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Sample records for large iron core

  1. Maximum stellar iron core mass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    60, No. 3. — journal of. March 2003 physics pp. 415–422. Maximum stellar iron core mass. F W GIACOBBE. Chicago Research Center/American Air Liquide ... iron core compression due to the weight of non-ferrous matter overlying the iron cores within large .... thermal equilibrium velocities will tend to be non-relativistic.

  2. Large enhanced dielectric permittivity in polyaniline passivated core-shell nano magnetic iron oxide by plasma polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joy, Lija K.; Sooraj, V.; Sethulakshmi, N.; Anantharaman, M. R., E-mail: mraiyer@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin-682022, Kerala (India); Sajeev, U. S. [Department of Physics, Government College, Kottayam-686613, Kerala (India); Nair, Swapna S. [Department of Physics, School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Central University of Kerala, Kasargode-671123, Kerala (India); Narayanan, T. N. [CSIR-Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikkudi-630006, Tamil Nadu (India); Ajayan, P. M. [Department of Material Science and Nano Engineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, Houston, Texas 7700 (United States)

    2014-03-24

    Commercial samples of Magnetite with size ranging from 25–30 nm were coated with polyaniline by using radio frequency plasma polymerization to achieve a core shell structure of magnetic nanoparticle (core)–Polyaniline (shell). High resolution transmission electron microscopy images confirm the core shell architecture of polyaniline coated iron oxide. The dielectric properties of the material were studied before and after plasma treatment. The polymer coated magnetite particles exhibited a large dielectric permittivity with respect to uncoated samples. The dielectric behavior was modeled using a Maxwell–Wagner capacitor model. A plausible mechanism for the enhancement of dielectric permittivity is proposed.

  3. Maximum stellar iron core mass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An analytical method of estimating the mass of a stellar iron core, just prior to core collapse, is described in this paper. The method employed depends, in part, upon an estimate of the true relativistic mass increase experienced by electrons within a highly compressed iron core, just prior to core collapse, and is significantly ...

  4. Advantages of iron core in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettis, E.S.; Ballou, J.K.; Becraft, W.R.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Watts, H.L.

    1977-01-01

    A quantitative comparison of the iron core vs air core concepts was carried out on a preliminary basis by using a representative tokamak reactor design with the following self-consistent reference parameters. In the area of plasma engineering, poloidal field and MHD equilibrium considerations with an unsaturated iron core is discussed. The question of proper poloidal field coils to maintain D-shaped plasmas of relatively high anti β (7%) with a saturated iron core is also discussed. Estimates of the required iron core size, volt seconds, magnetic flux and its influence on force loading on the superconducting toroidal field coils are shown. Conceptual designs of the mechanical structure of an iron core device are presented. Favorable impacts on the OH power supply cost and complexity are indicated

  5. Experimental evidence of body centered cubic iron in Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrubiak, R.; Meng, Y.; Shen, G.

    2017-12-01

    The Earth's core is mainly composed of iron. While seismic evidence has shown a liquid outer core and a solid inner core, the crystalline nature of the solid iron at the core condition remains debated, largely due to the difficulties in experimental determination of exact polymorphs at corresponding pressure-temperature conditions. We have examined crystal structures of iron up to 220 GPa and 6000 K with x-ray diffraction using a double-sided laser heating system at HPCAT, Advanced Photon Source. The iron sample is confined in a small chamber surrounded by single crystal MgO. The laser power can be modulated together with temperature measurements. The modulated heating of iron in an MgO single crystal matrix allows for microstructure analysis during heating and after the sample is quenched. We present experimental evidence of a body-centered-cubic (BCC) iron from about 100 GPa and 3000 K to at least 220 GPa and 4000 K. The observed BCC phase may be consistent with a theoretically predicted BCC phase that is dynamically stable in similar pressure-temperature conditions [1]. We will discuss the stability region of the BCC phase and the melting curve of iron and their implications in the nature of the Earth's inner core. References: A. B. Belonoshko et al., Nat. Geosci., 1-6 (2017).

  6. Core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhn, Luise Theil; Bojesen, A.; Timmermann, L.

    2004-01-01

    We present studies of the magnetic properties of core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoparticles. By combining Mossbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy we have been able to measure the change from a Fe3O4-like to a gamma-Fe2O3-like composition from the interface to the surface. Furthermore, we have...

  7. The end of the iron-core age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyttleton, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    The terrestrial planets aggregated essentially from small particles, to begin as solid cool bodies with the same general compositions, and there is no possibility of an iron-core developing within any of them at any stage. Their differing internal and surface properties receive ready explanation from their different masses which determine whether the pressures within are sufficient to bring about phase-changes. The claim that the terrestrial core can be identified by means of shock-wave data as nickel-iron is based on theoretical misconception, whereas the actual seismic data establish an uncompressed-density value much lower than any such mixture could have. The onset of the Ramsey phase-change in the earth takes the form of a rapid initial collapse to produce a large core in metallic state which thereafter continues to grow secularly as a result of radioactive heating and leads to reduction of surface-area at long last adequate to account for folded and thrusted mountain-building.

  8. Extrap with iron-cored coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, B.

    1985-05-01

    In Extrap configurations there is a high average beta value with respect to the plasma confinement volume. The externally imposed magnetic field which is required for stabilization therefore comes out to have a rather moderate strength, even under expected reactor conditions. As a consequence, this field can be generated not only by conventional external conductor arrangements, but also by iron-cored coils being operated below the saturation limit. A proposal for such iron-cored coil systems is presented in this paper. As compared to conventional conductors, this has the advantage of localizing the magnetic energy of the externally imposed magnetic field mainly to the discharge vessel and the plasma volume, thereby increasing the engineering beta value substantially. Also the problems of the coil stresses and of irradiation of the coils appear to become simplified, as well as replacement of the coil system. A main limitation of this proposal is due to combination of iron core saturation with the required stabilization effect from an ion Larmor radius of sufficient relative magnitude. This limitaion requires further investigation, especially in the full-scale reactor case. Also the modifications of the field geometry by iron core shaping needs further analysis. (Author)

  9. On the collapse of iron stellar cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkat, Z.; Rakavy, G.; Reiss, Y.; Wilson, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    The collapse of iron stellar cores is investigated to see whether the outward shock produced by the bounce at neutron star density is sufficient to burn appreciable amounts of the envelope around the iron core. Several models were tried, and in all cases no appreciable burn took place; hence no explosion results from the collapse of these models

  10. Plasma current sustainment after iron core saturation in the STOR-M tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitarai, O., E-mail: omitarai@ktmail.tokai-u.jp [Kumamoto Liberal Arts Education Center, Tokai University, 9-1-1 Toroku, Higashi-ku, Kumamoto 862-8652 (Japan); Ding, Y.; Hubeny, M.; Lu, Y.; Onchi, T.; McColl, D.; Xiao, C.; Hirose, A. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, University of Saskatchewan, 116 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5E2 (Canada)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Plasma current can be started up by small iron core without central solenoid. • Iron core removes central solenoid. • Plasma current can be maintained after iron core saturation. • Hysteresis curve shows the partial core saturation. • Image field from iron core is estimated during discharge. • Spherical tokamak reactor without CS is proposed using the small iron core. - Abstract: We propose to use of a small iron core transformer to start up the plasma current in a spherical tokamak (ST) reactor without central solenoid (CS). Taking advantage of the high aspect ratio of the STOR-M iron core tokamak, we have demonstrated that the plasma current up to 10–15 kA can be started up using the outer Ohmic heating (OH) coils without CS, and that the plasma current can be maintained further by increasing the outer OH coil current during iron core saturation phase. When the magnetizing current reaches 1.2 kA and the iron core becomes saturated, the third capacitor bank connected to the outer OH coils is discharged to maintain the plasma current. The plasma current is slightly increased and maintained for additional 5 ms as expected from numerical calculations. Core saturation has been clearly observed on the hysteresis curve. This is the first experimental demonstration of the feasibility of slow transition from the iron core to air core transformer phase without CS. The results implies that a plasma current can be initiated by a small iron core and could be ramped up by additional heating and vertical field after iron core saturation in future STs without CS.

  11. First order study for an iron core OH system for TNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballou, J.K.; Schultz, J.

    1977-01-01

    A simple comparison has been made between an air core and an iron core ohmic heating system for a particular device, and it was shown that the peak power requirements can be substantially reduced by the use of an iron core to power levels handled by industry today. It was also shown that for an ohmic heating system initiated plasma that the cost of the iron core ohmic heating power system (iron core, dual rectifier, and DC switch) is less than the cost for a subset of the power system for an air core system (dual rectifier and DC switch). There is considerable work being done on other methods of initiating the plasma none of which seem to be incompatible with the use of an iron core system

  12. Effect of superconducting solenoid model cores on spanwise iron magnet roll control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britcher, C. P.

    1985-01-01

    Compared with conventional ferromagnetic fuselage cores, superconducting solenoid cores appear to offer significant reductions in the projected cost of a large wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance system. The provision of sufficient magnetic roll torque capability has been a long-standing problem with all magnetic suspension and balance systems; and the spanwise iron magnet scheme appears to be the most powerful system available. This scheme utilizes iron cores which are installed in the wings of the model. It was anticipated that the magnetization of these cores, and hence the roll torque generated, would be affected by the powerful external magnetic field of the superconducting solenoid. A preliminary study has been made of the effect of the superconducting solenoid fuselage model core concept on the spanwise iron magnet roll torque generation schemes. Computed data for one representative configuration indicate that reductions in available roll torque occur over a range of applied magnetic field levels. These results indicate that a 30-percent increase in roll electromagnet capacity over that previously determined will be required for a representative 8-foot wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance system design.

  13. Iron/iron oxide core-shell nanoclusters for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiang You; Antony, Jiji; Sharma, Amit; Nutting, Joseph; Sikes, Daniel; Meyer, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Biocompatible magnetic nanoparticles have been found promising in several biomedical applications for tagging, imaging, sensing and separation in recent years. Most magnetic particles or beads currently used in biomedical applications are based on ferromagnetic iron oxides with very low specific magnetic moments of about 20-30 emu/g. Here we report a new approach to synthesize monodispersed core-shell nanostructured clusters with high specific magnetic moments above 200 emu/g. Iron nanoclusters with monodispersive size of diameters from 2 nm to 100 nm are produced by our newly developed nanocluster source and go to a deposition chamber, where a chemical reaction starts, and the nanoclusters are coated with iron oxides. HRTEM Images show the coatings are very uniform and stable. The core-shell nanoclusters are superparamagnetic at room temperature for sizes less than 15 nm, and then become ferromagnetic when the cluster size increases. The specific magnetic moment of core-shell nanoclusters is size dependent, and increases rapidly from about 80 emu/g at the cluster size of around 3 nm to over 200 emu/g up to the size of 100 nm. The use of high magnetic moment nanoclusters for biomedical applications could dramatically enhance the contrast for MRI, reduce the concentration of magnetic particle needs for cell separation, or make drug delivery possible with much lower magnetic field gradients

  14. Carbon Solubility in Silicon-Iron-Bearing Metals during Core Formation on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Kaaden, Kathleen E.; McCubbin, Francis M.; Ross, D. Kent; Rapp, Jennifer F.; Danielson, Lisa R.; Keller, Lindsay P.; Righter, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Recent results obtained from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft showed the surface of Mercury has high S abundances (approximately 4 wt%) and low Iron(II) Oxide abundances (less than 2 wt%). Based on these extreme values, the oxygen fugacity of Mercury's surface materials was estimated to be approximately 3 to 7 log(sub 10) units below the IW buffer (Delta IW-3 to Delta IW-7). This highly reducing nature of the planet has resulted in a large core and relatively thin mantle, extending to only approximately 420 km depth (corresponding to a core-mantle boundary pressure of approximately 4-7 GPa) within the planet. Furthermore, MESSENGER results have suggested the presence of carbon on the surface of the planet. Previous experimental results from have also suggested the possibility of a primary floatation crust on Mercury composed of graphite, produced after a global magma ocean event. With these exotic conditions of this compositional end-member planet, it begs the question, what is the core composition of Mercury? Although no definitive conclusion has been reached, previous studies have made advances towards answering this question. Riner et al. and Chen et al. looked at iron sulfide systems and implemented various crystallization and layered core scenarios to try and determine the composition and structure of Mercury's core. Malavergne et al. examined core crystallization scenarios in the presence of sulfur and silicon. Hauck et al. used the most recent geophysical constraints from the MESSENGER spacecraft to model the internal structure of Mercury, including the core, in a iron-sulfur-silicon system. More recently, Chabot et al. conducted a series of metal-silicate partitioning experiments in a iron-sulfur-silicon system. These results showed the core of Mercury has the potential to contain more than 15 wt% silicon. However, with the newest results from MESSENGER's low altitude campaign, carbon is another

  15. Toroidal equilibrium in an iron-core reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.

    1984-04-01

    An analytical theory of toroidal equilibrium in the ZT-40M reversed field pinch is obtained, including effects of iron cores and resistive shell. The iron cores alter the form of the equilibrium condition and cause the equilibrium to be unstable on the shell resistive time scale

  16. Iron-carbonate interaction at Earth's core-mantle boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, S. M.; Badro, J.; Nabiei, F.; Prakapenka, V.; Gillet, P.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon storage and flux in the deep Earth are moderated by oxygen fugacity and interactions with iron-bearing phases. The amount of carbon stored in Earth's mantle versus the core depends on carbon-iron chemistry at the core-mantle boundary. Oxidized carbonates subducted from Earth's surface to the lowermost mantle may encounter reduced Fe0 metal from disproportionation of Fe2+ in lower mantle silicates or mixing with the core. To understand the fate of carbonates in the lowermost mantle, we have performed experiments on sandwiches of single-crystal (Ca0.6Mg0.4)CO3 dolomite and Fe foil in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell at lower mantle conditions of 49-110 GPa and 1800-2500 K. Syntheses were conducted with in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction to identify phase assemblages. After quench to ambient conditions, samples were sectioned with a focused Ga+ ion beam for composition analysis with transmission electron microscopy. At the centers of the heated spots, iron melted and reacted completely with the carbonate to form magnesiowüstite, iron carbide, diamond, magnesium-rich carbonate and calcium carbonate. In samples heated at 49 and 64 GPa, the two carbonates exhibit a eutectoid texture. In the sample heated at 110 GPa, the carbonates form rounded ~150-nm-diameter grains with a higher modal proportion of interspersed diamonds. The presence of reduced iron in the deep lower mantle and core-mantle boundary region will promote the formation of diamonds in carbonate-bearing subducted slabs. The complete reaction of metallic iron to oxides and carbides in the presence of mantle carbonate supports the formation of these phases at the Earth's core-mantle boundary and in ultra-low velocity zones.

  17. Melting of iron at the Earth's core conditions by molecular dynamics simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. N. Wu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available By large scale molecular dynamics simulations of solid-liquid coexistence, we have investigated the melting of iron under pressures from 0 to 364 GPa. The temperatures of liquid and solid regions, and the pressure of the system are calculated to estimate the melting point of iron. We obtain the melting temperature of iron is about 6700±200K under the inner-outer core boundary, which is in good agreement with the result of Alfè et al. By the pair analysis technique, the microstructure of liquid iron under higher pressures is obviously different from that of lower pressures and ambient condition, indicating that the pressure-induced liquid-liquid phase transition may take place in iron melts.

  18. Structural and magnetic properties of core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhn, Luise Theil; Bojesen, A.; Timmermann, L.

    2002-01-01

    We present studies of the structural and magnetic properties of core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoparticles. alpha-Fe nanoparticles were fabricated by sputtering and subsequently covered with a protective nanocrystalline oxide shell consisting of either maghaemite (gamma-Fe2O3) or partially oxidized...... magnetite (Fe3O4). We observed that the nanoparticles were stable against further oxidation, and Mossbauer spectroscopy at high applied magnetic fields and low temperatures revealed a stable form of partly oxidized magnetite. The nanocrystalline structure of the oxide shell results in strong canting...... of the spin structure in the oxide shell, which thereby modifies the magnetic properties of the core-shell nanoparticles....

  19. Reduction of vibrational interference from the iron core on HBTXIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilcock, P.D.

    1981-01-01

    The HBTXIA machine is a toroidal reversed field pinch which utilises a 1 volt second iron core. This paper looks briefly at the sources of vibration from the iron core and describes the design of a novel support system that has been installed to minimise the transmission of vibration to plasma diagnostics and other equipment during the machine pulse. Vibration measurements on the completed installation when the core is driven to saturation are reported and compared with calculations for a ground mounted core. (author)

  20. SOLUBILITY OF IRON IN METALLIC HYDROGEN AND STABILITY OF DENSE CORES IN GIANT PLANETS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahl, Sean M.; Wilson, Hugh F.; Militzer, Burkhard

    2013-01-01

    The formation of the giant planets in our solar system, and likely a majority of giant exoplanets, is most commonly explained by the accretion of nebular hydrogen and helium onto a large core of terrestrial-like composition. The fate of this core has important consequences for the evolution of the interior structure of the planet. It has recently been shown that H 2 O, MgO, and SiO 2 dissolve in liquid metallic hydrogen at high temperature and pressure. In this study, we perform ab initio calculations to study the solubility of an innermost metallic core. We find dissolution of iron to be strongly favored above 2000 K over the entire pressure range (0.4-4 TPa) considered. We compare with and summarize the results for solubilities on other probable core constituents. The calculations imply that giant planet cores are in thermodynamic disequilibrium with surrounding layers, promoting erosion and redistribution of heavy elements. Differences in solubility behavior between iron and rock may influence evolution of interiors, particularly for Saturn-mass planets. Understanding the distribution of iron and other heavy elements in gas giants may be relevant in understanding mass-radius relationships, as well as deviations in transport properties from pure hydrogen-helium mixtures

  1. Equilibrium and stability studies for an iron-core tokamak with a poloidal divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solano, E.R.; Neilson, G.H.; Lao, L.L.

    1989-01-01

    A study of plasma equilibrium and stability in a tokamak with an unsaturated iron core is presented. A spool model is developed for the iron. Both, a simplified force balance code and a Grad-Shafranov solver are used to study the plasma equilibrium. It is observed that the iron can strongly modify the conditions for equilibrium and stability, and in some cases an infinite cylinder model for the iron core is not adequate. New criteria for plasma position stability in the presence of an iron core are introduced. 17 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  2. Equation of state of iron under core conditions of large rocky exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Raymond F.; Fratanduono, Dayne E.; Braun, David G.; Duffy, Thomas S.; Wicks, June K.; Celliers, Peter M.; Ali, Suzanne J.; Fernandez-Pañella, Amalia; Kraus, Richard G.; Swift, Damian C.; Collins, Gilbert W.; Eggert, Jon H.

    2018-06-01

    The recent discovery of thousands of planets outside our Solar System raises fundamental questions about the variety of planetary types and their corresponding interior structures and dynamics. To better understand these objects, there is a strong need to constrain material properties at the extreme pressures found within planetary interiors1,2. Here we used high-powered lasers at the National Ignition Facility to ramp compress iron over nanosecond timescales to 1.4 TPa (14 million atmospheres)—a pressure four times higher than for previous static compression data. A Lagrangian sound-speed analysis was used to determine pressure, density and sound speed along a continuous isentropic compression path. Our peak pressures are comparable to those predicted at the centre of a terrestrial-type exoplanet of three to four Earth masses3, representing the first absolute equation of state measurements for iron at such conditions. These results provide an experiment-based mass-radius relationship for a hypothetical pure iron planet that can be used to evaluate plausible compositional space for large, rocky exoplanets.

  3. Mitochondrial iron accumulation exacerbates hepatic toxicity caused by hepatitis C virus core protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine, Shuichi; Ito, Konomi; Watanabe, Haruna; Nakano, Takafumi [Laboratory of Biopharmaceutics, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan); Moriya, Kyoji; Shintani, Yoshizumi; Fujie, Hajime; Tsutsumi, Takeya; Miyoshi, Hideyuki; Fujinaga, Hidetake; Shinzawa, Seiko; Koike, Kazuhiko [Department of Internal Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Horie, Toshiharu, E-mail: t.horie@thu.ac.jp [Laboratory of Biopharmaceutics, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan)

    2015-02-01

    Patients with long-lasting hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are at major risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Iron accumulation in the livers of these patients is thought to exacerbate conditions of oxidative stress. Transgenic mice that express the HCV core protein develop HCC after the steatosis stage and produce an excess of hepatic reactive oxygen species (ROS). The overproduction of ROS in the liver is the net result of HCV core protein-induced dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. This study examined the impact of ferric nitrilacetic acid (Fe-NTA)-mediated iron overload on mitochondrial damage and ROS production in HCV core protein-expressing HepG2 (human HCC) cells (Hep39b cells). A decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and ROS production were observed following Fe-NTA treatment. After continuous exposure to Fe-NTA for six days, cell toxicity was observed in Hep39b cells, but not in mock (vector-transfected) HepG2 cells. Moreover, mitochondrial iron ({sup 59}Fe) uptake was increased in the livers of HCV core protein-expressing transgenic mice. This increase in mitochondrial iron uptake was inhibited by Ru360, a mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+} uniporter inhibitor. Furthermore, the Fe-NTA-induced augmentation of mitochondrial dysfunction, ROS production, and cell toxicity were also inhibited by Ru360 in Hep39b cells. Taken together, these results indicate that Ca{sup 2+} uniporter-mediated mitochondrial accumulation of iron exacerbates hepatocyte toxicity caused by the HCV core protein. - Highlights: • Iron accumulation in the livers of patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is thought to exacerbate oxidative stress. • The impact of iron overload on mitochondrial damage and ROS production in HCV core protein-expressing cells were examined. • Mitochondrial iron uptake was increased in the livers of HCV core protein-expressing transgenic mice. • Ca{sup 2+} uniporter-mediated mitochondrial accumulation of iron exacerbates

  4. Iron and stony-iron meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedix, Gretchen K.; Haack, Henning; McCoy, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    Without iron and stony-iron meteorites, our chances of ever sampling the deep interior of a differentiated planetary object would be next to nil. Although we live on a planet with a very substantial core, we will never be able to sample it. Fortunately, asteroid collisions provide us with a rich...... sampling of the deep interiors of differentiated asteroids. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are fragments of a large number of asteroids that underwent significant geological processing in the early solar system. Parent bodies of iron and some stony-iron meteorites completed a geological evolution similar...... to that continuing on Earth – although on much smaller length- and timescales – with melting of the metal and silicates; differentiation into core, mantle, and crust; and probably extensive volcanism. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are our only available analogues to materials found in the deep interiors of Earth...

  5. Neutrino energy loss rates due to key iron isotopes for core-collapse physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabi, J.-U.

    2008-07-01

    Accurate estimates of neutrino energy loss rates are needed for the study of the late stages of the stellar evolution, in particular for the cooling of neutron stars and white dwarfs. The energy spectra of neutrinos and antineutrinos arriving at the Earth can also provide useful information on the primary neutrino fluxes as well as neutrino mixing scenario. Proton-neutron quasi-particle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA) theory has recently being used for a microscopic calculation of stellar weak interaction rates of fp-shell nuclide, particularly iron isotopes, with success. Here I present the calculation of neutrino and antineutrino energy loss rates due to key iron isotopes in stellar matter using the pn-QRPA theory. The rates are calculated on a fine grid of temperature-density scale suitable for core-collapse simulators. The calculated rates are compared against earlier calculations. The neutrino cooling rates due to even-even isotopes of iron, 54,56 Fe, are in good agreement with the rates calculated using the large-scale shell model. The pn-QRPA calculated neutrino energy loss rates due to 55 Fe are enhanced roughly around an order of magnitude compared to the large-scale shell model calculation during the oxygen and silicon shell burning stages of massive stars and favor a lower entropy for the cores of massive stars. (author)

  6. A novel approach to linearization of the electromagnetic parameters of tokamaks with an iron core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, P. E-mail: fupeng@mail.ipp.ac.cn; Liu, Z.Z.; Zou, J.H

    2002-05-01

    The equivalent model of an iron core tokamak is developed, in which the electromagnetic parameters of several pairs of coils in opposite series (PCOS) are not dependent on the saturation of the iron core during tokamak operation. With this the electromagnetic parameters of all the coils in an iron core tokamak can be linearized, As an example, the electromagnetic parameters of Hefei Super-conductive Tokamak with iron core (HT-7) are linearized, and it is in good agreement with the experimental results. The linearization approach can be applied in real time plasma control and electromagnetic analysis.

  7. Size-Dependent Specific Surface Area of Nanoporous Film Assembled by Core-Shell Iron Nanoclusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiji Antony

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoporous films of core-shell iron nanoclusters have improved possibilities for remediation, chemical reactivity rate, and environmentally favorable reaction pathways. Conventional methods often have difficulties to yield stable monodispersed core-shell nanoparticles. We produced core-shell nanoclusters by a cluster source that utilizes combination of Fe target sputtering along with gas aggregations in an inert atmosphere at 7∘C. Sizes of core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoclusters are observed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The specific surface areas of the porous films obtained from Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET process are size-dependent and compared with the calculated data.

  8. Magnetization measurements and XMCD studies on ion irradiated iron oxide and core-shell iron/iron-oxide nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Maninder; Qiang, You; Jiang, Weilin; Pearce, Carolyn; McCloy, John S.

    2014-12-02

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) and core-shell iron/iron-oxide (Fe/Fe3O4) nanomaterials prepared by a cluster deposition system were irradiated with 5.5 MeV Si2+ ions and the structures determined by x-ray diffraction as consisting of 100% magnetite and 36/64 wt% Fe/FeO, respectively. However, x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) indicates similar surfaces in the two samples, slightly oxidized and so having more Fe3+ than the expected magnetite structure, with XMCD intensity much lower for the irradiated core-shell samples indicating weaker magnetism. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data lack the signature for FeO, but the irradiated core-shell system consists of Fe-cores with ~13 nm of separating oxide crystallite, so it is likely that FeO exists deeper than the probe depth of the XAS (~5 nm). Exchange bias (Hex) for both samples becomes increasingly negative as temperature is lowered, but the irradiated Fe3O4 sample shows greater sensitivity of cooling field on Hex. Loop asymmetries and Hex sensitivities of the irradiated Fe3O4 sample are due to interfaces and interactions between grains which were not present in samples before irradiation as well as surface oxidation. Asymmetries in the hysteresis curves of the irradiated core/shell sample are related to the reversal mechanism of the antiferromagnetic FeO and possibly some near surface oxidation.

  9. Iron snow in the Martian core?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Christopher J.; Pommier, Anne

    2018-01-01

    The decline of Mars' global magnetic field some 3.8-4.1 billion years ago is thought to reflect the demise of the dynamo that operated in its liquid core. The dynamo was probably powered by planetary cooling and so its termination is intimately tied to the thermochemical evolution and present-day physical state of the Martian core. Bottom-up growth of a solid inner core, the crystallization regime for Earth's core, has been found to produce a long-lived dynamo leading to the suggestion that the Martian core remains entirely liquid to this day. Motivated by the experimentally-determined increase in the Fe-S liquidus temperature with decreasing pressure at Martian core conditions, we investigate whether Mars' core could crystallize from the top down. We focus on the "iron snow" regime, where newly-formed solid consists of pure Fe and is therefore heavier than the liquid. We derive global energy and entropy equations that describe the long-timescale thermal and magnetic history of the core from a general theory for two-phase, two-component liquid mixtures, assuming that the snow zone is in phase equilibrium and that all solid falls out of the layer and remelts at each timestep. Formation of snow zones occurs for a wide range of interior and thermal properties and depends critically on the initial sulfur concentration, ξ0. Release of gravitational energy and latent heat during growth of the snow zone do not generate sufficient entropy to restart the dynamo unless the snow zone occupies at least 400 km of the core. Snow zones can be 1.5-2 Gyrs old, though thermal stratification of the uppermost core, not included in our model, likely delays onset. Models that match the available magnetic and geodetic constraints have ξ0 ≈ 10% and snow zones that occupy approximately the top 100 km of the present-day Martian core.

  10. Direct measurement of thermal conductivity in solid iron at planetary core conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konôpková, Zuzana; McWilliams, R Stewart; Gómez-Pérez, Natalia; Goncharov, Alexander F

    2016-06-02

    The conduction of heat through minerals and melts at extreme pressures and temperatures is of central importance to the evolution and dynamics of planets. In the cooling Earth's core, the thermal conductivity of iron alloys defines the adiabatic heat flux and therefore the thermal and compositional energy available to support the production of Earth's magnetic field via dynamo action. Attempts to describe thermal transport in Earth's core have been problematic, with predictions of high thermal conductivity at odds with traditional geophysical models and direct evidence for a primordial magnetic field in the rock record. Measurements of core heat transport are needed to resolve this difference. Here we present direct measurements of the thermal conductivity of solid iron at pressure and temperature conditions relevant to the cores of Mercury-sized to Earth-sized planets, using a dynamically laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. Our measurements place the thermal conductivity of Earth's core near the low end of previous estimates, at 18-44 watts per metre per kelvin. The result is in agreement with palaeomagnetic measurements indicating that Earth's geodynamo has persisted since the beginning of Earth's history, and allows for a solid inner core as old as the dynamo.

  11. Pure-iron/iron-based-alloy hybrid soft magnetic powder cores compacted at ultra-high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Tatsuya; Tsuruta, Hijiri; Watanabe, Asako; Ishimine, Tomoyuki; Ueno, Tomoyuki

    2018-04-01

    We developed Fe/FeSiAl soft magnetic powder cores (SMCs) for realizing the miniaturization and high efficiency of an electromagnetic conversion coil in the high-frequency range (˜20 kHz). We found that Fe/FeSiAl SMCs can be formed with a higher density under higher compaction pressure than pure-iron SMCs. These SMCs delivered a saturation magnetic flux density of 1.7 T and iron loss (W1/20k) of 158 kW/m3. The proposed SMCs exhibited similar excellent characteristics even in block shapes, which are closer to the product shapes.

  12. Pure-iron/iron-based-alloy hybrid soft magnetic powder cores compacted at ultra-high pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Saito

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We developed Fe/FeSiAl soft magnetic powder cores (SMCs for realizing the miniaturization and high efficiency of an electromagnetic conversion coil in the high-frequency range (∼20 kHz. We found that Fe/FeSiAl SMCs can be formed with a higher density under higher compaction pressure than pure-iron SMCs. These SMCs delivered a saturation magnetic flux density of 1.7 T and iron loss (W1/20k of 158 kW/m3. The proposed SMCs exhibited similar excellent characteristics even in block shapes, which are closer to the product shapes.

  13. Non-chondritic iron isotope ratios in planetary mantles as a result of core formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elardo, Stephen M.; Shahar, Anat

    2017-02-01

    Information about the materials and conditions involved in planetary formation and differentiation in the early Solar System is recorded in iron isotope ratios. Samples from Earth, the Moon, Mars and the asteroid Vesta reveal significant variations in iron isotope ratios, but the sources of these variations remain uncertain. Here we present experiments that demonstrate that under the conditions of planetary core formation expected for the Moon, Mars and Vesta, iron isotopes fractionate between metal and silicate due to the presence of nickel, and enrich the bodies' mantles in isotopically light iron. However, the effect of nickel diminishes at higher temperatures: under conditions expected for Earth's core formation, we infer little fractionation of iron isotopes. From our experimental results and existing conceptual models of magma ocean crystallization and mantle partial melting, we find that nickel-induced fractionation can explain iron isotope variability found in planetary samples without invoking nebular or accretionary processes. We suggest that near-chondritic iron isotope ratios of basalts from Mars and Vesta, as well as the most primitive lunar basalts, were achieved by melting of isotopically light mantles, whereas the heavy iron isotope ratios of terrestrial ocean floor basalts are the result of melting of near-chondritic Earth mantle.

  14. Polymorphic Nature of Iron and Degree of Lattice Preferred Orientation Beneath the Earth's Inner Core Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattesini, Maurizio; Belonoshko, Anatoly B.; Tkalčić, Hrvoje

    2018-01-01

    Deciphering the polymorphic nature and the degree of iron lattice-preferred orientation in the Earth's inner core holds a key to understanding the present status and evolution of the inner core. A multiphase lattice-preferred orientation pattern is obtained for the top 350 km of the inner core by means of the ab initio based Candy Wrapper Velocity Model coupled to a Monte Carlo phase discrimination scheme. The achieved geographic distribution of lattice alignment is characterized by two regions of freezing, namely within South America and the Western Central Pacific, that exhibit an uncommon high degree of lattice orientation. In contrast, widespread regions of melting of relatively weak lattice ordering permeate the rest of the inner core. The obtained multiphase lattice-preferred orientation pattern is in line with mantle-constrained geodynamo simulations and allows to setup an ad hoc mineral physics scenario for the complex Earth's inner core. It is found that the cubic phase of iron is the dominating iron polymorph in the outermost part of the inner core.

  15. Analysis of the plasma magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium in iron core transformer Tokamak HL-1M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiaoguang; Yuan Baoshan

    1992-01-01

    The physical and mathematical model are presented on the problem of MHD equilibrium with the self consistent in iron core transformer HL-1M. Calculation and analysis for the plasma equilibrium of the stable boundary and free boundary are shown respectively, in an axisymmetric equilibrium model of two dimensions. First, a variation formulation of the problem is written and the equations of the poloided flux ψ are solved by a finite element method; the Picard and Newton algorithms are tested for the non-linearities. The plasma boundary and the magnetic surfaces are being simulated, with the currents in the coils, the total plasma current, its current density function and the magnetic permeability of the iron being the data for the problem; a certain number of the characteristic parameter of the equilibrium configuration is calculated. Secondly, a simple method of calculation is adopted in the determination of equilibrium fields and currents in iron core HL-1M tokamak device. In the plasma equilibrium, the magnetic effect of the air gaps in the iron core and the iron magnetic shielded plate are considered in HL-1M device. Reliable data are provided for designing and constructing the poloidal field system of HL-1M device. A good computer code is constructed, which may be useful in operating on analysis for the future device

  16. Coupling between core and cladding modes in a helical core fiber with large core offset

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napiorkowski, Maciej; Urbanczyk, Waclaw

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the effect of resonant coupling between core and cladding modes in a helical core fiber with large core offset using the fully vectorial method based on the transformation optics formalism. Our study revealed that the resonant couplings to lower order cladding modes predicted by perturbative methods and observed experimentally in fibers with small core offsets are in fact prohibited for larger core offsets. This effect is related to the lack of phase matching caused by elongation of the optical path of the fundamental modes in the helical core. Moreover, strong couplings to the cladding modes of the azimuthal modal number much higher than predicted by perturbative methods may be observed for large core offsets, as the core offset introduces higher order angular harmonics in the field distribution of the fundamental modes. Finally, in contrast to previous studies, we demonstrate the existence of spectrally broad polarization sensitive couplings to the cladding modes suggesting that helical core fibers with large core offsets may be used as broadband circular polarizers. (paper)

  17. Rotating collapse of stellar iron cores in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, C D; Dimmelmeier, H; Marek, A; Janka, H-T; Zink, B; Hawke, I; Schnetter, E

    2007-01-01

    We present results from the first 2 + 1 and 3 + 1 simulations of the collapse of rotating stellar iron cores in general relativity employing a finite-temperature equation of state and an approximate treatment of deleptonization during collapse. We compare full 3 + 1 and conformally-flat spacetime evolution methods and find that the conformally-flat treatment is sufficiently accurate for the core-collapse supernova problem. We focus on the gravitational wave (GW) emission from rotating collapse, core bounce and early postbounce phases. Our results indicate that the GW signature of these phases is much more generic than previously estimated. In addition, we track the growth of a nonaxisymmetric instability of dominant m = 1 character in two of our models that leads to prolonged narrow-band GW emission at ∼920-930 Hz over several tens of milliseconds

  18. Modern Cored Wire Injection 2PE-9 Method in the Production of Ductile Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Guzik

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The results of studies on the use of modern two cored wires injection method for production of nodular graphite cast iron with use of unique implementation of drum ladle as a treatment/ transport and casting ladle instead vertical treatment ladle was described. The injection of length of Ø 9mm wires, cored: in FeSi + Mg nodulariser mixture and inoculant master alloy is a treatment method which can be used to produce iron melted in coreless induction furnace. This paper describes the results of using this method for possibility production of ductile iron under specific industrial conditions. In this case was taken ductile iron with material designation: EN-GJS-450- 10 Grade according PN-EN 1563:2000. Microstructure of 28 trials was controlled on internally used sample which has been correlated with standard sample before. The paper presents typical metallic matrix and graphite characteristic. Additionally, mechanical properties were checked in one experiment. Because of further possibility treatment temperature reduction only the rough magnesium recovery and cost of this new method are given.

  19. Iron and stony-iron meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruzicka, Alex M.; Haack, Henning; Chabot, Nancy L.

    2017-01-01

    By far most of the melted and differentiated planetesimals that have been sampled as meteorites are metal-rich iron meteorites or stony iron meteorites. The parent asteroids of these meteorites accreted early and differentiated shortly after the solar system formed, producing some of the oldest...... and interpretations for iron and stony iron meteorites (Plate 13.1). Such meteorites provide important constraints on the nature of metal-silicate separation and mixing in planetesimals undergoing partial to complete differentiation. They include iron meteorites that formed by the solidification of cores...... (fractionally crystallized irons), irons in which partly molten metal and silicates of diverse types were mixed together (silicate-bearing irons), stony irons in which partly molten metal and olivine from cores and mantles were mixed together (pallasites), and stony irons in which partly molten metal...

  20. Torque decomposition and control in an iron core linear permanent magnet motor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overboom, T.T.; Smeets, J.P.C.; Stassen, J.M.; Jansen, J.W.; Lomonova, E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract—This paper concerns the decomposition and control of the torque produced by an iron core linear permanent magnet motor. The proposed method is based on the dq0-decomposition of the three-phase currents using Park’s transformation. The torque is decomposed into a reluctance component and two

  1. Development of high performance core for large fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Kotaro; Kawashima, Katsuyuki; Watari, Yoshio.

    1982-01-01

    Subsequently to the fast breeder prototype reactor ''Monju'', the construction of a demonstration reactor with 1000 MWe output is planned. This research aims at the establishment of the concept of a large core with excellent fuel breeding property and safety for a demonstration and commercial reactors. For the purpose, the optimum specification of fuel design as a large core was clarified, and the new construction of a core was examined, in which a disk-shaped blanket with thin peripheral edge is introduced at the center of a core. As the result, such prospect was obtained that the time for fuel doubling would be 1/2, and the energy generated in a core collapse accident would be about 1/5 as compared with a large core using the same fuel as ''Monju''. Generally, as a core is enlarged, the rate of breeding lowers. If a worst core collapse accident occurs, the scale of accident will be very large in the case of a ''Monju'' type large core. In an unhomogeneous core, an internal blanket is provided in the core for the purpose of improving the breeding property and safety. Hitachi Ltd. developed the concept of a large core unhomogeneous in axial direction and proposed it. The research on the fuel design for a large core, an unhomogeneous core and its core collapse accident is reported. (Kako, I.)

  2. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the iron core transformer for the EXTRAP T1 device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bures, M.

    1983-11-01

    The possibility of driving the discharge current of the toroidal EXTRAP T1 device, using the iron core transformer, is investigated. It is shown that the breakdown voltage 20 kV can be supplied, along the zero line of the vacuum magnetic field, at a time shorter than 1 μs. this is made possible by the transient build-up of the magnetic field in the iron core laminations. The plasma current rise time is determined by the evolution of the inductance and resistance of the discharge. This enables the plasma current to be built up to an amplitude I(sub)p=50 kA within 10-15 μs and sustained at this value during a steady-state period of 100 μs. The premagnetized iron core of the cross-sectional area 0.16 m 2 is sufficient to provide the necessary flux swing, if the saturation induction is not lower than 1 T. It is further concluded that the SiFe lamination is adequate for the present application. However, to reduce the stray field interfering with the zero line of the octupole field, a lamination of thickness d < 0.1 mm with high resistivity should be employed. The interlamination voltage should be reduced by segmenting the core. The steady-state is supplied by an 0.4Ω, 20 kV artificial line consisting of 20 μF capacitive elements. (author)

  3. Large specific absorption rates in the magnetic hyperthermia properties of metallic iron nanocubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehdaoui, B.; Meffre, A.; Lacroix, L.-M. [Universite de Toulouse, INSA, UPS, LPCNO (Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie des Nano-Objets), 135 avenue de Rangueil, F-31077 Toulouse (France); CNRS, UMR 5215, LPCNO, F-31077 Toulouse (France); Carrey, J., E-mail: julian.carrey@insa-toulouse.f [Universite de Toulouse, INSA, UPS, LPCNO (Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie des Nano-Objets), 135 avenue de Rangueil, F-31077 Toulouse (France); CNRS, UMR 5215, LPCNO, F-31077 Toulouse (France); Lachaize, S. [Universite de Toulouse, INSA, UPS, LPCNO (Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie des Nano-Objets), 135 avenue de Rangueil, F-31077 Toulouse (France); CNRS, UMR 5215, LPCNO, F-31077 Toulouse (France); Gougeon, M. [Institut CARNOT-CIRIMAT-UMR 5085, Batiment 2R1, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Respaud, M. [Universite de Toulouse, INSA, UPS, LPCNO (Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie des Nano-Objets), 135 avenue de Rangueil, F-31077 Toulouse (France); CNRS, UMR 5215, LPCNO, F-31077 Toulouse (France); Chaudret, B. [Laboratoire de Chimie de Coordination-CNRS, 205 rte de Narbonne, 31077 Toulouse cedex 4 (France)

    2010-10-15

    We report on the magnetic hyperthermia properties of chemically synthesized ferromagnetic 11 and 16 nm Fe(0) nanoparticles of cubic shape displaying the saturation magnetization of bulk iron. The specific absorption rate measured on 16 nm nanocubes is 1690{+-}160 W/g at 300 kHz and 66 mT. This corresponds to specific losses-per-cycle of 5.6 mJ/g, largely exceeding the ones reported in other systems. A way to quantify the degree of optimization of any system with respect to hyperthermia applications is proposed. Applied here, this method shows that our nanoparticles are not fully optimized, probably due to the strong influence of magnetic interactions on their magnetic response. Once protected from oxidation and further optimized, such nano-objects could constitute efficient magnetic cores for biomedical applications requiring very large heating power.

  4. The earths innermost core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanda, J.N.

    1989-01-01

    A new earth model is advanced with a solid innermost core at the centre of the Earth where elements heavier than iron, over and above what can be retained in solution in the iron core, are collected. The innermost core is separated from the solid iron-nickel core by a shell of liquid copper. The innermost core has a natural vibration measured on the earth's surface as the long period 26 seconds microseisms. The earth was formed initially as a liquid sphere with a relatively thin solid crust above the Byerly discontinuity. The trace elements that entered the innermost core amounted to only 0.925 ppm of the molten mass. Gravitational differentiation must have led to the separation of an explosive thickness of pure 235 U causing a fission explosion that could expel beyond the Roche limit a crustal scab which would form the centre piece of the moon. A reservoir of helium floats on the liquid copper. A small proportion of helium-3, a relic of the ancient fission explosion present there will spell the exciting magnetic field. The field is stable for thousands of years because of the presence of large quantity of helium-4 which accounts for most of the gaseous collisions that will not disturb the atomic spin of helium-3 atoms. This field is prone to sudden reversals after long periods of stability. (author). 14 refs

  5. All Metal Iron Core For A Low Aspect Ratio Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gates, D.A.; Jun, C.; Zatz, I.; Zolfaghari, A.

    2010-01-01

    A novel concept for incorporating a iron core transformer within a axisymmetric toroidal plasma containment device with a high neutron flux is described. This design enables conceptual design of low aspect ratio devices which employ standard transformer-driven plasma startup by using all-metal high resistance separators between the toroidal field windings. This design avoids the inherent problems of a multiturn air core transformer which will inevitably suffer from strong neutron bombardment and hence lose the integrity of its insulation, both through long term material degradation and short term neutron-induced conductivity. A full 3-dimensional model of the concept has been developed within the MAXWELL program and the resultant loop voltage calculated. The utility of the result is found to be dependent on the resistivity of the high resistance separators. Useful loop voltage time histories have been obtained using achievable resistivities.

  6. Superconducting superferric dipole magnet with cold iron core for the VLHC

    CERN Document Server

    Foster, G W

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic system of the stage I Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) is based on 2 Tesla superconducting magnets with combined functions. These magnets have a room temperature iron yoke with two 20 mm air gaps. Magnetic field in both horizontally separated air gaps is generated by a single, 100 kA superconducting transmission line. An alternative design with a cold iron yoke, horizontally or vertically separated air gaps is under investigation. The cold iron option with horizontally separated air gaps reduces the amount of iron, which is one of the major cost drivers for the 233-km magnet system of future accelerator. The vertical beam separation decreases the superconductor volume, heat load from the synchrotron radiation and eliminates fringe field from the return bus. Nevertheless, the horizontal beam separation provides lowest volume of the iron yoke and, therefore, smaller heat load on the cryogenic system during cooling down. All these options are discussed and compared in the paper. Superconducting correct...

  7. Gold nanorod@iron oxide core-shell heterostructures: synthesis, characterization, and photocatalytic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue; Zhao, Junwei; You, Wenlong; Cheng, Danhong; Ni, Weihai

    2017-03-17

    Iron oxides are directly coated on the surface of cetyl-trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)-capped gold nanorods (AuNRs) in aqueous solutions at room temperature, which results in AuNR@Fe 2 O 3 , AuNR@Fe 3 O 4 , and AuNR@Fe 2 O 3 @Fe 3 O 4 core-shell heterostructures. The iron oxide shells are uniform, smooth, with characteristic porous structure, and their thickness can be readily tuned. The shell formation is highly dependent on the reaction parameters including pH and CTAB concentration. The Fe 2 O 3 shell is amorphous and exhibits nearly zero remanence and coercivity, while the Fe 3 O 4 shell is ferromagnetic with a low saturation magnetization of about 0.5 emu g -1 due to its low crystallinity and the porous structure. At elevated temperatures achieved by plasmonic heating of the Au core, the Fe 2 O 3 shell transforms from amorphous to γ-Fe 2 O 3 and α-Fe 2 O 3 phases, while the Fe 3 O 4 phase disappears because of the oxidation of Fe 2+ . A 1.4-fold increase of photocatalytic performance is observed due to the plasmonic resonance provided by the Au core. The photocatalytic efficiency of Fe 3 O 4 is about 1.7-fold higher than Fe 2 O 3 as more surface defects are present on the Fe 3 O 4 shell, promoting the adsorption and activation of reagents on the surface during the catalytic reactions. This approach can be readily extended to other nanostructures including Au spherical nanoparticles and nanostars. These highly uniform and multifunctional core-shell heterostructures can be of great potential in a variety of energy, magnetic, and environment applications.

  8. The clinical application of percutaneous large core needle biopsy on large breast mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Songhong; Ma Jie; Wang Guohong; Sun Guoping; Fu Jianmin; Zhou Dongxian

    2005-01-01

    Objective: An evaluation of the clinical application of percutaneous large core needle biopsy on large breast mass. Methods: Mammography and percutaneous large core needle biopsy were performed in 31 cases of large breast mass. Results: Apart from 5 cases showing characteristic calcification of malignancy, the rest cases were lack of diagnostic manifestation. Needle biopsy and pathological examination identified breast canner in 11 cases, suppurative mastitis in 9 case, fibrocystic mammary disorder in 7 cases, tuberculosis in 1 case, and fibroadenoma in 3 cases. Fibrocystic mammary disease was initially identified by biopsy in a case, while the following pathological diagnosis was fibrocystic mammary disorder with cancinoma in sim. Specificity rate of' biopsy was 96.8% and no false positive was observed. Vagotonia occurred in one case during the biopsy and hematoma in another. Conclusion: Percutaneous large core needle biopsy is a less invasive, simple, safe and reliable methods in the diagnosis of the large breast mass. And it may be recommended as a complementary procedure for routine imaging modality or surgical resection. (authors)

  9. "Conjugate channeling" effect in dislocation core diffusion: carbon transport in dislocated BCC iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Akio; Li, Ju; Ogata, Shigenobu

    2013-01-01

    Dislocation pipe diffusion seems to be a well-established phenomenon. Here we demonstrate an unexpected effect, that the migration of interstitials such as carbon in iron may be accelerated not in the dislocation line direction ξ, but in a conjugate diffusion direction. This accelerated random walk arises from a simple crystallographic channeling effect. c is a function of the Burgers vector b, but not ξ, thus a dislocation loop possesses the same everywhere. Using molecular dynamics and accelerated dynamics simulations, we further show that such dislocation-core-coupled carbon diffusion in iron has temperature-dependent activation enthalpy like a fragile glass. The 71° mixed dislocation is the only case in which we see straightforward pipe diffusion that does not depend on dislocation mobility.

  10. Iron environment in ferritin with large amounts of phosphate, from Azotobacter vinelandii and horse spleen, analyzed using Extended X-ray Absorption fine Structure (EXAFS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohrer, J.S.; Islam, Q.T.; Sayes, D.E.; Theil, E.C.; Watt, G.D.

    1990-01-01

    The iron core of proteins in the ferritin family displays structural variations that includes phosphate content was well as the number and the degree of ordering of the iron atoms. Earlier studies had shown that ferritin iron cores naturally high in phosphate, e.g., Azotobacter vinelandii (AV) ferritin had decreased long-range order. Here, the influence of phosphate on the local structure around iron in ferritin cores is reported, comparing the EXAFS of AV ferritin, reconstituted ferritin and native horse spleen ferritin. In contrast, when the phosphate content was high in AV ferritin and horse spleen ferritin reconstituted with phosphate, the average iron atom had five to six phosphorus neighbors at 3.17 angstrom. Moreover, the number of detectable iron neighbors was lower when phosphate was high or present during reconstitution and the interatomic distance was longer indicating that some phosphate bridges neighboring iron atoms. However, the decrease in the number of detectable iron-iron neighbors compared to HSF and the higher number of Fe-P interactions relative to Fe-Fe interactions suggest that some phosphate ligands were chain termini, or blocked crystal growth, and/or introduced defects which contributed both to the long-range disorder and to altered redox properties previously observed in AV ferritin

  11. Preparation and chemical stability of iron-nitride-coated iron microparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Xin; Liu Shixiong

    2007-01-01

    Iron-nitride-coated iron microparticles were prepared by nitridation of the surface of iron microparticles with ammonia gas at a temperature of 510 deg. C. The phases, composition, morphology, magnetic properties, and chemical stability of the particles were studied. The phases were α-Fe, ε-Fe 3 N, and γ-Fe 4 N. The composition varied from the core to the surface, with 99.8 wt% Fe in the core, and 93.8 wt% Fe and 6 wt% N in the iron-nitride coating. The thickness of the iron-nitride coating was about 0.28 μm. The chemical stability of the microparticles was greatly improved, especially the corrosion resistance in corrosive aqueous media. The saturation magnetization and the coercive force were 17.1x10 3 and 68 kA/m, respectively. It can be concluded that iron-nitride-coated iron microparticles will be very useful in many fields, such as water-based magnetorheological fluids and polishing fluids

  12. Development of concept and neutronic calculation method for large LMFBR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirakata, K.; Ishikawa, M.; Ikegami, T.; Sanda, T.; Kaneto, K.; Kawashima, M.; Kaise, Y.; Shirakawa, M.; Hibi, K.

    1991-01-01

    Presented in this paper is the state of the art of reactor physics R and Ds for the development of concept and neutronic calculation method for large Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) core. Physics characteristics of concepts for mixed oxide (MOX) fueled large FBR core were investigated by a series of benchmark critical experiments. Next, an adequacy and accuracy of the current neutronic calculation method was assessed by the experiments analyses, and then neutronic prediction accuracies by the method were evaluated for physics characteristics of the large core. Concerns on core development were discussed in terms of neutronics. (author)

  13. Comparative study of the iron cores in human liver ferritin, its pharmaceutical models and ferritin in chicken liver and spleen tissues using Moessbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alenkina, I.V.; Semionkin, V.A. [Faculty of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control, Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Faculty of Experimental Physics, Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Oshtrakh, M.I. [Faculty of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control, Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Klepova, Yu.V.; Sadovnikov, N.V. [Faculty of Physiology and Biotechnology, Ural State Agricultural Academy, Ekaterinburg, (Russian Federation); Dubiel, S.M. [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: Application of the Moessbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution (4096 channels) for a study of iron-containing biological species is of great interest. Improving the velocity resolution allows to reveal small variations in the electronic structure of iron, and to obtain hyperfine parameters with smaller instrumental (systematic) errors in comparison with measurements performed in 512 channels or less. It also allows a more reliable fitting of complex Moessbauer spectra. In the present study the Moessbauer spectroscopy with the high velocity resolution was used for a comparative analysis of ferritin and its pharmaceutically important models as well as iron storage proteins in a chicken liver and a spleen. The ferritin, an iron storage protein, consists of a nanosized polynuclear iron core formed by a ferrihydrite surrounded by a protein shell. Iron-polysaccharide complexes contain {beta}-FeOOH iron cores coated with various polysaccharides. The Moessbauer spectra of the ferritin and commercial products Imferon, MaltoferR and Ferrum Lek as well as those of the chicken liver and spleen tissues were measured with the high velocity resolution at 295 and 90 K. They were fitted using two models: (1) with a homogeneous iron core (an approximation using one quadrupole doublet), and (2) with a heterogeneous iron core (an approximation using several quadrupole doublets). The model (1) can be used as the first approximation fit to visualize small variations in the hyperfine parameters. Using this model, differences in the Moessbauer hyperfine parameters were obtained in both 295 and 90 K Moessbauer spectra. However, this model was considered as a rough approximation because the measured Moessbauer spectra had non-Lorentzian line shapes. Therefore, the spectra of the ferritin, Imferon, MaltoferR and Ferrum Lek as well as those of the liver and spleen tissues were fitted again using the model (2) in which a different number of the quadrupole doublets was

  14. Synthesis of composite nanoparticles using co-precipitation of a magnetic iron-oxide shell onto core nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primc, Darinka; Belec, Blaž; Makovec, Darko

    2016-01-01

    Composite nanoparticles can be synthesized by coating a shell made of one material onto core nanoparticles made of another material. Here we report on a novel method for coating a magnetic iron oxide onto the surface of core nanoparticles in an aqueous suspension. The method is based on the heterogeneous nucleation of an initial product of Fe"3"+/Fe"2"+ co-precipitation on the core nanoparticles. The close control of the supersaturation of the precipitating species required for an exclusively heterogeneous nucleation and the growth of the shell were achieved by immobilizing the reactive Fe"3"+ ions in a nitrate complex with urea ([Fe((CO(NH_2)_2)_6](NO_3)_3) and by using solid Mg(OH)_2 as the precipitating reagent. The slow thermal decomposition of the complex at 60 °C homogeneously releases the reactive Fe"3"+ ions into the suspension of the core nanoparticles. The key stage of the process is the thermal hydrolysis of the released Fe"3"+ ions prior to the addition of Mg(OH)_2. The thermal hydrolysis results in the formation of γ-FeOOH, exclusively at the surfaces of the core nanoparticles. After the addition of the solid hydroxide Mg(OH)_2, the pH increases and at pH ~ 5.7 the Fe"2"+ precipitates and reacts with the γ-FeOOH to form magnetic iron oxide with a spinel structure (spinel ferrite) at the surfaces of the core nanoparticles. The proposed low-temperature method for the synthesis of composite nanoparticles is capable of forming well-defined interfaces between the two components, important for the coupling of the different properties. The procedure is environmentally friendly, inexpensive, and appropriate for scaling up to mass production.Graphical abstract

  15. Iron-rich Oxides at the Core-mantle Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, J. K.; Jackson, J. M.; Sturhahn, W.; Bower, D. J.; Zhuravlev, K. K.; Prakapenka, V.

    2013-12-01

    Seismic observations near the base of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) have detected 5-20 km thick patches in which the seismic wave velocities are reduced by up to 30%. These ultra-low velocity zones (ULVZs) have been interpreted as aggregates of partially molten material (e.g. Williams and Garnero 1996, Hernlund and Jellinek, 2010) or as solid, iron-enriched residues (e.g. Knittle and Jeanloz, 1991; Mao et al., 2006; Wicks et al., 2010), typically based on proposed sources of velocity reduction. The stabilities of these structure types have been explored through dynamic models that have assembled a relationship between ULVZ stability and density (Hernlund and Tackley, 2007; Bower et al., 2010). Now, to constrain the chemistry and mineralogy of ULVZs, more information is needed on the relationship between density and sound velocity of candidate phases. We present the pressure-volume-temperature equation of state of (Mg0.06 57Fe0.94)O determined up to pressures of 120 GPa and temperatures of 2000 K. Volume was measured with X-ray diffraction at beamline 13-ID-D of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), where high pressures and temperatures are achieved in a diamond anvil cell with in-situ laser heating. Sample assemblies were prepared using dehydrated NaCl as an insulator and neon as a pressure transmitting medium. We present results with and without iron as a buffer and thermal pressure gauge. We have also determined the room temperature Debye velocity (VD) of (Mg0.06 57Fe0.94)O using nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and in-situ X-ray diffraction, up to 80 GPa at 3-ID-B of the APS. The effect of the electronic environment of the iron sites on the velocities was tracked in-situ using synchrotron Moessbauer spectroscopy. Using our measured equation of state, the seismically relevant compressional (VP) and shear (VS) wave velocities were calculated from the Debye velocities. We combine these studies with a simple mixing model to predict the properties of a solid

  16. Multistage Core Formation in Planetesimals Revealed by Numerical Modeling and Hf-W Chronometry of Iron Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, W.; Kruijer, T. S.; Breuer, D.; Kleine, T.

    2018-02-01

    Iron meteorites provide some of the most direct insights into the processes and timescales of core formation in planetesimals. Of these, group IVB irons stand out by having one of the youngest 182Hf-182W model ages for metal segregation (2.9 ± 0.6 Ma after solar system formation), as well as the lowest bulk sulfur content and hence highest liquidus temperature. Here, using a new model for the internal evolution of the IVB parent body, we show that a single stage of metal-silicate separation cannot account for the complete melting of pure Fe metal at the relatively late time given by the Hf-W model age. Instead, a complex metal-silicate separation scenario is required that includes migration of partial silicate melts, formation of a shallow magma ocean, and core formation in two distinct stages of metal segregation. In the first stage, a protocore formed at ≈1.5 Ma via settling of metal particles in a mantle magma ocean, followed by metal segregation from a shallow magma ocean at ≈5.4 Ma. As these stages of metal segregation occurred at different times, the two metal fractions had different 182W compositions. Consequently, the final 182W composition of the IVB core does not correspond to a single differentiation event, but represents the average composition of early- and late-segregated core fractions. Our best fit model indicates an ≈100 km radius for the IVB parent body and provides an accretion age of ≈0.1-0.5 Ma after solar system formation. The computed solidification time is, furthermore, consistent with the Re-Os age for crystallization of the IVB core.

  17. Very low sound velocities in iron-rich (Mg,Fe)O: Implications for the core-mantle boundary region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, J.K.; Jackson, J.M.; Sturhahn, W.

    2010-01-01

    The sound velocities of (Mg .16 Fe .84 )O have been measured to 121 GPa at ambient temperature using nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering. The effect of electronic environment of the iron sites on the sound velocities were tracked in situ using synchrotron Moessbauer spectroscopy. We found the sound velocities of (Mg .16 Fe .84 )O to be much lower than those in other presumed mantle phases at similar conditions, most notably at very high pressures. Conservative estimates of the effect of temperature and dilution on aggregate sound velocities show that only a small amount of iron-rich (Mg,Fe)O can greatly reduce the average sound velocity of an assemblage. We propose that iron-rich (Mg,Fe)O be a source of ultra-low velocity zones. Other properties of this phase, such as enhanced density and dynamic stability, strongly support the presence of iron-rich (Mg,Fe)O in localized patches above the core-mantle boundary.

  18. A facile solvothermal synthesis of large-grain iron cubes and cuboids with enhanced performances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Bai; Yang, Xueying; Li, Xiaopan; Cao, Ying; Yu, Ronghai

    2016-01-01

    The cubic and cuboid pure iron particles with particle size ranging from 500 nm to 2 μm have been fabricated using a solvothermal method in ethanol solution. The controlled morphology and size distribution can be easily tuned by adjusting the reaction temperatures. The morphologies of the as-synthesized iron particles can be transformed from cubes to cuboids with the reaction temperature increasing from 100 to 150 °C. Uniform particles with narrow size distribution and good dispersion can be obtained under 120 °C. These chemically synthesized Fe particles exhibit good air stability and very slight surface oxidation. High saturation magnetization of 208–211 A m 2 /kg and very low coercivity of 19–26 Oe can be achieved in these micron-level iron particles due to their high purity and small shape anisotropy. The relatively simple preparation process with low cost, good air stability and high saturation magnetization for these large-grain pure iron particles promise their great potential applications in complicated shape and miniaturized Fe-based composite magnetic components. - Highlights: • The micron-level cubic and cuboid pure iron particles have been prepared. • The morphologies of the large-grain iron particles can be tuned. • These iron particles show slight surface oxidation and good air stability. • These iron particles exhibit high saturation magnetization of 208–211 A m 2 kg −1 .

  19. Study of the rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution: Implication for the analysis of ferritin-like iron cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alenkina, I. V.; Oshtrakh, M. I.; Tugarova, A. V.; Biró, B.; Semionkin, V. A.; Kamnev, A. A.

    2014-09-01

    The results of a comparative study of two samples of the rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense (strain Sp245) prepared in different conditions and of human liver ferritin using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution demonstrated the presence of ferritin-like iron (i.e. iron similar to that found in ferritin-like proteins) in the bacterium. Mössbauer spectra of these samples were fitted in two ways: as a rough approximation using a one quadrupole doublet fit (the homogeneous iron core model) and using a superposition of quadrupole doublets (the heterogeneous iron core model). Both results demonstrated differences in the Mössbauer parameters for mammalian ferritin and for bacterial ferritin-like iron. Moreover, some differences in the Mössbauer parameters were observed between the two samples of A. brasilense Sp245 related to the differences in their preparation conditions.

  20. Shape-Controlled Synthesis of Magnetic Iron Oxide@SiO₂-Au@C Particles with Core-Shell Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mo; Li, Xiangcun; Qi, Xinhong; Luo, Fan; He, Gaohong

    2015-05-12

    The preparation of nonspherical magnetic core-shell nanostructures with uniform sizes still remains a challenge. In this study, magnetic iron oxide@SiO2-Au@C particles with different shapes, such as pseduocube, ellipsoid, and peanut, were synthesized using hematite as templates and precursors of magnetic iron oxide. The as-obtained magnetic particles demonstrated uniform sizes, shapes, and well-designed core-shell nanostructures. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis showed that the Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) of ∼6 nm were uniformly distributed between the silica and carbon layers. The embedding of the metal nanocrystals into the two different layers prevented the aggregation and reduced the loss of the metal nanocrystals during recycling. Catalytic performance of the peanut-like particles kept almost unchanged without a noticeable decrease in the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) in 8 min even after 7 cycles, indicating excellent reusability of the particles. Moreover, the catalyst could be readily recycled magnetically after each reduction by an external magnetic field.

  1. Core Formation on Asteroid 4 Vesta: Iron Rain in a Silicate Magma Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Walter S.; Mittlefehldt, David W.

    2017-01-01

    Geochemical observations of the eucrite and diogenite meteorites, together with observations made by NASA's Dawn spacecraft, suggest that Vesta resembles H chondrites in bulk chemical composition, possibly with about 25% of a CM-chondrite like composition added in. For this model, the core is 15% by mass (or 8 volume %) of the asteroid. The abundances of moderately siderophile elements (Ni, Co, Mo, W, and P) in eucrites require that essentially all of the metallic phase in Vesta segregated to form a core prior to eucrite solidification. Melting in the Fe-Ni-S system begins at a cotectic temperature of 940 deg. C. Only about 40% of the total metal phase, or 3-4 volume % of Vesta, melts prior to the onset of silicate melting. Liquid iron in solid silicate initially forms isolated pockets of melt; connected melt channels, which are necessary if the metal is to segregate from the silicate, are only possible when the metal phase exceeds about 5 volume %. Thus, metal segregation to form a core does not occur prior to the onset of silicate melting.

  2. Models of the earth's core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    The combination of seismology, high pressure experiment and theory, geomagnetism, fluid dynamics, and current views of terrestrial planetary evolution lead to strong constraints on core models. The synthesis presented here is devoted to the defense of the following properties: (1) core formation was contemporaneous with earth accretion; (2) the outer, liquid core is predominately iron but cannot be purely iron; (3) the inner core-outer core boundary represents a thermodynamic equilibrium between a liquid alloys and a predominanately iron solid; (4) thermodynamic and transport properties of outer core can be estimated from liquid-state theories; and (5) the outer core is probably adiabatic and uniform in composition. None of these propositions are universally accepted by geophysicists. But, the intent of this paper is to present a coherent picture which explains most of the data with the fewest ad hoc assumptions. Areas in which future progress is both essential and likely are geo- and cosmochronology, seismological determinations of core structure, fluid dynamics of the core and mantle, and condensed matter physics

  3. Evaluation of stator core loss of high speed motor by using thermography camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takeru; Enokizono, Masato

    2018-04-01

    In order to design a high-efficiency motor, the iron loss that is generated in the motor should be reduced. The iron loss of the motor is generated in a stator core that is produced with an electrical steel sheet. The iron loss characteristics of the stator core and the electrical steel sheet are agreed due to a building factor. To evaluate the iron loss of the motor, the iron loss of the stator core should be measured more accurately. Thus, we proposed the method of the iron loss evaluation of the stator core by using a stator model core. This stator model core has been applied to the surface mounted permanent magnet (PM) motors without windings. By rotate the permanent magnet rotor, the rotating magnetic field is generated in the stator core like a motor under driving. To evaluate the iron loss of the stator model core, the iron loss of the stator core can be evaluated. Also, the iron loss can be calculated by a temperature gradient. When the temperature gradient is measured by using thermography camera, the iron loss of entire stator core can be evaluated as the iron loss distribution. In this paper, the usefulness of the iron loss evaluation method by using the stator model core is shown by the simulation with FEM and the heat measurement with thermography camera.

  4. Zero-valent iron treatment of dark brown colored coffee effluent: Contributions of a core-shell structure to pollutant removals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomizawa, Mayuka; Kurosu, Shunji; Kobayashi, Maki; Kawase, Yoshinori

    2016-12-01

    The decolorization and total organic carbon (TOC) removal of dark brown colored coffee effluent by zero-valent iron (ZVI) have been systematically examined with solution pH of 3.0, 4.0, 6.0 and 8.0 under oxic and anoxic conditions. The optimal decolorization and TOC removal were obtained at pH 8.0 with oxic condition. The maximum efficiencies of decolorization and TOC removal were 92.6 and 60.2%, respectively. ZVI presented potential properties for pollutant removal at nearly neutral pH because of its core-shell structure in which shell or iron oxide/hydroxide layer on ZVI surface dominated the decolorization and TOC removal of coffee effluent. To elucidate the contribution of the core-shell structure to removals of color and TOC at the optimal condition, the characterization of ZVI surface by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was conducted. It was confirmed that the core-shell structure was formed and the shell on ZVI particulate surface and the precipitates formed during the course of ZVI treatment consisted of iron oxides and hydroxides. They were significantly responsible for decolorization and TOC removal of coffee effluent via adsorption to shell on ZVI surface and inclusion into the precipitates rather than the oxidative degradation by OH radicals and the reduction by emitted electrons. The presence of dissolved oxygen (DO) enhanced the formation of the core-shell structure and as a result improved the efficiency of ZVI treatment for the removal of colored components in coffee effluents. ZVI was found to be an efficient material toward the treatment of coffee effluents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Earth's core: its composition, formation and bearing upon the origin of the Earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringwood, A.E.

    1984-01-01

    The density of the outer core is about 3% smaller than pure iron, which implies that the core contains a substantial amount of one or more low atomic mass elements. New experimental data on the solubility of FeO in molten iron are compatible with oxygen being the other element. At atmospheric pressure FeO is extensively soluble in iron at 2500 0 C, completely miscible above 2800 0 C. Also the solubility of FeO in molten iron is considerably increased at higher pressures. The density measurements can be explained if the core contains about 35% FeO; the new data show this to be possible. A model for the formation of the core based on a high FeO content in the Bulk Earth can be explained if the Earth accreted from a mixture of two components: A, a highly reduced, metal-rich devolatilized assemblage and B, a highly oxidized, volatile-rich assemblage similar to Cl chondrites. The formation of these components in the solar nebula is discussed. The large amount of FeO now inferred to be present in the Earth was mainly produced during accretion by oxidation of metallic iron from component A by water from component B. (U.K.)

  6. A mesoscale iron enrichment in the western subarctic Pacific induces a large centric diatom bloom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Atsushi; Takeda, Shigenobu; Saito, Hiroaki; Nishioka, Jun; Nojiri, Yukihiro; Kudo, Isao; Kiyosawa, Hiroshi; Shiomoto, Akihiro; Imai, Keiri; Ono, Tsuneo; Shimamoto, Akifumi; Tsumune, Daisuke; Yoshimura, Takeshi; Aono, Tatsuo; Hinuma, Akira; Kinugasa, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Koji; Sohrin, Yoshiki; Noiri, Yoshifumi; Tani, Heihachiro; Deguchi, Yuji; Tsurushima, Nobuo; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Fukami, Kimio; Kuma, Kenshi; Saino, Toshiro

    2003-05-09

    We have performed an in situ test of the iron limitation hypothesis in the subarctic North Pacific Ocean. A single enrichment of dissolved iron caused a large increase in phytoplankton standing stock and decreases in macronutrients and dissolved carbon dioxide. The dominant phytoplankton species shifted after the iron addition from pennate diatoms to a centric diatom, Chaetoceros debilis, that showed a very high growth rate, 2.6 doublings per day. We conclude that the bioavailability of iron regulates the magnitude of the phytoplankton biomass and the key phytoplankton species that determine the biogeochemical sensitivity to iron supply of high-nitrate, low-chlorophyll waters.

  7. Final report on cost estimate of forward superconducting air core toroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fields, T.

    1992-12-01

    An independent cost-estimate for key components of the forward superconducting air core toroid (ACT) was obtained in May 1992 from an experienced manufacturer of large cryogenic vessels. This new cost estimate is summarized in this report. It implies that a suitably designed ACT may have a cost which is approximately equal to that of the presently designed SDC forward iron core toroid

  8. Large-area super-resolution optical imaging by using core-shell microfibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cheng-Yang; Lo, Wei-Chieh

    2017-09-01

    We first numerically and experimentally report large-area super-resolution optical imaging achieved by using core-shell microfibers. The particular spatial electromagnetic waves for different core-shell microfibers are studied by using finite-difference time-domain and ray tracing calculations. The focusing properties of photonic nanojets are evaluated in terms of intensity profile and full width at half-maximum along propagation and transversal directions. In experiment, the general optical fiber is chemically etched down to 6 μm diameter and coated with different metallic thin films by using glancing angle deposition. The direct imaging of photonic nanojets for different core-shell microfibers is performed with a scanning optical microscope system. We show that the intensity distribution of a photonic nanojet is highly related to the metallic shell due to the surface plasmon polaritons. Furthermore, large-area super-resolution optical imaging is performed by using different core-shell microfibers placed over the nano-scale grating with 150 nm line width. The core-shell microfiber-assisted imaging is achieved with super-resolution and hundreds of times the field-of-view in contrast to microspheres. The possible applications of these core-shell optical microfibers include real-time large-area micro-fluidics and nano-structure inspections.

  9. Large core plastic planar optical splitter fabricated by 3D printing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajzler, Václav; Kulha, Pavel; Knietel, Marian; Enser, Herbert

    2017-10-01

    We report on the design, fabrication and optical properties of large core multimode optical polymer splitter fabricated using fill up core polymer in substrate that was made by 3D printing technology. The splitter was designed by the beam propagation method intended for assembling large core waveguide fibers with 735 μm diameter. Waveguide core layers were made of optically clear liquid adhesive, and Veroclear polymer was used as substrate and cover layers. Measurement of optical losses proved that the insertion optical loss was lower than 6.8 dB in the visible spectrum.

  10. Vortex core properties in iron pnictides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakharchuk I.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of unconventional superconductivity in recently discovered Fe-based superconductors has been intensively discussed. A plausible candidate is the superconducting (SC pairing mediated by antiferromagnetic (AFM interactions. There are two different approaches predicting the s± pairing state, in which the SC gap shows an s-wave symmetry that changes sign between different Fermi-surface (FS sheets. The first one is based on the itinerant spin fluctuations promoted by FS nesting, and the second is based on the local AFM exchange couplings. We apply quasiclassical Eilenberger approach to the vortex state to calculate the cutoff parameter, ξh, at different levels of impurity scattering rates and to compare results with experimental data for iron pnictides. The s±-wave pairing symmetry is considered as a presumable state for these materials. Magnetic field dependence of ξh/ξc2 is found to be nonuniversal for s± pairing: depending on the chosen parameter set it can reside both below and above analytical Ginzburg-Landau curve. It is also found that normalized ξ2/ξc2(B/Bc2 dependence is increasing with pair-breaking (interband impurity scattering, and the intraband scattering results in decreasing of the ξ2/ξc2 value. Here, ξ2 is the vortex core size and ξc2 is the Ginzburg-Landau coherence length determined from the upper critical field. The ξ2/ξc2(B/Bc2 curve has a minimum at low temperatures and small scattering evolving into monotonously decreasing function at strong scattering and high temperatures.

  11. Electron-capture and Low-mass Iron-core-collapse Supernovae: New Neutrino-radiation-hydrodynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radice, David; Burrows, Adam; Vartanyan, David; Skinner, M. Aaron; Dolence, Joshua C.

    2017-11-01

    We present new 1D (spherical) and 2D (axisymmetric) simulations of electron-capture (EC) and low-mass iron-core-collapse supernovae (SN). We consider six progenitor models: the ECSN progenitor from Nomoto; two ECSN-like low-mass low-metallicity iron-core progenitors from A. Heger (2016, private communication); and the 9, 10, and 11 {M}⊙ (zero-age main-sequence) progenitors from Sukhbold et al. We confirm that the ECSN and ESCN-like progenitors explode easily even in 1D with explosion energies of up to a 0.15 Bethes (1 {{B}}\\equiv {10}51 {erg}), and are a viable mechanism for the production of very-low-mass neutron stars. However, the 9, 10, and 11 {M}⊙ progenitors do not explode in 1D and are not even necessarily easier to explode than higher-mass progenitor stars in 2D. We study the effect of perturbations and of changes to the microphysics and we find that relatively small changes can result in qualitatively different outcomes, even in 1D, for models sufficiently close to the explosion threshold. Finally, we revisit the impact of convection below the protoneutron star (PNS) surface. We analyze 1D and 2D evolutions of PNSs subject to the same boundary conditions. We find that the impact of PNS convection has been underestimated in previous studies and could result in an increase of the neutrino luminosity by up to factors of two.

  12. The Distribution of Dissolved Iron in the West Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijkenberg, M.J.A.; Middag, R.; Laan, P.; Gerringa, L.J.A.; van Aken, H.M.; Schoemann, V.; de Jong, J.T.; de Baar, H.J.W.

    2014-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential trace element for marine life. Extremely low Fe concentrations limit primary production and nitrogen fixation in large parts of the oceans and consequently influence ocean ecosystem functioning. The importance of Fe for ocean ecosystems makes Fe one of the core chemical

  13. Models of the earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Combined inferences from seismology, high-pressure experiment and theory, geomagnetism, fluid dynamics, and current views of terrestrial planetary evolution lead to models of the earth's core with five basic properties. These are that core formation was contemporaneous with earth accretion; the core is not in chemical equilibrium with the mantle; the outer core is a fluid iron alloy containing significant quantities of lighter elements and is probably almost adiabatic and compositionally uniform; the more iron-rich inner solid core is a consequence of partial freezing of the outer core, and the energy release from this process sustains the earth's magnetic field; and the thermodynamic properties of the core are well constrained by the application of liquid-state theory to seismic and labroatory data.

  14. Current limiting behavior in three-phase transformer-type SFCLs using an iron core according to variety of fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yong-Sun; Jung, Byung-Ik; Ha, Kyoung-Hun; Choi, Soo-Geun; Park, Hyoung-Min; Choi, Hyo-Sang

    To apply the superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) to the power system, the reliability of the fault-current-limiting operation must be ensured in diverse fault conditions. The SFCL must also be linked to the operation of the high-speed recloser in the power system. In this study, a three-phase transformer-type SFCL, which has a neutral line to improve the simultaneous quench characteristics of superconducting elements, was manufactured to analyze the fault-current-limiting characteristic according to the single, double, and triple line-to-ground faults. The transformer-type SFCL, wherein three-phase windings are connected to one iron core, reduced the burden on the superconducting element as the superconducting element on the sound phase was also quenched in the case of the single line-to-ground fault. In the case of double or triple line-to-ground faults, the flux from the faulted phase winding was interlinked with other faulted or sound phase windings, and the fault-current-limiting rate decreased because the windings of three phases were inductively connected by one iron core.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of iron based nanoparticles for novel applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurshid, Hafsa

    The work in this thesis has been focused on the fabrication and characterization of iron based nanoparticles with controlled size and morphology with the aim: (i) to investigate their properties for potential applications in MICR toners and biomedical field and (ii) to study finite size effects on the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles. For the biomedical applications, core/shell structured iron/iron-oxide and hollow shell nanoparticles were synthesized by thermal decomposition of iron organometallic compounds [Fe(CO)5] at high temperature. Core/shell structured iron/iron-oxide nanoparticles have been prepared in the presence of oleic acid and oleylamine. Particle size and composition was controlled by varying the reaction parameters during synthesis. The as-made particles are hydrophobic and not dispersible in water. Water dispersibility was achieved by ligand exchange a with double hydrophilic diblock copolymer. Relaxometery measurements of the transverse relaxation time T2 of the nanoparticles solution at 3 Tesla confirm that the core/shell nanoparticles are an excellent MRI contrast agent using T2 weighted imaging sequences. In comparison to conventionally used iron oxide nanoparticles, iron/iron-oxide core/shell nanoparticles offer four times stronger T2 shortening effect at comparable core size due to their higher magnetization. The magnetic properties were studied as a function of particle size, composition and morphology. Hollow nanostructures are composed of randomly oriented grains arranged together to make a shell layer and make an interesting class of materials. The hollow morphology can be used as an extra degree of freedom to control the magnetic properties. Owing to their hollow morphology, they can be used for the targeted drug delivery applications by filling the drug inside their cavity. For the magnetic toners applications, particles were synthesized by chemically reducing iron salt using sodium borohydride and then coated with polyethylene

  16. Synthesis of pure iron magnetic nanoparticles in large quantity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwary, C S; Kashyap, S; Chattopadhyay, K; Biswas, K

    2013-01-01

    Free nanoparticles of iron (Fe) and their colloids with high saturation magnetization are in demand for medical and microfluidic applications. However, the oxide layer that forms during processing has made such synthesis a formidable challenge. Lowering the synthesis temperature decreases rate of oxidation and hence provides a new way of producing pure metallic nanoparticles prone to oxidation in bulk amount (large quantity). In this paper we have proposed a methodology that is designed with the knowledge of thermodynamic imperatives of oxidation to obtain almost oxygen-free iron nanoparticles, with or without any organic capping by controlled milling at low temperatures in a specially designed high-energy ball mill with the possibility of bulk production. The particles can be ultrasonicated to produce colloids and can be bio-capped to produce transparent solution. The magnetic properties of these nanoparticles confirm their superiority for possible biomedical and other applications. (paper)

  17. Iron(III) species formed during iron(II) oxidation and iron-core formation in bacterioferritin of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, C.; Treffry, A.; Mackey, J.; Williams, J.M.; Andrews, S.C.; Guest, J.R.; Harrison, P.M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a preliminary investigation of the mechanisms of Fe(II) oxidation and storage of Fe(III) in the bacterioferritin of Escherichia coli (EcBFR). Using Moessbauer spectroscopy to examine the initial oxidation of iron by EcBFR it is confirmed that this ferritin exhibits 'ferroxidase' activity and is shown that dimeric and monomeric iron species are produced as intermediates. The characteristics of ferroxidase activity in EcBFR is compare d with those of human H-chain ferritin (HuHF) and discuss the different Moessbauer parameters of their dimeric iron with reference to the structures of their di-metal sites. In addition, it is presented preliminary findings suggesting that after an initial 'burst', the rate of oxidation is greatly reduced, possibly due to blockage of the ferroxidase centre by bound iron. A new component, not found in HuHF and probably representing a small cluster of Fe(III) atoms, is reported

  18. Uranium isotope ratios of Muonionalusta troilite and complications for the absolute age of the IVA iron meteorite core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennecka, Gregory A.; Amelin, Yuri; Kleine, Thorsten

    2018-05-01

    The crystallization ages of planetary crustal material (given by basaltic meteorites) and planetary cores (given by iron meteorites) provide fiducial marks for the progress of planetary formation, and thus, the absolute ages of these objects fundamentally direct our knowledge and understanding of planet formation and evolution. The lone precise absolute age of planetary core material was previously obtained on troilite inclusions from the IVA iron meteorite Muonionalusta. This previously reported Pb-Pb age of 4565.3 ± 0.1 Ma-assuming a 238U/235U =137.88-only post-dated the start of the Solar System by approximately 2-3 million years, and mandated fast cooling of planetary core material. Since an accurate Pb-Pb age requires a known 238U/235U of the sample, we have measured both 238U/235U and Pb isotopic compositions of troilite inclusions from Muonionalusta. The measured 238U/235U of the samples range from ∼137.84 to as low as ∼137.22, however based on Pb and U systematics, terrestrial contamination appears pervasive and has affected samples to various extents for Pb and U. The cause of the relative 235U excess in one sample does not appear to be from terrestrial contamination or the decay of short-lived 247Cm, but is more likely from fractionation of U isotopes during metal-silicate separation during core formation, exacerbated by the extreme U depletion in the planetary core. Due to limited Pb isotopic variation and terrestrial disturbance, no samples of this study produced useful age information; however the clear divergence from the previously assumed 238U/235U of any troilite in Muonionalusta introduces substantial uncertainty to the previously reported absolute age of the sample without knowledge of the 238U/235U of the sample. Uncertainties associated with U isotope heterogeneity do not allow for definition of a robust age of solidification and cooling for the IVA core. However, one sample of this work-paired with previous work using short

  19. Differentiation of Asteroid 4 Vesta: Core Formation by Iron Rain in a Silicate Magma Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Walter S.; Mittlefehldt, David W.

    2017-01-01

    Geochemical observations of the eucrite and diogenite meteorites, together with observations made by NASA's Dawn spacecraft while orbiting asteroid 4 Vesta, suggest that Vesta resembles H chondrites in bulk chemical composition, possible with about 25 percent of a CM-chondrite like composition added in. For this model, the core is 15 percent by mass (or 8 percent by volume) of the asteroid, with a composition of 73.7 percent by weight Fe, 16.0 percent by weight S, and 10.3 percent by weight Ni. The abundances of moderately siderophile elements (Ni, Co, Mo, W, and P) in eucrites require that essentially all of the metallic phase in Vesta segregated to form a core prior to eucrite solidification. The combination of the melting phase relationships for the silicate and metal phases, together with the moderately siderophile element concentrations together require that complete melting of the metal phase occurred (temperature is greater than1350 degrees Centigrade), along with substantial (greater than 40 percent) melting of the silicate material. Thus, core formation on Vesta occurs as iron rain sinking through a silicate magma ocean.

  20. Substitution of manganese and iron into hydroxyapatite: Core/shell nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pon-On, Weeraphat; Meejoo, Siwaporn; Tang, I.-Ming

    2008-01-01

    The bioceramics, hydroxyapatite (HAP), is a material which is biocompatible to the human body and is well suited to be used in hyperthermia applications for the treatment of bone cancer. We investigate the substitution of iron and manganese into the hydroxyapatite to yield ceramics having the empirical formula Ca 9.4 Fe 0.4 Mn 0.2 (PO 4 ) 6 (OH) 2 . The samples were prepared by the co-precipitation method. The formation of the nanocrystallites in the HAP structure as the heating temperatures were raised to obtain a glass-ceramic system are confirmed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction (ED) and electron spin resonance (ESR). TEM images show the core/shell structure of the nanoparticles, with the core being formed by the ferrites and the shell by the hydroxyapatite. The ED patterns indicate the nanoparticles formed at 500 deg. C have an amorphous structure while the nanoparticles formed at 1000 deg. C are crystalline. ESR spectroscopy indicated that the Fe 3+ ions have a g-factor of 4.23 and the Mn 2+ ions have a g-factor of 2.01. The values of the parameters in the spin Hamiltonian which describes the interaction between the transition metal ions and the Ca 2+ ions, indicate that the Mn 2+ ion substitute into the Ca 2+ sites which are ninefold coordinated, i.e., the Ca(1) sites

  1. Large population center and core melt accident considerations in siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camarinopoulos, L.; Yadigaroglu, G.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of providing suitable demographic siting criteria in the presence of a very large population center in an otherwise sparsely populated region is addressed. Simple calculations were performed making maximum use of pretabulated results of studies where core melt accidents are considered. These show that taking into consideration the air flow patterns in the region can lower the expected population doses from core melt accidents more effectively than distance alone. Expected doses are compared to the annual background radiation dose. A simple siting criterion combining geographical considerations with the probability of a release reaching the large population center is proposed

  2. Biodegradable Magnetic Silica@Iron Oxide Nanovectors with Ultra-Large Mesopores for High Protein Loading, Magnetothermal Release, and Delivery

    KAUST Repository

    Omar, Haneen

    2016-11-29

    The delivery of large cargos of diameter above 15 nm for biomedical applications has proved challenging since it requires biocompatible, stably-loaded, and biodegradable nanomaterials. In this study, we describe the design of biodegradable silica-iron oxide hybrid nanovectors with large mesopores for large protein delivery in cancer cells. The mesopores of the nanomaterials spanned from 20 to 60 nm in diameter and post-functionalization allowed the electrostatic immobilization of large proteins (e.g. mTFP-Ferritin, ~ 534 kDa). Half of the content of the nanovectors was based with iron oxide nanophases which allowed the rapid biodegradation of the carrier in fetal bovine serum and a magnetic responsiveness. The nanovectors released large protein cargos in aqueous solution under acidic pH or magnetic stimuli. The delivery of large proteins was then autonomously achieved in cancer cells via the silica-iron oxide nanovectors, which is thus a promising for biomedical applications.

  3. Research on the development strategy of Pingdingshan iron and steel industry cluster with Wugang Company as the core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Shuai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Arouse the great potential of the industrial clusters will play a significant role in promoting the development of local WuGang company. The article takes the Pingdingshan City as the research object, who is a typical resource-based city and develops on the basis of the local resources of coal and iron ore, the core enterprise WuGang Company is a large state-owned enterprise based on the wide and thick steel plate production. Many problems also exit in the cluster innovation, company network construction, company cooperation. The article is from the perspective of steel industry cluster and cluster innovation. Firstly, the article introduces the correlation theory about the steel industry cluster and the basic development information of Pingdingshan steel industry cluster, and promotes the research purpose and meaning.The article will give the analysis to the problems from the Pingdingshan steel industry cluster and develop the reform proposals and development strategy according to the actual situation.

  4. Top-down freezing in a Fe-FeS core and Ganymede's present-day magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rückriemen, Tina; Breuer, Doris; Spohn, Tilman

    2018-06-01

    Ganymede's core most likely possesses an active dynamo today, which produces a magnetic field at the surface of ∼ 719 nT. Thermochemical convection triggered by cooling of the core is a feasible power source for the dynamo. Experiments of different research groups indicate low pressure gradients of the melting temperatures for Fe-FeS core alloys at pressures prevailing in Ganymede's core ( < 10 GPa). This may entail that the core crystallizes from the top instead of from the bottom as is expected for Earth's core. Depending on the core sulfur concentration being more iron- or more sulfur-rich than the eutectic concentration either snowing iron crystals or a solid FeS layer can form at the top of the core. We investigate whether these two core crystallization scenarios are capable of explaining Ganymede's present magnetic activity. To do so, we set up a parametrized one-dimensional thermal evolution model. We explore a wide range of parameters by running a large set of Monte Carlo simulations. Both freezing scenarios can explain Ganymede's present-day magnetic field. Dynamos of iron snow models are rather young ( < 1 Gyr), whereas dynamos below the FeS layer can be both young and much older ( ∼ 3.8 Gyr). Successful models preferably contain less radiogenic heat sources in the mantle than the chondritic abundance and show a correlation between the reference viscosity in the mantle and the initial core sulfur concentration.

  5. Influence of New Sol-gel Refractory Coating on the Casting Properties of Cold Box and Furan Cores for Grey Cast iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nwaogu, Ugochukwu Chibuzoh; Poulsen, T.; Bischoff, C

    2010-01-01

    New Sol-Gel coated sand cores made from coldbox and furan binder systems were investigated. The idea of the coating was to improve the surface quality of castings. Grey iron was cast on the cores in a sand casting process. The effect of the high temperature of the melt on the cores was assessed...... by measuring the heating curves. The viscosity of the coating, moisture content and the permeability of the cores were evaluated. The surface quality of the castings was investigated using SEM and OM. The results show that the moisture content of the cores affected the permeability. In furan cores the vapour...... transport zone (VTZ) when in contact with the melt is larger than it is in a coldbox which means the furan cores have higher moisture content. The new sol-gel coating has the potential for improving the surface quality of castings without negative effects on the graphite distribution. The surface...

  6. Synthesis and magnetic properties of cobalt-iron/cobalt-ferrite soft/hard magnetic core/shell nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leandro Londoño-Calderón, César; Moscoso-Londoño, Oscar; Muraca, Diego; Arzuza, Luis; Carvalho, Peterson; Pirota, Kleber Roberto; Knobel, Marcelo; Pampillo, Laura Gabriela; Martínez-García, Ricardo

    2017-06-01

    A straightforward method for the synthesis of CoFe2.7/CoFe2O4 core/shell nanowires is described. The proposed method starts with a conventional pulsed electrodeposition procedure on alumina nanoporous template. The obtained CoFe2.7 nanowires are released from the template and allowed to oxidize at room conditions over several weeks. The effects of partial oxidation on the structural and magnetic properties were studied by x-ray spectrometry, magnetometry, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The results indicate that the final nanowires are composed of 5 nm iron-cobalt alloy nanoparticles. Releasing the nanowires at room conditions promoted surface oxidation of the nanoparticles and created a CoFe2O4 shell spinel-like structure. The shell avoids internal oxidation and promotes the formation of bi-magnetic soft/hard magnetic core/shell nanowires. The magnetic properties of both the initial single-phase CoFe2.7 nanowires and the final core/shell nanowires, reveal that the changes in the properties from the array are due to the oxidation more than effects associated with released processes (disorder and agglomeration).

  7. Hardware concepts for a large low-energetics LMFBR core. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutter, E.; Batch, R.V.

    1980-12-01

    A design study was made to identify a practical set of hardware configurations that would embody the requirements developed in the numerical study of a low-energetics core and blanket for a prototype large breeder reactor. Dimensioned drawings are presented for fuel, blanket, reflector/shield, and control rod subassemblies. A horizontal cross section drawing shows how these subassemblies are arranged in the total core/blanket assembly. A core support is illustrated showing a dual plenums arrangement

  8. Early Dynamics of the Moon's Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuk, Matija; Hamilton, Douglas; Stewart, Sarah T.

    2018-04-01

    The Moon has a small molten iron core (Williams et al. 2006). Remanent magnetization in lunar rocks likely derives from a past lunar dynamo (Wieczorek 2018 and references therein), which may have been powered by differential precession between the mantle and the core. The rotations of the lunar mantle and core were largely decoupled for much of lunar history, with a large mutual offset during the Cassini State Transition (Meyer and Wisdom, 2011). It is likely that the past work underestimated lunar obliquities, and therefore core offsets, during early lunar history (Cuk et al. 2016). Here we investigate the dynamics of the lunar core and mantle using a Lie-Poisson numerical integrator (Touma and Wisdom 2001) which includes interactions between triaxial core and mantle, as well as all gravitational and tidal effects included in the model of Cuk et al. (2016). Since we assume a rigid triaxial mantle, this model is applicable to the Moon only once it has acquired its current shape, which probably happened before the Moon reached 25 Earth radii. While some details of the core dynamics depend on our assumptions about the shape of the lunar core-mantle boundary, we can report some robust preliminary findings. The presence of the core does not change significantly the evolutionary scenario of Cuk et al. (2016). The core and mantle are indeed decoupled, with the core having a much smaller obliquity to the ecliptic than the mantle for almost all of the lunar history. The core was largely in an equivalent of Cassini State 2, with the vernal equinoxes (wrt the ecliptic) of the core and the mantle being anti-aligned. The core-mantle spin axis offset has been very large during the Moon's first billion years (this is true both in canonical and high-inclination tidal evolution), causing the lunar core to be sub-synchronous. If the ancient lunar magnetic dipole was rotating around the core axis that was inclined to the Moon's spin axis, then the magnetic poles would move across

  9. Core Characteristics Deterioration due to Plastic Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaido, Chikara; Arai, Satoshi

    This paper discusses the effect of plastic deformation at core manufacturing on the characteristics of cores where non-oriented electrical steel sheets are used as core material. Exciting field and iron loss increase proportionally to plastic deformation in the case of rPeddy currents increase because plastic deformations of crystalline grains are distributed and then the flux distribution is induced. In the case of rP>20, the deterioration tend to saturate, and the increases in magnetic field and iron loss are 1000 to 1500A/m and 2 to 4W/kg. They are related to grain size, and high grade with larger grain may have lager field increase and smaller iron loss increase. Anomalous eddy current losses scarcely increase in this region. In actual motors, the plastic deformation affects iron loss increase although exciting current increases a little.

  10. Cytosolic iron chaperones: Proteins delivering iron cofactors in the cytosol of mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, Caroline C; Ryu, Moon-Suhn; Frey, Avery; Patel, Sarju

    2017-08-04

    Eukaryotic cells contain hundreds of metalloproteins that are supported by intracellular systems coordinating the uptake and distribution of metal cofactors. Iron cofactors include heme, iron-sulfur clusters, and simple iron ions. Poly(rC)-binding proteins are multifunctional adaptors that serve as iron ion chaperones in the cytosolic/nuclear compartment, binding iron at import and delivering it to enzymes, for storage (ferritin) and export (ferroportin). Ferritin iron is mobilized by autophagy through the cargo receptor, nuclear co-activator 4. The monothiol glutaredoxin Glrx3 and BolA2 function as a [2Fe-2S] chaperone complex. These proteins form a core system of cytosolic iron cofactor chaperones in mammalian cells. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. The design, fabrication and testing of an iron-core current compensated magnetic channel for cyclotron extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laxdale, R.E.; Fong, K.; Houtman, H.

    1994-06-01

    An iron-core current compensated magnetic channel has been built ss part of the TRIUMF 450 MeV H - extraction feasibility project. The channel would operate in the 0.5 T cyclotron field and was designed using the two-dimensional code POISSON. Recent beam tests with the channel installed in the TRIUMF cyclotron confirmed that the electro-mechanical design is reliable and that the effect on the circulating beam is in agreement with calculation. The design and hardware details will be described and the beam test results reported. (author)

  12. A highly efficient multi-core algorithm for clustering extremely large datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kraus Johann M

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, the demand for computational power in computational biology has increased due to rapidly growing data sets from microarray and other high-throughput technologies. This demand is likely to increase. Standard algorithms for analyzing data, such as cluster algorithms, need to be parallelized for fast processing. Unfortunately, most approaches for parallelizing algorithms largely rely on network communication protocols connecting and requiring multiple computers. One answer to this problem is to utilize the intrinsic capabilities in current multi-core hardware to distribute the tasks among the different cores of one computer. Results We introduce a multi-core parallelization of the k-means and k-modes cluster algorithms based on the design principles of transactional memory for clustering gene expression microarray type data and categorial SNP data. Our new shared memory parallel algorithms show to be highly efficient. We demonstrate their computational power and show their utility in cluster stability and sensitivity analysis employing repeated runs with slightly changed parameters. Computation speed of our Java based algorithm was increased by a factor of 10 for large data sets while preserving computational accuracy compared to single-core implementations and a recently published network based parallelization. Conclusions Most desktop computers and even notebooks provide at least dual-core processors. Our multi-core algorithms show that using modern algorithmic concepts, parallelization makes it possible to perform even such laborious tasks as cluster sensitivity and cluster number estimation on the laboratory computer.

  13. N₂reduction and hydrogenation to ammonia by a molecular iron-potassium complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Meghan M; Bill, Eckhard; Brennessel, William W; Holland, Patrick L

    2011-11-11

    The most common catalyst in the Haber-Bosch process for the hydrogenation of dinitrogen (N(2)) to ammonia (NH(3)) is an iron surface promoted with potassium cations (K(+)), but soluble iron complexes have neither reduced the N-N bond of N(2) to nitride (N(3-)) nor produced large amounts of NH(3) from N(2). We report a molecular iron complex that reacts with N(2) and a potassium reductant to give a complex with two nitrides, which are bound to iron and potassium cations. The product has a Fe(3)N(2) core, implying that three iron atoms cooperate to break the N-N triple bond through a six-electron reduction. The nitride complex reacts with acid and with H(2) to give substantial yields of N(2)-derived ammonia. These reactions, although not yet catalytic, give structural and spectroscopic insight into N(2) cleavage and N-H bond-forming reactions of iron.

  14. Moessbauer spectroscopic studies of iron-storage proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    St. Pierre, T.G.

    1986-01-01

    /sup 57/Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to study iron storage proteins. Various cryostats and a superconducting magnet were used to obtain sample environment temperatures from 1.3 to 200K and applied magnetic fields of up to 10T. The Moessbauer spectra of ferritins isolated from iron-overloaded human spleen, limpet (Patella vulgata), giant limpet (Patella laticostata) and chiton (Clavarizona hirtosa) hemolymph, and bacterial (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) cells are used to gain information on the magnetic ordering- and superparamagnetic transition temperatures of the microcrystalline cores of the proteins. Investigations were made about the cause of the difference in the magnetic anisotropy constants of the cores of iron-overloaded human spleen ferritin and hemosiderin. Livers taken from an iron-overloaded hornbill and artificially iron-loaded rats showed no component with a superparamagnetic transition temperature approaching that of the human spleen hemosiderin.

  15. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2005-01-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast-iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1 (Program Management) and Task 2 (Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications) were completed in prior quarters while Task 3 (Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves) has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in cast-iron test pipe segments. Efforts in the current quarter continued to focus on Tasks 4-8. Highly valuable lessons were learned from field tests of the 4-inch gas pipe repair robot in cast-iron pipe at Public Service Electric & Gas. (These field tests were conducted and reported last quarter.) These tests identified several design issues which need to be implemented in both the small- and large

  16. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2005-04-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast-iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of old cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1 (Program Management) and Task 2 (Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications) were completed previously. Task 3 (Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves) has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in test cast-iron pipe segments. Efforts in the current quarter continued to be focused on Tasks 4-8. Highly valuable lessons were learned from field tests of the 4-inch gas pipe repair robot in cast-iron pipe at Public Service Electric & Gas. (These field tests were conducted and reported previously.) Several design issues were identified which need to be implemented in both the small- and large-diameter repair

  17. Influence of the dislocation core on the glide of the 1/2 < 111 >{110} edge dislocation in bcc-iron: An embedded atom method study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Haghighat, S.M.H.; von Pezold, J.; Race, C. P.; Kormann, F.; Friák, Martin; Neugebauer, J.; Raabe, D.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 87, MAY (2014), s. 274-282 ISSN 0927-0256 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Molecular dynamics * Edge dislocation * Core structure * Dislocation glide * Iron Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.131, year: 2014

  18. Repetitive on-demand drug release from polymeric matrices containing a macroscopic spherical iron core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovers, Stefan A; Kemmere, Maartje F; Keurentjes, Jos T F; Hoogenboom, Richard

    2017-09-15

    A system for multiple on-demand drug release has been prepared that can be activated with an alternating magnetic field as external trigger. The core/shell samples have been developed based on a macroscopic spherical iron core coated with a thermoresponsive polymer, poly(styrene-stat-butyl methacrylate), containing ibuprofen as a model drug. During exposure of the samples to the magnetic field (ON state), the release rate of ibuprofen is significantly increased, up to 35 times the release rate without the magnetic field (OFF state). Using one sample or two samples in line with the magnetic field does not influence the ON/OFF ratio of the system, showing the possibility of using multiple samples to increase and tune the drug dose. Increasing the concentration of ibuprofen in the polymer layer is shown to increase the release rate in both the ON and OFF states. Increasing the size of the iron core and, consequently, decreasing the polymer thickness, was found to only increase the release rate during exposure resulting in higher ON/OFF ratios. The developed on demand drug delivery systems represents a promising development towards on demand drug delivery implants. During my chemical engineering studies, it was only during my master thesis work that I decided to continue with PhD research as I really enjoyed doing original research. When coming to the end of my PhD research under supervision of Prof. Ulrich S. Schubert, I developed the ambition to pursue an academic career. Fortunately, I got the opportunity to stay with Prof. Schubert as project leader for the Dutch Polymer Institute (DPI). Within this position, I supervised ten researchers and was able to start developing my independent research lines. Despite that I now advise students to not stay in the same laboratory, this first position allowed me to gain some initial independence and to publish a large number of papers that has been a great benefit in my further career. After two and a half years I needed a new

  19. Optimization of Iron Oxide Tracer Synthesis for Magnetic Particle Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Ziemian

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The optimization of iron oxide nanoparticles as tracers for magnetic particle imaging (MPI alongside the development of data acquisition equipment and image reconstruction techniques is crucial for the required improvements in image resolution and sensitivity of MPI scanners. We present a large-scale water-based synthesis of multicore superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized with dextran (MC-SPIONs. We also demonstrate the preparation of single core superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in organic media, subsequently coated with a poly(ethylene glycol gallic acid polymer and phase transferred to water (SC-SPIONs. Our aim was to obtain long-term stable particles in aqueous media with high MPI performance. We found that the amplitude of the third harmonic measured by magnetic particle spectroscopy (MPS at 10 mT is 2.3- and 5.8-fold higher than Resovist for the MC-SPIONs and SC-SPIONs, respectively, revealing excellent MPI potential as compared to other reported MPI tracer particle preparations. We show that the reconstructed MPI images of phantoms using optimized multicore and specifically single-core particles are superior to that of commercially available Resovist, which we utilize as a reference standard, as predicted by MPS.

  20. Stellar core collapse and supernova

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.R.; Mayle, R.; Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.

    1985-04-01

    Massive stars that end their stable evolution as their iron cores collapse to a neutron star or black hole long been considered good candidates for producing Type II supernovae. For many years the outward propagation of the shock wave produced by the bounce of these iron cores has been studied as a possible mechanism for the explosion. For the most part, the results of these studies have not been particularly encouraging, except, perhaps, in the case of very low mass iron cores or very soft nuclear equations of state. The shock stalls, overwhelmed by photodisintegration and neutrino losses, and the star does not explode. More recently, slow late time heating of the envelope of the incipient neutron star has been found to be capable of rejuvenating the stalled shock and producing an explosion after all. The present paper discusses this late time heating and presents results from numerical calculations of the evolution, core collapse, and subsequent explosion of a number of recent stellar models. For the first time they all, except perhaps the most massive, explode with reasonable choices of input physics. 39 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab

  1. Atomic scale study of vacancies in Earth's inner core: effect of pressure and chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritterbex, S.; Tsuchiya, T.

    2017-12-01

    Seismic observations of the Earth's inner core [1] remain ambiguously related to mineral physics studies of the inner core stable crystalline iron phase [2,3,4,5]. This makes it difficult to clarify the role of plastic deformation as one of the primary candidates responsible for the observed seismic anisotropy of Earth's inner core. Nonetheless, atomic self-diffusion mechanisms provide a direct link between plastic deformation and the mechanical properties of Earth's inner core stable iron phase(s). Using first-principles density functional based calculation techniques, we have studied the conjugate effect of pressure and chemistry on vacancy diffusion in HCP-, BCC- and FCC-iron by taking into account potential light alloying elements as hydrogen, silicon and sulfur. Our results show that inner core pressure highly inhibits the rate of intrinsic self-diffusion by suppressing defect concentration rather than by effecting the mobility of the defects. Moreover, we found light elements to be able to affect metallic bonding which allows for extrinsic diffusion mechanisms in iron under inner core conditions. The latter clearly enables to enhance defect concentration and hence to enhance the rate of plastic deformation. This suggests that inner core chemistry affects the rheological properties (e.g.viscosity) of iron alloys which finally should match with seismic observations. references: [1] Deuss, A., 2014. Heterogeneity and Anisotropy of Earth's inner core. An. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci. 42, 103-126. [2] Anzellini, S., Dewaele, A., Mezouar, M., Loubeyre, P., Morard, G., 2013. Melting of iron at Earth's inner core boundary based on fast X-ray diffraction. Science 340, 464-466. [3] Godwal, B.K., Gonzales-Cataldo, F., Verma, A.K., Stixrude, L., Jeanloz, R., 2015. Stability of iron crystal structures at 0.3-1.5 TPa. [4] Vocadlo, L., 2007. Ab initio calculations of the elasticity of iron and iron alloys at inner core conditions: evidence for a partially molten inner core

  2. A retrospective analysis of ultrasound-guided large core needle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A retrospective analysis of ultrasound-guided large core needle biopsies of breast lesions at a regional public hospital in Durban, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. ... Objective: To assess the influence of technical variables on the diagnostic yield of breast specimens obtained by using US-LCNB, and the sensitivity of detecting ...

  3. Ultrasonographic findings 6 months after 11-gauge vacuum-assisted large-core breast biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Docktor, B.J.L.; MacGregor, J.H.; Burrowes, P.W. [Foothills Medical Centre, Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)]. E-mail: bobbie.docktor@calgaryhealthregion.ca

    2004-06-01

    To assess the ultrasonographic features of post-biopsy change 6 months after 11-gauge vacuum-assisted large-core breast biopsy of pathologically proven benign lesions. Using the literature as a reference, we hypothesized that large-core breast biopsy would result in tissue changes that may mimic malignancy and may be more apparent on ultrasonography than on mammography. Two radiologists whose subspecialty is breast imaging retrospectively reviewed the pre-biopsy and 6-month follow-up sonograms of 24 patients with pathologically proven benign lesions. The images were assessed for the number and type of ultrasonographic features. A Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) category was assigned to each lesion before biopsy and at 6-month follow-up. The composition of breast tissue surrounding the lesion was assessed as fatty, mixed fibroglandular or dense. The frequency of ultrasonographic changes at 6 months after 11-gauge vacuum-assisted large-core breast biopsy was more frequent than the rate of post-biopsy change previously reported to occur mammographically. The nature of these changes may mimic malignancy in some cases. The ultrasonographic appearance of the breast after large-core breast biopsy may mimic malignancy and is, therefore, a potential pitfall when interpreting a post-biopsy sonogram. (author)

  4. Ultrasonographic findings 6 months after 11-gauge vacuum-assisted large-core breast biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docktor, Bobbie Jo L; MacGregor, John Henry; Burrowes, Paul W

    2004-06-01

    To assess the ultrasonographic features of post-biopsy change 6 months after 11-gauge vacuum-assisted large-core breast biopsy of pathologically proven benign lesions. Using the literature as a reference, we hypothesized that large-core breast biopsy would result in tissue changes that may mimic malignancy and may be more apparent on ultrasonography than on mammography. Two radiologists whose subspecialty is breast imaging retrospectively reviewed the pre-biopsy and 6-month follow-up sonograms of 24 patients with pathologically proven benign lesions. The images were assessed for the number and type of ultrasonographic features. A Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) category was assigned to each lesion before biopsy and at 6-month follow-up. The composition of breast tissue surrounding the lesion was assessed as fatty, mixed fibroglandular or dense. The frequency of ultrasonographic changes at 6 months after 11-gauge vacuum-assisted large-core breast biopsy was more frequent than the rate of post-biopsy change previously reported to occur mammographically. The nature of these changes may mimic malignancy in some cases. The ultrasonographic appearance of the breast after large-core breast biopsy may mimic malignancy and is, therefore, a potential pitfall when interpreting a post-biopsy sonogram.

  5. Ultrasonographic findings 6 months after 11-gauge vacuum-assisted large-core breast biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Docktor, B.J.L.; MacGregor, J.H.; Burrowes, P.W.

    2004-01-01

    To assess the ultrasonographic features of post-biopsy change 6 months after 11-gauge vacuum-assisted large-core breast biopsy of pathologically proven benign lesions. Using the literature as a reference, we hypothesized that large-core breast biopsy would result in tissue changes that may mimic malignancy and may be more apparent on ultrasonography than on mammography. Two radiologists whose subspecialty is breast imaging retrospectively reviewed the pre-biopsy and 6-month follow-up sonograms of 24 patients with pathologically proven benign lesions. The images were assessed for the number and type of ultrasonographic features. A Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) category was assigned to each lesion before biopsy and at 6-month follow-up. The composition of breast tissue surrounding the lesion was assessed as fatty, mixed fibroglandular or dense. The frequency of ultrasonographic changes at 6 months after 11-gauge vacuum-assisted large-core breast biopsy was more frequent than the rate of post-biopsy change previously reported to occur mammographically. The nature of these changes may mimic malignancy in some cases. The ultrasonographic appearance of the breast after large-core breast biopsy may mimic malignancy and is, therefore, a potential pitfall when interpreting a post-biopsy sonogram. (author)

  6. A low-cost iron-cadmium redox flow battery for large-scale energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Y. K.; Zhao, T. S.; Zhou, X. L.; Wei, L.; Jiang, H. R.

    2016-10-01

    The redox flow battery (RFB) is one of the most promising large-scale energy storage technologies that offer a potential solution to the intermittency of renewable sources such as wind and solar. The prerequisite for widespread utilization of RFBs is low capital cost. In this work, an iron-cadmium redox flow battery (Fe/Cd RFB) with a premixed iron and cadmium solution is developed and tested. It is demonstrated that the coulombic efficiency and energy efficiency of the Fe/Cd RFB reach 98.7% and 80.2% at 120 mA cm-2, respectively. The Fe/Cd RFB exhibits stable efficiencies with capacity retention of 99.87% per cycle during the cycle test. Moreover, the Fe/Cd RFB is estimated to have a low capital cost of 108 kWh-1 for 8-h energy storage. Intrinsically low-cost active materials, high cell performance and excellent capacity retention equip the Fe/Cd RFB to be a promising solution for large-scale energy storage systems.

  7. N2 Reduction and Hydrogenation to Ammonia by a Molecular Iron-Potassium Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Meghan M.; Bill, Eckhard; Brennessel, William W.; Holland, Patrick L.

    2011-01-01

    The most common catalyst in the Haber-Bosch process for the hydrogenation of dinitrogen (N2) to ammonia is an iron surface promoted with K+, but soluble iron complexes have neither reduced the N-N bond of N2 to nitride nor produced large amounts of NH3 from N2. We report a molecular iron complex that reacts with N2 and a potassium reductant to give a complex with two nitrides, which are bound to iron and potassium cations. The product has a Fe3N2 core, implying that three iron atoms cooperate to break the N-N triple bond through a six-electron reduction. The nitride complex reacts with acid and with H2 to give substantial yields of N2-derived ammonia. These reactions, though not yet catalytic, give structural and spectroscopic insight into N2 cleavage and N-H bond-forming reactions of iron. PMID:22076372

  8. Arc-Discharge Synthesis of Iron Encapsulated in Carbon Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Chaitoglou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present work is to improve the protection against the oxidation that usually appears in core@shell nanoparticles. Spherical iron nanoparticles coated with a carbon shell were obtained by a modified arc-discharge reactor, which permits controlling the diameter of the iron core and the carbon shell of the particles. Oxidized iron nanoparticles involve a loss of the magnetic characteristics and also changes in the chemical properties. Our nanoparticles show superparamagnetic behavior and high magnetic saturation owing to the high purity α-Fe of core and to the high core sealing, provided by the carbon shell. A liquid iron precursor was injected in the plasma spot dragged by an inert gas flow. A fixed arc-discharge current of 40 A was used to secure a stable discharge, and several samples were produced at different conditions. Transmission electron microscopy indicated an iron core diameter between 5 and 9 nm. Selected area electron diffraction provided evidences of a highly crystalline and dense iron core. The magnetic properties were studied up to 5 K temperature using a superconducting quantum interference device. The results reveal a superparamagnetic behaviour, a narrow size distribution (σg=1.22, and an average diameter of 6 nm for nanoparticles having a blocking temperature near 40 K.

  9. A uranium core for the Earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouat, S.

    2003-01-01

    According to the theory of M. Herndon, a US independent geophysicist, the center of the Earth's core should be made of a uranium sphere of about 8 km of diameter. This natural reactor, or 'geo-reactor', should be at the origin of the internal heat and of the magnetic field of the Earth. M. Herndon has extended his theory to the other planets of the solar system. This theory contradicts the one adopted since the 1940's by the community of geophysicists and which involves a crystallized iron and nickel internal core inside a liquid iron external core. Herndon's theory can explain also the geomagnetic field reversals. (J.S.)

  10. A/C magnetic hyperthermia of melanoma mediated by iron(0)/iron oxide core/shell magnetic nanoparticles: a mouse study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balivada, Sivasai; Koper, Olga B; Tamura, Masaaki; Chikan, Viktor; Bossmann, Stefan H; Troyer, Deryl L; Rachakatla, Raja Shekar; Wang, Hongwang; Samarakoon, Thilani N; Dani, Raj Kumar; Pyle, Marla; Kroh, Franklin O; Walker, Brandon; Leaym, Xiaoxuan

    2010-01-01

    There is renewed interest in magnetic hyperthermia as a treatment modality for cancer, especially when it is combined with other more traditional therapeutic approaches, such as the co-delivery of anticancer drugs or photodynamic therapy. The influence of bimagnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) combined with short external alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure on the growth of subcutaneous mouse melanomas (B16-F10) was evaluated. Bimagnetic Fe/Fe 3 O 4 core/shell nanoparticles were designed for cancer targeting after intratumoral or intravenous administration. Their inorganic center was protected against rapid biocorrosion by organic dopamine-oligoethylene glycol ligands. TCPP (4-tetracarboxyphenyl porphyrin) units were attached to the dopamine-oligoethylene glycol ligands. The magnetic hyperthermia results obtained after intratumoral injection indicated that micromolar concentrations of iron given within the modified core-shell Fe/Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles caused a significant anti-tumor effect on murine B16-F10 melanoma with three short 10-minute AMF exposures. We also observed a decrease in tumor size after intravenous administration of the MNPs followed by three consecutive days of AMF exposure 24 hrs after the MNPs injection. These results indicate that intratumoral administration of surface modified MNPs can attenuate mouse melanoma after AMF exposure. Moreover, we have found that after intravenous administration of micromolar concentrations, these MNPs are capable of causing an anti-tumor effect in a mouse melanoma model after only a short AMF exposure time. This is a clear improvement to state of the art

  11. Effect of annealing process of iron powder on magnetic properties ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. Iron powder magnetic cores are used as soft magnetic rotors, in micro special motors such as BS brake motors, refrigerator compressor motors and brushless servo motors. Heat treatment of iron powder played an important role in the magnetic properties and loss of the motor cores. After the annealing process,.

  12. Shape preferred orientation of iron grains compatible with Earth's uppermost inner core hemisphericity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, Marie; Margerin, Ludovic

    2018-01-01

    Constraining the possible patterns of iron fabrics in the Earth's Uppermost Inner Core (UIC) is key to unravel the mechanisms controlling its growth and dynamics. In the framework of crystalline micro-structures composed of ellipsoidal, aligned grains, we discuss possible textural models of UIC compatible with observations of P-wave attenuation and velocity dispersion. Using recent results from multiple scattering theory in textured heterogeneous materials, we compute the P-wave phase velocity and scattering attenuation as a function of grain volume, shape, and orientation wrt to the propagation direction of seismic P-waves. Assuming no variations of the grain volume between the Eastern and Western hemisphere, we show that two families of texture are compatible with the degree-one structure of the inner core as revealed by the positive correlation between seismic velocity and attenuation. (1) Strong flattening of grains parallel to the Inner Core Boundary in the Western hemisphere and weak anisometry in the Eastern hemisphere. (2) Strong radial elongation of grains in the Western hemisphere and again weak anisometry in the Eastern hemisphere. Both textures can quantitatively explain the seismic data in a limited range of grain volumes. Furthermore, the velocity and attenuation anisotropy locally observed under Africa demands that the grains be locally elongated in the direction of Earth's meridians. Our study demonstrates that the hemispherical seismic structure of UIC can be entirely explained by changes in the shape and orientation of grains, thereby offering an alternative to changes in grain volumes. In the future, our theoretical toolbox could be used to systematically test the compatibility of textures predicted by geodynamical models with seismic observations.

  13. Ultrasonic testing of large blocks for prestressed cast iron pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stelling, H.A.

    1979-01-01

    Ultrasonic tests were made on plate specimen and large blocks of perlit cast iron with lamellar graphite. Aims of the investigations were the control of material porperties, the flaw detection and flaw classification. The material properties were classified by sound velocity and attenuation measurements. Flaw detection and flaw size estimation methods were modified with regard to the acoustic properties, the microstructure and the reflectivity of typical flaws in castings. Special localisation and flaw size estimation techniques are discussed. (orig.)

  14. The convenient preparation of stable aryl-coated zerovalent iron nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga A. Guselnikova

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel approach for the in situ synthesis of zerovalent aryl-coated iron nanoparticles (NPs based on diazonium salt chemistry is proposed. Surface-modified zerovalent iron NPs (ZVI NPs were prepared by simple chemical reduction of iron(III chloride aqueous solution followed by in situ modification using water soluble arenediazonium tosylate. The resulting NPs, with average iron core diameter of 21 nm, were coated with a 10 nm thick organic layer to provide long-term protection in air for the highly reactive zerovalent iron core up to 180 °C. The surface-modified iron NPs possess a high grafting density of the aryl group on the NPs surface of 1.23 mmol/g. FTIR spectroscopy, XRD, HRTEM, TGA/DTA, and elemental analysis were performed in order to characterize the resulting material.

  15. Effects of iron on the lattice thermal conductivity of Earth's deep mantle and implications for mantle dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Wen-Pin; Deschamps, Frédéric; Okuchi, Takuo; Lin, Jung-Fu

    2018-04-17

    Iron may critically influence the physical properties and thermochemical structures of Earth's lower mantle. Its effects on thermal conductivity, with possible consequences on heat transfer and mantle dynamics, however, remain largely unknown. We measured the lattice thermal conductivity of lower-mantle ferropericlase to 120 GPa using the ultrafast optical pump-probe technique in a diamond anvil cell. The thermal conductivity of ferropericlase with 56% iron significantly drops by a factor of 1.8 across the spin transition around 53 GPa, while that with 8-10% iron increases monotonically with pressure, causing an enhanced iron substitution effect in the low-spin state. Combined with bridgmanite data, modeling of our results provides a self-consistent radial profile of lower-mantle thermal conductivity, which is dominated by pressure, temperature, and iron effects, and shows a twofold increase from top to bottom of the lower mantle. Such increase in thermal conductivity may delay the cooling of the core, while its decrease with iron content may enhance the dynamics of large low shear-wave velocity provinces. Our findings further show that, if hot and strongly enriched in iron, the seismic ultralow velocity zones have exceptionally low conductivity, thus delaying their cooling.

  16. Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism and magnetization interaction reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Maninder; Dai, Qilin; Bowden, Mark; Engelhard, Mark H.; Wu, Yaqiao; Tang, Jinke; Qiang, You

    2013-08-01

    Cr-doped core-shell iron/iron-oxide nanoparticles (NPs) containing 0, 2, 5, and 8 at.% of Cr dopant were synthesized via a nanocluster deposition system and their structural and magnetic properties were investigated. We observed the formation of a σ-FeCr phase in 2 at.% of Cr doping in core-shell NPs. This is unique since it was reported in the past that the σ-phase forms above 20 at.% of Cr. The large coercive field and exchange bias are ascribed to the antiferromagnetic Cr2O3 layer formed with the Fe-oxide shell, which also acts as a passivation layer to decrease the Fe-oxide shell thickness. The additional σ-phase in the core and/or Cr2O3 in the shell cause the hysteresis loop to appear tight waisted near the zero-field axis. The exchange interaction competes with the dipolar interaction with the increase of σ-FeCr grains in the Fe-core. The interaction reversal has been observed in 8 at.% of Cr. The observed reversal mechanism is confirmed from the Henkel plot and delta M value, and is supported by a theoretical watermelon model based on the core-shell nanostructure system.

  17. Characterization of tetraethylene glycol passivated iron nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunes, Eloiza da Silva; Viali, Wesley Renato; Silva, Sebastião William da; Coaquira, José Antonio Huamaní; Garg, Vijayendra Kumar; Oliveira, Aderbal Carlos de; Morais, Paulo César; Jafelicci Júnior, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Metallic iron nanoparticles were passivated in tetraethylene glycol media. • Passivated nanoparticles presented pomegranate-like core@shell structure. • Passivation of metallic iron correlates with the tetraethylene glycol degradation. • Boron enriched metallic iron phase was more susceptible to oxidation. • The iron oxide shell was identified as Fe 3 O 4 with a mass fraction of 43:53 related to αFe. - Abstract: The present study describes the synthesis and characterization of iron@iron oxide nanoparticles produced by passivation of metallic iron in tetraethylene glycol media. Structural and chemical characterizations were performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Pomegranate-like core@shell nanoparticulate material in the size range of 90–120 nm was obtained. According to quantitative phase analysis using Rietveld structure refinement the synthesized iron oxide was identified as magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) whereas the iron to magnetite mass fractions was found to be 47:53. These findings are in good agreement with the data obtained from Mössbauer and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The XPS data revealed the presence of a surface organic layer with higher hydrocarbon content, possibly due to the tetraethylene glycol thermal degradation correlated with iron oxidation. The room-temperature (300 K) saturation magnetization measured for the as-synthesized iron and for the iron–iron oxide were 145 emu g −1 and 131 emu g −1 , respectively. The measured saturation magnetizations are in good agreement with data obtained from TEM, XRD and Mössbauer spectroscopy

  18. Toward a mineral physics reference model for the Moon's core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonangeli, Daniele; Morard, Guillaume; Schmerr, Nicholas C; Komabayashi, Tetsuya; Krisch, Michael; Fiquet, Guillaume; Fei, Yingwei

    2015-03-31

    The physical properties of iron (Fe) at high pressure and high temperature are crucial for understanding the chemical composition, evolution, and dynamics of planetary interiors. Indeed, the inner structures of the telluric planets all share a similar layered nature: a central metallic core composed mostly of iron, surrounded by a silicate mantle, and a thin, chemically differentiated crust. To date, most studies of iron have focused on the hexagonal closed packed (hcp, or ε) phase, as ε-Fe is likely stable across the pressure and temperature conditions of Earth's core. However, at the more moderate pressures characteristic of the cores of smaller planetary bodies, such as the Moon, Mercury, or Mars, iron takes on a face-centered cubic (fcc, or γ) structure. Here we present compressional and shear wave sound velocity and density measurements of γ-Fe at high pressures and high temperatures, which are needed to develop accurate seismic models of planetary interiors. Our results indicate that the seismic velocities proposed for the Moon's inner core by a recent reanalysis of Apollo seismic data are well below those of γ-Fe. Our dataset thus provides strong constraints to seismic models of the lunar core and cores of small telluric planets. This allows us to propose a direct compositional and velocity model for the Moon's core.

  19. Magnetothermal release of payload from iron oxide/silica drug delivery agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luong, T.T., E-mail: thientai.luong@chem.kuleuven.be [KU Leuven, Department of Chemistry, Celestijnenlaan 200D, Heverlee 3001 (Belgium); Hanoi National University of Education, Faculty of Chemistry, Xuan Thuy 136, Cau Giay, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Knoppe, S.; Bloemen, M.; Brullot, W.; Strobbe, R. [KU Leuven, Department of Chemistry, Celestijnenlaan 200D, Heverlee 3001 (Belgium); Locquet, J.-P. [KU Leuven, Department of Physics, Celestijnenlaan 200D, Heverlee 3001 (Belgium); Verbiest, T. [KU Leuven, Department of Chemistry, Celestijnenlaan 200D, Heverlee 3001 (Belgium)

    2016-10-15

    The release of covalently bound Rhodamine B from iron oxide/mesoporous silica core/shell nanoparticles under magnetically induced heating was studied. The system acts as a model to study drug delivery and payload release under magnetothermal heating. - Graphical abstract: The release of covalently bound Rhodamine B from iron oxide/mesoporous silica core/shell nanoparticles under magnetically induced heating was studied. - Highlights: • Iron oxide/mesoporous-SiO{sub 2} core-shell NPs were synthesized. • The dye was covalently bound to SiO{sub 2} shells. • The release of dye under magnetothermal heating was studied. • The results are relevant for controlled drug release.

  20. An Iron-Rain Model for Core Formation on Asteroid 4 Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Walter S.; Mittlefehldt, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Asteroid 4 Vesta is differentiated into a crust, mantle, and core, as demonstrated by studies of the eucrite and diogenite meteorites and by data from NASA's Dawn spacecraft. Most models for the differentiation and thermal evolution of Vesta assume that the metal phase completely melts within 20 degrees of the eutectic temperature, well before the onset of silicate melting. In such a model, core formation initially happens by Darcy flow, but this is an inefficient process for liquid metal and solid silicate. However, the likely chemical composition of Vesta, similar to H chondrites with perhaps some CM or CV chondrite, has 13-16 weight percent S. For such compositions, metal-sulfide melting will not be complete until a temperature of at least 1350 degrees Centigrade. The silicate solidus for Vesta's composition is between 1100 and 1150 degrees Centigrade, and thus metal and silicate melting must have substantially overlapped in time on Vesta. In this chemically and physically more likely view of Vesta's evolution, metal sulfide drops will sink by Stokes flow through the partially molten silicate magma ocean in a process that can be envisioned as "iron rain". Measurements of eucrites show that moderately siderophile elements such as Ni, Mo, and W reached chemical equilibrium between the metal and silicate phases, which is an important test for any Vesta differentiation model. The equilibration time is a function of the initial metal grain size, which we take to be 25-45 microns based on recent measurements of H6 chondrites. For these sizes and reasonable silicate magma viscosities, equilibration occurs after a fall distance of just a few meters through the magma ocean. Although metal drops may grow in size by merger with other drops, which increases their settling velocities and decreases the total core formation time, the short equilibration distance ensures that the moderately siderophile elements will reach chemical equilibrium between metal and silicate before

  1. A/C magnetic hyperthermia of melanoma mediated by iron(0/iron oxide core/shell magnetic nanoparticles: a mouse study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koper Olga B

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is renewed interest in magnetic hyperthermia as a treatment modality for cancer, especially when it is combined with other more traditional therapeutic approaches, such as the co-delivery of anticancer drugs or photodynamic therapy. Methods The influence of bimagnetic nanoparticles (MNPs combined with short external alternating magnetic field (AMF exposure on the growth of subcutaneous mouse melanomas (B16-F10 was evaluated. Bimagnetic Fe/Fe3O4 core/shell nanoparticles were designed for cancer targeting after intratumoral or intravenous administration. Their inorganic center was protected against rapid biocorrosion by organic dopamine-oligoethylene glycol ligands. TCPP (4-tetracarboxyphenyl porphyrin units were attached to the dopamine-oligoethylene glycol ligands. Results The magnetic hyperthermia results obtained after intratumoral injection indicated that micromolar concentrations of iron given within the modified core-shell Fe/Fe3O4 nanoparticles caused a significant anti-tumor effect on murine B16-F10 melanoma with three short 10-minute AMF exposures. We also observed a decrease in tumor size after intravenous administration of the MNPs followed by three consecutive days of AMF exposure 24 hrs after the MNPs injection. Conclusions These results indicate that intratumoral administration of surface modified MNPs can attenuate mouse melanoma after AMF exposure. Moreover, we have found that after intravenous administration of micromolar concentrations, these MNPs are capable of causing an anti-tumor effect in a mouse melanoma model after only a short AMF exposure time. This is a clear improvement to state of the art.

  2. Comparison of prestellar core elongations and large-scale molecular cloud structures in the Lupus I region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poidevin, Frédérick [UCL, KLB, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Gower Place, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Ade, Peter A. R.; Hargrave, Peter C.; Nutter, David [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Queens Buildings, The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Angile, Francesco E.; Devlin, Mark J.; Klein, Jeffrey [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Benton, Steven J.; Netterfield, Calvin B. [Department of Physics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 1A7 (Canada); Chapin, Edward L. [XMM SOC, ESAC, Apartado 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Canãda, Madrid (Spain); Fissel, Laura M.; Gandilo, Natalie N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Fukui, Yasuo [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); Gundersen, Joshua O. [Department of Physics, University of Miami, 1320 Campo Sano Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (United States); Korotkov, Andrei L. [Department of Physics, Brown University, 182 Hope Street, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Matthews, Tristan G.; Novak, Giles [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Mroczkowski, Tony K. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Olmi, Luca, E-mail: fpoidevin@iac.es [Physics Department, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, Box 23343, UPR station, San Juan, PR 00931 (United States); and others

    2014-08-10

    Turbulence and magnetic fields are expected to be important for regulating molecular cloud formation and evolution. However, their effects on sub-parsec to 100 parsec scales, leading to the formation of starless cores, are not well understood. We investigate the prestellar core structure morphologies obtained from analysis of the Herschel-SPIRE 350 μm maps of the Lupus I cloud. This distribution is first compared on a statistical basis to the large-scale shape of the main filament. We find the distribution of the elongation position angle of the cores to be consistent with a random distribution, which means no specific orientation of the morphology of the cores is observed with respect to the mean orientation of the large-scale filament in Lupus I, nor relative to a large-scale bent filament model. This distribution is also compared to the mean orientation of the large-scale magnetic fields probed at 350 μm with the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Telescope for Polarimetry during its 2010 campaign. Here again we do not find any correlation between the core morphology distribution and the average orientation of the magnetic fields on parsec scales. Our main conclusion is that the local filament dynamics—including secondary filaments that often run orthogonally to the primary filament—and possibly small-scale variations in the local magnetic field direction, could be the dominant factors for explaining the final orientation of each core.

  3. Characterization of tetraethylene glycol passivated iron nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunes, Eloiza da Silva; Viali, Wesley Renato [Laboratório de Materiais Magnéticos e Coloides, Departamento de Físico-química, Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP 14801-970 (Brazil); Silva, Sebastião William da; Coaquira, José Antonio Huamaní; Garg, Vijayendra Kumar; Oliveira, Aderbal Carlos de [Instituto de Física, Núcleo de Física Aplicada, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, DF 70910-900 (Brazil); Morais, Paulo César [Instituto de Física, Núcleo de Física Aplicada, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, DF 70910-900 (Brazil); School of Automation, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Jafelicci Júnior, Miguel, E-mail: jafeli@iq.unesp.br [Laboratório de Materiais Magnéticos e Coloides, Departamento de Físico-química, Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP 14801-970 (Brazil)

    2014-10-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Metallic iron nanoparticles were passivated in tetraethylene glycol media. • Passivated nanoparticles presented pomegranate-like core@shell structure. • Passivation of metallic iron correlates with the tetraethylene glycol degradation. • Boron enriched metallic iron phase was more susceptible to oxidation. • The iron oxide shell was identified as Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} with a mass fraction of 43:53 related to αFe. - Abstract: The present study describes the synthesis and characterization of iron@iron oxide nanoparticles produced by passivation of metallic iron in tetraethylene glycol media. Structural and chemical characterizations were performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Pomegranate-like core@shell nanoparticulate material in the size range of 90–120 nm was obtained. According to quantitative phase analysis using Rietveld structure refinement the synthesized iron oxide was identified as magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) whereas the iron to magnetite mass fractions was found to be 47:53. These findings are in good agreement with the data obtained from Mössbauer and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The XPS data revealed the presence of a surface organic layer with higher hydrocarbon content, possibly due to the tetraethylene glycol thermal degradation correlated with iron oxidation. The room-temperature (300 K) saturation magnetization measured for the as-synthesized iron and for the iron–iron oxide were 145 emu g{sup −1} and 131 emu g{sup −1}, respectively. The measured saturation magnetizations are in good agreement with data obtained from TEM, XRD and Mössbauer spectroscopy.

  4. Microwave absorption properties of the core/shell-type iron and nickel nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, B.; Dong, X. L.; Huang, H.; Zhang, X. F.; Zhu, X. G.; Lei, J. P.; Sun, J. P.

    Iron (Fe) and nickel (Ni) nanoparticles were prepared by the DC arc-discharge method in a mixture of hydrogen and argon gases, using bulk metals as the raw materials. The microstructure of core/shell (metal/metal oxide) in nanoparticle formed after in situ passivation process. The complex electromagnetic parameters (permittivity ɛ=ɛr'+iɛr″ and permeability μ=μr'+iμr″) of the paraffin-mixed nanocomposite samples (paraffin:nanoparticles=1:1 in mass ratio) were measured in the frequency range of 2-18 GHz. The polarization mechanisms of the space charge and dipole coexist in both the Fe and Ni nanoparticles. The orientational polarization is a particular polarization for Fe nanoparticles and brings a relatively higher dielectric loss. Natural resonance is the main reason for magnetic loss and the corresponding frequencies are 11.6 and 5.2 GHz for the Fe and Ni nanoparticles, respectively. The paraffin composite with Fe nanoparticles provided excellent microwave absorption properties (reflection loss <-20 dB) in the range 6.8-16.6 GHz over the absorber thickness of 1.1-2.3 mm.

  5. Iron Malabsorption in a Patient With Large Cell Lymphoma Involving the Duodenum

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    hemoglobin. The lymphomas (5-7). The presenting symptoms mimic chest radiograph in May demonstrated an anterior me- those of celiac disease and include...compounded the anemia in a pa- tion in celiac disease were reversible by the institution tient with diffuse large cell lymphoma involving the of a gluten...etiologies (usually 2-3 h) is expected in patients who are iron (e.g., celiac disease , pancreatic insufliciency). however, deficient and have normal

  6. A dendritic solidification experiment under large gravity - implications for the Earth's inner core solidification regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguen, R.; Alboussière, T.; Brito, D.; La Rizza, P.; Masson, J.

    2009-05-01

    The Earth's inner core solidification regime is usually thought to be dendritic, which should results in the formation of a mushy layer at the inner core boundary, possibly extending deep in the inner core. The release of latent heat and solute associated with crystallization provides an important boyancy source to drive thermo- chemical convection in the core. In the laboratory, two modes of convection associated with the crystallization of mushy layers have been observed. One is a boundary layer mode originating from the destabilisation of the chemical boundary layer present at the mush-liquid interface; the second is the so-called 'mushy layer mode' which involves the whole mushy layer. In the mushy layer mode, convection usually takes the form of narrow plumes rising through crystal free conduits called chimneys. One particularity of inner core crystallization is its extremely small solidification rate compared to typical outer core convective timescales. We have designed and build an experiment devoted to the study of crystallization under a large gravity field, using a centrifuge, of an aqueous solution of ammonium chloride, which is a good analogue to metallic alloys. The large gravity field allows to reach Rayleigh numbers much larger than in typical solidification experiments. Under large gravity fields, we observe the disappearance of chimney convection and show that the large gravity field promotes the boundary layer convection mode at the expent of the mushy layer mode. As the gravitationnal forcing is increased, convective heat and solute transport are significantly enhanced, which results in larger solid fraction directly below the mush-liquid interface. The increase in solid fraction results in a dramatic decrease of the permeability in the mushy layer, which eventually becomes subcritical in respect to the mushy layer mode. Because of the very slow solidification rate of the inner core, convective transport of heat and solute from the ICB is

  7. Comparison of Magnetic Characteristics of Powder Magnetic Core and Evaluation of Motor Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Yuji; Ito, Motoya; Masaki, Ryozo; Yamazaki, Katsuyuki; Asaka, Kazuo; Ishihara, Chio; Ohiwa, Syoji

    A magnetic characteristic measurement, a motor characteristic forecast, and an experimental evaluation of various powder magnetic cores were performed aiming at a fixed quantity grasp when the powder magnetic core was applied to the motor core as the magnetic material. The manufacturing conditions were changed, and magnetic characteristic compares a direct current magnetization characteristic and an iron disadvantageous characteristic with the silicon steel board for a different powder magnetic core. Therefore, though some permeabilities are low, characteristics almost equal to those of a silicon steel board were obtained in the maximum saturation magnetic induction, which confirms that the powder magnetic core in disadvantageous iron in a certain frequency domain, and to confirm disadvantageous iron lowers. Moreover, it has been shown to obtain characteristics almost equal to the silicon steel board when compared in terms of motor efficiency, though some disadvantageous iron increases since the effect when applying to the motor is verified the silicon steel board and the comparison evaluation for the surface type permanent magnet motor.

  8. Preliminary analysis of a large 1600 MWe PWR core loaded with 30% MOX fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polidoro, Franco; Corsetti, Edoardo; Vimercati, Giuliano

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents a full-core 3-D analysis of the performances of a large 1600 MWe PWR core, loaded with 30% MOX fuel, in accordance with the European Utility Requirements (EUR). These requirements state that the European next generation power plants have to be designed capable to use MOX (UO 2 - PuO 2 ) fuel assemblies up to 50% of the core, together with UO 2 fuel assemblies. The use of MOX assemblies has a significant impact on key physic parameters and on safety. A lot of studies have been carried out in the past to explore the feasibility of plutonium recycling strategies by loading LWR reactors with MOX fuel. Many of these works were based on lattice codes, in order to perform detailed analyses of the neutronic characteristics of MOX assemblies. With the aim to take into account their interaction with surrounding UO 2 fuel elements, and the global effects on the core at operational conditions, an integrated approach making use of a 3-D core simulation is required. In this light, the present study adopts the state-of-art numerical models CASMO-5 and SIMULATE-3 to analyze the behavior of the core fueled with 30% MOX and to compare it with that of a large PWR reference core, fueled with UO 2 . (author)

  9. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2004-04-01

    optimize the design of the robot elements and surface control electronics and software. Task 6 (Design & Build Surface Control and Monitoring System) has been completed with the control and computer display functions being operated through LabView. Task 7 (Design & Fabricate Large Diameter Live Access System) progressed to completing the detailed design of the entry fitting for 12-inch diameter cast iron pipe. The fitting is now being placed into manufacture. Task 8--System Integration and Laboratory Validation continued developing the robot module inter-connects and development of a master LabView-based system display and control software.

  10. Status review of large fast reactor core designs and their dynamics related features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spenke, H.; Kiefhaber, E.

    1982-01-01

    Since several years conventional and unconventional concepts of large fast reactor cores have been investigated in the Federal Republic of Germany at INTERATOM and Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe. The work was performed jointly with Belgonucleaire (Belgium). Basically, the studies were aimed at the determination of the performance potential of different core concepts for large fast reactors. Thus the following points were considered: power distribution, neutron fluence and residence time, doubling time, uranium ore consumption, dynamics and safety related features, economics, cooling strategy, core element bowing behaviour. In this paper, the state of the analysis will be presented with emphasis on those points relevant for this meeting. However, we have to make clear, that dynamic and accident studies are still under way and that we are not yet able to cover these aspects in a quantitative manner. This is due to the fact, that the efforts in the DeBeNe-countries have been concentrated on the work necessary for being granted the different licenses for SNR 300, fast breeder prototype reactor near Kalkar. As we expect to obtain these important licenses at the beginning of 1982, an increased man power can be devoted to studies of dynamic and safety problems of large fast cores from that time on. These studies have to fit into the planning recently announced by the utility ESK who will be ordering SNR 2, the first demonstration breeder reactor of Germany, Belgium, Netherlands and France. The planning calls for concept decisions in 1983, leading to an engineering contract for SNR 2 in 1983/1984. Accordingly we shall have to complete and evaluate the ongoing core concept Investigations till 1983 resulting in a subsequent final choice

  11. The melting curve of iron to 250 gigapascals - A constraint on the temperature at earth's center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Quentin; Jeanloz, Raymond; Bass, Jay; Svendsen, Bob; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    The melting curve of iron, the primary constituent of earth's core, has been measured to pressures of 250 gigapascals with a combination of static and dynamic techniques. The melting temperature of iron at the pressure of the core-mantle boundary (136 GPa) is 4800 + or - 200 K, whereas at the inner core-outer core boundary (330 GPa), it is 7600 + or - 500 K. A melting temperature for iron-rich alloy of 6600 K at the inner core-outer core boundary and a maximum temperature of 6900 K at earth's center are inferred. This latter value is the first experimental upper bound on the temperature at earth's center, and these results imply that the temperature of the lower mantle is significantly less than that of the outer core.

  12. A volatile-rich Earth's core inferred from melting temperature of core materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morard, G.; Andrault, D.; Antonangeli, D.; Nakajima, Y.; Auzende, A. L.; Boulard, E.; Clark, A. N.; Lord, O. T.; Cervera, S.; Siebert, J.; Garbarino, G.; Svitlyk, V.; Mezouar, M.

    2016-12-01

    Planetary cores are mainly constituted of iron and nickel, alloyed with lighter elements (Si, O, C, S or H). Understanding how these elements affect the physical and chemical properties of solid and liquid iron provides stringent constraints on the composition of the Earth's core. In particular, melting curves of iron alloys are key parameter to establish the temperature profile in the Earth's core, and to asses the potential occurrence of partial melting at the Core-Mantle Boundary. Core formation models based on metal-silicate equilibration suggest that Si and O are the major light element components1-4, while the abundance of other elements such as S, C and H is constrained by arguments based on their volatility during planetary accretion5,6. Each compositional model implies a specific thermal state for the core, due to the different effect that light elements have on the melting behaviour of Fe. We recently measured melting temperatures in Fe-C and Fe-O systems at high pressures, which complete the data sets available both for pure Fe7 and other binary alloys8. Compositional models with an O- and Si-rich outer core are suggested to be compatible with seismological constraints on density and sound velocity9. However, their crystallization temperatures of 3650-4050 K at the CMB pressure of 136 GPa are very close to, if not higher than the melting temperature of the silicate mantle and yet mantle melting above the CMB is not a ubiquitous feature. This observation requires significant amounts of volatile elements (S, C or H) in the outer core to further reduce the crystallisation temperature of the core alloy below that of the lower mantle. References 1. Wood, B. J., et al Nature 441, 825-833 (2006). 2. Siebert, J., et al Science 339, 1194-7 (2013). 3. Corgne, A., et al Earth Planet. Sc. Lett. 288, 108-114 (2009). 4. Fischer, R. a. et al. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 167, 177-194 (2015). 5. Dreibus, G. & Palme, H. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 60, 1125-1130 (1995). 6. Mc

  13. Fluid Core Size of Mars from Detection of the Solar Tide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, C. F.; Konopliv, A. S.; Yuan, D. N.; Standish, E. M.; Folkner, W. M.

    2003-04-01

    The solar tidal deformation of Mars, measured by its k2 potential Love number, has been obtained from an analysis of Mars Global Surveyor radio tracking. The observed k2 of 0.153 +/- 0.017 is large enough to rule out a solid iron core and so indicates that at least the outer part of the core is liquid. The inferred core radius is between 1520 and 1840 kilometers and is independent of many interior properties, although partial melt of the mantle is one factor that could reduce core size. Ice-cap mass changes can be deduced from the seasonal variations in air pressure and the odd gravity harmonic J3, given knowledge of cap mass distribution with latitude. The south cap seasonal mass change is about 30 to 40% larger than that of the north cap.

  14. Strength and permeability tests on ultra-large Stripa granite core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorpe, R.; Watkins, D.J.; Ralph, W.E.; Hsu, R.; Flexser, S.

    1980-09-01

    This report presents the results of laboratory tests on a 1 meter diameter by 2 meters high sample of granitic (quartz monzonite) rock from the Stripa mine in Sweden. The tests were designed to study the mechanical and hydraulic properties of the rock. Injection and withdrawal permeability tests were performed at several levels of axial stress using a borehole through the long axis of the core. The sample was pervasively fractured and its behavior under uniaxial compressive stress was very complicated. Its stress-strain behavior at low stresses was generally similar to that of small cores containing single healed fractures. However, this large core failed at a peak stress of 7.55 MPa, much less than the typical strength measured in small cores. The complex failure mechanism included a significant creep component. The sample was highly permeable, with flows-per-unit head ranging from 0.11 to 1.55 cm 2 /sec. Initial application of axial load caused a decrease in permeability, but this was followed by rapid increase in conductivity coincident with the failure of the core. The hydraulic regime in the fracture system was too intricate to be satisfactorily modeled by simple analogs based on the observed closure of the principal fractures. The test results contribute to the data base being compiled for the rock mass at the Stripa site, but their proper application will require synthesis of results from several laboratory and in situ test programs

  15. Metallic nanoshells with semiconductor cores: optical characteristics modified by core medium properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Rizia; Grady, Nathaniel K; Ali, Tamer; Halas, Naomi J

    2010-10-26

    It is well-known that the geometry of a nanoshell controls the resonance frequencies of its plasmon modes; however, the properties of the core material also strongly influence its optical properties. Here we report the synthesis of Au nanoshells with semiconductor cores of cuprous oxide and examine their optical characteristics. This material system allows us to systematically examine the role of core material on nanoshell optical properties, comparing Cu(2)O core nanoshells (ε(c) ∼ 7) to lower core dielectric constant SiO(2) core nanoshells (ε(c) = 2) and higher dielectric constant mixed valency iron oxide nanoshells (ε(c) = 12). Increasing the core dielectric constant increases nanoparticle absorption efficiency, reduces plasmon line width, and modifies plasmon energies. Modifying the core medium provides an additional means of tailoring both the near- and far-field optical properties in this unique nanoparticle system.

  16. Direct observations of the viscosity of Earth's outer core and extrapolation of measurements of the viscosity of liquid iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smylie, D E; Brazhkin, Vadim V; Palmer, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Estimates vary widely as to the viscosity of Earth's outer fluid core. Directly observed viscosity is usually orders of magnitude higher than the values extrapolated from high-pressure high-temperature laboratory experiments, which are close to those for liquid iron at atmospheric pressure. It turned out that this discrepancy can be removed by extrapolating via the widely known Arrhenius activation model modified by lifting the commonly used assumption of pressure-independent activation volume (which is possible due to the discovery that at high pressures the activation volume increases strongly with pressure, resulting in 10 2 Pa s at the top of the fluid core, and in 10 11 Pa s at its bottom). There are of course many uncertainties affecting this extrapolation process. This paper reviews two viscosity determination methods, one for the top and the other for the bottom of the outer core, the former of which relies on the decay of free core nutations and yields 2371 ± 1530 Pa s, while the other relies on the reduction in the rotational splitting of the two equatorial translational modes of the solid inner core oscillations and yields an average of 1.247 ± 0.035 Pa s. Encouraged by the good performance of the Arrhenius extrapolation, a differential form of the Arrhenius activation model is used to interpolate along the melting temperature curve and to find the viscosity profile across the entire outer core. The viscosity variation is found to be nearly log-linear between the measured boundary values. (methodological notes)

  17. Multi-scale three-dimensional characterization of iron particles in dusty olivine: Implications for paleomagnetism of chondritic meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einsle, Joshua F.; Harrison, Richard J.; Kasama, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Dusty olivine (olivine containing multiple sub-micrometer inclusions of metallic iron) in chondritic meteorites is considered an ideal carrier of paleomagnetic remanence, capable of maintaining a faithful record of pre-accretionary magnetization acquired during chondrule formation. Here we show how......-dimensional (3D) volume reconstruction of a dusty olivine grain, obtained by selective milling through a region of interest in a series of sequential 20 nm slices, which are then imaged using scanning electron microscopy. The data provide a quantitative description of the iron particle ensemble, including...... axes of the particles and the remanence vector imparted in different fields. Although the orientation of the vortex core is determined largely by the ellipsoidal geometry (i.e., parallel to the major axis for prolate ellipsoids and parallel to the minor axis for oblate ellipsoids), the core...

  18. Physico-chemical properties of the new generation IV iron preparations ferumoxytol, iron isomaltoside 1000 and ferric carboxymaltose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiser, Susann; Rentsch, Daniel; Dippon, Urs; Kappler, Andreas; Weidler, Peter G; Göttlicher, Jörg; Steininger, Ralph; Wilhelm, Maria; Braitsch, Michaela; Funk, Felix; Philipp, Erik; Burckhardt, Susanna

    2015-08-01

    The advantage of the new generation IV iron preparations ferric carboxymaltose (FCM), ferumoxytol (FMX), and iron isomaltoside 1000 (IIM) is that they can be administered in relatively high doses in a short period of time. We investigated the physico-chemical properties of these preparations and compared them with those of the older preparations iron sucrose (IS), sodium ferric gluconate (SFG), and low molecular weight iron dextran (LMWID). Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fe K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy indicated akaganeite structures (β-FeOOH) for the cores of FCM, IIM and IS, and a maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) structure for that of FMX. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies confirmed the structure of the carbohydrate of FMX as a reduced, carboxymethylated, low molecular weight dextran, and that of IIM as a reduced Dextran 1000. Polarography yielded significantly different fingerprints of the investigated compounds. Reductive degradation kinetics of FMX was faster than that of FCM and IIM, which is in contrast to the high stability of FMX towards acid degradation. The labile iron content, i.e. the amount of iron that is only weakly bound in the polynuclear iron core, was assessed by a qualitative test that confirmed decreasing labile iron contents in the order SFG ≈ IS > LMWID ≥ FMX ≈ IIM ≈ FCM. The presented data are a step forward in the characterization of these non-biological complex drugs, which is a prerequisite to understand their cellular uptake mechanisms and the relationship between the structure and physiological safety as well as efficacy of these complexes.

  19. Plastic deformation of FeSi at high pressures: implications for planetary cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupenko, Ilya; Merkel, Sébastien; Achorner, Melissa; Plückthun, Christian; Liermann, Hanns-Peter; Sanchez-Valle, Carmen

    2017-04-01

    The cores of terrestrial planets is mostly comprised of a Fe-Ni alloy, but it should additionally contain some light element(s) in order to explain the observed core density. Silicon has long been considered as a likely candidate because of geochemical and cosmochemical arguments: the Mg/Si and Fe/Si ratios of the Earth does not match those of the chondrites. Since silicon preferentially partition into iron-nickel metal, having 'missing' silicon in the core would solve this problem. Moreover, the evidence of present (e.g. Mercury) or ancient (e.g. Mars) magnetic fields on the terrestrial planets is a good indicator of (at least partially) liquid cores. The estimated temperature profiles of these planets, however, lay below iron melting curve. The addition of light elements in their metal cores could allow reducing their core-alloy melting temperature and, hence, the generation of a magnetic field. Although the effect of light elements on the stability and elasticity of Fe-Ni alloys has been widely investigated, their effect on the plasticity of core materials remains largely unknown. Yet, this information is crucial for understanding how planetary cores deform. Here we investigate the plastic deformation of ɛ-FeSi up to 50 GPa at room temperature employing a technique of radial x-ray diffraction in diamond anvil cells. Stoichiometric FeSi endmember is a good first-order approximation of the Fe-FeSi system and a good starting material to develop new experimental perspectives. In this work, we focused on the low-pressure polymorph of FeSi that would be the stable phase in the cores of small terrestrial planets. We will present the analysis of measured data and discuss their potential application to constrain plastic deformation in planetary cores.

  20. Use of radionuclides in the study of iron metabolism in iron deficient states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anatkov, A.; Karakostov, K.; Iliev, Z.; Dimitrov, L.

    1977-01-01

    A study of erythropoiesis in iron deficient anemias by simultaneous labelling with the radionuclides iron 59 and chromium 51 revealed accelerated iron circuit, higher percentage of daily hemolysis, severely reduced or even absent labile reserves, decreased volume of packed red cells with no decrease of blood volume. Adequate iron 59 utilization was observed after administration of large doses of iron (500 mg) in the treatment of iron deficient anemias. (author)

  1. Large Core Three Branch Polymer Power Splitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Prajzler

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report about three branch large core polymer power splitters optimized for connecting standard plastic optical fibers. A new point of the design is insertion of a rectangle-shaped spacing between the input and the central part of the splitter, which will ensure more even distribution of the output optical power. The splitters were designed by beam propagation method using BeamPROP software. Acrylic-based polymers were used as optical waveguides being poured into the Y-grooves realized by computer numerical controlled engraving on poly(methyl methacrylate substrate. Measurement of the optical insertion losses proved that the insertion optical loss could be lowered to 2.1 dB at 650 nm and optical power coupling ratio could reach 31.8% : 37.3% : 30.9%.

  2. THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL EVOLUTION TO CORE COLLAPSE OF A MASSIVE STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couch, Sean M. [TAPIR, Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Chatzopoulos, Emmanouil [Flash Center for Computational Science, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Arnett, W. David [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Timmes, F. X., E-mail: smc@tapir.caltech.edu [Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2015-07-20

    We present the first three-dimensional (3D) simulation of the final minutes of iron core growth in a massive star, up to and including the point of core gravitational instability and collapse. We capture the development of strong convection driven by violent Si burning in the shell surrounding the iron core. This convective burning builds the iron core to its critical mass and collapse ensues, driven by electron capture and photodisintegration. The non-spherical structure and motion generated by 3D convection is substantial at the point of collapse, with convective speeds of several hundreds of km s{sup −1}. We examine the impact of such physically realistic 3D initial conditions on the core-collapse supernova mechanism using 3D simulations including multispecies neutrino leakage and find that the enhanced post-shock turbulence resulting from 3D progenitor structure aids successful explosions. We conclude that non-spherical progenitor structure should not be ignored, and should have a significant and favorable impact on the likelihood for neutrino-driven explosions. In order to make simulating the 3D collapse of an iron core feasible, we were forced to make approximations to the nuclear network making this effort only a first step toward accurate, self-consistent 3D stellar evolution models of the end states of massive stars.

  3. THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL EVOLUTION TO CORE COLLAPSE OF A MASSIVE STAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couch, Sean M.; Chatzopoulos, Emmanouil; Arnett, W. David; Timmes, F. X.

    2015-01-01

    We present the first three-dimensional (3D) simulation of the final minutes of iron core growth in a massive star, up to and including the point of core gravitational instability and collapse. We capture the development of strong convection driven by violent Si burning in the shell surrounding the iron core. This convective burning builds the iron core to its critical mass and collapse ensues, driven by electron capture and photodisintegration. The non-spherical structure and motion generated by 3D convection is substantial at the point of collapse, with convective speeds of several hundreds of km s −1 . We examine the impact of such physically realistic 3D initial conditions on the core-collapse supernova mechanism using 3D simulations including multispecies neutrino leakage and find that the enhanced post-shock turbulence resulting from 3D progenitor structure aids successful explosions. We conclude that non-spherical progenitor structure should not be ignored, and should have a significant and favorable impact on the likelihood for neutrino-driven explosions. In order to make simulating the 3D collapse of an iron core feasible, we were forced to make approximations to the nuclear network making this effort only a first step toward accurate, self-consistent 3D stellar evolution models of the end states of massive stars

  4. Nitrate-dependent iron oxidation limits iron transport in anoxic ocean regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholz, Florian; Löscher, Carolin; Fiskal, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an essential element for life on Earth and limits primary production in large parts of the ocean. Oxygen-free continental margin sediments represent an important source of bioavailable iron to the ocean, yet little of the iron released from the seabed reaches the productive sea surface...

  5. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2004-11-01

    - and large-diameter cast iron repair robots to assure their commercial success. Task 4 (Design, Fabricate and Test Patch Setting Robotic Train) progressed to the design of the control electronics and pneumatic system to inflate the bladder robotic patch setting module in the last quarter 5. In this quarter, work has been concentrated on increasing the nitrogen bladder reservoir volume to allow at least two complete patch inflation/patch setting cycles in the event the sleeve does not set all ratchets in the same row on the first attempt. This problem was observed on a few of the repair sleeves that were recently installed during field tests with the small-diameter robotic system. For Task 5 (Design & Fabricate Pipe-Wall Cleaning Robot Train with Pan/Zoom/Tilt Camera) it was observed that it will be necessary to add a stiff brush to push debris away from the immediate vicinity of the bell and spigot joints in mains having low gas velocities. Otherwise, material removed by the cleaning flails (which were found to be very effective in cleaning bell and spigot joints) simply falls to the low side of the pipe and accumulates in a pile. This accumulation can prevent the sleeve from achieving a leak free repair. Similarly, it is also necessary to design a small magnet to capture existing service tap coupons and allow their removal from the inside of the pipe. These coupons were found to cause difficulty in launching and retrieving the small pipe repair robot; one coupon lodged beneath the end of the guide shoe. These new features require redesign of the pipe wall cleaning train and modification to the patch setting train. Task 6 (Design & Build Surface Control and Monitoring System) was previously completed with the control and computer display functions being operated through LabView. However, this must now be re-visited to add control routines for the coupon catcher to be added. This will most likely include a lift-off/place-on magnet translation function. Task 7 (Design

  6. Hydrogen-bearing iron peroxide and the origin of ultralow-velocity zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin; Hu, Qingyang; Young Kim, Duck; Wu, Zhongqing; Wang, Wenzhong; Xiao, Yuming; Chow, Paul; Meng, Yue; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Mao, Wendy L.

    2017-11-01

    Ultralow-velocity zones (ULVZs) at Earth’s core-mantle boundary region have important implications for the chemical composition and thermal structure of our planet, but their origin has long been debated. Hydrogen-bearing iron peroxide (FeO2Hx) in the pyrite-type crystal structure was recently found to be stable under the conditions of the lowermost mantle. Using high-pressure experiments and theoretical calculations, we find that iron peroxide with a varying amount of hydrogen has a high density and high Poisson ratio as well as extremely low sound velocities consistent with ULVZs. Here we also report a reaction between iron and water at 86 gigapascals and 2,200 kelvin that produces FeO2Hx. This would provide a mechanism for generating the observed volume occupied by ULVZs through the reaction of about one-tenth the mass of Earth’s ocean water in subducted hydrous minerals with the effectively unlimited reservoir of iron in Earth’s core. Unlike other candidates for the composition of ULVZs, FeO2Hx synthesized from the superoxidation of iron by water would not require an extra transportation mechanism to migrate to the core-mantle boundary. These dense FeO2Hx-rich domains would be expected to form directly in the core-mantle boundary region and their properties would provide an explanation for the many enigmatic seismic features that are observed in ULVZs.

  7. A comparative study of all-vanadium and iron-chromium redox flow batteries for large-scale energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Y. K.; Zhao, T. S.; An, L.; Zhou, X. L.; Wei, L.

    2015-12-01

    The promise of redox flow batteries (RFBs) utilizing soluble redox couples, such as all vanadium ions as well as iron and chromium ions, is becoming increasingly recognized for large-scale energy storage of renewables such as wind and solar, owing to their unique advantages including scalability, intrinsic safety, and long cycle life. An ongoing question associated with these two RFBs is determining whether the vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) or iron-chromium redox flow battery (ICRFB) is more suitable and competitive for large-scale energy storage. To address this concern, a comparative study has been conducted for the two types of battery based on their charge-discharge performance, cycle performance, and capital cost. It is found that: i) the two batteries have similar energy efficiencies at high current densities; ii) the ICRFB exhibits a higher capacity decay rate than does the VRFB; and iii) the ICRFB is much less expensive in capital costs when operated at high power densities or at large capacities.

  8. Microwave absorption properties of the core/shell-type iron and nickel nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, B.; Dong, X.L.; Huang, H.; Zhang, X.F.; Zhu, X.G.; Lei, J.P.; Sun, J.P.

    2008-01-01

    Iron (Fe) and nickel (Ni) nanoparticles were prepared by the DC arc-discharge method in a mixture of hydrogen and argon gases, using bulk metals as the raw materials. The microstructure of core/shell (metal/metal oxide) in nanoparticle formed after in situ passivation process. The complex electromagnetic parameters (permittivity ε r =ε r ' +iε r '' and permeability μ r =μ r ' +iμ r '' ) of the paraffin-mixed nanocomposite samples (paraffin:nanoparticles=1:1 in mass ratio) were measured in the frequency range of 2-18 GHz. The polarization mechanisms of the space charge and dipole coexist in both the Fe and Ni nanoparticles. The orientational polarization is a particular polarization for Fe nanoparticles and brings a relatively higher dielectric loss. Natural resonance is the main reason for magnetic loss and the corresponding frequencies are 11.6 and 5.2 GHz for the Fe and Ni nanoparticles, respectively. The paraffin composite with Fe nanoparticles provided excellent microwave absorption properties (reflection loss <-20 dB) in the range 6.8-16.6 GHz over the absorber thickness of 1.1-2.3 mm

  9. Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Tunable Size Synthesis and Analysis in Terms of the Core-Shell Structure and Mixed Coercive Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phong, P. T.; Oanh, V. T. K.; Lam, T. D.; Phuc, N. X.; Tung, L. D.; Thanh, Nguyen T. K.; Manh, D. H.

    2017-04-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are currently a very active research field. To date, a comprehensive study of iron oxide NPs is still lacking not only on the size dependence of structural phases but also in the use of an appropriate model. Herein, we report on a systematic study of the structural and magnetic properties of iron oxide NPs prepared by a co-precipitation method followed by hydrothermal treatment. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy reveal that the NPs have an inverse spinel structure of iron oxide phase (Fe3O4) with average crystallite sizes ( D XRD) of 6-19 nm, while grain sizes ( D TEM) are of 7-23 nm. In addition, the larger the particle size, the closer the experimental lattice constant value is to that of the magnetite structure. Magnetic field-dependent magnetization data and analysis show that the effective anisotropy constants of the Fe3O4 NPs are about five times larger than that of their bulk counterpart. Particle size ( D) dependence of the magnetization and the non-saturating behavior observed in applied fields up to 50 kOe are discussed using the core-shell structure model. We find that with decreasing D, while the calculated thickness of the shell of disordered spins ( t ˜ 0.3 nm) remains almost unchanged, the specific surface areas S a increases significantly, thus reducing the magnetization of the NPs. We also probe the coercivity of the NPs by using the mixed coercive Kneller and Luborsky model. The calculated results indicate that the coercivity rises monotonously with the particle size, and are well matched with the experimental ones.

  10. Experimental constraints on light elements in the Earth’s outer core

    OpenAIRE

    Youjun Zhang; Toshimori Sekine; Hongliang He; Yin Yu; Fusheng Liu; Mingjian Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Earth?s outer core is liquid and dominantly composed of iron and nickel (~5?10?wt%). Its density, however, is ~8% lower than that of liquid iron, and requires the presence of a significant amount of light element(s). A good way to specify the light element(s) is a direct comparison of density and sound velocity measurements between seismological data and those of possible candidate compositions at the core conditions. We report the sound velocity measurements of a model core composition in th...

  11. Size analysis of single-core magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, Frank, E-mail: f.ludwig@tu-bs.de [Institut für Elektrische Messtechnik und Grundlagen der Elektrotechnik, TU Braunschweig, Braunschweig (Germany); Balceris, Christoph; Viereck, Thilo [Institut für Elektrische Messtechnik und Grundlagen der Elektrotechnik, TU Braunschweig, Braunschweig (Germany); Posth, Oliver; Steinhoff, Uwe [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Berlin (Germany); Gavilan, Helena; Costo, Rocio [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, ICMM/CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Zeng, Lunjie; Olsson, Eva [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg (Sweden); Jonasson, Christian; Johansson, Christer [ACREO Swedish ICT AB, Göteborg (Sweden)

    2017-04-01

    Single-core iron-oxide nanoparticles with nominal core diameters of 14 nm and 19 nm were analyzed with a variety of non-magnetic and magnetic analysis techniques, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), static magnetization vs. magnetic field (M-H) measurements, ac susceptibility (ACS) and magnetorelaxometry (MRX). From the experimental data, distributions of core and hydrodynamic sizes are derived. Except for TEM where a number-weighted distribution is directly obtained, models have to be applied in order to determine size distributions from the measurand. It was found that the mean core diameters determined from TEM, M-H, ACS and MRX measurements agree well although they are based on different models (Langevin function, Brownian and Néel relaxation times). Especially for the sample with large cores, particle interaction effects come into play, causing agglomerates which were detected in DLS, ACS and MRX measurements. We observed that the number and size of agglomerates can be minimized by sufficiently strong diluting the suspension. - Highlights: • Investigation of size parameters of single-core magnetic nanoparticles with nominal core diameters of 14 nm and 19 nm utilizing different magnetic and non-magnetic methods • Hydrodynamic size determined from ac susceptibility measurements is consistent with the DLS findings • Core size agrees determined from static magnetization curves, MRX and ACS data agrees with results from TEM although the estimation is based on different models (Langevin function, Brownian and Néel relaxation times).

  12. Electrical resistivity discontinuity of iron along the melting curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagle, Fabian; Steinle-Neumann, Gerd

    2018-04-01

    Discontinuous changes of electrical resistivity ρel (increase), density ϱ and isothermal compressibility βT (decrease) occur across the melting temperature of metals and can be directly related by Ziman's theory in the long-wavelength approximation. By evaluating experimental data at ambient pressure, we show that Ziman's approximation holds for iron and other simple and transition metals. Using a thermodynamic model to determine βT for γ-, ɛ- and liquid Fe and a previously published model for ρel of liquid Fe, we apply Ziman's approximation to calculate ρel of solid Fe along the melting curve. For pure Fe, we find the discontinuity in ρel to decrease with pressure and to be negligibly small at inner core boundary conditions. However, if we account for light element enrichment in the liquid outer core, the electrical resistivity decrease across the inner core boundary is predicted to be as large as 36 per cent.

  13. Upper-bound fission product release assessment for large break LOCA in CANFLEX bundle reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Duk Ju; Lee, Kang Moon

    1996-07-01

    Quarter-core gap inventory assessment for CANDU-6 reactor core loaded with CANFLEX fuel bundles has been performed as one of the licensing safety analyses required for 24 natural uranium CANFLEX bundle irradiation in CANDU-6 reactor. The quarter-core gap inventory for the CANFLEX bundle core is 5 - 10 times lower than that for the standard bundle core, depending on the half-life of the isotope. The lower gap inventory of the CANFLEX bundle core is attributed to the lower linear power of the CANFLEX bundle compared with the standard bundle. However, the whole core total inventories for both the CANFLEX and standard bundle cores are nearly the same. The 6 - 8 times lower upper-bound fission product releases of the CANFLEX bundle core for large break LOCA than those of the standard bundle core imply that the loading of 24 natural uranium CANFLEX bundles would improve the predicted consequences of the postulated accident described in the Wolsung 2 safety report. 2 tabs., 6 figs., 3 refs. (Author)

  14. Method of reducing the hazard which may occur as a consequence of a reactor core meltdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donne, M.D.; Dorner, S.; Schumacher, G.

    1978-01-01

    The core melt resulting from a meltdown accident of a GFB, LWR or LMFRR is collected by a core catcher from graphite placed below the core. The core melt is penetrating step by step into a borate store in the collecting vessel and is dissolving in it. Therefore the borate at the same time will absorb the decay heat. In order to remove the solidified and cooled down melted mass water is applied eliminating the borate. The remaining oxide state of the powdery core is sucked off again from the core catcher together with the water. The borate store (e.g. alkali borate) itself consists of separate layers with shaped parts, the coverings of which are made of steel, iron, cast iron, nickel, iron or nickel alloys, ceramic material or glass. (DG) [de

  15. Method of reducing the hazard which may occur as a consequence of a reactor core meltdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donne, M.D.; Dorner, S.; Schumacher, G.

    1985-01-01

    The core melt resulting from a meltdown accident of a GFB, LWR or LMFRR is collected by a core catcher from graphite placed below the core. The core melt is penetrating step by step into a borate store in the collecting vessel and is dissolving in it. Therefore the borate at the same time will absorb the decay heat. In order to remove the solidified and cooled down melted mass water is applied eliminating the borate. The remaining oxide states of the powdery core is sucked off again from the core catcher together with the water. The borate store (e.g. alkali borate) itself consists of separate layers with shaped parts, the coverings of which are made of steel, iron, cast iron, nickel, iron or nickel alloys, ceramic material or glass. (orig./PW)

  16. Large longitude libration of Mercury reveals a molten core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margot, J L; Peale, S J; Jurgens, R F; Slade, M A; Holin, I V

    2007-05-04

    Observations of radar speckle patterns tied to the rotation of Mercury establish that the planet occupies a Cassini state with obliquity of 2.11 +/- 0.1 arc minutes. The measurements show that the planet exhibits librations in longitude that are forced at the 88-day orbital period, as predicted by theory. The large amplitude of the oscillations, 35.8 +/- 2 arc seconds, together with the Mariner 10 determination of the gravitational harmonic coefficient C22, indicates that the mantle of Mercury is decoupled from a core that is at least partially molten.

  17. The role of mitochondria in cellular iron-sulfur protein biogenesis and iron metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lill, Roland; Hoffmann, Bastian; Molik, Sabine; Pierik, Antonio J; Rietzschel, Nicole; Stehling, Oliver; Uzarska, Marta A; Webert, Holger; Wilbrecht, Claudia; Mühlenhoff, Ulrich

    2012-09-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in iron metabolism in that they synthesize heme, assemble iron-sulfur (Fe/S) proteins, and participate in cellular iron regulation. Here, we review the latter two topics and their intimate connection. The mitochondrial Fe/S cluster (ISC) assembly machinery consists of 17 proteins that operate in three major steps of the maturation process. First, the cysteine desulfurase complex Nfs1-Isd11 as the sulfur donor cooperates with ferredoxin-ferredoxin reductase acting as an electron transfer chain, and frataxin to synthesize an [2Fe-2S] cluster on the scaffold protein Isu1. Second, the cluster is released from Isu1 and transferred toward apoproteins with the help of a dedicated Hsp70 chaperone system and the glutaredoxin Grx5. Finally, various specialized ISC components assist in the generation of [4Fe-4S] clusters and cluster insertion into specific target apoproteins. Functional defects of the core ISC assembly machinery are signaled to cytosolic or nuclear iron regulatory systems resulting in increased cellular iron acquisition and mitochondrial iron accumulation. In fungi, regulation is achieved by iron-responsive transcription factors controlling the expression of genes involved in iron uptake and intracellular distribution. They are assisted by cytosolic multidomain glutaredoxins which use a bound Fe/S cluster as iron sensor and additionally perform an essential role in intracellular iron delivery to target metalloproteins. In mammalian cells, the iron regulatory proteins IRP1, an Fe/S protein, and IRP2 act in a post-transcriptional fashion to adjust the cellular needs for iron. Thus, Fe/S protein biogenesis and cellular iron metabolism are tightly linked to coordinate iron supply and utilization. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cell Biology of Metals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Equation of state of laser-shocked compressed iron; Equation d'etat du fer comprime par choc laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huser, G

    2004-01-01

    This thesis enters the field of highly compressed materials equation of state studies. In particular, it focuses on the case of laser shock compressed iron. This work indeed aims at getting to the conditions of the earth's core, comprising a solid inner core and a liquid outer core. The understanding of phenomena governing the core's thermodynamics and the geodynamic process requires the knowledge of iron melting line locus around the solid-liquid interface at 3.3 Mbar. Several experiments were performed to that extent. First, an absolute measurement of iron Hugoniot was obtained. Following is a study of partially released states of iron into a window material: lithium fluoride (LiF). This configuration enables direct access to compressed iron optical properties such as reflectivity and self-emission. Interface velocity measurement is dominated by compressed LiF optical properties and is used as a pressure gauge. Using a dual wavelength reflectivity diagnostic, compressed iron electrical conductivity was estimated and found to be in good agreement with previous results found in geophysics literature. Self-emission diagnostic was used to measure temperature of partially released iron and revealed a solid-liquid phase transition at Mbar pressures. (author)

  19. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiran M. Kothari, Gerard T. Pittard

    2004-01-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1--Program Management and Task 2--were completed in prior quarters while Task 3--Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in cast iron test pipe segments. Efforts in this quarter continued to focus on Tasks 4--8, with significant progress made in each. Task 4 (Design, Fabricate and Test Patch Setting Robotic Train) progressed to the design of the control electronics and pneumatic system to inflate the bladder robotic patch setting module. Task 5 (Design & Fabricate Pipe-Wall Cleaning Robot Train with Pan/Zoom/Tilt Camera) continued with additional in-pipe testing required to

  20. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiran M Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2004-07-01

    ) continued with additional in-pipe testing required to optimize the design of the robot elements and surface control electronics and software. Task 6 (Design & Build Surface Control and Monitoring System) has been completed with the control and computer display functions being operated through LabView. Task 7 (Design & Fabricate Large Diameter Live Access System) progressed to completing the detailed design of the entry fitting for 12-inch diameter cast iron pipe. The fitting is now being manufactured. The 12-inch ball valve for allowing no-blow access was also procured. Task 8 (System Integration and Laboratory Validation) continued with the development of the robot module inter-connects and of a master LabView-based system display and control software.

  1. Determining the magnetically nonlinear characteristics of a three phase core-type power transformer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolinar, Matjaz; Stumberger, Gorazd; Polajzer, Bostjan; Dolinar, Drago

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents nonlinear iron core model of a three-phase, three-limb power transformer which is given by the current-dependant characteristics of flux linkages. The magnetically nonlinear characteristics are determined by controlled magnetic excitation of all three limbs which allows to take into account the variable magnetic-cross couplings between different coils placed on limbs, caused by saturation. The corresponding partial derivatives of measured flux linkage characteristics are used in the transformer circuit model as a magnetically nonlinear iron core model in order to analyze the behaviour of a nonsymmetrically excited transformer. Numerical results using transformer model with the determined iron core model agree very well with the measured results

  2. Comparative performance of fluorescent iron-core ballasts and electronic ballasts. Rendement comparatif des ballasts a noyau de fer et des ballasts electroniques pour eclairage fluorescent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasini, I

    1987-01-01

    Commercially available one- and two-lamp fluorescent luminaires were tested, and a number of electrical parameters were measured using varying combinations of lamps and either iron-core or electronic ballasts. Comprehensive photometric tests and thermal measurements were also conducted. The test results were tabulated and compared. The performance of the iron-core ballasts was found to be sufficiently close to nominally rated values to not raise concerns. Results from testing the electronic ballasts showed that the user has to be careful when selecting these ballasts, as they far exceed standard specification limits for current and voltage crest factors. All other electrical, photometric and thermal parameters are within accepted levels. An economic analysis was undertaken to determine cost benefits and payback periods for using electronic ballasts, the use of which will result in higher efficiency and lower power consumption. A project life of 20 years was assumed, and analysis was run for a power cost of $0.04/kWh. A unit made by Fyrnetics showed the lowest total annual owning and operating costs and had a payback period of 12.1 years. 13 figs., 13 tabs.

  3. Superconducting electromagnets for large wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boom, R.W.; Abdelsalam, M.K.; Bakerek, K.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents a new design study of a Magnetic Suspension and Balance System (MSBS) for airplane models in a large 8 ft x 8 ft wind tunnel. New developments in the design include: use of a superconducting solenoid as a model core instead of magnetized iron; combination of permanent magnet material in the model wings along with four race-track coils to produce the required roll torque; and mounting of all the magnets in an integral cold structure instead of in separate cryostats. Design of superconducting solenoid model cores and practical experience with a small-scale prototype are discussed

  4. Testing the Large-scale Environments of Cool-core and Non-cool-core Clusters with Clustering Bias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medezinski, Elinor; Battaglia, Nicholas; Cen, Renyue; Gaspari, Massimo; Strauss, Michael A.; Spergel, David N. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, 4 Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Coupon, Jean, E-mail: elinorm@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Geneva, ch. dEcogia 16, CH-1290 Versoix (Switzerland)

    2017-02-10

    There are well-observed differences between cool-core (CC) and non-cool-core (NCC) clusters, but the origin of this distinction is still largely unknown. Competing theories can be divided into internal (inside-out), in which internal physical processes transform or maintain the NCC phase, and external (outside-in), in which the cluster type is determined by its initial conditions, which in turn leads to different formation histories (i.e., assembly bias). We propose a new method that uses the relative assembly bias of CC to NCC clusters, as determined via the two-point cluster-galaxy cross-correlation function (CCF), to test whether formation history plays a role in determining their nature. We apply our method to 48 ACCEPT clusters, which have well resolved central entropies, and cross-correlate with the SDSS-III/BOSS LOWZ galaxy catalog. We find that the relative bias of NCC over CC clusters is b = 1.42 ± 0.35 (1.6 σ different from unity). Our measurement is limited by the small number of clusters with core entropy information within the BOSS footprint, 14 CC and 34 NCC clusters. Future compilations of X-ray cluster samples, combined with deep all-sky redshift surveys, will be able to better constrain the relative assembly bias of CC and NCC clusters and determine the origin of the bimodality.

  5. Testing the Large-scale Environments of Cool-core and Non-cool-core Clusters with Clustering Bias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medezinski, Elinor; Battaglia, Nicholas; Cen, Renyue; Gaspari, Massimo; Strauss, Michael A.; Spergel, David N.; Coupon, Jean

    2017-01-01

    There are well-observed differences between cool-core (CC) and non-cool-core (NCC) clusters, but the origin of this distinction is still largely unknown. Competing theories can be divided into internal (inside-out), in which internal physical processes transform or maintain the NCC phase, and external (outside-in), in which the cluster type is determined by its initial conditions, which in turn leads to different formation histories (i.e., assembly bias). We propose a new method that uses the relative assembly bias of CC to NCC clusters, as determined via the two-point cluster-galaxy cross-correlation function (CCF), to test whether formation history plays a role in determining their nature. We apply our method to 48 ACCEPT clusters, which have well resolved central entropies, and cross-correlate with the SDSS-III/BOSS LOWZ galaxy catalog. We find that the relative bias of NCC over CC clusters is b = 1.42 ± 0.35 (1.6 σ different from unity). Our measurement is limited by the small number of clusters with core entropy information within the BOSS footprint, 14 CC and 34 NCC clusters. Future compilations of X-ray cluster samples, combined with deep all-sky redshift surveys, will be able to better constrain the relative assembly bias of CC and NCC clusters and determine the origin of the bimodality.

  6. Using PKiKP coda to study heterogeneity in the top layer of the inner core's western hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenbo; Irving, Jessica C. E.

    2017-05-01

    Significant lateral and depth variations of the inner core's properties, such as the large-scale hemispherical pattern, have been confirmed by a variety of seismological observations. However it is still unclear which dynamic processes in the core are responsible for these variations. Small-scale volumetric heterogeneity has been detected in the top layer of the inner core by PKiKP coda observations. Studies of these small-scale heterogeneities can provide critical information, such as the degree of alignment of iron crystals, the presence of possible partial melt and the grain size of iron crystals, all of which can be used to constrain the dynamic processes of the inner core. However, most previous observations sampled the inner core beneath the Pacific Ocean and Asia, often in the inner core's 'eastern hemisphere'. We use seismic stations in the North America, including the Earthscope Transportable Array, to look at PKiKP and its coda waves. We find 21 events with clear signals. In agreement with previous studies, inner core scattering (ICS), resulting in clear PKiKP coda, is found at epicentral distances of 60°-95°. However, the ICS we observe in these 21 western hemisphere events is weaker than previously reported for the eastern hemisphere. Comparing our observations with numerical simulations, we conclude that this relatively weak ICS indicates small-scale heterogeneity in at least the top layer of the inner core beneath Central America. Combining our clear observations with previous studies suggests either a hemispherical difference, or a regional variation, of small-scale heterogeneity in the inner core.

  7. Asymmetric explosion of core-collapse supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazeroni, Remi

    2016-01-01

    A core-collapse supernova represents the ultimate stage of the evolution of massive stars.The iron core contraction may be followed by a gigantic explosion which gives birth to a neutron star.The multidimensional dynamics of the innermost region, during the first hundreds milliseconds, plays a decisive role on the explosion success because hydrodynamical instabilities are able to break the spherical symmetry of the collapse. Large scale transverse motions generated by two instabilities, the neutrino-driven convection and the Standing Accretion Shock Instability (SASI),increase the heating efficiency up to the point of launching an asymmetric explosion and influencing the birth properties of the neutron star. In this thesis, hydrodynamical instabilities are studied using numerical simulations of simplified models. These models enable a wide exploration of the parameter space and a better physical understanding of the instabilities, generally inaccessible to realistic models.The non-linear regime of SASI is analysed to characterize the conditions under which a spiral mode prevails and to assess its ability to redistribute angular momentum radially.The influence of rotation on the shock dynamics is also addressed. For fast enough rotation rates, a corotation instability overlaps with SASI and greatly impacts the dynamics. The simulations enable to better constrain the effect of non-axisymmetric modes on the angular momentum budget of the iron core collapsing into a neutron star. SASI may under specific conditions spin up or down the pulsar born during the explosion. Finally, an idealised model of the heating region is studied to characterize the non-linear onset of convection by perturbations such as those produced by SASI or pre-collapse combustion inhomogeneities. The dimensionality issue is examined to stress the beneficial consequences of the three-dimensional dynamics on the onset of the explosion. (author) [fr

  8. Stabilization and functionalization of iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amstad, Esther; Textor, Marcus; Reimhult, Erik

    2011-07-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are used in a rapidly expanding number of research and practical applications in the biomedical field, including magnetic cell labeling separation and tracking, for therapeutic purposes in hyperthermia and drug delivery, and for diagnostic purposes, e.g., as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. These applications require good NP stability at physiological conditions, close control over NP size and controlled surface presentation of functionalities. This review is focused on different aspects of the stability of superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs, from its practical definition to its implementation by molecular design of the dispersant shell around the iron oxide core and further on to its influence on the magnetic properties of the superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs. Special attention is given to the selection of molecular anchors for the dispersant shell, because of their importance to ensure colloidal and functional stability of sterically stabilized superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs. We further detail how dispersants have been optimized to gain close control over iron oxide NP stability, size and functionalities by independently considering the influences of anchors and the attached sterically repulsive polymer brushes. A critical evaluation of different strategies to stabilize and functionalize core-shell superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs as well as a brief introduction to characterization methods to compare those strategies is given.Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are used in a rapidly expanding number of research and practical applications in the biomedical field, including magnetic cell labeling separation and tracking, for therapeutic purposes in hyperthermia and drug delivery, and for diagnostic purposes, e.g., as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. These applications require good NP stability at physiological conditions, close control over NP size and controlled surface

  9. Iron metabolism and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papanikolaou, G.; Pantopoulos, K.

    2005-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient with limited bioavailability. When present in excess, iron poses a threat to cells and tissues, and therefore iron homeostasis has to be tightly controlled. Iron's toxicity is largely based on its ability to catalyze the generation of radicals, which attack and damage cellular macromolecules and promote cell death and tissue injury. This is lucidly illustrated in diseases of iron overload, such as hereditary hemochromatosis or transfusional siderosis, where excessive iron accumulation results in tissue damage and organ failure. Pathological iron accumulation in the liver has also been linked to the development of hepatocellular cancer. Here we provide a background on the biology and toxicity of iron and the basic concepts of iron homeostasis at the cellular and systemic level. In addition, we provide an overview of the various disorders of iron overload, which are directly linked to iron's toxicity. Finally, we discuss the potential role of iron in malignant transformation and cancer

  10. Moessbauer and positron annihilation studies of microstructural peculiarities of iron-dextran complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshtrakh, M.I.; Kopelyan, E.A.; Semionkin, V.A.; Livshits, A.B.; Kozlov, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    The microstructural peculiarities of pharmaceutically important iron-dextran complexes were studied by Moessbauer and positron annihilation techniques. The results of Moessbauer spectroscopy showed variations of the iron cores in iron-dextran complexes containing different forms of FeOOH and different electronic and magnetic states of iron. The results of angular correlations of annihilation radiation and positron life-time spectroscopies showed microstructural variations of the dextran shell of the iron-dextran complexes. (author) 19 refs.; 4 tabs

  11. Scalable high-affinity stabilization of magnetic iron oxide nanostructures by a biocompatible antifouling homopolymer

    KAUST Repository

    Luongo, Giovanni; Campagnolo, Paola; Perez, Jose E.; Kosel, Jü rgen; Georgiou, Theoni K.; Regoutz, Anna; Payne, David J; Stevens, Molly M.; Ryan, Mary P.; Porter, Alexandra E; Dunlop, Iain E

    2017-01-01

    Iron oxide nanostructures have been widely developed for biomedical applications, due to their magnetic properties and biocompatibility. In clinical application, the stabilization of these nanostructures against aggregation and non-specific interactions is typically achieved using weakly anchored polysaccharides, with better-defined and more strongly anchored synthetic polymers not commercially adopted due to complexity of synthesis and use. Here, we show for the first time stabilization and biocompatibilization of iron oxide nanoparticles by a synthetic homopolymer with strong surface anchoring and a history of clinical use in other applications, poly(2-methacryloyloxyethy phosphorylcholine) (poly(MPC)). For the commercially important case of spherical particles, binding of poly(MPC) to iron oxide surfaces and highly effective individualization of magnetite nanoparticles (20 nm) are demonstrated. Next-generation high-aspect ratio nanowires (both magnetite/maghemite and core-shell iron/iron oxide) are furthermore stabilized by poly(MPC)-coating, with nanowire cytotoxicity at large concentrations significantly reduced. The synthesis approach is exploited to incorporate functionality into the poly(MPC) chain is demonstrated by random copolymerization with an alkyne-containing monomer for click-chemistry. Taking these results together, poly(MPC) homopolymers and random copolymers offer a significant improvement over current iron oxide nanoformulations, combining straightforward synthesis, strong surface-anchoring and well-defined molecular weight.

  12. Scalable high-affinity stabilization of magnetic iron oxide nanostructures by a biocompatible antifouling homopolymer

    KAUST Repository

    Luongo, Giovanni

    2017-10-12

    Iron oxide nanostructures have been widely developed for biomedical applications, due to their magnetic properties and biocompatibility. In clinical application, the stabilization of these nanostructures against aggregation and non-specific interactions is typically achieved using weakly anchored polysaccharides, with better-defined and more strongly anchored synthetic polymers not commercially adopted due to complexity of synthesis and use. Here, we show for the first time stabilization and biocompatibilization of iron oxide nanoparticles by a synthetic homopolymer with strong surface anchoring and a history of clinical use in other applications, poly(2-methacryloyloxyethy phosphorylcholine) (poly(MPC)). For the commercially important case of spherical particles, binding of poly(MPC) to iron oxide surfaces and highly effective individualization of magnetite nanoparticles (20 nm) are demonstrated. Next-generation high-aspect ratio nanowires (both magnetite/maghemite and core-shell iron/iron oxide) are furthermore stabilized by poly(MPC)-coating, with nanowire cytotoxicity at large concentrations significantly reduced. The synthesis approach is exploited to incorporate functionality into the poly(MPC) chain is demonstrated by random copolymerization with an alkyne-containing monomer for click-chemistry. Taking these results together, poly(MPC) homopolymers and random copolymers offer a significant improvement over current iron oxide nanoformulations, combining straightforward synthesis, strong surface-anchoring and well-defined molecular weight.

  13. Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism and magnetization interaction reversal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Maninder; Dai, Qilin; Bowden, Mark E.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Wu, Yaqiao; Tang, Jinke; Qiang, You

    2013-06-26

    Chromium (Cr) forms a solid solution with iron (Fe) lattice when doped in core-shell iron -iron oxide nanocluster (NC) and shows a mixed phase of sigma (σ) FeCr and bcc Fe. The Cr dopant affects heavily the magnetization and magnetic reversal process, and causes the hysteresis loop to shrink near the zero field axis. Dramatic transformation happens from dipolar interaction (0 at. % Cr) to strong exchange interaction (8 at. % of Cr) is confirmed from the Henkel plot and delta M plot, and is explained by a water-melon model of core-shell NC system.

  14. Influence green sand system by core sand additions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Špirutová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, about two thirds of iron alloys casting (especially for graphitizing alloys of iron are produced into green sand systems with usually organically bonded cores. Separation of core sands from the green sand mixture is very difficult, after pouring. The core sand concentration increase due to circulation of green sand mixture in a closed circulation system. Furthermore in some foundries, core sands have been adding to green sand systems as a replacement for new sands. The goal of this contribution is: “How the green sand systems are influenced by core sands?”This effect is considered by determination of selected technological properties and degree of green sand system re-bonding. From the studies, which have been published yet, there is not consistent opinion on influence of core sand dilution on green sand system properties. In order to simulation of the effect of core sands on the technological properties of green sands, there were applied the most common used technologies of cores production, which are based on bonding with phenolic resin. Core sand concentration added to green sand system, was up to 50 %. Influence of core sand dilution on basic properties of green sand systems was determined by evaluation of basic industrial properties: moisture, green compression strength and splitting strength, wet tensile strength, mixture stability against staling and physical-chemistry properties (pH, conductivity, and loss of ignition. Ratio of active betonite by Methylene blue test was also determined.

  15. Histological diagnosis of ultrasound-visible breast lesions by large core needle biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchis-Querol, E.; Valeros, O.; Collado, A.; Gimenez, J.; Yanguas, C.

    1999-01-01

    We present our experience in the histological diagnosis of breast lesions using ultrasound-guided large core needle biopsy (LCNB), assessing its utility as an alternative to excisional biopsy. We have studied retrospectively a series of 146 cases involving the performance of LCNB. The results were comparable with those of FNAB in 59 cases and with those of surgical aspiration biopsy in 105. Of the 113 lesions identified as malignant by percutaneous large core needle aspiration biopsy, 96 were resected. Surgical aspiration biopsy agreed with LCNB in 100% of cases. Of the 33 lesions identified as benign by LCNB, surgical biopsy detected malignancy in 5. The results obtained establish a specificity for LCNB of 100% and a sensitivity of 96%, both of which are superior to the values for FNAB. Thus, this technique can be considered valid for preoperative diagnosis. LCNB is useful in the preoperative diagnosis of breast lesions, making FNAB and surgical biopsy unnecessary. Moreover, it constitutes a significant change in the management of patients with malignant or undetermined breast lesions. (Author) 8 refs

  16. HYDROGEN IN THE EARTH’S OUTER CORE, AND ITS ROLE IN THE DEEP EARTH GEODYNAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Rumyantsev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The content of hydrogen in the outer core of the Earth is roughly quantified from the dependence of the density of iron (viewed as the main component of the core on the amount of hydrogen dissolved in the core, with account of the most likely presence of iron hydrogen in the outer core, and the matter’s density jumps at the boundaries between the outer liquid core and the internal solid core (that is devoid of hydrogen and the mantle. Estimations for the outer liquid core show that the hydrogen content varies from 0.67 wt. % at the boundary with the solid inner core to 3.04 wt. % at the boundary with the mantle.Iron occlusion is viewed as the most likely mechanism for the iron–nickel core to capture such a significant amount of hydrogen. Iron occlusion took place at the stage of the young sun when the metallic core emerged in the cooling protoplanetary cloud containing hydrogen in high amounts, and non-volatile hydrogen was accumulated. Absorption (occlusion of molecular hydrogen was preceded by dissociation of molecules into atoms and ionization of the atoms, as proved by results of studies focused on Fe–H2 system, and hydrogen dissipation was thus prevented. The core matter was subject to gravitational compression at high pressures that contributed to the forced rapprochement of protons and electrons which interaction resulted by the formation of hydrogen atoms. Highly active hydrogen atoms reacted with metals and produced hydrides of iron and nickel, FeH and NiH. While the metallic core and then the silicate mantle were growing and consolidating, the stability of FeH and NiH was maintained due to pressures that were steadily increasing. Later on, due to the impacts of external forces on the Earth, marginal layers at the mantle–core boundary were detached and displaced, pressures decreased in the system, and iron and nickel hydrides were decomposed to produce molecular hydrogen. Consequences of the hydrides transformation into

  17. A probabilistic SSYST-3 analysis for a PWR-core during a large break LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, J.D.; Gulden, W.; Jacobs, G.; Meyder, R.; Sengpiel, W.

    1985-05-01

    This report demonstrates the SSYST-3 analysis and application for a German PWR of 1300 MW. The report is concerned with the probabilistic analysis of a PWR core during a loss-of-coolant accident due to a large break. With the probabilistic analysis, the distribution functions of the maximum temperatures and cladding elongations occuring in the core can be calculated. Parameters like rod power, the thermohydraulic boundary conditions, stored energy in the fuel rods and the heat transfer coefficient were found to be the most important. The expected value of core damage was determined to be 2.9% on the base of response surfaces for cladding temperature and strain deduced from SSYST-3 single rod results. (orig./HP) [de

  18. The Thermal Conductivity of Earth's Core: A Key Geophysical Parameter's Constraints and Uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Q.

    2018-05-01

    The thermal conductivity of iron alloys at high pressures and temperatures is a critical parameter in governing ( a) the present-day heat flow out of Earth's core, ( b) the inferred age of Earth's inner core, and ( c) the thermal evolution of Earth's core and lowermost mantle. It is, however, one of the least well-constrained important geophysical parameters, with current estimates for end-member iron under core-mantle boundary conditions varying by about a factor of 6. Here, the current state of calculations, measurements, and inferences that constrain thermal conductivity at core conditions are reviewed. The applicability of the Wiedemann-Franz law, commonly used to convert electrical resistivity data to thermal conductivity data, is probed: Here, whether the constant of proportionality, the Lorenz number, is constant at extreme conditions is of vital importance. Electron-electron inelastic scattering and increases in Fermi-liquid-like behavior may cause uncertainties in thermal conductivities derived from both first-principles-associated calculations and electrical conductivity measurements. Additional uncertainties include the role of alloying constituents and local magnetic moments of iron in modulating the thermal conductivity. Thus, uncertainties in thermal conductivity remain pervasive, and hence a broad range of core heat flows and inner core ages appear to remain plausible.

  19. Equation of State of Fe3C and Implications for the Carbon Content of Earth's Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A.; Brauser, N.; Thompson, E. C.; Chidester, B.; Greenberg, E.; Prakapenka, V. B.; Campbell, A.

    2017-12-01

    Carbon is a common component in protoplanetary cores, as represented by iron meteorites. Therefore, along with silicon, oxygen, and other light elements, it is likely to be an alloying component with iron in Earth's core. Previous studies of the densities of iron carbides have not reached the combined pressure and temperature conditions relevant to Earth's core. To better understand the geophysical implications of carbon addition to Earth's core, we report P-V-T measurements of Fe3C to pressures and temperatures exceeding 110 GPa and 2500 K, using synchrotron X-ray diffraction in a laser heated diamond anvil cell. Fitting these measurements to an equation of state and assuming 1.5% density change upon melting and a 4000 K core-mantle boundary temperature, we report a value of 6 wt% carbon necessary to match the PREM density in the outer core. This value should be considered an upper bound due to the likely presence of other light elements.

  20. Iron Stain on Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Knaebe

    2013-01-01

    Iron stain, an unsightly blue–black or gray discoloration, can occur on nearly all woods. Oak, redwood, cypress, and cedar are particularly prone to iron stain because these woods contain large amounts of tannin-like extractives. The discoloration is caused by a chemical reaction between extractives in the wood and iron in steel products, such as nails, screws, and...

  1. Calculation of the neutron noise induced by periodic deformations of a large sodium-cooled fast reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zylbersztejn, F.; Tran, H.N.; Pazsit, I.; Filliatre, P.; Jammes, C.

    2014-01-01

    The subject of this paper is the calculation of the neutron noise induced by small-amplitude stationary radial variations of the core size (core expansion/compaction, also called core flowering) of a large sodium-cooled fast reactor. The calculations were performed on a realistic model of the European Sodium Fast Reactor (ESFR) core with a thermal output of 3600 MW(thermal), using a multigroup neutron noise simulator. The multigroup cross sections and their fluctuations that represent the core geometry changes for the neutron noise calculations were generated by the code ERANOS. The space and energy dependences of the noise source represented by the core expansion/compaction and the induced neutron noise are calculated and discussed. (authors)

  2. Iron homeostasis during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Allison L; Nemeth, Elizabeta

    2017-12-01

    During pregnancy, iron needs to increase substantially to support fetoplacental development and maternal adaptation to pregnancy. To meet these iron requirements, both dietary iron absorption and the mobilization of iron from stores increase, a mechanism that is in large part dependent on the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin. In healthy human pregnancies, maternal hepcidin concentrations are suppressed in the second and third trimesters, thereby facilitating an increased supply of iron into the circulation. The mechanism of maternal hepcidin suppression in pregnancy is unknown, but hepcidin regulation by the known stimuli (i.e., iron, erythropoietic activity, and inflammation) appears to be preserved during pregnancy. Inappropriately increased maternal hepcidin during pregnancy can compromise the iron availability for placental transfer and impair the efficacy of iron supplementation. The role of fetal hepcidin in the regulation of placental iron transfer still remains to be characterized. This review summarizes the current understanding and addresses the gaps in knowledge about gestational changes in hematologic and iron variables and regulatory aspects of maternal, fetal, and placental iron homeostasis. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  3. STAR-TO-STAR IRON ABUNDANCE VARIATIONS IN RED GIANT BRANCH STARS IN THE GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 3201

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmerer, Jennifer; Ivans, Inese I.; Filler, Dan; Francois, Patrick; Charbonnel, Corinne; Monier, Richard; James, Gaël

    2013-01-01

    We present the metallicity as traced by the abundance of iron in the retrograde globular cluster NGC 3201, measured from high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra of 24 red giant branch stars. A spectroscopic analysis reveals a spread in [Fe/H] in the cluster stars at least as large as 0.4 dex. Star-to-star metallicity variations are supported both through photometry and through a detailed examination of spectra. We find no correlation between iron abundance and distance from the cluster core, as might be inferred from recent photometric studies. NGC 3201 is the lowest mass halo cluster to date to contain stars with significantly different [Fe/H] values.

  4. Star-to-star Iron Abundance Variations in Red Giant Branch Stars in the Galactic Globular Cluster NGC 3201

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmerer, Jennifer; Ivans, Inese I.; Filler, Dan; Francois, Patrick; Charbonnel, Corinne; Monier, Richard; James, Gaël

    2013-02-01

    We present the metallicity as traced by the abundance of iron in the retrograde globular cluster NGC 3201, measured from high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra of 24 red giant branch stars. A spectroscopic analysis reveals a spread in [Fe/H] in the cluster stars at least as large as 0.4 dex. Star-to-star metallicity variations are supported both through photometry and through a detailed examination of spectra. We find no correlation between iron abundance and distance from the cluster core, as might be inferred from recent photometric studies. NGC 3201 is the lowest mass halo cluster to date to contain stars with significantly different [Fe/H] values.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of reconstructed ferritin as an iron-induced pathological model system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balejcikova, Lucia [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Institute of Measurement Science SAS, Dubravska cesta 9, 841 04 Bratislava 4 (Slovakia); Strbak, Oliver [Institute of Measurement Science SAS, Dubravska cesta 9, 841 04 Bratislava 4 (Slovakia); Biomedical Center Martin, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine in Martin, Comenius University in Bratislava, Mala Hora 4, 036 01 Martin (Slovakia); Baciak, Ladislav [Faculty of Chemical and Food Technology STU, Radlinskeho 9, 812 37 Bratislava (Slovakia); Kovac, Jozef [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Masarova, Marta; Krafcik, Andrej; Frollo, Ivan [Institute of Measurement Science SAS, Dubravska cesta 9, 841 04 Bratislava 4 (Slovakia); Dobrota, Dusan [Biomedical Center Martin, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine in Martin, Comenius University in Bratislava, Mala Hora 4, 036 01 Martin (Slovakia); Kopcansky, Peter [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia)

    2017-04-01

    Iron, an essential element of the human body, is a significant risk factor, particularly in the case of its concentration increasing above the specific limit. Therefore, iron is stored in the non-toxic form of the globular protein, ferritin, consisting of an apoferritin shell and iron core. Numerous studies confirmed the disruption of homeostasis and accumulation of iron in patients with various diseases (e.g. cancer, cardiovascular or neurological conditions), which is closely related to ferritin metabolism. Such iron imbalance enables the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a sensitive technique for the detection of iron-based aggregates through changes in the relaxation times, followed by the change in the inherent image contrast. For our in vitrostudy, modified ferritins with different iron loadings were prepared by chemical reconstruction of the iron core in an apoferritin shell as pathological model systems. The magnetic properties of samples were studied using SQUID magnetometry, while the size distribution was detected via dynamic light scattering. We have shown that MRI could represent the most advantageous method for distinguishing native ferritin from reconstructed ferritin which, after future standardisation, could then be suitable for the diagnostics of diseases associated with iron accumulation. - Highlights: • MRI is the sensitive technique for detecting iron-based aggregates. • Reconstructed Ferritin is suitable model system of iron-related disorders. • MRI allow distinguish of native ferritin from reconstructed ferritin. • MRI could be useful for diagnostics of diseases associated with iron accumulation.

  6. Deep-Earth Equilibration between Molten Iron and Solid Silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, M.; Zurkowski, C. C.; Chidester, B.; Campbell, A.

    2017-12-01

    Elemental partitioning between iron-rich metals and silicate minerals influences the properties of Earth's deep interior, and is ultimately responsible for the nature of the core-mantle boundary. These interactions between molten iron and solid silicates were influential during planetary accretion, and persist today between the mantle and liquid outer core. Here we report the results of diamond anvil cell experiments at lower mantle conditions (40 GPa, >2500 K) aimed at examining systems containing a mixture of metals (iron or Fe-16Si alloy) and silicates (peridotite). The experiments were conducted at pressure-temperature conditions above the metallic liquidus but below the silicate solidus, and the recovered samples were analyzed by FIB/SEM with EDS to record the compositions of the coexisting phases. Each sample formed a three-phase equilibrium between bridgmanite, Fe-rich metallic melt, and an oxide. In one experiment, using pure Fe, the quenched metal contained 6 weight percent O, and the coexisting oxide was ferropericlase. The second experiment, using Fe-Si alloy, was highly reducing; its metal contained 10 wt% Si, and the coexisting mineral was stishovite. The distinct mineralogies of the two experiments derived from their different starting metals. These results imply that metallic composition is an important factor in determining the products of mixed phase iron-silicate reactions. The properties of deep-Earth interfaces such as the core-mantle boundary could be strongly affected by their metallic components.

  7. Rapid sedimentation of iron oxyhydroxides in an active hydrothermal shallow semi-enclosed bay at Satsuma Iwo-Jima Island, Kagoshima, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyokawa, Shoichi; Ueshiba, Takuya

    2015-04-01

    Hydrothermal activity is common in the fishing port of Nagahama Bay, a small semi-enclosed bay located on the southwest coast of Satsuma Iwo-Jima Island (38 km south of Kyushu Island, Japan). The bay contains red-brown iron oxyhydroxides and thick deposits of sediment. In this work, the high concentration and sedimentation rates of oxyhydroxide in this bay were studied and the sedimentary history was reconstructed. Since dredging work in 1998, a thickness of 1.0-1.5 m of iron oxyhydroxide-rich sediments has accumulated on the floor of the bay. To estimate the volume of iron oxyhydroxide sediments and the amount discharged from hydrothermal vents, sediment traps were operated for several years and 13 sedimentary core samples were collected to reconstruct the 10-year sedimentary history of Nagahama Bay. To confirm the timing of sedimentary events, the core data were compared with meteorological records obtained on the island, and the ages of characteristic key beds were thus identified. The sedimentation rate of iron oxyhydroxide mud was calculated, after correcting for sediment input from other sources. The sediments in the 13 cores from Nagahama Bay consist mainly of iron oxyhydroxide mud, three thick tephra beds, and a topmost thick sandy mud bed. Heavy rainfall events in 2000, 2001, 2002, and 2004-2005 coincide with tephra beds, which were reworked from Iwo-Dake ash deposits to form tephra-rich sediment. Strong typhoon events with gigantic waves transported outer-ocean-floor sediments and supplied quartz, cristobalite, tridymite, and albite sands to Nagahama Bay. These materials were redeposited together with bay sediments as the sandy mud bed. Based on the results from the sediment traps and cores, it is estimated that the iron oxyhydroxide mud accumulated in the bay at the relatively rapid rate of 33.3 cm/year (from traps) and 2.8-4.9 cm/year (from cores). The pore water contents within the sediment trap and core sediments are 73%-82% and 47%-67%, respectively

  8. BDI behavior evaluation of an upgraded Monju core and a demonstration core. (1) Plans for the out of pile bundle compressive tests for large diameter pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Shoichi; Haga, Hiroyuki; Katsuyama, Kozo; Uwaba, Tomoyuki; Maeda, Koji; Nishinoiri, Kenji

    2012-07-01

    The life of FBR (Fast Breeder Reactor) fuel assembly is restricted by BDI (Bundle-Duct Interaction). Therefore, it is very important to carry out the out pile bundle compressive tests which can imitate BDI, in order to evaluate BDI behavior. The target of the conventional BDI behavior was small diameter pins (φ6.5mm) for fuel pellets which were used with the assembly of Monju (the Monju prototype fast breeder reactor) etc. Furthermore by an upgraded Monju core and a demonstration core, adoption of large diameter pins for the holler annular pellets is planned. Therefore, it was necessary to carry out BDI evaluation of a large diameter pin. Then, the plans for out of pile bundle compressive test for large diameter pins were are reported. (author)

  9. Anti frictional materials iron-pig iron-brass manufacture using shaving waste products of pig-iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasamov, S. N.; Krivij, N.; Gudenau, H. W.; Babich, A. I.; Garcia, L. L.; Formoso, A.; Cores, A.

    2003-01-01

    Parts based on iron and steel powders are widely used in the manufacture of automobile and domestic equipment. This work was done to study the anti-friction properties of iron-pig iron-brass compositions of materials which were obtained by pressing and sintering from a mix of iron powders and industrial by products of cast-iron turnings, brass, talc and technical sulphur. Experiments were performed using cold pressure technology in the flowing matrix of the powder composite without solid lubricants. The subsequent sintering was carried out at 1200 degree centigree under isothermal conditions in a nitrogen atmosphere in the sintering zone during 1 h. The physical-mechanical and anti-friction properties were almost double by the active drainage of the gases from the compression mould. The study of the microstructure of the sintered materials showed that free cementite existed between the particle limits and around the pores. large agglomerations of dark inclusions could be observed, consisting of graphite, zinc and iron oxides, which were points of tension in the materials that reduce its durability and, therefore, its wear resistance to dry friction. (Author) 34 refs

  10. Nitrate-dependent iron oxidation limits iron transport in anoxic ocean regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Florian; Löscher, Carolin R.; Fiskal, Annika; Sommer, Stefan; Hensen, Christian; Lomnitz, Ulrike; Wuttig, Kathrin; Göttlicher, Jörg; Kossel, Elke; Steininger, Ralph; Canfield, Donald E.

    2016-11-01

    Iron is an essential element for life on Earth and limits primary production in large parts of the ocean. Oxygen-free continental margin sediments represent an important source of bioavailable iron to the ocean, yet little of the iron released from the seabed reaches the productive sea surface. Even in the anoxic water of oxygen minimum zones, where iron solubility should be enhanced, most of the iron is rapidly re-precipitated. To constrain the mechanism(s) of iron removal in anoxic ocean regions we explored the sediment and water in the oxygen minimum zone off Peru. During our sampling campaign the water column featured two distinct redox boundaries separating oxic from nitrate-reducing (i.e., nitrogenous) water and nitrogenous from weakly sulfidic water. The sulfidic water mass in contact with the shelf sediment contained elevated iron concentrations >300 nM. At the boundary between sulfidic and nitrogenous conditions, iron concentrations dropped sharply to <20 nM coincident with a maximum in particulate iron concentration. Within the iron gradient, we found an increased expression of the key functional marker gene for nitrate reduction (narG). Part of this upregulation was related to the activity of known iron-oxidizing bacteria. Collectively, our data suggest that iron oxidation and removal is induced by nitrate-reducing microbes, either enzymatically through anaerobic iron oxidation or by providing nitrite for an abiotic reaction. Given the important role that iron plays in nitrogen fixation, photosynthesis and respiration, nitrate-dependent iron oxidation likely represents a key-link between the marine biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen, oxygen and carbon.

  11. Steam explosions of molten iron oxide drops: easier initiation at small pressurizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, L.S.; Duda, P.M.

    1982-01-01

    Steam explosions caused by hot molten materials contacting liquid water following a possible light water nuclear reactor core overheat have been investigated by releasing single drops of a core melt simulant, molten iron oxide, into liquid water. Small steam explosions were triggered shortly afterwards by applying a pressure pulse to the water. The threshold peak pulse level above which an explosion always occurs was studied at ambient pressures between 0.083 and 1.12 MPa. It was found that the threshold decreased to a minimum in the range 0.2 - 0.8 MPa and then increased again. The effect of easier initiation as ambient pressure increases may have an important role in the triggering and propagation of a large scale steam explosion through a coarsely premixed dispersion of melt in water. (U.K.)

  12. Evaluation of Iron Loss in Interior Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor with Consideration of Rotational Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lei; Sanada, Masayuki; Morimoto, Shigeo; Takeda, Yoji; Kaido, Chikara; Wakisaka, Takeaki

    Loss evaluation is an important issue in the design of electrical machines. Due to the complicate structure and flux distribution, it is difficult to predict the iron loss in the machines exactly. This paper studies the iron loss in interior permanent magnet synchronous motors based on the finite element method. The iron loss test data of core material are used in the fitting of the hysteresis and eddy current loss constants. For motors in practical operation, additional iron losses due to the appearance of rotation of flux density vector and harmonic flux density distribution makes the calculation data deviates from the measured ones. Revision is made to account for these excess iron losses which exist in the practical operating condition. Calculation results show good consistence with the experimental ones. The proposed method provides a possible way to predict the iron loss of the electrical machine with good precision, and may be helpful in the selection of the core material which is best suitable for a certain machine.

  13. Studying Irony Detection Beyond Ironic Criticism: Let's Include Ironic Praise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Bruntsch

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Studies of irony detection have commonly used ironic criticisms (i.e., mock positive evaluation of negative circumstances as stimulus materials. Another basic type of verbal irony, ironic praise (i.e., mock negative evaluation of positive circumstances is largely absent from studies on individuals' aptitude to detect verbal irony. However, it can be argued that ironic praise needs to be considered in order to investigate the detection of irony in the variety of its facets. To explore whether the detection ironic praise has a benefit beyond ironic criticism, three studies were conducted. In Study 1, an instrument (Test of Verbal Irony Detection Aptitude; TOVIDA was constructed and its factorial structure was tested using N = 311 subjects. The TOVIDA contains 26 scenario-based items and contains two scales for the detection of ironic criticism vs. ironic praise. To validate the measurement method, the two scales of the TOVIDA were experimentally evaluated with N = 154 subjects in Study 2. In Study 3, N = 183 subjects were tested to explore personality and ability correlates of the two TOVIDA scales. Results indicate that the co-variance between the ironic TOVIDA items was organized by two inter-correlated but distinct factors: one representing ironic praise detection aptitude and one representing ironic criticism detection aptitude. Experimental validation showed that the TOVIDA items truly contain irony and that item scores reflect irony detection. Trait bad mood and benevolent humor (as a facet of the sense of humor were found as joint correlates for both ironic criticism and ironic praise detection scores. In contrast, intelligence, trait cheerfulness, and corrective humor were found as unique correlates of ironic praise detection scores, even when statistically controlling for the aptitude to detect ironic criticism. Our results indicate that the aptitude to detect ironic praise can be seen as distinct from the aptitude to detect ironic

  14. An Equation Governing Ultralow-Velocity Zones: Implications for Holes in the ULVZ, Lateral Chemical Reactions at the Core-Mantle Boundary, and Damping of Heat Flux Variations in the Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernlund, J. W.; Matsui, H.

    2017-12-01

    Ultralow-velocity zones (ULVZ) are increasingly illuminated by seismology, revealing surprising diversity in size, shape, and physical characteristics. The only viable hypotheses are that ULVZs are a compositionally distinct FeO-enriched dense material, which could have formed by fractional crystallization of a basal magma ocean, segregation of subducted banded iron formations, precipitation of solids from the outer core, partial melting and segregation of iron-rich melts from subducted basalts, or most likely a combination of many different processes. But many questions remain: Are ULVZ partially molten in some places, and not in others? Are ULVZ simply the thicker portions of an otherwise global thin layer, covering the entire CMB and thus blocking or moderating chemical interactions between the core and overlying mantle? Is such a layer inter-connected and able to conduct electrical currents that allow electro-magnetic coupling of core and mantle angular momentum? Are they being eroded and shrinking in size due to viscous entrainment, or is more material being added to ULVZ over time? Here we derive an advection-diffusion-like equation that governs the dynamical evolution of a chemically distinct ULVZ. Analysis of this equation shows that ULVZ should become readily swept aside by viscous mantle flows at the CMB, exposing "ordinary mantle" to the top of the core, thus inducing chemical heterogeneity that drives lateral CMB chemical reactions. These reactions are correlated with heat flux, thus maintaining large-scale pressure variations atop the core that induce cyclone-like flows centered around ULVZ and ponded subducted slabs. We suggest that turbulent diffusion across adjacent cyclone streams inside a stratified region atop the core readily accommodates lateral transport and re-distribution of components such as O and Si, in addition to heat. Our model implies that the deeper core is at least partly shielded from the influence of strong heat flux variations at

  15. A novel thermal decomposition approach for the synthesis of silica-iron oxide core–shell nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishore, P.N.R.; Jeevanandam, P.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Silica-iron oxide core–shell nanoparticles have been synthesized by a novel thermal decomposition approach. ► The silica-iron oxide core–shell nanoparticles are superparamagnetic at room temperature. ► The silica-iron oxide core–shell nanoparticles serve as good photocatalyst for the degradation of Rhodamine B. - Abstract: A simple thermal decomposition approach for the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles consisting of silica as core and iron oxide nanoparticles as shell has been reported. The iron oxide nanoparticles were deposited on the silica spheres (mean diameter = 244 ± 13 nm) by the thermal decomposition of iron (III) acetylacetonate, in diphenyl ether, in the presence of SiO 2 . The core–shell nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, field emission-scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, transmission electron microscopy, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, and magnetic measurements. The results confirm the presence of iron oxide nanoparticles on the silica core. The core–shell nanoparticles are superparamagnetic at room temperature indicating the presence of iron oxide nanoparticles on silica. The core–shell nanoparticles have been demonstrated as good photocatalyst for the degradation of Rhodamine B.

  16. Systematic ab initio study of the electronic and magnetic properties of different pure and mixed iron systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izquierdo, J.; Vega, A.; Balbas, L. C.; Sanchez-Portal, Daniel; Junquera, Javier; Artacho, Emilio; Soler, Jose M.; Ordejon, Pablo

    2000-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electronic and magnetic properties of iron systems in different environments: pure iron systems [dimer, bcc bulk, (100) surface, and free-standing iron monolayer], and low-dimensional iron systems deposited on Ag (100) surface (monoatomic linear wires, iron monolayer, planar, and three-dimensional clusters). Electronic and magnetic properties have been calculated using a recently developed total-energy first-principles method based on density-functional theory with numerical atomic orbitals as a basis set for the description of valence electrons and nonlocal pseudopotentials for the atomic core. The Kohn-Sham equations are solved self-consistently within the generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation potential. Tests on the pseudopotential, the basis set, grid spacing, and k sampling are carefully performed. This technique, which has been proved to be very efficient for large nonmagnetic systems, is applied in this paper to calculate electronic and magnetic properties of different iron nanostructures. The results compare well with previous ab initio all-electron calculations and with experimental data. The method predicts the correct trends in the magnetic moments of Fe systems for a great variety of environments and requires a smaller computational effort than other ab initio methods. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  17. Systematic ab initio study of the electronic and magnetic properties of different pure and mixed iron systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izquierdo, J. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47011 Valladolid, (Spain); Vega, A. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47011 Valladolid, (Spain); Balbas, L. C. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47011 Valladolid, (Spain); Sanchez-Portal, Daniel [Department of Physics and Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Junquera, Javier [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, C-III, and Institut Nicolas Cabrera, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid, (Spain); Artacho, Emilio [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, C-III, and Institut Nicolas Cabrera, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid, (Spain); Soler, Jose M. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Ordejon, Pablo [Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona (CSIC), Campus de la U.A.B., Bellaterra, E-08193 Barcelona, (Spain)

    2000-05-15

    We present a theoretical study of the electronic and magnetic properties of iron systems in different environments: pure iron systems [dimer, bcc bulk, (100) surface, and free-standing iron monolayer], and low-dimensional iron systems deposited on Ag (100) surface (monoatomic linear wires, iron monolayer, planar, and three-dimensional clusters). Electronic and magnetic properties have been calculated using a recently developed total-energy first-principles method based on density-functional theory with numerical atomic orbitals as a basis set for the description of valence electrons and nonlocal pseudopotentials for the atomic core. The Kohn-Sham equations are solved self-consistently within the generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation potential. Tests on the pseudopotential, the basis set, grid spacing, and k sampling are carefully performed. This technique, which has been proved to be very efficient for large nonmagnetic systems, is applied in this paper to calculate electronic and magnetic properties of different iron nanostructures. The results compare well with previous ab initio all-electron calculations and with experimental data. The method predicts the correct trends in the magnetic moments of Fe systems for a great variety of environments and requires a smaller computational effort than other ab initio methods. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  18. Role of the NMDA receptor and iron on free radical production and brain damage following transient middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Doo Soon; Jeon, Jeong Wook; Lee, Jin Soo; Won, Seok Joon; Cho, Sung Ig; Lee, Yong Beom; Gwag, Byoung Joo

    2012-05-21

    Excess activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors and iron is believed to contribute to free radical production and neuronal death following hypoxic ischemia. We examined the possibility that both NMDA receptor activation and iron overload determine spatial and temporal patterns of free radical production after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Mitochondrial free radical (MFR) levels were maximally increased in neurons in the core at 1 h and 24 h after tMCAO. Early MFR production was blocked by administration of MK-801, an NMDA receptor antagonist, but not deferoxamine, an iron chelator. Neither MK-801 nor deferoxamine attenuated late MFR production in the core. Increased MFRs were observed in penumbral neurons within 6 h and gradually increased over 24 h after tMCAO. Slowly-evolving MFRs in the core and penumbra were accompanied by iron overload. Deferoxamine blocked iron overload but reduced MFR production only in the penumbra. Combined MK-801/deferoxamine reduced late MFR production in both core and penumbra in an additive manner. Combination therapy significantly ameliorated infarction compared with monotherapy. These findings suggest that the NMDA receptor activation and iron overload mediate late MFR production and infarction after tMCAO. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. THREE-DIMENSIONAL CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA SIMULATED USING A 15 M{sub ⊙} PROGENITOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lentz, Eric J.; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Harris, J. Austin; Yakunin, Konstantin N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Bruenn, Stephen W. [Department of Physics, Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431-0991 (United States); Hix, W. Raphael [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6354 (United States); Messer, O. E. Bronson [National Center for Computational Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6164 (United States); Endeve, Eirik [Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6164 (United States); Blondin, John M. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States); Marronetti, Pedro, E-mail: elentz@utk.edu [Physics Division, National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA 22207 (United States)

    2015-07-10

    We have performed ab initio neutrino radiation hydrodynamics simulations in three and two spatial dimensions (3D and 2D) of core-collapse supernovae from the same 15 M{sub ☉} progenitor through 440 ms after core bounce. Both 3D and 2D models achieve explosions; however, the onset of explosion (shock revival) is delayed by ∼100 ms in 3D relative to the 2D counterpart and the growth of the diagnostic explosion energy is slower. This is consistent with previously reported 3D simulations utilizing iron-core progenitors with dense mantles. In the ∼100 ms before the onset of explosion, diagnostics of neutrino heating and turbulent kinetic energy favor earlier explosion in 2D. During the delay, the angular scale of convective plumes reaching the shock surface grows and explosion in 3D is ultimately lead by a single, large-angle plume, giving the expanding shock a directional orientation not dissimilar from those imposed by axial symmetry in 2D simulations. We posit that shock revival and explosion in the 3D simulation may be delayed until sufficiently large plumes form, whereas such plumes form more rapidly in 2D, permitting earlier explosions.

  20. Core/shell magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles with radially oriented wide mesopores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Ž. Knežević

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Core/shell nanoparticles, containing magnetic iron-oxide (maghemite core and mesoporous shell with radial porous structure, were prepared by dispersing magnetite nanoparticles and adding tetraethylorthosilicate to a basic aqueous solution containing structure-templating cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and a pore-swelling mesithylene. The material is characterized by SEM and TEM imaging, nitrogen sorption and powder X-ray diffraction. Distinctive features of the prepared material are its high surface area (959 m2/g, wide average pore diameter (12.4 nm and large pore volume (2.3 cm3/g. The material exhibits radial pore structure and the high angle XRD pattern characteristic for maghemite nanoparticles, which are obtained upon calcination of the magnetite-containing material. The observed properties of the prepared material may render the material applicable in separation, drug delivery, sensing and heterogeneous catalysis.

  1. Large-scale fluid motion in the earth's outer core estimated from non-dipole magnetic field data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushima, Masaki; Honkura, Yoshimori

    1989-01-01

    Fluid motions in the Earth's outer core can be estimated from magnetic field data at the Earth's surface based on some assumptions. The basic standpoint here is that the non-dipole magnetic field is generated by the interaction between a strong toroidal magnetic field, created by differential rotation, and the convective motion in the outer core. Large-scale convective motions are studied to express them in terms of the poloidal velocity field expanded into a series of spherical harmonics. The radial distribution of differential rotation is estimated from the balance between the effective couple due to angular momentum transfer and the electromagnetic couple. Then the radial dependence of the toroidal magnetic field is derived from the interaction between the differential rotation thus estimated and the dipole magnetic field within the outer core. Magnetic field data are applied to a secular variation model which takes into account the fluctuations of the standing and drifting parts of the non-zonal magnetic field. The velocity field in the outer core is estimated for two cases. It is revealed that the pattern of convective motions is generally characterized by large-scale motions in the quasi-steady case. In the non-steady case, the magnitude of the velocity field is much larger, indicating a more dynamic feature. (N.K.)

  2. Iron Acquisition in Bacillus cereus: The Roles of IlsA and Bacillibactin in Exogenous Ferritin Iron Mobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buisson, Christophe; Daou, Nadine; Kallassy, Mireille; Lereclus, Didier; Arosio, Paolo; Bou-Abdallah, Fadi; Nielsen Le Roux, Christina

    2014-01-01

    In host-pathogen interactions, the struggle for iron may have major consequences on the outcome of the disease. To overcome the low solubility and bio-availability of iron, bacteria have evolved multiple systems to acquire iron from various sources such as heme, hemoglobin and ferritin. The molecular basis of iron acquisition from heme and hemoglobin have been extensively studied; however, very little is known about iron acquisition from host ferritin, a 24-mer nanocage protein able to store thousands of iron atoms within its cavity. In the human opportunistic pathogen Bacillus cereus, a surface protein named IlsA (Iron-regulated leucine rich surface protein type A) binds heme, hemoglobin and ferritin in vitro and is involved in virulence. Here, we demonstrate that IlsA acts as a ferritin receptor causing ferritin aggregation on the bacterial surface. Isothermal titration calorimetry data indicate that IlsA binds several types of ferritins through direct interaction with the shell subunits. UV-vis kinetic data show a significant enhancement of iron release from ferritin in the presence of IlsA indicating for the first time that a bacterial protein might alter the stability of the ferritin iron core. Disruption of the siderophore bacillibactin production drastically reduces the ability of B. cereus to utilize ferritin for growth and results in attenuated bacterial virulence in insects. We propose a new model of iron acquisition in B. cereus that involves the binding of IlsA to host ferritin followed by siderophore assisted iron uptake. Our results highlight a possible interplay between a surface protein and a siderophore and provide new insights into host adaptation of B. cereus and general bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:24550730

  3. Iron acquisition in Bacillus cereus: the roles of IlsA and bacillibactin in exogenous ferritin iron mobilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Segond

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In host-pathogen interactions, the struggle for iron may have major consequences on the outcome of the disease. To overcome the low solubility and bio-availability of iron, bacteria have evolved multiple systems to acquire iron from various sources such as heme, hemoglobin and ferritin. The molecular basis of iron acquisition from heme and hemoglobin have been extensively studied; however, very little is known about iron acquisition from host ferritin, a 24-mer nanocage protein able to store thousands of iron atoms within its cavity. In the human opportunistic pathogen Bacillus cereus, a surface protein named IlsA (Iron-regulated leucine rich surface protein type A binds heme, hemoglobin and ferritin in vitro and is involved in virulence. Here, we demonstrate that IlsA acts as a ferritin receptor causing ferritin aggregation on the bacterial surface. Isothermal titration calorimetry data indicate that IlsA binds several types of ferritins through direct interaction with the shell subunits. UV-vis kinetic data show a significant enhancement of iron release from ferritin in the presence of IlsA indicating for the first time that a bacterial protein might alter the stability of the ferritin iron core. Disruption of the siderophore bacillibactin production drastically reduces the ability of B. cereus to utilize ferritin for growth and results in attenuated bacterial virulence in insects. We propose a new model of iron acquisition in B. cereus that involves the binding of IlsA to host ferritin followed by siderophore assisted iron uptake. Our results highlight a possible interplay between a surface protein and a siderophore and provide new insights into host adaptation of B. cereus and general bacterial pathogenesis.

  4. Alkali Metal Variation and Twisting of the FeNNFe Core in Bridging Diiron Dinitrogen Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Sean F; Rodgers, Kenton R; Lukat-Rodgers, Gudrun; Mercado, Brandon Q; Grubel, Katarzyna; Holland, Patrick L

    2016-03-21

    Alkali metal cations can interact with Fe-N2 complexes, potentially enhancing back-bonding or influencing the geometry of the iron atom. These influences are relevant to large-scale N2 reduction by iron, such as in the FeMoco of nitrogenase and the alkali-promoted Haber-Bosch process. However, to our knowledge there have been no systematic studies of a large range of alkali metals regarding their influence on transition metal-dinitrogen complexes. In this work, we varied the alkali metal in [alkali cation]2[LFeNNFeL] complexes (L = bulky β-diketiminate ligand) through the size range from Na(+) to K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+). The FeNNFe cores have similar Fe-N and N-N distances and N-N stretching frequencies despite the drastic change in alkali metal cation size. The two diketiminates twist relative to one another, with larger dihedral angles accommodating the larger cations. In order to explain why the twisting has so little influence on the core, we performed density functional theory calculations on a simplified LFeNNFeL model, which show that the two metals surprisingly do not compete for back-bonding to the same π* orbital of N2, even when the ligand planes are parallel. This diiron system can tolerate distortion of the ligand planes through compensating orbital energy changes, and thus, a range of ligand orientations can give very similar energies.

  5. Double-diffusive translation of Earth's inner core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguen, R.; Alboussiére, T.; Labrosse, S.

    2018-03-01

    The hemispherical asymmetry of the inner core has been interpreted as resulting form a high-viscosity mode of inner core convection, consisting in a translation of the inner core. A thermally driven translation, as originally proposed, is unlikely if the currently favoured high values of the thermal conductivity of iron at core conditions are correct. We consider here the possibility that inner core translation results from an unstable compositional gradient, which would develop either because the light elements present in the core become increasingly incompatible as the inner core grows, or because of a possibly positive feedback of the development of the F-layer on inner core convection. Though the magnitude of the destabilising effect of the compositional field is predicted to be similar to or smaller than the stabilising effect of the thermal field, the huge difference between thermal and chemical diffusivities implies that double-diffusive instabilities can still arise even if the net buoyancy increases upward. Using linear stability analysis and numerical simulations, we demonstrate that a translation mode can indeed exist if the compositional field is destabilising, even if the temperature profile is subadiabatic, and irrespectively of the relative magnitudes of the composition and potential temperature gradients. The existence of this double diffusive mode of translation requires that the following conditions are met: (i) the compositional profile within the inner core is destabilising, and remains so for a duration longer than the destabilisation timescale (on the order of 200 My, but strongly dependent on the magnitude of the initial perturbation); and (ii) the inner core viscosity is sufficiently large, the required value being a strongly increasing function of the inner core size (e.g. 1017 Pa.s when the inner core was 200 km in radius, and ≃ 3 × 1021 Pa.s at the current inner core size). If these conditions are met, the predicted inner core

  6. Stability and anisotropy of (FexNi1-x)2O under high pressure and implications in Earth's and super-Earths' core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shengxuan; Wu, Xiang; Qin, Shan

    2018-01-10

    Oxygen is thought to be an important light element in Earth's core but the amount of oxygen in Earth's core remains elusive. In addition, iron-rich iron oxides are of great interest and significance in the field of geoscience and condensed matter physics. Here, static calculations based on density functional theory demonstrate that I4/mmm-Fe 2 O is dynamically and mechanically stable and becomes energetically favorable with respect to the assemblage of hcp-Fe and [Formula: see text]-FeO above 270 GPa, which indicates that I4/mmm-Fe 2 O can be a strong candidate phase for stable iron-rich iron oxides at high pressure, perhaps even at high temperature. The elasticity and anisotropy of I4/mmm-(Fe x Ni 1-x ) 2 O at high pressures are also determined. Based on these results, we have derived the upper limit of oxygen to be 4.3 wt% in Earth's lower outer core. On the other hand, I4/mmm-(Fe x Ni 1-x ) 2 O with high AV S is likely to exist in a super-Earth's or an ocean planet's solid core causing the locally seismic heterogeneity. Our results not only give some clues to explore and synthesize novel iron-rich iron oxides but also shed light on the fundamental information of oxygen in the planetary core.

  7. Tropical forest soil microbial communities couple iron and carbon biogeochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubinsky, E.A.; Silver, W.L.; Firestone, M.K.

    2009-10-15

    We report that iron-reducing bacteria are primary mediators of anaerobic carbon oxidation in upland tropical soils spanning a rainfall gradient (3500 - 5000 mm yr-1) in northeast Puerto Rico. The abundant rainfall and high net primary productivity of these tropical forests provide optimal soil habitat for iron-reducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria. Spatially and temporally dynamic redox conditions make iron-transforming microbial communities central to the belowground carbon cycle in these wet tropical forests. The exceedingly high abundance of iron-reducing bacteria (up to 1.2 x 10{sup 9} cells per gram soil) indicated that they possess extensive metabolic capacity to catalyze the reduction of iron minerals. In soils from the higher rainfall sites, measured rates of ferric iron reduction could account for up to 44 % of organic carbon oxidation. Iron reducers appeared to compete with methanogens when labile carbon availability was limited. We found large numbers of bacteria that oxidize reduced iron at sites with high rates of iron reduction and large numbers of iron-reducers. the coexistence of large populations of ironreducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria is evidence for rapid iron cycling between its reduced and oxidized states, and suggests that mutualistic interactions among these bacteria ultimately fuel organic carbon oxidation and inhibit CH4 production in these upland tropical forests.

  8. Neon-like Iron Ion Lines Measured in NIFS/Large Helical Device (LHD) and Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Tetsuya; Hara, Hirohisa; Murakami, Izumi; Kato, Daiji; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Morita, Shigeru; Suzuki, Chihiro; Tamura, Naoki; Yamamoto, Norimasa; Nakamura, Nobuyuki

    2017-06-01

    Line intensities emerging from the Ne-sequence iron ion (Fe XVII) are measured in the laboratory, by the Large Helical Device at the National Institute for Fusion Science, and in the solar corona by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board the Hinode mission. The intensity ratios of Fe XVII λ 204.6/λ 254.8 are derived in the laboratory by unblending the contributions of the Fe XIII and XII line intensities. They are consistent with theoretical predictions and solar observations, the latter of which endorses the in-flight radiometric calibrations of the EIS instrument. The still remaining temperature-dependent behavior of the line ratio suggests the contamination of lower-temperature iron lines that are blended with the λ 204.6 line.

  9. Neon-like Iron Ion Lines Measured in NIFS/Large Helical Device (LHD) and Hinode /EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Tetsuya; Hara, Hirohisa [National Astronomical Observatory, National Institutes of Natural Sciences 2-21-1 Osawa Mitaka Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan); Murakami, Izumi; Kato, Daiji; Morita, Shigeru [SOKENDAI (Graduate University for Advanced Studies) Hayama, Miura-gun, Kanagawa, 240-0193 (Japan); Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Suzuki, Chihiro; Tamura, Naoki [National Institute for Fusion Science, National Institutes of Natural Sciences 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki Gifu, 509-5292 (Japan); Yamamoto, Norimasa [Chubu University 1200 Matsumoto-cho, Kasugai Aichi, 487-0027 (Japan); Nakamura, Nobuyuki, E-mail: watanabe@uvlab.mtk.nao.ac.jp [The University of Electro-Communications 1-5-1 Chofugaoka, Chofu Tokyo, 182-8585 (Japan)

    2017-06-10

    Line intensities emerging from the Ne-sequence iron ion (Fe xvii) are measured in the laboratory, by the Large Helical Device at the National Institute for Fusion Science, and in the solar corona by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board the Hinode mission. The intensity ratios of Fe xvii λ 204.6/ λ 254.8 are derived in the laboratory by unblending the contributions of the Fe xiii and xii line intensities. They are consistent with theoretical predictions and solar observations, the latter of which endorses the in-flight radiometric calibrations of the EIS instrument. The still remaining temperature-dependent behavior of the line ratio suggests the contamination of lower-temperature iron lines that are blended with the λ 204.6 line.

  10. Atomic absorption assessment of mineral iron quantity in ferritin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinova, M.; Vladimirova, L.

    2009-01-01

    Possibilities for quantitative determination of the number of iron atoms in the mineral core of ferritin by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) are investigated in the work. Different measurements with AAS show an iron content from 1000 up to 4500 atoms per molecule ferritin. This motivated us to investigate the amount of iron in the Horse Spleen Ferritin with atomic absorption spectroscopy under application of the Bulgarian standard BDS EN 14082/2003 Foodstuffs - Determination of trace elements - Determination of lead, cadmium, zinc, copper, iron and chromium by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) after dry ashing. The obtained results give approx. 1800 atoms per molecule Ferritin. It is in accordance with previous results, published by leading researchers. The investigation of the iron content with AAS under the use of the Bulgarian standard is a good opportunity to study many other objects of biological interest. (authors)

  11. THE DETECTION OF A HOT MOLECULAR CORE IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD WITH ALMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimonishi, Takashi; Onaka, Takashi; Kawamura, Akiko; Aikawa, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    We report the first detection of a hot molecular core outside our Galaxy based on radio observations with ALMA toward a high-mass young stellar object (YSO) in a nearby low metallicity galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Molecular emission lines of CO, C 17 O, HCO + , H 13 CO + , H 2 CO, NO, SiO, H 2 CS, 33 SO, 32 SO 2 , 34 SO 2 , and 33 SO 2 are detected from a compact region (∼0.1 pc) associated with a high-mass YSO, ST11. The temperature of molecular gas is estimated to be higher than 100 K based on rotation diagram analysis of SO 2 and 34 SO 2 lines. The compact source size, warm gas temperature, high density, and rich molecular lines around a high-mass protostar suggest that ST11 is associated with a hot molecular core. We find that the molecular abundances of the LMC hot core are significantly different from those of Galactic hot cores. The abundances of CH 3 OH, H 2 CO, and HNCO are remarkably lower compared to Galactic hot cores by at least 1–3 orders of magnitude. We suggest that these abundances are characterized by the deficiency of molecules whose formation requires the hydrogenation of CO on grain surfaces. In contrast, NO shows a high abundance in ST11 despite the notably low abundance of nitrogen in the LMC. A multitude of SO 2 and its isotopologue line detections in ST11 imply that SO 2 can be a key molecular tracer of hot core chemistry in metal-poor environments. Furthermore, we find molecular outflows around the hot core, which is the second detection of an extragalactic protostellar outflow. In this paper, we discuss the physical and chemical characteristics of a hot molecular core in the low metallicity environment.

  12. What Would It Take for an Atmospheric Neutrino Detector to Constrain the Hydrogen Content of the Earth's Core ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourret, S.; Coelho, J. A. B.; Kaminski, E. C.; Van Elewyck, V.

    2017-12-01

    The difference between PREM density and seismic profiles in the Earth's core and the values for pure iron and iron-nickel alloys inferred from high pressure/high temperature experiments and ab initio calculations requires the presence of a few wt% of light elements. The nature and amount of these light elements (O, Si, S, H, C...) remains controversial. Recent studies have renewed the interest in H. It is the most abundant element in the nebula and can be easily dissolved in iron in the early stages of Earth's evolution. 1 to 2 wt% of H could explain the difference between PREM and pure iron. However, current geophysical methods alone cannot settle the debate between H and the other candidate elements. Neutrino oscillation tomography using atmospheric neutrinos opens an avenue to collect independent data on Earth's core composition. This method exploits the quantum phenomenon of neutrino flavour oscillations, which depends on the electron density along the path of the neutrino through the Earth. The combination of a neutrino-based measurement of the electron density with the PREM mass density profile constrains the average proton-to-nucleon ratio of the medium (Z/A). Since this parameter varies among chemical elements, e.g. 0.466 for Fe and 1 for H, this technique has the potential to provide unprecedented insights into the chemical composition of the core, and in particular its hydrogen content. Performing such a measurement requires large-size detectors with good efficiency in the relevant energy range and precise determination of the neutrino energy, arrival direction, and flavour. Considering a generic but realistic model of detector response, we quantify the influence of various detector performance indicators on the sensitivity to the average Z/A in the core. We further evaluate the impact of systematic uncertainties, such as those related to the physical model for neutrino oscillations and the incoming flux of atmospheric neutrinos. We consider specific

  13. Translation and convection of Earth's inner core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnereau, M.; Calvet, M.; Margerin, L.; Mizzon, H.; Souriau, A.

    2012-12-01

    The image of the inner core growing slowly at the center of the Earth by gradual cooling and solidification of the surrounding liquid outer core is being replaced by the more vigorous image of a ``deep foundry'', where melting and crystallization rates exceed by many times the net growth rate. Recently, a particular mode of convection, called translation, has been put forward as an important mode of inner core dynamics because this mechanism is able to explain the observed East-West asymmetry of P-wave velocity and attenuation (Monnereau et al. 2010). Translation is a pure solid displacement of the inner core material (solid iron) within its envelop, implying crystallization of entering iron on one side of the inner core and melting on the opposite side. Translation is consistent with multiple scattering models of wave propagation. If they do not experience deformation, iron crystals grow as they transit from one hemisphere to the other. Larger crystals constituting a faster and more attenuating medium, a translation velocity of some cm/yr (about ten times the growth rate) is enough to account for the superficial asymmetry observed for P-wave velocity and attenuation, with grains of a few hundred meters on the crystallizing side (West) growing up to a few kilometers before melting on the East side, and a drift direction located in the equatorial plane. Among all hypotheses that have been proposed to account for the seismic asymmetry, translation is the only one based on a demonstrated link between the seismic data and the proposed dynamics, notably through a model of seismic wave propagation. This mechanism was also proposed to be responsible for the formation of a dense layer at the bottom of the outer core, since the high rate of melting and crystallization would release a liquid depleted in light elements at the surface of the inner core (Alboussiere et al 2010). This would explain the anomalously low gradient of P wave velocity in the lowermost 200 km of the

  14. Microwave interrogated large core fused silica fiber Michelson interferometer for strain sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Liwei; Song, Yang; Huang, Jie; Lan, Xinwei; Li, Yanjun; Xiao, Hai

    2015-08-20

    A Michelson-type large core optical fiber sensor has been developed, which is designed based on the optical carrier-based microwave interferometry technique, and fabricated by using two pieces of 200-μm diameter fused silica core fiber as two arms of the Michelson interferometer. The interference fringe pattern caused by the optical path difference of the two arms is interrogated in the microwave domain, where the fringe visibility of 40 dB has easily been obtained. The strain sensing at both room temperature and high temperatures has been demonstrated by using such a sensor. Experimental results show that this sensor has a linear response to the applied strain, and also has relatively low temperature-strain cross talk. The dopant-free quality of the fused silica fiber provides high possibility for the sensor to have promising strain sensing performance in a high temperature environment.

  15. Ultrasonic testing of pre-turned contours for large components made of ductile iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitte, Till; Chichkov, Nikolai; Nemitz, Oliver; Orth, Thomas; Hocks, Heinrich Jr.; Rusche, Sascha; Opalla, Dirk; Frank, Joerg

    2015-01-01

    In the ultrasonic testing of large, thick-walled components made of ductile iron partial acoustic paths of several meters are needed. Considered here are cylindrical components such as the body of CASTOR containers with diameters 2-3 m, a height of up to 6 m and a wall thickness of 500 mm. So far, an automated technique for this is not available, therefore such components are checked in a complex and lengthy process by manual ultrasonic testing. The development and design of the testing by means of simulations and the realization as a mobile testing device are topics of this paper. Measurements on a reference body with test reflectors in different depths are presented and discussed. [de

  16. Iron fertilization enhanced net community production but not downward particle flux during the Southern Ocean iron fertilization experiment LOHAFEX

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Martin, P.; Loeff, M.M.R. van der.; Cassar, N.; Vandromme, P.; d'Ovidio, F.; Stemmann, L.; Rengarajan, R.; Soares, M.A.; Gonzalez, H.E.; Ebersbach, F.; Lampitt, R.S.; Sanders, R.; Barnett, B.A.; Smetacek, V.; Naqvi, S.W.A.

    A closed eddy core in the Subantarctic Atlantic Ocean was fertilized twice with two tons of iron (as FeSO4), and the 300 km2 fertilized patch was studied for 39 days to test whether fertilization enhances downward particle flux...

  17. Comparison of high temperature, high frequency core loss and dynamic B-H loops of two 50 Ni-Fe crystalline alloys and an iron-based amorphous alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieserman, W.R.; Schwarze, G.E.; Niedra, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    The availability of experimental data that characterizes the performance of soft magnetic materials for the combined conditions of high temperature and high frequency is almost non-existent. An experimental investigation was conducted over the temperature range of 23 to 300 C and frequency range of 1 to 50 kHz to determine the effects of temperature and frequency on the core loss and dynamic B-H loops of three different soft magnetic materials; an oriented-grain 50Ni-50Fe alloy, a nonoriented-grain 50Ni-50Fe alloy, and an iron-based amorphous material (Metglas 2605SC). A comparison of these materials show that the nonoriented-grain 50Ni-50Fe alloy tends to have either the lowest or next lowest core loss for all temperatures and frequencies investigated

  18. A code for the correction of field imperfections in iron-core superconducting magnets by shimming of iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradhan, J.; Bhunia, U.; Dey, M.K.; Mallik, C.; Bhandari, R.K.

    2005-01-01

    The magnetic field measurement of the median plane of K500 superconducting cyclotron at VECC have been carried out. A code has been developed using the mathematical software to calculate the magnetic field distribution for an arbitrary shaped saturated iron piece, and the various harmonics therein

  19. Magnetic resonance microscopy of iron transport in methanogenic granules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartacek, Jan; Vergeldt, Frank J.; Gerkema, Edo; Jenicek, Pavel; Lens, Piet N. L.; Van As, Henk

    2009-10-01

    Interactions between anaerobic biofilms and heavy metals such as iron, cobalt or nickel are largely unknown. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive method that allows in situ studies of metal transport within biofilm matrixes. The present study investigates quantitatively the penetration of iron (1.75 mM) bound to ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) into the methanogenic granules (spherical biofilm). A spatial resolution of 109 × 109 × 218 μm 3 and a temporal resolution of 11 min are achieved with 3D Turbo Spin Echo (TSE) measurements. The longitudinal relaxivity, i.e. the slope the dependence of the relaxation rate (1/ T1) on the concentration of paramagnetic metal ions, was used to measure temporal changes in iron concentration in the methanogenic granules. It took up to 300 min for the iron-EDTA complex ([FeEDTA] 2-) to penetrate into the methanogenic granules (3-4 mm in diameter). The diffusion was equally fast in all directions with irregularities such as diffusion-facilitating channels and diffusion-resistant zones. Despite these irregularities, the overall process could be modeled using Fick's equations for diffusion in a sphere, because immobilization of [FeEDTA] 2- in the granular matrix (or the presence of a reactive barrier) was not observed. The effective diffusion coefficient ( D ejf) of [FeEDTA] 2- was found to be 2.8 × 10 -11 m 2 s -1, i.e. approximately 4% of D ejf of [FeEDTA] 2- in water. The Fickian model did not correspond to the processes taking place in the core of the granule (3-5% of the total volume of the granule), where up to 25% over-saturation by iron (compare to the concentration in the bulk solution) occurred.

  20. Integrity of 111In-radiolabeled superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Haotian; Kumar, Rajiv; Nagesha, Dattatri; Duclos, Richard I.; Sridhar, Srinivas; Gatley, Samuel J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Iron-oxide nanoparticles can act as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), while radiolabeling the same platform with nuclear medicine isotopes allows imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) or single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), modalities that offer better quantification. For successful translation of these multifunctional imaging platforms to clinical use, it is imperative to evaluate the degree to which the association between radioactive label and iron oxide core remains intact in vivo. Methods: We prepared iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized by oleic acid and phospholipids which were further radiolabeled with 59 Fe, 14 C-oleic acid, and 111 In. Results: Mouse biodistributions showed 111 In preferentially localized in reticuloendothelial organs, liver, spleen and bone. However, there were greater levels of 59 Fe than 111 In in liver and spleen, but lower levels of 14 C. Conclusions: While there is some degree of dissociation between the 111 In labeled component of the nanoparticle and the iron oxide core, there is extensive dissociation of the oleic acid component

  1. Ultrafine ferromagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: Facile synthesis by low temperature decomposition of iron glycerolate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartůněk, Vilém, E-mail: vilem.bartunek@vscht.cz [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Průcha, David [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Švecová, Marie [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Engineering, University of Chemistry and Technology, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Ulbrich, Pavel [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Faculty of Food and Biochemical Technology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Technická 3, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Huber, Štěpán; Sedmidubský, David; Jankovský, Ondřej [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2016-09-01

    We synthesized dark colored ultrafine – sub 10 nm iron oxide nanoparticles by a facile and low temperature process based on thermal decomposition of an affordable precursor – iron glycerolate. Simultaneous thermal analysis (STA) was used to study the thermal behaviour during the decomposition. The iron glycerolate was thoroughly analysed by various methods. The size of the iron nanoparticles was determined from XRD patterns and by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and their composition has been confirmed by XPS. Magnetic properties of the nanoparticles were studied by vibrating sample magnetometry. The prepared single phase material exhibiting ferromagnetic properties is usable in a wide range of applications and may be suitable even for large scale industrial applications. - Highlights: • Iron glycerolate prepared and characterised. • Iron oxide nanoparticles prepared by thermal decomposition of iron glycerolate. • STA used to study the decomposition. • Products characterised by XRD, XPS, FT-IR, SEM and TEM. • Magnetic behaviour of monophasic samples determined.

  2. Burst shield for a pressurized nuclear-reactor core and method of operating same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beine, B.; Schilling, F.

    1976-01-01

    A pressurized nuclear-reactor core stands on a base up from which extends a cylindrical side wall formed of a plurality of hollow iron castings held together by circumferential and longitudinal prestressed elements. A cylindrical space between this shield and the core serves for inspection of the core and is normally filled with cast-iron segmental slabs so that if the core bursts pieces thrown out do not acquire any dangerous kinetic energy before engaging the burst shield. The top of the shield is removably secured to the side so that it can be moved out of the way periodically for removal of the filler slabs and inspection of the core. An anchor on the upper end of each longitudinal prestressing element bears against a sleeve pressing against the uppermost side element, and a nut engageable with this anchor is engageable down over the top to hold it in place, removal of this nut leaving the element prestressed in the side wall. 11 claims, 16 drawing figures

  3. Structure and mechanical properties of ductile iron GJS-500-7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuryloa, P.; Tertela, E.

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the results of research on mechanical properties (hardness distribution along the cross section towards the cast’s core) and on the structures of ductile iron GJS-500-7. The study defines the range and form of the surface layer of cast iron. It has been shown that the surface layer of the working surface of the cast may be shaped within its transition zone. [es

  4. One-pot synthesis of water soluble iron nanoparticles using rationally-designed peptides and ligand release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papst, Stefanie; Cheong, Soshan; Banholzer, Moritz J; Brimble, Margaret A; Williams, David E; Tilley, Richard D

    2013-05-18

    Herein we report the rational design of new phosphopeptides for control of nucleation, growth and aggregation of water-soluble, superparamagnetic iron-iron oxide core-shell nanoparticles. The use of the designed peptides enables a one-pot synthesis that avoids utilizing unstable or toxic iron precursors, organic solvents, and the need for exchange of capping agent after synthesis of the NPs.

  5. Kinetic, spectroscopic and chemical modification study of iron release from transferrin; iron(III) complexation to adenosine triphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, C.P.

    1985-01-01

    Amino acids other than those that serve as ligands have been found to influence the chemical properties of transferrin iron. The catalytic ability of pyrophosphate to mediate transferrin iron release to a terminal acceptor is largely quenched by modification non-liganded histine groups on the protein. The first order rate constants of iron release for several partially histidine modified protein samples were measured. A statistical method was employed to establish that one non-liganded histidine per metal binding domain was responsible for the reduction in rate constant. These results imply that the iron mediated chelator, pyrophosphate, binds directly to a histidine residue on the protein during the iron release process. EPR spectroscopic results are consistent with this interpretation. Kinetic and amino acid sequence studies of ovotransferrin and lactoferrin, in addition to human serum transferrin, have allowed the tentative assignment of His-207 in the N-terminal domain and His-535 in the C-terminal domain as the groups responsible for the reduction in rate of iron release. The above concepts have been extended to lysine modified transferrin. Complexation of iron(II) to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was also studied to gain insight into the nature of iron-ATP species present at physiological pH. 31 P NMR spectra are observed when ATP is presented in large excess

  6. Large-core single-mode rib SU8 waveguide using solvent-assisted microcontact molding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng-Sheng; Wang, Wei-Chih

    2008-09-01

    This paper describes a novel fabrication technique for constructing a polymer-based large-core single-mode rib waveguide. A negative tone SU8 photoresist with a high optical transmission over a large wavelength range and stable mechanical properties was used as a waveguide material. A waveguide was constructed by using a polydimethylsiloxane stamp combined with a solvent-assisted microcontact molding technique. The effects on the final pattern's geometry of four different process conditions were investigated. Optical simulations were performed using beam propagation method software. Single-mode beam propagation was observed at the output of the simulated waveguide as well as the actual waveguide through the microscope image.

  7. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron - Chapter 2: Grey Iron (Ⅱ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Cast iron, as a traditional metal material, has advantages of low total cost, good castability and machinability, good wear resistance and low notch sensitivity, and is still facing tough challenge in quality, property and variety of types etc. Experts and engineers studying and producing iron castings all around world extremely concern this serious challenge. Over more than 30 years, a great of research work has been carried out on how to further improve its property, expand its application and combine cast iron technology with some hi-techs (for example, computer technology. Nevertheless, cast iron is a multi-element and multi-phase alloy and has complex and variety of structures and still has great development potential in structure and property. For further studying and developing cast iron, theoretical research work is important promise, and the study on solidification process and control mechanism of graphite morphology is fundamental for improving property of cast iron and developing new type of cast iron. Metallography of cast iron normally includes two sections: liquid phase transformation and solid phase transformation. The book, Colour Metallography of Cast Iron, uses colour metallography technique to study solidification structures of cast irons: graphite, carbides, austenite and eutectics; and focuses on solidification processes. With progress of modern solidification theory, the control of material solidification process becomes important measure for improving traditional materials and developing new materials. Solidification structure not only influences mechanical and physical properties of cast iron, but also affects its internal quality. The book uses a large amount of colour photos to describe the formation of solidification structures and their relations. Crystallization phenomena, which cannot be displayed with traditional metallography, are presented and more phase transformation information is obtained from these colour

  8. Facile synthesis and excellent microwave absorption properties of FeCo-C core-shell nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Bingbing; Wang, Shiliang; Kuang, Daitao; Hou, Lizhen; Yu, Bowen; Lin, Liangwu; Deng, Lianwen; Huang, Han; He, Jun

    2018-02-01

    FeCo-C core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) with diameters of 10-50 nm have been fabricated on a large scale by one-step metal-organic chemical vapor deposition using the mixture of cobalt acetylacetonate and iron acetylacetonate as the precursor. The Fe/Co molar ratio of the alloy nanocores and graphitization degree of C shells, and thus the magnetic and electric properties of the core-shell NPs, can be tuned by the deposition temperature ranging from 700 °C to 900 °C. Comparative tests reveal that a relatively high Fe/Co molar ratio and low graphitization degree benefit the microwave absorption (MA) performance of the core-shell NPs. The composite with 20 wt% core-shell NP obtained at 800 °C and 80 wt% paraffin exhibits an optimal reflection loss ({{R}}{{L}}) of -60.4 dB at 7.5 GHz with a thickness of 3.3 mm, and an effective absorption bandwidth (frequency range for RL ≤10 dB) of 9.2 GHz (8.8-18.0 GHz) under an absorber thickness of 2.5 mm. Our study provides a facile route for the fabrication of alloy-C core-shell nanostructures with high MA performance.

  9. Moessbauer and EXAFS studies of amorphous iron produced by thermal decomposition of carbonyl iron in liquid phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Kiyoshi; Tanaka, Junichi; Ujihira, Yusuke; Takahashi, Tamotu; Uchida, Yasuzo

    1990-01-01

    Decomposition of iron carbonyl Fe(CO) 5 and Fe 2 (CO) 9 in liquid phase gave amorphous and crystalline iron powders in the absence and presence of catalyst, respectively. The hyperfine fields were large in amorphous phases prepared from Fe(CO) 5 than from Fe 2 (CO) 9 . Crystalline iron, iron carbide and a trace amount of Fe 3 O 4 were detected in the decomposition products of the amorphous phase prepared from Fe(CO) 5 , and iron carbide was mainly included in the decomposition products of the amorphous phase prepared from Fe 2 (CO) 9 . (orig.)

  10. Human nitric oxide biomarker as potential NO donor in conjunction with superparamagnetic iron oxide @ gold core shell nanoparticles for cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nimisha; Patel, Khushbu; Sahoo, Suban K; Kumar, Rajender

    2018-03-01

    Nitric oxide releasing superparamagnetic (Fe 3 O 4 -Au@NTHP) nanoparticles were synthesized by conjugation of human biomarker of nitric oxide, N-nitrosothioproline with iron oxide-gold (Fe 3 O 4 -Au) core shell nanoparticles. The structure and morphology of the prepared nanoparticles were confirmed by ATR-FTIR, HR-TEM, EDAX, XPS, DLS and VSM measurements. N-nitrosothioproline is a natural molecule and nontoxic to humans. Thus, the core shell nanoparticles prepared were highly biocompatible. The prepared Fe 3 O 4 -Au@NTHP nanoparticles also provided an excellent release of nitric oxide in dark and upon light irradiation for cancer treatment. The amount of NO release was controllable with the wavelength of light and time of irradiation. The developed nanoparticles provided efficient cellular uptake and good cytotoxicity in picomolar range when tested on HeLa cancerous cells. These nanoparticles on account of their controllable NO release can also be used to release small amount of NO for killing cancerous cells without any toxic effect. Furthermore, the magnetic and photochemical properties of these nanoparticles provides dual platform for magneto therapy and phototherapy for cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Reactor core structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashinakagawa, Emiko; Sato, Kanemitsu.

    1992-01-01

    Taking notice on the fact that Fe based alloys and Ni based alloys are corrosion resistant in a special atmosphere of a nuclear reactor, Fe or Ni based alloys are applied to reactor core structural components such as fuel cladding tubes, fuel channels, spacers, etc. On the other hand, the neutron absorption cross section of zirconium is 0.18 barn while that of iron is 2.52 barn and that of nickel is 4.6 barn, which amounts to 14 to 25 times compared with that of zirconium. Accordingly, if the reactor core structural components are constituted by the Fe or Ni based alloys, neutron economy is lowered. Since it is desirable that neutrons contribute to uranium fission with least absorption to the reactor core structural components, the reactor core structural components are constituted with the Fe or Ni based alloys of good corrosion resistance only at a portion in contact with reactor water, that is, at a surface portion, while the main body is constituted with zircalloy in the present invention. Accordingly, corrosion resistnace can be kept while keeping small neutron absorption cross section. (T.M.)

  12. A uranium core for the Earth; Un coeur d'uranium pour la terre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouat, S

    2003-06-01

    According to the theory of M. Herndon, a US independent geophysicist, the center of the Earth's core should be made of a uranium sphere of about 8 km of diameter. This natural reactor, or 'geo-reactor', should be at the origin of the internal heat and of the magnetic field of the Earth. M. Herndon has extended his theory to the other planets of the solar system. This theory contradicts the one adopted since the 1940's by the community of geophysicists and which involves a crystallized iron and nickel internal core inside a liquid iron external core. Herndon's theory can explain also the geomagnetic field reversals. (J.S.)

  13. CD/MCD/VTVH-MCD Studies of Escherichia coli Bacterioferritin Support a Binuclear Iron Cofactor Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Yeonju; Schwartz, Jennifer K; Huang, Victor W; Boice, Emily; Kurtz, Donald M; Solomon, Edward I

    2015-12-01

    Ferritins and bacterioferritins (Bfrs) utilize a binuclear non-heme iron binding site to catalyze oxidation of Fe(II), leading to formation of an iron mineral core within a protein shell. Unlike ferritins, in which the diiron site binds Fe(II) as a substrate, which then autoxidizes and migrates to the mineral core, the diiron site in Bfr has a 2-His/4-carboxylate ligand set that is commonly found in diiron cofactor enzymes. Bfrs could, therefore, utilize the diiron site as a cofactor rather than for substrate iron binding. In this study, we applied circular dichroism (CD), magnetic CD (MCD), and variable-temperature, variable-field MCD (VTVH-MCD) spectroscopies to define the geometric and electronic structures of the biferrous active site in Escherichia coli Bfr. For these studies, we used an engineered M52L variant, which is known to eliminate binding of a heme cofactor but to have very minor effects on either iron oxidation or mineral core formation. We also examined an H46A/D50A/M52L Bfr variant, which additionally disrupts a previously observed mononuclear non-heme iron binding site inside the protein shell. The spectral analyses define a binuclear and an additional mononuclear ferrous site. The biferrous site shows two different five-coordinate centers. After O2 oxidation and re-reduction, only the mononuclear ferrous signal is eliminated. The retention of the biferrous but not the mononuclear ferrous site upon O2 cycling supports a mechanism in which the binuclear site acts as a cofactor for the O2 reaction, while the mononuclear site binds the substrate Fe(II) that, after its oxidation to Fe(III), migrates to the mineral core.

  14. Immobilization of Three-Mile Island core debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, J.M.; Miller, R.L.; Flinn, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    The immobilization of Three-Mile Island core debris in iron-enriched basalt (IEB), a fused-cast nuclear waste form, was considered. The amount of zirconium clad UO 2 fuel assemblies that can be dissolved in IEB using the Zr to UO 2 ratio present in the core was bracketed between 25 and 30% at 1500 0 C. The factors controlling the rate of dissolution of fuel pellets and Inconel, a structural component of the core, were investigated. Since the UO 2 dissolved in IEB could be a valuable resource in the future, the recovery of uranium from IEB using conventional ore-dressing and leaching techniques was assessed

  15. Whole-body iron-59 retention measurements for estimating the iron status of piglets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfau, A.; Rudolphi, K.; Heinrich, H.C.; Gabbe, E.E.

    1976-01-01

    A large-volume, 4π whole-body liquid scintillation detector was used to determine 59 Fe absorption in 173 one-to-six-weeks-old piglets with normal and depleted iron stores. Values of intestinal absorption from a 10 μmole (corresponds to 0.558 mg) 59 Fe 2+ test dose were compared with levels of haemoglobin, haematocrit, and serum iron as well as with stainable diffuse iron of bone marrow reticuloendothelial cells, and the dose relationship of intestinal iron absorption from 59 Fe-labelled FeSO 4 and methaemoglobin was measured. The investigations indicated that neither blood parameters, cytochemical gradings nor absorption levels from the 59 Fe test dose alone were sufficient to describe quantitatively the various stages of iron deficiency in piglets. A synopsis of all parameters appeared to be necessary for defining normal iron status and prelatent, latent and manifest iron deficiency. Piglets fed on sows' milk only developed manifest iron deficiency within the first three weeks of age. After an access to soil and/or creep feed from the eighth day of age, or intramuscular injections of 200 mg Fe as iron-dextran at three days of age, or injections of 200 or 400 mg Fe combined with access to creep feed, stages of manifest, latent or prelatent iron deficiency could be observed. For an iron-dextran dose of 800 mg Fe injected in amounts of 400 mg Fe at 3 and 10 days of age, a normal iron status was obtained in three-week-old piglets. The iron dose relationship indicated that 20 mg Fe administered orally as FeSO 4 or 40 mg Fe as methaemoglobin-Fe daily should cover the iron requirement of piglets for the first three weeks of life, whereas a three-week total of iron given orally in a single dose would lead to unphysiological or fatal conditions in nursing pigs. (author)

  16. A core performance study on an actinide recycling 'zero-sodium-void worth' core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, M.; Nakagawa, M.; Yamaoka, M.; Kasahara, F.

    1994-01-01

    A core performance study was made for an absorber-type parfait core (A-APC) as one of 'Zero-sodium-void-worth' core concepts. This evaluation study pursued different two aspects; one for transuranic (TRU) management strategy, and another for a loss-of-coolant anticipated transient behavior considering the unique core configuration. The results indicated that this core has a large flexibility for actinide recycling in terms of self-sufficiency and minor actinide burning. The result also showed that this core has kept a large mitigation potential for ULOF events as well as a simple flat core concept, reflecting detailed three dimensional core bowing behavior for the A-APC configuration. (author)

  17. Comparative biogeochemical behaviors of iron-55 and stable iron in the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weimer, W.C.; Langford, J.C.; Jenkins, C.E.

    1978-01-01

    Studies of atmospheric aerosols have demonstrated that much of the 55 Fe associated with the aerosol input to the oceans is present as either an amorphous or hydrous iron oxide or as very small particulate species attached to the surfaces of the large aerosol particles. By comparison, nearly all of the stable iron is bound in the mineral phase of aerosol particles. This difference in the chemical and physical forms of the radioactive and stable iron isotopes results in the 55 Fe being more biologically available than is the stable iron. This difference in availability is responsible for the transfer of a much higher specific activity 55 Fe to certain ocean organisms and man relative to the specific activity of the total aerosol or of sea water. This differential biological uptake of the radioactive element and its stable element counterpart points out that natural levels of stable elements in the marine environment may not effectively dilute radioelements or other stable elements of anthropogenic sources. The effectiveness of dilution by natural sources depends on the chemical and physical forms of the materials in both the source terms and the receiving environments. The large difference in specific activities of 55 Fe in aerosols and sea water relative to ocean organisms reflects the independent behaviors of 55 Fe and stable iron

  18. Multistandard wireless transmission over SSMF and large-core POF for access and in-home networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shi, Y.; Morant, M.; Okonkwo, C.M.; Llorente, R.; Tangdiongga, E.; Koonen, A.M.J.

    2012-01-01

    An end-to-end transmission of coexisting multistandard radio (LTE, WiMAX, and UWB) signals is demonstrated for the first time with the transmission over a combined access and in-home networks consisting of 25-km SSMF, 25-m large-core diameter polymethylmethacrylate graded-index plastic optical fiber

  19. Is stereotactic large-core needle biopsy beneficial prior to surgical treatment in BI-RADS 5 lesions?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorntje, LE; Peeters, PHM; Mali, WPTM; Rinkes, IHMB

    Introduction. Due to screening mammography, more nonpalpable mammographic lesions warrant histological evaluation. Stereotactic large-core needle biopsy (SLCNB) has been shown to be as effective in diagnosing these lesions as diagnostic surgical excision, and has become the preferred diagnostic

  20. Large-scale Instability during Gravitational Collapse with Neutrino Transport and a Core-Collapse Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenov, A. G.; Chechetkin, V. M.

    2018-04-01

    Most of the energy released in the gravitational collapse of the cores of massive stars is carried away by neutrinos. Neutrinos play a pivotal role in explaining core-collape supernovae. Currently, mathematical models of the gravitational collapse are based on multi-dimensional gas dynamics and thermonuclear reactions, while neutrino transport is considered in a simplified way. Multidimensional gas dynamics is used with neutrino transport in the flux-limited diffusion approximation to study the role of multi-dimensional effects. The possibility of large-scale convection is discussed, which is interesting both for explaining SN II and for setting up observations to register possible high-energy (≳10MeV) neutrinos from the supernova. A new multi-dimensional, multi-temperature gas dynamics method with neutrino transport is presented.

  1. Uncertainty Evaluation of Reactivity Coefficients for a large advanced SFR Core Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khamakhem, Wassim; Rimpault, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors are currently being reshaped in order to meet Generation IV goals on economics, safety and reliability, sustainability and proliferation resistance. Recent studies have led to large SFR cores for a 3600 MWth power plants, cores which exhibit interesting features. The designs have had to balance between competing aspects such as sustainability and safety characteristics. Sustainability in neutronic terms is translated into positive breeding gain and safety into rather low Na void reactivity effects. The studies have been done on two SFR concepts using oxide and carbide fuels. The use of the sensitivity theory in the ERANOS determinist code system has been used. Calculations have been performed with different sodium evaluations: JEF2.2, ERALIB-1 and the most recent JEFF3.1 and ENDF/B-VII in order to make a broad comparison. Values for the Na void reactivity effect exhibit differences as large as 14% when using the different sodium libraries. Uncertainties due to nuclear data on the reactivity coefficients were performed with BOLNA variances-covariances data, the Na Void Effect uncertainties are near to 12% at 1σ. Since, the uncertainties are far beyond the target accuracy for a design achieving high performance, two directions are envisaged: the first one is to perform new differential measurements or in a second attempt use integral experiments to improve effectively the nuclear data set and its uncertainties such as performed in the past with ERALIB1. (authors)

  2. Large-Scale Synthesis of Single-Crystalline Iron Oxide Magnetic Nanorings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jia, Chun-Jiang; Sun, Ling-Dong; Luo, Feng

    2008-01-01

    We present an innovative approach to the production of single-crystal iron oxide nanorings employing a solution-based route. Single-crystal hematite (alpha-Fe2O3) nanorings were synthesized using a double anion-assisted hydrothermal method (involving phosphate and sulfate ions), which can...... an intriguing three-dimensional magnetic configuration. This work provides an easily scaled-up method for preparing tailor-made iron oxide nanorings that could meet the demands of a variety of applications ranging from medicine to magnetoelectronics....... able to control the size, morphology, and surface architecture to produce a variety of three-dimensional hollow nanostructures. These can then be converted to magnetite (Fe3O4) and maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) by a reduction or reduction-oxidation process while preserving the same morphology. The structures...

  3. Lactoferrin conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles for targeting brain glioma cells in magnetic particle imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomitaka, Asahi; Arami, Hamed; Gandhi, Sonu; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new real-time imaging modality, which promises high tracer mass sensitivity and spatial resolution directly generated from iron oxide nanoparticles. In this study, monodisperse iron oxide nanoparticles with median core diameters ranging from 14 to 26 nm were synthesized and their surface was conjugated with lactoferrin to convert them into brain glioma targeting agents. The conjugation was confirmed with the increase of the hydrodynamic diameters, change of zeta potential, and Bradford assay. Magnetic particle spectrometry (MPS), performed to evaluate the MPI performance of these nanoparticles, showed no change in signal after lactoferrin conjugation to nanoparticles for all core diameters, suggesting that the MPI signal is dominated by Néel relaxation and thus independent of hydrodynamic size difference or presence of coating molecules before and after conjugations. For this range of core sizes (14-26 nm), both MPS signal intensity and spatial resolution improved with increasing core diameter of nanoparticles. The lactoferrin conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles (Lf-IONPs) showed specific cellular internalization into C6 cells with a 5-fold increase in MPS signal compared to IONPs without lactoferrin, both after 24 h incubation. These results suggest that Lf-IONPs can be used as tracers for targeted brain glioma imaging using MPI.

  4. Early diagenetic processes affecting nutrients in the pore waters of Central Indian Ocean cores

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nath, B.N.; Mudholkar, A.V.

    and unoxidized organic carbon are observed in the Arabian Sea core, while nitrification with intermediate low nitrate and high organic carbon are found in the mottled zones of the pelagic cores. Mobilization of iron-host oxyhydroxides and peaked profiles...

  5. Large-scale synthesis of Ni-Ag core-shell nanoparticles with magnetic, optical and anti-oxidation properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chung-Che; Chen, Dong-Hwang [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2006-07-14

    The large-scale synthesis and characterization of Ni-core/Ag-shell (Ni at Ag) nanoparticles by the successive hydrazine reduction of nickel chloride and silver nitrate in ethylene glycol using polyethyleneimine (PEI) as a protective agent are described. The resultant Ni at Ag nanoparticles had a mean core diameter of 6.2 nm and a shell thickness of 0.85 nm, without significant change in the nickel concentration of 0.25-25 mM for the Ag coating. Also, both Ni cores and Ag nanoshells had an fcc structure and PEI was capped on the particle surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis confirmed that the Ni cores were fully covered by Ag nanoshells. In addition, the Ni at Ag nanoparticles exhibited a characteristic absorption band at 430 nm and were nearly superparamagnetic. Based on the weight of Ni cores, the saturation magnetization (M{sub s}), remanent magnetization (M{sub r}) and coercivity (H{sub c}) were obtained as 17.2 emu g{sup -1}, 4.0 emu g{sup -1} and 81 Oe, respectively. Furthermore, the resultant Ni at Ag nanoparticles exhibited better anti-oxidation properties than Ni nanoparticles did due to the protection of the Ag nanoshells.

  6. Addressing Challenges and Scalability in the Synthesis of Thin Uniform Metal Shells on Large Metal Nanoparticle Cores: Case Study of Ag-Pt Core-Shell Nanocubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Umar; Linic, Suljo

    2017-12-13

    Bimetallic nanoparticles in which a metal is coated with an ultrathin (∼1 nm) layer of a second metal are often desired for their unique chemical and physical properties. Current synthesis methods for producing such core-shell nanostructures often require incremental addition of a shell metal precursor which is rapidly reduced onto metal cores. A major shortcoming of this approach is that it necessitates precise concentrations of chemical reagents, making it difficult to perform at large scales. To address this issue, we considered an approach whereby the reduction of the shell metal precursor was controlled through in situ chemical modification of the precursor. We used this approach to develop a highly scalable synthesis for coating atomic layers of Pt onto Ag nanocubes. We show that Ag-Pt core-shell nanostructures are synthesized in high yields and that these structures effectively combine the optical properties of the plasmonic Ag nanocube core with the surface properties of the thin Pt shell. Additionally, we demonstrate the scalability of the synthesis by performing a 10 times scale-up.

  7. The Detection of Hot Cores and Complex Organic Molecules in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewiło, Marta; Indebetouw, Remy; Charnley, Steven B.; Zahorecz, Sarolta; Oliveira, Joana M.; van Loon, Jacco Th.; Ward, Jacob L.; Chen, C.-H. Rosie; Wiseman, Jennifer; Fukui, Yasuo; Kawamura, Akiko; Meixner, Margaret; Onishi, Toshikazu; Schilke, Peter

    2018-02-01

    We report the first extragalactic detection of the complex organic molecules (COMs) dimethyl ether (CH3OCH3) and methyl formate (CH3OCHO) with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). These COMs, together with their parent species methanol (CH3OH), were detected toward two 1.3 mm continuum sources in the N 113 star-forming region in the low-metallicity Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Rotational temperatures ({T}{rot}∼ 130 K) and total column densities ({N}{rot}∼ {10}16 cm‑2) have been calculated for each source based on multiple transitions of CH3OH. We present the ALMA molecular emission maps for COMs and measured abundances for all detected species. The physical and chemical properties of two sources with COMs detection, and the association with H2O and OH maser emission, indicate that they are hot cores. The fractional abundances of COMs scaled by a factor of 2.5 to account for the lower metallicity in the LMC are comparable to those found at the lower end of the range in Galactic hot cores. Our results have important implications for studies of organic chemistry at higher redshift.

  8. Evidence that assembly of the yeast cytochrome bc1 complex involves formation of a large core structure in the inner mitochondrial membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zara, Vincenzo; Conte, Laura; Trumpower, Bernard L.

    2009-01-01

    The assembly status of the cytochrome bc1 complex has been analyzed in distinct yeast deletion strains in which genes for one or more of the bc1 subunits had been deleted. In all the yeast strains tested a bc1 sub-complex of about 500 kDa was found when the mitochondrial membranes were analyzed by blue native electrophoresis. The subsequent molecular characterization of this sub-complex, carried out in the second dimension by SDS-PAGE and immunodecoration, revealed the presence of the two catalytic subunits cytochrome b and cytochrome c1, associated with the non catalytic subunits core protein 1, core protein 2, Qcr7p and Qcr8p. Altogether these bc1 subunits build up the core structure of the cytochrome bc1 complex which is then able to sequentially bind the remaining subunits, such as Qcr6p, Qcr9p, the Rieske iron-sulfur protein and Qcr10p. This bc1 core structure may represent a true assembly intermediate during the maturation of the bc1 complex, first because of its wide distribution in distinct yeast deletion strains and second for its characteristics of stability which resemble those of the intact homodimeric bc1 complex. Differently from this latter, however, the bc1 core structure is not able to interact with the cytochrome c oxidase complex to form respiratory supercomplexes. The characterization of this novel core structure of the bc1 complex provides a number of new elements for clarification of the molecular events leading to the maturation of the yeast cytochrome bc1 complex in the inner mitochondrial membrane. PMID:19236481

  9. Mössbauer, magnetization and X-ray diffraction characterization methods for iron oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabbasov, Raul, E-mail: gabbasov-raul@yandex.ru [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Polikarpov, Michael; Cherepanov, Valery [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Chuev, Michael; Mischenko, Iliya; Lomov, Andrey [Institute of Physics and Technology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Wang, Andrew [Ocean NanoTech. Springdale, AR (United States); Panchenko, Vladislav [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-15

    Water soluble magnetite iron oxide nanoparticles with oleic polymer coating and average diameters in the range of 5–25 nm, previously determined by TEM, were characterized using Mössbauer, magnetization and X-ray diffraction measurements. Comparative analysis of the results demonstrated a large diversity of magnetic relaxation regimes. Analysis showed the presence of an additional impurity component in the 25 nm nanoparticles, with principally different magnetic nature at the magnetite core. In some cases, X-ray diffraction measurements were unable to estimate the size of the magnetic core and Mössbauer data were necessary for the correct interpretation of the experimental results. - Highlights: • KV parameter, obtained from Mössbauer spectra can be used for nanoparticle size characterization. • Mössbauer spectra of 10–25 nm nanoparticles can be effectively described by ferromagnetic model. • Surface impurities can cause incorrect nanoparticle size determination.

  10. Xenon oscillation in a large PHWR core (Atucha II type): TRISIC code applicability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solanilla, Roberto

    2000-01-01

    A three dimensional nuclear reactor simulation code (TRISIC) was developed many years ago to design a PHWR (pressurizer heavy water reactors - Atucha type) based in the 'source-sink model' (heterogeneous theory). The limited processor computational performance available at that time was the constraint of the code when a detailed reactor description was necessary. A modern PC (pentium) code version with a full reactor core representation (461 fuel channels) including diagonal control rod banks and flux-reading detectors with theirs tube guide was used in the present paper for simulation of the Xenon transient when a local asymmetric perturbation was produced in a large core (Atucha II type). The results obtained and the computer time required for the 70 hour's simulation with an adequate time step, established the potential of the code to deal with this kind of transients. The paper shows that the method of TRISIC allows to detect and control azimuthal, radial and axial oscillation. This code is a proper way to elaborate a program of control rods movement from the flux reading detectors to damp the oscillation. TRISIC could also be a accurate tool to supervise the full core flux distribution in real time during the operation of the reactor. (author)

  11. Effect of shrink fitting and cutting on iron loss of permanent magnet motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, N.; Morimoto, H.; Yunoki, Y.; Miyagi, D.

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic properties of a motor core are affected by the distortion due to the compression caused by shrink fitting and the distortion caused by punching, etc. In this paper, the B-H curve and iron loss of stator core of actual motor under shrink fitting are measured. It is shown that the maximum permeability is reduced by about 50%, and the iron loss is increased by about 30% due to the shrink fitting. It is illustrated that the loss of motor is increased by about 10%, 4% and 2% due to the shrink fitting, the cutting stress and the eddy current in rotor magnet, respectively

  12. Photoreduction of Terrigenous Fe-Humic Substances Leads to Bioavailable Iron in Oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazevic, Amir; Orlowska, Ewelina; Kandioller, Wolfgang; Jirsa, Franz; Keppler, Bernhard K; Tafili-Kryeziu, Myrvete; Linert, Wolfgang; Krachler, Rudolf F; Krachler, Regina; Rompel, Annette

    2016-05-23

    Humic substances (HS) are important iron chelators responsible for the transport of iron from freshwater systems to the open sea, where iron is essential for marine organisms. Evidence suggests that iron complexed to HS comprises the bulk of the iron ligand pool in near-coastal waters and shelf seas. River-derived HS have been investigated to study their transport to, and dwell in oceanic waters. A library of iron model compounds and river-derived Fe-HS samples were probed in a combined X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopy (VtC-XES) study at the Fe K-edge. The analyses performed revealed that iron complexation in HS samples is only dependent on oxygen-containing HS functional groups, such as carboxyl and phenol. The photoreduction mechanism of Fe III -HS in oceanic conditions into bioavailable aquatic Fe II forms, highlights the importance of river-derived HS as an iron source for marine organisms. Consequently, such mechanisms are a vital component of the upper-ocean iron biogeochemistry cycle.

  13. Potentiometric assessment of iron release during ferritin reduction by exogenous agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimirova, Lilia S; Kochev, Valery K

    2010-09-01

    This work studied the possibilities for quantitative determination of iron mobilization in connection with ferritin reduction by ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and sodium dithionite in vitro. The iron storage protein was incubated with an excess of reductant in aerobic conditions in the absence of complexing agents in the medium. The release of Fe(2+) was let to go to completion, and the overall content of Fe(2+) in the solution was evaluated with the aid of potentiometric titration using Ce(4+) as an oxidizing titrant. Results suggest a moderate iron efflux under the influence of the chosen reducing agents. Although such a reduction of the protein mineral core by dihydroxyfumarate contributes greatly to the iron mobilization, ferritin behavior with vitamin C and dithionite seems to be different. Although redox properties of dihydroxyfumarate are determined by hydroxyl groups similar to those of ascorbic acid, the two compounds differ significantly in structure, and this could be the basis for an explanation of the specificities in their interaction with ferritin. As revealed by the study, potentiometric titration promises to be a reliable tool for evaluation of the amount of Fe(2+) present in the solution as a result of the reduction of the ferritin's mineral core. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. An Interconnected Network of Core-Forming Melts Produced by Shear Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhn, D.; Groebner, N.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    2000-01-01

    The formation mechanism of terrestrial planetary is still poorly understood, and has been the subject of numerous experimental studies. Several mechanisms have been proposed by which metal-mainly iron with some nickel-could have been extracted from a silicate mantle to form the core. Most recent models involve gravitational sinking of molten metal or metal sulphide through a partially or fully molten mantle that is often referred to as a'magma ocean. Alternative models invoke percolation of molten metal along an interconnected network (that is, porous flow) through a solid silicate matrix. But experimental studies performed at high pressures have shown that, under hydrostatic conditions, these melts do not form an interconnected network, leading to the widespread assumption that formation of metallic cores requires a magma ocean. In contrast, here we present experiments which demonstrate that shear deformation to large strains can interconnect a significant fraction of initially isolated pockets of metal and metal sulphide melts in a solid matrix of polycrystalline olivine. Therefore, in a dynamic (nonhydrostatic) environment, percolation remains a viable mechanism for the segregation and migration of core-forming melts in a solid silicate mantle.

  15. First-principles calculation for the effect of hydrogen atoms on the mobility of a screw dislocation in BCC iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itakura, Mitsuhiro; Kaburaki, Hideo; Yamaguchi, Masatake; Endo, Tatsuro; Higuchi, Kenji; Ogata, Shigenobu; Kimizuka, Hajime

    2012-01-01

    Effect of hydrogen atoms on the mobility of a screw dislocation in BCC iron has been evaluated using the first-principles calculation. The stable position of a hydrogen atom is found to be near the screw dislocation core and inside the core respectively when the dislocation is at the easy-core or hard-core configuration in BCC iron. The intrinsically unstable hard-core configuration of the screw dislocation is stabilized when a hydrogen atom is trapped inside the core. On the basis of this first-principles result, an elastic string model of a dislocation is developed to predict the kink motion in the presence of a hydrogen atom. It is found that a double-kink formation is facilitated when a hydrogen atom is located near a dislocation line, however, a kink motion is retarded when a hydrogen atom is behind the kink. (author)

  16. Shock Compression and Melting of an Fe-Ni-Si Alloy: Implications for the Temperature Profile of the Earth's Core and the Heat Flux Across the Core-Mantle Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Youjun; Sekine, Toshimori; Lin, Jung-Fu; He, Hongliang; Liu, Fusheng; Zhang, Mingjian; Sato, Tomoko; Zhu, Wenjun; Yu, Yin

    2018-02-01

    Understanding the melting behavior and the thermal equation of state of Fe-Ni alloyed with candidate light elements at conditions of the Earth's core is critical for our knowledge of the region's thermal structure and chemical composition and the heat flow across the liquid outer core into the lowermost mantle. Here we studied the shock equation of state and melting curve of an Fe-8 wt% Ni-10 wt% Si alloy up to 250 GPa by hypervelocity impacts with direct velocity and reliable temperature measurements. Our results show that the addition of 10 wt% Si to Fe-8 wt% Ni alloy slightly depresses the melting temperature of iron by 200-300 (±200) K at the core-mantle boundary ( 136 GPa) and by 600-800 (±500) K at the inner core-outer core boundary ( 330 GPa), respectively. Our results indicate that Si has a relatively mild effect on the melting temperature of iron compared with S and O. Our thermodynamic modeling shows that Fe-5 wt% Ni alloyed with 6 wt% Si and 2 wt% S (which has a density-velocity profile that matches the outer core's seismic profile well) exhibits an adiabatic profile with temperatures of 3900 K and 5300 K at the top and bottom of the outer core, respectively. If Si is a major light element in the core, a geotherm modeled for the outer core indicates a thermal gradient of 5.8-6.8 (±1.6) K/km in the D″ region and a high heat flow of 13-19 TW across the core-mantle boundary.

  17. Binding of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Apo-Bacterioferritin Associated Ferredoxin to Bacterioferritin B Promotes Heme Mediation of Electron Delivery and Mobilization of Core Mineral Iron†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeratunga, Saroja K.; Gee, Casey E.; Lovell, Scott; Zeng, Yuhong; Woodin, Carrie L.; Rivera, Mario

    2009-01-01

    The bfrB gene from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was cloned and expressed in E. coli. The resultant protein (BfrB), which assembles into a 445.3 kDa complex0020from 24 identical subunits, binds 12 molecules of heme axially coordinated by two Met residues. BfrB, isolated with 5–10 iron atoms per protein molecule, was reconstituted with ferrous ions to prepare samples with a core mineral containing 600 ± 40 ferric ions per BfrB molecule and approximately one phosphate molecule per iron atom. In the presence of sodium dithionite or in the presence of P. aeruginosa ferredoxin NADP reductase (FPR) and NADPH the heme in BfrB remains oxidized and the core iron mineral is mobilized sluggishly. In stark contrast, addition of NADPH to a solution containing BfrB, FPR and the apo-form of P. aeruginosa bacterioferritin associated ferredoxin (apo-Bfd) results in rapid reduction of the heme in BfrB and in the efficient mobilization of the core iron mineral. Results from additional experimentation indicate that Bfd must bind to BfrB to promote heme mediation of electrons from the surface to the core to support the efficient mobilization of ferrous ions from BfrB. In this context, the thus far mysterious role of heme in bacterioferritins has been brought to the front by reconstituting BfrB with its physiological partner, apo-Bfd. These findings are discussed in the context of a model for the utilization of stored iron in which the significant upregulation of the bfd gene under low-iron conditions [Ochsner, U.A., Wilderman, P.J., Vasil, A.I., and Vasil, M.L. (2002) Mol. Microbiol. 45, 1277–1287] ensures sufficient concentrations of apo-Bfd to bind BfrB and unlock the iron stored in its core. Although these findings are in contrast to previous speculations suggesting redox mediation of electron transfer by holo-Bfd, the ability of apo-Bfd to promote iron mobilization is an economical strategy used by the cell because it obviates the need to further deplete cellular iron levels to

  18. Multilevel parallel strategy on Monte Carlo particle transport for the large-scale full-core pin-by-pin simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, B.; Li, G.; Wang, W.; Shangguan, D.; Deng, L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces the Strategy of multilevel hybrid parallelism of JCOGIN Infrastructure on Monte Carlo Particle Transport for the large-scale full-core pin-by-pin simulations. The particle parallelism, domain decomposition parallelism and MPI/OpenMP parallelism are designed and implemented. By the testing, JMCT presents the parallel scalability of JCOGIN, which reaches the parallel efficiency 80% on 120,000 cores for the pin-by-pin computation of the BEAVRS benchmark. (author)

  19. Insights into Mercury's Core Evolution from the Thermodynamic Properties of Fe-S-Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgington, A.; Vocadlo, L.; Stixrude, L. P.; Wood, I. G.; Lord, O. T.

    2015-12-01

    The structure, composition and evolution of Mercury, the innermost planet, are puzzling, as its high uncompressed density implies a body highly enriched in metallic iron, whilst the existence of Mercury's magnetic field and observations of its longitude librations [1] suggest at least a partially molten core. This study uses a combination of experimental and ab-initio computer simulation techniques to determine the properties of Fe-S-Si (relative atomic percentages, 80:10:10) throughout the conditions of the interior of the planet Mercury, and evaluates the implications of this material for the structure and evolution of the planet's core. Previous studies have considered the addition of sulphur to the pure iron system, as this can significantly depress the melting curve of iron, and so may possibly allow Mercury's core to remain molten to the present day [2]. However, important constraints placed by the MESSENGER spacecraft on Mercury's surface abundance of iron [3] suggest that the planet formed in highly reduced conditions, in which significant amounts of silicon could have also dissolved into the core [4]. First-principles molecular dynamics simulations of the thermodynamic properties of liquid Fe-S-Si, alongside laser-heated diamond-anvil-cell experiments to determine the melting behaviour of the same composition, reveal the slopes of the adiabatic gradient and melting curve respectively, which together may allow insight into the evolution of our solar system's smallest planet. [1] Margot, J. L. et al. (2007) Science, 316: 710-714[2] Schubert, G. et al. (1988) in 'Mercury' 429-460[3] Nittler, L. R. et al. (2011) Science, 333, 1847-1850[4] Malavergne, V. et al. (2010) Icarus, 206:199-209

  20. Tuning dipolar magnetic interactions by controlling individual silica coating of iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas Rojas, P. C.; Tancredi, P.; Moscoso Londoño, O.; Knobel, M.; Socolovsky, L. M.

    2018-04-01

    Single and fixed size core, core-shell nanoparticles of iron oxides coated with a silica layer of tunable thickness were prepared by chemical routes, aiming to generate a frame of study of magnetic nanoparticles with controlled dipolar interactions. The batch of iron oxides nanoparticles of 4.5 nm radii, were employed as cores for all the coated samples. The latter was obtained via thermal decomposition of organic precursors, resulting on nanoparticles covered with an organic layer that was subsequently used to promote the ligand exchange in the inverse microemulsion process, employed to coat each nanoparticle with silica. The amount of precursor and times of reaction was varied to obtain different silica shell thicknesses, ranging from 0.5 nm to 19 nm. The formation of the desired structures was corroborated by TEM and SAXS measurements, the core single-phase spinel structure was confirmed by XRD, and superparamagnetic features with gradual change related to dipolar interaction effects were obtained by the study of the applied field and temperature dependence of the magnetization. To illustrate that dipolar interactions are consistently controlled, the main magnetic properties are presented and analyzed as a function of center to center minimum distance between the magnetic cores.

  1. Chemical and thermal stability of core-shelled magnetite nanoparticles and solid silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendrowski, Krzysztof; Sikora, Pawel; Zielinska, Beata; Horszczaruk, Elzbieta; Mijowska, Ewa

    2017-06-01

    Pristine nanoparticles of magnetite were coated by solid silica shell forming core/shell structure. 20 nm thick silica coating significantly enhanced the chemical and thermal stability of the iron oxide. Chemical and thermal stability of this structure has been compared to the magnetite coated by mesoporous shell and pristine magnetite nanoparticles. It is assumed that six-membered silica rings in a solid silica shell limit the rate of oxygen diffusion during thermal treatment in air and prevent the access of HCl molecules to the core during chemical etching. Therefore, the core/shell structure with a solid shell requires a longer time to induce the oxidation of iron oxide to a higher oxidation state and, basically, even strong concentrated acid such as HCl is not able to dissolve it totally in one month. This leads to the desired performance of the material in potential applications such as catalysis and environmental protection.

  2. Tungsten isotopic compositions of iron meteorites: Chronological constraints vs. cosmogenic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowski, A.; Quitté, G.; Halliday, A. N.; Kleine, T.

    2006-02-01

    High-precision W isotopic compositions are presented for 35 iron meteorites from 7 magmatic groups (IC, IIAB, IID, IIIAB, IIIF, IVA, and IVB) and 3 non-magmatic groups (IAB, IIICD, and IIE). Small but resolvable isotopic variations are present both within and between iron meteorite groups. Variations in the 182W/ 184W ratio reflect either time intervals of metal-silicate differentiation, or result from the burnout of W isotopes caused by a prolonged exposure to galactic cosmic rays. Calculated apparent time spans for some groups of magmatic iron meteorites correspond to 8.5 ± 2.1 My (IID), 5.1 ± 2.3 My (IIAB), and 5.3 ± 1.3 My (IVB). These time intervals are significantly longer than those predicated from models of planetesimal accretion. It is shown that cosmogenic effects can account for a large part of the W isotopic variation. No simple relationship exists with exposure ages, compromising any reliable method of correction. After allowance for maximum possible cosmogenic effects, it is found that there is no evidence that any of the magmatic iron meteorites studied here have initial W isotopic compositions that differ from those of Allende CAIs [ ɛ182W = - 3.47 ± 0.20; [T. Kleine, K. Mezger, H. Palme, E. Scherer and C. Münker, Early core formation in asteroids and late accretion of chondrite parent bodies: evidence from 182Hf- 182W in CAIs, metal-rich chondrites and iron meteorites, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta (in press)]. Cosmogenic corrections cannot yet be made with sufficient accuracy to obtain highly precise ages for iron meteorites. Some of the corrected ages nevertheless require extremely early metal-silicate segregation no later than 1 My after formation of CAIs. Therefore, magmatic iron meteorites appear to provide the best examples yet identified of material derived from the first planetesimals that grew by runaway growth, as modelled in dynamic simulations. Non-magmatic iron meteorites have a more radiogenic W isotopic composition than magmatic

  3. Iron transport and storage in the coccolithophore: Emiliania huxleyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnett, Andrej; Böttger, Lars H; Matzanke, Berthold F; Carrano, Carl J

    2012-11-01

    Iron is an essential element for all living organisms due to its ubiquitous role in redox and other enzymes, especially in the context of respiration and photosynthesis. The iron uptake and storage systems of terrestrial/higher plants are now reasonably well understood with two basic strategies for iron uptake being distinguished: strategy I plants use a mechanism involving soil acidification and induction of Fe(III)-chelate reductase (ferrireductase) and Fe(II) transporter proteins while strategy II plants have evolved sophisticated systems based on high-affinity, iron specific, binding compounds called phytosiderophores. In contrast, there is little knowledge about the corresponding systems in marine plant-like lineages. Herein we report a study of the iron uptake and storage mechanisms in the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi. Short term radio-iron uptake studies indicate that iron is taken up by Emiliania in a time and concentration dependent manner consistent with an active transport process. Based on inhibitor studies it appears that iron is taken up directly as Fe(iii). However if a reductive step is involved the Fe(II) must not be accessible to the external environment. Upon long term exposure to (57)Fe we have been able, using a combination of Mössbauer and XAS spectroscopies, to identify a single metabolite which displays spectral features similar to the phosphorus-rich mineral core of bacterial and plant ferritins.

  4. Iron-mediated anaerobic oxidation of methane in brackish coastal sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egger, Matthias; Rasigraf, Olivia; Sapart, Célia J; Jilbert, Tom; Jetten, Mike S M; Röckmann, Thomas; van der Veen, Carina; Bândă, Narcisa; Kartal, Boran; Ettwig, Katharina F; Slomp, Caroline P

    2015-01-06

    Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas and its biological conversion in marine sediments, largely controlled by anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), is a crucial part of the global carbon cycle. However, little is known about the role of iron oxides as an oxidant for AOM. Here we provide the first field evidence for iron-dependent AOM in brackish coastal surface sediments and show that methane produced in Bothnian Sea sediments is oxidized in distinct zones of iron- and sulfate-dependent AOM. At our study site, anthropogenic eutrophication over recent decades has led to an upward migration of the sulfate/methane transition zone in the sediment. Abundant iron oxides and high dissolved ferrous iron indicate iron reduction in the methanogenic sediments below the newly established sulfate/methane transition. Laboratory incubation studies of these sediments strongly suggest that the in situ microbial community is capable of linking methane oxidation to iron oxide reduction. Eutrophication of coastal environments may therefore create geochemical conditions favorable for iron-mediated AOM and thus increase the relevance of iron-dependent methane oxidation in the future. Besides its role in mitigating methane emissions, iron-dependent AOM strongly impacts sedimentary iron cycling and related biogeochemical processes through the reduction of large quantities of iron oxides.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predescu, Andra Mihaela; Matei, Ecaterina; Berbecaru, Andrei Constantin; Pantilimon, Cristian; Drăgan, Claudia; Vidu, Ruxandra; Predescu, Cristian; Kuncser, Victor

    2018-03-01

    Synthesis and characterization of iron oxide nanoparticles coated with a large molar weight dextran for environmental applications are reported. The first experiments involved the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles which were coated with dextran at different concentrations. The synthesis was performed by a co-precipitation technique, while the coating of iron oxide nanoparticles was carried out in solution. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry. The results demonstrated a successful coating of iron oxide nanoparticles with large molar weight dextran, of which agglomeration tendency depended on the amount of dextran in the coating solution. SEM and TEM observations have shown that the iron oxide nanoparticles are of about 7 nm in size.

  6. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron - Chapter 3: Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron (Ⅳ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Cast iron, as a traditional metal material, has advantages of low total cost, good castability and machinability, good wear resistance and low notch sensitivity, and is still facing tough challenge in quality, property and variety of types etc. Experts and engineers studying and producing iron castings all around world extremely concern this serious challenge. Over more than 30 years, a great of research work has been carried out on how to further improve its property, expand its application and combine cast iron technology with some hi-techs (for example, computer technology. Nevertheless, cast iron is a multi-element and multi-phase alloy and has complex and variety of structures and still has great development potential in structure and property. For further studying and developing cast iron, theoretical research work is important promise, and the study on solidification process and control mechanism of graphite morphology is fundamental for improving property of cast iron and developing new type of cast iron. Metallography of cast iron normally includes two sections: liquid phase transformation and solid phase transformation. The book, Colour Metallography of Cast Iron, uses colour metallography technique to study solidification structures of cast irons: graphite, carbides, austenite and eutectics; and focuses on solidification processes. With progress of modern solidification theory, the control of material solidification process becomes important measure for improving traditional materials and developing new materials. Solidification structure not only influences mechanical and physical properties of cast iron, but also affects its internal quality. The book uses a large amount of colour photos to describe the formation of solidification structures and their relations. Crystallization phenomena, which cannot be displayed with traditional metallography, are presented and more phase transformation information is obtained from these colour

  7. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron - Chapter 3: Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron (Ⅰ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Cast iron, as a traditional metal material, has advantages of low total cost, good castability and machinability, good wear resistance and low notch sensitivity, and is still facing tough challenge in quality, property and variety of types etc. Experts and engineers studying and producing iron castings all around world extremely concern this serious challenge. Over more than 30 years, a great of research work has been carried out on how to further improve its property, expand its application and combine cast iron technology with some hi-techs (for example, computer technology. Nevertheless, cast iron is a multi-element and multi-phase alloy and has complex and variety of structures and still has great development potential in structure and property. For further studying and developing cast iron, theoretical research work is important promise, and the study on solidification process and control mechanism of graphite morphology is fundamental for improving property of cast iron and developing new type of cast iron. Metallography of cast iron normally includes two sections: liquid phase transformation and solid phase transformation. The book, Colour Metallography of Cast Iron, uses colour metallography technique to study solidification structures of cast irons: graphite, carbides, austenite and eutectics; and focuses on solidification processes. With progress of modern solidification theory, the control of material solidification process becomes important measure for improving traditional materials and developing new materials. Solidification structure not only influences mechanical and physical properties of cast iron, but also affects its internal quality. The book uses a large amount of colour photos to describe the formation of solidification structures and their relations. Crystallization phenomena, which cannot be displayed with traditional metallography, are presented and more phase transformation information is obtained from these colour

  8. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron - Chapter 4: Vermicular Graphite Cast Iron (Ⅱ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Cast iron, as a traditional metal material, has advantages of low total cost, good castability and machinability, good wear resistance and low notch sensitivity, and is still facing tough challenge in quality, property and variety of types etc. Experts and engineers studying and producing iron castings all around world extremely concern this serious challenge. Over more than 30 years, a great of research work has been carried out on how to further improve its property, expand its application and combine cast iron technology with some hi-techs (for example, computer technology. Nevertheless, cast iron is a multi-element and multi-phase alloy and has complex and variety of structures and still has great development potential in structure and property. For further studying and developing cast iron, theoretical research work is important promise, and the study on solidification process and control mechanism of graphite morphology is fundamental for improving property of cast iron and developing new type of cast iron. Metallography of cast iron normally includes two sections: liquid phase transformation and solid phase transformation. The book, Colour Metallography of Cast Iron, uses colour metallography technique to study solidification structures of cast irons: graphite, carbides, austenite and eutectics; and focuses on solidification processes. With progress of modern solidification theory, the control of material solidification process becomes important measure for improving traditional materials and developing new materials. Solidification structure not only influences mechanical and physical properties of cast iron, but also affects its internal quality. The book uses a large amount of colour photos to describe the formation of solidification structures and their relations. Crystallization phenomena, which cannot be displayed with traditional metallography, are presented and more phase transformation information is obtained from these colour

  9. Preparation of novel magnetic polyurethane foam nanocomposites by using core-shell nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Nikje,Mir Mohammad Alavi; Moghaddam,Sahebeh Tamaddoni; Noruzian,Maede

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (NP's) converted to the core- shell structres by reacting with by n-(2-aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyl trimethoxysilane (AEAP) incorporated in polyurethane flexible (PUF) foam formulations. Fourier transform spectra, thermal gravimetric analysis, scanning electron images, thermo-mechanical analysis and magnetic properties of the prepared nanocomposites were studied. Obtained data shown that by the increasing of the amine modified magnetic iron oxide NP's u...

  10. Genetic diversity and population structure analysis to construct a core collection from a large Capsicum germplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hea-Young; Ro, Na-Young; Jeong, Hee-Jin; Kwon, Jin-Kyung; Jo, Jinkwan; Ha, Yeaseong; Jung, Ayoung; Han, Ji-Woong; Venkatesh, Jelli; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl

    2016-11-14

    Conservation of genetic diversity is an essential prerequisite for developing new cultivars with desirable agronomic traits. Although a large number of germplasm collections have been established worldwide, many of them face major difficulties due to large size and a lack of adequate information about population structure and genetic diversity. Core collection with a minimum number of accessions and maximum genetic diversity of pepper species and its wild relatives will facilitate easy access to genetic material as well as the use of hidden genetic diversity in Capsicum. To explore genetic diversity and population structure, we investigated patterns of molecular diversity using a transcriptome-based 48 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a large germplasm collection comprising 3,821 accessions. Among the 11 species examined, Capsicum annuum showed the highest genetic diversity (H E  = 0.44, I = 0.69), whereas the wild species C. galapagoense showed the lowest genetic diversity (H E  = 0.06, I = 0.07). The Capsicum germplasm collection was divided into 10 clusters (cluster 1 to 10) based on population structure analysis, and five groups (group A to E) based on phylogenetic analysis. Capsicum accessions from the five distinct groups in an unrooted phylogenetic tree showed taxonomic distinctness and reflected their geographic origins. Most of the accessions from European countries are distributed in the A and B groups, whereas the accessions from Asian countries are mainly distributed in C and D groups. Five different sampling strategies with diverse genetic clustering methods were used to select the optimal method for constructing the core collection. Using a number of allelic variations based on 48 SNP markers and 32 different phenotypic/morphological traits, a core collection 'CC240' with a total of 240 accessions (5.2 %) was selected from within the entire Capsicum germplasm. Compared to the other core collections, CC240 displayed higher

  11. Stability of polyelectrolyte-coated iron nanoparticles for T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Andrew J.; Dolan, Ciaran; Cheong, Soshan; Herman, David A. J.; Naysmith, Briar; Zong, Fangrong; Galvosas, Petrik; Farrand, Kathryn J.; Hermans, Ian F.; Brimble, Margaret; Williams, David E.; Jin, Jianyong; Tilley, Richard D.

    2017-10-01

    Iron nanoparticles are highly-effective magnetic nanoparticles for T2 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, the stability of their magnetic properties is dependent on good protection of the iron core from oxidation in aqueous media. Here we report the synthesis of custom-synthesized phosphonate-grafted polyelectrolytes (PolyM3) of various chain lengths, for efficient coating of iron nanoparticles with a native iron oxide shell. The size of the nanoparticle-polyelectrolyte assemblies was investigated by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, while surface attachment was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Low cytotoxicity was observed for each of the nanoparticle-polyelectrolyte ("Fe-PolyM3") assemblies, with good cell viability (>80%) remaining up to 100 μg mL-1 Fe in HeLa cells. When applied in T2-weighted MRI, corresponding T2 relaxivities (r2) of the Fe-PolyM3 assemblies were found to be dependent on the chain length of the polyelectrolyte. A significant increase in contrast was observed when polyelectrolyte chain length was increased from 6 to 65 repeating units, implying a critical chain length required for stabilization of the α-Fe nanoparticle core.

  12. A Large Solid Inner Core at Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, A.; Goossens, S.; Mazarico, E.; Lemoine, F. G.; Neumann, G. A.; Kuang, W.; Sabaka, T. J.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    2018-05-01

    New measurements of the polar moments of inertia of the whole planet and of the outer layers (crust+mantle), and simulations of Mercury’s magnetic field dynamo suggest the presence of a solid inner core with a Ric 0.3-0.5 Roc.

  13. Terrestrial magma ocean and core segregation in the earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, Eiji; Yurimoto, Naoyoshi

    1992-01-01

    According to the recent theories of formation of the earth, the outer layer of the proto-earth was molten and the terrestrial magma ocean was formed when its radius exceeded 3000 km. Core formation should have started in this magma ocean stage, since segregation of metallic iron occurs effectively by melting of the proto-earth. Therefore, interactions between magma, mantle minerals, and metallic iron in the magma ocean stage controlled the geochemistry of the mantle and core. We have studied the partitioning behaviors of elements into the silicate melt, high pressure minerals, and metallic iron under the deep upper mantle and lower mantle conditions. We employed the multi-anvil apparatus for preparing the equilibrating samples in the ranges from 16 to 27 GPa and 1700-2400 C. Both the electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA) and the Secondary Ion Mass spectrometer (SIMS) were used for analyzing the run products. We obtained the partition coefficients of various trace elements between majorite, Mg-perovskite, and liquid, and magnesiowustite, Mg-perovskite, and metallic iron. The examples of the partition coefficients of some key elements are summarized in figures, together with the previous data. We may be able to assess the origin of the mantle abundances of the elements such as transition metals by using the partitioning data obtained above. The mantle abundances of some transition metals expected by the core-mantle equilibrium under the lower mantle conditions cannot explain the observed abundance of some elements such as Mn and Ge in the mantle. Estimations of the densities of the ultrabasic magma Mg-perovskite at high pressure suggest existence of a density crossover in the deep lower mantle; flotation of Mg-perovskite occurs in the deep magma ocean under the lower mantle conditions. The observed depletion of some transition metals such as V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni in the mantle may be explained by the two stage process, the core-mantle equilibrium under the lower

  14. Evidence that the assembly of the yeast cytochrome bc1 complex involves the formation of a large core structure in the inner mitochondrial membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zara, Vincenzo; Conte, Laura; Trumpower, Bernard L

    2009-04-01

    The assembly status of the cytochrome bc(1) complex has been analyzed in distinct yeast deletion strains in which genes for one or more of the bc(1) subunits were deleted. In all the yeast strains tested, a bc(1) sub-complex of approximately 500 kDa was found when the mitochondrial membranes were analyzed by blue native electrophoresis. The subsequent molecular characterization of this sub-complex, carried out in the second dimension by SDS/PAGE and immunodecoration, revealed the presence of the two catalytic subunits, cytochrome b and cytochrome c(1), associated with the noncatalytic subunits core protein 1, core protein 2, Qcr7p and Qcr8p. Together, these bc(1) subunits build up the core structure of the cytochrome bc(1) complex, which is then able to sequentially bind the remaining subunits, such as Qcr6p, Qcr9p, the Rieske iron-sulfur protein and Qcr10p. This bc(1) core structure may represent a true assembly intermediate during the maturation of the bc(1) complex; first, because of its wide distribution in distinct yeast deletion strains and, second, for its characteristics of stability, which resemble those of the intact homodimeric bc(1) complex. By contrast, the bc(1) core structure is unable to interact with the cytochrome c oxidase complex to form respiratory supercomplexes. The characterization of this novel core structure of the bc(1) complex provides a number of new elements clarifying the molecular events leading to the maturation of the yeast cytochrome bc(1) complex in the inner mitochondrial membrane.

  15. Removal of both dissolved and particulate iron from groundwater

    OpenAIRE

    H. van Dijk; H. Leijssen; L. Rietveld; A. Abrahamse; K. Teunissen

    2008-01-01

    Iron is the primary source for discolouration problems in the drinking water distribution system. The removal of iron from groundwater is a common treatment step in the production of drinking water. Even when clear water meets the drinking water standards, the water quality in the distribution system can deteriorate due to settling of iron (hydroxide) particles or post-treatment flocculation of dissolved iron. Therefore it is important to remove dissolved and particulate iron to a large exten...

  16. Geochemistry of sediment cores of the western equatorial Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murty, P.S.N.; Cronan, D.S.; Rao, Ch.M.; Paropkari, A.L.; Topgi, R.S.; Guptha, M.V.S.; Colley, N.

    the Somali Basin, and that among the Somali Basin cores depth appears to influence the variable distributions of metals in them. Iron, aluminium and titanium appear to be mainly supplied from terrigenous sources, manganese from authigenic sources...

  17. The Role of Body Crystallization in Asteroidal Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, J. T.

    1993-07-01

    Large fractionations (factors of 2000-6000) in Ir/Ni and other ratios demonstrate that the magmatic groups of iron meteorites formed by fractional crystallization, and thus that the residual liquid remained well stirred during core crystallization. Past models have relied on solidification at the base or the top of the core, but body crystallization offers an attractive alternative. The simplest of the earlier models involved convective maxing induced by the liberation of heat and light elements (especially S) during upward crystallization from the center of the core. Other models involving downward crystallization from the core-mantle interface are based on the fact that temperatures at this location are slightly lower than those at the center; no whole-core stirring mechanism is provided by these models. Haack and Scott recently published a variant of the downward crystallization model involving the growth of giant (kilometer-scale) dendrites. Because crystallization creates a boundary layer enriched in S that does not participate in the convection, these models require several K of supercooling to induce crystallization (this undercooling is much greater than the temperature difference between the center of the core and the core-mantle interface). Buoyant forces will occasionally remove droplets of the basal boundary fluid; thus it was thinner and its degree of undercooling less than in that at the ceiling of the magma chamber. Homogeneous nucleation of metals is difficult to achieve; generally 200-300 K of undercooling is required, much more than could possibly occur in an asteroidal core. Crystals could, however, nucleate in the magma body on chromite, probably the first liquidus phase (A. Kracher, personal communication, notes that this is required to explain why Cr behaved like a compatible element despite having a solid/liquid D crystallize. The rate of core crystallization is limited by the rate of heat transport across the core-mantle interface. If

  18. Iron Deficiency Anaemia in Pregnancy and Postpartum: Pathophysiology and Effect of Oral versus Intravenous Iron Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alhossain A. Khalafallah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nutritional iron-deficiency anaemia (IDA is the most common disorder in the world, affecting more than two billion people. The World Health Organization’s global database on anaemia has estimated a prevalence of 14% based on a regression-based analysis. Recent data show that the prevalence of IDA in pregnant women in industrialized countries is 17.4% while the incidence of IDA in developing countries increases significantly up to 56%. Although oral iron supplementation is widely used for the treatment of IDA, not all patients respond adequately to oral iron therapy. This is due to several factors including the side effects of oral iron which lead to poor compliance and lack of efficacy. The side effects, predominantly gastrointestinal discomfort, occur in a large cohort of patients taking oral iron preparations. Previously, the use of intravenous iron had been associated with undesirable and sometimes serious side effects and therefore was underutilised. However, in recent years, new type II and III iron complexes have been developed, which offer better compliance and toleration as well as high efficacy with a good safety profile. In summary, intravenous iron can be used safely for a rapid repletion of iron stores and correction of anaemia during and after pregnancy.

  19. Rhometal interface in pseudo-core shell powders like Permalloy/Rhometal type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chicinaş, I.; Marinca, T.F.; Popa, F.; Neamţu, B.V.

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Pseudo-core shell powders like Permalloy/Rhometal type obtained by microalloying. • During annealing, by interdiffusion, Rhometal phase is formed at the interface. • Both bcc and fcc structures of the Rhometal have been evidenced in interface. - Abstract: The nanocrystalline Ni{sub 3}Fe (around Permalloy composition) powders were prepared by dry mechanical alloying. The nanocrystalline Ni{sub 3}Fe and carbonyl Fe mixture powders and green compacts have been subjected to heat treatments in an argon atmosphere in order to obtain pseudo-core-shell like particles by micro-alloying in the temperature range of 400–900 °C. The large Permalloy particles are partially covered by very small Fe particles and at the interface a layer of Rhometal is formed by micro-alloying. The Permalloy particles remain in the nanocrystalline/nanostructured state after the annealing independent on the annealing temperature up to 900 °C. Structural, microstructural characterisation and local elemental chemical analysis have been performed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis. The Rhometal interface was studied and evidenced by Fe and Ni concentration profile (EDX microanalysis) and X-ray diffraction. It was found that by a heat treatment up to 900 °C the interface is in the iron zone and at the heat treatment temperature of 900 °C the interface is in both Permalloy and iron zones. By XRD the bcc and fcc structures of the Rhometal have been evidenced. The interface length in iron zones is about 0.8 μm for the heat treatment at 400 °C and reaches 2.5 μm for heat treatment at 900 °C. The interface reaches 10 μm for a temperature of a heat treatment of 900 °C. The iron zones welded by Permalloy zones is evidenced the presence of the Ni atoms up to 4.7 at%. Also, in Permalloy particles are evidenced two zones with a different amount of Ni: one around Ni{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 0.4} composition close to the interface and the second in the

  20. Fatigue properties of ductile cast iron containing chunky graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferro, P., E-mail: ferro@gest.unipd.it [Department of Management and Engineering, University of Padova, Stradella S. Nicola 3, I-36100 Vicenza (Italy); Lazzarin, P.; Berto, F. [Department of Management and Engineering, University of Padova, Stradella S. Nicola 3, I-36100 Vicenza (Italy)

    2012-09-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experimental determination of high cycle fatigue properties of EN-GJS-400. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evaluation of the influence of chunky graphite morphology on fatigue life. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metallurgical analysis and microstructural parameters determination. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nodule counting and nodularity rating. - Abstract: This work deals with experimental determination of high cycle fatigue properties of EN-GJS-400 ductile cast iron containing chunky graphite. Constant amplitude axial tests were performed at room temperature under a nominal load ratio R = 0. In order to evaluate the influence of chunky graphite morphology on fatigue life, fatigue tests were carried out also on a second set of specimens without this microstructural defect. All samples were taken from the core of a large casting component. Metallurgical analyses were performed on all the samples and some important microstructural parameters (nodule count and nodularity rating, among others) were measured and compared. It was found that a mean content of 40% of chunky graphite in the microstructure (with respect to total graphite content) does not influence significantly the fatigue strength properties of the analysed cast iron. Such result was attributed to the presence of microporosity detected on the surface fracture of the specimens by means of electron scanning microscope.

  1. Fatigue properties of ductile cast iron containing chunky graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferro, P.; Lazzarin, P.; Berto, F.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Experimental determination of high cycle fatigue properties of EN-GJS-400. ► Evaluation of the influence of chunky graphite morphology on fatigue life. ► Metallurgical analysis and microstructural parameters determination. ► Nodule counting and nodularity rating. - Abstract: This work deals with experimental determination of high cycle fatigue properties of EN-GJS-400 ductile cast iron containing chunky graphite. Constant amplitude axial tests were performed at room temperature under a nominal load ratio R = 0. In order to evaluate the influence of chunky graphite morphology on fatigue life, fatigue tests were carried out also on a second set of specimens without this microstructural defect. All samples were taken from the core of a large casting component. Metallurgical analyses were performed on all the samples and some important microstructural parameters (nodule count and nodularity rating, among others) were measured and compared. It was found that a mean content of 40% of chunky graphite in the microstructure (with respect to total graphite content) does not influence significantly the fatigue strength properties of the analysed cast iron. Such result was attributed to the presence of microporosity detected on the surface fracture of the specimens by means of electron scanning microscope.

  2. Chemical synthesis and characterization of hollow dopamine coated, pentagonal and flower shaped magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riasat, Rabia; Kaynat, Sumbal

    2018-04-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles have gained attention recently in the field of nanoscience and technology due to their unique physicochemical properties. We hereby chemically synthesized novel pentagonal flower shaped iron oxide nanoparticles by thermal decomposition of iron penta-carbonyl in a two way annealing process. Controlled oxidation by acid etching was performed for these nanoparticles. At first 13 nm core shell nanoparticles of iron oxide (Fe/Fe3O4) were synthesized at 120°C annealing temperature that act as template material. The core shell nanoparticles then converted into porous hollow core shell nanoparticles (PH Fe/ Fe3O4) in a two way annealing process of heating, first at 100°C then at 250°C and heating rate of 5°C was kept constant throughout the reaction time. X-Ray diffraction (XRD) was done for the phase confirmation of as synthesized nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and higher resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) clearly shows the flower like nanoparticles that are approx. 16 nm-18 nm in size having the 4-5 nm core of Fe and 1-2 nm of the pores in the shell while the cavity between the shell and core is about 2 nm and the shell is 4-5 nm in diameter according to the TEM micrographs. The as prepared nanoparticles were then surface functionalized by dopamine polymer to make them water dispersible. Fourier transform Infrared spectroscopy confirmed the dopamine coating on the nanoparticles and the magnetic saturation of 38 emu/g of nanoparticles was analyzed by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Magnetic saturation persists in the dopamine coated nanoparticles. These nanoparticles were surface functionalized with dopamine and show dispersity in the aqueous media and can further be exploited in many nano-biotechnological applications including target specific therapeutic applications for several diseases.

  3. Hydrogen Plasma Processing of Iron Ore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabat, Kali Charan; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2017-06-01

    Iron is currently produced by carbothermic reduction of oxide ores. This is a multiple-stage process that requires large-scale equipment and high capital investment, and produces large amounts of CO2. An alternative to carbothermic reduction is reduction using a hydrogen plasma, which comprises vibrationally excited molecular, atomic, and ionic states of hydrogen, all of which can reduce iron oxides, even at low temperatures. Besides the thermodynamic and kinetic advantages of a hydrogen plasma, the byproduct of the reaction is water, which does not pose any environmental problems. A review of the theory and practice of iron ore reduction using a hydrogen plasma is presented. The thermodynamic and kinetic aspects are considered, with molecular, atomic and ionic hydrogen considered separately. The importance of vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules in overcoming the activation energy barriers, and in transferring energy to the iron oxide, is emphasized. Both thermal and nonthermal plasmas are considered. The thermophysical properties of hydrogen and argon-hydrogen plasmas are discussed, and their influence on the constriction and flow in the of arc plasmas is considered. The published R&D on hydrogen plasma reduction of iron oxide is reviewed, with both the reduction of molten iron ore and in-flight reduction of iron ore particles being considered. Finally, the technical and economic feasibility of the process are discussed. It is shown that hydrogen plasma processing requires less energy than carbothermic reduction, mainly because pelletization, sintering, and cokemaking are not required. Moreover, the formation of the greenhouse gas CO2 as a byproduct is avoided. In-flight reduction has the potential for a throughput at least equivalent to the blast furnace process. It is concluded that hydrogen plasma reduction of iron ore is a potentially attractive alternative to standard methods.

  4. Large geomagnetic field anomalies revealed in Bronze to Iron Age archeomagnetic data from Tel Megiddo and Tel Hazor, Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaar, Ron; Tauxe, Lisa; Ron, Hagai; Ebert, Yael; Zuckerman, Sharon; Finkelstein, Israel; Agnon, Amotz

    2016-05-01

    Geomagnetic field measurements from the past few centuries show heightened secular variation activity in the southern hemisphere associated with the south Atlantic anomaly (SAA). It is uncertain whether geomagnetic anomalies at a similar scale have existed in the past owing to limited coverage and uncertainties in the paleomagnetic database. Here we provide new evidence from archaeological sources in the Levant suggesting a large positive northern hemisphere anomaly, similar in magnitude to the SAA during the 9th-8th centuries BCE, called ;Levantine Iron Age anomaly;. We also report an additional geomagnetic spike in the 8th century. The new dataset comprises 73 high precision paleointensity estimates from ca. 3000 BCE to 732 BCE, and five directional measurements between the 14th and the 9th centuries BCE. Well-dated pottery and cooking ovens were collected from twenty archaeological strata in two large contemporaneous stratigraphical mounds (tells) in Israel: Tel Megiddo and Tel Hazor. The new data are combined with previously published data and interpreted automatically using the PmagPy Thellier GUI program. The Tel Megiddo and Tel Hazor data sets demonstrate excellent internal consistency and remarkable agreement with published data from Mesopotamia (Syria). The data illustrate the evolution of an extreme geomagnetic high that culminated in at least two spikes between the 11th and the 8th centuries BCE (Iron Age in the Levant). The paleomagnetic directional data of the 9th century BCE show positive inclination anomalies, and deviations of up to 22° from the averaged geocentric axial dipole (GAD) direction. From comparison of the Levantine archaeomagnetic data with IGRF model for 2015 we infer the ;Levantine Iron Age anomaly; between the 10th and the 8th centuries BCE is a local positive anomaly. The eastward extent of the anomaly is currently unknown.

  5. Iron deficiency anaemia in Sri Lanka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liyanage, K.D.C.E.

    1992-01-01

    The commonest cause of nutritional anaemia in the Sri Lankan population is iron deficiency. The diets of the population belonging to the lower socio-economic groups contain little food of animal origin. Thus, their diets are deficient in easily absorbable (haem) iron; and are also heavily cereal-based. Therefore interference in the absorption of dietary iron also occurs. Iron-deficiency anaemia is not restricted to the so-called ''vulnerable groups'' in Sri Lanka, however, their greater demands make the problem not only commoner but also more severe. Among pregnant and lactating women anaemia is often associated with folate deficiency. It must also be noted that the low availability of dietary iron is compounded in large population groups. Malaria, presently raging on an epidemic scale is also a major contributory factor to the incidence of anaemia. The purpose of this study was to examine the iron status of pre-school children and pregnant women; to establish normal levels of biochemical indices at different trimesters; to record the effect of iron supplementation during pregnancy; and to record the bioavailability of iron from weaning foods and common adult diets. 6 figs, 14 tabs

  6. A Feasibility Study on Core Cooling of Reduced-Moderation PWR for the Large Break LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiroyuki Yoshida; Akira Ohnuki; Hajime Akimoto

    2002-01-01

    A design study of a reduced-moderation water reactor (RMWR) with tight lattice core is being carried out at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) as one candidate for future reactors. The concept is developed to achieve a conversion ratio greater than unity using the tight lattice core (volume ratio of moderator to fuel is around 0.5 and the gap spacing between the fuel rods is remarkably narrower than in a reactor currently operated). Under such tight configuration, the core thermal margin becomes smaller and should be evaluated in a normal operation and also during the reflood phase in a large break loss-of-coolant accident (LBLOCA) for PWR type reactors. In this study, we have performed a feasibility evaluation on core cooling of reduced moderation PWR for the LBLOCA (200% break). The evaluation was performed for the primary system after the break by the REFLA/TRAC code. The core thermal output of the reduced moderation PWR is 2900 MWt, the gap between adjacent fuel rods is 1 mm, and heavy water is used as the moderator and coolant. The present design adopts seed fuel assemblies (MOX fuel) and several blanket fuel assemblies. In the blanket fuel assemblies, power density is lower than that of the seed fuel assemblies. Then, we set a channel box to each fuel assembly in order to adjust the flow rate in each assembly, because the possibility that the coolant boils in the seed fuel assemblies is very high. The pressure vessel diameter is bigger in comparison with a current PWR and core height is smaller than the current one. The current 4-loop PWR system is used, and, however, to fit into the bigger pressure vessel volume (about 1.5 times), we set up the capacity of the accumulator (1.5 times of the current PWR). Although the maximum clad temperature reached at about 1200 K in the position of 0.6 m from the lower core support plate, it is sufficiently lower than the design criteria of the current PWR (1500 K). The core cooling of the reduced moderation

  7. A Holistic Model That Physicochemically Links Iron Oxide - Apatite and Iron Oxide - Copper - Gold Deposits to Magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, A. C.; Reich, M.; Knipping, J.; Bilenker, L.; Barra, F.; Deditius, A.; Lundstrom, C.; Bindeman, I. N.

    2015-12-01

    Iron oxide-apatite (IOA) and iron oxide-copper-gold deposits (IOCG) are important sources of their namesake metals and increasingly for rare earth metals in apatite. Studies of natural systems document that IOA and IOCG deposits are often spatially and temporally related with one another and coeval magmatism. However, a genetic model that accounts for observations of natural systems remains elusive, with few observational data able to distinguish among working hypotheses that invoke meteoric fluid, magmatic-hydrothermal fluid, and immiscible melts. Here, we use Fe and O isotope data and high-resolution trace element (e.g., Ti, V, Mn, Al) data of individual magnetite grains from the world-class Los Colorados (LC) IOA deposit in the Chilean Iron Belt to elucidate the origin of IOA and IOCG deposits. Values of d56Fe range from 0.08‰ to 0.26‰, which are within the global range of ~0.06‰ to 0.5‰ for magnetite formed at magmatic conditions. Values of δ18O for magnetite and actinolite are 2.04‰ and 6.08‰, respectively, consistent with magmatic values. Ti, V, Al, and Mn are enriched in magnetite cores and decrease systematically from core to rim. Plotting [Al + Mn] vs. [Ti + V] indicates that magnetite cores are consistent with magmatic and/or magmatic-hydrothermal (i.e., porphyry) magnetites. Decreasing Al, Mn, Ti, V is consistent with a cooling trend from porphyry to Kiruna to IOCG systems. The data from LC are consistent with the following new genetic model for IOA and IOCG systems: 1) magnetite cores crystallize from silicate melt; 2) these magnetite crystals are nucleation sites for aqueous fluid that exsolves and scavenges inter alia Fe, P, S, Cu, Au from silicate melt; 3) the magnetite-fluid suspension is less dense that the surrounding magma, allowing ascent; 4) as the suspension ascends, magnetite grows in equilibrium with the fluid and takes on a magmatic-hydrothermal character (i.e., lower Al, Mn, Ti, V); 5) during ascent, magnetite, apatite and

  8. Development and evaluation of a prediction model for underestimated invasive breast cancer in women with ductal carcinoma in situ at stereotactic large core needle biopsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne C E Diepstraten

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We aimed to develop a multivariable model for prediction of underestimated invasiveness in women with ductal carcinoma in situ at stereotactic large core needle biopsy, that can be used to select patients for sentinel node biopsy at primary surgery. METHODS: From the literature, we selected potential preoperative predictors of underestimated invasive breast cancer. Data of patients with nonpalpable breast lesions who were diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ at stereotactic large core needle biopsy, drawn from the prospective COBRA (Core Biopsy after RAdiological localization and COBRA2000 cohort studies, were used to fit the multivariable model and assess its overall performance, discrimination, and calibration. RESULTS: 348 women with large core needle biopsy-proven ductal carcinoma in situ were available for analysis. In 100 (28.7% patients invasive carcinoma was found at subsequent surgery. Nine predictors were included in the model. In the multivariable analysis, the predictors with the strongest association were lesion size (OR 1.12 per cm, 95% CI 0.98-1.28, number of cores retrieved at biopsy (OR per core 0.87, 95% CI 0.75-1.01, presence of lobular cancerization (OR 5.29, 95% CI 1.25-26.77, and microinvasion (OR 3.75, 95% CI 1.42-9.87. The overall performance of the multivariable model was poor with an explained variation of 9% (Nagelkerke's R(2, mediocre discrimination with area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.66 (95% confidence interval 0.58-0.73, and fairly good calibration. CONCLUSION: The evaluation of our multivariable prediction model in a large, clinically representative study population proves that routine clinical and pathological variables are not suitable to select patients with large core needle biopsy-proven ductal carcinoma in situ for sentinel node biopsy during primary surgery.

  9. Iron Polymerization and Arsenic Removal During In-Situ Iron Electrocoagulation in Synthetic Bangladeshi Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Genuchten, C. M.; Pena, J.; Addy, S.; Gadgil, A.

    2010-12-01

    Millions of people worldwide are exposed to arsenic-contamination in groundwater drinking supplies. The majority of affected people live in rural Bangladesh. Electrocoagulation (EC) using iron electrodes is a promising arsenic removal strategy that is based on the generation of iron precipitates with a high affinity for arsenic through the electrochemical dissolution of a sacrificial iron anode. Many studies of iron hydrolysis in the presence of co-occurring ions in groundwater such as PO43-, SiO44-, and AsO43- suggest that these ions influence the polymerization and formation of iron oxide phases. However, the combined impact of these ions on precipitates generated by EC is not well understood. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was used to examine EC precipitates generated in synthetic Bangladeshi groundwater (SBGW). The iron oxide structure and arsenic binding geometry were investigated as a function of EC operating conditions. As and Fe k-edge spectra were similar between samples regardless of the large range of current density (0.02, 1.1, 5.0, 100 mA/cm2) used during sample generation. This result suggests that current density does not play a large role in the formation EC precipitates in SBGW. Shell-by-shell fits of Fe K-edge data revealed the presence of a single Fe-Fe interatomic distance at approximately 3.06 Å. The absence of longer ranged Fe-Fe correlations suggests that EC precipitates consist of nano-scale chains (polymers) of FeO6 octahedra sharing equatorial edges. Shell-by-shell fits of As K-edge spectra show arsenic bound in primarily bidentate, binuclear corner sharing complexes. In this coordination geometry, arsenic prevents the formation of FeO6 corner-sharing linkages, which are necessary for 3-dimensional crystal growth. The individual and combined effects of other anions, such as PO43- and SiO44- present in SBGW are currently being investigated to determine the role of these ions in stunting crystal growth. The results provided by this

  10. Core expansion in young star clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elson, R.A.W.; Freeman, K.C.; Lauer, T.R.

    1989-01-01

    The core radii of 18 rich star clusters in the LMC with ages from 10 Myr to 1 Gyr. Data for an additional 17 clusters with ages from 1 Myr to 10 Gyr are available in the literature. The combined sample shows that the core radii increase from about 0 to about 5 pc between about 1 Myr and 1 Gyr, and then begin to decrease again. The expansion of the cores is probably driven by mass loss from evolving stars. Models of cluster evolution show that the rate of increase in core radius is sensitive to the slope of the initial mass function. The observed core radius-age relation for the LMC clusters favors an intial mass function with slope slightly flatter than the Salpeter value. 20 refs

  11. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopic Characterization of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radu, T., E-mail: Teodora.Radu@itim-cj.ro [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 67-103 Donat Street, 400293, Cluj Napoca (Romania); Iacovita, C. [Department of Pharmaceutical Physics-Biophysics, Faculty of Pharmacy, “Iuliu Hatieganu” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 400349, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Benea, D. [Faculty of Physics, Babes Bolyai University, 400271, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Turcu, R. [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 67-103 Donat Street, 400293, Cluj Napoca (Romania)

    2017-05-31

    Highlights: • Characterization of three types of iron oxides magnetic nanoparticles. • A correlation between valence band XPS and the degree of iron oxidation is proposed. • Theoretical contributions of Fe in tetragonal and octahedral environment are shown. - Abstract: We report X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results on iron oxide magnetic nanoparticle (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) synthesized using solvothermal reduction in the presence of polyethylene glycol. The magnetite obtained was employed as precursor for the synthesis of γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (by oxygen dissociation) which in turn was transformed into α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. We confirmed the magnetite, maghemite and hematite structure by Fourier Transformed Spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The analysis of the XPS core level and valence band (VB) photoemission spectra for all investigated samples is discussed in terms of the degree of iron oxidation. This is of fundamental importance to better understand the electronic structure of the obtained iron oxide nanoparticles in order to control and improve their quality for specific biomedical applications. Moreover, theoretical band structure calculations are performed for magnetite and the separate contributions of Fe in tetragonal and octahedral environment are shown.

  12. LACOMERA - large scale experiments on core degradation, melt retention and coolability at the Forschungszentrum Karslruhe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miassoedov, A.; Alsmeyer, H.; Meyer, L.

    2003-01-01

    The LACOMERA project at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe is a 3 year shared-cost action within the Fifth Framework Programme which started in September 2002. The overall objectives of the LACOMERA project are to provide research institutions from the EU member countries and associated states access to large scale experimental facilities at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe which shall be used to increase the knowledge of the quenching of a degraded core and regaining melt coolability in the reactor pressure vessel, of possible melt dispersion to the cavity, of molten core concrete interaction and of ex-vessel melt coolability. One major aspect is to understand how these events affect the safety of European reactors so as to lead to soundly-based accident management procedures. The project will bring together interested partners of different European member states in the area of severe accident analysis and control, with the goal to increase the public confidence in the use of nuclear energy. Moreover, partners from the newly associated states should be included as far as possible, and therefore the needs of Eastern, as well as Western, reactors will be considered in LACOMERA project. The project offers a unique opportunity to get involved in the networks and activities supporting VVER safety, and for Eastern experts to get an access to large scale experimental facilities in a Western research organisation to improve understanding of material properties and core behaviour under severe accident conditions. As a result of the first call for proposals a project on air ingress test in the QUENCH facility has been selected. A second call for proposals is opened with a deadline of 31 December 2003. (author)

  13. Synthesis and morphology of iron-iron oxide core-shell nanoparticles produced by high pressure gas condensation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xing, Lijuan; ten Brink, Gert H.; Chen, Bin; Schmidt, Franz P.; Haberfehlner, Georg; Hofer, Ferdinand; Kooi, Bart J.; Palasantzas, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Core-shell structured Fe nanoparticles (NPs) produced by high pressure magnetron sputtering gas condensation were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, electron diffraction, electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), tomographic reconstruction, and Wulff shape construction

  14. Performance Improvement of a Magnetized Coaxial Plasma Gun by adopting Iron-core Bias Coil and New Pre-Ionization System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edo, Takahiro; Asai, T.; Tanaka, F.; Yamada, S.; Hosozawa, A.; Gota, H.; Roche, T.; Allfrey, I.; Matsumoto, T.

    2017-10-01

    A magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) is a device used to generate a compact toroid (CT), which has a spheromak-like configuration. A typical MCPG consists of a set of axisymmetric cylindrical electrodes, bias coil, and gas-puff valves. In order to expand the CT operating range, the distributions of the bias magnetic field and neutral gas have been investigated. We have developed a new means of generating stuffing flux. By inserting an iron core into the bias coil, the magnetic field increases dramatically; even a small current of a few Amps produces a sufficient bias field. According to a simulation result, it was also suggested that the radial distribution of the bias field is easily controlled. The ejected CT and the target FRC are cooled by excess neutral gas that typical MCPGs require to initiate a breakdown; therefore, we have adopted a miniature gun as a new pre-ionization (PI) system. By introducing this PI system, the breakdown occurs at lower neutral gas density so that the amount of excess neutral gas can be reduced.

  15. Large D-2 theory of superconducting fluctuations in a magnetic field and its application to iron pnictides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, James M; Tesanović, Zlatko

    2010-07-16

    A Ginzburg-Landau approach to fluctuations of a layered superconductor in a magnetic field is used to show that the interlayer coupling can be incorporated within an interacting self-consistent theory of a single layer, in the limit of a large number of neighboring layers. The theory exhibits two phase transitions-a vortex liquid-to-solid transition is followed by a Bose-Einstein condensation into the Abrikosov lattice-illustrating the essential role of interlayer coupling. By using this theory, explicit expressions for magnetization, specific heat, and fluctuation conductivity are derived. We compare our results with recent experimental data on the iron-pnictide superconductors.

  16. Normal Mode Derived Models of the Physical Properties of Earth's Outer Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, J. C. E.; Cottaar, S.; Lekic, V.; Wu, W.

    2017-12-01

    Earth's outer core, the largest reservoir of metal in our planet, is comprised of an iron alloy of an uncertain composition. Its dynamical behaviour is responsible for the generation of Earth's magnetic field, with convection driven both by thermal and chemical buoyancy fluxes. Existing models of the seismic velocity and density of the outer core exhibit some variation, and there are only a small number of models which aim to represent the outer core's density.It is therefore important that we develop a better understanding of the physical properties of the outer core. Though most of the outer core is likely to be well mixed, it is possible that the uppermost outer core is stably stratified: it may be enriched in light elements released during the growth of the solid, iron enriched, inner core; by elements dissolved from the mantle into the outer core; or by exsolution of compounds previously dissolved in the liquid metal which will eventually be swept into the mantle. The stratified layer may host MAC or Rossby waves and it could impede communication between the chemically differentiated mantle and outer core, including screening out some of the geodynamo's signal. We use normal mode center frequencies to estimate the physical properties of the outer core in a Bayesian framework. We estimate the mineral physical parameters needed to best produce velocity and density models of the outer core which are consistent with the normal mode observations. We require that our models satisfy realistic physical constraints. We create models of the outer core with and without a distinct uppermost layer and assess the importance of this region.Our normal mode-derived models are compared with observations of body waves which travel through the outer core. In particular, we consider SmKS waves which are especially sensitive to the uppermost outer core and are therefore an important way to understand the robustness of our models.

  17. Effect of the hybrid composition on the physicochemical properties and morphology of iron oxide–gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, C. M.; Gueorguieva, M.; Lees, M. R.; McGarvey, D. J.; Darton, R. J.; Hoskins, C.

    2012-01-01

    Hybrid nanoparticles (HNPs) formed from iron oxide cores and gold nano-shells are becoming increasingly applicable in biomedicine. However, little investigation has been carried out on the effects of the constituent components on their physical characteristics. Here we determine the effect of polymer intermediate, gold nano-shell thickness and magnetic iron oxide core diameter on the morphological and physical properties of these nano-hybrids. Our findings suggest that the use of polymer intermediate directly impacts the morphology of the nanostructure formed. Here, we observed the formation of nano-sphere and nano-star structures by varying the cationic polymer intermediate. The nano-stars formed have a larger magnetic coercivity, T 2 relaxivity and exhibited a unique characteristic nano-heating pattern upon laser irradiation. Increasing the iron oxide core diameter resulted in a greater T 2 relaxivity enhanced and nano-heating capabilities due to increased surface area. Increasing the gold nano-shell thickness resulted in a decreased efficiency as a nano-heater along with a decrease in T 2 relaxivity. These results highlight the importance of identifying the key traits required when fabricating HNPs in order to tailor them to specific applications.

  18. Geochemical Constraints on Core-Mantle Interaction from Fe/Mn Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humayun, M.; Qin, L.

    2003-12-01

    The greater density of liquid iron alloy, and its immiscibility with silicate, maintains the physical separation of the core from the mantle. There are no a priori reasons, however, why the Earth's mantle should be chemically isolated from the core. Osmium isotopic variations in mantle plumes have been interpreted in terms of interaction between outer core and the source regions of deep mantle plumes. If chemical transport occurs across the core-mantle boundary its mechanism remains to be established. The Os isotope evidence has also been interpreted as the signatures of subducted Mn-sediments, which are known to have relatively high Pt/Os. In the mantle, Fe occurs mainly as the divalent ferrous ion, and Mn occurs solely as a divalent ion, and both behave in a geochemically coherent manner because of similarity in ionic charge and radius. Thus, the Fe/Mn ratio is a planetary constant insensitive to processes of mantle differentiation by partial melting. Two processes may perturb the ambient mantle Fe/Mn of 60: a) the subduction of Mn-sediments should decrease the Fe/Mn ratio in plume sources, while b) chemical transport from the outer core may increase the Fe/Mn ratio. The differentiation of the liquid outer core to form the solid inner core may increase abundances of the light element constituents (FeS, FeO, etc.) to the point of exsolution from the core at the CMB. The exact rate of this process is determined by the rate of inner core growth. Two end-member models include 1) inner core formation mainly prior to 3.5 Ga with heat release dominated by radioactive sources, or 2) inner core formation occurring mainly in the last 1.5 Ga with heat release dominated by latent heat. This latter model would imply large fluxes of Fe into the sources of modern mantle plumes. Existing Fe/Mn data for Gorgona and Hawaiian samples place limits on both these processes. We describe a new procedure for the precise determination of the Fe/Mn ratio in magmatic rocks by ICP-MS. This

  19. Electron Spectroscopy Studies of Iron, Iron Sulfides and Supported Iron Surfaces: Chemisorption of Simple Gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yiu Chung

    EELS was used to investigate the chemisorption of oxygen and carbon on iron. The EELS spectra of oxidized iron show characteristic features with strong enhancement of the interband transitions involving the Fe 3d band (4.6 and 7.5 eV) and moderate enhancement of the M(,2,3) transition doublet (54.4 and 58.2 eV). The changes in the electron energy loss structures with an overlayer of graphitic or carbidic carbon were investigated. The adsorption and growth of iron on Ni(100) has been studied using the combined techniques of LEED and EELS. Initially iron grows by a layer-by-layer mechanism for the first few layers. High iron coverages result in the observation of complex LEED patterns with satellites around the main (1 x 1) diffraction sports. This is due to the formation of b.c.c. Fe(110) crystallites arranged in domains with different orientations. EELS studies show the presence of three stages in the growth of iron on Ni(100): low-coverage, film-like and bulk-like. Auger and EELS were used to study the iron sulfide (FeS(,2), Fe(,7)S(,8) and FeS) surfaces. A characteristic M(,2,3) VV Auger doublet with a separation of 5.0 eV was observed on the sulfides. An assignment of the electron energy loss peaks was made based on the energy dependence of the loss peaks and previous photoemission results. The effect of argon ion bombardment was studied. Peaks with strong iron and sulfur character were observed. Heating the damaged sulfides results in reconstruction of the sulfide surfaces. The reactions of the sulfides with simple gases, such as H(,2), CO, CH(,4), C(,2)H(,4), NH(,3) and O(,2) were also studied. Using XPS, the chemisorption of SO(,2) on CaO(100) has been studied. The chemical state of sulfur has been identified as that of sulfate. The kinetics of SO(,2) chemisorption on CaO are discussed. The binding states of Fe and Na on CaO were determined to be Fe('2+) and Na('+) respectively. At low Fe or Na coverages (< 0.5 ML), there is a large increase in the rate of

  20. Cell type-specific sorting of neuropeptides : a mechanism to modulate peptide composition of large dense core vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klumperman, J.; Spijker, S.; Minnen, J. van; Sharp-Baker, H.; Smit, A.B.; Geraerts, W.P.M.

    1996-01-01

    The CNS of Lymnaea stagnalis contains two populations of egg-laying hormone (ELH)-producing neurons that differ in size and topology. In type I neurons, all peptides located C-terminally from the cleavage site Arg-Ser-Arg-Arg180-183 are sorted into secretory large dense-core vesicles (LDCV), whereas

  1. MONJU experimental data analysis and its feasibility evaluation to build up the standard data base for large FBR nuclear core design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugino, K.; Iwai, T.

    2006-01-01

    MONJU experimental data analysis was performed by using the detailed calculation scheme for fast reactor cores developed in Japan. Subsequently, feasibility of the MONJU integral data was evaluated by the cross-section adjustment technique for the use of FBR nuclear core design. It is concluded that the MONJU integral data is quite valuable for building up the standard data base for large FBR nuclear core design. In addition, it is found that the application of the updated data base has a possibility to considerably improve the prediction accuracy of neutronic parameters for MONJU. (authors)

  2. Local iron homeostasis in the breast ductal carcinoma microenvironment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, Oriana; Porto, Graça; Rêma, Alexandra; Faria, Fátima; Cruz Paula, Arnaud; Gomez-Lazaro, Maria; Silva, Paula; Martins da Silva, Berta; Lopes, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    While the deregulation of iron homeostasis in breast epithelial cells is acknowledged, iron-related alterations in stromal inflammatory cells from the tumor microenvironment have not been explored. Immunohistochemistry for hepcidin, ferroportin 1 (FPN1), transferrin receptor 1 (TFR1) and ferritin (FT) was performed in primary breast tissues and axillary lymph nodes in order to dissect the iron-profiles of epithelial cells, lymphocytes and macrophages. Furthermore, breast carcinoma core biopsies frozen in optimum cutting temperature (OCT) compound were subjected to imaging flow cytometry to confirm FPN1 expression in the cell types previously evaluated and determine its cellular localization. We confirm previous results by showing that breast cancer epithelial cells present an ‘iron-utilization phenotype’ with an increased expression of hepcidin and TFR1, and decreased expression of FT. On the other hand, lymphocytes and macrophages infiltrating primary tumors and from metastized lymph nodes display an ‘iron-donor’ phenotype, with increased expression of FPN1 and FT, concomitant with an activation profile reflected by a higher expression of TFR1 and hepcidin. A higher percentage of breast carcinomas, compared to control mastectomy samples, present iron accumulation in stromal inflammatory cells, suggesting that these cells may constitute an effective tissue iron reservoir. Additionally, not only the deregulated expression of iron-related proteins in epithelial cells, but also on lymphocytes and macrophages, are associated with clinicopathological markers of breast cancer poor prognosis, such as negative hormone receptor status and tumor size. The present results reinforce the importance of analyzing the tumor microenvironment in breast cancer, extending the contribution of immune cells to local iron homeostasis in the tumor microenvironment context

  3. Large-scale synthesis of high-purity well-aligned carbon nanotubes using pyrolysis of iron(II) phthalocyanine and acetylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, B. C.; Lee, T. J.; Lee, S. H.; Park, C. Y.; Lee, C. J.

    2003-08-01

    Well-aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with high purity have been produced by pyrolysis of iron(II) phthalocyanine and acetylene at 800 °C. The synthesized CNTs have a length of 75 μm and diameters ranging from 20 to 60 nm. The CNTs have a bamboo-like structure and exhibit good crystallinity of graphite sheets. The growth rate of the CNTs was rapidly increased with adding C 2H 2. Our results demonstrate that the proposed growth method is suitable to large-scale synthesis of high-purity well-aligned CNTs on various substrates.

  4. Effect of Melting Techniques on Ductile Iron castings Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bockus, S.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was designed to investigate the effects of the charge, melting conditions, nodularizing and inoculation on the ductile iron castings properties. Results showed that the temperature and holding time of the melt in an induction furnace and the intensity of spheroidizing effect on the carbon and residual magnesium contents in the ductile iron castings. The same grade of ductile iron may be obtained using different chemical compositions. The castings of ductile iron will be ferritic as-cast only when large amount of pig iron in the charge and in addition some-steps inoculating treatment are used.

  5. Magnetodielectric coupling in multiferroic holmium iron garnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malar Selvi, M.; Chakraborty, Deepannita; Venkateswaran, C.

    2017-01-01

    Single phase magneto-electric multiferroics require a large magnetic or electric field for producing magneto-electric (ME) and magnetodielectric (MD) effects. For utilizing these effects in devices investigations on the room temperature and low field MD studies are necessary. Recently, efforts have been largely devoted to the investigation of rare earth iron garnets. In the physical method, the preparation of rare earth iron garnet requires high sintering temperature and processing time. To solve these problems, ball milling assisted microwave sintering technique is used to prepare nanocrystalline holmium iron garnets (Ho_3Fe_5O_1_2). Magnetic and dielectric properties of the prepared sample are investigated. These properties get enhanced in nanocrystalline form when compared to the bulk. The MD coupling of the prepared sample is evident from the anomaly in the temperature dependent dielectric constant plot and the ME coupling susceptibility is derived from the room temperature MD measurements. - Highlights: • Formation of single phase Holmium iron garnet reported. • Ball milling assisted microwave sintering reduces the sintering temperature and time. • Holmium iron garnet shows enhanced magnetic and dielectric properties. • Pyromagnetic and pyroelectric measurements confirm the magnetoelectric coupling. • Room temperature magnetodielectric measurements show the nonlinear behaviour.

  6. Microbial Beneficiation of Salem Iron Ore Using Penicillium purpurogenum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, M.; Pradhan, M.; Sukla, L. B.; Mishra, B. K.

    2011-02-01

    High alumina and silica content in the iron ore affects coke rate, reducibility, and productivity in a blast furnace. Iron ore is being beneficiated all around the world to meet the quality requirement of iron and steel industries. Choosing a beneficiation treatment depends on the nature of the gangue present and its association with the ore structure. The advanced physicochemical methods used for the beneficiation of iron ore are generally unfriendly to the environment. Biobeneficiation is considered to be ecofriendly, promising, and revolutionary solutions to these problems. A characterization study of Salem iron ore indicates that the major iron-bearing minerals are hematite, magnetite, and goethite. Samples on average contains (pct) Fe2O3-84.40, Fe (total)-59.02, Al2O3-7.18, and SiO2-7.53. Penicillium purpurogenum (MTCC 7356) was used for the experiment . It removed 35.22 pct alumina and 39.41 pct silica in 30 days in a shake flask at 10 pct pulp density, 308 K (35 °C), and 150 rpm. In a bioreactor experiment at 2 kg scale using the same organism, it removed 23.33 pct alumina and 30.54 pct silica in 30 days at 300 rpm agitation and 2 to 3 l/min aeration. Alumina and silica dissolution follow the shrinking core model for both shake flask and bioreactor experiments.

  7. Hydrogen sulphide improves adaptation of Zea mays seedlings to iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juan; Wu, Fei-Hua; Shang, Yu-Ting; Wang, Wen-Hua; Hu, Wen-Jun; Simon, Martin; Liu, Xiang; Shangguan, Zhou-Ping; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is emerging as a potential molecule involved in physiological regulation in plants. However, whether H2S regulates iron-shortage responses in plants is largely unknown. Here, the role of H2S in modulating iron availability in maize (Zea mays L. cv Canner) seedlings grown in iron-deficient culture solution is reported. The main results are as follows: Firstly, NaHS, a donor of H2S, completely prevented leaf interveinal chlorosis in maize seedlings grown in iron-deficient culture solution. Secondly, electron micrographs of mesophyll cells from iron-deficient maize seedlings revealed plastids with few photosynthetic lamellae and rudimentary grana. On the contrary, mesophyll chloroplasts appeared completely developed in H2S-treated maize seedlings. Thirdly, H2S treatment increased iron accumulation in maize seedlings by changing the expression levels of iron homeostasis- and sulphur metabolism-related genes. Fourthly, phytosiderophore (PS) accumulation and secretion were enhanced by H2S treatment in seedlings grown in iron-deficient solution. Indeed, the gene expression of ferric-phytosiderophore transporter (ZmYS1) was specifically induced by iron deficiency in maize leaves and roots, whereas their abundance was decreased by NaHS treatment. Lastly, H2S significantly enhanced photosynthesis through promoting the protein expression of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase large subunit (RuBISCO LSU) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and the expression of genes encoding RuBISCO large subunit (RBCL), small subunit (RBCS), D1 protein (psbA), and PEPC in maize seedlings grown in iron-deficient solution. These results indicate that H2S is closely related to iron uptake, transport, and accumulation, and consequently increases chlorophyll biosynthesis, chloroplast development, and photosynthesis in plants. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  8. Rapid estimate of solid volume in large tuff cores using a gas pycnometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thies, C.; Geddis, A.M.; Guzman, A.G.

    1996-09-01

    A thermally insulated, rigid-volume gas pycnometer system has been developed. The pycnometer chambers have been machined from solid PVC cylinders. Two chambers confine dry high-purity helium at different pressures. A thick-walled design ensures minimal heat exchange with the surrounding environment and a constant volume system, while expansion takes place between the chambers. The internal energy of the gas is assumed constant over the expansion. The ideal gas law is used to estimate the volume of solid material sealed in one of the chambers. Temperature is monitored continuously and incorporated into the calculation of solid volume. Temperature variation between measurements is less than 0.1 degrees C. The data are used to compute grain density for oven-dried Apache Leap tuff core samples. The measured volume of solid and the sample bulk volume are used to estimate porosity and bulk density. Intrinsic permeability was estimated from the porosity and measured pore surface area and is compared to in-situ measurements by the air permeability method. The gas pycnometer accommodates large core samples (0.25 m length x 0.11 m diameter) and can measure solid volume greater than 2.20 cm 3 with less than 1% error

  9. Material and technique of S i-Mo heatresistant vermicular iron exhaust manifold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Yong-xi

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Si-Mo vermicular iron is an ideal material for exhaust manifold that works in high temperature and therm alcycle conditions because its properties oftherm alfatigue resistance and thermal distortion resistance are significantly better than that of gray cast iron and nodular iron. This paper explains that the verm icularity of Si-Mo verm icular iron is better to be controlled approxim ately to 50% for the applications of exhaust manifold castings, and generalizes the successful experience ofverm icularizing technique thatuses sandwich(pouroverprocess combining with cored-wire injection in trough process together,and uses rare earths-magnesium-silicon as verm icularizing alloy in Disa high speed molding line and autom atic plug rod airpressure pouring furnace. In addition, this paper also describes the method to solve the shrinkage hole and porosity defects in the exhaustm anifold production.

  10. Iron oxides in acid mine drainage environments and their association with bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferris, F G; Tazaki, K; Fyfe, W S

    1989-01-20

    A variety of iron oxides were identified by X-ray diffraction in sediments receiving acid drainage from mine tailing and coal refuse impoundments. Small amounts of goethite and hematite were found in the sediment samples. However, the major iron oxide species was ferrihydrite which gave diffuse diffraction bands at angles corresponding to d2.5, 2.2 and 1.5 Angstrom. Main core line binding energies in Fe (2p) and O (1s) X-ray photoelectron spectra were consistent with the hydrous nature and predominance of ferrihydrite. Electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy also showed that individual bacterial cells promoted the development of iron oxide mineralization. The bacterial associated iron oxides were similar to those in the bulk sediment samples, and exhibited structures conforming to the presence of chemisorbed sulfate or silicate anions. 23 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Experimental analysis of flow of ductile cast iron in stream lined gating systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov-Hansen, Søren Peter; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2008-01-01

    Streamlined gating systems have been developed for production of high integrity ductile cast iron parts. Flow of ductile cast iron in streamlined gating systems was studied in glass fronted sand moulds where flow in the gating system and casting was recorded by a digital video camera. These results...... show how the quality of pouring, design of ingates, design of bends and flow over cores influence melt flow and act to determine the quality of the castings....

  12. Iron Refractory Iron Deficiency Anaemia: A Rare Cause of Iron Deficiency Anaemia

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGrath, T

    2018-01-01

    We describe the case of a 17-month-old boy with a hypochromic microcytic anaemia, refractory to oral iron treatment. After exclusion of dietary and gastrointestinal causes of iron deficiency, a genetic cause for iron deficiency was confirmed by finding two mutations in the TMPRSS6 gene, consistent with a diagnosis of iron-refractory iron deficiency anaemia (IRIDA).

  13. Influence of Shell Thickness on the Colloidal Stability of Magnetic Core-Shell Particle Suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Frances; Moreno-Atanasio, Roberto

    2018-01-01

    We present a Discrete Element study of the behavior of magnetic core-shell particles in which the properties of the core and the shell are explicitly defined. Particle cores were considered to be made of pure iron and thus possessed ferromagnetic properties, while particle shells were considered to be made of silica. Core sizes ranged between 0.5 and 4.0 μm with the actual particle size of the core-shell particles in the range between 0.6 and 21 μm. The magnetic cores were considered to have a magnetization of one tenth of the saturation magnetization of iron. This study aimed to understand how the thickness of the shell hinders the formation of particle chains. Chain formation was studied with different shell thicknesses and particle sizes in the presence and absence of an electrical double layer force in order to investigate the effect of surface charge density on the magnetic core-shell particle interactions. For core sizes of 0.5 and 4.0 μm the relative shell thicknesses needed to hinder the aggregation process were approximately 0.4 and 0.6 respectively, indicating that larger core sizes are detrimental to be used in applications in which no flocculation is needed. In addition, the presence of an electrical double layer, for values of surface charge density of less than 20 mC/m 2 , could stop the contact between particles without hindering their vertical alignment. Only when the shell thickness was considerably larger, was the electrical double layer able to contribute to the full disruption of the magnetic flocculation process.

  14. A model for Cryogenian iron formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Grant M.; Halverson, Galen P.; Poirier, André; Le Heron, Daniel; Strauss, Justin V.; Stevenson, Ross

    2016-01-01

    The Neoproterozoic Tatonduk (Alaska) and Holowilena (South Australia) iron formations share many characteristics including their broadly coeval (Sturtian) ages, intimate association with glaciogenic sediments, and mineralogy. We show that these shared characteristics extend to their neodymium (εNd) and iron isotope (δ56Fe) systematics. In both regions δ56Fe values display a distinct up-section trend to isotopically heavier values, while εNd values are primitive and similar to non-ferruginous mudstones within these successions. The δ56Fe profiles are consistent with oxidation of ferruginous waters during marine transgression, and the εNd values imply that much of this iron was sourced from the leaching of continental margin sediments largely derived from continental flood basalts. Rare earth element data indicate a secondary hydrothermal source for this iron.

  15. IAEA/WHO programme on iron nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudley, R.A.

    1973-01-01

    For many years, both the World Health Organization and the International Atomic Energy Agency have sponsored research related to the subject of iron deficiency in humans. About four years ago their collective efforts were brought into focus in a co-ordinated research programme on iron nutrition. This may not yet be the 'large co-operative effort' which Dr. Moore envisioned, but it has the same objectives. Through modest financial assistance, the central supply of certain essential materials, and the effective exchange of information among collaborating scientists, the programme attempts to understand the state of iron nutrition in several societies and to identify means by which it can be improved. For two reasons, the emphasis of this co-ordinated programme is on iron nutrition in the developing countries. First, nutrition in general and iron nutrition in particular are more often marginal in these countries than in the developed countries, and second, the developing countries have fewer resources of their own to devote to this problem

  16. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Cast iron, as a traditional metal material, has advantages of low total cost, good castability and machinability, good wear resistance and low notch sensitivity, and is still facing tough challenge in quality, property and variety of types etc. Experts and engineers studying and producing iron castings all around world extremely concern this serious challenge. Over more than 30 years, a great of research work has been carried out on how to further improve its property, expand its application and combine cast iron technology with some hi-techs (for example, computer technology. Nevertheless, cast iron is a multi-element and multi-phase alloy and has complex and variety of structures and still has great development potential in structure and property. For further studying and developing cast iron, theoretical research work is important promise, and the study on solidification process and control mechanism of graphite morphology is fundamental for improving property of cast iron and developing new type of cast iron.Metallography of cast iron normally includes two sections: liquid phase transformation and solid phase transformation. The book, Colour Metallography of Cast Iron , uses colour metallography technique to study solidification structures of cast irons: graphite, carbides, austenite and eutectics; and focuses on solidification processes. With progress of modern solidification theory, the control of material solidification process becomes important measure for improving traditionalmaterials and developing new materials. Solidification structure not only influences mechanical and physical properties of cast iron, but also affects its internal quality. The book uses a large amount of colour photos to describe the formation of solidification structures and their relations. Crystallization phenomena, which cannot be displayed with traditional metallography, are presented and more phase transformation information is obtained from these colour

  17. Theoretical Investigation of Hydrogen Adsorption and Dissociation on Iron and Iron Carbide Surfaces Using the ReaxFF Reactive Force Field Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Chenyu; van Duin, Adri C.T.; Sorescu, Dan C.

    2012-06-01

    We have developed a ReaxFF reactive force field to describe hydrogen adsorption and dissociation on iron and iron carbide surfaces relevant for simulation of Fischer–Tropsch (FT) synthesis on iron catalysts. This force field enables large system (>>1000 atoms) simulations of hydrogen related reactions with iron. The ReaxFF force field parameters are trained against a substantial amount of structural and energetic data including the equations of state and heats of formation of iron and iron carbide related materials, as well as hydrogen interaction with iron surfaces and different phases of bulk iron. We have validated the accuracy and applicability of ReaxFF force field by carrying out molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen adsorption, dissociation and recombination on iron and iron carbide surfaces. The barriers and reaction energies for molecular dissociation on these two types of surfaces have been compared and the effect of subsurface carbon on hydrogen interaction with iron surface is evaluated. We found that existence of carbon atoms at subsurface iron sites tends to increase the hydrogen dissociation energy barrier on the surface, and also makes the corresponding hydrogen dissociative state relatively more stable compared to that on bare iron. These properties of iron carbide will affect the dissociation rate of H{sub 2} and will retain more surface hydride species, thus influencing the dynamics of the FT synthesis process.

  18. Separated core turbofan engine; Core bunrigata turbofan engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Y; Endo, M; Matsuda, Y; Sugiyama, N; Sugahara, N; Yamamoto, K [National Aerospace Laboratory, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-04-01

    This report outlines the separated core turbofan engine. This engine is featured by parallel separated arrangement of a fan and core engine which are integrated into one unit in the conventional turbofan engine. In general, cruising efficiency improvement and noise reduction are achieved by low fan pressure ratio and low exhaust speed due to high bypass ratio, however, it causes various problems such as large fan and nacelle weight due to large air flow rate of a fan, and shift of an operating point affected by flight speed. The parallel separated arrangement is thus adopted. The stable operation of a fan and core engine is easily retained by independently operating air inlet unaffected by fan. The large degree of freedom of combustion control is also obtained by independent combustor. Fast response, simple structure and optimum aerodynamic design are easily achieved. This arrangement is also featured by flexibility of development and easy maintenance, and by various merits superior to conventional turbofan engines. It has no technological problems difficult to be overcome, and is also suitable for high-speed VTOL transport aircraft. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Balancing ESA and iron therapy in a prospective payment environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronoff, George R; Gaweda, Adam E

    2014-02-01

    Ever since the introduction of EPO, ESAs and iron dosing have been driven by financial incentives. When ESAs were a profit center for providers, large doses were used. With ESAs becoming a cost center, a new trend has appeared, gradually replacing their use with iron to achieve the same therapeutic effect at lower cost. This financially driven approach, treating ESAs and iron as alternatives, is not consistent with human physiology where these agents act in a complementary manner. It is likely that we are still giving unnecessarily large doses of ESAs and iron, relative to what our patients' true needs are. Although we have highlighted the economic drivers of this outcome, many other factors play a role. These include our lack of understanding of the complex interplay of the anemia of chronic disease, inflammation, poor nutrition, blood loss through dialysis, ESAs and iron deficiency. We propose that physiology-driven modeling may provide some insight into the interactions between erythropoiesis and ferrokinetics. This insight can then be used to derive new, physiologically compatible dosing guidelines for ESAs and iron.

  20. Noise pollution in iron and steel industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisio, G.; Piromalli, W.; Acerbo, P.

    1999-01-01

    Iron and steel industry is characterized by high energy consumption and thus present remarkable problems from the point of view of noise pollution. The aims of this paper is to examine characteristic and acoustical emissions and immisions of some fundamentals iron and steel plants with several remarks on the possible measures to reduce noise pollution. For a large integrate iron and steel system, some surveys are shown with all devices running and, in addition, comparisons are made with other surveys when the main devices were out of service owing to great maintenance works [it

  1. Hydrogenation of carbon to methane in reduced sponge iron, chromium, and ferrochromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qayyum, M A; Reeve, D A

    1976-01-01

    Hydrogenation of excess carbon to methane in reduced sponge iron, chromium and ferrochromium under isothermal and temperature-programmed conditions indicates that it is possible to control the residual carbon content of the metallized products which may be an advantage if further processing of the products is contemplated. Hydrogenation starts above 800/sup 0/C and a shrinking-core kinetic model fits the experimental data. The mean apparent activation energy for the hydrogenation of residual carbon to methane in sponge iron, chromium and ferrochromium is 21 kcal/mole.

  2. Integrating themes, evidence gaps, and research needs identified by workshop on iron screening and supplementation in iron-replete pregnant women and young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannon, Patsy M; Stover, Patrick J; Taylor, Christine L

    2017-12-01

    This report addresses the evidence and the uncertainties, knowledge gaps, and research needs identified by participants at the NIH workshop related to iron screening and routine iron supplementation of largely iron-replete pregnant women and young children (6-24 mo) in developed countries. The workshop presentations and panel discussions focused on current understanding and knowledge gaps related to iron homeostasis, measurement of and evidence for iron status, and emerging concerns about supplementing iron-replete members of these vulnerable populations. Four integrating themes emerged across workshop presentations and discussion and centered on 1 ) physiologic or developmental adaptations of iron homeostasis to pregnancy and early infancy, respectively, and their implications, 2 ) improvement of the assessment of iron status across the full continuum from iron deficiency anemia to iron deficiency to iron replete to iron excess, 3 ) the linkage of iron status with health outcomes beyond hematologic outcomes, and 4 ) the balance of benefit and harm of iron supplementation of iron-replete pregnant women and young children. Research that addresses these themes in the context of the full continuum of iron status is needed to inform approaches to the balancing of benefits and harms of screening and routine supplementation. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  3. On Intensive Late Holocene Iron Mining and Production in the Northern Congo Basin and the Environmental Consequences Associated with Metallurgy in Central Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, Karen D; Schmitt, Dave N; Kiahtipes, Christopher A; Ndanga, Jean-Paul; Young, D Craig; Simiti, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    An ongoing question in paleoenvironmental reconstructions of the central African rainforest concerns the role that prehistoric metallurgy played in shaping forest vegetation. Here we report evidence of intensive iron-ore mining and smelting in forested regions of the northern Congo Basin dating to the late Holocene. Volumetric estimates on extracted iron-ore and associated slag mounds from prehistoric sites in the southern Central African Republic suggest large-scale iron production on par with other archaeological and historically-known iron fabrication areas. These data document the first evidence of intensive iron mining and production spanning approximately 90 years prior to colonial occupation (circa AD 1889) and during an interval of time that is poorly represented in the archaeological record. Additional site areas pre-dating these remains by 3-4 centuries reflect an earlier period of iron production on a smaller scale. Microbotanical evidence from a sediment core collected from an adjacent riparian trap shows a reduction in shade-demanding trees in concert with an increase in light-demanding species spanning the time interval associated with iron intensification. This shift occurs during the same time interval when many portions of the Central African witnessed forest transgressions associated with a return to moister and more humid conditions beginning 500-100 years ago. Although data presented here do not demonstrate that iron smelting activities caused widespread vegetation change in Central Africa, we argue that intense mining and smelting can have localized and potentially regional impacts on vegetation communities. These data further demonstrate the high value of pairing archeological and paleoenvironmental analyses to reconstruct regional-scale forest histories.

  4. Oncoidal granular iron formation in the Mesoarchaean Pongola Supergroup, southern Africa: Textural and geochemical evidence for biological activity during iron deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A J B; Beukes, N J; Gutzmer, J; Czaja, A D; Johnson, C M; Nhleko, N

    2017-11-01

    We document the discovery of the first granular iron formation (GIF) of Archaean age and present textural and geochemical results that suggest these formed through microbial iron oxidation. The GIF occurs in the Nconga Formation of the ca. 3.0-2.8 Ga Pongola Supergroup in South Africa and Swaziland. It is interbedded with oxide and silicate facies micritic iron formation (MIF). There is a strong textural control on iron mineralization in the GIF not observed in the associated MIF. The GIF is marked by oncoids with chert cores surrounded by magnetite and calcite rims. These rims show laminated domal textures, similar in appearance to microstromatolites. The GIF is enriched in silica and depleted in Fe relative to the interbedded MIF. Very low Al and trace element contents in the GIF indicate that chemically precipitated chert was reworked above wave base into granules in an environment devoid of siliciclastic input. Microbially mediated iron precipitation resulted in the formation of irregular, domal rims around the chert granules. During storm surges, oncoids were transported and deposited in deeper water environments. Textural features, along with positive δ 56 Fe values in magnetite, suggest that iron precipitation occurred through incomplete oxidation of hydrothermal Fe 2+ by iron-oxidizing bacteria. The initial Fe 3+ -oxyhydroxide precipitates were then post-depositionally transformed to magnetite. Comparison of the Fe isotope compositions of the oncoidal GIF with those reported for the interbedded deeper water iron formation (IF) illustrates that the Fe 2+ pathways and sources for these units were distinct. It is suggested that the deeper water IF was deposited from the evolved margin of a buoyant Fe 2+ aq -rich hydrothermal plume distal to its source. In contrast, oncolitic magnetite rims of chert granules were sourced from ambient Fe 2+ aq -depleted shallow ocean water beyond the plume. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Chemical and physical changes during seawater flow through intact dunite cores: An experimental study at 150-200 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, Andrew J.; Tutolo, Benjamin M.; Bagley, Brian C.; Mildner, David F. R.; Scheuermann, Peter P.; Feinberg, Joshua M.; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Seyfried, William E.

    2017-10-01

    Two flow-through experiments were conducted to assess serpentinization of intact dunite cores. Permeability and fluid chemistry indicate significantly more reaction during the second experiment at 200 °C than the first experiment at 150 °C. Permeability decreased by a factor of 2.4 and 25 during the experiments at 150 and 200 °C, respectively. Furthermore, hydrogen and methane concentrations exceeded 600 μmol/kg and 300 μmol/kg during the 200 °C experiment, and were one and two orders of magnitude higher, respectively, than the 150 °C experiment. Fe K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure analyses of alteration minerals demonstrated Fe oxidation that occurred during the 200 °C experiment. Vibrating sample magnetometer measurements on post-experimental cores indicated little to no magnetite production, suggesting that the hydrogen was largely generated by the oxidation of iron as olivine was converted to ferric iron (Fe(III)) serpentine and/or saponite. Scanning electron microscopy images suggested secondary mineralization on the post-experimental core from the 200 °C experiment, portraying the formation of a secondary phase with a honeycomb-like texture as well as calcite and wollastonite. Scanning electron microscopy images also illustrated dissolution along linear bands through the interiors of olivine crystals, possibly along pathways with abundant fluid inclusions. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy identified Cl uptake in serpentine, while Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy suggested the formation of serpentine, saponite, and talc. However, no change was observed when comparing pre- and post-experimental X-ray computed tomography scans of the cores. Furthermore, (ultra) small angle neutron scattering datasets were collected to assess changes in porosity, surface area, and fractal characteristics of the samples over the ≈ 1 nm- to 10 μm-scale range. The results from the 200 °C post-experimental core generally fell within the range of

  6. Collapsing stellar cores and supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, R J [Nordisk Inst. for Teoretisk Atomfysik, Copenhagen (Denmark); Noorgaard, H [Nordisk Inst. for Teoretisk Atomfysik, Copenhagen (Denmark); Chicago Univ., IL (USA). Enrico Fermi Inst.); Bond, J R [Niels Bohr Institutet, Copenhagen (Denmark); California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena (USA). W.K. Kellogg Radiation Lab.)

    1979-05-01

    The evolution of a stellar core is studied during its final quasi-hydrostatic contraction. The core structure and the (poorly known) properties of neutron rich matter are parametrized to include most plausible cases. It is found that the density-temperature trajectory of the material in the central part of the core (the core-center) is insensitive to nearly all reasonable parameter variations. The central density at the onset of the dynamic phase of the collapse (when the core-center begins to fall away from the rest of the star) and the fraction of the emitted neutrinos which are trapped in the collapsing core-center depend quite sensitively on the properties of neutron rich matter. We estimate that the amount of energy Ecm which is imparted to the core-mantle by the neutrinos which escape from the imploded core-center can span a large range of values. For plausible choices of nuclear and model parameters Ecm can be large enough to yield a supernova event.

  7. Waves in the core and mechanical core-mantle interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jault, D.; Finlay, Chris

    2015-01-01

    This Chapter focuses on time-dependent uid motions in the core interior, which can beconstrained by observations of the Earth's magnetic eld, on timescales which are shortcompared to the magnetic diusion time. This dynamics is strongly inuenced by the Earth's rapid rotation, which rigidies...... the motions in the direction parallel to the Earth'srotation axis. This property accounts for the signicance of the core-mantle topography.In addition, the stiening of the uid in the direction parallel to the rotation axis gives riseto a magnetic diusion layer attached to the core-mantle boundary, which would...... otherwisebe dispersed by Alfven waves. This Chapter complements the descriptions of large-scaleow in the core (8.04), of turbulence in the core (8.06) and of core-mantle interactions(8.12), which can all be found in this volume. We rely on basic magnetohydrodynamictheory, including the derivation...

  8. Reduction of iron-bearing lunar minerals for the production of oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massieon, Charles; Cutler, Andrew; Shadman, Farhang

    1992-01-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of the reduction of simulants of the iron-bearing lunar minerals olivine ((Fe,Mg)2SiO4), pyroxene ((Fe,Mg,Ca)SiO3), and ilmenite (FeTiO3) are investigated, extending previous work with ilmenite. Fayalite is reduced by H2 at 1070 K to 1480 K. A layer of mixed silica glass and iron forms around an unreacted core. Reaction kinetics are influenced by permeation of hydrogen through this layer and a reaction step involving dissociated hydrogen. Reaction mechanisms are independent of Mg content. Augite, hypersthene, and hedenbergite are reduced in H2 at the same temperatures. The products are iron metal and lower iron silicates mixed throughout the mineral. Activation energy rises with calcium content. Ilmenite and fayalite are reduced with carbon deposited on partially reduced minerals via the CO disproportionation reaction. Reduction with carbon is rapid, showing the carbothermal reduction of lunar minerals is possible.

  9. The solar elemental abundances problem: Large enhancements in photoionization and bound-free opacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, A.; Nahar, S.

    2016-05-01

    Aimed at solving the outstanding problem of solar opacity and radiation transport, we report substantial photoabsorption in the high-energy regime due to atomic core photo-excitations not heretofore considered. In an extensive R-Matrix calculations of unprecedented complexity for an important iron ion Fe XVII, with a wave function expansion of 99 Fe XVIII core states from n current opacity models, and ii) demonstrate convergence with respect to successive core excitations. These findings may explain the ``higher-than-predicted'' monochromatic iron opacity measured recently at the Sandia Z-pinch fusion device at solar interior conditions. The findings will also impact the total atomic photoabsorption and radiation transport in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, such as UV emission from host stars of extra-solar planets. Support: NSF, DOE, Ohio Supercomputer Center, Columbus, OH.

  10. Visualizing Iron Deposition in Multiple Sclerosis Cadaver Brains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib, Charbel A.; Zheng Weili; Mark Haacke, E.; Webb, Sam; Nichol, Helen

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To visualize and validate iron deposition in two cases of multiple sclerosis using rapid scanning X-Ray Fluorescence (RS-XRF) and Susceptibility Weighted Imaging (SWI). Material and Methods: Two (2) coronal cadaver brain slices from patients clinically diagnosed with multiple sclerosis underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), specifically SWI to image iron content. To confirm the presence of iron deposits and the absence of zinc-rich myelin in lesions, iron and zinc were mapped using RS-XRF. Results: MS lesions were visualized using FLAIR and correlated with the absence of zinc by XRF. XRF and SWI showed that in the first MS case, there were large iron deposits proximal to the draining vein of the caudate nucleus as well as iron deposits associated with blood vessels throughout the globus pallidus. Less iron was seen in association with lesions than in the basal ganglia. The presence of larger amounts of iron correlated reasonably well between RS-XRF and SWI. In the second case, the basal ganglia appeared normal and acute perivascular iron deposition was absent. Conclusion: Perivascular iron deposition is seen in some but not all MS cases, giving credence to the use of SWI to assess iron involvement in MS pathology in vivo.

  11. Estimation of the iron loss in deep-sea permanent magnet motors considering seawater compressive stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yongxiang; Wei, Yanyu; Zou, Jibin; Li, Jianjun; Qi, Wenjuan; Li, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Deep-sea permanent magnet motor equipped with fluid compensated pressure-tolerant system is compressed by the high pressure fluid both outside and inside. The induced stress distribution in stator core is significantly different from that in land type motor. Its effect on the magnetic properties of stator core is important for deep-sea motor designers but seldom reported. In this paper, the stress distribution in stator core, regarding the seawater compressive stress, is calculated by 2D finite element method (FEM). The effect of compressive stress on magnetic properties of electrical steel sheet, that is, permeability, BH curves, and BW curves, is also measured. Then, based on the measured magnetic properties and calculated stress distribution, the stator iron loss is estimated by stress-electromagnetics-coupling FEM. At last the estimation is verified by experiment. Both the calculated and measured results show that stator iron loss increases obviously with the seawater compressive stress.

  12. Estimation of the Iron Loss in Deep-Sea Permanent Magnet Motors considering Seawater Compressive Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxiang Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea permanent magnet motor equipped with fluid compensated pressure-tolerant system is compressed by the high pressure fluid both outside and inside. The induced stress distribution in stator core is significantly different from that in land type motor. Its effect on the magnetic properties of stator core is important for deep-sea motor designers but seldom reported. In this paper, the stress distribution in stator core, regarding the seawater compressive stress, is calculated by 2D finite element method (FEM. The effect of compressive stress on magnetic properties of electrical steel sheet, that is, permeability, BH curves, and BW curves, is also measured. Then, based on the measured magnetic properties and calculated stress distribution, the stator iron loss is estimated by stress-electromagnetics-coupling FEM. At last the estimation is verified by experiment. Both the calculated and measured results show that stator iron loss increases obviously with the seawater compressive stress.

  13. Iron Contamination Mechanism and Reaction Performance Research on FCC Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoyong Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available FCC (Fluid Catalytic Cracking catalyst iron poisoning would not only influence units’ product slate; when the poisoning is serious, it could also jeopardize FCC catalysts’ fluidization in reaction-regeneration system and further cause bad influences on units’ stable operation. Under catalytic cracking reaction conditions, large amount of iron nanonodules is formed on the seriously iron contaminated catalyst due to exothermic reaction. These nodules intensify the attrition between catalyst particles and generate plenty of fines which severely influence units’ smooth running. A dense layer could be formed on the catalysts’ surface after iron contamination and the dense layer stops reactants to diffuse to inner structures of catalyst. This causes extremely negative effects on catalyst’s heavy oil conversion ability and could greatly cut down gasoline yield while increasing yields of dry gas, coke, and slurry largely. Research shows that catalyst’s reaction performance would be severely deteriorated when iron content in E-cat (equilibrium catalyst exceeds 8000 μg/g.

  14. Solid - solid and solid - liquid phase transitions of iron and iron alloys under laser shock compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmand, M.; Krygier, A.; Appel, K.; Galtier, E.; Hartley, N.; Konopkova, Z.; Lee, H. J.; McBride, E. E.; Miyanishi, K.; Nagler, B.; Nemausat, R.; Vinci, T.; Zhu, D.; Ozaki, N.; Fiquet, G.

    2017-12-01

    An accurate knowledge of the properties of iron and iron alloys at high pressures and temperatures is crucial for understanding and modelling planetary interiors. While Earth-size and Super-Earth Exoplanets are being discovered in increasingly large numbers, access to detailed information on liquid properties, melting curves and even solid phases of iron and iron at the pressures and temperatures of their interiors is still strongly limited. In this context, XFEL sources coupled with high-energy lasers afford unique opportunities to measure microscopic structural properties at far extreme conditions. Also the achievable time resolution allows the shock history and phase transition mechanisms to be followed during laser compression, improving our understanding of the high pressure and high strain experiments. Here we present recent studies devoted to investigate the solid-solid and solid-liquid transition in laser-shocked iron and iron alloys (Fe-Si, Fe-C and Fe-O alloys) using X-ray diffraction and X-ray diffuse scattering. Experiment were performed at the MEC end-station of the LCLS facility at SLAC (USA). Detection of the diffuse scattering allowed the identification of the first liquid peak position along the Hugoniot, up to 4 Mbar. The time resolution shows ultrafast (between several tens and several hundreds of picoseconds) solid-solid and solid-liquid phase transitions. Future developments at XFEL facilities will enable detailed studies of the solid and liquid structures of iron and iron alloys as well as out-of-Hugoniot studies.

  15. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2005-07-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. Bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple castiron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs with the pipe in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, minimize excavation, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of old cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct safe repair operations on live mains.

  16. On-line iron loss resistance identification by a state observer for rotor-flux-oriented control of induction motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrera, Pablo M. de la; Bossio, Guillermo R.; Solsona, Jorge A.; Garcia, Guillermo O.

    2008-01-01

    A rotor flux state observer considering iron loss, for an Induction Motor (IM), is proposed. The aim of this proposal is to avoid detuning caused by the IM iron loss on a field-oriented control (FOC). An adaptive scheme for the K Fe , a parameter that represents the IM iron loss, is also proposed. The main objective of this scheme is to improve the dynamic response of control by compensating the variations of iron losses due to possible variations in the stator core characteristics. Simulation results demonstrated that the observer and the adaptive scheme showed a good performance fulfilling then the objectives

  17. Large Enhancement in High-Energy Photoionization of Fe XVII and Missing Continuum Plasma Opacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahar, Sultana N.; Pradhan, Anil K.

    2016-06-01

    Aimed at solving the outstanding problem of solar opacity, and radiation transport plasma models in general, we report substantial photoabsorption in the high-energy regime due to atomic core photoexcitations not heretofore considered. In extensive R -matrix calculations of unprecedented complexity for an important iron ion Fe xvii (Fe16 + ), with a wave function expansion of 99 Fe xviii (Fe17 + ) LS core states from n ≤4 complexes (equivalent to 218 fine structure levels), we find (i) up to orders of magnitude enhancement in background photoionization cross sections, in addition to strongly peaked photo-excitation-of-core resonances not considered in current opacity models, and ii) demonstrate convergence with respect to successive core excitations. The resulting increase in the monochromatic continuum, and 35% in the Rosseland mean opacity, are compared with the "higher-than-predicted" iron opacity measured at the Sandia Z -pinch fusion device at solar interior conditions.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  19. Efficient MRI labeling of endothelial progenitor cells: design of thiolated surface stabilized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahnaz, Gul; Kremser, Christian; Reinisch, Andreas; Vetter, Anja; Laffleur, Flavia; Rahmat, Deni; Iqbal, Javed; Dünnhaupt, Sarah; Salvenmoser, Willi; Tessadri, Richard; Griesser, Ulrich; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to design thiolated surface stabilized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (TSS-SPIONs) for efficient internalization with high MRI sensitivity. TSS-SPIONs were developed by chelation between thiolated chitosan-thioglycolic acid (chitosan-TGA) hydrogel and iron ions (Fe(2+)/Fe(3+)). Likely, unmodified chitosan hydrogel SPIONs (UC-SPIONs) and uncoated SPIONs were used as control. Moreover, TSS-SPIONs were investigated regarding to their iron core size, hydrodynamic diameter, zeta potential, iron contents, molar relaxivities (r1 and r2), and cellular internalization. TSS-SPIONs demonstrated an iron oxide core diameter (crystallite size by XRD) of 3.1 ± 0.02 nm, a hydrodynamic diameter of 94 ± 20 nm, a zeta potential of +21 ± 5 mV, and an iron content of 3.6 ± 0.9 mg/mL. In addition, internalization of TSS-SPIONs into human endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) from umbilical cord blood was more than threefold and 17-fold higher in contrast to UC-SPIONs and SPIONs, respectively. With twofold lower incubation iron concentration of TSS-SPIONs, more than threefold higher internalization was achieved as compared to Resovist®. Also, cell viability of more than 90% was observed in the presence of TSS-SPIONs after 24h. The molar MR relaxivities (r2) value at 1.5 T was threefold higher than that of Resovist® and demonstrated that TSS-SPIONs have the potential as very effective T2 contrast-enhancement agent. According to these findings, TSS-SPIONs with efficient internalization, lower cytotoxicity, and high MRI sensitivity seem to be promising for cell tracking. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of dietary iron source and iron status on iron bioavailability tests in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, D.; Hendricks, D.G.; Mahoney, A.W.

    1986-01-01

    Weanling male rats were made anemic in 7 days by feeding a low iron diet and bleeding. Healthy rats were fed the low iron diet supplemented with ferrous sulfate (29 ppm Fe). Each group was subdivided and fed for 10 days on test diets containing about 29 ppm iron that were formulated with meat:spinach mixtures or meat:soy mixtures to provided 100:0, 75:25, 50:50, 25:75, or 0:100% of the dietary iron from these sources or from a ferrous sulfate diet. After 3 days on the diets all rats were dosed orally with 2 or 5 micro curries of 59 Fe after a 18 hour fast and refeeding for 1.5 hours. Iron status influenced liver iron, carcass iron, liver radio activity and percent of radioactive dose retained. Diet influenced fecal iron and apparent absorption of iron. In iron bioavailability studies assessment methodology and iron status of the test subject greatly influences the estimates of the value of dietary sources of iron

  1. Characterization of Coated Sand Cores from Two Different Binder Systems for Grey Iron Castings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nwaogu, Ugochukwu Chibuzoh; Tiedje, Niels Skat; Poulsen, Thomas

    or veining and metal penetration defects. The use of refractory coatings on cores is fundamental to obtaining acceptable casting surface quality and is used on resin bonded cores in production foundries. In this study new sol gel-coated sand cores made from coldbox and furan binder systems were investigated......Expansion defects on the surface of the castings include sand burn-in, metal penetration and/or veining, finning or scab. Veining or finning and metal penetration are of interest. These defects are associated with silica sand and result from the penetration of liquid metal into cracks formed during...... differential expansion of the core during heating. The rapid expansion of silica sand up to 600 oC and especially at 573 oC, where the α – β phase transformation occurs, is the cause of stresses in the core system. These stresses cause crack formation and metal melt flows into these cracks causing finning...

  2. Rapid estimate of solid volume in large tuff cores using a gas pycnometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thies, C. [ed.; Geddis, A.M.; Guzman, A.G. [and others

    1996-09-01

    A thermally insulated, rigid-volume gas pycnometer system has been developed. The pycnometer chambers have been machined from solid PVC cylinders. Two chambers confine dry high-purity helium at different pressures. A thick-walled design ensures minimal heat exchange with the surrounding environment and a constant volume system, while expansion takes place between the chambers. The internal energy of the gas is assumed constant over the expansion. The ideal gas law is used to estimate the volume of solid material sealed in one of the chambers. Temperature is monitored continuously and incorporated into the calculation of solid volume. Temperature variation between measurements is less than 0.1{degrees}C. The data are used to compute grain density for oven-dried Apache Leap tuff core samples. The measured volume of solid and the sample bulk volume are used to estimate porosity and bulk density. Intrinsic permeability was estimated from the porosity and measured pore surface area and is compared to in-situ measurements by the air permeability method. The gas pycnometer accommodates large core samples (0.25 m length x 0.11 m diameter) and can measure solid volume greater than 2.20 cm{sup 3} with less than 1% error.

  3. Inverse-model estimates of the ocean's coupled phosphorus, silicon, and iron cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquier, Benoît; Holzer, Mark

    2017-09-01

    The ocean's nutrient cycles are important for the carbon balance of the climate system and for shaping the ocean's distribution of dissolved elements. Dissolved iron (dFe) is a key limiting micronutrient, but iron scavenging is observationally poorly constrained, leading to large uncertainties in the external sources of iron and hence in the state of the marine iron cycle. Here we build a steady-state model of the ocean's coupled phosphorus, silicon, and iron cycles embedded in a data-assimilated steady-state global ocean circulation. The model includes the redissolution of scavenged iron, parameterization of subgrid topography, and small, large, and diatom phytoplankton functional classes. Phytoplankton concentrations are implicitly represented in the parameterization of biological nutrient utilization through an equilibrium logistic model. Our formulation thus has only three coupled nutrient tracers, the three-dimensional distributions of which are found using a Newton solver. The very efficient numerics allow us to use the model in inverse mode to objectively constrain many biogeochemical parameters by minimizing the mismatch between modeled and observed nutrient and phytoplankton concentrations. Iron source and sink parameters cannot jointly be optimized because of local compensation between regeneration, recycling, and scavenging. We therefore consider a family of possible state estimates corresponding to a wide range of external iron source strengths. All state estimates have a similar mismatch with the observed nutrient concentrations and very similar large-scale dFe distributions. However, the relative contributions of aeolian, sedimentary, and hydrothermal iron to the total dFe concentration differ widely depending on the sources. Both the magnitude and pattern of the phosphorus and opal exports are well constrained, with global values of 8. 1 ± 0. 3 Tmol P yr-1 (or, in carbon units, 10. 3 ± 0. 4 Pg C yr-1) and 171. ± 3. Tmol Si yr-1. We diagnose the

  4. Efficiency of carbon removal per added iron in ocean iron fertilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Baar, Hein J. W.; Gerringa, Loes J. A.; Laan, Patrick; Timmermans, Klaas R.

    2008-01-01

    The major response to ocean iron fertilization is by large diatoms, which at Fe-replete ambient seawater show an optimum C:Fe elemental ratio of similar to 23 000 and a higher ratio of similar to 160 000 or more under Fe-limited conditions. The efficiency of CO2 drawdown during the several weeks of

  5. Primordial Noble Gases from Earth's Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K.; Lu, X.; Brodholt, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    Recent partitioning experiment suggests helium is more compatible in iron melt than in molten silicates at high pressures (> 10 GPa) (1), thus provide the possibility of the core as being the primordial noble gases warehouse that is responsible for the high primordial/radiogenic noble gas isotopic ratios observed in plume-related basalts. However, the possible transportation mechanism of the noble gases from the core to the overlying mantle is still ambiguous, understanding how this process would affect the noble gas isotopic characteristics of the mantle is critical to validate this core reservoir model. As diffusion is a dominant mass transport process that plays an important role in chemical exchange at the core-mantle boundary (CMB), we have determined the diffusion coefficients of helium, neon and argon in major lower mantle minerals, i.e. periclase (MgO), bridgemanite (MgSiO3-Pv) and post-perovskite (MgSiO3-PPv), by first-principles calculation based on density functional theory (DFT). As expected, the diffusion rate of helium is the fastest at the CMB, which is in the range of 3 × 10-10 to 1 × 10-8 m2/s. The neon diffusion is slightly slower, from 5 × 10-10 to 5 × 10-9 m2/s. Argon diffuses slowest at the rate from 1 × 10-10 to 2 × 10-10 m2/s. We have further simulated the evolution of noble gas isotopic ratios in the mantle near the CMB. Considering its close relationship with the mantle plumes and very likely to be the direct source of "hot-spot" basalts, we took a close investigation on the large low-shear-velocity provinces (LLSVPs). Under reasonable assumptions based on our diffusion parameters, the modelling results indicate that LLSVP is capable of generating all the noble gas isotope signals, e.g., 3He/4He = 55 Ra, 3He/22Ne = 3.1, 3He/36Ar = 0.82, 40Ar/36Ar = 9500, that are in good agreement with the observed values in "hot-spot" basalts (2). Therefore, this core-reservior hypothesis is a self-consistent model that can fits in multiple noble gas

  6. Measuring marine iron(III) complexes by CLE-AdSV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Town, R.M.; Leeuwen, van H.P.

    2005-01-01

    Iron(iii) speciation data, as determined by competitive ligand exchange?adsorptive stripping voltammetry (CLE-AdSV), is reconsidered in the light of the kinetic features of the measurement. The very large stability constants reported for iron(iii) in marine ecosystems are shown to be possibly due to

  7. Characterization of the oleic acid/iron oxide nanoparticle interface by magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masur, S., E-mail: sabrina.masur@uni-due.de; Zingsem, B.; Marzi, T.; Meckenstock, R.; Farle, M.

    2016-10-01

    The synthesis of colloidal nanoparticles involves surfactant molecules, which bind to the particle surface and stabilize nanoparticles against aggregation. In many cases these protecting shells also can be used for further functionalization. In this study, we investigated monodisperse single crystalline iron oxide core/shell nanoparticles (Fe{sub x}O{sub y}-NPs) in situ covered with an oleic acid layer which showed two electron spin resonance (ESR) signals. The nanoparticles with the ligands attached were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and ferro- and paramagnetic resonance (FMR, EPR). Infrared spectroscopy confirmed the presence of the functional groups and revealed that the oleic acid (OA) is chemisorbed as a carboxylate on the iron oxide and is coordinated symmetrically to the oxide atoms. We show that the EPR signal of the OA ligand molecule can be used as a local probe to determine the temperature changes at the surface of the nanoparticle. - Highlights: • Monodisperse single crystalline iron oxide core/shell nanoparticles (Fe{sub x}O{sub y}-NPs) in situ covered with an oleic acid layer two electron spin resonance (ESR) signals. • We show that the EPR signal of the OA ligand molecule can be used as a local probe to determine the temperature changes at the surface of the nanoparticle.

  8. Doxorubicin loaded PVA coated iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayal, S.; Ramanujan, R.V.

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic drug targeting is a drug delivery system that can be used in locoregional cancer treatment. Coated magnetic particles, called carriers, are very useful for delivering chemotherapeutic drugs. Magnetic carriers were synthesized by coprecipitation of iron oxide followed by coating with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Characterization was carried out using X-ray diffraction, TEM, TGA, FTIR and VSM techniques. The magnetic core of the carriers was magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ), with average size of 10 nm. The room temperature VSM measurements showed that magnetic particles were superparamagnetic. The amount of PVA bound to the iron oxide nanoparticles were estimated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and the attachment of PVA to the iron oxide nanoparticles was confirmed by FTIR analysis. Doxorubicin (DOX) drug loading and release profiles of PVA coated iron oxide nanoparticles showed that up to 45% of adsorbed drug was released in 80 h, the drug release followed the Fickian diffusion-controlled process. The binding of DOX to the PVA was confirmed by FTIR analysis. The present findings show that DOX loaded PVA coated iron oxide nanoparticles are promising for magnetically targeted drug delivery.

  9. Iron absorption in relation to iron status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnusson, B.; Bjoern-Rasmussen, E.; Hallberg, L.; Rossander, L.

    1981-01-01

    The absorption from a 3 mg dose of ferrous iron was measured in 250 male subjects. The absorption was related to the log concentration of serum ferritin in 186 subjects of whom 99 were regular blood donors (r= -0.76), and to bone marrow haemosiderin grading in 52 subjects with varying iron status. The purpose was to try and establish a percentage absorption from such a dose that is representative of subjects who are borderline iron deficient. This information is necessary for food iron absorption studies in order (1) to calculate the absorption of iron from the diet at a given iron status and (2) compare the absorption of iron from different meals studied in different groups of subjects by different investigarors. The results suggest that an absorption of about 40% of a 3 mg reference dose of ferrous iron is given in a fasting state, roughly corresponds to the absorption in borderline-iron-deficient subjects. The results indicate that this 40% absorption value corresponds to a serum ferritin level of 30 μg/l and that food iron absorption in a group of subjects should be expressed preferably as the absorption corresponding to a reference-dose absorption of 45%, or possibly a serum ferritin level of 30 μg/l. (author)

  10. Formulation design for target delivery of iron nanoparticles to TCE zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ziheng; Acosta, Edgar

    2013-12-01

    Nanoparticles of zero-valent iron (NZVI) are effective reducing agents for some dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contaminants such as trichloroethylene (TCE). However, target delivery of iron nanoparticles to DNAPL zones in the aquifer remains an elusive feature for NZVI technologies. This work discusses three strategies to deliver iron nanoparticles to DNAPL zones. To this end, iron oxide nanoparticles coated with oleate (OL) ions were used as stable analogs for NZVI. The OL-coated iron oxide nanoparticles are rendered lipophilic via (a) the addition of CaCl2, (b) acidification, or (c) the addition of a cationic surfactant, benzethonium chloride (BC). Mixtures of OL and BC show promise as a target delivery strategy due to the high stability of the nanoparticles in water, and their preferential partition into TCE in batch experiments. Column tests show that while the OL-BC coated iron oxide nanoparticles remain largely mobile in TCE-free columns, a large fraction of these particles are retained in TCE-contaminated columns, confirming the effectiveness of this target delivery strategy. © 2013.

  11. 'NC100150', a preparation of iron oxide nanoparticles ideal for positive-contrast MR angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellar, K E; Fujii, D K; Gunther, W H; Briley-Saebø, K; Spiller, M; Koenig, S H

    1999-08-01

    A laboratory-scale synthesis of NC100150 (iron oxide particles with an oxidized starch coating) was characterized by magnetization measurements (vibrating sample magnetometry, VSM), relaxometry (1/T1 NMRD profiles and 1/T2 at 10 and 20 MHz), and dynamic light scattering (photon correlation spectroscopy, PCS). The results were related to give a self-consistent physical description of the particles: a water-impenetrable part making up 12% of the total particle volume, 82% of this volume consisting of an iron oxide core and the remaining 18% consisting of an oxidized starch rind; and, a water-penetrable part making up 88% of the total particle volume, consisting of oxidized starch polymers and entrained water molecules. Relating the magnetization to the relaxometry results required that the oxidized starch coating slows the diffusivity of solvent water molecules in the vicinity of the iron oxide cores. The effect of the organic coating on water diffusivity, not previously considered in the application of relaxation theory to iron oxide nanoparticles, is supported by the much greater (factor of about 2) diameter obtained from the dynamic light scattering measurements in comparison to that obtained from the magnetization measurements. The present work shows that three physical techniques--VSM, relaxometry, and PCS--are needed for properly assessing iron oxide nanoparticles for use as contrast agents for magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). It is also shown that NC100150 has a narrow range of diameters and the smallest value of r2/r1 reported to date, an asset for MRA.

  12. Effects of core models and neutron energy group structures on xenon oscillation in large graphite-moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasita, Kiyonobu; Harada, Hiroo; Murata, Isao; Shindo, Ryuichi; Tsuruoka, Takuya.

    1993-01-01

    Xenon oscillations of large graphite-moderated reactors have been analyzed by a multi-group diffusion code with two- and three-dimensional core models to study the effects of the geometric core models and the neutron energy group structures on the evaluation of the Xe oscillation behavior. The study clarified the following. It is important for accurate Xe oscillation simulations to use the neutron energy group structure that describes well the large change in the absorption cross section of Xe in the thermal energy range of 0.1∼0.65 eV, because the energy structure in this energy range has significant influences on the amplitude and the period of oscillations in power distributions. Two-dimensional R-Z models can be used instead of three-dimensional R-θ-Z models for evaluation of the threshold power of Xe oscillation, but two-dimensional R-θ models cannot be used for evaluation of the threshold power. Although the threshold power evaluated with the R-θ-Z models coincides with that of the R-Z models, it does not coincide with that of the R-θ models. (author)

  13. Trapped Melt in IIIAB Irons: Solid/Liquid Elemental Partitioning During the Fractionation of the IIIAB Magma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, John T.

    1999-01-01

    Group IIIAB, the largest iron-meteorite group, shows compositional trends (including a three-order-of-magnitude It concentration range) indicating that it formed by fractional crystallization of a metallic magma. Because about 200 irons are available, and all degrees of crystallization are well represented, IIIAB offers an excellent set of samples for the study of crystallization at all depths of the asteroidal core. On log-log Ir-Au, and Ir-As diagrams IIIAB forms a broad band; the breadth represents real meteorite-to-meteorite variations, far outside experimental or sampling uncertainties. A successful model must explain the width of this band; I suggest that it mainly resulted from the trapping of parental magma within the crystallizing solid. Because S is essentially insoluble in metal, the abundance of FeS is a measure of the fraction of trapped liquid. The trapped-melt model is supported by the observation that irons having higher S contents plot closer to the inferred composition of the magmatic parental liquid. The lowest S values are found in the irons occupying the left envelope of the IIIAB Ir-Au or Ir-As compositional fields, thus it is this set of irons that should be interpreted as the solid products of a fractionating magma. This simplifies the modeling of the crystallization process and allows inferences regarding the distribution ratios for other elements in the evolved IIIAB system. The large (multiton) Cape York irons show wide variations in their trapped-melt fractions; their compositions seem best understood in terms of a low initial S content of the IIIAB magma, about 20 mg/g. The inferred initial IIIAB distribution coefficient for Ir, 4.6, is much higher than published values based on laboratory studies of low-S systems; I suggest that low-S (and low-P) partition-ratio measurements tend to err in the direction of unity. In IIIAB distribution coefficients for Au, As, and Ni were still < 1 when the most evolved IIIAB irons formed, another

  14. An iron-57 Moessbauer spectroscopic study of titania-supported iron- and iron-iridium catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, F.J.; Jobson, S.

    1992-01-01

    57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy shows that titania-supported iron is reduced by treatment in hydrogen at significantly lower temperatures than corresponding silica- and alumina-supported catalysts. The metallic iron formed under hydrogen at 600deg C is partially converted to carbide by treatment in carbon monoxide and hydrogen. In contrast to its alumina- and silica-supported counterparts, the remainder of the titania-supported iron is unchanged by this gaseous mixture. The 57 Fe Moessbauer spectra of EXAFS show that iron and iridium in the titania-supported iron-iridium catalysts are reduced in hydrogen at even lower temperatures and, after treatment at 600deg C, are predominantly present as the iron-iridium alloy. The treatment of these reduced catalysts in carbon monoxide and hydrogen is shown by Moessbauer spectroscopy and EXAFS to induce the segregation of iron from the iron-iridium alloy and its conversion to iron oxide. (orig.)

  15. Bioavailable iron in typical Thai meals: Comparative studies between radioactive in vitro and in vivo food iron absorption measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sritongkul, N.

    1989-03-01

    Presently available in vivo methods for assessing iron absorption in human subjects, although physiologically acceptable and accurate, are not practical for screening large numbers of food and diet samples. A simple in vitro method for determining the amount of iron available for absorption was therefore investigated. It is based on the common pool concept of food iron absorption using radioactive Fe-59 as a marker of the iron present in the bioavailable iron pool. The ionizable iron was measured after an initial peptic digestion by using pepsin/HCl at pH 1.35 followed by an increase of the pH to 6.0 to simulate duodenal alkalinity. The method was proved to be simple, reproducible and applicable either to single food items or whole meals of varying composition. It is able to detect known enhancers or inhibitors of food iron absorption. The percent ionizable iron among 5 different meals with the inclusion of inhibitor or enhancer was shown to correlate closely with the percentage of iron absorbed in human subjects (r=0.9197, p<0.001). A high correlation between the in vivo and in vitro methods was also observed when the results were expressed as absorption ratios and ionizable ratios (r=0.9192, p<0.001). The method is expected to be useful for improving diet composition to increase the iron availability of some typical meals in developing countries, including those which are known to contain considerable amounts of inhibitors of iron absorption. 39 refs, 1 fig., 13 tabs

  16. On Intensive Late Holocene Iron Mining and Production in the Northern Congo Basin and the Environmental Consequences Associated with Metallurgy in Central Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, Karen D.; Schmitt, Dave N.; Kiahtipes, Christopher A.; Ndanga, Jean-Paul; Young, D. Craig; Simiti, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    An ongoing question in paleoenvironmental reconstructions of the central African rainforest concerns the role that prehistoric metallurgy played in shaping forest vegetation. Here we report evidence of intensive iron-ore mining and smelting in forested regions of the northern Congo Basin dating to the late Holocene. Volumetric estimates on extracted iron-ore and associated slag mounds from prehistoric sites in the southern Central African Republic suggest large-scale iron production on par with other archaeological and historically-known iron fabrication areas. These data document the first evidence of intensive iron mining and production spanning approximately 90 years prior to colonial occupation (circa AD 1889) and during an interval of time that is poorly represented in the archaeological record. Additional site areas pre-dating these remains by 3-4 centuries reflect an earlier period of iron production on a smaller scale. Microbotanical evidence from a sediment core collected from an adjacent riparian trap shows a reduction in shade-demanding trees in concert with an increase in light-demanding species spanning the time interval associated with iron intensification. This shift occurs during the same time interval when many portions of the Central African witnessed forest transgressions associated with a return to moister and more humid conditions beginning 500-100 years ago. Although data presented here do not demonstrate that iron smelting activities caused widespread vegetation change in Central Africa, we argue that intense mining and smelting can have localized and potentially regional impacts on vegetation communities. These data further demonstrate the high value of pairing archeological and paleoenvironmental analyses to reconstruct regional-scale forest histories. PMID:26161540

  17. Size distribution of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles using Warren-Averbach XRD analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, S.; Behera, S. P.; Gnanaprakash, G.; Jayakumar, T.; Philip, J.; Rao, B. P. C.

    2012-07-01

    We use the Fourier transform based Warren-Averbach (WA) analysis to separate the contributions of X-ray diffraction (XRD) profile broadening due to crystallite size and microstrain for magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. The profile shape of the column length distribution, obtained from WA analysis, is used to analyze the shape of the magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. From the column length distribution, the crystallite size and its distribution are estimated for these nanoparticles which are compared with size distribution obtained from dynamic light scattering measurements. The crystallite size and size distribution of crystallites obtained from WA analysis are explained based on the experimental parameters employed in preparation of these magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. The variation of volume weighted diameter (Dv, from WA analysis) with saturation magnetization (Ms) fits well to a core shell model wherein it is known that Ms=Mbulk(1-6g/Dv) with Mbulk as bulk magnetization of iron oxide and g as magnetic shell disorder thickness.

  18. An axially and radially two-zoned large liquid-metal fast breeder reactor core concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamei, T.; Arie, K.; Moriki, Y.; Suzuki, M.; Yamaoka, M.

    1985-01-01

    A new core concept that has advantages over conventional homogeneous cores in neutronics characteristics such as power peaking factor, burnup reactivity loss, and reactivity response to the movement of control rods in earthquakes has been evolved. Two options of the new core concept are feasible. One is the so-called axially heterogeneous core, with the internal blanket placed at the lower part of the core. The other concept is similar to the conventional homogeneous core, but has two different plutonium-enriched zones in the axial as well as in the radial direction, so it is a hybrid type of the conventional homogeneous core and the axially heterogeneous core. The new design concept is described and the way that the core characteristics are improved by the chosen key parameters is shown

  19. High Temperature Magneto-Elastic Instability of Dislocations in bcc Iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudarev, S.; Bullough, R.; Gilbert, M.; Derlet, P.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Density functional calculations show that the low temperature structure of self-interstitial defects in iron is fundamentally different from the structure of self-interstitial defects in all the other bcc metals. The origin of this anomaly is associated with the magnetic part of the cohesive energy of iron, where the Stoner exchange term stabilizes the body centred cubic phase, and where the magnetic part of energy is strongly affected by the large strain associated with the core region of an interstitial defect. At elevated temperatures magnetic excitations erode the stability of the bcc phase, giving rise to the gradual softening of the 110 transverse acoustic phonon modes and to the α-γ bcc-fcc martensitic phase transition occurring at 912 deg. C at normal pressure. Elastic moduli of bcc iron vary as a function of temperature with c' = (C 11 - c 12 )/2 vanishing at the α-γ transition point. This has significant effects on the magnitude of both the elastic interactions between dislocations and other defects in the material and on the intrinsic structural stability of the dislocations and other defects themselves. To evaluate structural stability of defects at elevated temperatures we investigate elastic self-energies of dislocations in the continuum anisotropic elasticity approximation. We also develop atomistic models of dislocations and point defects based on a generalised form of the magnetic potential. By varying the magnetic part of the potential we are able to reproduce the experimentally observed variation of elastic moduli as a function of temperature, and assess relative stability of various types of defect structures. Our analysis shows that, in complete contrast to other straight dislocations, the elastic self-energy of straight 100 edge dislocations actually sharply decreases as we approach the α-γ transition, indicating that this surprising fact is a probable explanation of the frequent observation of the 100

  20. Nitric oxide activation by distal redox modulation in tetranuclear iron nitrosyl complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruiter, Graham; Thompson, Niklas B; Lionetti, Davide; Agapie, Theodor

    2015-11-11

    A series of tetranuclear iron complexes displaying a site-differentiated metal center was synthesized. Three of the metal centers are coordinated to our previously reported ligand, based on a 1,3,5-triarylbenzene motif with nitrogen and oxygen donors. The fourth (apical) iron center is coordinatively unsaturated and appended to the trinuclear core through three bridging pyrazolates and an interstitial μ4-oxide moiety. Electrochemical studies of complex [LFe3(PhPz)3OFe][OTf]2 revealed three reversible redox events assigned to the Fe(II)4/Fe(II)3Fe(III) (-1.733 V), Fe(II)3Fe(III)/Fe(II)2Fe(III)2 (-0.727 V), and Fe(II)2Fe(III)2/Fe(II)Fe(III)3 (0.018 V) redox couples. Combined Mössbauer and crystallographic studies indicate that the change in oxidation state is exclusively localized at the triiron core, without changing the oxidation state of the apical metal center. This phenomenon is assigned to differences in the coordination environment of the two metal sites and provides a strategy for storing electron and hole equivalents without affecting the oxidation state of the coordinatively unsaturated metal. The presence of a ligand-binding site allowed the effect of redox modulation on nitric oxide activation by an Fe(II) metal center to be studied. Treatment of the clusters with nitric oxide resulted in binding of NO to the apical iron center, generating a {FeNO}(7) moiety. As with the NO-free precursors, the three reversible redox events are localized at the iron centers distal from the NO ligand. Altering the redox state of the triiron core resulted in significant change in the NO stretching frequency, by as much as 100 cm(-1). The increased activation of NO is attributed to structural changes within the clusters, in particular, those related to the interaction of the metal centers with the interstitial atom. The differences in NO activation were further shown to lead to differential reactivity, with NO disproportionation and N2O formation performed by the more

  1. Evaluation of residual iron in carbon nanotubes purified by acid treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, E.R., E-mail: eliltonedwards@hotmail.com [Sao Paulo State University - UNESP, Av. Dr. Ariberto Pereira da Cunha, 333, CEP: 12.516-410 CP:20, Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil); Antunes, E.F. [National Institute for Space Research - INPE, Av. dos Astronautas, 1758, CEP: 12.254-97, Sao Jose dos Campos-SP (Brazil); Aeronautical Institute of Technology - ITA, Praca Marechal Eduardo Gomes, 50, CEP: 12.228-900, Sao Jose dos Campos-SP (Brazil); Botelho, E.C. [Sao Paulo State University - UNESP, Av. Dr. Ariberto Pereira da Cunha, 333, CEP: 12.516-410 CP:20, Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil); Baldan, M.R.; Corat, E.J. [National Institute for Space Research - INPE, Av. dos Astronautas, 1758, CEP: 12.254-97, Sao Jose dos Campos-SP (Brazil)

    2011-11-01

    A detailed analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was carried out on multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) surfaces after non-oxidative and oxidative purification treatments in liquid-phase. The MWCNT were produced by pyrolysis of camphor and ferrocene, that provides a high yield but with high iron contamination ({approx}15% wt). The elimination and/or oxidation of iron nanoparticles were monitored by Fe2p and O1s core level. Oxygen-based functional groups attachment was also investigated by C1s fitting. The effectiveness of each treatment in iron removal was evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). The integrity of the MWCNT structure was verified by Raman spectroscopy (RS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A purity degree higher than 98% was achieved only with non-oxidative treatments using sonification process.

  2. {Fe6O2}-Based Assembly of a Tetradecanuclear Iron Nanocluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana G. Baca

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The tetradecanuclear FeIII pivalate nanocluster [Fe14O10(OH4(Piv18], comprising a new type of metal oxide framework, has been solvothermally synthesized from a hexanuclear iron pivalate precursor in dichlormethane/acetonitrile solution. Magnetic measurements indicate the presence of very strong antiferromagnetic interactions in the cluster core.

  3. The AVRDC - The World Vegetable Center mungbean (Vigna radiata) core and mini core collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafleitner, Roland; Nair, Ramakrishnan Madhavan; Rathore, Abhishek; Wang, Yen-wei; Lin, Chen-yu; Chu, Shu-hui; Lin, Pin-yun; Chang, Jian-Cheng; Ebert, Andreas W

    2015-04-29

    Large ex situ germplasm collections generally harbor a wide range of crop diversity. AVRDC--The World Vegetable Center is holding in trust the world's second largest mungbean (Vigna radiata) germplasm collection with more than 6,700 accessions. Screening large collections for traits of interest is laborious and expensive. To enhance the access of breeders to the diversity of the crop, mungbean core and mini core collections have been established. The core collection of 1,481 entries has been built by random selection of 20% of the accessions after geographical stratification and subsequent cluster analysis of eight phenotypic descriptors in the whole collection. Summary statistics, especially the low differences of means, equal variance of the traits in both the whole and core collection and the visual inspection of quantile-quantile plots comparing the variation of phenotypic traits present in both collections indicated that the core collection well represented the pattern of diversity of the whole collection. The core collection was genotyped with 20 simple sequence repeat markers and a mini core set of 289 accessions was selected, which depicted the allele and genotype diversity of the core collection. The mungbean core and mini core collections plus their phenotypic and genotypic data are available for distribution to breeders. It is expected that these collections will enhance the access to biodiverse mungbean germplasm for breeding.

  4. Exploring Microbial Iron Oxidation in Wetland Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Muyzer, G.; Bodelier, P. L. E.; den Oudsten, F.; Laanbroek, H. J.

    2009-04-01

    sequences all represented novel culturable iron oxidizers most closely related to Gallionella spp. Based on their nucleotide sequences four groups could be identified, which were comparable to the DGGE banding pattern obtained before with the gradient tubes enrichments. The above mentioned nested PCR-DGGE method was used to study the distribution and community composition of Gallionella-like iron-oxidizing bacteria under the influence of plants species, soil depth, as well as season. Soil samples from Appels, Belgium, an intertidal, freshwater marsh known to hold intensive iron cycling, were taken from 5 different vegetation types in April, July and October 2007. Soil cores were sliced at 1-cm intervals and subjected to chemical and molecular analyses. The DGGE patterns showed that the community of iron-oxidizing bacteria differed with vegetation type, and sediment depth. Samples taken in autumn held lower diversity in Gallionella-related iron oxidizers than those sampled in spring and summer.

  5. Direct Production of a Novel Iron-Based Nanocomposite from the Laser Pyrolysis of Fe(CO5/MMA Mixtures: Structural and Sensing Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Alexandrescu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron/iron oxide-based nanocomposites were prepared by IR laser sensitized pyrolysis of Fe(CO5 and methyl methacrylate (MMA mixtures. The morphology of nanopowder analyzed by TEM indicated that mainly core-shell structures were obtained. X-ray diffraction techniques evidence the cores as formed mainly by iron/iron oxide crystalline phases. A partially degraded (carbonized polymeric matrix is suggested for the coverage of the metallic particles. The nanocomposite structure at the variation of the laser density and of the MMA flow was studied. The new materials prepared as thick films were tested for their potential for acting as gas sensors. The temporal variation of the electrical resistance in presence of NO2, CO, and CO2, in dry and humid air was recorded. Preliminary results show that the samples obtained at higher laser power density exhibit rather high sensitivity towards NO2 detection and NO2 selectivity relatively to CO and CO2. An optimum working temperature of 200°C was found.

  6. Analysis of the behavior of orthogonal-core-type push-pull parametric transformer with iron and copper losses. Tetsuson oyobi doson wo koryoshita chokko jishinkei push pull parametric hen prime atsuki no dosa kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajima, K; Anazawa, Y; Kaga, A [Akita University, Akita (Japan). Mining College; Ichinokura, O [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1991-04-30

    This paper reports on a precise numerical analysis of operating characteristics of the push-pull parametric transformer of orthogonal-core type (proposed by the authors in the preceding papers) made in consideration of both the iron loss of its magnetic core and the copper loss of its windings. A model of magnetic circuit in the core is presented, which involves magnetic reluctances representing saturation characteristics of the core and magnetic inductances representing effects produced by hysteresis. Use is made of the function that expresses the saturation characteristics by a twenty-first power series of magnetic flux, the coefficient of each term being determined by use of experimental data on a specified sample of the magnetic core. Furthermore, recourse is had to the circuit simulator SPICE in order to analyze the operating characteristics of the transformer. Comparing results of the present analysis with experimental results, the following are noted: first, both output voltages and currents of windings of the transformer under the condition of parametric oscillation are calculated with sufficient accuracy; second, the present analysis is capable of evaluating the conversion efficiency of electric power and input power factor of the transformer, and of providing more accurate values of both voltage and current in the case of the maximum output under loading conditions as compared with the analyses so far presented. 8 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Evaluation of the influence of UV/IR radiation on iron release from ferritin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gritzkov, M.; Kochev, V.; Vladimirova, L

    2010-01-01

    In the present work the influence of UV/IR radiation on the iron-releasing process from ferritin is investigated. The ferritins are a family of iron-storing proteins playing a key role in the biochemical reactions between iron and oxygen-processes of exclusive importance for the existence of all living organisms. The iron is stored within the ferritin core in the form of insoluble crystals containing Fe(III). Therefore for its release, the mineral matrix has to be decomposed, usually through a reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II). Our study considers the action of UV/IR radiation on the structure of the protein molecule. Eventual changes in the ferritin conformation under the irradiation could result in the change of channel forming regions responsible for the iron efflux. This can be assess by the quantity of Fe (II) obtained in a subsequent mobilization procedure evoked by exogenous reducing agents. In our case the content of the reduced iron is determined electrochemically by the method of potentiometric titration. As already was shown, this method promises to become highly useful for quantitative evaluation of released Fe 2+ . (Author)

  8. Pelagic Iron Recycling in the Southern Ocean: Exploring the Contribution of Marine Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavenia Ratnarajah

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The availability of iron controls primary productivity in large areas of the Southern Ocean. Iron is largely supplied via atmospheric dust deposition, melting ice, the weathering of shelf sediments, upwelling, sediment resuspension, mixing (deep water, biogenic, and vertical mixing and hydrothermal vents with varying degrees of temporal and spatial importance. However, large areas of the Southern Ocean are remote from these sources, leading to regions of low primary productivity. Recent studies suggest that recycling of iron by animals in the surface layer could enhance primary productivity in the Southern Ocean. The aim of this review is to provide a quantitative and qualitative assessment of the current literature on pelagic iron recycling by marine animals in the Southern Ocean and highlight the next steps forward in quantifying the retention and recycling of iron by higher trophic levels in the Southern Ocean. Phytoplankton utilize the iron in seawater to meet their metabolic demand. Through grazing, pelagic herbivores transfer the iron in phytoplankton cells into their body tissues and organs. Herbivores can recycle iron through inefficient feeding behavior that release iron into the water before ingestion, and through the release of fecal pellets. The iron stored within herbivores is transferred to higher trophic levels when they are consumed. When predators consume iron beyond their metabolic demand it is either excreted or defecated. Waste products from pelagic vertebrates can thus contain high concentrations of iron which may be in a form that is available to phytoplankton. Bioavailability of fecal iron for phytoplankton growth is influenced by a combination of the size of the fecal particle, presence of organic ligands, the oxidation state of the iron, as well as biological (e.g., remineralization, coprochaly, coprorhexy, and coprophagy and physical (e.g., dissolution, fragmentation processes that lead to the degradation and release of

  9. Iron inhibits hydroxyapatite crystal growth in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guggenbuhl, Pascal; Filmon, Robert; Mabilleau, Guillaume; Baslé, Michel F; Chappard, Daniel

    2008-07-01

    Hemochromatosis is a known cause of osteoporosis in which the pathophysiology of bone loss is largely unknown and the role of iron remains questionable. We have investigated the effects of iron on the growth of hydroxyapatite crystals in vitro on carboxymethylated poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) pellets. This noncellular and enzyme-independent model mimics the calcification of woven bone (composed of calcospherites made of hydroxyapatite crystals). Polymer pellets were incubated with body fluid containing iron at increasing concentrations (20, 40, 60 micromol/L). Hydroxyapatite growth was studied by chemical analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and Raman microscopy. When incubated in body fluid containing iron, significant differences were observed with control pellets. Iron was detected at a concentration of 5.41- to 7.16-fold that of controls. In pellets incubated with iron, there was a approximately 3- to 4-fold decrease of Ca and P and a approximately 1.3- to 1.4-fold increase in the Ca/P ratio. There was no significant difference among the iron groups of pellets, but a trend to a decrease of Ca with the increase of iron concentration was noted. Calcospherite diameters were significantly lower on pellets incubated with iron. Raman microspectroscopy showed a decrease in crystallinity (measured by the full width of the half height of the 960 Deltacm(-1) band) with a significant increase in carbonate substitution (measured by the intensity ratio of 1071 to 960 Deltacm(-1) band). Energy dispersive x-ray analysis identified iron in the calcospherites. In vitro, iron is capable to inhibit bone crystal growth with significant changes in crystallinity and carbonate substitution.

  10. Operating experience, measurements, and analysis of the LEU whole core demonstration at the FNR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weha, D.K.; Drumm, C.R.; King, J.S.; Martin, W.R.; Lee, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    The 2-MW Ford Nuclear Reactor at the University of Michigan is serving as the demonstration reactor for the MTR-type low enrichment (LEU) fuel for the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor program. Operational experience gained through six months of LEU core operation and seven months of mixed HEU-LEU core operation is presented. Subcadmium flux measurements performed with rhodium self-powered neutron detectors and iron wire activations are compared with calculations. Measured reactivity parameters are compared for HEU and LEU cores. Finally, the benchmark calculations for several HEU, LEU, and mixed HEU-LEU FNR cores and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) benchmark problem are presented. (author)

  11. Iron-dependent formation of reactive oxygen species and glutathione depletion after accumulation of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by oligodendroglial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohnholt, Michaela C.; Dringen, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP) are currently used for various neurobiological applications. To investigate the consequences of a treatment of brain cells with such particles, we have applied dimercaptosuccinate (DMSA)-coated IONP that had an average hydrodynamic diameter of 60 nm to oligodendroglial OLN-93 cells. After exposure to 4 mM iron applied as DMSA–IONP, these cells increased their total specific iron content within 8 h 600-fold from 7 to 4,200 nmol/mg cellular protein. The strong iron accumulation was accompanied by a change in cell morphology, although the cell viability was not compromized. DMSA–IONP treatment caused a concentration-dependent increase in the iron-dependent formation of reactive oxygen species and a decrease in the specific content of the cellular antioxidative tripeptide glutathione. During a 16 h recovery phase in IONP-free culture medium following exposure to DMSA–IONP, OLN-93 cells maintained their high iron content and replenished their cellular glutathione content. These data demonstrate that viable OLN-93 cells have a remarkable potential to deal successfully with the consequences of an accumulation of large amounts of iron after exposure to DMSA–IONP.

  12. A Core Set Based Large Vector-Angular Region and Margin Approach for Novelty Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiusheng Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A large vector-angular region and margin (LARM approach is presented for novelty detection based on imbalanced data. The key idea is to construct the largest vector-angular region in the feature space to separate normal training patterns; meanwhile, maximize the vector-angular margin between the surface of this optimal vector-angular region and abnormal training patterns. In order to improve the generalization performance of LARM, the vector-angular distribution is optimized by maximizing the vector-angular mean and minimizing the vector-angular variance, which separates the normal and abnormal examples well. However, the inherent computation of quadratic programming (QP solver takes O(n3 training time and at least O(n2 space, which might be computational prohibitive for large scale problems. By (1+ε  and  (1-ε-approximation algorithm, the core set based LARM algorithm is proposed for fast training LARM problem. Experimental results based on imbalanced datasets have validated the favorable efficiency of the proposed approach in novelty detection.

  13. A motional Stark effect diagnostic analysis routine for improved resolution of iota in the core of the large helical device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbins, T J; Ida, K; Suzuki, C; Yoshinuma, M; Kobayashi, T; Suzuki, Y; Yoshida, M

    2017-09-01

    A new Motional Stark Effect (MSE) analysis routine has been developed for improved spatial resolution in the core of the Large Helical Device (LHD). The routine was developed to reduce the dependency of the analysis on the Pfirsch-Schlüter (PS) current in the core. The technique used the change in the polarization angle as a function of flux in order to find the value of diota/dflux at each measurement location. By integrating inwards from the edge, the iota profile can be recovered from this method. This reduces the results' dependency on the PS current because the effect of the PS current on the MSE measurement is almost constant as a function of flux in the core; therefore, the uncertainty in the PS current has a minimal effect on the calculation of the iota profile. In addition, the VMEC database was remapped from flux into r/a space by interpolating in mode space in order to improve the database core resolution. These changes resulted in a much smoother iota profile, conforming more to the physics expectations of standard discharge scenarios in the core of the LHD.

  14. The role of interfacial metal silicates on the magnetism in FeCo/SiO{sub 2} and Fe{sub 49%}Co{sub 49%}V{sub 2%}/SiO{sub 2} core/shell nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desautels, R. D., E-mail: rddesautels@physics.umanitoba.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Toyota Research Institute of North America, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48169 (United States); Freeland, J. W. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Rowe, M. P. [Toyota Research Institute of North America, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48169 (United States); Lierop, J. van [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada)

    2015-05-07

    We have investigated the role of spontaneously formed interfacial metal silicates on the magnetism of FeCo/SiO{sub 2} and Fe{sub 49%}Co{sub 49%}V{sub 2%}/SiO{sub 2} core/shell nanoparticles. Element specific x-ray absorption and photoelectron spectroscopy experiments have identified the characteristic spectral features of metallic iron and cobalt from within the nanoparticle core. In addition, metal silicates of iron, cobalt, and vanadium were found to have formed spontaneously at the interface between the nanoparticle core and silica shell. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism experiments indicated that the elemental magnetism was a result of metallic iron and cobalt with small components from the iron, cobalt, and vanadium silicates. Magnetometry experiments have shown that there was no exchange bias loop shift in the FeCo nanoparticles; however, exchange bias from antiferromagnetic vanadium oxide was measured in the V-doped nanoparticles. These results showed clearly that the interfacial metal silicates played a significant role in the magnetism of these core/shell nanoparticles, and that the vanadium percolated from the FeCo-cores into the SiO{sub 2}-based interfacial shell.

  15. [Insufficient evidence supporting iron supplementation in anaemia during pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegerinck, Melanie M; Mol, Ben Willem J

    2012-01-01

    The Royal Dutch Organization of Midwives (KNOV) recently presented their practice guideline 'Anaemia in midwifery practice'. The guideline identified available evidence on diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of anaemia in pregnancy. Anaemia based on iron deficiency and subsequent treatment with iron supplementation are probably the most frequent aspects of care for pregnant women. However, there is surprisingly enough no evidence of the efficacy of iron supplementation treatment on relevant clinical outcomes in pregnant women with anaemia. We plead to make the next guideline a multidisciplinary one. Such a guideline may lead to a large pragmatic trial evaluating the efficacy of iron supplementation treatment for patients with anaemia.

  16. Higher iron bioavailability of a human-like collagen iron complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chenhui; Yang, Fan; Fan, Daidi; Wang, Ya; Yu, Yuanyuan

    2017-07-01

    Iron deficiency remains a public health problem around the world due to low iron intake and/or bioavailability. FeSO 4 , ferrous succinate, and ferrous glycinate chelate are rich in iron but have poor bioavailability. To solve the problem of iron deficiency, following previous research studies, a thiolated human-like collagen-ironcomplex supplement with a high iron content was prepared in an anaerobic workstation. In addition, cell viability tests were evaluated after conducting an MTT assay, and a quantitative analysis of the thiolated human-like collagen-iron digesta samples was performed using the SDS-PAGE method coupled with gel filtration chromatography. The iron bioavailability was assessed using Caco-2 cell monolayers and iron-deficiency anemia mice models. The results showed that (1) one mole of thiolated human-like collagen-iron possessed approximately 35.34 moles of iron; (2) thiolated human-like collagen-iron did not exhibit cytotoxity and (3) thiolated human-like collagen- iron digesta samples had higher bioavailability than other iron supplements, including FeSO 4 , ferrous succinate, ferrous glycine chelate and thiolated human-like collagen-Fe iron. Finally, the iron bioavailability was significantly enhanced by vitamin C. These results indicated that thiolated human-like collagen-iron is a promising iron supplement for use in the future.

  17. BEND-INDUCED LOSSES IN A SINGLE-MODE MICROSTRUCTURED FIBER WITH A LARGE CORE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. A. Gatchin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A study of bend-induced losses in a silica-based single-mode microstructured fiber with a core diameter ranging from 20 to 35 microns and increased relative air content in the holey cladding has been conducted. With the use of the equivalent step-index profile method in approximation of waveguide parameters of microstructured fiber (normalized frequency and normalized transverse attenuation constant the effect of bending on the spectral position of the fundamentalmode short-wavelength leakage boundary has been analyzed. Upon measurement of spectral characteristics of attenuation in the considered fibers good accordance of numerical and experimental data has been found out. It is shown that increase of the air content in the holey cladding leads to expansion of the mentioned boundary to lower wavelengths for the value from 150 to 800 nm depending on the core size and bending conditions. A single-transverse-mode propagation is achieved on fiber length of 5-10 meters due to a substantial difference in losses of fundamental and higher-order guided modes attained by bending. Optical losses in all studied samples are less than 10 dB/km at the wavelength λ = 1550 nm. The results of the study can be applied in the design of high-power laser systems having such basic requirements as a relatively large mode spot and high beam quality.

  18. The Role of Carbon in Core Formation Under Highly Reducing Conditions With Implications for the Planet Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Kaaden, Kathleen E..; McCubbin, Francis M.; Ross, D. Kent; Draper, David S.

    2017-01-01

    Results from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft have shown elevated abundances of carbon on the surface of Mercury. Furthermore, the X-Ray Spectrometer on board MESSENGER measured elevated abundances of sulfur and low abundances of iron, suggesting the planet's oxygen fugacity (fO2) is several log10 units below the Iron-Wüstite (IW) buffer. Similar to the role of other volatiles (e.g. sulfur) on highly reducing planetary bodies, carbon is expected to behave differently than it would under higher fO2. As discussed by Nittler et al. and Hauck et al., under such highly reducing conditions, the majority of the iron partitions into the core. On Mercury, this resulted in a relatively large core and a thin mantle. Using a composition similar to the largest volcanic field on the planet (the northern volcanic plains), Vander Kaaden and McCubbin conducted sink-float experiments to determine the density of melts and minerals on Mercury. They showed that graphite would be the only buoyant mineral in a mercurian magma ocean. Therefore, Vander Kaaden and McCubbin proposed a possible primary flotation crust on the planet composed of graphite. Concurrently, Peplowski et al. used GRS data from MESSENGER to show an average northern hemisphere abundance of C on the planet of 1.4 +/- 0.9 wt%. However, as this result was only at the one-sigma detection limit, possible carbon abundances at the three-sigma detection limit for Mercury range from 0 to 4.1 wt% carbon. Additionally, Murchie et al. investigated the possible darkening agent on Mercury and concluded that coarse-grained graphite could darken high reflectance plains to the low reflectance material. To further test the possibility of elevated abundances of carbon in Mercury's crust, Peplowski et al. used the low-altitude MESSENGER data to show that carbon is the only material consistent with both the visible to near-infrared spectra and the neutron measurements of low

  19. Comparison of facility characteristics between SCTF Core-I and Core-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Hiromichi; Iwamura, Takamichi; Sobajima, Makoto; Ohnuki, Akira; Abe, Yutaka; Murao, Yoshio.

    1990-08-01

    The Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF) was constructed to investigate two-dimensional thermal-hydraulics in the core and fluid behavior of carryover water out of the core including its feed-back effect to the core behavior mainly during the reflood phase of a large break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Since three simulated cores are used in the SCTF Test Program and the design of these three cores are slightly different one by one, repeatability test is required to justify a direct comparison of data obtained with different cores. In the present report, data of Test S2-13 (Run 618) obtained with SCTF Core-II were compared with those of Test S1-05 (Run 511) obtained with the Core-I, which were performed under the forced-flooding condition. Thermal-hydraulic behaviors in these two tests showed quite similar characteristics of both system behavior and two-dimensional core behaviors. Therefore, the test data obtained from the two cores can be compared directly with each other. After the turnaround of clad temperatures, however, some differences were found in upper plenum water accumulation and resultant two-dimensional core cooling behaviors such as quench front propagation from bottom to top of the core. (author)

  20. No iron fertilization in the equatorial Pacific Ocean during the last ice age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, K M; McManus, J F; Anderson, R F; Ren, H; Sigman, D M; Winckler, G; Fleisher, M Q; Marcantonio, F; Ravelo, A C

    2016-01-28

    The equatorial Pacific Ocean is one of the major high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll regions in the global ocean. In such regions, the consumption of the available macro-nutrients such as nitrate and phosphate is thought to be limited in part by the low abundance of the critical micro-nutrient iron. Greater atmospheric dust deposition could have fertilized the equatorial Pacific with iron during the last ice age--the Last Glacial Period (LGP)--but the effect of increased ice-age dust fluxes on primary productivity in the equatorial Pacific remains uncertain. Here we present meridional transects of dust (derived from the (232)Th proxy), phytoplankton productivity (using opal, (231)Pa/(230)Th and excess Ba), and the degree of nitrate consumption (using foraminifera-bound δ(15)N) from six cores in the central equatorial Pacific for the Holocene (0-10,000 years ago) and the LGP (17,000-27,000 years ago). We find that, although dust deposition in the central equatorial Pacific was two to three times greater in the LGP than in the Holocene, productivity was the same or lower, and the degree of nitrate consumption was the same. These biogeochemical findings suggest that the relatively greater ice-age dust fluxes were not large enough to provide substantial iron fertilization to the central equatorial Pacific. This may have been because the absolute rate of dust deposition in the LGP (although greater than the Holocene rate) was very low. The lower productivity coupled with unchanged nitrate consumption suggests that the subsurface major nutrient concentrations were lower in the central equatorial Pacific during the LGP. As these nutrients are today dominantly sourced from the Subantarctic Zone of the Southern Ocean, we propose that the central equatorial Pacific data are consistent with more nutrient consumption in the Subantarctic Zone, possibly owing to iron fertilization as a result of higher absolute dust fluxes in this region. Thus, ice-age iron fertilization in the

  1. Core Hunter 3: flexible core subset selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Beukelaer, Herman; Davenport, Guy F; Fack, Veerle

    2018-05-31

    Core collections provide genebank curators and plant breeders a way to reduce size of their collections and populations, while minimizing impact on genetic diversity and allele frequency. Many methods have been proposed to generate core collections, often using distance metrics to quantify the similarity of two accessions, based on genetic marker data or phenotypic traits. Core Hunter is a multi-purpose core subset selection tool that uses local search algorithms to generate subsets relying on one or more metrics, including several distance metrics and allelic richness. In version 3 of Core Hunter (CH3) we have incorporated two new, improved methods for summarizing distances to quantify diversity or representativeness of the core collection. A comparison of CH3 and Core Hunter 2 (CH2) showed that these new metrics can be effectively optimized with less complex algorithms, as compared to those used in CH2. CH3 is more effective at maximizing the improved diversity metric than CH2, still ensures a high average and minimum distance, and is faster for large datasets. Using CH3, a simple stochastic hill-climber is able to find highly diverse core collections, and the more advanced parallel tempering algorithm further increases the quality of the core and further reduces variability across independent samples. We also evaluate the ability of CH3 to simultaneously maximize diversity, and either representativeness or allelic richness, and compare the results with those of the GDOpt and SimEli methods. CH3 can sample equally representative cores as GDOpt, which was specifically designed for this purpose, and is able to construct cores that are simultaneously more diverse, and either are more representative or have higher allelic richness, than those obtained by SimEli. In version 3, Core Hunter has been updated to include two new core subset selection metrics that construct cores for representativeness or diversity, with improved performance. It combines and outperforms the

  2. A retrospective analysis of ultrasound-guided large core needle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-07-27

    Jul 27, 2016 ... The different types of non-surgical breast biopsy procedures include: fine needle aspiration biopsy. (FNAB), core needle ... needle biopsies of breast lesions at a regional public hospital in ..... NCR_2009_FINAL.pdf. 2. Parikh J ...

  3. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  4. A cascade of iron-containing proteins governs the genetic iron starvation response to promote iron uptake and inhibit iron storage in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Encinar del Dedo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential cofactor, but it is also toxic at high levels. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the sensor glutaredoxin Grx4 guides the activity of the repressors Php4 and Fep1 to mediate a complex transcriptional response to iron deprivation: activation of Php4 and inactivation of Fep1 leads to inhibition of iron usage/storage, and to promotion of iron import, respectively. However, the molecular events ruling the activity of this double-branched pathway remained elusive. We show here that Grx4 incorporates a glutathione-containing iron-sulfur cluster, alone or forming a heterodimer with the BolA-like protein Fra2. Our genetic study demonstrates that Grx4-Fra2, but not Fep1 nor Php4, participates not only in iron starvation signaling but also in iron-related aerobic metabolism. Iron-containing Grx4 binds and inactivates the Php4 repressor; upon iron deprivation, the cluster in Grx4 is probably disassembled, the proteins dissociate, and Php4 accumulates at the nucleus and represses iron consumption genes. Fep1 is also an iron-containing protein, and the tightly bound iron is required for transcriptional repression. Our data suggest that the cluster-containing Grx4-Fra2 heterodimer constitutively binds to Fep1, and upon iron deprivation the disassembly of the iron cluster between Grx4 and Fra2 promotes reverse metal transfer from Fep1 to Grx4-Fra2, and de-repression of iron-import genes. Our genetic and biochemical study demonstrates that the glutaredoxin Grx4 independently governs the Php4 and Fep1 repressors through metal transfer. Whereas iron loss from Grx4 seems to be sufficient to release Php4 and allow its nuclear accumulation, total or partial disassembly of the Grx4-Fra2 cluster actively participates in iron-containing Fep1 activation by sequestering its iron and decreasing its interaction with promoters.

  5. Comparison of void strengthening in fcc and bcc metals: Large-scale atomic-level modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osetsky, Yu.N.; Bacon, D.J.

    2005-01-01

    Strengthening due to voids can be a significant radiation effect in metals. Treatment of this by elasticity theory of dislocations is difficult when atomic structure of the obstacle and dislocation is influential. In this paper, we report results of large-scale atomic-level modelling of edge dislocation-void interaction in fcc (copper) and bcc (iron) metals. Voids of up to 5 nm diameter were studied over the temperature range from 0 to 600 K. We demonstrate that atomistic modelling is able to reveal important effects, which are beyond the continuum approach. Some arise from features of the dislocation core and crystal structure, others involve dislocation climb and temperature effects

  6. Iron Losses in Electrical Machines Due to Non Sinusoidal Alternating Fluxes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritchie, Ewen; Walker, J.A.; Dorrell, D. G.

    2007-01-01

    This paper shows how the flux waveform in the core of an electrical machine can be vary non- sinusoidally which complicates the calculation of the iron loss in a machine. A set of tests are conducted on a steel sample using an Epstein square where harmonics are injected into the flux waveform which...... of a machine....

  7. Dietary iron intake, iron status, and gestational diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cuilin; Rawal, Shristi

    2017-12-01

    Pregnant women are particularly vulnerable to iron deficiency and related adverse pregnancy outcomes and, as such, are routinely recommended for iron supplementation. Emerging evidence from both animal and population-based studies, however, has raised potential concerns because significant associations have been observed between greater iron stores and disturbances in glucose metabolism, including increased risk of type 2 diabetes among nonpregnant individuals. Yet, the evidence is uncertain regarding the role of iron in the development of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), a common pregnancy complication which has short-term and long-term adverse health ramifications for both women and their children. In this review, we critically and systematically evaluate available data examining the risk of GDM associated with dietary iron, iron supplementation, and iron status as measured by blood concentrations of several indicators. We also discuss major methodologic concerns regarding the available epidemiologic studies on iron and GDM. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  8. Enhanced bio-compatibility of ferrofluids of self-assembled superparamagnetic iron oxide-silica core-shell nanoparticles

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Narayanan, T.N.; Mary, A.P.R.; Swalih, P.K.A.; Kumar, D.S.; Makarov, D.; Albrecht, M.; Puthumana, J.; Anas, A.; Anantharaman, A.

    -interacting, monodispersed and hence the synthesis of such nanostructures has great relevance in the realm of nanoscience. Silica-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles based ferrofluids were prepared using polyethylene glycol as carrier fluid by employing a...

  9. Studies on the pathogenesis in iron deficiency anemia Part 1. Urinary iron excretion in iron deficiency anemia patients and rats in various iron states

    OpenAIRE

    中西,徳彦

    1991-01-01

    In the "iron excretion test" , urinary iron excretion after injection of saccharated iron oxide has been reported to be accelerated in relapsing idiopathic iron deficiency anemia. To determine the relevance of urinary iron excretion to clinical factors other than iron metabolism, 15 clinical parameters were evaluated. The serum creatinine level was positively and the serum albumin level was negatively correlated with urinary iron excretion, showing coefficients of r=0.97,-0.86 respectively, a...

  10. Efficient parallel and out of core algorithms for constructing large bi-directed de Bruijn graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaughn Matthew

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Assembling genomic sequences from a set of overlapping reads is one of the most fundamental problems in computational biology. Algorithms addressing the assembly problem fall into two broad categories - based on the data structures which they employ. The first class uses an overlap/string graph and the second type uses a de Bruijn graph. However with the recent advances in short read sequencing technology, de Bruijn graph based algorithms seem to play a vital role in practice. Efficient algorithms for building these massive de Bruijn graphs are very essential in large sequencing projects based on short reads. In an earlier work, an O(n/p time parallel algorithm has been given for this problem. Here n is the size of the input and p is the number of processors. This algorithm enumerates all possible bi-directed edges which can overlap with a node and ends up generating Θ(nΣ messages (Σ being the size of the alphabet. Results In this paper we present a Θ(n/p time parallel algorithm with a communication complexity that is equal to that of parallel sorting and is not sensitive to Σ. The generality of our algorithm makes it very easy to extend it even to the out-of-core model and in this case it has an optimal I/O complexity of Θ(nlog(n/BBlog(M/B (M being the main memory size and B being the size of the disk block. We demonstrate the scalability of our parallel algorithm on a SGI/Altix computer. A comparison of our algorithm with the previous approaches reveals that our algorithm is faster - both asymptotically and practically. We demonstrate the scalability of our sequential out-of-core algorithm by comparing it with the algorithm used by VELVET to build the bi-directed de Bruijn graph. Our experiments reveal that our algorithm can build the graph with a constant amount of memory, which clearly outperforms VELVET. We also provide efficient algorithms for the bi-directed chain compaction problem. Conclusions The bi

  11. Efficient parallel and out of core algorithms for constructing large bi-directed de Bruijn graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundeti, Vamsi K; Rajasekaran, Sanguthevar; Dinh, Hieu; Vaughn, Matthew; Thapar, Vishal

    2010-11-15

    Assembling genomic sequences from a set of overlapping reads is one of the most fundamental problems in computational biology. Algorithms addressing the assembly problem fall into two broad categories - based on the data structures which they employ. The first class uses an overlap/string graph and the second type uses a de Bruijn graph. However with the recent advances in short read sequencing technology, de Bruijn graph based algorithms seem to play a vital role in practice. Efficient algorithms for building these massive de Bruijn graphs are very essential in large sequencing projects based on short reads. In an earlier work, an O(n/p) time parallel algorithm has been given for this problem. Here n is the size of the input and p is the number of processors. This algorithm enumerates all possible bi-directed edges which can overlap with a node and ends up generating Θ(nΣ) messages (Σ being the size of the alphabet). In this paper we present a Θ(n/p) time parallel algorithm with a communication complexity that is equal to that of parallel sorting and is not sensitive to Σ. The generality of our algorithm makes it very easy to extend it even to the out-of-core model and in this case it has an optimal I/O complexity of Θ(nlog(n/B)Blog(M/B)) (M being the main memory size and B being the size of the disk block). We demonstrate the scalability of our parallel algorithm on a SGI/Altix computer. A comparison of our algorithm with the previous approaches reveals that our algorithm is faster--both asymptotically and practically. We demonstrate the scalability of our sequential out-of-core algorithm by comparing it with the algorithm used by VELVET to build the bi-directed de Bruijn graph. Our experiments reveal that our algorithm can build the graph with a constant amount of memory, which clearly outperforms VELVET. We also provide efficient algorithms for the bi-directed chain compaction problem. The bi-directed de Bruijn graph is a fundamental data structure for

  12. Atomistic modeling of thermodynamic equilibrium and polymorphism of iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Tongsik; Baskes, Michael I; Valone, Steven M; Doll, J D

    2012-01-01

    We develop two new modified embedded-atom method (MEAM) potentials for elemental iron, intended to reproduce the experimental phase stability with respect to both temperature and pressure. These simple interatomic potentials are fitted to a wide variety of material properties of bcc iron in close agreement with experiments. Numerous defect properties of bcc iron and bulk properties of the two close-packed structures calculated with these models are in reasonable agreement with the available first-principles calculations and experiments. Performance at finite temperatures of these models has also been examined using Monte Carlo simulations. We attempt to reproduce the experimental iron polymorphism at finite temperature by means of free energy computations, similar to the procedure previously pursued by Müller et al (2007 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 19 326220), and re-examine the adequacy of the conclusion drawn in the study by addressing two critical aspects missing in their analysis: (i) the stability of the hcp structure relative to the bcc and fcc structures and (ii) the compatibility between the temperature and pressure dependences of the phase stability. Using two MEAM potentials, we are able to represent all of the observed structural phase transitions in iron. We discuss that the correct reproductions of the phase stability among three crystal structures of iron with respect to both temperature and pressure are incompatible with each other due to the lack of magnetic effects in this class of empirical interatomic potential models. The MEAM potentials developed in this study correctly predict, in the bcc structure, the self-interstitial in the 〈110〉 orientation to be the most stable configuration, and the screw dislocation to have a non-degenerate core structure, in contrast to many embedded-atom method potentials for bcc iron in the literature. (paper)

  13. Inverse-model estimates of the ocean's coupled phosphorus, silicon, and iron cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Pasquier

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The ocean's nutrient cycles are important for the carbon balance of the climate system and for shaping the ocean's distribution of dissolved elements. Dissolved iron (dFe is a key limiting micronutrient, but iron scavenging is observationally poorly constrained, leading to large uncertainties in the external sources of iron and hence in the state of the marine iron cycle. Here we build a steady-state model of the ocean's coupled phosphorus, silicon, and iron cycles embedded in a data-assimilated steady-state global ocean circulation. The model includes the redissolution of scavenged iron, parameterization of subgrid topography, and small, large, and diatom phytoplankton functional classes. Phytoplankton concentrations are implicitly represented in the parameterization of biological nutrient utilization through an equilibrium logistic model. Our formulation thus has only three coupled nutrient tracers, the three-dimensional distributions of which are found using a Newton solver. The very efficient numerics allow us to use the model in inverse mode to objectively constrain many biogeochemical parameters by minimizing the mismatch between modeled and observed nutrient and phytoplankton concentrations. Iron source and sink parameters cannot jointly be optimized because of local compensation between regeneration, recycling, and scavenging. We therefore consider a family of possible state estimates corresponding to a wide range of external iron source strengths. All state estimates have a similar mismatch with the observed nutrient concentrations and very similar large-scale dFe distributions. However, the relative contributions of aeolian, sedimentary, and hydrothermal iron to the total dFe concentration differ widely depending on the sources. Both the magnitude and pattern of the phosphorus and opal exports are well constrained, with global values of 8. 1  ±  0. 3 Tmol P yr−1 (or, in carbon units, 10. 3  ±  0. 4

  14. Soluble Supercapacitors: Large and Reversible Charge Storage in Colloidal Iron-Doped ZnO Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozek, Carl K; Zhou, Dongming; Liu, Hongbin; Li, Xiaosong; Kittilstved, Kevin R; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2018-05-09

    Colloidal ZnO semiconductor nanocrystals have previously been shown to accumulate multiple delocalized conduction-band electrons under chemical, electrochemical, or photochemical reducing conditions, leading to emergent semimetallic characteristics such as quantum plasmon resonances and raising prospects for application in multielectron redox transformations. Here, we demonstrate a dramatic enhancement in the capacitance of colloidal ZnO nanocrystals through aliovalent Fe 3+ -doping. Very high areal and volumetric capacitances (33 μF cm -2 , 233 F cm -3 ) are achieved in Zn 0.99 Fe 0.01 O nanocrystals that rival those of the best supercapacitors used in commercial energy-storage devices. The redox properties of these nanocrystals are probed by potentiometric titration and optical spectroscopy. These data indicate an equilibrium between electron localization by Fe 3+ dopants and electron delocalization within the ZnO conduction band, allowing facile reversible charge storage and removal. As "soluble supercapacitors", colloidal iron-doped ZnO nanocrystals constitute a promising class of solution-processable electronic materials with large charge-storage capacity attractive for future energy-storage applications.

  15. Some antarctic soil cores from Wood Bay characterised by Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertelle, M.; Leotta, G.; Calogero, S.; Constantinescu, S.; Oddone, M.

    1999-01-01

    Marine, lacustrine and terrestrial soil cores, sampled in a restricted area of Wood Bay in Antarctica, were characterised by 57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy. The results of X-ray diffraction and instrumental neutron activation analysis are shortly discussed too. The soils, formed by mechanical disaggregation and weathering of rocks of volcanic origin from Mt. Melbourne, consist of alkaline feldspars, olivines, augitic clinopyroxenes, and iron oxides such as haematite, goethite, and magnetite. Lacustrine and terrestrial soils are richer in clinopyroxenes whereas marine soils are richer in olivines. This finding shows that the soils retain a content in olivines and clinopyroxenes comparable to that found in the parent lava outcropped from Mt. Melbourne volcano. The soils appear at the initial stage of weathering. Two main weathering effects are observed: 1. atmospheric oxygen determines the oxidation of the iron(II) present in olivines and clinopyroxenes and the neo-formed iron(III) is mainly retained in silicate sites as structural iron(III); 2. a part of magnetite, present as a primary constituent of the volcanic rocks, is oxidised to bulk haematite and goethite. (authors)

  16. Iron from Zealandic bog iron ore -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngstrøm, Henriette Syrach

    2011-01-01

    og geologiske materiale, metallurgiske analyser og eksperimentel arkæologiske forsøg - konturerne af en jernproduktion med udgangspunkt i den sjællandske myremalm. The frequent application by archaeologists of Werner Christensen’s distribution map for the occurrence of bog iron ore in Denmark (1966...... are sketched of iron production based on bog iron ore from Zealand....

  17. Response to parenteral iron therapy distinguish unexplained refractory iron deficiency anemia from iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, M; Sarbay, H; Guler, S; Balci, Y I; Polat, A

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated that response to parenteral iron therapy could be helpful in distinguishing the types of iron deficiency anemia. This study analyzed responses to IV iron sucrose therapy of 15 children with unexplained refractory iron deficiency anemia (URIDA). We compared the results at diagnosis, 6 weeks and 6 months after the therapy. Results were compared with responses of 11 patients' results with iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) from our previous study. Six weeks after the start of treatment, ferritin, MCV, MCH and Hb values were in normal range in 10 patients. The increase in Hb, MCH, MCV, and ferritin values ranged 2.6-3.5 g/dL, 1.7-4.2 pg, 2-9 fL, and 13-25 ng/mL, respectively. In five patients, Hb, MCH, and MCV mean (range) values [11.2 g/dL (11-12.2), 24.5 pg (24-25.6), and 67 fL (65-70)] were nearly normal but ferritin mean (range) values [9.8 ng/mL (8-11)] were below normal. Six weeks after the start of treatment, Hb, MCH, MCV and ferritin values of patients with IRIDA were increased. The increase in Hb, MCH, MCV, and ferritin values ranged 0.8-2.7 g/dL, 1.7-4.2 pg, 2-9 fL, and 13-25 ng/mL, respectively. IRIDA is only partially responsive to parenteral iron supplementation. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the response to intravenous iron therapy for the URIDA cases improved blood parameters more effectively than hereditary IRIDA. Response to parenteral iron therapy would be helpful to distinguish unexplained refractory IDA from hereditary IRIDA for clinicians who do not have access to hepcidin or TMPRS6 mutation analysis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Magnetic and gravity gradiometry framework for Mesoproterozoic iron oxide-apatite and iron oxide-copper-gold deposits, southeast Missouri, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCafferty, Anne E.; Phillips, Jeffrey; Driscoll, Rhonda L.

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution airborne magnetic and gravity gradiometry data provide the geophysical framework for evaluating the exploration potential of hidden iron oxide deposits in Mesoproterozoic basement rocks of southeast Missouri. The data are used to calculate mineral prospectivity for iron oxide-apatite (IOA) ± rare earth element (REE) and iron oxide-copper-gold (IOCG) deposits. Results delineate the geophysical footprints of all known iron oxide deposits and reveal several previously unrecognized prospective areas. The airborne data are also inverted to three-dimensional density and magnetic susceptibility models over four concealed deposits at Pea Ridge (IOA ± REE), Boss (IOCG), Kratz Spring (IOA), and Bourbon (IOCG). The Pea Ridge susceptibility model shows a magnetic source that is vertically extensive and traceable to a depth of greater than 2 km. A smaller density source, located within the shallow Precambrian basement, is partly coincident with the magnetic source at Pea Ridge. In contrast, the Boss models show a large (625-m-wide), vertically extensive, and coincident dense and magnetic stock with shallower adjacent lobes that extend more than 2,600 m across the shallow Precambrian paleosurface. The Kratz Spring deposit appears to be a smaller volume of iron oxides and is characterized by lower density and less magnetic rock compared to the other iron deposits. A prospective area identified south of the Kratz Spring deposit shows the largest volume of coincident dense and nonmagnetic rock in the subsurface, and is interpreted as prospective for a hematite-dominant lithology that extends from the top of the Precambrian to depths exceeding 2 km. The Bourbon deposit displays a large bowl-shaped volume of coincident high density and high-magnetic susceptibility rock, and a geometry that suggests the iron mineralization is vertically restricted to the upper parts of the Precambrian basement. In order to underpin the evaluation of the prospectivity and three

  19. Iron behavior in the ozonation and filtration of groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sallanko, J.; Lakso, E.; Ropelinen, J. [University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland)

    2006-08-15

    In Finnish groundwater, the main substances that require treatment are iron and manganese. In addition to this, groundwaters are soft and acidic. Iron removal is usually relatively effective by oxidizing dissolved iron into an insoluble form, either by aeration or chemical oxidation and removing the formed precipitate by sand filtration. Sometimes, if the untreated water contains high amounts of organic matter, problems may arise for iron removal. In Finland, it is quite common that groundwater contains high levels of both iron and natural organic matter, mainly as humic substances. The groundwater of the Kukkala intake plant in Liminka has been found to be problematic, due to its high level of natural organic matter. This research studied the removal of iron from this water by means of oxidation with ozone and filtration. While the oxidation of iron by ozone was rapid, the precipitate particles formed were small, and thus could not be removed by sand and anthracite filtration, and the iron residue in the treated water was more than 2 mg L{sup -1}. And while the filtration was able to remove iron well without the feed of ozone, the iron residue in the treated water was only 0.30 mg L{sup -1}. In this case, iron was led to the filter in a bivalent dissolved form. So, the result of iron removal was the best when the sand/anthracite filter functioned largely as an adsorption filter.

  20. In-core Instrument Subcritical Verification (INCISV) - Core Design Verification Method - 358

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prible, M.C.; Heibel, M.D.; Conner, S.L.; Sebastiani, P.J.; Kistler, D.P.

    2010-01-01

    According to the standard on reload startup physics testing, ANSI/ANS 19.6.1, a plant must verify that the constructed core behaves sufficiently close to the designed core to confirm that the various safety analyses bound the actual behavior of the plant. A large portion of this verification must occur before the reactor operates at power. The INCISV Core Design Verification Method uses the unique characteristics of a Westinghouse Electric Company fixed in-core self powered detector design to perform core design verification after a core reload before power operation. A Vanadium self powered detector that spans the length of the active fuel region is capable of confirming the required core characteristics prior to power ascension; reactivity balance, shutdown margin, temperature coefficient and power distribution. Using a detector element that spans the length of the active fuel region inside the core provides a signal of total integrated flux. Measuring the integrated flux distributions and changes at various rodded conditions and plant temperatures, and comparing them to predicted flux levels, validates all core necessary core design characteristics. INCISV eliminates the dependence on various corrections and assumptions between the ex-core detectors and the core for traditional physics testing programs. This program also eliminates the need for special rod maneuvers which are infrequently performed by plant operators during typical core design verification testing and allows for safer startup activities. (authors)

  1. Development of iron homeostasis in infants and young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lönnerdal, Bo

    2017-12-01

    Healthy, term, breastfed infants usually have adequate iron stores that, together with the small amount of iron that is contributed by breast milk, make them iron sufficient until ≥6 mo of age. The appropriate concentration of iron in infant formula to achieve iron sufficiency is more controversial. Infants who are fed formula with varying concentrations of iron generally achieve sufficiency with iron concentrations of 2 mg/L (i.e., with iron status that is similar to that of breastfed infants at 6 mo of age). Regardless of the feeding choice, infants' capacity to regulate iron homeostasis is important but less well understood than the regulation of iron absorption in adults, which is inverse to iron status and strongly upregulated or downregulated. Infants who were given daily iron drops compared with a placebo from 4 to 6 mo of age had similar increases in hemoglobin concentrations. In addition, isotope studies have shown no difference in iron absorption between infants with high or low hemoglobin concentrations at 6 mo of age. Together, these findings suggest a lack of homeostatic regulation of iron homeostasis in young infants. However, at 9 mo of age, homeostatic regulatory capacity has developed although, to our knowledge, its extent is not known. Studies in suckling rat pups showed similar results with no capacity to regulate iron homeostasis at 10 d of age when fully nursing, but such capacity occurred at 20 d of age when pups were partially weaned. The major iron transporters in the small intestine divalent metal-ion transporter 1 (DMT1) and ferroportin were not affected by pup iron status at 10 d of age but were strongly affected by iron status at 20 d of age. Thus, mechanisms that regulate iron homeostasis are developed at the time of weaning. Overall, studies in human infants and experimental animals suggest that iron homeostasis is absent or limited early in infancy largely because of a lack of regulation of the iron transporters DMT1 and ferroportin

  2. Spatial distribution of iron, copper and lead in mangrove sediments in a degradation gradient in Guanabara Bay (Rio de Janeiro State)

    OpenAIRE

    Borges, Anderson C.; Dias, Jailson C.; Machado, Wilson; Patchineelam, Sambasiva R.; Sella, Silvia M.

    2007-01-01

    Iron, copper and lead distribution was evaluated in sediment cores from a disturbed mangrove area in Guanabara Bay: a core from a seaward site where mangrove vegetation was removed ~20 yr before sampling (MD); a core from an intermediate site with dead vegetation, apparently due to insect attack (MP), and a core from a landward site with living vegetation (MV). Metal concentrations showed increasing values seaward while organic matter content showed an inverse trend, displaying a negative cor...

  3. Iron isomaltoside 1000: a new intravenous iron for treating iron deficiency in chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wikström, Björn; Bhandari, Sunil; Barany, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) often suffer from iron deficiency anemia necessitating treatment with intravenous iron. This study was designed to assess the safety of iron isomaltoside 1000 (Monofer) in CKD patients. The secondary objective was to assess its effect on iron deficiency...... anemia....

  4. The Effect Of Local Coal And Smelting Sponge Iron On Iron Content Of Pig Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oediyani, Soesaptri; Juwita Sari, Pramita; Hadi P, Djoko

    2018-03-01

    The new regulation on mineral resources was announced by Ministry of Energy and Mineral resources (ESDM) of Indonesia at 2014 which it called Permen ESDM No 1/2014. Therefore, this research was conducted to add the value of local iron ores by using smelting technology. The objective of the research is to produce pig iron that meet the requirement of the new regulation of mineral resources such as 90% Fe. First, iron ores and coal mixed together with lime as a flux, then smelted in a Electric Arc Furnace at 1800°C. The process variables are (1; 1.25; 1.5; 1.75; 2.0) and the composition of coal (0.8%, 1.6%, 3.0%). The type of coal that used in this research was bituminous coal from Kalimantan and also the iron ores from Kalimantan. The products of the smelting technology are Pig iron and slag. Both pig iron and slag then analyzed by SEM-EDS to measure the iron content. The result shows that the maximum iron content on pig iron is about 95.04% meanwhile the minimum iron content on slag is about 3.66%. This result achieved at 1.6% coal and 2.0.

  5. Metal-Organic Framework Derived Iron Sulfide-Carbon Core-Shell Nanorods as a Conversion-Type Battery Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Wei; Li, Shuo; Cao, Xianyi

    2017-01-01

    of a redox conversion-type lithium-ion battery, this composite material has demonstrated high lithium-ion storage capacity at 1148 mA h g-1 under the current rate of 500 mA g-1 for 170 cycles and an impressive rate-retention capability at 657 mA h g-1 with a current density of 2000 mA g-1. On the basis......We report the design and nanoengineering of carbon-film-coated iron sulfide nanorods (C@Fe7S8) as an advanced conversion-type lithium-ion storage material. The structural advantages of the iron-based metal-organic framework (MIL-88-Fe) as both a sacrificed template and a precursor are explored...

  6. Iron biomineralization by anaerobic neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miot, Jennyfer; Benzerara, Karim; Morin, Guillaume

    2009-01-01

    Minerals formed by bio-oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) at neutral pH, their association with bacterial ultrastructures as well as their impact on the metabolism of iron-oxidizing bacteria remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated iron biomineralization by the anaerobic nitrate-dependent ......Minerals formed by bio-oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) at neutral pH, their association with bacterial ultrastructures as well as their impact on the metabolism of iron-oxidizing bacteria remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated iron biomineralization by the anaerobic nitrate...... precipitation in the periplasm (in a few tens of minutes), followed by the formation of surface-bound globules. Moreover, we frequently observed an asymmetric mineral thickening at the cell poles. In parallel, the evolution of iron oxidation was quantified by STXM: iron both contained in the bacteria...... and in the extracellular precipitates reached complete oxidation within 6 days. While a progressive oxidation of Fe in the bacteria and in the medium could be observed, spatial redox (oxido-reduction state) heterogeneities were detected at the cell poles and in the extracellular precipitates after 1 day. All...

  7. Secular change of LOD caused by core evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, C.; Rybicki, K. R.; Varga, P.

    2003-04-01

    Fossils and tidal deposits suggest that, on the average, the Earth's despinning rate had been five times less in the Proterozoic than in the Phanerozoic. This difference is probably due, for the major part, to the existence of a Proterozoic supercontinent. Nevertheless, core formation and core evolution should have compensated to some extent the effect of tidal friction, by diminishing the Earth's inertia moment. We have investigated quantitatively this contribution of the evolving core to the change of LOD. For the present epoch, we find that the solidification of the inner core causes a relative secular decrease of LOD of approximately 3 μs per century, whereas the macrodiffusion of iron oxides and sulfides from the D" into the outer core across the CMB (inasfar as Majewski's theory holds) leads to a relative secular decrease of LOD by about 15 μs per century. On the other hand, the theory of slow core formation developped by Runcorn in the early 1960s as a by-product of his theory of mantle-wide convection, leads to a relative secular decrease of LOD during most of the Proterozoic of about 0.25 ms per century. Although core formation is now widely assumed to have been a thermal run-away process that occurred shortly after the Earth itself had formed, Runcorn's theory of the growing core would nicely explain the observed palaeo-LOD curve. In any case, formation of the core implies, all in all, a relative decrease of LOD of typically 3 hours.

  8. 46 CFR 56.60-10 - Cast iron and malleable iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cast iron and malleable iron. 56.60-10 Section 56.60-10... APPURTENANCES Materials § 56.60-10 Cast iron and malleable iron. (a) The low ductility of cast iron and malleable iron should be recognized and the use of these metals where shock loading may occur should be...

  9. Core–shell composite particles composed of biodegradable polymer particles and magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oka, Chiemi; Ushimaru, Kazunori [Department of Innovative and Engineered Materials, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Horiishi, Nanao [Bengala Techno Laboratory, 9-5-1006, 1-1 Kodai, Miyamae-ku, Kawasaki 216-0007 (Japan); Tsuge, Takeharu [Department of Innovative and Engineered Materials, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Kitamoto, Yoshitaka, E-mail: kitamoto.y.aa@m.titech.ac.jp [Department of Innovative and Engineered Materials, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    Core–shell composite particles with biodegradability and superparamagnetic behavior were prepared using a Pickering emulsion for targeted drug delivery based on magnetic guidance. The composite particles were composed of a core of biodegradable polymer and a shell of assembled magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. It was found that the dispersibility of the nanoparticles is crucial for controlling the core–shell structure. The addition of a small amount of dispersant into the nanoparticle's suspension could improve the dispersibility and led to the formation of composite particles with a thin magnetic shell covering a polymeric core. The composite particles were also fabricated with a model drug loaded into the core, which was released via hydrolysis of the core under strong alkaline conditions. Because the core can also be biodegraded by lipase, this result suggests that the slow release of the drug from the composite particles should occur inside the body. - Highlights: • Core−shell composites with biodegradability and magnetism are prepared. • O/W emulsion stabilized by iron oxide nanoparticles is utilized for the preparation. • The nanoparticle's dispersibility is crucial for controlling the composite structure. • Composites loading a model drug are also prepared. • The model drug is released with decomposition of the composites.

  10. SUZAKU OBSERVATION OF STRONG FLUORESCENT IRON LINE EMISSION FROM THE YOUNG STELLAR OBJECT V1647 ORI DURING ITS NEW X-RAY OUTBURST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Grosso, Nicolas; Kastner, Joel H.; Richmond, Michael; Weintraub, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The Suzaku X-ray satellite observed the young stellar object (YSO) V1647 Ori on 2008 October 8 during the new mass accretion outburst reported in 2008 August. During the 87 ks observation with a net exposure of 40 ks, V1647 Ori showed a high level of X-ray emission with a gradual decrease in flux by a factor of 5 and then displayed an abrupt flux increase by an order of magnitude. Such enhanced X-ray variability was also seen in XMM-Newton observations in 2004 and 2005 during the 2003-2005 outburst, but has rarely been observed for other YSOs. The spectrum clearly displays emission from Helium-like iron, which is a signature of hot plasma (kT ∼ 5 keV). It also shows a fluorescent iron Kα line with a remarkably large equivalent width (EW) of ∼600 eV. Such a large EW suggests that a part of the incident X-ray emission that irradiates the circumstellar material and/or the stellar surface is hidden from our line of sight. XMM-Newton spectra during the 2003-2005 outburst did not show a strong fluorescent iron Kα line, so that the structure of the circumstellar gas very close to the stellar core that absorbs and re-emits X-ray emission from the central object may have changed in between 2005 and 2008. This phenomenon may be related to changes in the infrared morphology of McNeil's nebula between 2004 and 2008.

  11. Large scale reflood test with cylindrical core test facility (CCTF). Core I. FY 1979 tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murao, Yoshio; Akimoto, Hajime; Okubo, Tsutomu; Sudoh, Takashi; Hirano, Kenmei

    1982-03-01

    This report presents the results of analysis of the data obtained in the CCTF Core I test series (19 tests) in FY. 1979 as an interim report. The Analysis of the test results showed that: (1) The present safety evaluation model on the reflood phenomena during LOCA conservatively represents the phenomena observed in the tests except for the downcomer thermohydrodynamic behavior. (2) The downcomer liquid level rose slowly and it took long time for the water to reach a terminal level or the spill-over level. It was presume that such a results was due to an overly conservative selection of the ECC flow rate. This presumption will be checked against a future test result for an increased flow rate. The loop-seal-water filling test was unsuccessful due to a premature power shutdown by the core protection circuit. The test will be conducted again. The tests to be performed in the future are summerized. Tests for investigation of the refill phenomena were also proposed. (author)

  12. Acid monolayer functionalized iron oxide nanoparticle catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikenberry, Myles

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle functionalization is an area of intensely active research, with applications across disciplines such as biomedical science and heterogeneous catalysis. This work demonstrates the functionalization of iron oxide nanoparticles with a quasi-monolayer of 11-sulfoundecanoic acid, 10-phosphono-1-decanesulfonic acid, and 11-aminoundecanoic acid. The carboxylic and phosphonic moieties form bonds to the iron oxide particle core, while the sulfonic acid groups face outward where they are available for catalysis. The particles were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), potentiometric titration, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The sulfonic acid functionalized particles were used to catalyze the hydrolysis of sucrose at 80° and starch at 130°, showing a higher activity per acid site than the traditional solid acid catalyst Amberlyst-15, and comparing well against results reported in the literature for sulfonic acid functionalized mesoporous silicas. In sucrose catalysis reactions, the phosphonic-sulfonic nanoparticles (PSNPs) were seen to be incompletely recovered by an external magnetic field, while the carboxylic-sulfonic nanoparticles (CSNPs) showed a trend of increasing activity over the first four recycle runs. Between the two sulfonic ligands, the phosphonates produced a more tightly packed monolayer, which corresponded to a higher sulfonic acid loading, lower agglomeration, lower recoverability through application of an external magnetic field, and higher activity per acid site for the hydrolysis of starch. Functionalizations with 11-aminoundecanoic acid resulted in some amine groups binding to the surfaces of iron oxide nanoparticles. This amine binding is commonly ignored in iron oxide

  13. Inner core boundary topography explored with reflected and diffracted P waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    deSilva, Susini; Cormier, Vernon F.; Zheng, Yingcai

    2018-03-01

    The existence of topography of the inner core boundary (ICB) can affect the amplitude, phase, and coda of body waves incident on the inner core. By applying pseudospectral and boundary element methods to synthesize compressional waves interacting with the ICB, these effects are predicted and compared with waveform observations in pre-critical, critical, post-critical, and diffraction ranges of the PKiKP wave reflected from the ICB. These data sample overlapping regions of the inner core beneath the circum-Pacific belt and the Eurasian, North American, and Australian continents, but exclude large areas beneath the Pacific and Indian Oceans and the poles. In the pre-critical range, PKiKP waveforms require an upper bound of 2 km at 1-20 km wavelength for any ICB topography. Higher topography sharply reduces PKiKP amplitude and produces time-extended coda not observed in PKiKP waveforms. The existence of topography of this scale smooths over minima and zeros in the pre-critical ICB reflection coefficient predicted from standard earth models. In the range surrounding critical incidence (108-130 °), this upper bound of topography does not strongly affect the amplitude and waveform behavior of PKIKP + PKiKP at 1.5 Hz, which is relatively insensitive to 10-20 km wavelength topography height approaching 5 km. These data, however, have a strong overlap in the regions of the ICB sampled by pre-critical PKiKP that require a 2 km upper bound to topography height. In the diffracted range (>152°), topography as high as 5 km attenuates the peak amplitudes of PKIKP and PKPCdiff by similar amounts, leaving the PKPCdiff/PKIKP amplitude ratio unchanged from that predicted by a smooth ICB. The observed decay of PKPCdiff into the inner core shadow and the PKIKP-PKPCdiff differential travel time are consistent with a flattening of the outer core P velocity gradient near the ICB and iron enrichment at the bottom of the outer core.

  14. Internal core tightener

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brynsvold, G.V.; Snyder, H.J. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    An internal core tightener is disclosed which is a linear actuated (vertical actuation motion) expanding device utilizing a minimum of moving parts to perform the lateral tightening function. The key features are: (1) large contact areas to transmit loads during reactor operation; (2) actuation cam surfaces loaded only during clamping and unclamping operation; (3) separation of the parts and internal operation involved in the holding function from those involved in the actuation function; and (4) preloaded pads with compliant travel at each face of the hexagonal assembly at the two clamping planes to accommodate thermal expansion and irradiation induced swelling. The latter feature enables use of a ''fixed'' outer core boundary, and thus eliminates the uncertainty in gross core dimensions, and potential for rapid core reactivity changes as a result of core dimensional change. 5 claims, 12 drawing figures

  15. Maize global transcriptomics reveals pervasive leaf diurnal rhythms but rhythms in developing ears are largely limited to the core oscillator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin R Hayes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plant diurnal rhythms are vital environmental adaptations to coordinate internal physiological responses to alternating day-night cycles. A comprehensive view of diurnal biology has been lacking for maize (Zea mays, a major world crop. METHODOLOGY: A photosynthetic tissue, the leaf, and a non-photosynthetic tissue, the developing ear, were sampled under natural field conditions. Genome-wide transcript profiling was conducted on a high-density 105 K Agilent microarray to investigate diurnal rhythms. CONCLUSIONS: In both leaves and ears, the core oscillators were intact and diurnally cycling. Maize core oscillator genes are found to be largely conserved with their Arabidopsis counterparts. Diurnal gene regulation occurs in leaves, with some 23% of expressed transcripts exhibiting a diurnal cycling pattern. These transcripts can be assigned to over 1700 gene ontology functional terms, underscoring the pervasive impact of diurnal rhythms on plant biology. Considering the peak expression time for each diurnally regulated gene, and its corresponding functional assignment, most gene functions display temporal enrichment in the day, often with distinct patterns, such as dawn or midday preferred, indicating that there is a staged procession of biological events undulating with the diurnal cycle. Notably, many gene functions display a bimodal enrichment flanking the midday photosynthetic maximum, with an initial peak in mid-morning followed by another peak during the afternoon/evening. In contrast to leaves, in developing ears as few as 47 gene transcripts are diurnally regulated, and this set of transcripts includes primarily the core oscillators. In developing ears, which are largely shielded from light, the core oscillator therefore is intact with little outward effect on transcription.

  16. Quantification of body iron and iron absorption in the REDS-II Donor Iron Status Evaluation (RISE) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Joseph E; Birch, Rebecca J; Steele, Whitney R; Wright, David J; Cable, Ritchard G

    2017-07-01

    Repeated blood donation alters the iron balance of blood donors. We quantified these effects by analyzing changes in body iron as well as calculating iron absorbed per day for donors enrolled in a prospective study. For 1308 donors who completed a final study visit, we calculated total body iron at the enrollment and final visits and the change in total body iron over the course of the study. Taking into account iron lost from blood donations during the study and obligate losses, we also calculated the average amount of iron absorbed per day. First-time/reactivated donors at enrollment had iron stores comparable to previous general population estimates. Repeat donors had greater donation intensity and greater mean iron losses than first-time/reactivated donors, yet they had little change in total body iron over the study period, whereas first-time/reactivated donors had an average 35% drop. There was higher estimated iron absorption in the repeat donors (men: 4.49 mg/day [95% confidence interval [CI], 4.41-4.58 mg/day]; women: 3.75 mg/day [95% CI, 3.67-3.84 mg/day]) compared with estimated iron absorption in first-time/reactivated donors (men: 2.89 mg/day [95% CI, 2.75-3.04 mg/day]; women: 2.76 mg/day [95% CI, 2.64-2.87 mg/day]). The threshold for negative estimated iron stores (below "0" mg/kg stores) was correlated with the development of anemia at a plasma ferritin value of 10 ng/mL. These analyses provide quantitative data on changes in estimated total body iron for a broad spectrum of blood donors. In contrast to using ferritin alone, this model allows assessment of the iron content of red blood cells and the degree of both iron surplus and depletion over time. © 2017 AABB.

  17. An experiment to measure the spectra of primary proton, helium and iron nuclei at the 'knee' region at a high altitude

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, X W; Ding, L K; Zhang, C S; Ohnishi, M

    2003-01-01

    The possibility of measuring the energy spectra of some single elements (proton, helium and iron) in primary cosmic rays at the 'knee' energies, by setting up an air shower (AS) core detector in the AS gamma array (4300 m a.s.l., Tibet, China) is investigated. Taking into account the sensitivity and the acceptance needed for this measurement, the feasibility of construction and operation of the apparatus at a high altitude, and the cost, it is shown that this aim can be achieved by a simple AS core detector that mainly measures the high-energy electromagnetic components in AS cores. In this paper, such a detector is described. With a three-year exposure, proton, helium and iron spectra at the 'knee' energy region can be obtained with three event samples selected by an artificial neural network (ANN).

  18. Comparative metatranscriptomics identifies molecular bases for the physiological responses of phytoplankton to varying iron availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Adrian; Schruth, David M; Durkin, Colleen A; Parker, Micaela S; Kodner, Robin B; Berthiaume, Chris T; Morales, Rhonda; Allen, Andrew E; Armbrust, E Virginia

    2012-02-07

    In vast expanses of the oceans, growth of large phytoplankton such as diatoms is limited by iron availability. Diatoms respond almost immediately to the delivery of iron and rapidly compose the majority of phytoplankton biomass. The molecular bases underlying the subsistence of diatoms in iron-poor waters and the plankton community dynamics that follow iron resupply remain largely unknown. Here we use comparative metatranscriptomics to identify changes in gene expression associated with iron-stimulated growth of diatoms and other eukaryotic plankton. A microcosm iron-enrichment experiment using mixed-layer waters from the northeastern Pacific Ocean resulted in increased proportions of diatom transcripts and reduced proportions of transcripts from most other taxa within 98 h after iron addition. Hundreds of diatom genes were differentially expressed in the iron-enriched community compared with the iron-limited community; transcripts of diatom genes required for synthesis of photosynthesis and chlorophyll components, nitrate assimilation and the urea cycle, and synthesis of carbohydrate storage compounds were significantly overrepresented. Transcripts of genes encoding rhodopsins in eukaryotic phytoplankton were significantly underrepresented following iron enrichment, suggesting rhodopsins help cells cope with low-iron conditions. Oceanic diatoms appear to display a distinctive transcriptional response to iron enrichment that allows chemical reduction of available nitrogen and carbon sources along with a continued dependence on iron-free photosynthetic proteins rather than substituting for iron-containing functional equivalents present within their gene repertoire. This ability of diatoms to divert their newly acquired iron toward nitrate assimilation may underlie why diatoms consistently dominate iron enrichments in high-nitrate, low-chlorophyll regions.

  19. Soft magnetic characteristics of laminated magnetic block cores assembled with a high Bs nanocrystalline alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Yao

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on an evaluation of core losses in laminated magnetic block cores assembled with a high Bs nanocrystalline alloy in high magnetic flux density region. To discuss the soft magnetic properties of the high Bs block cores, the comparison with amorphous (SA1 block cores is also performed. In the high Bs block core, both low core losses and high saturation flux densities Bs are satisfied in the low frequency region. Furthermore, in the laminated block core made of the high Bs alloy, the rate of increase of iron losses as a function of the magnetic flux density remains small up to around 1.6 T, which cannot be realized in conventional laminated block cores based on amorphous alloy. The block core made of the high Bs alloy exhibits comparable core loss with that of amorphous alloy core in the high-frequency region. Thus, it is expected that this laminated high Bs block core can achieve low core losses and high saturation flux densities in the high-frequency region.

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  1. High-density multicore fiber with heterogeneous core arrangement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amma, Y.; Sasaki, Y.; Takenaga, K.

    2015-01-01

    A 30-core fiber with heterogeneous cores that achieved large spatial multiplicity and low crosstalk of less than −40 dB at 100 km was demonstrated. The correlation lengths were estimated to be more than 1 m.......A 30-core fiber with heterogeneous cores that achieved large spatial multiplicity and low crosstalk of less than −40 dB at 100 km was demonstrated. The correlation lengths were estimated to be more than 1 m....

  2. Development of Powder-in-Tube Processed Iron Pnictide Wires and Tapes

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, Yanwei

    2011-06-01

    The development of PIT fabrication process of iron pnictide superconducting wires and tapes has been reviewed. Silver was found to be the best sheath material, since no reaction layer was observed between the silver sheath and the superconducting core. The grain connectivity of iron pnictide wires and tapes has been markedly improved by employing Ag or Pb as dopants. At present, critical current densities in excess of 3750 A /cm 2 (I c = 37.5 A) at 4.2 K have been achieved in Ag-sheathed SrKFeAs wires prepared with the above techniques, which is the highest value obtained in iron-based wires and tapes so far. Moreover, Ag-sheathed Sm-1111 superconducting tapes were successfully prepared by PIT method at temperatures as low as ̃ 900 °C, instead of commonly used temperatures of ̃ 1200 °C. These results demonstrate the feasibility of producing superconducting pnictide composite wires, even grain boundary properties require much more attention. © 2010 IEEE.

  3. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the service...

  4. MicroRNA-related genetic variants in iron regulatory genes, dietary iron intake, microRNAs and lung cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Ye, Y; Tu, H; Hildebrandt, M A; Zhao, L; Heymach, J V; Roth, J A; Wu, X

    2017-05-01

    Genetic variations in MicroRNA (miRNA) binding sites may alter structural accessibility of miRNA binding sites to modulate risk of cancer. This large-scale integrative multistage study was aimed to evaluate the interplay of genetic variations in miRNA binding sites of iron regulatory pathway, dietary iron intake and lung cancer (LC) risk. The interplay of genetic variant, dietary iron intake and LC risk was assessed in large-scale case-control study. Functional characterization of the validated SNP and analysis of target miRNAs were performed. We found that the miRNA binding site SNP rs1062980 in 3' UTR of Iron-Responsive Element Binding protein 2 gene (IREB2) was associated with a 14% reduced LC risk (P value = 4.9×10 - 9). Comparing to AA genotype, GG genotype was associated with a 27% reduced LC risk. This association was evident in males and ever-smokers but not in females and never-smokers. Higher level of dietary iron intake was significantly associated with 39% reduced LC risk (P value = 2.0×10 - 8). This association was only present in individuals with AG + AA genotypes with a 46% reduced risk (P value = 1.0×10 - 10), but not in GG genotype. The eQTL-analysis showed that rs1062980 significantly alters IREB2 expression level. Rs1062980 is predicted to alter a miR-29 binding site on IREB2 and indeed the expression of miR-29 is inversely correlated with IREB2 expression. Further, we found that higher circulating miR-29a level was significantly associated with 78% increased LC risk. The miRNA binding site SNP rs1062980 in iron regulatory pathway, which may alter the expression of IREB2 potentially through modulating the binding of miR-29a, together with dietary iron intake may modify risk of LC both individually and jointly. These discoveries reveal novel pathway for understanding lung cancer tumorigenesis and risk stratification. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for

  5. Key Roles of Size and Crystallinity of Nanosized Iron Hydr(oxides) Stabilized by Humic Substances in Iron Bioavailability to Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikova, Natalia A; Polyakov, Alexander Yu; Lebedev, Vasily A; Abroskin, Dmitry P; Volkov, Dmitry S; Pankratov, Denis A; Klein, Olga I; Senik, Svetlana V; Sorkina, Tatiana A; Garshev, Alexey V; Veligzhanin, Alexey A; Garcia Mina, Jose M; Perminova, Irina V

    2017-12-27

    Availability of Fe in soil to plants is closely related to the presence of humic substances (HS). Still, the systematic data on applicability of iron-based nanomaterials stabilized with HS as a source for plant nutrition are missing. The goal of our study was to establish a connection between properties of iron-based materials stabilized by HS and their bioavailability to plants. We have prepared two samples of leonardite HS-stabilized iron-based materials with substantially different properties using the reported protocols and studied their physical chemical state in relation to iron uptake and other biological effects. We used Mössbauer spectroscopy, XRD, SAXS, and TEM to conclude on iron speciation, size, and crystallinity. One material (Fe-HA) consisted of polynuclear iron(III) (hydr)oxide complexes, so-called ferric polymers, distributed in HS matrix. These complexes are composed of predominantly amorphous small-size components (Bioavailability studies were conducted on wheat plants under conditions of iron deficiency. The uptake studies have shown that small and amorphous ferric polymers were readily translocated into the leaves on the level of Fe-EDTA, whereas relatively large and crystalline feroxyhyte NPs were mostly sorbed on the roots. The obtained data are consistent with the size exclusion limits of cell wall pores (5-20 nm). Both samples demonstrated distinct beneficial effects with respect to photosynthetic activity and lipid biosynthesis. The obtained results might be of use for production of iron-based nanomaterials stabilized by HS with the tailored iron availability to plants. They can be applied as the only source for iron nutrition as well as in combination with the other elements, for example, for industrial production of "nanofortified" macrofertilizers (NPK).

  6. Capture and storage of hydrogen gas by zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Eric J

    2014-02-01

    Granular Fe(o), used to reductively degrade a variety of contaminants in groundwater, corrodes in water to produce H2(g). A portion enters the Fe(o) lattice where it is stored in trapping sites such as lattice defects and microcracks. The balance is dissolved by the groundwater where it may exsolve as a gas if its solubility is exceeded. Gas exsolution can reduce the effectiveness of the Fe(o) treatment zone by reducing contact of the contaminant with iron surfaces or by diverting groundwater flow. It also represents a lost electron resource that otherwise could be involved in reductive degradation of contaminants. It is advantageous to select an iron for remediation purposes that captures a large proportion of the H2(g) it generates. This study examines various aspects of the H2(g) uptake process and has found 1) H2(g) does not have to be generated at the water/iron interface to enter the lattice. It can enter directly from the gas/water phases, 2) exposure of granular sponge iron to H2(g) reduces the dormant period for the onset of iron corrosion, 3) the large quantities of H2(g) generated by nano-Fe(o) injected into a reactive barrier of an appropriate granular iron can be captured in the lattice of that iron, and 4) lattice-bound hydrogen represents an additional electron resource to Fe(o) for remediation purposes and may be accessible using physical or chemical means. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Aspects of unconventional cores for large sodium cooled power reactors; evaluation of a literature survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefhaber, E.

    1978-10-01

    The report gives an overview of a literature study on the application of unconventional cores for sodium cooled fast reactors. Different types of unconventional cores (heterogeneous cores, pancake cores, moderated cores and others) are compared with conventional cores, which are characterized by a cylindrical geometry with two or three fissile zones surrounded by an axial and a radial blanket. The main parameters of interest in this comparison are the neutronic parameters sodium void and Doppler effect, the breeding properties and the steel damage. Consequences for the core safety and the overall plant design are also mentioned

  8. Unified Phase Diagram for Iron-Based Superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yanhong; Liu, Zhaoyu; Xie, Tao; Zhang, Wenliang; Gong, Dongliang; Hu, Ding; Ma, Xiaoyan; Li, Chunhong; Zhao, Lingxiao; Lin, Lifang; Xu, Zhuang; Tan, Guotai; Chen, Genfu; Meng, Zi Yang; Yang, Yi-Feng; Luo, Huiqian; Li, Shiliang

    2017-10-13

    High-temperature superconductivity is closely adjacent to a long-range antiferromagnet, which is called a parent compound. In cuprates, all parent compounds are alike and carrier doping leads to superconductivity, so a unified phase diagram can be drawn. However, the properties of parent compounds for iron-based superconductors show significant diversity and both carrier and isovalent dopings can cause superconductivity, which casts doubt on the idea that there exists a unified phase diagram for them. Here we show that the ordered moments in a variety of iron pnictides are inversely proportional to the effective Curie constants of their nematic susceptibility. This unexpected scaling behavior suggests that the magnetic ground states of iron pnictides can be achieved by tuning the strength of nematic fluctuations. Therefore, a unified phase diagram can be established where superconductivity emerges from a hypothetical parent compound with a large ordered moment but weak nematic fluctuations, which suggests that iron-based superconductors are strongly correlated electron systems.

  9. Unified Phase Diagram for Iron-Based Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yanhong; Liu, Zhaoyu; Xie, Tao; Zhang, Wenliang; Gong, Dongliang; Hu, Ding; Ma, Xiaoyan; Li, Chunhong; Zhao, Lingxiao; Lin, Lifang; Xu, Zhuang; Tan, Guotai; Chen, Genfu; Meng, Zi Yang; Yang, Yi-feng; Luo, Huiqian; Li, Shiliang

    2017-10-01

    High-temperature superconductivity is closely adjacent to a long-range antiferromagnet, which is called a parent compound. In cuprates, all parent compounds are alike and carrier doping leads to superconductivity, so a unified phase diagram can be drawn. However, the properties of parent compounds for iron-based superconductors show significant diversity and both carrier and isovalent dopings can cause superconductivity, which casts doubt on the idea that there exists a unified phase diagram for them. Here we show that the ordered moments in a variety of iron pnictides are inversely proportional to the effective Curie constants of their nematic susceptibility. This unexpected scaling behavior suggests that the magnetic ground states of iron pnictides can be achieved by tuning the strength of nematic fluctuations. Therefore, a unified phase diagram can be established where superconductivity emerges from a hypothetical parent compound with a large ordered moment but weak nematic fluctuations, which suggests that iron-based superconductors are strongly correlated electron systems.

  10. Investigation of Large Scale Cortical Models on Clustered Multi-Core Processors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Playstation 3 with 6 available SPU cores outperforms the Intel Xeon processor (with 4 cores) by about 1.9 times for the HTM model and by 2.4 times...runtime breakdowns of the HTM and Dean models respectively on the Cell processor (on the Playstation 3) and the Intel Xeon processor ( 4 thread...YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ORGANIZATION. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER

  11. Heat Transfer Analysis of the European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) Core Catcher Test Facility Volley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pikkarainen, Mika; Laine, Jani; Purhonen, Heikki; Kyrki-Rajamaeki, Riitta [Lappeenranta University of Technology, P.O. 20 53851 Lappeenranta (Finland); Sairanen, Risto [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, P.O. 14 00881 Helsinki (Finland)

    2008-07-01

    The EPR is designed to cope with severe accidents, involving core meltdown. A specific melt spreading area has been designed within the containment. This core catcher will be flooded by water, which transfers the decay heat to the containment heat removal system. To improve cooling, horizontal flow channels made of cast iron are located also below the core catcher. STUK, the radiation and nuclear safety authority in Finland, wanted an independent study of the functionality of the core catcher design. Effect of the presence of insulation material and boric acid in the cooling water was to be studied, as well as the general behavior of the system in different phases of the flooding of the core melt spreading area. To verify the function of the core catcher design, a scaled down test facility was built at Lappeenranta University of Technology. Since there are some physical restrictions of a test facility computational tools were applied especially for the tests where steady state conditions could not be reached without endangering the integrity of the test facility. This paper introduces the Volley test facility, computational simulations and compares them with the test results. Simulated temperatures of those Volley tests, which could be run until steady state conditions, are very close to the measured temperatures. It can be concluded also, that the temperatures are evidently below the cast iron melting point with heat fluxes used in the tests, if there is a small flow inside the cooling channels or even in case when only a few adjacent cooling channels are totally dry. (authors)

  12. Heat Transfer Analysis of the European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) Core Catcher Test Facility Volley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pikkarainen, Mika; Laine, Jani; Purhonen, Heikki; Kyrki-Rajamaeki, Riitta; Sairanen, Risto

    2008-01-01

    The EPR is designed to cope with severe accidents, involving core meltdown. A specific melt spreading area has been designed within the containment. This core catcher will be flooded by water, which transfers the decay heat to the containment heat removal system. To improve cooling, horizontal flow channels made of cast iron are located also below the core catcher. STUK, the radiation and nuclear safety authority in Finland, wanted an independent study of the functionality of the core catcher design. Effect of the presence of insulation material and boric acid in the cooling water was to be studied, as well as the general behavior of the system in different phases of the flooding of the core melt spreading area. To verify the function of the core catcher design, a scaled down test facility was built at Lappeenranta University of Technology. Since there are some physical restrictions of a test facility computational tools were applied especially for the tests where steady state conditions could not be reached without endangering the integrity of the test facility. This paper introduces the Volley test facility, computational simulations and compares them with the test results. Simulated temperatures of those Volley tests, which could be run until steady state conditions, are very close to the measured temperatures. It can be concluded also, that the temperatures are evidently below the cast iron melting point with heat fluxes used in the tests, if there is a small flow inside the cooling channels or even in case when only a few adjacent cooling channels are totally dry. (authors)

  13. Comparative study of efficacy, tolerability and compliance of oral iron preparations (iron edetate, iron polymatose complex) and intramuscular iron sorbitol in iron deficiency anaemia in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afzal, M.; Qureshi, S.M.; Lutafullah, M.

    2009-01-01

    To compare the efficacy, tolerability and compliance of oral iron preparations(iron edetate and Iron polymaltose complex) with each other and with intramuscular iron sorbitol in iron deficiency anaemia in children. A Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) was carried out at the Paediatric Department of Combined Military Hospital (CMH) from January 2006 to December 2007. In total 146 children, up to 12 years age having haemoglobin (Hb%) less than 8 gm% were included. They were randomly distributed into three groups. Group A(64 cases) received oral sodium iron edetate (SIE), Group B (40 cases) received oral iron polymaltose complex (IPC) and group C (42 cases) received intramuscular iron sorbitol (IS) in recommended dosages. Rise in Hb%>10 gm% was kept as desired target. Maximum duration of treatment planned was 2 weeks for parenteral iron (group C) and 12 weeks for oral iron (groups A and B). Haematological parameters- Hb%, mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH), mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC) were measured at induction followed at 2 weeks, 4 weeks, 8 weeks and 12 weeks after start of treatment. Compliance and drop out rates were determined on each visit. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 10. ANOVA was used to analyze difference in rise in Hb% at various intervals. Statistically significant increase in mean Hb%, MCV, MCHC after 02 weeks was observed in group C (IS). Rise in these parameters became significant in group A (SIE) and B (IPC) after 04 weeks. Persistent rise was observed in oral groups at 08 and 12 weeks. Rise in Hb% was much faster in group C (IS). It took 2 weeks to achieve mean Hb% > 10 gm% and compliance rate was 40.5%, while to achieve same target, duration required was 8 weeks in group A (SIE) and 12 weeks in group B (IPC) and compliance rate was 39% and 30% respectively. Adverse effects were much more common with group A (SIE) as compared to other two groups. Intramuscular iron sorbitol is a reliable and

  14. The unexpectedly large proportion of high-mass star-forming cores in a Galactic mini-starburst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motte, F.; Nony, T.; Louvet, F.; Marsh, K. A.; Bontemps, S.; Whitworth, A. P.; Men'shchikov, A.; Nguyáën Luong, Q.; Csengeri, T.; Maury, A. J.; Gusdorf, A.; Chapillon, E.; Könyves, V.; Schilke, P.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Didelon, P.; Gaudel, M.

    2018-04-01

    Understanding the processes that determine the stellar initial mass function (IMF) is a critical unsolved problem, with profound implications for many areas of astrophysics1. In molecular clouds, stars are formed in cores—gas condensations sufficiently dense that gravitational collapse converts a large fraction of their mass into a star or small clutch of stars. In nearby star-formation regions, the core mass function (CMF) is strikingly similar to the IMF, suggesting that the shape of the IMF may simply be inherited from the CMF2-5. Here, we present 1.3 mm observations, obtained with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array telescope, of the active star-formation region W43-MM1, which may be more representative of the Galactic-arm regions where most stars form6,7. The unprecedented resolution of these observations reveals a statistically robust CMF at high masses, with a slope that is markedly shallower than the IMF. This seriously challenges our understanding of the origin of the IMF.

  15. The unexpectedly large proportion of high-mass star-forming cores in a Galactic mini-starburst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motte, F.; Nony, T.; Louvet, F.; Marsh, K. A.; Bontemps, S.; Whitworth, A. P.; Men'shchikov, A.; Nguyen Luong, Q.; Csengeri, T.; Maury, A. J.; Gusdorf, A.; Chapillon, E.; Könyves, V.; Schilke, P.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Didelon, P.; Gaudel, M.

    2018-06-01

    Understanding the processes that determine the stellar initial mass function (IMF) is a critical unsolved problem, with profound implications for many areas of astrophysics1. In molecular clouds, stars are formed in cores—gas condensations sufficiently dense that gravitational collapse converts a large fraction of their mass into a star or small clutch of stars. In nearby star-formation regions, the core mass function (CMF) is strikingly similar to the IMF, suggesting that the shape of the IMF may simply be inherited from the CMF2-5. Here, we present 1.3 mm observations, obtained with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array telescope, of the active star-formation region W43-MM1, which may be more representative of the Galactic-arm regions where most stars form6,7. The unprecedented resolution of these observations reveals a statistically robust CMF at high masses, with a slope that is markedly shallower than the IMF. This seriously challenges our understanding of the origin of the IMF.

  16. Results of the First American Prospective Study of Intravenous Iron in Oral Iron-Intolerant Iron-Deficient Gravidas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, Michael; James, Stephanie E; Nicoletti, Melissa; Lenowitz, Steven; London, Nicola; Bahrain, Huzefa F; Derman, Richard; Smith, Samuel

    2017-12-01

    Anemia affects up to 42% of gravidas. Neonatal iron deficiency is associated with low birth weight, delayed growth and development, and increased cognitive and behavioral abnormalities. While oral iron is convenient, up to 70% report significant gastrointestinal toxicity. Intravenous iron formulations allowing replacement in one visit with favorable side-effect profiles decrease rates of anemia with improved hemoglobin responses and maternal fetal outcomes. Seventy-four oral iron-intolerant, second- and third-trimester iron-deficient gravidas were questioned for oral iron intolerance and treated with intravenous iron. All received 1000 mg of low-molecular-weight iron dextran in 250 mL normal saline. Fifteen minutes after a test dose, the remainder was infused over the balance of 1 hour. Subjects were called at 1, 2, and 7 days to assess delayed reactions. Four weeks postinfusion or postpartum, hemoglobin levels and iron parameters were measured. Paired t test was used for hemoglobin and iron; 58/73 women were questioned about interval growth and development of their babies. Seventy-three of 74 enrolled subjects completed treatment. Sixty had paired pre- and posttreatment data. The mean pre- and posthemoglobin concentrations were 9.7 and 10.8 g/dL (P iron deficiency anemia. Intravenous iron has less toxicity and is more effective, supporting moving it closer to frontline therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Iron oxide nanoparticles: the Influence of synthesis method and size on composition and magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, M.D.; Henriques, F.; Ferreira, L.P.; Godinho, M.; Cruz, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles with mean diameter ranging from 7 to 20 nm were synthesized using two routes: the precipitation method in controlled atmosphere and a reduction–precipitation method under air, in some cases followed by a hydrothermal treatment. The smallest nanoparticles were obtained by the reduction–precipitation method. In order to establish the composition of the iron oxide nanoparticles and its relation with size, the morphological, structural and magnetic properties of the prepared samples were investigated using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Mössbauer spectroscopy and SQUID magnetometry. The results allow to conclude that the nanoparticles can be essentially described as Fe 3−x O 4 , x decreasing with the particle size increase. The composition and magnetic behavior of the synthesized iron oxide nanoparticles are directly related with their size. The overall results are compatible with a core@shell structure model, where a magnetite core is surrounded by an oxidized magnetite layer (labeled as maghemite), the magnetite core dimension depending on the average particle size. - Graphical abstract: TEM images and Mössbauer spectroscopy spectra of Fe 3−x O 4 samples with different sizes. Highlights: ► Fe 3−x O 4 nanoparticles with a mean size between 7 and 20 nm were synthesized. ► The smallest nanoparticles were obtained by a reduction precipitation method, under air. ► The increase of particles size was succeeded using a hydrothermal treatment at 150 °C. ► The magnetic properties of the nanoparticles are directly related with their size

  18. Native iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Charles Kent

    2015-01-01

    System, was reduced. The oxidized outer layers of the Earth have formed by two processes. Firstly, water is decomposed to oxygen and hydrogen by solar radiation in the upper parts of the atmosphere, the light hydrogen diffusing to space, leaving oxygen behind. Secondly, plants, over the course......, hematite, or FeO.Fe2O3, magnetite), with carbon in the form of coke. This is carried out in a blast furnace. Although the Earth's core consists of metallic iron, which may also be present in parts of the mantle, this is inaccessible to us, so we must make our own. In West Greenland, however, some almost......We live in an oxidized world: oxygen makes up 22 percent of the atmosphere and by reacting with organic matter produces most of our energy, including the energy our bodies use to function: breathe, think, move, etc. It has not always been thus. Originally the Earth, in common with most of the Solar...

  19. A combined vector potential-scalar potential method for FE computation of 3D magnetic fields in electrical devices with iron cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R.; Demerdash, N. A.

    1991-01-01

    A method of combined use of magnetic vector potential based finite-element (FE) formulations and magnetic scalar potential (MSP) based formulations for computation of three-dimensional magnetostatic fields is introduced. In this method, the curl-component of the magnetic field intensity is computed by a reduced magnetic vector potential. This field intensity forms the basic of a forcing function for a global magnetic scalar potential solution over the entire volume of the region. This method allows one to include iron portions sandwiched in between conductors within partitioned current-carrying subregions. The method is most suited for large-scale global-type 3-D magnetostatic field computations in electrical devices, and in particular rotating electric machinery.

  20. Absorption of medicamental iron and iron from food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reizenstein, P.; Carlmark, B.; Ehn, L.; Forsberg, K.; Hoeglund, S.; Terpstra, T.

    1976-01-01

    Methods are reviewed for the measurement of iron absorption. The chemical balance method has been almost entirely supplanted by radioisotope methods, which include notably whole-body counting and measurement of incorporation of radioiron into red cells. A survey is also given of the various conditions that influence iron absorption, including chemical form of iron, amount of iron, accompanying diet. Absorption tests must be conducted under relevant conditions. (author)

  1. Moessbauer study of ancient iron smelting slag in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, A.

    2008-01-01

    For an investigation of the ancient iron manufacturing technique, a reproducing experiment was carried out by archaeologists, where ancient type of iron smelting furnace was built and iron sand with high titanium contents was used as the raw material. During the operation of furnace, a large amount of slag flowed away from the furnace. In order to investigate the possibility for the estimation about the operative condition of furnace and the raw material, 57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy was applied for characterizing these slags and it was found that these slags mainly consisted of ferropseudobrookite (FeTi 2 O 5 ).

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  3. Study of an amorphous alloy core transformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafalski, A.; Frost, D. C.

    1994-05-01

    Amorphous core transformers (ACT) have become a technological and commercial reality and there are an estimated 400,000 units installed worldwide [1]. Their applications reflect changes in buying practices, where the efficiency evaluation is an important factor in the purchasing decision for distribution transformers. Use of the total ownership cost (TOC) concept facilities the selection of a transformer on the basis of its performance. This concept is used in this paper to investigate the feasibility of applying a distribution ACT in Western Australian (WA). A 10 kVA ACT, evaluated by the TOC method, was compared with a traditional silicon iron core transformer of the same rating. The cost of amorphous metal (relative to alternative materials), the distribution load profile, and the values of capitalised loss costs are factors which affect the cost effectiveness of ACTs.

  4. Analysis of ex-core detector response measured during nuclear ship Mutsu land-loaded core critical experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itagaki, M.; Abe, J.I.; Kuribayashi, K.

    1987-01-01

    There are some cases where the ex-core neutron detector response is dependent not only on the fission source distribution in a core but also on neutron absorption in the borated water reflector. For example, an unexpectedly large response variation was measured during the nuclear ship Mutsu land-loaded core critical experiment. This large response variation is caused largely by the boron concentration change associated with the change in control rod positioning during the experiment. The conventional Crump-Lee response calculation method has been modified to take into account this boron effect. The correction factor in regard to this effect has been estimated using the one-dimensional transport code ANISN. The detector response variations obtained by means of this new calculation procedure agree well with the measured values recorded during the experiment

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, ... iron-fortified foods that have iron added. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you choose nonmeat ...

  6. In-situ surface hardening of cast iron by surface layer metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, Sebastian F.; Muschna, Stefan; Bührig-Polaczek, Andreas; Bünck, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Abrasive wear is a serious problem in many cast iron castings used in industry. To minimize failure and repair of these components, different strategies exist to improve their surface microhardness thus enhancing their wear resistance. However, most of these methods lead to very brittle and/or expensive castings. In the current work a new method for surface hardening is presented which utilizes surface layer metallurgy to generate in-situ a boron-enriched white cast iron surface layer with a high microhardness on a gray cast iron casting. To do this, sand molds are coated with a ferroboron suspension and cast with a cast iron melt. After solidification, a 100–900 µm thick layer of boron-enriched ledeburite is formed on the surface of the casting which produces an increase in the average microhardness from 284 HV 0.1 ±52 HV 0.1 to 505 HV 0.1 ±87 HV 0.1 . Analyses of the samples' core reveal a typical cast iron microstructure which leads to the conclusion that the coating mainly affects the castings' surface. By varying the grain size of the ferroboron powder in the coatings, it is shown that a powder size ≤100 µm is most suitable to create a boron-enriched ledeburite surface layer possessing high hardness values

  7. Potential of phytase-mediated iron release from cereal-based foods: a quantitative view

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Veller Friis; Tetens, Inge; Meyer, Anne S.

    2013-01-01

    The major part of iron present in plant foods such as cereals is largely unavailable for direct absorption in humans due to complexation with the negatively charged phosphate groups of phytate (myo-inositol (1,2,3,4,5,6)-hexakisphosphate). Human biology has not evolved an efficient mechanism...... to naturally release iron from iron phytate complexes. This narrative review will evaluate the quantitative significance of phytase-catalysed iron release from cereal foods. In vivo studies have shown how addition of microbially derived phytases to cereal-based foods has produced increased iron absorption via...... phytate complexes, and (3) the extent of phytate dephosphorylation required for iron release from inositol phosphates is warranted. Phytase-mediated iron release can improve iron absorption from plant foods. There is a need for development of innovative strategies to obtain better effects....

  8. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    formation comprised of coarse, large-grain sand in ice. Results with this core showed that the viscosity of the drilling fluid must also be carefully controlled. When coarse sand was being cored, the core barrel became stuck because the drilling fluid was not viscous enough to completely remove the large grains of sand. These tests were very valuable to the project by showing the difficulties in coring permafrost or hydrates in a laboratory environment (as opposed to a field environment where drilling costs are much higher and the potential loss of equipment greater). Among the conclusions reached from these simulated hydrate coring tests are the following: Frozen hydrate core samples can be recovered successfully; A spring-finger core catcher works best for catching hydrate cores; Drilling fluid can erode the core and reduces its diameter, making it more difficult to capture the core; Mud must be designed with proper viscosity to lift larger cuttings; and The bottom 6 inches of core may need to be drilled dry to capture the core successfully.

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency anemia is a ... address the cause of your iron deficiency, such as any underlying bleeding. If undiagnosed or untreated, iron- ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  11. Plant cell nucleolus as a hot spot for iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roschzttardtz, Hannetz; Grillet, Louis; Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Conéjéro, Geneviève; Ortega, Richard; Curie, Catherine; Mari, Stéphane

    2011-08-12

    Many central metabolic processes require iron as a cofactor and take place in specific subcellular compartments such as the mitochondrion or the chloroplast. Proper iron allocation in the different organelles is thus critical to maintain cell function and integrity. To study the dynamics of iron distribution in plant cells, we have sought to identify the different intracellular iron pools by combining three complementary imaging approaches, histochemistry, micro particle-induced x-ray emission, and synchrotron radiation micro X-ray fluorescence. Pea (Pisum sativum) embryo was used as a model in this study because of its large cell size and high iron content. Histochemical staining with ferrocyanide and diaminobenzidine (Perls/diaminobenzidine) strongly labeled a unique structure in each cell, which co-labeled with the DNA fluorescent stain DAPI, thus corresponding to the nucleus. The unexpected presence of iron in the nucleus was confirmed by elemental imaging using micro particle-induced x-ray emission. X-ray fluorescence on cryo-sectioned embryos further established that, quantitatively, the iron concentration found in the nucleus was higher than in the expected iron-rich organelles such as plastids or vacuoles. Moreover, within the nucleus, iron was particularly accumulated in a subcompartment that was identified as the nucleolus as it was shown to transiently disassemble during cell division. Taken together, our data uncover an as yet unidentified although abundant iron pool in the cell, which is located in the nuclei of healthy, actively dividing plant tissues. This result paves the way for the discovery of a novel cellular function for iron related to nucleus/nucleolus-associated processes.

  12. Conceptual study of advanced PWR core design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Jin; Chang, Moon Hee; Kim, Keung Ku; Joo, Hyung Kuk; Kim, Young Il; Noh, Jae Man; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Kim, Taek Kyum; Yoo, Yon Jong.

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this project is for developing and verifying the core design concepts with enhanced safety and economy, and associated methodologies for core analyses. From the study of the sate-of-art of foreign advanced reactor cores, we developed core concepts such as soluble boron free, high convertible and enhanced safety core loaded semi-tight lattice hexagonal fuel assemblies. To analyze this hexagonal core, we have developed and verified some neutronic and T/H analysis methodologies. HELIOS code was adopted as the assembly code and HEXFEM code was developed for hexagonal core analysis. Based on experimental data in hexagonal lattices and the COBRA-IV-I code, we developed a thermal-hydraulic analysis code for hexagonal lattices. Using the core analysis code systems developed in this project, we designed a 600 MWe core and studied the feasibility of the core concepts. Two additional scopes were performed in this project : study on the operational strategies of soluble boron free core and conceptual design of large scale passive core. By using the axial BP zoning concept and suitable design of control rods, this project showed that it was possible to design a soluble boron free core in 600 MWe PWR. The results of large scale core design showed that passive concepts and daily load follow operation could be practiced. (author). 15 refs., 52 tabs., 101 figs

  13. Conceptual study of advanced PWR core design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Jin; Chang, Moon Hee; Kim, Keung Ku; Joo, Hyung Kuk; Kim, Young Il; Noh, Jae Man; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Kim, Taek Kyum; Yoo, Yon Jong

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this project is for developing and verifying the core design concepts with enhanced safety and economy, and associated methodologies for core analyses. From the study of the sate-of-art of foreign advanced reactor cores, we developed core concepts such as soluble boron free, high convertible and enhanced safety core loaded semi-tight lattice hexagonal fuel assemblies. To analyze this hexagonal core, we have developed and verified some neutronic and T/H analysis methodologies. HELIOS code was adopted as the assembly code and HEXFEM code was developed for hexagonal core analysis. Based on experimental data in hexagonal lattices and the COBRA-IV-I code, we developed a thermal-hydraulic analysis code for hexagonal lattices. Using the core analysis code systems developed in this project, we designed a 600 MWe core and studied the feasibility of the core concepts. Two additional scopes were performed in this project : study on the operational strategies of soluble boron free core and conceptual design of large scale passive core. By using the axial BP zoning concept and suitable design of control rods, this project showed that it was possible to design a soluble boron free core in 600 MWe PWR. The results of large scale core design showed that passive concepts and daily load follow operation could be practiced. (author). 15 refs., 52 tabs., 101 figs.

  14. Nucleosynthesis and hydrodynamic instabilities in core collapse supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kifonidis, K.

    2001-01-01

    Hydrodynamic instabilities are of crucial importance for the explosion of massive stars as core collapse supernovae, for the synthesis of the heavy elements, and for their injection into the interstellar medium. The processes hereby involved are studied by means of two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations which follow all phases from shock revival to shock breakout through the photosphere of a massive star. The computed distributions of radioactive elements are compared to observational data of SN 1987 A and other supernovae. While we find good agreement of our models with observations of Type Ib supernovae, the high velocities of iron group elements observed in SN 1987 A cannot be reproduced. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. Hydrodynamic instabilities are of crucial importance for the explosion of massive stars as core collapse supernovae, for the synthesis of the heavy elements, and for their injection into the interstellar medium. The processes hereby involved are studied by means of two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations which follow all phases from shock revival to shock breakout through the photosphere of a massive star. The computed distributions of radioactive elements are compared to observational data of SN 1987 A and other supernovae. While we find good agreement of our models with observations of Type Ib supernovae, the high velocities of iron group elements observed in SN 1987 A cannot be reproduced. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed

  15. Serum iron and total iron binding capacity levels among the abo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Iron deficiency anaemia is a common tropical disease. Iron plays a very important role in the human body. The understanding of the different blood groups ability to retain iron in their system can give an insight into their ability to handle the disease Iron deficiency anaemia. Serum Iron, Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC) and ...

  16. Melt propagation in dry core debris beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosanjh, S.S.

    1989-01-01

    During severe light water reactor accidents like Three Mile Island Unit 2, the fuel rods can fragment and thus convert the reactor core into a large particle bed. The postdryout meltdown of such debris beds is examined. A two-dimensional model that considers the presence of oxidic (UO 2 and ZrO 2 ) as well as metallic (e.g., zirconium) constituents is developed. Key results are that a dense metallic crust is created near the bottom of the bed as molten materials flow downward and freeze; liquid accumulates above the blockage and, if zirconium is present, the pool grows rapidly as molten zirconium dissolved both UO 2 and ZrO 2 particles; if the melt wets the solid, a fraction of the melt flows radially outward under the action of capillary forces and freezes near the radial boundary; in a nonwetting system, all of the melt flows into the bottom of the bed; and when zirconium and iron are in intimate contact and the zirconium metal atomic fraction is > 0.33, these metals can liquefy and flow out of the bed very early in the meltdown sequence

  17. Zinc deficiency-induced iron accumulation, a consequence of alterations in iron regulatory protein-binding activity, iron transporters, and iron storage proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, Brad J; Clegg, Michael S; Hanna, Lynn A; Chou, Susan S; Momma, Tony Y; Hong, Heeok; Keen, Carl L

    2008-02-22

    One consequence of zinc deficiency is an elevation in cell and tissue iron concentrations. To examine the mechanism(s) underlying this phenomenon, Swiss 3T3 cells were cultured in zinc-deficient (D, 0.5 microM zinc), zinc-supplemented (S, 50 microM zinc), or control (C, 4 microM zinc) media. After 24 h of culture, cells in the D group were characterized by a 50% decrease in intracellular zinc and a 35% increase in intracellular iron relative to cells in the S and C groups. The increase in cellular iron was associated with increased transferrin receptor 1 protein and mRNA levels and increased ferritin light chain expression. The divalent metal transporter 1(+)iron-responsive element isoform mRNA was decreased during zinc deficiency-induced iron accumulation. Examination of zinc-deficient cells revealed increased binding of iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2) and decreased binding of IRP1 to a consensus iron-responsive element. The increased IRP2-binding activity in zinc-deficient cells coincided with an increased level of IRP2 protein. The accumulation of IRP2 protein was independent of zinc deficiency-induced intracellular nitric oxide production but was attenuated by the addition of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine or ascorbate to the D medium. These data support the concept that zinc deficiency can result in alterations in iron transporter, storage, and regulatory proteins, which facilitate iron accumulation.

  18. Mammalian iron metabolism and its control by iron regulatory proteins☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Cole P.; Shen, Lacy; Eisenstein, Richard S.; Leibold, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular iron homeostasis is maintained by iron regulatory proteins 1 and 2 (IRP1 and IRP2). IRPs bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs) located in the untranslated regions of mRNAs encoding protein involved in iron uptake, storage, utilization and export. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made in understanding how IRPs are regulated by iron-dependent and iron-independent mechanisms and the pathological consequences of IRP2 deficiency in mice. The identification of novel IREs involved in diverse cellular pathways has revealed that the IRP–IRE network extends to processes other than iron homeostasis. A mechanistic understanding of IRP regulation will likely yield important insights into the basis of disorders of iron metabolism. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cell Biology of Metals. PMID:22610083

  19. Purification and characterization of an iron-induced ferritin from soybean (Glycine max) cell suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lescure, A M; Massenet, O; Briat, J F

    1990-11-15

    Ferric citrate induces ferritin synthesis and accumulation in soybean (Glycine max) cell suspension cultures [Proudhon, Briat & Lescure (1989) Plant Physiol. 90, 586-590]. This iron-induced ferritin has been purified from cells grown for 72 h in the presence of either 100 microM- or 500 microM-ferric citrate. It has a molecular mass of about 600 kDa and is built up from a 28 kDa subunit which is recognized by antibodies raised against pea (Pisum sativum) seed ferritin and it has the same N-terminal sequence as this latter, except for residue number 3, which is alanine in pea seed ferritin instead of valine in iron-induced soybean cell ferritin. It contains an average of 1800 atoms of iron per molecule whatever the ferric citrate concentration used to induce its synthesis. It is shown that the presence of 100 microM- or 500 microM-ferric citrate in the culture medium leads respectively to an 11- and 28-fold increase in the total intracellular iron concentration and to a 30- and 60-fold increase in the ferritin concentration. However, the percentage of iron stored in the mineral core of ferritin remains constant whatever the ferric citrate concentration used and represents only 5-6% of cellular iron.

  20. Iron-binding haemerythrin RING ubiquitin ligases regulate plant iron responses and accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takanori; Nagasaka, Seiji; Senoura, Takeshi; Itai, Reiko Nakanishi; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Nishizawa, Naoko K.

    2013-01-01

    Iron is essential for most living organisms. Plants transcriptionally induce genes involved in iron acquisition under conditions of low iron availability, but the nature of the deficiency signal and its sensors are unknown. Here we report the identification of new iron regulators in rice, designated Oryza sativa Haemerythrin motif-containing Really Interesting New Gene (RING)- and Zinc-finger protein 1 (OsHRZ1) and OsHRZ2. OsHRZ1, OsHRZ2 and their Arabidopsis homologue BRUTUS bind iron and zinc, and possess ubiquitination activity. OsHRZ1 and OsHRZ2 are susceptible to degradation in roots irrespective of iron conditions. OsHRZ-knockdown plants exhibit substantial tolerance to iron deficiency, and accumulate more iron in their shoots and grains irrespective of soil iron conditions. The expression of iron deficiency-inducible genes involved in iron utilization is enhanced in OsHRZ-knockdown plants, mostly under iron-sufficient conditions. These results suggest that OsHRZ1 and OsHRZ2 are iron-binding sensors that negatively regulate iron acquisition under conditions of iron sufficiency. PMID:24253678

  1. Extracting phosphoric iron under laboratorial conditions smelting bog iron ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Török, B; Thiele, A

    2013-01-01

    In recent years it has been indicated by archaeometric investigations that phosphoric-iron (P-iron, low carbon steel with 0,5-1,5wt% P), which is an unknown and unused kind of steel in the modern industry, was widely used in different parts of the world in medieval times. In this study we try to explore the role of phosphorus in the arhaeometallurgy of iron and answer some questions regarding the smelting bog iron ores with high P-content. XRF analyses were performed on bog iron ores collected in Somogy county. Smelting experiments were carried out on bog iron ores using a laboratory model built on the basis of previously conducted reconstructed smelting experiments in copies of excavated furnaces. The effect of technological parameters on P-content of the resulted iron bloom was studied. OM and SEM-EDS analyses were carried out on the extracted iron and slag samples. On the basis of the material analyses it can be stated that P-iron is usually extracted but the P-content is highly affected by technological parameters. Typical microstructures of P-iron and of slag could also be identified. It could also be established that arsenic usually solved in high content in iron as well

  2. Iron: A Key Element for Understanding the Origin and Evolution of Interstellar Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwek, Eli

    2016-01-01

    The origin and depletion of iron differ from all other abundant refractory elements that make up the composition of the interstellar dust. Iron is primarily synthesized in Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) and in core collapse supernovae (CCSN), and is present in the outflows from AGB (Asymptotic Giant Branch) stars. Only the latter two are observed to be sources of interstellar dust, since searches for dust in SN Ia have provided strong evidence for the absence of any significant mass of dust in their ejecta. Consequently, more than 65 percent of the iron is injected into the ISM (Inter-Stellar Matter) in gaseous form. Yet, ultraviolet and X-ray observations along many lines of sight in the ISM show that iron is severely depleted in the gas phase compared to expected solar abundances. The missing iron, comprising about 90 percent of the total, is believed to be locked up in interstellar dust. This suggests that most of the missing iron must have precipitated from the ISM gas by cold accretion onto preexisting silicate, carbon, or composite grains. Iron is thus the only element that requires most of its growth to occur outside the traditional stellar condensation sources. This is a robust statement that does not depend on our evolving understanding of the dust destruction efficiency in the ISM. Reconciling the physical, optical, and chemical properties of such composite grains with their many observational manifestations is a major challenge for understanding the nature and origin of interstellar dust.

  3. Iron Therapy in Patients with Heart Failure and Iron Deficiency: Review of Iron Preparations for Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozd, Marcin; Jankowska, Ewa A; Banasiak, Waldemar; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2017-06-01

    In patients with heart failure (HF), iron deficiency (ID) correlates with decreased exercise capacity and poor health-related quality of life, and predicts worse outcomes. Both absolute (depleted iron stores) and functional (where iron is unavailable for dedicated tissues) ID can be easily evaluated in patients with HF using standard laboratory tests (assessment of serum ferritin and transferrin saturation). Intravenous iron therapy in iron-deficient patients with HF and reduced ejection fraction has been shown to alleviate HF symptoms and improve exercise capacity and quality of life. In this paper, we provide information on how to diagnose ID in HF. Further we discuss pros and cons of different iron preparations and discuss the results of major trials implementing iron supplementation in HF patients, in order to provide practical guidance for clinicians on how to manage ID in patients with HF.

  4. Siderophore-mediated iron trafficking in humans is regulated by iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhuoming; Lanford, Robert; Mueller, Sebastian; Gerhard, Glenn S.; Luscieti, Sara; Sanchez, Mayka; Devireddy, L.

    2013-01-01

    Siderophores are best known as small iron binding molecules that facilitate microbial iron transport. In our previous study we identified a siderophore-like molecule in mammalian cells and found that its biogenesis is evolutionarily conserved. A member of the short chain dehydrogenase family of reductases, 3-OH butyrate dehydrogenase (BDH2) catalyzes a rate-limiting step in the biogenesis of the mammalian siderophore. We have shown that depletion of the mammalian siderophore by inhibiting expression of bdh2 results in abnormal accumulation of cellular iron and mitochondrial iron deficiency. These observations suggest that the mammalian siderophore is a critical regulator of cellular iron homeostasis and facilitates mitochondrial iron import. By utilizing bioinformatics, we identified an iron-responsive element (IRE; a stem-loop structure that regulates genes expression post-transcriptionally upon binding to iron regulatory proteins or IRPs) in the 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) of the human BDH2 (hBDH2) gene. In cultured cells as well as in patient samples we now demonstrate that the IRE confers iron-dependent regulation on hBDH2 and binds IRPs in RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assays. In addition, we show that the hBDH2 IRE associates with IRPs in cells and that abrogation of IRPs by RNAi eliminates the iron-dependent regulation of hBDH2 mRNA. The key physiologic implication is that iron-mediated post-transcriptional regulation of hBDH2 controls mitochondrial iron homeostasis in human cells. These observations provide a new and an unanticipated mechanism by which iron regulates its intracellular trafficking. PMID:22527885

  5. Ultra-low velocity zone heterogeneities at the core-mantle boundary from diffracted PKKPab waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaolong; Sun, Xinlei

    2017-08-01

    Diffracted waves around Earth's core could provide important information of the lowermost mantle that other seismic waves may not. We examined PKKPab diffraction waves from 52 earthquakes occurring at the western Pacific region and recorded by USArray to probe the velocity structure along the core-mantle boundary (CMB). These diffracted waves emerge at distances up to 10° past the theoretical cutoff epicentral distance and show comparable amplitudes. We measured the ray parameters of PKKPab diffraction waves by Radon transform analysis that is suitable for large-aperture arrays. These ray parameters show a wide range of values from 4.250 to 4.840 s/deg, suggesting strong lateral heterogeneities in sampling regions at the base of the mantle. We further estimated the P-wave velocity variations by converting these ray parameters and found the CMB regions beneath the northwestern edge of African Anomaly (Ritsma et al. in Science 286:1925-1928, 1999) and southern Sumatra Islands exhibit velocity reductions up to 8.5% relative to PREM. We suggest that these low velocity regions are Ultra-low velocity zones, which may be related to partial melt or iron-enriched solids.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. New approach to the design of core support structures for large LMFBR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burelbach, J.P.; Kann, W.J.; Pan, Y.C.; Saiveau, J.G.; Seidensticker, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    The paper describes an innovative design concept for a LMFBR Core Support Structure. A hanging Core Support Structure is described and analyzed. The design offers inherent safety features, constructibility advantages, and potential cost reductions

  7. Iron-dextran complex: geometrical structure and magneto-optical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graczykowski, Bartłomiej; Dobek, Andrzej

    2011-11-15

    Molecular mass of the iron-dextran complex (M(w)=1133 kDa), diameter of its particles (∼8.3 nm) and the content of iron ions in the complex core (N(Fe)=6360) were determined by static light scattering, measurements of refractive index increment and the Cotton-Mouton effect in solution. The known number of iron ions permitted the calculation of the permanent magnetic dipole moment value to be μ(Fe)=3.17×10(-18) erg Oe(-1) and the determination of anisotropy of linear magneto-optical polarizabilities components as Δχ=9.2×10(-21) cm(3). Knowing both values and the value of the mean linear optical polarizability α=7.3×10(-20) cm(3), it was possible to show that the total measured CM effect was due to the reorientation of the permanent and the induced magnetic dipole moments of the complex. Analysis of the measured magneto-optical birefringence indicated very small optical anisotropy of linear optical polarizability components, κ(α), which suggested a homogeneous structure of particles of spherical symmetry. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. China's emergence as the world's leading iron-ore-consuming country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, W.S.

    2004-01-01

    China has become the leading iron ore consuming nation, and, based on recent steel production capacity increases and plans for more, its consumption will almost certainly to continue to grow. China's iron ore industry, however, faces a number of problems. China's iron ore is low-grade, expensive to process, and its mines are being depleted. For many Chinese steelmakers, particularly in the coastal regions, the delivered cost of domestic iron ore, is more than the delivered cost of foreign ore. Thus China's iron ore imports are expected to increase. As China's growth continues, it will almost certainly surpass Japan to become the leading iron ore importing country as well. Without China's increasing appetite for iron ore, the world iron ore market would be flat or declining. China's recent imports largely offset the slump in demand in North America and Europe. China is regarded by the iron ore industry as the growth sector for the next decade. Although Chinese imports are expected to continue their rapid increase and imports in other Asian countries are expected to continue growing, there appears to be enough greenfield and expansion projects to meet future demand for iron ore worldwide. Present suppliers of iron ore, Australia, Brazil, India, and South Africa, will probably be the chief beneficiaries of China's increasing consumption of iron ore. How long China can continue its extraordinary growth is the primary issue for the future of the iron ore industry. Based on the number and size of planned blast furnaces it appears that China's growth could continue for several more years. ?? 2004 Taylor and Francis.

  9. Precipitated iron. A limit on gettering efficacy in multicrystalline silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenning, D.P.; Hofstetter, J.; Bertoni, M.I.; Buonassisi, T. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Coletti, G. [ECN Solar Energy, Westerduinweg 3, NL-1755 LE Petten (Netherlands); Lai, B. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Del Canizo, C. [Instituto de Energia Solar, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-01-31

    A phosphorus diffusion gettering model is used to examine the efficacy of a standard gettering process on interstitial and precipitated iron in multicrystalline silicon. The model predicts a large concentration of precipitated iron remaining after standard gettering for most as-grown iron distributions. Although changes in the precipitated iron distribution are predicted to be small, the simulated post-processing interstitial iron concentration is predicted to depend strongly on the as-grown distribution of precipitates, indicating that precipitates must be considered as internal sources of contamination during processing. To inform and validate the model, the iron distributions before and after a standard phosphorus diffusion step are studied in samples from the bottom, middle, and top of an intentionally Fe-contaminated laboratory ingot. A census of iron-silicide precipitates taken by synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy confirms the presence of a high density of iron-silicide precipitates both before and after phosphorus diffusion. A comparable precipitated iron distribution was measured in a sister wafer after hydrogenation during a firing step. The similar distributions of precipitated iron seen after each step in the solar cell process confirm that the effect of standard gettering on precipitated iron is strongly limited as predicted by simulation. Good agreement between the experimental and simulated data supports the hypothesis that gettering kinetics is governed by not only the total iron concentration but also by the distribution of precipitated iron. Finally, future directions based on the modeling are suggested for the improvement of effective minority carrier lifetime in multicrystalline silicon solar cells.

  10. New insights into iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camaschella, Clara

    2017-07-01

    Recent advances in iron metabolism have stimulated new interest in iron deficiency (ID) and its anemia (IDA), common conditions worldwide. Absolute ID/IDA, i.e. the decrease of total body iron, is easily diagnosed based on decreased levels of serum ferritin and transferrin saturation. Relative lack of iron in specific organs/tissues, and IDA in the context of inflammatory disorders, are diagnosed based on arbitrary cut offs of ferritin and transferrin saturation and/or marker combination (as the soluble transferrin receptor/ferritin index) in an appropriate clinical context. Most ID patients are candidate to traditional treatment with oral iron salts, while high hepcidin levels block their absorption in inflammatory disorders. New iron preparations and new treatment modalities are available: high-dose intravenous iron compounds are becoming popular and indications to their use are increasing, although long-term side effects remain to be evaluated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Iron absorption studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekenved, G.

    1976-01-01

    The main objective of the present work was to study iron absorption from different iron preparations in different types of subjects and under varying therapeutic conditions. The studies were performed with different radioiron isotope techniques and with a serum iron technique. The preparations used were solutions of ferrous sulphate and rapidly-disintegrating tablets containing ferrous sulphate, ferrous fumarate and ferrous carbonate and a slow-release ferrous sulphate tablet of an insoluble matrix type (Duroferon Durules). The serum iron method was evaluated and good correlation was found between the serum iron response and the total amount of iron absorbed after an oral dose of iron given in solution or in tablet form. New technique for studying the in-vivo release properties of tablets was presented. Iron tablets labelled with a radio-isotope were given to healthy subjects. The decline of the radioactivity in the tablets was followed by a profile scanning technique applied to different types of iron tablets. The release of iron from the two types of tablets was shown to be slower in vivo than in vitro. It was found that co-administration of antacids and iron tablets led to a marked reduction in the iron absorption and that these drugs should not be administered sumultaneously. A standardized meal markedly decreased the absorbability of iron from iron tablets. The influence of the meal was more marked with rapidly-disintegrating than with slow-release ferrous sulphate tablets. The absorption from rapidly-disintegrating and slow-release ferrous sulphate tablets was compared under practical clinical conditions during an extended treatment period. The studies were performed in healthy subjects, blood donors and patients with iron deficiency anaemia and it was found that the absorption of iron from the slow-release tablets was significantly better than from the rapidly-disintegrating tablets in all three groups of subjects. (author)

  12. On estimating the molecular viscosity of the Earth's outer core: comment on the paper by D E Smylie et al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zharkov, Vladimir N

    2009-01-01

    The paper 'Direct observations of the viscosity of Earth's outer core and extrapolation of measurements of the viscosity of liquid iron' by D.E. Smylie, V.V. Brazhkin, and A. Palmer [Phys. Usp. 52 (1) 79 (2009)] is subject to critique for its proposed approach to estimating the viscosity of the Earth's outer core. (methodological notes)

  13. Bioconjugated iron oxide nanocubes: synthesis, functionalization, and vectorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortmann, Laura; Ilyas, Shaista; Niznansky, Daniel; Valldor, Martin; Arroub, Karim; Berger, Nadja; Rahme, Kamil; Holmes, Justin; Mathur, Sanjay

    2014-10-08

    A facile bottom-up approach for the synthesis of inorganic/organic bioconjugated nanoprobes based on iron oxide nanocubes as the core with a nanometric silica shell is demonstrated. Surface coating and functionalization protocols developed in this work offered good control over the shell thickness (8-40 nm) and enabled biovectorization of SiO2@Fe3O4 core-shell structures by covalent attachment of folic acid (FA) as a targeting unit for cellular uptake. The successful immobilization of folic acid was investigated both quantitatively (TGA, EA, XPS) and qualitatively (AT-IR, UV-vis, ζ-potential). Additionally, the magnetic behavior of the nanocomposites was monitored after each functionalization step. Cell viability studies confirmed low cytotoxicity of FA@SiO2@Fe3O4 conjugates, which makes them promising nanoprobes for targeted internalization by cells and their imaging.

  14. Simulation experiment on the flooding behaviour of core melts: KATS-9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fieg, G.; Massier, H.; Schuetz, W.; Stegmaier, U.; Stern, G.

    2000-11-01

    For future Light Water Reactors special devices (core catchers) are being developed to prevent containment failure by basement erosion after reactor pressure vessel meltthrough during a core meltdown accident. Quick freezing of the molten core masses is desirable to reduce release of radioactivity. Several concepts of core catcher devices have been proposed based on the spreading of corium melt onto flat surfaces with subsequent water cooling. A KATS-experiment has been performed to investigate the flooding behaviour of high temperature melts using alumina-iron thermite melts as a simulant. The oxidic thermite melt is conditioned by adding other oxides to simulate a realistic corium melt as close as possible in terms of liquidus and solidus temperatures. Before flooding with water, spreading of the separate oxidic and metallic melts has been done in one-dimensional channels with a silicate concrete as the substrate. The flooding rate was, in relation to the melt surface, identical to the flooding rate in EPR. (orig.) [de

  15. Bond-order potential for magnetic body-centered-cubic iron and its transferability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Shen; Mrovec, M.; Vitek, V.

    2016-06-01

    We derived and thoroughly tested a bond-order potential (BOP) for body-centered-cubic (bcc) magnetic iron that can be employed in atomistic calculations of a broad variety of crystal defects that control structural, mechanical, and thermodynamic properties of this technologically important metal. The constructed BOP reflects correctly the mixed nearly free electron and covalent bonding arising from the partially filled d band as well as the ferromagnetism that is actually responsible for the stability of the bcc structure of iron at low temperatures. The covalent part of the cohesive energy is determined within the tight-binding bond model with the Green's function of the Schrödinger equation determined using the method of continued fractions terminated at a sufficient level of the moments of the density of states. This makes the BOP an O (N ) method usable for very large numbers of particles. Only d d bonds are included explicitly, but the effect of s electrons on the covalent energy is included via their screening of the corresponding d d bonds. The magnetic part of the cohesive energy is included using the Stoner model of itinerant magnetism. The repulsive part of the cohesive energy is represented, as in any tight-binding scheme, by an empirical formula. Its functional form is physically justified by studies of the repulsion in face-centered-cubic (fcc) solid argon under very high pressure where the repulsion originates from overlapping s and p closed-shell electrons just as it does from closed-shell s electro