WorldWideScience

Sample records for large orbital contribution

  1. High-spin organic molecules with dominant spin-orbit contribution and unprecedentedly large magnetic anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misochko, Eugenii Ya.; Akimov, Alexander V.; Masitov, Artem A.; Korchagin, Denis V.; Yakushchenko, Igor K.; Chapyshev, Sergei V.

    2012-08-01

    High-spin organic molecules with dominant spin-orbit contribution to magnetic anisotropy are reported. Quintet 4-azido-3,5-dibromopyridyl-2,6-dinitrene (Q-1), quintet 2-azido-3,5-dibromopyridyl-4,6-dinitrene (Q-2), and septet 3,5-dibromopyridyl-2,4,6-trinitrene (S-1) were generated in solid argon matrices by ultraviolet irradiation of 2,4,6-triazido-3,5-dibromopyridine. The zero-field splitting (ZFS) parameters, derived from electron spin resonance spectra, show unprecedentedly large magnitudes of the parameters D: |DQ1| = 0.289, |DQ2| = 0.373, and |DS1| = 0.297 cm-1. The experimental ZFS parameters were successfully reproduced by density functional theory calculations, confirming that magnetic anisotropy of high-spin organic molecules can considerably be enhanced by the "heavy atom effect." In bromine-containing high-spin nitrenes, the spin-orbit term is dominant and governs both the magnitude and the sign of magnetic anisotropy. The largest negative value of D among septet trinitrenes is predicted for 1,3,5-trinitrenobenzene bearing three heavy atoms (Br) in positions 2, 4, and 6 of the benzene ring.

  2. W-band EPR studies of high-spin nitrenes with large spin-orbit contribution to zero-field splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimov, Alexander; Masitov, Artem; Korchagin, Denis; Chapyshev, Sergei; Misochko, Eugenii; Savitsky, Anton

    2015-08-01

    First W-band 94 GHz EPR spectra of randomly oriented triplet, quintet, and septet nitrenes formed during the photolysis of 1,3,5-triazido-2,4,6-tribromobenzene in cryogenic matrices are reported. In comparison with conventional X-band 9 GHz electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, W-band EPR spectroscopy allows the detection and complete spectroscopic characterization of all paramagnetic species formed at different stages of the photolysis of aromatic polyazides. This type of spectroscopy is of paramount importance for experimental determination of the sign of the zero-field splitting (ZFS) parameters of high-spin molecules with large spin-orbit contribution to the ZFS, caused by the effect of heavy atoms. The study shows that triplet 1,3-diazido-2,4,6-tribromo-5-nitrenobenzene (T1) has DT = 1.369 cm-1, ET = 0.093 cm-1, and g = 2.0033, quintet 1-azido-2,4,6-tribromo-3,5-dinitrenobenzene (Q1) shows DQ = - 0.306 cm-1, EQ = 0.0137 cm-1, and g = 2.0070, and septet 2,4,6-tribromo-1,3,5-trinitrenobenzene (S1) has DS = - 0.203 cm-1, ES = 0, and g = 2.0073. The experimental ZFS parameters agree well with the results of density functional theory calculations at the PBE/Ahlrichs-DZ level of theory, showing that such calculations adequately describe the magnetic properties of bromine-containing high-spin nitrenes. Both experimental and theoretical data indicate that, in contrast to all known to date quintet dinitrenes, dinitrene Q1 has the negative sign of magnetic anisotropy due to the "heavy atom effect." This dinitrene along with septet trinitrene S1 possess the largest negative value of D among all known quintet and septet organic polyradicals.

  3. W-band EPR studies of high-spin nitrenes with large spin-orbit contribution to zero-field splitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akimov, Alexander; Masitov, Artem; Korchagin, Denis; Chapyshev, Sergei; Misochko, Eugenii, E-mail: misochko@icp.ac.ru [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics RAS, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Savitsky, Anton [Max-Planck Institute for Chemical Energy Conversion, Mulheim/Ruhr (Germany)

    2015-08-28

    First W-band 94 GHz EPR spectra of randomly oriented triplet, quintet, and septet nitrenes formed during the photolysis of 1,3,5-triazido-2,4,6-tribromobenzene in cryogenic matrices are reported. In comparison with conventional X-band 9 GHz electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, W-band EPR spectroscopy allows the detection and complete spectroscopic characterization of all paramagnetic species formed at different stages of the photolysis of aromatic polyazides. This type of spectroscopy is of paramount importance for experimental determination of the sign of the zero-field splitting (ZFS) parameters of high-spin molecules with large spin-orbit contribution to the ZFS, caused by the effect of heavy atoms. The study shows that triplet 1,3-diazido-2,4,6-tribromo-5-nitrenobenzene (T1) has D{sub T} = 1.369 cm{sup −1}, E{sub T} = 0.093 cm{sup −1}, and g = 2.0033, quintet 1-azido-2,4,6-tribromo-3,5-dinitrenobenzene (Q1) shows D{sub Q} = − 0.306 cm{sup −1}, E{sub Q} = 0.0137 cm{sup −1}, and g = 2.0070, and septet 2,4,6-tribromo-1,3,5-trinitrenobenzene (S1) has D{sub S} = − 0.203 cm{sup −1}, E{sub S} = 0, and g = 2.0073. The experimental ZFS parameters agree well with the results of density functional theory calculations at the PBE/Ahlrichs-DZ level of theory, showing that such calculations adequately describe the magnetic properties of bromine-containing high-spin nitrenes. Both experimental and theoretical data indicate that, in contrast to all known to date quintet dinitrenes, dinitrene Q1 has the negative sign of magnetic anisotropy due to the “heavy atom effect.” This dinitrene along with septet trinitrene S1 possess the largest negative value of D among all known quintet and septet organic polyradicals.

  4. Robert Hooke's Seminal Contribution to Orbital Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauenberg, Michael

    2005-03-01

    During the second half of the seventeenth century, the outstanding problem in astronomy was to understand the physical basis for Kepler’s laws describing the observed orbital motion of a planet around the Sun. In the middle 1660s,Robert Hooke (1635 1703) proposed that a planet’s motion is determined by compounding its tangential velocity with the change in radial velocity impressed by the gravitational attraction of the Sun, and he described his physical concept to Isaac Newton (1642 1726) in correspondence in 1679. Newton denied having heard of Hooke’s novel concept of orbital motion, but shortly after their correspondence he implemented it by a geometric construction from which he deduced the physical origin of Kepler’s area law,which later became Proposition I, Book I, of his Principia in 1687.Three years earlier, Newton had deposited a preliminary draft of it, his De Motu Corporum in Gyrum (On the Motion of Bodies), at the Royal Society of London, which Hooke apparently was able to examine a few months later, because shortly there-after he applied Newton’s construction in a novel way to obtain the path of a body under the action of an attractive central force that varies linearly with the distance from its center of motion (Hooke’s law). I show that Hooke’s construction corresponds to Newton’s for his proof of Kepler’s area law in his De Motu. Hooke’s understanding of planetary motion was based on his observations with mechanical analogs. I repeated two of his experiments and demonstrated the accuracy of his observations.My results thus cast new light on the significance of Hooke’s contributions to the development of orbital dynamics, which in the past have either been neglected or misunderstood.

  5. Contribution Analysis of BDS/GPS Combined Orbit Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qin

    2016-07-01

    BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) does not have the ability of global navigation and positioning currently. The whole tracking observation of satellite orbit and the geometry of reference station are not perfect. These situations influence the accuracy of satellite orbit determination. Based on the theory and method of dynamic orbit determination, the analytical contribution of multi-GNSS combined orbit determination to the solution precision of parameters was derived. And using the measured data, the statistical contribution of BDS/GPS combined orbit determination to the solution precision of orbit and clock error was analyzed. The results show that the contribution of combined orbit determination to the solution precision of the common parameters between different systems was significant. The solution precisions of the orbit and clock error were significantly improved except GEO satellites. The statistical contribution of BDS/GPS combined orbit determination to the precision of BDS satellite orbit, the RMS of BDS satellite clock error and the RMS of receiver clock error were 36.21%, 26.88% and 20.88% respectively. Especially, the contribution to the clock error of receivers which were in the area with few visible satellites was particularly significant. And the statistical contribution was 45.95%.

  6. A contribution to the definition of a new method to predict the catastrophic disintegration of spacecraft after collision with large orbital debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccariotto, M.; Francesconi, A.; Galvanetto, U.

    2016-10-01

    The main limitation of the currently adopted method for predicting spacecraft catastrophic fragmentation due to a collision with large debris is the total independence of the critical value of the energy-to-target mass ratio from both the satellite configuration and the impact point; in fact these two issues are not accounted for by the classical 40 J/g rule. To go beyond this limitation, the method proposed in this paper evaluates the distribution of impact energy into the system using the mechanical properties of the structural parts and the knowledge of the impact location. In this way, it becomes possible to predict how impact energy is partitioned among some selected macroscopic structural parts, each of them is finally evaluated versus its own minimum value of impact energy for which the part is fragmented (shattering threshold). Energy partition is performed by solving a system of equations written according to Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA). The paper describes in detail the proposed energy-partition method and presents its application to a geometrical representative model of a spacecraft subject to impact at different points. Results are finally compared to those obtained by the application of the classical 40 J/g rule. It is shown that the evaluation of spacecraft disintegration is highly influenced by the impact point and the structural properties of the components.

  7. Possibility of Large EW Penguin contribution

    CERN Document Server

    Mishima, S; Mishima, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Tadashi

    2005-01-01

    We discuss a possibility of large electroweak(EW) penguin contribution in B-->K pi and pi pi. The recent experimental data may be still suggesting that there are some discrepancies between the data and theoretical estimations. In B --> K pi decays, to explain several theoretical relations among the branching ratios, a slightly large electroweak penguin contribution and large strong phase differences or quite large color suppressed tree contribution seem to be needed. The contributions should appear also in B --> pi pi. We show, as an example, a solution to solve the discrepancies in both B --> K pi and B --> pi pi. It may be suggesting to need the large electroweak penguin contribution with new weak phases and some SU(3) breaking effects by new physics in both QCD and electroweak penguin type processes.

  8. Orbital Contributions to the Electron g Factor in Semiconductor Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Georg W.; Varjas, Dániel; Skolasinski, Rafal; Soluyanov, Alexey A.; Troyer, Matthias; Wimmer, Michael

    2017-07-01

    Recent experiments on Majorana fermions in semiconductor nanowires [S. M. Albrecht, A. P. Higginbotham, M. Madsen, F. Kuemmeth, T. S. Jespersen, J. Nygård, P. Krogstrup, and C. M. Marcus, Nature (London) 531, 206 (2016), 10.1038/nature17162] revealed a surprisingly large electronic Landé g factor, several times larger than the bulk value—contrary to the expectation that confinement reduces the g factor. Here we assess the role of orbital contributions to the electron g factor in nanowires and quantum dots. We show that an L .S coupling in higher subbands leads to an enhancement of the g factor of an order of magnitude or more for small effective mass semiconductors. We validate our theoretical finding with simulations of InAs and InSb, showing that the effect persists even if cylindrical symmetry is broken. A huge anisotropy of the enhanced g factors under magnetic field rotation allows for a straightforward experimental test of this theory.

  9. Controllability of Large SEP for Earth Orbit Raising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, Gordon

    2004-01-01

    A six-degree-of-freedom (6DOF) simulation was constructed and exercised for a large solar electric propulsion (SEP) vehicle operating in low Earth orbit Nominal power was 500 kWe, with the large array sizes implied. Controllability issues, including gravity gradient, roll maneuvering for Sun tracking, and flexible arrays, and flight control methods, were investigated. Initial findings are that a SEP vehicle of this size is controllable and could be used for orbit raising of heavy payloads.

  10. Large spin-orbit coupling in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, G A; Pei, F; Laird, E A; Jol, J M; Meerwaldt, H B; Kouwenhoven, L P

    2013-01-01

    It has recently been recognised that the strong spin-orbit interaction present in solids can lead to new phenomena, such as materials with non-trivial topological order. Although the atomic spin-orbit coupling in carbon is weak, the spin-orbit coupling in carbon nanotubes can be significant due to their curved surface. Previous works have reported spin-orbit couplings in reasonable agreement with theory, and this coupling strength has formed the basis of a large number of theoretical proposals. Here we report a spin-orbit coupling in three carbon nanotube devices that is an order of magnitude larger than previously measured. We find a zero-field spin splitting of up to 3.4 meV, corresponding to a built-in effective magnetic field of 29 T aligned along the nanotube axis. Although the origin of the large spin-orbit coupling is not explained by existing theories, its strength is promising for applications of the spin-orbit interaction in carbon nanotubes devices.

  11. Large spin-orbit coupling in carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, G. A.; Pei, F.; Laird, E. A.; Jol, J. M.; Meerwaldt, H. B.; Kouwenhoven, L. P.

    2013-03-01

    It has recently been recognised that the strong spin-orbit interaction present in solids can lead to new phenomena, such as materials with non-trivial topological order. Although the atomic spin-orbit coupling in carbon is weak, the spin-orbit coupling in carbon nanotubes can be significant due to their curved surface. Previous works have reported spin-orbit couplings in reasonable agreement with theory, and this coupling strength has formed the basis of a large number of theoretical proposals. Here we report a spin-orbit coupling in three carbon nanotube devices that is an order of magnitude larger than previously measured. We find a zero-field spin splitting of up to 3.4 meV, corresponding to a built-in effective magnetic field of 29 T aligned along the nanotube axis. Although the origin of the large spin-orbit coupling is not explained by existing theories, its strength is promising for applications of the spin-orbit interaction in carbon nanotubes devices.

  12. Tailoring approach for obtaining molecular orbitals of large systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anuja P Rahalkar; Shridhar R Gadre

    2012-01-01

    Molecular orbitals (MO’s) within Hartree-Fock (HF) theory are of vital importance as they provide preliminary information of bonding and features such as electron localization and chemical reactivity. The contemporary literature treats the Kohn-Sham orbitals within density functional theory (DFT) equivalently to the MO's obtained within HF framework. The high scaling order of ab initio methods is the main hurdle in obtaining the MO's for large molecular systems. With this view, an attempt is made in the present work to employ molecular tailoring approach (MTA) for obtaining the complete set of MO's including occupied and virtual orbitals, for large molecules at HF and B3LYP levels of theory. The energies of highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals, and hence the band gaps, are accurately estimated by MTA for most of the test cases benchmarked in this study, which include -conjugated molecules. Typically, the root mean square errors of valence MO's are in range of 0.001 to 0.010 a.u. for all the test cases examined. MTA shows a time advantage factor of 2 to 3 over the corresponding actual calculation, for many of the systems reported.

  13. Solar electric propulsion for the orbital transfer of large spacecraft to geosynchronous orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, James L.

    1992-01-01

    Low thrust trajectories utilizing electric propulsion and photovoltaic power sources are derived for the transfer of a large spacecraft from assembly in low earth orbit to operation at geosynchronous orbit. Conventional silicon photovoltaic devices are assumed. A 1 MeV equivalent electron flux model is used. The solar panel mass and size are taken from Advanced Photovoltaic Solar Array design concepts with 3-mil shielding. Shadowing of the vehicle and low earth orbit atmospheric drag are also modeled. The power system is sized so that end of life output is 30 percent of initial output. Steering of the thrust vector is defined by a three term series in which the coefficients are varied as controls to minimize the total power loss with cumulative exposure in the Van Allen region.

  14. Reconstruction of Large Orbital Posterior Floor Wall Fracture Considering Orbital Floor Slope Using Endoscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jinhwan; Huh, Jungah; Lee, Joonsik; Chang, Minwook; Lee, Hwa; Park, Minsoo; Baek, Sehyun

    2017-06-01

    Reconstruction of a large orbital fracture extending to the posterior wall of the maxillary sinus is difficult and challenging. In this study, the authors present transconjunctival or transcaruncular approach using endoscopy and layered porous polyethylene barrier sheets to manage large orbital floor wall fracture. A retrospective review of all patients who underwent reconstruction of large orbital floor wall fractures between June 2009 and July 2015 was conducted. Patient demographics, degree of enophthalmos, ocular motility and diplopia test results, and surgical complications were reviewed. This study included 53 eyes of 53 patients. The mean time from trauma to surgery was 34.1 days (range, 1-360 days). The average postoperative follow-up period was 6.1 months (range, 3-14 months). The degrees of enophthalmos preoperatively, and 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months postoperatively were -1.98 mm (range, -1.5 to -3 mm), 0.13 mm (range, -1.0 to +1.5 mm), -0.09 mm (range, -2.0 to +1.5 mm), and -0.43 mm (range, -2.0 to +1.0 mm), respectively. The mean improvement in enophthalmos at 3 months postoperation was 1.55 mm (P < 0.001). There was only 1 patient with residual 2 mm enophthalmos at 3 months postoperation. There were no definite surgical complications in any patient. Sufficient dissection to the posterior extent of the fracture and reconstruction of the orbital floor slope are the most important surgical factors to prevent residual enophthalmos. The authors believe using an endoscope and layered porous polyethylene are effective techniques in challenging patients with large orbital wall fracture.

  15. Efficient construction of nonorthogonal localized molecular orbitals in large systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ganglong; Fang, Weihai; Yang, Weitao

    2010-08-26

    Localized molecular orbitals (LMOs) are much more compact representations of electronic degrees of freedom than canonical molecular orbitals (CMOs). The most compact representation is provided by nonorthogonal localized molecular orbitals (NOLMOs), which are linearly independent but are not orthogonal. Both LMOs and NOLMOs are thus useful for linear-scaling calculations of electronic structures for large systems. Recently, NOLMOs have been successfully applied to linear-scaling calculations with density functional theory (DFT) and to reformulating time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) for calculations of excited states and spectroscopy. However, a challenge remains as NOLMO construction from CMOs is still inefficient for large systems. In this work, we develop an efficient method to accelerate the NOLMO construction by using predefined centroids of the NOLMO and thereby removing the nonlinear equality constraints in the original method ( J. Chem. Phys. 2004 , 120 , 9458 and J. Chem. Phys. 2000 , 112 , 4 ). Thus, NOLMO construction becomes an unconstrained optimization. Its efficiency is demonstrated for the selected saturated and conjugated molecules. Our method for fast NOLMO construction should lead to efficient DFT and NOLMO-TDDFT applications to large systems.

  16. Decomposition of nuclear magnetic resonance spin-spin coupling constants into active and passive orbital contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräfenstein, Jürgen; Tuttle, Tell; Cremer, Dieter

    2004-06-01

    The theory of the J-OC-PSP (decomposition of J into orbital contributions using orbital currents and partial spin polarization) method is derived to distinguish between the role of active, passive, and frozen orbitals on the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-spin coupling mechanism. Application of J-OC-PSP to the NMR spin-spin coupling constants of ethylene, which are calculated using coupled perturbed density functional theory in connection with the B3LYP hybrid functional and a [7s,6p,2d/4s,2p] basis set, reveal that the well-known pi mechanism for Fermi contact (FC) spin coupling is based on passive pi orbital contributions. The pi orbitals contribute to the spin polarization of the sigma orbitals at the coupling nuclei by mediating spin information between sigma orbitals (spin-transport mechanism) or by increasing the spin information of a sigma orbital by an echo effect. The calculated FC(pi) value of the SSCC (1)J(CC) of ethylene is 4.5 Hz and by this clearly smaller than previously assumed.

  17. High Power Microwave Emission of Large and Small Orbit Gyrotron Devices in Rectangular Interaction Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochman, J. M.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Jaynes, R. L.; Rintamaki, J. I.; Luginsland, J. W.; Lau, Y. Y.; Spencer, T. A.

    1996-11-01

    Experiments utilize large and small orbit e-beam gyrotron devices in a rectangular-cross-section (RCS) gyrotron. This device is being explored to examine polarization control. Other research issues include pulse shortening, and mode competition. MELBA generates electron beams with parameters of: -800kV, 1-10kA diode current, and 0.5-1.0 μ sec pulselengths. The small orbit gyrotron device is converted to a large orbit experiment by running MELBA's annular electron beam through a magnetic cusp. Initial experiments showed an increase in beam alpha (V_perp/V_par) of a factor of ~ 4 between small and large orbit devices. Experimental results from the RCS gyrotron will be compared for large-orbit and small-orbit electron beams. Beam transport data and frequency measurements will be presented. Computer modeling utilizing the MAGIC and E-gun codes will be shown.

  18. Bayesian Linking of Geosynchronous Orbital Debris Tracks as seen by the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Michael D

    2011-01-01

    We describe a Bayesian sampling model for linking and constraining orbit models from angular observations of "streaks" in optical telescope images. Our algorithm is particularly suited to situations where the observation times are small fractions of the orbital periods of the observed objects or when there is significant confusion of objects in the observation field. We use Markov Chain Monte Carlo to sample from the joint posterior distribution of the parameters of multiple orbit models (up to the number of observed tracks) and parameters describing which tracks are linked with which orbit models. Using this algorithm, we forecast the constraints on geosynchronous (GEO) debris orbits achievable with the planned Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). Because of the short 15 second exposure times, preliminary orbit determinations of GEO objects from LSST will have large and degenerate errors on the orbital elements. Combined with the expected crowded fields of GEO debris it will be challenging to reliably lin...

  19. Temporal Approach to Removal of a Large Orbital Foreign Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Morais, Hécio Henrique Araújo; Barbalho, Jimmy Charles Melo; de Souza Dias, Tasiana Guedes; Grempel, Rafael Grotta; Vasconcellos, Ricardo José de Holanda

    2014-01-01

    Accidents with firearms can result in extensive orbital trauma. Moreover, gun parts can come loose and impale the maxillofacial region. These injuries can cause the loss of visual acuity and impair eye movements. Multidisciplinary treatment is required for injuries associated with this type of trauma. Computed tomography with three-dimensional reconstruction is useful for determining the precise location and size of the object lodged in the facial skeleton, thereby facilitating the planning of the correct surgical approach. The temporal approach is a fast, simple technique with few complications that is indicated for access to the infratemporal fossa. This article describes the use of the temporal approach on a firearm victim in whom the breech of a rifle had impaled orbital region, with the extremity lodged in the infratemporal fossa. PMID:26269733

  20. WALDO - A System for Removal of Large Orbital Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, R.; Robinson, E. Y.

    2012-01-01

    Orbital debris objects present disastrous interference and collision threats to neighboring satellites, or even actual collisions. There are no proven means of satellite relocation and removal to super synchronous burial orbit or to deorbit the dead satellites. The Aerospace Corporation patented satellite capture system is a concept called WALDO that offers a possible solution for removal and relocation of orbital debris such as dead satellites, via a "hand in the sky". WALDO comprises a base satellite which, after launch, commands deployment of individually articulating tendons to act like fingers that coil around and capture the object. A combination of three such pods forms a "hand in the sky" that captures the target object for removal. In the present case, the target objects (random dead satellites) are assumed to be passive and will not have a capture interface. The essential benefit of WALDO is its ability to approach a target object from the "front" and embrace it all around with a controllable non-damaging "soft grab" that will not damage or break off appendages. The concept of operations is illustrated by a video animation.

  1. Orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Guochang

    2008-01-01

    This is the first book of the satellite era which describes orbit theory with analytical solutions of the second order with respect to all possible disturbances. Based on such theory, the algorithms of orbits determination are completely revolutionized.

  2. Contribution of forbidden orbits in the photoabsorption spectra of atoms and molecules in a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzkin, A.; Dando, P. A.; Monteiro, T. S.

    2003-02-01

    In a previous work [Phys. Rev. A 66, 013410 (2002)], we noted a partial disagreement between quantum R matrix and semiclassical calculations of photoabsorption spectra of molecules in a magnetic field. We show that this disagreement is due to a nonvanishing contribution of processes, which are forbidden according to the usual semiclassical formalism. Formulas to include these processes are obtained by using a refined stationary phase approximation. The resulting higher order in ħ contributions also account for previously unexplained “recurrences without closed orbits.” Quantum and semiclassical photoabsorption spectra for Rydberg atoms and molecules in a magnetic field are calculated and compared to assess the validity of the first-order forbidden orbit contributions.

  3. Contribution of forbidden orbits in the photoabsorption spectra of atoms and molecules in a magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Matzkin, A; Monteiro, T S

    2003-01-01

    In a previous work [Phys. Rev. A \\textbf{66}, 0134XX (2002)] we noted a partial disagreement between quantum R-matrix and semiclassical calculations of photoabsorption spectra of molecules in a magnetic field. We show this disagreement is due to a non-vanishing contribution of processes which are forbidden according to the usual semiclassical formalism. Formulas to include these processes are obtained by using a refined stationary phase approximation. The resulting higher order in $\\hbar$ contributions also account for previously unexplained ``recurrences without closed-orbits''. Quantum and semiclassical photoabsorption spectra for Rydberg atoms and molecules in a magnetic field are calculated and compared to assess the validity of the first-order forbidden orbit contributions.

  4. Investigating the contribution of Gaia to orbit improvement and stellar occultation prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoto, Federica; Tanga, Paolo; Mignard, Francois; Carry, Benoit

    2016-10-01

    The ESA Gaia mission, currently surveying the sky from the L2 Lagrangian Point, is providing astrometry of stars and asteroids, at the sub-milliarcsec accuracy. However, the exploitation of this unprecedented capacity of investigation, requires to tackle some specific issues, mostly related to the peculiar properties of the Gaiadata.Orbit determination and improvement have to be tuned at several levels, from the preliminary short-arc solution, up to the most extreme dynamical modeling taking into account observations on a long time span. More specifically, asteroid positions determined by Gaia are very accurate in one direction only, and are affected by a large correlation of the uncertainties in the equatorial coordinates. In order to make the best possible exploitation of Gaia astrometry, we are adapting the software tools to correctly take into account suchcorrelation. We will discuss preliminary results obtained while validating our approach on some asteroid observations by Gaia, that provide for the first time a quantitative evaluation of the reachable accuracy onreal data.In particular, we will discuss the contribution of Gaia relative to the whole available record of observations, and the differences found in the accuracy of alerts (daily processing) with respect to the exploitation of better calibrations. The impact of the first Gaia data release (GDR1) and following on the prediction of stellar occultations by asteroids, is also addressed.

  5. Argentine Population Genetic Structure: Large Variance in Amerindian Contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldin, Michael F.; Tian, Chao; Shigeta, Russell; Scherbarth, Hugo R.; Silva, Gabriel; Belmont, John W.; Kittles, Rick; Gamron, Susana; Allevi, Alberto; Palatnik, Simon A.; Alvarellos, Alejandro; Paira, Sergio; Caprarulo, Cesar; Guillerón, Carolina; Catoggio, Luis J.; Prigione, Cristina; Berbotto, Guillermo A.; García, Mercedes A.; Perandones, Carlos E.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta E.

    2011-01-01

    Argentine population genetic structure was examined using a set of 78 ancestry informative markers (AIMs) to assess the contributions of European, Amerindian, and African ancestry in 94 individuals members of this population. Using the Bayesian clustering algorithm STRUCTURE, the mean European contribution was 78%, the Amerindian contribution was 19.4%, and the African contribution was 2.5%. Similar results were found using weighted least mean square method: European, 80.2%; Amerindian, 18.1%; and African, 1.7%. Consistent with previous studies the current results showed very few individuals (four of 94) with greater than 10% African admixture. Notably, when individual admixture was examined, the Amerindian and European admixture showed a very large variance and individual Amerindian contribution ranged from 1.5 to 84.5% in the 94 individual Argentine subjects. These results indicate that admixture must be considered when clinical epidemiology or case control genetic analyses are studied in this population. Moreover, the current study provides a set of informative SNPs that can be used to ascertain or control for this potentially hidden stratification. In addition, the large variance in admixture proportions in individual Argentine subjects shown by this study suggests that this population is appropriate for future admixture mapping studies. PMID:17177183

  6. The Role of Resorbable Plate and Artificial Bone Substitute in Reconstruction of Large Orbital Floor Defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is essential to reduce and reconstruct bony defects adequately in large orbital floor fracture and defect. Among many reconstructive methods, alloplastic materials have attracted attention because of their safety and ease of use. We have used resorbable plates combined with artificial bone substitutes in large orbital floor defect reconstructions and have evaluated their long-term reliability compared with porous polyethylene plate. A total of 147 patients with traumatic orbital floor fracture were included in the study. Surgical results were evaluated by clinical evaluations, exophthalmometry, and computed tomography at least 12 months postoperatively. Both orbital floor height discrepancy and orbital volume change were calculated and compared with preoperative CT findings. The average volume discrepancy and vertical height discrepancies were not different between two groups. Also, exophthalmometric measurements were not significantly different between the two groups. No significant postoperative complication including permanent diplopia, proptosis, and enophthalmos was noted. Use of a resorbable plate with an artificial bone substitute to repair orbital floor defects larger than 2.5 cm2 in size yielded long-lasting, effective reconstruction without significant complications. We therefore propose our approach as an effective alternative method for large orbital floor reconstructions.

  7. Large-scale shielding structures in low earth orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panov, D. V.; Silnikov, M. V.; Mikhaylin, A. I.; Rubzov, I. S.; Nosikov, V. B.; Minenko, E. Yu.; Murtazin, D. A.

    2015-04-01

    The problems involved in the design-engineering digital simulation of large-size transformable-screen constructions for protecting spacecraft and equipment from space debris and meteoroids were considered. The engineering principles used to improve the design and efficiency of protective screens are presented. The use of embedded matrix transducers located all over the composite material used for armor tiles is proposed for the construction of protective clad screens; this approach enables efficient detection of damaged areas of the protective screen, the assessment of the level of damage, and the prediction of damage to spacecraft and equipment structures.

  8. Contribution of large region joint associations to complex traits genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paré, Guillaume; Asma, Senay; Deng, Wei Q

    2015-04-01

    A polygenic model of inheritance, whereby hundreds or thousands of weakly associated variants contribute to a trait's heritability, has been proposed to underlie the genetic architecture of complex traits. However, relatively few genetic variants have been positively identified so far and they collectively explain only a small fraction of the predicted heritability. We hypothesized that joint association of multiple weakly associated variants over large chromosomal regions contributes to complex traits variance. Confirmation of such regional associations can help identify new loci and lead to a better understanding of known ones. To test this hypothesis, we first characterized the ability of commonly used genetic association models to identify large region joint associations. Through theoretical derivation and simulation, we showed that multivariate linear models where multiple SNPs are included as independent predictors have the most favorable association profile. Based on these results, we tested for large region association with height in 3,740 European participants from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) study. Adjusting for SNPs with known association with height, we demonstrated clustering of weak associations (p = 2x10-4) in regions extending up to 433.0 Kb from known height loci. The contribution of regional associations to phenotypic variance was estimated at 0.172 (95% CI 0.063-0.279; p < 0.001), which compared favorably to 0.129 explained by known height variants. Conversely, we showed that suggestively associated regions are enriched for known height loci. To extend our findings to other traits, we also tested BMI, HDLc and CRP for large region associations, with consistent results for CRP. Our results demonstrate the presence of large region joint associations and suggest these can be used to pinpoint weakly associated SNPs.

  9. A method of orbital analysis for large-scale first-principles simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohwaki, Tsukuru; Otani, Minoru; Ozaki, Taisuke

    2014-06-01

    An efficient method of calculating the natural bond orbitals (NBOs) based on a truncation of the entire density matrix of a whole system is presented for large-scale density functional theory calculations. The method recovers an orbital picture for O(N) electronic structure methods which directly evaluate the density matrix without using Kohn-Sham orbitals, thus enabling quantitative analysis of chemical reactions in large-scale systems in the language of localized Lewis-type chemical bonds. With the density matrix calculated by either an exact diagonalization or O(N) method, the computational cost is O(1) for the calculation of NBOs associated with a local region where a chemical reaction takes place. As an illustration of the method, we demonstrate how an electronic structure in a local region of interest can be analyzed by NBOs in a large-scale first-principles molecular dynamics simulation for a liquid electrolyte bulk model (propylene carbonate + LiBF4).

  10. Solution of the flyby problem for large space debris at sun-synchronous orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, A. A.; Grishko, D. A.; Medvedevskikh, V. V.; Lapshin, V. V.

    2016-05-01

    the paper considers the flyby problem related to large space debris (LSD) objects at low earth orbits. The data on the overall dimensions of known last and upper stages of launch vehicles makes it possible to single out five compact groups of such objects from the NORAD catalog in the 500-2000 km altitude interval. The orbits of objects of each group have approximately the same inclinations. The features of the mutual distribution of the orbital planes of LSD objects in the group are shown in a portrait of the evolution of deviations of the right ascension of ascending nodes (RAAN). In the case of the first three groups (inclinations of 71°, 74°, and 81°), the straight lines of relative RAAN deviations of object orbits barely intersect each other. The fourth (83°) and fifth (97°-100°) LSD groups include a considerable number of objects whose orbits are described by straight lines (diagonals), which intersect other lines many times. The use of diagonals makes it possible to significantly reduce the temporal and total characteristic velocity expenditures required for object flybys, but it complicates determination of the flyby sequence. Diagonal solutions can be obtained using elements of graph theory. A solution to the flyby problem is presented for the case of group 5, formed of LSD objects at sun-synchronous orbits.

  11. Physiological and lifestyle factors contributing to risk and severity of peri-orbital dark circles in the Brazilian population*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Mary S; Schalka, Sérgio; Vanderover, Garrett; Fthenakis, Christina G.; Christopher, J; Bombarda, Patricia Camarano Pinto; Bueno, Juliana Regina; Viscomi, Bianca Lenci Inácio; Bombarda Júnior, Mário Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Peri-orbital dark circles are a cosmetic concern worldwide, and have been attributed to hyperpigmentation from allergy or atopic dermatitis, blood stasis, structural shadowing effects, and a thin epidermis/dermis under the eye. It is of interest to better understand lifestyle and demographic risk factors and the relative impact of melanin, blood and epidermal/dermal factors on the severity of Peri-orbital dark circles. OBJECTIVE To compare by non-invasive imaging the impact of biological factors to a visual grading scale for Peri-orbital dark circles, and test the correlation of various demographic factors with Peri-orbital dark circles. METHODS Subjects completed a lifestyle and health survey, and Peri-orbital dark circles severity was evaluated using standardized photographs. Hyperspectral image analysis was used to assess the contributions of melanin, blood volume, degree of blood oxygen saturation, and dermal scattering. RESULTS Family history was the most significant risk factor for Peri-orbital dark circles. The average age of onset was 24 years, and earlier onset correlated with higher severity scores. Asthma was significantly associated with Peri-orbital dark circles scores, but self-reported allergy was not. In this study, sleep was not correlated with Peri-orbital dark circles scores. Hyperspectral imaging indicated that melanin was the dominant correlate for Peri-orbital dark circles severity, while oxygen saturation was secondary. The difference between under-eye and cheek measurements for ∆L*and ∆E* were the most significant instrumental parameters correlated with visual assessment of Peri-orbital dark circles severity. CONCLUSION Although typically associated with lack of sleep, risk of Peri-orbital dark circles is primarily hereditary. The main factors contributing to the appearance of Peri-orbital dark circles are melanin and (deoxygenated) blood. PMID:26375218

  12. MECHANICAL ANALYSIS OF ORBIT TRACKING MOVEMENT OF FEED SYSTEM IN LARGE SPHERICAL RADIO-TELESCOPE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ming-zhi; SHEN Yu-ru; LIU Jun; NA Bai

    2005-01-01

    The curve equation and its mechanics analysis of suspended-cable under the condition of end load are given. Then on the basis of it, the mechanical analysis of suspended-cable system for large spherical radio-telescope is studied, and procedures of the control for the orbit tracking movement of the line feed in large spherical radiotelescope are given. The validity of the results mentioned above is confirmed by means of computer simulations.

  13. Analysis of electron correlation effects and contributions of NMR J-couplings from occupied localized molecular orbitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarycz, Natalia; Aucar, Gustavo A

    2012-02-02

    NMR J-coupling calculations at the second-order of polarization propagator approach, SOPPA, are among the most reliable. They include a high percentage of the total electron correlation effects in saturated and unsaturated molecular systems. Furthermore, J-couplings are quite sensitive to the whole electronic molecular framework. We present in this article the first study of all three response mechanisms, Fermi contact, FC, spin-dipolar, SD and paramagnetic spin-orbital, PSO, for J-couplings with occupied localized molecular orbitals at the SOPPA level of approach. Even though SOPPA results are not invariant under unitary transformations, the difference between results obtained with canonical and localized molecular orbitals, LMOs, are small enough to permit its application with confidence. The following small-size saturated and unsaturated compounds were analyzed: CH(4), CH(3)F, C(2)H(6), NH(3), C(2)H(4), CH(2)NH, H(2)C═CHF, and FHC═CHF. The local character of the FC mechanism that appears in J-couplings of these molecular models is shown through the analysis of contributions from LMOs. The importance of including the electron correlation on the engaged bonding orbitals for one-bond couplings is emphasized. Almost all electron correlation effects are included in such orbitals. Interesting findings were the large contributions by s-type LMOs to the C-H and C-C J-couplings; they are responsible for the variation of (1)J(C-C) when going from ethane to ethene and to 1,2-difluoroethene. The previously proposed hyperconjugative transfer mechanism has been tested. Among other tests we found the difference anti-syn of one-bond (1)J(C-H) in imine as due to both the corresponding σ(C-H) and the lone-pair, LP, contribution. Geminal and vicinal J-couplings were also analyzed. Our findings are in accord with a previous work by Pople and Bothner-by, who considered results taken from calculations or empirical data. For all geminal couplings the pattern of J-couplings, like

  14. Incompatibility of FRC `Self--Colliding Beams' with Classical Large Orbit Theory and Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglich, Bogdan

    2012-03-01

    Rosenbluth^1: ``One key physics issue is the behavior of very large gyro radius systems, for which the usual thermal physics is inadequate.''- Rostoker^2 posited (1) 0.42 KeV d^+ FRC can achieve confinement^ τ =30 s observed^3 in self-colliding orbits (SCO) of 725 KeV d^+,^ stabilized by magnet focusing^4 and electrons^5 ; (2) FRC result ^6τ=2 x10-3 s is ``record long lived plasma state for advanced, aneutronic fuels ''; (3) non-intersecting collision-less orbits produce nuclear reactions. (i) Bz(r) of FRC is defocusing, field index n>0. From single particle orbit theory^7,8 destructive instability must occur with τ^ AIP CP 311, 292 (93); 9. J.App.Phys.46, 2915 (75); 10. NIM A346 322 (93); 11.NIM 144, 65 (77)

  15. An on-orbit experiment for dynamics and control of large structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, H. J.; Schock, R. W.; Waites, H. B.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to the definition of the on-orbit dynamic testing that is currently being planned for the flight of a large solar array test article, the Solar Array Flight Experiment (SAFE 1), which consists of a coilable longeron mast that deploys a large solar array blanket. Also discussed is the design of an additional experiment employing this structure in conjunction with a two- or three-axis gimbal system, in order to demonstrate control techniques applicable to such large structures. SAFE 1 experiment objectives, hardware, software, and the experimental operations foreseen are discussed.

  16. The Orbital Nature of 81 Ellipsoidal Red Giant Binaries in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, J. D.; Wood, P. R.; Nicholls, C. P.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we collect a sample of 81 ellipsoidal red giant binaries in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), and we study their orbital natures individually and statistically. The sample contains 59 systems with circular orbits and 22 systems with eccentric orbits. We derive orbital solutions using the 2010 version of the Wilson–Devinney code. The sample is selection-bias corrected, and the orbital parameter distributions are compared to model predictions for the LMC and to observations in the solar vicinity. The masses of the red giant primaries are found to range from about 0.6 to 9 {M}ȯ with a peak at around 1.5 {M}ȯ , in agreement with studies of the star formation history of the LMC, which find a burst of star formation beginning around 4 Gyr ago. The observed distribution of mass ratios q={m}2/{m}1 is more consistent with the flat q distribution derived for the solar vicinity by Raghavan et al. than it is with the solar vicinity q distribution derived by Duquennoy & Mayor. There is no evidence for an excess number of systems with equal mass components. We find that about 20% of the ellipsoidal binaries have eccentric orbits, twice the fraction estimated by Soszynski et al. Our eccentricity evolution test shows that the existence of eccentric ellipsoidal red giant binaries on the upper parts of the red giant branch (RGB) can only be explained if tidal circularization rates are ∼1/100 the rates given by the usual theory of tidal dissipation in convective stars.

  17. Interface orbital engineering of large-gap topological states: Decorating gold on a Si(111) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bing; Jin, Kyung-Hwan; Zhuang, Houlong L.; Zhang, Lizhi; Liu, Feng

    2016-03-01

    Intensive effort has recently been made in search of topological insulators (TIs) that have great potential in spintronics applications. In this paper, a novel concept of overlayer induced interfacial TI phase in conventional semiconductor surface is proposed. The first-principles calculations demonstrate that a p -band-element X (X =In , Bi, and Pb) decorated d -band surface, such as Au/Si(111) surface [X /Au/Si(111)] of an existing experimental system, offers a promising prototype for TIs. Specifically, Bi/Au/Si(111) and Pb/Au/Si(111) are identified to be large-gap TIs. A p -d band inversion mechanism induced by growth of X in the Au/Si(111) surface is revealed to function at different coverage of X with different lattice symmetries, suggesting a general approach of interface orbital engineering of large-gap TIs via tuning the interfacial atomic orbital position of X relative to Au.

  18. Near Earth asteroid resource utilisation for large in-orbit reflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, C. R.

    2016-11-01

    The resources offered by the family of near Earth asteroids could provide bulk materials to support future space science ventures, both crewed missions and space-based astronomy. Using low-energy transfer trajectories small near Earth asteroids could be captured directly, or their material resources returned to Earth orbit or the Lagrange points. With novel fabrication methods, such as additive layer manufacturing, large-scale space structures including optical and radio telescopes could in principle be assembled from such resources. Indeed, with bulk materials readily available, very large numbers of structures could be fabricated in-situ for interferometry applications.

  19. Preliminary results on the dynamics of large and flexible space structures in Halo orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colagrossi, Andrea; Lavagna, Michèle

    2017-05-01

    The global exploration roadmap suggests, among other ambitious future space programmes, a possible manned outpost in lunar vicinity, to support surface operations and further astronaut training for longer and deeper space missions and transfers. In particular, a Lagrangian point orbit location - in the Earth- Moon system - is suggested for a manned cis-lunar infrastructure; proposal which opens an interesting field of study from the astrodynamics perspective. Literature offers a wide set of scientific research done on orbital dynamics under the Three-Body Problem modelling approach, while less of it includes the attitude dynamics modelling as well. However, whenever a large space structure (ISS-like) is considered, not only the coupled orbit-attitude dynamics should be modelled to run more accurate analyses, but the structural flexibility should be included too. The paper, starting from the well-known Circular Restricted Three-Body Problem formulation, presents some preliminary results obtained by adding a coupled orbit-attitude dynamical model and the effects due to the large structure flexibility. In addition, the most relevant perturbing phenomena, such as the Solar Radiation Pressure (SRP) and the fourth-body (Sun) gravity, are included in the model as well. A multi-body approach has been preferred to represent possible configurations of the large cis-lunar infrastructure: interconnected simple structural elements - such as beams, rods or lumped masses linked by springs - build up the space segment. To better investigate the relevance of the flexibility effects, the lumped parameters approach is compared with a distributed parameters semi-analytical technique. A sensitivity analysis of system dynamics, with respect to different configurations and mechanical properties of the extended structure, is also presented, in order to highlight drivers for the lunar outpost design. Furthermore, a case study for a large and flexible space structure in Halo orbits around

  20. The On-Orbit Calibrations for the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, Aous A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Ajello, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Ampe, J.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Anderson, B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.; Bagagli, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, Guido; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bartelt, J.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bastieri, Denis; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bederede, D.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Bellardi, F.; /INFN, Pisa; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Belli, F.; /Frascati /Rome U.,Tor Vergata; Berenji, B.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bisello, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Ecole Polytechnique /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /DAPNIA, Saclay /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Washington U., Seattle /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /Kalmar U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /DAPNIA, Saclay /ASDC, Frascati /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /George Mason U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /DAPNIA, Saclay /NASA, Goddard /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; /more authors..

    2011-11-17

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on-board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope began its on-orbit operations on June 23, 2008. Calibrations, defined in a generic sense, correspond to synchronization of trigger signals, optimization of delays for latching data, determination of detector thresholds, gains and responses, evaluation of the perimeter of the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA), measurements of live time, of absolute time, and internal and spacecraft boresight alignments. Here we describe on-orbit calibration results obtained using known astrophysical sources, galactic cosmic rays, and charge injection into the front-end electronics of each detector. Instrument response functions will be described in a separate publication. This paper demonstrates the stability of calibrations and describes minor changes observed since launch. These results have been used to calibrate the LAT datasets to be publicly released in August 2009.

  1. Sequence Planning for On-Orbit Assembly of Large Space Truss Structures in a Multirobot Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Jifeng; WANG Ping; CUI Naigang

    2006-01-01

    An approach to sequence planning for on-orbit assembly of large space truss structures in a multirobot environment is presented. A hierarchical representation of large space truss structures at the structural volume element level and strut level is adopted. The representation of connectivity matrix and directed graph is respectively presented at the strut level and SVE level. The multirobot environment that consists of autonomous space robots and struts is supposed. Then the multirobot serial assembly strategy, assembly states, assembly tasks and assembly sequences are described. The assembly sequence planning algorithms at the strut level and SVE level are respectively discussed. The results of the simulations show that this approach is feasible and efficient. Two extensions of this approach include more accurate assessment of the efficiency representation and improvements in planning algorithm. In the future, the assembly sequence planning of more large space truss structures and complex multirobot environments and assembly tasks will be considered.

  2. Does cerebral large-artery disease contribute to cognitive impairment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Kimura

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: Impaired cognition was observed in some of the non-demented patients with CLAD. Older age, drinking habit, severe PVH and decreased cerebral perfusion contributed to their poor cognitive performance. Strict treatment of atherosclerosis and intervention for CLAD might be necessary to prevent cognitive decline in these patients.

  3. An optimum organizational structure for a large earth-orbiting multidisciplinary Space Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragusa, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to identify an optimum hypothetical organizational structure for a large earth-orbiting multidisciplinary research and applications (R&A) Space Base manned by a mixed crew of technologists. Since such a facility does not presently exist, in situ empirical testing was not possible. Study activity was, therefore, concerned with the identification of a desired organizational structural model rather than the empirical testing of it. The essential finding of this research was that a four-level project type 'total matrix' model will optimize the efficiency and effectiveness of Space Base technologists.

  4. Detection of a large valley-orbit splitting in silicon with two-donor spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, B; Dupont-Ferrier, E; Voisin, B; Cobian, M; Jehl, X; Wacquez, R; Vinet, M; Niquet, Y-M; Sanquer, M

    2012-05-18

    We measure a large valley-orbit splitting for shallow isolated phosphorus donors in a silicon gated nanowire. This splitting is close to the bulk value and well above previous reports in silicon nanostructures. It was determined using a double dopant transport spectroscopy which eliminates artifacts induced by the environment. Quantitative simulations taking into account the position of the donors with respect to the Si/SiO2 interface and electric field in the wire show that the values found are consistent with the device geometry.

  5. Specific effects of large asteroids on the orbits of terrestrial planets and the ASETEP database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljbaae, S.; Souchay, J.

    2012-04-01

    The necessity to take into account the perturbations caused by a large number of asteroids on the terrestrial planets is fundamental in the construction of modern numerical ephemeris on the solar system. Therefore about 300 of the largest asteroids were taken into account in recent ephemeris. Yet, the uncertainty on the mass values of the great majority of these asteroids constitutes a crucial and the main limit of accuracy of this ephemeris. Consequently, it is important to conduct a specific and detailed study of their individual effects especially on the terrestrial planets, which are far more affected than the giant planets. This was already done explicitly, but only for Mars and for only two orbital elements (a and λ). We aim both to confirm these previous results and to extend the study to all orbital elements and to the other three terrestrial planets (Mercury, Venus and the Earth), which are priori less affected by asteroid perturbations. Our methodology consists in several steps: we carried out precise computations of the orbital motions of the planets at short (100 y) and longer (1000 y) time scales with numerical integration. For that purpose we included the eight planets and also considered 43 of the most powerful asteroids. These were added to the numerical integrations once separately and once combined to determine their specific effects on the orbital elements of the Earth and the three other terrestrial planets. This procedure also allowed us to assess the spatial geocentric coordinates of the three terrestrial planets. We determined the signal that represents the effects by simple subtraction. Then we systematically analyzed this signal by FFT (fast Fourier transform), and finally we adjusted the signal with a set of sinusoidal components. We analyzed in detail the variations of the six orbital elements a, e, i, Ω, ˜ ω and λ of Mercury, Venus, the Earth-Moon barycenter (EMB) and Mars that are caused by the individual influences of the set of

  6. Calculation of the paramagnetism of large carbon nanotubes, using a parameter-independent molecular orbital model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, J. R. Alvarez

    A previous self-consistent field molecular orbital method, able to describe systems having a large number of unpaired electrons, n, is reviewed and improved. This method is applied to the study of paramagnetism in large (1,000-16,000 atoms) zigzag carbon nanotubes, represented by their n values. The computational scheme is based on the Hückel neglect differential overlap approach. It is shown that dependence of n on the semiempirical parameters is very small, and so they can be removed from the calculation. Enhancement of the paramagnetism (increase of n), by use of a strong external magnetic field, is also studied. Finally, the dependence of the Fermi one-electron potential energies and the spin atomic densities on both the parameters and the shape of the nanotubes is analyzed.0

  7. Large anisotropic Fe orbital moments in perpendicularly magnetized Co2FeAl Heusler alloy thin films revealed by angular-dependent x-ray magnetic circular dichroism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabayashi, Jun; Sukegawa, Hiroaki; Wen, Zhenchao; Inomata, Koichiro; Mitani, Seiji

    2013-09-01

    Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) in Heusler alloy Co2FeAl thin films sharing an interface with a MgO layer is investigated by angular-dependent x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. Orbital and spin magnetic moments are deduced separately for Fe and Co 3d electrons. In addition, the PMA energies are estimated using the orbital magnetic moments parallel and perpendicular to the film surfaces. We found that PMA in Co2FeAl is determined mainly by the contribution of Fe atoms with large orbital magnetic moments, which are enhanced at the interface between Co2FeAl and MgO. Furthermore, element specific magnetization curves of Fe and Co are found to be similar, suggesting the existence of ferromagnetic coupling between Fe and Co PMA directions.

  8. Precise Orbit Determination of BeiDou Satellites with Contributions from Chinese National Continuous Operating Reference Stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Chen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The precise orbit determination (POD for BeiDou satellites is usually limited by the insufficient quantity and poor distribution of ground tracking stations. To cope with this problem, this study used the GPS and BeiDou joint POD method based on Chinese national continuous operating reference stations (CNCORS and IGS/MGEX stations. The results show that the 3D RMS of the differences of overlapping arcs is better than 22 cm for geostationary orbit (GEO satellites and better than 10 cm for inclined geosynchronous orbit (IGSO and medium earth orbit (MEO satellites. The radial RMS is better than 2 cm for all three types of BeiDou satellites. The results of satellite laser ranging (SLR residuals show that the RMS of the IGSO and MEO satellites is better than 5 cm, whereas the GEO satellite has a systematic bias. This study investigates the contributions of CNCORS to the POD of BeiDou satellites. The results show that after the incorporation of CNCORS, the precision of overlapping arcs of the GEO, IGSO, and MEO satellites is improved by 15.5%, 57.5%, and 5.3%, respectively. In accordance with the improvement in the precision of overlapping arcs, the accuracy of the IGSO and MEO satellites assessed by the SLR is improved by 30.1% and 4.8%, respectively. The computation results and analysis demonstrate that the inclusion of CNCORS yields the biggest contribution in the improvement of orbit accuracy for IGSO satellites, when compared to GEO satellites, while the orbit improvement for MEO satellites is the lowest due to their global coverage.

  9. Large engine cylinder honing as a contribution to emissions reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Josef [Nagel Maschinen- und Werkzeugfabrik GmbH, Nuertingen (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    As well as new combustion processes and aftertreatment, increasingly rigorous environmental protection regulations are also promoting advances in engine manufacturing techniques. These measures include optimised surfaces made possible using the most modern honing technologies, such as those already in widespread use in the manufacture of automotive engines. The transfer of these honing technologies to large high and medium speed engines is best achieved using new machining concepts. (orig.)

  10. Orbital Monitoring of the AstraLux Large M-dwarf Multiplicity Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Janson, Markus; Brandner, Wolfgang; Bonnefoy, Mickael; Schlieder, Joshua; Kohler, Rainer; Hormuth, Felix; Henning, Thomas; Hippler, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Orbital monitoring of M-type binaries is essential for constraining their fundamental properties. This is particularly useful in young systems, where the extended pre-main sequence evolution can allow for precise isochronal dating. Here, we present the continued astrometric monitoring of the more than 200 binaries of the AstraLux Large Multiplicity Survey, building both on our previous work, archival data, and new astrometric data spanning the range of 2010-2012. The sample is very young overall -- all included stars have known X-ray emission, and a significant fraction (18%) of them have recently also been identified as members of young moving groups in the Solar neighborhood. We identify ~30 targets that both have indications of being young and for which an orbit either has been closed or appears possible to close in a reasonable timeframe (a few years to a few decades). One of these cases, GJ 4326, is however identified as probably being substantially older than has been implied from its apparent moving gr...

  11. The Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter : An ESA Contribution to the Europa-Jupiter System Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drossart, Pierre; Blanc, M.; Lebreton, J. P.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Greeley, R.; Fujimoto, M.; EJSM/Jupiter Science Definition Team

    2008-09-01

    In the framework of an outer planets mission, under study after the NASA-Juno mission, the Europa-Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) would combine a fleet of up to three satellites in order to investigate in depth many questions related to the Jupiter System. These investigations are essential for our understanding of the emergence and evolution of habitable worlds, not only within the Solar System, but also for extrasolar planets investigations. Scientific targets of EJSM will focus on Europa and Ganymede as a key pair of Galilean satellites, to address the questions on their habitability, formation, and internal structure, as well as the coupling with the whole Jovian system : Jupiter's atmosphere and interior, magnetosphere and magnetodisk. .In combination with a Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO likely provided by NASA) and a Jupiter Magnetospheric Orbiter (JMO likely provided by JAXA), ESA is studying a Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). The mission scenario includes a direct launch in 2020 with a transfer time to Jupiter of 6 years. After the orbit insertion around Jupiter, a first phase ( 2 years) will be devoted to Jupiter system and Callisto studies, with multiple flybys of Callisto planned at low altitude ( 200 km), followed by a Ganymede orbit insertion and extensive study of Ganymede ( 1 year). In-depth comparative study of inner (Io and Europa) and outer (Ganymede and Callisto) satellites with combined payload of JEO and JGO will address the question of the relative geological evolution of the satellites. On JGO, the transport phenomena in the magnetosphere of Jupiter will be studied in combination with JMO, and the Ganymede magnetosphere will be observed in situ. Jupiter atmosphere investigations on JGO will focus on coupling phenomena between troposphere, stratosphere and mesosphere, the stratospheric composition and the question of thermospheric heating.

  12. Folding and unfolding of large-size shell construction for application in Earth orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondyurin, Alexey; Pestrenina, Irena; Pestrenin, Valery; Rusakov, Sergey

    2016-07-01

    A future exploration of space requires a technology of large module for biological, technological, logistic and other applications in Earth orbits [1-3]. This report describes the possibility of using large-sized shell structures deployable in space. Structure is delivered to the orbit in the spaceship container. The shell is folded for the transportation. The shell material is either rigid plastic or multilayer prepreg comprising rigid reinforcements (such as reinforcing fibers). The unfolding process (bringing a construction to the unfolded state by loading the internal pressure) needs be considered at the presence of both stretching and bending deformations. An analysis of the deployment conditions (the minimum internal pressure bringing a construction from the folded state to the unfolded state) of large laminated CFRP shell structures is formulated in this report. Solution of this mechanics of deformable solids (MDS) problem of the shell structure is based on the following assumptions: the shell is made of components whose median surface has a reamer; in the separate structural element relaxed state (not stressed and not deformed) its median surface coincides with its reamer (this assumption allows choose the relaxed state of the structure correctly); structural elements are joined (sewn together) by a seam that does not resist rotation around the tangent to the seam line. The ways of large shell structures folding, whose median surface has a reamer, are suggested. Unfolding of cylindrical, conical (full and truncated cones), and large-size composite shells (cylinder-cones, cones-cones) is considered. These results show that the unfolding pressure of such large-size structures (0.01-0.2 atm.) is comparable to the deploying pressure of pneumatic parts (0.001-0.1 atm.) [3]. It would be possible to extend this approach to investigate the unfolding process of large-sized shells with ruled median surface or for non-developable surfaces. This research was

  13. Orbital Monitoring of the AstraLux Large M-dwarf Multiplicity Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janson, Markus; Bergfors, Carolina; Brandner, Wolfgang; Bonnefoy, Mickaël; Schlieder, Joshua; Köhler, Rainer; Hormuth, Felix; Henning, Thomas; Hippler, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    Orbital monitoring of M-type binaries is essential for constraining their fundamental properties. This is particularly useful in young systems, where the extended pre-main-sequence evolution can allow for precise isochronal dating. Here, we present the continued astrometric monitoring of the more than 200 binaries of the AstraLux Large Multiplicity Survey, building both on our previous work, archival data, and new astrometric data spanning the range of 2010-2012. The sample is very young overall—all included stars have known X-ray emission, and a significant fraction (18%) of them have recently also been identified as members of young moving groups in the solar neighborhood. We identify ~30 targets that both have indications of being young and for which an orbit either has been closed or appears possible to close in a reasonable time frame (a few years to a few decades). One of these cases, GJ 4326, is, however, identified as probably being substantially older than has been implied from its apparent moving group membership, based on astrometric and isochronal arguments. With further astrometric monitoring, these targets will provide a set of empirical isochrones, against which theoretical isochrones can be calibrated, and which can be used to evaluate the precise ages of nearby young moving groups. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, under observing programs 081.C-0314(A), 082.C-0053(A), and 084.C-0812(A), and on observations collected at the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto, operated jointly by the Max-Planck Institute for Astronomy and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC).

  14. Russian contribution to ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter: Atmospheric Chemistry Suite (ACS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakun, Alexey; Korablev, Oleg; Trokhimovskiy, Alexander; Grigoriev, Alexey; Anufreychik, Konstantin; Fedorova, Anna; Ignatiev, Nikolay; Ivanov, Yuriy; Moshkin, Boris; Kalinnikov, Yuriy; Montmessin, Franck

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric Chemistry Suite (ACS) is a part of science payload of Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO), ExoMars mission. This project developed by European Space Agency (ESA) in collaboration with Russian Space Agency (Roscosmos). Russian contribution to ExoMars TGO is the Proton rocket and two science instruments ACS (three infrared spectrometers) and FREND (neutron detector). ACS consists of three infrared spectrometers (ACS/NIR, ACS/MIR and ACS/TIRVIM) capable to take spectral measurements from near to thermal infrared range simultaneously or separately. Spectrometric channels of ACS share common mechanical, electrical, and thermal interfaces. Electronic box (ACS/BE) provides to spectrometric channels power and data transfer interfaces. SpaceWire link is used for science data transfer and MIL-1553 link - for commanding and housekeeping data transfer. The NIR channel is an echelle spectrometer with acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) for the selection of diffraction orders. ACS NIR is capable to perform nadir and occultation observations. NIR covers the spectral range of 0.7-1.7 μm with resolving power of ~25000. NIR will perform unique for TGO instruments nightglow science (searching for O2, OH, NO nightglow emissions on Mars). From the 1.38 μm band NIR will do water vapour mapping in nadir and H2O vertical profiling in solar occultations. High resolution NIR measurements of 1.27 μm O2(a1Δg) dayglow will supply indirect ozone observations on the dayside on nadir. In solar occultation mode, the O2 vertical profiles will be measured from the surface (in case of low dust activity) to the 40 km altitude based on 0.76 μm absorption band. Together with MIR channel in solar occultation NIR will support the measurements of CO2 density profiles (based on 1.43 μm band) and aerosols characterization from 0.7 to 4 μm. The wide spectral range will allow not just determine aerosol particle sizes and density at different altitudes, but also distinguish between dust and ice particles

  15. CeRh3B2: A ferromagnet with anomalously large Ce 5d spin and orbital magnetic moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaouanc, A.; Dalmas de Réotier, P.; Sanchez, J.-P.; Tschentscher, Th.; Lejay, P.

    1998-01-01

    We report a high-energy magnetic-Compton-scattering study performed on the ferromagnet CeRh3B2. This technique solely measures the electron spin magnetic moments. In contrast to a number of Ce intermetallics with nonmagnetic elements, the Ce 5d spin moment is found to be large and parallel to the Ce 4f spin moment. Therefore the Kondo effect does not play a key role for CeRh3B2. The inferred large Ce 5d orbital magnetic moment is a signature of the strong spin-orbit interaction for the Ce 5d band.

  16. Orbits of massive satellite galaxies - I. A close look at the Large Magellanic Cloud and a new orbital history for M33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ekta; Besla, Gurtina; Sohn, Sangmo Tony

    2017-02-01

    The Milky Way (MW) and M31 both harbour massive satellite galaxies, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and M33, which may comprise up to 10 per cent of their host's total mass. Massive satellites can change the orbital barycentre of the host-satellite system by tens of kiloparsec and are cosmologically expected to harbour dwarf satellite galaxies of their own. Assessing the impact of these effects crucially depends on the orbital histories of the LMC and M33. Here, we revisit the dynamics of the MW-LMC system and present the first detailed analysis of the M31-M33 system utilizing high-precision proper motions and statistics from the dark-matter-only Illustris cosmological simulation. With the latest Hubble Space Telescope proper motion measurements of M31, we reliably constrain M33's interaction history with its host. In particular, like the LMC, M33 is either on its first passage (tinf picture and provide further insight about their host masses. We conclude that, cosmologically, massive satellites such as the LMC and M33 are likely completing their first orbits about their hosts. We also find that the orbital energies of such analogues prefer an MW halo mass ˜1.5 × 1012 M⊙ and an M31 halo mass ≥1.5 × 1012 M⊙. Despite conventional wisdom, we conclude it is highly improbable that M33 made a close (<100 kpc) approach to M31 recently (tperi < 3 Gyr ago). Such orbits are rare (<1 per cent) within the 4σ error space allowed by observations. This conclusion cannot be explained by perturbative effects through four-body encounters amongst the MW, M31, M33, and the LMC. This surprising result implies that we must search for a new explanation for M33's strongly warped gas and stellar discs.

  17. Highly correlated configuration interaction calculations on water with large orbital bases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almora-Díaz, César X., E-mail: xalmora@fisica.unam.mx [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 20-364, México 01000, México (Mexico)

    2014-05-14

    A priori selected configuration interaction (SCI) with truncation energy error [C. F. Bunge, J. Chem. Phys. 125, 014107 (2006)] and CI by parts [C. F. Bunge and R. Carbó-Dorca, J. Chem. Phys. 125, 014108 (2006)] are used to approximate the total nonrelativistic electronic ground state energy of water at fixed experimental geometry with CI up to sextuple excitations. Correlation-consistent polarized core-valence basis sets (cc-pCVnZ) up to sextuple zeta and augmented correlation-consistent polarized core-valence basis sets (aug-cc-pCVnZ) up to quintuple zeta quality are employed. Truncation energy errors range between less than 1 μhartree, and 100 μhartree for the largest orbital set. Coupled cluster CCSD and CCSD(T) calculations are also obtained for comparison. Our best upper bound, −76.4343 hartree, obtained by SCI with up to sextuple excitations with a cc-pCV6Z basis recovers more than 98.8% of the correlation energy of the system, and it is only about 3 kcal/mol above the “experimental” value. Despite that the present energy upper bounds are far below all previous ones, comparatively large dispersion errors in the determination of the extrapolated energies to the complete basis set do not allow to determine a reliable estimation of the full CI energy with an accuracy better than 0.6 mhartree (0.4 kcal/mol)

  18. The Elliott-Yafet theory of spin relaxation generalized for large spin-orbit coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Annamária; Szolnoki, Lénard; Simon, Ferenc

    2016-03-01

    We generalize the Elliott-Yafet (EY) theory of spin relaxation in metals with inversion symmetry for the case of large spin-orbit coupling (SOC). The EY theory treats the SOC to the lowest order but this approach breaks down for metals of heavy elements (such as e.g. caesium or gold), where the SOC energy is comparable to the relevant band-band separation energies. The generalized theory is presented for a four-band model system without band dispersion, where analytic formulae are attainable for arbitrary SOC for the relation between the momentum- and spin-relaxation rates. As an extended description, we also consider an empirical pseudopotential approximation where SOC is deduced from the band potential (apart from an empirical scaling constant) and the spin-relaxation rate can be obtained numerically. Both approaches recover the usual EY theory for weak SOC and give that the spin-relaxation rate approaches the momentum-relaxation rate in the limit of strong SOC. We argue that this limit is realized in gold by analyzing spin relaxation data. A calculation of the g-factor shows that the empirical Elliott-relation, which links the g-factor and spin-relaxation rate, is retained even for strong SOC.

  19. No large population of unbound or wide-orbit Jupiter-mass planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mróz, Przemek; Udalski, Andrzej; Skowron, Jan; Poleski, Radosław; Kozłowski, Szymon; Szymański, Michał K.; Soszyński, Igor; Wyrzykowski, Łukasz; Pietrukowicz, Paweł; Ulaczyk, Krzysztof; Skowron, Dorota; Pawlak, Michał

    2017-08-01

    Planet formation theories predict that some planets may be ejected from their parent systems as result of dynamical interactions and other processes. Unbound planets can also be formed through gravitational collapse, in a way similar to that in which stars form. A handful of free-floating planetary-mass objects have been discovered by infrared surveys of young stellar clusters and star-forming regions as well as wide-field surveys, but these studies are incomplete for objects below five Jupiter masses. Gravitational microlensing is the only method capable of exploring the entire population of free-floating planets down to Mars-mass objects, because the microlensing signal does not depend on the brightness of the lensing object. A characteristic timescale of microlensing events depends on the mass of the lens: the less massive the lens, the shorter the microlensing event. A previous analysis of 474 microlensing events found an excess of ten very short events (1-2 days)—more than known stellar populations would suggest—indicating the existence of a large population of unbound or wide-orbit Jupiter-mass planets (reported to be almost twice as common as main-sequence stars). These results, however, do not match predictions of planet-formation theories and surveys of young clusters. Here we analyse a sample of microlensing events six times larger than that of ref. 11 discovered during the years 2010-15. Although our survey has very high sensitivity (detection efficiency) to short-timescale (1-2 days) microlensing events, we found no excess of events with timescales in this range, with a 95 per cent upper limit on the frequency of Jupiter-mass free-floating or wide-orbit planets of 0.25 planets per main-sequence star. We detected a few possible ultrashort-timescale events (with timescales of less than half a day), which may indicate the existence of Earth-mass and super-Earth-mass free-floating planets, as predicted by planet-formation theories.

  20. Urey Prize Lecture: Orbital Dynamics of Extrasolar Planets, Large and Small

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Eric B.

    2012-10-01

    For centuries, planet formation theories were fine tuned to explain the details of solar system. Since 1999, the Doppler technique has discovered dozens of multiple planet systems. The diversity of architectures of systems with giant planets challenged previous theories and led to insights into planet formation, orbital migration and the excitation of orbital eccentricities and inclinations. Recently, NASA's Kepler mission has identified over 300 systems with multiple transiting planet candidates, including many potentially rocky planets. Precise measurements of the orbital period and phase constrain the significance of mutual gravitational interactions and potential orbital resonances. For systems that are tightly-packed or near an orbital resonance, measurements of transit timing variations provide a new means for confirming transiting planets and detecting non-transiting planets in multiple planet systems, even around faint target stars. Over the course of the extended mission, Kepler is poised to measure the gravitational effects of mutual planetary perturbations for 200 planets, providing precise (but complex) constraints on planetary masses, densities and orbits. I will survey the systems with multiple transiting planet candidates identified by Kepler and discuss early efforts to translate these observations into new constraints on the formation and orbital evolution of planetary systems with low-mass planets.

  1. Orbits of Massive Satellite Galaxies: I. A Close Look at the Large Magellanic Cloud and a New Orbital History for M33

    CERN Document Server

    Patel, Ekta; Sohn, Tony

    2016-01-01

    The Milky Way (MW) and M31 both harbor massive satellite galaxies, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and M33, which may comprise up to 10 per cent of their host's total mass. Massive satellites can change the orbital barycentre of the host-satellite system by tens of kiloparsecs and are cosmologically expected to harbor dwarf satellite galaxies of their own. Assessing the impact of these effects depends crucially on the orbital histories of the LMC and M33. Here, we revisit the dynamics of the MW-LMC system and present the first detailed analysis of the M31-M33 system utilizing high precision proper motions and statistics from the dark matter-only Illustris cosmological simulation. With the latest Hubble Space Telescope proper motion measurements of M31, we reliably constrain M33's interaction history with its host. In particular, like the LMC, M33 is either on its first passage (t_{inf} =2x10^12 Msun), it is on a long period orbit of about 6 Gyr. Cosmological analogs of the LMC and M33 identified in Illustris...

  2. Large Quantum imaging of nonlocal spatial correlations induced by orbital angular momentum

    CERN Document Server

    Altman, A; Corndorf, E; Kumar, P; Barbosa, G A; Altman, Adam R.; K\\"{o}pr\\"{u}l\\"{u}, Kahraman G.; Corndorf, Eric; Kumar, Prem; Barbosa, Geraldo A.

    2004-01-01

    Through scanned coincidence counting, we probe the quantum image produced by parametric down conversion with a pump beam carrying orbital angular momentum. Nonlocal spatial correlations are manifested through splitting of the coincidence spot into two.

  3. J/ψ -pair production at large momenta: Indications for double parton scatterings and large α$_s^5$ contributions

    CERN Document Server

    Lansberg, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The recent observations of prompt J/psi-pair production by CMS at the LHC and by D0 at the Tevatron reveal the presence of different production mechanisms in different kinematical regions. We find out that next-to-leading-order single-parton-scattering contributions at alpha_s^5 dominate the yield at large transverse momenta of the pair. Our analysis further emphasises the importance of double-parton-scatterings --which are expected to dominate the yield at large rapidity differences-- at large invariant masses of the pair in the CMS acceptance. In addition, we provide the first exact --gauge-invariant and infrared-safe-- evaluation of a class of leading-P_T next-to-next-to-leading-order contributions, which are dominant in the region of large sub-leading transverse momenta, precisely where the colour-octet contributions can be non-negligible. Finally, we discuss the contribution from decays of excited charmonium states within both single- and double-parton scatterings and suggest measurements to distinguish ...

  4. NASA Orbital Debris Large-Object Baseline Population in ORDEM 3.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krisco, Paula H.; Vavrin, A. B.; Anz-Meador, P. D.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) has created and validated high fidelity populations of the debris environment for the latest Orbital Debris Engineering Model (ORDEM 3.0). Though the model includes fluxes of objects 10 um and larger, this paper considers particle fluxes for 1 cm and larger debris objects from low Earth orbit (LEO) through Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit (GTO). These are validated by several reliable radar observations through the Space Surveillance Network (SSN), Haystack, and HAX radars. ORDEM 3.0 populations were designed for the purpose of assisting, debris researchers and sensor developers in planning and testing. This environment includes a background derived from the LEO-to-GEO ENvironment Debris evolutionary model (LEGEND) with a Bayesian rescaling as well as specific events such as the FY-1C anti-satellite test, the Iridium 33/Cosmos 2251 accidental collision, and the Soviet/Russian Radar Ocean Reconnaissance Satellite (RORSAT) sodium-potassium droplet releases. The environment described in this paper is the most realistic orbital debris population larger than 1 cm, to date. We describe derivations of the background population and added specific populations. We present sample validation charts of our 1 cm and larger LEO population against Space Surveillance Network (SSN), Haystack, and HAX radar measurements.

  5. Combined fragment molecular orbital cluster in molecule approach to massively parallel electron correlation calculations for large systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlater, Alexander D; Zahariev, Federico; Gordon, Mark S

    2015-04-16

    The local correlation "cluster-in-molecule" (CIM) method is combined with the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method, providing a flexible, massively parallel, and near-linear scaling approach to the calculation of electron correlation energies for large molecular systems. Although the computational scaling of the CIM algorithm is already formally linear, previous knowledge of the Hartree-Fock (HF) reference wave function and subsequent localized orbitals is required; therefore, extending the CIM method to arbitrarily large systems requires the aid of low-scaling/linear-scaling approaches to HF and orbital localization. Through fragmentation, the combined FMO-CIM method linearizes the scaling, with respect to system size, of the HF reference and orbital localization calculations, achieving near-linear scaling at both the reference and electron correlation levels. For the 20-residue alanine α helix, the preliminary implementation of the FMO-CIM method captures 99.6% of the MP2 correlation energy, requiring 21% of the MP2 wall time. The new method is also applied to solvated adamantine to illustrate the multilevel capability of the FMO-CIM method.

  6. Energy Decomposition Analysis Based on Absolutely Localized Molecular Orbitals for Large-Scale Density Functional Theory Calculations in Drug Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, M J S; Fox, T; Tautermann, C S; Skylaris, C-K

    2016-07-12

    We report the development and implementation of an energy decomposition analysis (EDA) scheme in the ONETEP linear-scaling electronic structure package. Our approach is hybrid as it combines the localized molecular orbital EDA (Su, P.; Li, H. J. Chem. Phys., 2009, 131, 014102) and the absolutely localized molecular orbital EDA (Khaliullin, R. Z.; et al. J. Phys. Chem. A, 2007, 111, 8753-8765) to partition the intermolecular interaction energy into chemically distinct components (electrostatic, exchange, correlation, Pauli repulsion, polarization, and charge transfer). Limitations shared in EDA approaches such as the issue of basis set dependence in polarization and charge transfer are discussed, and a remedy to this problem is proposed that exploits the strictly localized property of the ONETEP orbitals. Our method is validated on a range of complexes with interactions relevant to drug design. We demonstrate the capabilities for large-scale calculations with our approach on complexes of thrombin with an inhibitor comprised of up to 4975 atoms. Given the capability of ONETEP for large-scale calculations, such as on entire proteins, we expect that our EDA scheme can be applied in a large range of biomolecular problems, especially in the context of drug design.

  7. The Mutual Orbit, Mass, and Density of the Large Transneptunian Binary System Varda and Ilmar\\"e

    CERN Document Server

    Grundy, W M; Benecchi, S D; Roe, H G; Noll, K S; Trujillo, C A; Thirouin, A; Stansberry, J A; Barker, E; Levison, H F

    2015-01-01

    From observations by the Hubble Space Telescope, Keck II Telescope, and Gemini North Telescope, we have determined the mutual orbit of the large transneptunian object (174567) Varda and its satellite Ilmar\\"e. These two objects orbit one another in a highly inclined, circular or near-circular orbit with a period of 5.75 days and a semimajor axis of 4810 km. This orbit reveals the system mass to be (2.664 +/- 0.064) x 10^20 kg, slightly greater than the mass of the second most massive main-belt asteroid (4) Vesta. The dynamical mass can in turn be combined with estimates of the surface area of the system from Herschel Space Telescope thermal observations to estimate a bulk density of 1.24 +0.50 -0.35 g cm^-3. Varda and Ilmar\\"e both have colors similar to the combined colors of the system, B-V = 0.886 +/- 0.025 and V-I = 1.156 +/- 0.029.

  8. Ancient planetary systems are orbiting a large fraction of white dwarf stars

    CERN Document Server

    Zuckerman, B; Klein, B; Koester, D; Jura, M

    2010-01-01

    Infrared studies have revealed debris likely related to planet formation in orbit around ~30% of youthful, intermediate mass, main sequence stars. We present evidence, based on atmospheric pollution by various elements heavier than helium, that a comparable fraction of the white dwarf descendants of such main sequence stars are orbited by planetary systems. These systems have survived, at least in part, through all stages of stellar evolution that precede the white dwarf. During the time interval (~200 million years) that a typical polluted white dwarf in our sample has been cooling it has accreted from its planetary system the mass of one of the largest asteroids in our solar system (e.g., Vesta or Ceres). Usually, this accreted mass will be only a fraction of the total mass of rocky material that orbits these white dwarfs; for plausible planetary system configurations we estimate that this total mass is likely to be at least equal to that of the Sun's asteroid belt, and perhaps much larger. We report abunda...

  9. The dynamics and control of large flexible space structures. Volume 3, part B: The modelling, dynamics, and stability of large Earth pointing orbiting structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainum, P. M.; Kumar, V. K.

    1980-01-01

    The dynamics and stability of large orbiting flexible beams, and platforms and dish type structures oriented along the local horizontal are treated both analytically and numerically. It is assumed that such structures could be gravitationally stabilized by attaching a rigid light-weight dumbbell at the center of mass by a spring loaded hinge which also could provide viscous damping. For the beam, the small amplitude inplane pitch motion, dumbbell librational motion, and the anti-symmetric elastic modes are all coupled. The three dimensional equations of motion for a circular flat plate and shallow spherical shell in orbit with a two-degree-of freedom gimballed dumbbell are also developed and show that only those elastic modes described by a single nodal diameter line are influenced by the dumbbell motion. Stability criteria are developed for all the examples and a sensitivity study of the system response characteristics to the key system parameters is carried out.

  10. Flyby of Large-Size Space Debris Objects Situated at Leo with Their Successive De-Orbiting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Baranov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Regarding the large-size space debris objects with a cross-section more than 5 m2 situated at LEO, it is possible to mark out 5 non-structured groups of such objects according to their spatial distribution. The orbits of objects in a group have approximately the same inclinations whereas the deviations in the Right Ascension of the Ascending node (RAAN may be arbitrary. The features of changing orbital planes’ mutual orientation in a group are seen from the RAAN deviations’ evolution portrait. The flights between the objects are being executed by a single active space vehicle (SV which captures a LSSD object and takes it away to the especially calculated circular or elliptical low disposal orbit (DO, and then returns back for the next object.The calculation of flyby maneuvers, in fact, breaks up into two independent tasks. At first, one can determine the parameters of the DO for each LSSD object using special software, so the coplanar maneuvers can be calculated ensuring the object’s transition to this orbit. Secondly, the flight to attain a new object is carried out from the DO of the previous object at the moment when their orbital planes will become equal. So it is possible to calculate the maneuvers, which help to return back for the next object, using numerical-analytical algorithm developed for noncoplanar rendez-vous of middle duration.The time interval for an active SV to stay at the DO is defined by difference of precession velocities of orbital planes of the de-orbited object and of the next object. The usage of a circular DO allows an LSSD object to leave promptly from the region (over 700 km where active SVs and other debris exist for a long time, whereas the apogee of the elliptical DO remains in the mentioned belt for 10 years. While forming elliptical DO one will need approximately 30% less of required summary characteristic velocity as compared with circular DO. The collision risk for an object staying at the elliptical DO

  11. Large spin-orbit torques in Pt/Co-Ni/W heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiawei; Qiu, Xuepeng; Legrand, William; Yang, Hyunsoo

    2016-07-01

    The spin orbit torques (SOTs) in perpendicularly magnetized Co-Ni multilayers sandwiched between two heavy metals (HM) have been studied. By exploring various HM materials, we show an efficient enhancement or cancellation of the total SOT, depending on the combination of the two HM materials. The maximum SOT effective field is obtained in Pt/Co-Ni/W heterostructures. We also model our double HM system and show that the effective spin Hall angle has a peak value at certain HM thicknesses. Measuring the SOT in Pt/Co-Ni/W for various W thicknesses confirms an effective spin Hall angle up to 0.45 in our double HM system.

  12. Introduction and Overview: Counseling Psychologists' Roles, Training, and Research Contributions to Large-Scale Disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Sue C.; Leach, Mark M.; Gerstein, Lawrence H.

    2011-01-01

    Counseling psychologists have responded to many disasters, including the Haiti earthquake, the 2001 terrorist attacks in the United States, and Hurricane Katrina. However, as a profession, their responses have been localized and nonsystematic. In this first of four articles in this contribution, "Counseling Psychology and Large-Scale Disasters,…

  13. The large-scale nebular pattern of a superwind binary in an eccentric orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyosun; Trejo, Alfonso; Liu, Sheng-Yuan; Sahai, Raghvendra; Taam, Ronald E.; Morris, Mark R.; Hirano, Naomi; Hsieh, I.-Ta

    2017-03-01

    Preplanetary nebulae and planetary nebulae are evolved, mass-losing stellar objects that show a wide variety of morphologies. Many of these nebulae consist of outer structures that are nearly spherical (spiral/shell/arc/halo) and inner structures that are highly asymmetric (bipolar/multipolar) 1,2 . The coexistence of such geometrically distinct structures is enigmatic because it hints at the simultaneous presence of both wide and close binary interactions, a phenomenon that has been attributed to stellar binary systems with eccentric orbits 3 . Here, we report high-resolution molecular line observations of the circumstellar spiral-shell pattern of AFGL 3068, an asymptotic giant branch star transitioning to the preplanetary nebula phase. The observations clearly reveal that the dynamics of the mass loss is influenced by the presence of an eccentric-orbit binary. This quintessential object opens a window on the nature of deeply embedded binary stars through the circumstellar spiral-shell patterns that reside at distances of several thousand au from the stars.

  14. Origin of Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy and Large Orbital Moment in Fe Atoms on MgO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, S; Donati, F; Stepanow, S; Rusponi, S; Paul, W; Gangopadhyay, S; Rau, I G; Pacchioni, G E; Gragnaniello, L; Pivetta, M; Dreiser, J; Piamonteze, C; Lutz, C P; Macfarlane, R M; Jones, B A; Gambardella, P; Heinrich, A J; Brune, H

    2015-12-04

    We report on the magnetic properties of individual Fe atoms deposited on MgO(100) thin films probed by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and scanning tunneling spectroscopy. We show that the Fe atoms have strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy with a zero-field splitting of 14.0±0.3  meV/atom. This is a factor of 10 larger than the interface anisotropy of epitaxial Fe layers on MgO and the largest value reported for Fe atoms adsorbed on surfaces. The interplay between the ligand field at the O adsorption sites and spin-orbit coupling is analyzed by density functional theory and multiplet calculations, providing a comprehensive model of the magnetic properties of Fe atoms in a low-symmetry bonding environment.

  15. Origin of Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy and Large Orbital Moment in Fe Atoms on MgO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, S.; Donati, F.; Stepanow, S.; Rusponi, S.; Paul, W.; Gangopadhyay, S.; Rau, I. G.; Pacchioni, G. E.; Gragnaniello, L.; Pivetta, M.; Dreiser, J.; Piamonteze, C.; Lutz, C. P.; Macfarlane, R. M.; Jones, B. A.; Gambardella, P.; Heinrich, A. J.; Brune, H.

    2015-12-01

    We report on the magnetic properties of individual Fe atoms deposited on MgO(100) thin films probed by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and scanning tunneling spectroscopy. We show that the Fe atoms have strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy with a zero-field splitting of 14.0 ±0.3 meV /atom . This is a factor of 10 larger than the interface anisotropy of epitaxial Fe layers on MgO and the largest value reported for Fe atoms adsorbed on surfaces. The interplay between the ligand field at the O adsorption sites and spin-orbit coupling is analyzed by density functional theory and multiplet calculations, providing a comprehensive model of the magnetic properties of Fe atoms in a low-symmetry bonding environment.

  16. Sensitivity of orbiting JEM-EUSO to large-scale cosmic-ray anisotropies

    CERN Document Server

    Denton, Peter B; Berlind, Andreas A; Richardson, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The two main advantages of space-based observation of extreme-energy ($\\gtrsim 10^{19}$~eV) cosmic-rays (EECRs) over ground-based observatories are the increased field of view, and the all-sky coverage with nearly uniform systematics of an orbiting observatory. The former guarantees increased statistics, whereas the latter enables a partitioning of the sky into spherical harmonics. We have begun an investigation, using the spherical harmonic technique, of the reach of \\J\\ into potential anisotropies in the extreme-energy cosmic-ray sky-map. The technique is explained here, and simulations are presented. The discovery of anisotropies would help to identify the long-sought origin of EECRs.

  17. Amygdala Contributions to Stimulus–Reward Encoding in the Macaque Medial and Orbital Frontal Cortex during Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averbeck, Bruno B.

    2017-01-01

    Orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), medial frontal cortex (MFC), and amygdala mediate stimulus–reward learning, but the mechanisms through which they interact are unclear. Here, we investigated how neurons in macaque OFC and MFC signaled rewards and the stimuli that predicted them during learning with and without amygdala input. Macaques performed a task that required them to evaluate two stimuli and then choose one to receive the reward associated with that option. Four main findings emerged. First, amygdala lesions slowed the acquisition and use of stimulus–reward associations. Further analyses indicated that this impairment was due, at least in part, to ineffective use of negative feedback to guide subsequent decisions. Second, the activity of neurons in OFC and MFC rapidly evolved to encode the amount of reward associated with each stimulus. Third, amygdalectomy reduced encoding of stimulus–reward associations during the evaluation of different stimuli. Reward encoding of anticipated and received reward after choices were made was not altered. Fourth, amygdala lesions led to an increase in the proportion of neurons in MFC, but not OFC, that encoded the instrumental response that monkeys made on each trial. These correlated changes in behavior and neural activity after amygdala lesions strongly suggest that the amygdala contributes to the ability to learn stimulus–reward associations rapidly by shaping encoding within OFC and MFC. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Altered functional interactions among orbital frontal cortex (OFC), medial frontal cortex (MFC), and amygdala are thought to underlie several psychiatric conditions, many related to reward learning. Here, we investigated the causal contribution of the amygdala to the development of neuronal activity in macaque OFC and MFC related to rewards and the stimuli that predict them during learning. Without amygdala inputs, neurons in both OFC and MFC showed decreased encoding of stimulus–reward associations. MFC also

  18. Amygdala Contributions to Stimulus-Reward Encoding in the Macaque Medial and Orbital Frontal Cortex during Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudebeck, Peter H; Ripple, Joshua A; Mitz, Andrew R; Averbeck, Bruno B; Murray, Elisabeth A

    2017-02-22

    Orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), medial frontal cortex (MFC), and amygdala mediate stimulus-reward learning, but the mechanisms through which they interact are unclear. Here, we investigated how neurons in macaque OFC and MFC signaled rewards and the stimuli that predicted them during learning with and without amygdala input. Macaques performed a task that required them to evaluate two stimuli and then choose one to receive the reward associated with that option. Four main findings emerged. First, amygdala lesions slowed the acquisition and use of stimulus-reward associations. Further analyses indicated that this impairment was due, at least in part, to ineffective use of negative feedback to guide subsequent decisions. Second, the activity of neurons in OFC and MFC rapidly evolved to encode the amount of reward associated with each stimulus. Third, amygdalectomy reduced encoding of stimulus-reward associations during the evaluation of different stimuli. Reward encoding of anticipated and received reward after choices were made was not altered. Fourth, amygdala lesions led to an increase in the proportion of neurons in MFC, but not OFC, that encoded the instrumental response that monkeys made on each trial. These correlated changes in behavior and neural activity after amygdala lesions strongly suggest that the amygdala contributes to the ability to learn stimulus-reward associations rapidly by shaping encoding within OFC and MFC.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Altered functional interactions among orbital frontal cortex (OFC), medial frontal cortex (MFC), and amygdala are thought to underlie several psychiatric conditions, many related to reward learning. Here, we investigated the causal contribution of the amygdala to the development of neuronal activity in macaque OFC and MFC related to rewards and the stimuli that predict them during learning. Without amygdala inputs, neurons in both OFC and MFC showed decreased encoding of stimulus-reward associations. MFC also showed

  19. LEMUR: Large European Module for solar Ultraviolet Research. European contribution to JAXA's Solar-C mission

    CERN Document Server

    Teriaca, Luca; Auchère, Frédéric; Brown, Charles M; Buchlin, Eric; Cauzzi, Gianna; Culhane, J Len; Curdt, Werner; Davila, Joseph M; Del Zanna, Giulio; Doschek, George A; Fineschi, Silvano; Fludra, Andrzej; Gallagher, Peter T; Green, Lucie; Harra, Louise K; Imada, Shinsuke; Innes, Davina; Kliem, Bernhard; Korendyke, Clarence; Mariska, John T; Martínez-Pillet, Valentin; Parenti, Susanna; Patsourakos, Spiros; Peter, Hardi; Poletto, Luca; Rutten, Rob; Schühle, Udo; Siemer, Martin; Shimizu, Toshifumi; Socas-Navarro, Hector; Solanki, Sami K; Spadaro, Daniele; Trujillo-Bueno, Javier; Tsuneta, Saku; Dominguez, Santiago Vargas; Vial, Jean-Claude; Walsh, Robert; Warren, Harry P; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Winter, Berend; Young, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the solar outer atmosphere requires concerted, simultaneous solar observations from the visible to the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and soft X-rays, at high spatial resolution (between 0.1" and 0.3"), at high temporal resolution (on the order of 10 s, i.e., the time scale of chromospheric dynamics), with a wide temperature coverage (0.01 MK to 20 MK, from the chromosphere to the flaring corona), and the capability of measuring magnetic fields through spectropolarimetry at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. Simultaneous spectroscopic measurements sampling the entire temperature range are particularly important. These requirements are fulfilled by the Japanese Solar-C mission (Plan B), composed of a spacecraft in a geosynchronous orbit with a payload providing a significant improvement of imaging and spectropolarimetric capabilities in the UV, visible, and near-infrared with respect to what is available today and foreseen in the near future. The Large European Module for solar Ultraviolet Research...

  20. Study of a prototypical convective boundary layer observed during BLLAST: contributions by large-scale forcings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Pietersen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We study the disturbances of CBL dynamics due to large-scale atmospheric contributions for a representative day observed during the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST campaign. We first reproduce the observed boundary-layer dynamics by combining the Dutch Atmospheric Large-Eddy Simulation (DALES model with a mixed-layer theory based model. We find that by only taking surface and entrainment fluxes into account, the boundary-layer height is overestimated by 70%. If we constrain our numerical experiments with the BLLAST comprehensive data set, we are able to quantify the contributions of advection of heat and moisture, and subsidence. We find that subsidence has a clear diurnal pattern. Supported by the presence of a nearby mountain range, this pattern suggests that not only synoptic scales exert their influence on the boundary layer, but also mesoscale circulations. Finally, we study whether the vertical and temporal evolution of turbulent variables are influenced by these large-scale forcings. Our model results show good correspondence of the vertical structure of turbulent variables with observations. Our findings further indicate that when large-scale advection and subsidence are applied, the values for turbulent kinetic are lower than without these large-scale forcings. We conclude that the prototypical CBL can still be used as a valid representation of the boundary-layer dynamics near regions characterized by complex topography and small-scale surface heterogeneity, provided that surface- and large-scale forcings are well characterized.

  1. The two-photon exchange contribution to elastic electron-nucleon scattering at large momentum transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei V. Afanasev; Stanley J. Brodsky; Carl E. Carlson; Yu-Chun Chen; Marc Vanderhaeghen

    2005-01-01

    We estimate the two-photon exchange contribution to elastic electron-proton scattering at large momentum transfer by using a quark-parton representation of virtual Compton scattering. We thus can relate the two-photon exchange amplitude to the generalized parton distributions which also enter in other wide angle scattering processes. We find that the interference of one- and two-photon exchange contribution is able to substantially resolve the difference between electric form factor measurements from Rosenbluth and polarization transfer experiments.

  2. A large motion zero-gravity suspension system for experimental simulation of orbital construction and deployment. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straube, Timothy Milton

    1993-01-01

    The design and implementation of a vertical degree of freedom suspension system is described which provides a constant force off-load condition to counter gravity over large displacements. By accommodating motions up to one meter for structures weighing up to 100 pounds, the system is useful for experiments which simulate orbital construction events such as docking, multiple component assembly, or structural deployment. A unique aspect of this device is the combination of a large stroke passive off-load device augmented by electromotive torque actuated force feedback. The active force feedback has the effect of reducing break-away friction by a factor of twenty over the passive system alone. The thesis describes the development of the suspension hardware and the control algorithm. Experiments were performed to verify the suspensions system's effectiveness in providing a gravity off-load and simulating the motion of a structure in orbit. Additionally, a three dimensional system concept is presented as an extension of the one dimensional suspension system which was implemented.

  3. Spin-orbit contributions in high-spin nitrenes/carbenes: a hybrid CASSCF/MRMP2 study of zero-field splitting tensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugisaki, Kenji; Toyota, Kazuo; Sato, Kazunobu; Shiomi, Daisuke; Kitagawa, Masahiro; Takui, Takeji

    2010-10-04

    Zero-field splitting (ZFS) tensors (D tensors) of organic high-spin oligonitrenes/oligocarbenes up to spin-septet are quantitatively determined on the basis of quantum chemical calculations. The spin-orbit contributions, D(SO) tensors are calculated in terms of a hybrid CASSCF/MRMP2 approach, which was recently proposed by us. The spin-spin counterparts, D(SS) tensors are computed based on McWeeny-Mizuno's equation in conjunction with the RODFT spin densities. The present calculations show that more than 10% of ZFS arises from spin-orbit interactions in the high-spin nitrenes under study. Contributions of spin-bearing site-site interactions are estimated with the aid of a semi-empirical model for the D tensors and found to be ca. 5% of the D(SO) tensor. The analysis of intermediate states reveal that the largest contributions to the calculated D(SO) tensors are attributed to intra-site spin flip excitations and delocalized π and π* orbitals play an important role in the inter-site spin-orbit interactions.

  4. A third-generation density-functional-theory-based method for calculating canonical molecular orbitals of large molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Toshiyuki; Sato, Fumitoshi

    2014-07-28

    We used grid-free modified Cholesky decomposition (CD) to develop a density-functional-theory (DFT)-based method for calculating the canonical molecular orbitals (CMOs) of large molecules. Our method can be used to calculate standard CMOs, analytically compute exchange-correlation terms, and maximise the capacity of next-generation supercomputers. Cholesky vectors were first analytically downscaled using low-rank pivoted CD and CD with adaptive metric (CDAM). The obtained Cholesky vectors were distributed and stored on each computer node in a parallel computer, and the Coulomb, Fock exchange, and pure exchange-correlation terms were calculated by multiplying the Cholesky vectors without evaluating molecular integrals in self-consistent field iterations. Our method enables DFT and massively distributed memory parallel computers to be used in order to very efficiently calculate the CMOs of large molecules.

  5. Physiological and lifestyle factors contributing to risk and severity of peri-orbital dark circles in the Brazilian population

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matsui, Mary S; Schalka, Sérgio; Vanderover, Garrett; Fthenakis, Christina G; Christopher, J; Bombarda, Patricia Camarano Pinto; Bueno, Juliana Regina; Viscomi, Bianca Lenci Inácio; Bombarda Júnior, Mário Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    ... epidermis/dermis under the eye. It is of interest to better understand lifestyle and demographic risk factors and the relative impact of melanin, blood and epidermal/dermal factors on the severity of Peri-orbital dark...

  6. Physiological and lifestyle factors contributing to risk and severity of peri-orbital dark circles in the Brazilian population

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matsui, Mary S; Schalka, Sérgio; Vanderover, Garrett; Fthenakis, Christina G; Christopher, J; Bombarda, Patricia Camarano Pinto; Bueno, Juliana Regina; Viscomi, Bianca Lenci Inácio; Bombarda Júnior, Mário Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    AbstractBACKGROUND:Peri-orbital dark circles are a cosmetic concern worldwide, and have been attributed to hyperpigmentation from allergy or atopic dermatitis, blood stasis, structural shadowing effects, and a thin...

  7. A contribution to large deviations for heavy-tailed random sums

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU; Chun

    2001-01-01

    [1] Nagaev, A. V., Integral limit theorems for large deviations when Cramer's condition is not fulfilled I, II, Theory Prob. Appl., 1969, 14: 51-64, 193-208.[2] Nagaev, A. V., Limit theorems for large deviations where Cramer's conditions are violated (In Russian), Izv. Akad. Nauk USSR Ser., Fiz-Mat Nauk., 1969, 7: 17.[3] Heyde, C. C., A contribution to the theory of large deviations for sums of independent random variables, Z. Wahrscheinlichkeitsth, 1967, 7: 303.[4] Heyde, C. C., On large deviation probabilities for sums of random variables which are not attracted to the normal law, Ann. Math. Statist., 1967, 38: 1575.[5] Heyde, C. C., On large deviation probabilities in the case of attraction to a nonnormal stable law, Sanky, 1968, 30: 253.[6] Nagaev, S. V., Large deviations for sums of independent random variables, in Sixth Prague Conf. on Information Theory, Random Processes and Statistical Decision Functions, Prague: Academic, 1973, 657674.[7] Nagaev, S. V., Large deviations of sums of independent random variables, Ann. Prob., 1979, 7: 745.[8] Embrechts, P., Klüppelberg, C., Mikosch, T., Modelling Extremal Events for Insurance and Finance, Berlin-Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag, 1997.[9] Cline, D. B. H., Hsing, T., Large deviation probabilities for sums and maxima of random variables with heavy or subexponential tails, Preprint, Texas A&M University, 1991.[10] Klüppelberg, C., Mikosch, T., Large deviations of heavy-tailed random sums with applications to insurance and finance, J. Appl. Prob., 1997, 34: 293.

  8. Large Impact Basins on Mercury: Global Distribution, Characteristics, and Modification History from MESSENGER Orbital Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassett, Caleb I.; Head, James W.; Baker, David M. H.; Zuber, Maria T.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Solomon, Sean C.; Klimczak, Christian; Strom, Robert G.; Chapman, Clark R.; Prockter, Louise M.; Phillips, Roger J.; Oberst, Juergen; Preusker, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The formation of large impact basins (diameter D greater than or equal to 300 km) was an important process in the early evolution of Mercury and influenced the planet's topography, stratigraphy, and crustal structure. We catalog and characterize this basin population on Mercury from global observations by the MESSENGER spacecraft, and we use the new data to evaluate basins suggested on the basis of the Mariner 10 flybys. Forty-two certain or probable impact basins are recognized a few additional basins that may have been degraded to the point of ambiguity are plausible on the basis of new data but are classified as uncertain. The spatial density of large basins (D greater than or equal to 500 km) on Mercury is lower than that on the Moon. Morphological characteristics of basins on Mercury suggest that on average they are more degraded than lunar basins. These observations are consistent with more efficient modification, degradation, and obliteration of the largest basins on Mercury than on the Moon. This distinction may be a result of differences in the basin formation process (producing fewer rings), greater relaxation of topography after basin formation (subduing relief), and/or higher rates of volcanism during the period of heavy bombardment on Mercury compared to the Moon (burying basin rings and interiors).

  9. The spin and orbital contributions to the total magnetic moments of free Fe, Co, and Ni clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Jennifer; Tombers, Matthias; Wüllen, Christoph van; Niedner-Schatteburg, Gereon, E-mail: gns@chemie.uni-kl.de [Fachbereich Chemie and Forschungszentrum OPTIMAS, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Peredkov, Sergey; Eberhardt, Wolfgang [Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstrasse 36, 10623 Berlin, Germany and DESY-CFEL, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Neeb, Matthias [Helmholtz-Zentrum für Materialien und Energie, BESSY II, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Palutke, Steffen; Martins, Michael; Wurth, Wilfried [Institut für Experimentalphysik, Universität Hamburg, Luruper Chausee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-09-14

    We present size dependent spin and orbital magnetic moments of cobalt (Co{sub n}{sup +}, 8 ≤ n ≤ 22), iron (Fe{sub n}{sup +}, 7 ≤ n ≤ 17), and nickel cluster (Ni{sub n}{sup +}, 7 ≤ n ≤ 17) cations as obtained by X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) spectroscopy of isolated clusters in the gas phase. The spin and orbital magnetic moments range between the corresponding atomic and bulk values in all three cases. We compare our findings to previous XMCD data, Stern-Gerlach data, and computational results. We discuss the application of scaling laws to the size dependent evolution of the spin and orbital magnetic moments per atom in the clusters. We find a spin scaling law “per cluster diameter,” ∼n{sup −1/3}, that interpolates between known atomic and bulk values. In remarkable contrast, the orbital moments do likewise only if the atomic asymptote is exempt. A concept of “primary” and “secondary” (induced) orbital moments is invoked for interpretation.

  10. Direct Detection of Planets Orbiting Large Angular Diameter Stars: Sensitivity of an Internally-Occulting Space-Based Coronagraph

    CERN Document Server

    Crepp, Justin R; Ge, Jian

    2009-01-01

    High-contrast imaging observations of large angular diameter stars enable complementary science questions to be addressed compared to the baseline goals of proposed missions like the Terrestrial Planet Finder-Coronagraph, New World's Observer, and others. Such targets however present a practical problem in that finite stellar size results in unwanted starlight reaching the detector, which degrades contrast. In this paper, we quantify the sensitivity, in terms of contrast, of an internally-occulting, space-based coronagraph as a function of stellar angular diameter, from unresolved dwarfs to the largest evolved stars. Our calculations show that an assortment of band-limited image masks can accommodate a diverse set of observations to help maximize mission scientific return. We discuss two applications based on the results: the spectro-photometric study of planets already discovered with the radial velocity technique to orbit evolved stars, which we elucidate with the example of Pollux b, and the direct detecti...

  11. Realization of electron vortices with large orbital angular momentum using miniature holograms fabricated by electron beam lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafakheri, E.; Tavabi, A. H.; Lu, P.-H.; Balboni, R.; Venturi, F.; Menozzi, C.; Gazzadi, G. C.; Frabboni, S.; Sit, A.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E.; Karimi, E.; Grillo, V.

    2017-02-01

    Free electron beams that carry high values of orbital angular momentum (OAM) possess large magnetic moments along the propagation direction. This makes them an ideal probe for measuring the electronic and magnetic properties of materials, as well as for fundamental experiments in magnetism. However, their generation requires the use of complex diffractive elements, which usually take the form of nano-fabricated holograms. Here, we show how the limitations of the current fabrication of such holograms can be overcome by using electron beam lithography. We demonstrate experimentally the realization of an electron vortex beam with the largest OAM value that has yet been reported to the first diffraction order (L = 1000 ℏ), paving the way for even more demanding demonstrations and applications of electron beam shaping.

  12. Large-nf Contributions to the Four-Loop Splitting Functions in QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Davies, J; Ruijl, B; Ueda, T; Vermaseren, J A M

    2016-01-01

    We have computed the fourth-order nf^2 contributions to all three non-singlet quark-quark splitting functions and their four nf^3 flavour-singlet counterparts for the evolution of the parton distributions of hadrons in perturbative QCD with nf effectively massless quark flavours. The analytic form of these functions is presented in both Mellin N-space and momentum-fraction x-space; the large-x and small-x limits are discussed. Our results agree with all available predictions derived from lower-order information. The large-x limit of the quark-quark cases provides the complete nf^2 part of the four-loop cusp anomalous dimension which agrees with two recent partial computations.

  13. Large-nf contributions to the four-loop splitting functions in QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, J.; Vogt, A.; Ruijl, B.; Ueda, T.; Vermaseren, J. A. M.

    2017-02-01

    We have computed the fourth-order nf2 contributions to all three non-singlet quark-quark splitting functions and their four nf3 flavour-singlet counterparts for the evolution of the parton distributions of hadrons in perturbative QCD with nf effectively massless quark flavours. The analytic form of these functions is presented in both Mellin N-space and momentum-fraction x-space; the large-x and small-x limits are discussed. Our results agree with all available predictions derived from lower-order information. The large-x limit of the quark-quark cases provides the complete nf2 part of the four-loop cusp anomalous dimension which agrees with two recent partial computations.

  14. THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE ON ORBIT: EVENT CLASSIFICATION, INSTRUMENT RESPONSE FUNCTIONS, AND CALIBRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, M. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bogart, J. R.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Albert, A. [Department of Physics, Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Atwood, W. B.; Bouvier, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Axelsson, M. [Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Baldini, L. [Universita di Pisa and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Ballet, J. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Universite Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bastieri, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bellazzini, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bissaldi, E. [Institut fuer Astro- und Teilchenphysik and Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Bonamente, E., E-mail: echarles@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: luca.baldini@pi.infn.it, E-mail: rando@pd.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); and others

    2012-11-15

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT, hereafter LAT), the primary instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) mission, is an imaging, wide field-of-view, high-energy {gamma}-ray telescope, covering the energy range from 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV. During the first years of the mission, the LAT team has gained considerable insight into the in-flight performance of the instrument. Accordingly, we have updated the analysis used to reduce LAT data for public release as well as the instrument response functions (IRFs), the description of the instrument performance provided for data analysis. In this paper, we describe the effects that motivated these updates. Furthermore, we discuss how we originally derived IRFs from Monte Carlo simulations and later corrected those IRFs for discrepancies observed between flight and simulated data. We also give details of the validations performed using flight data and quantify the residual uncertainties in the IRFs. Finally, we describe techniques the LAT team has developed to propagate those uncertainties into estimates of the systematic errors on common measurements such as fluxes and spectra of astrophysical sources.

  15. Large non-factorizable contributions in $B \\to a_0 a_0$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Dou, Defa; Li, Jing-Wu; Xiao, Zhen-Jun

    2015-01-01

    We investigate three tree-dominated $B \\to a_0 a_0$ decays for the first time in the perturbative QCD(pQCD) approach at leading order in the standard model, with $a_0$ standing for the light scalar $a_0(980)$ state, which is assumed as a meson based on the model of conventional two-quark$(q\\bar q)$ structure. All the topologies of the Feynman diagrams such as the non-factorizable spectator ones and the annihilation ones are calculated in the pQCD approach. It is of great interest to find that, contrary to the known $B \\to \\pi \\pi$ decays, the $B \\to a_0 a_0$ decays are governed by the large non-factorizable contributions, which give rise to the large $B \\to a_0 a_0$ decay rates in the order of $10^{-6} \\sim 10^{-5}$, although the $a_0$ meson has an extremely small vector decay constant $f_{a_0}$. The large direct CP-violating asymmetries around $15\\%$ and $30\\%$ for the $B^0 \\to a_0^0 a_0^0$ and $a_0^+ a_0^-$ modes are also observed. These sizable predictions could be easily examined at the running Large Hadr...

  16. Parentage assignment and parental contribution analysis in large yellow croaker Larimichthys crocea using microsatellite markers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiande LIU; Guangtai ZHAO; Zhiyong WANG; Mingyi CAI; Hua YE; Qiurong WANG

    2012-01-01

    The large yellow croaker Larimichthys crocea is one of the most important fish species in China.To estimate the reproductive success of breeders,three independent full-factorial crosses were created and the fins of breeders and progenies were sampled for microsatellite analysis.Out of 959 offspring from three sets,99.6% were assigned to their parents using 6-7 microsatellite markers.In all crosses,some parent pairs produced a large number of offspring and some parent pairs did not produce any offspring.The contributions of male or female parents were unequal,ranging from 1.0-89.3% across the three sets.The loss of putative Ne was 69.6% in set 1,31.2% in set 2 and 57.6% in set 3.These results suggest that the unequal contribution of parents is universal in artificial breeding ofL.crocea,especially in a small population,and this should be taken into account in hatcheries or when releasing animals for resource enhancement [Current Zoology 58 (2):244-249,2012].

  17. Game auction prices are not related to biodiversity contributions of southern African ungulates and large carnivores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalerum, Fredrik; Miranda, Maria

    2016-02-01

    There is an urgent need for human societies to become environmentally sustainable. Because public policy is largely driven by economic processes, quantifications of the relationship between market prices and environmental values can provide important information for developing strategies towards sustainability. Wildlife in southern Africa is often privately owned and traded at game auctions to be utilized for commercial purposes mostly related to tourism. This market offers an interesting opportunity to evaluate how market prices relate to biologically meaningful species characteristics. In this market, prices were not correlated with species contributions to either phylogenetic or functional diversity, and species contributions to phylogenetic or functional diversity did not influence the trends in prices over time for the past 20 years. Since this economic market did not seem to appreciate evolutionary or ecologically relevant characteristics, we question if the game tourism market may contribute towards biodiversity conservation in southern Africa. We suggest that market prices in general may have limited values as guides for directing conservation and environmental management. We further suggest that there is a need to evaluate what humans value in biological organisms, and how potentially necessary shifts in such values can be instigated.

  18. Contribution Of The SWOT Mission To Large-Scale Hydrological Modeling Using Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, C. M.; Biancamaria, S.; Boone, A. A.; Ricci, S. M.; Rochoux, M. C.; Garambois, P. A.; Paris, A.; Calmant, S.

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to improve water fluxes estimation on the continental surfaces, at interanual and interseasonal scale (from few years to decennial time period). More specifically, it studies contribution of the incoming SWOT satellite mission to improve hydrology model at global scale, and using the land surface model ISBA-TRIP. This model corresponds to the continental component of the CNRM (French meteorological research center)'s climatic model. This study explores the potential of satellite data to correct either input parameters of the river routing scheme TRIP or its state variables. To do so, a data assimilation platform (using an Ensemble Kalman Filter, EnKF) has been implemented to assimilate SWOT virtual observations as well as discharges estimated from real nadir altimetry data. A series of twin experiments is used to test and validate the parameter estimation module of the platform. SWOT virtual-observations of water heights along SWOT tracks (with a 10 cm white noise model error) are assimilated to correct the river routing model parameters. To begin with, we chose to focus exclusively on the river manning coefficient, with the possibility to easily extend to other parameters such as the river widths. First results show that the platform is able to recover the "true" Manning distribution assimilating SWOT-like water heights. The error on the coefficients goes from 35 % before assimilation to 9 % after four SWOT orbit repeat period of 21 days. In the state estimation mode, daily assimilation cycles are realized to correct TRIP river water storage initial state by assimilating ENVISAT-based discharge. Those observations are derived from ENVISAT water elevation measures, using rating curves from the MGB-IPH hydrological model (calibrated over the Amazon using in situ gages discharge). Using such kind of observation allows going beyond idealized twin experiments and also to test contribution of a remotely-sensed discharge product, which could

  19. Large contribution of sea surface warming to recent increase in Atlantic hurricane activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Mark A; Lea, Adam S

    2008-01-31

    Atlantic hurricane activity has increased significantly since 1995 (refs 1-4), but the underlying causes of this increase remain uncertain. It is widely thought that rising Atlantic sea surface temperatures have had a role in this, but the magnitude of this contribution is not known. Here we quantify this contribution for storms that formed in the tropical North Atlantic, Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico; these regions together account for most of the hurricanes that make landfall in the United States. We show that a statistical model based on two environmental variables--local sea surface temperature and an atmospheric wind field--can replicate a large proportion of the variance in tropical Atlantic hurricane frequency and activity between 1965 and 2005. We then remove the influence of the atmospheric wind field to assess the contribution of sea surface temperature. Our results indicate that the sensitivity of tropical Atlantic hurricane activity to August-September sea surface temperature over the period we consider is such that a 0.5 degrees C increase in sea surface temperature is associated with a approximately 40% increase in hurricane frequency and activity. The results also indicate that local sea surface warming was responsible for approximately 40% of the increase in hurricane activity relative to the 1950-2000 average between 1996 and 2005. Our analysis does not identify whether warming induced by greenhouse gases contributed to the increase in hurricane activity, but the ability of climate models to reproduce the observed relationship between hurricanes and sea surface temperature will serve as a useful means of assessing whether they are likely to provide reliable projections of future changes in Atlantic hurricane activity.

  20. Spontaneous large-scale autolysis in Clostridium acetobutylicum contributes to generation of more spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Qiao, Kai; Tian, Lei; Zhang, Quan; Liu, Zi-Yong; Li, Fu-Li

    2015-01-01

    Autolysis is a widespread phenomenon in bacteria. In batch fermentation of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824, there is a spontaneous large-scale autolysis phenomenon with significant decrease of cell density immediately after exponential phase. To unravel the role of autolysis, an autolysin-coding gene, CA_C0554, was disrupted by using ClosTron system to obtain the mutant C. acetobutylicum lyc::int(72). The lower final cell density and faster cell density decrease rate of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 than those of C. acetobutylicum lyc::int(72) indicates that CA_C0554 was an important but not the sole autolysin-coding gene responding for the large-scale autolysis. Similar glucose utilization and solvents production but obvious lower cell density of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 comparing to C. acetobutylicum lyc::int(72) suggests that lysed C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 cells were metabolic inactive. On the contrary, the spore density of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 is 26.1% higher than that of C. acetobutylicum lyc::int(72) in the final culture broth of batch fermentation. We speculated that spontaneous autolysis of metabolic-inactive cells provided nutrients for the sporulating cells. The present study suggests that one important biological role of spontaneous large-scale autolysis in C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 batch fermentation is contributing to generation of more spores during sporulation. PMID:26441884

  1. Spontaneous large-scale autolysis in Clostridium acetobutylicum contributes to generation of more spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Qiao, Kai; Tian, Lei; Zhang, Quan; Liu, Zi-Yong; Li, Fu-Li

    2015-01-01

    Autolysis is a widespread phenomenon in bacteria. In batch fermentation of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824, there is a spontaneous large-scale autolysis phenomenon with significant decrease of cell density immediately after exponential phase. To unravel the role of autolysis, an autolysin-coding gene, CA_C0554, was disrupted by using ClosTron system to obtain the mutant C. acetobutylicum lyc::int(72). The lower final cell density and faster cell density decrease rate of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 than those of C. acetobutylicum lyc::int(72) indicates that CA_C0554 was an important but not the sole autolysin-coding gene responding for the large-scale autolysis. Similar glucose utilization and solvents production but obvious lower cell density of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 comparing to C. acetobutylicum lyc::int(72) suggests that lysed C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 cells were metabolic inactive. On the contrary, the spore density of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 is 26.1% higher than that of C. acetobutylicum lyc::int(72) in the final culture broth of batch fermentation. We speculated that spontaneous autolysis of metabolic-inactive cells provided nutrients for the sporulating cells. The present study suggests that one important biological role of spontaneous large-scale autolysis in C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 batch fermentation is contributing to generation of more spores during sporulation.

  2. Spontaneous large-scale autolysis in Clostridium acetobutylicum contributes to generation of more spores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen eLiu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Autolysis is a widespread phenomenon in bacteria. In batch fermentation of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824, there is a spontaneous large-scale autolysis phenomenon with significant decrease of cell density immediately after exponential phase. To unravel the role of autolysis, an autolysin-coding gene, CA_C0554, was disrupted by using ClosTron system to obtain the mutant C. acetobutylicum lyc::int(72. The lower final cell density and faster cell density decrease rate of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 than those of C. acetobutylicum lyc::int(72 indicates that CA_C0554 was an important but not the sole autolysin-coding gene responding for the large-scale autolysis. Similar glucose utilization and solvents production but obvious lower cell density of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 comparing to C. acetobutylicum lyc::int(72 suggests that lysed C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 cells were metabolic inactive. On the contrary, the spore density of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 is 26.1% higher than that of C. acetobutylicum lyc::int(72 in the final culture broth of batch fermentation. We speculated that spontaneous autolysis of metabolic-inactive cells provided nutrients for the sporulating cells. The present study suggests that one important biological role of spontaneous large-scale autolysis in C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 batch fermentation is contributing to generation of more spores during sporulation.

  3. [Contribution to the anatomical and surgical study of the infra orbital area. Clinical applications to the tear trough area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saban, Y; Polselli, R

    2010-01-01

    To define the anatomy of the infra orbital area and assess the possible connections with the facial morphotypes identifying the tears trough. To deduce therapeutic proposition concerning the management of this area in aesthetic medicine or surgery. Anatomic dissections of 10 fresh specimens not frozen and not formalin. Dissection layer by layer from skin to bones paying special attention to the infra orbital superficial muscles and the distribution of subcutaneous fat. In this study, it was precised the existence of zygomaticus superficialis and levator genae muscles whose variations in the connections with the orbicularis oculi muscle is probably the origin of the diversity of human facial expression. On the other hand, the tear trough seems to depend on different distributions of the anatomical complex formed by these muscles with the subcutaneous fat and skin that covers it. An anatomical classification into three muscle types has been proposed. The main variations between individual facial expression are related to a different muscular anatomy from one subject to another. The myological classical anatomic description, too stereotyped, can not explain those differences. The classification proposed by the authors can differentiate the facial morphotypes in the infra orbital area and offer therapeutic solutions.

  4. Large non-factorizable contributions in B → a 0 a 0 decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Defa; Liu, Xin; Li, Jing-Wu; Xiao, Zhen-Jun

    2016-08-01

    We investigate three tree-dominated B\\to {a}0{a}0 decays for the first time in the perturbative QCD(pQCD) approach at leading order in the standard model, with a 0 standing for the light scalar {a}0(980) state, which is assumed as a meson based on the model of a conventional two-quark (q\\bar{q}) structure. All the topologies of the Feynman diagrams such as the non-factorizable spectator ones and the annihilation ones are calculated in the pQCD approach. It is of great interest to find that, in contrast to the known B\\to π π decays, the B\\to {a}0{a}0 decays are governed by the large non-factorizable contributions, which give rise to the large B\\to {a}0{a}0 decay rates in the order of {10}-6∼ {10}-5, although the a 0 meson has an extremely small vector decay constant {f}{a0}. Also observed are large direct CP-violating asymmetries around 15% and 30% for the {B}0\\to {a}00{a}00 and {a}0+{a}0- modes. These sizable predictions could be easily examined at the running Large Hadron Collider and the near future Super-B/Belle-II experiments. The future precision measurements combined with these pQCD predictions might be helpful to explore the complicated QCD dynamics and the inner structure of the light scalar a 0, as well as to complementarily constrain the unitary angle α.

  5. Contribution of anadromous fish to the diet of European catfish in a large river system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syväranta, Jari; Cucherousset, Julien; Kopp, Dorothée; Martino, Aurélia; Céréghino, Régis; Santoul, Frédéric

    2009-05-01

    Many anadromous fish species, when migrating from the sea to spawn in fresh waters, can potentially be a valuable prey for larger predatory fish, thereby efficiently linking these two ecosystems. Here, we assess the contribution of anadromous fish to the diet of European catfish ( Silurus glanis) in a large river system (Garonne, southwestern France) using stable isotope analysis and allis shad ( Alosa alosa) as an example of anadromous fish. Allis shad caught in the Garonne had a very distinct marine δ13C value, over 8‰ higher after lipid extraction compared to the mean δ13C value of all other potential freshwater prey fish. The δ13C values of European catfish varied considerably between these two extremes and some individuals were clearly specializing on freshwater prey, whereas others specialized on anadromous fish. The mean contribution of anadromous fish to the entire European catfish population was estimated to be between 53% and 65%, depending on the fractionation factor used for δ13C.

  6. Unique contributions of ISCOLE to the advancement of accelerometry in large studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor-Locke, C; Barreira, T V; Schuna, J M; Katzmarzyk, P T

    2015-12-01

    Accelerometry has become a mainstay approach for objectively monitoring children's physical activity and sedentary time in epidemiological studies. The magnitude of effort underlying successful data collection, management and treatment is prodigious and its complexity has been associated with increasingly diverse methodological choices that, while defensible relative to specific research questions, conspire to undermine the ability to compare results between studies. Although respecting widespread calls for best practices, it is also important to openly share tools and resources supporting potential improvements to research practice and study design, thus allowing others to replicate, further improve, and/or otherwise build on this foundation. The International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and the Environment (ISCOLE) is a large multinational study that included accelerometer-based measures of physical activity, sedentary time and sleep. This review summarizes the unique contributions of ISCOLE to the advancement of accelerometry in large studies of children's behavior, and in particular: (1) open-access publication of the ISCOLE accelerometry Manual of Operations; (2) 24-h waist-worn accelerometry protocol; (3) identification and extraction of nocturnal total sleep episode time (with open access to editable SAS syntax); (4) development of the first interpretive infrastructure for identifying and defining an evolved list of sleep-related variables from 24-h waist-worn accelerometry; (5) provision of a detailed model for reporting accelerometer paradata (administrative data related to accelerometry); and (6) cataloging the most detailed and defensible list of accelerometry-derived physical activity and sedentary time variables to date. The novel tools and resources associated with these innovations are shared openly in an effort to support methodological harmonization and overall advancement of accelerometry in large epidemiological studies.

  7. Fullerene antiferromagnetic reconstructed spinterface subsurface layer dominates multi-orbitals spin-splitting and large magnetic moment in C60

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, Yangfan; Pan, Hui; Shi, Xingqiang

    2016-01-01

    The interfaces between organic molecules and metal surfaces with layered antiferromagnetic order have gained increasing interests in the field of antiferromagnetic spintronics. The C60 layered AFM spinterfaces have been studied for C60 bonded only to the outermost ferromagnetic layer. Using density functional theory calculations, here we demonstrate that C60 adsorption can reconstruct the layered AFM Cr(001) surface so that C60 bonds to the top two Cr layers with opposite spin direction. Surface reconstruction drastically changes C60 s spintronic properties 1 the spin-split p-d hybridization involve multi-orbitals of C60 and metal double layers, 2 the subsurface layer dominates the C60 spin properties, and 3) reconstruction induces a large magnetic moment in C60 of 0.58 B, which is a synergetic effect of the top two layers as a result of a magnetic direct-exchange interaction. Understanding these complex spinterfaces phenomena is a crucial step for their device applications. The surface reconstruction can be ...

  8. Main results of biological experiments on Russian orbital stations and its contribution in future life support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechitailo, Galina S.

    Biological experiments in a field of space biology have been started before the first satellite flight. These experiments were devoted to an estimation of space radiation factors on living organisms and carried out in mountains. The systematic biological experiments in space have been started in 1971 with orbital station Salyut. In total more than 1000 experiments have been installed in space flights: fundamental investigations (panspermia theory, gravity biology, complex factors of space environment on biological objects) and applications focused on future biological life support systems. The investigations were directed to some tasks: influence of complex factors of space flight on living organisms at different stages of the evolution scale; investigations of proteins and DNA, cell, tissue, organism and assembled organisms under space flight factors with separation of individual factors, for example, microgravity and space radiation. The aim was to understand the organism reactions on different levels, to get complete ontogenesis cycle in space flight and to find adaption ability of organisms to extreme factors of the space flight. In course of investigations, the unique experimental equipment for orbital biological experiments has been designed; new methods for organism protection against the negative factors of space flight were found; developed new biotechnological products and processes; developed recommendations for space station interior with biological objects for psychological comfort of crew. The results showed a possibility and ways to include different organisms into biotechnological life support systems for future space stations and interplanet spaceships.

  9. Multipole contribution from an off-axis orbit in an IR quadrupole and the consequences on the dynamic aperture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, M.; Caspi, S.; Forest, E.; Robin, D.; Zholents, A.; Cai, Y.; Destaebler, H.; Donald, M.; Helm, R.; Irwin, J.

    1994-06-01

    The low-energy beam of the proposed PEP-II B factory enters the first quadrupole (Q1) after the interaction point off axis in order to separate the low-energy beam from the high-energy beam. The off-axis beam orbit in Q1 gives rise to significant feed-down terms from higher multipoles that originate from systematic effects and random fabrication errors. The authors study superconducting and permanent magnet designs of Q1, and look at the effect these different designs have on the dynamic aperture. Including a dipole field in a superconducting design allows one to offset the magnetic axis from the mechanical axis, thereby maintaining the separation of the beams while greatly reducing the feed-down effect. They illustrate relevant points of the discussion with tracking results for the PEP-II low-energy ring.

  10. The contribution of advisory committees and public involvement to large studies: case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tew Jerry

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many large studies have complex advisory committee structures, yet there is no empirical evidence regarding their optimal composition, scope and contribution. The aim of this study was to inform the committee and advice infrastructure for future research studies. Methods In the context of a five-year study funded by the UK National Institute for Health Research, three advisory committees were formed. In addition, advice was obtained from individual experts. All recommendations received in the start-up phase (first seven months of the study were recorded, along with the decision about implementation of the recommendation. A particular focus was on the impact of public involvement. Results A total of 172 recommendations were made, including 70 from 20 individual experts. The recommendations were grouped into five emergent themes: Scientific, Pragmatic, Resources, Committee and Collaboration. Most recommendations related to strengthening existing components or adding new components to the study protocol. Very few recommendations either proposed removing study components or contradicted other recommendations. Three 'implementation criteria' were identified: scientific value, pragmatic feasibility, and paradigmatic consistency. 103 (60% of recommendations were implemented and 25 (15% were not implemented. The benefits identified by the research team were improved quality and confidence, and the costs were increased cognitive demands, protocol revision time, and slower progress. Conclusions The findings are discussed in the context of the wider literature on public involvement in research. Six recommendations are identified. First, have a clear rationale for each advisory committee expressed as terms of reference, and consider the best balance between committees and individual consultation with experts. Second, an early concern of committees is inter-committee communication, so consider cross-representation and copying minutes

  11. Large Area X-Ray Proportional Counter (LAXPC) Instrument on AstroSat and Some Preliminary Results from its Performance in the Orbit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P. C. Agrawal; J. S. Yadav; H. M. Antia; Dhiraj Dedhia; P. Shah; Jai Verdhan Chauhan; R. K. Manchanda; V. R. Chitnis; V. M. Gujar; Tilak Katoch; V. N. Kurhade; P. Madhwani; T. K. Manojkumar; V. A. Nikam; A. S. Pandya; J. V. Parmar; D. M. Pawar; Jayashree Roy; B. Paul; Mayukh Pahari; Ranjeev Misra; M. H. Ravichandran; K. Anilkumar; C. C. Joseph; K. H. Navalgund; R. Pandiyan; K. S. Sarma; K. Subbarao

    2017-06-01

    Large area X-ray propositional counter (LAXPC) instrument on AstroSat is aimed at providing high time resolution X-ray observations in 3–80 keV energy band with moderate energy resolution. To achieve large collecting area, a cluster of three co-aligned identical LAXPC detectors, is used to realize an effective area in access of ∼6000cm2 at 15 keV. The large detection volume of the LAXPC detectors, filled with xenon gas at ∼2 atmosphere pressure, results in detection efficiency greater than 50%, above 30 keV. In this article, we present salient features of the LAXPC detectors, their testing and characterization in the laboratory prior to launch and calibration in the orbit. Some preliminary results on timing and spectral characteristics of a few X-ray binaries and other type of sources, are briefly discussed to demonstrate that the LAXPC instrument is performing as planned in the orbit.

  12. Visualization of a Large Set of Hydrogen Atomic Orbital Contours Using New and Expanded Sets of Parametric Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhile, Ian J.

    2014-01-01

    Atomic orbitals are a theme throughout the undergraduate chemistry curriculum, and visualizing them has been a theme in this journal. Contour plots as isosurfaces or contour lines in a plane are the most familiar representations of the hydrogen wave functions. In these representations, a surface of a fixed value of the wave function ? is plotted…

  13. Global fuel consumption optimization of an open-time terminal rendezvous and docking with large-eccentricity elliptic-orbit by the method of interval analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongliang; Xu, Shijie

    2016-11-01

    By defining two open-time impulse points, the optimization of a two-impulse, open-time terminal rendezvous and docking with target spacecraft on large-eccentricity elliptical orbit is proposed in this paper. The purpose of optimization is to minimize the velocity increment for a terminal elliptic-reference-orbit rendezvous and docking. Current methods for solving this type of optimization problem include for example genetic algorithms and gradient based optimization. Unlike these methods, interval methods can guarantee that the globally best solution is found for a given parameterization of the input. The non-linear Tschauner- Hempel(TH) equations of the state transitions for a terminal elliptic target orbit are transformed form time domain to target orbital true anomaly domain. Their homogenous solutions and approximate state transition matrix for the control with a short true anomaly interval can be used to avoid interval integration. The interval branch and bound optimization algorithm is introduced for solving the presented rendezvous and docking optimization problem and optimizing two open-time impulse points and thruster pulse amplitudes, which systematically eliminates parts of the control and open-time input spaces that do not satisfy the path and final time state constraints. Several numerical examples are undertaken to validate the interval optimization algorithm. The results indicate that the sufficiently narrow spaces containing the global optimization solution for the open-time two-impulse terminal rendezvous and docking with target spacecraft on large-eccentricity elliptical orbit can be obtained by the interval algorithm (IA). Combining the gradient-based method, the global optimization solution for the discontinuous nonconvex optimization problem in the specifically remained search space can be found. Interval analysis is shown to be a useful tool and preponderant in the discontinuous nonconvex optimization problem of the terminal rendezvous and

  14. CONTRIBUTION OF ENGINEERING INFORMATION IN VISUAL MANAGEMENT: A CASE STUDY ON LARGE COMPANY FROM CURITIBA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navarro Mercado

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Information systems in organizations are becoming an essential element. This fact contributes to the increased value added, competitiveness, and innovation with regard to management. The sophisticated technology industries invest in their plant floor operations. For example, extensive training where sometimes strategic use is not implemented in the best way. The aim of this paper is to present a tool called Visual Management Lean Manufacturing. For thus contribute to better results in the management of information on the factory floor, was applied in a manufacturing company. A case study conducted in a multinational company located in Curitiba / Paraná appears. Therefore, the work encourages further research with respect to lean manufacturing in conjunction with the Information Engineering in organizations for the contribution of knowledge and improvements in their processes.

  15. APPLICATION OF VISION METROLOGY TO IN-ORBIT MEASUREMENT OF LARGE REFLECTOR ONBOARD COMMUNICATION SATELLITE FOR NEXT GENERATION MOBILE SATELLITE COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Akioka

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Satellite for next generation mobile satellite communication service with small personal terminal requires onboard antenna with very large aperture reflector larger than twenty meters diameter because small personal terminal with lower power consumption in ground base requires the large onboard reflector with high antenna gain. But, large deployable antenna will deform in orbit because the antenna is not a solid dish but the flexible structure with fine cable and mesh supported by truss. Deformation of reflector shape deteriorate the antenna performance and quality and stability of communication service. However, in case of digital beam forming antenna with phased array can modify the antenna beam performance due to adjustment of excitation amplitude and excitation phase. If we can measure the reflector shape precisely in orbit, beam pattern and antenna performance can be compensated with the updated excitation amplitude and excitation phase parameters optimized for the reflector shape measured every moment. Softbank Corporation and National Institute of Information and Communications Technology has started the project "R&D on dynamic beam control technique for next generation mobile communication satellite" as a contracted research project sponsored by Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communication of Japan. In this topic, one of the problem in vision metrology application is a strong constraints on geometry for camera arrangement on satellite bus with very limited space. On satellite in orbit, we cannot take many images from many different directions as ordinary vision metrology measurement and the available area for camera positioning is quite limited. Feasibility of vision metrology application and general methodology to apply to future mobile satellite communication satellite is to be found. Our approach is as follows: 1 Development of prototyping simulator to evaluate the expected precision for network design in zero order and first order

  16. Application of Vision Metrology to In-Orbit Measurement of Large Reflector Onboard Communication Satellite for Next Generation Mobile Satellite Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akioka, M.; Orikasa, T.; Satoh, M.; Miura, A.; Tsuji, H.; Toyoshima, M.; Fujino, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Satellite for next generation mobile satellite communication service with small personal terminal requires onboard antenna with very large aperture reflector larger than twenty meters diameter because small personal terminal with lower power consumption in ground base requires the large onboard reflector with high antenna gain. But, large deployable antenna will deform in orbit because the antenna is not a solid dish but the flexible structure with fine cable and mesh supported by truss. Deformation of reflector shape deteriorate the antenna performance and quality and stability of communication service. However, in case of digital beam forming antenna with phased array can modify the antenna beam performance due to adjustment of excitation amplitude and excitation phase. If we can measure the reflector shape precisely in orbit, beam pattern and antenna performance can be compensated with the updated excitation amplitude and excitation phase parameters optimized for the reflector shape measured every moment. Softbank Corporation and National Institute of Information and Communications Technology has started the project "R&D on dynamic beam control technique for next generation mobile communication satellite" as a contracted research project sponsored by Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communication of Japan. In this topic, one of the problem in vision metrology application is a strong constraints on geometry for camera arrangement on satellite bus with very limited space. On satellite in orbit, we cannot take many images from many different directions as ordinary vision metrology measurement and the available area for camera positioning is quite limited. Feasibility of vision metrology application and general methodology to apply to future mobile satellite communication satellite is to be found. Our approach is as follows: 1) Development of prototyping simulator to evaluate the expected precision for network design in zero order and first order 2) Trial

  17. The orbital decay of the semi-major axis of LARES and the LARASE contribution to SLR measurements for applications in the fields of space geodesy and geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardini, Carmen; Anselmo, Luciano; Masimo Lucchesi, David; Bassan, Massimo; Magnafico, Carmelo; Nobili, Anna Maria; Peron, Roberto; Pucacco, Giuseppe; Stanga, Ruggero; Visco, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    The new laser-ranged satellite LARES (LAser RElativity Satellite) is expected to provide new refined measurements of relativistic physics as well as significant contributions to space geodesy and geophysics. The very low area-to-mass ratio of this passive and dense satellite was chosen to reduce as much as possible the disturbing effects due to the non-gravitational perturbations in order to compensate for its much lower altitude with respect to the two older LAGEOS (LAser GEOdynamic Satellite) satellites, currently the best tracked satellites of the International Laser Ranging Service network. Indeed, because of its height, about 1450 km with respect to the 5900 km of the two LAGEOS, LARES is subject to a much stronger perturbation provoked by the neutral drag than that on the two LAGEOS. From a Precise Orbit Determination (POD) of LARES over a time span of about 3.7 years we have been able to measure an orbital decay in the residuals of its semi-major axis of about 1 m/yr, that corresponds to a transversal mean acceleration of about -1.457×10-11 m/s2. This POD has been obtained analyzing LARES normal points with the GEODYN II (NASA/GSFC) software. Neither the neutral drag nor the thermal effects have been included in the dynamical models of GEODYN II. By means of a modified version of the SATellite Reentry Analysis Program (SATRAP) of ISTI/CNR, the neutral drag perturbation has been computed over the same time span accounting for the measured decay and considering the real evolution of the solar and geomagnetic activities for several atmospheric models. In particular, assuming as reference for the unmodeled transversal acceleration due to the neutral atmosphere the above value, the drag coefficient estimated by SATRAP is comparable to the average value estimated by GEODYN II in a least square fit of the tracking data. This means that the current best models developed for the atmosphere behavior are able to account for the observed decay, within their errors and

  18. Unrestricted density functional theory based on the fragment molecular orbital method for the ground and excited state calculations of large systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakata, Hiroya, E-mail: nakata.h.ab@m.titech.ac.jp [Center for Biological Resources and Informatics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, B-62 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); RIKEN, Research Cluster for Innovation, Nakamura Lab, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Fedorov, Dmitri G. [NRI, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Yokojima, Satoshi [RIKEN, Research Cluster for Innovation, Nakamura Lab, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1423-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Kitaura, Kazuo [Graduate School of System Informatics, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Sakurai, Minoru [Center for Biological Resources and Informatics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, B-62 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Nakamura, Shinichiro [RIKEN, Research Cluster for Innovation, Nakamura Lab, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2014-04-14

    We extended the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method interfaced with density functional theory (DFT) into spin unrestricted formalism (UDFT) and developed energy gradients for the ground state and single point excited state energies based on time-dependent DFT. The accuracy of FMO is evaluated in comparison to the full calculations without fragmentation. Electronic excitations in solvated organic radicals and in the blue copper protein, plastocyanin (PDB code: 1BXV), are reported. The contributions of solvent molecules to the electronic excitations are analyzed in terms of the fragment polarization and quantum effects such as interfragment charge transfer.

  19. Large anisotropy in colossal magnetoresistance of charge orbital ordered epitaxial Sm0.5Ca0.5MnO3 films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yunzhong; Sun, J.R.; Zhao, J.L.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the structure and magnetotransport properties of Sm0.5Ca0.5MnO3 (SCMO) films epitaxially grown on (011)-oriented SrTiO3 substrates, which exhibited clear charge/orbital ordering transition. A significant anisotropy of ~1000 in the colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) effect was observed...... in the films with a thickness between 50 and 80 nm, which was distinctly different from the basically isotropic CMR effect in bulk SCMO. The large anisotropy in the CMR can be ascribed to the intrinsic asymmetric strain in the film, which plays an important role in tuning the spin–orbit coupling in manganite...... films. The origin of the peculiar CMR effect is discussed....

  20. Spontaneous large-scale autolysis in Clostridium acetobutylicum contributes to generation of more spores

    OpenAIRE

    Zhen eLiu; Kai eQiao; Lei eTian; Quan eZhang; Zi-Yong eLiu; Fu-Li eLi

    2015-01-01

    Autolysis is a widespread phenomenon in bacteria. In batch fermentation of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824, there is a spontaneous large-scale autolysis phenomenon with significant decrease of cell density immediately after exponential phase. To unravel the role of autolysis, an autolysin-coding gene, CA_C0554, was disrupted by using ClosTron system to obtain the mutant C. acetobutylicum lyc::int(72). The lower final cell density and faster cell density decrease rate of C. acetobutylicum ...

  1. Contribution of the infrasound technology to characterize large scale atmospheric disturbances and impact on infrasound monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, Elisabeth; Le Pichon, Alexis; Ceranna, Lars; Pilger, Christoph; Charlton Perez, Andrew; Smets, Pieter

    2016-04-01

    The International Monitoring System (IMS) developed for the verification of the Comprehensive nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) provides a unique global description of atmospheric disturbances generating infrasound such as extreme events (e.g. meteors, volcanoes, earthquakes, and severe weather) or human activity (e.g. explosions and supersonic airplanes). The analysis of the detected signals, recorded at global scales and over near 15 years at some stations, demonstrates that large-scale atmospheric disturbances strongly affect infrasound propagation. Their time scales vary from several tens of minutes to hours and days. Their effects are in average well resolved by the current model predictions; however, accurate spatial and temporal description is lacking in both weather and climate models. This study reviews recent results using the infrasound technology to characterize these large scale disturbances, including (i) wind fluctuations induced by gravity waves generating infrasound partial reflections and modifications of the infrasound waveguide, (ii) convection from thunderstorms and mountain waves generating gravity waves, (iii) stratospheric warming events which yield wind inversions in the stratosphere, (iv)planetary waves which control the global atmospheric circulation. Improved knowledge of these disturbances and assimilation in future models is an important objective of the ARISE (Atmospheric dynamics Research InfraStructure in Europe) project. This is essential in the context of the future verification of the CTBT as enhanced atmospheric models are necessary to assess the IMS network performance in higher resolution, reduce source location errors, and improve characterization methods.

  2. The large contribution of projected HFC emissions to future climate forcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velders, Guus J M; Fahey, David W; Daniel, John S; McFarland, Mack; Andersen, Stephen O

    2009-07-01

    The consumption and emissions of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are projected to increase substantially in the coming decades in response to regulation of ozone depleting gases under the Montreal Protocol. The projected increases result primarily from sustained growth in demand for refrigeration, air-conditioning (AC) and insulating foam products in developing countries assuming no new regulation of HFC consumption or emissions. New HFC scenarios are presented based on current hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) consumption in leading applications, patterns of replacements of HCFCs by HFCs in developed countries, and gross domestic product (GDP) growth. Global HFC emissions significantly exceed previous estimates after 2025 with developing country emissions as much as 800% greater than in developed countries in 2050. Global HFC emissions in 2050 are equivalent to 9-19% (CO(2)-eq. basis) of projected global CO(2) emissions in business-as-usual scenarios and contribute a radiative forcing equivalent to that from 6-13 years of CO(2) emissions near 2050. This percentage increases to 28-45% compared with projected CO(2) emissions in a 450-ppm CO(2) stabilization scenario. In a hypothetical scenario based on a global cap followed by 4% annual reductions in consumption, HFC radiative forcing is shown to peak and begin to decline before 2050.

  3. Orbital and physical parameters, and the distance of the eclipsing binary system OGLE-LMC-ECL-25658 in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Elgueta, S S; Gieren, W; Pietrzynski, G; Thompson, I B; Konorski, P; Pilecki, B; Villanova, S; Udalski, A; Soszynski, I; Suchomska, K; Karczmarek, P; Gorski, M; Wielgorski, P

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of a new detached eclipsing binary, OGLE-LMC-ECL-25658, in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The system consists of two late G-type giant stars on an eccentric orbit and orbital period of ~200 days. The system shows total eclipses and the components have similar temperatures, making it ideal for a precise distance determination. Using multi-color photometric and high resolution spectroscopic data, we have performed an analysis of light and radial velocity curves simultaneously using the Wilson Devinney code. We derived orbital and physical parameters of the binary with a high precision of < 1 %. The masses and surface metallicities of the components are virtually the same and equal to 2.23 +/- 0.02 M_sun and [Fe/H] = -0.63 +/- 0.10 dex. However their radii and rates of rotation show a distinct trace of differential stellar evolution. The distance to the system was calculated using an infrared calibration between V-band surface brightness and (V-K) color, leading to a distance modulus of (m...

  4. On the contribution of large scale structure to strong gravitational lensing

    CERN Document Server

    Faure, C; Hilbert, S; Massey, R; Covone, G; Finoguenov, A; Leauthaud, A; Taylor, J E; Pires, S; Scoville, N

    2008-01-01

    We study the correlation between the locations of galaxy-galaxy strong lensing candidates and tracers of large-scale structure from both weak lensing or X-ray emission. The COSMOS survey is a unique data set, combining deep, high resolution and contiguous imaging in which strong lenses have been discovered, plus unparalleled multiwavelength coverage. To help interpret the COSMOS data, we have also produced mock COSMOS strong and weak lensing observations, based on ray-tracing through the Millenium simulation. In agreement with the simulations, we find that strongly lensed images with the largest angular separations are found in the densest regions of the COSMOS field. This is explained by a prevalence among the lens population in dense environments of elliptical galaxies with high total-to-stellar mass ratios, which can deflect light through larger angles. However, we also find that the overall fraction of elliptical galaxies with strong gravitational lensing is independent of the local mass density; this obs...

  5. An Efficient Method to Evaluate Intermolecular Interaction Energies in Large Systems Using Overlapping Multicenter ONIOM and the Fragment Molecular Orbital Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Naoya; Fedorov, Dmitri G.; Kitaura, Kazuo; Nakanishi, Isao; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2012-01-01

    We propose an approach based on the overlapping multicenter ONIOM to evaluate intermolecular interaction energies in large systems and demonstrate its accuracy on several representative systems in the complete basis set limit at the MP2 and CCSD(T) level of theory. In the application to the intermolecular interaction energy between insulin dimer and 4′-hydroxyacetanilide at the MP2/CBS level, we use the fragment molecular orbital method for the calculation of the entire complex assigned to the lowest layer in three-layer ONIOM. The developed method is shown to be efficient and accurate in the evaluation of the protein-ligand interaction energies. PMID:23050059

  6. An optimum organizational structure for a large earth-orbiting multidisciplinary space base. Ph.D. Thesis - Fla. State Univ., 1973

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragusa, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    An optimum hypothetical organizational structure was studied for a large earth-orbiting, multidisciplinary research and applications space base manned by a crew of technologists. Because such a facility does not presently exist, in situ empirical testing was not possible. Study activity was, therefore, concerned with the identification of a desired organizational structural model rather than with the empirical testing of the model. The essential finding of this research was that a four-level project type total matrix model will optimize the efficiency and effectiveness of space base technologists.

  7. The contribution of large, slow-moving landslides to landscape evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Benjamin Hunter

    This dissertation discusses the contribution of deep-seated landslides and earthflows to the morphology, erosion, and evolution of mountainous landscapes, focusing on the northern California Coast Ranges. In active landscapes, channel incision is necessary to create relief but also increases stresses in adjacent hillslopes, ultimately leading to slope failure. While conceptually simple, the spatial relationships between channel incision and landsliding have not been well quantified. Along the South Fork Eel River, I mapped the distribution of deep-seated landslides using light detection and ranging (LiDAR) derived maps. Landslide density increases in regions subject to late Pleistocene--Holocene channel incision and particularly in response to lateral incision at the apex of meander bends. Wavelet analysis of channel sinuosity reveals hillslopes are most sensitive to meander wavelengths of 1.5 km. Argillaceous lithology generates abundant earthflow activity along the main stem Eel River, yet spatial and temporal patterns of earthflow movement are poorly understood. I undertook a detailed study of the Kekawaka Earthflow using LiDAR, meteoric 10Be in soil, orthorectified historical aerial photographs, and field surveys. Inventories of 10Be in soil pits increase systematically downslope, indicate an average movement rate of 2.1 +/- 1.3 m/a over the past 150 years, and establish a minimum earthflow age of 1700 years. The Kekawaka earthflow has a systematic history of movement, both spatially, with greatest movement in the narrow transport zone, and temporally, as velocities peaked in the 1960's and have slowed since 1981. I used LiDAR and aerial photographs to map earthflow movement and calculate sediment flux across 226 km2 of the main stem Eel River. From 1944--2006, 7.3% of the study area was active, and earthflows account for an erosion rate of 0.53 +/- 0.04 mm/a, over half the regional average sediment yield. Velocity time series on 17 earthflows suggest temporal

  8. The VLT/NaCo Large program to probe the occurrence of exoplanets and brown dwarfs in wide orbits: I- Sample definition and characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Desidera, S; Messina, S; Carson, J; Hagelberg, J; Schlieder, J E; Biazzo, K; Alcala, J M; Chauvin, G; Vigan, A; Beuzit, J L; Bonavita, M; Bonnefoy, M; Delorme, P; D'Orazi, V; Esposito, M; Feldt, M; Girardi, L; Gratton, R; Henning, T; Lagrange, A M; Lanzafame, A C; Launhardt, R; Marmier, M; Melo, C; Meyer, M; Mouillet, D; Moutou, C; Segransan, D; Udry, S; Zaidi, C M

    2014-01-01

    Young, nearby stars are ideal targets to search for planets using the direct imaging technique. The determination of stellar parameters is crucial for the interpretation of imaging survey results particularly since the luminosity of substellar objects has a strong dependence on system age. We have conducted a large program with NaCo at the VLT in order to search for planets and brown dwarfs in wide orbits around 86 stars. A large fraction of the targets observed with NaCo were poorly investigated in the literature. We performed a study to characterize the fundamental properties (age, distance, mass) of the stars in our sample. To improve target age determinations, we compiled and analyzed a complete set of age diagnostics. We measured spectroscopic parameters and age diagnostics using dedicated observations acquired with FEROS and CORALIE spectrographs at La Silla Observatory. We also made extensive use of archival spectroscopic data and results available in the literature. Additionally, we exploited photomet...

  9. The Orbital and Physical Parameters, and the Distance of the Eclipsing Binary System OGLE-LMC-ECL-25658 in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgueta, S. S.; Graczyk, D.; Gieren, W.; Pietrzyński, G.; Thompson, I. B.; Konorski, P.; Pilecki, B.; Villanova, S.; Udalski, A.; Soszyński, I.; Suchomska, K.; Karczmarek, P.; Górski, M.; Wielgórski, P.

    2016-08-01

    We present an analysis of a new detached eclipsing binary, OGLE-LMC-ECL-25658, in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The system consists of two late G-type giant stars on an eccentric orbit with an orbital period of ˜200 days. The system shows total eclipses and the components have similar temperatures, making it ideal for a precise distance determination. Using multi-color photometric and high resolution spectroscopic data, we have performed an analysis of light and radial velocity curves simultaneously using the Wilson-Devinney code. We derived orbital and physical parameters of the binary with a high precision of \\lt 1%. The masses and surface metallicities of the components are virtually the same and equal to 2.23+/- 0.02 {M}⊙ and [{Fe}/{{H}}]\\=\\-0.63+/- 0.10 dex. However, their radii and rates of rotation show a distinct trace of differential stellar evolution. The distance to the system was calculated using an infrared calibration between V-band surface brightness and (V-K) color, leading to a distance modulus of (m-M)\\=\\18.452+/- 0.023 (statistical) ± 0.046 (systematic). Because OGLE-LMC-ECL-25658 is located relatively far from the LMC barycenter, we applied a geometrical correction for its position in the LMC disk using the van der Marel et al. model of the LMC. The resulting barycenter distance to the galaxy is {d}{{LMC}}\\=\\50.30+/- 0.53 (stat.) kpc, and is in perfect agreement with the earlier result of Pietrzyński et al.

  10. Contribution of Large Genomic Rearrangements in Italian Lynch Syndrome Patients: Characterization of a Novel Alu-Mediated Deletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Duraturo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome is associated with germ-line mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes, mainly MLH1 and MSH2. Most of the mutations reported in these genes to date are point mutations, small deletions, and insertions. Large genomic rearrangements in the MMR genes predisposing to Lynch syndrome also occur, but the frequency varies depending on the population studied on average from 5 to 20%. The aim of this study was to examine the contribution of large rearrangements in the MLH1 and MSH2 genes in a well-characterised series of 63 unrelated Southern Italian Lynch syndrome patients who were negative for pathogenic point mutations in the MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 genes. We identified a large novel deletion in the MSH2 gene, including exon 6 in one of the patients analysed (1.6% frequency. This deletion was confirmed and localised by long-range PCR. The breakpoints of this rearrangement were characterised by sequencing. Further analysis of the breakpoints revealed that this rearrangement was a product of Alu-mediated recombination. Our findings identified a novel Alu-mediated rearrangement within MSH2 gene and showed that large deletions or duplications in MLH1 and MSH2 genes are low-frequency mutational events in Southern Italian patients with an inherited predisposition to colon cancer.

  11. Orbital cellulitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hemolytic streptococci may also cause orbital cellulitis. Orbital cellulitis infections in children may get worse very quickly and ... in the space around the eye. An orbital cellulitis infection can get worse very quickly. A person with ...

  12. Small Atomic Orbital Basis Set First-Principles Quantum Chemical Methods for Large Molecular and Periodic Systems: A Critical Analysis of Error Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sure, Rebecca; Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Grimme, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    In quantum chemical computations the combination of Hartree-Fock or a density functional theory (DFT) approximation with relatively small atomic orbital basis sets of double-zeta quality is still widely used, for example, in the popular B3LYP/6-31G* approach. In this Review, we critically analyze the two main sources of error in such computations, that is, the basis set superposition error on the one hand and the missing London dispersion interactions on the other. We review various strategies to correct those errors and present exemplary calculations on mainly noncovalently bound systems of widely varying size. Energies and geometries of small dimers, large supramolecular complexes, and molecular crystals are covered. We conclude that it is not justified to rely on fortunate error compensation, as the main inconsistencies can be cured by modern correction schemes which clearly outperform the plain mean-field methods.

  13. On the shape and orientation control of an orbiting shallow spherical shell structure. [shape and orientation control of large dish type receivers/reflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainum, P. M.; Reddy, A. S. S. R.

    1981-01-01

    A proposed method for controlling the shape and orientation of very large shallow dish type receiver/reflectors to be used in communication, radiometry and in electronic orbital based mail systems involves connecting a rigid light weight dumbell with heavy tip masses to the shell at its apex by a spring loaded double gimballed joint with dampling. To completely damp the system transient motion in all of the important lower frequency modes, an active control system is required. A mathematical model is extended to include the effects of point actuators located at preselected positions on the shell surface. The formulation of the uncontrolled dynamics assumes an a priori knowledge of the frequencies of all the elastic modes to be incorporated within the system model. As an example, three rigid body modes and six elastic modes are included in the model and six actuators are assumed, none of which lies on a nodal line or circle.

  14. Relative Contribution of Matrix Structure, Patch Resources and Management to the Local Densities of Two Large Blue Butterfly Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajzer-Bonk, Joanna; Skórka, Piotr; Nowicki, Piotr; Bonk, Maciej; Król, Wiesław; Szpiłyk, Damian; Woyciechowski, Michal

    2016-01-01

    The type of matrix, the landscape surrounding habitat patches, may determine the distribution and function of local populations. However, the matrix is often heterogeneous, and its various components may differentially contribute to metapopulation processes at different spatial scales, a phenomenon that has rarely been investigated. The aim of this study was to estimate the relative importance of matrix composition and spatial scale, habitat quality, and management intensity on the occurrence and density of local populations of two endangered large blue butterflies: Phengaris teleius and P. nausithous. Presence and abundance data were assessed over two years, 2011-12, in 100 local patches within two heterogeneous regions (near Kraków and Tarnów, southern Poland). The matrix composition was analyzed at eight spatial scales. We observed high occupancy rates in both species, regions and years. With the exception of area and isolation, almost all of the matrix components contributed to Phengaris sp. densities. The different matrix components acted at different spatial scales (grassland cover within 4 and 3 km, field cover within 0.4 and 0.3 km and water cover within 4 km radii for P. teleius and P. nausithous, respectively) and provided the highest independent contribution to the butterfly densities. Additionally, the effects of a 0.4 km radius of forest cover and a food plant cover on P. teleius, and a 1 km radius of settlement cover and management intensity on P. nausithous densities were observed. Contrary to former studies we conclude that the matrix heterogeneity and spatial scale rather than general matrix type are of relevance for densities of butterflies. Conservation strategies for these umbrella species should concentrate on maintaining habitat quality and managing matrix composition at the most appropriate spatial scales.

  15. Contribution of large-scale circulation anomalies to changes in extreme precipitation frequency in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lejiang; Zhong, Shiyuan; Pei, Lisi; Bian, Xindi; Heilman, Warren E.

    2016-04-01

    The mean global climate has warmed as a result of the increasing emission of greenhouse gases induced by human activities. This warming is considered the main reason for the increasing number of extreme precipitation events in the US. While much attention has been given to extreme precipitation events occurring over several days, which are usually responsible for severe flooding over a large region, little is known about how extreme precipitation events that cause flash flooding and occur at sub-daily time scales have changed over time. Here we use the observed hourly precipitation from the North American Land Data Assimilation System Phase 2 forcing datasets to determine trends in the frequency of extreme precipitation events of short (1 h, 3 h, 6 h, 12 h and 24 h) duration for the period 1979-2013. The results indicate an increasing trend in the central and eastern US. Over most of the western US, especially the Southwest and the Intermountain West, the trends are generally negative. These trends can be largely explained by the interdecadal variability of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), with the AMO making a greater contribution to the trends in both warm and cold seasons.

  16. Contribution of large submarine landslide to tsunami potential in the NE Atlantic region: The Gorringe Bank case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, Inês; Omira, Rachid; Baptista, Maria Ana; Miranda, Miguel; Terrinha, Pedro; Batista, Luis; Roque, Cristina

    2015-04-01

    Tsunami is recognized as a natural hazard, and it is now widely accepted that submarine mass-failures are one of possible tsunami sources. Various studies on tsunami-induced by submarine landslides were carried out based on a spontaneous trigger of the mass-failure. In this study we focus on the deep-water submarine landslide in the Gorringe Bank (GB) area, NE Atlantic. In particular, we investigate the contribution of such mass-failure, as an additional source, to tsunami potential. We assume that an initial tsunami is generated by a large earthquake in the south west Iberia margin area that also initiates the failure of the GB landslide. This mass-failure can play the role of a secondary source of tsunami and contribute to tsunami potential. We simulate the tsunami generation as combination between the sea free surface perturbation caused instantaneously by the earthquake and the initial wave generated progressively due to the slide motion. Okada's equations are employed to compute the initial tsunami induced by the earthquake. While, a multi-layers viscous shallow water (VSW) model is used to simulate the flow of the submarine mass failure and the resulting tsunami wave. To model the propagation and coastal impact of the tsunami resulted from a combination of earthquake and landslide, we use a non-linear shallow water model and a nested grid system that allow estimating properly near-shore wave heights and inundation. We consider a 1755-like earthquake of magnitude Mw8.5, and a landslide of an approximate volume of about 60 km3. The characteristics of the landslide come from the analysis of detailed marine geological data including the erosional area (dimensions and scarps) and the seismic profiles. The results are presents in terms of: i) evidences of submarine mass failures in the area of GB; ii) simulations of the slide motion and the resulting tsunami wave; iii) simulations of the tsunami generated by a combination of two triggers: earthquake and landslide

  17. Ray Structure of the Coronal Streamer Belt and Its Manifestation as Sharp Large Peaks of Solar Wind Plasma Density at the Earth's Orbit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. V. Eselevich; V. G. Eselevich; Z. Q. Zang

    2005-01-01

    The white-light corona calibrated data with processing level L1 from the LASCO-C2/SOHO instrument, and data from the Wind spacecraft with one-hour and one-minute time resolution on quasi-stationary slow (v between 300-450 km/s at the Earth's orbit) the Solar Wind (SW) parameters in the absence of sporadic SW streams are examined. Within distances from the Sun's center less than R in the range of 20-30 Rs,(Rs, the solar radius), slow wind is known as the streamer belt, and at larger distances it is called the Heliospheric Plasma Sheet (HPS). It is shown that the streamer belt comprises a sequence of pairs of rays. In general, ray brightnesses in each pair can differ, and the magnetic field is oppositely directed in them. The neutral line of the radial magnetic field of the Sun runs along the belt between the rays of each of the pairs.The area in which the streamer belt intersects the ecliptic plane and which lies at the central meridian, will be recorded at the earth's orbit with a time delay of 5-6 days, in the form of one or several peaks with Nmax > 10 cm-3. Furthermore, the simplest density profile of the portion of the HCS has the form of two peaks of a different or identical amplitude . The such a profile is observed in cases where the angle of intersection of the streamer belt with the ecliptic plane near the Sun is sufficiently large, i.e. close to 90°. The two-ray structure of the cross-section of the streamer-belt moves from the Sun to the Earth, it retains not only the angular size of the peaks but also the relative density variations, and the position of the neutral line(sector boundary) in between. At the Earth's orbit the ray structure of the streamer belt provides the source for sharp (i.e. with steep fronts of a duration of a few minutes or shorter) solar wind plasma density peaks (of a duration of several hours) with maximum values Nmax > 10 cm-3.

  18. Magnetic configuration effects on TAE-induced losses and a comparison with the orbit-following model in the Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, K. [Nagoya University, Japan; Isobe, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Toi, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Spong, Donald A [ORNL; Osakabe, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan

    2012-01-01

    Fast-ion losses from Large Helical Device (LHD) plasmas due to toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAEs) were measured by a scintillator-based lost fast-ion probe (SLIP) to understand the loss processes. TAE-induced losses measured by the SLIP appeared in energy E ranges of around 50-180 keV with pitch angles. between 35 degrees-45 degrees, and increased with the increase in TAE amplitudes. Position shifts of the magnetic axis due to a finite plasma pressure led not only to an increase in TAE-induced losses but also to a stronger scaling of fast-ion losses on TAE amplitudes. Characteristics of the observed fast-ion losses were compared with a numerical simulation based on orbit-following models in which the TAE fluctuations are taken into account. The calculation indicated that the number of lost fast ions reaching the SLIP increased with the increase in the TAE amplitude at the TAE gap. Moreover, the calculated dependence of fast-ion loss fluxes on the fluctuation amplitude became stronger in the case of large magnetic axis shifts, compared with the case of smaller shifts, as was observed in the experiments. The simulation results agreed qualitatively with the experimental observations in the LHD.

  19. Significant contribution of As 4 p orbitals to the low-lying electronic structure of the 112-type iron-based superconductor Ca 0.9La 0.1FeAs 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M. Y.; Liu, Z. T.; Zhou, W.; Yang, H. F.; Shen, D. W.; Li, W.; Jiang, J.; Niu, X. H.; Xie, B. P.; Sun, Y.; Fan, C. C.; Yao, Q.; Liu, J. S.; Shi, Z. X.; Xie, X. M.

    2015-01-01

    We report a systematic polarization-dependent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study of the three-dimensional electronic structure of the recently discovered 112-type iron-based superconductor Ca1 -xLaxFeAs2 (x =0.1 ). Besides the commonly reported three holelike and two electronlike bands in iron-based superconductors, we resolve one additional holelike band around the zone center and one more fast-dispersing band near the X point in the vicinity of the Fermi level. By tuning the polarization and the energy of incident photons, we are able to identify the specific orbital character and the kz dependence of all bands. Combining these results with band calculations, we find that As 4 pz and 4 px(4 py) orbitals contribute significantly to the additional three-dimensional holelike band and the narrow band, respectively. Also, there is considerable hybridization between the As 4 pz and Fe 3 d orbitals in the additional holelike band, which suggests strong coupling between the unique arsenic zigzag bond layers and the FeAs layers therein. Our findings provide a comprehensive picture of the orbital character of the low-lying band structure of 112-type iron-based superconductors, which can be a starting point for the further understanding of their unconventional superconductivity.

  20. The large area crop inventory experiment: An experiment to demonstrate how space-age technology can contribute to solving critical problems here on earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    The large area crop inventory experiment is being developed to predict crop production through satellite photographs. This experiment demonstrates how space age technology can contribute to solving practical problems of agriculture management.

  1. Observations of the gamma-ray emission from the Quiescent Sun with Fermi Large Area Telescope during the first 7 years in orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainó S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The high energy gamma-ray emission from the quiescent Sun is due to the interactions of cosmic ray (CR protons and electrons with matter and photons in the solar environment. Such interactions lead to two component gamma-ray emission: a disk-like emission due to the nuclear interactions of CR protons and nuclei in the solar atmosphere and a space extended emission due to the inverse Compton (IC scattering of CR electrons off solar photons in the whole heliosphere. The observation of these two solar emission components may give useful information about the evolution of the solar cycle by probing two different CR components (proton and electrons in regions not directly accessible by direct observations. We present the results of the observations of the Sun with Fermi-LAT in the first 7 years on orbit, with the exception of the flaring periods. Significantly large photon statistics and improved processing performance with respect to previous analysis allow us to explore both components of the emission in greater details and perform better comparisons of data with current models of the IC component. This allows us to probe CR electrons in the inner heliosphere which is not possible by other methods. Moreover, the longer period of observations allows us to study the variations of the emission between the maximum and the minimum of the solar cycle.

  2. DETERMINATION OF THE POINT-SPREAD FUNCTION FOR THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE FROM ON-ORBIT DATA AND LIMITS ON PAIR HALOS OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, M. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Buehler, R. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Asano, K. [Interactive Research Center of Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro City, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Atwood, W. B. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Ballet, J. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Universite Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bastieri, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bonamente, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Brandt, T. J. [CNRS, IRAP, F-31028 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Brigida, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' M. Merlin' dell' Universita e del Politecnico di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Bruel, P., E-mail: mdwood@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: mar0@uw.edu [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Ecole polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); and others

    2013-03-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope is a pair-conversion telescope designed to detect photons with energies from Almost-Equal-To 20 MeV to >300 GeV. The pre-launch response functions of the LAT were determined through extensive Monte Carlo simulations and beam tests. The point-spread function (PSF) characterizing the angular distribution of reconstructed photons as a function of energy and geometry in the detector is determined here from two years of on-orbit data by examining the distributions of {gamma} rays from pulsars and active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Above 3 GeV, the PSF is found to be broader than the pre-launch PSF. We checked for dependence of the PSF on the class of {gamma}-ray source and observation epoch and found none. We also investigated several possible spatial models for pair-halo emission around BL Lac AGNs. We found no evidence for a component with spatial extension larger than the PSF and set upper limits on the amplitude of halo emission in stacked images of low- and high-redshift BL Lac AGNs and the TeV blazars 1ES0229+200 and 1ES0347-121.

  3. Temporal trends in West Antarctic surface mass balance: do large scale modes of climate contribute to observed records?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, M.; Rupper, S.; Williams, J.; Burgener, L. K.; Koenig, L.; Forster, R. R.; Koutnik, M. R.; Skinner, R.; Miege, C.; Brucker, L.

    2013-12-01

    . These trends represent a negative region-wide SMB trend that is likely connected to large scale modes of climate, possibly associated with tropical Pacific climate variability. All five of the modeled SMB datasets show anomalous accumulation during anomalous phases of SAM and ENSO, although not all of these anomalies are significant at the 95% confidence level. These simulated results are compared to composite analysis of the firn core data over the same region to assess the validity of the model results. Understanding how large scale modes of climate contribute to the trends observed from the firn core records will help reconstruct past and predict future changes in the central WAIS SMB.

  4. Sequence diversity in the large subunit of RNA polymerase I contributes to Mefenoxam insensitivity in Phytophthora infestans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Eva; Young, Vanessa; Sierotzki, Helge; Scalliet, Gabriel; Birch, Paul R J; Cooke, David E L; Csukai, Michael; Whisson, Stephen C

    2014-09-01

    Phenylamide fungicides have been widely used for the control of oomycete-incited plant diseases for over 30 years. Insensitivity to this chemical class of fungicide was recorded early in its usage history, but the precise protein(s) conditioning insensitivity has proven difficult to determine. To determine the genetic basis of insensitivity and to inform strategies for the cloning of the gene(s) responsible, genetic crosses were established between Mefenoxam sensitive and intermediate insensitive isolates of Phytophthora infestans, the potato late blight pathogen. F1 progeny showed the expected semi-dominant phenotypes for Mefenoxam insensitivity and suggested the involvement of multiple loci, complicating the positional cloning of the gene(s) conditioning insensitivity to Mefenoxam. Instead, a candidate gene strategy was used, based on previous observations that the primary effect of phenylamide compounds is to inhibit ribosomal RNA synthesis. The subunits of RNA polymerase I (RNApolI) were sequenced from sensitive and insensitive isolates and F1 progeny. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) specific to insensitive field isolates were identified in the gene encoding the large subunit of RNApolI. In a survey of field isolates, SNP T1145A (Y382F) showed an 86% association with Mefenoxam insensitivity. Isolates not showing this association belonged predominantly to one P. infestans genotype. The transfer of the 'insensitive' allele of RPA190 to a sensitive isolate yielded transgenic lines that were insensitive to Mefenoxam. These results demonstrate that sequence variation in RPA190 contributes to insensitivity to Mefenoxam in P. infestans.

  5. Visualizing the Contributions of Virtual States to Two-Photon Absorption Cross Sections by Natural Transition Orbitals of Response Transition Density Matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Kaushik D; Krylov, Anna I

    2017-07-20

    Observables such as two-photon absorption cross sections cannot be computed from the wave functions of initial and final states alone because of their nonlinear nature. Rather, they depend on the entire manifold of the excited states, which follows from the familiar sum-over-states expressions of second- and higher-order properties. Consequently, the interpretation of the computed nonlinear optical properties in terms of molecular orbitals is not straightforward and usually relies on approximate few-states models. Here, we show that the two-photon absorption (2PA) transitions can be visualized using response one-particle transition density matrices, which are defined as transition density matrices between the zero-order and first-order perturbed states. We also extend the concept of natural transition orbitals to 2PA transitions. We illustrate the utility of this new tool, which provides a rigorous black box alternative to traditional qualitative few-states analysis, by considering 2PA transitions in ethylene, trans-stilbene, and para-nitroaniline.

  6. Is the magnetic anisotropy proportional to the orbital moment?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skomski, R; Kashyap, A; Enders, A

    2011-04-01

    The relation between orbital moment and magnetic anisotropy is investigated by model calculations, which show that only a part of the spin-orbit coupling contributes to the anisotropy. A large part of the anisotropy energy, about 50% for iron series elements and nearly 100% for rare-earths, is stored in the nonrelativistic part of the Hamiltonian. A feature important for x-ray magnetic circular dichroism is that the orbital moment of heavy atoms rotates with the spin moment, whereas in light atoms, the orbital moment is recreated in each different direction. In the discussion, we consider three examples of current interest in different areas of magnetism, namely, spin-orbit coupling in Gd3+ and Eu2+, surface anisotropy of Nd2Fe14B, and multiferroic magnetization switching using rare-earths. (C) 2011 American Institute of Physics. [doi:10.1063/1.3562445

  7. Small Orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Borsten, L; Ferrara, S; Marrani, A; Rubens, W

    2012-01-01

    We study both the "large" and "small" U-duality charge orbits of extremal black holes appearing in D = 5 and D = 4 Maxwell-Einstein supergravity theories with symmetric scalar manifolds. We exploit a formalism based on cubic Jordan algebras and their associated Freudenthal triple systems, in order to derive the minimal charge representatives, their stabilizers and the associated "moduli spaces". After recalling N = 8 maximal supergravity, we consider N = 2 and N = 4 theories coupled to an arbitrary number of vector multiplets, as well as N = 2 magic, STU, ST^2 and T^3 models. While the STU model may be considered as part of the general N = 2 sequence, albeit with an additional triality symmetry, the ST^2 and T^3 models demand a separate treatment, since their representative Jordan algebras are Euclidean or only admit non-zero elements of rank 3, respectively. Finally, we also consider minimally coupled N = 2, matter coupled N = 3, and "pure" N = 5 theories.

  8. Orbital pseudotumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Goodlick TA, Kay MD, Glaser JS, Tse DT, Chang WJ. Orbital disease and neuro-ophthalmology. In: Tasman ... 423. Review Date 8/20/2016 Updated by: Franklin W. Lusby, MD, ophthalmologist, Lusby Vision Institute, La ...

  9. Foreign body orbital cyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdanfard, Younes; Heegard, Steffen; Fledelius, Hans C.

    2001-01-01

    Ophthalmology, penetrating orbital injury, orbital foreign body, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), histology......Ophthalmology, penetrating orbital injury, orbital foreign body, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), histology...

  10. 计算大型塔板效率的区域贡献法%Local Contribution Method for Efficiency of Large Plates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许松林; 王惠媛; 徐世民

    2005-01-01

    From the measurement of liquid flow field on a large plate by a hot-film anemometer, three different regions on the large plate were presented, including a liquid circulation area near the inlet down-comer, a region with very slow moving or stagnant liquid on the side of the tray and an active flow region at the center of the plate.According to the contribution of the three regions, the tray efficiency for large plates was proposed. The prediction plate efficiency by the present model are compared with the experimental data in the literature and those calculated by other models. It is shown that the present model is more accurate for prediction of efficiency of large plates, and the calculation is simpler.

  11. The small and large subunits of carbamoyl-phosphate synthase exhibit diverse contributions to pathogenicity in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Jing; SonG Xue; Zou Li-fang; Zou Hua-song; CHen Gong-you

    2015-01-01

    Carbamoyl-phosphate synthase plays a vital role in the carbon and nitrogen metabolism cycles. In Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, carA and carB encode the smal and large subunits of carbamoyl-phosphate synthase, respectively. The deletion mutation of the coding regions revealed that carA did not affect any of the phenotypes, while carB played multiple roles in pathogenicity. The deletion of carB rendered the loss of pathogenicity in host plants and the ability to induce a hyper-sensitive reaction in the non-hosts. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR assays indicated that 11 hrp genes coding the type III secretion system were suppressed when interacting with citrus plants. The mutation in carB also affected bacterial utilization of several carbon and nitrogen resources in minimal medium MMX and extracel ular enzyme activities. These data demonstrated that only the large subunit of carbamoyl-phosphate synthase was essential for canker development by X. citri subsp. citri.

  12. Simulations of the cosmic infrared and submillimeter background for future large surveys: II. Removing the low-redshift contribution to the anisotropies using stacking

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez-Conde, N; Puget, J-L; Dole, H; 10.1051/0004-6361/200912924

    2010-01-01

    Herschel and Planck are surveying the sky at unprecedented angular scales and sensitivities over large areas. But both experiments are limited by source confusion in the submillimeter. The high confusion noise in particular restricts the study of the clustering properties of the sources that dominate the cosmic infrared background. At these wavelengths, it is more appropriate to consider the statistics of the unresolved component. In particular, high clustering will contribute in excess of Poisson noise in the power spectra of CIB anisotropies. These power spectra contain contributions from sources at all redshift. We show how the stacking technique can be used to separate the different redshift contributions to the power spectra. We use simulations of CIB representative of realistic Spitzer, Herschel, Planck, and SCUBA-2 observations. We stack the 24um sources in longer wavelengths maps to measure mean colors per redshift and flux bins. The information retrieved on the mean spectral energy distribution obtai...

  13. Precise Orbit Determination for ALOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Ryo; Nakamura, Shinichi; Kudo, Nobuo; Katagiri, Seiji

    2007-01-01

    The Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) has been developed to contribute to the fields of mapping, precise regional land coverage observation, disaster monitoring, and resource surveying. Because the mounted sensors need high geometrical accuracy, precise orbit determination for ALOS is essential for satisfying the mission objectives. So ALOS mounts a GPS receiver and a Laser Reflector (LR) for Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR). This paper deals with the precise orbit determination experiments for ALOS using Global and High Accuracy Trajectory determination System (GUTS) and the evaluation of the orbit determination accuracy by SLR data. The results show that, even though the GPS receiver loses lock of GPS signals more frequently than expected, GPS-based orbit is consistent with SLR-based orbit. And considering the 1 sigma error, orbit determination accuracy of a few decimeters (peak-to-peak) was achieved.

  14. Remote Sensing Contributions to Prediction and Risk Assessment of Natural Disasters Caused by Large Scale Rift Valley Fever Outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyamba, Assaf; Linthicum, Kenneth J.; Small, Jennifer; Britch, S. C.; Tucker, C. J.

    2012-01-01

    Remotely sensed vegetation measurements for the last 30 years combined with other climate data sets such as rainfall and sea surface temperatures have come to play an important role in the study of the ecology of arthropod-borne diseases. We show that epidemics and epizootics of previously unpredictable Rift Valley fever are directly influenced by large scale flooding associated with the El Ni o/Southern Oscillation. This flooding affects the ecology of disease transmitting arthropod vectors through vegetation development and other bioclimatic factors. This information is now utilized to monitor, model, and map areas of potential Rift Valley fever outbreaks and is used as an early warning system for risk reduction of outbreaks to human and animal health, trade, and associated economic impacts. The continuation of such satellite measurements is critical to anticipating, preventing, and managing disease epidemics and epizootics and other climate-related disasters.

  15. Helioseismology with Solar Orbiter

    CERN Document Server

    Löptien, Björn; Gizon, Laurent; Schou, Jesper; Appourchaux, Thierry; Rodríguez, Julián Blanco; Cally, Paul S; Dominguez-Tagle, Carlos; Gandorfer, Achim; Hill, Frank; Hirzberger, Johann; Scherrer, Philip H; Solanki, Sami K

    2014-01-01

    The Solar Orbiter mission, to be launched in July 2017, will carry a suite of remote sensing and in-situ instruments, including the Polarimetric and Helioseismic Imager (PHI). PHI will deliver high-cadence images of the Sun in intensity and Doppler velocity suitable for carrying out novel helioseismic studies. The orbit of the Solar Orbiter spacecraft will reach a solar latitude of up to 21 deg (up to 34 deg by the end of the extended mission) and thus will enable the first local helioseismology studies of the polar regions. Here we consider an array of science objectives to be addressed by helioseismology within the baseline telemetry allocation (51 Gbit per orbit, current baseline) and within the science observing windows (baseline 3 x 10 days per orbit). A particularly important objective is the measurement of large-scale flows at high latitudes (rotation and meridional flow), which are largely unknown but play an important role in flux transport dynamos. The full range of Earth-Sun-spacecraft angles provi...

  16. Large-scale phenotypic analysis reveals identical contributions to cell functions of known and unknown yeast genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, M M; Ngo, S; Vandenbol, M; Sartori, G; Morlupi, A; Ricci, C; Stefani, S; Morlino, G B; Hilger, F; Carignani, G; Slonimski, P P; Frontali, L

    2001-11-01

    Sequencing of the yeast genome has shown that about one-third of the yeast ORFs code for unknown proteins. Many other have similarity to known genes, but still the cellular functions of the gene products are unknown. The aim of the B1 Consortium of the EUROFAN project was to perform a qualitative phenotypic analysis on yeast strains deleted for functionally orphan genes. To this end we set up a simple approach to detect growth defects of a relatively large number of strains in the presence of osmolytes, ethanol, high temperature, inhibitory compounds or drugs affecting protein biosynthesis, phosphorylation level or nucleic acids biosynthesis. We have now developed this procedure to a semi-quantitative level, we have included new inhibitors, such as hygromycin B, benomyl, metals and additional drugs interfering with synthesis of nucleic acids, and we have performed phenotypic analysis on the deleted strains of 564 genes poorly characterized in respect to their cellular functions. About 30% of the deleted strains showed at least one phenotype: many of them were pleiotropic. For many gene deletions, the linkage between the deletion marker and the observed phenotype(s) was studied by tetrad analysis and their co-segregation was demonstrated. Co-segregation was found in about two-thirds of the analysed strains showing phenotype(s).

  17. The contribution of undiagnosed adrenal insufficiency to euvolaemic hyponatraemia: results of a large prospective single-centre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, Martín; Garrahy, Aoife; Slattery, David; Gupta, Saket; Hannon, Anne Marie; Forde, Hannah; McGurren, Karen; Sherlock, Mark; Tormey, William; Thompson, Christopher J

    2016-12-01

    The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis (SIAD) is the commonest cause of hyponatraemia. Data on SIAD are mainly derived from retrospective studies, often with poor ascertainment of the minimum criteria for the correct diagnosis. Reliable data on the incidence of adrenal failure in SIAD are therefore unavailable. The aim of the study was to describe the aetiology of SIAD and in particular to define the prevalence of undiagnosed adrenal insufficiency. Prospective, single centre, noninterventional, observational study of patients admitted to Beaumont Hospital with euvolaemic hyponatraemia (plasma sodium ≤ 130 mmol/l) between January 1st and October 1st 2015. A total of 1323 admissions with hyponatraemia were prospectively evaluated; 576 had euvolaemic hyponatraemia, with 573 (43·4%) initially classified as SIAD. (i) Aetiology of SIAD, defined by diagnostic criteria; (ii) Incidence of adrenal insufficiency. Central nervous system diseases were the commonest cause of SIAD (n = 148, 26%) followed by pulmonary diseases (n = 111, 19%), malignancy (n = 105, 18%) and drugs (n = 47, 8%). A total of 22 patients (3·8%), initially diagnosed as SIAD, were reclassified as secondary adrenal insufficiency on the basis of cortisol measurements and clinical presentation; 9/22 cases had undiagnosed hypopituitarism; 13/22 patients had secondary adrenal insufficiency due to exogenous steroid administration. In a large, prospective and well-defined cohort of euvolaemic hyponatraemia, undiagnosed secondary adrenal insufficiency co-occurred in 3·8% of cases initially diagnosed as SIAD. Undiagnosed pituitary disease was responsible for 1·5% of cases presenting as euvolaemic hyponatraemia. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Antimicrobial resistance in urinary tract infections at a large urban ED: Factors contributing to empiric treatment failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Rossana; Abbo, Lilian M; Raney, Kenley; Tookes, Hansel E; Supino, Mark

    2017-03-01

    To calculate the emergency department (ED)-level Escherichia coli percentage of isolates susceptible to commonly used antibiotics and to determine the risk factors associated with inadequate empiric antibiotic therapy among patients treated for urinary tract infections (UTIs) in our ED. Retrospective cohort study conducted at a large tertiary teaching hospital. Participants included patients older than 18years of age who had a urine culture with growth of >100,000 colonies of E. coli. Demographic and therapeutic choices associated with inadequate empiric antibiotic therapy were explored. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of E. coli isolates recovered from ED patients were calculated, and stratified by gender and age. A total of 300 unique patients had E. coli bacteriuria during the study period. Among patients who received at least one dose of antibiotic in the ED, variables independently associated with an increased risk of inadequate empiric therapy were age (relative risk [RR] 1.016; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.001-1.031; P=0.032), male gender (RR 2.507; 95% CI 1.470-4.486; P=0.001), and use of fluoroquinolones (RR 2.128; 95% CI 1.249-3.624 P=0.005). Sub-group analysis of patients discharged from the ED showed that definitive therapy with nitrofurantoin decreased the risk of inadequate empiric antibiotic therapy by 80% (RR 0.202; CI 0.065-0.638; P=0.006). ED-level antibiograms showed differences in antimicrobial susceptibility of E. coli by age and gender. Development of ED-level antimicrobial susceptibility data and consideration of patients' clinical characteristics can help better guide selection of empiric antibiotic therapy for the treatment of UTIs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Extremely large anthropogenic-aerosol contribution to total aerosol load over the Bay of Bengal during winter season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Kaskaoutis

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Ship-borne observations of spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD have been carried out over the entire Bay of Bengal (BoB as part of the W-ICARB cruise campaign during the period 27 December 2008–30 January 2009. The results reveal a pronounced temporal and spatial variability in the optical characteristics of aerosols mainly due to anthropogenic emissions and their dispersion controlled by local meteorology. The highest aerosol amount, with mean AOD500>0.4, being even above 1.0 on specific days, is found close to the coastal regions in the western and northern parts of BoB. In these regions the Ångström exponent is also found to be high (~1.2–1.25 indicating transport of strong anthropogenic emissions from continental regions, while very high AOD500 (0.39±0.07 and α380–870 values (1.27±0.09 are found over the eastern BoB. Except from the large α380–870 values, an indication of strong fine-mode dominance is also observed from the AOD curvature, which is negative in the vast majority of the cases, suggesting dominance of an anthropogenic-pollution aerosol type. On the other hand, clean maritime conditions are rather rare over the region, while the aerosol types are further examined through a classification scheme based on the relationship between α and dα. It was found that even for the same α values the fine-mode dominance is larger for higher AODs showing the strong continental influence over the marine environment of BoB. Furthermore, there is also an evidence of aerosol-size growth under more turbid conditions indicative of coagulation and/or humidification over specific BoB regions. The results obtained using OPAC model show significant fraction of soot aerosols (~6 %–8 % over the eastern and northwestern BoB, while coarse-mode sea salt particles are found to dominate in the southern parts of BoB.

  20. [Secondary orbital lymphoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basanta, I; Sevillano, C; Álvarez, M D

    2015-09-01

    A case is presented of an 85 year-old Caucasian female with lymphoma that recurred in the orbit (secondary ocular adnexal lymphoma). The orbital tumour was a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma according to the REAL classification (Revised European-American Lymphoma Classification). Orbital lymphomas are predominantly B-cell proliferations of a variety of histological types, and most are low-grade tumours. Patients are usually middle-aged or elderly, and it is slightly more common in women. A palpable mass, proptosis and blepharoptosis are the most common signs of presentation. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Plasma Flowfields Around Low Earth Orbit Objects: Aerodynamics to Underpin Orbit Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capon, Christopher; Boyce, Russell; Brown, Melrose

    2016-07-01

    Interactions between orbiting bodies and the charged space environment are complex. The large variation in passive body parameters e.g. size, geometry and materials, makes the plasma-body interaction in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) a region rich in fundamental physical phenomena. The aerodynamic interaction of LEO orbiting bodies with the neutral environment constitutes the largest non-conservative force on the body. However in general, study of the LEO plasma-body interaction has not been concerned with external flow physics, but rather with the effects on surface charging. The impact of ionospheric flow physics on the forces on space debris (and active objects) is not well understood. The work presented here investigates the contribution that plasma-body interactions have on the flow structure and hence on the total atmospheric force vector experienced by a polar orbiting LEO body. This work applies a hybrid Particle-in-Cell (PIC) - Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code, pdFoam, to self-consistently model the electrostatic flowfield about a cylinder with a uniform, fixed surface potential. Flow conditions are representative of the mean conditions experienced by the Earth Observing Satellite (EOS) based on the International Reference Ionosphere model (IRI-86). The electron distribution function is represented by a non-linear Boltzmann electron fluid and ion gas-surface interactions are assumed to be that of a neutralising, conducting, thermally accommodating solid wall with diffuse reflections. The variation in flowfield and aerodynamic properties with surface potential at a fixed flow condition is investigated, and insight into the relative contributions of charged and neutral species to the flow physics experienced by a LEO orbiting body is provided. This in turn is intended to help improve the fidelity of physics-based orbit predictions for space debris and other near-Earth space objects.

  2. Geometric orbit datum and orbit covers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁科; 侯自新

    2001-01-01

    Vogan conjectured that the parabolic induction of orbit data is independent of the choice of the parabolic subgroup. In this paper we first give the parabolic induction of orbit covers, whose relationship with geometric orbit datum is also induced. Hence we show a geometric interpretation of orbit data and finally prove the conjugation for geometric orbit datum using geometric method.

  3. Leading large-x logarithms of the quark–gluon contributions to inclusive Higgs-boson and lepton-pair production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Lo Presti

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We present all-order expressions for the leading double-logarithmic threshold contributions to the quark–gluon coefficient functions for inclusive Higgs-boson production in the heavy top-quark limit and for Drell–Yan lepton-pair production. These results have been derived using the structure of the unfactorized cross sections in dimensional regularization and the large-x resummation of the gluon–quark and quark–gluon splitting functions. The resummed coefficient functions, which are identical up to colour factor replacements, are similar to their counterparts in deep-inelastic scattering but slightly more complicated.

  4. The VLT/NaCo large program to probe the occurrence of exoplanets and brown dwarfs at wide orbits: II- Survey description, results and performances

    CERN Document Server

    Chauvin, G; Bonnefoy, M; Desidera, S; Bonavita, M; Mesa, D; Boccaletti, A; Buenzli, E; Carson, J; Delorme, P; Hagelberg, J; Montagnier, G; Mordasini, C; Quanz, S P; Segransan, D; Thalmann, C; Beuzit, J -L; Biller, B; Covino, E; Feldt, M; Girard, J; Gratton, R; Henning, T; Kasper, M; Lagrange, A -M; Messina, S; Meyer, M; Mouillet, D; Moutou, C; Reggianni, M; Schlieder, J E; Zurlo, A

    2014-01-01

    In anticipation of the VLT/SPHERE planet imager guaranteed time programs, we have conducted a preparatory survey of 86 stars between 2009 and 2013 in order to identify new faint comoving companions to ultimately carry out a comprehensive analysis of the occurence of giant planets and brown dwarf companions at wide (10-2000 AU) orbits around young, solar-type stars. We used NaCo at VLT to explore the occurrence rate of giant planets and brown dwarfs between typically 0.1 and 8''. Diffraction-limited observations in H-band combined with angular differential imaging enabled us to reach primary star-companion brightness ratios as small as 10-6 at 1.5''. 12 systems were resolved as new binaries, including the discovery of a new white dwarf companion to the star HD8049. Around 34 stars, at least one companion candidate was detected in the observed field of view. More than 400 faint sources were detected, 90% of them in 4 crowded fields. With the exception of HD8049B, we did not identify any new comoving companions....

  5. Application of PMF and CMB receptor models for the evaluation of the contribution of a large coal-fired power plant to PM10 concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contini, Daniele; Cesari, Daniela; Conte, Marianna; Donateo, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    The evaluation of the contribution of coal-fired thermo-electrical power plants to particulate matter (PM) is important for environmental management, for evaluation of health risks, and for its potential influence on climate. The application of receptor models, based on chemical composition of PM, is not straightforward because the chemical profile of this source is loaded with Si and Al and it is collinear with the profile of crustal particles. In this work, a new methodology, based on Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) receptor model and Si/Al diagnostic ratio, specifically developed to discriminate the coal-fired power plant contribution from the crustal contribution is discussed. The methodology was applied to daily PM10 samples collected in central Italy in proximity of a large coal-fired power plant. Samples were simultaneously collected at three sites between 2.8 and 5.8km from the power plant: an urban site, an urban background site, and a rural site. Chemical characterization included OC/EC concentrations, by thermo-optical method, ions concentrations (NH4(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), SO4(2-), NO3(-), Cl(-)), by high performances ion chromatography, and metals concentrations (Si, Al, Ti, V, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br), by Energy dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (ED-XRF). Results showed an average primary contribution of the power plant of 2% (±1%) in the area studied, with limited differences between the sites. Robustness of the methodology was tested inter-comparing the results with two independent evaluations: the first obtained using the Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) receptor model and the second correlating the Si-Al factor/source contribution of PMF with wind directions and Calpuff/Calmet dispersion model results. The contribution of the power plant to secondary ammonium sulphate was investigated using an approach that integrates dispersion model results and the receptor models (PMF and CMB), a sulphate contribution of 1.5% of PM10 (±0.3%) as

  6. Dynamics of electron impact ionization of the outer and inner valence (1t{sub 2} and 2a{sub 1}) molecular orbitals of CH{sub 4} at intermediate and large ion recoil momentum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahmam-Bennani, A; Naja, A; Staicu Casagrande, E M; Okumus, N [Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires (LCAM), Universite Paris-Sud 11, Bat. 351, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Dal Cappello, C [Laboratoire de Physique Moleculaire et des Collisions, Institut de Physique, ICPMB (FR 2843), Universite Paul Verlaine-Metz, 1 rue Arago, 57078 Metz Cedex 3 (France); Charpentier, I [Laboratoire de Physique et Mecanique des Materiaux (UMR 7554), Universite Paul Verlaine-Metz, Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz Cedex 1 (France); Houamer, S [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique et Systemes Dynamiques, Universite Ferhat Abbas, Setif (Algeria)

    2009-08-28

    The triply differential cross section has been measured for electron-impact ionization of the outer valence 1t{sub 2} and the inner valence 2a{sub 1} orbitals of methane using the (e,2e) technique with coplanar asymmetric kinematics. The measurements are performed at scattered electron energy of 500 eV, ejected electron energy of 12, 37 and 74 eV and for scattering angle of the fast outgoing electron of 6 deg. This kinematics is characterized by a target ion recoil momentum ranging from moderate (0.25 au) to very large (3.2 au) values. The results are compared with theoretical cross sections calculated using the 1CW and the BBK models recently extended to molecules. The experimental cross sections exhibit a very large recoil scattering, especially for the inner 2a{sub 1} molecular orbital, which is not predicted by the theory. The differences between experiment and theory are attributed to the very strong scattering from the ion, not properly accounted for by theory. This indicates the need for further theoretical developments as well as experimental investigations in order to correctly model the process of molecular ionization.

  7. Quantifying the Relative Contributions of Forest Change and Climatic Variability to Hydrology in Large Watersheds: A Critical Review of Research Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohua Wei

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Forest change and climatic variability are two major drivers for influencing change in watershed hydrology in forest–dominated watersheds. Quantifying their relative contributions is important to fully understand their individual effects. This review paper summarizes the progress on quantifying the relative contributions of forest or land cover change and climatic variability to hydrology in large watersheds using available case studies. It compared pros and cons of various research methods, identified research challenges and proposed future research priorities. Our synthesis shows that the relative hydrological effects of forest changes and climatic variability are largely dependent on their own change magnitudes and watershed characteristics. In some severely disturbed watersheds, impacts of forest changes or land use changes can be as important as those from climatic variability. This paper provides a brief review on eight selected research methods for this type of research. Because each method or technique has its own strengths and weaknesses, combining two or more methods is a more robust approach than using any single method alone. Future research priorities include conducting more case studies, refining research methods, and considering mechanism-based research using landscape ecology and geochemistry approaches.

  8. Evaluation of the Obesity Genes FTO and MC4R for Contribution to the Risk of Large Artery Atherosclerotic Stroke in a Chinese Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Song

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obesity is a well-established risk factor for large artery atherosclerotic (LAA stroke. The aim of the study was to explore whether obesity genes, such as MC4R and FTO, contribute to LAA stroke risk in the Chinese Han population. Methods: 322 LAA stroke patients and 473 controls were recruited. Gene polymorphism of MC4R (rs17782313 and FTO (rs8050136 and rs9939609 were genotyped. Results: No differences were observed in genotype frequencies of variants of FTO (rs8050136 and rs9939609 or MC4R (rs17782313 between LAA stroke patients and control subjects. However, rs17782313 of the MC4R gene was associated with LAA stroke susceptibility in smokers (rs17782313: p = 0.020, OR (95% CI = 1.55 (1.07-2.23 in the stratified analysis. Furthermore, multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis revealed that the combination of MC4R variant (rs17782313, hypertension and smoking habit was significantly associated with increased risk of LAA stroke (p Conclusion: Our study indicated that the synergistic effects of MC4R variants, hypertension, and smoking habit contribute significantly to the risk of LAA stroke in the Chinese Han population. The finding revealed that obesity gene MC4R contribute to the risk of LAA stroke via a synergistic mechanism, which will provide new insight into the genetic architecture of LAA stroke.

  9. New Orbit Propagator to Be Used in Orbital Debris Evolutionary Models

    OpenAIRE

    Narumi, Tomohiro; Hanada, Toshiya

    2007-01-01

    An orbital environment debris evolutionary model for low Earth orbit has been developed at Kyushu University. A fast orbit propagator is essentially needed in such an evolutionary model because the number of space debris larger than 1 cm in low earth orbit is very large and it takes much time to compute long-term orbital changes of space debris. The effects of orbital perturbations are investigated for hundreds of years, and the rate of change in orbital elements were invented by earlier publ...

  10. Orbit analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelotti, L.

    1995-01-01

    The past fifteen years have witnessed a remarkable development of methods for analyzing single particle orbit dynamics in accelerators. Unlike their more classic counterparts, which act upon differential equations, these methods proceed by manipulating Poincare maps directly. This attribute makes them well matched for studying accelerators whose physics is most naturally modelled in terms of maps, an observation that has been championed most vigorously by Forest. In the following sections the author sketchs a little background, explains some of the physics underlying these techniques, and discusses the best computing strategy for implementing them in conjunction with modeling accelerators.

  11. Inflammation of the Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Eye Exams, Study Finds Additional Content Medical News Inflammation of the Orbit (Inflammatory Orbital Pseudotumor) By James ... Introduction to Eye Socket Disorders Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis Inflammation of the Orbit Orbital Cellulitis Preseptal Cellulitis Tumors ...

  12. Imaging of Orbital Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed Hassan Mostafavi

    2010-01-01

    Preseptal and orbital cellulitis occur more commonly in children than adults. The history and physical examination are crucial in distinguishing between preseptal and orbital cellulitis. The orbital septum delineates the anterior eyelid soft tissues from the orbital soft tissue. Infections anterior to the orbital septum are classified as preseptal cellulitis and those posterior to the orbital septum are termed orbital cellulitis. "nRecognition of orbital involvement is important not only...

  13. Orbital liposarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borbolla-Pertierra, A M; Morales-Baños, D R; Martínez-Nava, L R; Garrido-Sánchez, G A; López-Hernández, C M; Velasco-Ramos, P

    2017-02-01

    The case is presented of a 46-year-old male with right eye proptosis and conjunctival hyperaemia, of 18 months onset. A well-defined intraconal mass was found in the computed tomography. In magnetic resonance this was hypo-intense on T1, enhanced with gadolinium and hyperintense on T2. Excisional biopsy was performed, which was reported as a well-differentiated liposarcoma in the histopathology study. Liposarcoma is a malignant adipose tissue tumour. It is very rare in the orbit, with 5 histological types, the most common being myxoid. The treatment of choice is wide surgical excision and may be accompanied with radiotherapy. As it is an infiltrative tumour, It has a high rate of recurrence. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. The Baltic Sea Experiment (BALTEX): A European contribution to the investigation of the energy and water cycle over a large drainage basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raschke, E.; Meywerk, J.; Warrach, K.

    2001-01-01

    The Baltic Sea Experiment (BALTEX) is one of the five continental-scale experiments of the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX). More than 50 research groups from 14 European countries are participating in this project to measure and model the energy and water cycle over the large...... drainage basin of the Baltic Sea in northern Europe. BALTEX aims to provide a better understanding of the processes of the climate system and to improve and to validate the water cycle in regional numerical models for weather forecasting and climate studies. A major effort is undertaken to couple...... interactively the atmosphere with the vegetated continental surfaces and the Baltic Sea including its sea ice. The intensive observational and modeling phase BRIDGE, which is a contribution to the Coordinated Enhanced Observing Period of GEWEX, will provide enhanced datasets for the period October 1999-February...

  15. EphA2/CD10/Bcl-6/MUM1 contributes to sub-classiifcation of diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Xiaoyin; Wang Jiandong; Sun Qian; Fu Haijin; Guan Xiaoxiang; Wang Jinghua

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the clinical and prognostic signiifcance of EphA2 expression in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Methods:Immunohistochemistry for EphA2/CD10/Bcl-6/MUM-1 was performed on tissue sections from 51 patients diagnosed with DLBCL, and its correlation with clinicopathologic variables of patients was assessed using Pearson’s χ2 test or Fisher’s exact test when necessary. The survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier method. Results:High expression of EphA2 was detected in patients of lower clinical stage (P=0.001), better international prognostic index (IPI) score (P = 0.020) and germinal center B-cell (GCB) phenotype (P = 0.000). It was also correlated with the expression of CD10 (P = 0.001) and MUM-1 (P=0.001). Conclusion:EphA2/CD10/MUM1 might contribute to sub-classiifcation of DLBCL.

  16. Design cusp electron gun for of 0.6 THz 3rd-harmonic large orbit gyrotron%0.6THz三次谐波大回旋电子枪设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马春燕; 胡强; 袁学松; 韩煜; 鄢扬

    2012-01-01

    Large orbit axis-encircling electron beams can provide improved coupling and mode selectivity in a high harmonic terahertz gyrotron. For developing a 0. 6 THz 3rd-harmonic large orbit gyrotron, a cusp gun with a beam voltage of 55 kV and a beam current of 1 A has been designed based on a comparatively simple Pierce-type electron gun and cusp magnetic field. The optimized result shows that the velocity ratio, axial velocity spread and transverse velocity spread are 1. 53, 7. 10% and 3. 39% , respectively.%基于会切磁场的理论模型,采用粒子模拟软件对0.6 THz三次谐波的太赫兹回旋管所需的大回旋电子光学系统进行研究.文中通过大量的模拟计算,分析讨论了不同参数对电子注的横向速度离散、纵向速度离散及横纵速度比的影响,优化了电子光学系统的性能参量,得到符合设计要求且具有工程实际应用的电子枪,该电子枪能够产生55 kV,1A,横向速度离散为3.39%、纵向速度离散为7.10%、横纵速度比为1.53的大回旋电子注.

  17. On the contribution of external cost calculations to energy system governance: The case of a potential large-scale nuclear accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laes, Erik, E-mail: erik.laes@vito.be [Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Meskens, Gaston, E-mail: gaston.meskens@sckcen.be [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Sluijs, Jeroen P. van der, E-mail: j.p.vandersluijs@uu.nl [Copernicus Institute, Department of Science Technology and Society, Utrecht University, Budapestlaan 6, 584 CD Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2011-09-15

    The contribution of nuclear power to a sustainable energy future is a contested issue. This paper presents a critical review of an attempt to objectify this debate through the calculation of the external costs of a potential large-scale nuclear accident in the ExternE project. A careful dissection of the ExternE approach resulted in a list of 30 calculation steps and assumptions, from which the 6 most contentious ones were selected through a stakeholder internet survey. The policy robustness and relevance of these key assumptions were then assessed in a workshop using the concept of a 'pedigree of knowledge'. Overall, the workshop outcomes revealed the stakeholder and expert panel's scepticism about the assumptions made: generally these were considered not very plausible, subjected to disagreement, and to a large extent inspired by contextual factors. Such criticism indicates a limited validity and useability of the calculated nuclear accident externality as a trustworthy sustainability indicator. Furthermore, it is our contention that the ExternE project could benefit greatly - in terms of gaining public trust - from employing highly visible procedures of extended peer review such as the pedigree assessment applied to our specific case of the external costs of a potential large-scale nuclear accident. - Highlights: > Six most contentious assumptions were selected through a stakeholder internet survey. > Policy robustness of these assumptions was assessed in a pedigree assessment workshop. > Assumptions were considered implausible, controversial, and inspired by contextual factors. > This indicates a limited validity and useability as a trustworthy sustainability indicator.

  18. Characterizing the relative contributions of large vessels to total ocean noise fields: a case study using the Gerry E. Studds Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Leila; Clark, Christopher; Merrick, Richard; Van Parijs, Sofie; Ponirakis, Dimitri; Schwehr, Kurt; Thompson, Michael; Wiley, David

    2008-11-01

    In 2006, we used the U.S. Coast Guard's Automatic Identification System (AIS) to describe patterns of large commercial ship traffic within a U.S. National Marine Sanctuary located off the coast of Massachusetts. We found that 541 large commercial vessels transited the greater sanctuary 3413 times during the year. Cargo ships, tankers, and tug/tows constituted 78% of the vessels and 82% of the total transits. Cargo ships, tankers, and cruise ships predominantly used the designated Boston Traffic Separation Scheme, while tug/tow traffic was concentrated in the western and northern portions of the sanctuary. We combined AIS data with low-frequency acoustic data from an array of nine autonomous recording units analyzed for 2 months in 2006. Analysis of received sound levels (10-1000 Hz, root-mean-square pressure re 1 microPa +/- SE) averaged 119.5 +/- 0.3 dB at high-traffic locations. High-traffic locations experienced double the acoustic power of less trafficked locations for the majority of the time period analyzed. Average source level estimates (71-141 Hz, root-mean-square pressure re 1 microPa +/- SE) for individual vessels ranged from 158 +/- 2 dB (research vessel) to 186 +/- 2 dB (oil tanker). Tankers were estimated to contribute 2 times more acoustic power to the region than cargo ships, and more than 100 times more than research vessels. Our results indicate that noise produced by large commercial vessels was at levels and within frequencies that warrant concern among managers regarding the ability of endangered whales to maintain acoustic contact within greater sanctuary waters.

  19. Quark spin-orbit correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Lorcé, Cédric

    2014-01-01

    The proton spin puzzle issue focused the attention on the parton spin and orbital angular momentum contributions to the proton spin. However, a complete characterization of the proton spin structure requires also the knowledge of the parton spin-orbit correlation. We showed that this quantity can be expressed in terms of moments of measurable parton distributions. Using the available phenomenological information about the valence quarks, we concluded that this correlation is negative, meaning that the valence quark spin and kinetic orbital angular momentum are, in average, opposite. The quark spin-orbit correlation can also be expressed more intuitively in terms of relativistic phase-space distributions, which can be seen as the mother distributions of the standard generalized and transverse-momentum dependent parton distributions. We present here for the first time some examples of the general multipole decomposition of these phase-space distributions.

  20. Orbital entanglement in quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Boguslawski, Katharina

    2014-01-01

    The basic concepts of orbital entanglement and its application to chemistry are briefly reviewed. The calculation of orbital entanglement measures from correlated wavefunctions is discussed in terms of reduced $n$-particle density matrices. Possible simplifications in their evaluation are highlighted in case of seniority-zero wavefunctions. Specifically, orbital entanglement allows us to dissect electron correlation effects in its strong and weak contributions, to determine bond orders, to assess the quality and stability of active space calculations, to monitor chemical reactions, and to identify points along the reaction coordinate where electronic wavefunctions change drastically. Thus, orbital entanglement represents a useful and intuitive tool to interpret complex electronic wavefunctions and to facilitate a qualitative understanding of electronic structure and how it changes in chemical processes.

  1. An analysis of near-circular lunar mapping orbits

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R V Ramanan; V Adimurthy

    2005-12-01

    Numerical investigations have been carried out to analyse the evolution of lunar circular orbits and the influence of the higher order harmonics of the lunar gravity field.The aim is to select the appropriate near-circular orbit characteristics,which extend orbit life through passive orbit maintenance.The spherical harmonic terms that make major contributions to the orbital behaviour are identified through many case studies.It is found that for low circular orbits,the 7th and the 9th zonal harmonics have predominant effect in the case of orbits for which the evolution is stable and the life is longer,and also in the case of orbits for which the evolution is unstable and a crash takes place in a short duration.By analysing the contribution of the harmonic terms to the orbit behaviour,the appropriate near-circular orbit characteristics are identified.

  2. Updates in Orbital Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nila; F.Moeloek

    1993-01-01

    Orbital anatomy, the clinical features of orbital tumors, the recent development of the diagnosis and management of orbital tumors were described. The incidence of orbital tumors in Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital in the past years were introduced. The principle of management of orbital tumors and their prognosis were discussed.

  3. Identification and determination of the contribution of iron-steel manufacturing industry to sediment-associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in a large shallow lake of eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liu; Bai, Ya-Shu; Wang, Ji-Zhong; Peng, Shu-Chuan; Chen, Tian-Hu; Yin, Da-Qiang

    2016-11-01

    Seventeen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds were determined in surface sediments collected from the Chaohu Lake (a large shallow lake in eastern China) and its tributaries. Both diagnostic ratios and a receptor model (positive matrix factorization, PMF) were applied to identify and determine the contribution of a local iron-steel manufacturing plant located in the Nanfei River (NFR) to the Chaohu Lake basin. The results show that sites located in the downstream of the steel plant contained concentrations of 17 PAH (Σ17PAH) approximately two orders of magnitudes higher than those from other sites. Five factors were identified by the PMF model, including industrial waste, wood/biomass burning, diagenetic origin, domestic coal combustion, and industrial combustion. Our findings suggest that sediments in the downstream of the plant and in the western part of the Chaohu Lake were predominantly affected by industrial coal combustion. A mixture of pyrolytic origins impacted urban sediments in the upstream of the plant, whereas diagenetic origins along with coal and biomass burning were suggested to influence the eastern part and rural tributaries of the lake. To assess the potential ecological risk and toxicity caused by the iron-steel plant, sediment toxicity was evaluated by the PMF model, sediment quality guideline, and toxic equivalent factors. All of the three approaches suggested PAH accumulation in the NFR sediments could produce significant adverse ecological effects and half of the sediment toxicity in the NFR may be attributed to the emissions from the iron-steel plant. Some rural locations also exhibited PAH concentrations above probable effects, most likely contributed by wood/biomass burning.

  4. Novel Surgical Approaches to the Orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Ashley A; Grob, Seanna R; Yoon, Michael K

    2015-01-01

    Determining safe surgical access to the orbit can be difficult given the complex anatomy and delicacy of the orbital structures. When considering biopsy or removal of an orbital tumor or repair of orbital fractures, careful planning is required to determine the ideal approach. Traditionally, this has at times necessitated invasive procedures with large incisions and extensive bone removal. The purpose of this review was to present newly techniques and devices in orbital surgery that have been reported over the past decade, with aims to provide better exposure and/or minimally invasive approaches and to improve morbidity and/or mortality.

  5. Imaging of Orbital Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hassan Mostafavi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Preseptal and orbital cellulitis occur more commonly in children than adults. The history and physical examination are crucial in distinguishing between preseptal and orbital cellulitis. The orbital septum delineates the anterior eyelid soft tissues from the orbital soft tissue. Infections anterior to the orbital septum are classified as preseptal cellulitis and those posterior to the orbital septum are termed orbital cellulitis. "nRecognition of orbital involvement is important not only because of the threatened vision loss associated with orbital cellulitis but also because of the potential for central nervous system complications including cavernous sinus thrombosis, meningitis, and death. "nOrbital imaging should be obtained in all patients suspected of having orbital cellulitis. CT is preferred to MR imaging, as the orbital tissues have high con-trast and the bone can be well visualized. Orbital CT scanning allows localization of the disease process to the preseptal area, the extraconal or intraconal fat, or the subperiosteal space. Axial CT views allow evaluation of the medial orbit and ethmoid sinuses, whereas coronal scans image the orbital roof and floor and the frontal and maxillary sinuses. If direct coronal imaging is not possible, reconstruction of thin axial cuts may help the assessment of the orbital roof and floor. Potential sources of orbital cellulitis such as sinusitis, dental infection, and facial cellulitis are often detectable on CT imaging. "nIn this presentation, the imaging considerations of the orbital infections; including imaging differentiation criteria of all types of orbital infections are reviewed.

  6. Preseptal Cellulitis, Orbital Cellulitis, Orbital Abscess

    OpenAIRE

    Rana Altan Yaycıoğlu

    2012-01-01

    Patients with orbital infections present to our clinic usually with unilateral pain, hyperemia, and edema of the eyelids. The differentiation between preseptal and orbital cellulitis is utmost important in that the second requires hospitalization. Since in orbital cellulitis, the tissues posterior to the orbital septum are involved, signs such as conjunctival chemosis, limited eye movement, decreased vision, as well as afferent pupil defect secondary to optic nerve involvement may al...

  7. Bilateral orbital cavernous haemangiomas.

    OpenAIRE

    Fries, P D; Char, D. H.

    1988-01-01

    Simultaneous bilateral orbital lesions are rare. The differential diagnosis includes orbital pseudotumour, metastasis, leukaemia, lymphoma, Wegener's granulomatosis, and neurofibromatosis. We report what we believe to be the first case of bilateral orbital cavernous haemangiomas.

  8. Preseptal and orbital cellulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Akçay

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Preseptal cellulitis (PC is defined as an inflammation of the eyelid and surrounding skin, whereas orbital cellulitis (OC is an inflammation of the posterior septum of the eyelid affecting the orbit and its contents. Periorbital tissues may become infected as a result of trauma (including insect bites or primary bacteremia. Orbital cellulitis generally occurs as a complication of sinusitis. The most commonly isolated organisms are Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, S. epidermidis, Haempphilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis and S. pyogenes. The method for the diagnosis of OS and PS is computed tomography. Using effective antibiotics is a mainstay for the treatment of PC and OC. There is an agreement that surgical drainage should be performed in cases of complete ophthalmoplegia or significant visual impairment or large abscesses formation. This infections are also at a greater risk of acute visual loss, cavernous sinus thrombosis, meningitis, cerebritis, endophthalmitis, and brain abscess in children. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are crucial to control the infection. Diagnosis, treatment, management and complications of PC and OC are summarized in this manuscript. J MicrobiolInfect Dis 2014; 4(3: 123-127

  9. Modeling water and heat balance components of large territory for vegetation season using information from polar-orbital and geostationary meteorological satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzylev, Eugene; Startseva, Zoya; Uspensky, Alexander; Volkova, Elena; Kukharsky, Alexander; Uspensky, Sergey

    2015-04-01

    To date, physical-mathematical modeling processes of land surface-atmosphere interaction is considered to be the most appropriate tool for obtaining reliable estimates of water and heat balance components of large territories. The model of these processes (Land Surface Model, LSM) developed for vegetation period is destined for simulating soil water content W, evapotranspiration Ev, vertical latent LE and heat fluxes from land surface as well as vertically distributed soil temperature and moisture, soil surface Tg and foliage Tf temperatures, and land surface skin temperature (LST) Ts. The model is suitable for utilizing remote sensing data on land surface and meteorological conditions. In the study these data have been obtained from measurements by scanning radiometers AVHRR/NOAA, MODIS/EOS Terra and Aqua, SEVIRI/geostationary satellites Meteosat-9, -10 (MSG-2, -3). The heterogeneity of the land surface and meteorological conditions has been taken into account in the model by using soil and vegetation characteristics as parameters and meteorological characteristics as input variables. Values of these characteristics have been determined from ground observations and remote sensing information. So, AVHRR data have been used to build the estimates of effective land surface temperature (LST) Ts.eff and emissivity E, vegetation-air temperature (temperature at the vegetation level) Ta, normalized vegetation index NDVI, vegetation cover fraction B, the leaf area index LAI, and precipitation. From MODIS data the values of LST Tls, Å, NDVI, LAI have been derived. From SEVIRI data there have been retrieved Tls, E, Ta, NDVI, LAI and precipitation. All named retrievals covered the vast territory of the part of the agricultural Central Black Earth Region located in the steppe-forest zone of European Russia. This territory with coordinates 49°30'-54°N, 31°-43°E and a total area of 227,300 km2 has been chosen for investigation. It has been carried out for years 2009

  10. Intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms contribute to maintain the JAK/STAT pathway aberrantly activated in T-type large granular lymphocyte leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramo, Antonella; Gattazzo, Cristina; Passeri, Francesca; Lico, Albana; Tasca, Giulia; Cabrelle, Anna; Martini, Veronica; Frezzato, Federica; Trimarco, Valentina; Ave, Elisa; Boscaro, Elisa; Piazza, Francesco; Facco, Monica; Trentin, Livio; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Zambello, Renato

    2013-05-09

    The JAK/STAT pathway is altered in T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia. In all patients, leukemic LGLs display upregulation of phosphorylated STAT3 (P-STAT3) that activates expression of many antiapoptotic genes. To investigate the mechanisms maintaining STAT3 aberrantly phosphorylated using transcriptional protein and functional assays, we analyzed interleukin (IL)-6 and suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS3), 2 key factors of the JAK/STAT pathway that induce and inhibit STAT3 activation, respectively. We showed that IL-6 was highly expressed and released by the patients' peripheral blood LGL-depleted population, accounting for a trans-signaling process. By neutralizing IL-6 or its specific receptor with specific antibodies, a significant reduction of P-STAT3 levels and, consequently, LGL survival was demonstrated. In addition, we found that SOCS3 was down-modulated in LGL and unresponsive to IL-6 stimulation. By treating neoplastic LGLs with a demethylating agent, IL-6-mediated SOCS3 expression was restored with consequent P-STAT3 and myeloid cell leukemia-1 down-modulation. Methylation in the SOCS3 promoter was not detectable, suggesting that an epigenetic inhibition mechanism occurs at a different site. Our data indicate that loss of the inhibitor SOCS3 cooperates with IL-6 to maintain JAK/STAT pathway activation, thus contributing to leukemic LGL survival, and suggest a role of demethylating agents in the treatment of this disorder.

  11. Formation around planetary displaced orbit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Sheng-ping; LI Jun-feng; BAOYIN He-xi

    2007-01-01

    The paper investigates the relative motion around the planetary displaced orbit. Several kinds of displaced orbits for geocentric and martian cases were discussed. First, the relative motion was linearized around the displaced orbits. Then, two seminatural control laws were investigated for each kind of orbit and the stable regions were obtained for each case. One of the two control laws is the passive control law that is very attractive for engineering practice. However, the two control laws are not very suitable for the Martian mission. Another special semi-natural control law is designed based on the requirement of the Martian mission. The results show that large stable regions exist for the control law.

  12. Analytical representations of precise orbit predictions for Earth orbiting space objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Jizhang; Li, Bin; Chen, Junyu; Zhang, Pin; Ning, Jinsheng

    2017-01-01

    Accurate orbits of Earth orbiting space objects are usually generated from an orbit determination/prediction process using numerical integrators, and presented to users in a tabulated form or a state vector including force model parameters. When dealing with hundreds of thousands of space objects such as in the space conjunction assessment, the memory required for the tabulated orbits or the computing time for propagating orbits using the state vector are both confronting to users. This paper presents two methods of analytically representing numerical orbits considering the accuracy, computing efficiency and memory. The first one is a two-step TLE-based method in which the numerical orbits are first fitted into a TLE set and then correction functions are applied to improve the position accuracy. In the second method, the orbit states are represented in equinoctial elements first, and then again correction functions are applied to reduce the position errors. Experiments using six satellite laser ranging (SLR) satellites and 12 debris objects with accurate orbits show that both methods can represent the accurate orbits over 5 days in an accuracy of a few dozens of meters for the circular orbits and several hundred meters for the eccentric orbits. The computing time is similar to that using the NORAD TLE/SGP4 algorithm, and storage for the orbit elements and function coefficients is about 3-5 KB. These features could make the two methods beneficial for the maintenance of orbit catalog of large numbers of space objects.

  13. Identification of Large Space Structures on Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-01

    problem is thus the inverse of the analysis problem for dynamical systems with which the structural engineers are quite familiar . However, whereas the...Belgrade, Yugoslavia. Gagliardt, R. M., "Input Selection for Parameter Identification in Discrete Systems", IEEE Trama . Auto. Cont., Vol. AC-12, Pp

  14. A newly discovered superoantero-orbital sinus connecting to the interaural canal may play a role in zebra finch hearing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kenneth Kragh; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Suthers, Roderick A.

    on the amplitude gain and time delay through IAC. Theoretically, different combinations of frequency dependent gains and delays produce very different directionalities of the ears but it is still uncertain how gain and delay can be shaped by evolution. We have discovered that a large forehead sinus superoanterior...... to the orbits (superoantero-orbital sinus, SAOS) connects to the IAC via a tube inferomedial to the orbits (IMT). SAOS has a very complex shape with connections through an arc over the eye to the bullae of each ear and also to two smaller lateral sinuses in front of each eye. The contribution of this structure...

  15. Orbital dystopia due to orbital roof defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rha, Eun Young; Joo, Hong Sil; Byeon, Jun Hee

    2013-01-01

    We performed a retrospective review of patients who presented with delayed dystopia as a consequence of an orbital roof defect due to fractures and nontraumatic causes to search for a correlation between orbital roof defect size and surgical indications for the treatment thereof. Retrospective analyses were performed in 7 patients, all of whom presented with delayed dystopia due to orbital roof defects, between January 2001 and June 2011. The causes of orbital roof defects were displaced orbital roof fractures (5 cases), tumor (1 case), and congenital sphenoid dysplasia (1 case). All 7 patients had initially been treated conservatively and later presented with significant dystopia. The sizes of the defects were calculated on computed tomographic scans. Among the 7 patients, aspiration of cerebrospinal fluid, which caused ocular symptoms, in 1 patient with minimal displaced orbital roof and reconstruction with calvarial bone, titanium micromesh, or Medpor in 6 other patients were performed. The minimal size of the orbital roof in patients who underwent orbital roof reconstruction was 1.2 cm (defect height) x 1.0 cm (defect length), 0.94 cm(2). For all patients with orbital dystopia, displacement of the globe was corrected without any complications, regardless of whether the patient was evaluated grossly or by radiology. In this retrospective study, continuous monitoring of clinical signs and active surgical management should be considered for cases in which an orbital roof defect is detected, even if no definite symptoms are noted, to prevent delayed sequelae.

  16. Orbital and spin moments in the ferromagnetic superconductor URhGe by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, F.; Sanchez, J. P.; Brison, J.-P.; Aoki, D.; Shick, A. B.; Rogalev, A.

    2017-06-01

    The ferromagnetic superconductor URhGe has been investigated by high field magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) at the U M4 ,5, Rh L2 ,3, and Ge K edges at 2.1 K and at applied fields up to 17 T. The XMCD performed at the M4 ,5 absorption edges allows us to determine the spectroscopic branching ratio and the 5 f electron contribution to the valence spin-orbit interaction. Combination with polarized neutron diffraction results allows us to derive the individual U orbital and spin moments and the magnetic-dipole contribution . There is no evidence for any change of the orbital-to-spin moment ratios across the spin reorientation transition at HR=12 T , when the field is applied along the initial hard b axis. We also confirm that the magnetism of URhGe is dominated by U , with the contribution of Rh representing only about 10 % of the macroscopic moment. The orbital and spin moments at the Rh site are found to be parallel to each other and parallel to the macroscopic magnetization, but an unexpectedly large orbital-to-spin moment ratio is observed. The XMCD at the Ge K edge reveals the presence of a small induced Ge 4 p orbital moment, parallel to the macroscopic magnetization. The results are discussed against predictions of the electronic band structure calculations by the density functional theory plus Coulomb U , including spin-orbit coupling (DFT +U +SOC ) .

  17. Determining Relative f and d Orbital Contributions to M–Cl Covalency in MCl 6 2– (M = Ti, Zr, Hf, U) and UOCl 5 Using Cl K-Edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minasian, Stefan G.; Keith, Jason M.; Batista, Enrique R.; Boland, Kevin S.; Clark, David L.; Conradson, Steven D.; Kozimor, Stosh A.; Martin, Richard L.; Schwarz, Daniel E.; Shuh, David K.; Wagner, Gregory L.; Wilkerson, Marianne P.; Wolfsberg, Laura E.; Yang, Ping

    2012-03-28

    Chlorine K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and ground-state and time-dependent hybrid density functional theory (DFT) were used to probe electronic structure for O{sub h}-MCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}(M = Ti, Zr, Hf, U) and C{sub 4v}-UOCl{sub 5}{sup -}, and to determine the relative contributions of valence 3d, 4d, 5d, 6d, and 5f orbitals in M-Cl bonding. Spectral interpretations were guided by time-dependent DFT calculated transition energies and oscillator strengths, which agree well with the experimental XAS spectra. The data provide new spectroscopic evidence for the involvement of both 5f and 6d orbitals in actinide-ligand bonding in UCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}. For the MCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}, where transitions into d orbitals of t{sub 2g} symmetry are spectroscopically resolved for all four complexes, the experimentally determined Cl 3p character per M-Cl bond increases from 8.3(4)% (TiCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}) to 10.3(5)% (ZrCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}), 12(1)% (HfCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}), and 26 18(1)% (UCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}). Chlorine K-edge XAS spectra of UOCl{sub 5}{sup -} provide additional insights into the transition assignments by 27 lowering the symmetry to C{sub 4v}, where five pre-edge transitions into both 5f and 6d orbitals are observed. For UCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}, the XAS data 28 suggest that orbital mixing associated with the U 5f orbitals is considerably lower than that of the U 6d orbitals. For both UCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}29 and UOCl{sub 5}{sup -}, the ground-state DFT calculations predict a larger 5f contribution to bonding than is determined experimentally. 30 These findings are discussed in the context of conventional theories of covalent bonding for d- and f-block metal complexes.

  18. The VLT/NaCo large program to probe the occurrence of exoplanets and brown dwarfs at wide orbits. III. The frequency of brown dwarfs and giant planets as companions to solar-type stars

    CERN Document Server

    Reggiani, M; Chauvin, G; Vigan, A; Quanz, S P; Biller, B; Bonavita, M; Desidera, S; Delorme, P; Hagelberg, J; Maire, A -L; Boccaletti, A; Beuzit, J -L; Buenzli, E; Carson, J; Covino, E; Feldt, M; Girard, J; Gratton, R; Henning, T; Kasper, M; Lagrange, A -M; Mesa, D; Messina, S; Montagnier, G; Mordasini, C; Mouillet, D; Schlieder, J E; Segransan, D; Thalmann, C; Zurlo, A

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there have been many attempts to characterize the occurrence of stellar, BD and planetary-mass companions to solar-type stars, with the aim of constraining formation mechanisms. From RV observations a dearth of companions with masses between 10-40 MJup has been noticed at close separations, suggesting the possibility of a distinct formation mechanism for objects above and below this range. We present a model for the substellar companion mass function (CMF). It consists of the superposition of the planet and BD companion mass distributions, assuming that we can extrapolate the RV measured companion mass function for planets to larger separations and the stellar companion mass-ratio distribution over all separations into the BD mass regime. By using both the results of the VLT/NaCo large program and the complementary archive datasets that probe the occurrence of planets and BDs on wide orbits around solar-type stars, we place some constraints on the planet and BD distributions. We developed a MC...

  19. GridOrbit public display

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramos, Juan David Hincapie; Tabard, Aurélien; Bardram, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    We introduce GridOrbit, a public awareness display that visualizes the activity of a community grid used in a biology laboratory. This community grid executes bioin-formatics algorithms and relies on users to donate CPU cycles to the grid. The goal of GridOrbit is to create a shared awareness about...... the research taking place in the biology laboratory. This should promote contribu-tions to the grid, and thereby mediate the appropriation of the grid technology. GridOrbit visualizes the activity in the grid, shows information about the different active projects, and supports a messaging functionality where...... people comment on projects. Our work explores the usage of interactive technologies as enablers for the appropriation of an otherwise invisible infrastructure....

  20. A Large-Scale Genetic Analysis Reveals a Strong Contribution of the HLA Class II Region to Giant Cell Arteritis Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, F. David; Mackie, Sarah L.; Martín, Jose-Ezequiel; Taylor, John C.; Vaglio, Augusto; Eyre, Stephen; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Castañeda, Santos; Cid, Maria C.; Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Prieto-González, Sergio; Solans, Roser; Ramentol-Sintas, Marc; González-Escribano, M. Francisca; Ortiz-Fernández, Lourdes; Morado, Inmaculada C.; Narváez, Javier; Miranda-Filloy, José A.; Martínez-Berriochoa, Agustín; Unzurrunzaga, Ainhoa; Hidalgo-Conde, Ana; Madroñero-Vuelta, Ana B.; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; Ordóñez-Cañizares, M. Carmen; Escalante, Begoña; Marí-Alfonso, Begoña; Sopeña, Bernardo; Magro, César; Raya, Enrique; Grau, Elena; Román, José A.; de Miguel, Eugenio; López-Longo, F. Javier; Martínez, Lina; Gómez-Vaquero, Carmen; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Luis; Díaz-López, J. Bernardino; Caminal-Montero, Luis; Martínez-Zapico, Aleida; Monfort, Jordi; Tío, Laura; Sánchez-Martín, Julio; Alegre-Sancho, Juan J.; Sáez-Comet, Luis; Pérez-Conesa, Mercedes; Corbera-Bellalta, Marc; García-Villanueva, M. Jesús; Fernández-Contreras, M. Encarnación; Sanchez-Pernaute, Olga; Blanco, Ricardo; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Ríos-Fernández, Raquel; Callejas, José L.; Fanlo-Mateo, Patricia; Martínez-Taboada, Víctor M.; Beretta, Lorenzo; Lunardi, Claudio; Cimmino, Marco A.; Gianfreda, Davide; Santilli, Daniele; Ramirez, Giuseppe A.; Soriano, Alessandra; Muratore, Francesco; Pazzola, Giulia; Addimanda, Olga; Wijmenga, Cisca; Witte, Torsten; Schirmer, Jan H.; Moosig, Frank; Schönau, Verena; Franke, Andre; Palm, Øyvind; Molberg, Øyvind; Diamantopoulos, Andreas P.; Carette, Simon; Cuthbertson, David; Forbess, Lindsy J.; Hoffman, Gary S.; Khalidi, Nader A.; Koening, Curry L.; Langford, Carol A.; McAlear, Carol A.; Moreland, Larry; Monach, Paul A.; Pagnoux, Christian; Seo, Philip; Spiera, Robert; Sreih, Antoine G.; Warrington, Kenneth J.; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Pease, Colin T.; Gough, Andrew; Green, Michael; Hordon, Lesley; Jarrett, Stephen; Watts, Richard; Levy, Sarah; Patel, Yusuf; Kamath, Sanjeet; Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Worthington, Jane; Koeleman, Bobby P.C.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Barrett, Jennifer H.; Salvarani, Carlo; Merkel, Peter A.; González-Gay, Miguel A.; Morgan, Ann W.; Martín, Javier

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a large-scale genetic analysis on giant cell arteritis (GCA), a polygenic immune-mediated vasculitis. A case-control cohort, comprising 1,651 case subjects with GCA and 15,306 unrelated control subjects from six different countries of European ancestry, was genotyped by the Immunochip array. We also imputed HLA data with a previously validated imputation method to perform a more comprehensive analysis of this genomic region. The strongest association signals were observed in the HLA region, with rs477515 representing the highest peak (p = 4.05 × 10−40, OR = 1.73). A multivariate model including class II amino acids of HLA-DRβ1 and HLA-DQα1 and one class I amino acid of HLA-B explained most of the HLA association with GCA, consistent with previously reported associations of classical HLA alleles like HLA-DRB1∗04. An omnibus test on polymorphic amino acid positions highlighted DRβ1 13 (p = 4.08 × 10−43) and HLA-DQα1 47 (p = 4.02 × 10−46), 56, and 76 (both p = 1.84 × 10−45) as relevant positions for disease susceptibility. Outside the HLA region, the most significant loci included PTPN22 (rs2476601, p = 1.73 × 10−6, OR = 1.38), LRRC32 (rs10160518, p = 4.39 × 10−6, OR = 1.20), and REL (rs115674477, p = 1.10 × 10−5, OR = 1.63). Our study provides evidence of a strong contribution of HLA class I and II molecules to susceptibility to GCA. In the non-HLA region, we confirmed a key role for the functional PTPN22 rs2476601 variant and proposed other putative risk loci for GCA involved in Th1, Th17, and Treg cell function. PMID:25817017

  1. Orbital Energy-Based Reaction Analysis of SN2 Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao Tsuneda

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An orbital energy-based reaction analysis theory is presented as an extension of the orbital-based conceptual density functional theory. In the orbital energy-based theory, the orbitals contributing to reactions are interpreted to be valence orbitals giving the largest orbital energy variation from reactants to products. Reactions are taken to be electron transfer-driven when they provide small variations for the gaps between the contributing occupied and unoccupied orbital energies on the intrinsic reaction coordinates in the initial processes. The orbital energy-based theory is then applied to the calculations of several S N2 reactions. Using a reaction path search method, the Cl− + CH3I → ClCH3 + I− reaction, for which another reaction path called “roundabout path” is proposed, is found to have a precursor process similar to the roundabout path just before this SN2 reaction process. The orbital energy-based theory indicates that this precursor process is obviously driven by structural change, while the successor SN2 reaction proceeds through electron transfer between the contributing orbitals. Comparing the calculated results of the SN2 reactions in gas phase and in aqueous solution shows that the contributing orbitals significantly depend on solvent effects and these orbitals can be correctly determined by this theory.

  2. Primary orbital neuroblastoma in a neonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirzai Hasan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma is an undifferentiated malignant tumor of the primitive neuroblasts. Orbital neuroblastoma is typically a metastatic tumor. We describe a two-days-old girl, who presented with a large tumor in her left orbit. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed that the tumor originated from the retrobulbar area, extending into the upper and lateral orbit. She was operated on the fifth day of life. A histopathologic diagnosis of neuroblastoma was made. Medical evaluation including chest roentgenogram, ultrasonography of the abdomen, whole body computerized tomogram and bone scintigraphy showed no evidence of systemic involvement or metastasis. Neuroblastoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of neonatal orbital tumors.

  3. Preseptal Cellulitis, Orbital Cellulitis, Orbital Abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Altan Yaycıoğlu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Patients with orbital infections present to our clinic usually with unilateral pain, hyperemia, and edema of the eyelids. The differentiation between preseptal and orbital cellulitis is utmost important in that the second requires hospitalization. Since in orbital cellulitis, the tissues posterior to the orbital septum are involved, signs such as conjunctival chemosis, limited eye movement, decreased vision, as well as afferent pupil defect secondary to optic nerve involvement may also be observed. Prompt intravenous antibiotic treatment should be started, and surgical drainage may be performed if patient shows failure to improve in 48 hours despite optimal management. Without treatment, the clinical course may progress to subperiosteal or orbital abscess, and even to cavernous sinus thrombosis. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2012; 42: Supplement 52-6

  4. Loss of PRDM1/BLIMP-1 function contributes to poor prognosis for activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xia, Y; Xu-Monette, Z Y; Tzankov, A

    2017-01-01

    PRDM1/BLIMP-1, a master regulator of plasma-cell differentiation, is frequently inactivated in activated B-cell-like (ABC) diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) patients. Little is known about its genetic aberrations and relevant clinical implications. A large series of patients with de novo DLBC...

  5. Lunar Orbiter Photo Gallery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lunar Orbiter Photo Gallery is an extensive collection of over 2,600 high- and moderate-resolution photographs produced by all five of the Lunar Orbiter...

  6. ASC Champ Orbit Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Troels; Jørgensen, John Leif

    1999-01-01

    This documents describes a test of the implementation of the ASC orbit model for the Champ satellite.......This documents describes a test of the implementation of the ASC orbit model for the Champ satellite....

  7. Polygons in billiard orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Don, Henk

    2011-01-01

    We study the geometry of billiard orbits on rectangular billiards. A truncated billiard orbit induces a partition of the rectangle into polygons. We prove that thirteen is a sharp upper bound for the number of different areas of these polygons.

  8. Exploratory orbit analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelotti, L.

    1989-03-01

    Unlike the other documents in these proceedings, this paper is neither a scientific nor a technical report. It is, rather, a short personal essay which attempts to describe an Exploratory Orbit Analysis (EOA) environment. Analyzing the behavior of a four or six dimensional nonlinear dynamical system is at least as difficult as analyzing events in high-energy collisions; the consequences of doing it badly, or slowly, would be at least as devastating; and yet the level of effort and expenditure invested in the latter, the very attention paid to it by physicists at large, must be two orders of magnitude greater than that given to the former. It is difficult to choose the model which best explains the behavior of a physical device if one does not first understand the behavior of the available models. The time is ripe for the development of a functioning EOA environment, which I will try to describe in this paper to help us achieve this goal.

  9. Traumatic transconjunctival orbital emphysema.

    OpenAIRE

    Stroh, E M; Finger, P T

    1990-01-01

    Orbital emphysema can be produced by trans-conjunctival migration of air from a high pressure airgun. In an industrial accident an 8 mm conjunctival laceration was produced in the superior fornix which acted as a portal of entry for air into the subconjunctival, subcutaneous, and retrobulbar spaces. Computed tomography revealed no evidence of orbital fracture and showed that traumatic orbital emphysema occurred without a broken orbital bone.

  10. Large gradual solar energetic particle events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Mihir; Giacalone, Joe

    2016-12-01

    Solar energetic particles, or SEPs, from suprathermal (few keV) up to relativistic (˜ few GeV) energies are accelerated near the Sun in at least two ways: (1) by magnetic reconnection-driven processes during solar flares resulting in impulsive SEPs, and (2) at fast coronal-mass-ejection-driven shock waves that produce large gradual SEP events. Large gradual SEP events are of particular interest because the accompanying high-energy ({>}10s MeV) protons pose serious radiation threats to human explorers living and working beyond low-Earth orbit and to technological assets such as communications and scientific satellites in space. However, a complete understanding of these large SEP events has eluded us primarily because their properties, as observed in Earth orbit, are smeared due to mixing and contributions from many important physical effects. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the current state of knowledge of these important phenomena, and summarizes some of the key questions that will be addressed by two upcoming missions—NASA’s Solar Probe Plus and ESA’s Solar Orbiter. Both of these missions are designed to directly and repeatedly sample the near-Sun environments where interplanetary scattering and transport effects are significantly reduced, allowing us to discriminate between different acceleration sites and mechanisms and to isolate the contributions of numerous physical processes occurring during large SEP events.

  11. Introducing Earth's Orbital Eccentricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostra, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Most students know that planetary orbits, including Earth's, are elliptical; that is Kepler's first law, and it is found in many science textbooks. But quite a few are mistaken about the details, thinking that the orbit is very eccentric, or that this effect is somehow responsible for the seasons. In fact, the Earth's orbital eccentricity is…

  12. Removing Orbital Debris with Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Phipps, Claude R; Bradford, Brian; George, E Victor; Libby, Stephen B; Liedahl, Duane A; Marcovici, Bogdan; Olivier, Scot S; Pleasance, Lyn D; Reilly, James P; Rubenchik, Alexander; Strafford, David N; Valley, Michael T

    2011-01-01

    Orbital debris in low Earth orbit (LEO) are now sufficiently dense that the use of LEO space is threatened by runaway collisional cascading. A problem predicted more than thirty years ago, the threat from debris larger than about 1 cm demands serious attention. A promising proposed solution uses a high power pulsed laser system on the Earth to make plasma jets on the objects, slowing them slightly, and causing them to re-enter and burn up in the atmosphere. In this paper, we reassess this approach in light of recent advances in low-cost, light-weight modular design for large mirrors, calculations of laser-induced orbit changes and in design of repetitive, multi-kilojoule lasers, that build on inertial fusion research. These advances now suggest that laser orbital debris removal (LODR) is the most cost-effective way to mitigate the debris problem. No other solutions have been proposed that address the whole problem of large and small debris. A LODR system will have multiple uses beyond debris removal. Internat...

  13. Precision Orbit Determination for the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter: orbit quality and gravity field estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazarico, E.; Rowlands, D. D.; Neumann, G. A.; Lemoine, F. G.; Torrence, M. H.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.; Mao, D.

    2010-12-01

    We present results of the Precision Orbit Determination work undertaken by the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) Science Team for the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) mission, in order to meet the position knowledge accuracy requirements (50-m total position) and to precisely geolocate the LRO datasets. In addition to the radiometric tracking data, one-way laser ranges (LR) between Earth stations and the spacecraft are made possible by a small telescope mounted on the spacecraft high-gain antenna. The photons received from Earth are transmitted to one LOLA detector by a fiber optics bundle. The LOLA timing system enables 5-s LR normal points with precision better than 10cm. Other types of geodetic constraints are derived from the altimetric data itself. The orbit geometry can be constrained at the times of laser groundtrack intersections (crossovers). Due to the Moon's slow rotation, orbit solutions and normal equations including altimeter crossovers are processed and created in one month batches. Recent high-resolution topographic maps near the lunar poles are used to produce a new kind of geodetic constraints. Purely geometric, those do not necessitate actual groundtrack intersections. We assess the contributions of those data types, and the quality of our orbits. Solutions which use altimetric crossover meet the horizontal 50-m requirement, and perform usually better (10-20m). We also obtain gravity field solutions based on LRO and historical data. The various LRO data are accumulated into normal equations, separately for each one month batch and for each measurement type, which enables the final weights to be adjusted during the least-squares inversion step. Expansion coefficients to degree and order 150 are estimated, and a Kaula rule is still needed to stabilize the farside field. The gravity field solutions are compared to previous solutions (GLGM-3, LP150Q, SGM100h) and the geopotential predicted from the latest LOLA spherical harmonic expansion.

  14. Painless orbital myositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul T Chakor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic orbital inflammation is the third most common orbital disease, following Graves orbitopathy and lymphoproliferative diseases. We present a 11 year old girl with 15 days history of painless diplopia. There was no history of fluctuation of symptoms, drooping of eye lids or diminished vision. She had near total restricted extra-ocular movements and mild proptosis of the right eye. There was no conjunctival injection, chemosis, or bulb pain. There was no eyelid retraction or lid lag. Rest of the neurological examination was unremarkable.Erythrocyte sedimentation rate was raised with eosinophilia. Antinuclear antibodies were positive. Liver, renal and thyroid functions were normal. Antithyroid, double stranded deoxyribonucleic acid and acetylcholine receptor antibodies were negative. Repetitive nerve stimulation was negative. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the orbit was typical of orbital myositis. The patient responded to oral steroids. Orbital myositis can present as painless diplopia. MRI of orbit is diagnostic in orbital myositis.

  15. Orbital fractures: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey M Joseph, Ioannis P GlavasDivision of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, New York University, New York, NY, USA; Manhattan Eye, Ear, and Throat Hospital, New York, NY, USAAbstract: This review of orbital fractures has three goals: 1 to understand the clinically relevant orbital anatomy with regard to periorbital trauma and orbital fractures, 2 to explain how to assess and examine a patient after periorbital trauma, and 3 to understand the medical and surgical management of orbital fractures. The article aims to summarize the evaluation and management of commonly encountered orbital fractures from the ophthalmologic perspective and to provide an overview for all practicing ophthalmologists and ophthalmologists in training.Keywords: orbit, trauma, fracture, orbital floor, medial wall, zygomatic, zygomatic complex, zmc fracture, zygomaticomaxillary complex fractures 

  16. Contribution of high-nl shells to electron-impact ionization processes

    CERN Document Server

    Jonauskas, V; Merkelis, G; Gaigalas, G; Kisielius, R; Kučas, S; Masys, Š; Radžiūtė, L; Rynkun, P

    2015-01-01

    The contribution to electron-impact ionization cross sections from excitations to high-nl shells and a consequent autoionization is investigated. We perform relativistic subconfiguration-average and detailed level-to-level calculations for this process. Ionization cross sections for the W27+ ion are presented to illustrate the large influence of the high shells (n >= 9) and orbitals (l >= 4) in the excitation-autoionization process. The obtained results show that the excitations to the high shells (n >= 9) increase cross sections of the indirect ionization process by a factor of 2 compared to the excitations to the lower shells (n <= 8). The excitations to the shells with orbital quantum number l = 4 give the largest contribution comparedwith the other orbital quantum numbers l. Radiative damping reduces the cross sections of the indirect process approximately twofold in the case of the level-to-level calculations. Determined data show that the excitation-autoionization process contributes approximately 40...

  17. Spectroscopic demonstration of a large antisymmetric exchange contribution to the spin-frustrated ground state of a D3 symmetric hydroxy-bridged trinuclear Cu(II) complex: ground-to-excited state superexchange pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jungjoo; Mirica, Liviu M; Stack, T Daniel P; Solomon, Edward I

    2004-10-06

    The magnetic and electronic properties of a spin-frustrated ground state of an antiferromagnetically coupled 3-fold symmetric trinuclear copper complex (TrisOH) is investigated using a combination of variable-temperature variable-field magnetic circular dichroism (VTVH MCD) and powder/single-crystal EPR. Direct evidence for a low-lying excited S = (1)/(2) state from the zero-field split ground (2)E state is provided by the nonlinear dependence of the MCD intensity on 1/T and the nesting of the VTVH MCD isotherms. A consistent zero-field splitting (Delta) value of approximately 65 cm(-1) is obtained from both approaches. In addition, the strong angular dependence of the single-crystal EPR spectrum, with effective g-values from 2.32 down to an unprecedented 1.2, requires in-state spin-orbit coupling of the (2)E state via antisymmetric exchange. The observable EPR intensities also require lowering of the symmetry of the trimer structure, likely reflecting a magnetic Jahn-Teller effect. Thus, the Delta of the ground (2)E state is shown to be governed by the competing effects of antisymmetric exchange (G = 36.0 +/- 0.8 cm(-1)) and symmetry lowering (delta = 17.5 +/- 5.0 cm(-1)). G and delta have opposite effects on the spin distribution over the three metal sites where the former tends to delocalize and the latter tends to localize the spin of the S(tot) = (1)/(2) ground state on one metal center. The combined effects lead to partial delocalization, reflected by the observed EPR parallel hyperfine splitting of 74 x 10(-4) cm(-1). The origin of the large G value derives from the efficient superexchange pathway available between the ground d(x2-y2) and excited d(xy) orbitals of adjacent Cu sites, via strong sigma-type bonds with the in-plane p-orbitals of the bridging hydroxy ligands. This study provides significant insight into the orbital origin of the spin Hamiltonian parameters of a spin-frustrated ground state of a trigonal copper cluster.

  18. Pressureless Orbital Decompression for Myopic Proptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajak, Saul N; McGovern, Richard A; Selva, Dinesh

    2017-01-01

    Orbital decompression surgery increases the orbital volume. It has rarely been used for proptosis of the large highly myopic globe. However, external decompression surgery carries significant risks because of the large thin-walled globe. The authors report the first use of endoscopic medial wall orbital decompression surgery in this setting to obviate the risk of globe pressure.Endoscopic medial wall decompression brought about a 4 mm reduction of proptosis, correction of exotropia and elimination of retrobulbar ache providing good symmetry with the fellow eye.Endoscopic medial wall orbital decompression can be very effective for correcting the proptosis of high myopia and minimizes the risk of damage to the very large, thin-walled globe.

  19. The International Space Station on-orbit tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierotti, Elizabeth; Atodaria, Jitu

    2001-02-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) program has identified specific Orbital Replaceable Units (ORUs) as candidates for on-orbit intermediate level maintenance. Performing intermediate level maintenance on-orbit will allow sparing at the Shop Replaceable Unit (SRU) level rather than the ORU level. This will minimize cost and volume to transport replaceable units to and from orbit, minimize stowage on-orbit, and maximize on-orbit spare availability that will in turn minimize system downtime. To accomplish on-orbit intermediate level maintenance, additional requirements for fault isolation and confidence testing must be implemented. Test equipment used on-ground to perform fault isolation and acceptance testing is large and heavy. Consideration for weight and volume is an important factor for any test equipment that is to be transported, used and stowed on-orbit. This paper summarizes a phased approach to testing electronic hardware on-orbit with minimal additional weight and volume for the test equipment. .

  20. A Large-Scale Genetic Analysis Reveals a Strong Contribution of the HLA Class II Region to Giant Cell Arteritis Susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    David Carmona, F.; Mackie, Sarah L.; Martin, Jose-Ezequiel; Taylor, John C.; Vaglio, Augusto; Eyre, Stephen; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Castaneda, Santos; Cid, Maria C.; Hernandez-Rodriguez, Jose; Prieto-Gonzalez, Sergio; Solans, Roser; Ramentol-Sintas, Marc; Francisca Gonzalez-Escribano, M.; Ortiz-Fernandez, Lourdes; Morado, Inmaculada C.; Narvaez, Javier; Miranda-Filloy, Jose A.; Beretta, Lorenzo; Lunardi, Claudio; Cimmino, Marco A.; Gianfreda, Davide; Santilli, Daniele; Ramirez, Giuseppe A.; Soriano, Alessandra; Muratore, Francesco; Pazzola, Giulia; Addimanda, Olga; Wijmenga, Cisca; Witte, Torsten; Schirmer, Jan H.; Moosig, Frank; Schoenau, Verena; Franke, Andre; Palm, Oyvind; Molberg, Oyvind; Diamantopoulos, Andreas P.; Carette, Simon; Cuthbertson, David; Forbess, Lindsy J.; Hoffman, Gary S.; Khalidi, Nader A.; Koening, Curry L.; Langford, Carol A.; McAlear, Carol A.; Moreland, Larry; Monach, Paul A.; Pagnoux, Christian; Seo, Philip; Spiera, Robert; Sreih, Antoine G.; Warrington, Kenneth J.; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Pease, Colin T.; Gough, Andrew; Green, Michael; Hordon, Lesley; Jarrett, Stephen; Watts, Richard; Levy, Sarah; Patel, Yusuf; Kamath, Sanjeet; Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Worthington, Jane; Koeleman, Bobby P. C.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Barrett, Jennifer H.; Salvarani, Carlo; Merkel, Peter A.; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.; Morgan, Ann W.; Martin, Javier

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a large-scale genetic analysis on giant cell arteritis (GCA), a polygenic immune-mediated vasculitis. A case-control cohort, comprising 1,651 case subjects with GCA and 15,306 unrelated control subjects from six different countries of European ancestry, was genotyped by the Immunochip a

  1. Trimer effects in fragment molecular orbital-linear combination of molecular orbitals calculation of one-electron orbitals for biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobori, Tomoki; Sodeyama, Keitaro; Otsuka, Takao; Tateyama, Yoshitaka; Tsuneyuki, Shinji

    2013-09-07

    The fragment molecular orbital (FMO)-linear combination of molecular orbitals (LCMO) method incorporates as an efficient post-process calculation of one-electron orbitals of the whole system after the FMO total energy calculation. A straightforward way to increase the accuracy is inclusion of the trimer effect. Here, we derive a comprehensive formulation called the FMO3-LCMO method. To keep the computational costs of the trimer term low enough, we use a matrix-size reduction technique. We evaluated the accuracy and efficiency of the FMO3-LCMO scheme in model biological systems (alanine oligomer and chignolin). The results show that delocalized electronic orbitals with covalent and hydrogen bonds are better described at the trimer level, and the FMO3-LCMO method is applicable to quantitative evaluations of a wide range of frontier orbitals in large biosystems.

  2. Posttraumatic Orbital Emphysema: A Numerical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Skorek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Orbital emphysema is a common symptom accompanying orbital fracture. The pathomechanism is still not recognized and the usually assumed cause, elevated pressure in the upper airways connected with sneezing or coughing, does not always contribute to the occurrence of this type of fracture. Observations based on the finite model (simulating blowout type fracture of the deformations of the inferior orbital wall after a strike in its lower rim. Authors created a computer numeric model of the orbit with specified features—thickness and resilience modulus. During simulation an evenly spread 14400 N force was applied to the nodular points in the inferior rim (the maximal value not causing cracking of the outer rim, but only ruptures in the inferior wall. The observation was made from 1·10-3 to 1·10-2 second after a strike. Right after a strike dislocations of the inferior orbital wall toward the maxillary sinus were observed. Afterwards a retrograde wave of the dislocation of the inferior wall toward the orbit was noticed. Overall dislocation amplitude reached about 6 mm. Based on a numeric model of the orbit submitted to a strike in the inferior wall an existence of a retrograde shock wave causing orbital emphysema has been found.

  3. Rotation Axis Variation Due To Spin Orbit Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Gallavotti, G

    1993-01-01

    Abstract: rotation axis variation due to spin orbit resonance: conference report; keywords: planetary precession, rigid body, chaos, KAM, Arnold diffusion, averaging, celestial mechanics, classical mechanics, large deviations

  4. Contributions respectives des courants et de la houle dans la mobilité sédimentaire d'une plate-forme interne estuarienne. Exemple : le seuil interinsulaire, au large du pertuis d'Antioche, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idier, Déborah; Pedreros, Rodrigo; Oliveros, Carlos; Sottolichio, Aldo; Choppin, Lorraine; Bertin, Xavier

    2006-08-01

    This paper investigates the relative influence of waves, wind-induced current and tidal current on the sediment mobility of a macro-tidal environment belonging to the inner shelf seaward of the 'pertuis Charentais' (France). This study, mainly based on three-week hydrodynamic in-situ measurements, shows that, for a water depth of 23 m, the swell (rather than wind waves) orbital velocity is large enough to initiate the motion of medium sands that are then transported by currents. Estimations show that medium sand of 0.2 mm is transported during 92% of the measurements, whereas coarse sand and gravel move sporadically, during storm, synchronously with spring tides. Further more, bedload fluxes appear strongly larger when waves are taken into account (370 times larger for 0.2-mm sands). To cite this article: D. Idier et al., C. R. Geoscience 338 (2006).

  5. Bifurcations of double homoclinic flip orbits with resonant eigenvalues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Concerns double homoclinic loops with orbit flips and two resonant eigenvalues in a four-dimensional system. We use the solution of a normal form system to construct a singular map in some neighborhood of the equilibrium, and the solution of a linear variational system to construct a regular map in some neighborhood of the double culation gives explicitly an expression of the associated successor function. By a delicate analysis of the bifurcation equation, we obtain the condition that the original double homoclinic loops are kept, and prove the existence and the existence regions of the large 1-homoclinic orbit bifurcation surface, 2-fold large 1-periodic orbit bifurcation surface,large 2-homoclinic orbit bifurcation surface and their approximate expressions. We also locate the large periodic orbits and large homoclinic orbits and their number.

  6. The contribution of HGAL/GCET2 in immunohistological algorithms: a comparative study in 424 cases of nodal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualco, Gabriela; Bacchi, Lívia M; Domeny-Duarte, Pollyanna; Natkunam, Yasodha; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2012-11-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma can be subclassified into at least two molecular subgroups by gene expression profiling: germinal center B-cell like and activated B-cell like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Several immunohistological algorithms have been proposed as surrogates to gene expression profiling at the level of protein expression, but their reliability has been an issue of controversy. Furthermore, the proportion of misclassified cases of germinal center B-cell subgroup by immunohistochemistry, in all reported algorithms, is higher compared with germinal center B-cell cases defined by gene expression profiling. We analyzed 424 cases of nodal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with the panel of markers included in the three previously described algorithms: Hans, Choi, and Tally. To test whether the sensitivity of detecting germinal center B-cell cases could be improved, the germinal center B-cell marker HGAL/GCET2 was also added to all three algorithms. Our results show that the inclusion of HGAL/GCET2 significantly increased the detection of germinal center B-cell cases in all three algorithms (P<0.001). The proportions of germinal center B-cell cases in the original algorithms were 27%, 34%, and 19% for Hans, Choi, and Tally, respectively. In the modified algorithms, with the inclusion of HGAL/GCET2, the frequencies of germinal center B-cell cases were increased to 38%, 48%, and 35%, respectively. Therefore, HGAL/GCET2 protein expression may function as a marker for germinal center B-cell type diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Consideration should be given to the inclusion of HGAL/GCET2 analysis in algorithms to better predict the cell of origin. These findings bear further validation, from comparison to gene expression profiles and from clinical/therapeutic data.

  7. Contribution of Road Grade to the Energy Use of Modern Automobiles Across Large Datasets of Real-World Drive Cycles: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, E.; Burton, E.; Duran, A.; Gonder, J.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the real-world power demand of modern automobiles is of critical importance to engineers using modeling and simulation to inform the intelligent design of increasingly efficient powertrains. Increased use of global positioning system (GPS) devices has made large scale data collection of vehicle speed (and associated power demand) a reality. While the availability of real-world GPS data has improved the industry's understanding of in-use vehicle power demand, relatively little attention has been paid to the incremental power requirements imposed by road grade. This analysis quantifies the incremental efficiency impacts of real-world road grade by appending high fidelity elevation profiles to GPS speed traces and performing a large simulation study. Employing a large real-world dataset from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Transportation Secure Data Center, vehicle powertrain simulations are performed with and without road grade under five vehicle models. Aggregate results of this study suggest that road grade could be responsible for 1% to 3% of fuel use in light-duty automobiles.

  8. The statistical mechanics of planet orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Tremaine, Scott

    2015-01-01

    The final "giant-impact" phase of terrestrial planet formation is believed to begin with a large number of planetary "embryos" on nearly circular, coplanar orbits. Mutual gravitational interactions gradually excite their eccentricities until their orbits cross and they collide and merge; through this process the number of surviving bodies declines until the system contains a small number of planets on well-separated, stable orbits. In this paper we explore a simple statistical model for the orbit distribution of planets formed by this process, based on the sheared-sheet approximation and the ansatz that the planets explore uniformly all of the stable region of phase space. The model provides analytic predictions for the distribution of eccentricities and semimajor axis differences, correlations between orbital elements of nearby planets, and the complete N-planet distribution function, in terms of a single parameter that is determined by the planetary masses. The predicted properties are generally consistent ...

  9. 8mm三次谐波潘尼管大回旋电子枪设计%Design of large-orbit electron gun for 8 mm third-harmonic peniotron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武新慧; 李家胤; 赵晓云; 胡标; 李天明

    2012-01-01

    根据现有磁体条件和工艺设计了一过渡区较长的倒向磁场系统,其主磁场为0.396 T,反向磁场为-0.033 T,并给出了一种实用8 mm三次谐波潘尼管电子枪的设计结果.该大回旋电子枪工作在43.5kV,1.45A下,阴极可置于轴向磁场幅值渐减区域.该结构电子枪不追求在通过反转点之前形成薄的环形电子束,不利用突变倒向磁场,不需要刻意控制磁力线与电子注包络走向的一致性,显著降低了调试的难度和要求.最终优化所得电子注的纵向速度零散为4.78%,偏心率为7.18%,速度比高达2.2,而速度比的零散仅为4.88%,满足三次谐波潘尼管的要求.经大信号模拟计算,在该电子枪驱动下,潘尼管器件功率可达31.9 kW,效率高达49.4%,总体参量仍具有吸引力且建立在可实现的电子光学系统基础上.%According to current magnetic and processing conditions, a gradually-changing reversal magnetic system and a practical 8 mm third-harmonic peniotron electron gun are designed. This large-orbit electron gun is designed under the operating voltage of 43. 5 kV, and operating current of 1. 45 A, and its cathode can be located in the axial magnetic field where its magnitude decreases gradually. It does not demand the consistency between the field lines and the contour of the beam trajectories, which reduces the design requirements and difficulty greatly. After optimization, an axis-encircling electron beam with an axial velocity spread of 4. 78% , a guiding center deviation ratio of 7. 18% and a velocity ratio of 2. 2 is obtained, which satisfies the requirements of the third-harmonic peniotron. The large-signal simulation shows that, driven by the electron gun, the peniotron can achieve an output power of 31. 9 kW with the efficiency up to 49. 4%. This is an attractive result in laboratory platform.

  10. The Exoplanet Orbit Database

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Jason T; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Han, Eunkyu; Feng, Ying; Johnson, John Asher; Howard, Andrew W; Valenti, Jeff A; Anderson, Jay; Piskunov, Nikolai

    2010-01-01

    We present a database of well determined orbital parameters of exoplanets. This database comprises spectroscopic orbital elements measured for 421 planets orbiting 357 stars from radial velocity and transit measurements as reported in the literature. We have also compiled fundamental transit parameters, stellar parameters, and the method used for the planets discovery. This Exoplanet Orbit Database includes all planets with robust, well measured orbital parameters reported in peer-reviewed articles. The database is available in a searchable, filterable, and sortable form on the Web at http://exoplanets.org through the Exoplanets Data Explorer Table, and the data can be plotted and explored through the Exoplanets Data Explorer Plotter. We use the Data Explorer to generate publication-ready plots giving three examples of the signatures of exoplanet migration and dynamical evolution: We illustrate the character of the apparent correlation between mass and period in exoplanet orbits, the selection different biase...

  11. Preseptal and orbital cellulitis

    OpenAIRE

    Emine Akçay; Gamze Dereli Can; Nurullah Çağıl

    2014-01-01

    Preseptal cellulitis (PC) is defined as an inflammation of the eyelid and surrounding skin, whereas orbital cellulitis (OC) is an inflammation of the posterior septum of the eyelid affecting the orbit and its contents. Periorbital tissues may become infected as a result of trauma (including insect bites) or primary bacteremia. Orbital cellulitis generally occurs as a complication of sinusitis. The most commonly isolated organisms are Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, S. epid...

  12. Orbital inflammation: Corticosteroids first.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagi Glass, Lora R; Freitag, Suzanne K

    2016-01-01

    Orbital inflammation is common, and may affect all ages and both genders. By combining a thorough history and physical examination, targeted ancillary laboratory testing and imaging, a presumptive diagnosis can often be made. Nearly all orbital inflammatory pathology can be empirically treated with corticosteroids, thus obviating the need for histopathologic diagnosis prior to initiation of therapy. In addition, corticosteroids may be effective in treating concurrent systemic disease. Unless orbital inflammation responds atypically or incompletely, patients can be spared biopsy.

  13. Epstein-Barr virus large tegument protein BPLF1 contributes to innate immune evasion through interference with toll-like receptor signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiel van Gent

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Viral infection triggers an early host response through activation of pattern recognition receptors, including Toll-like receptors (TLR. TLR signaling cascades induce production of type I interferons and proinflammatory cytokines involved in establishing an anti-viral state as well as in orchestrating ensuing adaptive immunity. To allow infection, replication, and persistence, (herpesviruses employ ingenious strategies to evade host immunity. The human gamma-herpesvirus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is a large, enveloped DNA virus persistently carried by more than 90% of adults worldwide. It is the causative agent of infectious mononucleosis and is associated with several malignant tumors. EBV activates TLRs, including TLR2, TLR3, and TLR9. Interestingly, both the expression of and signaling by TLRs is attenuated during productive EBV infection. Ubiquitination plays an important role in regulating TLR signaling and is controlled by ubiquitin ligases and deubiquitinases (DUBs. The EBV genome encodes three proteins reported to exert in vitro deubiquitinase activity. Using active site-directed probes, we show that one of these putative DUBs, the conserved herpesvirus large tegument protein BPLF1, acts as a functional DUB in EBV-producing B cells. The BPLF1 enzyme is expressed during the late phase of lytic EBV infection and is incorporated into viral particles. The N-terminal part of the large BPLF1 protein contains the catalytic site for DUB activity and suppresses TLR-mediated activation of NF-κB at, or downstream of, the TRAF6 signaling intermediate. A catalytically inactive mutant of this EBV protein did not reduce NF-κB activation, indicating that DUB activity is essential for attenuating TLR signal transduction. Our combined results show that EBV employs deubiquitination of signaling intermediates in the TLR cascade as a mechanism to counteract innate anti-viral immunity of infected hosts.

  14. Geometric orbit datum and orbit covers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG; Ke(

    2001-01-01

    [1]Vogan, D. , Dixmier algebras, sheets and representation theory (in Actes du colloque en I' honneur de Jacques Dixmier),Progress in Math. 92, Boston: Birkhauser Verlag, 1990, 333-397.[2]McGovern, W., Dixmier Algebras and Orbit Method, Operator Algebras, Unitary Representations and Invariant Theory,Boston: Birkhauser, 1990, 397-416.[3]Liang, K. , Parabolic inductions of nilpotent geometric orbit datum, Chinese Science Bulletin (in Chinese) , 1996, 41 (23):2116-2118.[4]Vogan, D., Representations of Real Reductive Lie Groups, Boston-Basel-Stuttgart: Birkhauser, 1981.[5]Lustig, G., Spaltenstein, N., Induced unipotent class, J. London Math. Soc., 1997, 19. 41-52.[6]Collingwood, D. H. , McGovern, W. M. , Nilpotent Orbits in Semisimple Lie Algebras, New York: Van Nostremt Reinhold,1993.

  15. Family of Orbiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image shows the paths of three spacecraft currently in orbit around Mars, as well as the path by which NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander will approach and land on the planet. The t-shaped crosses show where the orbiters will be when Phoenix enters the atmosphere, while the x-shaped crosses show their location at landing time. All three orbiters, NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, NASA's Mars Odyssey and the European Space Agency's Mars Express, will be monitoring Phoenix during the final steps of its journey to the Red Planet. Phoenix will land just south of Mars's north polar ice cap.

  16. Low Earth Orbiter: Terminal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Steven E.; Bundick, Steven N.

    1999-01-01

    In response to the current government budgetary environment that requires the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to do more with less, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility has developed and implemented a class of ground stations known as a Low Earth Orbiter-Terminal (LEO-T). This development thus provides a low-cost autonomous ground tracking service for NASA's customers. More importantly, this accomplishment provides a commercial source to spacecraft customers around the world to purchase directly from the company awarded the NASA contract to build these systems. A few years ago, NASA was driven to provide more ground station capacity for spacecraft telemetry, tracking, and command (TT&C) services with a decreasing budget. NASA also made a decision to develop many smaller, cheaper satellites rather than a few large spacecraft as done in the past. In addition, university class missions were being driven to provide their own TT&C services due to the increasing load on the NASA ground-tracking network. NASA's solution for this ever increasing load was to use the existing large aperture systems to support those missions requiring that level of performance and to support the remainder of the missions with the autonomous LEO-T systems. The LEO-T antenna system is a smaller, cheaper, and fully autonomous unstaffed system that can operate without the existing NASA support infrastructure. The LEO-T provides a low-cost, reliable space communications service to the expanding number of low-earth orbiting missions around the world. The system is also fostering developments that improve cost-effectiveness of autonomous-class capabilities for NASA and commercial space use. NASA has installed three LEO-T systems. One station is at the University of Puerto Rico, the second system is installed at the Poker Flat Research Range near Fairbanks, Alaska, and the third system is installed at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. This paper

  17. Mechanisms of enhanced orbital dia- and paramagnetism: application to the Rashba semiconductor BiTeI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, G A H; Murakawa, H; Bahramy, M S; Arita, R; Kaneko, Y; Tokura, Y; Nagaosa, N

    2012-06-15

    We study the magnetic susceptibility of a layered semiconductor BiTeI with giant Rashba spin splitting both theoretically and experimentally to explore its orbital magnetism. Apart from the core contributions, a large temperature-dependent diamagnetic susceptibility is observed when the Fermi energy E(F) is near the crossing point of the Rashba spin-split conduction bands at the time-reversal symmetry point A. On the other hand, when E(F) is below this band crossing, the susceptibility turns to be paramagnetic. These features are consistent with first-principles calculations, which also predict an enhanced orbital magnetic susceptibility with both positive and negative signs as a function of E(F) due to band (anti)crossings. Based on these observations, we propose two mechanisms for the enhanced paramagnetic orbital susceptibility.

  18. Orbit Response Measurements at the SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Wenninger, J

    2004-01-01

    The optics of the SPS ring and the TT40 transfer line have been analyzed using the closed orbit (respectively trajectory) response to controlled corrector magnet deflections. A large amount of information on the machine model, beam position monitor quality and orbit corrector calibrations can be extracted from te response data. The data was analyzed with the LOCO fit program that was adapted to the SPS machine model. A large amount of data was collected on the SPS ring, and the modelling was tested under a number of different conditions. The SPS ring data showed that a significant number of horizontal SPS orbit correctors do not provide the nominal kick strength and are damaged at the level of the magnet coil. This note describes the experience that has been gained at the SPS, the information that could be extracted from orbit data and some of the limitations of the analysis procedure in the context of the SPS.

  19. Distant retrograde orbits and the asteroid hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perozzi, Ettore; Ceccaroni, Marta; Valsecchi, Giovanni B.; Rossi, Alessandro

    2017-08-01

    Distant Retrograde Orbits (DROs) gained a novel wave of fame in space mission design because of their numerous advantages within the framework of the US plans for bringing a large asteroid sample in the vicinity of the Earth as the next target for human exploration. DROs are stable solutions of the three-body problem that can be used whenever an object, whether of natural or artificial nature, is required to remain in the neighborhood of a celestial body without being gravitationally captured by it. As such, they represent an alternative option to Halo orbits around the collinear Lagrangian points L1 and L2. Also known under other names ( e.g., quasi-satellite orbits, cis-lunar orbits, family- f orbits) these orbital configurations found interesting applications in several mission profiles, like that of a spacecraft orbiting around the small irregularly shaped satellite of Mars Phobos or the large Jovian moon Europa. In this paper a basic explanation of the DRO dynamics is presented in order to clarify some geometrical properties that characterize them. Their accessibility is then discussed from the point of view of mission analysis under different assumptions. Finally, their relevance within the framework of the present asteroid hazard protection programs is shown, stressing the significant increase in warning time they would provide in the prediction of impactors coming from the direction of the Sun.

  20. Contribution of Organic Food to the Diet in a Large Sample of French Adults (the NutriNet-Santé Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Baudry

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In developed countries, the demand for organic products continues to substantially increase each year. However, little information is available regarding the level of consumption of organic food and its relative share of the whole diet. Our aim was to provide, using individual consumption data, a detailed description of organic food consumption among French adults. Conventional and organic intakes were assessed using an organic food frequency questionnaire administered to 28,245 French adults participating in the NutriNet-Santé study. P values of Student t-test or Chi-square for the difference between genders were reported. Less than 12% of the respondents reported never consuming organic food in the past year. Women consumed on average 20% organic food in their whole diet per day while men consumed an average of 18%. The proportion of vegetables consumed that came from organic sources was 31% among women and 28% among men. Overall, the estimate of the contribution of organic food from products of plant origin was higher than that from products of animal origin. Our study provides a framework for the exploration of organic consumption and its correlates and can serve as a basis for future studies investigating relationships between the level of organic food consumption and health outcomes.

  1. Contribution of Organic Food to the Diet in a Large Sample of French Adults (the NutriNet-Santé Cohort Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudry, Julia; Méjean, Caroline; Allès, Benjamin; Péneau, Sandrine; Touvier, Mathilde; Hercberg, Serge; Lairon, Denis; Galan, Pilar; Kesse-Guyot, Emmanuelle

    2015-10-21

    In developed countries, the demand for organic products continues to substantially increase each year. However, little information is available regarding the level of consumption of organic food and its relative share of the whole diet. Our aim was to provide, using individual consumption data, a detailed description of organic food consumption among French adults. Conventional and organic intakes were assessed using an organic food frequency questionnaire administered to 28,245 French adults participating in the NutriNet-Santé study. P values of Student t-test or Chi-square for the difference between genders were reported. Less than 12% of the respondents reported never consuming organic food in the past year. Women consumed on average 20% organic food in their whole diet per day while men consumed an average of 18%. The proportion of vegetables consumed that came from organic sources was 31% among women and 28% among men. Overall, the estimate of the contribution of organic food from products of plant origin was higher than that from products of animal origin. Our study provides a framework for the exploration of organic consumption and its correlates and can serve as a basis for future studies investigating relationships between the level of organic food consumption and health outcomes.

  2. An exact result concerning the $1/f$ noise contribution to the large-angle error in CMB temperature and polarization maps

    CERN Document Server

    Bucher, Martin

    2016-01-01

    We present an exact expression for the $1/f$ contribution to the noise of the CMB temperature and polarization maps for a survey in which the scan pattern is isotropic. The result for polarization applies likewise to surveys with and without a rotating half-wave plate. A representative range of survey parameters is explored and implications for the design and optimization of future surveys are discussed. These results are most directly applicable to space-based surveys, which afford considerable freedom in the choice of the scan pattern on the celestial sphere. We discuss the applicability of the methods developed here to analyzing past experiments and present some conclusions pertinent to the design of future experiments. The techniques developed here do not require that the excess low frequency noise have exactly the $1/f$ shape and readily generalize to other functional forms for the detector noise power spectrum. In the case of weakly anisotropic scanning patterns the techniques in this paper can be used ...

  3. Environmental orientation of large energy companies? The large four and their contribution to environmental protection; Um(welt)orientierung grosser Energiekonzerne? Die grossen Vier und ihr Beitrag zum Klimaschutz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiyar, Dagmar

    2014-07-01

    The project is aimed to study the motivation and willingness for environmental engagement of the four large German energy companies RWE, E.ON, Vattenfall and EnBW. The two changes of political appraisal of nuclear energy by the German government occurred during the project. The work covers the following issues: Governance and climate policy, multi-level governance, corporate governance; climate topics in the management practice, energy policy and climate policy, national and international aspects, initiatives and engagement; research design and empirical investigations.

  4. Diffusive chaos in navigation satellites orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Daquin, J; Tsiganis, K

    2016-01-01

    The navigation satellite constellations in medium-Earth orbit exist in a background of third-body secular resonances stemming from the perturbing gravitational effects of the Moon and the Sun. The resulting chaotic motions, emanating from the overlapping of neighboring resonant harmonics, induce especially strong perturbations on the orbital eccentricity, which can be transported to large values, thereby increasing the collision risk to the constellations and possibly leading to a proliferation of space debris. We show here that this transport is of a diffusive nature and we present representative diffusion maps that are useful in obtaining a global comprehension of the dynamical structure of the navigation satellite orbits.

  5. The calculation of indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constants in large molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Mark A; Sałek, Paweł; Macak, Peter; Jaszuński, Michał; Helgaker, Trygve

    2004-09-20

    We present calculations of indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constants in large molecular systems, performed using density functional theory. Such calculations, which have become possible because of the use of linear-scaling techniques in the evaluation of the Coulomb and exchange-correlation contributions to the electronic energy, allow us to study indirect spin-spin couplings in molecules of biological interest, without having to construct artificial model systems. In addition to presenting a statistical analysis of the large number of short-range coupling constants in large molecular systems, we analyse the asymptotic dependence of the indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constants on the internuclear separation. In particular, we demonstrate that, in a sufficiently large one-electron basis set, the indirect spin-spin coupling constants become proportional to the inverse cube of the internuclear separation, even though the diamagnetic and paramagnetic spin-orbit contributions to the spin-spin coupling constants separately decay as the inverse square of this separation. By contrast, the triplet Fermi contact and spin-dipole contributions to the indirect spin-spin coupling constants decay exponentially and as the inverse cube of the internuclear separation, respectively. Thus, whereas short-range indirect spin-spin coupling constants are usually dominated by the Fermi contact contribution, long-range coupling constants are always dominated by the negative diamagnetic spin-orbit contribution and by the positive paramagnetic spin-orbit contribution, with small spin-dipole and negligible Fermi contact contributions.

  6. Space Shuttle Orbiter-Illustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This illustration is an orbiter cutaway view with callouts. The orbiter is both the brains and heart of the Space Transportation System (STS). About the same size and weight as a DC-9 aircraft, the orbiter contains the pressurized crew compartment (which can normally carry up to seven crew members), the huge cargo bay, and the three main engines mounted on its aft end. There are three levels to the crew cabin. Uppermost is the flight deck where the commander and the pilot control the mission. The middeck is where the gallery, toilet, sleep stations, and storage and experiment lockers are found for the basic needs of weightless daily living. Also located in the middeck is the airlock hatch into the cargo bay and space beyond. It is through this hatch and airlock that astronauts go to don their spacesuits and marned maneuvering units in preparation for extravehicular activities, more popularly known as spacewalks. The Space Shuttle's cargo bay is adaptable to hundreds of tasks. Large enough to accommodate a tour bus (60 x 15 feet or 18.3 x 4.6 meters), the cargo bay carries satellites, spacecraft, and spacelab scientific laboratories to and from Earth orbit. It is also a work station for astronauts to repair satellites, a foundation from which to erect space structures, and a hold for retrieved satellites to be returned to Earth. Thermal tile insulation and blankets (also known as the thermal protection system or TPS) cover the underbelly, bottom of the wings, and other heat-bearing surfaces of the orbiter to protect it during its fiery reentry into the Earth's atmosphere. The Shuttle's 24,000 individual tiles are made primarily of pure-sand silicate fibers, mixed with a ceramic binder. The solid rocket boosters (SRB's) are designed as an in-house Marshall Space Flight Center project, with United Space Boosters as the assembly and refurbishment contractor. The solid rocket motor (SRM) is provided by the Morton Thiokol Corporation.

  7. Atoms in parallel fields: Analysis with diffractive periodic orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, S. M.; Monteiro, T. S.; Dando, P. A.

    2000-11-01

    We show that fluctuations in the density of states of nonhydrogenic atoms in parallel fields are strongly influenced by diffractive periodic orbits. Unlike typical systems with a diffractive point scatterer, the atomic core of small atoms like lithium and helium is best understood as a combined geometric and diffractive scatterer. Each Gutzwiller (geometric) periodic orbit is paired with a diffractive orbit of the same action. We investigate, particularly, amplitudes for contributions from repetitions, and multiple scattering orbits. We find that periodic orbit repetitions are described by ``hybrid'' orbits, combining both diffractive and geometric core scatters, and that by including all possible permutations we can obtain excellent agreement between the semiclassical model and accurate fully quantal calculations. For high repetitions, we find even one-scatter diffractive contributions become of the same order as those of the geometric periodic orbit for repetition numbers n~ħ-1/2. Although the contribution of individual diffractive orbits is suppressed by O(ħ1/2) relative to the geometric periodic orbits, the proliferation of diffractive orbits with increasing period means that the diffractive effect for the atom can persist in the ħ-->0 limit.

  8. Congenital orbital encephalocele, orbital dystopia, and exophthalmos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Han Joon

    2012-07-01

    We present here an exceedingly rare variant of a nonmidline basal encephalocele of the spheno-orbital type, and this was accompanied with orbital dystopia in a 56-year-old man. On examination, his left eye was located more inferolaterally than his right eye, and the patient said this had been this way since his birth. The protrusion of his left eye was aggravated when he is tired. His naked visual acuity was 0.7/0.3, and the ocular pressure was 14/12 mm Hg. The exophthalmometry was 10/14 to 16 mm. His eyeball motion was not restricted, yet diplopia was present in all directions. The distance from the midline to the medial canthus was 20/15 mm. The distance from the midline to the midpupillary line was 35/22 mm. The vertical dimension of the palpebral fissure was 12/9 mm. The height difference of the upper eyelid margin was 11 mm, and the height difference of the lower eyelid margin was 8 mm. Facial computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed left sphenoid wing hypoplasia and herniation of the left anterior temporal pole and dura mater into the orbit, and this resulted into left exophthalmos and encephalomalacia in the left anterior temporal pole. To the best of our knowledge, our case is the second case of basal encephalocele and orbital dystopia.

  9. Investigation of the energy dependence of the orbital light curve in LS 5039

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Z.; Zhang, S.; Ji, L.; Chen, Y. P.; Kretschmar, P.; Kuulkers, E.; Collmar, W.; Liu, C. Z.

    2016-11-01

    LS 5039 is so far the best-studied γ-ray binary system at multiwavelength energies. A time-resolved study of its spectral energy distribution (SED) shows that above 1 keV its power output is changing along its binary orbit as well as being a function of energy. To disentangle the energy dependence of the power output as a function of orbital phase, we investigated in detail the orbital light curves as derived with different telescopes at different energy bands. We analysed the data from all existing International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL)/INTEGRAL on-board Imager/INTEGRAL Soft Gamma-Ray Imager observations of the source and generated the most up-to-date orbital light curves at hard X-ray energies. In the γ-ray band, we carried out orbital phase-resolved analysis of Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) data between 30 MeV and 10 GeV in five different energy bands. We found that, at ≲100 MeV and ≳1 TeV the peak of the γ-ray emission is near orbital phase 0.7, while between ˜100 MeV and ˜1 GeV it moves close to orbital phase 1.0 in an orbital anticlockwise manner. This result suggests that the transition region in the SED at soft γ-rays (below a hundred MeV) is related to the orbital phase interval of 0.5-1.0 but not to the one of 0.0-0.5, when the compact object is `behind' its companion. Another interesting result is that between 3 and 20 GeV no orbital modulation is found, although Fermi-LAT significantly (˜18σ) detects LS 5039. This is consistent with the fact that at these energies, the contributions to the overall emission from the inferior conjunction phase region (INFC, orbital phase 0.45-0.9) and from the superior conjunction phase region (orbital phase 0.9-0.45) are equal in strength. At TeV energies the power output is again dominant in the INFC region and the flux peak occurs at phase ˜0.7.

  10. Patterns of orbital disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasubramanian Thiagarajan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses various patterns of presentations of orbital lesions. Since this article has been authored by an otolaryngologist, the entire concept has been viewed from otolaryngologist's angle. With the advent of nasal endoscope trans nasal access to orbit is becoming the order of the day. Major advantage being that external skin incision is avoided.

  11. LUNISOLAR INVARIANT RELATIVE ORBITS

    OpenAIRE

    Walid Ali Rahoma

    2013-01-01

    The present study deal with constructing an analytical model within Hamiltonian formulation to design invariant relative orbits due to the perturbation of J2 and the lunisolar attraction. To fade the secular drift separation over the time between two neighboring orbits, two second order conditions that guarantee that drift are derived and enforced to be equal.

  12. Reticulohistiocytoma of the Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, Heather M.; Hayek, Brent R.; Grossniklaus, Hans E.

    2015-01-01

    Reticulohistiocytoma is a rare, benign histiocytic proliferation of the skin or soft tissue. While ocular involvement has been documented in the past, there have been no previously reported cases of reticulohistiocytoma of the orbit. In this report, the authors describe a reticulohistiocytoma of the orbit in a middle-aged woman. PMID:24807799

  13. Lunar Orbit Stability for Small Satellite Mission Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dono, Andres

    2015-01-01

    The irregular nature of the lunar gravity field will severely affect the orbit lifetime and behavior of future lunar small satellite missions. These spacecraft need stable orbits that do not require large deltaV budgets for station-keeping maneuvers. The initial classical elements of any lunar orbit are critical to address its stability and to comply with mission requirements. This publication identifies stable regions according to different initial conditions at the time of lunar orbit insertion (LOI). High fidelity numerical simulations with two different gravity models were performed. We focus in low altitude orbits where the dominant force in orbit propagation is the existence of unevenly distributed lunar mass concentrations. These orbits follow a periodic oscillation in some of the classical elements that is particularly useful for mission design. A set of orbital maintenance strategies for various mission concepts is presented.

  14. Orbital Plots Using Gnuplot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Brian G.

    2000-06-01

    The plotting program Gnuplot is freely available, general purpose, easy to use, and available on a variety of platforms. Complex three-dimensional surfaces, including the familiar angular parts of the hydrogen atom orbitals, are easily represented using Gnuplot. Contour plots allow viewing the radial and angular variation of the probability density in an orbital. Examples are given of how Gnuplot is used in an undergraduate physical chemistry class to view familiar atomic orbitals in new ways or to generate views of orbital functions that the student may have not seen before. Gnuplot may also be easily integrated into the environment of a Web page; an example of this is discussed (and is available at http://onsager.bd.psu.edu/~moore/orbitals_gnuplot). The plotting commands are entered with a form and a CGI script is used to run Gnuplot and display the result back to the browser.

  15. Enhanced large conductance K+ channel activity contributes to the impaired myogenic response in the cerebral vasculature of Fawn Hooded Hypertensive rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabbidi, Mallikarjuna R.; Mazur, Olga; Fan, Fan; Farley, Jerry M.; Gebremedhin, Debebe; Harder, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that the myogenic response (MR) in cerebral arteries is impaired in Fawn Hooded Hypertensive (FHH) rats and that transfer of a 2.4 megabase pair region of chromosome 1 (RNO1) containing 15 genes from the Brown Norway rat into the FHH genetic background restores MR in a FHH.1BN congenic strain. However, the mechanisms involved remain to be determined. The present study examined the role of the large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channel in impairing the MR in FHH rats. Whole-cell patch-clamp studies of cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) revealed that iberiotoxin (IBTX; BK inhibitor)-sensitive outward potassium (K+) channel current densities are four- to fivefold greater in FHH than in FHH.1BN congenic strain. Inside-out patches indicated that the BK channel open probability (NPo) is 10-fold higher and IBTX reduced NPo to a greater extent in VSMCs isolated from FHH than in FHH.1BN rats. Voltage sensitivity of the BK channel is enhanced in FHH as compared with FHH.1BN rats. The frequency and amplitude of spontaneous transient outward currents are significantly greater in VSMCs isolated from FHH than in FHH.1BN rats. However, the expression of the BK-α and -β-subunit proteins in cerebral vessels as determined by Western blot is similar between the two groups. Middle cerebral arteries (MCAs) isolated from FHH rats exhibited an impaired MR, and administration of IBTX restored this response. These results indicate that there is a gene on RNO1 that impairs MR in the MCAs of FHH rats by enhancing BK channel activity. PMID:24464756

  16. Orbital magnetism of graphene nanostructures: Bulk and confinement effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heße, Lisa; Richter, Klaus

    2014-11-01

    We consider the orbital magnetic properties of noninteracting charge carriers in graphene-based nanostructures in the low-energy regime. The magnetic response of such systems results both from bulk contributions and from confinement effects that can be particularly strong in ballistic quantum dots. First we provide a comprehensive study of the magnetic susceptibility χ of bulk graphene in a magnetic field for the different regimes arising from the relative magnitudes of the energy scales involved, i.e., temperature, Landau-level spacing, and chemical potential. We show that for finite temperature or chemical potential, χ is not divergent although the diamagnetic contribution χ0 from the filled valance band exhibits the well-known -B-1 /2 dependence. We further derive oscillatory modulations of χ , corresponding to de Haas-van Alphen oscillations of conventional two-dimensional electron gases. These oscillations can be large in graphene, thereby compensating the diamagnetic contribution χ0 and yielding a net paramagnetic susceptibility for certain energy and magnetic field regimes. Second, we predict and analyze corresponding strong, confinement-induced susceptibility oscillations in graphene-based quantum dots with amplitudes distinctly exceeding the corresponding bulk susceptibility. Within a semiclassical approach we derive generic expressions for orbital magnetism of graphene quantum dots with regular classical dynamics. Graphene-specific features can be traced back to pseudospin interference along the underlying periodic orbits. We demonstrate the quality of the semiclassical approximation by comparison with quantum-mechanical results for two exemplary mesoscopic systems, a graphene disk with infinite mass-type edges, and a rectangular graphene structure with armchair and zigzag edges, using numerical tight-binding calculations in the latter case.

  17. Small Orbital Stereo Tracking Camera Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Tom; MacLeod, Todd; Gagliano, Larry

    2017-01-01

    Any exploration vehicle assembled or Spacecraft placed in LEO or GTO must pass through this debris cloud and survive. Large cross section, low thrust vehicles will spend more time spiraling out through the cloud and will suffer more impacts.Better knowledge of small debris will improve survival odds. Current estimated Density of debris at various orbital attitudes with notation of recent collisions and resulting spikes. Orbital Debris Tracking and Characterization has now been added to NASA Office of Chief Technologists Technology Development Roadmap in Technology Area 5 (TA5.7)[Orbital Debris Tracking and Characterization] and is a technical gap in the current National Space Situational Awareness necessary to safeguard orbital assets and crews due to the risk of Orbital Debris damage to ISS Exploration vehicles. The Problem: Traditional orbital trackers looking for small, dim orbital derelicts and debris typically will stare at the stars and let any reflected light off the debris integrate in the imager for seconds, thus creating a streak across the image. The Solution: The Small Tracker will see Stars and other celestial objects rise through its Field of View (FOV) at the rotational rate of its orbit, but the glint off of orbital objects will move through the FOV at different rates and directions. Debris on a head-on collision course (or close) will stay in the FOV at 14 Km per sec. The Small Tracker can track at 60 frames per sec allowing up to 30 fixes before a near-miss pass. A Stereo pair of Small Trackers can provide range data within 5-7 Km for better orbit measurements.

  18. Orbital Magnetism of Bloch Electrons: III. Application to Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Masao

    2016-10-01

    The orbital susceptibility for graphene is calculated exactly up to the first order with respect to the overlap integrals between neighboring atomic orbitals. The general and rigorous theory of orbital susceptibility developed in the preceding paper is applied to a model for graphene as a typical two-band model. It is found that there are contributions from interband, Fermi surface, and occupied states in addition to the Landau-Peierls orbital susceptibility. The relative phase between the atomic orbitals on the two sublattices related to the chirality of Dirac cones plays an important role. It is shown that there are some additional contributions to the orbital susceptibility that are not included in the previous calculations using the Peierls phase in the tight-binding model for graphene. The physical origin of this difference is clarified in terms of the corrections to the Peierls phase.

  19. A New Tour Design Technique to Enable an Enceladus Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strange, N.; Campagnola, S.; Russell, R.

    2009-12-01

    As a result of discoveries made by the Cassini spacecraft, Saturn's moon Enceladus has emerged as a high science-value target for a future orbiter mission. [1] However, past studies of an Enceladus orbiter mission [2] found that entering Enceladus orbit either requires a prohibitively large orbit insertion ΔV (> 3.5 km/s) or a prohibitively long flight time. In order to reach Enceladus with a reasonable flight time and ΔV budget, a new tour design method has been developed that uses gravity-assists of the low-mass moons Rhea, Dione, and Tethys combined with v-infinity leveraging maneuvers. This new method can achieve Enceladus orbit with a combined leveraging and insertion ΔV of ~1 km/s and a 2.5 year Saturn tour. Among many challenges in designing a trajectory for an Enceladus mission, the two most prominent arise because Enceladus is a low mass moon (its GM is only ~7 km^2/s^2), deep within Saturn's gravity well (its orbit is at 4 Saturn radii). Designing ΔV-efficient rendezvous with Enceladus is the first challenge, while the second involves finding a stable orbit which can achieve the desired science measurements. A paper by Russell and Lara [3] has recently addressed the second problem, and a paper this past August by Strange, Campagnola, and Russell [4] has adressed the first. This method developed to solve the second problem, the leveraging tour, and the science possibilities of this trajectory will be the subject of this presentation. the new methods in [4], a leveraging tour with Titan, Rhea, Dione, and Tethys can reach Enceladus orbit with less than half of the ΔV of a direct Titan-Enceladus transfer. Starting from the TSSM Saturn arrival conditions [5], with a chemical bi-prop system, this new tour design technique could place into Enceladus orbit ~2800 kg compared to ~1100 kg from a direct Titan-Enceladus transfer. Moreover, the 2.5 year leveraging tour provides many low-speed and high science value flybys of Rhea, Dione, and Tethys. This exciting

  20. Pilot-wave hydrodynamics in a rotating frame: Exotic orbits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oza, Anand U.; Wind-Willassen, Øistein; Harris, Daniel M.;

    2014-01-01

    , stable circular orbits give way to wobbling orbits, which are succeeded in turn by instabilities of the orbital center characterized by steady drifting then discrete leaping. In the limit of large vibrational forcing, the walker’s trajectory becomes chaotic, but its statistical behavior reflects...... the influence of the unstable orbital solutions. The study results in a complete regime diagram that summarizes the dependence of the walker’s behavior on the system parameters. Our predictions compare favorably to the experimental observations of Harris and Bush [“Droplets walking in a rotating frame: from...... quantized orbits to multi-modal statistics,” J. Fluid Mech. 739, 444–464 (2014)]....

  1. Orbit Stabilization of Nanosat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JOHNSON,DAVID J.

    1999-12-01

    An algorithm is developed to control a pulsed {Delta}V thruster on a small satellite to allow it to fly in formation with a host satellite undergoing time dependent atmospheric drag deceleration. The algorithm uses four short thrusts per orbit to correct for differences in the average radii of the satellites due to differences in drag and one thrust to symmetrize the orbits. The radial difference between the orbits is the only input to the algorithm. The algorithm automatically stabilizes the orbits after ejection and includes provisions to allow azimuthal positional changes by modifying the drag compensation pulses. The algorithm gives radial and azimuthal deadbands of 50 cm and 3 m for a radial measurement accuracy of {+-} 5 cm and {+-} 60% period variation in the drag coefficient of the host. Approaches to further reduce the deadbands are described. The methodology of establishing a stable orbit after ejection is illustrated in an appendix. The results show the optimum ejection angle to minimize stabilization thrust is upward at 86{sup o} from the orbital velocity. At this angle the stabilization velocity that must be supplied by the thruster is half the ejection velocity. An ejection velocity of 0.02 m/sat 86{sup o} gives an azimuthal separation after ejection and orbit stabilization of 187 m. A description of liquid based gas thrusters suitable for the satellite control is included in an appendix.

  2. Correlation effects and orbital magnetism of Co clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Di Marco, L Peters I; Şaşıoğlu, E; Altun, A; Rossen, S; Friedrich, C; Blügel, S; Katsnelson, M I; Kirilyuk, A; Eriksson, O

    2016-01-01

    Recent experiments on isolated Co clusters have shown huge orbital magnetic moments in comparison with their bulk and surface counterparts. These clusters hence provide the unique possibility to study the evolution of the orbital magnetic moment with respect to the cluster size and how competing interactions contribute to the quenching of orbital magnetism. We investigate here different theoretical methods to calculate the spin and orbital moments of Co clusters, and assess the performances of the methods in comparison with experiments. It is shown that density functional theory in conventional local density or generalized gradient approximations, or even with a hybrid functional, severely underestimates the orbital moment. As natural extensions/corrections we considered the orbital polarization correction, the LDA+U approximation as well as the LDA+DMFT method. Our theory shows that of the considered methods, only the LDA+DMFT method provides orbital moments in agreement with experiment, thus emphasizing the...

  3. Quark Orbital Angular Momentum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkardt Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Definitions of orbital angular momentum based on Wigner distributions are used as a framework to discuss the connection between the Ji definition of the quark orbital angular momentum and that of Jaffe and Manohar. We find that the difference between these two definitions can be interpreted as the change in the quark orbital angular momentum as it leaves the target in a DIS experiment. The mechanism responsible for that change is similar to the mechanism that causes transverse single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering.

  4. Prototyping LHC Orbit Control

    CERN Document Server

    Wijnands, Thijs; Srinivasan, B

    2002-01-01

    Orbit correction consists in adjusting the strengths of the corrector magnets to make the measured beam position match a predefined reference. In the LHC, this involves around 2000 sensors and more than 1000 actuators that are distributed along both rings. The orbit correction scheme should be able to compensate for very slow orbit drifts in the range of a 10-2 Hz but also for fast motions (vibrations) up to 1 Hz. In this paper we investigate correction schemes that could be used in either case. The choice of design formalisms is based on the experience we gained with the SPS and the LEP.

  5. THE STATISTICAL MECHANICS OF PLANET ORBITS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tremaine, Scott, E-mail: tremaine@ias.edu [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2015-07-10

    The final “giant-impact” phase of terrestrial planet formation is believed to begin with a large number of planetary “embryos” on nearly circular, coplanar orbits. Mutual gravitational interactions gradually excite their eccentricities until their orbits cross and they collide and merge; through this process the number of surviving bodies declines until the system contains a small number of planets on well-separated, stable orbits. In this paper we explore a simple statistical model for the orbit distribution of planets formed by this process, based on the sheared-sheet approximation and the ansatz that the planets explore uniformly all of the stable region of phase space. The model provides analytic predictions for the distribution of eccentricities and semimajor axis differences, correlations between orbital elements of nearby planets, and the complete N-planet distribution function, in terms of a single parameter, the “dynamical temperature,” that is determined by the planetary masses. The predicted properties are generally consistent with N-body simulations of the giant-impact phase and with the distribution of semimajor axis differences in the Kepler catalog of extrasolar planets. A similar model may apply to the orbits of giant planets if these orbits are determined mainly by dynamical evolution after the planets have formed and the gas disk has disappeared.

  6. Relative size of the eye and orbit: an evolutionary and craniofacial constraint model for examining the etiology and disparate incidence of juvenile-onset myopia in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Michael P

    2012-05-01

    The principal aim of this research is to provide a new model for investigating myopia in humans, and contribute to an understanding of the degree to which modern variation and evolutionary change in orbital and overall craniofacial morphology may help explain the common eye form association with this condition. Recent research into long and short-term evolution of the human orbit reveals a number of changes in this feature, and particularly since the Upper Paleolithic. These include a reduction in orbital depth, a decrease in anterior projection of the upper and lower orbital margins, and most notably, a reduction in orbital volume since the Holocene in East Asia. Reduced orbital volume in this geographic region could exacerbate an existing trend in recent hominin evolution toward larger eyes in smaller orbits, and may help explain the unusually high frequency of myopia in East Asian populations. The objective of the current study is to test a null hypothesis of no relationship between a ratio of orbit to eye volume and spherical equivalent refractive error (SER) in a sample of Chinese adults, and examine how relative size of the eye within the orbit relates to SER between the sexes and across the sample population. Analysis of the orbit, eye, and SER reveals a strong relationship between relative size of the eye within the orbit and the severity of myopic refractive error. An orbit/eye ratio of 3 for females and 3.5 for males (or an eye that occupies approximately 34% and 29% of the orbit, respectively), designates a clear threshold at which myopia develops, and becomes progressively worse as the eye continues to occupy a greater proportion of the orbital cavity. These results indicate that relative size of the eye within the orbit is an important factor in the development of myopia, and suggests that individuals with large eyes in small orbits lack space for adequate development of ocular tissues, leading to compression and distortion of the lithesome globe

  7. Jumping Jupiter can explain Mercury's orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Roig, Fernando; DeSouza, Sandro Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The orbit of Mercury has large values of eccentricity and inclination that cannot be easily explained if this planet formed on a circular and coplanar orbit. Here, we study the evolution of Mercury's orbit during the instability related to the migration of the giant planets in the framework of the jumping Jupiter model. We found that some instability models are able to produce the correct values of Mercury's eccentricity and inclination, provided that relativistic effects are included in the precession of Mercury's perihelion. The orbital excitation is driven by the fast change of the normal oscillation modes of the system corresponding to the perihelion precession of Jupiter (for the eccentricity), and the nodal regression of Uranus (for the inclination).

  8. Earth orbital operations supporting manned interplanetary missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Brent; Buddington, Patricia A.; Whittaker, William L.

    The orbital operations required to accumulate, assemble, test, verify, maintain, and launch complex manned space systems on interplanetary missions from earth orbit are as vital as the flight hardware itself. Vast numbers of orbital crew are neither necessary nor desirable for accomplishing the required tasks. A suite of robotic techniques under human supervisory control, relying on sensors, software and manipulators either currently emergent or already applied in terrestrial settings, can make the job tractable. The mission vehicle becomes largely self-assembling, using its own rigid aerobrake as a work platform. The Space Station, having been used as a laboratory testbed and to house an assembly crew of four, is not dominated by the process. A feasible development schedule, if begun soon, could emplace orbital support technologies for exploration missions in time for a 2004 first interplanetary launch.

  9. Congenital orbital teratoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shereen Aiyub

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of mature congenital orbital teratoma managed with lid-sparing exenteration and dermis fat graft. This is a case report on the management of congenital orbital teratoma. A full-term baby was born in Fiji with prolapsed right globe which was surrounded by a nonpulsatile, cystic mass. Clinical and imaging features were consistent with congenital orbital teratoma. Due to limited surgical expertise, the patient was transferred to Adelaide, Australia for further management. The patient underwent a lid-sparing exenteration with frozen section control of the apical margin. A dermis fat graft from the groin was placed beneath the lid skin to provide volume. Histopathology revealed mature tissues from each of the three germ cell layers which confirmed the diagnosis of mature teratoma. We describe the successful use of demis fat graft in socket reconstruction following lid-sparing exenteration for congenital orbital teratoma.

  10. Envelopes of Cometary Orbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijajlović, Ž.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available We discuss cometary orbits from the standpoint of Nonstandard (Leibnitz analysis, a relatively new branch of mathematics. In particular, we consider parabolic cometary paths. It appears that, in a sense, every parabola is an ellipse.

  11. Orbital interactions in chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Albright, Thomas A; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Explains the underlying structure that unites all disciplines in chemistry Now in its second edition, this book explores organic, organometallic, inorganic, solid state, and materials chemistry, demonstrating how common molecular orbital situations arise throughout the whole chemical spectrum. The authors explore the relationships that enable readers to grasp the theory that underlies and connects traditional fields of study within chemistry, thereby providing a conceptual framework with which to think about chemical structure and reactivity problems. Orbital Interactions

  12. Geometric and diffractive orbits in the scattering from confocal hyperbolae

    CERN Document Server

    Whelan, N D

    1994-01-01

    We study the scattering resonances between two confocal hyperbolae and show that the spectrum is dominated by the effect of a single periodic orbit. There are two distinct cases depending on whether the orbit is geometric or diffractive. A generalization of periodic orbit theory allows us to incorporate the second possibility. In both cases we also perform a WKB analysis. Although it is found that the semiclassical approximations work best for resonances with large energies and narrow widths, there is reasonable agreement even for resonances with large widths - unlike the two disk scatterer. We also find agreement with the next order correction to periodic orbit theory.

  13. Antisymmetric Orbit Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoliy Klimyk

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, properties of antisymmetric orbit functions are reviewed and further developed. Antisymmetric orbit functions on the Euclidean space $E_n$ are antisymmetrized exponential functions. Antisymmetrization is fulfilled by a Weyl group, corresponding to a Coxeter-Dynkin diagram. Properties of such functions are described. These functions are closely related to irreducible characters of a compact semisimple Lie group $G$ of rank $n$. Up to a sign, values of antisymmetric orbit functions are repeated on copies of the fundamental domain $F$ of the affine Weyl group (determined by the initial Weyl group in the entire Euclidean space $E_n$. Antisymmetric orbit functions are solutions of the corresponding Laplace equation in $E_n$, vanishing on the boundary of the fundamental domain $F$. Antisymmetric orbit functions determine a so-called antisymmetrized Fourier transform which is closely related to expansions of central functions in characters of irreducible representations of the group $G$. They also determine a transform on a finite set of points of $F$ (the discrete antisymmetric orbit function transform. Symmetric and antisymmetric multivariate exponential, sine and cosine discrete transforms are given.

  14. [Orbital complications of sinusitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šuchaň, M; Horňák, M; Kaliarik, L; Krempaská, S; Koštialová, T; Kovaľ, J

    2014-12-01

    Orbital complications categorised by Chandler are emergency. They need early diagnosis and agresive treatment. Stage and origin of orbital complications are identified by rhinoendoscopy, ophtalmologic examination and CT of orbite and paranasal sinuses. Periorbital cellulitis and early stage of orbital cellulitis can be treated conservatively with i. v. antibiotics. Monitoring of laboratory parameters and ophtalmologic symptoms is mandatory. Lack of improvement or worsening of symptoms within 24-48 hours and advanced stages of orbital complications are indicated for surgery. The purpose of the study is to evaluate epidemiology, clinical features and management of sinogenic orbital complications. Retrospective data of 8 patients with suspicion of orbital complication admited to hospital from 2008 to 2013 were evaluated. Patients were analyzed in terms of gender, age, CT findings, microbiology, clinical features, stage and treatment. Male and female were afected in rate 1,66:1. Most of patients were young adult in 3rd. and 4th. decade of life (62,5 %). Acute and chronic sinusitis were cause of orbital complication in the same rate. The most common origin of orbital complication was ethmoiditis (62,5 %), than maxillary (25 %) and frontal (12,5 %) sinusitis. Polysinusitis with affection of ethmoidal, maxillary and frontal sinuses (75 %) was usual CT finding. Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus were etiological agens in half of cases. Periorbital oedema (100 %), proptosis, chemosis (50 %), diplopia and glaucoma (12,5 %) were observed. Based on examinations, diagnosis of periorbital oedema/preseptal cellulitis was made in 3 (37,5 %), orbital cellulitis in 3 (37,5 %) and subperiosteal abscess in 2 cases (25 %). All patients underwent combined therapy - i. v. antibiotics and surgery within 24 hours. Eradication of disease from ostiomeatal complex (OMC), drainage of affected sinuses and drainage of subperiosteal abscess were done via fuctional endonasal

  15. Extraction of information about periodic orbits from scattering functions

    CERN Document Server

    Bütikofer, T; Seligman, T H; Bütikofer, Thomas; Jung, Christof; Seligman, Thomas H.

    1999-01-01

    As a contribution to the inverse scattering problem for classical chaotic systems, we show that one can select sequences of intervals of continuity, each of which yields the information about period, eigenvalue and symmetry of one unstable periodic orbit.

  16. Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) missions applications and systems requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, W. G.; Cramblit, D. C.

    The routine delivery of large payloads to low earth orbit has become a reality with the Space Transportation System (STS). However, once earth orbit has been achieved, orbit transfer operations represent an inefficient use of the Space Shuttle. The Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) will add a new and needed dimension to STS capabilities. Utilized in a reusable manner, the OMV is needed to deliver and retrieve satellites to and from orbital altitudes or inclinations beyond the practical limits of the Space Shuttle and to support basic Space Station activities. The initial OMV must also be designed to permit the addition of future mission kits to support the servicing, module changeout, or refueling of satellites in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO), and the retrieval and deorbit of space debris. This paper addresses the mission needs along with the resulting performance implications, design requirements and operational capabilities imposed on the OMV planned for use in the late 1980s.

  17. Disruption of co-orbital (1:1) planetary resonances during gas-driven orbital migration

    CERN Document Server

    Pierens, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    Planets close to their stars are thought to form farther out and migrate inward due to angular momentum exchange with gaseous protoplanetary disks. This process can produce systems of planets in co-orbital (Trojan or 1:1) resonance, in which two planets share the same orbit, usually separated by 60 degrees. Co-orbital systems are detectable among the planetary systems found by the Kepler mission either directly or by transit timing variations. However, no co-orbital systems have been found within the thousands of Kepler planets and candidates. Here we study the orbital evolution of co-orbital planets embedded in a protoplanetary disk using a grid-based hydrodynamics code. We show that pairs of similar-mass planets in co-orbital resonance are disrupted during large-scale orbital migration. Destabilization occurs when one or both planets is near the critical mass needed to open a gap in the gaseous disk. A confined gap is opened that spans the 60 degree azimuthal separation between planets. This alters the torq...

  18. Periodic orbits in cosmological billiards: the Selberg trace formula for asymptotic Bianchi IX universes, evidence for scars in the wavefunction of the quantum universe and large-scale structure anisotropies of the present universe

    CERN Document Server

    Lecian, Orchidea Maria

    2013-01-01

    The Selberg trace formula is specified for cosmological billiards in $4=3+1$ spacetime dimensions. The spectral formula is rewritten as an exact sum over the initial conditions for the Einstein field equations for which periodic orbits are implied. For this, a suitable density of measure invariant under the billiard maps has been defined, within the statistics implied by the BKL paradigm. The trace formula has also been specified for the stochastic limit of the dynamics, where the sum over initial conditions has been demonstrated to be equivalent to a sum over suitable symmetry operations on the generators of the groups that define the billiard dynamics, and acquires different features for the different statistical maps. Evidence for scars at the quantum regime is provided. The validity of the Selberg trace formula at the classical level and in the quantum regime enforces the validity of the semiclassical descriptions of these systems, thus offering further elements for the comparison of quantum-gravity effec...

  19. Correlation between the 2-Dimensional Extent of Orbital Defects and the 3-Dimensional Volume of Herniated Orbital Content in Patients with Isolated Orbital Wall Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Jong Hyun; Moon, Myeong Ho; Lee, Yong Hae; Koh, In Chang; Kim, Kyu Nam; Kim, Chang Gyun

    2017-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess the correlation between the 2-dimensional (2D) extent of orbital defects and the 3-dimensional (3D) volume of herniated orbital content in patients with an orbital wall fracture. Methods This retrospective study was based on the medical records and radiologic data of 60 patients from January 2014 to June 2016 for a unilateral isolated orbital wall fracture. They were classified into 2 groups depending on whether the fracture involved the inferior wall (group I, n=30) or the medial wall (group M, n=30). The 2D area of the orbital defect was calculated using the conventional formula. The 2D extent of the orbital defect and the 3D volume of herniated orbital content were measured with 3D image processing software. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the correlations between the 2D and 3D parameters. Results Varying degrees of positive correlation were found between the 2D extent of the orbital defects and the 3D herniated orbital volume in both groups (Pearson correlation coefficient, 0.568−0.788; R2=32.2%−62.1%). Conclusions Both the calculated and measured 2D extent of the orbital defects showed a positive correlation with the 3D herniated orbital volume in orbital wall fractures. However, a relatively large volume of herniation (>0.9 cm3) occurred not infrequently despite the presence of a small orbital defect (<1.9 cm2). Therefore, estimating the 3D volume of the herniated content in addition to the 2D orbital defect would be helpful for determining whether surgery is indicated and ensuring adequate surgical outcomes. PMID:28194344

  20. Orbital angular momentum in the nucleons

    CERN Document Server

    Lorcé, Cédric

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, it has been realized that the orbital angular momentum of partons inside the nucleon plays a major role. It contributes significantly to nucleon properties and is at the origin of many asymmetries observed in spin physics. It is therefore of paramount importance to determine this quantity if we want to understand the nucleon internal structure and experimental observables. This triggered numerous discussions and controversies about the proper definition of orbital angular momentum and its extraction from experimental data. We summarize the present situation and discuss recent developments in this field.

  1. Local orbitals in electron scattering calculations*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winstead, Carl L.; McKoy, Vincent

    2016-05-01

    We examine the use of local orbitals to improve the scaling of calculations that incorporate target polarization in a description of low-energy electron-molecule scattering. After discussing the improved scaling that results, we consider the results of a test calculation that treats scattering from a two-molecule system using both local and delocalized orbitals. Initial results are promising. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  2. Orbit Propagation and Determination of Low Earth Orbit Satellites

    OpenAIRE

    Ho-Nien Shou

    2014-01-01

    This paper represents orbit propagation and determination of low Earth orbit (LEO) satellites. Satellite global positioning system (GPS) configured receiver provides position and velocity measures by navigating filter to get the coordinates of the orbit propagation (OP). The main contradictions in real-time orbit which is determined by the problem are orbit positioning accuracy and the amount of calculating two indicators. This paper is dedicated to solving the problem of tradeoffs. To plan t...

  3. Orbits for sixteen binaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvetković Z.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper orbits for 13 binaries are recalculated and presented. The reason is that recent observations show higher residuals than the corresponding ephemerides calculated by using the orbital elements given in the Sixth Catalog of Orbits of Visual Binary Stars. The binaries studied were: WDS 00182+7257 = A 803, WDS 00335+4006 = HO 3, WDS 00583+2124 = BU 302, WDS 01011+6022 = A 926, WDS 01014+1155 = BU 867, WDS 01112+4113 = A 655, WDS 01361−2954 + HJ 3447, WDS 02333+5219 = STT 42 AB,WDS 04362+0814 = A 1840 AB,WDS 08017−0836 = A 1580, WDS 08277−0425 = A 550, WDS 17471+1742 = STF 2215 and WDS 18025+4414 = BU 1127 Aa-B. In addition, for three binaries - WDS 01532+1526 = BU 260, WDS 02563+7253 = STF 312 AB and WDS 05003+3924 = STT 92 AB - the orbital elements are calculated for the first time. In this paper the authors present not only the orbital elements, but the masses dynamical parallaxes, absolute magnitudes and ephemerides for the next five years, as well.

  4. Orbital Fluid Resupply Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, Ralph N.

    1989-01-01

    Orbital fluid resupply can significantly increase the cost-effectiveness and operational flexibility of spacecraft, satellites, and orbiting platforms and observatories. Reusable tankers are currently being designed for transporting fluids to space. A number of options exist for transporting the fluids and propellant to the space-based user systems. The fluids can be transported to space either in the Shuttle cargo bay or using expendable launch vehicles (ELVs). Resupply can thus be accomplished either from the Shuttle bay, or the tanker can be removed from the Shuttle bay or launched on an ELV and attached to a carrier such as the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) or Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV) for transport to the user to be serviced. A third option involves locating the tanker at the space station or an unmanned platform as a quasi-permanent servicing facility or depot which returns to the ground for recycling once its tanks are depleted. Current modular tanker designs for monopropellants, bipropellants, and water for space station propulsion are discussed. Superfluid helium tankers are addressed, including trade-offs in tanker sizes, shapes to fit the range of ELVs currently available, and boil-off losses associated with longer-term (greater than 6-month) space-basing. It is concluded that the mixed fleet approach to on-orbit consumables resupply offers significant advantages to the overall logistics requirements.

  5. Extended duration orbiter (EDO) insignia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Extended duration orbiter (EDO) insignia incorporates a space shuttle orbiter with payload bay doors (PLBDs) open and a spacelab module inside. Trailing the orbiter are the initials EDO. The EDO-modified Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, will be flown for the first EDO mission, STS-50.

  6. The earth orbiting space debris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi A.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The space debris population is similar to the asteroid belt, since it is subject to a process of high-velocity mutual collisions that affects the long-term evolution of its size distribution. Presently, more than 10 000 artificial debris particles with diameters larger than 10 cm (and more than 300 000 with diameters larger than 1 cm are orbiting the Earth, and are monitored and studied by a large network of sensors around the Earth. Many objects of different kind compose the space debris population, produced by different source mechanisms ranging from high energy fragmentation of large spacecraft to slow diffusion of liquid metal. The impact against a space debris is a serious risk that every spacecraft must face now and it can be evaluated with ad-hoc algorithms. The long term evolution of the whole debris population is studied with computer models allowing the simulation of all the known source and sink mechanisms. One of these codes is described in this paper and the evolution of the debris environment over the next 100 years, under different traffic scenarios, is shown, pointing out the possible measures to mitigate the growth of the orbital debris population. .

  7. Precise orbit determination and rapid orbit recovery supported by time synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Rui; Zhou, JianHua; Hu, XiaoGong; Liu, Li; Tang, Bo; Li, XiaoJie; Wu, Shan

    2015-06-01

    In order to maintain optimal signal coverage, GNSS satellites have to experience orbital maneuvers. For China's COMPASS system, precise orbit determination (POD) as well as rapid orbit recovery after maneuvers contribute to the overall Positioning, Navigation and Timing (PNT) service performance in terms of accuracy and availability. However, strong statistical correlations between clock offsets and the radial component of a satellite's positions require long data arcs for POD to converge. We propose here a new strategy which relies on time synchronization between ground tracking stations and in-orbit satellites. By fixing satellite clock offsets measured by the satellite station two-way synchronization (SSTS) systems and receiver clock offsets, POD and orbital recovery performance can be improved significantly. Using the Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) as orbital accuracy evaluation, we find the 4-hr recovered orbit achieves about 0.71 m residual root mean square (RMS) error of fit SLR data, the recovery time is improved from 24-hr to 4-hr compared with the conventional POD without time synchronization support. In addition, SLR evaluation shows that for 1-hr prediction, about 1.47 m accuracy is achieved with the new proposed POD strategy.

  8. Magnetic and orbital ordering in the iron-based superconductors. Role of spin-orbit coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Felix; Eremin, Ilya [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik III, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (Germany); Knolle, Johannes [Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Dresden (Germany); Fernandes, Rafael [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2015-07-01

    We analyze the magnetic ordering in the iron-based superconductors in presence of spin-orbit coupling. Based on several tight-binding parametrizations of the 3d electron states we show how the spin-orbit coupling introduces the anisotropy of the magnetization of the striped antiferromagnetic state by lifting the degeneracy of all three components of the magnetization m{sub x}, m{sub y} and m{sub z}. The orientation of the magnetic moment is determined by the contribution of the xy, xz, and yz orbitals to the electronic states near the Fermi level of the electron and hole bands and is determined by the electron filling. We find that within an itinerant approach the magnetic ordering is most favorable along the wavevector of the striped AF state. This appears to be a natural consequence of the spin-orbit coupling in the striped AF state where the ferro-orbital order of the xz and yz orbitals is only a consequence of the striped AF order. We further analyze the role of spin-orbit coupling for the C{sub 4} magnetic structure where SDW order parameters with both wavevectors, Q{sub x} = (π,0) and Q{sub y} = (0,π), coexist.

  9. Magnetism and spin-orbit coupling in Ir-based double perovskites La2-xSrxCoIrO6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolchinskaya, A.; Komissinskiy, P.; Yazdi, M. Baghaie; Vafaee, M.; Mikhailova, D.; Narayanan, N.; Ehrenberg, H.; Wilhelm, F.; Rogalev, A.; Alff, L.

    2012-06-01

    We have studied Ir spin and orbital magnetic moments in the double perovskites La2-xSrxCoIrO6 by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. In La2CoIrO6, Ir4+ couples antiferromagnetically to the weak ferromagnetic moment of the canted Co2+ sublattice and shows an unusually large negative total magnetic moment (-0.38 μB/f.u.) combined with strong spin-orbit interaction. In contrast, in Sr2CoIrO6, Ir5+ has a paramagnetic moment with almost no orbital contribution. A simple kinetic-energy-driven mechanism including spin-orbit coupling explains why Ir is susceptible to the induction of substantial magnetic moments in the double perovskite structure.

  10. The orbital record in stratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Alfred G.

    1992-01-01

    Orbital signals are being discovered in pre-Pleistocene sediments. Due to their hierarchical nature these cycle patterns are complex, and the imprecision of geochronology generally makes the assignment of stratigraphic cycles to specific orbital cycles uncertain, but in sequences such as the limnic Newark Group under study by Olsen and pelagic Cretaceous sequence worked on by our Italo-American group the relative frequencies yield a definitive match to the Milankovitch hierarchy. Due to the multiple ways in which climate impinges on depositional systems, the orbital signals are recorded in a multiplicity of parameters, and affect different sedimentary facies in different ways. In platform carbonates, for example, the chief effect is via sea-level variations (possibly tied to fluctuating ice volume), resulting in cycles of emergence and submergence. In limnic systems it finds its most dramatic expression in alternations of lake and playa conditions. Biogenic pelagic oozes such as chalks and the limestones derived from them display variations in the carbonate supplied by planktonic organisms such as coccolithophores and foraminifera, and also record variations in the aeration of bottom waters. Whereas early studies of stratigraphic cyclicity relied mainly on bedding variations visible in the field, present studies are supplementing these with instrumental scans of geochemical, paleontological, and geophysical parameters which yield quantitative curves amenable to time-series analysis; such analysis is, however, limited by problems of distorted time-scales. My own work has been largely concentrated on pelagic systems. In these, the sensitivity of pelagic organisms to climatic-oceanic changes, combined with the sensitivity of botton life to changes in oxygen availability (commonly much more restricted in the Past than now) has left cyclic patterns related to orbital forcing. These systems are further attractive because (1) they tend to offer depositional continuity

  11. Reconstruction of internal orbital fractures with Vitallium mesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, L A; Fulks, K D

    1991-07-01

    Trauma to the face frequently results in internal orbital fractures that may produce large orbital defects involving multiple walls. Accurate anatomic reconstruction of the bony orbit is essential to maintain normal appearance and function of the eye following such injuries. Autogenous bone grafts do not always produce predictable long-term support of the globe. Displacement and varying amounts of bone-graft resorption can lead to enophthalmos. This study examines the use of Vitallium mesh in the acute reconstruction of internal orbital defects. Fifty-four patients with 66 orbits underwent reconstruction of internal orbital defects with Vitallium mesh. Associated fractures were anatomically reduced and rigidly fixed. Forty-six patients and 57 orbits had adequate follow-up for analysis of results. The average follow-up was 9 months, with 85 percent of the patients followed 6 months or longer. There were no postoperative orbital infections, and none of the Vitallium mesh required removal. Large internal orbital defects can be reconstructed using Vitallium mesh with good results and little risk of infection. Vitallium mesh appears to be well tolerated in spite of free communication with the sinuses. Stable reconstruction of the internal orbit can be achieved and predictable eye position maintained without donor-site morbidity.

  12. [Ethmoidal mucocele after transpalpebral bony orbital decompression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gire, J; Facon, F; Guigou, S; Fauquier, S; Malet, T

    2012-10-01

    We report a case of a late ethmoidal mucocele occurring after transpalpebral bony orbital decompression. A 39-year-old man presented with a recurrence of a right-sided proptosis without signs of orbital inflammation. The patient had undergone bilateral transpalpebral bony orbital decompression for dysthyroid orbitopathy 2 years prior. Orbital CT scan showed a large mucocele in the supero-lateral right ethmoidal sinus with lateral extension to the medial rectus. The patient was therefore referred to an ear, nose and throat (ENT) surgeon, who performed an anterior ethmoidectomy with marsupialization and drainage of the mucocele via an endoscopic approach. A complete postoperative resolution of proptosis was observed without recurrence of the mucocele to date, approximately 6 months postoperative. Sinus complications occurring after orbital decompression may include sinusitis, hematoma, imploding antrum syndrome and mucoceles. Recurrent proptosis secondary to an ethmoidal mucocele is a rare event after bony orbital decompression surgery, with only two cases reported in the international literature. Management requires ophthalmologic diagnosis and collaboration between the ophthalmologist and otorhinolaryngologist. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Vertical orbital dystopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S T; Ashworth, G; Czypionka, S; Poole, M D; Briggs, M

    1996-06-01

    Many pathologic processes may lead to vertical orbital dystopia. We reviewed 47 consecutive cases seen over a 13-year period. Twenty-nine patients underwent eye leveling procedures to improve cosmesis, 2 of these by camouflage procedures and 27 by orbital translocation. Ten patients had 16 secondary operations. There was one death, serious complications occurred in 3 patients, and nuisance complications occurred in 20 others. Seven patients developed diplopia postoperatively, and in 6 patients it was troublesome. In these, it resolved fully in 2 patients, improved to be of no consequence in 2, and in the remaining 2 troublesome symptoms persisted requiring inferior oblique muscle recession in 1. Binocular vision was never restored when not present preoperatively, and in 3 patients temporary loss occurred. There was an overall modest but significant improvement in appearance after surgery. It is concluded that vertical orbital translocation is rewarding and worthwhile.

  14. Deceleration Orbit Improvements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, M.

    1991-04-26

    During the accelerator studies period of 12/90-1/91 much study time was dedicated to improving the E760 deceleration ramps. 4 general goals were in mind: (1) Reduce the relative orbit deviations from the nominal reference orbit as much as possible. This reduces the potential error in the orbit length calculation - which is the primary source of error in the beam energy calculation. (2) Maximize the transverse apertures. This minimizes beam loss during deceleration and during accidental beam blow-ups. (3) Measure and correct lattice parameters. Knowledge of {gamma}{sub T}, {eta}, Q{sub h}, Q{sub v}, and the dispersion in the straight sections allows for a more accurate energy calculation and reliable SYNCH calculations. (4) Minimize the coupling. This allows one to discern between horizontal and vertical tunes.

  15. Distant retrograde orbits for the Moon's exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorenko, Vladislav

    We discuss the properties of the distant retrograde orbits (which are called quasi-satellite orbits also) around Moon. For the first time the distant retrograde orbits were described by J.Jackson in studies on restricted three body problem at the beginning of 20th century [1]. In the synodic (rotating) reference frame distant retrograde orbit looks like an ellipse whose center is slowly drifting in the vicinity of minor primary body while in the inertial reference frame the third body is orbiting the major primary body. Although being away the Hill sphere the third body permanently stays close enough to the minor primary. Due to this reason the distant retrograde orbits are called “quasi-satellite” orbits (QS-orbits) too. Several asteroids in solar system are in a QS-orbit with respect to one of the planet. As an example we can mention the asteroid 2002VE68 which circumnavigates Venus [2]. Attention of specialists in space flight mechanics was attracted to QS-orbits after the publications of NASA technical reports devoted to periodic moon orbits [3,4]. Moving in QS-orbit the SC remains permanently (or at least for long enough time) in the vicinity of small celestial body even in the case when the Hill sphere lies beneath the surface of the body. The properties of the QS-orbit can be studied using the averaging of the motion equations [5,6,7]. From the theoretical point of view it is a specific case of 1:1 mean motion resonance. The integrals of the averaged equations become the parameters defining the secular evolution of the QS-orbit. If the trajectory is robust enough to small perturbations in the simplified problem (i.e., restricted three body problem) it may correspond to long-term stability of the real-world orbit. Our investigations demonstrate that under the proper choice of the initial conditions the QS-orbits don’t escape from Moon or don’t impact Moon for long enough time. These orbits can be recommended as a convenient technique for the large

  16. Orbital MALT Lymphoma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shobha G Pai

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available A case of orbital MALT (mucous associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma is reported for its rarity. It presented as a large tumor obscuring the whole eye with loss of vision, without any signs of dissemination and remained free of recurrence or metastasis 12 months after undergoing simple surgical excision.

  17. Optical orbital angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Stephen M.; Babiker, Mohamed; Padgett, Miles J.

    2017-01-01

    We present a brief introduction to the orbital angular momentum of light, the subject of our theme issue and, in particular, to the developments in the 13 years following the founding paper by Allen et al. (Allen et al. 1992 Phys. Rev. A 45, 8185 (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.45.8185)). The papers by our invited authors serve to bring the field up to date and suggest where developments may take us next. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Optical orbital angular momentum’. PMID:28069775

  18. Optical orbital angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Stephen M.; Babiker, Mohamed; Padgett, Miles J.

    2017-02-01

    We present a brief introduction to the orbital angular momentum of light, the subject of our theme issue and, in particular, to the developments in the 13 years following the founding paper by Allen et al. (Allen et al. 1992 Phys. Rev. A 45, 8185 (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.45.8185)). The papers by our invited authors serve to bring the field up to date and suggest where developments may take us next. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  19. Orbital Instability and Relaxation in Stellar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valluri, Monica; Merritt, David

    We review recent progress in understanding the role of chaos in influencing the structure and evolution of galaxies. The orbits of stars in galaxies are generically chaotic: the chaotic behavior arises in part from the intrinsically grainy nature of a potential that is composed of point masses. Even if the potential is assumed to be smooth, however, much of the phase space of non-axisymmetric galaxies is chaotic due to the presence of central density cusps or black holes. The chaotic nature of orbits implies that perturbations will grow exponentially and this in turn is expected to result in a diffusion in phase space. We show that the degree of orbital evolution is not well predicted by the growth rate of infinitesimal perturbations, i.e. by the Liapunov exponent. A more useful criterion is whether perturbations continue to grow exponentially until their scale is of order the size of the system. We illustrate these ideas in a potential consisting of N fixed point masses. Liapunov exponents are large for all values of N, but orbits become increasingly regular in their behavior as N increases; the reason is that the exponential divergence saturates at smaller and smaller distances as N is increased. The objects which lend phase space its structure and impede diffusion are the invariant tori; in the triaxial potentials we consider, a large fraction of the tori correspond to resonant (thin) orbits and their associated families of regular orbits. Perturbations to the potential destroy the resonant tori. When only a few stable resonances remain, we find that the phase space distribution of an ensemble of chaotic orbits evolves rapidly toward a nearly stationary state. This mixing process is shown to occur on timescales of a few crossing times in triaxial potentials containing massive central singularities, consistent with the rapid evolution observed in N-body simulations of galaxies with central black holes.

  20. Local orbitals by minimizing powers of the orbital variance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansik, Branislav; Høst, Stinne; Kristensen, Kasper;

    2011-01-01

    It is demonstrated that a set of local orthonormal Hartree–Fock (HF) molecular orbitals can be obtained for both the occupied and virtual orbital spaces by minimizing powers of the orbital variance using the trust-region algorithm. For a power exponent equal to one, the Boys localization function...... is obtained. For increasing power exponents, the penalty for delocalized orbitals is increased and smaller maximum orbital spreads are encountered. Calculations on superbenzene, C60, and a fragment of the titin protein show that for a power exponent equal to one, delocalized outlier orbitals may...

  1. A GIANT CONGENITAL ORBITAL TUMOR - AN UNUSUAL PRESENTATION OF RETINOBLASTOMA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ZWAAN, CM; DEWAAL, FC; KOOLE, FD; MENKO, FH; VANDERVALK, P; SLATER, RM; SCHEFFER, H; VANWAVEREN, G; MOLL, AC; SCHOUTENVANMEETEREN, AYN; TAN, KEWP

    1994-01-01

    We report a case of an unusual giant congential tumor presenting in a newborn infant as a large exophytic mass emerging from the left orbit. After enucleation orbital recurrence developed within 14 days. No anti-tumor treatment was given and the child died at the age of 4 weeks. The histopathologica

  2. Experimental effects of orbit on polarization loss in RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranjbar V.; Bai, M.; Huang, H.; Marusic, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Minty, M.

    2012-05-20

    We are performing several experiments during the RHIC ramp to better understand the impact of orbit errors on the polarization at our current working point. These will be conducted by exciting specified orbit harmonics during the final two large intrinsic resonance crossing in RHIC during the 250 GeV polarized proton ramp. The resultant polarization response will then be measured.

  3. Variational construction of unbounded orbits in Lagrangian systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    We show the existence of unbounded orbits in perturbations of generic geodesic flow in T2 by a generic periodic potential. Different from previous work such as in Mather (1997), the initial values of the orbits obtained here are not required sufficiently large.

  4. Solar Orbiter Status Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Holly; St. Cyr, Orville Chris; Mueller, Daniel; Zouganelis, Yannis; Velli, Marco

    2017-08-01

    With the delivery of the instruments to the spacecraft builder, the Solar Orbiter mission is in the midst of Integration & Testing phase at Airbus in Stevenage, U.K. This mission to “Explore the Sun-Heliosphere Connection” is the first medium-class mission of ESA’s Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 program and is being jointly implemented with NASA. The dedicated payload of 10 remote-sensing and in-situ instruments will orbit the Sun as close as 0.3 A.U. and will provide measurments from the photosphere into the solar wind. The three-axis stabilized spacecraft will use Venus gravity assists to increase the orbital inclination out of the ecliptic to solar latitudes as high as 34 degrees in the extended mission. The science team of Solar Orbiter has been working closely with the Solar Probe Plus scientists to coordinate observations between these two highly-complementary missions. This will be a status report on the mission development; the interested reader is referred to the recent summary by Müller et al., Solar Physics 285 (2013).

  5. Sedna Orbit Animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This animation shows the location of the newly discovered planet-like object, dubbed 'Sedna,' in relation to the rest of the solar system. Starting at the inner solar system, which includes the orbits of Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars (all in yellow), the view pulls away through the asteroid belt and the orbits of the outer planets beyond (green). Pluto and the distant Kuiper Belt objects are seen next until finally Sedna comes into view. As the field widens the full orbit of Sedna can be seen along with its current location. Sedna is nearing its closest approach to the Sun; its 10,000 year orbit typically takes it to far greater distances. Moving past Sedna, what was previously thought to be the inner edge of the Oort cloud appears. The Oort cloud is a spherical distribution of cold, icy bodies lying at the limits of the Sun's gravitational pull. Sedna's presence suggests that this Oort cloud is much closer than scientists believed.

  6. Myxoma of the orbit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rambhatla Saptagirish

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Myxomas are rare, benign neoplasms of mesenchymal origin that usually develop in soft tissues. As the clinical manifestations are non-specific, it is difficult to diagnose the tumour without biopsy and histopathological examination. We report a case of orbital myxoma with histopathological correlation.

  7. Sedna Orbit Animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This animation shows the location of the newly discovered planet-like object, dubbed 'Sedna,' in relation to the rest of the solar system. Starting at the inner solar system, which includes the orbits of Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars (all in yellow), the view pulls away through the asteroid belt and the orbits of the outer planets beyond (green). Pluto and the distant Kuiper Belt objects are seen next until finally Sedna comes into view. As the field widens the full orbit of Sedna can be seen along with its current location. Sedna is nearing its closest approach to the Sun; its 10,000 year orbit typically takes it to far greater distances. Moving past Sedna, what was previously thought to be the inner edge of the Oort cloud appears. The Oort cloud is a spherical distribution of cold, icy bodies lying at the limits of the Sun's gravitational pull. Sedna's presence suggests that this Oort cloud is much closer than scientists believed.

  8. Spin-Orbit Torques in Co/Pd Multilayer Nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Jamali, Mahdi

    2013-12-09

    Current induced spin-orbit torques have been studied in ferromagnetic nanowires made of 20 nm thick Co/Pd multilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Using Hall voltage and lock-in measurements, it is found that upon injection of an electric current both in-plane (Slonczewski-like) and perpendicular (fieldlike) torques build up in the nanowire. The torque efficiencies are found to be as large as 1.17 and 5 kOe at 108  A/cm2 for the in-plane and perpendicular components, respectively, which is surprisingly comparable to previous studies in ultrathin (∼1  nm) magnetic bilayers. We show that this result cannot be explained solely by spin Hall effect induced torque at the outer interfaces, indicating a probable contribution of the bulk of the Co/Pd multilayer.

  9. A universal on-orbit servicing system used in the geostationary orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenfu; Liang, Bin; Li, Bing; Xu, Yangsheng

    2011-07-01

    The geostationary orbit (GEO), a unique satellite orbit of the human beings, is a very precious orbit resource. However, the continuous increasing of GEO debris makes the GEO orbit more and more crowded. Moreover, the failures of GEO spacecrafts will result in large economic cost and other bad impacts. In this paper, we proposed a space robotic servicing system, and developed key pose (position and orientation) measurement and control algorithm. Firstly, the necessity of orbit service in GEO was analyzed. Then, a servicing concept for GEO non-cooperative targets was presented and a universal space robotic servicing system was designed. The system has a 2-DOF docking mechanism, a 7-DOF redundant manipulator and a set of stereo vision, in addition to the traditional subsystems of a spacecraft. This system can serve most existing satellites in GEO, not requiring specially designed objects for grappling and measuring on the target. The servicing contents include: (a) visual inspecting; (b) target tracking, approaching and docking; (c) ORUs (Orbital Replacement Units) replacement; (d) Malfunctioned mechanism deploying; (e) satellites life extension by taking over its control, or re-orbiting the abandoned satellites. As an example, the servicing mission of a malfunctioned GEO satellite with three severe mechanical failures was designed and simulated. The results showed the validity and flexibility of the proposed system.

  10. The Differential Contribution of the Innate Immune System to a Good Pathological Response in the Breast and Axillary Lymph Nodes Induced by Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Women with Large and Locally Advanced Breast Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viriya Kaewkangsadan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The tumour microenvironment consists of malignant cells, stroma, and immune cells. The role of adaptive immunity in inducing a pathological complete response (pCR in breast cancer with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC is well studied. The contribution of innate immunity, however, is poorly documented. Breast tumours and axillary lymph nodes (ALNs from 33 women with large and locally advanced breast cancers (LLABCs undergoing NAC were immunohistochemically assessed for tumour-infiltrating macrophages (TIMs: M1 and M2, neutrophils (TINs, and dendritic cells (TIDCs using labelled antibodies and semiquantitative methods. Patients’ blood neutrophils (n=108, DCs (mDC1 and pDC, and their costimulatory molecules (n=30 were also studied. Pathological results were classified as pCR, good (GPR or poor (PRR. In breast and metastatic ALNs, high levels of CD163+ TIMs were significantly associated with a pCR. In blood, high levels of neutrophils were significantly associated with pCR in metastatic ALNs, whilst the % of mDC1 and pDC and expression of HLA-DR, mDC1 CD40, and CD83 were significantly reduced. NAC significantly reduced tumour DCs but increased blood DCs. PPRs to NAC had significantly reduced HLA-DR, CD40, and CD86 expression. Our study demonstrated novel findings documenting the differential but important contributions of innate immunity to pCRs in patients with LLABCs undergoing NAC.

  11. Spin-orbit relativistic long-range corrected time-dependent density functional theory for investigating spin-forbidden transitions in photochemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Ayako; Tsuneda, Takao; Hirao, Kimihiko

    2011-12-14

    A long-range corrected (LC) time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) incorporating relativistic effects with spin-orbit couplings is presented. The relativistic effects are based on the two-component zeroth-order regular approximation Hamiltonian. Before calculating the electronic excitations, we calculated the ionization potentials (IPs) of alkaline metal, alkaline-earth metal, group 12 transition metal, and rare gas atoms as the minus orbital (spinor) energies on the basis of Koopmans' theorem. We found that both long-range exchange and spin-orbit coupling effects are required to obtain Koopmans' IPs, i.e., the orbital (spinor) energies, quantitatively in DFT calculations even for first-row transition metals and systems containing large short-range exchange effects. We then calculated the valence excitations of group 12 transition metal atoms and the Rydberg excitations of rare gas atoms using spin-orbit relativistic LC-TDDFT. We found that the long-range exchange and spin-orbit coupling effects significantly contribute to the electronic spectra of even light atoms if the atoms have low-lying excitations between orbital spinors of quite different electron distributions.

  12. Unusual Sclerosing Orbital Pseudotumor Infiltrating Orbits and Maxillofacial Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Toprak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic orbital pseudotumor (IOP is a benign inflammatory condition of the orbit without identifiable local or systemic causes. Bilateral massive orbital involvement and extraorbital extension of the IOP is very rare. We present an unusual case of IOP with bilateral massive orbital infiltration extending into maxillofacial regions and discuss its distinctive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI features that help to exclude other entities during differential diagnoses.

  13. Orbit correction algorithm for SSRF fast orbit feedback system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ming; YIN Chongxian; LIU Dekang

    2009-01-01

    A fast orbit feedback system is designed at SSRF to suppress beam orbit disturbance within sub-micron in the bandwidth up to 100 Hz.The SVD (Singular value decomposition) algorithm is applied to calculate the inverse response matrix in global orbit correction.The number of singular eigenvalues will influence orbit noise suppression and corrector strengths.The method to choose singular eigenvalue rejection threshold is studied in this paper,and the simulation and experiment results are also presented.

  14. Comparison of Low Earth Orbit and Geosynchronous Earth Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    The technological, environmental, social, and political ramifications of low Earth orbits as compared to geosynchronous Earth orbits for the solar power satellite (SPS) are assessed. The capital cost of the transmitting facilities is dependent on the areas of the antenna and rectenna relative to the requirement of high efficiency power transmission. The salient features of a low orbit Earth orbits are discussed in terms of cost reduction efforts.

  15. Excitation of the Orbital Inclination of Iapetus during Planetary Encounters

    CERN Document Server

    Nesvorny, David; Deienno, Rogerio; Walsh, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    Saturn's moon Iapetus has an orbit in a transition region where the Laplace surface is bending from the equator to the orbital plane of Saturn. The orbital inclination of Iapetus to the local Laplace plane is ~8 deg, which is unexpected, because the inclination should be ~0 if Iapetus formed from a circumplanetary disk on the Laplace surface. It thus appears that some process has pumped up Iapetus's inclination while leaving its eccentricity near zero (e=0.03 at present). Here we examined the possibility that Iapetus's inclination was excited during the early solar system instability when encounters between Saturn and ice giants occurred. We found that the dynamical effects of planetary encounters on Iapetus's orbit sensitively depend on the distance of the few closest encounters. In four out of ten instability cases studied here, the orbital perturbations were too large to be plausible. In one case, Iapetus's orbit was practically unneffected. In the remaining five cases, the perturbations of Iapetus's incli...

  16. Biomechanical modeling of eye trauma for different orbit anthropometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Ashley A; Loftis, Kathryn L; Duma, Stefan M; Stitzel, Joel D

    2011-04-29

    In military, automotive, and sporting safety, there is concern over eye protection and the effects of facial anthropometry differences on risk of eye injury. The objective of this study is to investigate differences in orbital geometry and analyze their effect on eye impact injury. Clinical measurements of the orbital aperture, brow protrusion angle, eye protrusion, and the eye location within the orbit were used to develop a matrix of simulations. A finite element (FE) model of the orbit was developed from a computed tomography (CT) scan of an average male and transformed to model 27 different anthropometries. Impacts were modeled using an eye model incorporating lagrangian-eulerian fluid flow for the eye, representing a full eye for evaluation of omnidirectional impact and interaction with the orbit. Computational simulations of a Little League (CD25) baseball impact at 30.1m/s were conducted to assess the effect of orbit anthropometry on eye injury metrics. Parameters measured include stress and strain in the corneoscleral shell, internal dynamic eye pressure, and contact forces between the orbit, eye, and baseball. The location of peak stresses and strains was also assessed. Main effects and interaction effects identified in the statistical analysis illustrate the complex relationship between the anthropometric variation and eye response. The results of the study showed that the eye is more protected from impact with smaller orbital apertures, more brow protrusion, and less eye protrusion, provided that the orbital aperture is large enough to deter contact of the eye with the orbit.

  17. Secular orbital evolution of Jupiter family comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickman, H.; Gabryszewski, R.; Wajer, P.; Wiśniowski, T.; Wójcikowski, K.; Szutowicz, S.; Valsecchi, G. B.; Morbidelli, A.

    2017-02-01

    Context. The issue of the long term dynamics of Jupiter family comets (JFCs) involves uncertain assumptions about the physical evolution and lifetimes of these comets. Contrary to what is often assumed, real effects of secular dynamics cannot be excluded and therefore merit investigation. Aims: We use a random sample of late heavy bombardment cometary projectiles to study the long-term dynamics of JFCs by a Monte Carlo approach. In a steady-state picture of the Jupiter family, we investigate the orbital distribution of JFCs, including rarely visited domains like retrograde orbits or orbits within the outer parts of the asteroid main belt. Methods: We integrate 100 000 objects over a maximum of 100 000 orbital revolutions including the Sun, a comet, and four giant planets. Considering the steady-state number of JFCs to be proportional to the total time spent in the respective orbital domain, we derive the capture rate based on observed JFCs with small perihelia and large nuclei. We consider a purely dynamical model and one where the nuclei are eroded by ice sublimation. Results: The JFC inclination distribution is incompatible with our erosional model. This may imply that a new type of comet evolution model is necessary. Considering that comets may live for a long time, we show that JFCs can evolve into retrograde orbits as well as asteroidal orbits in the outer main belt or Cybele regions. The steady-state capture rate into the Jupiter family is consistent with 1 × 109 scattered disk objects with diameters D > 2 km. Conclusions: Our excited scattered disk makes it difficult to explain the JFC inclination distribution, unless the physical evolution of JFCs is more intricate than assumed in standard, erosional models. Independent of this, the population size of the Jupiter family is consistent with a relatively low-mass scattered disk.

  18. Two-Dimensional Metallicity with a Large Spin-Orbit Splitting: DFT Calculations of the Atomic, Electronic, and Spin Structures of the Au/Ge(111-(3×3R30° Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Fleszar

    2015-01-01

    of the many-body effects (self-interaction corrections beyond the LDA or GGA approximations. The most interesting property of this surface system is the large spin splitting of its metallic surface bands and the undulating spin texture along the hexagonal Fermi contours, which highly resembles the spin texture at the Dirac state of the topological insulator Bi2Te3. These properties make this system particularly interesting from both fundamental and technological points of view.

  19. Highly stable evolution of Earth's future orbit despite chaotic behavior of the Solar System

    CERN Document Server

    Zeebe, Richard E

    2015-01-01

    Due to the chaotic nature of the Solar System, the question of its dynamic long-term stability can only be answered in a statistical sense, e.g. based on numerical ensemble integrations of nearby orbits. Destabilization, including catastrophic encounters and/or collisions involving the Earth, has been suggested to be initiated through a large increase in Mercury's eccentricity (eM), with an estimated probability of ~1%. However, it has recently been shown that the statistics of numerical Solar System integrations are sensitive to the accuracy and type of numerical algorithm. Here I report results from computationally demanding ensemble integrations (N=1,600 with slightly different initial conditions) at unprecedented accuracy based on the full equations of motion of the eight planets and Pluto over 5Gyr, including contributions from general relativity. The standard symplectic algorithm produced spurious results for highly eccentric orbits and during close encounters, which were hence integrated with a suitabl...

  20. Periodic orbits and TDHF phase space structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Yukio; Iwasawa, Kazuo [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Physics; Tsukuma, Hidehiko; Sakata, Fumihiko

    1998-03-01

    The collective motion of atomic nuclei is closely coupled with the motion of nucleons, therefore, it is nonlinear, and the contents of the motion change largely with the increase of its amplitude. As the framework which describes the collective motion accompanied by the change of internal structure, time-dependent Hurtley Fock (TDHF) method is suitable. At present, the authors try to make the method for studying the large region structure in quantum system by utilizing the features of the TDHF phase space. The studies made so far are briefed. In this report, the correspondence of the large region patterns appearing in the band structure chart of three-level model with the periodic orbit group in the TDHF phase space is described. The Husimi function is made, and it possesses the information on the form of respective corresponding intrinsic state. The method of making the band structure chart is explained. There are three kinds of the tendency in the intrinsic state group. The E-T charts are made for the band structure charts to quantitatively express the large region tendency. The E-T chart and the T{sub r}-T chart are drawn for a selected characteristic orbit group. It became to be known that the large region properties of the quantum intrinsic state group of three-level model can be forecast by examining the properties of the periodic orbit group in the TDHF phase space. (K.I.)

  1. Periodic orbits and TDHF phase space structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Yukio; Iwasawa, Kazuo [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Physics; Tsukuma, Hidehiko; Sakata, Fumihiko

    1998-03-01

    The collective motion of atomic nuclei is closely coupled with the motion of nucleons, therefore, it is nonlinear, and the contents of the motion change largely with the increase of its amplitude. As the framework which describes the collective motion accompanied by the change of internal structure, time-dependent Hurtley Fock (TDHF) method is suitable. At present, the authors try to make the method for studying the large region structure in quantum system by utilizing the features of the TDHF phase space. The studies made so far are briefed. In this report, the correspondence of the large region patterns appearing in the band structure chart of three-level model with the periodic orbit group in the TDHF phase space is described. The Husimi function is made, and it possesses the information on the form of respective corresponding intrinsic state. The method of making the band structure chart is explained. There are three kinds of the tendency in the intrinsic state group. The E-T charts are made for the band structure charts to quantitatively express the large region tendency. The E-T chart and the T{sub r}-T chart are drawn for a selected characteristic orbit group. It became to be known that the large region properties of the quantum intrinsic state group of three-level model can be forecast by examining the properties of the periodic orbit group in the TDHF phase space. (K.I.)

  2. Diplopia secondary to orbital surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbert, David I; Matta, Noelle S; Singman, Eric L

    2012-01-01

    Diplopia may occur following any type of ocular or pericocular surgery. The surgeries most frequently associated with postoperative diplopia include: repair of orbital fracture, endoscopic sinus surgery (from inadvertent orbital penetration), and orbital decompression for thyroid-related immune orbitopathy (TRIO). Postoperative diplopia after orbital tumor resection has been reported--e.g., after excision of fibrous dysplasia and osteoma. However, a recent case series suggests diplopia after orbital tumor resection is uncommon and transient. Surgical intervention for orbital trauma carries the highest risk of postoperative diplopia and will be the focus of this review. We will also present a case report of worsening diplopia following repair of orbital floor fracture to highlight potential motility issues that can arise when implants are employed to treat orbital floor fractures.

  3. Topics in orbit equivalence

    CERN Document Server

    Kechris, Alexander S

    2004-01-01

    This volume provides a self-contained introduction to some topics in orbit equivalence theory, a branch of ergodic theory. The first two chapters focus on hyperfiniteness and amenability. Included here are proofs of Dye's theorem that probability measure-preserving, ergodic actions of the integers are orbit equivalent and of the theorem of Connes-Feldman-Weiss identifying amenability and hyperfiniteness for non-singular equivalence relations. The presentation here is often influenced by descriptive set theory, and Borel and generic analogs of various results are discussed. The final chapter is a detailed account of Gaboriau's recent results on the theory of costs for equivalence relations and groups and its applications to proving rigidity theorems for actions of free groups.

  4. Reconstructing the orbit of the Chelyabinsk meteor using satellite observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Proud, Simon Richard

    2013-01-01

    The large number of objects in a range of orbits around the Sun means that some will inevitably intersect the Earth, becoming a meteor. These objects are commonly comet fragments or asteroids. To determine the type of a particular meteor requires knowledge of its trajectory and orbital path...... that is typically estimated by using ground-based observations such as images or radar measurements. A lack of data can, however, make this difficult and create large uncertainties in the reconstructed orbit. Here I show a new method for estimating a meteor's trajectory, and hence allowing computation of the orbit......, based upon measurements from satellite sensors. The meteor that fell on 15 February 2013 is used as an example and the resulting orbit is in broad agreement with estimates from other observations. This new technique represents an alternative method for trajectory determination that may be particularly...

  5. Small Mercury Relativity Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Peter L.; Vincent, Mark A.

    1989-01-01

    The accuracy of solar system tests of gravitational theory could be very much improved by range and Doppler measurements to a Small Mercury Relativity Orbiter. A nearly circular orbit at roughly 2400 km altitude is assumed in order to minimize problems with orbit determination and thermal radiation from the surface. The spacecraft is spin-stabilized and has a 30 cm diameter de-spun antenna. With K-band and X-band ranging systems using a 50 MHz offset sidetone at K-band, a range accuracy of 3 cm appears to be realistically achievable. The estimated spacecraft mass is 50 kg. A consider-covariance analysis was performed to determine how well the Earth-Mercury distance as a function of time could be determined with such a Relativity Orbiter. The minimum data set is assumed to be 40 independent 8-hour arcs of tracking data at selected times during a two year period. The gravity field of Mercury up through degree and order 10 is solved for, along with the initial conditions for each arc and the Earth-Mercury distance at the center of each arc. The considered parameters include the gravity field parameters of degree 11 and 12 plus the tracking station coordinates, the tropospheric delay, and two parameters in a crude radiation pressure model. The conclusion is that the Earth-Mercury distance can be determined to 6 cm accuracy or better. From a modified worst-case analysis, this would lead to roughly 2 orders of magnitude improvement in the knowledge of the precession of perihelion, the relativistic time delay, and the possible change in the gravitational constant with time.

  6. Chaos Behaviour of Molecular Orbit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shu-Tang; SUN Fu-Yan; SHEN Shu-Lan

    2007-01-01

    Based on H(u)ckel's molecular orbit theory,the chaos and;bifurcation behaviour of a molecular orbit modelled by a nonlinear dynamic system is studied.The relationship between molecular orbit and its energy level in the nonlinear dynamic system is obtained.

  7. Orbiter OMS and RCS technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreaux, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    Orbiter Orbital Maneuver Subsystem (OMS) and Reaction Control Subsystem (RCS) tankage has proved to be highly successful in shuttle flights on-orbit propellant transfer tests were done. Tank qualification tests along with flight demonstrations were carried out future uses of storable propellants are cited.

  8. Quantum Mechanical Earth: Where Orbitals Become Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeports, David

    2012-01-01

    Macroscopic objects, although quantum mechanical by nature, conform to Newtonian mechanics under normal observation. According to the quantum mechanical correspondence principle, quantum behavior is indistinguishable from classical behavior in the limit of very large quantum numbers. The purpose of this paper is to provide an example of the…

  9. Quantum Mechanical Earth: Where Orbitals Become Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeports, David

    2012-01-01

    Macroscopic objects, although quantum mechanical by nature, conform to Newtonian mechanics under normal observation. According to the quantum mechanical correspondence principle, quantum behavior is indistinguishable from classical behavior in the limit of very large quantum numbers. The purpose of this paper is to provide an example of the…

  10. Algorithms for Autonomous GPS Orbit Determination and Formation Flying: Investigation of Initialization Approaches and Orbit Determination for HEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrad, Penina; Speed, Eden; Leitner, Jesse A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes the efforts to date in processing GPS measurements in High Earth Orbit (HEO) applications by the Colorado Center for Astrodynamics Research (CCAR). Two specific projects were conducted; initialization of the orbit propagation software, GEODE, using nominal orbital elements for the IMEX orbit, and processing of actual and simulated GPS data from the AMSAT satellite using a Doppler-only batch filter. CCAR has investigated a number of approaches for initialization of the GEODE orbit estimator with little a priori information. This document describes a batch solution approach that uses pseudorange or Doppler measurements collected over an orbital arc to compute an epoch state estimate. The algorithm is based on limited orbital element knowledge from which a coarse estimate of satellite position and velocity can be determined and used to initialize GEODE. This algorithm assumes knowledge of nominal orbital elements, (a, e, i, omega, omega) and uses a search on time of perigee passage (tau(sub p)) to estimate the host satellite position within the orbit and the approximate receiver clock bias. Results of the method are shown for a simulation including large orbital uncertainties and measurement errors. In addition, CCAR has attempted to process GPS data from the AMSAT satellite to obtain an initial estimation of the orbit. Limited GPS data have been received to date, with few satellites tracked and no computed point solutions. Unknown variables in the received data have made computations of a precise orbit using the recovered pseudorange difficult. This document describes the Doppler-only batch approach used to compute the AMSAT orbit. Both actual flight data from AMSAT, and simulated data generated using the Satellite Tool Kit and Goddard Space Flight Center's Flight Simulator, were processed. Results for each case and conclusion are presented.

  11. Neptune's Orbital Migration Was Grainy, Not Smooth

    CERN Document Server

    Nesvorny, David

    2016-01-01

    The Kuiper belt is a population of icy bodies beyond the orbit of Neptune. The complex orbital structure of the Kuiper belt, including several categories of objects inside and outside of resonances with Neptune, emerged as a result of Neptune's migration into an outer planetesimal disk. An outstanding problem with the existing migration models is that they invariably predict excessively large resonant populations, while observations show that the non-resonant orbits are in fact common (e.g., the main belt population is 2-4 times larger than Plutinos in the 3:2 resonance). Here we show that this problem can resolved if it is assumed that Neptune's migration was grainy, as expected from scattering encounters of Neptune with massive planetesimals. The grainy migration acts to destabilize resonant bodies with large libration amplitudes, a fraction of which ends up on stable non-resonant orbits. Thus, the non-resonant--to--resonant ratio obtained with the grainy migration is higher, up to ~10 times higher for the ...

  12. Role of core-scattered closed orbits in nonhydrogenic atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, P. A.; Monteiro, T. S.; Delande, D.; Taylor, K. T.

    1996-07-01

    While both diamagnetic and Stark spectra of hydrogen can be analyzed accurately in terms of classical orbits, in nonhydrogenic atoms the multielectron core induces additional spectral modulations that cannot be analyzed reliably in terms of standard periodic orbit-type theories. However, by extending closed-orbit theory to include core-scattered waves consistently, both diamagnetic and Stark photoabsorption spectra of nonhydrogenic Rydberg atoms at constant scaled energy can be analyzed semiclassically using only the closed orbits of the corresponding hydrogenic systems. Frequencies and amplitudes of the core-scattered modulations, as well as corrected amplitudes for contributions from repetitions of primitive hydrogenic orbits, are found to be in excellent agreement with quantum results. We consider whether these nonhydrogenic systems correspond to quantum chaos.

  13. Improved orbit predictions using two-line elements

    CERN Document Server

    Levit, Creon

    2010-01-01

    The density of orbital space debris constitutes an increasing environmental challenge. There are three ways to alleviate the problem: debris mitigation, debris removal and collision avoidance. This paper addresses collision avoidance, by describing a method that contributes to achieving a requisite increase in orbit prediction accuracy. Batch least-squares differential correction is applied to the publicly available two-line element (TLE) catalog of space objects. Using a high-precision numerical propagator, we fit an orbit to state vectors derived from successive TLEs. We then propagate the fitted orbit further forward in time. These predictions are compared to precision ephemeris data derived from the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS) for several satellites, including objects in the congested sun-synchronous orbital region. The method leads to a predicted range error that increases at a typical rate of 100 meters per day, approximately a 10-fold improvement over TLE's propagated with their associat...

  14. Trust region minimization of orbital localization functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyvik, Ida-Marie; Jansik, Branislav; Jørgensen, Poul

    2012-01-01

    The trust region method has been applied to the minimization of localization functions, and it is shown that both local occupied and local virtual Hartree–Fock (HF) orbitals can be obtained. Because step sizes are size extensive in the trust region method, large steps may be required when the met...... radius and the length of the step is determined from a line search along the obtained direction. Numerical results for large molecular systems have shown that large steps can then safely be taken, and a robust and nearly monotonic convergence is obtained....

  15. LROC - Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, M. S.; Eliason, E.; Hiesinger, H.; Jolliff, B. L.; McEwen, A.; Malin, M. C.; Ravine, M. A.; Thomas, P. C.; Turtle, E. P.

    2009-12-01

    terraces and rims, and both large and small radial and circumferential ejecta patterns, reflecting their ballistic emplacement and interaction with pre-existing topography and that created by earlier ejecta, extending out more than a crater diameter. Early efforts at reducing NAC stereo observations to topographic models show spatial resolutions of 2.5 m to 5 m will be possible from the 50 km orbit. Systematic seven-color WAC observations will commence at the beginning of the primary mapping phase. A key goal of the LROC experiment is to characterize future exploration targets in cooperation with the NASA Constellation program. By the end of the commissioning phase all fifty high priority targets will have partial reconnaissance mode coverage (0.5 m to 2 m per pixel).

  16. Orbit Propagation and Determination of Low Earth Orbit Satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Nien Shou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents orbit propagation and determination of low Earth orbit (LEO satellites. Satellite global positioning system (GPS configured receiver provides position and velocity measures by navigating filter to get the coordinates of the orbit propagation (OP. The main contradictions in real-time orbit which is determined by the problem are orbit positioning accuracy and the amount of calculating two indicators. This paper is dedicated to solving the problem of tradeoffs. To plan to use a nonlinear filtering method for immediate orbit tasks requires more precise satellite orbit state parameters in a short time. Although the traditional extended Kalman filter (EKF method is widely used, its linear approximation of the drawbacks in dealing with nonlinear problems was especially evident, without compromising Kalman filter (unscented Kalman Filter, UKF. As a new nonlinear estimation method, it is measured at the estimated measurements on more and more applications. This paper will be the first study on UKF microsatellites in LEO orbit in real time, trying to explore the real-time precision orbit determination techniques. Through the preliminary simulation results, they show that, based on orbit mission requirements and conditions using UKF, they can satisfy the positioning accuracy and compute two indicators.

  17. Numerical Method for Following the Closed Orbits in High-dimensional Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武际可; 周鵾

    1994-01-01

    The spline interpolation is used to approximate the closed orbits, and the problem of following the dosed orbit in large-scale is turned to tracking the solution curve of a nonlinear equation system in higher-dimensional space. The deformation of the closed orbit of Lorenz equation is calculated.

  18. Galactic Habitable Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, A.; Mao, S.; Kawata, D.

    2014-03-01

    The fossil record shows that the Earth has experienced several mass extinctions over the past 500 million years1, and it has been suggested that there is a periodicity in extinction events on timescales of tens1 and/or hundreds of millions of years. Various hypotheses have been proposed to explain the cause of the mass extinctions, including the suggestion that the Earth's ozone layer may have been destroyed by intense radiation from a nearby supernovae2- 3, exposing the Earth's surface to damaging UV radiation. Recent observations of cores taken from the ocean floor revealed atoms of a very rare isotope of iron (60Fe) believed to have arrived on Earth around 2 million years ago as fallout from a nearby supernovae4. Astronomical evidence for that past supernovae was recently found in the debris of a young cluster of massive stars5, by tracing its past orbit, putting it at the right place at the right time to explain the mild extinction event. Here we report new high-resolution (both in space and time) N-body chemodynamical simulations (carried out with our novel code GCD+6) of the evolution of a model Milky Way Galaxy, tracing the orbit of èsun-like' stars over a 500 million year period, checking the proximity to supernovae throughout the history of the orbit and comparing the times when this occurs with past mass extinctions on Earth. We additionally explain the important effects of the spiral arm pattern, radial migration of stars and Galactic chemistry on habitability.

  19. Review of orbital imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goh, P.S. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, National University Hospital, 5 Lower Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119074 (Singapore)], E-mail: dnrgohps@nus.edu.sg; Gi, M.T. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, National University Hospital, 5 Lower Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119074 (Singapore); Charlton, A. [Department of Pathology, National University Hospital, 5 Lower Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119074 (Singapore); Tan, C.; Gangadhara Sundar, J.K.; Amrith, S. [Department of Ophthalmology, National University Hospital, 5 Lower Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119074 (Singapore)

    2008-06-15

    CT and MRI are commonly used in the evaluation of patients with suspected orbital disease. Many different diseases may present within this small anatomical space. The purpose of this article is to present a diagnostic strategy based on a compartment model. Localizing pathology to sinus, bone, extraconal space, muscle cone, intraconal space, optic nerve, globe or lacrimal fossa allows significant reduction in the number of differential diagnoses as these compartments contain different tissues which disease may involve or arise from. Certain diseases may also present in multiple compartments. Common diseases which might present in one or multiple compartments will be discussed.

  20. Lunar Exploration Orbiter (LEO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaumann, R.; Spohn, T.; Hiesinger, H.; Jessberger, E. K.; Neukum, G.; Oberst, J.; Helbert, J.; Christensen, U.; Keller, H. U.; Mall, U.; Böhnhardt, H.; Hartogh, P.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Auster, H.-U.; Moreira, A.; Werner, M.; Pätzold, M.; Palme, H.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R.; Mandea, M.; Lesur, V.; Häusler, B.; Hördt, A.; Eichentopf, K.; Hauber, E.; Hoffmann, H.; Köhler, U.; Kührt, E.; Michaelis, H.; Pauer, M.; Sohl, F.; Denk, T.; van Gasselt, S.

    2007-08-01

    The Moon is an integral part of the Earth-Moon system, it is a witness to more than 4.5 b. y. of solar system history, and it is the only planetary body except Earth for which we have samples from known locations. The Moon is our closest companion and can easily be reached from Earth at any time, even with a relatively modest financial budget. Consequently, the Moon was the first logical step in the exploration of our solar system before we pursued more distant targets such as Mars and beyond. The vast amount of knowledge gained from the Apollo and other lunar missions of the late 1960's and early 1970's demonstrates how valuable the Moon is for the understanding of our planetary system. Even today, the Moon remains an extremely interesting target scientifically and technologically, as ever since, new data have helped to address some of our questions about the Earth-Moon system, many questions remained. Therefore, returning to the Moon is the critical stepping-stone to further exploring our immediate planetary neighborhood. In this concept study, we present scientific and technological arguments for a national German lunar mission, the Lunar Explorations Orbiter (LEO). Numerous space-faring nations have realized and identified the unique opportunities related to lunar exploration and have planned missions to the Moon within the next few years. Among these missions, LEO will be unique, because it will globally explore the Moon in unprecedented spatial and spectral resolution. LEO will significantly improve our understanding of the lunar surface composition, surface ages, mineralogy, physical properties, interior, thermal history, gravity field, regolith structure, and magnetic field. The Lunar Explorations Orbiter will carry an entire suite of innovative, complementary technologies, including high-resolution camera systems, several spectrometers that cover previously unexplored parts of the electromagnetic spectrum over a broad range of wavelengths, microwave and

  1. The relationship of the globe to the orbital rim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, Lauren A; Shadpour, Joseph M; Menghani, Ravi; Goldberg, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    To present a novel method for accurately characterizing the position of the globe relative to the orbital rim. The appearance and function of the eyelids are dependent on the underlying orbital bony architecture and globe position; however, no comprehensive language to describe these complex 3-dimensional relationships exists. Three-dimensional orbital reconstructions were generated from computed tomographic scans of 15 Occidental and 12 Oriental orbits without orbital pathologic disease. Globe and orbital rim anatomy were identified and outlined. Reference points were measured along 2 independent axes: (1) the distance between a plane defined by the corneal apex and the sagittal projection of the orbital rim and (2) the distance between the circumference of the globe and the coronal projection of the orbital rim. For Occidental orbits, the mean (SD) elevation of the sagittal projection of the orbital rim relative to the anterior projection of the globe was 4.6 (4.2) mm superiorly, 5.9 (3.0) mm nasally, 12.6 (3.7) mm inferiorly, and 20.6 (2.6) mm laterally. The mean (SD) radial distance between the coronal projection of the orbital rim and the circumference of the globe was 3.7 (2.1) mm superiorly, 7.6 (1.8) mm nasally, 6.6 (2.2) mm inferiorly, and 4.6 (2.3) mm laterally. For Oriental orbits, the mean (SD) elevation of the sagittal projection of the orbital rim relative to the anterior projection of the globe was 5.0 (4.5) mm superiorly, 6.8 (4.1) mm nasally, 11.1 (4.3) mm inferiorly, and 17.5 (3.3) mm laterally. The mean (SD) radial distance between the coronal projection of the orbital rim and the circumference of the globe was 2.1 (1.2) mm superiorly, 8.2 (2.0) mm nasally, 6.5 (1.9) mm inferiorly, and 4.5 (1.7) mm laterally. Comparison of Occidental and Oriental orbital rim and globe configurations revealed quantitative and qualitative differences. In addition to differences in soft-tissue anatomy, bony architectural variations may contribute substantially to

  2. Orbital Parameters of the Microquasar LSI +61 303

    CERN Document Server

    Casares, J; Paredes, J M; Martí, J; Allende-Prieto, C

    2005-01-01

    New optical spectroscopy of the HMXB microquasar LSI +61 303 is presented. Eccentric orbital fits to our radial velocity measurements yield updated orbital parameters in good agreement with previous work. Our orbital solution indicates that the periastron passage occurs at radio phase 0.23 and the X-ray/radio outbursts are triggered 2.5--4 days after the compact star passage. The spectrum of the optical star is consistent with a B0 V spectral type and contributes ~65 percent of the total light, the remaining due to emission by a circumstellar disc. We also measure the projected rotational velocity to be v sin i = 113 km/s.

  3. Loops in the Sun’s orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjanov Milutin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Besides translation, spin around its axis and rotation around center of the Milky Way, the Sun performs relative motion in the solar system Laplacian plane, also. This motion was anticipated by Newton himself, in his Principia. The form of the Sun’s orbit is substantially different from the other solar system bodies’ orbits. Namely, the Sun moves along the path composed of the chain of large and small loops [1, 2, 6, 9]. This chain is situated within the circular outline with the diameter approximately twice as large as the Sun’s is. Under supposition that the solar system is stable, the Sun is going to move along it, in the same region, for eternity, never reitereiting the same path. It was also shown in this work that velocity and acceleration of the Sun’s center of mass are completely defined by the relative velocities and accelerations of the planets with respect to the Sun.

  4. Periodic orbits for three and four co-orbital bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrier, P. E.; McInnes, C. R.

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the natural families of periodic orbits associated with the equilibrium configurations of the planar-restricted 1 + n-body problem for the case 2 ≤ n ≤ 4 equal-mass satellites. Such periodic orbits can be used to model both trojan exoplanetary systems and parking orbits for captured asteroids within the Solar system. For n = 2, there are two families of periodic orbits associated with the equilibria of the system: the well-known horseshoe and tadpole orbits. For n = 3, there are three families that emanate from the equilibrium configurations of the satellites, while for n = 4, there are six such families as well as numerous additional connecting families. The families of periodic orbits are all of the horseshoe or tadpole type, and several have regions of neutral linear stability.

  5. Periodic orbits for 3 and 4 co-orbital bodies

    CERN Document Server

    Verrier, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the natural families of periodic orbits associated with the equilibrium configurations of the the planar restricted $1+n$ body problem for the case $2\\leq n \\leq 4$ equal mass satellites. Such periodic orbits can be used to model both trojan exoplanetary systems and parking orbits for captured asteroids within the solar system. For $n=2$ there are two families of periodic orbits associated with the equilibria of the system: the well known horseshoe and tadpole orbits. For $n=3$ there are three families that emanate from the equilibrium configurations of the satellites, while for $n=4$ there are six such families as well as numerous additional connecting families. The families of periodic orbits are all of the horseshoe or tadpole type, and several have regions of neutral linear stability.

  6. Lunar ring dikes from orbiter I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'keefe, J A; Lowman, P D; Cameron, W S

    1967-01-01

    Orbiter photographs of the wall of a large circular formation on the moon show that the wall is a convex body resembling a flow of viscous lava. The slopes are less than the angle of repose of dry rock; hence an explanation in terms of mass wastage is hard to support. The viscosity is approximately 10(13) centimeter-gram- second units, indicating an acid lava.

  7. Orbital debris issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, D. J.

    Orbital debris issues fall into three major topics: Environment Definition, Spacecraft Hazard, and Space Object Management. The major issue under Environment Definition is defining the debris flux for sizes smaller (10 cm in diameter) than those tracked by the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD). Sources for this size debris are fragmentation of larger objects, either by explosion or collision, and solid rocket motor products. Modeling of these sources can predict fluxes in low Earth orbit which are greater than the meteoroid environment. Techniques to measure the environment in the size interval between 1 mm and 10 cm are being developed, including the use of telescopes and radar both on the ground and in space. Some impact sensors designed to detect meteoroids may have detected solid rocket motor products. Once the environment is defined, it can be combined with hypervelocity impact data and damage criteria to evaluate the Spacecraft Hazard. Shielding may be required to obtain an acceptable damage level. Space Object Management includes techniques to control the environment and the desired policy to effectively minimize the hazard to spacecraft. One control technique - reducing the likelihood of future explosions in space - has already been implemented by NASA. The effectiveness of other techniques has yet to be evaluated.

  8. Interface-Enhanced Spin-Orbit Torques and Current-Induced Magnetization Switching of Pd /Co /AlOx Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Abhijit; Garello, Kevin; Avci, Can Onur; Gabureac, Mihai; Gambardella, Pietro

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic heterostructures that combine large spin-orbit torque efficiency, perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, and low resistivity are key to developing electrically controlled memory and logic devices. Here, we report on vector measurements of the current-induced spin-orbit torques and magnetization switching in perpendicularly magnetized Pd /Co /AlOx layers as a function of Pd thickness. We find sizable dampinglike (DL) and fieldlike (FL) torques, on the order of 1 mT per 107 A /cm2 , which have different thicknesses and magnetization angle dependencies. The analysis of the DL torque efficiency per unit current density and the electric field using drift-diffusion theory leads to an effective spin Hall angle and spin-diffusion length of Pd larger than 0.03 and 7 nm, respectively. The FL spin-orbit torque includes a significant interface contribution, is larger than estimated using drift-diffusion parameters, and, furthermore, is strongly enhanced upon rotation of the magnetization from the out-of-plane to the in-plane direction. Finally, taking advantage of the large spin-orbit torques in this system, we demonstrate bipolar magnetization switching of Pd /Co /AlOx layers with a similar current density to that used for Pt /Co layers with a comparable perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

  9. Modelling resonances and orbital chaos in disk galaxies. Application to a Milky Way spiral model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michtchenko, T. A.; Vieira, R. S. S.; Barros, D. A.; Lépine, J. R. D.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Resonances in the stellar orbital motion under perturbations from the spiral arm structure can play an important role in the evolution of the disks of spiral galaxies. The epicyclic approximation allows the determination of the corresponding resonant radii on the equatorial plane (in the context of nearly circular orbits), but is not suitable in general. Aims: We expand the study of resonant orbits by analysing stellar motions perturbed by spiral arms with Gaussian-shaped groove profiles without any restriction on the stellar orbital configurations, and we expand the concept of Lindblad (epicyclic) resonances for orbits with large radial excursions. Methods: We define a representative plane of initial conditions, which covers the whole phase space of the system. Dynamical maps on representative planes of initial conditions are constructed numerically in order to characterize the phase-space structure and identify the precise location of the co-rotation and Lindblad resonances. The study is complemented by the construction of dynamical power spectra, which provide the identification of fundamental oscillatory patterns in the stellar motion. Results: Our approach allows a precise description of the resonance chains in the whole phase space, giving a broader view of the dynamics of the system when compared to the classical epicyclic approach. We generalize the concept of Lindblad resonances and extend it to cases of resonant orbits with large radial excursions, even for objects in retrograde motion. The analysis of the solar neighbourhood shows that, depending on the current azimuthal phase of the Sun with respect to the spiral arms, a star with solar kinematic parameters (SSP) may evolve in dynamically distinct regions, either inside the stable co-rotation resonance or in a chaotic zone. Conclusions: Our approach contributes to quantifying the domains of resonant orbits and the degree of chaos in the whole Galactic phase-space structure. It may serve as a

  10. [Endoscopic approaches to the orbit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebula, H; Lahlou, A; De Battista, J C; Debry, C; Froelich, S

    2010-01-01

    During the last decade, the use of endoscopic endonasal approaches to the pituitary has increased considerably. The endoscopic endonasal and transantral approaches offer a minimally invasive alternative to the classic transcranial or transconjunctival approaches to the medial aspect of the orbit. The medial wall of the orbit, the orbital apex, and the optic canal can be exposed through a middle meatal antrostomy, an anterior and posterior ethmoidectomy, and a sphenoidotomy. The inferomedial wall of the orbit can be also perfectly visualized through a sublabial antrostomy or an inferior meatal antrostomy. Several reports have described the use of an endoscopic approach for the resection or the biopsy of lesions located on the medial extraconal aspect of the orbit and orbital apex. However, the resection of intraconal lesions is still limited by inadequate instrumentation. Other indications for the endoscopic approach to the orbit are the decompression of the orbit for Graves' ophthalmopathy and traumatic optic neuropathy. However, the optimal management of traumatic optic neuropathy remains very controversial. Endoscopic endonasal decompression of the optic nerve in case of tumor compression could be a more valid indication in combination with radiation therapy. Finally, the endoscopic transantral treatment of blowout fracture of the floor of the orbit is an interesting option that avoids the eyelid or conjunctive incision of traditional approaches. The collaboration between the neurosurgeon and the ENT surgeon is mandatory and reduces the morbidity of the approach. Progress in instrumentation and optical devices will certainly make this approach promising for intraconal tumor of the orbit.

  11. On-orbit parametric identification methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadaegh, Fred Y.; Bayard, David S.

    1988-01-01

    On-orbit system identification (ID) of large space systems is essential for various reasons. For example, the complex composite structure of such systems cannot be ground-tested; their structural dynamic characteristics must be known accurately in order to accomplish active control. Furthermore, such capability can be used to characterize/identify various disturbances. The identification process is consisted of four principal elements: (1) modeling, (2) the estimation algorithm, (3) input system, and (4) measurement system. These elements are highly correlated and all togerher determine the success of the identification problem. Accurate modeling of large space systems is the most important element of the identification process. Large flexible structures are non-linear and infinite dimensional systems with highly coupled parameters and low frequency packed modes. In addition, these systems are subject to stochastic and time-varying disturbances, they have structural parameters which can vary due to on-orbit assembly deployment, and operations. These systems are generally; however, represented by constant coefficient, finite order differential equations. The non-linearities, coupling and noise effects are also often neglected. Moreover, identification experiment designs which lead to highly complex optimization problems usually require the simultaneous choice of ID algorithm, sensor, and actuator type and placement. On-orbit bandwidth and power restrictions on excitation, limited data window, and restrictions on sensor/actuator type, placement and number, has led to practical questions of implementations.

  12. A Comparison of Damaging Meteoroid and Orbital Debris Fluxes in Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, William; Matney, Mark; Moorhead, Althea V.; Vavrin, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Low Earth orbit is populated with a substantial amount of orbital debris, and it is usually assumed that the flux from these objects contributes to most of the hypervelocity particle risk to spacecraft in this region. The meteoroid flux is known to be dominant at very low altitudes (less than 300 km), where atmospheric drag rapidly removes debris, and at very high altitudes (beyond geostationary), where debris is practically non-existent. The vagueness of these boundaries and repeated questions from spacecraft projects have prompted this work, in which we compare the fluxes of meteoroids and orbital debris capable of producing a millimeter-deep crater in aluminum for circular orbits with altitudes ranging from the top of the atmosphere to 100,000 km. The outputs from the latest NASA debris and meteoroid models, ORDEM 3.0 and MEMR2, are combined with the modified Cour-Palais ballistic limit equation to make a realistic evaluation of the damage-capable particle fluxes, thereby establishing the relative contributions of hazardous debris and meteoroids throughout near-Earth space.

  13. A Typical Presentation of Orbital Pseudotumor Mimicking Orbital Cellulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ayatollahi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Orbital pseudotumor, also known as idiopathic orbital inflammatory syndrome (IOIS, is a benign, non- infective inflammatory condition of the orbit without identifiable local or systemic causes. The disease may mimics a variety of pathologic conditions. We pre-sent a case of pseudotumor observed in a patient admitted under the name of orbital celluli-ties. Case Report: A 26-year-old woman reffered to our hospital with the history of left ocular pain and headache 2 days before her visit.. Ophthalmological examination of the patient was normal except for the redness and lid edema, mild chemosis and conjunctival injection. Gen-eral assessment was normal but a low grade fever was observed. She was hospitalized as an orbital cellulitis patient. She was treated with intravenous antibiotics. On the third day , sud-denly diplopia, proptosis in her left eye and ocular pain in her right side appeared. MRI re-vealed bilateral enlargement of extraocular muscles. Diagnosis of orbital pseudotumor was made and the patient was treated with oral steroid.She responded promptly to the treatment. Antibiotics were discontinued and steroid was tapered in one month period under close fol-low up. Conclusion: The clinical features of orbital pseudotumor vary widely . Orbital pseudotumor and orbital cellulitis can occasionally demonstrate overlapping features.. Despite complete physical examination and appropriate imaging, sometimes correct diagnosis of the disease would be difficult (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2013; 20 (3:256-259

  14. Long-Term Stability of Horseshoe Orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Ćuk, Matija; Holman, Matthew J

    2012-01-01

    Unlike Trojans, horseshoe coorbitals are not generally considered to be long-term stable (Dermott and Murray, 1981; Murray and Dermott, 1999). As the lifetime of Earth's and Venus's horseshoe coorbitals is expected to be about a Gyr, we investigated the possible contribution of late-escaping inner planet coorbitals to the lunar Late Heavy Bombardment. Contrary to analytical estimates, we do not find many horseshoe objects escaping after first 100 Myr. In order to understand this behaviour, we ran a second set of simulations featuring idealized planets on circular orbits with a range of masses. We find that horseshoe coorbitals are generally long lived (and potentially stable) for systems with primary-to-secondary mass ratios larger than about 1200. This is consistent with results of Laughlin and Chambers (2002) for equal-mass pairs or coorbital planets and the instability of Jupiter's horseshoe companions (Stacey and Connors, 2008). Horseshoe orbits at smaller mass ratios are unstable because they must approa...

  15. LOP- LONG-TERM ORBIT PREDICTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, J. H.

    1994-01-01

    The Long-Term Orbit Predictor (LOP) trajectory propagation program is a useful tool in lifetime analysis of orbiting spacecraft. LOP is suitable for studying planetary orbit missions with reconnaissance (flyby) and exploratory (mapping) trajectories. Sample data is included for a geosynchronous station drift cycle study, a Venus radar mapping strategy, a frozen orbit about Mars, and a repeat ground trace orbit. LOP uses the variation-of-parameters method in formulating the equations of motion. Terms involving the mean anomaly are removed from numerical integrations so that large step sizes, on the order of days, are possible. Consequently, LOP executes much faster than programs based on Cowell's method, such as the companion program ASAP (the Artificial Satellite Analysis Program, NPO-17522, also available through COSMIC). The program uses a force model with a gravity field of up to 21 by 21, lunisolar perturbation, drag, and solar radiation pressure. The input includes classical orbital elements (either mean or oscillating), orbital elements of the sun relative to the planet, reference time and dates, drag coefficients, gravitational constants, planet radius, rotation rate. The printed output contains the classical elements for each time step or event step, and additional orbital data such as true anomaly, eccentric anomaly, latitude, longitude, periapsis altitude, and the rate of change per day of certain elements. Selected output is additionally written to a plot file for postprocessing by the user. LOP is written in FORTRAN 77 for batch execution on IBM PC compatibles running MS-DOS with a minimum of 256K RAM. Recompiling the source requires the Lahey F77 v2.2 compiler. The LOP package includes examples that use LOTUS 1-2-3 for graphical displays, but any graphics software package should be able to handle the ASCII plot file. The program is available on two 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskettes. The program was written in 1986 and last updated in 1989. LOP is

  16. Orbital maneuvers around irregular shaped bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venditti, Flaviane; Rocco, E. M.; Almeida Prado, A. B.

    2013-05-01

    Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): In the solar system there are many small bodies called asteroids. The large majority of these bodies are located in the asteroid belt, between the orbits of the planets Mars and Jupiter. The Near- Earth Objects, or NEOs, are objects with perihelion below 1.3AU, which include comets and asteroids. The NEOs are considered to have orbits passing close to the Earth’s orbit and, in the case of asteroids, are called Near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs). Among the NEAs there are bodies considered potentially hazardous asteroids (PHAs), whose minimum orbit intersection distance with Earth is 0.05AU and that have absolute magnitude (H) of 22, which would mean an asteroid of at least 110-240 meters, depending on its albedo. One of the major characteristic of the asteroids is the irregular shape, causing the dynamics of orbits around these bodies to be different from a spherical shaped one. The fact that an object is not spherical generates a perturbation on the gravitational field. The disturbing force can be determined considering the shape of the specific body. A satellite orbiting this body would suffer the effects of this perturbation, but knowing the disturbing force, it’s possible to correct and control the orbit according to the desired mission. The polyhedron method is a traditional way to model an asteroid by dividing the object into smaller parts. The data used on this work are composed by a combination of triangular faces. The total disturbing force is a sum of the force on each piece of the model. Therefore, after the simulations are obtained, it’s possible to apply the desired corrections of the perturbation using continuous low thrust in closed loop, making it possible to perform maneuvers near these bodies. One of the important applications of the study shown above is in the ASTER mission, that is under study by INPE and several other Brazilian academic institutions, which goal is to send a spacecraft to an asteroid and then

  17. Pilot-wave hydrodynamics in a rotating frame: Exotic orbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oza, Anand U.; Harris, Daniel M.; Rosales, Rodolfo R.; Bush, John W. M., E-mail: bush@math.mit.edu [Department of Mathematics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Wind-Willassen, Øistein [Department of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

    2014-08-15

    We present the results of a numerical investigation of droplets walking on a rotating vibrating fluid bath. The drop's trajectory is described by an integro-differential equation, which is simulated numerically in various parameter regimes. As the forcing acceleration is progressively increased, stable circular orbits give way to wobbling orbits, which are succeeded in turn by instabilities of the orbital center characterized by steady drifting then discrete leaping. In the limit of large vibrational forcing, the walker's trajectory becomes chaotic, but its statistical behavior reflects the influence of the unstable orbital solutions. The study results in a complete regime diagram that summarizes the dependence of the walker's behavior on the system parameters. Our predictions compare favorably to the experimental observations of Harris and Bush [“Droplets walking in a rotating frame: from quantized orbits to multimodal statistics,” J. Fluid Mech. 739, 444–464 (2014)].

  18. Orbital engineering in symmetry-breaking polar heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disa, Ankit S; Kumah, Divine P; Malashevich, Andrei; Chen, Hanghui; Arena, Dario A; Specht, Eliot D; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab; Walker, F J; Ahn, Charles H

    2015-01-16

    We experimentally demonstrate a novel approach to substantially modify orbital occupations and symmetries in electronically correlated oxides. In contrast to methods using strain or confinement, this orbital tuning is achieved by exploiting charge transfer and inversion symmetry breaking using atomically layered heterostructures. We illustrate the technique in the LaTiO_{3}-LaNiO_{3}-LaAlO_{3} system; a combination of x-ray absorption spectroscopy and ab initio theory reveals electron transfer and concomitant polar fields, resulting in a ∼50% change in the occupation of Ni d orbitals. This change is sufficiently large to remove the orbital degeneracy of bulk LaNiO_{3} and creates an electronic configuration approaching a single-band Fermi surface. Furthermore, we theoretically show that such three-component heterostructuring is robust and tunable by choice of insulator in the heterostructure, providing a general method for engineering orbital configurations and designing novel electronic systems.

  19. Current perspectives on the role of orbital fibroblasts in the pathogenesis of Graves' ophthalmopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dik, Willem A; Virakul, Sita; van Steensel, Leendert

    2016-01-01

    Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) is an extra-thyroidal complication of Graves' disease (GD; Graves' hyperthyroidism) characterized by orbital tissue inflammation, expansion, remodeling and fibrosis. Although the initiating trigger of GO is still indistinct, excessive orbital fibroblast activity is at the heart of its pathogenesis. Orbital fibroblasts are activated by cellular interactions with immune cells and the soluble factors they secrete. Orbital fibroblasts, especially from GO patients, express the thyrotropin receptor (TSH-receptor; TSHR), and activation of the orbital fibroblast population by stimulatory autoantibodies directed against the TSHR may provide an important link between GD and GO. Furthermore, stimulatory autoantibodies directed against the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor have been proposed to contribute to orbital fibroblast activation in GO. Activated orbital fibroblasts produce inflammatory mediators thereby contributing to the orbital inflammatory process in GO. Moreover, orbital fibroblasts exhibit robust proliferative activity and extracellular matrix (especially hyaluronan) synthesizing capacity and can differentiate into adipocytes and myofibroblasts with disease progression, thereby contributing to tissue expansion/remodeling and fibrosis in GO. Orbital fibroblasts, especially those from GO patients, exhibit a hyper-responsive phenotype when compared to fibroblasts from other anatomical regions, which may further contribute to GO pathogenesis. Fibrocytes have been identified as additional source of orbital fibroblasts in GO, where they may contribute to orbital tissue inflammation, adipogenesis and remodeling/fibrosis. This review addresses our current view on the role that orbital fibroblasts fulfill in GO pathogenesis and both established as well as less established not fully crystallized concepts that need future studies will be discussed.

  20. Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, T.; Chin, G.

    2007-08-01

    NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) plans to launch in October 2008 with a companion secondary impactor mission, LCROSS, as the inaugural missions for the Exploration System Mission Directorate. LRO is a pathfinder whose objective is to obtain the needed information to prepare for eventual human return to the Moon. LRO will undertake at least one baseline year of operation with additional extended mission phase sponsored by NASA's Science Mission Directorate. LRO will employ six individual instruments to produce accurate maps and high-resolution images of future landing sites, to assess potential lunar resources, and to characterize the radiation environment. LRO will also test the feasibility of one advanced technology demonstration package. The LRO payload includes: Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) which will determine the global topography of the lunar surface at high resolution, measure landing site slopes, surface roughness, and search for possible polar surface ice in shadowed regions; Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) which will acquire targeted narrow angle images of the lunar surface capable of resolving meter-scale features to support landing site selection, as well as wide-angle images to characterize polar illumination conditions and to identify potential resources; Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) which will map the flux of neutrons from the lunar surface to search for evidence of water ice, and will provide space radiation environment measurements that may be useful for future human exploration; Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment (DLRE) which will chart the temperature of the entire lunar surface at approximately 300 meter horizontal resolution to identify cold-traps and potential ice deposits; Lyman-Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) which will map the entire lunar surface in the far ultraviolet. LAMP will search for surface ice and frost in the polar regions and provide images of permanently shadowed regions illuminated only

  1. Orbital State Uncertainty Realism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwood, J.; Poore, A. B.

    2012-09-01

    Fundamental to the success of the space situational awareness (SSA) mission is the rigorous inclusion of uncertainty in the space surveillance network. The *proper characterization of uncertainty* in the orbital state of a space object is a common requirement to many SSA functions including tracking and data association, resolution of uncorrelated tracks (UCTs), conjunction analysis and probability of collision, sensor resource management, and anomaly detection. While tracking environments, such as air and missile defense, make extensive use of Gaussian and local linearity assumptions within algorithms for uncertainty management, space surveillance is inherently different due to long time gaps between updates, high misdetection rates, nonlinear and non-conservative dynamics, and non-Gaussian phenomena. The latter implies that "covariance realism" is not always sufficient. SSA also requires "uncertainty realism"; the proper characterization of both the state and covariance and all non-zero higher-order cumulants. In other words, a proper characterization of a space object's full state *probability density function (PDF)* is required. In order to provide a more statistically rigorous treatment of uncertainty in the space surveillance tracking environment and to better support the aforementioned SSA functions, a new class of multivariate PDFs are formulated which more accurately characterize the uncertainty of a space object's state or orbit. The new distribution contains a parameter set controlling the higher-order cumulants which gives the level sets a distinctive "banana" or "boomerang" shape and degenerates to a Gaussian in a suitable limit. Using the new class of PDFs within the general Bayesian nonlinear filter, the resulting filter prediction step (i.e., uncertainty propagation) is shown to have the *same computational cost as the traditional unscented Kalman filter* with the former able to maintain a proper characterization of the uncertainty for up to *ten

  2. NGC 1300 Dynamics: III. Orbital analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Patsis, P A; Grosbol, P

    2010-01-01

    We present the orbital analysis of four response models, that succeed in reproducing morphological features of NGC 1300. Two of them assume a planar (2D) geometry with $\\Omega_p$=22 and 16 \\ksk respectively. The two others assume a cylindrical (thick) disc and rotate with the same pattern speeds as the 2D models. These response models reproduce most successfully main morphological features of NGC 1300 among a large number of models, as became evident in a previous study. Our main result is the discovery of three new dynamical mechanisms that can support structures in a barred-spiral grand design system. These mechanisms are presented in characteristic cases, where these dynamical phenomena take place. They refer firstly to the support of a strong bar, of ansae type, almost solely by chaotic orbits, then to the support of spirals by chaotic orbits that for a certain number of pat tern revolutions follow an n:1 (n=7,8) morphology, and finally to the support of spiral arms by a combination of orbits trapped arou...

  3. Orbital Eccrine Hidrocystoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Marangoz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A 29-year-old female patient presented with a painless mass on her upper eyelid medially. She noticed the mass 4 years earlier and it had increased in size over time. She had no diplopia, eyelid swelling, skin lesion overlying the mass, or visual disturbances. On ocular examination, eye movements and funduscopy were normal. The mass was movable and painless with palpation. Magnetic resonance imaging with contrast showed a 12x8x7 mm well-circumscribed cystic lesion with no contrast dye appearance. Surgical removal was performed delicately and no capsular rupture occured. Pathological examination revealed an eccrine hidrocystoma. Our aim is to underline that eccrine hidrocystoma should be included in differential diagnosis of orbital masses.

  4. Orbital angular momentum microlaser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Pei; Zhang, Zhifeng; Sun, Jingbo; Walasik, Wiktor; Longhi, Stefano; Litchinitser, Natalia M.; Feng, Liang

    2016-07-01

    Structured light provides an additional degree of freedom for modern optics and practical applications. The effective generation of orbital angular momentum (OAM) lasing, especially at a micro- and nanoscale, could address the growing demand for information capacity. By exploiting the emerging non-Hermitian photonics design at an exceptional point, we demonstrate a microring laser producing a single-mode OAM vortex lasing with the ability to precisely define the topological charge of the OAM mode. The polarization associated with OAM lasing can be further manipulated on demand, creating a radially polarized vortex emission. Our OAM microlaser could find applications in the next generation of integrated optoelectronic devices for optical communications in both quantum and classical regimes.

  5. Orbital science's 'Bermuda Triangle'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrill, Thomas J.

    1991-02-01

    The effects of a part of the inner Van Allen belt lying closest to the earth, known as the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) upon spacecraft including the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), are discussed. The area consists of positively charged ions and electrons from the Van Allen Belt which become trapped in the earth's dipole field. Contor maps representing the number of protons per square centimeter per second having energies greater than 10 million electron volts are presented. It is noted that the HST orbit causes it to spend about 15 percent of its time in the SAA, but that, unlike the experience with earlier spacecraft, the satellite's skin, internal structure, and normal electronic's packaging provides sufficient protection against eletrons, although some higher energy protons still get through. Various charged particle effects which can arise within scientific instruments including fluorescence, Cerenkov radiation, and induced radioactivity are described.

  6. Geology orbiter comparison study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutts, J. A. J.; Blasius, K. R.; Davis, D. R.; Pang, K. D.; Shreve, D. C.

    1977-01-01

    Instrument requirements of planetary geology orbiters were examined with the objective of determining the feasibility of applying standard instrument designs to a host of terrestrial targets. Within the basic discipline area of geochemistry, gamma-ray, X-ray fluorescence, and atomic spectroscopy remote sensing techniques were considered. Within the discipline area of geophysics, the complementary techniques of gravimetry and radar were studied. Experiments using these techniques were analyzed for comparison at the Moon, Mercury, Mars and the Galilean satellites. On the basis of these comparative assessments, the adaptability of each sensing technique was judged as a basic technique for many targets, as a single instrument applied to many targets, as a single instrument used in different mission modes, and as an instrument capability for nongeoscience objectives.

  7. A unified framework for the orbital structure of bars and triaxial ellipsoids

    CERN Document Server

    Valluri, Monica; Abbott, Caleb G; Debattista, Victor P

    2015-01-01

    We examine a large random sample of orbits in self-consistent simulations of N-body bars. Orbits in the bars are classified both visually and with a new automated orbit classification method based on frequency analysis. The well known prograde x1 orbit family originates from the same parent orbit as the box orbits in stationary and rotating triaxial ellipsoids. However only a small fraction of bar orbits ~4% have predominately prograde motion like their periodic parent orbit. Most bar orbits arising from the x1 orbit have little net angular momentum in the bar frame making them equivalent to box orbits in rotating triaxial potentials. A small fraction of bar orbits (~7%) are long axis tubes that behave exactly like those in triaxial ellipsoids:they are tipped about the intermediate-axis due to the Coriolis force, with the sense of tipping determined by the sign of their angular momentum about the long axis. No orbits parented by prograde periodic x2 orbits are found in the pure bar model, but a tiny populatio...

  8. Orbit Determination Toolbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, James R.; Berry, Kevin; Gregpru. Late; Speckman, Keith; Hur-Diaz, Sun; Surka, Derek; Gaylor, Dave

    2010-01-01

    The Orbit Determination Toolbox is an orbit determination (OD) analysis tool based on MATLAB and Java that provides a flexible way to do early mission analysis. The toolbox is primarily intended for advanced mission analysis such as might be performed in concept exploration, proposal, early design phase, or rapid design center environments. The emphasis is on flexibility, but it has enough fidelity to produce credible results. Insight into all flight dynamics source code is provided. MATLAB is the primary user interface and is used for piecing together measurement and dynamic models. The Java Astrodynamics Toolbox is used as an engine for things that might be slow or inefficient in MATLAB, such as high-fidelity trajectory propagation, lunar and planetary ephemeris look-ups, precession, nutation, polar motion calculations, ephemeris file parsing, and the like. The primary analysis functions are sequential filter/smoother and batch least-squares commands that incorporate Monte-Carlo data simulation, linear covariance analysis, measurement processing, and plotting capabilities at the generic level. These functions have a user interface that is based on that of the MATLAB ODE suite. To perform a specific analysis, users write MATLAB functions that implement truth and design system models. The user provides his or her models as inputs to the filter commands. The software provides a capability to publish and subscribe to a software bus that is compliant with the NASA Goddard Mission Services Evolution Center (GMSEC) standards, to exchange data with other flight dynamics tools to simplify the flight dynamics design cycle. Using the publish and subscribe approach allows for analysts in a rapid design center environment to seamlessly incorporate changes in spacecraft and mission design into navigation analysis and vice versa.

  9. The conservation of orbital symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Woodward, R B

    2013-01-01

    The Conservation of Orbital Symmetry examines the principle of conservation of orbital symmetry and its use. The central content of the principle was that reactions occur readily when there is congruence between orbital symmetry characteristics of reactants and products, and only with difficulty when that congruence does not obtain-or to put it more succinctly, orbital symmetry is conserved in concerted reaction. This principle is expected to endure, whatever the language in which it may be couched, or whatever greater precision may be developed in its application and extension. The book ope

  10. Homogeneous orbit closures and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lindenstrauss, Elon

    2011-01-01

    We give new classes of examples of orbits of the diagonal group in the space of unit volume lattices in R^d for d > 2 with nice (homogeneous) orbit closures, as well as examples of orbits with explicitly computable but irregular orbit closures. We give Diophantine applications to the former, for instance we show that if x is the cubic root of 2 then for any y,z in R liminf |n|=0 (as |n| goes to infinity), where denotes the distance of a real number c to the integers.

  11. Orbit Alignment in Triple Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokovinin, Andrei

    2017-08-01

    The statistics of the angle Φ between orbital angular momenta in hierarchical triple systems with known inner visual or astrometric orbits are studied. A correlation between apparent revolution directions proves the partial orbit alignment known from earlier works. The alignment is strong in triples with outer projected separation less than ∼50 au, where the average Φ is about 20^\\circ . In contrast, outer orbits wider than 1000 au are not aligned with the inner orbits. It is established that the orbit alignment decreases with the increasing mass of the primary component. The average eccentricity of inner orbits in well-aligned triples is smaller than in randomly aligned ones. These findings highlight the role of dissipative interactions with gas in defining the orbital architecture of low-mass triple systems. On the other hand, chaotic dynamics apparently played a role in shaping more massive hierarchies. The analysis of projected configurations and triples with known inner and outer orbits indicates that the distribution of Φ is likely bimodal, where 80% of triples have {{Φ }}< 70^\\circ and the remaining ones are randomly aligned.

  12. Giant osteoma of the ethmoid sinus with orbital extension: craniofacial approach and orbital reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez Burgos, R; González Martín-Moro, J; Arias Gallo, J; Carceller Benito, F; Burgueño García, M

    2013-12-01

    Osteomas are the most common fibro-osseous lesions in the paranasal sinus. They are benign tumours characterized by slow growth and are often asymptomatic. Treatment is indicated in sphenoid osteomas that threaten the optic canal or orbital apex and in symptomatic cases. The choice of surgical management depends on the location, size and experience of the surgeon. An open approach allows tumour removal with direct visual control and remains the best option in large tumours, but the continued progression in endoscopic approaches is responsible for new indications in closed techniques. Immediate reconstruction allows aesthetic and functional restoration of neighbouring structures, which should one of the goals in the treatment of this benign entity. We report a case of a giant ethmoid osteoma with orbital invasion treated by a combined open craniofacial approach with reconstruction of the anterior cranial base and orbital walls. The literature is reviewed and aetiopathogenic theories, diagnostic procedures and surgical approaches are discussed.

  13. Distributions of Orbital Elements for Meteoroids on Near-Parabolic Orbits According to Radar Observational Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomiyets, S. V.

    2011-01-01

    Some results of the International Heliophysical Year (IHY) Coordinated Investigation Program (CIP) number 65 Meteors in the Earth Atmosphere and Meteoroids in the Solar System are presented. The problem of hyperbolic and near-parabolic orbits is discussed. Some possibilities for the solution of this problem can be obtained from the radar observation of faint meteors. The limiting magnitude of the Kharkov, Ukraine, radar observation program in the 1970 s was +12, resulting in a very large number of meteors being detected. 250,000 orbits down to even fainter limiting magnitude were determined in the 1972-78 period in Kharkov (out of them 7,000 are hyperbolic). The hypothesis of hyperbolic meteors was confirmed. In some radar meteor observations 1 10% of meteors are hyperbolic meteors. Though the Advanced Meteor Orbit Radar (AMOR, New Zealand) and Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR, Canada) have accumulated millions of meteor orbits, there are difficulties in comparing the radar observational data obtained from these three sites (New Zealand, Canada, Kharkov). A new global program International Space Weather Initiative (ISWI) has begun in 2010 (http://www.iswi-secretariat.org). Today it is necessary to create the unified radar catalogue of nearparabolic and hyperbolic meteor orbits in the framework of the ISWI, or any other different way, in collaboration of Ukraine, Canada, New Zealand, the USA and, possibly, Japan. Involvement of the Virtual Meteor Observatory (Netherlands) and Meteor Data Centre (Slovakia) is desirable too. International unified radar catalogue of near-parabolic and hyperbolic meteor orbits will aid to a major advance in our understanding of the ecology of meteoroids within the Solar System and beyond.

  14. Synthetic hydroxyapatite orbital implants: a clinical and MRI evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvananthan, N; Liddicoat, A J; Fahy, G T

    1999-04-01

    Coralline hydroxypatite orbital implants have been used since the 1980s. More recently, synthetic hydroxyapatite orbital implants have been used, in both primary and secondary orbital implantation surgery. The implant may be drilled and pegged, if required, after adequate vascularisation of the implant has occurred. In this study we evaluated the clinical results and vascularisation of synthetic hydroxyapatite orbital implants. Twelve consecutive patients who had synthetic hydroxyapaptite orbital implants were evaluated clinically and 8 of these patients had orbital magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans with intravenous gadolinium performed at least 9 months post-operatively to assess vascularisation of the implant. Six patients had primary orbital implants at the time of enucleation and 6 patients had secondary implants. No significant complications occurred following insertion of the synthetic hydroxyapatite orbital implants. All patients reported cosmetic satisfaction with the results of surgery. MRI scans revealed inhomogeneous enhancement in 3 of the 4 patients receiving primary implants. All patients with secondary implants and 1 patients who had a primary implant had moderate to large areas of poor enhancement in the implant. Synthetic hydroxyapatite implants gave good clinical results but variable vascularisation occurs, especially with secondary implants.

  15. French Meteor Network for High Precision Orbits of Meteoroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atreya, P.; Vaubaillon, J.; Colas, F.; Bouley, S.; Gaillard, B.; Sauli, I.; Kwon, M. K.

    2011-01-01

    There is a lack of precise meteoroids orbit from video observations as most of the meteor stations use off-the-shelf CCD cameras. Few meteoroids orbit with precise semi-major axis are available using film photographic method. Precise orbits are necessary to compute the dust flux in the Earth s vicinity, and to estimate the ejection time of the meteoroids accurately by comparing them with the theoretical evolution model. We investigate the use of large CCD sensors to observe multi-station meteors and to compute precise orbit of these meteoroids. An ideal spatial and temporal resolution to get an accuracy to those similar of photographic plates are discussed. Various problems faced due to the use of large CCD, such as increasing the spatial and the temporal resolution at the same time and computational problems in finding the meteor position are illustrated.

  16. Long-term orbital stability of exosolar planetary systems with highly eccentric orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadou, Kyriaki I

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, many extrasolar planetary systems possessing at least one planet on a highly eccentric orbit have been discovered. In this work, we study the possible long-term stability of such systems. We consider the general three body problem as our model. Highly eccentric orbits are out of the Hill stability regions. However, mean motion resonances can provide phase protection and orbits with long-term stability exist. We construct maps of dynamical stability based on the computation of chaotic indicators and we figure out regions in phase space, where the long-term stability is guaranteed. We focus on regions where at least one planet is highly eccentric and attempt to associate them with the existence of stable periodic orbits. The values of the orbital elements, which are derived from observational data, are often given with very large deviations. Generally, phase space regions of high eccentricities are narrow and thus, our dynamical analysis may restrict considerably the valid domain of the system's locat...

  17. Long-term orbital stability of exosolar planetary systems with highly eccentric orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniadou, Kyriaki I.; Voyatzis, George

    2016-10-01

    Nowadays, many extrasolar planetary systems possessing at least one planet on a highly eccentric orbit have been discovered. In this work, we study the possible long-term stability of such systems. We consider the general three body problem as our model. Highly eccentric orbits are out of the Hill stability regions. However, mean motion resonances can provide phase protection and orbits with long-term stability exist. We construct maps of dynamical stability based on the computation of chaotic indicators and we figure out regions in phase space, where the long-term stability is guaranteed. We focus on regions where at least one planet is highly eccentric and attempt to associate them with the existence of stable periodic orbits. The values of the orbital elements, which are derived from observational data, are often given with very large deviations. Generally, phase space regions of high eccentricities are narrow and thus, our dynamical analysis may restrict considerably the valid domain of the system's location.

  18. New orbit correction method uniting global and local orbit corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, N.; Takaki, H.; Sakai, H.; Satoh, M.; Harada, K.; Kamiya, Y.

    2006-01-01

    A new orbit correction method, called the eigenvector method with constraints (EVC), is proposed and formulated to unite global and local orbit corrections for ring accelerators, especially synchrotron radiation(SR) sources. The EVC can exactly correct the beam positions at arbitrarily selected ring positions such as light source points, simultaneously reducing closed orbit distortion (COD) around the whole ring. Computer simulations clearly demonstrate these features of the EVC for both cases of the Super-SOR light source and the Advanced Light Source (ALS) that have typical structures of high-brilliance SR sources. In addition, the effects of errors in beam position monitor (BPM) reading and steering magnet setting on the orbit correction are analytically expressed and also compared with the computer simulations. Simulation results show that the EVC is very effective and useful for orbit correction and beam position stabilization in SR sources.

  19. PyORBIT: A Python Shell For ORBIT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jean-Francois Ostiguy; Jeffrey Holmes

    2003-07-01

    ORBIT is code developed at SNS to simulate beam dynamics in accumulation rings and synchrotrons. The code is structured as a collection of external C++ modules for SuperCode, a high level interpreter shell developed at LLNL in the early 1990s. SuperCode is no longer actively supported and there has for some time been interest in replacing it by a modern scripting language, while preserving the feel of the original ORBIT program. In this paper, we describe a new version of ORBIT where the role of SuperCode is assumed by Python, a free, well-documented and widely supported object-oriented scripting language. We also compare PyORBIT to ORBIT from the standpoint of features, performance and future expandability.

  20. Orbital Chondroma: A rare mesenchymal tumor of orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi S Kabra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available While relatively common in the skeletal system, cartilaginous tumors are rarely seen originating from the orbit. Here, we report a rare case of an orbital chondroma. A 27-year-old male patient presented with a painless hard mass in the superonasal quadrant (SNQ of left orbit since 3 months. On examination, best-corrected visual acuity of both eyes was 20/20, with normal anterior and posterior segment with full movements of eyeballs and normal intraocular pressure. Computerized tomography scan revealed well defined soft tissue density lesion in SNQ of left orbit. Patient was operated for anteromedial orbitotomy under general anesthesia. Mass was excised intact and sent for histopathological examination (HPE. HPE report showed lobular aggregates of benign cartilaginous cells with mild atypia suggesting of benign cartilaginous tumor - chondroma. Very few cases of orbital chondroma have been reported in literature so far.

  1. Rigorous KAM results around arbitrary periodic orbits for Hamiltonian systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapela, Tomasz; Simó, Carles

    2017-03-01

    We set up a methodology for computer assisted proofs of the existence and the KAM stability of an arbitrary periodic orbit for Hamiltonian systems. We give two examples of application for systems with two and three degrees of freedom. The first example verifies the existence of tiny elliptic islands inside large chaotic domains for a quartic potential. In the 3-body problem we prove the KAM stability of the well-known figure eight orbit and two selected orbits of the so called family of rotating eights. Some additional theoretical and numerical information is also given for the dynamics of both examples.

  2. Orbital debris policy issues: Battelle involvement and some personal observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgecombe, D. S.

    1985-01-01

    The possible hazards presented by orbital debris have been a matter of concern since the early 1960s. The area of initial concern was the potential hazard of the Earth from reentering debris. In the very early days of the space program, it was believed that only specially protected objects would survive reentry. Subsequent events showed this to be incorrect. The recognition of the potential hazard of orbital debris to orbiting objects did not occur until the late 1970s. Concern over this potential hazard has increased, and has also given rise to a number of policy issues. These issues are, at present, largely unresolved.

  3. Numerical simulation of orbitally shaken viscous fluids with free surface

    OpenAIRE

    Discacciati, Marco; Hacker, David; Quarteroni, A.; Quinodoz, Samuel; Tissot, Stéphanie; Wurm, M. Florian

    2013-01-01

    Orbitally shaken bioreactors are an emerging alternative to stirred-tank bioreactors for large-scale mam- malian cell culture, but their fluid dynamics is still not well defined. Among the theoretical and practical issues that remain to be resolved, the characterization of the liquid free surface during orbital shaking remains a major challenge because it is an essential aspect of gas transfer and mixing in these reactors. To simulate the fluid behavior and the free surface shape, we develope...

  4. Banana orbits in elliptic tokamaks with hole currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, P.; Castro, E.; Puerta, J.

    2015-03-01

    Ware Pinch is a consequence of breaking of up-down symmetry due to the inductive electric field. This symmetry breaking happens, though up-down symmetry for magnetic surface is assumed. In previous work Ware Pinch and banana orbits were studied for tokamak magnetic surface with ellipticity and triangularity, but up-down symmetry. Hole currents appear in large tokamaks and their influence in Ware Pinch and banana orbits are now considered here for tokamaks magnetic surfaces with ellipticity and triangularity.

  5. Forecast analysis on satellites that need de-orbit technologies: future scenarios for passive de-orbit devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla, Chiara; Kingston, Jennifer

    2016-09-01

    Propulsion-based de-orbit is a space-proven technology; however, this strategy can strongly limit operational lifetime, as fuel mass is dedicated to the de-orbiting. In addition previous reliability studies have identified the propulsion subsystem as one of the major contributors driving satellite failures. This issue brings the need to develop affordable de-orbit technologies with a limited reliance on the system level performance of the host satellite, ideally largely passive methods. Passive disposal strategies which take advantage of aerodynamic drag as the de-orbit force are particularly attractive because they are independent of spacecraft propulsion capabilities. This paper investigates the future market for passive de-orbit devices in LEO to aid in defining top-level requirements for the design of such devices. This is performed by considering the compliances of projected future satellites with the Inter Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee de-orbit time, to quantify the number of spacecraft that are compliant or non-compliant with the guidelines and, in this way, determine their need for the previously discussed devices. The study is performed by using the SpaceTrak™ database which provides future launch schedules, and spacecraft information; the de-orbit analysis is carried out by means of simulations with STELA. A case study of a passive strategy is given by the de-orbit mechanism technological demonstrator, which is currently under development at Cranfield University and designed to deploy a drag sail at the end of the ESEO satellite mission.

  6. 10 meter Sub-Orbital Large Balloon Reflector (LBR) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — If successful, the LBR will allow high spatial and spectral resolution follow-on studies from missions such as Herschel, Spitzer, and SOFIA to be performed at a...

  7. 10 meter Sub-Orbital Large Balloon Reflector (LBR) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Besides serving as a launch vehicle, the carrier balloon provides a stable mount for the enclosed telescope. Looking up, the LBR will serve as a telescope. Looking...

  8. On-Orbit Degradation of Solar Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    BenMoussa, A.; Gissot, S.; Schühle, U.; Del Zanna, G.; Auchère, F.; Mekaoui, S.; Jones, A. R.; Walton, D.; Eyles, C. J.; Thuillier, G.; Seaton, D.; Dammasch, I. E.; Cessateur, G.; Meftah, M.; Andretta, V.; Berghmans, D.; Bewsher, D.; Bolsée, D.; Bradley, L.; Brown, D. S.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Dewitte, S.; Didkovsky, L. V.; Dominique, M.; Eparvier, F. G.; Foujols, T.; Gillotay, D.; Giordanengo, B.; Halain, J. P.; Hock, R. A.; Irbah, A.; Jeppesen, C.; Judge, D. L.; Kretzschmar, M.; McMullin, D. R.; Nicula, B.; Schmutz, W.; Ucker, G.; Wieman, S.; Woodraska, D.; Woods, T. N.

    2013-11-01

    We present the lessons learned about the degradation observed in several space solar missions, based on contributions at the Workshop about On-Orbit Degradation of Solar and Space Weather Instruments that took place at the Solar Terrestrial Centre of Excellence (Royal Observatory of Belgium) in Brussels on 3 May 2012. The aim of this workshop was to open discussions related to the degradation observed in Sun-observing instruments exposed to the effects of the space environment. This article summarizes the various lessons learned and offers recommendations to reduce or correct expected degradation with the goal of increasing the useful lifespan of future and ongoing space missions.

  9. On-Orbit Degradation of Solar Instruments

    CERN Document Server

    BenMoussa, A; Schühle, U; Del Zanna, G; Auchère, F; Mekaoui, S; Jones, A R; Walton, D; Eyles, C J; Thuillier, G; Seaton, D; Dammasch, I E; Cessateur, G; Meftah, M; Andretta, V; Berghmans, D; Bewsher, D; Bolsée, D; Bradley, L; Brown, D S; Chamberlin, P C; Dewitte, S; Didkovsky, L V; Dominique, M; Eparvier, F G; Foujols, T; Gillotay, D; Giordanengo, B; Halain, J -P; Hock, R A; Irbah, A; Jeppesen, C; Judge, D L; Kretzschmar, M; McMullin, D R; Nicula, B; Schmutz, W; Ucker, G; Wieman, S; Woodraska, D; Woods, T N; 10.1007/s11207-013-0290-z

    2013-01-01

    We present the lessons learned about the degradation observed in several space solar missions, based on contributions at the Workshop about On-Orbit Degradation of Solar and Space Weather Instruments that took place at the Solar Terrestrial Centre of Excellence (Royal Observatory of Belgium) in Brussels on 3 May 2012. The aim of this workshop was to open discussions related to the degradation observed in Sun-observing instruments exposed to the effects of the space environment. This article summarizes the various lessons learned and offers recommendations to reduce or correct expected degradation with the goal of increasing the useful lifespan of future and ongoing space missions.

  10. Diplopia and orbital wall fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boffano, P.; Roccia, F.; Gallesio, C.; Karagozoglu, K.H.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2014-01-01

    Diplopia is a symptom that is frequently associated with orbital wall fractures. The aim of this article was to present the incidence and patterns of diplopia after orbital wall blow-out fractures in 2 European centers, Turin and Amsterdam, and to identify any correlation between this symptom and su

  11. [Enophthalmos in an orbital tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Bianca; Szabo, I; Nicula, Cristina; Popescu, Livia Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Enophtalmus is an unusual sign of the orbital tumors often represented by proptosis. One patient with enophtalmus and intraorbital tumor and aplasy is presented. The treatment of choice of orbital tumor is complete surgical excision and careful follow-up. Considering the more aggressive course followed by recurrent tumor, correct diagnosis and management is essential.

  12. Diffractive molecular-orbital tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Chunyang; Zhu, Xiaosong; Lan, Pengfei; Wang, Feng; He, Lixin; Shi, Wenjing; Li, Yang; Li, Min; Zhang, Qingbin; Lu, Peixiang

    2017-03-01

    High-order-harmonic generation in the interaction of femtosecond lasers with atoms and molecules opens the path to molecular-orbital tomography and to probe the electronic dynamics with attosecond-Ångström resolutions. Molecular-orbital tomography requires both the amplitude and phase of the high-order harmonics. Yet the measurement of phases requires sophisticated techniques and represents formidable challenges at present. Here we report a scheme, called diffractive molecular-orbital tomography, to retrieve the molecular orbital solely from the amplitude of high-order harmonics without measuring any phase information. We have applied this method to image the molecular orbitals of N2, CO2, and C2H2 . The retrieved orbital is further improved by taking account the correction of Coulomb potential. The diffractive molecular-orbital tomography scheme, removing the roadblock of phase measurement, significantly simplifies the molecular-orbital tomography procedure and paves an efficient and robust way to the imaging of more complex molecules.

  13. GridOrbit public display

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramos, Juan David Hincapie; Tabard, Aurélien; Bardram, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    We introduce GridOrbit, a public awareness display that visualizes the activity of a community grid used in a biology laboratory. This community grid executes bioin-formatics algorithms and relies on users to donate CPU cycles to the grid. The goal of GridOrbit is to create a shared awareness about...

  14. Diplopia and orbital wall fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boffano, P.; Roccia, F.; Gallesio, C.; Karagozoglu, K.H.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2014-01-01

    Diplopia is a symptom that is frequently associated with orbital wall fractures. The aim of this article was to present the incidence and patterns of diplopia after orbital wall blow-out fractures in 2 European centers, Turin and Amsterdam, and to identify any correlation between this symptom and

  15. Spacewire on Earth orbiting scatterometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Alex; Lang, Minh; Lux, James; Steffke, Richard

    2002-01-01

    The need for a high speed, reliable and easy to implement communication link has led to the development of a space flight oriented version of IEEE 1355 called SpaceWire. SpaceWire is based on high-speed (200 Mbps) serial point-to-point links using Low Voltage Differential Signaling (LVDS). SpaceWIre has provisions for routing messages between a large network of processors, using wormhole routing for low overhead and latency. {additionally, there are available space qualified hybrids, which provide the Link layer to the user's bus}. A test bed of multiple digital signal processor breadboards, demonstrating the ability to meet signal processing requirements for an orbiting scatterometer has been implemented using three Astrium MCM-DSPs, each breadboard consists of a Multi Chip Module (MCM) that combines a space qualified Digital Signal Processor and peripherals, including IEEE-1355 links. With the addition of appropriate physical layer interfaces and software on the DSP, the SpaceWire link is used to communicate between processors on the test bed, e.g. sending timing references, commands, status, and science data among the processors. Results are presented on development issues surrounding the use of SpaceWire in this environment, from physical layer implementation (cables, connectors, LVDS drivers) to diagnostic tools, driver firmware, and development methodology. The tools, methods, and hardware, software challenges and preliminary performance are investigated and discussed.

  16. Orbital Debris Observations with WFCAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bold, Matthew; Cross, Nick; Irwin, Mike; Kendrick, Richard; Kerr, Thomas; Lederer, Susan; Mann, Robert; Sutorius, Eckhard

    2014-01-01

    The United Kingdom Infrared Telescope has been operating for 35 years on the summit of Mauna Kea as a premier Infrared astronomical facility. In its 35th year the telescope has been turned over to a new operating group consisting of University of Arizona, University of Hawaii and the LM Advanced Technology Center. UKIRT will continue its astronomical mission with a portion of observing time dedicated to orbital debris and Near Earth Object detection and characterization. During the past 10 years the UKIRT Wide Field CAMera (WFCAM) has been performing large area astronomical surveys in the J, H and K bands. The data for these surveys have been reduced by the Cambridge Astronomical Survey Unit in Cambridge, England and archived by the Wide Field Astronomy Unit in Edinburgh, Scotland. During January and February of 2014 the Wide Field CAMera (WFCAM) was used to scan through the geostationary satellite belt detecting operational satellites as well as nearby debris. Accurate photometric and astrometric parameters have been developed by CASU for each of the detections and all data has been archived by WFAU.

  17. Computed tomography of the orbital tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jai Korl; Lee, Hwang Bok; Kang, Eun Young; Seol, Hae Young; Suh, Won Hyuck [College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Byeong Yeob [Han Mi Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-04-15

    The development of computed tomography (CT) provided a noninvasive safe technique for imaging the orbit in any plane exquisitely demonstrating its normal anatomy as well as its pathologic process. The orbit is an ideal structure to be examined by CT because of large difference of absorption values between the intraorbital fat, muscle, optic nerve and vessels. In this study, the authors reviewed CT findings of 66 pathologically proven orbital tumors and tumorous conditions among the total of 98 cases who had taken orbital CT scan because if exophthalmos, ocular pain, diplopia and other ophthalmologic symptoms suggesting orbital masses during the period of 3 years. For the analysis of characteristic CT findings of the orbital lesions, all lesions are divided into 4 groups according to the site of origin, i.e., tumors arising in the eyeball (group 1); from intraconal space (group 2); from extraconal space (group 3); and from extraorbital regions (group 4). The results are as follows; 1.Extra tumor detection and localization was possible in 63 cases. Thus the detection rate was 95% with CT scan. 2.Among 36 males and 30 females, their age ranged from 10 months to 72 years. 3.Intraocular tumors (group 1) were 10 cases. Retinoblastoma occurred wholly in the young children under 5 years and combined with calcification in 57%. Choroidal melanoma occurred wholly in adults. 4.Intraconal tumors (group 2) were 9 cases. Vascular tumors (7 cases) were the most frequent and well enhancing mass. 5.The tumors arising in the extraconal region (group 3) were pseudotumor (12 cases), lymphoma (3 cases), dermoid cyst (4 cases), metastasis (2 cases), adenoid cystic carcinoma (1 case) and teratoma (1 case). A case of lymphoma demonstrating retrobulbar ill defined mass with scleral l thickening could not be differentiated from the pseudotumor which showing similar finding. 6.The lesions arising from extraorbital region (group 4) were PNS cancer (9 cases), mucocele (3 cases), lid cancer (4

  18. NanoSail - D Orbital and Attitude Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Andrew F.; Faller, Brent F.; Katan, Chelsea K.

    2013-01-01

    NanoSail-D unfurled January 20th, 2011 and successfully demonstrated the deployment and deorbit capability of a solar sail in low Earth orbit. The orbit was strongly perturbed by solar radiation pressure, aerodynamic drag, and oblate gravity which were modeled using STK HPOP. A comparison of the ballistic coefficient history to the orbit parameters exhibits a strong relationship between orbital lighting, the decay rate of the mean semi-major axis and mean eccentricity. A similar comparison of mean solar area using the STK HPOP solar radiation pressure model exhibits a strong correlation of solar radiation pressure to mean eccentricity and mean argument of perigee. NanoSail-D was not actively controlled and had no capability on-board for attitude or orbit determination. To estimate attitude dynamics we created a 3-DOF attitude dynamics simulation that incorporated highly realistic estimates of perturbing forces into NanoSail-D torque models. By comparing the results of this simulation to the orbital behavior and ground observations of NanoSail-D, we conclude that there is a coupling between the orbit and attitude dynamics as well as establish approximate limits on the location of the NanoSail-D solar center of pressure. Both of these observations contribute valuable data for future solar sail designs and missions.

  19. Video Orbits of the Geminids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajdukova, M.

    2014-07-01

    Geminid meteoroids, observed by the video technique, were analysed with the aim of determining the actual dispersion of their reciprocal semimajor axes 1/a within the stream. Orbits were selected from the European Video Meteor Network Database, EDMOND, (Kornos et al., 2013), from the SonotaCo Shower Catalogue (SonotaCo, 2009), and from the Czech Catalogue of Video Meteor Orbits (Koten et al., 2003). The observed orbital dispersion, including the measurement errors, was compared with that obtained from the precisely-reduced photographic orbits of Geminids from the IAU Meteor Data Center (Lindblad et al., 2003). In this paper, we concentrate on the influence of errors on the orbital dispersion. The size and distribution of observational errors determined from the long-period meteoroid streams (Hajdukova 2013), were applied to determine the real dispersion within this short-period meteoroid stream. The observed dispersions, described by the median absolute deviation in terms of 1/a, range from 0.041 to 0.050 1/au. The deviation of the median reciprocal semimajor axis from the parent (3200) Phaethon, obtained from Japanese video orbits, is 0.009 1/au, and that from the EDMOND data 0.01 1/au. This deviation obtained from the photographic orbits of the IAU Meteor Data Center was significantly greater (Hajdukova 2009). Similar results were obtained from the Czech Video Orbits Catalogue, where the value is 0.05 1/au. The investigation showed that semimajor axes of meteor orbits in both the SonotaCo and EDMOND datasets are systematically biased as a consequence of the method used for the video orbit determination, probably because corrections for atmospheric deceleration were either incorrectly made or were not done at all. Thus, the determined heliocentric velocities are underestimated, and the semimajor axes medians shifted towards smaller values. The observed distributions in 1/a from these video data become biased towards higher values of 1/a. The orbits of the Geminid

  20. Infrared On-Orbit Inspection of Shuttle Orbiter Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Using Solar Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, P. A.; Winfree, W. P.; Cramer, K. Elliott

    2005-01-01

    Thermographic nondestructive inspection techniques have been shown to provide quantitative, large area damage detection capabilities for the ground inspection of the reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) used for the wing leading edge of the Shuttle orbiter. The method is non-contacting and able to inspect large areas in a relatively short inspection time. Thermal nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspections have been shown to be applicable for several applications to the Shuttle in preparation for return to flight, including for inspection of RCC panels during impact testing, and for between-flight orbiter inspections. The focus of this work is to expand the capabilities of the thermal NDE methodology to enable inspection by an astronaut during orbital conditions. The significant limitations of available resources, such as weight and power, and the impact of these limitations on the inspection technique are discussed, as well as the resultant impact on data analysis and processing algorithms. Of particular interest is the impact to the inspection technique resulting from the use of solar energy as a heat source, the effect on the measurements due to working in the vacuum of space, and the effect of changes in boundary conditions, such as radiation losses seen by the material, on the response of the RCC. The resultant effects on detectability limits are discussed. Keywords: Nondestructive Evaluation, Shuttle, on-orbit inspection, thermography, infrared

  1. Probabilistic Structural Health Monitoring of the Orbiter Wing Leading Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Keng C.; Macias, Jesus; Kaouk, Mohamed; Gafka, Tammy L.; Kerr, Justin H.

    2011-01-01

    A structural health monitoring (SHM) system can contribute to the risk management of a structure operating under hazardous conditions. An example is the Wing Leading Edge Impact Detection System (WLEIDS) that monitors the debris hazards to the Space Shuttle Orbiter s Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels. Since Return-to-Flight (RTF) after the Columbia accident, WLEIDS was developed and subsequently deployed on board the Orbiter to detect ascent and on-orbit debris impacts, so as to support the assessment of wing leading edge structural integrity prior to Orbiter re-entry. As SHM is inherently an inverse problem, the analyses involved, including those performed for WLEIDS, tend to be associated with significant uncertainty. The use of probabilistic approaches to handle the uncertainty has resulted in the successful implementation of many development and application milestones.

  2. Measuring Scars of Periodic Orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, L

    1999-01-01

    The phenomenon of periodic orbit scarring of eigenstates of classically chaotic systems is attracting increasing attention. Scarring is one of the most important ``corrections'' to the ideal random eigenstates suggested by random matrix theory. This paper discusses measures of scars and in so doing also tries to clarify the concepts and effects of eigenfunction scarring. We propose a new, universal scar measure which takes into account an entire periodic orbit and the linearized dynamics in its vicinity. This measure is tuned to pick out those structures which are induced in quantum eigenstates by unstable periodic orbits and their manifolds. It gives enhanced scarring strength as measured by eigenstate overlaps and inverse participation ratios, especially for longer orbits. We also discuss off-resonance scars which appear naturally on either side of an unstable periodic orbit.

  3. The 2009 Mars Telecommunications Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, G. R.; Depaula, R.; Diehl, R. E.; Edwards, C. D.; Fitzgerald, R. J.; Franklin, S. F.; Gibbs, R. G.; Kerridge, S. A.; Komarek, T. A.; Noreen, G. K.

    The first spacecraft with a primary function of providing communication links while orbiting a foreign planet has begun development for a launch in 2009. NASA's Mars Telecommunications Orbiter would use three radio bands to magnify the benefits of other future Mars missions and enable some types of missions otherwise impractical. It would serve as the Mars hub for a growing interplanetary Internet. And it would pioneer the use of planet-to-planet laser communications to demonstrate the possibility for even great networking capabilities in the future. During its nearly 10-year mission in orbit, Mars Telecommunications Orbiter would aid navigation of arriving spacecraft to their martian landing sites and monitor critical events during landings and orbit insertions. In addition, it would enable data-transmission volumes great enough to bring a virtual Mars presence to the public through a range of Internet and video features.

  4. Poster contributions; Contributions par affiches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allegraud, K.; Gatilova, I.; Guaitella, O.; Ionikh, Y.; Roepcke, J.; Rousseau, A.; Aranchuk, L.E.; Larour, J.; Asad, S.; Tendero, C.; Tixier, C.; Jaoul, C.; Tristant, P.; Boisse-Laporte, C.; Leprince, P.; Leniniven, C.; Assouar, M.B.; Jimenez Rioboo, R.J.; Aubert, X.; Rousseau, A.; Sadeghi, N.; Bekstein, A.; Benhenni, M.; Yousfi, M.; Bousquet, A.; Granier, A.; Cartry, G.; Calafat, M.; Escaich, D.; Raynaud, P.; Clergereaux, R.; Cardoso, R.P.; Belmonte, T.; Henrion, G.; Sadeghi, N.; Cavarroc, M.; Mikikian, M.; Tessier, Y.; Boufendi, I.; Celestin, S.; Guaitella, O.; Bourdon, A.; Rousseau, A.; Cernogora, G.; Szopa, C.; Cavarroc, M.; Boufendi, I.; Commaux, N.; Geraud, A.; Pegourie, B.; Clairet, F.; Gil, C.; Gros, G.; Gunn, J.; Joffrin, E.; Hertout, P.; Costin, C.; Choimet, J.B.; Minea, T.; Couedel, L.; Mikikian, M.; Tessier, Y.; Boufendi, I.; Samarian, A.A.; Cousin, R.; Larour, J.; Gouard, P.; Raymond, P.; Curley, G.A.; Booth, J.P.; Corr, C.S.; Foldes, T.; Guillon, J.; Czarny, O.; Huysmans, G.; Daniel, A.; Belmonte, T.; Poucques, L. de; Imbert, J.C.; Teule-Gay, L.; Boisse-Laporte, C.; Devaux, S.; Manfredi, G.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Grandgirard, V.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Dong, B.; Bauchire, J.M.; Pouvesle, J.M.; Magnier, P.; Hong, D.; Duluard, C.; Tillocher, T.; Mekkakia Maaza, N.; Dussart, R.; Mellhaoui, X.; Lefaucheux, P.; Puech, M.; Ranson, P.; Faudot, E.; Heuraux, S.; Colas, L.; Fubiani, G.; Boilson, D.; Hemsworth, R.S.; Gatilova, L.; Allegraud, K.; Ionikh, Y.; Roepcke, J.; Cartry, G.; Rousseau, A.; Gauthier, J.C.; Fourment, C.; Schurtz, G.; Nicolai, Ph.; Peyrusse, O.; Feugeas, J.L

    2006-07-01

    This document gathers the poster contributions among which 11 are relevant for fusion plasmas or particle acceleration: 1) the spectral study of a micro plasma from an X-pinch explosion; 2) experiments with a plasma density greater than the Greenwald value via the injection of icicles in Tore-Supra; 3) Bezier's surfaces and finite elements method for non-linear MHD; 4) 2-dimensional simulation of the RF casings before the ICRF antennas in tokamaks; 5) negative ion sources for ITER; 6) experimental characterization of electron heat transport on the laser integration line; 7) comparison of fluctuation measurement methods of plasma density via reflectometry in mode-o and mode-x in Tore-Supra; 8) water-bag model applied to kinetics equations of magnetic fusion plasmas; 9) computerized simulation of electron acceleration in plasma waves generated in a capillary pipe through laser wakefield; 10) the slowing-down of an alpha particle in a strongly magnetized dense plasma; and 11) stochastic processes of particle trapping by a wave in a magnetized plasma. (A.C.)

  5. Halo orbit to science orbit captures at planetary moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokelmann, Kevin A.; Russell, Ryan P.

    2017-05-01

    Ballisticly connecting halo orbits to science orbits in the circular-restricted three-body problem is investigated. Two classes of terminal science orbits are considered: low-altitude, tight orbits that are deep in the gravity well of the secondary body, and high-altitude, loose orbits that are strongly perturbed by the gravity of the primary body. General analytic expressions are developed to provide a minimum bound on impulse cost in both the circular restricted and the Hill's approximations. The equations are applied to a broad range of planetary moons, providing a mission design reference. Systematic grid search methods are developed to numerically find feasible transfers from halo orbits at Europa, confirming the analytical lower bound formulas. The two-impulse capture options in the case of Europa reveal a diverse set of potential solutions. Tight captures result in maneuver costs of 425-550 m/s while loose captures are found with costs as low as 30 m/s. The terminal orbits are verified to avoid escape or impact for at least 45 days.

  6. VSOP-2 Orbit Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, H.; VSOP-2 Orbit Determination Sub-Working Group

    2009-08-01

    Precise orbit determination (POD) is a key factor to enable phase referencing observations with Astro-G. A POD accuracy of 30 cm is required for efficient X-band phase referencing observations, accuracy of 6 cm for K-band observations, and accuracy of 3 cm for Q-band observations. For the POD, Astro-G will be equipped with a GPS/Galileo receiver and a SLR (Satellite Laser Ranging) retroreflector array. Four POD antennas will be equipped on four sides of the satellite body, to cover all directions. The SLR will be used as a complement to the GPS at middle-to-high altitude. Because the refroreflector array should always face to the Earth direction, it will be set up on the Ka-link antenna gimbal. The most significant perturbing force for the Astro-G is solar radiation pressure (SRP). The reflectivity of each surface component should be preliminary measured in detail to model the SRP. The estimated achievable POD accuracy at apogee is 10 ˜ 30 cm in nominal case. Phase referencing observations in K- or Q-band can be performed if the enough amount of SLR tracking data can be obtained at high altitudes.

  7. Natural triple excitations in local coupled cluster calculations with pair natural orbitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riplinger, Christoph; Sandhoefer, Barbara; Hansen, Andreas; Neese, Frank

    2013-10-01

    In this work, the extension of the previously developed domain based local pair-natural orbital (DLPNO) based singles- and doubles coupled cluster (DLPNO-CCSD) method to perturbatively include connected triple excitations is reported. The development is based on the concept of triples-natural orbitals that span the joint space of the three pair natural orbital (PNO) spaces of the three electron pairs that are involved in the calculation of a given triple-excitation contribution. The truncation error is very smooth and can be significantly reduced through extrapolation to the zero threshold. However, the extrapolation procedure does not improve relative energies. The overall computational effort of the method is asymptotically linear with the system size O(N). Actual linear scaling has been confirmed in test calculations on alkane chains. The accuracy of the DLPNO-CCSD(T) approximation relative to semicanonical CCSD(T0) is comparable to the previously developed DLPNO-CCSD method relative to canonical CCSD. Relative energies are predicted with an average error of approximately 0.5 kcal/mol for a challenging test set of medium sized organic molecules. The triples correction typically adds 30%-50% to the overall computation time. Thus, very large systems can be treated on the basis of the current implementation. In addition to the linear C150H302 (452 atoms, >8800 basis functions) we demonstrate the first CCSD(T) level calculation on an entire protein, Crambin with 644 atoms, and more than 6400 basis functions.

  8. Hydrogenoid orbitals revisited: From Slater orbitals to Coulomb Sturmians

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Danilo Calderini; Simonetta Cavalli; Cecilia Coletti; Gaia Grossi; Vincenzo Qquilanti

    2012-01-01

    The simple connection between the Slater orbitals, venerable in quantum chemistry, and the Coulomb Sturmian orbitals, more recently employed in atomic and molecular physics, is pointed out explicitly in view of the renewed interest in both as basis sets in applied quantum mechanics. Research in Slater orbitals mainly concerns multicentre, many-body integrals, whereas that on Sturmians exploits their orthonormality and completeness with no need of continuum states. An account of recent progress is outlined, also with reference to relationships between the two basis sets, and with the momentum space and hyperspherical harmonics representations.

  9. Lobe Overflow as the Likely Cause of Pericenter Outburst in an SMBH Orbiter

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, R E

    2015-01-01

    A very large lobe overflow event is suggested to explain the $0.^m4$ brightening observed in K band at pericenter passage of the star known as S2 that orbits the Galaxy's supermassive black hole (SMBH). Known observed properties of S2 that contribute to lobe filling are 1) the enormous mass ratio, $M_{SMBH}/M_{S2}$, 2) S2's fast rotation, and 3) S2's large orbital eccentricity. Published estimates have given limiting lobe sizes of order 100 to 300 $R_\\odot$ but, with S2's fast rotation taken into account, the computed lobe size is much smaller, being compatible with either a main sequence OB star or a stripped evolved star. An important evolutionary consideration that predicts very large pericenter overflows is envelope expansion following mass loss that is characteristic of highly evolved stars. Material removed by lobe overflow at pericenter is replenished by envelope expansion as an evolved star awaits its next pericenter passage. An observational signature of lobe overflow for upcoming pericenter passages...

  10. Local explicitly correlated second- and third-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory with pair natural orbitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hättig, Christof; Tew, David P; Helmich, Benjamin

    2012-05-28

    We present an algorithm for computing explicitly correlated second- and third-order Møller-Plesset energies near the basis set limit for large molecules with a cost that scales formally as N(4) with system size N. This is achieved through a hybrid approach where locality is exploited first through orbital specific virtuals (OSVs) and subsequently through pair natural orbitals (PNOs) and integrals are approximated using density fitting. Our method combines the low orbital transformation costs of the OSVs with the compactness of the PNO representation of the doubles amplitude vector. The N(4) scaling does not rely upon the a priori definition of domains, enforced truncation of pair lists, or even screening and the energies converge smoothly to the canonical values with decreasing occupation number thresholds, used in the selection of the PNO basis. For MP2.5 intermolecular interaction energies, we find that 99% of benchmark basis set limit correlation energy contributions are recovered using an aug-cc-pVTZ basis and that on average only 50 PNOs are required to correlate the significant orbital pairs.

  11. Local explicitly correlated second- and third-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory with pair natural orbitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hättig, Christof; Tew, David P.; Helmich, Benjamin

    2012-05-01

    We present an algorithm for computing explicitly correlated second- and third-order Møller-Plesset energies near the basis set limit for large molecules with a cost that scales formally as N^4 with system size N. This is achieved through a hybrid approach where locality is exploited first through orbital specific virtuals (OSVs) and subsequently through pair natural orbitals (PNOs) and integrals are approximated using density fitting. Our method combines the low orbital transformation costs of the OSVs with the compactness of the PNO representation of the doubles amplitude vector. The N^4 scaling does not rely upon the a priori definition of domains, enforced truncation of pair lists, or even screening and the energies converge smoothly to the canonical values with decreasing occupation number thresholds, used in the selection of the PNO basis. For MP2.5 intermolecular interaction energies, we find that 99% of benchmark basis set limit correlation energy contributions are recovered using an aug-cc-pVTZ basis and that on average only 50 PNOs are required to correlate the significant orbital pairs.

  12. Spin orbit torques and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction in dual-interfaced Co-Ni multilayers

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Jiawei

    2016-09-07

    We study the spin orbit torque (SOT) and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) in the dual-interfaced Co-Ni perpendicular multilayers. Through the combination of top and bottom layer materials (Pt, Ta, MgO and Cu), SOT and DMI are efficiently manipulated due to an enhancement or cancellation of the top and bottom contributions. However, SOT is found to originate mostly from the bulk of a heavy metal (HM), while DMI is more of interfacial origin. In addition, we find that the direction of the domain wall (DW) motion can be either along or against the electron flow depending on the DW tilting angle when there is a large DMI. Such an abnormal DW motion induces a large assist field required for hysteretic magnetization reversal. Our results provide insight into the role of DMI in SOT driven magnetization switching, and demonstrate the feasibility of achieving desirable SOT and DMI for spintronic devices.

  13. Enhanced radial transport and energization of radiation belt electrons due to drift orbit bifurcations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukhorskiy, A Y; Sitnov, M I; Millan, R M; Kress, B T; Smith, D C

    2014-01-01

    [1]Relativistic electron intensities in Earth's outer radiation belt can vary by multiple orders of magnitude on the time scales ranging from minutes to days. One fundamental process contributing to dynamic variability of radiation belt intensities is the radial transport of relativistic electrons across their drift shells. In this paper we analyze the properties of three-dimensional radial transport in a global magnetic field model driven by variations in the solar wind dynamic pressure. We use a test particle approach which captures anomalous effects such as drift orbit bifurcations. We show that the bifurcations lead to an order of magnitude increase in radial transport rates and enhance the energization at large equatorial pitch angles. Even at quiet time fluctuations in dynamic pressure, radial transport at large pitch angles exhibits strong deviations from the diffusion approximation. The radial transport rates are much lower at small pitch angle values which results in a better agreement with the diffusion approximation.

  14. Surface mass variation monitoring from orbit information of GPS-tracked low-Earth orbiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, O.; Weigelt, M. L. B.; Zehentner, N.; Mayer-Gürr, T.; van Dam, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    In the last decade, temporal variations of the gravity field from GRACE inter-satellite observations have become one of the most ubiquitous and valuable sources of information for environmental studies. In order to bridge the likely gap between the present GRACE and the upcoming GRACE follow-on projects, we investigate the potential of gravity field information derived from orbit analysis for surface mass variation detection. The Swarm mission - launched on November 22, 2013 - is the most promising candidate to directly acquire large-scale mass variation information on the Earth's surface in the absence of GRACE. Although the magnetometry mission Swarm has not been designed for gravity field purposes, its three satellites have the appropriate orbit characteristics for such an endeavour. Hence, from an orbit analysis point of view the Swarm satellites are comparable to the CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE spacecraft. In a first study, we assess the stand-alone capability of the Swarm mission for mass variation detection in a real-case environment. For this purpose, we ''approximate'' the Swarm scenario by the GRACE+CHAMP constellation. In a second study, we incorporate tracking observations from a series of additional satellites (e.g., GOCE, MetOp, TanDEM-X, Swarm) and extend the length of the time series according to data availability. We will demonstrate to what extent these measures improve the inference of time-variable features from orbit information. For both studies, in the first step, kinematic orbits of the individual satellites are derived from GPS observations. From these orbits, we compute monthly combined time-variable gravity fields. Finally, we infer mass variation in selected areas from the gravity signal. These results are compared to the findings obtained from mass variation detection exploiting CSR-RL05 gravity fields (the latter serve as ''benchmark solutions'').

  15. SPHERES Mars Orbiting Sample Return External Orbiting Capture Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission scenario utilizes a small Orbiting Sample (OS) satellite, launched from the surface of Mars, which will rendezvous with an...

  16. Orbital Infarction due to Sickle Cell Disease without Orbital Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron L. McBride

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease is a hemoglobinopathy that results in paroxysmal arteriolar occlusion and tissue infarction that can manifest in a plurality of tissues. Rarely, these infarcted crises manifest in the bony orbit. Orbital infarction usually presents with acute onset of periorbital tenderness, swelling, erythema, and pain. Soft tissue swelling can result in proptosis and attenuation of extraocular movements. Expedient diagnosis of sickle cell orbital infarction is crucial because this is a potentially sight-threatening entity. Diagnosis can be delayed since the presentation has physical and radiographic findings mimicking various infectious and traumatic processes. We describe a patient who presented with sickle cell orbital crisis without pain. This case highlights the importance of maintaining a high index of suspicion in patients with known sickle cell disease or of African descent born outside the United States in a region where screening for hemoglobinopathy is not routine, even when the presentation is not classic.

  17. [Orbital tumor emergencies in childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morax, S; Desjardins, L

    2009-05-01

    Emergencies in childhood orbital tumorals are rare. The absolute emergency involves malignant primary orbital tumors, such as rhabdomyosarcoma or secondary malignant tumors (metastatic neuroblastoma, leukemia), involving a vital prognosis requiring prompt diagnosis. Delayed emergencies are usually vascular lesions. Among these lesions, immature orbital hemangioma, with a good prognosis, must be distinguished from orbital adnexal lymphangiomas, which are less frequent but can lead to dramatic cosmetic and functional disorders. In rare cases, they can be responsible for sudden, painful proptosis, due to orbital hemorrhage, with a risk of optic nerve compression, requiring emergency surgical treatment. Neurogenous lesions, either isolated, such as in gliomas, or associated with a systemic disease, such as Recklinghausen neurofibromatosis, threaten the functional prognosis. Diagnosis of pediatric orbital tumors is based on a good clinical examination, precise imaging investigations, and evaluation of the locoregional extension of the tumor. Biopsy is required in emergency situations, when rhabdomyosarcoma is suspected, in order to start the chemotherapy. However, the biopsy can be superfluous, and even useless or dangerous, when clinical and imaging investigations are sufficient to provide a diagnosis of capillary hemangioma, lymphangioma, or metastatic tumor from an abdominal malignancy. Treatment is closely related to the etiopathogenesis of the tumor. The outcomes are vital, functional and cosmetic. They may require orbital surgery (biopsy, tumoral resection, orbital decompression in case of a compressive hemorrhage), systemic corticotherapy (as in immature adnexal hemangioma), radiation, and chemotherapy (rhabdomyosarcoma, secondary malignant tumor). These diseases require a pediatric ophthalmological medical center specializing in orbital surgery, with close collaboration of multiple specialists such as onco-pediatricians and neurosurgeons.

  18. Ocular complications of orbital venography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safer, J N; Guibor, P

    1975-03-01

    Three ocular complications directly related to orbital venography are described, one resulting in permanent loss of vision,. The patient had lymphangioma of the orbit which evidently had bled secondary to increased venous pressure and injection of contrast bolus. Both of the 2 patients with transient visual disturbances had diabetic retinopathy. The common factor is felt to be an imparied vascular bed which cannot meet the stress of increased venous pressure and contrast medium injection. Conditions which predispose to ocular-orbital stasis and/or hemorrhage are discussed.

  19. Summary of the results from the lunar orbiter laser altimeter after seven years in lunar orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Mazarico, Erwan; Lemoine, Frank G.; Head, James W., III; Lucey, Paul G.; Aharonson, Oded; Robinson, Mark S.; Sun, Xiaoli; Torrence, Mark H.; Barker, Michael K.; Oberst, Juergen; Duxbury, Thomas C.; Mao, Dandan; Barnouin, Olivier S.; Jha, Kopal; Rowlands, David D.; Goossens, Sander; Baker, David; Bauer, Sven; Gläser, Philipp; Lemelin, Myriam; Rosenburg, Margaret; Sori, Michael M.; Whitten, Jennifer; Mcclanahan, Timothy

    2017-02-01

    In June 2009 the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft was launched to the Moon. The payload consists of 7 science instruments selected to characterize sites for future robotic and human missions. Among them, the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) was designed to obtain altimetry, surface roughness, and reflectance measurements. The primary phase of lunar exploration lasted one year, following a 3-month commissioning phase. On completion of its exploration objectives, the LRO mission transitioned to a science mission. After 7 years in lunar orbit, the LOLA instrument continues to map the lunar surface. The LOLA dataset is one of the foundational datasets acquired by the various LRO instruments. LOLA provided a high-accuracy global geodetic reference frame to which past, present and future lunar observations can be referenced. It also obtained high-resolution and accurate global topography that were used to determine regions in permanent shadow at the lunar poles. LOLA further contributed to the study of polar volatiles through its unique measurement of surface brightness at zero phase, which revealed anomalies in several polar craters that may indicate the presence of water ice. In this paper, we describe the many LOLA accomplishments to date and its contribution to lunar and planetary science.

  20. Hooke's memorandum on the development of orbital dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Nauenberg, Michael

    2005-01-01

    I discuss a memorandum entitled " A True state of the Case and Controversy between Sir Isaak Newton and Dr. Robert Hooke as the Priority of that Noble Hypothesis of motion of ye Planets about ye Sun as their Centers", where Hooke summarizes his life long contributions to the development of the physics of orbital motion and the universal theory of gravitation

  1. CODIMENSION 3 BIFURCATIONS OF HOMOCLINIC ORBITS WITH ORBIT FLIPS AND INCLINATION FLIPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHUI SHULIANG; ZHU DEMING

    2004-01-01

    The homoclinic bifurcations in four dimensional vector fields are investigated by setting up a local coordinates near the homoclinic orbit. This homoclinic orbit is nonprincipal in the meanings that its positive semi-orbit takes orbit flip and its unstable foliation takes inclination flip. The existence, nonexistence, uniqueness and coexistence of the 1-homoclinic orbit and the 1-periodic orbit are studied. The existence of the twofold periodic orbit and three-fold periodic orbit are also obtained.

  2. Atmospheric Drag Perturbation in an Autonomous Orbit Determination for Satellite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE shen-fang; JIN Sheng-zhen; NING Shu-nian; SUN Cai-hong

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, an autonomous orbit determination method for satellite using a large field of view star sensor is presented. The simulation of orbit under atmospheric drag perturbation are given with expanded Kalman filtering.The large field of view star sensor has the same precision as star sensor and a sufficient filed of view. Therefore ,the refraction stars can be observed more accurately in real time. The geometric relation between the refracted starlight and the earth can be determined by tangent altitude of the refraction starlight. And then the earth enter can be determined in satellite body frame. The simulation shows that the precision of the mean square deviation of satellite's position and velocity is 5m and 0.01m/s respectively. The calculated decrement of the semi-major axis in one day is close to the theoretical result, and the absolute error is in the range of decimeter when the altitude of orbit is 750 km. The simulateion of orbit of different initial semi-major axis shows that the higher the altitude of orbit is, the smaller the decrement of the semi-major axis is, and when the altitude of orbit is 1700 km the decimeter of the semi-major axis is 10-7km.

  3. Classification of Stellar Orbits in Axisymmetric Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Baile; Khan, Fazeel

    2014-01-01

    It is known that two supermassive black holes (SMBHs) cannot merge in a spherical galaxy within a Hubble time; an emerging picture is that galaxy geometry, rotation, and large potential perturbations may usher the SMBH binary through the critical three-body scattering phase and ultimately drive the SMBH to coalesce. We explore the orbital content within an N-body model of a mildly- flattened, non-rotating, SMBH-embedded elliptical galaxy. When used as the foundation for a study on the SMBH binary coalescence, the black holes bypassed the binary stalling often seen within spherical galaxies and merged on Gyr timescales (Khan et al. 2013). Using both frequency-mapping and angular momentum criteria, we identify a wealth of resonant orbits in the axisymmetric model, including saucers, that are absent from an otherwise identical spherical system and that can potentially interact with the binary. We quantified the set of orbits that could be scattered by the SMBH binary, and found that the axisymmetric model contai...

  4. Accurate determination of heteroclinic orbits in chaotic dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jizhou; Tomsovic, Steven

    2017-03-01

    Accurate calculation of heteroclinic and homoclinic orbits can be of significant importance in some classes of dynamical system problems. Yet for very strongly chaotic systems initial deviations from a true orbit will be magnified by a large exponential rate making direct computational methods fail quickly. In this paper, a method is developed that avoids direct calculation of the orbit by making use of the well-known stability property of the invariant unstable and stable manifolds. Under an area-preserving map, this property assures that any initial deviation from the stable (unstable) manifold collapses onto them under inverse (forward) iterations of the map. Using a set of judiciously chosen auxiliary points on the manifolds, long orbit segments can be calculated using the stable and unstable manifold intersections of the heteroclinic (homoclinic) tangle. Detailed calculations using the example of the kicked rotor are provided along with verification of the relation between action differences and certain areas bounded by the manifolds.

  5. Lux in obscuro: Photon Orbits of Extremal Black Holes Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Khoo, Fech Scen

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown in the literature that the event horizon of an asymptotically flat extremal Reissner-Nordstr\\"om black hole is also a stable photon sphere. We further clarify this statement and give a general proof that this holds for a large class of static spherically symmetric black hole spacetimes with an extremal horizon. In contrast, an asymptotically flat extremal Kerr black hole has an unstable photon orbit on the equatorial plane of its horizon. In addition, we show that an asymptotically flat extremal Kerr-Newman black hole exhibits two equatorial photon orbits if $a M/2$, there is only one equatorial photon orbit, located on the extremal horizon, and it is unstable. There can be no photon orbit on the horizon of a non-extremal Kerr-Newman black hole.

  6. TOLOSA-HUNT SYNDROME MIMICKING AS ORBITAL COMPLICATION OF SINUSITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raveendra . Gadag

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Tolosa – Hunt syndrome is a rare, benign condition characterized by severe unilateral headache with extraocular palsies, orbital pain caused by nonspecific granulomatous inflammation in the cavernous sinus, superior orbital fissure or the orbit. (1-4 The incidence of Tolosa - Hunt syndrome has been estimated as approximately one to two cases per million. The etiology of the syndrome is largely unknown and it can affect people of virtually any age, with no sex predilection. It is usually unilateral, with no predisposition for right or left side; it has been reported as bilateral in 4.1-5 % cases. (2, 4 We report a rare case of Tolosa-Hunt syndrome which was misdiagnosed as sinusitis with orbital complication. The clinical features, diagnostic investigation and the importance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI studies in the differentiation of the condition are addressed.

  7. Orbital physics in the perovskite Ti oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochizuki, Masahito [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Imada, Masatoshi [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan)

    2004-11-01

    Titanate compounds have been recognized as key materials for understanding the coupling of magnetism and orbitals in strongly correlated electron systems. In the perovskite Ti oxide RTiO{sub 3} (where R represents the trivalent rare-earth ions), which is a typical Mott-Hubbard insulator, the Ti t{sub 2g} orbitals and spins in the 3d{sup 1} state couple each other through the strong electron correlations, resulting in a rich variety of orbital-spin phases. One way of controlling the coupling is to change the tiltings of the TiO{sub 6} octahedra (namely the GdFeO{sub 3}-type distortion) by varying the R ions, through which the relative ratio of the electron bandwidth to the Coulomb interaction is controlled. With this control, these Mott insulators exhibit an antiferromagnetic-to-ferromagnetic (AFM-FM) phase transition, which has turned out to be a consequence of rich orbital physics in these materials. The origin and nature of orbital-spin structures of these Mott insulators have been intensively studied both experimentally and theoretically. When the Mott insulators are doped with carriers, the titanates show touchstone properties of the filling controlled Mott transition. In this paper, we first review the state of the art on the studies for understanding physics contained in the properties of the perovskite titanates. On the properties of the insulators, we focus on the following three topics: (1) the origin and nature of the ferromagnetism as well as the orbital ordering in the compounds with relatively small R ions such as GdTiO{sub 3} and YTiO{sub 3} (2) the origin of the G-type antiferromagnetism and the orbital state in LaTiO{sub 3} and (3) the orbital-spin structures in other AFM(G) compounds with relatively large R ions (R = Ce, Pr, Nd and Sm). On the basis of these discussions, we discuss the whole phase diagram together with mechanisms of the magnetic phase transition. On the basis of the microscopic understanding of the orbital-spin states, we show that

  8. Real and Hybrid Atomic Orbitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, D. B.; Fowler, P. W.

    1981-01-01

    Demonstrates that the Schrodinger equation for the hydrogenlike atom separates in both spheroconal and prolate spheroidal coordinates and that these separations provide a sound theoretical basis for the real and hybrid atomic orbitals. (Author/SK)

  9. [Orbital metastasis in malignant melanoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroli, G L; Hamedani, M; Barraco, P; Oubaaz, A; Morax, S

    2001-03-01

    We report the case of a 60-year-old man presenting bilateral progressive proptosis with diplopia, weight loss, tachycardia, nervosity, and stomach pain. These signs seemed at first to favor a diagnosis of Graves'ophthalmopathy. Thyroid tests were negative and the initial orbital CT scan was considered normal. A new radiological investigation 4 months later in our hospital revealed typical hypertrophy of the extraocular muscles compatible with orbital metastasis. The systemic investigations demonstrated a pulmonary tumor, multiple hepatic lesions, and several pigmented nodules of gastric mucosa. The pathology of pulmonary and gastric specimens confirmed the diagnosis of malignant melanoma. The primary lesion remains unknown. The authors discuss the differential diagnoses of orbital metastasis and the radiological characteristics of orbital metastasis in malignant melanoma.

  10. NASA Orbital Debris Baseline Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krisko, Paula H.; Vavrin, A. B.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has created high fidelity populations of the debris environment. The populations include objects of 1 cm and larger in Low Earth Orbit through Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit. They were designed for the purpose of assisting debris researchers and sensor developers in planning and testing. This environment is derived directly from the newest ORDEM model populations which include a background derived from LEGEND, as well as specific events such as the Chinese ASAT test, the Iridium 33/Cosmos 2251 accidental collision, the RORSAT sodium-potassium droplet releases, and other miscellaneous events. It is the most realistic ODPO debris population to date. In this paper we present the populations in chart form. We describe derivations of the background population and the specific populations added on. We validate our 1 cm and larger Low Earth Orbit population against SSN, Haystack, and HAX radar measurements.

  11. ORBITAL MANIFESTATIONS OF SINUS DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyothirmayi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM : To study the orbital manifestations in patients with sinus disease. METHODS : Patients wit h paranasal sinus disease presenting to OPD at Government ENT Hospital, AMC, Visakhapatnam from January 2012 to June 2014 were screened for orbital manifestations. Out of these, thirteen patients with orbital disease were referred to GREH, AMC, Visakhapatn am and were thoroughly investigated and managed appropriately. RESULTS : Out of the 14 patients 4 were female and 10 were male. Age ranged from 19 years to 70 years. 5 had maxillary sinus disease (4 - carcinoma and 1 case of mucormycosis. Frontal sinus dis ease was seen in two patients, one fibrous dysplasia and one malignancy. Five patients had ethmoidal sinus disease of which three patients were found to have ethmoidal sinus tumour (Malignant melanoma, Squamous cell Carcinoma. More than two sinuses were i nvolved in 2 patients. CONCLUSIONS : Early screening of patients with sinus disease by an Ophthalmologist can help in preventing severe vision threatening orbital complications.

  12. Closed Orbits in Phase Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Andrew; Haestad, Jace; Morgan, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    We report characteristics of closed classical orbits in an electric field in phase space produced in photoabsorption. Rydberg states of atomic and molecular hydrogen and helium are considered. The core potential used for the hydrogen molecule is an effective one electron one center core potential evaluated at the internuclear equilibrium distance. Poincare surfaces of section in phase space are generated by integrating the equations of motion in semiparabolic coordinates u = (r + z) 1 / 2 and v = (r - z) 1 / 2, and plotting the location in phase space (pv versus v) whenever u = 0, with the electric field in the z direction. Combination orbits produced by Rydberg electron core scattering are studied and the evolution in phase space of these combination orbits due to scattering from one closed orbit into another is investigated. Connections are made to measured laser photoabsorption experiments that excite Rydberg states (20 recurrence spectra. The phase space structures responsible for the spectra are identified.

  13. A Case of Orbital Histoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakauer, Mark; Prendes, Mark Armando; Wilkes, Byron; Lee, Hui Bae Harold; Fraig, Mostafa; Nunery, William R

    2016-01-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum var capsulatum is a dimorphic fungus endemic to the Ohio and Mississippi River Valleys of the United States. In this case report, a 33-year-old woman who presented with a right orbital mass causing progressive vision loss, diplopia, and facial swelling is described. Lateral orbitotomy with lateral orbital wall bone flap was performed for excisional biopsy of the lesion. The 1.5 × 1.8 × 2.3 cm cicatricial mass demonstrated a granulomatous lesion with necrosis and positive staining consistent with Histoplasma capsulatum var capsulatum infection. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of orbital histoplasmosis to be reported in the United States and the first case worldwide of orbital histoplasmosis due to Histoplasma capsulatum var capsulatum.

  14. How to Orbit the Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quimby, Donald J.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the geometry, algebra, and logic involved in the solution of a "Mindbenders" problem in "Discover" magazine and applies it to calculations of satellite orbital velocity. Extends the solution of this probe to other applications of falling objects. (JM)

  15. The LOFT (Large Observatory for X-ray Timing) background simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campana, R.; Feroci, M.; Del Monte, E.

    2012-01-01

    around compact objects. With an effective area of ~10 m2 LOFT will be able to measure very fast variability in the X-ray fluxes and spectra. A good knowledge of the in-orbit background environment is essential to assess the scientific performance of the mission and to optimize the instrument...... design. The two main contributions to the background are cosmic diffuse X-rays and high energy cosmic rays; also, albedo emission from the Earth is significant. These contributions to the background for both the Large Area Detector and the Wide Field Monitor are discussed, on the basis of extrensive...

  16. Spin–orbit coupling in actinide cations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagus, Paul S.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Martin, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    The limiting case of Russell–Saunders coupling, which leads to a maximum spin alignment for the open shell electrons, usually explains the properties of high spin ionic crystals with transition metals. For actinide compounds, the spin–orbit splitting is large enough to cause a significantly reduced...... spin alignment. Novel concepts are used to explain the dependence of the spin alignment on the 5f shell occupation. We present evidence that the XPS of ionic actinide materials may provide direct information about the angular momentum coupling within the 5f shell....

  17. Polar antiferromagnets produced with orbital order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Naoki; Ogimoto, Yasushi; Ida, Yoshiaki; Nomura, Yusuke; Arita, Ryotaro; Miyano, Kenjiro

    2012-04-13

    Polar states are realized in pseudocubic manganite films fabricated on high-index substrates, in which a Jahn-Teller (JT) distortion remains an active variable. Several types of orbital orders (OOs) were found to develop large optical second harmonics, signaling broken-inversion symmetry distinct from their bulk forms and films on (100) substrates. The observed symmetry lifting and first-principles calculation both indicate that the modified JT q2 mode drives Mn-site off centering, which can be controlled by a magnetic-field-induced phase transition via a coupling of OO and spin orders.

  18. Orbital mechanics near Lagrange's points

    OpenAIRE

    Utashima, Masayoshi; 歌島 昌由

    1997-01-01

    The first libration-point satellite ISEE-3 (International Sun-Earth Explorer-3) was launched in 1978. Though, no libration-point satellites were realized after the launch of the ISEE-3, NASA launched the ESA's Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft into the halo orbit in the sun-earth system in late 1995. The halo orbit in the sun-earth system is adequate for missions such as solar observation, astronomical observation, NEO (Near Earth Objects) observation, communications with t...

  19. Orbit Determination Analysis for SSAPurposes

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Space Situational Awareness (SSA) is the characterization of the space environmentand of space activities. The fundament of SSA is the access to information about theorbit of space objects. There exist several techniques to determine the orbit of objects inspace, both from space-based and from ground-based observations. This Master's Thesisproject aims at investigating orbit determinations from ground-based radar observations.In particular, the use of the EISCAT Ultra-High-Frequency (UHF) inc...

  20. Orbits in a logarithmic potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooverman, R. H.

    2014-04-15

    The characteristics of charged particle orbits in the logarithmic electrostatic potential field surrounding a straight conducting wire at a fixed potential are investigated. The equations of motion of an electron in a logarithmic potential are derived, the limiting cases are considered, and the results of numerical integration of the equations of motion are presented along with sketches of a few representative orbits. (C.E.S.)

  1. Impact of Ionosphere on GPS-based Precise Orbit Determination of Low Earth Orbiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, D.; Jaeggi, A.; Beutler, G.; Meyer, U.; Schaer, S.

    2015-12-01

    Deficiencies in geodetic products derived from the orbital trajectories of Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) satellites determined by GPS-based Precise Orbit Determination (POD) were identified in recent years. The precise orbits of the Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) mission are, e.g., severely affected by an increased position noise level over the geomagnetic poles and spurious signatures along the Earth's geomagnetic equator (see Fig. 1, which shows the carrier phase residuals of a reduced-dynamic orbit determination for GOCE in m). Such degradations may directly map into the gravity fields recovered from the orbits. They are related to a disturbed GPS signal propagation through the Earth's ionosphere and indicate that the GPS observation model and/or the data pre-processing need to be improved. While GOCE was the first mission where severe ionosphere-related problems became obvious, the GPS-based LEO POD of satellites of the more recent missions Swarm and Sentinel-1A turn out to be affected, as well. We characterize the stochastic and systematic behavior of the ionosphere by analyzing GPS data collected by the POD antennas of various LEO satellites covering a broad altitude range (e.g., GRACE, GOCE and Swarm) and for periods covering significant parts of an entire solar cycle, which probe substantially different ionosphere conditions. The information may provide the basis for improvements of data pre-processing to cope with the ionosphere-induced problems of LEO POD. The performance of cycle slip detection can, e.g., be degraded by large changes of ionospheric refraction from one measurement epoch to the next. Geographically resolved information on the stochastic properties of the ionosphere above the LEOs provide more realistic threshold values for cycle slip detection algorithms. Removing GPS data showing large ionospheric variations is a crude method to mitigate the ionosphere-induced artifacts in orbit and gravity field products

  2. Diplopia and orbital wall fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffano, Paolo; Roccia, Fabio; Gallesio, Cesare; Karagozoglu, K Hakki; Forouzanfar, Tymour

    2014-01-01

    Diplopia is a symptom that is frequently associated with orbital wall fractures. The aim of this article was to present the incidence and patterns of diplopia after orbital wall blow-out fractures in 2 European centers, Turin and Amsterdam, and to identify any correlation between this symptom and such fractures. This study is based on 2 databases that have continuously recorded data of patients hospitalized with maxillofacial fractures between 2001 and 2010. On the whole, 447 patients (334 males, 113 females) with pure blow-out orbital wall fractures were included. The most frequently involved orbital site was the floor (359 fractures), followed by medial wall (41 fractures) and lateral wall (5 fractures). At presentation, 227 patients (50.7%) had evidence of diplopia. In particular, in most patients, a diplopia in all directions was referred (78 patients). Statistically significant associations were found between diplopia on eye elevation and orbital floor fractures (P diplopia and medial wall fractures (P diplopia on eye elevation and horizontal diplopia at presentation could be useful clinical indicators orbital floor and medial wall fractures, respectively.

  3. Microbiological profile of orbital abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Suneetha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Knowledge of the culture and sensitivity pattern is necessary, for the institution of appropriate empirical antibiotic therapy in orbital abscess. Objective: The objective of this study is to describe culture and sensitivity patterns of specimens from the orbit and surrounding structures. Materials and Methods: Retrospectively the medical records of 56 cases of orbital abscess were reviewed. Results: Cultures were positive in 38/56 (68.8% orbital specimens and the organisms included Staphylococcus aureus 18, Streptococci 7, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 3, 2 each of Enterobactersp, Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Acinetobacter sp. and 1 each of Actinomyces israelii, Diptheroids, Coagulase negative Staphylococcus, Citrobacter freundii, Methicillin-resistant S. aureus and Enterococcus faecalis. Four had polymicrobial infection. Culture of purulent nasal discharge, swabs taken from foci of infection on the face, and blood cultures were done in 26/56, and positive cultures were obtained in 16/26 (61.5% specimens. In 12 patients, there was a concurrence in the organism cultured from the orbit and from cultures from other sites. Gram-negative organisms were associated with increased ocular morbidity. Conclusion: Gram-positive cocci, especially S. aureus are the most common organisms isolated from orbital abscesses. Infections by Gram-negative organisms were associated with more complications. Empirical intravenous antibiotic therapy should have a broad spectrum of activity effective against a wide range of Staphylococcal organisms and Gram-negative bacilli.

  4. Low Earth orbit communications satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroney, D.; Lashbrook, D.; Mckibben, B.; Gardener, N.; Rivers, T.; Nottingham, G.; Golden, B.; Barfield, B.; Bruening, J.; Wood, D.

    1992-01-01

    A current thrust in satellite communication systems considers a low-Earth orbiting constellations of satellites for continuous global coverage. Conceptual design studies have been done at the time of this design project by LORAL Aerospace Corporation under the program name GLOBALSTAR and by Motorola under their IRIDIUM program. This design project concentrates on the spacecraft design of the GLOBALSTAR low-Earth orbiting communication system. Overview information on the program was gained through the Federal Communications Commission licensing request. The GLOBALSTAR system consists of 48 operational satellites positioned in a Walker Delta pattern providing global coverage and redundancy. The operational orbit is 1389 km (750 nmi) altitude with eight planes of six satellites each. The orbital planes are spaced 45 deg., and the spacecraft are separated by 60 deg. within the plane. A Delta 2 launch vehicle is used to carry six spacecraft for orbit establishment. Once in orbit, the spacecraft will utilize code-division multiple access (spread spectrum modulation) for digital relay, voice, and radio determination satellite services (RDSS) yielding position determination with accuracy up to 200 meters.

  5. Orbital Volumetry in Graves' Orbitopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Bakri, Moug; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh; Thomsen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    .6 cm(3) in controls, 8.7 ± 8.0 cm(3) in GO without DON, and 9.4 ± 3.1 cm(3) in GO with DON. The muscle and fat volumes were higher in patients with GO than in controls (P orbits with and without DON were not significantly different. The volume of the optic nerve were...... similar in the 3 groups. The number of apical, coronal 2 mm thick slices with no fat was 2.9 ± 0.9 in normal orbits, it was 4.1 ± 1.0 in GO orbits without DON and 5.3 ± 0.8 in GO orbits with DON (P = 0.007). Conclusion. Apical muscle enlargement may be more important than orbital fat enlargement......Purpose. We wanted to investigate the relative significance of fat and muscle enlargement in the development of dysthyroid optic neuropathy (DON) in Graves' orbitopathy (GO). Methods. Preoperative coronal CT scans of 13 patients with and without DON who subsequently underwent orbital decompression...

  6. Spinning test-body orbiting around Schwarzschild black hole: circular dynamics and gravitational-wave fluxes

    CERN Document Server

    Harms, Enno; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Nagar, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    We consider a spinning test-body in circular motion around a nonrotating black hole and analyze different prescriptions for the body's dynamics. We compare, for the first time, the Mathisson-Papapetrou formalism under the Tulczyjew spin-supplementary-condition (SSC), the Pirani SSC and the Ohashi-Kyrian-Semerak SSC, and the spinning particle limit of the effective-one-body Hamiltonian of [Phys.~Rev.~D.90,~044018(2014)]. We analyze the four different dynamics in terms of the ISCO shifts and in terms of the coordinate invariant binding energies, separating higher-order spin contributions from spin-orbit contributions. The asymptotic gravitational wave fluxes produced by the spinning body are computed by solving the inhomogeneous $(2+1)D$ Teukolsky equation and contrasted for the different cases. For small orbital frequencies $\\Omega$, all the prescriptions reduce to the same dynamics and the same radiation fluxes. For large frequencies, ${x \\equiv (M \\Omega)^{2/3} >0.1 }$, where $M$ is the black hole mass, and ...

  7. Angular dependence of spin-orbit spin-transfer torques

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Ki-Seung

    2015-04-06

    In ferromagnet/heavy-metal bilayers, an in-plane current gives rise to spin-orbit spin-transfer torque, which is usually decomposed into fieldlike and dampinglike torques. For two-dimensional free-electron and tight-binding models with Rashba spin-orbit coupling, the fieldlike torque acquires nontrivial dependence on the magnetization direction when the Rashba spin-orbit coupling becomes comparable to the exchange interaction. This nontrivial angular dependence of the fieldlike torque is related to the Fermi surface distortion, determined by the ratio of the Rashba spin-orbit coupling to the exchange interaction. On the other hand, the dampinglike torque acquires nontrivial angular dependence when the Rashba spin-orbit coupling is comparable to or stronger than the exchange interaction. It is related to the combined effects of the Fermi surface distortion and the Fermi sea contribution. The angular dependence is consistent with experimental observations and can be important to understand magnetization dynamics induced by spin-orbit spin-transfer torques.

  8. Space Tourism: Orbital Debris Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudian, N.; Shajiee, S.; Moghani, T.; Bahrami, M.

    2002-01-01

    Space activities after a phase of research and development, political competition and national prestige have entered an era of real commercialization. Remote sensing, earth observation, and communication are among the areas in which this growing industry is facing competition and declining government money. A project like International Space Station, which draws from public money, has not only opened a window of real multinational cooperation, but also changed space travel from a mere fantasy into a real world activity. Besides research activities for sending man to moon and Mars and other outer planets, space travel has attracted a considerable attention in recent years in the form of space tourism. Four countries from space fairing nations are actively involved in the development of space tourism. Even, nations which are either in early stages of space technology development or just beginning their space activities, have high ambitions in this area. This is worth noting considering their limited resources. At present, trips to space are available, but limited and expensive. To move beyond this point to generally available trips to orbit and week long stays in LEO, in orbital hotels, some of the required basic transportations, living requirements, and technological developments required for long stay in orbit are already underway. For tourism to develop to a real everyday business, not only the price has to come down to meaningful levels, but also safety considerations should be fully developed to attract travelers' trust. A serious hazard to space activities in general and space tourism in particular is space debris in earth orbit. Orbiting debris are man-made objects left over by space operations, hazardous to space missions. Since the higher density of debris population occurs in low earth orbit, which is also the same orbit of interest to space tourism, a careful attention should be paid to the effect of debris on tourism activities. In this study, after a

  9. Orbital, subconjunctival, and subcutaneous emphysema after an orbital floor fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ababneh OH

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Osama H Ababneh Department of Ophthalmology, The University of Jordan and Jordan University Hospital, Amman, Jordan Abstract: A 16-year-old boy presented to the emergency department with the complaint of a sudden, painful left eye and proptosis after an episode of sneezing. A few hours earlier, he had sustained a blunt trauma to the left orbit as the result of a fistfight. The initial examination showed subcutaneous and subconjunctival emphysema. Visual acuity in the left eye was 20/30 (0.67, the pupils were reactive with no relative afferent pupillary defect, and there were mild limitations in levoduction and supraduction. A slit-lamp examination showed normal anterior and posterior segments with an intraocular pressure of 26 mmHg. An orbital computed tomography scan showed orbital, subconjunctival, and subcutaneous emphysema associated with a small fracture of the orbital floor. Following conservative management with broad-spectrum oral antibiotics, a topical antiglaucoma drug, and lubricating eye drops, the patient improved dramatically within one week. Keywords: emphysema, orbital fracture, trauma

  10. Celestial n-Body Coupling in the Lunar Orbit Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, K. H.

    2000-09-01

    Making use of the fact that, in the solar system, the angular momentum is carried predominantly by the planets while the mass is beared almost entirely by the Sun, an iterative scheme is devised to solve approximately the n-body contributions of the lunar orbit problem. The scheme envisages the Moon-Earth-Sun three-body subsystem as being nested in the grand Earth-Jupiter-Sun system. In the planetocentric representation, the orbital motion of the Sun about the solar system center of mass is transmitted to the third body via the second primary body in both the grand and nested three-body systems.

  11. A Framework for Precise Orbit Determination of Small Body Orbiting Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesar, Siamak G.

    Spacecraft flying in close proximity of small bodies face a very complex dynamical environment with numerous types of perturbing forces acting on them. Development of new techniques are needed for precise navigation of spacecraft in such environments. This study focuses on furthering our understanding of precise orbit determination of spacecraft in close proximity of small bodies via implementation of new methods for precise representation of strong and weak perturbing forces acting on spacecraft, such as the irregular gravitational field, strong solar radiation pressure effects, and thermal radiation pressure effects from the surface of small bodies. Solar radiation pressure is a strong perturbing force acting on spacecraft in the orbital environment of small bodies that constantly pushes the spacecraft in a general direction away from the Sun. The existence of strong solar radiation pressure effects creates a complex dynamical environment around asteroids and comets that results in a particular set of orbital regimes, such as the family of the terminator or close to terminator orbits, whose dynamical evolution may not be intuitive. Small perturbations caused by maneuver errors and other sources may lead to large deviations in a spacecraft trajectory from its nominal orbit. Understanding the evolution of errors and uncertainties in the orbital elements of spacecraft is a crucial piece of mission planning and spacecraft navigation. In this thesis, we derive analytical expressions that govern the secular motion of the perturbed orbital elements in an environment that is strongly perturbed by the solar radiation pressure effects. Furthermore, we study a framework based on a Fourier series expansion for precise representation of the solar radiation pressure and small body surface thermal radiation pressure effects on spacecraft. This method is utilized in generating precise orbit determination solutions for simulated spacecraft in orbit about small bodies in the

  12. Valence Virtual Orbitals: An Unambiguous ab Initio Quantification of the LUMO Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Michael W; Hull, Emily A; Windus, Theresa L

    2015-10-15

    Many chemical concepts hinge on the notion of an orbital called the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital, or LUMO. This hypothetical orbital and the much more concrete highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) constitute the two "frontier orbitals", which rationalize a great deal of chemistry. A viable LUMO candidate should have a sensible energy value, a realistic shape with amplitude on those atoms where electron attachment or reduction or excitation processes occur, and often an antibonding correspondence to one of the highest occupied MOs. Unfortunately, today's quantum chemistry calculations do not yield useful empty orbitals. Instead, the empty canonical orbitals form a large sea of orbitals, where the interesting valence antibonds are scrambled with the basis set's polarization and diffuse augmentations. The LUMO is thus lost within a continuum associated with a detached electron, as well as many Rydberg excited states. A suitable alternative to the canonical orbitals is proposed, namely, the valence virtual orbitals. VVOs are found by a simple algorithm based on singular value decomposition, which allows for the extraction of all valence-like orbitals from the large empty canonical orbital space. VVOs are found to be nearly independent of the working basis set. The utility of VVOs is demonstrated for construction of qualitative MO diagrams, for prediction of valence excited states, and as starting orbitals for more sophisticated calculations. This suggests that VVOs are a suitable realization of the LUMO, LUMO + 1, ... VVO generation requires no expert knowledge, as the number of VVOs sought is found by counting s-block atoms as having only a valence s orbital, transition metals as having valence s and d, and main group atoms as being valence s and p elements. Closed shell, open shell, or multireference wave functions and elements up to xenon may be used in the present program.

  13. Periodic local MP2 method employing orbital specific virtuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usvyat, Denis, E-mail: denis.usvyat@chemie.uni-regensburg.de; Schütz, Martin, E-mail: martin.schuetz@chemie.uni-regensburg.de [Institute for Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Universität Regensburg, Universitätsstraße 31, D-93040 Regensburg (Germany); Maschio, Lorenzo, E-mail: lorenzo.maschio@unito.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, and Centre of Excellence NIS (Nanostructured Interfaces and Surfaces), Università di Torino, via Giuria 5, I-10125 Torino (Italy)

    2015-09-14

    We introduce orbital specific virtuals (OSVs) to represent the truncated pair-specific virtual space in periodic local Møller-Plesset perturbation theory of second order (LMP2). The OSVs are constructed by diagonalization of the LMP2 amplitude matrices which correspond to diagonal Wannier-function (WF) pairs. Only a subset of these OSVs is adopted for the subsequent OSV-LMP2 calculation, namely, those with largest contribution to the diagonal pair correlation energy and with the accumulated value of these contributions reaching a certain accuracy. The virtual space for a general (non diagonal) pair is spanned by the union of the two OSV sets related to the individual WFs of the pair. In the periodic LMP2 method, the diagonal LMP2 amplitude matrices needed for the construction of the OSVs are calculated in the basis of projected atomic orbitals (PAOs), employing very large PAO domains. It turns out that the OSVs are excellent to describe short range correlation, yet less appropriate for long range van der Waals correlation. In order to compensate for this bias towards short range correlation, we augment the virtual space spanned by the OSVs by the most diffuse PAOs of the corresponding minimal PAO domain. The Fock and overlap matrices in OSV basis are constructed in the reciprocal space. The 4-index electron repulsion integrals are calculated by local density fitting and, for distant pairs, via multipole approximation. New procedures for determining the fit-domains and the distant-pair lists, leading to higher efficiency in the 4-index integral evaluation, have been implemented. Generally, and in contrast to our previous PAO based periodic LMP2 method, the OSV-LMP2 method does not require anymore great care in the specification of the individual domains (to get a balanced description when calculating energy differences) and is in that sense a black box procedure. Discontinuities in potential energy surfaces, which may occur for PAO-based calculations if one is not

  14. Early-type Eclipsing Binaries at Intermediate Orbital Periods

    CERN Document Server

    Moe, Maxwell

    2015-01-01

    We analyze 221 eclipsing binaries (EBs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud with B-type main-sequence (MS) primaries ($M_1$ $\\approx$ 4 - 14 M$_{\\odot}$) and orbital periods $P$ = 20 - 50 days that were photometrically monitored by the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment. We utilize our three-stage automated pipeline to (1) classify all 221 EBs, (2) fit physical models to the light curves of 130 detached well-defined EBs from which unique parameters can be determined, and (3) recover the intrinsic binary statistics by correcting for selection effects. We uncover two statistically significant trends with age. First, younger EBs tend to reside in dustier environments with larger photometric extinctions, an empirical relation that can be implemented when modeling stellar populations. Second, younger EBs generally have large eccentricities. This demonstrates that massive binaries at moderate orbital periods are born with a Maxwellian "thermal" orbital velocity distribution, which indicates they formed via dynamica...

  15. Orbit graphs and face-transitivity of k-orbit polytopes

    OpenAIRE

    Cunningham, Gabe

    2012-01-01

    The orbit graph of a k-orbit polytope is a graph on k nodes that shows how the flag orbits are related by flag adjacency. Using orbit graphs, we classify k-orbit polytopes and determine when a k-orbit polytope is i-transitive. We then provide an explicit classification of three-orbit polytopes, and we describe a generating set for their automorphism groups.

  16. Coupled thermo-orbital evolution of tidally-evolved Earth-like planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behounkova, Marie; Walterova, Michaela; Cadek, Ondrej; Tobie, Gabriel; Choblet, Gael

    2016-10-01

    Progress in detection techniques of exoplanets inspired increasing number of studies focused on their internal dynamics and evolution. The detection methods tend to favor the discovery of short-period exoplanets, that are predicted to get rapidly tidally locked. During the locking process planets despin and a significant amount of tidal heating may contribute to the thermal budget of the planet. Moreover, tidally locked exoplanets exhibit large surface temperature contrasts between sub-stellar and anti-stellar sides due to uneven insolation which influence the convection pattern and cooling of the planet. Here, we will present the evolution of tidally locked Earth-like exoplanets using numerical tool Antigone (Behounkova et al., 2010, 2011) coupling long-term internal evolution, tidal dissipation (taking into account Maxwell or Andrade rheology) and uneven insolation pattern. For constant orbital parameters, we will focus on numerical simulation of the heat transfer in exoEarths for various rheological properties of planet and various values of spin-orbit resonance, semi-major axis, eccentricity and luminosity of star. In the case of effective heat transfer, our results suggest that the melting is mainly observed within the upper part of the mantle for tidal heating lower than 100TW . For tidal heating higher than 100TW, the melt is produced also within the deep part of the mantle and degree-2 convection is enhanced due to tidal heating pattern. For large tidal heating (larger than 1000TW), global melting is observed and temperature field is homogenized due to global melting, the heat transfer is mainly due to melt extraction and advection is suppressed. We will further present first results of coupled orbital-internal evolution of planets without companion using numerical model of orbital evolution with realistic (Maxwell or Andrade) rheology (Walterova et al., in prep). We will concentrate on the capture into the spin-orbit resonance. Special attention will be

  17. Tumor pathology of the orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héran, F; Bergès, O; Blustajn, J; Boucenna, M; Charbonneau, F; Koskas, P; Lafitte, F; Nau, E; Roux, P; Sadik, J C; Savatovsky, J; Williams, M

    2014-10-01

    The term orbital tumor covers a wide range of benign and malignant diseases affecting specific component of the orbit or developing in contact with them. They are found incidentally or may be investigated as part of the assessment of a systemic disorder or because of orbital signs (exophthalmos, pain, etc.). Computed tomography, MRI and Color Doppler Ultrasound (CDU), play a varying role depending on the clinical presentation and the disease being investigated. This article reflects long experience in a reference center but does not claim to be exhaustive. We have chosen to consider these tumors from the perspective of their usual presentation, emphasizing the most common causes and suggestive radiological and clinical presentations (progressive or sudden-onset exophthalmos, children or adults, lacrimal gland lesions, periorbital lesions and enophthalmos). We will describe in particular muscle involvement (thyrotoxicosis and tumors), vascular lesions (cavernous sinus hemangioma, orbital varix, cystic lymphangioma), childhood lesions and orbital hematomas. We offer straightforward useful protocols for simple investigation and differential diagnosis. Readers who wish to go further to extend their knowledge in this fascinating area can refer to the references in the bibliography.

  18. First Spacecraft Orbit of Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-03-01

    After a 7.9-billion-kilometer flight since its launch on 3 August 2004—which included flybys of Earth, Venus, and Mercury—NASA's MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft entered a planned, highly elliptical orbit around the closest planet to our Sun on 17 March. Engineers in the mission operations center at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) in Laurel, Md., which manages the mission for NASA, received radiometric signals indicating a successful orbit insertion at 9:10 P.M. local time. "Tonight we will have orbited the fifth planet in the solar system. This is a major accomplishment," Ed Weiler, NASA assistant administrator for the Science Mission Directorate, said at a 17 March public forum at JHU/APL, noting that spacecraft have previously entered orbit around several other planets. "You only go into orbit for the first time around Mercury once in human history, and that is what was accomplished tonight."

  19. Featured Image: Globular Cluster Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-04-01

    This figure (click for the full view) shows the meridional galactic orbits of 12 globular clusters that orbit the Milky Way. The recent release of stellar parallax data from Gaia allowed a team of scientists at Dartmouth College to improve measurements of a number of galactic globular clusters very old clusters of stars that can either orbit within the galactic disk and bulge or more distantly in the galactic halo. In a recent publication led by Erin OMalley, the team presents their findings and combines their new measurements for the clusters with proper motions from past studies to calculate the orbits that these globulars take. These calculations show us whether the clusters reside in the galactic disk and bulge (as only NGC 104 does in the sample shown here, since its orbit is confined to 8 kpc radially and 4 kpc vertically of the galactic center), or if they are halo clusters. To learn more about the authors work, you can check out the paper below!CitationErin M. OMalley et al 2017 ApJ 838 162. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/aa6574

  20. MYC/BCL2 protein coexpression contributes to the inferior survival of activated B-cell subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and demonstrates high-risk gene expression signatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Shimin; Xu-Monette, Zijun Y; Tzankov, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is stratified into prognostically favorable germinal center B-cell (GCB)-like and unfavorable activated B-cell (ABC)-like subtypes based on gene expression signatures. In this study, we analyzed 893 de novo DLBCL patients treated with R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclo...

  1. Orbital Evolution of Impact Ejecta from Ganymede

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarellos, Jose Luis; Zahnle, Kevin J.; Dobrovolskis, Anthony R.; Hamill, Patrick

    2002-11-01

    We have numerically computed the orbital evolution of ˜10 3 particles representing high-speed ejecta from Gilgamesh, the largest impact basin on Ganymede. The integration includes the four Galilean satellites, Jupiter (including J2 and J4), Saturn, and the Sun. The integrations last 100,000 years. The particles are ejected at a variety of speeds and directions, with the fastest particles ejected at 1.4 times the escape speed vesc≡ 2GM G/R G of Ganymede. Ejecta with speeds v0.96 vesc, most particles escape Ganymede and achieve orbits about Jupiter. Eventually most (˜71%) of the jovicentric particles hit Ganymede, with 92% of these hitting within 1000 years. The accretion rate scales as 1/ t. Their impact sites are randomly distributed, as expected for planetocentric debris. We estimate that most of the resulting impact craters are a few kilometers across and smaller. The rest of the escaping ejecta are partitioned as follows: ˜3% hit Io; ˜10% hit Europa; ˜13% hit Callisto; 2% reach heliocentric space; and less than ˜1% hit Jupiter. Only two particles survived the entire 10 5-year integration. Ejecta from large impact events do not appear to be a plausible source of large craters on the Galilean satellites; however, such ejecta may account for the majority of small craters.

  2. In-Orbit Servicing: The Master Enabler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Benjamin B.; Kienlen, Michael; Naasz, Bo; Roberts, Brian; Deweese, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Some of the most noteworthy missions in space exploration have occurred in the last two decades and owe their success to on-orbit servicing. The tremendously successful Hubble Space Telescope repair and upgrade missions, as well as the completed assembly of the International Space Station (ISS) and its full utilization, lead us to the next chapter and set of challenges. These include fully exploiting the many space systems already launched, assembling large structures in situ thereby enabling new scientific discoveries, and providing systems that reliably and cost-effectively support the next steps in space exploration. In-orbit servicing is a tool--a tool that can serve as the master enabler to create space architectures that would otherwise be unattainable. This paper will survey how NASA's satellite-servicing technology development efforts are being applied to the planning and execution of two such ambitious missions, specifically asteroid capture and the in-space assembly of a very large life-finding telescope.

  3. The "Master Enabler" - In-Orbit Servicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Benjamin; Kienlen, Michael; Naasz, Bo; Roberts, Brian; Deweese, Keith; Cassidy, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Some of the most noteworthy missions in space exploration have occurred in the last two decades and owe their success to on-orbit servicing. The tremendously successful Hubble Space Telescope repair and upgrade missions, as well as the completed assembly of the International Space Station (ISS) and its full utilization, lead us to the next chapter and set of challenges. These include fully exploiting the many space systems already launched, assembling large structures in situ thereby enabling new scientific discoveries, and providing systems that reliably and cost-effectively support the next steps in space exploration. In-orbit servicing is a tool-a tool that can serve as the master enabler to create space architectures that would otherwise be unattainable. This paper will survey how NASA's satellite-servicing technology development efforts are being applied to the planning and execution of two such ambitious missions, specifically asteroid capture and the in-space assembly of a very large life-finding telescope.

  4. The Master Enabler: In Orbit Servicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Benjamin B.; Kienlen, Michael; Naasz, Bo; Roberts, Brian; Deweese, Keith; Cassidy, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Some of the most noteworthy missions in space exploration have occurred in the last two decades and owe their success to on-orbit servicing. The tremendously successful Hubble Space Telescope repair and upgrade missions, as well as the completed assembly of the International Space Station (ISS) and its full utilization, lead us to the next chapter and set of challenges. These include fully exploiting the many space systems already launched, assembling large structures in situ thereby enabling new scientific discoveries, and providing systems that reliably and cost-effectively support the next steps in space exploration. In-orbit servicing is a tool--a tool that can serve as the master enabler to create space architectures that would otherwise be unattainable. This paper will survey how NASA's satellite-servicing technology development efforts are being applied to the planning and execution of two such ambitious missions, specifically asteroid capture and the in-space assembly of a very large life-finding telescope.

  5. Review of current activities to model and measure the orbital debris environment in low-earth orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, R. C.

    A very active orbital debris program is currently being pursued at the NASA/Johnson Space Center (JSC), with projects designed to better define the current environment, to project future environments, to model the processes contributing to or constraining the growth of debris in the environment, and to gather supporting data needed to improve the understanding of the orbital debris problem and the hazard it presents to spacecraft. This paper is a review of the activity being conducted at JSC, by NASA, Lockheed Engineering and Sciences Company, and other support contractors, and presents a review of current activity, results of current research, and a discussion of directions for future development.

  6. Spin-Orbit Coupling, Antilocalization, and Parallel Magnetic Fields in Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zumbuhl, D.; Miller, Jessica; M. Marcus, C.;

    2002-01-01

    We investigate antilocalization due to spin-orbit coupling in ballistic GaAs quantum dots. Antilocalization that is prominent in large dots is suppressed in small dots, as anticipated theoretically. Parallel magnetic fields suppress both antilocalization and also, at larger fields, weak...... localization, consistent with random matrix theory results once orbital coupling of the parallel field is included. In situ control of spin-orbit coupling in dots is demonstrated as a gate-controlled crossover from weak localization to antilocalization....

  7. CT and orbital ultrasound findings in a case of Castleman disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubaker, Jacob W; Harrie, Roger P; Patel, Bhupendra C; Davis, Don K; Mamalis, Nick

    2011-01-01

    A 53-year-old man with a 2-month history of left periorbital swelling was found to have a large solid intraconal mass on CT scan. Orbital ultrasound showed that the lesion had a cavernous pattern of internal reflectivity. Histopathology revealed hyaline-vascular type Castleman disease (CD). This article represents the first reported orbital ultrasound findings in CD. The findings of CT scan and ultrasound may be useful in the preoperative evaluation of orbital hyaline-vascular type CD.

  8. Hybrid regression trees applied to the monitoring of dynamic safety of isolated networks with large eolic production contribution; Utilizacao de arvores de regressao hibridas na monitorizacao da seguranca dinamica de redes isoladas com grande producao eolica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, J.A Pecas; Vasconcelos, Maria Helena O.P. de [Instituto de Engenharia de Sistemas e Computadores (INESC), Porto (Portugal). E-mail: jpl@riff.fe.up.pt; hvasconcelos@inescn.pt

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes in a synthetic manner the technology adopted to define structures used in the fast evaluation of dynamic safety of isolated network with high level of eolic production contribution. This methodology uses hybrid regression trees, which allows the quantification the endurance connected to the dynamic behavior of these networks by emulating the frequency minimum deviation that will be experienced by the system when submitted toa pre-defined perturbation. Also, new procedures for data automatic generation are presented, which will be used for construction and measurements of the evaluation structures performance. The paper describes the Terceira island - Acores archipelago network study case.

  9. Enhanced orbital magnetic moments in magnetic heterostructures with interface perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Tetsuro; Sinha, Jaivardhan; Inami, Nobuhito; Takeichi, Yasuo; Mitani, Seiji; Ono, Kanta; Hayashi, Masamitsu

    2015-10-12

    We have studied the magnetic layer thickness dependence of the orbital magnetic moment in magnetic heterostructures to identify contributions from interfaces. Three different heterostructures, Ta/CoFeB/MgO, Pt/Co/AlOx and Pt/Co/Pt, which possess significant interface contribution to the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, are studied as model systems. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy is used to evaluate the relative orbital moment, i.e. the ratio of the orbital to spin moments, of the magnetic elements constituting the heterostructures. We find that the relative orbital moment of Co in Pt/Co/Pt remains constant against its thickness whereas the moment increases with decreasing Co layer thickness for Pt/Co/AlOx, suggesting that a non-zero interface orbital moment exists for the latter system. For Ta/CoFeB/MgO, a non-zero interface orbital moment is found only for Fe. X-ray absorption spectra shows that a particular oxidized Co state in Pt/Co/AlOx, absent in other heterosturctures, may give rise to the interface orbital moment in this system. These results show element specific contributions to the interface orbital magnetic moments in ultrathin magnetic heterostructures.

  10. A UNIFIED FRAMEWORK FOR THE ORBITAL STRUCTURE OF BARS AND TRIAXIAL ELLIPSOIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valluri, Monica; Abbott, Caleb [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Shen, Juntai [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Debattista, Victor P., E-mail: mvalluri@umich.edu, E-mail: calebga@umich.edu, E-mail: jshen@shao.ac.cn, E-mail: vpdebattista@uclan.ac.uk [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, PR1 2HE (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-20

    We examine a large random sample of orbits in two self-consistent simulations of N-body bars. Orbits in these bars are classified both visually and with a new automated orbit classification method based on frequency analysis. The well-known prograde x1 orbit family originates from the same parent orbit as the box orbits in stationary and rotating triaxial ellipsoids. However, only a small fraction of bar orbits (∼4%) have predominately prograde motion like their periodic parent orbit. Most bar orbits arising from the x1 orbit have little net angular momentum in the bar frame, making them equivalent to box orbits in rotating triaxial potentials. In these simulations a small fraction of bar orbits (∼7%) are long-axis tubes that behave exactly like those in triaxial ellipsoids: they are tipped about the intermediate axis owing to the Coriolis force, with the sense of tipping determined by the sign of their angular momentum about the long axis. No orbits parented by prograde periodic x2 orbits are found in the pure bar model, but a tiny population (∼2%) of short-axis tube orbits parented by retrograde x4 orbits are found. When a central point mass representing a supermassive black hole (SMBH) is grown adiabatically at the center of the bar, those orbits that lie in the immediate vicinity of the SMBH are transformed into precessing Keplerian orbits that belong to the same major families (short-axis tubes, long-axis tubes and boxes) occupying the bar at larger radii. During the growth of an SMBH, the inflow of mass and outward transport of angular momentum transform some x1 and long-axis tube orbits into prograde short-axis tubes. This study has important implications for future attempts to constrain the masses of SMBHs in barred galaxies using orbit-based methods like the Schwarzschild orbit superposition scheme and for understanding the observed features in barred galaxies.

  11. Planar resonant periodic orbits in Kuiper belt dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Voyatzis, G; Voyatzis, George; Kotoulas, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    In the framework of the planar restricted three body problem we study a considerable number of resonances associated to the Kuiper Belt dynamics and located between 30 and 48 a.u. Our study is based on the computation of resonant periodic orbits and their stability. Stable periodic orbits are surrounded by regular librations in phase space and in such domains the capture of trans-Neptunian object is possible. All the periodic orbits found are symmetric and there is evidence for the existence of asymmetric ones only in few cases. In the present work first, second and third order resonances are under consideration. In the planar circular case we found that most of the periodic orbits are stable. The families of periodic orbits are temporarily interrupted by collisions but they continue up to relatively large values of the Jacobi constant and highly eccentric regular motion exists for all cases. In the elliptic problem and for a particular eccentricity value of the primary bodies the periodic orbits are isolated...

  12. The Eccentric Behavior of Nearly Frozen Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetser, Theodore H.; Vincent, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Frozen orbits are orbits which have only short-period changes in their mean eccentricity and argument of periapse, so that they basically keep a fixed orientation within their plane of motion. Nearly frozen orbits are those whose eccentricity and argument of periapse have values close to those of a frozen orbit. We call them "nearly" frozen because their eccentricity vector (a vector whose polar coordinates are eccentricity and argument of periapse) will stay within a bounded distance from the frozen orbit eccentricity vector, circulating around it over time. For highly inclined orbits around the Earth, this distance is effectively constant over time. Furthermore, frozen orbit eccentricity values are low enough that these orbits are essentially eccentric (i.e., off center) circles, so that nearly frozen orbits around Earth are bounded above and below by frozen orbits.

  13. MRI of orbital hydroxyapatite implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanders, A.E. [Dept. of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson Univ. Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); De Potter, P. [Dept. of Ophthalmology, Wills Eye Inst., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Rao, V.M. [Dept. of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson Univ. Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Tom, B.M. [Dept. of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson Univ. Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Shields, C.L. [Dept. of Ophthalmology, Wills Eye Inst., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Shields, J.A. [Dept. of Ophthalmology, Wills Eye Inst., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Our aim was to use MRI for the postsurgical assessment of a new form of integrated orbital implant composed of a porous calcium phosphate hydroxyapatite substrate. We studied ten patients 24-74 years of age who underwent enucleation and implantation of a hydroxyapatite ball; 5-13 months after surgery, each patient was examined by spin-echo MRI, with fat suppression and gadolinium enhancement. Fibrovascular ingrowth was demonstrated in all ten patients as areas of enhancement at the periphery of the hydroxyapatite sphere that extended to the center to a variable degree. The radiologist should aware of the MRI appearances of the coralline hydroxyapatite orbital implant since it is now widely used following enucleation. MRI is a useful means to determine successful incorporation of the substrate into the orbital tissues. The normal pattern of contrast enhancement should not be mistaken for recurrent tumor or infection. (orig.)

  14. Orbital Evolution of 4179 Toutatis

    CERN Document Server

    Siregar, Suryadi

    2013-01-01

    Asteroid 1934 CT;1989 AC, well known as 4179 Toutatis, is an Apollo and Mars-crosser asteroid with a chaotic orbit produced by a 3:1 resonance with Jupiter and a 1:4 resonance with the Earth, and frequent close approaches to the Earth. It is listed as a potential hazardous object (PHA). The aim of this study is to investigate the possibility of 4179 Toutatis to be ejected from the Solar System. This paper presents an orbital evolution of 4179 Toutatis in time interval of ~300 kyr. Investigation of its orbital evolution is conducted by using the Mercury subroutine package, where the gravitational perturbations of eight major planets in the Solar System are considered. Over very short time scales (~300 kyr) relative to the Solar System life time (~10 Gyr), the asteroid 4179 Toutatis gave an example of chaotic motion that can cause asteroid to move outward and may be followed by escaping from the Solar System.

  15. Oncocytic Adenocarcinoma of the Orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Gerald J; Paul, Sean; Hunt, Bryan C

    Oncocytic adenocarcinoma of the orbit is a rare tumor, with 1 case of nonlacrimal sac, nonlacrimal gland origin, and a poor outcome previously reported. An 85-year-old man with a 2-month history of left-sided epiphora, enlarging eyelid nodules, and diplopia in left gaze was found on imaging to have a poorly circumscribed, nodular mass of uniform radiodensity in the inferomedial orbit. Incisional biopsy revealed morphologic and immunohistochemical features of oncocytic adenocarcinoma with origin in the caruncle suspected, and CT of the neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis showed no metastases or remote primary tumor source. Based on multidisciplinary consensus, orbital exenteration with adjuvant radiation therapy was performed, and there was no evidence of residual or recurrent tumor 2 years after treatment.

  16. Multiple Myeloma of the Orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors report a case of a 62-year-old female with history of multiple myeloma who presents with complains of swelling and pain in her right eye. On examination, it was found that she has proptosis, chemosis, and diplopia along with decreased vision. Initial workup and treatment did not yield significant results, eventually she was found to have myelomatous changes in her right orbit on MRI and was diagnosed with multiple myeloma of the orbit which resolved solely with radiation. This case tends to highlight the importance of considering myeloma of the orbit as a very important and early differential diagnosis in a patient with a history of multiple myeloma presenting with a swollen and painful eye.

  17. Contribution to the large and stable electric field induced strain for textured Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)0.675Ti0.325O3 ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jiangtao; Zhao, Kunyu; Ruan, Wei; Ruan, Xuezheng; Zheng, Liaoying; Li, Guorong

    2016-08-01

    Textured Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)0.675Ti0.325O3 (PMN-PT) ceramics were prepared by the templated grain growth method with 3% plate-like BaTiO3 as templates. The degree of grain orientation was about 81% by calculating from the XRD pattern. Temperature dependence of electric field induced strain was measured for both untextured and textured PMN-PT ceramics. The results show that the electric field induced strain for textured PMN-PT ceramics is much larger and more stable than that for untextured PMN-PT ceramics in a wide temperature range. The contribution from the piezoelectric effect and electrostrictive effect to the strain was analyzed, and it was found that textured PMN-PT ceramics exhibited electrostrictive coefficient Q33 as high as 5.19 × 10-2 m4 C-2 and it was comparable to that of PMN-PT single crystals. The electrostrictive effect contributed the main part of the enhancement of electric field induced strain for textured PMN-PT ceramics.

  18. Spin Hall and spin Nernst effects in graphene with intrinsic and Rashba spin-orbit interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Guo-Bao

    2012-01-01

    The spin Hall and spin Nernst effects in graphene are studied based on Green's function formalism.We calculate intrinsic contributions to spin Hall and spin Nernst conductivities in the Kane-Mele model with various structures.When both intrinsic and Rashba spin-orbit interactions are present,their interplay leads to some characteristics of the dependence of spin Hall and spin Nernst conductivities on the Fermi level.When the Rashba spin-orbit interaction is smaller than intrinsic spin-orbit coupling,a weak kink in the conductance appears.The kink disappears and a divergence appears when the Rashba spin-orbit interaction enhances.When the Rashba spin-orbit interaction approaches and is stronger than intrinsic spin-orbit coupling,the divergence becomes more obvious.

  19. Orbital computed tomography for exophthalmos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ok Keun; Lee, Hyun; Sol, Chang Hyo; Kim, Byung Soo [College of Medicine, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-06-15

    Since exophthalmos is caused by any decrease in the size of bony orbit or occurrence of mass within the rigid orbit, the accurate diagnosis of its causes are essential in determining the therapeutic aims. Exophthalmos is one of the important signs being the indication for orbital computed tomography along with periorbital swelling, visual loss, orbital trauma and diplopia. CT as the diagnostic tool for the cause of exophthalmos not only displays a superb role with uncomparable quality in comparison to any conventional diagnostic methods but also has a decisive role in determining the therapeutic aims and the appropriate operative method when the operation is indicated. The orbital CT was performed from May in 1983 to May in 1985 whose with chief complaints were exophthalmos and 23 cases were confirmed by operation, biopsy, clinical progression or other diagnostic procedures. Here was report thoroughly analyzed 23 cases. The results were as follows : 1. The etiologic disease of exophthalmos were 6 cases of pseudotumor, 4 cases of thyroid ophthalmopathy, 4 cases of maxill ary sinus and nasal cavity Ca., 3 cases of mucocele and 1 case of alveolar soft part sarcoma, osteoma, dermoid cyst, pleomorphic adenoma, meningioma, and C.C.F. each. 2. The origin of the etiologic diseases of exophthalmos were 13 cases of primary within bony orbit and 10 cases of secondary from adjacent structure. 3. The site of lesions were 11 cases of intraconal and extraconal, 10 cases of extraconal, and 2 cases of intraconal origin. 4. The degree of exophthalmos in CT scan was in proportion to the volume of the mass except in the case of thyroid ophthalmopathy. The upper limit of normal range by CT scan using regression line equation was 16.2 mm in approximation. 5. CT was a very useful diagnostic tool in the accurate assessment of the kinds of lesion, its location, and its relationship to adjacent structures in the diagnosis of etiologic diseases of exophthalmos.

  20. Energy and the Elliptical Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, Bill

    2009-03-01

    In the January 2007 issue of The Physics Teacher, Prentis, Fulton, Hesse, and Mazzino describe a laboratory exercise in which students use a geometrical analysis inspired by Newton to show that an elliptical orbit and an inverse-square law force go hand in hand. The historical, geometrical, and teamwork aspects of the exercise are useful and important. This paper presents an exercise which uses an energy/angular momentum conservation model for elliptical orbits. This exercise can be done easily by an individual student and on regular notebook-sized paper.

  1. AA, closed orbit observation pickup

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    Electrostatic pickups around the circumference of the AA served for the measurement of the closed orbits across the wide momentum range of +- 3% to either side of central orbit. The pickups were of the "shoebox" type, with diagonal cuts, a horizontal and a vertical one mechanically coupled together. They were located where they would not require extra space. The wide ones (very wide indeed: 70 cm), like the one we see here, were placed inside the vacuum chamber of the wide quadrupoles QFW, at maximum dispersion. See also 8001372, 8001383, 8010045

  2. AA, closed orbit observation pickup

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    Electrostatic pickups around the circumference of the AA served for the measurement of the closed orbits across the wide momentum range of +- 3% to either side of central orbit. The pickups were of the "shoebox" type, with diagonal cuts, a horizontal and a vertical one mechanically coupled together. They were located where they would not require extra space. The wide ones (very wide indeed: 70 cm), like the one we see here, were placed inside the vacuum chamber of the wide quadrupoles, QFW, at maximum dispersion. See also 8001372,8001383, 8010042

  3. Orbital resonances around black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, Jeandrew; Geyer, Marisa; Hinderer, Tanja

    2015-02-27

    We compute the length and time scales associated with resonant orbits around Kerr black holes for all orbital and spin parameters. Resonance-induced effects are potentially observable when the Event Horizon Telescope resolves the inner structure of Sgr A*, when space-based gravitational wave detectors record phase shifts in the waveform during the resonant passage of a compact object spiraling into the black hole, or in the frequencies of quasiperiodic oscillations for accreting black holes. The onset of geodesic chaos for non-Kerr spacetimes should occur at the resonance locations quantified here.

  4. AA, closed orbit observation pickup

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Electrostatic pickups around the circumference of the AA served for the measurement of the closed orbits across the wide momentum range of +- 3% to either side of central orbit. The pickups were of the "shoebox" type, with diagonal cuts, a horizontal and a vertical one mechanically coupled together. They were located where they would not require extra space. The small ones, like the one we see here, were inserted into the vacuum chamber of the BLG (long and narrow) bending magnets. See also 8001372, 8010042, 8010045

  5. AA, closed orbit observation pickup

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    Electrostatic pickups around the circumference of the AA served for the measurement of the closed orbits across the wide momentum range of +- 3% to either side of central orbit. The pickups were of the "shoebox" type, with diagonal cuts, a horizontal and a vertical one mechanically coupled together. They were located where they would not require extra space. The small ones, like the one we see here, were inserted into the vacuum chamber of the BLG (long and narrow) bending magnets. Werner Sax contemplates his achievement. See also 8001383, 8010042, 8010045.

  6. Primary orbital squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana L. Campos Arbulú

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Primary orbital squamous cell carcinoma is a rare entity. There is little published literature. We report a case of primary squamous cell carcinoma of the orbital soft tissues. Surgical resection offered the best treatment for the patient. Complete resection of the lesion was achieved. The patient received adjuvant radiotherapy due to the proximity of the lesion to the surgical margins. Surgical treatment is feasible and should be considered as part of the surgeon's arsenal. However, therapeutic decisions must be made on a case-by-case basis

  7. Nodular Fasciitis of the Orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Christopher J; Clark, Jeremy D; Thompson, Matthew P; Lee, Hui Bae H; Nunery, William R

    A 13-month-old boy was presented with new onset proptosis of the right eye. CT scan and MRI showed an enhancing mass in the right superior orbit with local bone remodeling and erosion. A craniotomy was performed for biopsy and sub-total resection. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry confirmed the lesion to be nodular fasciitis. Nodular fasciitis lesions are classically found in the anterior ocular adnexa, especially in pediatric patients. This is the first reported case of nodular fasciitis arising in the posterior orbit of a child younger than 16.

  8. Exoplanet orbital eccentricities derived from LAMOST-Kepler analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ji-Wei; Dong, Subo; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Huber, Daniel; Zheng, Zheng; De Cat, Peter; Fu, Jianning; Liu, Hui-Gen; Luo, Ali; Wu, Yue; Zhang, Haotong; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Ji-Lin; Cao, Zihuang; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-10-11

    The nearly circular (mean eccentricity [Formula: see text]) and coplanar (mean mutual inclination [Formula: see text]) orbits of the solar system planets motivated Kant and Laplace to hypothesize that planets are formed in disks, which has developed into the widely accepted theory of planet formation. The first several hundred extrasolar planets (mostly Jovian) discovered using the radial velocity (RV) technique are commonly on eccentric orbits ([Formula: see text]). This raises a fundamental question: Are the solar system and its formation special? The Kepler mission has found thousands of transiting planets dominated by sub-Neptunes, but most of their orbital eccentricities remain unknown. By using the precise spectroscopic host star parameters from the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) observations, we measure the eccentricity distributions for a large (698) and homogeneous Kepler planet sample with transit duration statistics. Nearly half of the planets are in systems with single transiting planets (singles), whereas the other half are multiple transiting planets (multiples). We find an eccentricity dichotomy: on average, Kepler singles are on eccentric orbits with [Formula: see text] 0.3, whereas the multiples are on nearly circular [Formula: see text] and coplanar [Formula: see text] degree) orbits similar to those of the solar system planets. Our results are consistent with previous studies of smaller samples and individual systems. We also show that Kepler multiples and solar system objects follow a common relation [[Formula: see text](1-2)[Formula: see text

  9. On the orbits that generate the X-shape in the Milky Way bulge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Caleb G.; Valluri, Monica; Shen, Juntai; Debattista, Victor P.

    2017-09-01

    The Milky Way (MW) bulge shows a boxy/peanut or X-shaped bulge (hereafter BP/X) when viewed in infrared or microwave bands. We examine orbits in an N-body model of a barred disc galaxy that is scaled to match the kinematics of the MW bulge. We generate maps of projected stellar surface density, unsharp masked images, 3D excess-mass distributions (showing mass outside ellipsoids), line-of-sight number count distributions, and 2D line-of-sight kinematics for the simulation as well as co-added orbit families, in order to identify the orbits primarily responsible for the BP/X shape. We estimate that between 19 and 23 per cent of the mass of the bar in this model is associated with the BP/X shape and that the majority of bar orbits contribute to this shape that is clearly seen in projected surface density maps and 3D excess mass for non-resonant box orbits, 'banana' orbits, 'fish/pretzel' orbits and 'brezel' orbits. Although only the latter two families (comprising 7.5 per cent of the total mass) show a distinct X-shape in unsharp masked images, we find that nearly all bar orbit families contribute some mass to the 3D BP/X-shape. All co-added orbit families show a bifurcation in stellar number count distribution with distance that resembles the bifurcation observed in red clump stars in the MW. However, only the box orbit family shows an increasing separation of peaks with increasing galactic latitude |b|, similar to that observed. Our analysis suggests that no single orbit family fully explains all the observed features associated with the MW's BP/X-shaped bulge, but collectively the non-resonant boxes and various resonant boxlet orbits contribute at different distances from the centre to produce this feature. We propose that since box orbits (which are the dominant population in bars) have three incommensurable orbital fundamental frequencies, their 3D shapes are highly flexible and, like Lissajous figures, this family of orbits is most easily able to adapt to

  10. Trajectory Design and Orbital Dynamics of Deep Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y. H.

    2013-05-01

    The term of deep space exploration is used for the exploration in which a probe, unlike an earth satellite, escapes from the Earth's gravitation field, and conducts the exploration of celestial bodies within or away from the solar system. As the progress of aerospace science and technology, the exploration of the Moon and other planets of the solar system has attracted more and more attention throughout the world since late 1990s. China also accelerated its progress of the lunar exploration in recent years. Its first lunar-orbiting spacecraft, Chang'e 1, was successfully launched on 2007 October 24. It then achieved the goals of accurate maneuver and lunar orbiting, acquired a large amount of scientific data and a full lunar image, and finally impacted the Moon under control. On 2010 October 1, China launched Chang'e 2 with success, which obtained a full lunar image with a higher resolution and a high-definition image of the Sinus Iridum, and completed multiple extended missions such as orbiting the Lagrangian point L2, laying the groundwork for future deep space exploration. As the first phase of the three main operational phases (orbiting, landing, return) of the Chinese Lunar Exploration Program, the successful launches and flights of Chang'e 1 and Chang'e 2 are excellent applications of the orbit design of both the Earth-Moon transfer orbit and the circumlunar orbit, yet not involving the design of the entire trajectory consisting of the Earth-Moon transfer orbit, the circumlunar orbit, and the return orbit, which is produced particularly for sample return spacecraft. This paper studies the entire orbit design of the lunar sample return spacecraft which would be employed in both the third phase of the lunar exploration program and the human lunar landing program, analyzes the dynamic characteristics of the orbit, and works out the launch windows based on specific conditions. The results are universally applicable, and could serve as the basis of the orbit

  11. Editorial Introduction: Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petro, Noah E.; Keller, John W.; Gaddis, Lisa R.

    2017-02-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) mission has shifted our understanding of the history of the Moon. The seven instruments on LRO each have contributed to creating new paradigms for the evolution of the Moon by providing unprecedented measurements of the surface, subsurface, and lunar environment. In this second volume of the LRO Special Issue, we present 21 papers from a broad range of the areas of investigation from LRO, from the volatile inventory, to the shape of the Moons surface, to its rich volcanic history, and the interactions between the lunar surface and the space environment. These themes provide rich science for the instrument teams, as well as for the broader science community who continue to use the LRO data in their research.

  12. Testing Lorentz symmetry with planetary orbital dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Hees, Aurélien; Poncin-Lafitte, Christophe Le; Bourgoin, Adrien; Rivoldini, Attilio; Lamine, Brahim; Meynadier, Frédéric; Guerlin, Christine; Wolf, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Planetary ephemerides are a very powerful tool to constrain deviations from the theory of General Relativity using orbital dynamics. The effective field theory framework called the Standard-Model Extension (SME) has been developed in order to systematically parametrize hypothetical violations of Lorentz symmetry (in the Standard Model and in the gravitational sector). In this communication, we use the latest determinations of the supplementary advances of the perihelia and of the nodes obtained by planetary ephemerides analysis to constrain SME coefficients from the pure gravity sector and also from gravity-matter couplings. Our results do not show any deviation from GR and they improve current constraints. Moreover, combinations with existing constraints from Lunar Laser Ranging and from atom interferometry gravimetry allow us to disentangle contributions from the pure gravity sector from the gravity-matter couplings.

  13. Does covalency really increase across the 5f series? A comparison of molecular orbital, natural population, spin and electron density analyses of AnCp3 (An = Th-Cm; Cp = η(5)-C5H5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirker, Ian; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas

    2011-01-07

    The title compounds are studied with scalar relativistic, gradient-corrected (PBE) and hybrid (PBE0) density functional theory. The metal-Cp centroid distances shorten from ThCp(3) to NpCp(3), but lengthen again from PuCp(3) to CmCp(3). Examination of the valence molecular orbital structures reveals that the highest-lying Cp π(2,3)-based orbitals transform as 1e + 2e + 1a(1) + 1a(2). Above these levels come the predominantly metal-based 5f orbitals, which stabilise across the actinide series such that in CmCp(3) the 5f manifold is at more negative energy than the Cp π(2,3)-based levels. Mulliken population analysis shows metal d orbital participation in the e symmetry Cp π(2,3)-based orbitals. Metal 5f character is found in the 1a(1) and 1a(2) levels, and this contribution increases significantly from ThCp(3) to AmCp(3). This is in agreement with the metal spin densities, which are enhanced above their formal value in NpCp(3), PuCp(3) and especially AmCp(3) with both PBE and PBE0. However, atoms-in-molecules analysis of the electron densities indicates that the An-Cp bonding is very ionic, increasingly so as the actinide becomes heavier. It is concluded that the large metal orbital contributions to the Cp π(2,3)-based levels, and enhanced metal spin densities toward the middle of the actinide series arise from a coincidental energy match of metal and ligand orbitals, and do not reflect genuinely increased covalency (in the sense of appreciable overlap between metal and ligand levels and a build up of electron density in the region between the actinide and carbon nuclei).

  14. Multiple payload Shuttle flights from WTR - Some operational and orbital mechanics considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgecombe, D. S.; Fischer, N. H.; Rea, F. G.

    1981-01-01

    It is pointed out that if the difference between the nodal crossing time of the Shuttle parking orbit and the final orbit of a spacecraft is more than about half an hour, current design spacecraft may have to carry a prohibitively large propulsion system to meet its requirements. Various solutions to this problem are discussed.

  15. Atmospheric trajectory and heliocentric orbit of the Ejby meteorite fall in Denmark on February 6, 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spurný, P.; Borovička, Jan; Baumgarten, G.

    2017-01-01

    at 18.3km. The heliocentric orbit of this meteoroid was of Apollo type with low inclination of 1° and perihelion distance just inside the Earth's orbit. It had a relatively large semimajor axis of 2.8AU and aphelion distance 4.64AU. It is the second largest aphelion distance among all meteorites...

  16. Optimal Reorientation Of Spacecraft Orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelnokov Yuriy Nikolaevich

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of optimal reorientation of the spacecraft orbit is considered. For solving the problem we used quaternion equations of motion written in rotating coordinate system. The use of quaternion variables makes this consideration more efficient. The problem of optimal control is solved on the basis of the maximum principle. An example of numerical solution of the problem is given.

  17. DOT strategies versus orbiter strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    The Dutch Open Telescope is a high-resolution solar imager coming on-line at La Palma. The definition of the DOT science niche, strategies, and requirements resemble Solar Orbiter considerations and deliberations. I discuss the latter in the light of the former, and claim that multi-line observation

  18. Three planets orbiting Wolf 1061

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, D J; Tinney, C G; Bentley, J S; Zhao, Jinglin

    2015-01-01

    We use archival HARPS spectra to detect three planets orbiting the M3 dwarf Wolf1061 (GJ 628). We detect a 1.36 Mearth minimum-mass planet with an orbital period P = 4.888d (Wolf1061b), a 4.25 Mearth minimum-mass planet with orbital period P = 17.867d (Wolf1061c), and a likely 5.21 Mearth minimum-mass planet with orbital period P = 67.274d (Wolf1061d). All of the planets are of sufficiently low mass that they may be rocky in nature. The 17.867d planet falls within the habitable zone for Wolf 1061 and the 67.274d planet falls just outside the outer boundary of the habitable zone. There are no signs of activity observed in the bisector spans, cross-correlation full-width-half-maxima, Calcium H & K indices, NaD indices, or H-alpha indices near the planetary periods. We use custom methods to generate a cross-correlation template tailored to the star. The resulting velocities do not suffer the strong annual variation observed in the HARPS DRS velocities. This differential technique should deliver better exploi...

  19. Orbital abscess: Management and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Suneetha

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To discuss the diagnosis, management and outcome of various types of orbital abscess. Methods: The medical records of 13 patients diagnosed and treated for orbital abscess were reviewed. The sources of infection included: paranasal sinusitis (n = 5, odontogenic origin of infection (n = 4, one each, temporal fossa abscess, palatal abscess, furuncle on the nose, and secondary to retrobulbar injection of steroid. Computed tomographic scans revealed the presence of an abscess in all 13 cases. Associated findings on CT scan included: sinus disease (n = 8, cavernous sinus thrombosis (n = 2 and subdural empyema (n = 2. All patients were treated with intensive, multiple, intravenous antibiotics and early surgical drainage. Results: Purulent material collected surgically from the orbit cultured Staphylococcus aureus (n = 3, two each Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, Acinetobacter species and one each β-haemolytic Streptococci, Citrobacter frundi and Enterobacter. Final visual acuity was good in 6 patients (6/12 - 6/6 and no light perception in 6 others. Visual acuity could not be recorded in the infant. The other complications were intracranial abscess (n = 4, cavernous sinus thrombosis (n = 2 and restricted ocular motility (n = 1. Conclusions: A high index of suspicion is necessary, along with early institution of appropriate diagnostic imaging, and aggressive medical and surgical treatment for a favourable outcome in cases of orbital abscess.

  20. Myeloid Sarcoma in the Orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xiaoxiao; Gigantelli, James W; Abromowitch, Minnie; Morgan, Linda A; Suh, Donny W

    2016-12-08

    The authors describe a case of myeloid sarcoma of the orbit in a pediatric patient. An 8-month-old male infant presented to the ophthalmology clinic with a left orbital mass, which had been increasing in size over the previous 2 months. The mass was initially diagnosed at another clinic as an infantile hemangioma, and had been treated with a topical formulation of timolol. In the ophthalmology clinic, orbital magnetic resonance imaging showed a solid enhancing mass. A biopsy was performed, and histopathology revealed myeloid sarcoma. The disease responded well to a standard chemotherapy regimen. Myeloid sarcoma is a rare, extra-medullary presentation that can occur as an isolated tumor, concurrently with or at relapse of acute myeloid leukemia. Because few cases of myeloid sarcoma in the orbit have been reported, this case report aids in the management of myeloid sarcoma in pediatric patients. The report describes an 8-month-old male infant, the youngest patient to develop myeloid sarcoma without preexisting acute myeloid leukemia. [J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2016;53:e64-e68.].