure and the sequencing. We used it to compare the

  20. Mechanisms for convection triggering by cold pools

    CERN Document Server

    Torri, Giuseppe; Tian, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Cold pools are fundamental ingredients of deep convection. They contribute to organizing the sub-cloud layer and are considered key elements in triggering convective cells. It was long known that this could happen mechanically, through lifting by the cold pools' fronts. More recently, it has been suggested that convection could also be triggered thermodynamically, by accumulation of moisture around the edges of cold pools. A method based on Lagrangian tracking is here proposed to disentangle the signatures of both forcings and quantify their importance in a given environment. Results from a simulation of radiative-convective equilibrium over the ocean show that parcels reach their level of free convection through a combination of both forcings, each being dominant at different stages of the ascent. Mechanical forcing is an important player in lifting parcels from the surface, whereas thermodynamic forcing reduces the inhibition encountered by parcels before they reach their level of free convection.

  1. Effects of indoor swimming pools on the nasal cytology of pool workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkul, E; Yaz, A; Cıngı, C; İnançli, H M; San, T; Bal, C

    2014-05-01

    We aimed to evaluate the relationship between swimming pool pollutants and allergic rhinitis in swimming pool workers. Twenty-seven indoor pool workers (group 1) and 49 control subjects (group 2) were enrolled in the study. A skin prick test was performed and a nasal smear was obtained from each subject to evaluate rhinitis. When the groups were compared in terms of epithelial cells, group 1 had significantly more epithelial cells than group 2. When the groups were compared with regard to eosinophils, group 1 had significantly more eosinophils than group 2. The skin prick test results for both groups were not significantly different. Indoor pool workers showed severe symptoms of rhinitis and eosinophilic nasal cytology, likely due to chlorine. Nasal cytology is an easy-to-administer diagnostic test and can be used to follow up rhinitis in indoor pool workers, along with nasal endoscopy, a detailed clinical history and a skin prick test.

  2. 47 CFR 90.35 - Industrial/Business Pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Industrial/Business Pool. 90.35 Section 90.35... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Industrial/Business Radio Pool § 90.35 Industrial/Business Pool. (a) Eligibility... Industrial/Business Pool to provide commercial mobile radio service as defined in part 20 of this chapter...

  3. 48 CFR 232.470 - Advance payment pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Advance payment pool. 232... Items 232.470 Advance payment pool. (a) An advance payment pool agreement— (1) Is a means of financing... addition to any other advance payment pool agreement at a single contractor location when it is...

  4. 47 CFR 90.20 - Public Safety Pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Public Safety Pool. 90.20 Section 90.20... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Public Safety Radio Pool § 90.20 Public Safety Pool. (a) Eligibility. The following are eligible to hold authorizations in the Public Safety Pool. (1) Any territory, possession,...

  5. Adrian Poole. Shakespeare and the Victorians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béatrice LAURENT

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Dr Adrian Poole of Trinity College, Cambridge offers in this new study a comprehensive panorama of Shakespeare’s influence on the Victorians. Dr Poole investigates the interpretation and appropriation of the plays and, to a lesser extent, of the poems by Shakespeare with a view to demonstrate that they provided a major source of inspiration to Victorian actors, novelists and visual artists.The point of view is that of a distinguished Victorianist, and the reader is supposed to have a sound kn...

  6. Zooplankton at deep Red Sea brine pools

    KAUST Repository

    Kaartvedt, Stein

    2016-03-02

    The deep-sea anoxic brines of the Red Sea comprise unique, complex and extreme habitats. These environments are too harsh for metazoans, while the brine–seawater interface harbors dense microbial populations. We investigated the adjacent pelagic fauna at two brine pools using net tows, video records from a remotely operated vehicle and submerged echosounders. Waters just above the brine pool of Atlantis II Deep (2000 m depth) appeared depleted of macrofauna. In contrast, the fauna appeared to be enriched at the Kebrit Deep brine–seawater interface (1466 m).

  7. The new pooled cohort equations risk calculator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preiss, David; Kristensen, Søren L

    2015-01-01

    total cardiovascular risk score. During development of joint guidelines released in 2013 by the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and American Heart Association (AHA), the decision was taken to develop a new risk score. This resulted in the ACC/AHA Pooled Cohort Equations Risk Calculator. This risk...... disease and any measure of social deprivation. An early criticism of the Pooled Cohort Equations Risk Calculator has been its alleged overestimation of ASCVD risk which, if confirmed in the general population, is likely to result in statin therapy being prescribed to many individuals at lower risk than...

  8. Censored Exploration and the Dark Pool Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Ganchev, Kuzman; Nevmyvaka, Yuriy; Vaughan, Jennifer Wortman

    2012-01-01

    We introduce and analyze a natural algorithm for multi-venue exploration from censored data, which is motivated by the Dark Pool Problem of modern quantitative finance. We prove that our algorithm converges in polynomial time to a near-optimal allocation policy; prior results for similar problems in stochastic inventory control guaranteed only asymptotic convergence and examined variants in which each venue could be treated independently. Our analysis bears a strong resemblance to that of efficient exploration/ exploitation schemes in the reinforcement learning literature. We describe an extensive experimental evaluation of our algorithm on the Dark Pool Problem using real trading data.

  9. A Meltwater Pool Discovered in Tianshan Mountains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ On an expedition to northwest China's Glacier 1 in the TianshanMountains, a research team led by Prof. Li Zhongqin from the CAS Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute found a 15-meter-long, 4-meterhigh ice cliff in the northwest of the source area on the glacier top. To their surprise, the south-facing ice cliff overlooked an approximately 30-m2 pool sprawling on the glacial sheet. The experts say the pool is at least 1.5 m deep and formed by the summer melt.

  10. Longevity of Wood-Forced Pools in an Old-Growth Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffington, J. M.; Woodsmith, R. D.; Johnson, A. C.

    2009-12-01

    Wood debris plays an important role in scouring pools in forest channels and providing resultant habitat for aquatic organisms. We investigated the longevity of such pools in a gravel-bed river flowing through old-growth forest in southeastern Alaska by aging trees and “bear’s bread” fungi (Ganoderma applanatum, Fomitopsis pinicola) growing on pool-forming wood debris. Ages were determined by counting annual growth rings from cores and cross sections of trees and fungi growing on the wood debris. These ages are minimum values because they do not account for lag time between debris recruitment and seedling/spore establishment on the debris, nor do they account for flood scour that may periodically reset tree and fungi growth on the debris. The study stream has a gradient of about 1%, bankfull width and depth of 13.3 and 0.78 m, respectively, median grain size of 18 mm, a high wood loading (0.8 pieces/m), and a correspondingly low pool spacing (0.3 bankfull widths/pool), with 81% of the pools forced by wood debris. The size of wood debris in the study stream is large relative to the channel (average log length of 7.6 m and diameter of 0.35 m), rendering most debris immobile. Eighty-one pool-forming pieces of wood were dated over 1.2 km of stream length, with 28% of these pieces causing scour of more than one pool. In all, 122 wood-forced pools were dated, accounting for 38% of all pools at the site and 47% of the wood-forced pools. Fifty-three percent of the wood-forced pools lacked datable wood because these pieces either: were newly recruited; had been scoured by floods; or were contained below the active channel elevation, prohibiting vegetation establishment on the wood debris (the most common cause). The debris age distribution declined exponentially from 2 to 113 yrs., with a median value of 18 yrs. Similar exponential residence time distributions have been reported in other studies, but our analysis focused specifically on the ages of pool-forming wood

  11. Pyrimidine pool imbalance induced by BLM helicase deficiency contributes to genetic instability in Bloom syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabosseau, Pauline; Buhagiar-Labarchède, Géraldine; Onclercq-Delic, Rosine; Lambert, Sarah; Debatisse, Michelle; Brison, Olivier; Amor-Guéret, Mounira

    2011-06-28

    Defects in DNA replication are associated with genetic instability and cancer development, as illustrated in Bloom syndrome. Features of this syndrome include a slowdown in replication speed, defective fork reactivation and high rates of sister chromatid exchange, with a general predisposition to cancer. Bloom syndrome is caused by mutations in the BLM gene encoding a RecQ helicase. Here we report that BLM deficiency is associated with a strong cytidine deaminase defect, leading to pyrimidine pool disequilibrium. In BLM-deficient cells, pyrimidine pool normalization leads to reduction of sister chromatid exchange frequency and is sufficient for full restoration of replication fork velocity but not the fork restart defect, thus identifying the part of the Bloom syndrome phenotype because of pyrimidine pool imbalance. This study provides new insights into the molecular basis of control of replication speed and the genetic instability associated with Bloom syndrome. Nucleotide pool disequilibrium could be a general phenomenon in a large spectrum of precancerous and cancer cells.

  12. Evaluation of a pooled strategy for high-throughput sequencing of cosmid clones from metagenomic libraries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy N Lam

    Full Text Available High-throughput sequencing methods have been instrumental in the growing field of metagenomics, with technological improvements enabling greater throughput at decreased costs. Nonetheless, the economy of high-throughput sequencing cannot be fully leveraged in the subdiscipline of functional metagenomics. In this area of research, environmental DNA is typically cloned to generate large-insert libraries from which individual clones are isolated, based on specific activities of interest. Sequence data are required for complete characterization of such clones, but the sequencing of a large set of clones requires individual barcode-based sample preparation; this can become costly, as the cost of clone barcoding scales linearly with the number of clones processed, and thus sequencing a large number of metagenomic clones often remains cost-prohibitive. We investigated a hybrid Sanger/Illumina pooled sequencing strategy that omits barcoding altogether, and we evaluated this strategy by comparing the pooled sequencing results to reference sequence data obtained from traditional barcode-based sequencing of the same set of clones. Using identity and coverage metrics in our evaluation, we show that pooled sequencing can generate high-quality sequence data, without producing problematic chimeras. Though caveats of a pooled strategy exist and further optimization of the method is required to improve recovery of complete clone sequences and to avoid circumstances that generate unrecoverable clone sequences, our results demonstrate that pooled sequencing represents an effective and low-cost alternative for sequencing large sets of metagenomic clones.

  13. Evaluation of a pooled strategy for high-throughput sequencing of cosmid clones from metagenomic libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Kathy N; Hall, Michael W; Engel, Katja; Vey, Gregory; Cheng, Jiujun; Neufeld, Josh D; Charles, Trevor C

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing methods have been instrumental in the growing field of metagenomics, with technological improvements enabling greater throughput at decreased costs. Nonetheless, the economy of high-throughput sequencing cannot be fully leveraged in the subdiscipline of functional metagenomics. In this area of research, environmental DNA is typically cloned to generate large-insert libraries from which individual clones are isolated, based on specific activities of interest. Sequence data are required for complete characterization of such clones, but the sequencing of a large set of clones requires individual barcode-based sample preparation; this can become costly, as the cost of clone barcoding scales linearly with the number of clones processed, and thus sequencing a large number of metagenomic clones often remains cost-prohibitive. We investigated a hybrid Sanger/Illumina pooled sequencing strategy that omits barcoding altogether, and we evaluated this strategy by comparing the pooled sequencing results to reference sequence data obtained from traditional barcode-based sequencing of the same set of clones. Using identity and coverage metrics in our evaluation, we show that pooled sequencing can generate high-quality sequence data, without producing problematic chimeras. Though caveats of a pooled strategy exist and further optimization of the method is required to improve recovery of complete clone sequences and to avoid circumstances that generate unrecoverable clone sequences, our results demonstrate that pooled sequencing represents an effective and low-cost alternative for sequencing large sets of metagenomic clones.

  14. Building a Better Applicant Pool--A Case Study of the Use of Predictive Modeling and Market Segmentation to Build and Enroll Better Pools of Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herridge, Bart; Heil, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Predictive modeling has been a popular topic in higher education for the last few years. This case study shows an example of an effective use of modeling combined with market segmentation to strategically divide large, unmanageable prospect and inquiry pools and convert them into applicants, and eventually, enrolled students. (Contains 6 tables.)

  15. Building a Better Applicant Pool--A Case Study of the Use of Predictive Modeling and Market Segmentation to Build and Enroll Better Pools of Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herridge, Bart; Heil, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Predictive modeling has been a popular topic in higher education for the last few years. This case study shows an example of an effective use of modeling combined with market segmentation to strategically divide large, unmanageable prospect and inquiry pools and convert them into applicants, and eventually, enrolled students. (Contains 6 tables.)

  16. Vision-based detection of MAG weld pool

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Jinqiang; Wu Chuansong; Zhang Min; Zhao Yanhua

    2007-01-01

    Weld pool contains significant information about the welding process. The weld pool images of MAG welding are detected by LaserStrobe system. An algorithm for extracting weld pool edge is proposed according to the characteristics of MAG weld pool images. The maximum weld pool length and width are calculated. The measurement data can be used to verify the results of welding process simulation and to provide a good foundation for automatic control of MAG welding process.

  17. Pooling ASR data for closely related languages

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Heerden, C

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe several experiments that were conducted to assess the viability of data pooling as a means to improve speech-recognition performance for under-resourced languages. Two groups of closely related languages from the Southern Bantu language...

  18. Transferring Goods or Splitting a Resource Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Jacob; Van Assen, Marcel A. L. M.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the consequences for exchange outcomes of the violation of an assumption underlying most social psychological research on exchange. This assumption is that the negotiated direct exchange of commodities between two actors (pure exchange) can be validly represented as two actors splitting a fixed pool of resources (split pool…

  19. The Pool with the Movable Bottom

    Science.gov (United States)

    American School and University, 1977

    1977-01-01

    A major diagnostic, therapeutic, educational, and training center for the handicapped has under construction a swimming pool with a floor that will rise to deck level to enable handicapped persons to roll their wheel chairs on and then float free as the floor is lowered. (Author/MLF)

  20. Enhanced heat transfer in confined pool boiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rops, C.M.; Lindken, R.; Velthuis, J.F.M.; Westerweel, J.

    2009-01-01

    We report the results of an experimental investigation of the heat transfer during nucleate boiling on a spatially confined boiling surface. The heat flux as a function of the boiling surface temperature was measured in pool boiling pots with diameters ranging from 15 mm down to 4.5 mm. It was found

  1. Enhanced heat transfer in confined pool boiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rops, C.M. [TNO Science and Industry, P.O. Box 155, 2600 AD Delft (Netherlands)], E-mail: cor.rops@tno.nl; Lindken, R. [Laboratory for Aero and Hydrodynamics, Delft University of Technology (Netherlands); Velthuis, J.F.M. [TNO Science and Industry, P.O. Box 155, 2600 AD Delft (Netherlands); Westerweel, J. [Laboratory for Aero and Hydrodynamics, Delft University of Technology (Netherlands)

    2009-08-15

    We report the results of an experimental investigation of the heat transfer during nucleate boiling on a spatially confined boiling surface. The heat flux as a function of the boiling surface temperature was measured in pool boiling pots with diameters ranging from 15 mm down to 4.5 mm. It was found that a reduction of the pool diameter leads to an enhancement of the nucleate boiling heat flux for most of the boiling curve. Our experimental results indicate that this enhancement is not affected by the depth of the boiling pot, the material of the bounding wall, or the diameter of the inlet water supply. High-speed camera imaging shows that the heat transfer enhancement for the spatially confined pool boiling occurs in conjunction with a stable circulating flow, which is in contrast to the chaotic and mainly upward motion for boiling in larger pool diameters. An explanation for the enhancement of the heat transfer and the associated change in flow pattern is found in the singularisation of the nucleate boiling process.

  2. "Teisele poole" Agambeniga ja Agambenita / Ragne Nukk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Nukk, Ragne, 1984-

    2012-01-01

    Tallinna Fotokuu rahvusvahelise fotonäituse "Teisele poole" ideeliste lähtekohtade tõlgendamisest. Autor kõrvutab Adam Budaki kuraatornäituse aluseks olnud Giorgio Agambeni esseed „Viimne kohtupäev“ näitusel eksponeeritud piltidega

  3. 24 CFR 320.9 - Pool administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) GOVERNMENT NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT GUARANTY OF MORTGAGE-BACKED SECURITIES Pass-Through Type Securities § 320.9 Pool administration. The Association will only guarantee securities if the issuer executes a guaranty agreement or contractual agreement in the form...

  4. Pricing Electricity in Pools With Wind Producers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morales González, Juan Miguel; Conejo, A. J.; Kai Liu

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers an electricity pool that includes a significant number of wind producers and is cleared through a network-constrained auction, one day in advance and on an hourly basis. The hourly auction is formulated as a two-stage stochastic programming problem, where the first stage repr...

  5. Enhanced heat transfer in confined pool boiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rops, C.M.; Lindken, R.; Velthuis, J.F.M.; Westerweel, J.

    2009-01-01

    We report the results of an experimental investigation of the heat transfer during nucleate boiling on a spatially confined boiling surface. The heat flux as a function of the boiling surface temperature was measured in pool boiling pots with diameters ranging from 15 mm down to 4.5 mm. It was found

  6. The Pool Is Not Just for Swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzker, Andrea

    2004-01-01

    Participating in water fitness workouts is one way to benefit one's health at very little cost. If the pool at a school is used only for swimming, then the benefits of having one barely causes a ripple. When the properties of water and how humans react to water are understood and applied to water activity programs, health benefits and enjoyment…

  7. Strategies for chemically healthy public swimming pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht

    of the strategies which can be used to achieve microbiological safe water with low levels of DBPs to ensure healthy environment for bathers. There are different approaches to achieve healthy environment in public swimming pools which in this thesis are divided into three strategies: alternatives to chlorination...

  8. The warm pool in the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vinayachandran, P.N.; Shetye, S.R.

    ) a single maximum/minimum (northern and southern part of the Pacific warm pool and the south Indian Ocean), (iii) two maxima/minima (Arabian Sea, western equatorial Indian Ocean and Southern Bay of Bengal), and (iv) a rapid rise, a steady phase and a...

  9. "Teisele poole" Agambeniga ja Agambenita / Ragne Nukk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Nukk, Ragne, 1984-

    2012-01-01

    Tallinna Fotokuu rahvusvahelise fotonäituse "Teisele poole" ideeliste lähtekohtade tõlgendamisest. Autor kõrvutab Adam Budaki kuraatornäituse aluseks olnud Giorgio Agambeni esseed „Viimne kohtupäev“ näitusel eksponeeritud piltidega

  10. Suncatcher and cool pool. Project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammond, J.

    1981-03-01

    The Suncatcher is a simple, conical solar concentrating device that captures light entering clerestory windows and directs it onto thermal storage elements at the back of a south facing living space. The cone shape and inclination are designed to capture low angle winter sunlight and to reflect away higher angle summer sunlight. It is found that winter radiation through a Suncatcher window is 40 to 50% higher than through an ordinary window, and that the average solar fraction is 59%. Water-filled steal culvert pipes used for thermal storage are found to undergo less stratification, and thus to be more effective, when located where sunlight strikes the bottom rather than the top. Five Suncatcher buildings are described. Designs are considered for 32/sup 0/, 40/sup 0/ and 48/sup 0/ north latitude, and as the latitude increases, the inclination angle of the cone should be lowered. The Cool Pool is an evaporating, shaded roof pond which thermosiphons cool water into water-filled columns within a building. Preliminary experiments indicate that the best shade design has unimpeded north sky view, good ventilation, complete summer shading, a low architectural profile, and low cost attic vent lowers work. Another series of experiments established the satisfactory performance of the Cool Pool on a test building using four water-filled cylinders, two cylinders, and two cylinders connected to the Cool Pool through a heat exchanger. Although an unshaded pool cools better at night than a shaded one, daytime heat gain far offsets this advantage. A vinyl waterbag heat exchanger was developed for use with the Cool Pool. (LEW)

  11. Registry in a tube: multiplexed pools of retrievable parts for genetic design space exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Lauren B A; Gorochowski, Thomas E; Roehner, Nicholas; Mikkelsen, Tarjei S; Densmore, Douglas; Gordon, D Benjamin; Nicol, Robert; Voigt, Christopher A

    2016-12-21

    Genetic designs can consist of dozens of genes and hundreds of genetic parts. After evaluating a design, it is desirable to implement changes without the cost and burden of starting the construction process from scratch. Here, we report a two-step process where a large design space is divided into deep pools of composite parts, from which individuals are retrieved and assembled to build a final construct. The pools are built via multiplexed assembly and sequenced using next-generation sequencing. Each pool consists of ∼20 Mb of up to 5000 unique and sequence-verified composite parts that are barcoded for retrieval by PCR. This approach is applied to a 16-gene nitrogen fixation pathway, which is broken into pools containing a total of 55 848 composite parts (71.0 Mb). The pools encompass an enormous design space (10(43) possible 23 kb constructs), from which an algorithm-guided 192-member 4.5 Mb library is built. Next, all 10(30) possible genetic circuits based on 10 repressors (NOR/NOT gates) are encoded in pools where each repressor is fused to all permutations of input promoters. These demonstrate that multiplexing can be applied to encompass entire design spaces from which individuals can be accessed and evaluated.

  12. Mercury concentrations and pools in four adjacent coniferous and deciduous upland forests in Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Wang, Zhangwei; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Gao, Yu

    2017-05-01

    Understanding of forest mercury (Hg) pools is important for quantifying the global atmospheric Hg removal. We studied gaseous elemental Hg (GEM) concentrations, litterfall Hg depositions, and pool sizes in four adjacent stands at Mount Dongling to assess Hg dynamics in the forested catchment and the potential of Hg release during wildfires. The average GEM concentration was 2.5 ± 0.5 ng m-3, about 1.5 times of the background levels in the Northern Hemisphere. In all four stands, Hg concentrations increase in the following order: bole wood < branch/twig < bark < mineral soil < needles/leaves < litterfall < Oi litter < Oe soil < Oa organic soil. The Hg pools of aboveground biomass were comparable in the forests of larch, oak, and Chinese pine, which were much greater than that of mixed broadleaf stands due to lower biomass. The total Hg pools in ecosystems were similar in the four stands, because of the comparable Hg pool in the soil horizons (0-40 cm), which accounted for over 97% of the total ecosystem Hg storage in the four stands. Although Hg pools of the forest ecosystem in north China were comparable to North America and North Europe, Hg storage in forests constituted a high threat for large Hg emission pulses to the atmosphere by wildfires. The potential Hg emissions from the combustion at the four stands were ranged from 0.675 to 1.696 mg m-2.

  13. Factors driving semi-aquatic predator occurrence in traditional cattle drinking pools: conservation issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul Manenti

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In several cases, human impact on water bodies and on their freshwater communities is detrimental, but in some cases the human activity may favour and enhance the biodiversity of small water bodies, as traditional cattle drinking pools. Despite their small size, small water bodies may constitute hot spot of biodiversity often representing the only lentic aquatic biotope in landscapes where superficial water lacks or flows in lotic environments like creeks and streams. Predators are good indicators of biodiversity in ponds and give information of food chain web complexity. In particular, semi-aquatic predators like amphibians and dragonflies may account for a substantial percentage of energy flow between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. In this study, we evaluated the conservation value of traditional cattle drinking pools building by assessing the factors determining the occurrence and distribution of the semi-aquatic predators. From April to August 2015, we investigated 30 distinct pools recording several abiotic and biotic environmental variables. We detected 4 semi-aquatic predators: Salamandra salamandra larvae, Triturus carnifex, Aeshna sp. larvae and Libellula sp. larvae. Abiotic features played a major role in shaping the predator community that resulted linked to stable, with no dryness period, and large drinking pools. Invertebrate prey biomass was not particularly important, while vegetation cover and occurrence of unpalatable tadpoles were the most important biotic features of the pools. Our study provides novel evidence on the importance of cattle drinking pools management to preserve biodiversity especially in areas where traditional pastoral activity is disappearing.

  14. Outbreaks of Short-Incubation Ocular and Respiratory Illness Following Exposure to Indoor Swimming Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Anna B.; Kile, James C.; Otto, Charles; Kazerouni, Neely; Austin, Connie; Blount, Benjamin C.; Wong, Hong-Nei; Beach, Michael J.; Fry, Alicia M.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Chlorination destroys pathogens in swimming pool water, but by-products of chlorination can cause human illness. We investigated outbreaks of ocular and respiratory symptoms associated with chlorinated indoor swimming pools at two hotels. Measurements We interviewed registered guests and companions who stayed at hotels X and Y within 2 days of outbreak onset. We performed bivariate and stratified analyses, calculated relative risks (RR), and conducted environmental investigations of indoor pool areas. Results Of 77 guests at hotel X, 47 (61%) completed questionnaires. Among persons exposed to the indoor pool area, 22 (71%) of 31 developed ocular symptoms [RR = 24; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.5–370], and 14 (45%) developed respiratory symptoms (RR = 6.8; 95% CI, 1.0–47) with a median duration of 10 hr (0.25–24 hr). We interviewed 30 (39%) of 77 registered persons and 59 unregistered companions at hotel Y. Among persons exposed to the indoor pool area, 41 (59%) of 69 developed ocular symptoms (RR = 24; 95% CI, 1.5–370), and 28 (41%) developed respiratory symptoms (RR = 17; 95% CI, 1.1–260) with a median duration of 2.5 hr (2 min–14 days). Four persons sought medical care. During the outbreak, the hotel X’s ventilation system malfunctioned. Appropriate water and air samples were not available for laboratory analysis. Conclusions and relevance to professional practice Indoor pool areas were associated with illness in these outbreaks. A large proportion of bathers were affected; symptoms were consistent with chloramine exposure and were sometimes severe. Improved staff training, pool maintenance, and pool area ventilation could prevent future outbreaks. PMID:17384776

  15. Pooled platelet concentrates: an alternative to single donor apheresis platelets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietersz, R N I

    2009-10-01

    Three types of platelet concentrates (PC) are compared: PC either processed with the platelet-rich plasma (PRP) or the Buffy coat (BC) method from whole blood units and PC obtained by apheresis. Leuko-reduction (LR) pre-storage is advocated to improve quality of the PC during storage and reduce adverse reactions in recipients. Standardization of methods allow preparation of PC with comparable yields of approximately 400 x 10(9) platelets in pooled non-LR-PRP, approximately 370 x 10(9) in pooled LR-BC-PC and in LR apheresis PC the number of platelets can be targeted on 350 x 10(9) or more with devices of various manufacturers. While viral transmission can be prevented by outstanding laboratory tests, the risk of bacterial contamination should be reduced by improved arm disinfection, deviation of the first 20-30 ml of blood and culture or rapid detection assays of the PC pre-issue. In a large prospective multicenter trial no significant difference was observed between cultures of apheresis PC (n = 15,198): 0.09% confirmed positive units versus 0.06% in pooled BC-PC (n = 37,045), respectively. Though platelet activation as measured by CD62 expression may differ in vitro in PC obtained with various apheresis equipment, and also between PC processed with the two whole blood methods there is scarce literature about the clinical impact of these findings. In conclusion the final products of LR-PC derived from whole blood or obtained by apheresis can be comparable, provided the critical steps of the processing method are identified and covered and the process is in control.

  16. OBS FOMAR POOL: Gibraltar and ALERTES-RIM experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Antonio; Martín Davila, Jose; Buforn, Elisa; Cabieces, Roberto; Santos, Jose; Sandoval, Nicolas; Roca, Antoni; Dahm, Torsten

    2016-04-01

    The Eurasian-African plate boundary crosses the called "Ibero-Maghrebian" region from the San Vicente Cape (SW Portugal) to Tunisia including the south Iberia, Alboran Sea, and northern of Morocco and Algeria. The low convergence rate at this plate boundary produces a continuous moderate seismic activity of low magnitude and shallow depth, where the occurrence of large earthquakes is separated by long time intervals, even with associated tsunamis, like the 1755 Lisbon earthquake. In this region, there are also intermediate and very deep earthquakes. Due to the fact that part of the seismic activity is located at marine areas, and also because of the poor geographic azimuthal coverage at some zones provided by the land stations (specially in the SW of the San Vicente Cape area), Royal Spanish Navy Observatory (ROA) acquired three "LOSTERN" broad band (CMG-40T sensors) OBS, manufactured by KUM (Kiel, Germany), and, more recently (2014), the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM) acquired another three with Trillium 120 sensors. All of them conform the OBS FOMAR pool. Since January to November 2014, the FOMAR pool has been deployed along the Gibraltar strait (Gibraltar experiment), in collaboration with SECEGSA (Spanish society to study the fix communication through the Gibraltar Strait), to study the local microseismicity in the Gibraltar strait area. Also, since September 2015, the FOMAR pool has been deployed for 8 months in SW of the San Vicente Cape with an hexagonal array configuration as a part of ALERTES-RIM project. In this work the some preliminary results of the Gibraltar strait and ALERTES-RIM OBS experiment are shown.

  17. Alternative heating of a municipal swimming pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazzarin, R.

    1982-03-01

    Swimming pools require great amounts of energy at low temperature levels. Therefore the application of alternative heating systems is very suitable. Four different systems are taken into account: compression heat pump, absorption heat pump, motor driven heat pump with thermal recovery, and a combined system. A short thermodynamic analysis is carried out in order to evaluate operating savings. Initial cost estimates demonstrate the advantages of each proposed solution over the conventional system.

  18. Health risks of early swimming pool attendance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoefer, Yvonne; Zutavern, Anne; Brockow, Inken; Schäfer, Torsten; Krämer, Ursula; Schaaf, Beate; Herbarth, Olf; von Berg, Andrea; Wichmann, H-Erich; Heinrich, Joachim

    2008-07-01

    Swimming pool attendance and exposure to chlorination by-products showed adverse health effects on children. We assessed whether early swimming pool attendance, especially baby swimming, is related to higher rates of early infections and to the development of allergic diseases. In 2003-2005, 2192 children were analysed for the 6-year follow-up of a prospective birth cohort study. Data on early swimming pool attendance, other lifestyle factors and medical history were collected by parental-administered questionnaire. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate associations. Babies who did not participate in baby swimming had lower rates of infection in the 1st year of life (i) diarrhoea: OR 0.68 CI 95% 0.54-0.85; (ii) otitis media: OR 0.81 CI 95% 0.62-1.05; (iii) airway infections: OR 0.85 CI 95% 0.67-1.09. No clear association could be found between late or non-swimmers and atopic dermatitis or hay fever until the age of 6 years, while higher rates of asthma were found (OR 2.15 95% CI 1.16-3.99), however, potentially due to reverse causation. The study indicates that, in terms of infections, baby swimming might not be as harmless as commonly thought. Further evidence is needed to make conclusions if the current regulations on chlorine in Germany might not protect swimming pool attendees from an increased risk of gastrointestinal infections. In terms of developing atopic diseases there is no verifiable detrimental effect of early swimming.

  19. Labor market pooling and occupational agglomeration

    OpenAIRE

    Gabe, Todd M.; Jaison R. Abel

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the micro-foundations of occupational agglomeration in U.S. metropolitan areas, with an emphasis on labor market pooling. Controlling for a wide range of occupational attributes, including proxies for the use of specialized machinery and for the importance of knowledge spillovers, we find that jobs characterized by a unique knowledge base exhibit higher levels of geographic concentration than do occupations with generic knowledge requirements. Further, by analyzing co-aggl...

  20. Poole-frenkel piezoconductive element and sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habermehl, Scott D.

    2004-08-03

    A new class of highly sensitive piezoconductive strain sensor elements and sensors has been invented. The new elements function under conditions such that electrical conductivity is dominated by Poole-Frenkel transport. A substantial piezoconductive effect appears in this regime, allowing the new sensors to exhibit sensitivity to applied strain as much as two orders of magnitude in excess of prior art sensors based on doped silicon.

  1. Lagrangian three-dimensional finite-element formulation for the nonlinear fluid-structural response of reactor components. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulak, R. F.; Fiala, C.

    1980-03-01

    This report presents the formulations used in the NEPTUNE code. Specifically, it describes the finite-element formulation of a three-dimensional hexahedral element for simulating the behavior of either fluid or solid continua. Since the newly developed hexahedral element and the original triangular plate element are finite elements, they are compatible in the sense that they can be combined arbitrarily to simulate complex reactor components in three-dimensional space. Because rate-type constitutive relations are used in conjunction with a velocity-strain tensor, the formulation is applicable to large deformation problems. This development can be used to simulate (1) the fluid adjacent to reactor components and (2) the concrete fill found in large reactor head closures.

  2. Ulk4 Regulates Neural Stem Cell Pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Guan, Zhenlong; Shen, Qin; Flinter, Frances; Domínguez, Laura; Ahn, Joo Wook; Collier, David A; O'Brien, Timothy; Shen, Sanbing

    2016-09-01

    The size of neural stem cell (NSC) pool at birth determines the starting point of adult neurogenesis. Aberrant neurogenesis is associated with major mental illness, in which ULK4 is proposed as a rare risk factor. Little is known about factors regulating the NSC pool, or function of the ULK4. Here, we showed that Ulk4(tm1a/tm1a) mice displayed a dramatically reduced NSC pool at birth. Ulk4 was expressed in a cell cycle-dependent manner and peaked in G2/M phases. Targeted disruption of the Ulk4 perturbed mid-neurogenesis and significantly reduced cerebral cortex in postnatal mice. Pathway analyses of dysregulated genes in Ulk4(tm1a/tm1a) mice revealed Ulk4 as a key regulator of cell cycle and NSC proliferation, partially through regulation of the Wnt signaling. In addition, we identified hemizygous deletion of ULK4 gene in 1.2/1,000 patients with pleiotropic symptoms including severe language delay and learning difficulties. ULK4, therefore, may significantly contribute to neurodevelopmental, neuropsychiatric, and neurodegenerative disorders. Stem Cells 2016;34:2318-2331.

  3. Forced pooling and mediation: the odd couple

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascoe, D.

    2001-07-01

    The mandate and activities of the office of the Ontario Mining and Lands Commissioner is explained. The office has jurisdiction under the Mining Act, the Conservation Authorities Act, the Assessment Act, the Aggregates Resources Act , the Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act, and most importantly, under the Oil, Gas and Salt Resources Act. Under the Oil, Gas and Salt Resources Act, the Commissioner may under clause (a) order the joining of interest within a spacing unit for the purpose of drilling and operating a well and apportioning the associated costs and benefits. Under clause (b) the Commissioner may, by order, require and regulate the joining of interests within a field or a pool for the purpose of drilling or operating wells and may order also the designation of management and apportioning of costs. Pooling (matters relating to spacing units) and unitization (matters relating to joining interests in a field or pool) are legislated departures from the old rule of capture which essentially allowed any landowner to sink a well on his land and remove the resource without consideration of the interest of surrounding landowners. In essence, the Mining and Land Commissioner protects the interest of all landowners within a spacing unit, while ensuring that the resource extraction can proceed under the economically and technically most favorable conditions.

  4. Vesicle Pools: Lessons from Adrenal Chromaffin Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Stevens

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The adrenal chromaffin cell serves as a model system to study fast Ca2+-dependent exocytosis. Membrane capacitance measurements in combination with Ca2+ uncaging offers a temporal resolution in the millisecond range and reveals that catecholamine release occurs in three distinct phases. Release of a readily releasable (RRP and a slowly releasable (SRP pool are followed by sustained release, due to maturation and release of vesicles which were not release-ready at the start of the stimulus. Trains of depolarizations, a more physiological stimulus, induce release from a small immediately releasable pool of vesicles residing adjacent to calcium channels, as well as from the RRP. The SRP is poorly activated by depolarization. A sequential model, in which non-releasable docked vesicles are primed to a slowly releasable state, and then further mature to the readily releasable state, has been proposed. The docked state, dependent on membrane proximity, requires SNAP-25, synaptotagmin and syntaxin. The ablation or modification of SNAP-25 and syntaxin, components of the SNARE complex, as well as of synaptotagmin, the calcium sensor, and modulators such complexins and Snapin alter the properties and/or magnitudes of different phases of release, and in particular can ablate the RRP. These results indicate that the composition of the SNARE complex and its interaction with modulatory molecules drives priming and provides a molecular basis for different pools of releasable vesicles.

  5. Topography Battles Surface Texture: An Experimental Study of Pool-riffle Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartrand, S. M.; Hassan, M. A.; Jellinek, M.

    2016-12-01

    Pool-riffles are perhaps the most common streambed shape found in streams and rivers, and not surprisingly, they are essential to salmon ecology, and are a central focus of many restoration actions. Yet, when an applied earth scientist or engineer is faced with developing a pool-riffle design, there is a lack of clear and rigorously developed design guidelines. Given the volumes of money spent annually within the restoration industry, this is a real problem. Recognition of this problem is growing, however, and an increasing level of attention has been directed to questions of pool-riffle formation in the past decade. At this point and given certain landscape characteristics, it is well established that streamwise gradients in channel width are associated with pool-riffles. Specifically, pools are associated with negative gradients in width, and riffles with positive gradients. Importantly, these associations have now been documented from field-derived data, as well as via experimental and numerical investigations. There is much to build from the present knowledge base, and central to this are questions related to (a) how pool-riffles evolve during the formative process, (b) what are the basic set of ingredients necessary for pool-riffle formation within systems characterized by relatively non-erodible channel margins, and (c) do pool-riffles persist, once formed, under a broad range of forcing conditions? We have completed four physical experiments examining the process and evolution of pool-riffle formation under a large range of upstream boundary, as well as physical channel conditions. We will report on two of the completed experiments. Our work will highlight two new non-dimensional channel evolution numbers, derived to help describe and characterize bedform development, as well as response to perturbations from near-equilibrium conditions. The channel evolution numbers lay the foundation for development of a new regime diagram, which quantifies the basic

  6. POOL WATER TREATMENT AND COOLING SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. King

    2000-06-19

    The Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System is located in the Waste Handling Building (WHB), and is comprised of various process subsystems designed to support waste handling operations. This system maintains the pool water temperature within an acceptable range, maintains water quality standards that support remote underwater operations and prevent corrosion, detects leakage from the pool liner, provides the capability to remove debris from the pool, controls the pool water level, and helps limit radiological exposure to personnel. The pool structure and liner, pool lighting, and the fuel staging racks in the pool are not within the scope of the Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System. Pool water temperature control is accomplished by circulating the pool water through heat exchangers. Adequate circulation and mixing of the pool water is provided to prevent localized thermal hotspots in the pool. Treatment of the pool water is accomplished by a water treatment system that circulates the pool water through filters, and ion exchange units. These water treatment units remove radioactive and non-radioactive particulate and dissolved solids from the water, thereby providing the water clarity needed to conduct waste handling operations. The system also controls pool water chemistry to prevent advanced corrosion of the pool liner, pool components, and fuel assemblies. Removal of radioactivity from the pool water contributes to the project ALARA (as low as is reasonably achievable) goals. A leak detection system is provided to detect and alarm leaks through the pool liner. The pool level control system monitors the water level to ensure that the minimum water level required for adequate radiological shielding is maintained. Through interface with a demineralized water system, adequate makeup is provided to compensate for loss of water inventory through evaporation and waste handling operations. Interface with the Site Radiological Monitoring System provides continuous

  7. Experimental Study on the Thermal Stratification in a Pool Boiling with a Horizontal Heat Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seok; Ryu, Sung Uk; Euh, Dong-Jin; Song, Chul-Hwa [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Thermal stratification is formed in horizontal fluid layers with different temperatures, where the warmer fluid layers are situated above the cooler fluid layers. Thermal stratification phenomena are common in pool type reactor systems, such as the liquid-salt cooled advanced high temperature reactor (AHTR) and liquid-metal cooled fast reactor systems such as the sodium fast reactor (SFR). Thermal stratification is increasingly encountered in large pools that are being used as heat sinks in the new generation of advanced reactors. The small-scale pool test was conducted to investigate the thermal stratification phenomena that occurred during the heat-up of a water in a pool. Because turbulence and boiling models affect the natural convection significantly, it is important to obtain local information regarding the fluid velocity and void distribution to determine the relevant physical models. To understand the flow phenomena inside a pool, a non-intrusive technique is adopted to measure the flow velocity field. In this study, the 2D particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurement technique is used to determine the fluid velocity vector field of single- and/or two-phase natural convection flow and thermal stratification in a pool. Detailed velocity measurements using the 2D PIV measurement technique were conducted to investigate single- and/or two-phase natural convection flow and thermal stratification in a pool boiling. In this study, the two-dimensional velocity vector fields as the water temperature increased were experimentally acquired in a pool that contained a horizontal heater rod. The experimental results indicate a large natural convection flow at the region above the heater rod and thermal stratification at the region below the heater rod. The flow of the opposite direction to each other was shown in the region between the heater rod and the thermal boundary layer. This flow pattern will contribute to maintain the thermal stratification and retard the water

  8. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Heffner, Grayson; Goldman, Charles

    2009-01-30

    In 2007, the Southwest Power Pool (SPP) formed the Customer Response Task Force (CRTF) to identify barriers to deploying demand response (DR) resources in wholesale markets and develop policies to overcome these barriers. One of the initiatives of this Task Force was to develop more detailed information on existing retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs, program rules, and utility operating practices. This report describes the results of a comprehensive survey conducted by LBNL in support of the Customer Response Task Force and discusses policy implications for integrating legacy retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs into wholesale markets in the SPP region. LBNL conducted a detailed survey of existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs administered by SPP's member utilities. Survey respondents were asked to provide information on advance notice requirements to customers, operational triggers used to call events (e.g. system emergencies, market conditions, local emergencies), use of these DR resources to meet planning reserves requirements, DR resource availability (e.g. seasonal, annual), participant incentive structures, and monitoring and verification (M&V) protocols. Nearly all of the 30 load-serving entities in SPP responded to the survey. Of this group, fourteen SPP member utilities administer 36 DR programs, five dynamic pricing tariffs, and six voluntary customer response initiatives. These existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs have a peak demand reduction potential of 1,552 MW. Other major findings of this study are: o About 81percent of available DR is from interruptible rate tariffs offered to large commercial and industrial customers, while direct load control (DLC) programs account for ~;;14percent. o Arkansas accounts for ~;;50percent of the DR resources in the SPP footprint; these DR resources are primarily managed by cooperatives. o Publicly-owned cooperatives accounted for 54percent of the existing DR resources

  9. UMRS LTRMP 2010/11 LCU Mapping -- Pool 21

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Aerial photographs for Pools 1-13 Upper Mississippi River System and Pools, Alton-Marseilles, Illinois River were collected in color infrared (CIR) in August of...

  10. UMRS LTRMP 2010/11 LCU Mapping -- Pool 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Aerial photographs for Pools 1-13 Upper Mississippi River System and Pools, Alton-Marseilles, Illinois River were collected in color infrared (CIR) in August of...

  11. UMRS LTRMP 2010/11 LCU Mapping -- Pool 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Aerial photographs for Pools 1-13 Upper Mississippi River System and Pools, Alton-Marseilles, Illinois River were collected in color infrared (CIR) in August of...

  12. UMRS LTRMP 2010/11 LCU Mapping -- Pool 14

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Aerial photographs for Pools 1-13 Upper Mississippi River System and Pools, Alton-Marseilles, Illinois River were collected in color infrared (CIR) in August of 2010...

  13. UMRS LTRMP 2010/11 LCU Mapping -- Pool 7

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Aerial photographs for Pools 1-13 Upper Mississippi River System and Pools, Alton-Marseilles, Illinois River were collected in color infrared (CIR) in August of 2010...

  14. UMRS LTRMP 2010/11 LCU Mapping -- Pool 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Aerial photographs for Pools 1-13 Upper Mississippi River System and Pools, Alton-Marseilles, Illinois River were collected in color infrared (CIR) in August of 2010...

  15. UMRS LTRMP 2010/11 LCU Mapping -- Pool 10

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Aerial photographs for Pools 1-13 Upper Mississippi River System and Pools, Alton-Marseilles, Illinois River were collected in color infrared (CIR) in August of 2010...

  16. UMRS LTRMP 2010/11 LCU Mapping -- Pool 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Aerial photographs for Pools 1-13 Upper Mississippi River System and Pools, Alton-Marseilles, Illinois River were collected in color infrared (CIR) in August of 2010...

  17. UMRS LTRMP 2010/11 LCU Mapping -- Pool 13

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Aerial photographs for Pools 1-13 Upper Mississippi River System and Pools, Alton-Marseilles, Illinois River were collected in color infrared (CIR) in August of 2010...

  18. UMRS LTRMP 2010/11 LCU Mapping -- Pool 22

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Aerial photographs for Pools 1-13 Upper Mississippi River System and Pools, Alton-Marseilles, Illinois River were collected in color infrared (CIR) in August of 2010...

  19. UMRS LTRMP 2010/11 LCU Mapping -- Pool 18

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Aerial photographs for Pools 1-13 Upper Mississippi River System and Pools, Alton-Marseilles, Illinois River were collected in color infrared (CIR) in August of 2010...

  20. UMRS LTRMP 2010/11 LCU Mapping -- Pool 5a

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Aerial photographs for Pools 1-13 Upper Mississippi River System and Pools, Alton-Marseilles, Illinois River were collected in color infrared (CIR) in August of 2010...

  1. UMRS LTRMP 2010/11 LCU Mapping -- Pool 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Aerial photographs for Pools 1-13 Upper Mississippi River System and Pools, Alton-Marseilles, Illinois River were collected in color infrared (CIR) in August of 2010...

  2. UMRS LTRMP 2010/11 LCU Mapping -- Pool 8

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Aerial photographs for Pools 1-13 Upper Mississippi River System and Pools, Alton-Marseilles, Illinois River were collected in color infrared (CIR) in August of 2010...

  3. UMRS LTRMP 2010/11 LCU Mapping -- Pool 24

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Aerial photographs for Pools 1-13 Upper Mississippi River System and Pools, Alton-Marseilles, Illinois River were collected in color infrared (CIR) in August of 2010...

  4. UMRS LTRMP 2010/11 LCU Mapping -- Pool 19

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Aerial photographs for Pools 1-13 Upper Mississippi River System and Pools, Alton-Marseilles, Illinois River were collected in color infrared (CIR) in August of 2010...

  5. UMRS LTRMP 2010/11 LCU Mapping -- Pool 20

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Aerial photographs for Pools 1-13 Upper Mississippi River System and Pools, Alton-Marseilles, Illinois River were collected in color infrared (CIR) in August of 2010...

  6. UMRS LTRMP 2010/11 LCU Mapping -- Pool 26

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Aerial photographs for Pools 1-13 Upper Mississippi River System and Pools, Alton-Marseilles, Illinois River were collected in color infrared (CIR) in August of 2010...

  7. UMRS LTRMP 2010/11 LCU Mapping -- Pool 09

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Aerial photographs for Pools 1-13 Upper Mississippi River System and Pools, Alton-Marseilles, Illinois River were collected in color infrared (CIR) in August of 2010...

  8. UMRS LTRMP 2010/11 LCU Mapping -- Pool 25

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Aerial photographs for Pools 1-13 Upper Mississippi River System and Pools, Alton-Marseilles, Illinois River were collected in color infrared (CIR) in August of 2010...

  9. UMRS LTRMP 2010/11 LCU Mapping -- Pool 21

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Aerial photographs for Pools 1-13 Upper Mississippi River System and Pools, Alton-Marseilles, Illinois River were collected in color infrared (CIR) in August of 2010...

  10. UMRS LTRMP 2010/11 LCU Mapping -- Pool 12

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Aerial photographs for Pools 1-13 Upper Mississippi River System and Pools, Alton-Marseilles, Illinois River were collected in color infrared (CIR) in August of 2010...

  11. UMRS LTRMP 2010/11 LCU Mapping -- Pool 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Aerial photographs for Pools 1-13 Upper Mississippi River System and Pools, Alton-Marseilles, Illinois River were collected in color infrared (CIR) in August of 2010...

  12. UMRS LTRMP 2010/11 LCU Mapping -- Pool 25

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Aerial photographs for Pools 1-13 Upper Mississippi River System and Pools, Alton-Marseilles, Illinois River were collected in color infrared (CIR) in August of...

  13. Performance Study and Dynamic Optimization Design for Thread Pool Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Dongping [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2004-12-19

    Thread pools have been widely used by many multithreaded applications. However, the determination of the pool size according to the application behavior still remains problematic. To automate this process, in this thesis we have developed a set of performance metrics for quantitatively analyzing thread pool performance. For our experiments, we built a thread pool system which provides a general framework for thread pool research. Based on this simulation environment, we studied the performance impact brought by the thread pool on different multithreaded applications. Additionally, the correlations between internal characterizations of thread pools and their throughput were also examined. We then proposed and evaluated a heuristic algorithm to dynamically determine the optimal thread pool size. The simulation results show that this approach is effective in improving overall application performance.

  14. [Tiit Hennoste loengusarjast 'Hüpped modernismi poole'] / Hasso Krull

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Krull, Hasso, 1964-

    1997-01-01

    Tiit Hennoste loengusarjast 'Hüpped modernismi poole : Eesti 20. sajandi kirjandusest Euroopa modernismi taustal' (1993, nr. 10 - 1997, nr. 10/11).Vastukaja: Hüpped modernismi poole: kajad ja vastukajad // Vikerkaar (1998) nr. 6, lk. 99-111

  15. [Tiit Hennoste loengusarjast 'Hüpped modernismi poole'] / Hasso Krull

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Krull, Hasso, 1964-

    1997-01-01

    Tiit Hennoste loengusarjast 'Hüpped modernismi poole : Eesti 20. sajandi kirjandusest Euroopa modernismi taustal' (1993, nr. 10 - 1997, nr. 10/11).Vastukaja: Hüpped modernismi poole: kajad ja vastukajad // Vikerkaar (1998) nr. 6, lk. 99-111

  16. Phytolith-Occluded Carbon Pools and Fluxes: New Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyerson, P. E.; Alexandre, A. E.; Santos, G.

    2015-12-01

    Phytoliths are microscopic grains of silica (SiO2•nH2O) formed within plants. The biomineralization process typically encapsulates small quantities of carbon termed phytC. Upon decomposition, phytoliths are released from biomass and into soils. Recent research has suggested that phytC may be a large sink of atmospheric CO2 in soils. Important steps, therefore, are to quantify phytC cycling across ecosystems and to measure it's importance relative to the organic C cycle as a whole. Thus, information regarding phytC pool sizes and flux rates are needed. To an extent this has been performed. PhytC quantities can be easily estimated as long as 1) phytolith quantities and 2) the amount of C present in phytoliths are known. The quantity of C within phytoliths is still a subject of debate, but recent work has found quantities of less than 0.22%. Older studies, which rely on extraction methods which are now known to incompletely remove surface organic residues, have found phytC quantities from 1% to 20%. Hence, studies of phytC cycling using outdated methods may lead to overestimates. In order to re-estimate phytC dynamics, we compiled an extensive list of published works which document phytolith pools in above-ground biomass and soils, as well as flux rates. From these data phytC quantities were calculated using revised estimates of phytolith C percentages. PhytC quantities were also compared to total organic C (TOC) pools and fluxes. These calculations were then extrapolated to biome and global scales. At the biome scale, our results indicate that phytC within living biomass and soil pools as well as fluxes are one to two orders of magnitude smaller than previously estimated. PhytC is generally less than 0.01% of biomass TOC, and less than 1% of soil TOC. Annual phytC fluxes are less than 0.01% of TOC fluxes. At the global scale, annual phytC production is approximately 0.01% to 0.10% of gross C production. The findings of the present study suggest that direct C

  17. Heater size effect on subcooled pool boiling of FC-72

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raj, Rishi; Kim, Jungho [University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2009-07-01

    Extensive research has been conducted on pool boiling using heaters larger than the capillary length. For large heaters and/or high gravity conditions, boiling is dominated by buoyancy, and the heat transfer is heater size independent. Much less is known about boiling on small heaters and at low gravity levels. The ratio of heater size L{sub h} to capillary length L{sub c} is an important parameter in the determination of heater size dependence on heat transfer. As the ratio L{sub h}/L{sub c} decreases due to a decrease in either heater size or gravity, surface tension forces become dominant. It is proposed that transition from buoyancy to surface tension dominated boiling occurs when the heater size and bubble departure diameter are of the same order. Previous work in variable gravity with flat surfaces has shown that the heat transfer was heater size independent only when the ratio L{sub h}/L{sub c} was considerably larger than 1. An array of 96 platinum resistance heater elements in a 10 x 10 configuration with individual elements 0.7 x 0.7 mm{sup 2} in size was used to vary heater size and measure the heat transfer. The threshold value of L{sub h}/L{sub c} above which pool boiling is heater size independent was found to be about 2.8. (author)

  18. Understanding the Impacts of Dark Pools on Price Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Linlin

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of dark pools on price discovery (the efficiency of prices on stock exchanges to aggregate information). Assets are traded in either an exchange or a dark pool, with the dark pool offering better prices but lower execution rates. Informed traders receive noisy and heterogeneous signals about an asset's fundamental. We find that informed traders use dark pools to mitigate their information risk and there is a sorting effect: in equilibrium, traders with stron...

  19. Birth order and childhood type 1 diabetes risk: a pooled analysis of 31 observational studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardwell, Chris R; Stene, Lars C; Joner, Geir

    2011-01-01

    The incidence rates of childhood onset type 1 diabetes are almost universally increasing across the globe but the aetiology of the disease remains largely unknown. We investigated whether birth order is associated with the risk of childhood diabetes by performing a pooled analysis of previous...

  20. Lung cancer risk among bricklayers in a pooled analysis of case-control studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Consonni, Dario; De Matteis, Sara; Olsson, Ann; Pesch, Beate; Kromhout, Hans; Straif, Kurt; Brüning, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Bricklayers may be exposed to several lung carcinogens, including crystalline silica and asbestos. Previous studies reported an excess of lung cancer among these workers. We examined lung cancer risk among bricklayers within SYNERGY, a large international pooled analysis of case-control

  1. 40 CFR 97.143 - Compliance supplement pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance supplement pool. 97.143... Allocations § 97.143 Compliance supplement pool. (a) In addition to the CAIR NOX allowances allocated under... CAIR NOX allowances to CAIR NOX units in the respective State: State Compliancesupplement pool...

  2. 40 CFR 96.143 - Compliance supplement pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance supplement pool. 96.143... CAIR NOX Allowance Allocations § 96.143 Compliance supplement pool. (a) In addition to the CAIR NOX... Compliancesupplement pool Alabama 10,166 Delaware 843 District Of Columbia 0 Florida 8,335 Georgia 12,397 Illinois...

  3. 40 CFR 97.43 - Compliance Supplement Pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance Supplement Pool. 97.43... Allocations § 97.43 Compliance Supplement Pool. (a) For any NOX Budget unit that reduces its NOX emission rate... State's compliance supplement pool set forth in appendix D of this part has a number of NOX...

  4. 48 CFR 873.114 - Best value pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Best value pool. 873.114... SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS SIMPLIFIED ACQUISITION PROCEDURES FOR HEALTH-CARE RESOURCES 873.114 Best value pool... solicitation. These vendors constitute the best value pool. This determination is within the sole discretion...

  5. 48 CFR 252.232-7000 - Advance payment pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Advance payment pool. 252... Provisions And Clauses 252.232-7000 Advance payment pool. As prescribed in 232.412-70(a), use the following clause: Advance Payment Pool (DEC 1991) (a) Notwithstanding any other provision of this contract,...

  6. New algebraic constructions for pooling design in DNA library screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zengti; Gao, Suogang; Du, Hongjie; Shi, Yan

    2010-01-01

    Pooling design is an important mathematical tool in DNA library screening. It has been showed that using pooling design, the number of tests in DNA library screening can be greatly reduced. In this paper, we present some new algebraic constructions for pooling design.

  7. Spatial and temporal variation in ephemeral pool crustacean communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janette Holtz; Marie A. Simovich; Thomas Philippi

    2005-01-01

    Vernal pool habitat losses in San Diego County, California, are estimated at 95 percent and will increase as development continues. The majority of San Diego’s remaining pools are located at the Marine Corps Air Station, Miramar. Crustacean communities in eight vernal pools in San Diego County were sampled over 3 years that differed in rainfall amount and pattern. In...

  8. 7 CFR 985.57 - Reserve pool requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reserve pool requirements. 985.57 Section 985.57... Reserve pool requirements. (a) On November 1, or such other date as the Committee, with the approval of the Secretary may establish, the Committee shall pool identified excess oil as reserve oil in...

  9. Soil organic carbon pools in the northern circumpolar permafrost region

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Tarnocai; J.G. Canadell; E.A.G. Schuur; P. Kuhry; G. Mazhitova; S. Zimov

    2009-01-01

    The Northern Circumpolar Soil Carbon Database was developed to determine carbon pools in soils of the northern circumpolar permafrost region. Here we report a new estimate of the carbon pools in soils of the northern permafrost region, including deeper layers and pools not accounted for in previous analyses.

  10. A Skeleton for Distributed Work Pools in Eden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dieterle, Mischa; Berthold, Jost; Loogen, Rita

    2010-01-01

    We present a flexible skeleton for implementing distributed work pools in our parallel functional language Eden. The skeleton manages a pool of tasks (work pool) in a distributed manner using a demand-driven work stealing approach for load balancing. All coordination is done locally within...

  11. NACUBO's Guide to Unitizing Investment Pools. Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Mary S.

    2011-01-01

    The National Association of College and University Business Officers' (NACUBO's) "Guide to Unitizing Investment Pools" addresses the principles and concepts for administering a consolidated investment pool. Unitization is the mechanism by which investment funds are pooled to maximize investment efficiencies and provide information for donors,…

  12. Bisulfite-based epityping on pooled genomic DNA provides an accurate estimate of average group DNA methylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Docherty Sophia J

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA methylation plays a vital role in normal cellular function, with aberrant methylation signatures being implicated in a growing number of human pathologies and complex human traits. Methods based on the modification of genomic DNA with sodium bisulfite are considered the 'gold-standard' for DNA methylation profiling on genomic DNA; however, they require relatively large amounts of DNA and may be prohibitively expensive when used on the large sample sizes necessary to detect small effects. We propose that a high-throughput DNA pooling approach will facilitate the use of emerging methylomic profiling techniques in large samples. Results Compared with data generated from 89 individual samples, our analysis of 205 CpG sites spanning nine independent regions of the genome demonstrates that DNA pools can be used to provide an accurate and reliable quantitative estimate of average group DNA methylation. Comparison of data generated from the pooled DNA samples with results averaged across the individual samples comprising each pool revealed highly significant correlations for individual CpG sites across all nine regions, with an average overall correlation across all regions and pools of 0.95 (95% bootstrapped confidence intervals: 0.94 to 0.96. Conclusion In this study we demonstrate the validity of using pooled DNA samples to accurately assess group DNA methylation averages. Such an approach can be readily applied to the assessment of disease phenotypes reducing the time, cost and amount of DNA starting material required for large-scale epigenetic analyses.

  13. Simulation of Thermal Stratification in BWR Suppression Pools with One Dimensional Modeling Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haihua Zhao; Ling Zou; Hongbin Zhang

    2014-01-01

    The suppression pool in a boiling water reactor (BWR) plant not only is the major heat sink within the containment system, but also provides the major emergency cooling water for the reactor core. In several accident scenarios, such as a loss-of-coolant accident and extended station blackout, thermal stratification tends to form in the pool after the initial rapid venting stage. Accurately predicting the pool stratification phenomenon is important because it affects the peak containment pressure; the pool temperature distribution also affects the NPSHa (available net positive suction head) and therefore the performance of the Emergency Core Cooling System and Reactor Core Isolation Cooling System pumps that draw cooling water back to the core. Current safety analysis codes use zero dimensional (0-D) lumped parameter models to calculate the energy and mass balance in the pool; therefore, they have large uncertainties in the prediction of scenarios in which stratification and mixing are important. While three-dimensional (3-D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods can be used to analyze realistic 3-D configurations, these methods normally require very fine grid resolution to resolve thin substructures such as jets and wall boundaries, resulting in a long simulation time. For mixing in stably stratified large enclosures, the BMIX++ code (Berkeley mechanistic MIXing code in C++) has been developed to implement a highly efficient analysis method for stratification where the ambient fluid volume is represented by one-dimensional (1-D) transient partial differential equations and substructures (such as free or wall jets) are modeled with 1-D integral models. This allows very large reductions in computational effort compared to multi-dimensional CFD modeling. One heat-up experiment performed at the Finland POOLEX facility, which was designed to study phenomena relevant to Nordic design BWR suppression pool including thermal stratification and mixing, is used for

  14. An efficient modeling method for thermal stratification simulation in a BWR suppression pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haihua Zhao; Ling Zou; Hongbin Zhang; Hua Li; Walter Villanueva; Pavel Kudinov

    2012-09-01

    The suppression pool in a BWR plant not only is the major heat sink within the containment system, but also provides major emergency cooling water for the reactor core. In several accident scenarios, such as LOCA and extended station blackout, thermal stratification tends to form in the pool after the initial rapid venting stage. Accurately predicting the pool stratification phenomenon is important because it affects the peak containment pressure; and the pool temperature distribution also affects the NPSHa (Available Net Positive Suction Head) and therefore the performance of the pump which draws cooling water back to the core. Current safety analysis codes use 0-D lumped parameter methods to calculate the energy and mass balance in the pool and therefore have large uncertainty in prediction of scenarios in which stratification and mixing are important. While 3-D CFD methods can be used to analyze realistic 3D configurations, these methods normally require very fine grid resolution to resolve thin substructures such as jets and wall boundaries, therefore long simulation time. For mixing in stably stratified large enclosures, the BMIX++ code has been developed to implement a highly efficient analysis method for stratification where the ambient fluid volume is represented by 1-D transient partial differential equations and substructures such as free or wall jets are modeled with 1-D integral models. This allows very large reductions in computational effort compared to 3-D CFD modeling. The POOLEX experiments at Finland, which was designed to study phenomena relevant to Nordic design BWR suppression pool including thermal stratification and mixing, are used for validation. GOTHIC lumped parameter models are used to obtain boundary conditions for BMIX++ code and CFD simulations. Comparison between the BMIX++, GOTHIC, and CFD calculations against the POOLEX experimental data is discussed in detail.

  15. Swimming Pools, Swimming pools, licensed - name, address, contact, volume, Published in 2006, Iowa Dept. of Public Health.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Swimming Pools dataset, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2006. It is described as 'Swimming pools, licensed - name,...

  16. Development of Scaling Approach for Prediction of Terminal Spread Thickness of Melt Poured into a Pool of Water

    OpenAIRE

    Konovalenko, Alexander; Kudinov, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Corium melt stabilization and long term cooling in a pool of water located beneath reactor vessel is adopted in several existing designs of light water reactors (LWRs) as an element in severe accident (SA) mitigation strategy. At certain conditions of melt release into the pool (e.g. large ratio of the vessel breach size to the pool depth), liquid melt can spread under water and reach a coolable configuration. Coolability of the melt is contingent on terminal spread thickness of the melt laye...

  17. Dominant factors in controlling marine gas pools in South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, S.; Watney, W.L.

    2007-01-01

    In marine strata from Sinian to Middle Triassic in South China, there develop four sets of regional and six sets of local source rocks, and ten sets of reservoir rocks. The occurrence of four main formation periods in association with five main reconstruction periods, results in a secondary origin for the most marine gas pools in South China. To improve the understanding of marine gas pools in South China with severely deformed geological background, the dominant control factors are discussed in this paper. The fluid sources, including the gas cracked from crude oil, the gas dissolved in water, the gas of inorganic origin, hydrocarbons generated during the second phase, and the mixed pool fluid source, were the most significant control factors of the types and the development stage of pools. The period of the pool formation and the reconstruction controlled the pool evolution and the distribution on a regional scale. Owing to the multiple periods of the pool formation and the reconstruction, the distribution of marine gas pools was complex both in space and in time, and the gas in the pools is heterogeneous. Pool elements, such as preservation conditions, traps and migration paths, and reservoir rocks and facies, also served as important control factors to marine gas pools in South China. Especially, the preservation conditions played a key role in maintaining marine oil and gas accumulations on a regional or local scale. According to several dominant control factors of a pool, the pool-controlling model can be constructed. As an example, the pool-controlling model of Sinian gas pool in Weiyuan gas field in Sichuan basin was summed up. ?? Higher Education Press and Springer-Verlag 2007.

  18. Cold Pool and Surface Flux Interactions in Different Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, L. D.; van den Heever, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    Cold pools play important roles in tropical and midlatitude deep convective initiation and organization through their influence on near-surface kinematic and thermodynamic fields. Because temperature, moisture, and winds are perturbed within cold pools, cold pools can also impact surface sensible and latent heat fluxes. In turn, surface fluxes both within the cold pool and in the environment can modify the characteristics of cold pools and their evolution, with subsequent implications for convective initiation and organization. The two-way interaction between cold pools and surface energy fluxes has not been well studied and is likely to vary according to the environment and surface type. The goal of this study is therefore to investigate the mechanisms by which surface fluxes and cold pools interact in environmental conditions ranging from tropical oceanic to dry continental. This goal will be accomplished using high-resolution (grid spacings as fine as 10 m), idealized, 2D simulations of isolated cold pools; such modeling experiments have proven useful for investigating cold pools and their dynamics in many previous studies. In the proposed experiments, the surface flux formulation, surface type, and environmental conditions will be systematically varied. The impact of surface fluxes on various cold pool characteristics and their evolution, including the buoyancy, maximum vertical velocity, and moisture distribution, will be analyzed and presented. Results suggest that the mechanisms by which surface fluxes and cold pools interact vary substantially with the environment. Additionally, the indirect effects of surface fluxes on turbulent entrainment rates into the cold pool are found to play an important role in cold pool evolution. These results suggest that surface fluxes can impact the timing and manner in which cold pools initiate convection, and that their effects may be important to incorporate into cold pool parameterizations for climate simulations.

  19. Dominant factors in controlling marine gas pools in South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Sihuang; W.Lynn Watney

    2007-01-01

    In marine strata from Sinian to Middle Triassic in South China,there develop four sets of regional and six sets of local source rocks,and ten sets of reservoir rocks.The occurrence of four main formation periods in association with five main reconstruction periods,results in a secondary origin for the most marine gas pools in South China.To improve the understanding of marine gas pools in South China with severely deformed geological background,the dominant control factors are discussed in this paper.The fluid sources,including the gas cracked from crude oil,the gas dissolved in water,the gas of inorganic origin,hydrocarbons generated during the second phase,and the mixed pool fluid source,were the most significant control factors of the types and the development stage of pools.The period of the pool formation and the reconstruction controlled the pool evolution and the distribution on a regional scale.Owing to the multiple periods of the pool formation and the reconstruction,the distribution of marine gas pools was complex both in space and in time,and the gas in the pools is heterogeneous.Pool elements,such as preservation conditions,traps and migration paths,and reservoir rocks and facies,also served as important control factors to marine gas pools in South China.Especially,the preservation conditions played a key role in maintaining marine oil and gas accumulations on a regional or local scale.According to several dominant control factors of a pool,the pool-controlling model can be constructed.As an example,the pool-controlling model of Sinian gas pool in Weiyuan gas field in Sichuan basin was summed up.

  20. An introduction to mid-Atlantic seasonal pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L.J.; Jung, R.E.

    2005-01-01

    Seasonal pools, also known as vernal ponds, provide important ecological services to the mid-Atlantic region. This publication serves as an introduction to seasonal pool ecology and management; it also provides tools for exploring seasonal pools, including a full-color field guide to wildlife. Seasonal pools are defined as having four distinctive features: surface water isolation, periodic drying, small size and shallow depth, and support of a characteristic biological community. Seasonal pools experience regular drying that excludes populations of predatory fish. Thus, pools in the mid-Atlantic region provide critical breeding habitat for amphibian and invertebrate species (e.g., spotted salamander (Ambystoma maculatum), wood frog (Rana sylvatica), and fairy shrimp (Order Anostraca)) that would be at increased risk of predation in more permanent waters. The distinctive features of seasonal pools also make them vulnerable to human disturbance. In the mid-Atlantic region, land-use changes pose the greatest challenges to seasonal pool conservation. Seasonal pools are threatened by direct loss (e.g., filling or draining of the pool) as well as by destruction and fragmentation of adjoining terrestrial habitat. Many of the species that depend on seasonal pools for breeding spend the majority of their lives in the surrounding lands that extend a radius of 1000 feet or more from the pools; these vital habitats are being transected by roads and converted to other land uses. Other threats to seasonal pools include biological introductions and removals, mosquito control practices, amphibian diseases, atmospheric deposition, and climate change. The authors recommend a three-pronged strategy for seasonal pool conservation and management in the mid-Atlantic region: education and research, inventory and monitoring of seasonal pools, and landscape-level planning and management.

  1. Giant Poole-Frenkel effect for the shallow dislocation-related hole traps in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trushin, M; Kittler, M [Joint Lab IHP/BTU, Konrad-Wachsmann-Allee 1, 03046 Cottbus (Germany); Vyvenko, O; Vdovin, V, E-mail: vyvenko@gmail.com [V.A. Fok Institute of Physics, St. Petersburg State University, Ulyanovskaya 1, 198504 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2011-02-01

    The results of a theoretical calculation of the Pool-Frenkel effect due to the strain field of screw and 60{sup 0} dislocations upon the valence band in silicon, and of a detailed DLTS study of the electrical field impact on carrier emission from the dislocation-related states of two types of bonded samples are presented and discussed. A good agreement between the theory and experiment was established. It is concluded that the large Pool-Frenkel coefficient value that significantly exceeds the value for a Coulomb-like potential is a new distinguishing feature of the hole thermo-emission from dislocation-related levels in silicon.

  2. Pool boiling visualization on open microchannel surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaniowski Robert

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents visualization investigations into pool boiling heat transfer for open minichannel surfaces. The experiments were carried out wih saturated water at atmospheric pressure. Parallel microchannels fabricated by machining were about 0.3 mm wide and 0.2 to 0.4 mm deep. High-speed videos were used as an aid to understanding the heat transfer mechanism. The visualization study aimed at identifying nucleation sites of the departing bubbles and determining their diameters and frequency at various superheats.

  3. Subcooled pool boiling CHF in ethanol

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jongdoc; Fukuda, Katsuya; Liu, Qiusheng

    2006-01-01

    Steady-state and transient critical heat fluxes (CHFs) were measured using a 1.0 mm diameter horizontal cylinder in a pool of highly wetting liquid, such as ethanol, due to steady and transient heat generation rate for wide range of subcoolings and pressures. Boiling CHF was assumed to happen based on a kind of hydrodynamic instability (HI) at CHF, and the model is supposed that the increase in vapor generation from the cylinder surface causes a limit of the steady-state vapor escape flow whe...

  4. DNA methylation profiling using bisulfite-based epityping of pooled genomic DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docherty, Sophia J; Davis, Oliver S P; Haworth, Claire M A; Plomin, Robert; Mill, Jonathan

    2010-11-01

    DNA methylation plays a vital role in normal cellular function, with aberrant methylation signatures being implicated in a growing number of human pathologies and complex human traits. Methods based on the modification of genomic DNA with sodium bisulfite are considered the 'gold-standard' for DNA methylation profiling on genomic DNA; however they require large amounts of DNA and may be prohibitively expensive when used on the large sample sizes necessary to detect small effects. DNA pooling approaches are already widely used in large-scale studies of DNA sequence and gene expression. In this paper, we describe the application of this economical DNA pooling technique to the study of DNA methylation profiles. This method generates accurate quantitative assessments of group DNA methylation averages, reducing the time, cost and amount of DNA starting material required for large-scale epigenetic investigation of disease phenotypes.

  5. EDITORIAL: In vitro experiments with primary mammalian cells: To Pool or not to Pool?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MJ Stoddart

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available There are various strategies that can be adopted when performing in vitro experiments with primary cells such as mesenchymal stem cells. It is generally accepted that multiple donors need to be investigated to take into account donor to donor variability; this is especially critical when investigating primary human cells. However, increasingly it is being seen that studies are pooling the cells from multiple donors prior to performing the experiment. This has obvious advantages but also many disadvantages, the greatest being loss of statistical power. This loss of statistical power is the reason why the pooling of primary cells for experiments is not to be recommended.

  6. Weld pool vision sensing and image processing for GMAW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE Jianfeng; LI Liangyu; FAN Fanglei; WU Baolin

    2009-01-01

    It is difficult to acquire satisfied weld pool image by CCD sensor during gas metal arc welding(GMAW), for arc disturbs violently, welding current is great and working frequeacy is high. By using CMOS vision sensor to GMA W process, the vivid weld pool image is collected at any time, furthermore, whose gray compression ratio is controllable by sensor hardware circuit developed. Acquired weld pool image is firstly pre-processed by using Wiener filter and Ostu threshold segmentation algorithm. Subsequently separation between weld pool intage and cathode mist region is conducted by means of mathematical morphological algorithm, and the edge of weld pool image is extracted by using Prewitt algorithm.

  7. RECONSTRUCTION OF WELD POOL SURFACE BASED ON SHAPE FROM SHADING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Quanying; CHEN Shanben; LIN Tao

    2006-01-01

    A valid image-processing algorithm of weld pool surface reconstruction according to an input image of weld pool based on shape from shading (SFS) in computer vision is presented. The weld pool surface information is related to the backside weld width, which is crucial to the quality of weldjoint. The image of weld pool is recorded with an optical sensing method. Firstly, the reflectance map model, which specifies the imaging process, is estimated. Then, the algorithm of weld pool surface reconstruction based on SFS is implemented by iteration scheme and speeded by hierarchical structure. The results indicate the accuracy and effectiveness of the approach.

  8. THE CLIMATE FEATURES OF THE SOUTH CHINA SEA WARM POOL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    There exists a warm pool in the South China Sea (SCS). The temporal and spatial distribution and evolution of SCS warm pool is investigated using water temperatures at a depth of 20 m in the sea. The formation of the warm pool is discussed by combining water temperatures with geostrophic currents and simulated oceanic circulation. It is found that there are significant seasonal and interannual changes in the warm pool and in association with the general circulation of the atmosphere. The development of SCS warm pool is also closely related to the gyre activities in the sea and imported warm water from Indian Ocean (Java Sea) besides radiative warming.

  9. Nucleate pool boiling in microgravity: Recent progress and future prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, Catherine; Kannengieser, Olivier; Bergez, Wladimir; Lebon, Michel; Sebilleau, Julien; Sagan, Michaël; Tanguy, Sébastien

    2017-01-01

    Pool boiling on flat plates in microgravity has been studied for more than 50 years. The results of recent experiments performed in sounding rocket are presented and compared to previous results. At low heat flux, the vertical oscillatory motion of the primary bubble is responsible for the increase in the heat transfer coefficient in microgravity compared to ground experiments. The effect of a non-condensable gas on the stabilisation of the large primary bubble on the heater is pointed out. Experiments on isolated bubbles are also performed on ground and in parabolic flight. The effect of a shear flow on the bubble detachment is highlighted. A force balance model allows determining an expression of the capillary force and of the drag force acting on the bubble.

  10. Assessing pooled BAC and whole genome shotgun strategies for assembly of complex genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feltus F

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We investigate if pooling BAC clones and sequencing the pools can provide for more accurate assembly of genome sequences than the "whole genome shotgun" (WGS approach. Furthermore, we quantify this accuracy increase. We compare the pooled BAC and WGS approaches using in silico simulations. Standard measures of assembly quality focus on assembly size and fragmentation, which are desirable for large whole genome assemblies. We propose additional measures enabling easy and visual comparison of assembly quality, such as rearrangements and redundant sequence content, relative to the known target sequence. Results The best assembly quality scores were obtained using 454 coverage of 15× linear and 5× paired (3kb insert size reads (15L-5P on Arabidopsis. This regime gave similarly good results on four additional plant genomes of very different GC and repeat contents. BAC pooling improved assembly scores over WGS assembly, coverage and redundancy scores improving the most. Conclusions BAC pooling works better than WGS, however, both require a physical map to order the scaffolds. Pool sizes up to 12Mbp work well, suggesting this pooling density to be effective in medium-scale re-sequencing applications such as targeted sequencing of QTL intervals for candidate gene discovery. Assuming the current Roche/454 Titanium sequencing limitations, a 12 Mbp region could be re-sequenced with a full plate of linear reads and a half plate of paired-end reads, yielding 15L-5P coverage after read pre-processing. Our simulation suggests that massively over-sequencing may not improve accuracy. Our scoring measures can be used generally to evaluate and compare results of simulated genome assemblies.

  11. Nucleate Pool Boiling Experiments (NPBX) on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhir, Vijay Kumar; Warrier, Gopinath R.; Aktinol, Eduardo; Chao, David; Eggers, Jeffery; Sheredy, William; Booth, Wendell

    2012-11-01

    During the period of March-May 2011, a series of boiling experiments was carried out in the Boiling Experimental Facility (BXF) located in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) of the International Space Station (ISS). The BXF Facility was carried to ISS on Space Shuttle Mission STS-133 on February 24, 2011. Nucleate Pool Boiling Experiment (NPBX) was one of the two experiments housed in the BXF. Results of experiments on single bubble dynamics (e.g., inception and growth), multiple bubble dynamics (lateral merger and departure, if any), nucleate pool boiling heat transfer, and critical heat flux are described. In the experiments Perfluoro-n-hexane was used as the test liquid. The system pressure was varied from 51 to 243 kPa, pool temperature was varied from 30° to 59°C, and test surface temperature was varied from 40° to 80°C. The test surface was a polished aluminum disc (1 mm thick, 89.5 mm in diameter) heated from below with strain gage heaters. Five cylindrical cavities were formed on the surface with four cavities located at the corners of a square and one in the middle. During experiments the magnitude of mean gravity level normal to the heater surface varied from 1.2 × 10 - 7g e to 6 × 10 - 7g e . The results of the experiments show that a single bubble continues to grow to occupy the size of the chamber without departing from the heater surface. During lateral merger of bubbles, at high superheats a large bubble may lift off from the surface but continues to hover near the surface. Neighboring bubbles are continuously pulled into the large bubble. At low superheats bubbles at neighboring sites simply merge to yield a larger bubble. The larger bubble mostly locates in the middle of the heated surface and serves as a vapor sink. The latter mode continues to persist when boiling is occurring all over the heater surface. Heat fluxes for steady state nucleate boiling and critical heat fluxes are found to be much lower than those obtained under earth

  12. Plant diversity associated with pools in natural and restored peatlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Fontaine

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This study describes plant assemblages associated with the edges of peatland pools. We conducted inventories in six natural peatlands in the province of Québec (Canada in order to measure the contribution of pools to species diversity in climatic regions where peatlands are used for peat extraction. We also carried out vegetation surveys in a peatland that has been restored after peat extraction/harvesting to determine whether pool vegetation establishes along the edges of created pools when dry surface restoration techniques only are used. Pools enhanced plant species richness in natural peatlands. Around created pools, species associated with natural pools were still absent, and non-bog species were present, six years after restoration. On this basis, we emphasise the importance of preserving natural peatlands with pools. In order to restore fully the plant diversity associated with peatlands at harvested sites, it may be necessary to modify pool excavation techniques so that created pools resemble more closely those in natural peatlands. Active introduction of the plant species or communities associated with natural pools may also be needed; candidate species for North America include Andromeda glaucophylla, Cladopodiella fluitans, Carex limosa, Eriophorum virginicum, Rhynchospora alba and Sphagnum cuspidatum.

  13. Opportunities and challenges when pooling milk samples using ELISA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Græsbøll, Kaare; Andresen, Lars Ole; Hisham Beshara Halasa, Tariq

    2017-01-01

    to standard pooling. Their efficiency and the potential savings were determined as a function of prevalence and the number of pooled samples. The potential benefit of pooling samples is dependent upon the changes in the analytical sensitivity and specificity of the test used when diluting test......-positive samples by pooling. To illustrate this, the sensitivity of antibody ELISA on pooled samples of bovine milk for Salmonella Dublin, Mycobacterium avium spp. paratuberculosis, and bovine virus diarrhea was tested. For these milk assays, the analytical sensitivity decreased rapidly with increasing pool sizes...... of samples, the two-stage non-hierarchical test may be more efficient, both in terms of number of tests and overall cost. In order to apply these results in different laboratory settings, a free Shiny WebApp was developed, to compare several pooling schemes with different cost parameters....

  14. Design of inventory pools in spare part support operation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Daniel Y.; Tseng, Mitchell M.; Cheung, Raymond K.

    2014-06-01

    The objective of a spare part support operation is to fulfill the part request order with different service contracts in the agreed response time. With this objective to achieve different service targets for multiple service contracts and the considerations of inventory investment, it is not only important to determine the inventory policy but also to design the structure of inventory pools and the order fulfilment strategies. In this research, we focused on two types of inventory pools: multiple inventory pool (MIP) and consolidated inventory pool (CIP). The idea of MIP is to maintain separated inventory pools based on the types of service contract, while CIP solely maintains a single inventory pool regardless of service contract. Our research aims to design the inventory pool analytically and propose reserve strategies to manage the order fulfilment risks in CIP. Mathematical models and simulation experiments would be applied for analysis and evaluation.

  15. Vision detection of weld pool shape parameters and numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Youzhi; Liu, Nansheng; Wang, Yanfeng; Luo, Wei; Liu, Xiaorui

    2008-12-01

    An active vision sensing system which established by low power laser and common CCD is used to shoot GTAW welding pool images. Based on choose the appropriate LASER and filters, projected angle of laser and shoot angle of CCD, we avoid the disturbance of arc effectively and obtain clear images of the welding pool. The shape parameters of welding pool can obtain by demarcated and calculated. And then a three-dimentional numerical model of GTAW welding pool is established based on the theories of fluid dynamics and heat transfer. It considered the convection heat transfer of liquid metal and heat conduction of solid metal. And FLUENT software is used for simulate the GTAW welding pool. Extract the weld pool shape parameters and done comparative study with the vision detection of pool. This will be beneficial to avoid repeat experiments and improve work efficiency.

  16. Evolution of the pilot infrastructure of CMS: towards a single glideinWMS pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belforte, S. [Trieste U.; Gutsche, O. [Fermilab; Letts, J. [San Diego U.; Majewski, K. [Fermilab; McCrea, A. [San Diego U.; Sfiligoi, I. [San Diego U.

    2014-01-01

    CMS production and analysis job submission is based largely on glideinWMS and pilot submissions. The transition from multiple different submission solutions like gLite WMS and HTCondor-based implementations was carried out over years and is coming now to a conclusion. The historically explained separate glideinWMS pools for different types of production jobs and analysis jobs are being unified into a single global pool. This enables CMS to benefit from global prioritization and scheduling possibilities. It also presents the sites with only one kind of pilots and eliminates the need of having to make scheduling decisions on the CE level. This paper provides an analysis of the benefits of a unified resource pool, as well as a description of the resulting global policy. It will explain the technical challenges moving forward and present solutions to some of them.

  17. Evolution of the pilot infrastructure of CMS: towards a single glideinWMS pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belforte, S.; Gutsche, O.; Letts, J.; Majewski, K.; McCrea, A.; Sfiligoi, I.

    2014-06-01

    CMS production and analysis job submission is based largely on glideinWMS and pilot submissions. The transition from multiple different submission solutions like gLite WMS and HTCondor-based implementations was carried out over years and is coming now to a conclusion. The historically explained separate glideinWMS pools for different types of production jobs and analysis jobs are being unified into a single global pool. This enables CMS to benefit from global prioritization and scheduling possibilities. It also presents the sites with only one kind of pilots and eliminates the need of having to make scheduling decisions on the CE level. This paper provides an analysis of the benefits of a unified resource pool, as well as a description of the resulting global policy. It will explain the technical challenges moving forward and present solutions to some of them.

  18. Evolution of the pilot infrastructure of CMS towards a single glideinWMS pool

    CERN Document Server

    Gutsche, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    CMS production and analysis job submission is based largely on glideinWMS and pilot submissions. The transition from multiple different submission solutions like gLite WMS and HTCondor-based implementations was carried out over years and is coming now to a conclusion. The historically explained separate glideinWMS pools for different types of production jobs and analysis jobs are being unified into a single global pool. This enables CMS to benefit from global prioritization and scheduling possibilities. It also presents the sites with only one kind of pilots and eliminates the need of having to make scheduling decisions on the CE level. This paper provides an analysis of the benefits of a unified resource pool, as well as a description of the resulting global policy. It will explain the technical challenges moving forward and present solutions to some of them.

  19. Numerical study on onset of oscillatory thermocapillary flow in rectangular liquid pool

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Thermocapillary flow in a rectangular liquid pool of large Prandtl fluid(Pr=105.6) is numerically studied in microgravity.Oscillatory thermocapillary flow arises when the imposed temperature difference between the sidewalls exceeds a critical value.The fluctuations of the oscillatory flow,accompanied by the propagation of the hydrothermal wave from the cold sidewall to the hot one,are much smaller than the time-averaged velocity and temperature fields.The corresponding disturbance cells arise in the centre of the liquid pool initially,and extend to the whole region with the increasing imposed temperature difference.The present study reveals the different characteristics of the oscillatory themocapillary flow in the rectangular liquid pool as compared to the cases in other configurations.

  20. Molecular underpinnings of synaptic vesicle pool heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Devon C; Kavalali, Ege T

    2015-04-01

    Neuronal communication relies on chemical synaptic transmission for information transfer and processing. Chemical neurotransmission is initiated by synaptic vesicle fusion with the presynaptic active zone resulting in release of neurotransmitters. Classical models have assumed that all synaptic vesicles within a synapse have the same potential to fuse under different functional contexts. In this model, functional differences among synaptic vesicle populations are ascribed to their spatial distribution in the synapse with respect to the active zone. Emerging evidence suggests, however, that synaptic vesicles are not a homogenous population of organelles, and they possess intrinsic molecular differences and differential interaction partners. Recent studies have reported a diverse array of synaptic molecules that selectively regulate synaptic vesicles' ability to fuse synchronously and asynchronously in response to action potentials or spontaneously irrespective of action potentials. Here we discuss these molecular mediators of vesicle pool heterogeneity that are found on the synaptic vesicle membrane, on the presynaptic plasma membrane, or within the cytosol and consider some of the functional consequences of this diversity. This emerging molecular framework presents novel avenues to probe synaptic function and uncover how synaptic vesicle pools impact neuronal signaling.

  1. Visual attention and flexible normalization pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Odelia; Coen-Cagli, Ruben

    2013-01-01

    Attention to a spatial location or feature in a visual scene can modulate the responses of cortical neurons and affect perceptual biases in illusions. We add attention to a cortical model of spatial context based on a well-founded account of natural scene statistics. The cortical model amounts to a generalized form of divisive normalization, in which the surround is in the normalization pool of the center target only if they are considered statistically dependent. Here we propose that attention influences this computation by accentuating the neural unit activations at the attended location, and that the amount of attentional influence of the surround on the center thus depends on whether center and surround are deemed in the same normalization pool. The resulting form of model extends a recent divisive normalization model of attention (Reynolds & Heeger, 2009). We simulate cortical surround orientation experiments with attention and show that the flexible model is suitable for capturing additional data and makes nontrivial testable predictions. PMID:23345413

  2. Pool screen PCR for estimating the prevalence of Leishmania infantum infection in sandflies (Diptera: Nematocera, Phlebotomidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Sánchez, J; Gállego, M; Barón, S; Castillejo, S; Morillas-Marquez, F

    2006-06-01

    Prevalence studies of infection in the sandfly vector can be used as an indicator of a change in the intensity of Leishmania transmission. However, these studies are difficult to carry out as prevalence in the vector is usually low and its estimation requires a large number of sandflies to be dissected. Our objective was to establish whether a L. infantum-specific PCR-ELISA applied to pools of female sandflies and a previously described algorithm could be useful tools to study the prevalence of infection by this parasite in natural vector populations. We collected sandflies from six collection points in two stable foci of leishmaniasis in southern (N=3) and north-eastern (N=3) Spain, following standard procedures. A fraction of the collected females was dissected and morphologically identified. Another fraction was used for pool screening. In total, 127 pools of 30 females (3810 specimens) were studied by PCR-ELISA and 1764 specimens were individually dissected. The prevalence of infection determined by dissection does not differ from that determined by pool screen PCR. The results suggest that pool screen PCR can be of practical use in the epidemiological surveillance of leishmaniasis in European countries of the western Mediterranean basin, associated with control interventions or global change.

  3. Pooling designs with surprisingly high degree of error correction in a finite vector space

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Pooling designs are standard experimental tools in many biotechnical applications. It is well-known that all famous pooling designs are constructed from mathematical structures by the "containment matrix" method. In particular, Macula's designs (resp. Ngo and Du's designs) are constructed by the containment relation of subsets (resp. subspaces) in a finite set (resp. vector space). Recently, we generalized Macula's designs and obtained a family of pooling designs with more high degree of error correction by subsets in a finite set. In this paper, as a generalization of Ngo and Du's designs, we study the corresponding problems in a finite vector space and obtain a family of pooling designs with surprisingly high degree of error correction. Our designs and Ngo and Du's designs have the same number of items and pools, respectively, but the error-tolerant property is much better than that of Ngo and Du's designs, which was given by D'yachkov et al. \\cite{DF}, when the dimension of the space is large enough.

  4. Statistical Mutation Calling from Sequenced Overlapping DNA Pools in TILLING Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Comai Luca

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TILLING (Targeting induced local lesions IN genomes is an efficient reverse genetics approach for detecting induced mutations in pools of individuals. Combined with the high-throughput of next-generation sequencing technologies, and the resolving power of overlapping pool design, TILLING provides an efficient and economical platform for functional genomics across thousands of organisms. Results We propose a probabilistic method for calling TILLING-induced mutations, and their carriers, from high throughput sequencing data of overlapping population pools, where each individual occurs in two pools. We assign a probability score to each sequence position by applying Bayes' Theorem to a simplified binomial model of sequencing error and expected mutations, taking into account the coverage level. We test the performance of our method on variable quality, high-throughput sequences from wheat and rice mutagenized populations. Conclusions We show that our method effectively discovers mutations in large populations with sensitivity of 92.5% and specificity of 99.8%. It also outperforms existing SNP detection methods in detecting real mutations, especially at higher levels of coverage variability across sequenced pools, and in lower quality short reads sequence data. The implementation of our method is available from: http://www.cs.ucdavis.edu/filkov/CAMBa/.

  5. A high-fidelity approach towards heat transfer prediction of pool boiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Miad; Alahyari, Abbas; Radcliff, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    A novel numerical approach is developed to simulate the multiscale problem of pool-boiling phase change with an unprecedented fidelity and cost. The particular focus is to predict the heat transfer coefficient of pool-boiling regime and its transition to critical heat flux on surfaces of arbitrary shape and roughness distribution. The large-scale of the phase change and bubble dynamics is addressed through employing off-the-shelf methods for interface tracking and interphase mass and energy transfer. The small-scale of the microlayer which forms at early stage of bubble nucleation is resolved through asymptotic approximation of the thin-film theory which provides a closed-form solution for the distribution of the micro-layer and its influence on the evaporation process. In addition, the surface roughness and its role in bubble nucleation and growth is represented based on thermodynamics of nucleation process which allows the simulation of pool boiling on any surface with known roughness and enhancement characteristics. The numerical model is validated for dynamics and hydrothermal characteristics of a single nucleated bubble on a flat surface against available literature data. In addition, the model's prediction of pool-boiling heat transfer coefficient is verified against reputable correlations for various roughness distributions and different surface alignment. Finally, the model is employed to demonstrate pool-boiling phenomenon on enhanced structures with reentrance cavities and to explore the effect of enhancement features on thermal and hydrodynamic characteristics of these surfaces.

  6. Bacterial community structure and dissolved organic matter in repeatedly flooded subsurface karst water pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabarova, Tanja; Villiger, Jörg; Morenkov, Oleg; Niggemann, Jutta; Dittmar, Thorsten; Pernthaler, Jakob

    2014-07-01

    Bacterial diversity, community assembly, and the composition of the dissolved organic matter (DOM) were studied in three temporary subsurface karst pools with different flooding regimes. We tested the hypothesis that microorganisms introduced to the pools during floods faced environmental filtering toward a 'typical' karst water community, and we investigated whether DOM composition was related to floodings and the residence time of water in stagnant pools. As predicted, longer water residence consistently led to a decline of bacterial diversity. The microbial assemblages in the influx water harbored more 'exotic' lineages with large distances to known genotypes, yet these initial communities already appeared to be shaped by selective processes. β-Proteobacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) closely related to microbes from subsurface or surface aquatic environments were mainly responsible for the clustering of samples according to water residence time in the pools. By contrast, several Cytophagaceae and Flavobacteriaceae OTUs were related to different floodings, which were also the main determinants of DOM composition. A subset of compounds distinguishable by molecular mass and O/C content were characteristic for individual floods. Moreover, there was a transformation of DOM in stagnant pools toward smaller and more aromatic compounds, potentially also reflecting microbial utilization. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Volatile disinfection byproducts resulting from chlorination of uric acid: implications for swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Lushi; E, Yue; Li, Jing; Blatchley, Ernest R

    2014-03-18

    Cyanogen chloride (CNCl) and trichloramine (NCl3) are important disinfection byproducts in chlorinated swimming pools. However, some unknowns exist regarding the precursors of their formation. In this study, uric acid is shown to be an efficient precursor to formation of CNCl and NCl3. The molar yields of CNCl and NCl3 were observed to be as high as 44% (pH = 6.0, chlorine/precursor molar ratio [Cl/P] = 6.4) and 108% (pH = 7.0, Cl/P = 30), respectively, both being strong functions of Cl/P, pH, and temperature. Analysis of swimming pool water samples, combined with the results of experiments involving chlorination of uric acid, and chlorination of body fluid analog mixtures, indicated that uric acid chlorination may account for a large fraction of CNCl formation in swimming pools. Moreover, given that uric acid introduction to pools is attributable to urination, a voluntary action for most swimmers, these findings indicate important benefits to pool water and air chemistry that could result from improved hygiene habits on the part of swimmers.

  8. Expanding the live kidney donor pool: ethical considerations regarding altruistic donors, paired and pooled programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shaneel Rajendra; Chadha, Priyanka; Papalois, Vassilios

    2011-06-01

    In renal transplant, there is a well-known deficiency in organ supply relative to demand. Live donation provides superior results when compared with deceased donation including a better rate of graft success and fewer immunologic complications. This deficiency in organs leads to significant morbidity and mortality rates. Alternative avenues have been extensively explored that may expand the live donor pool. They include altruistic donation as well as paired and pooled exchange programs. Altruistic donation is a truly selfless act from a donor unknown to the recipient. Kidney paired donation involves 2 incompatible donor-recipient pairs swapping donors to produce compatibility. Pooled donation involves at least 2 pairs, and can take the form of domino chains in which altruistic input sets up a chain of transplants, in which each recipient's incompatible donor makes a donation for the next recipient. Despite application of these various methods, there lie extensive ethical issues surrounding them. Misconceptions frequently occur; for instance, the perceived benefit that donating an organ to a loved one is greater for a related donor than for an altruistic one. Additionally, it is frequently believed that immunologic incompatibility offers coerced donors liberation from surgery, and that overcoming these barriers by introducing exchange programs provides vulnerable donors less protection. This article explores these and other complex ethical issues surrounding the various methods of expanding the donor pool. The authors offer opinions that challenge the ethical issues and attempt to overcome those views that hinder progress in the field.

  9. To pool or not to pool? Impact of the use of individual and pooled fecal samples for in vitro fermentation studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aguirre, M.; Ramiro Garcia, J.; Koenen, M.E.; Venema, K.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the stability and the activity of the microbiota from a single and a pool of donors in the TNO in vitro model of the colon (TIM-2 system). Our findings demonstrate the suitability of the preparation of a pool of fecal sample to be used for fermentation experiments.

  10. To pool or not to pool? Impact of the use of individual and pooled fecal samples for in vitro fermentation studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aguirre, M.; Ramiro-Garcia, J.; Koenen, M.E.; Venema, K.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the stability and the activity of the microbiota from a single and a pool of donors in the TNO in vitro model of the colon (TIM-2 system). Our findings demonstrate the suitability of the preparation of a pool of fecal sample to be used for fermentation experiments. Chemicals/

  11. Statistical implications of pooling RNA samples for microarray experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landfield Philip W

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray technology has become a very important tool for studying gene expression profiles under various conditions. Biologists often pool RNA samples extracted from different subjects onto a single microarray chip to help defray the cost of microarray experiments as well as to correct for the technical difficulty in getting sufficient RNA from a single subject. However, the statistical, technical and financial implications of pooling have not been explicitly investigated. Results Modeling the resulting gene expression from sample pooling as a mixture of individual responses, we derived expressions for the experimental error and provided both upper and lower bounds for its value in terms of the variability among individuals and the number of RNA samples pooled. Using "virtual" pooling of data from real experiments and computer simulations, we investigated the statistical properties of RNA sample pooling. Our study reveals that pooling biological samples appropriately is statistically valid and efficient for microarray experiments. Furthermore, optimal pooling design(s can be found to meet statistical requirements while minimizing total cost. Conclusions Appropriate RNA pooling can provide equivalent power and improve efficiency and cost-effectiveness for microarray experiments with a modest increase in total number of subjects. Pooling schemes in terms of replicates of subjects and arrays can be compared before experiments are conducted.

  12. The flexible gene pool of Propionibacterium acnes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brüggemann, Holger; Lomholt, Hans B; Kilian, Mogens

    2012-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is a Gram-positive bacterium that is intimately associated with humans. The nature and consequences of this symbiosis are poorly understood; it might comprise both mutualistic and parasitic properties. Recent advances in distinguishing phylotypes of P. acnes have revealed...... that certain type I lineages are predominantly associated with acne vulgaris. Genome analyses revealed a highly conserved core genome and the existence of island-like genomic regions and possible mobile genetic elements as part of the flexible gene pool. The analysis of clustered regularly interspaced short...... palindromic repeats (CRISPR), found exclusively in type II P. acnes, recently revealed the presence of CRISPR spacers that derived from mobile genetic elements. These elements are present in a subset of P. acnes type I lineages. Their significance for type-specific host-interacting properties...

  13. One knowledge base or many knowledge pools?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundvall, Bengt-Åke

    It is increasingly realized that knowledge is the most important resource and that learning is the most important process in the economy. Sometimes this is expressed by coining the current era as characterised by a ‘knowledge based economy'. But this concept might be misleading by indicating...... that there is one common knowledge base on which economic activities can be built. In this paper we argue that it is more appropriate to see the economy as connecting to different ‘pools of knowledge'. The argument is built upon a conceptual framework where we make distinctions between private/public, local....../global, individual/collective and tacit/codified knowledge. The purpose is both ‘academic' and practical. Our analysis demonstrates the limits of a narrowly economic perspective on knowledge and we show that these distinctions have important implications both for innovation policy and for management of innovation....

  14. Drop Impact on to Moving Liquid Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Sánchez, Beatriz Natividad; Castrejón-Pita, José Rafael; Castrejón-Pita, Alfonso Arturo; Hutchings, Ian M.

    2014-11-01

    The deposition of droplets on to moving liquid substrates is an omnipresent situation both in nature and industry. A diverse spectrum of phenomena emerges from this simple process. In this work we present a parametric experimental study that discerns the dynamics of the impact in terms of the physical properties of the fluid and the relative velocity between the impacting drop and the moving liquid pool. The behaviour ranges from smooth coalescence (characterized by little mixing) to violent splashing (generation of multiple satellite droplets and interfacial vorticity). In addition, transitional regimes such as bouncing and surfing are also found. We classify the system dynamics and show a parametric diagram for the conditions of each regime. This work was supported by the EPSRC (Grant EP/H018913/1), the Royal Society, Becas Santander Universidades and the International Relationships Office of the University of Extremadura.

  15. Pool Boiling Heat Transfer on structured Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addy, J.; Olbricht, M.; Müller, B.; Luke, A.

    2016-09-01

    The development in the process and energy sector shows the importance of efficient utilization of available resources to improve thermal devices. To achieve this goal, all thermal components have to be optimized continuously. Various applications of multi-phase heat and mass transfer have to be improved. Therefore, the heat transfer and the influence of surface roughness in nucleate boiling with the working fluid propane is experimentally investigated on structured mild steel tubes, because only few data are available in the literature. The mild steel tube is sandblasted to obtain different surface roughness. The measurements are carried out over wide ranges of heat flux and pressure. The experimental results are compared with correlations from literature and the effect of surface roughness on the heat transfer is discussed. It is shown that the heat transfer coefficient increases with increasing surface roughness, heat flux and reduced pressure at nucleate pool boiling.

  16. High Velocity Droplet Rebound On Liquid Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doak, William; Laiacona, Danielle; Chiarot, Paul; German, Guy

    2015-11-01

    Rebound of high velocity, periodic droplet streams off viscous liquid pools is studied experimentally. Droplets, approximately 60 micrometers in diameter, impact the oil surface at velocities up to 13 m/s and at angles between 2-25 degrees. The oil surface does not degrade or lose its ability to provide rebound even after millions of droplet impacts. The oil was varied to examine the effect that surface tension and viscosity had on droplet rebound. Stable rebound is achievable on oils varying in dynamic viscosity in the range 13-970 Pa.s and surface tensions in the range 19-28 mN/m. When rebound occurs, a consistent 29% loss of droplet kinetic energy is observed. This is a surprising relationship due to the fact that it holds true for all cases of stable rebound regardless of the oil used. We further observe an upper inertial limit where droplets no longer provide stable rebound and instead become fully entrained in the oil pool. This limit is governed by the Rayleigh-Plateau instability and can be characterized and predicted using a modified version of the Weber number. The droplet rebound presented in this study is unique due to the size, velocity, and frequency of the droplets used. Another unique feature is that the rebound manifests itself as an effectively static phenomenon. No motion of the interface - oscillations, waves, or otherwise - was observed during rebound. The quasi-static nature of rebound enabled distinctions to be made regarding energy dissipation and the transition from droplet rebound to entrainment.

  17. Monoterpene emissions from boreal tree species: Determination of de novo and pool emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghirardo, Andrea; Koch, Kristine; Taipale, Risto; Zimmer, Ina; Schnitzler, Joerg-Peter; Rinne, Janne

    2010-05-01

    Boreal forests emit a large amount of monoterpenes into the atmosphere. Traditionally these emissions are assumed to originate as evaporation from large storage pools. Thus their diurnal cycle would depend mostly on temperature. However, there is indication that a significant part of the monoterpene emission would originate directly from de novo synthesis. By applying 13CO2 fumigation and analyzing the isotope fractions with proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and classical GC-MS we studied the origin of monoterpene emissions from some major Eurasian boreal and alpine tree species. We determined the fractions originating from de novo biosynthesis and from large internal monoterpene storages for three coniferous tree species with specialized monoterpene storage structures and one dicotyledon species without such structures. The emission from dicotyledon species Betula pendula originated solely from the de novo synthesis. The origin of the emissions from coniferous species was mixed with varying fraction originating from de novo synthesis (Pinus sylvestris 58 %, Picea abies 33.5 %, Larix decidua 9.8 %) and the rest from large internal monoterpene storage pools. We have also measured the ecosystem scale monoterpene emission fluxes from a boreal Pinus sylvestris forest by disjunct eddy covariance technique. Application of the observed fraction of emission originating from de novo synthesis and large storage pools in a hybrid emission algorithm resulted in a better description of ecosystem scale monoterpene emissions, as compared to the measured fluxes.

  18. Mixed convection and stratification phenomena in a heavy liquid metal pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarantino, Mariano, E-mail: mariano.tarantino@enea.it [Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development, C.R. ENEA Brasimone (Italy); Martelli, Daniele; Barone, Gianluca [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile e Industriale, University of Pisa, Largo Lucio Lazzarino, 1-56100 Pisa Italy (Italy); Di Piazza, Ivan [Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development, C.R. ENEA Brasimone (Italy); Forgione, Nicola [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile e Industriale, University of Pisa, Largo Lucio Lazzarino, 1-56100 Pisa Italy (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Results related to experiments reproducing PLOHS + LOF accident in CIRCE pool facility. • Vertical thermal stratification in large HLM pool. • Transition from forced to natural circulation in HLM pool under DHR conditions. • Heat transfer coefficient measurement in HLM pin bundle. • Nusselt numbers calculations and comparison with correlations. - Abstract: This work deals with an analysis of the first experimental series of tests performed to investigate mixed convection and stratification phenomena in CIRCE HLM large pool. In particular, the tests concern the transition from nominal flow to natural circulation regime, typical of decay heat removal (DHR) regime. To this purpose the CIRCE pool facility has been updated to host a suitable test section in order to reproduce the thermal-hydraulic behaviour of a HLM pool-type reactor. The test section basically consists of an electrical bundle (FPS) made up of 37 pins arranged in a hexagonal wrapped lattice with a pitch diameter ratio of 1.8. Along the FPS active length, three sections were instrumented to monitor the heat transfer coefficient along the bundle as well as the cladding temperatures at different ranks of the sub-channels. This paper reports the experimental data as well as a preliminary analysis and discussion of the results, focusing on the most relevant tests of the campaign, namely Test I (48 h) and Test II (97 h). Temperatures along three sections of the FPS and at inlet and outlet sections of the main components were reported and the Nusselt number in the FPS sub-channels was investigated together with the void fraction in the riser. Concerning the investigation of in-pool thermal stratification phenomena, the temperatures in the whole LBE pool were monitored at different elevations and radial locations. The analysis of experimental data obtained from Tests I and II underline the occurrence of thermal stratification phenomena in the region placed between the outlet sections of

  19. Estimates of array and pool-construction variance for planning efficient DNA-pooling genome wide association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Earp Madalene A

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Until recently, genome-wide association studies (GWAS have been restricted to research groups with the budget necessary to genotype hundreds, if not thousands, of samples. Replacing individual genotyping with genotyping of DNA pools in Phase I of a GWAS has proven successful, and dramatically altered the financial feasibility of this approach. When conducting a pool-based GWAS, how well SNP allele frequency is estimated from a DNA pool will influence a study's power to detect associations. Here we address how to control the variance in allele frequency estimation when DNAs are pooled, and how to plan and conduct the most efficient well-powered pool-based GWAS. Methods By examining the variation in allele frequency estimation on SNP arrays between and within DNA pools we determine how array variance [var(earray] and pool-construction variance [var(econstruction] contribute to the total variance of allele frequency estimation. This information is useful in deciding whether replicate arrays or replicate pools are most useful in reducing variance. Our analysis is based on 27 DNA pools ranging in size from 74 to 446 individual samples, genotyped on a collective total of 128 Illumina beadarrays: 24 1M-Single, 32 1M-Duo, and 72 660-Quad. Results For all three Illumina SNP array types our estimates of var(earray were similar, between 3-4 × 10-4 for normalized data. Var(econstruction accounted for between 20-40% of pooling variance across 27 pools in normalized data. Conclusions We conclude that relative to var(earray, var(econstruction is of less importance in reducing the variance in allele frequency estimation from DNA pools; however, our data suggests that on average it may be more important than previously thought. We have prepared a simple online tool, PoolingPlanner (available at http://www.kchew.ca/PoolingPlanner/, which calculates the effective sample size (ESS of a DNA pool given a range of replicate array values. ESS can

  20. Sharing as risk pooling in a social dilemma experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd L. Cherry

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In rural economies with missing or incomplete markets, idiosyncratic risk is frequently pooled through informal networks. Idiosyncratic shocks, however, are not limited to private goods but can also restrict an individual from partaking in or benefiting from a collective activity. In these situations, a group must decide whether to provide insurance to the affected member. We describe results of a laboratory experiment designed to test whether a simple sharing institution can sustain risk pooling in a social dilemma with idiosyncratic risk. We tested whether risk could be pooled without a commitment device and, separately, whether effective risk pooling induced greater cooperation in the social dilemma. We found that even in the absence of a commitment device or reputational considerations, subjects voluntarily pooled risk, thereby reducing variance in individual earnings. In spite of effective risk pooling, however, cooperation in the social dilemma was unaffected.

  1. Load balancing in distributed framework for frequency based thread pools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheraz Ahmad

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The consequence of load balancing algorithms on a thread pool framework name is distributed load balancing frequency based optimization scheme (LDFBOS to increase its execution. Load balancing in distributed frequency based thread pool scheme is residential towards the ground of synchronizing overhead crude named LDFBOS in Java that slows down its execution due to framework exchange and synchronizing overhead in nodes, we are demonstrating the contrive and execution of load balancing in distributed frequency based thread pool LDFBOS to does usage from distributed in frequency based thread pool (DFBOS, synchronizing primitives that propose benefits of significant scalable moreover, dynamism. We have got resembled the execution of some schemes by Thread Pool Tester which is a Java application simulator and the consequence have demonstrated that load balancing in distributed frequency based thread pool LDFBOS exceeds preceding DFBOS scheme.

  2. The Kallisti Limnes, carbon dioxide-accumulating subsea pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Natural CO2 releases from shallow marine hydrothermal vents are assumed to mix into the water column, and not accumulate into stratified seafloor pools. We present newly discovered shallow subsea pools located within the Santorini volcanic caldera of the Southern Aegean Sea, Greece, that accumulate CO2 emissions from geologic reservoirs. This type of hydrothermal seafloor pool, containing highly concentrated CO2, provides direct evidence of shallow benthic CO2 accumulations originating from sub-seafloor releases. Samples taken from within these acidic pools are devoid of calcifying organisms, and channel structures among the pools indicate gravity driven flow, suggesting that seafloor release of CO2 at this site may preferentially impact benthic ecosystems. These naturally occurring seafloor pools may provide a diagnostic indicator of incipient volcanic activity and can serve as an analog for studying CO2 leakage and benthic accumulations from subsea carbon capture and storage sites.

  3. Aircraft observations of cold pools under marine stratocumulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Terai

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Although typically associated with precipitating cumuli, cold pools also form under shallower stratocumulus. The NSF/NCAR C-130 made cloud and boundary layer measurements over the southeast Pacific stratocumulus region at an altitude of approximately 150 m during the VOCALS Regional Experiment. Ninety edges of cold pools are found in the C-130 measurements by identifying step-like decreases in the potential temperature. Examination of their mesoscale environment shows that the observed cold pools tend to form under heavier precipitation, thicker clouds, and in cleaner environments. Cold pools are also found to form under clouds with high LWP values over the night of or before sampling. When they form, cold pools often form in clusters or on top of each other, rather than as separate, individual entities. Their sizes range from 2 km to 16 km (middle 50th percentile, where the largest of cold pools are associated with the greatest drops in temperature. Composites of various observed thermodynamic and chemical variables along the cold pool edges indicate increased humidity, equivalent potential temperature, coarse-mode aerosol, and dimethyl sulfide concentration inside cold pools. The enhancements inside cold pools are consistent with increased static stability that traps fluxes from the ocean surface in the lowest levels of the boundary layer. By using pressure perturbations, the average cold pool is estimated to be approximately 300 m deep. The temperature depression in cold pools leads to density-driven flows that drive convergence of horizontal winds and measurable, mechanically-driven vertical wind velocity at the edges of cold pools.

  4. Thermohydraulics of LMFBR core catchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turland, B. D.

    Characterization of the likely form of fuel debris after an accident, following interaction with sodium in the primary vessel and mechanisms controlling the location of the debris in the primary system is discussed. Heat transfer from particulate to liquid sodium and the development of models predicting the amount of debris that may be retained in a coolable form on a structure are considered. The evaluation of the coolability of the structure itself in post accident conditions, particularly the cooling provided by natural convection alone is treated. The response of structures at elevated temperatures and under high thermal loads is considered. The potential for vessel failure if significant quantities of debris accumulate at the bottom of the vessel is shown. The performance of a flat plate core catcher, or similar structure with good cooling from underneath is evaluated.

  5. Reactor vessel support system. [LMFBR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, M.P.; Holley, J.C.

    1980-05-09

    A reactor vessel support system includes a support ring at the reactor top supported through a box ring on a ledge of the reactor containment. The box ring includes an annular space in the center of its cross-section to reduce heat flow and is keyed to the support ledge to transmit seismic forces from the reactor vessel to the containment structure. A coolant channel is provided at the outside circumference of the support ring to supply coolant gas through the keyways to channels between the reactor vessel and support ledge into the containment space.

  6. TNO contribution to LMFBR development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1973-01-01

    As TNO started work on the use of sodium as a coolant more than ten years ago, and as our latest status report was presented some five years ago, it seemed appropriate to show you once more the status of our work.

  7. A deeper look at the relationship between root carbon pools and the vertical distribution of the soil carbon pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Dietzel

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant root material makes a substantial contribution to the soil organic carbon (C pool, but this contribution is disproportionate below 20 cm where 30 % of root mass and 50 % of soil organic C is found. Root carbon inputs changed drastically when native perennial plant systems were shifted to cultivated annual plant systems. We used the reconstruction of a native prairie and a continuous maize field to examine both the relationship between root carbon and soil carbon and the fundamental rooting system differences between the vegetation under which the soils developed versus the vegetation under which the soils continue to change. In all treatments we found that root C  :  N ratios increased with depth, and this plays a role in why an unexpectedly large proportion of soil organic C is found below 20 cm. Measured root C  :  N ratios and turnover times along with modeled root turnover dynamics showed that in the historical shift from prairie to maize, a large, structural-tissue-dominated root C pool with slow turnover concentrated at shallow depths was replaced by a small, nonstructural-tissue-dominated root C pool with fast turnover evenly distributed in the soil profile. These differences in rooting systems suggest that while prairie roots contribute more C to the soil than maize at shallow depths, maize may contribute more C to soil C stocks than prairies at deeper depths.

  8. Fluid-structure interaction analysis of a water pool under loading caused by steam injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timperi, A.; Paettikangas, T.; Niemi, J.; Ilvonen, M. [VTT Technical Researc Centre of Finland (Finland)

    2006-04-15

    CFD and structural analysis codes. MpCCI 3.0 was used for coupling Fluent CFD code with ABAQUS FE code. ES-FSI was used for coupling Star-CD CFD code with ABAQUS. FSI analyses, in which the calculation was carried out entirely in ABAQUS, were also performed. In this case, acoustic elements were used for the fluid and the acoustic and structural domains were coupled. FSI calculations were performed for simple test cases and for a test pool at Lappeenranta University of Technology. The Method of Images was studied as an alternative method for the analyses of the pool. Particularly, the determination of pressure source for the method was studied. Earlier work carried out with the homogenous two-phase model was continued by testing the model with Fluent. Calculation of condensation of steam in a water pool was tested with a new implementation. The two-directionally coupled simulations of the pool with MpCCI and ES-FSI were found to be numerically instable. It was concluded that an implicit coupling method may have to be used in order to avoid the instability. Calculations of the pool were finally performed by using one directional coupling. In the simulations with MpCCI, the incompressible and compressible VOF models of Fluent were used. With ES-FSI, the incompressible VOF model of Star-CD was used for modelling the beginning of a steam injection experiment. The magnitudes of pressure and stress peaks in the simulation and experiment were of comparable size. Otherwise, however, differences between the simulation and experiment were large due to the simplifications used in the simulation. Results obtained with the acoustic-structural FE analyses were compared to analytical and experimental results. The results indicated that the coupled acoustic-structural analysis can be used for calculating the coupled Eigenmodes of BWR pressure suppression pools. (au)

  9. ViPAR: a software platform for the Virtual Pooling and Analysis of Research Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Kim W; Francis, Richard W; Carter, K W; Francis, R W; Bresnahan, M; Gissler, M; Grønborg, T K; Gross, R; Gunnes, N; Hammond, G; Hornig, M; Hultman, C M; Huttunen, J; Langridge, A; Leonard, H; Newman, S; Parner, E T; Petersson, G; Reichenberg, A; Sandin, S; Schendel, D E; Schalkwyk, L; Sourander, A; Steadman, C; Stoltenberg, C; Suominen, A; Surén, P; Susser, E; Sylvester Vethanayagam, A; Yusof, Z

    2015-10-08

    Research studies exploring the determinants of disease require sufficient statistical power to detect meaningful effects. Sample size is often increased through centralized pooling of disparately located datasets, though ethical, privacy and data ownership issues can often hamper this process. Methods that facilitate the sharing of research data that are sympathetic with these issues and which allow flexible and detailed statistical analyses are therefore in critical need. We have created a software platform for the Virtual Pooling and Analysis of Research data (ViPAR), which employs free and open source methods to provide researchers with a web-based platform to analyse datasets housed in disparate locations. Database federation permits controlled access to remotely located datasets from a central location. The Secure Shell protocol allows data to be securely exchanged between devices over an insecure network. ViPAR combines these free technologies into a solution that facilitates 'virtual pooling' where data can be temporarily pooled into computer memory and made available for analysis without the need for permanent central storage. Within the ViPAR infrastructure, remote sites manage their own harmonized research dataset in a database hosted at their site, while a central server hosts the data federation component and a secure analysis portal. When an analysis is initiated, requested data are retrieved from each remote site and virtually pooled at the central site. The data are then analysed by statistical software and, on completion, results of the analysis are returned to the user and the virtually pooled data are removed from memory. ViPAR is a secure, flexible and powerful analysis platform built on open source technology that is currently in use by large international consortia, and is made publicly available at [http://bioinformatics.childhealthresearch.org.au/software/vipar/]. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the

  10. Application of pooled genotyping to scan candidate regions for association with HDL cholesterol levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinds David A

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Association studies are used to identify genetic determinants of complex human traits of medical interest. With the large number of validated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs currently available, two limiting factors in association studies are genotyping capability and costs. Pooled DNA genotyping has been proposed as an efficient means of screening SNPs for allele frequency differences in case-control studies and for prioritising them for subsequent individual genotyping analysis. Here, we apply quantitative pooled genotyping followed by individual genotyping and replication to identify associations with human serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol levels. The DNA from individuals with low and high HDL cholesterol levels was pooled separately, each pool was amplified by polymerase chain reaction in triplicate and each amplified product was separately hybridised to a high-density oligonucleotide array. Allele frequency differences between case and control groups with low and high HDL cholesterol levels were estimated for 7,283 SNPs distributed across 71 candidate gene regions spanning a total of 17.1 megabases. A novel method was developed to take advantage of independently derived haplotype map information to improve the pooled estimates of allele frequency differences. A subset of SNPs with the largest estimated allele frequency differences between low and high HDL cholesterol groups was chosen for individual genotyping in the study population, as well as in a separate replication population. Four SNPs in a single haplotype block within the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP gene interval were significantly associated with HDL cholesterol levels in both populations. Our study is among the first to demonstrate the application of pooled genotyping followed by confirmation with individual genotyping to identify genetic determinants of a complex trait.

  11. DNA--a molecule in search of additional functions: recipient of pool wave emissions? A hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerfler, Walter

    2010-09-01

    Almost the entire nucleotide sequence of human DNA is functionally unaccounted for, although large parts of the human genome are transcribed. The genes, as defined by current molecular biology, comprise about 1.5-2% of the DNA molecule. It is proposed that DNA encodes additional, hitherto unrecognized functions. In this discussion, the total information inside and outside the universe we live in is termed the pool or the sum total, known or unknown, of all laws, matter, energy, concepts and events. In a hypothetical model, a Gedankenexperiment, it is suggested that the total of all information emits pool waves of an unknown physical nature. They could be related to black energy or have completely different qualities. The designation pool waves should not imply any similarity to electromagnetism. Further, DNA is suggested to have the capability of interacting with the pool waves and thus permit humans - to some partly genetically determined and yet very limited extent - to perceive information from the pool. Pool emissions might be one of the forces that have been instrumental in and are still driving evolution from simple oligonucleotides to DNA with ever more complex recipient capacities. It will be a major challenge for researchers in the field to unravel these and less hypothetical undetected coding principles in DNA. It is uncertain whether the current trend to search the available DNA sequences with ever more refined computer technology on the basis of our present understanding of biology will detect unknown coding systems. For molecular medicine, research into the genetics of the most common human diseases could profit from the elucidation of presently still ephemeral codes in human DNA. Young scientists with a proven record of original research deserve support for the pursuit of unconventional ideas. This concept of granting priorities will be of the utmost importance in advancing the field beyond current concepts in molecular biology.

  12. Estimation of retention factor of cesium in sodium pool under fuel pin failure scenario in SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradeep, Arjun [Computational Simulation Section, Safety Engineering Division, Nuclear and Safety Engineering Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Rao, P. Mangarjuna, E-mail: pmr@igcar.gov.in [Computational Simulation Section, Safety Engineering Division, Nuclear and Safety Engineering Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Nashine, B.K.; Chellapandi, P. [Computational Simulation Section, Safety Engineering Division, Nuclear and Safety Engineering Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model retention factor of cesium in infinite dilute solution of sodium pool. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study variation in retention factor with cover gas temperature gradient. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increasing height and temperature difference decreases the retention factor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In infinite dilution regime retention factor is independent of cesium inventory. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The retention factor is useful in estimating source term in cover gas region. - Abstract: Radioactive source term in argon (Ar) cover gas region of the primary vessel due to cesium (Cs) leaked from the failed fuel pins into the primary coolant of Sodium cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) depends on its thermodynamic and kinetic behavior with the coolant sodium. Evaluation of this source term requires detailed knowledge on the distribution of Cs between large volume of the liquid sodium, and the inert Ar cover gas. Solute-solvent combination like liquid Cs and sodium, with relative volatility greater than unity, is an important system to be analyzed in the context of SFR safety. Distribution of Cs between Ar cover gas and liquid sodium pool is complicated by the imposition of temperature difference across the cover gas region and its resultant enrichment of the more volatile solute. An analytical model has been developed to obtain the geometry dependent Retention Factor (RF) of Cs in the sodium pool as a function of the height of cover gas, initial mass inventory of Cs, the temperature difference across the cover gas region (between the sodium pool surface and top roof bottom plate) for an infinite dilute solution of Cs in the sodium pool. The model predicted results are validated with available experimental results in the literature and found that they are fairly in good agreement. In the infinite dilute solution (IDS) regime sodium pool is having the retention capacity to keep the Cs from being released into

  13. Insights into soil carbon dynamics across climatic gradients from carbon-pool specific radiocarbon analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Voort, Tessa Sophia; Hagedorn, Frank; McIntyre, Cameron; Zell, Claudia; Eglinton, Timothy Ian

    2017-04-01

    Soil carbon constitutes the largest terrestrial reservoir of organic carbon, and therefore understanding the mechanisms and drivers of carbon stabilization is crucial, especially in the framework of climate change. The understanding of the dependence of soil organic turnover in specific carbon pools as related to e.g. climate, soil texture and mineralogy is limited. In this framework, radiocarbon constitutes a uniquely powerful tool that help to unravel carbon dynamics from decadal to millennial timescales. This project combines bulk and pool-specific radiocarbon analyses in the top and deep soil on a wide range of forested soils that span a large climatic gradient (MAT 1.3-9.2°C, MAP 600 to 2100 mm m-2y-1). These well-studies sites are part of the Long-Term Forest Ecosystem Research (LWF) program of the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape research (WSL). This study aims to combine the insights gained from bulk and pool-specific turnover to environmental conditions and molecular composition of soil carbon. The pools investigated span the mineral-associated (occluded and heavy fractions from density fractionation) and potentially water-soluble (free light fractions from density fractionation and water extractable organic carbon) organic carbon fractions. Pool-specific radiocarbon work is augmented by the measurement of abundance of compounds such as alkanes, fatty acids and lignin phenols on a subset of samples. Initial results show disparate patterns depending on soil type and in particular soil texture, which could be indicative of various stabilization mechanisms in different soils. Overall, this study provides new insights into the controls of soil organic matter dynamics as related to environmental conditions, in particular in specific sub-pools of carbon.

  14. The atmospheric wet pool: definition and comparison with the oceanic warm pool

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Caiyun; CHEN Ge

    2008-01-01

    The oceanic warm pool (OWP) defined by sea surface temperature (SST) is known as the "heat reservoir" in the ocean. The warmest portion in the ocean mirrors the fact that the wettest region with the largest accumulation of water vapor (WV) in the atmosphere, termed atmospheric wet pool (AWP), should be identified because of the well-known Clausius-Clapeyron relationship between SST and WV. In this study, we used 14-year simultaneous observations of WV and SST from January 1988 to December 2001 to define the AWP and investigate its coupling and co-variations with the OWP. The joint examination of the area variations, centroid locations, and zonal migrations of the AWP and OWP lead to a number of interesting findings. The results hopefully can contribute to our understanding of the air-sea interaction in general and characterization of El Nifio/La Nina events in particular.

  15. The atmospheric wet pool: definition and comparison with the oceanic warm pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Caiyun; Chen, Ge

    2008-11-01

    The oceanic warm pool (OWP) defined by sea surface temperature (SST) is known as the “heat reservoir” in the ocean. The warmest portion in the ocean mirrors the fact that the wettest region with the largest accumulation of water vapor (WV) in the atmosphere, termed atmospheric wet pool (AWP), should be identified because of the well-known Clausius-Clapeyron relationship between SST and WV. In this study, we used 14-year simultaneous observations of WV and SST from January 1988 to December 2001 to define the AWP and investigate its coupling and co-variations with the OWP. The joint examination of the area variations, centroid locations, and zonal migrations of the AWP and OWP lead to a number of interesting findings. The results hopefully can contribute to our understanding of the air-sea interaction in general and characterization of El Niño/La Niña events in particular.

  16. Mercury bioaccumulation in wood frogs developing in seasonal pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftin, Cynthia S.; Calhoun, Aram J. K.; Nelson, Sarah J.; Elskus, Adria; Simon, Kevin S.

    2012-01-01

    Seasonal woodland pools contribute significant biomass to terrestrial ecosystems through production of pool-breeding amphibians. The movement of amphibian metamorphs potentially transports toxins bioaccumulated during larval development in the natal pool into the surrounding terrestrial environment. We documented total mercury (THg) in seasonal woodland pool water, sediment, litter, and Lithobates sylvaticus LeConte (Wood Frog) in Acadia National Park, ME. THg concentrations in pool water varied over the study season, increasing during April—June and remaining high in 2 of 4 pools upon October refill. Water in pools surrounded by softwoods had lower pH, greater dissolved organic carbon, and greater THg concentrations than pools surrounded by hardwoods, with seasonal patterns in sediment THg but not litter THg. THg increased rapidly from near or below detection in 1–2 week old embryos (<0.2 ng; 0–0.49 ppb wet weight) to 17.1–54.2 ppb in tadpoles within 6 weeks; 7.2–42.0% of THg was methyl Hg in tadpoles near metamorphosis. Metamorphs emigrating from seasonal pools may transfer mercury into terrestrial food webs.

  17. Crust formation and its effect on the molten pool coolability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, R.J.; Lee, S.J.; Sim, S.K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-09-01

    Experimental and analytical studies of the crust formation and its effect on the molten pool coolability have been performed to examine the crust formation process as a function of boundary temperatures as well as to investigate heat transfer characteristics between molten pool and overlying water in order to evaluate coolability of the molten pool. The experimental test results have shown that the surface temperature of the bottom plate is a dominant parameter in the crust formation process of the molten pool. It is also found that the crust thickness of the case with direct coolant injection into the molten pool is greater than that of the case with a heat exchanger. Increasing mass flow rate of direct coolant injection to the molten pool does not affect the temperature of molten pool after the crust has been formed in the molten pool because the crust behaves as a thermal barrier. The Nusselt number between the molten pool and the coolant of the case with no crust formation is greater than that of the case with crust formation. The results of FLOW-3D analyses have shown that the temperature distribution contributes to the crust formation process due to Rayleigh-Benard natural convection flow.

  18. Disinfection byproducts in swimming pool: occurrences, implications and future needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Shakhawat; Alhooshani, Khalid; Karanfil, Tanju

    2014-04-15

    Disinfection of swimming pool water is essential to deactivate pathogenic microorganisms. Many swimming pools apply chlorine or bromine based disinfectants to prevent microbial growth. The chlorinated swimming pool water contains higher chlorine residual and is maintained at a higher temperature than a typical drinking water distribution system. It constitutes environments with high levels of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in water and air as a consequence of continuous disinfection and constant organic loading from the bathers. Exposure to those DBPs is inevitable for any bather or trainer, while such exposures can have elevated risks to human health. To date, over 70 peer-reviewed publications have reported various aspects of swimming pool, including types and quantities of DBPs, organic loads from bathers, factors affecting DBPs formation in swimming pool, human exposure and their potential risks. This paper aims to review the state of research on swimming pool including with the focus of DBPs in swimming pools, understand their types and variability, possible health effects and analyze the factors responsible for the formation of various DBPs in a swimming pool. The study identifies the current challenges and future research needs to minimize DBPs formation in a swimming pool and their consequent negative effects to bathers and trainers.

  19. Marginal granilocytic pool in the treatment of malignant tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelova, I.; Bakalov, M.; Zografov, D. (Meditsinska Akademiya, Sofia (Bulgaria). Nauchen Inst. po Rentgenologiya i Radiobiologiya)

    1982-01-01

    Using the adrenaline test in 57 patients with malignant tumors, the authors examined the marginal granulocytic pool at different time in the course of treatment. The state of the pool was correlated with that of the neutrophilic cells in the circulating blood and with its state before treatment was started. It is concluded that in the course of treatment the neutrophilic cell counts in the marginal cells pool undergo changes similar to those in the circulation pool. It is therefore unjustifiable to include the adrenaline test in the control examination of patients with leucopenia.

  20. Automated management of engineering infrastructure of pools of different purpose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirokov Lev Alekseevich

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Pools play an important role in people’s life. They answer people’s demand in rest and improve their health. At the same time pools are rather important for industrial use, for example in construction industry. In order to solve different construction problems it is essential to investigate the influence of microclimatic parameters on construction materials and structures. For this aim pools are in demand as special test sites for construction materials and structures in different environmental conditions including the case of a direct water impact. The efficient use of pools presupposes the necessity of constant hydroclimatic contro: air humidity and temperature, water temperature, chemical composition of water and air. Classification of pools of different purposes is presented in the article. The author considers the main problems of operation of pools as objects with complicated air-and-water environment. The questions of maintaining optimal microclimatic parameters in a pool are considered. The necessity of use of the control system of a microclimate, its efficiency, profitability and social effect of its implementation is described. A mathematical model of the thermal mode of a pool area is constructed. The process of indoor temperature regulation in the pool is considered.

  1. Synapsin-dependent reserve pool of synaptic vesicles supports replenishment of the readily releasable pool under intense synaptic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasileva, Mariya; Horstmann, Heinz; Geumann, Constanze; Gitler, Daniel; Kuner, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    Synapsins are abundant synaptic vesicle (SV)-associated proteins thought to mediate synaptic vesicle mobility and clustering at most synapses. We used synapsin triple knock-out (TKO) mice to examine the morphological and functional consequences of deleting all synapsin isoforms at the calyx of Held, a giant glutamatergic synapse located in the auditory brain stem. Quantitative three-dimensional (3D) immunohistochemistry of entire calyces showed lower amounts of the synaptic vesicle protein vGluT1 while the level of the active zone marker bassoon was unchanged in TKO terminals. Examination of brain lysates by ELISA revealed a strong reduction in abundance of several synaptic vesicle proteins, while proteins of the active zone cytomatrix or postsynaptic density were unaffected. Serial section scanning electron microscopy of large 3D-reconstructed segments confirmed a decrease in the number of SVs to approximately 50% in TKO calyces. Short-term depression tested at stimulus frequencies ranging from 10 to 300 Hz was accelerated only at frequencies above 100 Hz and the time course of recovery from depression was slowed in calyces lacking synapsins. These results reveal that in wild-type synapses, the synapsin-dependent reserve pool contributes to the replenishment of the readily releasable pool (RRP), although accounting only for a small fraction of the SVs that enter the RRP. In conclusion, our results suggest that synapsins may be required for normal synaptic vesicle biogenesis, trafficking and immobilization of synaptic vesicles, yet they are not essential for sustained high-frequency synaptic transmission at the calyx terminal.

  2. Carbon pool densities and a first estimate of the total carbon pool in the Mongolian forest-steppe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulamsuren, Choimaa; Klinge, Michael; Degener, Jan; Khishigjargal, Mookhor; Chenlemuge, Tselmeg; Bat-Enerel, Banzragch; Yeruult, Yolk; Saindovdon, Davaadorj; Ganbaatar, Kherlenchimeg; Tsogtbaatar, Jamsran; Leuschner, Christoph; Hauck, Markus

    2016-02-01

    The boreal forest biome represents one of the most important terrestrial carbon stores, which gave reason to intensive research on carbon stock densities. However, such an analysis does not yet exist for the southernmost Eurosiberian boreal forests in Inner Asia. Most of these forests are located in the Mongolian forest-steppe, which is largely dominated by Larix sibirica. We quantified the carbon stock density and total carbon pool of Mongolia's boreal forests and adjacent grasslands and draw conclusions on possible future change. Mean aboveground carbon stock density in the interior of L. sibirica forests was 66 Mg C ha(-1) , which is in the upper range of values reported from boreal forests and probably due to the comparably long growing season. The density of soil organic carbon (SOC, 108 Mg C ha(-1) ) and total belowground carbon density (149 Mg C ha(-1) ) are at the lower end of the range known from boreal forests, which might be the result of higher soil temperatures and a thinner permafrost layer than in the central and northern boreal forest belt. Land use effects are especially relevant at forest edges, where mean carbon stock density was 188 Mg C ha(-1) , compared with 215 Mg C ha(-1) in the forest interior. Carbon stock density in grasslands was 144 Mg C ha(-1) . Analysis of satellite imagery of the highly fragmented forest area in the forest-steppe zone showed that Mongolia's total boreal forest area is currently 73 818 km(2) , and 22% of this area refers to forest edges (defined as the first 30 m from the edge). The total forest carbon pool of Mongolia was estimated at ~ 1.5-1.7 Pg C, a value which is likely to decrease in future with increasing deforestation and fire frequency, and global warming.

  3. Proceedings of the NEACRP/IAEA Specialists meeting on the international comparison calculation of a large sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor at Argonne National Laboratory on February 7-9, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeSage, L.G.; McKnight, R.D.; Wade, D.C.; Freese, K.E.; Collins, P.J.

    1980-08-01

    The results of an international comparison calculation of a large (1250 MWe) LMFBR benchmark model are presented and discussed. Eight reactor configurations were calculated. Parameters included with the comparison were: eigenvalue, k/sub infinity/, neutron balance data, breeding reaction rate ratios, reactivity worths, central control rod worth, regional sodium void reactivity, core Doppler and effective delayed neutron fraction. Ten countries participated in the comparison, and sixteen solutions were contributed. The discussion focuses on the variation in parameter values, the degree of consistency among the various parameters and solutions, and the identification of unexpected results. The results are displayed and discussed both by individual participants and by groupings of participants (e.g., results from adjusted data sets versus non-adjusted data sets).

  4. 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility closure plan. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    The Hanford Site, located northwest of the city of Richland, Washington, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials, and activities associated with nuclear energy development. The 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility (LSFF), which was in operation from about 1972 to 1986, was a research laboratory that occupied the former ventilation supply room on the southwest side of the 105-DR Reactor facility. The LSFF was established to provide a means of investigating fire and safety aspects associated with large sodium or other metal alkali fires in the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) facilities. The 105-DR Reactor facility was designed and built in the 1950`s and is located in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site. The building housed the 105-DR defense reactor, which was shut down in 1964. The LSFF was initially used only for engineering-scale alkali metal reaction studies. In addition, the Fusion Safety Support Studies program sponsored intermediate-size safety reaction tests in the LSFF with lithium and lithium lead compounds. The facility has also been used to store and treat alkali metal waste, therefore the LSFF is subject to the regulatory requirements for the storage and treatment of dangerous waste. Closure will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610. This closure plan presents a description of the facility, the history of waste managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the LSFF as an Alkali Metal Treatment Facility. No future use of the LSFF is expected.

  5. Seasonal dynamics of water and air chemistry in an indoor chlorinated swimming pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare Afifi, Mehrnaz; Blatchley, Ernest R

    2015-01-01

    Although swimming is known to be beneficial in terms of cardiovascular health, as well as for some forms of rehabilitation, swimming is also known to present risks to human health, largely in the form of exposure to microbial pathogens and disinfection byproducts (DBPs). Relatively little information is available in the literature to characterize the seasonal dynamics of air and water chemistry in indoor chlorinated swimming pools. To address this issue, water samples were collected five days per week from an indoor chlorinated swimming pool facility at a high school during the academic year and once per week during summer over a fourteen-month period. The samples were analyzed for free and combined chlorine, urea, volatile DBPs, pH, temperature and total alkalinity. Membrane Introduction Mass Spectrometry (MIMS) was used to identify and measure the concentrations of eleven aqueous-phase volatile DBPs. Variability in the concentrations of these DBPs was observed. Factors that influenced variability included bather loading and mixing by swimmers. These compounds have the ability to adversely affect water and air quality and human health. A large fraction of the existing literature regarding swimming pool air quality has focused on trichloramine (NCl₃). For this work, gas-phase NCl₃ was analyzed by an air sparging-DPD/KI method. The results showed that gas-phase NCl₃ concentration is influenced by bather loading and liquid-phase NCl₃ concentration. Urea is the dominant organic-N compound in human urine and sweat, and is known to be an important precursor for producing NCl₃ in swimming pools. Results of daily measurements of urea indicated a link between bather load and urea concentration in the pool.

  6. Steady State Vapor Bubble in Pool Boiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, An; Chanana, Ashish; Agrawal, Amit; Wayner, Peter C.; Maroo, Shalabh C.

    2016-02-01

    Boiling, a dynamic and multiscale process, has been studied for several decades; however, a comprehensive understanding of the process is still lacking. The bubble ebullition cycle, which occurs over millisecond time-span, makes it extremely challenging to study near-surface interfacial characteristics of a single bubble. Here, we create a steady-state vapor bubble that can remain stable for hours in a pool of sub-cooled water using a femtosecond laser source. The stability of the bubble allows us to measure the contact-angle and perform in-situ imaging of the contact-line region and the microlayer, on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces and in both degassed and regular (with dissolved air) water. The early growth stage of vapor bubble in degassed water shows a completely wetted bubble base with the microlayer, and the bubble does not depart from the surface due to reduced liquid pressure in the microlayer. Using experimental data and numerical simulations, we obtain permissible range of maximum heat transfer coefficient possible in nucleate boiling and the width of the evaporating layer in the contact-line region. This technique of creating and measuring fundamental characteristics of a stable vapor bubble will facilitate rational design of nanostructures for boiling enhancement and advance thermal management in electronics.

  7. Steady State Vapor Bubble in Pool Boiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, An; Chanana, Ashish; Agrawal, Amit; Wayner, Peter C; Maroo, Shalabh C

    2016-02-03

    Boiling, a dynamic and multiscale process, has been studied for several decades; however, a comprehensive understanding of the process is still lacking. The bubble ebullition cycle, which occurs over millisecond time-span, makes it extremely challenging to study near-surface interfacial characteristics of a single bubble. Here, we create a steady-state vapor bubble that can remain stable for hours in a pool of sub-cooled water using a femtosecond laser source. The stability of the bubble allows us to measure the contact-angle and perform in-situ imaging of the contact-line region and the microlayer, on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces and in both degassed and regular (with dissolved air) water. The early growth stage of vapor bubble in degassed water shows a completely wetted bubble base with the microlayer, and the bubble does not depart from the surface due to reduced liquid pressure in the microlayer. Using experimental data and numerical simulations, we obtain permissible range of maximum heat transfer coefficient possible in nucleate boiling and the width of the evaporating layer in the contact-line region. This technique of creating and measuring fundamental characteristics of a stable vapor bubble will facilitate rational design of nanostructures for boiling enhancement and advance thermal management in electronics.

  8. State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) Checklist for the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility Closure Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-01

    The Hanford Site, located northwest of the city of Richland, Washington, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials, as well as for activities associated with nuclear energy development. The 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility (LSFF), which was in operation from about 1972 to 1986, was a research laboratory that occupied the former ventilation supply room on the southwest side of the 105-DR Reactor facility. The LSFF was established to provide means of investigating fire and safety aspects associated with large sodium or other metal alkali fires in the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) facilities. The 105-DR Reactor facility was designed and built in the 1950's and is located in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site. The building housed the DR defense reactor, which was shut down in 1964. The LSFF is subject to the regulatory requirements for the storage and treatment of dangerous wastes. Clean closure is the proposed method of closure for the LSFF. Closure will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 (Ecology 1989). This closure plan presents a description of the facility, the history of wastes managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the LSFF as an Alkali Metal Treatment Facility. No future use of the LSFF is expected.

  9. Sanitary Conditions of Public Swimming Pools in Amman, Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Abu Aqoulah

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out in the summer of 2005 and investigated all of active public swimming pools (85 out of 93 in Amman, the capital of Jordan. The aim of this study was to find out if these swimming pools are in compliance with Jordanian Standards for Swimming Pools Water (JS 1562/2004. The pools were surveyed against the water microbial quality and other physicochemical parameters indicated in the standards. Two samples from each pool were collected for microbial analysis and pools monitoring were carried out during the afternoon of the weekends when the pools are most heavily used. The results indicated overall poor compliance with the standards. Compliance of the pools water to the microbial parameters was 56.5%, for residual chlorine 49.4%, for pH 87.7%, water temperature 48.8%, and bathing load 70.6%. The results also indicated that water microbial quality deteriorated with time. Multivariate analysis showed significant association of water contamination with time of sample collection, residual chlorine, water temperature and load of swimmers. The poor compliance was attributed to lack of proper disinfection, staff training, proper maintenance, and timely inspection.

  10. Sanitary Conditions of Public Swimming Pools in Amman, Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Abu Aqoulah

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out in the summer of 2005 and investigated all of active public swimming pools (85 out of 93 in Amman, the capital of Jordan. The aim of this study was to find out if these swimming pools are in compliance with Jordanian Standards for Swimming Pools Water (JS 1562/2004. The pools were surveyed against the water microbial quality and other physicochemical parameters indicated in the standards. Two samples from each pool were collected for microbial analysis and pools monitoring were carried out during the afternoon of the weekends when the pools are most heavily used. The results indicated overall poor compliance with the standards. Compliance of the pools water to the microbial parameters was 56.5%, for residual chlorine 49.4%, for pH 87.7%, water temperature 48.8%, and bathing load 70.6%. The results also indicated that water microbial quality deteriorated with time. Multivariate analysis showed significant association of water contamination with time of sample collection, residual chlorine, water temperature and load of swimmers. The poor compliance was attributed to lack of proper disinfection, staff training, proper maintenance, and timely inspection.

  11. Mathematical-programming approaches to test item pool design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldkamp, Bernard P.; van der Linden, Willem J.; Ariel, A.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to item pool design that has the potential to improve on the quality of current item pools in educational and psychological testing andhence to increase both measurement precision and validity. The approach consists of the application of mathematical programming

  12. 41 CFR 109-27.5106 - Precious metals pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Precious metals pool. 109-27.5106 Section 109-27.5106 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management...-INVENTORY MANAGEMENT 27.51-Management of Precious Metals § 109-27.5106 Precious metals pool....

  13. The Solitude of Relevant Documents in the Pool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lipani, A.; Lupu, M.; Kanoulas, E.; Hanbury, A.

    2016-01-01

    Pool bias is a well understood problem of test-collection based benchmarking in information retrieval. The pooling method itself is designed to identify all relevant documents. In practice, 'all' translates to `as many as possible given some budgetary constraints' and the problem persists, albeit

  14. [Green hair caused by frequent swimming pool use].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biel, K; Kretzschmar, L; Müller, C; Metze, D; Traupe, H

    1997-08-01

    Three patients presented with an acquired green discoloration of their scalp hair. History revealed that all of them swam regularly in private swimming pools. Examination of the hair by atomic emission spectroscopy showed that the green discoloration was caused by an excessively high copper content of the hair. This exogeneous discoloration is characteristically related to the uptake of copper from private swimming pools.

  15. 17 CFR 275.206(4)-8 - Pooled investment vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pooled investment vehicles... COMMISSION (CONTINUED) RULES AND REGULATIONS, INVESTMENT ADVISERS ACT OF 1940 § 275.206(4)-8 Pooled investment vehicles. (a) Prohibition. It shall constitute a fraudulent, deceptive, or manipulative...

  16. Odonata (Insecta at a wadi Pool near Nizwa, northern Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine M. Cowan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Fourteen damselfly and dragonfly species were recorded in 68 visits to a wadi pool in northern Oman, March 2012 to June 2014.  All identifications were based on photographs.  Apparently the pool has a core community of eight resident species.  Paragomphus sinaiticus, globally Near Threatened, was regularly  recorded. 

  17. Odonata (Insecta at a wadi Pool near Nizwa, northern Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine M. Cowan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Fourteen damselfly and dragonfly species were recorded in 68 visits to a wadi pool in northern Oman, March 2012 to June 2014.  All identifications were based on photographs.  Apparently the pool has a core community of eight resident species.  Paragomphus sinaiticus, globally Near Threatened, was regularly  recorded. 

  18. (Average-) convexity of common pool and oligopoly TU-games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, T.S.H.; Meinhardt, H.

    2000-01-01

    The paper studies both the convexity and average-convexity properties for a particular class of cooperative TU-games called common pool games. The common pool situation involves a cost function as well as a (weakly decreasing) average joint production function. Firstly, it is shown that, if the rele

  19. Case-control association testing of common variants from sequencing of DNA pools.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan F McRae

    Full Text Available While genome-wide association studies (GWAS have been successful in identifying a large number of variants associated with disease, the challenge of locating the underlying causal loci remains. Sequencing of case and control DNA pools provides an inexpensive method for assessing all variation in a genomic region surrounding a significant GWAS result. However, individual variants need to be ranked in terms of the strength of their association to disease in order to prioritise follow-up by individual genotyping. A simple method for testing for case-control association in sequence data from DNA pools is presented that allows the partitioning of the variance in allele frequency estimates into components due to the sampling of chromosomes from the pool during sequencing, sampling individuals from the population and unequal contribution from individuals during pool construction. The utility of this method is demonstrated on a sequence from the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH gene cluster on a case-control sample for heavy alcohol consumption.

  20. HYDRODYNAMIC UPLIFT FORCE AND STABILITY OF ARCIFORM LUNGE POOL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Compared with general trapeziform plunge pools, an arciform plunge pool has its advantages, e.g. Less excavate quantity, higher stability, etc. In this paper, the hy-drodynamic pressure distribution on the soleplate of the arci-form plunge pool is measured under a relatively dangerous condition of operation. The result is helpful to the design of the arciform plunge pool. The result also shows that the difference between the maximum and the minimum pressures on the upward surface of the soleplate may cause an additional uplift force on the soleplate under certain condition and should be taken into consideration in the uplift force calculation of the soleplate. The scour experiment verifies the higher stability of the arciform plunge pool.