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Sample records for large friction anisotropy

  1. Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, N., E-mail: niranjan@igcar.gov.in [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Radhika, R. [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai (India); Kozakov, A.T. [Research Institute of Physics, Southern Federal University, Rostov-on-Don (Russian Federation); Pandian, R. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Chakravarty, S. [UGC-DAE CSR, Kalpakkam (India); Ravindran, T.R.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite is observed in macroscopic sliding condition. • Low friction coefficient is observed in basal plane and becomes high in prismatic direction. • 3D phase of boronated graphite transformed into 2D structure after friction test. • Chemical activity is high in prismatic plane forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces. - Abstract: Anisotropic friction behavior in macroscopic scale was observed in boronated graphite. Depending upon sliding speed and normal loads, this value was found to be in the range 0.1–0.35 in the direction of basal plane and becomes high 0.2–0.8 in prismatic face. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction analysis shows prominent reflection of (0 0 2) plane at basal and prismatic directions of boronated graphite. However, in both the wear tracks (1 1 0) plane become prominent and this transformation is induced by frictional energy. The structural transformation in wear tracks is supported by micro-Raman analysis which revealed that 3D phase of boronated graphite converted into a disordered 2D lattice structure. Thus, the structural aspect of disorder is similar in both the wear tracks and graphite transfer layers. Therefore, the crystallographic aspect is not adequate to explain anisotropic friction behavior. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows weak signature of oxygen complexes and functional groups in wear track of basal plane while these species dominate in prismatic direction. Abundance of these functional groups in prismatic plane indicates availability of chemically active sites tends to forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces which eventually increases friction coefficient.

  2. Friction Anisotropy: A unique and intrinsic property of decagonal quasicrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulleregan, Alice; Park, Jeong Young; Salmeron, Miquel; Ogetree, D.F.; Jenks, C.J.; Thiel, P.A.; Brenner, J.; Dubois, J.M.

    2008-06-25

    We show that friction anisotropy is an intrinsic property of the atomic structure of Al-Ni-Co decagonal quasicrystals and not only of clean and well-ordered surfaces that can be prepared in vacuum [J.Y. Park et al., Science (2005)]. Friction anisotropy is manifested both in nanometer size contacts obtained with sharp atomic force microscope (AFM) tips as well as in macroscopic contacts produced in pin-on-disc tribometers. We show that the friction anisotropy, which is not observed when an amorphous oxide film covers the surface, is recovered when the film is removed due to wear. Equally important is the loss of the friction anisotropy when the quasicrystalline order is destroyed due to cumulative wear. These results reveal the intimate connection between the mechanical properties of these materials and their peculiar atomic structure.

  3. Giant and Tunable Anisotropy of Nanoscale Friction in Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Clara M.; Prioli, Rodrigo; Fragneaud, Benjamin; Cançado, Luiz Gustavo; Paupitz, Ricardo; Galvão, Douglas S.; de Cicco, Marcelo; Menezes, Marcos G.; Achete, Carlos A.; Capaz, Rodrigo B.

    2016-08-01

    The nanoscale friction between an atomic force microscopy tip and graphene is investigated using friction force microscopy (FFM). During the tip movement, friction forces are observed to increase and then saturate in a highly anisotropic manner. As a result, the friction forces in graphene are highly dependent on the scanning direction: under some conditions, the energy dissipated along the armchair direction can be 80% higher than along the zigzag direction. In comparison, for highly-oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG), the friction anisotropy between armchair and zigzag directions is only 15%. This giant friction anisotropy in graphene results from anisotropies in the amplitudes of flexural deformations of the graphene sheet driven by the tip movement, not present in HOPG. The effect can be seen as a novel manifestation of the classical phenomenon of Euler buckling at the nanoscale, which provides the non-linear ingredients that amplify friction anisotropy. Simulations based on a novel version of the 2D Tomlinson model (modified to include the effects of flexural deformations), as well as fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and first-principles density-functional theory (DFT) calculations, are able to reproduce and explain the experimental observations.

  4. Modelling of friction anisotropy of deepdrawing sheet in ABAQUS/EXPLICIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Stachowicz

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the experimental and numerical results of rectangular cup drawing of steel sheets. The aim of the experimental study was to analyze material behavior under deformation. The received results were further used to verify the results from numerical simulation by taking friction and material anisotropy into consideration. A 3D parametric finite element (FE model was built using the FE-package ABAQUS/Standard. ABAQUS allows analyzing physical models of real processes putting special emphasis on geometrical non-linearities caused by large deformations, material non-linearities and complex friction conditions. Frictional properties of the deep drawing quality steel sheet were determined by using the pin-on-disc tribometer. It shows that the friction coefficient value depends on the measured angle from the rolling direction and corresponds to the surface topography. A quadratic Hill anisotropic yield criterion was compared with Huber-Mises yield criterion having isotropic hardening. Plastic anisotropy is the result of the distortion of the yield surface shape due to the material microstructural state. The sensitivity of constitutive laws to the initial data characterizing material behavior isalso presented. It is found that plastic anisotropy of the matrix in ductile sheet metal has influence on deformation behavior of the material. If the material and friction anisotropy are taken into account in the finite element analysis, this approach undoubtedly gives the most approximate numerical results to real processes. This paper is the first part of the study of numerical investigation using ABAQUS and mainly deals with the most influencing parameters in a forming process to simulate the sheet metal forming of rectangular cup.

  5. Fabricated and friction test anisotropy material of ultrasonic motor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QU Yan-yan; QU Jian-jun; KUANG Nai-hang

    2010-01-01

    The twisters for composed of anisotropic material were designed and manufactured.And two kinds of directional-composites were made:one was fiber direction vertical with frictional interface and another was parallel with frictional interface and moving direction.By varying the proportions of epoxy resin and fiber and arranging the orientations of fiber,the composites anisotropy along longitudinal and circumferential were got.Using density measurement,the mass fraction of resin and fiber were calculated.According to composite mesoscopic mechanics,the elasticity constants of composite were analyzed and calculated.The composite different thicknesses were sliced,and attach to the rotor,then the load characteristics,no-load speed,stop load of ultrasonic motor(USM) were test.The output properties of USM with 0.6 mm thickness composite were superior.The effect of friction material on ultrasonic motor was analyzed.Elastic modulus,thickness and micro-morphology of material are main factors which affect characteristics of ultrasonic motor.

  6. Effect of friction and cohesion on anisotropy in quasi-static granular materials under shear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, A.; Magnanimo, Vanessa; Luding, Stefan; R. Yang A. Yu, K. Dong

    2013-01-01

    We study the effect of particle friction and cohesion on the steady-state shear stress and the contact anisotropy of a granular assembly sheared in a split-bottom ring shear cell. For non-cohesive frictional materials, the critical state shear stress first increases and then saturates with friction.

  7. Anisotropy effects and friction maps in the framework of the 2d PT model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajardo, O.Y. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón and Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Gnecco, E. [Instituto Madrileño de Estudios Avanzados, IMDEA Nanociencia, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Mazo, J.J., E-mail: juanjo@unizar.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón and Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2014-12-15

    We present a series of numerical simulations on the friction–anisotropy behavior and stick–slip dynamics of a point mass in the framework of a 2d Prandtl–Tomlinson model. Results for three representative surface lattice are shown: square, hexagonal and honeycomb. Curves for scan angle dependence of static friction force, and kinetic one at T=0 K and T=300 K are shown. Friction force maps are computed at different directions.

  8. Enhanced Locomotion Efficiency of a Bio-inspired Walking Robot using Contact Surfaces with Frictional Anisotropy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manoonpong, Poramate; Petersen, Dennis; Kovalev, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    stability. It shows high frictional anisotropy due to an array of sloped denticles. The orientation of the denticles to the underlying collagenous material also strongly influences their mechanical interlocking with the substrate. This study not only opens up a new way of achieving energy-efficient legged...

  9. Stability analysis of sandy slope considering anisotropy effect in friction angle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hamed Farshbaf Aghajani; Hossein Salehzadeh; Habib Shahnazari

    2015-09-01

    This paper aims to investigate the effect of anisotropy of shear strength parameter on the stability of a sandy slope by performing the limit equilibrium analysis. Because of scarcity of mathematical equation for anisotropic friction angle of sand, at first, all results of principal stress rotation tests are processed by artificial neural network and a computational procedure is developed for determining sand friction angle subjected to various loading directions. By implementing this procedure, slope stability analysis is performed in both isotropic and anisotropic conditions. The results indicate that while isotropic slope stability overestimates the factor of safety between 5 and 25% which the deviation is more for flatter slope, the location of critical slip surface is coincident in both conditions. Also in specific slip surface, the parameters of face angle, geometry of slip surface and soil properties relating to anisotropy are the main factors governing the result of anisotropic slope stability.

  10. Erosion of Globular Cluster Systems: The Influence of Radial Anisotropy, Central Black Holes and Dynamical Friction

    CERN Document Server

    Brockamp, Michael; Thies, Ingo; Baumgardt, Holger; Kroupa, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    We present the adaptable MUESLI code for investigating dynamics and erosion processes of globular clusters (GCs) in galaxies. MUESLI follows the orbits of individual clusters and applies internal and external dissolution processes to them. Orbit integration is based on the self-consistent field method in combination with a time-transformed leapfrog scheme, allowing us to handle velocity-dependent forces like triaxial dynamical friction. In a first application, the erosion of globular cluster systems (GCSs) in elliptical galaxies is investigated. Observations show that massive ellipticals have rich, radially extended GCSs, while some compact dwarf ellipticals contain no GCs at all. For several representative examples, spanning the full mass scale of observed elliptical galaxies, we quantify the influence of radial anisotropy, galactic density profiles, SMBHs, and dynamical friction on the GC erosion rate. We find that GC number density profiles are centrally flattened in less than a Hubble time, naturally expl...

  11. Optimizing snake locomotion in the plane. II. Large transverse friction

    CERN Document Server

    Alben, Silas

    2013-01-01

    We determine analytically the form of optimal snake locomotion when the coefficient of transverse friction is large, the typical regime for biological and robotic snakes. We find that the optimal snake motion is a retrograde traveling wave, with a wave amplitude that decays as the -1/4 power of the coefficient of transverse friction. This result agrees well with our numerical computations.

  12. Physical properties of elongated magnetic particles: magnetization and friction coefficient anisotropies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereda, Fernando; de Vicente, Juan; Hidalgo-Alvarez, Roque

    2009-06-02

    Anisotropy counts: A brief review of the main physical properties of elongated magnetic particles (EMPs) is presented. The most important characteristic of an EMP is the additional contribution of shape anisotropy to the total anisotropy energy of the particle, when compared to spherical magnetic particles. The electron micrograph shows Ni-ferrite microrods fabricated by the authors.We present an overview of the main physical properties of elongated magnetic particles (EMPs), including some of their more relevant properties in suspension. When compared to a spherical magnetic particle, the most important characteristic of an EMP is an additional contribution of shape anisotropy to the total anisotropy energy of the particle. Increasing aspect ratios also lead to an increase in both the critical single-domain size of a magnetic particle and its resistance to thermally activated spontaneous reversal of the magnetization. For single-domain EMPs, magnetization reversal occurs primarily by one of two modes, coherent rotation or curling, the latter being facilitated by larger aspect ratios. When EMPs are used to prepare colloidal suspensions, other physical properties come into play, such as their anisotropic friction coefficient and the consequent enhanced torque they experience in a shear flow, their tendency to align in the direction of an external field, to form less dense sediments and to entangle into more intricate aggregates. From a more practical point of view, EMPs are discussed in connection with two interesting types of magnetic colloids: magnetorheological fluids and suspensions for magnetic hyperthermia. Advances reported in the literature regarding the use of EMPs in these two systems are included. In the final section, we present a summary of the most relevant methods documented in the literature for the fabrication of EMPs, together with a list of the most common ferromagnetic materials that have been synthesized in the form of EMPs.

  13. Semi-Active Friction Damping of Large Space Truss Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Gaul

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The present approach for vibration suppression of flexible structures is based on friction damping in semi-active joints. At optimal locations conventional rigid connections of a large truss structure are replaced by semi-active friction joints. Two different concepts for the control of the normal forces in the friction interfaces are implemented. In the first approach each semi-active joint has its own local feedback controller, whereas the second concept uses a global, clipped-optimal controller. Simulation results of a 10-bay truss structure show the potential of the proposed semi-active concept.

  14. Large-scale microwave anisotropy from gravitating seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeraraghavan, Shoba; Stebbins, Albert

    1992-01-01

    Topological defects could have seeded primordial inhomogeneities in cosmological matter. We examine the horizon-scale matter and geometry perturbations generated by such seeds in an expanding homogeneous and isotropic universe. Evolving particle horizons generally lead to perturbations around motionless seeds, even when there are compensating initial underdensities in the matter. We describe the pattern of the resulting large angular scale microwave anisotropy.

  15. Search for Large Scale Anisotropies with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonino, R.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    The Pierre Auger Observatory studies the nature and the origin of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (>3\\cdot1018 eV). Completed at the end of 2008, it has been continuously operating for more than six years. Using data collected from 1 January 2004 until 31 March 2009, we search for large scale anisotropies with two complementary analyses in different energy windows. No significant anisotropies are observed, resulting in bounds on the first harmonic amplitude at the 1% level at EeV energies.

  16. Enhanced Locomotion Efficiency of a Bio-inspired Walking Robot using Contact Surfaces with Frictional Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoonpong, Poramate; Petersen, Dennis; Kovalev, Alexander; Wörgötter, Florentin; Gorb, Stanislav N.; Spinner, Marlene; Heepe, Lars

    2016-12-01

    Based on the principles of morphological computation, we propose a novel approach that exploits the interaction between a passive anisotropic scale-like material (e.g., shark skin) and a non-smooth substrate to enhance locomotion efficiency of a robot walking on inclines. Real robot experiments show that passive tribologically-enhanced surfaces of the robot belly or foot allow the robot to grip on specific surfaces and move effectively with reduced energy consumption. Supplementing the robot experiments, we investigated tribological properties of the shark skin as well as its mechanical stability. It shows high frictional anisotropy due to an array of sloped denticles. The orientation of the denticles to the underlying collagenous material also strongly influences their mechanical interlocking with the substrate. This study not only opens up a new way of achieving energy-efficient legged robot locomotion but also provides a better understanding of the functionalities and mechanical properties of anisotropic surfaces. That understanding will assist developing new types of material for other real-world applications.

  17. Enhanced Locomotion Efficiency of a Bio-inspired Walking Robot using Contact Surfaces with Frictional Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoonpong, Poramate; Petersen, Dennis; Kovalev, Alexander; Wörgötter, Florentin; Gorb, Stanislav N.; Spinner, Marlene; Heepe, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Based on the principles of morphological computation, we propose a novel approach that exploits the interaction between a passive anisotropic scale-like material (e.g., shark skin) and a non-smooth substrate to enhance locomotion efficiency of a robot walking on inclines. Real robot experiments show that passive tribologically-enhanced surfaces of the robot belly or foot allow the robot to grip on specific surfaces and move effectively with reduced energy consumption. Supplementing the robot experiments, we investigated tribological properties of the shark skin as well as its mechanical stability. It shows high frictional anisotropy due to an array of sloped denticles. The orientation of the denticles to the underlying collagenous material also strongly influences their mechanical interlocking with the substrate. This study not only opens up a new way of achieving energy-efficient legged robot locomotion but also provides a better understanding of the functionalities and mechanical properties of anisotropic surfaces. That understanding will assist developing new types of material for other real-world applications. PMID:28008936

  18. Large-scale microwave anisotropy from gravitating seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veeraraghavan, S.; Stebbins, A. (Massachusetts, University, Amherst (United States) NASA/Fermilab Astrophysics Center, Batavia, Il (United States))

    1992-08-01

    Topological defects could have seeded primordial inhomogeneities in cosmological matter. The authors examine the horizon-scale matter and geometry perturbations generated by such seeds in an expanding homogeneous and isotropic universe. Evolving particle horizons generally lead to perturbations around motionless seeds, even when there are compensating initial underdensities in the matter. The authors describe the pattern of the resulting large angular scale microwave anisotropy. 17 refs.

  19. Large scale anisotropy studies with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonino, R., E-mail: rbonino@to.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica - IFSI, c.so Fiume 4, 10133 Torino (Italy); INFN sezione di Torino, v. P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy)

    2012-11-11

    Completed at the end of 2008, the Pierre Auger Observatory has been continuously operating for more than seven years. We present here the analysis techniques and the results about the search for large scale anisotropies in the sky distribution of cosmic rays, reporting both the phase and the amplitude measurements of the first harmonic modulation in right ascension in different energy ranges above 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} eV. Thanks to the collected statistics, a sensitivity of 1% at EeV energies can be reached. No significant anisotropies have been observed, upper limits on the amplitudes have been derived and are here compared with the results of previous experiments and with some theoretical expectations.

  20. Large scale anisotropy studies with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonino, R.

    2012-11-01

    Completed at the end of 2008, the Pierre Auger Observatory has been continuously operating for more than seven years. We present here the analysis techniques and the results about the search for large scale anisotropies in the sky distribution of cosmic rays, reporting both the phase and the amplitude measurements of the first harmonic modulation in right ascension in different energy ranges above 2.5×1017 eV. Thanks to the collected statistics, a sensitivity of 1% at EeV energies can be reached. No significant anisotropies have been observed, upper limits on the amplitudes have been derived and are here compared with the results of previous experiments and with some theoretical expectations.

  1. Large-scale streaming motions and microwave background anisotropies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Sanz, J.L. (Cantabria Universidad, Santander (Spain))

    1989-12-01

    The minimal microwave background radiation is calculated on each angular scale implied by the existence of large-scale streaming motions. These minimal anisotropies, due to the Sachs-Wolfe effect, are obtained for different experiments, and give quite different results from those found in previous work. They are not in conflict with present theories of galaxy formation. Upper limits are imposed on the scale at which large-scale streaming motions can occur by extrapolating results from present double-beam-switching experiments. 17 refs.

  2. Engineered Heusler Ferrimagnets with a Large Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Ranjbar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA ferrimagnets consisting of 30-nm-thick D022-MnGa and Co2MnSi (CMS cubic Heusler alloys with different thicknesses of 1, 3, 5, 10 and 20 nm, buffered and capped with a Cr film, are successfully grown epitaxially on MgO substrate. Two series samples with and without post annealing at 400 °C are fabricated. The (002 peak of the cubic L21 structure of CMS films on the MnGa layer is observed, even for the 3-nm-thick CMS film for both un-annealed and annealed samples. The smaller remnant magnetization and larger switching field values of CMS (1–20 nm/MnGa (30 nm bilayers compared with 30-nm-thick MnGa indicates antiferromagnetic (AFM interfacial exchange coupling (Jex between MnGa and CMS films for both un-annealed and annealed samples. The critical thickness of the CMS film for observing PMA with AFM coupling in the CMS/MnGa bilayer is less than 10 nm, which is relatively large compared to previous studies.

  3. Magnetic anisotropy investigations of (Ga,Mn)As with a large epitaxial strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juszyński, P.; Gryglas-Borysiewicz, M.; Szczytko, J.; Tokarczyk, M.; Kowalski, G. [Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, Hoża 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Sadowski, J. [Max-IV Laboratory, Lund University, Lund SE-221 00 (Sweden); Institute of Physics, PAS, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Wasik, D. [Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, Hoża 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-12-15

    Magnetic properties of 20 nm thick (Ga,Mn)As layer deposited on (Ga,In)As buffer with very large epitaxial tensile strain are investigated. Ga{sub 1−x}In{sub x}As buffer with x=30% provides a 2% lattice mismatch, which is an important extension of the mismatch range studied so far (up to 0.5%). Evolution of magnetic anisotropy as a function of temperature is determined by magnetotransport measurements. Additionally, results of direct measurements of magnetization are shown. - Highlights: • Magnetic anisotropy parameter in (Ga,Mn)As with a large epitaxial strain is determined. • Extension of a linear magnetic anisotropy dependence on lattice mismatch up to 2% is presented. • A linear dependence of magnetic anisotropy on magnetization is established. • Magnetic anisotropy dependence on temperature is shown. • Electrical transport measurements are successfully applied to study magnetic anisotropy.

  4. Does hydrologic circulation mask frictional heat on faults after large earthquakes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Patrick M.; Harris, Robert N.; Saffer, Demian M.; Brodsky, Emily E.

    2010-09-01

    Knowledge of frictional resistance along faults is important for understanding the mechanics of earthquakes and faulting. The clearest in situ measure of fault friction potentially comes from temperature measurements in boreholes crossing fault zones within a few years of rupture. However, large temperature signals from frictional heating on faults have not been observed. Unambiguously interpreting the coseismic frictional resistance from small thermal perturbations observed in borehole temperature profiles requires assessing the impact of other potentially confounding thermal processes. We address several issues associated with quantifying the temperature signal of frictional heating including transient fluid flow associated with the earthquake, thermal disturbance caused by borehole drilling, and heterogeneous thermal physical rock properties. Transient fluid flow is investigated using a two-dimensional coupled fluid flow and heat transport model to evaluate the temperature field following an earthquake. Simulations for a range of realistic permeability, frictional heating, and pore pressure scenarios show that high permeabilities (>10-14 m2) are necessary for significant advection within the several years after an earthquake and suggest that transient fluid flow is unlikely to mask frictional heat anomalies. We illustrate how disturbances from circulating fluids during drilling diffuse quickly leaving a robust signature of frictional heating. Finally, we discuss the utility of repeated borehole temperature profiles for discriminating between different interpretations of thermal perturbations. Our results suggest that temperature anomalies from even low friction should be detectable at depths >1 km 1 to 2 years after a large earthquake and that interpretations of low friction from existing data are likely robust.

  5. On the Origin of the Large Magnetic Anisotropy of Rare Earth-Cobalt Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szpunar, B.; Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1979-01-01

    Experimental data on the magnetocrystalline anisotropy in Co, YCo5, GdCo5, SmCo5 and Y2Co17 is analysed using a single-ion crystal field and isotropic exchange interaction. The large magnetic anisotropy at high temperatures in the alloys is due to significant deviations in the alloy lattices...

  6. A BAROTROPIC QUASI-GEOSTROPHIC MODEL WITH LARGE-SCALE TOPOGRAPHY, FRICTION AND HEATING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Based on the barotropic equations including large-scale topography, friction and heat factor, a barotropic quasi-geostrophic model with large-scale topography, friction and heating is obtained by means of scale analysis and small parameter method. It is shown that this equation is a basic one, which is used to study the influence of the Tibetan Plateau on the large-scale flow in the atmosphere. If the friction and heating effect of large-scale topography are neglected, this model will degenerate to the general barotropic quasi-geostrophic one.

  7. Experimental and numerical friction characterization for large-scale forming simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, J.; Meinders, Vincent T.; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.; Hora, P.

    2013-01-01

    A new trend in forming simulation technology is the development of friction models applicable to large scale forming simulations. In this respect, the optimization of forming processes and the success of newly developed friction models requires a complete understanding of the tribological behavior

  8. Maine Pseudotachylyte Localities and the Role of Host Rock Anisotropy in Fault Zone Development and Frictional Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, M. T.

    2004-12-01

    Gerrish Island serves as host to the complex Fort Foster Brittle Zone where it localizes brittle fault slip and contributes to a maximum area of contact between the sliding surfaces which, in turn, yields fault vein thicknesses of 1-2 mm and locally up to 2 cm. The reactivation of this planar anisotropy in brittle shear produces long overlapping geometries that develop linking structures in both extensional and contractional stepovers may reflect the development of sidewall ripouts due to adhesive wear. The prominent development of closely-spaced individual single-slip fault veins suggests frictional welding as an effective strain hardening mechanism for repeated stick-slip.

  9. Large magnetic anisotropy in ferrihydrite nanoparticles synthesized from reverse micelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, E L [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, CP 66318, Sao Paulo, 05315-970 (Brazil); Itri, R [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, CP 66318, Sao Paulo, 05315-970 (Brazil); Jr, E Lima [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, CP 66318, Sao Paulo, 05315-970 (Brazil); Baptista, M S [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Avenida Professor Lineu Prestes 748, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Berquo, T S [Institute for Rock Magnetism, University of Minnesota, 100 Union Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455-0128 (United States); Goya, G F [Instituto de Nanociencias de Aragon (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, Pedro Cerbuna 12 (50009), Zaragoza (Spain)

    2006-11-28

    Six-line ferrihydrite (FH) nanoparticles have been synthesized in the core of reverse micelles, used as nanoreactors to obtain average particle sizes {approx} 2-4 nm. The blocking temperatures T{sub B}{sup m} extracted from magnetization data increased from {approx}10 to 20 K for increasing particle size. Low-temperature Moessbauer measurements allowed us to observe the onset of differentiated contributions from the particle core and surface as the particle size increases. The magnetic properties measured in the liquid state of the original emulsion showed that the ferrihydrite phase is not present in the liquid precursor, but precipitates in the micelle cores after the free water is freeze-dried. Systematic susceptibility {chi}{sub ac}(f,T) measurements showed the dependence of the effective magnetic anisotropy energies E{sub a} with particle volume, and yielded an effective anisotropy value of K{sub eff} = 312 {+-} 10 kJ m{sup -3}.

  10. Measurement and Calculation of Frictional Loss in Large Two-Stroke Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vølund, Anders

    2003-01-01

    The total frictional loss in a large two-stroke marine diesel engine is rather well determined. However, the contribution (size and distribution) from the different machine elements are not well known. The aim of this study is to establish methods to measure and calculate friction in the piston...... assembly and guide shoe system for a large two-stroke marine diesel engine. These components are the two major contributors to the total friction in a two-stroke marine diesel engine. The piston pack represents approximately 60% of the total mechanical loss at full load and the guide shoe system 23......%. The rest of the mechanical loss is situated in the piston rod 2%, piston skirt 3% and main bearings and connecting rod bearing 12%. Information about the friction distribution can be used in future design of these machine elements. Theoretical models for determination of frictional losses for both...

  11. Circular and linear dichroism of periodical helical media with large dielectric anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Arakelian, H M; Eritsyan, H S

    2000-01-01

    The interaction of light with a layer of periodical helical media is considered. Features of circular and linear dichroism at large dielectric anisotropy are studied. Influence of dielectric boundaries on circular and linear dichroism is investigated.

  12. Large Angular Scale Anisotropy in Cosmic Microwave Background Induced by Cosmic Strings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, B.; Caldwell, R.R.; Shellard, E.P.; Stebbins, A.; Veeraraghavan, S. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin---Milwaukee, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201 (United States)]|[University of Cambridge, Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Silver Street, Cambridge CB3 9EW (United Kingdom)]|[NASA/Fermilab Astrophysics Center, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States)]|[NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)

    1996-10-01

    We simulate the anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) induced by cosmic strings. By numerically evolving a network of cosmic strings we generate full-sky CMB temperature anisotropy maps. Based on 192 maps, we compute the anisotropy power spectrum for multipole moments l{le}20. By comparing with the observed temperature anisotropy, we set the normalization for the cosmic string mass per unit length {mu}, obtaining {ital G}{mu}/{ital c}{sup 2}=1.05{sub {minus}0.20}{sup +0.35}{times}10{sup {minus}6}, which is consistent with all other observational constraints on cosmic strings. We demonstrate that the anisotropy pattern is consistent with a Gaussian random field on large angular scales. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  13. Galactic magnetic fields and the large-scale anisotropy at MILAGRO

    CERN Document Server

    Battaner, E; Masip, M

    2009-01-01

    The air-shower observatory Milagro has detected a large-scale anisotropy of unknown origin in the flux of TeV cosmic rays. We propose that this anisotropy is caused by galactic magnetic fields, in particular, that it results from the combined effects of the regular and the turbulent (fluctuating) magnetic fields in our vicinity. Instead of a diffusion equation, we integrate Boltzmann's equation to show that the turbulence may define a preferred direction in the cosmic-ray propagation that is orthogonal to the local regular magnetic field. The approximate dipole anisotropy that we obtain explains well Milagro's data.

  14. Spin kinetic Monte Carlo method for nanoferromagnetism and magnetization dynamics of nanomagnets with large magnetic anisotropy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bang-gui; ZHANG Kai-cheng; LI Ying

    2007-01-01

    The Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) method based on the transition-state theory, powerful and famous for sim-ulating atomic epitaxial growth of thin films and nanostruc-tures, was used recently to simulate the nanoferromagnetism and magnetization dynamics of nanomagnets with giant mag-netic anisotropy. We present a brief introduction to the KMC method and show how to reformulate it for nanoscale spin systems. Large enough magnetic anisotropy, observed exper-imentally and shown theoretically in terms of first-principle calculation, is not only essential to stabilize spin orientation but also necessary in making the transition-state barriers dur-ing spin reversals for spin KMC simulation. We show two applications of the spin KMC method to monatomic spin chains and spin-polarized-current controlled composite nano-magnets with giant magnetic anisotropy. This spin KMC method can be applied to other anisotropic nanomagnets and composite nanomagnets as long as their magnetic anisotropy energies are large enough.

  15. Large-Scale Cosmic-Ray Anisotropy as a Probe of Interstellar Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Giacinti, Gwenael

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the large-scale cosmic-ray (CR) anisotropies predicted for a range of Goldreich-Sridhar (GS) and isotropic models of interstellar turbulence, and compare them with IceTop data. In general, the predicted CR anisotropy is not a pure dipole; the cold spots reported at 400 TeV and 2 PeV are consistent with a GS model that contains a smooth deficit of parallel-propagating waves and a broad resonance function, although some other possibilities cannot, as yet, be ruled out. In particular, isotropic fast magnetosonic wave turbulence can match the observations at high energy, but cannot accommodate an energy-dependence in the shape of the CR anisotropy. Our findings suggest that improved data on the large-scale CR anisotropy could provide a valuable probe of the properties - notably the power-spectrum - of the local interstellar turbulence.

  16. A coverage independent method to analyze large scale anisotropies

    CERN Document Server

    Billoir, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    The arrival time distribution of cosmic ray events is well suited to extract information regarding sky anisotropies. For an experiment with nearly constant exposure, the frequency resolution one can achieve is given by the inverse of the time $T$ during which the data was recorded. For $T$ larger than one calendar year the resolution becomes sufficient to resolve the sidereal and diurnal frequencies. Using a Fourier expansion on a modified time parameter, we show in this note that one can accurately extract sidereal modulations without knowledge of the experimental coverage. This procedure also gives the full frequency pattern of the event sample under studies which contains important information about possible systematics entering in the sidereal analysis. We also show how this method allows to correct for those systematics. Finally, we show that a two dimensional analysis, in the form of the spherical harmonic ($Y_l^m$) decomposition, can be performed under the same conditions for all $m\

  17. Friction in Orthogonal Cutting Finite Elements Models with Large Negative Rake Angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P. Markopoulos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, orthogonal cutting finite elements models are built for the investigation of the impact of large negative rake angles on the friction coefficient in the tool-chip interface in machining. The simulation results give an insight on the mechanism of chip formation in processes with large negative active rake angle, such as machining with chamfered tools, grinding and micromachining. For the present analysis, cutting conditions resembling the qualitative and quantitative characteristics of the aforementioned processes were selected. More specifically, tool rake angles varying from -10o to -55o and Coulomb friction with constant friction coefficient were considered. The results indicate that friction coefficient is greatly affected by the negative tool rake angle, exhibiting values well above 1 for the high extreme of the examined rake angle spectrum.

  18. How large grains increase bulk friction in bi-disperse granular chute flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staron, Lydie; Phillips, Jeremy C.

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution, we apply contact dynamics discrete simulations to explore how the mechanical properties of simple bi-dimensional granular chute flows are affected by the existence of two grain sizes. Computing partial stress tensors for the phases of small and large grains, we show that the phase of large grain exhibits a much larger shear strength than the phase of small grains. This difference translates in terms of the flow internal friction: adopting the μ (I) dependence to describe the flow frictional properties, we establish that the flow mean friction coefficient increases with the volume fraction of large grains. Hence, while the presence of large grains may induce lubrication in 3D unconfined flows due to the self-channelisation and levées formation, the effect of large grains on the bulk properties is to decrease the flow mobility.

  19. LARGE GAMMA ANISOTROPY OBSERVED IN THE CF-252 SPONTANEOUS-FISSION PROCESS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERPLOEG, H; BACELAR, JC; VANDENBERG, T; IACOB, VE; JONGMAN, [No Value; VANDERWOUDE, A

    1992-01-01

    The energy spectrum and the angular dependence relative to the fission direction of photons in the energy region between 2 and 40 MeV have been measured for the spontaneous fission of Cf-252. A large anisotropy was found in the energy region 8 to 12 MeV implying that photons in this region are emitt

  20. Large-Scale Cosmic-Ray Anisotropy as a Probe of Interstellar Turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the large-scale cosmic-ray (CR) anisotropies predicted for a range of Goldreich-Sridhar (GS) and isotropic models of interstellar turbulence, and compare them with IceTop data. In general, the predicted CR anisotropy is not a pure dipole; the cold spots reported at 400 TeV and 2 PeV are consistent with a GS model that contains a smooth deficit of parallel-propagating waves and a broad resonance function, although some other possibilities cannot, as yet, be ruled out. In particula...

  1. Analytical modeling of large-angle CMBR anisotropies from textures

    CERN Document Server

    Magueijo, J

    1995-01-01

    We propose an analytic method for predicting the large angle CMBR temperature fluctuations induced by model textures. The model makes use of only a small number of phenomenological parameters which ought to be measured from simple simulations. We derive semi-analytically the C^l-spectrum for 2\\leq l\\leq 30 together with its associated non-Gaussian cosmic variance error bars. A slightly tilted spectrum with an extra suppression at low l is found, and we investigate the dependence of the tilt on the parameters of the model. We also produce a prediction for the two point correlation function. We find a high level of cosmic confusion between texture scenarios and standard inflationary theories in any of these quantities. However, we discover that a distinctive non-Gaussian signal ought to be expected at low l, reflecting the prominent effect of the last texture in these multipoles.

  2. Friction and scale-dependent deformation processes of large experimental carbonate faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesei, Telemaco; Carpenter, Brett M.; Giorgetti, Carolina; Scuderi, Marco M.; Sagy, Amir; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Collettini, Cristiano

    2017-07-01

    We studied the frictional behaviour and deformation products of large (20 cm × 20 cm bare surfaces) experimental limestone faults. We sheared samples in a direct shear configuration, with an imposed normal force of 40-200 kN and shear velocity of 10 μm/s. The steady-state shearing of these surfaces yielded a coefficient of friction 0.7hold-slide tests, is null (Δμ≤0 upon re-shear). Moreover, sliding of these surfaces is accompanied by dilatation and production of grooves, gouge striations and fault mirrors. These products are entirely analogous to slip surface phenomena found on natural limestone-bearing faults at both the macroscale and at the microscale. We infer that high friction, accompanied by dilatant deformation, and null frictional healing are the macroscopic effect of brittle damage on the sliding surface, constrained by the strength of the rock and by fast healing processes in the gouge. Simultaneously to brittle failure, plastic deformation occurs on the sliding surface and inside the intact rock via nanoparticle formation (mirrors) and twinning at the micron scale. Because of the similarity between experimental and natural structures, we suggest that sliding of carbonate-bearing faults in the uppermost crust could be characterized by high friction, fast healing and strongly dilatant deformation, which would help to explain shallow seismicity frequently documented in carbonatic terrains such as the Northern Apennines of Italy.

  3. Effect of interfacial friction during forging of solid powder discs of large slenderness ratio

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R K Ranjan; S Kumar

    2004-10-01

    The paper reports an investigation into the effect of interfacial friction law during the forging of a powder circular disc with large slenderness ratio (L/D) between two flat dies. The deformation pattern during the operation is influenced by many factors, which interact with each other in a complex manner. The relative velocity between the work piece material and the die surface, together with high interfacial pressure and/or deformation modes, creates the conditions essential for adhesion in addition to sliding. The decisive factors are the interfacial conditions, initial relative density of the preform and geometry of the preform. An attempt has been made to determine the most realistic interfacial friction law and die pressures developed during such forging using an upper bound approach. The results so obtained are presented graphically and discussed critically to illustrate the interaction of various interfacial friction laws involved.

  4. The Large Scale Cosmic-Ray Anisotropy as Observed with Milagro

    CERN Document Server

    Abdo, A A; Aune, T; Berley, D; Casanova, S; Chen, C; Dingus, B L; Ellsworth, R W; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Hoffman, C M; Hopper, B; Hüntemeyer, P H; Kolterman, B E; Lansdell, C P; Linnemann, J T; McEnery, J E; Mincer, A I; Némethy, P; Noyes, D; Ryan, J M; Parkinson, P M Saz; Shoup, A; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Vasileiou, V; Walker, G P; Williams, D A; Yodh, G B

    2008-01-01

    Results are presented of a harmonic analysis of the large scale cosmic-ray anisotropy as observed by the Milagro observatory. We show a two-dimensional display of the sidereal anisotropy projections in right ascension generated by the fitting of three harmonics to 18 separate declination bands. The Milagro observatory is a water Cherenkov detector located in the Jemez mountains near Los Alamos, New Mexico. With a high duty cycle and large field-of-view, Milagro is an excellent instrument for measuring this anisotropy with high sensitivity at TeV energies. The analysis is conducted using a seven year data sample consisting of more than 95 billion events. We observe an anisotropy with a magnitude around 0.1% for cosmic rays with a median energy of 6 TeV. The dominant feature is a deficit region of depth (-2.85 +/- 0.06 stat. +/- 0.08 syst.)x10^(-3) in the direction of the Galactic North Pole with a range in declination of -10 to 45 degrees and 150 to 225 degrees in right ascension. We observe a steady increase ...

  5. Effects of the galactic magnetic field upon large scale anisotropies of extragalactic cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harari, D.; Mollerach, S.; Roulet, E., E-mail: harari@cab.cnea.gov.ar, E-mail: mollerach@cab.cnea.gov.ar, E-mail: roulet@cab.cnea.gov.ar [CONICET, Centro Atómico Bariloche, Bustillo 9500, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina)

    2010-11-01

    The large scale pattern in the arrival directions of extragalactic cosmic rays that reach the Earth is different from that of the flux arriving to the halo of the Galaxy as a result of the propagation through the galactic magnetic field. Two different effects are relevant in this process: deflections of trajectories and (de)acceleration by the electric field component due to the galactic rotation. The deflection of the cosmic ray trajectories makes the flux intensity arriving to the halo from some direction to appear reaching the Earth from another direction. This applies to any intrinsic anisotropy in the extragalactic distribution or, even in the absence of intrinsic anisotropies, to the dipolar Compton-Getting anisotropy induced when the observer is moving with respect to the cosmic rays rest frame. For an observer moving with the solar system, cosmic rays traveling through far away regions of the Galaxy also experience an electric force coming from the relative motion (due to the rotation of the Galaxy) of the local system in which the field can be considered as being purely magnetic. This produces small changes in the particles momentum that can originate large scale anisotropies even for an isotropic extragalactic flux.

  6. Non-Gaussianity of Large-Scale CMB Anisotropies beyond Perturbation Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolo, N; Riotto, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    We compute the fully non-linear Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies on scales larger than the horizon at last-scattering in terms of only the curvature perturbation, providing a generalization of the linear Sachs-Wolfe effect at any order in perturbation theory. We show how to compute the $n$-point connected correlation functions of the large-scale CMB anisotropies for generic primordial seeds provided by standard slow-roll inflation as well as the curvaton and other scenarios for the generation of cosmological perturbations. As an application of our formalism, we compute the three- and four-point connected correlation functions whose detection in future CMB experiments might be used to assess the level of primordial non-Gaussianity, giving the theoretical predictions for the parameters of quadratic and cubic non-linearities f_NL and g_NL.

  7. Is there evidence for anomalous dipole anisotropy in the large-scale structure?

    CERN Document Server

    Bengaly,, C A P; Alcaniz, J S; Xavier, H S; Novaes, C P

    2016-01-01

    We probe the anisotropy of the large-scale structure (LSS) with the WISE-2MASS catalogue. This analysis is performed by a directional comparison of the galaxy number counts through the entire celestial sphere once systematic effects, such as star-galaxy separation and foregrounds contamination, are properly taken into account. We find a maximal hemispherical asymmetry whose dipolar component is $A = 0.0507 \\pm 0.0014$ toward the $(l,b) = (323^{\\circ},-5^{\\circ})$ direction. This result is consistent with previous estimations of our proper motion in low and intermediate redshifts, as those carried out with Type Ia Supernovae and similar LSS catalogues.Furthermore, this dipole amplitude obtained is statistically consistent with mock catalogues simulated according to the $\\Lambda$CDM matter density expected fluctuations, in addition to observational biases such as the incomplete celestial coverage, anisotropic sky exposure. Our results suggest, therefore, that there is no strong evidence for anomalous anisotropy...

  8. Phase diagram and criticality of the random anisotropy model in the large-N limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouhanna, Dominique; Tarjus, Gilles

    2016-12-01

    We revisit the thermodynamic behavior of the random-anisotropy O(N ) model by investigating its large-N limit. We focus on the system at zero temperature where the mean-field-like artifacts of the large-N limit are less severe. We analyze the connection between the description in terms of self-consistent Schwinger-Dyson equations and the functional renormalization group. We provide a unified description of the phase diagram and critical behavior of the model and clarify the nature of the possible "glassy" phases. Finally we discuss the implications of our findings for the finite-N and finite-temperature systems.

  9. Long-lived ultrafast spin precession in manganese alloys films with a large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, S; Wu, F; Sakuma, A; Walowski, J; Watanabe, D; Kubota, T; Zhang, X; Naganuma, H; Oogane, M; Ando, Y; Miyazaki, T

    2011-03-18

    Spin precession with frequencies up to 280 GHz is observed in Mn(3-δ)Ga alloy films with a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy constant K(u)∼15  M erg/cm(3). The damping constant α, characterizing macroscopic spin relaxation and being a key factor in spin-transfer-torque systems, is not larger than 0.008 (0.015) for the δ=1.46 (0.88) film. Those are about one-tenth of α values for known materials with large K(u). First-principles calculations well describe both low α and large K(u) for these alloys.

  10. The Friction Force Determination of Large-Sized Composite Rods in Pultrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriev, S. N.; Krasnovskii, A. N.; Kazakov, I. A.

    2014-08-01

    Nowadays, the simple pull-force models of pultrusion process are not suitable for large sized rods because they are not considered a chemical shrinkage and thermal expansion acting in cured material inside the die. But the pulling force of the resin-impregnated fibers as they travels through the heated die is essential factor in the pultrusion process. In order to minimize the number of trial-and-error experiments a new mathematical approach to determine the frictional force is presented. The governing equations of the model are stated in general terms and various simplifications are implemented in order to obtain solutions without extensive numerical efforts. The influence of different pultrusion parameters on the frictional force value is investigated. The results obtained by the model can establish a foundation by which process control parameters are selected to achieve an appropriate pull-force and can be used for optimization pultrusion process.

  11. High-spin organic molecules with dominant spin-orbit contribution and unprecedentedly large magnetic anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misochko, Eugenii Ya.; Akimov, Alexander V.; Masitov, Artem A.; Korchagin, Denis V.; Yakushchenko, Igor K.; Chapyshev, Sergei V.

    2012-08-01

    High-spin organic molecules with dominant spin-orbit contribution to magnetic anisotropy are reported. Quintet 4-azido-3,5-dibromopyridyl-2,6-dinitrene (Q-1), quintet 2-azido-3,5-dibromopyridyl-4,6-dinitrene (Q-2), and septet 3,5-dibromopyridyl-2,4,6-trinitrene (S-1) were generated in solid argon matrices by ultraviolet irradiation of 2,4,6-triazido-3,5-dibromopyridine. The zero-field splitting (ZFS) parameters, derived from electron spin resonance spectra, show unprecedentedly large magnitudes of the parameters D: |DQ1| = 0.289, |DQ2| = 0.373, and |DS1| = 0.297 cm-1. The experimental ZFS parameters were successfully reproduced by density functional theory calculations, confirming that magnetic anisotropy of high-spin organic molecules can considerably be enhanced by the "heavy atom effect." In bromine-containing high-spin nitrenes, the spin-orbit term is dominant and governs both the magnitude and the sign of magnetic anisotropy. The largest negative value of D among septet trinitrenes is predicted for 1,3,5-trinitrenobenzene bearing three heavy atoms (Br) in positions 2, 4, and 6 of the benzene ring.

  12. Apparent Dependence of Rate- and State-Dependent Friction Parameters on Loading Velocity and Cumulative Displacement Inferred from Large-Scale Biaxial Friction Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urata, Yumi; Yamashita, Futoshi; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Noda, Hiroyuki; Mizoguchi, Kazuo

    2017-06-01

    We investigated the constitutive parameters in the rate- and state-dependent friction (RSF) law by conducting numerical simulations, using the friction data from large-scale biaxial rock friction experiments for Indian metagabbro. The sliding surface area was 1.5 m long and 0.5 m wide, slid for 400 s under a normal stress of 1.33 MPa at a loading velocity of either 0.1 or 1.0 mm/s. During the experiments, many stick-slips were observed and those features were as follows. (1) The friction drop and recurrence time of the stick-slip events increased with cumulative slip displacement in an experiment before which the gouges on the surface were removed, but they became almost constant throughout an experiment conducted after several experiments without gouge removal. (2) The friction drop was larger and the recurrence time was shorter in the experiments with faster loading velocity. We applied a one-degree-of-freedom spring-slider model with mass to estimate the RSF parameters by fitting the stick-slip intervals and slip-weakening curves measured based on spring force and acceleration of the specimens. We developed an efficient algorithm for the numerical time integration, and we conducted forward modeling for evolution parameters ( b) and the state-evolution distances (L_{{c}}), keeping the direct effect parameter ( a) constant. We then identified the confident range of b and L_{{c}} values. Comparison between the results of the experiments and our simulations suggests that both b and L_{{c}} increase as the cumulative slip displacement increases, and b increases and L_{{c}} decreases as the loading velocity increases. Conventional RSF laws could not explain the large-scale friction data, and more complex state evolution laws are needed.

  13. Apparent Dependence of Rate- and State-Dependent Friction Parameters on Loading Velocity and Cumulative Displacement Inferred from Large-Scale Biaxial Friction Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urata, Yumi; Yamashita, Futoshi; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Noda, Hiroyuki; Mizoguchi, Kazuo

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the constitutive parameters in the rate- and state-dependent friction (RSF) law by conducting numerical simulations, using the friction data from large-scale biaxial rock friction experiments for Indian metagabbro. The sliding surface area was 1.5 m long and 0.5 m wide, slid for 400 s under a normal stress of 1.33 MPa at a loading velocity of either 0.1 or 1.0 mm/s. During the experiments, many stick-slips were observed and those features were as follows. (1) The friction drop and recurrence time of the stick-slip events increased with cumulative slip displacement in an experiment before which the gouges on the surface were removed, but they became almost constant throughout an experiment conducted after several experiments without gouge removal. (2) The friction drop was larger and the recurrence time was shorter in the experiments with faster loading velocity. We applied a one-degree-of-freedom spring-slider model with mass to estimate the RSF parameters by fitting the stick-slip intervals and slip-weakening curves measured based on spring force and acceleration of the specimens. We developed an efficient algorithm for the numerical time integration, and we conducted forward modeling for evolution parameters (b) and the state-evolution distances (L_{c} ), keeping the direct effect parameter (a) constant. We then identified the confident range of b and L_{c} values. Comparison between the results of the experiments and our simulations suggests that both b and L_{c} increase as the cumulative slip displacement increases, and b increases and L_{c} decreases as the loading velocity increases. Conventional RSF laws could not explain the large-scale friction data, and more complex state evolution laws are needed.

  14. Large deflection and rotation of Timoshenko beams with frictional end supports under three-point bending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dao-Kui; Li, Xian-Fang

    2016-08-01

    Three-point bending of a beam is studied based on the Timoshenko beam theory. Large deflection and large rotation of a beam resting on simple supports with friction are calculated for a concentrated force acting at the midspan. Using the Lagrangian kinematic relations, a system of non-linear differential equations are obtained for a prismatic shear-deformable Timoshenko beam. Exact solutions for the deflection, horizontal displacement, and rotation of cross-section are derived analytically. Two deflections of small and large scale exist under three-point bending. The solutions corresponding to linearized model coincide with the well-known solutions to the classical Timoshenko beams. Numerical calculations are carried out to show the effect of the important parameters such as shear rigidity of the beam and the coefficient of friction at the contact position between the beam and supports on the deflection. The load-deflection curves are graphically presented. A comparison of large deflections and large rotations with their classical counterparts and with experimental data is made. The obtained results are useful in safety design of linear and non-linear beams subject to three-point bending.

  15. Large deformation analysis of axisymmetric inhomogeneities including coupled elastic and plastic anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brannon, R.M.

    1996-12-31

    A mathematical framework is developed for the study of materials containing axisymmetric inclusions or flaws such as ellipsoidal voids, penny-shaped cracks, or fibers of circular cross-section. The general case of nonuniform statistical distributions of such heterogeneities is attacked by first considering a spatially uniform distribution of flaws that are all oriented in the same direction. Assuming an isotropic substrate, the macroscopic material properties of this simpler microstructure naturally should be transversely isotropic. An orthogonal basis for the linear subspace consisting of all double-symmetric transversely-isotropic fourth-order tensors associated with a given material vector is applied to deduce the explicit functional dependence of the material properties of these aligned materials on the shared symmetry axis. The aligned and uniform microstructure seems geometrically simple enough that the macroscopic transversely isotropic properties could be derived in closed form. Since the resulting properties are transversely isotropic, the analyst must therefore be able to identify the appropriate coefficients of the transverse basis. Once these functions are identified, a principle of superposition of strain rates ay be applied to define an expectation integral for the composite properties of a material containing arbitrary anisotropic distributions of axisymmetric inhomogeneities. A proposal for coupling plastic anisotropy to the elastic anisotropy is presented in which the composite yield surface is interpreted as a distortion of the isotropic substrate yield surface; the distortion directions are coupled to the elastic anisotropy directions. Finally, some commonly assumed properties (such as major symmetry) of the Cauchy tangent stiffness tensor are shown to be inappropriate for large distortions of anisotropic materials.

  16. Thermal Stability of Magnetic States in Circular Thin-Film Nanomagnets with Large Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves-O'Flynn, Gabriel

    The scaling of the energy barrier to magnetization reversal in thin-film nanomagnets with perpendicular magnetization as a function of their lateral size is of great interest and importance for high-density magnetic random access memory devices. Experimental studies of such elements show either a quadratic or linear dependence of the energy barrier on element diameter. I will discuss a theoretical model we developed to determine the micromagnetic configurations that set the energy barrier for thermally activated reversal of a thin disk with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy as a function of disk diameter. We find a critical length in the problem that is set by the exchange and effective perpendicular magnetic anisotropy energies, with the latter including the size dependence of the demagnetization energy. For diameters smaller than this critical length, the reversal occurs by nearly coherent magnetization rotation and the energy barrier scales with the square of the diameter normalized to the critical length (for fixed film thickness), while for larger diameters, the transition state has a domain wall, and the energy barrier depends linearly on the normalized diameter. Simple analytic expressions are derived for these two limiting cases and verified using full micromagnetic simulations with the string method. Further, the effect of an applied field is considered and shown to lead to a plateau in the energy barrier versus diameter dependence at large diameters. Based on these finding I discuss the prospects and material challenges in the scaling of magnetic memory devices based on thin films with strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. In collaboration with G. Wolf, J. Z. Sun and A. D. Kent. Supported by NSF-DMR-1309202 and in part by Spin Transfer Technologies Inc. and the Nanoelectronics Research Initiative through the Institute for Nanoelectronics Discovery and Exploration.

  17. A Mortar Segment-to-Segment Frictional Contact Method for Large Deformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puso, M; Laursen, T

    2003-10-29

    Contact modeling is still one of the most difficult aspects of nonlinear implicit structural analysis. Most 3D contact algorithms employed today use node-on-segment approaches for contacting dissimilar meshes. Two pass node-on-segment contact approaches have the well known deficiency of locking due to over constraint. Furthermore, node-on-segment approaches suffer when individual nodes slide out of contact at contact surface boundaries or when contacting nodes slide from facet to facet. This causes jumps in the contact forces due to the discrete nature of the constraint enforcement and difficulties in convergence for implicit solution techniques. In a previous work, we developed a segment-to-segment contact approach based on the mortar method that was applicable to large deformation mechanics. The approach proved extremely robust since it eliminated the overconstraint which caused ''locking'' and provided smooth force variations in large sliding. Here, we extend this previous approach in to treat frictional contact problems. The proposed approach is then applied to several challenging frictional contact problems which demonstrate its effectiveness.

  18. Large Proton Anisotropies in the 18 August 2010 Solar Particle Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leske, R. A.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Christian, Eric R.; Cummings, A. C.; Labrador, A. W.; Stone, E. C.; Wiedenbeck, Mark E.; Rosenvinge, Tycho T Von

    2012-01-01

    The solar particle event observed at STEREO Ahead on 18 August 2010 displayeda rich variety of behavior in the particle anisotropies. Sectored rates measured by theLow Energy Telescope (LET) on STEREO showed very large bidirectional anisotropies in4 6 MeV protons for the first 17 hours of the event while inside a magnetic cloud, withintensities along the field direction several hundred to nearly 1000 times greater than thoseperpendicular to the field. At the trailing end of the cloud, the protons became isotropic andtheir spectrum hardened slightly, while the HeH abundance ratio plunged by a factor of approximatelyfour for about four hours. Associated with the arrival of a shock on 20 Augustwas a series of brief (10 minute duration) intensity increases (commonly called shockspikes) with relatively narrow angular distributions (45 FWHM), followed by an abruptdecrease in particle intensities at the shock itself and a reversal of the proton flow to a directiontoward the Sun and away from the receding shock. We discuss the STEREOLETobservations of this interesting event in the context of other observations reported in theliterature

  19. Is there evidence for anomalous dipole anisotropy in the large-scale structure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengaly, C. A. P., Jr.; Bernui, A.; Alcaniz, J. S.; Xavier, H. S.; Novaes, C. P.

    2017-01-01

    We probe the anisotropy of the large-scale structure (LSS) with the WISE-2MASS catalogue. This analysis is performed by a directional comparison of the galaxy number counts through the entire celestial sphere once systematic effects, such as star-galaxy separation and foregrounds contamination, are properly taken into account. We find a maximal hemispherical asymmetry whose dipolar component is A = 0.0507 ± 0.0014 towards the (l, b) = (323°, -5°) direction, whose result is consistent with previous estimations of our proper motion in low and intermediate redshifts, as those carried out with Type Ia Supernovae and similar LSS catalogues. Furthermore, this dipole amplitude is statistically consistent (p-value = 0.061) with mock catalogues simulated according to the expected Λ cold dark matter density fluctuations, in addition to observational biases such as the incomplete celestial coverage and anisotropic sky exposure. Our results suggest, therefore, that there is no strong evidence for anomalous anisotropy in the LSS, given the limitations and systematics of current data, in the concordance model scenario.

  20. Designing a robustly metallic noncenstrosymmetric ruthenate oxide with large thermopower anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puggioni, Danilo; Rondinelli, James M

    2014-03-17

    The existence of ~30 noncentrosymmetric metals (NCSM) suggests a contraindication between crystal structures without inversion symmetry and metallic behaviour. Those containing oxygen are especially scarce. Here we propose and demonstrate a design framework to remedy this property disparity and accelerate NCSM oxide discovery. The primary ingredient relies on the removal of inversion symmetry through displacements of atoms whose electronic degrees of freedom are decoupled from the states at the Fermi level. Density functional theory calculations validate this crystal-chemistry strategy, and we predict a new polar ruthenate exhibiting robust metallicity. We demonstrate that the electronic structure is unaffected by the inclusion of spin-orbit interactions, and that cation-ordered SrCaRu2O6 exhibits a large thermopower anisotropy (|ΔS⊥|~6.3 μV K(-1) at 300 K) derived from its polar structure. Our findings provide chemical and structural selection guidelines to aid in the search of NCSM with enhanced thermopower anisotropy.

  1. Is there evidence for anomalous dipole anisotropy in the large-scale structure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengaly, C. A. P.; Bernui, A.; Alcaniz, J. S.; Xavier, H. S.; Novaes, C. P.

    2016-09-01

    We probe the anisotropy of the large-scale structure (LSS) with the WISE-2MASS catalogue. This analysis is performed by a directional comparison of the galaxy number counts through the entire celestial sphere once systematic effects, such as star-galaxy separation and foregrounds contamination, are properly taken into account. We find a maximal hemispherical asymmetry whose dipolar component is A = 0.0507 ± 0.0014 toward the (l, b) = (323°, -5°) direction, whose result is consistent with previous estimations of our proper motion in low and intermediate redshifts, as those carried out with Type Ia Supernovae and similar LSS catalogues. Furthermore, this dipole amplitude is statistically consistent (p-value = 0.061) with mock catalogues simulated according to the expected ΛCDM matter density fluctuations, in addition to observational biases such as the incomplete celestial coverage and anisotropic sky exposure. Our results suggest, therefore, that there is no strong evidence for anomalous anisotropy in the LSS, given the limitations and systematics of current data, in the concordance model scenario.

  2. New method for oblique impact dynamics research of a flexible beam with large overall motion considering impact friction force

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W Yuan; L Li; D G Zhang; J Z Hong

    2016-01-01

    A flexible beam with large overall rotating motion impacting with a rigid slope is studied in this paper. The tangential friction force caused by the oblique impact is analyzed. The tangential motion of the system is divided into a stick state and a slip state. The contact constraint model and Coulomb friction model are used respectively to deal with the two states. Based on this hybrid mod-eling method, dynamic equations of the system, which include all states (before, during, and after the collision) are obtained. Simulation results of a concrete example are compared with the results obtained from two other models: a nontangential friction model and a modified Coulomb model. Differences in the results from the three models are discussed. The tangential friction force cannot be ignored when an oblique impact occurs. In addition, the results obtained from the model proposed in this paper are more consistent with real movement.

  3. Large-scale CMB anisotropies wrinkles in the Galaxy rather than in time

    CERN Document Server

    López-Corredoira, M

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents strong evidence for the Galactic, rather than cosmological, nature of the large-scale anisotropies in the microwave background radiation, or at least the greater part of them, in form of the dependence of their amplitude on Galactic latitude. What have hitherto been called wrinkles in time in the light of the first COBE-DMR data and claimed to mark the discovery of the primordial seeds from which our present-day Universe has grown could more appropriately be named wrinkles in the interstellar medium of our Galaxy in the light of the present analysis, which uses the same data as those used by Smoot et al. This implies that present models of Galaxy formation and many parts of the standard cosmology are not correct.

  4. Measurement of the large-scale anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation at 3mm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, G.L.

    1983-12-01

    A balloon-borne differential radiometer has measured the large-scale anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) with high sensitivity. The antenna temperature dipole anistropy at 90 GHz (3 mm wavelength) is 2.82 +- 0.19 mK, corresponding to a thermodynamic anistropy of 3.48 +- mK for a 2.7 K blackbody CBR. The dipole direction, 11.3 +- 0.1 hours right ascension and -5.7/sup 0/ +- 1.8/sup 0/ declination, agrees well with measurements at other frequencies. Calibration error dominates magnitude uncertainty, with statistical errors on dipole terms being under 0.1 mK. No significant quadrupole power is found, placing a 90% confidence-level upper limit of 0.27 mK on the RMS thermodynamic quadrupolar anistropy. 22 figures, 17 tables.

  5. Large angle CMB anisotropy in an open universe in the one-bubble inflationary scenario

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, K; Tanaka, T; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Sasaki, Misao; Tanaka, Takahiro

    1995-01-01

    We consider an alternative scenario of inflation which can account for a spatially open universe. It is similar to the old inflation in which the bubble nucleation occurs in the sea of false vacuum, but differs from it in that the second slow rollover inflation occurs inside a nucleated bubble. Hence our observable universe is entirely contained in one nucleated bubble. The significance of the scenario is that apart from a variance due to model parameters it gives us a definite prediction on the spectrum of the primordial density perturbations, hence is observationally testable. Here we investigate the spectrum of CMB anisotropies on large angular scales. We find that the contribution from peculiar modes which never appear in the usual harmonic analysis is significant in the case \\Omega_0\\lesssim0.1.

  6. Anisotropy and nonuniversality in scaling laws of the large-scale energy spectrum in rotating turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Amrik; Mininni, Pablo D; Rosenberg, Duane; Pouquet, Annick

    2012-09-01

    Rapidly rotating turbulent flow is characterized by the emergence of columnar structures that are representative of quasi-two-dimensional behavior of the flow. It is known that when energy is injected into the fluid at an intermediate scale Lf, it cascades towards smaller as well as larger scales. In this paper we analyze the flow in the inverse cascade range at a small but fixed Rossby number, Rof≈0.05. Several numerical simulations with helical and nonhelical forcing functions are considered in periodic boxes with unit aspect ratio. In order to resolve the inverse cascade range with reasonably large Reynolds number, the analysis is based on large eddy simulations which include the effect of helicity on eddy viscosity and eddy noise. Thus, we model the small scales and resolve explicitly the large scales. We show that the large-scale energy spectrum has at least two solutions: one that is consistent with Kolmogorov-Kraichnan-Batchelor-Leith phenomenology for the inverse cascade of energy in two-dimensional (2D) turbulence with a ∼k⊥-5/3 scaling, and the other that corresponds to a steeper ∼k⊥-3 spectrum in which the three-dimensional (3D) modes release a substantial fraction of their energy per unit time to the 2D modes. The spectrum that emerges depends on the anisotropy of the forcing function, the former solution prevailing for forcings in which more energy is injected into the 2D modes while the latter prevails for isotropic forcing. In the case of anisotropic forcing, whence the energy goes from the 2D to the 3D modes at low wave numbers, large-scale shear is created, resulting in a time scale τsh, associated with shear, thereby producing a ∼k-1 spectrum for the total energy with the horizontal energy of the 2D modes still following a ∼k⊥-5/3 scaling.

  7. The East-West Method: An Exposure-independent Method to Search for Large-scale Anisotropies of Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonino, R.; Alekseenko, V. V.; Deligny, O.; Ghia, P. L.; Grigat, M.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lyberis, H.; Mollerach, S.; Over, S.; Roulet, E.

    2011-09-01

    The measurement of large-scale anisotropies in cosmic ray arrival directions at energies above 1013 eV is performed through the detection of extensive air showers (EAS) produced by cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere. The observed anisotropies are small, so accurate measurements require small statistical uncertainties, i.e., large data sets. These can be obtained by employing ground detector arrays with large extensions (from 104 to 109 m2) and long operation time (up to 20 years). The control of such arrays is challenging and spurious variations in the counting rate due to instrumental effects (e.g., data taking interruptions or changes in the acceptance) and atmospheric effects (e.g., air temperature and pressure effects on EAS development) are usually present. These modulations must be corrected very precisely before performing standard anisotropy analyses, i.e., harmonic analysis of the counting rate versus local sidereal time. In this paper we discuss an alternative method to measure large-scale anisotropies, the "East-West method." It was originally proposed in the 1940s to study asymmetries in the flux of solar cosmic rays and later applied by Nagashima et al. to EAS at higher energies. It is a differential method, as it is based on the analysis of the difference of the counting rates in the east and west directions. Besides explaining the principle, we present here its mathematical derivation, showing that the method is largely independent of experimental effects, that is, it does not require corrections for acceptance and/or for atmospheric effects. We explain the use of the method to derive the amplitude and phase of the anisotropy and demonstrate its power under different conditions of detector operation.

  8. Large-scale sidereal anisotropy of multi-TeV galactic cosmic rays and the heliosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Amenomori, M; Chen, D; Cui, S W; Danzengluobu,; Ding, L K; Ding, X H; Fan, C; Feng, C F; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Z Y; Gao, X Y; Geng, Q X; Gou, Q B; Guo, H W; He, H H; He, M; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Hu, Haibing; Hu, H B; Huang, J; Huang, Q; Jia, H Y; Jiang, L; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kato, C; Kawata, K; Labaciren,; Le, G M; Li, A F; Li, H C; Li, J Y; Liu, C; Lou, Y -Q; Lü, H; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Mu, J; Munakata, K; Nagai, A; Nanjo, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Ozawa, S; Saitô, T; Saito, T Y; Sakata, M; Sako, T K; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Takita, M; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Torii, S; Tsuchiya, H; Udo, S; Wang, B; Wang, H; Wang, Y; Wang, Y G; Wu, H R; Xue, L; Yamamoto, Y; Yan, C T; Yang, X C; Yasue, S; Ye, Z H; Yu, G C; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhang, H M; Zhang, J L; Zhang, N J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Ying; Zhaxisangzhu,; Zhou, X X; Kota, J

    2009-01-01

    We develop a model anisotropy best-fitting to the two-dimensional sky-map of multi-TeV galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity observed with the Tibet III air shower (AS) array. By incorporating a pair of intensity excesses in the hydrogen deflection plane (HDP) suggested by Gurnett et al., together with the uni-directional and bi-directional flows for reproducing the observed global feature, this model successfully reproduces the observed sky-map including the "skewed" feature of the excess intensity from the heliotail direction, whose physical origin has long remained unknown. These additional excesses are modeled by a pair of the northern and southern Gaussian distributions, each placed ~50 degree away from the heliotail direction. The amplitude of the southern excess is as large as ~0.2 %, more than twice the amplitude of the northern excess. This implies that the Tibet AS experiment discovered for the first time a clear evidence of the significant modulation of GCR intensity in the heliotail and the asymmetr...

  9. Large Eddy Simulations Analysis of the Energy Spectrum Without Mutual Friction in Superfluid 4 He: HVBK Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtaoui, M.; Merahi, L.

    2017-01-01

    The reliability of the filtered on the Hall-Vinen-Bekarevich-Khalatnikov (HVBK) model without mutual friction force is now investigated via some large eddy simulations of freely decaying isotropic superfluid turbulence. The filtered HVBK model is solved using a fully pseudo-spectral method, which is an extension of the classical Rogallo's method to the two-fluid model. Furthermore, in this paper, we analyze the evolution of various terms constituting the HVBK momentum equations using the balance equation for the energy-spectrum function. Our results are presented in both cases with and without mutual friction force. LES predictions have shown that this mutual friction decreases the energy dissipation of the normal part and the energy transfer is more significant when this force is taken into account.

  10. Unusually large magnetic anisotropy in electrochemically deposited Co-rich Co-Pt films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirtori, V; Cavallotti, P L; Rognoni, R; Xu, X; Zangari, G; Fratesi, G; Trioni, M I; Bernasconi, M

    2011-06-01

    Co-rich Co-Pt films grown by electrodeposition from an amino-nitrite/citrate/glycine electrolyte onto Au(111) substrates apparently grow with a hexagonal structure, with its c-axis directed perpendicular to the surface. The films exhibit a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (MCA) of the same order of magnitude as the shape anisotropy. Experimental estimates of the MCA result in a higher anisotropy than that reported for bulk materials of the same composition, but similar to values measured in films grown by vacuum methods at relatively high temperature, which partly consist of a high anisotropy, metastable orthorhombic Pmm2 phase. Comparison of valence band X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements on electrodeposited films with density functional theory simulations of the electronic structure of the various reported Co(3)Pt structures support the notion that the films may consist of a mixture of the hexagonal and the Pmm2 structure.

  11. Reynolds number dependence of large-scale friction control in turbulent channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canton, Jacopo; Örlü, Ramis; Chin, Cheng; Schlatter, Philipp

    2016-12-01

    The present work investigates the effectiveness of the control strategy introduced by Schoppa and Hussain [Phys. Fluids 10, 1049 (1998), 10.1063/1.869789] as a function of Reynolds number (Re). The skin-friction drag reduction method proposed by these authors, consisting of streamwise-invariant, counter-rotating vortices, was analyzed by Canton et al. [Flow, Turbul. Combust. 97, 811 (2016), 10.1007/s10494-016-9723-8] in turbulent channel flows for friction Reynolds numbers (Reτ) corresponding to the value of the original study (i.e., 104) and 180. For these Re, a slightly modified version of the method proved to be successful and was capable of providing a drag reduction of up to 18%. The present study analyzes the Reynolds number dependence of this drag-reducing strategy by performing two sets of direct numerical simulations (DNS) for Reτ=360 and 550. A detailed analysis of the method as a function of the control parameters (amplitude and wavelength) and Re confirms, on the one hand, the effectiveness of the large-scale vortices at low Re and, on the other hand, the decreasing and finally vanishing effectiveness of this method for higher Re. In particular, no drag reduction can be achieved for Reτ=550 for any combination of the parameters controlling the vortices. For low Reynolds numbers, the large-scale vortices are able to affect the near-wall cycle and alter the wall-shear-stress distribution to cause an overall drag reduction effect, in accordance with most control strategies. For higher Re, instead, the present method fails to penetrate the near-wall region and cannot induce the spanwise velocity variation observed in other more established control strategies, which focus on the near-wall cycle. Despite the negative outcome, the present results demonstrate the shortcomings of the control strategy and show that future focus should be on methods that directly target the near-wall region or other suitable alternatives.

  12. Finite electric field effects in the large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy surface Pt/Fe/Pt(001): a first-principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujikawa, Masahito; Oda, Tatsuki

    2009-06-19

    We investigate crystalline magnetic anisotropy in the electric field (EF) for the FePt surface which has a large perpendicular anisotropy, by means of the first-principles approach. Anisotropy is reduced linearly with respect to the inward EF, associated with the induced spin density around the Fe layer. Although the magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) density reveals large variation around the atoms, the intrinsic contribution to the MAE is found to mainly come from the Fe layer. The surface without the capping Pt layer also shows similar linear dependence.

  13. Design of a Binuclear Ni(II) Complex with Large Ising-type Anisotropy and Weak Anti-Ferromagnetic Coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Khatib, Fatima; Cahier, Benjamin; López-Jordà, Maurici; Guillot, Régis; Rivière, Eric; Hafez, Hala; Saad, Zeinab; Girerd, Jean-Jacques; Guihéry, Nathalie; Mallah, Talal

    2017-09-05

    The preparation of a binuclear Ni(II) complex with a pentacoordinate environment using a cryptand organic ligand and the imidazolate bridge is reported. The coordination sphere is close to trigonal bipyramidal (tbp) for one Ni(II) and to square pyramidal (spy) for the other. The use of the imidazolate bridge that undergoes π-π stacking with two benzene rings of the chelating ligand induces steric hindrance that stabilizes the pentacoordinate environment. Magnetic measurements together with theoretical studies of the spin states energy levels allow fitting the data and reveal a large Ising-type anisotropy and a weak anti-ferromagnetic exchange coupling between the metal ions. The magnitude and the nature of the magnetic anisotropy and the difference in anisotropy between the two metal ions are rationalized using wave-function-based calculations. We show that a slight distortion of the coordination sphere of Ni(II) from spy to tbp leads to an Ising-type anisotropy. Broken-symmetry density functional calculations rationalize the weak anti-ferromagnetic exchange coupling through the imidazolate bridge.

  14. The East-West method: an exposure-independent method to search for large scale anisotropies of cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Bonino, R; Deligny, O; Ghia, P L; Grigat, M; Letessier-Selvon, A; Lyberis, H; Mollerach, S; Over, S; Roulet, E

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of large scale anisotropies in cosmic ray arrival directions at energies above 10^13 eV is performed through the detection of Extensive Air Showers produced by cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere. The observed anisotropies are small, so accurate measurements require small statistical uncertainties, i.e. large datasets. These can be obtained by employing ground detector arrays with large extensions (from 10^4 to 10^9 m^2) and long operation time (up to 20 years). The control of such arrays is challenging and spurious variations in the counting rate due to instrumental effects (e.g. data taking interruptions or changes in the acceptance) and atmospheric effects (e.g. air temperature and pressure effects on EAS development) are usually present. These modulations must be corrected very precisely before performing standard anisotropy analyses, i.e. harmonic analysis of the counting rate versus local sidereal time. In this paper we discuss an alternative method to measure large scale anisotrop...

  15. Large Voltage-Induced Changes in the Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy of an MgO-Based Tunnel Junction with an Ultrathin Fe Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Takayuki; Kozioł-Rachwał, Anna; Skowroński, Witold; Zayets, Vadym; Shiota, Yoichi; Tamaru, Shingo; Kubota, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji; Suzuki, Yoshishige

    2016-04-01

    We study the voltage control of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in an ultrathin Fe layer sandwiched between the Cr buffer and MgO tunneling barrier layers. A high-interface magnetic anisotropy energy of 2.1 mJ /m2 is achieved in the Cr/ultrathin Fe /MgO structure. A large voltage-induced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy change is observed under the negative-bias voltage applications for the case of the Fe layer thinner than 0.6 nm. The amplitude of the voltage-induced anisotropy energy change exhibits a strong Fe-thickness dependence and it reaches as high as 290 fJ /Vm . The observed high values of the surface anisotropy and voltage-induced anisotropy energy change demonstrate the feasibility of voltage-driven spintronic devices.

  16. Stick slip contact mechanics between dissimilar materials: effect of charging and large friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuiggan, Patricia M

    2008-04-15

    Measurements of the contact radius as a function of applied force between a mica surface and a silica surface (mica/silica) in air are reported. The load/unload results show that the contact radius generally increases with applied force. Because of the presence of charging due to contact electrification, both a short-range van der Waals adhesion force and longer-range electrostatic adhesive interaction contribute to the measured force. The results indicate that approximately 20% of the pull-off force is due to van der Waals forces. The contact radius versus applied force results can be fit to Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) theory by considering that only the short-range van der Waals forces contribute to the work of adhesion and subtracting a constant longer-range electrostatic force. Also, an additional and unexpected step function is superimposed on the contact radius versus applied force curve. Thus, the contact diameter increases in a stepped dependence with increasing force. The stepped contact behavior is seen only for increasing force and is not observed when symmetric mica/mica or silica/silica contacts are measured. In humid conditions, the contact diameter of the mica/silica contact increases monotonically with applied force. Friction forces between the surfaces are also measured and the shear stress of a mica/silica interface is 100 times greater than the shear stress of a mica/mica interface. This large shear stress retards the increase in contact area as the force is increased and leads to the observed stepped contact mechanics behavior.

  17. From gas dynamics with large friction to gradient flows describing diffusion theories

    KAUST Repository

    Lattanzio, Corrado

    2016-12-09

    We study the emergence of gradient flows in Wasserstein distance as high friction limits of an abstract Euler flow generated by an energy functional. We develop a relative energy calculation that connects the Euler flow to the gradient flow in the diffusive limit regime. We apply this approach to prove convergence from the Euler-Poisson system with friction to the Keller-Segel system in the regime that the latter has smooth solutions. The same methodology is used to establish convergence from the Euler-Korteweg theory with monotone pressure laws to the Cahn-Hilliard equation.

  18. Application of Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility to large-scale fault kinematics: an evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Antonio M.; Roman-Berdiel, Teresa; Marcén, Marcos; Oliva-Urcia, Belen; Soto, Ruth; Garcia-Lasanta, Cristina; Calvin, Pablo; Pocovi, Andres; Gil-Imaz, Andres; Pueyo-Anchuela, Oscar; Izquierdo-Llavall, Esther; Vernet, Eva; Santolaria, Pablo; Osacar, Cinta; Santanach, Pere; Corrado, Sveva; Invernizzi, Chiara; Aldega, Luca; Caricchi, Chiara; Villalain, Juan Jose

    2017-04-01

    Major discontinuities in the Earth's crust are expressed by faults that often cut across its whole thickness favoring, for example, the emplacement of magmas of mantelic origin. These long-lived faults are common in intra-plate environments and show multi-episodic activity that spans for hundred of million years and constitute first-order controls on plate evolution, favoring basin formation and inversion, rotations and the accommodation of deformation in large segments of plates. Since the post-Paleozoic evolution of these large-scale faults has taken place (and can only be observed) at shallow crustal levels, the accurate determination of fault kinematics is hampered by scarcely developed fault rocks, lack of classical structural indicators and the brittle deformation accompanying fault zones. These drawbacks are also found when thick clayey or evaporite levels, with or without diapiric movements, are the main detachment levels that facilitate large displacements in the upper crust. Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) provides a useful tool for the analysis of fault zones lacking fully developed kinematic indicators. However, its meaning in terms of deformational fabrics must be carefully checked by means of outcrop and thin section analysis in order to establish the relationship between the orientation of magnetic ellipsoid axes and the transport directions, as well as the representativity of scalar parameters regarding deformation mechanisms. Timing of faulting, P-T conditions and magnetic mineralogy are also major constraints for the interpretation of magnetic fabrics and therefore, separating ferro- and para-magnetic fabric components may be necessary in complex cases. AMS results indicate that the magnetic lineation can be parallel (when projected onto the shear plane) or perpendicular (i.e. parallel to the intersection lineation) to the transport direction depending mainly on the degree of shear deformation. Changes between the two end-members can

  19. Observations of Large Scale Sidereal Anisotropy in 1 and 11 TeV cosmic rays from the MINOS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Jong, J.K.

    2012-01-01

    The MINOS Near and Far Detectors are two large, functionally-identical, steel-scintillating sampling calorimeters located at depths of 220 mwe and 2100 mwe respectively. The detectors observe the muon component of hadronic showers produced from cosmic ray interactions with nuclei in the earth's atmosphere. From the arrival direction of these muons, the anisotropy in arrival direction of the cosmic ray primaries can be determined. The MINOS Near and Far Detector have observed anisotropy on the order of 0.1% at 1 and 11 TeV respectively. The amplitude and phase of the first harmonic at 1 TeV are 8.2 {+-} 1.7(stat.) x 10{sup -4} and (8.9 {+-} 12.1(stat.)){sup o}, and at 11 TeV are 3.8 {+-} 0.5(stat.) x 10{sup -4} and (27.2 {+-} 7.2(stat.)){sup o}.

  20. Origin of Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy and Large Orbital Moment in Fe Atoms on MgO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, S; Donati, F; Stepanow, S; Rusponi, S; Paul, W; Gangopadhyay, S; Rau, I G; Pacchioni, G E; Gragnaniello, L; Pivetta, M; Dreiser, J; Piamonteze, C; Lutz, C P; Macfarlane, R M; Jones, B A; Gambardella, P; Heinrich, A J; Brune, H

    2015-12-04

    We report on the magnetic properties of individual Fe atoms deposited on MgO(100) thin films probed by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and scanning tunneling spectroscopy. We show that the Fe atoms have strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy with a zero-field splitting of 14.0±0.3  meV/atom. This is a factor of 10 larger than the interface anisotropy of epitaxial Fe layers on MgO and the largest value reported for Fe atoms adsorbed on surfaces. The interplay between the ligand field at the O adsorption sites and spin-orbit coupling is analyzed by density functional theory and multiplet calculations, providing a comprehensive model of the magnetic properties of Fe atoms in a low-symmetry bonding environment.

  1. Sensitivity of full-sky experiments to large scale cosmic ray anisotropies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Peter B.; Weiler, Thomas J.

    2015-12-01

    The two main advantages of space-based observation of extreme energy (≳ 5 ×1019 eV) cosmic rays (EECRs) over ground based observatories are the increased field of view and the full-sky coverage with nearly uniform systematics across the entire sky. The former guarantees increased statistics, whereas the latter enables a clean partitioning of the sky into spherical harmonics. The discovery of anisotropies would help to identify the long sought origin of EECRs. We begin an investigation of the reach of a full-sky space-based experiment such as EUSO to detect anisotropies in the extreme-energy cosmic-ray sky compared to ground based partial-sky experiments such as the Pierre Auger Observatory and Telescope Array. The technique is explained here, and simulations for a Universe with just two nonzero multipoles, monopole plus either dipole or quadrupole, are presented. These simulations quantify the advantages of space-based, all-sky coverage.

  2. Origin of Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy and Large Orbital Moment in Fe Atoms on MgO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, S.; Donati, F.; Stepanow, S.; Rusponi, S.; Paul, W.; Gangopadhyay, S.; Rau, I. G.; Pacchioni, G. E.; Gragnaniello, L.; Pivetta, M.; Dreiser, J.; Piamonteze, C.; Lutz, C. P.; Macfarlane, R. M.; Jones, B. A.; Gambardella, P.; Heinrich, A. J.; Brune, H.

    2015-12-01

    We report on the magnetic properties of individual Fe atoms deposited on MgO(100) thin films probed by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and scanning tunneling spectroscopy. We show that the Fe atoms have strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy with a zero-field splitting of 14.0 ±0.3 meV /atom . This is a factor of 10 larger than the interface anisotropy of epitaxial Fe layers on MgO and the largest value reported for Fe atoms adsorbed on surfaces. The interplay between the ligand field at the O adsorption sites and spin-orbit coupling is analyzed by density functional theory and multiplet calculations, providing a comprehensive model of the magnetic properties of Fe atoms in a low-symmetry bonding environment.

  3. Sensitivity of orbiting JEM-EUSO to large-scale cosmic-ray anisotropies

    CERN Document Server

    Denton, Peter B; Berlind, Andreas A; Richardson, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The two main advantages of space-based observation of extreme-energy ($\\gtrsim 10^{19}$~eV) cosmic-rays (EECRs) over ground-based observatories are the increased field of view, and the all-sky coverage with nearly uniform systematics of an orbiting observatory. The former guarantees increased statistics, whereas the latter enables a partitioning of the sky into spherical harmonics. We have begun an investigation, using the spherical harmonic technique, of the reach of \\J\\ into potential anisotropies in the extreme-energy cosmic-ray sky-map. The technique is explained here, and simulations are presented. The discovery of anisotropies would help to identify the long-sought origin of EECRs.

  4. Experimental Investigation of Friction Effect on Liner Model Rolling Bearings for Large Diameter Thrust Bearing Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Babu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Studying friction coefficient has significant importance, especially when dealing with high load and temperature applications that have frequent starting and stopping points. Towards that, two sets of angular contact Linear Model Mockup Bearings (LMMB were designed and fabricated. This linear model assembly was made up of high precision, grounded raceways (AISI 4140 and commercially purchased balls (AISI 52100. The experimental studies were carried out by placing different number of balls between the raceways under different loads at dry lubricating condition. The static friction coefficients were measured using two different experiments: viz gravitation-based experiment and direct linear force measurement experiment. And Digital Image Correlation (DIC technique was used to find the stiffness of LMMB set.

  5. Large-scale structure formation and cosmic microwave anisotropy in a cold plus hot dark matter universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Robert K.; Shafi, Qaisar; Stecker, Floyd W.

    1989-01-01

    Several particle physics models suggest the simultaneous existence of both cold and hot forms of dark matter particles. Assuming a Harrison-Zel'dovich spectrum of primordial density fluctuations and Omega = 1, the formation of structure in a universe dominated by a combination of cold dark matter and massive neutrinos is explored. It is found that the presence of the hot dark matter component can cause enough power on large scales to explain some recent observations, while there is still sufficient power on small scales to allow galactic structure formation. Spatial anisotropies in the microwave background radiation are computed and found to be compatible with observational limits.

  6. Sensitivity of full-sky experiments to large scale cosmic ray anisotropies

    CERN Document Server

    Denton, Peter B

    2015-01-01

    The two main advantages of space-based observation of extreme energy ($\\gtrsim5\\times10^{19}$ eV) cosmic rays (EECRs) over ground based observatories are the increased field of view and the full-sky coverage with nearly uniform systematics across the entire sky. The former guarantees increased statistics, whereas the latter enables a clean partitioning of the sky into spherical harmonics. The discovery of anisotropies would help to identify the long sought origin of EECRs. We begin an investigation of the reach of a full-sky space-based experiment such as EUSO to detect anisotropies in the extreme-energy cosmic-ray sky compared to ground based partial-sky experiments such as the Pierre Auger Observatory and Telescope Array. The technique is explained here, and simulations for a Universe with just two nonzero multipoles, monopole plus either dipole or quadrupole, are presented. These simulations quantify the advantages of space-based, all-sky coverage.

  7. The hot hELicon eXperiment (HELIX) and the large experiment on instabilities and anisotropy (LEIA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scime, E. E.; Keiter, P. A.; Balkey, M. M.; Kline, J. L.; Sun, X.; Keesee, A. M.; Hardin, R. A.; Biloiu, I. A.; Houshmandyar, S.; Chakraborty Thakur, S.; Carr, J.; Galante, M.; McCarren, D.; Sears, S.

    2015-01-01

    The West Virginia University Hot hELIcon eXperiment (HELIX) provides variable density and ion temperature plasmas, with controllable levels of thermal anisotropy, for space relevant laboratory experiments in the Large Experiment on Instabilities and Anisotropy (LEIA) as well as fundamental studies of helicon source physics in HELIX. Through auxiliary ion heating, the ion temperature anisotropy (T ⊥/T ∥) is variable from 1 to 20 for parallel plasma beta (β = 8πnkT i∥/B 2) values that span the range of 0.0001 to 0.01 in LEIA. The ion velocity distribution function is measured throughout the discharge volume in steady-state and pulsed plasmas with laser induced fluorescence (LIF). The wavelengths of very short wavelength electrostatic fluctuations are measured with a coherent microwave scattering system. Operating at low neutral pressures triggers spontaneous formation of a current-free electric double layer. Ion acceleration through the double layer is detected through LIF. LIF-based velocity space tomography of the accelerated beam provides a two-dimensional mapping of the bulk and beam ion distribution functions. The driving frequency for the m = 1 helical antenna is continuously variable from 8.5 to 16 MHz and frequency dependent variations of the RF coupling to the plasma allow the spontaneously appearing double layers to be turned on and off without modifying the plasma collisionality or magnetic field geometry. Single and multi-species plasmas are created with argon, helium, nitrogen, krypton, and xenon. The noble gas plasmas have steep neutral density gradients, with ionization levels reaching 100% in the core of the plasma source. The large plasma density in the source enables the study of Aflvén waves in the HELIX device.

  8. Fabrication of Flexible Oriented Magnetic Thin Films with Large in-plane Uniaxial Anisotropy by Roll-to-roll Nanoimprint Lithography

    OpenAIRE

    Thantirige, Rukshan M.; John, Jacob; Pradhan, Nihar R.; Carter, Kenneth R.; Tuominen, Mark T.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report wafer scale fabrication of densely packed Fe nanostripe-based magnetic thin films on a flexible substrate and their magnetic anisotropy properties. We find that Fe nanostripes exhibit large in-plane uniaxial anisotropy and nearly square hysteresis loops with energy products (BH)max exceeding 3 MGOe at room temperature. High density Fe nanostripes were fabricated on 70 nm flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) gratings, which were made by roll-to-roll (R2R) UV nanoimprintlit...

  9. Large-eddy simulation of flow over a cylinder with from to : a skin-friction perspective

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Wan

    2017-05-05

    We present wall-resolved large-eddy simulations (LES) of flow over a smooth-wall circular cylinder up to , where is Reynolds number based on the cylinder diameter and the free-stream speed . The stretched-vortex subgrid-scale (SGS) model is used in the entire simulation domain. For the sub-critical regime, six cases are implemented with . Results are compared with experimental data for both the wall-pressure-coefficient distribution on the cylinder surface, which dominates the drag coefficient, and the skin-friction coefficient, which clearly correlates with the separation behaviour. In the super-critical regime, LES for three values of are carried out at different resolutions. The drag-crisis phenomenon is well captured. For lower resolution, numerical discretization fluctuations are sufficient to stimulate transition, while for higher resolution, an applied boundary-layer perturbation is found to be necessary to stimulate transition. Large-eddy simulation results at , with a mesh of , agree well with the classic experimental measurements of Achenbach (J. Fluid Mech., vol. 34, 1968, pp. 625-639) especially for the skin-friction coefficient, where a spike is produced by the laminar-turbulent transition on the top of a prior separation bubble. We document the properties of the attached-flow boundary layer on the cylinder surface as these vary with . Within the separated portion of the flow, mean-flow separation-reattachment bubbles are observed at some values of , with separation characteristics that are consistent with experimental observations. Time sequences of instantaneous surface portraits of vector skin-friction trajectory fields indicate that the unsteady counterpart of a mean-flow separation-reattachment bubble corresponds to the formation of local flow-reattachment cells, visible as coherent bundles of diverging surface streamlines.

  10. Large magnetic anisotropy in strained Fe/Co multilayers on AuCu and the effect of carbon doping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Giannopoulos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A tetragonally distorted FeCo structure is obtained in Fe/Co multilayers epitaxially grown on Au50Cu50 buffer using MgO single crystal substrates as a result of the lattice mismatch between the buffer and the FeCo ferromagnetic layer. The presence of large magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE of the order of 1 MJ/m3 has been confirmed by ferromagnetic resonance. Furthermore, the effect of carbon (C doping to maintain the tetragonal distortion throughout the thickness of 3 nm FeCo has been investigated. Our study shows that FeCo alloys maintain large magnetic moment and possess high MAE properties that are required for designing permanent magnets.

  11. Analysis of large-scale anisotropy of ultra-high energy cosmic rays in HiRes data

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasi, R U; Allen, M; Amann, J F; Archbold, G; Belov, K; Belz, J W; Bergman, D R; Blake, S A; Brusova, O A; Burt, G W; Cannon, C; Cao, Z; Deng, W; Fedorova, Y; Findlay, J; Finley, C B; Gray, R C; Hanlon, W F; Hoffman, C M; Holzscheiter, M H; Hughes, G; Hüntemeyer, P; Ivanov, D; Jones, B F; Jui, C C H; Kim, K; Kirn, M A; Koers, H; Loh, E C; Maestas, M M; Manago, N; Marek, L J; Martens, K; Matthews, J A J; Matthews, J N; Moore, S A; O'Neill, A; Painter, C A; Perera, L; Reil, K; Riehle, R; Roberts, M D; Rodriguez, D; Sasaki, M; Schnetzer, S R; Scott, L M; Sinnis, G; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Song, C; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Thomas, J R; Thomas, S B; Thomson, G B; Tinyakov, P; Tupa, D; Wiencke, L R; Zech, A; Zhang, X

    2010-01-01

    Stereo data collected by the HiRes experiment over a six year period are examined for large-scale anisotropy related to the inhomogeneous distribution of matter in the nearby Universe. We consider the generic case of small cosmic-ray deflections and a large number of sources tracing the matter distribution. In this matter tracer model the expected cosmic ray flux depends essentially on a single free parameter, the typical deflection angle theta. We find that the HiRes data with threshold energies of 40 EeV and 57 EeV are incompatible with the matter tracer model at a 95% confidence level unless theta is larger than 10 degrees and are compatible with an isotropic flux. The data set above 10 EeV is compatible with both the matter tracer model and an isotropic flux.

  12. Trigonal antiprismatic Co(ii) single molecule magnets with large uniaxial anisotropies: importance of Raman and tunneling mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan-Zhu; Gómez-Coca, Silvia; Brown, Andrew J; Saber, Mohamed R; Zhang, Xuan; Dunbar, Kim R

    2016-10-19

    The air-stable mononuclear Co(ii) compounds [Co(II)(Tpm)2][ClO4]2 (1, Tpm = tris(pyrazol-1-yl)methane), [Co(II)(Tpm)2][BPh4]2·2MeCN (2) with trigonal antiprismatic geometry (trigonally elongated octahedral geometry) are reported. Magnetic and theoretical studies reveal that the complexes exhibit single-molecule magnet behavior with uniaxial anisotropy and a huge energy difference between ground and first excited Karmers' doublets (∼200 cm(-1)). Under applied DC fields, compounds 1 and 2 exhibit frequency and temperature dependence of the imaginary susceptibility. The fit of the data to an Orbach relaxation process yields effective energy barriers of 30.6(1) and 44.7(6) cm(-1) for 1 and 2, respectively, but there is no real state at that energy. The inclusion of tunneling, direct and Raman relaxation processes leads to the conclusion that the inclusion of an Orbach process is not required to provide a good fit to the data. More interestingly, a detailed study of the dependence of the relaxation time with field shows that for these Kramers' ions, tunneling is the predominant process at low temperature and that differences in the counteranion allow for a tuning of the Raman process at higher temperatures. These findings underscore the fact that large uniaxial anisotropy can be achieved in hexacoordinate Co(ii) trigonal antiprismatic complexes which is an unexplored geometry in mononuclear single molecule magnets.

  13. The amplitude and spectral index of the large angular scale anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganga, Ken; Page, Lyman; Cheng, Edward; Meyer, Stephan

    1994-01-01

    In many cosmological models, the large angular scale anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background is parameterized by a spectral index, n, and a quadrupolar amplitude, Q. For a Harrison-Peebles-Zel'dovich spectrum, n = 1. Using data from the Far Infrared Survey (FIRS) and a new statistical measure, a contour plot of the likelihood for cosmological models for which -1 less than n less than 3 and 0 equal to or less than Q equal to or less than 50 micro K is obtained. Depending upon the details of the analysis, the maximum likelihood occurs at n between 0.8 and 1.4 and Q between 18 and 21 micro K. Regardless of Q, the likelihood is always less than half its maximum for n less than -0.4 and for n greater than 2.2, as it is for Q less than 8 micro K and Q greater than 44 micro K.

  14. Large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of single Co atom on MgO monolayer: A first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Bin; Shi, Wu-Jun [Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Quantum Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Feng, Min [School of Physics, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Zuo, Xu, E-mail: xzuo@nankai.edu.cn [College of Electronic Information and Optical Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2015-05-07

    Realizing the magnetic bit with a single atom is the ultimate goal for magnetic storage. Based on density functional theory, the magnetic anisotropy (MA) of single Co atom on MgO monolayer has been investigated. Results show that this two dimensional system possesses a large perpendicular MA, about 5.8 meV per Co atom. Besides, there exists remarkable unquenched orbital moments for different magnetization directions, which can be attributed to the reduction of coordination number in two dimensional system and is responsible for the enhanced MA. The Bloch pseudo-wavefunction and band structure of Co d-orbitals have been calculated to elucidate the origin of the perpendicular MA.

  15. Fabrication of flexible oriented magnetic thin films with large in-plane uniaxial anisotropy by roll-to-roll nanoimprint lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thantirige, Rukshan M.; John, Jacob; Pradhan, Nihar R.; Carter, Kenneth R.; Tuominen, Mark T.

    2016-06-01

    Here, we report wafer scale fabrication of densely packed Fe nanostripe-based magnetic thin films on a flexible substrate and their magnetic anisotropy properties. We find that Fe nanostripes exhibit large in-plane uniaxial anisotropy and nearly square hysteresis loops with energy products (BHmax) exceeding 3 MGOe at room temperature. High density Fe nanostripes were fabricated on 70 nm flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) gratings, which were made by a roll-to-roll (R2R) UV nanoimprint lithography technique. We observed large in-plane uniaxial anisotropies along the long dimension of nanostripes that can be attributed to the shape. Temperature dependent hysteresis measurements confirm that the magnetization reversal is driven by non-coherent rotation reversal processes.

  16. CONSTRAINTS ON THE ORIGIN OF COSMIC RAYS ABOVE 10{sup 18} eV FROM LARGE-SCALE ANISOTROPY SEARCHES IN DATA OF THE PIERRE AUGER OBSERVATORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, P.; Andringa, S. [LIP and Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon (Portugal); Aglietta, M. [Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario (INAF), Universita di Torino and Sezione INFN, Torino (Italy); Ahlers, M. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Ahn, E. J. [Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States); Albuquerque, I. F. M. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Allard, D. [Laboratoire AstroParticule et Cosmologie (APC), Universite Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, Paris (France); Allekotte, I. [Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro (CNEA-UNCuyo-CONICET), San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Allen, J. [New York University, New York, NY (United States); Allison, P. [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Almela, A. [Universidad Tecnologica Nacional - Facultad Regional Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Castillo, J. Alvarez [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Alvarez-Muniz, J. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Alves Batista, R. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, IFGW, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Ambrosio, M.; Aramo, C. [Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' and Sezione INFN, Napoli (Italy); Aminaei, A. [IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen (Netherlands); Anchordoqui, L. [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Antici' c, T. [Rudjer Boskovi' c Institute, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Arganda, E. [IFLP, Universidad Nacional de La Plata and CONICET, La Plata (Argentina); Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration; and others

    2013-01-01

    A thorough search for large-scale anisotropies in the distribution of arrival directions of cosmic rays detected above 10{sup 18} eV at the Pierre Auger Observatory is reported. For the first time, these large-scale anisotropy searches are performed as a function of both the right ascension and the declination and expressed in terms of dipole and quadrupole moments. Within the systematic uncertainties, no significant deviation from isotropy is revealed. Upper limits on dipole and quadrupole amplitudes are derived under the hypothesis that any cosmic ray anisotropy is dominated by such moments in this energy range. These upper limits provide constraints on the production of cosmic rays above 10{sup 18} eV, since they allow us to challenge an origin from stationary galactic sources densely distributed in the galactic disk and emitting predominantly light particles in all directions.

  17. Large electric-field control of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in strained [Co/Ni] / PZT heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopman, Daniel; Dennis, Cindi; Chen, P. J.; Iunin, Yury; Shull, Robert

    We present a piezoelectric/ferromagnetic heterostructure with PMA - a Co/Ni multilayer sputtered directly onto a Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT) substrate. Chemical-mechanical polishing was used to reduce the roughness of PZT plates to below 2 nm rms, enabling optimal magnetoelectric coupling via the direct interface between PZT and sputtered Co/Ni films with large PMA (Keff = (95 +/-9 kJ/m3)) . We grew the following layer stack: Ta(3)/Pt(2)/[Co(0.15)/Ni(0.6)]x4/Co(0.15)/Pt(2)/Ta(3); numbers in parentheses indicate thicknesses in nm. Applied electric fields up to +/- 2 MV/m to the PZT generated 0.05% in-plane compression in the Co/Ni multilayer, enabling a large electric-field reduction of the PMA (ΔKeff >= 103 J/m3) and of the coercive field (35%). Our results demonstrate that: (i) heterostructures combining PZT and [Co/Ni] exhibit larger PMA (Keff ~105 J/m3) than previous magnetoelectric heterostructures based on Co/Pt and CoFeB, enabling thermally stable hybrid magnetoelectric/spintronic devices only tens of nm in diameter and (ii) electric-field control of the PMA is promising for more energy efficient switching of spintronic devices.

  18. Methods for the reconstruction of large scale anisotropies of the cosmic ray flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Over, Sven

    2010-01-15

    In cosmic ray experiments the arrival directions, among other properties, of cosmic ray particles from detected air shower events are reconstructed. The question of uniformity in the distribution of arrival directions is of large importance for models that try to explain cosmic radiation. In this thesis, methods for the reconstruction of parameters of a dipole-like flux distribution of cosmic rays from a set of recorded air shower events are studied. Different methods are presented and examined by means of detailed Monte Carlo simulations. Particular focus is put on the implications of spurious experimental effects. Modifications of existing methods and new methods are proposed. The main goal of this thesis is the development of the horizontal Rayleigh analysis method. Unlike other methods, this method is based on the analysis of local viewing directions instead of global sidereal directions. As a result, the symmetries of the experimental setup can be better utilised. The calculation of the sky coverage (exposure function) is not necessary in this analysis. The performance of the method is tested by means of further Monte Carlo simulations. The new method performs similarly good or only marginally worse than established methods in case of ideal measurement conditions. However, the simulation of certain experimental effects can cause substantial misestimations of the dipole parameters by the established methods, whereas the new method produces no systematic deviations. The invulnerability to certain effects offers additional advantages, as certain data selection cuts become dispensable. (orig.)

  19. Compression Buckling Behavior of Large-Scale Friction Stir Welded and Riveted 2090-T83 Al-Li Alloy Skin-Stiffener Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Eric K.; Hafley, Robert A.; Wagner, John A.; Jegley, Dawn C.; Pecquet, Robert W.; Blum, Celia M.; Arbegast, William J.

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the potential of friction stir welding (FSW) as a replacement for traditional rivet fastening for launch vehicle dry bay construction, a large-scale friction stir welded 2090-T83 aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloy skin-stiffener panel was designed and fabricated by Lockheed-Martin Space Systems Company - Michoud Operations (LMSS) as part of NASA Space Act Agreement (SAA) 446. The friction stir welded panel and a conventional riveted panel were tested to failure in compression at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The present paper describes the compression test results, stress analysis, and associated failure behavior of these panels. The test results provide useful data to support future optimization of FSW processes and structural design configurations for launch vehicle dry bay structures.

  20. Sliding Mode Controller Design for Position and Speed Control of Flight Simulator Servo System with Large Friction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘金琨; 尔联洁

    2003-01-01

    Flight simulator is an important device and a typical high-performance position and speed servo system used in the hardware-in-the-loop simulation of flight control system. Friction is the main nonlinear resistance in the flight simulator servo system, especially in a low-speed state. Based on the description of dynamic and static models of a nonlinear Stribeck friction model, this paper puts forward sliding mode controller to overcome the friction, whose stability is proved. Simulation example indicates that the controller can guarantee a high robust performance and have a high precision of position tracking and speed tracking for a flight simulator servo system.

  1. Vortex pinning and lock-in effect in a layered superconductor with large in-plane anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansky, P.A.; Danner, G.; Chaikin, P.M. [Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    1995-09-01

    We use ac susceptibility to study the vortex pinning force anisotropy and the magnetic lock-in effect in the organic superconductor (TMTSF){sub 2}ClO{sub 4}, which is believed to have an in-plane anisotropy of {gamma}{sub {ital b}{ital a}}{similar_to}10 and a maximum out-of-plane anisotropy {gamma}{sub {ital c}{ital a}}{similar_to}100. Our measurements show only weak effects of the in-plane anisotropy. The pinning force for Josephson vortices (parallel to the conducting planes) is nearly independent of their orientation, except for a small but narrow peak (full width at half maximum {congruent}6{degree}) when the vortices are parallel to the TMTSF stacks ({ital a} axis). The pinning force initially {ital decreases} {ital as} {ital the} {ital vortices} {ital unlock} {ital from} {ital the} {ital layers}, contrary to the behavior previously observed in the organic superconductor (BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu(SCN){sub 2}. The lock-in threshold field is only weakly dependent on the initial angle of the Josephson vortices in the {ital ab} plane.

  2. Large anisotropy in colossal magnetoresistance of charge orbital ordered epitaxial Sm0.5Ca0.5MnO3 films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yunzhong; Sun, J.R.; Zhao, J.L.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the structure and magnetotransport properties of Sm0.5Ca0.5MnO3 (SCMO) films epitaxially grown on (011)-oriented SrTiO3 substrates, which exhibited clear charge/orbital ordering transition. A significant anisotropy of ~1000 in the colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) effect was observed...... in the films with a thickness between 50 and 80 nm, which was distinctly different from the basically isotropic CMR effect in bulk SCMO. The large anisotropy in the CMR can be ascribed to the intrinsic asymmetric strain in the film, which plays an important role in tuning the spin–orbit coupling in manganite...... films. The origin of the peculiar CMR effect is discussed....

  3. Supernovae anisotropy power spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Ghodsi, Hoda; Habibi, Farhang

    2016-01-01

    We contribute another anisotropy study to this field of research using Supernovae Type Ia (SNe Ia). In this work, we utilise the power spectrum calculation method and apply it to both the current SNe Ia data and simulation. Our simulations are constructed with the characteristics of the upcoming survey of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), which shall bring us the largest SNe Ia collection to date. We make predictions for the amplitude of a possible dipole anisotropy or anisotropy in higher multipole moments that would be detectable by the LSST.

  4. Large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of ultrathin Ru and Rh films on a NiAl(001) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dongyoo; Yang, JeongHwa; Hong, Jisang [Department of Physics, Pukyong National University, Busan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-27

    Using the full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW) method, the magnetic properties of two-dimensional Ru and Rh monolayers (MLs) on a NiAl(001) surface have been investigated. It has been found that free standing one monolayer Ru and Rh films have ferromagnetic ground state with magnetic moments of 2.21 and 1.48 {mu}{sub B}, respectively. The ferromagnetism is still observed even on a Ni terminated NiAl(001) surface, while no magnetic state is found on an Al terminated surface. The calculated magnetic moments of Ru and Rh atoms are 1.56 and 0.88 {mu}{sub B}, respectively. In addition, an induced magnetic moment in surface Ni is observed. It has been found that the free standing Ru film has perpendicular magnetization to the film surface with a magnetocrystalline anisotropy (MCA) energy of 0.66 meV/atom, while an in-plane MCA energy of 0.37 meV/atom is achieved in Rh film. Very interestingly, we find that both Ru/NiAl(001) and Rh/NiAl(001) films have perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and the calculated MCA energies are 0.66 and 1.11 meV in Ru/NiAl(001) and Rh/NiAl(001), respectively. Along with the magnetic anisotropy, we have presented theoretically calculated x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) results.

  5. Large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of ultrathin Ru and Rh films on a NiAl(001) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, DongYoo; Yang, JeongHwa; Hong, Jisang

    2010-10-27

    Using the full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW) method, the magnetic properties of two-dimensional Ru and Rh monolayers (MLs) on a NiAl(001) surface have been investigated. It has been found that free standing one monolayer Ru and Rh films have ferromagnetic ground state with magnetic moments of 2.21 and 1.48 μ(B), respectively. The ferromagnetism is still observed even on a Ni terminated NiAl(001) surface, while no magnetic state is found on an Al terminated surface. The calculated magnetic moments of Ru and Rh atoms are 1.56 and 0.88 μ(B), respectively. In addition, an induced magnetic moment in surface Ni is observed. It has been found that the free standing Ru film has perpendicular magnetization to the film surface with a magnetocrystalline anisotropy (MCA) energy of 0.66 meV/atom, while an in-plane MCA energy of 0.37 meV/atom is achieved in Rh film. Very interestingly, we find that both Ru/NiAl(001) and Rh/NiAl(001) films have perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and the calculated MCA energies are 0.66 and 1.11 meV in Ru/NiAl(001) and Rh/NiAl(001), respectively. Along with the magnetic anisotropy, we have presented theoretically calculated x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) results.

  6. Note: A rigid piezo motor with large output force and an effective method to reduce sliding friction force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ying; Hou, Yubin; Lu, Qingyou

    2014-05-01

    We present a completely practical TunaDrive piezo motor. It consists of a central piezo stack sandwiched by two arm piezo stacks and two leg piezo stacks, respectively, which is then sandwiched and spring-clamped by a pair of parallel polished sapphire rods. It works by alternatively fast expanding and contracting the arm/leg stacks while slowly expanding/contracting the central stack simultaneously. The key point is that sufficiently fast expanding and contracting a limb stack can make its two sliding friction forces well cancel, resulting in the total sliding friction force is piezo motor's high compactness, precision, and output force make it perfect in building a high-quality harsh-condition (vibration resistant) atomic resolution scanning probe microscope.

  7. Magnetic anisotropy and porosity of Antarctic chondrites

    OpenAIRE

    Hamano,Yozo/Yomogida,Kiyoshi

    1982-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility anisotropy and porosity were measured in eleven Antarctic meteorites. These meteorites are ordinary chondrites (H and L type) in various metamorphic stages. Large magnetic anisotropy has been observed in most of the chondrites. The foliation type of the anisotropy, inferred from the shape of the susceptibility ellipsoid indicates that a uniaxial compressional type deformation is responsible for the anisotropy. The degree of the anisotropy and the porosity do not correl...

  8. Financial Frictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard Jensen, Mads

    frictions, a call option should never be exercised early, but only at expiration or just before the underlying stock pays a dividend. Chapter one of this thesis shows that suffciently severe frictions can make early exercise optimal. Short-sale costs especially represent an important driver of early...

  9. Large magnetic anisotropy predicted for rare-earth-free F e16 -xC oxN2 alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Yao, Yongxin; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2016-12-01

    Structures and magnetic properties of F e16 -xC oxN2 are studied using adaptive genetic algorithm and first-principles calculations. We show that substituting Fe with Co in F e16N2 with a Co/Fe ratio ≤1 can greatly improve the magnetic anisotropy of the material. The magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy from first-principles calculations reaches 3.18 MJ / m3 (245.6 μeV per metal atom) for F e12C o4N2 , much larger than that of F e16N2 , and is one of the largest among the reported rare-earth-free magnets. From our systematic crystal structure searches, we show that there is a structure transition from tetragonal F e16N2 to cubic C o16N2 in F e16 -xC oxN2 as the Co concentration increases, which can be well explained by electron counting analysis. Different magnetic properties between the Fe-rich (x ≤8 ) and Co-rich (x >8 ) F e16 -xC oxN2 is closely related to the structural transition.

  10. Solid friction between soft filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Ward, Andrew; Schwenger, Walter; Welch, David; Lau, A W C; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Mahadevan, L; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-01-01

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments' overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes' drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. Our findings demonstrate how altering a filament's elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the prop...

  11. An Evaluation of Constitutive Laws and their Ability to Predict Flow Stress over Large Variations in Temperature, Strain, and Strain Rate Characteristic of Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuykendall, Katherine

    2011-07-01

    Constitutive laws commonly used to model friction stir welding have been evaluated, both qualitatively and quantitatively, and a new application of a constitutive law which can be extended to materials commonly used in FSW is presented. Existing constitutive laws have been classified as path-dependent or path-independent. Path-independent laws have been further classified according to the physical phenomena they capture: strain hardening, strain rate hardening, and/or thermal softening. Path-dependent laws can track gradients in temperature and strain rate characteristic to friction stir welding; however, path-independent laws cannot. None of the path-independent constitutive laws evaluated has been validated over the full range of strain, strain rate, and temperature in friction stir welding. Holding all parameters other than constitutive law constant in a friction stir weld model resulted in temperature differences of up to 21%. Varying locations for maximum temperature difference indicate that the constitutive laws resulted in different temperature profiles. The Sheppard and Wright law is capable of capturing saturation but incapable of capturing strain hardening with errors as large as 57% near yield. The Johnson-Cook law is capable of capturing strain hardening; however, its inability to capture saturation causes over-predictions of stress at large strains with errors as large as 37% near saturation. The Kocks and Mecking model is capable of capturing strain hardening and saturation with errors less than 5% over the entire range of plastic strain. The Sheppard and Wright and Johnson-Cook laws are incapable of capturing transients characteristic of material behavior under interrupted temperature or strain rate. The use of a state variable in the Kocks and Mecking law allows it to predict such transients. Constants for the Kocks and Mecking model for AA 5083, AA 3004, and Inconel 600 were determined from Atlas of Formability data. Constants for AA 5083 and AA

  12. The effect of the geomagnetic field on cosmic ray energy estimates and large scale anisotropy searches on data from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Ahn, E J; Albuquerque, I F M; Allard, D; Allekotte, I; Allen, J; Allison, P; Castillo, J Alvarez; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Ambrosio, M; Aminaei, A; Anchordoqui, L; Andringa, S; Antičić, T; Anzalone, A; Aramo, C; Arganda, E; Arqueros, F; Asorey, H; Assis, P; Aublin, J; Ave, M; Avenier, M; Avila, G; Bäcker, T; Balzer, M; Barber, K B; Barbosa, A F; Bardenet, R; Barroso, S L C; Baughman, B; Bäuml, J; Beatty, J J; Becker, B R; Becker, K H; Bellétoile, A; Bellido, J A; BenZvi, S; Berat, C; Bertou, X; Biermann, P L; Billoir, P; Blanco, F; Blanco, M; Bleve, C; Blümer, H; Boháčová, M; Boncioli, D; Bonifazi, C; Bonino, R; Borodai, N; Brack, J; Brogueira, P; Brown, W C; Bruijn, R; Buchholz, P; Bueno, A; Burton, R E; Caballero-Mora, K S; Caramete, L; Caruso, R; Castellina, A; Catalano, O; Cataldi, G; Cazon, L; Cester, R; Chauvin, J; Cheng, S H; Chiavassa, A; Chinellato, J A; Chou, A; Chudoba, J; Clay, R W; Coluccia, M R; Conceição, R; Contreras, F; Cook, H; Cooper, M J; Coppens, J; Cordier, A; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Creusot, A; Criss, A; Cronin, J; Curutiu, A; Dagoret-Campagne, S; Dallier, R; Dasso, S; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; de Almeida, R M; De Domenico, M; De Donato, C; de Jong, S J; De La Vega, G; Junior, W J M de Mello; Neto, J R T de Mello; De Mitri, I; de Souza, V; de Vries, K D; Decerprit, G; del Peral, L; del Río, M; Deligny, O; Dembinski, H; Dhital, N; Di Giulio, C; Diaz, J C; Castro, M L Díaz; Diep, P N; Dobrigkeit, C; Docters, W; D'Olivo, J C; Dong, P N; Dorofeev, A; Anjos, J C dos; Dova, M T; D'Urso, D; Dutan, I; Ebr, J; Engel, R; Erdmann, M; Escobar, C O; Espadanal, J; Etchegoyen, A; Luis, P Facal San; Tapia, I Fajardo; Falcke, H; Farrar, G; Fauth, A C; Fazzini, N; Ferguson, A P; Ferrero, A; Fick, B; Filevich, A; Filipčič, A; Fliescher, S; Fracchiolla, C E; Fraenkel, E D; Fröhlich, U; Fuchs, B; Gaior, R; Gamarra, R F; Gambetta, S; García, B; Gámez, D García; Garcia-Pinto, D; Gascon, A; Gemmeke, H; Gesterling, K; Ghia, P L; Giaccari, U; Giller, M; Glass, H; Gold, M S; Golup, G; Albarracin, F Gomez; Berisso, M Gómez; Gonçalves, P; Gonzalez, D; Gonzalez, J G; Gookin, B; Góra, D; Gorgi, A; Gouffon, P; Gozzini, S R; Grashorn, E; Grebe, S; Griffith, N; Grigat, M; Grillo, A F; Guardincerri, Y; Guarino, F; Guedes, G P; Guzman, A; Hague, J D; Hansen, P; Harari, D; Harmsma, S; Harton, J L; Haungs, A; Hebbeker, T; Heck, D; Herve, A E; Hojvat, C; Hollon, N; Holmes, V C; Homola, P; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Hrabovský, M; Huege, T; Insolia, A; Ionita, F; Italiano, A; Jarne, C; Jiraskova, S; Josebachuili, M; Kadija, K; Kampert, K H; Karhan, P; Kasper, P; Kégl, B; Keilhauer, B; Keivani, A; Kelley, J L; Kemp, E; Kieckhafer, R M; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Knapp, J; Koang, D -H; Kotera, K; Krohm, N; Krömer, O; Kruppke-Hansen, D; Kuehn, F; Kuempel, D; Kulbartz, J K; Kunka, N; La Rosa, G; Lachaud, C; Lautridou, P; Leão, M S A B; Lebrun, D; Lebrun, P; de Oliveira, M A Leigui; Lemiere, A; Letessier-Selvon, A; Lhenry-Yvon, I; Link, K; López, R; Agüera, A Lopez; Louedec, K; Bahilo, J Lozano; Lu, L; Lucero, A; Ludwig, M; Lyberis, H; Maccarone, M C; Macolino, C; Maldera, S; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Mariazzi, A G; Marin, J; Marin, V; Maris, I C; Falcon, H R Marquez; Marsella, G; Martello, D; Martin, L; Martinez, H; Bravo, O Martínez; Mathes, H J; Matthews, J; Matthews, J A J; Matthiae, G; Maurizio, D; Mazur, P O; Medina-Tanco, G; Melissas, M; Melo, D; Menichetti, E; Menshikov, A; Mertsch, P; Meurer, C; Mićanović, S; Micheletti, M I; Miller, W; Miramonti, L; Molina-Bueno, L; Mollerach, S; Monasor, M; Ragaigne, D Monnier; Montanet, F; Morales, B; Morello, C; Moreno, E; Moreno, J C; Morris, C; Mostafá, M; Moura, C A; Mueller, S; Muller, M A; Müller, G; Münchmeyer, M; Mussa, R; Navarra, G; Navarro, J L; Navas, S; Necesal, P; Nellen, L; Nelles, A; Neuser, J; Nhung, P T; Niemietz, L; Nierstenhoefer, N; Nitz, D; Nosek, D; Nožka, L; Nyklicek, M; Oehlschläger, J; Olinto, A; Oliva, P; Olmos-Gilbaja, V M; Ortiz, M; Pacheco, N; Selmi-Dei, D Pakk; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Palmieri, N; Parente, G; Parizot, E; Parra, A; Parsons, R D; Pastor, S; Paul, T; Pech, M; Pȩkala, J; Pelayo, R; Pepe, I M; Perrone, L; Pesce, R; Petermann, E; Petrera, S; Petrinca, P; Petrolini, A; Petrov, Y; Petrovic, J; Pfendner, C; Phan, N; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pieroni, P; Pimenta, M; Pirronello, V; Platino, M; Ponce, V H; Pontz, M; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Quel, E J; Querchfeld, S; Rautenberg, J; Ravel, O; Ravignani, D; Revenu, B; Ridky, J; Riggi, S; Risse, M; Ristori, P; Rivera, H; Rizi, V; Roberts, J; Robledo, C; de Carvalho, W Rodrigues; Rodriguez, G; Martino, J Rodriguez; Rojo, J Rodriguez; Rodriguez-Cabo, I; Rodríguez-Frías, M D; Ros, G; Rosado, J; Rossler, T; Roth, M; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Rühle, C; Salamida, F; Salazar, H; Salina, G; Sánchez, F; Santo, C E; Santos, E; Santos, E M; Sarazin, F; Sarkar, B; Sarkar, S; Sato, R; Scharf, N; Scherini, V; Schieler, H; Schiffer, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, F; Scholten, O; Schoorlemmer, H; Schovancova, J; Schovánek, P; Schröder, F; Schulte, S; Schuster, D; Sciutto, S J; Scuderi, M; Segreto, A; Settimo, M; Shadkam, A; Shellard, R C; Sidelnik, I; Sigl, G; Lopez, H H Silva; Śmiałkowski, A; Šmída, R; Snow, G R; Sommers, P; Sorokin, J; Spinka, H; Squartini, R; Stanic, S; Stapleton, J; Stasielak, J; Stephan, M; Strazzeri, E; Stutz, A; Suarez, F; Suomijärvi, T; Supanitsky, A D; Šuša, T; Sutherland, M S; Swain, J; Szadkowski, Z; Szuba, M; Tamashiro, A; Tapia, A; Tartare, M; Taşcău, O; Ruiz, C G Tavera; Tcaciuc, R; Tegolo, D; Thao, N T; Thomas, D; Tiffenberg, J; Timmermans, C; Tiwari, D K; Tkaczyk, W; Peixoto, C J Todero; Tomé, B; Tonachini, A; Travnicek, P; Tridapalli, D B; Tristram, G; Trovato, E; Tueros, M; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Urban, M; Galicia, J F Valdés; Valiño, I; Valore, L; Berg, A M van den; Varela, E; Cárdenas, B Vargas; Vázquez, J R; Vázquez, R A; Veberič, D; Verzi, V; Vicha, J; Videla, M; Villaseñor, L; Wahlberg, H; Wahrlich, P; Wainberg, O; Walz, D; Warner, D; Watson, A A; Weber, M; Weidenhaupt, K; Weindl, A; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Wieczorek, G; Wiencke, L; Wilczyńska, B; Wilczyński, H; Will, M; Williams, C; Winchen, T; Winnick, M G; Wommer, M; Wundheiler, B; Yamamoto, T; Yapici, T; Younk, P; Yuan, G; Yushkov, A; Zamorano, B; Zas, E; Zavrtanik, D; Zavrtanik, M; Zaw, I; Zepeda, A; Silva, M Zimbres; Ziolkowski, M

    2011-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the influence of the geomagnetic field on the energy estimation of extensive air showers with a zenith angle smaller than $60^\\circ$, detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory. The geomagnetic field induces an azimuthal modulation of the estimated energy of cosmic rays up to the ~2% level at large zenith angles. We present a method to account for this modulation of the reconstructed energy. We analyse the effect of the modulation on large scale anisotropy searches in the arrival direction distributions of cosmic rays. At a given energy, the geomagnetic effect is shown to induce a pseudo-dipolar pattern at the percent level in the declination distribution that needs to be accounted for.

  13. The effect of the geomagnetic field on cosmic ray energy estimates and large scale anisotropy searches on data from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre Auger Collaboration; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Antičić, T.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Bardenet, R.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bäuml, J.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; del Peral, L.; del Río, M.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Fajardo Tapia, I.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gaior, R.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; García Gámez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gascon, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Gesterling, K.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Gozzini, S. R.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Guzman, A.; Hague, J. D.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jarne, C.; Jiraskova, S.; Josebachuili, M.; Kadija, K.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Kasper, P.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Kotera, K.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, J. K.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lautridou, P.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, J.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Mertsch, P.; Meurer, C.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nhung, P. T.; Niemietz, L.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parra, A.; Parsons, R. D.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pękala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Phan, N.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivera, H.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Robledo, C.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Rühle, C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Silva Lopez, H. H.; Śacute; Smiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šuša, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Tamashiro, A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Taşąu, O.; Tavera Ruiz, C. G.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tegolo, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tiwari, D. K.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Winnick, M. G.; Wommer, M.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2011-11-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the influence of the geomagnetic field on the energy estimation of extensive air showers with a zenith angle smaller than 60°, detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory. The geomagnetic field induces an azimuthal modulation of the estimated energy of cosmic rays up to the ~ 2% level at large zenith angles. We present a method to account for this modulation of the reconstructed energy. We analyse the effect of the modulation on large scale anisotropy searches in the arrival direction distributions of cosmic rays. At a given energy, the geomagnetic effect is shown to induce a pseudo-dipolar pattern at the percent level in the declination distribution that needs to be accounted for.

  14. Large enhancement of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and high annealing stability by Pt insertion layer in (Co/Ni-based multilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Chen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the influence of ultrathin Pt insertion layers on the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA and annealing stability of Ta/Pt/(Co/Ni×3/Co/Pt/Ta multilayered films. When the Pt layers were inserted at the Co/Ni interfaces, the PMA of the multilayered films decreased monotonically as the thickness of the Pt insertion layer (tPt was increased. However, when the Pt layers were inserted at the Ni/Co interfaces, the PMA increased from 1.39 × 106 to 3.5 × 106 erg/cm3 as tPt increased from 0 to 10 Å. Moreover, the multilayered film containing 6-Å-thick Pt insertion layers that inserted at the Ni/Co interfaces exhibited the highest annealing stability for PMA, which was up to temperature of 480 °C. We hypothesize that the introduced Pt/Co interfaces, due to the Pt insertion layers, are responsible for the enhanced PMA and high annealing stability. This study is particularly important for perpendicularly magnetized spintronic devices that require high PMA and high annealing stability.

  15. The effect of the geomagnetic field on cosmic ray energy estimates and large scale anisotropy searches on data from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, P.; /Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M.; /IFSI, Turin; Ahn, E.J.; /Fermilab; Albuquerque, I.F.M.; /Sao Paulo U.; Allard, D.; /APC, Paris; Allekotte, I.; /Centro Atomico Bariloche; Allen, J.; /New York U.; Allison, P.; /Ohio State U.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; /Mexico U., ICN; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; /Santiago de Compostela U.; Ambrosio, M.; /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Nijmegen U., IMAPP

    2011-11-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the influence of the geomagnetic field on the energy estimation of extensive air showers with a zenith angle smaller than 60{sup o}, detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory. The geomagnetic field induces an azimuthal modulation of the estimated energy of cosmic rays up to the {approx} 2% level at large zenith angles. We present a method to account for this modulation of the reconstructed energy. We analyse the effect of the modulation on large scale anisotropy searches in the arrival direction distributions of cosmic rays. At a given energy, the geomagnetic effect is shown to induce a pseudo-dipolar pattern at the percent level in the declination distribution that needs to be accounted for. In this work, we have identified and quantified a systematic uncertainty affecting the energy determination of cosmic rays detected by the surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory. This systematic uncertainty, induced by the influence of the geomagnetic field on the shower development, has a strength which depends on both the zenith and the azimuthal angles. Consequently, we have shown that it induces distortions of the estimated cosmic ray event rate at a given energy at the percent level in both the azimuthal and the declination distributions, the latter of which mimics an almost dipolar pattern. We have also shown that the induced distortions are already at the level of the statistical uncertainties for a number of events N {approx_equal} 32 000 (we note that the full Auger surface detector array collects about 6500 events per year with energies above 3 EeV). Accounting for these effects is thus essential with regard to the correct interpretation of large scale anisotropy measurements taking explicitly profit from the declination distribution.

  16. First-principles investigation of the very large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy at Fe | MgO and Co | MgO interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, H. X.

    2011-08-01

    The perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) arising at the interface between ferromagnetic transition metals and metallic oxides was investigated via first-principles calculations. In this work very large values of PMA, up to 3 erg/cm2, at Fe|MgO interfaces are reported, in agreement with recent experiments. The origin of PMA is attributed to overlap between O-pz and transition metal dz2 orbitals hybridized with dxz(yz) orbitals with stronger spin-orbit coupling-induced splitting around the Fermi level for perpendicular magnetization orientation. Furthermore, it is shown that the PMA value weakens in the case of over- or underoxidation due to the fact that oxygen pz and transition metal dz2 orbital overlap is strongly affected by disorder, in agreement with experimental observations in magnetic tunnel junctions.

  17. Simulations of the cosmic infrared and submillimeter background for future large surveys: II. Removing the low-redshift contribution to the anisotropies using stacking

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez-Conde, N; Puget, J-L; Dole, H; 10.1051/0004-6361/200912924

    2010-01-01

    Herschel and Planck are surveying the sky at unprecedented angular scales and sensitivities over large areas. But both experiments are limited by source confusion in the submillimeter. The high confusion noise in particular restricts the study of the clustering properties of the sources that dominate the cosmic infrared background. At these wavelengths, it is more appropriate to consider the statistics of the unresolved component. In particular, high clustering will contribute in excess of Poisson noise in the power spectra of CIB anisotropies. These power spectra contain contributions from sources at all redshift. We show how the stacking technique can be used to separate the different redshift contributions to the power spectra. We use simulations of CIB representative of realistic Spitzer, Herschel, Planck, and SCUBA-2 observations. We stack the 24um sources in longer wavelengths maps to measure mean colors per redshift and flux bins. The information retrieved on the mean spectral energy distribution obtai...

  18. Surface spin-glass, large surface anisotropy, and depression of magnetocaloric effect in La0.8Ca0.2MnO3 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, S. B.; Lu, W. J.; Wu, H. Y.; Tong, P.; Sun, Y. P.

    2012-01-01

    The surface magnetic behavior of La0.8Ca0.2MnO3 nanoparticles was investigated. We observed irreversibility in high magnetic field. The surface spin-glass behavior as well as the high-field irreversibility is suppressed by increasing particle size while the freezing temperature TF does not change with particle size. The enhanced coercivity has been observed in the particles and we attributed it to the large surface anisotropy. We have disclosed a clear relationship between the particle size, the thickness of the shell, and the saturation magnetization of the particles. The large reduction of the saturation magnetization of the samples is found to be induced by the increase of nonmagnetic surface large since the thickness of the spin-disordered surface layer increases with a decrease in the particle size. Due to the reduction of the magnetization, the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) has been reduced by the decreased particle size since the nonmagnetic surface contributes little to the MCE. Based on the core-shell structure, large relative cooling powers RCP(s) of 180 J/kg and 471 J/kg were predicted for a field change of 2.0 T and 4.5 T, respectively, in the small particles with thin spin-glass layer. PMID:23319829

  19. Surface spin-glass, large surface anisotropy, and depression of magnetocaloric effect in La(0.8)Ca(0.2)MnO(3) nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, S B; Lu, W J; Wu, H Y; Tong, P; Sun, Y P

    2012-12-15

    The surface magnetic behavior of La(0.8)Ca(0.2)MnO(3) nanoparticles was investigated. We observed irreversibility in high magnetic field. The surface spin-glass behavior as well as the high-field irreversibility is suppressed by increasing particle size while the freezing temperature T(F) does not change with particle size. The enhanced coercivity has been observed in the particles and we attributed it to the large surface anisotropy. We have disclosed a clear relationship between the particle size, the thickness of the shell, and the saturation magnetization of the particles. The large reduction of the saturation magnetization of the samples is found to be induced by the increase of nonmagnetic surface large since the thickness of the spin-disordered surface layer increases with a decrease in the particle size. Due to the reduction of the magnetization, the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) has been reduced by the decreased particle size since the nonmagnetic surface contributes little to the MCE. Based on the core-shell structure, large relative cooling powers RCP(s) of 180 J/kg and 471 J/kg were predicted for a field change of 2.0 T and 4.5 T, respectively, in the small particles with thin spin-glass layer.

  20. Multiscale friction modeling for sheet metal forming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, J.; Cid Alfaro, M.V.; de Rooij, Matthias B.; Meinders, Vincent T.; Felder, Eric; Montmitonnet, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The most often used friction model for sheet metal forming simulations is the relative simple Coulomb friction model. This paper presents a more advanced friction model for large scale forming simulations based on the surface change on the micro-scale. The surface texture of a material changes when

  1. Anisotropy and non-universality in scaling laws of the large scale energy spectrum in rotating turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Sen, Amrik; Rosenberg, Duane; pouquet, Annick

    2012-01-01

    Rapidly rotating turbulent flow is characterized by the emergence of columnar structures that are representative of quasi-two dimensional behavior of the flow. It is known that when energy is injected into the fluid at an intermediate scale $L_f$, it cascades towards smaller as well as larger scales. In this paper we analyze the flow in the \\textit{inverse cascade} range at a small but fixed Rossby number, {$\\mathcal{R}o_f \\approx 0.05$}. Several {numerical simulations with} helical and non-helical forcing functions are considered in periodic boxes with unit aspect ratio. In order to resolve the inverse cascade range with {reasonably} large Reynolds number, the analysis is based on large eddy simulations which include the effect of helicity on eddy viscosity and eddy noise. Thus, we model the small scales and resolve explicitly the large scales. We show that the large-scale energy spectrum has at least two solutions: one that is consistent with Kolmogorov-Kraichnan-Batchelor-Leith (KKBL) phenomenology for the...

  2. Large Differences in the Optical Spectrum Associated with the Same Complex: The Effect of the Anisotropy of the Embedding Lattice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aramburu, José Antonio; García-Fernández, Pablo; García Lastra, Juan Maria

    2017-01-01

    of the electric field created by the rest of lattice ions over the complex. To illustrate this concept we analyze the origin of the surprisingly large differences in the d–d optical transitions of two systems containing square-planar CuF42– complexes, CaCuF4, and center II in Cu2+-doped Ba2ZnF6, even though...

  3. Large scale anisotropy studies of ultra high energy cosmic rays using data taken with the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigat, Marius

    2011-06-10

    The distribution of arrival directions of cosmic rays is remarkably uniform over the complete spectrum of energies. At large angular scales only tiny deviations from isotropy have been observed and huge statistics are required to quantify the corresponding amplitudes. The measurement of cosmic rays with energies above 10{sup 15} eV is only feasible with large, earthbound observatories: The cosmic ray primary particles initiate cascades of secondary particles in the Earth's atmosphere. Every aspect of the development of these air showers down to the measurement of the resulting particles at ground level needs to be well understood and controlled in order to precisely reconstruct the properties of the primary particle. The development of air showers is subject to systematic distortions caused by the magnetic field of the Earth. Both this and other local effects are capable of inducing false anisotropy into the distribution of arrival directions. In this thesis, the effect of the geomagnetic field on the energy measurement is modelled and quantified; consequently, a correction of the energy estimator is derived. Furthermore, a method is introduced to fit dipolar patterns to the distribution of arrival directions of cosmic rays as observed from the field of view of the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory. After correcting for all relevant local effects the method is applied to data and the parameters of a potentially underlying dipole are determined and evaluated. (orig.)

  4. A large piece of a small pie: Minimum wages and unemployment benefits in an assignment model with search frictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Gautier (Pieter); C.N. Teulings (Coen)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractMost empirical studies on the minimum wage find a spike at the minimum wage, compression of wage differentials at a large interval above the minimum wage and small employment losses. This paper offers a search model which is consistent with these facts. We consider a continuum of worker

  5. A large piece of a small pie: Minimum wages and unemployment benefits in an assignment model with search frictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Gautier (Pieter); C.N. Teulings (Coen)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractMost empirical studies on the minimum wage find a spike at the minimum wage, compression of wage differentials at a large interval above the minimum wage and small employment losses. This paper offers a search model which is consistent with these facts. We consider a continuum of worker

  6. On the recovery of ISW fluctuations using large-scale structure tracers and CMB temperature and polarization anisotropies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonavera, L.; Barreiro, R. B.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Vielva, P.

    2016-06-01

    In this work we present a method to extract the signal induced by the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). It makes use of the Linear Covariance-Based filter introduced by Barreiro et al., and combines CMB data with any number of large-scale structure (LSS) surveys and lensing information. It also exploits CMB polarization to reduce cosmic variance. The performance of the method has been thoroughly tested with simulations taking into account the impact of non-ideal conditions such as incomplete sky coverage or the presence of noise. In particular, three galaxy surveys are simulated, whose redshift distributions peak at low (z ≃ 0.3), intermediate (z ≃ 0.6) and high redshift (z ≃ 0.9). The contribution of each of the considered data sets as well as the effect of a mask and noise in the reconstructed ISW map is studied in detail. When combining all the considered data sets (CMB temperature and polarization, the three galaxy surveys and the lensing map), the proposed filter successfully reconstructs a map of the weak ISW signal, finding a perfect correlation with the input signal for the ideal case and around 80 per cent, on average, in the presence of noise and incomplete sky coverage. We find that including CMB polarization improves the correlation between input and reconstruction although only at a small level. Nonetheless, given the weakness of the ISW signal, even modest improvements can be of importance. In particular, in realistic situations, in which less information is available from the LSS tracers, the effect of including polarization is larger. For instance, for the case in which the ISW signal is recovered from CMB plus only one survey, and taking into account the presence of noise and incomplete sky coverage, the improvement in the correlation coefficient can be as large as 10 per cent.

  7. Fault Frictional Stability in a Nuclear Waste Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana, Felipe; Violay, Marie; Scuderi, Marco; Collettini, Cristiano

    2016-04-01

    Exploitation of underground resources induces hydro-mechanical and chemical perturbations in the rock mass. In response to such disturbances, seismic events might occur, affecting the safety of the whole engineering system. The Mont Terri Rock Laboratory is an underground infrastructure devoted to the study of geological disposal of nuclear waste in Switzerland. At the site, it is intersected by large fault zones of about 0.8 - 3 m in thickness and the host rock formation is a shale rock named Opalinus Clay (OPA). The mineralogy of OPA includes a high content of phyllosilicates (50%), quartz (25%), calcite (15%), and smaller proportions of siderite and pyrite. OPA is a stiff, low permeable rock (2×10-18 m2), and its mechanical behaviour is strongly affected by the anisotropy induced by bedding planes. The evaluation of fault stability and associated fault slip behaviour (i.e. seismic vs. aseismic) is a major issue in order to ensure the long-term safety and operation of the repository. Consequently, experiments devoted to understand the frictional behaviour of OPA have been performed in the biaxial apparatus "BRAVA", recently developed at INGV. Simulated fault gouge obtained from intact OPA samples, were deformed at different normal stresses (from 4 to 30 MPa), under dry and fluid-saturated conditions. To estimate the frictional stability, the velocity-dependence of friction was evaluated during velocity steps tests (1-300 μm/s). Slide-hold-slide tests were performed (1-3000 s) to measure the amount of frictional healing. The collected data were subsequently modelled with the Ruina's slip dependent formulation of the rate and state friction constitutive equations. To understand the deformation mechanism, the microstructures of the sheared gouge were analysed. At 7 MPa normal stress and under dry conditions, the friction coefficient decreased from a peak value of μpeak,dry = 0.57 to μss,dry = 0.50. Under fluid-saturated conditions and same normal stress, the

  8. On Surface Structure and Friction Regulation in Reptilian Limbless Locomotion

    CERN Document Server

    Abdel-Aal, Hisham A

    2012-01-01

    One way of controlling friction and associated energy losses is to engineer a deterministic structural pattern on the surface of the rubbing parts (i.e., texture engineering). Custom texturing enhances the quality of lubrication, reduces friction, and allows the use of lubricants of lower viscosity. To date, a standardized procedure to generate deterministic texture constructs is virtually non-existent. Many engineers, therefore, study natural species to explore surface construction and to probe the role surface topography assumes in friction control. Snakes offer rich examples of surfaces where topological features allow the optimization and control of frictional behavior. In this paper, we investigate the frictional behavior of a constrictor type reptile, Python regius. The study employed a specially designed tribo-acoustic probe capable of measuring the coefficient of friction and detecting the acoustical behavior of the skin in vivo. The results confirm the anisotropy of the frictional response of snakesk...

  9. On the recovery of ISW fluctuations using large-scale structure tracers and CMB temperature and polarization anisotropies

    CERN Document Server

    Bonavera, L; Marcos-Caballero, A; Vielva, P

    2016-01-01

    In this work we present a method to extract the signal induced by the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). It makes use of the Linear Covariance-Based filter introduced by Barreiro et al., and combines CMB data with any number of large-scale structure (LSS) surveys and lensing information. It also exploits CMB polarization to reduce cosmic variance. The performance of the method has been thoroughly tested with simulations taking into account the impact of non-ideal conditions such as incomplete sky coverage or the presence of noise. In particular, three galaxy surveys are simulated, whose redshift distributions peak at low ($z \\simeq 0.3$), intermediate ($z \\simeq 0.6$) and high redshift ($z \\simeq 0.9$). The contribution of each of the considered data sets as well as the effect of a mask and noise in the reconstructed ISW map is studied in detail. When combining all the considered data sets (CMB temperature and polarization, the three galaxy surveys and the lensing ma...

  10. Effect of small in-plane anisotropy in the large-D phase systems based on Ni{sup 2+} (S=1) ions in Heisenberg antiferromagnetic chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudowicz, Czesław, E-mail: crudowicz@zut.edu.pl

    2014-03-01

    Heisenberg antiferromagnetic chains based on Ni{sup 2+} ions with integer spin S=1 exhibit intriguing behavior, e.g. the Haldane gap phase and the large-D phase. The predicted transitions between the two phases and the Neel phase has generated search for real candidate systems. Crucial to this search is the interplay between the ‘in-plane anisotropy’, i.e. the rhombic zero-field splitting (ZFS) E-term, and the ‘planar anisotropy’, i.e. the axial ZFS D-term. This paper clarifies intricate properties of orthorhombic ZFS Hamiltonians (H{sub ZFS}) and inconsistencies revealed by critical survey of pertinent studies. Reporting the non-standard (D, E) sets with λ=E/D out of the standard range (0, 1/3) alongside the standard sets with λ∝(0, 1/3) indicates that these properties are not recognized. We show that direct comparisons of the non-standard and standard sets are meaningless and lead to incorrect conclusions on the strength of the ‘in-plane anisotropy’ (E) as compared with the ‘planar anisotropy’ (D). To remedy such problems, the ZFSP sets reported for the large-D phase candidate systems are reanalyzed using orthorhombic standardization. The six physically equivalent ZFSP sets are determined in the conventional (D, E) and Stevens (b{sub 2}{sup 0}, b{sub 2}{sup 2}) notation. These considerations help understanding intricacies inherent in orthorhombic H{sub ZFS} and provide consistent data for future modeling of ZFS parameters in the large-D phase and Haldane gap systems.

  11. Extremely large electronic anisotropy caused by electronic phase separation in Ca3(Ru0.97Ti0.03)2O7 single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jing; Wu, Xiaoshan; Mao, Zhiqiang

    2015-03-01

    Bilayered ruthenate Ca3 Ru2O7 exhibits rich electronic and magnetic properties. It orders at 56K, with FM bilayers antiferromagnetically coupled along c-axis (AFM-a). The AFM transition is closely followed by a first-order metal-insulator (MI) transition at 48K where spin directions switch to the b-axis (AFM-b). While this MI transition is accompanied by the opening of anisotropic charge gap; small Fermi pockets survive from the MI transition, thus resulting in quasi-2D metallic transport behavior for Tinsulating state with a nearest-neighbor AFM order via Ti doping. Ca3(Ru0 . 97 Ti0 . 03) 2O7 is close to the critical composition for the AFM-b-to-G-AFM phase transition. Our recent studies show the sample with this composition is characterized by an electronic phase separation between the insulating G-AFM phase (major) and the localized AFM-b phase (minor). The minor AFM-b phase forms a conducting path through electronic percolation within the ab-plane, but not along the c-axis, thus resulting in extremely large electronic anisotropy with ρab /ρc ~109 , which may be the largest among bulk materials.

  12. Phase stability and large in-plane resistivity anisotropy in the 112-type iron-based superconductor Ca1 -xLaxFeAs2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Chang-Jong; Birol, Turan; Kotliar, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    The recently discovered high-Tc superconductor Ca1 -xLaxFeAs2 is a unique compound not only because of its low-symmetry crystal structure but also because of its electronic structure, which hosts Dirac-like metallic bands resulting from (spacer) zigzag As chains. We present a comprehensive first-principles theoretical study of the electronic and crystal structures of Ca1 -xLaxFeAs2 . After discussing the connection between the crystal structure of the 112 family, which Ca1 -xLaxFeAs2 is a member of, with the other known structures of Fe pnictide superconductors, we check the thermodynamic phase stability of CaFeAs2, and similar hyphothetical compounds SrFeAs2 and BaFeAs2 which, we find, are slightly higher in energy. We calculate the optical conductivity of Ca1 -xLaxFeAs2 using the DFT+DMFT method and predict a large in-plane resistivity anisotropy in the normal phase, which does not originate from electronic nematicity, but is enhanced by the electronic correlations. In particular, we predict a 0.34 eV peak in the y y component of the optical conductivity of the 30% La-doped compound, which corresponds to coherent interband transitions within a fast-dispersing band arising from the zigzag As chains, which are unique to this compound. We also study the Landau free energy for Ca1 -xLaxFeAs2 including the order parameter relevant for the nematic transition and find that the free energy does not have any extra terms that could induce ferro-orbital order. This explains why the presence of As chains does not broaden the nematic transition in Ca1 -xLaxFeAs2 .

  13. Earthquake sequence simulation of a multi-scale asperity model following rate and state friction - occurrence of large earthquakes by cascade up vs. own nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, H.; Nakatani, M.; Hori, T.

    2012-12-01

    Seismological observations [e.g., Abercrombie and Rice, 2005] suggest that a larger earthquake has larger fracture energy Gc. One way to realize such scaling is to assume a hierarchical patchy distribution of Gc on a fault; there are patches of different sizes with different Gc so that a larger patch has larger Gc. Ide and Aochi [2005] conducted dynamic rupture simulations with such a distribution of weakening distance Dc in a linear slip-weakening law, initiating ruptures on the smallest patch which sometimes grow up by cascading into a larger scale. They suggested that the initial phase of a large earthquake is indistinguishable from that of a small earthquake. In the present study we simulate a similar multi-scale asperity model but following rate and state friction (RSF), where stress and strength distribution resulting from the history of coseismic and aseismic slip influences the way of rupture initiation, growth, and arrest of a forthcoming earthquake. Multi-scale asperities were represented by a distribution of the state evolution distance dc in the aging version of RSF evolution law. Numerical scheme adopted [Noda and Lapsuta, 2010] is fully dynamic and 3D. We have modeled a circular rate-weakening patch, Patch L (radius R), which has a smaller patch, Patch S (radius r), in it by the rim. The ratio of the radii α = R/r is the amount of the gap between two scales. Patch L and Patch S respectively have nucleation sizes Rc and rc. The same brittleness β = R/Rc = r/rc is assumed for simplicity. We shall call an earthquake which ruptures only Patch S as an S-event, and one which ruptures Patch L, an L-event. We have conducted a series of simulations with α from 2 to 5 while keeping β = 3 until the end of the 20th L-event. If the patch S was relatively large (α = 2 and 2.5), only L-events occurred and they always dynamically cascaded up from a patch S rupture following small quasi-static nucleation there. If the patch S was small enough (α = 5), in

  14. Acoustics of friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akay, Adnan

    2002-04-01

    This article presents an overview of the acoustics of friction by covering friction sounds, friction-induced vibrations and waves in solids, and descriptions of other frictional phenomena related to acoustics. Friction, resulting from the sliding contact of solids, often gives rise to diverse forms of waves and oscillations within solids which frequently lead to radiation of sound to the surrounding media. Among the many everyday examples of friction sounds, violin music and brake noise in automobiles represent the two extremes in terms of the sounds they produce and the mechanisms by which they are generated. Of the multiple examples of friction sounds in nature, insect sounds are prominent. Friction also provides a means by which energy dissipation takes place at the interface of solids. Friction damping that develops between surfaces, such as joints and connections, in some cases requires only microscopic motion to dissipate energy. Modeling of friction-induced vibrations and friction damping in mechanical systems requires an accurate description of friction for which only approximations exist. While many of the components that contribute to friction can be modeled, computational requirements become prohibitive for their contemporaneous calculation. Furthermore, quantification of friction at the atomic scale still remains elusive. At the atomic scale, friction becomes a mechanism that converts the kinetic energy associated with the relative motion of surfaces to thermal energy. However, the description of the conversion to thermal energy represented by a disordered state of oscillations of atoms in a solid is still not well understood. At the macroscopic level, friction interacts with the vibrations and waves that it causes. Such interaction sets up a feedback between the friction force and waves at the surfaces, thereby making friction and surface motion interdependent. Such interdependence forms the basis for friction-induced motion as in the case of

  15. Mechanical anisotropy and the common occurrence of misoriented faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bistacchi, A.; Massironi, M.; Menegon, L.; Bolognesi, F.; Donghi, V.

    2011-12-01

    Brittle fault zones can be considered weak either in an absolute or relative sense. In the second case, weakness is detected since the fault is active under unfavourable tensional conditions, which means that it is unfavourably oriented with respect to the regional stress field. Three classes of mechanisms have been proposed to explain the "anomalous" (but not so uncommon) weakness of faults, which may be related to the presence of weak minerals, high pore fluid pressure, and stress rotation. However, no one of these mechanisms explains why some faults tend to nucleate (particularly in certain tectonic environments) with an unfavourable orientation. In this contribution we discuss how the mechanical anisotropy (or anisotropic weakness) of foliated phyllosilicate-rich rocks provides both a weakening mechanism, and a mechanism that is likely to guide the nucleation of large scale brittle faults in a misoriented attitude. Experiments and microphysical models indicate that mechanical anisotropy exerts a substantial influence on shear failure and subsequent frictional sliding. Intermediate-grade metamorphic rocks composed of > 30% phyllosilicates show an anisotropic internal friction coefficient which varies from ca. 0.6, at high angle to foliation, to ca. 0.3 for shear initiation along an inherited foliation. This may result in the nucleation of misoriented faults/fractures (fractures or faults oriented unfavourably with respect to classic Mohr-Coulomb fracture criterion) and inhibit the development of classical "well-oriented" Andersonian conjugate sets. To test the relevance of this mechanism at the regional scale, we have developed a Slip Tendency analysis, which has been modified to account for anisotropy in friction coefficients, thus named Anisotropic Slip Tendency analysis. The analysis has been applied to different large-scale, mature fault zones in the Alps, showing different kinematics and relationships with respect to the regional-scale stress field, but all

  16. Elastic anisotropy of crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M. Kube

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An anisotropy index seeks to quantify how directionally dependent the properties of a system are. In this article, the focus is on quantifying the elastic anisotropy of crystalline materials. Previous elastic anisotropy indices are reviewed and their shortcomings discussed. A new scalar log-Euclidean anisotropy measure AL is proposed, which overcomes these deficiencies. It is based on a distance measure in a log-Euclidean space applied to fourth-rank elastic tensors. AL is an absolute measure of anisotropy where the limiting case of perfect isotropy yields zero. It is a universal measure of anisotropy applicable to all crystalline materials. Specific examples of strong anisotropy are highlighted. A supplementary material provides an anisotropy table giving the values of AL for 2,176 crystallite compounds.

  17. Anisotropy in the deep Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowicz, Barbara; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

    2017-08-01

    Seismic anisotropy has been found in many regions of the Earth's interior. Its presence in the Earth's crust has been known since the 19th century, and is due in part to the alignment of anisotropic crystals in rocks, and in part to patterns in the distribution of fractures and pores. In the upper mantle, seismic anisotropy was discovered 50 years ago, and can be attributed for the most part, to the alignment of intrinsically anisotropic olivine crystals during large scale deformation associated with convection. There is some indication for anisotropy in the transition zone, particularly in the vicinity of subducted slabs. Here we focus on the deep Earth - the lower mantle and core, where anisotropy is not yet mapped in detail, nor is there consensus on its origin. Most of the lower mantle appears largely isotropic, except in the last 200-300 km, in the D″ region, where evidence for seismic anisotropy has been accumulating since the late 1980s, mostly from shear wave splitting measurements. Recently, a picture has been emerging, where strong anisotropy is associated with high shear velocities at the edges of the large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) in the central Pacific and under Africa. These observations are consistent with being due to the presence of highly anisotropic MgSiO3 post-perovskite crystals, aligned during the deformation of slabs impinging on the core-mantle boundary, and upwelling flow within the LLSVPs. We also discuss mineral physics aspects such as ultrahigh pressure deformation experiments, first principles calculations to obtain information about elastic properties, and derivation of dislocation activity based on bonding characteristics. Polycrystal plasticity simulations can predict anisotropy but models are still highly idealized and neglect the complex microstructure of polyphase aggregates with strong and weak components. A promising direction for future progress in understanding the origin of seismic anisotropy in the deep mantle

  18. Novel Folding Large-Scale Optical Switch Matrix with Total Internal Reflection Mirrors on Silicon-on-Insulator by Anisotropy Chemical Etching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jing-Wei; YU Jin-Zhong; CHEN Shao-Wu

    2005-01-01

    A compact optical switch matrix was designed, in which light circuits were folded by total internal reflective (TIR) mirrors. Two key elements, 2 × 2 switch and TIR mirror, have been fabricated on silicon-on-insulator wafer by anisotropy chemical etching. The 2 × 2 switch showed very low power consumption of 140mW and avery high speed of 8 ± 1 μs. An improved design for the TIR mirror was developed, and the fabricated mirror with smooth and vertical reflective facet showed low excess loss of 0.7 ± 0.3 dB at 1.55μm.

  19. Large enhanced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in CoFeB/MgO system with the typical Ta buffer replaced by an Hf layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Liu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available By systematically comparing the magnetic properties of the Ta/CoFeB/Ta and MgO/CoFeB/MgO structures with and without a submonolayer of MgO, Ta, V, Nb, Hf and W inserted in the middle of the CoFeB layer, we have proved that the observed perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA in Ta/CoFeB/MgO sandwiches is solely originated from the CoFeB/MgO interface with the Ta buffer acting to enhance the CoFeB/MgO interface anisotropy significantly. Moreover, replacing Ta with Hf causes the CoFeB/MgO interfacial PMA further enhanced by 35%, and the CoFeB layer with perpendicular magnetization has a much larger critical thickness accordingly, leaving a wider thickness margin for the CoFeB/MgO-based perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction optimization. Also the sputter deposited thin Hf films are amorphous with low surface roughness. These results will ensure the Hf/CoFeB/MgO more promising material system for PMA device development.

  20. On the frictional (in) stability of clay-bearing faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violay, M.; Orellana, F.; Scuderi, M. M.; Collettini, C.

    2016-12-01

    Opalinus clay (OPA) is shale rock studied under the context of deep geological disposal by The Mont Terri Laboratory research program in Switzerland. Despite its favorable hydro-mechanical properties, the presence of a large tectonic fault system intersecting the rock formation arises questions over the long-term safety performance of a nuclear waste repository, in terms of possible leakages and the possibility of earthquakes triggered by fault instability. To study the frictional stability of OPA, we have performed velocity steps (1-300 μm/s) and slide-hold-slide tests (1-10000 s) on simulated gouge and intact samples - sheared parallel and perpendicular to foliation - at different normal stresses (4 - 30 MPa). To understand the deformation mechanisms, we have analyzed the microstructures of the sheared samples trough optical and SE microscopy. Results reported peak and steady state friction values ranging from 0.21 to 0.52 and from 0.14 to 0.39 respectively. Consistently, samples with well-developed layering showed lower friction values than gouge samples even though they have the same mineralogical composition. At all normal stresses, velocity dependence tests on gouge showed a velocity strengthening regime, whereas, intact samples developed both velocity-strengthening and velocity-weakening regimes. Finally, we have recorded near zero healing values for both intact and powdered samples at different normal stress. However, a complex evolution from negative to positive frictional healing rate, with an inflexion holding time of 300 s, has been observed. In conclusion, our data suggests that both the velocity strengthening regime and the near zero healing for the simulated gouge, are consistent with aseismic creep. We have also reported the possibility of unstable sliding outside the fault core accompanied by low capacity of contact regeneration, and low capacity to sustain future stress drops compared to evidence showed by experiments on simulated gouge. Moreover

  1. Optimum thickness of soft magnetic phase in FePt/FeCo permanent magnet superlattices with high energy product and large magnetic anisotropy energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kumar Jain

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ab initio calculations on hard/soft (FePtm/(FeCon, (m = 4, 6, 8 and n = 2-2m magnetic superlattices show that the B2 type FeCo layers become anisotropic with varying interlayer spacing and enhanced magnetic moments. The average magnetic moment in superlattices is higher than in bulk FePt, resulting in high maximum energy product for (FePt4/(FeCo8 which is nearly double the calculated value for bulk FePt. The calculation of the magnetic anisotropy energy shows that the optimal thickness of the soft magnetic phase for good permanent magnet behaviour of the superlattice is less than ∼2 nm.

  2. Tetragonal D022 Mn3+xGe Epitaxial Films Grown on MgO(100) with a Large Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, Shigemi; Sakuma, Akimasa; Sugihara, Atsushi; Kubota, Takahide; Kondo, Yukio; Tsuchiura, Hiroki; Miyazaki, Terunobu

    2013-12-01

    First-principles calculation of D022 Mn3Ge shows a fully spin-polarized Δ1 band at the Fermi level, low saturation magnetization MS=180 emu/cm3, high uniaxial magnetic anisotropy Ku=23 Merg/cm3, and low Gilbert damping α=9×10-4. We also experimentally investigate D022 Mn3+xGe epitaxial films grown on MgO(100) substrates with different compositions x. The films exhibit a coercivity of about 20 kOe, MS of about 130 emu/cm3, and Ku of about 10 Merg/cm3 at x=0.55 (78 at.% Mn). These indicate that D022 Mn3Ge is a good candidate for spin-transfer-torque random access memory.

  3. Torsional friction damper optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shaochun; Williams, Keith A.

    2006-06-01

    A new approach for the analysis of friction dampers is presented in this work. The exact form of the steady-state solution for a friction damper implemented on a primary system is developed and numerical solutions are used to determine the optimum friction in a friction damper applied to a specific primary system. When compared to classical results presented by earlier authors, the new approach provides a more optimal solution. In addition, viscous damping in the primary system may be included with the new analysis approach. The ability to optimize a friction damper when viscous damping is included in the primary system is a significant improvement over earlier methods and shows potential for serving as a guide to realizing a more accurate estimate of the optimal damping for friction dampers.

  4. Extraordinarily large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in epitaxially strained cobalt-ferrite Co{sub x}Fe{sub 3−x}O{sub 4}(001) (x = 0.75, 1.0) thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niizeki, Tomohiko; Utsumi, Yuji; Aoyama, Ryohei; Yanagihara, Hideto; Inoue, Jun-ichiro; Kita, Eiji [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Yamasaki, Yuichi; Nakao, Hironori [Photon Factory and Condensed Matter Research Center, Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Koike, Kazuyuki [Division of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Kita 10, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo (Japan)

    2013-10-14

    Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) of cobalt-ferrite Co{sub x}Fe{sub 3-x}O{sub 4} (x = 0.75 and 1.0) epitaxial thin films grown on MgO (001) by a reactive magnetron sputtering technique was investigated. The saturation magnetization was found to be 430 emu/cm{sup 3} for x = 0.75, which is comparable to that of bulk CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (425 emu/cm{sup 3}). Torque measurements afforded PMA constants of K{sub u}{sup eff}=9.0 Merg/cm{sup 3} (K{sub u}=10.0 Merg/cm{sup 3}) and K{sub u}{sup eff}=9.7 Merg/cm{sup 3} for x = 0.75 and 1.0, respectively. The value of K{sub u}{sup eff} extrapolated using Miyajima's plot was as high as 14.7 Merg/cm{sup 3} for x = 1.0. The in-plane four-fold magnetic anisotropy was evaluated to be 1.6 Merg/cm{sup 3} for x = 0.75. X-ray diffraction measurement revealed our films to be pseudomorphically strained on MgO (001) with a Poisson ratio of 0.4, leading to a considerable in-plane tensile strain by which the extraordinarily large PMA could be accounted for.

  5. On the superradiance-tidal friction correspondence

    CERN Document Server

    Glampedakis, K; Kennefick, D

    2013-01-01

    Since the work of Hartle in the 1970s, and the subsequent development of the the Membrane Paradigm approach to black hole physics it has been widely accepted that superradiant scattering of gravitational waves bears strong similarities with the phenomenon of ``tidal friction'' (well-known from Newtonian gravity) operating in binary systems of viscous material bodies. In this paper we revisit the superradiance-tidal friction analogy within the context of ultracompact relativistic bodies. We advocate that as long as these bodies have non-zero viscosity they should undergo tidal friction that can be construed as a kind of superradiant scattering from the point of view of the dynamics of an orbiting test-body. In addition we consider the presence of anisotropic matter, which is required for at least some ultracompact bodies, if they are to sustain a radius very close to the gravitational radius. We find that the tidal friction/superradiance output is enhanced with increasing anisotropy and that strongly anisotrop...

  6. Large negative thermal expansion of the Co subnetwork measured by EXAFS in highly disordered Nd₁-xCox thin films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, J; Cid, R; Hierro, A; M Álvarez-Prado, L; Quirós, C; Alameda, J M

    2013-10-23

    We have measured a negative thermal expansion (NTE) of the Co subnetwork in amorphous Nd1-xCox (0.78 < x < 0.84) thin films of the order of 1% in volume using linearly polarized EXAFS spectroscopy at RT and 10 K. The expansion, which is anisotropic, is uncorrelated with the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) observed in all the films, but correlated with the method used to deposit them. The atomic environments of the Nd atoms resulted in such a strong disorder that Nd-Nd and Nd-Co environments were invisible to EXAFS, and only Co-Co atomic environments were detected. The information on the Nd subnetwork was obtained through its magnetic moment measured by XMCD. These measurements demonstrate an increasing interaction of neodymium atoms with their particular local crystal field as the temperature decreased, suggesting possible structural modifications at their sites. Since the magnetic moment of the cobalt subnetwork remains essentially constant with the temperature, it is proposed that its detected NTE may be caused by the mechanical response of the amorphous network to structural transformations at the Nd sites. These results support that the PMA in RE-TM alloys is localized at the RE sites. The complete absence of EXAFS oscillations in the Nd L3 EXAFS spectra is remarkable: it means that the coherence length of the photoemitted electrons in disordered matter can be strongly reduced from that expected by atomic calculations to the point of being less than first neighbor distances, which is contrary to the common belief that first neighbors are always visible by EXAFS.

  7. Anisotropy and Corotation of Galactic Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Amenomori, M; Bi, X J; Chen, D; Cui, S W; Danzengluobu; Ding, L K; Ding, X H; Feng Cun Feng; Zhaoyang Feng; Feng, Z Y; Gao, X Y; Geng, Q X; Guo, H W; He, H H; He, M; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Haibing, H; Hu, H B; Huang, J; Huang, Q; Jia, H Y; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kato, C; Kawata, K; Labaciren; Le, G M; Li, A F; Li, J Y; Lou, Y Q; Lü, H; Lu, S L; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Mu, J; Munakata, K; Nagai, A; Nanjo, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Onuma, H; Ouchi, T; Ozawa, S; Ren, J R; Saitô, T; Saito, T Y; Sakata, M; Sako, T K; Sasaki, T; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Takita, M; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Torii, S; Tsuchiya, H; Udo, S; Wang, B; Wang, H; Wang, X; Wang, Y G; Wu, H R; Xue Liang; Yamamoto, Y; Yan, C T; Yang, X C; Yasue, S; Ye, Z H; Yu, G C; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhang, H M; Zhang, J L; Zhang, N J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhaxisangzhu; Zhou, X X

    2006-01-01

    The intensity of Galactic cosmic rays is nearly isotropic because of the influence of magnetic fields in the Milky Way. Here, we present two-dimensional high-precision anisotropy measurement for energies from a few to several hundred teraelectronvolts (TeV), using the large data sample of the Tibet Air Shower Arrays. Besides revealing finer details of the known anisotropies, a new component of Galactic cosmic ray anisotropy in sidereal time is uncovered around the Cygnus region direction. For cosmic-ray energies up to a few hundred TeV, all components of anisotropies fade away, showing a corotation of Galactic cosmic rays with the local Galactic magnetic environment. These results have broad implications for a comprehensive understanding of cosmic rays, supernovae, magnetic fields, and heliospheric and Galactic dynamic environments.

  8. Friction in orthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashant, P. S.; Nandan, Hemant; Gopalakrishnan, Meera

    2015-01-01

    Conventional wisdom suggests that resistance to sliding (RS) generated at the wire-bracket interface has a bearing on the force transmitted to the teeth. The relative importance of static and kinetic friction and also the effect of friction on anchorage has been a topic of debate. Lot of research work has been done to evaluate the various factors that affect friction and thus purportedly retards the rate of tooth movement. However, relevancy of these studies is questionable as the methodology used hardly simulates the oral conditions. Lately studies have concluded that more emphasis should be laid on binding and notching of archwires as these are considered to be the primary factors involved in retarding the tooth movement. This article reviews the various components involved in RS and the factors affecting friction. Further, research work should be carried out to provide cost effective alternatives aimed at reducing friction. PMID:26538873

  9. Frictional stability-permeability relationships for fractures in shales: Friction-Permeability Relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Yi [Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, EMS Energy Institute, and G3 Center, Pennsylvania State University, University Park Pennsylvania USA; Elsworth, Derek [Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, EMS Energy Institute, and G3 Center, Pennsylvania State University, University Park Pennsylvania USA; Department of Geosciences, EMS Energy Institute, and G3 Center, Pennsylvania State University, University Park Pennsylvania USA; Wang, Chaoyi [Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, EMS Energy Institute, and G3 Center, Pennsylvania State University, University Park Pennsylvania USA; Ishibashi, Takuya [Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, EMS Energy Institute, and G3 Center, Pennsylvania State University, University Park Pennsylvania USA; Fukushima Renewable Energy Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Koriyama Japan; Fitts, Jeffrey P. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton New Jersey USA

    2017-01-01

    There is wide concern that fluid injection in the subsurface, such as for the stimulation of shale reservoirs or for geological CO2 sequestration (GCS), has the potential to induce seismicity that may change reservoir permeability due to fault slip. However, the impact of induced seismicity on fracture permeability evolution remains unclear due to the spectrum of modes of fault reactivation (e.g., stable versus unstable). As seismicity is controlled by the frictional response of fractures, we explore friction-stability-permeability relationships through the concurrent measurement of frictional and hydraulic properties of artificial fractures in Green River shale (GRS) and Opalinus shale (OPS). We observe that carbonate-rich GRS shows higher frictional strength but weak neutral frictional stability. The GRS fracture permeability declines during shearing while an increased sliding velocity reduces the rate of permeability decline. By comparison, the phyllosilicate-rich OPS has lower friction and strong stability while the fracture permeability is reduced due to the swelling behavior that dominates over the shearing induced permeability reduction. Hence, we conclude that the friction-stability-permeability relationship of a fracture is largely controlled by mineral composition and that shale mineral compositions with strong frictional stability may be particularly subject to permanent permeability reduction during fluid infiltration.

  10. Measurement of the thermopower anisotropy in iron arsenide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, T., E-mail: fujii@crc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Cryogenic Research Center, the University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Shirachi, T. [Department of Applied Physics, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Asamitsu, A. [Cryogenic Research Center, the University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Department of Applied Physics, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Ashikaga Institute of Technology, 268-1 Omae, Ashikaga, Tochigi 326-8558 (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • In this study, in order to investigate the origin of the in-plane anisotropy, the in-plane anisotropy of the thermopower was measured for the detwined single crystals of BFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. And, we found no anisotropy in the thermopower above T{sub AFO}, although there is a large anisotropy in the resistivity. This result gives evidence that the anisotropy in the resistivity arise from the anisotropy of the scattering time, and the energy dependence of the scattering time can be considered negligible. In the case of iron pnictides, the proposed orbital ordering more likely results in an anisotropy of electronic structure below T{sub AFO}, whereas the spin-nematic ordering leads to an anisotropy of electron scattering above T{sub AFO}. Therefore, our results suggest that nematicity above T{sub AFO} results from anisotropic magnetic scattering. - Abstract: We investigated the in-plane anisotropy of the thermopower and electrical resistivity on detwinned single crystals of BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. The in-plane anisotropy of the resistivity was clearly observed far above the magnetostructural transition temperature T{sub AFO}. While, the thermopower showed the in-plane anisotropy only below T{sub AFO}. These results are associated with the different origin of the anisotropy above and below T{sub AFO}. Since the thermopower does not depend on the scattering time, the anisotropy of the resistivity above T{sub AFO} is considered to be due to the anisotropic scattering. On the other hand, the anisotropy in the thermopower below T{sub AFO} is ascribed to the reconstructed Fermi surface.

  11. Iliotibial band friction syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavine, Ronald

    2010-07-20

    Published articles on iliotibial band friction syndrome have been reviewed. These articles cover the epidemiology, etiology, anatomy, pathology, prevention, and treatment of the condition. This article describes (1) the various etiological models that have been proposed to explain iliotibial band friction syndrome; (2) some of the imaging methods, research studies, and clinical experiences that support or call into question these various models; (3) commonly proposed treatment methods for iliotibial band friction syndrome; and (4) the rationale behind these methods and the clinical outcome studies that support their efficacy.

  12. Polymer friction Molecular Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, Vladimir N.; Persson, Bo N. J.

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate, and b) polymer sliding on polymer. In the first setup the shear stresses are relatively...... independent of molecular length. For polymer sliding on polymer the friction is significantly larger, and dependent on the molecular chain length. In both cases, the shear stresses are proportional to the squeezing pressure and finite at zero load, indicating an adhesional contribution to the friction force....

  13. Measurement of fission anisotropy for 16O+181Ta

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bivash R Behera; Subinit Roy; P Basu; M K Sharan; S Jena; M Satpathy; M L Chatterjee; S K Datta

    2001-07-01

    Anisotropies in fission fragment angular distributions measured for the system 16O+181Ta over a range of bombarding energies from 83 MeV to 120 MeV have been analysed. It is shown that statistical transition state model (TSM) with pre-scission neutron correction described adequately the measured anisotropy data. Strong friction parameter is found to be necessary to estimate the pre-saddle to pre-scission neutron ratio.

  14. Science 101: What Causes Friction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Bill

    2014-01-01

    Defining friction and asking what causes it might seem like a trivial question. Friction seems simple enough to understand. Friction is a force between surfaces that pushes against things that are moving or tending to move, and the rougher the surfaces, the greater the friction. Bill Robertson answers this by saying, "Well, not exactly".…

  15. Friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolle; Charles R. , Clark; Denis E. , Barnes; Timothy A.

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  16. Mantle wedge dynamics from seismic anisotropy (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, M. D.; Wirth, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    The mantle wedge above subducting slabs plays a critical role in many of the physical processes associated with subduction, including water transport into the upper mantle and the generation and transport of melts. Our understanding of mantle wedge dynamics is incomplete; in particular, the mantle flow field above subducting slabs remains poorly understood. Because seismic anisotropy is a consequence of deformation, observations of anisotropy (such as shear wave splitting and P-to-SH converted waves) can constrain the geometry of the wedge flow field. Additionally, because the presence of water (either in nominally anhydrous minerals or as hydrous phases) can have a large effect on anisotropic structure, a detailed understanding of mantle wedge anisotropy can help to constrain processes related to water cycling in subduction systems. We present a global, synoptic view of anisotropy observations in subduction zone mantle wedges, compiled from a large number of individual studies, with the goal of understanding the first-order controls on wedge anisotropy and flow patterns. This compilation allows us to explicitly test the predictions made by many different conceptual models for wedge anisotropy, as well as to explore the relationships between observed anisotropy parameters and other parameters that describe subduction. We find that no simple model can explain all of the trends observed in the global data set. Mantle wedge flow is likely controlled by a combination of downdip motion of the slab, trench migration, ambient mantle flow, small-scale convection, proximity to slab edges, and slab morphology, with the relative contributions of these in any given subduction system controlled by the subduction kinematics and mantle rheology. There is also a likely contribution from B-type olivine and/or serpentinite fabric in many subduction zones, governed by the local thermal structure and volatile distribution.

  17. Synthesis, detailed characterization, and theoretical understanding of mononuclear chromium(III)-containing polyoxotungstates [Cr(III)(HX(V)W₇O₂₈)₂]¹³⁻ (X = P, As) with exceptionally large magnetic anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenjing; Christian, Jonathan H; Al-Oweini, Rami; Bassil, Bassem S; van Tol, Johan; Atanasov, Mihail; Neese, Frank; Dalal, Naresh S; Kortz, Ulrich

    2014-09-02

    Two monochromium(III)-containing heteropolytungstates, [Cr(III)(HP(V)W7O28)2](13-) (1a) and [Cr(III)(HAs(V)W7O28)2](13-) (2a), were prepared via simple, one-pot reactions in aqueous, basic medium, by reaction of the composing elements, and then isolated as hydrated sodium salts, Na13[Cr(III)(HP(V)W7O28)2]·47H2O (1) and Na13[Cr(III)(HAs(V)W7O28)2]·52H2O (2). Polyanions 1a and 2a comprise an octahedrally coordinated Cr(III) ion, sandwiched by two {PW7} or {AsW7} units. Both compounds 1 and 2 were fully characterized in the solid state by single-crystal XRD, IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric and elemental analyses, magnetic susceptibility, and EPR measurements. Magnetic studies on 1 and 2 demonstrated that both compounds exhibit appreciable deviation from typical paramagnetic behavior, and have a ground state S = 3/2, as expected for a Cr(III) ion, but with an exceptionally large zero-field uniaxial anisotropy parameter (D). EPR measurements on powder and single-crystal samples of 1 and 2 using 9.5, 34.5, and 239.2 GHz frequencies and over 4-295 K temperature fully support the magnetization results and show that D = +2.4 cm(-1), the largest and sign-assigned D-value so far reported for an octahedral Cr(III)-containing, molecular compound. Ligand field analysis of results from CASSCF and NEVPT2-correlated electronic structure calculations on Cr(OH)6(3-) model complexes allowed to unravel the crucial role of the second coordination sphere of Cr(III) for the unusually large magnetic anisotropy reflected by the experimental value of D. The newly developed theoretical modeling, combined with the synthetic procedure for producing such unusual magnetic molecules in a well-defined and essentially magnetically isolated environment, appears to be a versatile new research area.

  18. Friction in volcanic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Jackie E.; Lavallée, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic landscapes are amongst the most dynamic on Earth and, as such, are particularly susceptible to failure and frictional processes. In rocks, damage accumulation is frequently accompanied by the release of seismic energy, which has been shown to accelerate in the approach to failure on both a field and laboratory scale. The point at which failure occurs is highly dependent upon strain-rate, which also dictates the slip-zone properties that pertain beyond failure, in scenarios such as sector collapse and pyroclastic flows as well as the ascent of viscous magma. High-velocity rotary shear (HVR) experiments have provided new opportunities to overcome the grand challenge of understanding faulting processes during volcanic phenomena. Work on granular ash material demonstrates that at ambient temperatures, ash gouge behaves according to Byerlee's rule at low slip velocities, but is slip-weakening, becoming increasingly lubricating as slip ensues. In absence of ash along a slip plane, rock-rock friction induces cataclasis and heating which, if sufficient, may induce melting (producing pseudotachylyte) and importantly, vesiculation. The viscosity of the melt, so generated, controls the subsequent lubrication or resistance to slip along the fault plane thanks to non-Newtonian suspension rheology. The shear-thinning behaviour and viscoelasticity of frictional melts yield a tendency for extremely unstable slip, and occurrence of frictional melt fragmentation. This velocity-dependence acts as an important feedback mechanism on the slip plane, in addition to the bulk composition, mineralogy and glass content of the magma, that all influence frictional behaviour. During sector collapse events and in pyroclastic density currents it is the frictional properties of the rocks and ash that, in-part, control the run-out distance and associated risk. In addition, friction plays an important role in the eruption of viscous magmas: In the conduit, the rheology of magma is integral

  19. Variables influencing the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veijgen, N K; Masen, M A; van der Heide, E

    2013-12-01

    In the past decades, skin friction research has focused on determining which variables are important to affect the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin. Until now, there is still limited knowledge on these variables. This study has used a large dataset to identify the effect of variables on the human skin, subject characteristics and environmental conditions on skin friction. The data are obtained on 50 subjects (34 males and 16 females). Friction measurements represent the friction between in vivo human skin and an aluminium sample, assessed on three anatomical locations. The coefficient of friction increased significantly (pskin and the height of the subject. Other outcome variables in this study were the hydration of the skin and the skin temperature.

  20. Reorientation of magnetic anisotropy in obliquely sputtered metallic thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisfi, A.; Lodder, J.C.; Wormeester, H.; Poelsema, B.

    2002-01-01

    Reorientation in the magnetic anisotropy as a function of film thickness has been observed in Co-Ni and Co thin films, obliquely sputtered on a polyethylene terephthalate substrate at a large incidence angle (70°). This effect is a consequence of the low magnetocrystalline anisotropy of the films (f

  1. Ultrasonic velocity and attenuation anisotropy of shales, Whitby, United Kingdom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhubayev, A.; Houben, M.E.; Smeulders, D.M.J.; Barnhoorn, A.

    2015-01-01

    We have conducted ultrasonic experiments, between 0.3 and 1 MHz, to measure velocity and attenuation (Q−1) anisotropy of P- and S-waves in dry Whitby Mudstone samples as a function of stress. We found the degree of anisotropy to be as large as 70% for velocity and attenuation. The sensitivity of P-w

  2. Ultrasonic velocity and attenuation anisotropy of shales, Whitby, United Kingdom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhubayev, Alimzhan; Houben, M.E.; Smeulders, David; Barnhoorn, A.

    2016-01-01

    We have conducted ultrasonic experiments, between 0.3 and 1 MHz, to measure velocity and attenuation (Q−1) anisotropy of P- and S-waves in dry Whitby Mudstone samples as a function of stress. We found the degree of anisotropy to be as large as 70% for velocity and attenuation. The sensitivity of P-w

  3. Reflections on Friction in Quantum Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yair Rezek

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Distinctly quantum friction effects of three types are surveyed: internalfriction, measurement-induced friction, and quantum-fluctuation-induced friction. We demonstrate that external driving will lead to quantum internal friction, and critique the measurement-based interpretation of friction. We conclude that in general systems will experience internal and external quantum friction over and beyond the classical frictional contributions.

  4. Variables influencing the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veijgen, N.K.; Masen, M.A.; Heide, van der E.

    2013-01-01

    In the past decades, skin friction research has focused on determining which variables are important to affect the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin. Until now, there is still limited knowledge on these variables. This study has used a large dataset to identify the effect of variables on t

  5. Variables influencing the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veijgen, N.K.; Masen, M.A.; Heide, E. van der

    2013-01-01

    In the past decades, skin friction research has focused on determining which variables are important to affect the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin. Until now, there is still limited knowledge on these variables.This study has used a large dataset to identify the effect of variables on the

  6. A study on the frictional response of reptilian shed skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Aal, H. A.; Vargiolu, R.; Zahouani, H.; El Mansori, M.

    2011-08-01

    Deterministic surfaces are constructs of which profile, topography and textures are integral to the function of the system they enclose. They are designed to yield a predetermined tribological response. Developing such entities relies on controlling the structure of the rubbing interface so that, not only the surface is of optimized topography, but also is able to self-adjust its tribological behaviour according to the evolution of sliding conditions. In seeking inspirations for such designs, many engineers are turning toward the biological world to study the construction and behaviour of bio-analogues, and to probe the role surface topography assumes in conditioning of frictional response. That is how a bio-analogue can self-adjust its tribological response to adapt to habitat constraints. From a tribological point of view, Squamate Reptiles, offer diverse examples where surface texturing, submicron and nano-scale features, achieves frictional regulation. In this paper, we study the frictional response of shed skin obtained from a snake (Python regius). The study employed a specially designed tribo-acoustic probe capable of measuring the coefficient of friction and detecting the acoustical behavior of the skin in vivo. The results confirm the anisotropy of the frictional response of snakes. The coefficient of friction depends on the direction of sliding: the value in forward motion is lower than that in the backward direction. Diagonal and side winding motion induces a different value of the friction coefficient. We discuss the origin of such a phenomenon in relation to surface texturing and study the energy constraints, implied by anisotropic friction, on the motion of the reptile.

  7. Wet Friction-Elements Boundary Friction Mechanism and Friction Coefficient Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Yanzhong

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The friction mechanism for the boundary friction course of friction elements engagement was explicitly expressed. The boundary friction model was built up by the surface topography. The model contained the effect of boundary film, adhesion, plough and lubrication. Based on the model, a coefficient for weakening plough for the lubrication was proposed. The modified model could fit for the working condition of wet friction elements. The friction coefficient as a function curve of rotating speed could be finally obtained by the data k and s/sm. The method provides a well interpretation of friction condition and friction coefficient prediction and the agreement between theoretical and experimental friction coefficients is reasonably good.

  8. Energy Balance of Friction and Friction Coefficient in Energetical Interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Fedorov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sliding friction energy model is proposed. In this model, generalized mechanism of transformation and dissipation of energy under friction the model of elastic-plastic deformation and fracture contact volumes is considered. Energy model of the process of plastic deformation and destruction of solid bodies is based on the concept of ergodynamic of deformable bodies. Equations of energy balance of friction within the structural and energetic interpretation of deformation are proposed. The energy interpretation of the coefficient of friction is showed. From this position the friction coefficient is the most informative characteristic of the process. Experimental friction curves have been generalized. As a result of the energy analysis of friction, the energy diagram of the structural evolution of the friction surfaces is suggested.

  9. The expected anisotropy in solid inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartolo, Nicola; Ricciardone, Angelo [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia ' ' G. Galilei' ' , Università degli Studi di Padova, via Marzolo 8, I-35131, Padova (Italy); Peloso, Marco; Unal, Caner, E-mail: nicola.bartolo@pd.infn.it, E-mail: peloso@physics.umn.edu, E-mail: angelo.ricciardone@pd.infn.it, E-mail: unal@physics.umn.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street S.E., Minneapolis 55455 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Solid inflation is an effective field theory of inflation in which isotropy and homogeneity are accomplished via a specific combination of anisotropic sources (three scalar fields that individually break isotropy). This results in specific observational signatures that are not found in standard models of inflation: a non-trivial angular dependence for the squeezed bispectrum, and a possibly long period of anisotropic inflation (to drive inflation, the ''solid'' must be very insensitive to any deformation, and thus background anisotropies are very slowly erased). In this paper we compute the expected level of statistical anisotropy in the power spectrum of the curvature perturbations of this model. To do so, we account for the classical background values of the three scalar fields that are generated on large (superhorizon) scales during inflation via a random walk sum, as the perturbation modes leave the horizon. Such an anisotropy is unavoidably generated, even starting from perfectly isotropic classical initial conditions. The expected level of anisotropy is related to the duration of inflation and to the amplitude of the squeezed bispectrum. If this amplitude is close to its current observational limit (so that one of the most interesting predictions of the model can be observed in the near future), we find that a level of statistical anisotropy F{sup 2} gives frozen and scale invariant vector perturbations on superhorizon scales.

  10. The expected anisotropy in solid inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolo, Nicola; Ricciardone, Angelo; Unal, Caner

    2014-01-01

    Solid inflation is an effective field theory of inflation in which isotropy and homogeneity are accomplished via a specific combination of anisotropic sources (three scalar fields that individually break isotropy). This results in specific observational signatures that are not found in standard models of inflation: a non-trivial angular dependence for the squeezed bispectrum, and a possibly long period of anisotropic inflation (to drive inflation, the "solid" must be very insensitive to any deformation, and thus background anisotropies are very slowly erased). In this paper we compute the expected level of statistical anisotropy in the power spectrum of the curvature perturbations of this model. To do so, we account for the classical background values of the three scalar fields that are generated on large (superhorizon) scales during inflation via a random walk sum, as the perturbation modes leave the horizon. Such an anisotropy is unavoidably generated, even starting from perfectly isotropic classical initia...

  11. CMB Anisotropies Total Angular Momentum Method

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, W; Hu, Wayne; White, Martin

    1997-01-01

    A total angular momentum representation simplifies the radiation transport problem for temperature and polarization anisotropy in the CMB. Scattering terms couple only the quadrupole moments of the distributions and each moment corresponds directly to the observable angular pattern on the sky. We develop and employ these techniques to study the general properties of anisotropy generation from scalar, vector and tensor perturbations to the metric and the matter, both in the cosmological fluids and from any seed perturbations (e.g.~defects) that may be present. The simpler, more transparent form and derivation of the Boltzmann equations brings out the geometric and model-independent aspects of temperature and polarization anisotropy formation. Large angle scalar polarization provides a robust means to distinguish between isocurvature and adiabatic models for structure formation in principle. Vector modes have the unique property that the CMB polarization is dominated by magnetic type parity at small angles and ...

  12. Ab initio modelling of magnetic anisotropy in Sr3NiPtO6

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pradipto, A. -M.; Broer, R.; Picozzi, S.

    2016-01-01

    First principles calculations in the framework of Density Functional Theory (DFT) and wavefunction-based correlated methods have been performed to investigate in detail the magnetic anisotropy in Sr3NiPtO6. This material is known for the easy-plane anisotropy with a large anisotropy constant of abou

  13. Tool For Friction Stir Tack Welding of Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkman, Gerald W.; Dingler, Johnny W.; Loftus, Zachary

    2003-01-01

    A small friction-stir-welding tool has been developed for use in tack welding of aluminum-alloy workpieces. It is necessary to tack-weld the workpieces in order to hold them together during friction stir welding because (1) in operation, a full-size friction-stir-welding tool exerts a large force that tends to separate the workpieces and (2) clamping the workpieces is not sufficient to resist this force. It is possible to tack the pieces together by gas tungsten arc welding, but the process can be awkward and time-consuming and can cause sufficient damage to necessitate rework. Friction stir tack welding does not entail these disadvantages. In addition, friction stir tack welding can be accomplished by use of the same automated equipment (except for the welding tool) used in subsequent full friction stir welding. The tool for friction stir tack welding resembles the tool for full friction stir welding, but has a narrower shoulder and a shorter pin. The shorter pin generates a smaller workpiece-separating force so that clamping suffices to keep the workpieces together. This tool produces a continuous or intermittent partial-penetration tack weld. The tack weld is subsequently consumed by action of the larger tool used in full friction stir welding tool.

  14. Direct friction measurement in draw bead testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, David Dam; Bay, Niels; Andreasen, Jan Lasson

    2005-01-01

    The application of draw beads in sheet metal stamping ensures controlled drawing-in of flange parts. Lubrication conditions in draw beads are severe due to sliding under simultaneous bending. Based on the original draw bead test design by Nine [1] comprehensive studies of friction in draw beads...... have been reported in literature. A major drawback in all these studies is that friction is not directly measured, but requires repeated measurements of the drawing force with and without relative sliding between the draw beads and the sheet material. This implies two tests with a fixed draw bead tool...... and a freely rotating tool respectively, an approach, which inevitably implies large uncertainties due to scatter in the experimental conditions. In order to avoid this problem a new draw bead test is proposed by the authors measuring the friction force acting on the tool radius directly by a build...

  15. Direct friction measurement in draw bead testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, David Dam; Bay, Niels; Andreasen, Jan Lasson

    2005-01-01

    have been reported in literature. A major drawback in all these studies is that friction is not directly measured, but requires repeated measurements of the drawing force with and without relative sliding between the draw beads and the sheet material. This implies two tests with a fixed draw bead tool...... and a freely rotating tool respectively, an approach, which inevitably implies large uncertainties due to scatter in the experimental conditions. In order to avoid this problem a new draw bead test is proposed by the authors measuring the friction force acting on the tool radius directly by a build......-in piezoelectric torque transducer. This technique results in a very sensitive measurement of friction, which furthermore enables recording of lubricant film breakdown as function of drawing distance. The proposed test is validated in an experimental investigation of the influence of lubricant viscosity...

  16. Scale dependence of rock friction at high work rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Futoshi; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Mizoguchi, Kazuo; Takizawa, Shigeru; Xu, Shiqing; Kawakata, Hironori

    2015-12-10

    Determination of the frictional properties of rocks is crucial for an understanding of earthquake mechanics, because most earthquakes are caused by frictional sliding along faults. Prior studies using rotary shear apparatus revealed a marked decrease in frictional strength, which can cause a large stress drop and strong shaking, with increasing slip rate and increasing work rate. (The mechanical work rate per unit area equals the product of the shear stress and the slip rate.) However, those important findings were obtained in experiments using rock specimens with dimensions of only several centimetres, which are much smaller than the dimensions of a natural fault (of the order of 1,000 metres). Here we use a large-scale biaxial friction apparatus with metre-sized rock specimens to investigate scale-dependent rock friction. The experiments show that rock friction in metre-sized rock specimens starts to decrease at a work rate that is one order of magnitude smaller than that in centimetre-sized rock specimens. Mechanical, visual and material observations suggest that slip-evolved stress heterogeneity on the fault accounts for the difference. On the basis of these observations, we propose that stress-concentrated areas exist in which frictional slip produces more wear materials (gouge) than in areas outside, resulting in further stress concentrations at these areas. Shear stress on the fault is primarily sustained by stress-concentrated areas that undergo a high work rate, so those areas should weaken rapidly and cause the macroscopic frictional strength to decrease abruptly. To verify this idea, we conducted numerical simulations assuming that local friction follows the frictional properties observed on centimetre-sized rock specimens. The simulations reproduced the macroscopic frictional properties observed on the metre-sized rock specimens. Given that localized stress concentrations commonly occur naturally, our results suggest that a natural fault may lose its

  17. Intelligent Flow Friction Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Brkić

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the Colebrook equation is used as a mostly accepted relation for the calculation of fluid flow friction factor. However, the Colebrook equation is implicit with respect to the friction factor (λ. In the present study, a noniterative approach using Artificial Neural Network (ANN was developed to calculate the friction factor. To configure the ANN model, the input parameters of the Reynolds Number (Re and the relative roughness of pipe (ε/D were transformed to logarithmic scales. The 90,000 sets of data were fed to the ANN model involving three layers: input, hidden, and output layers with, 2, 50, and 1 neurons, respectively. This configuration was capable of predicting the values of friction factor in the Colebrook equation for any given values of the Reynolds number (Re and the relative roughness (ε/D ranging between 5000 and 108 and between 10−7 and 0.1, respectively. The proposed ANN demonstrates the relative error up to 0.07% which had the high accuracy compared with the vast majority of the precise explicit approximations of the Colebrook equation.

  18. Skin tribology: Science friction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heide, van der E.; Zeng, X.; Masen, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    The application of tribological knowledge is not just restricted to optimizing mechanical and chemical engineering problems. In fact, effective solutions to friction and wear related questions can be found in our everyday life. An important part is related to skin tribology, as the human skin is fre

  19. Gravitomagnetic dynamical friction

    CERN Document Server

    Cashen, Benjamin; Kesden, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A supermassive black hole moving through a field of stars will gravitationally scatter the stars, inducing a backreaction force on the black hole known as dynamical friction. In Newtonian gravity, the axisymmetry of the system about the black hole's velocity $\\mathbf{v}$ implies that the dynamical friction must be anti-parallel to $\\mathbf{v}$. However, in general relativity the black hole's spin $\\mathbf{S}$ need not be parallel to $\\mathbf{v}$, breaking the axisymmetry of the system and generating a new component of dynamical friction similar to the Lorentz force $\\mathbf{F} = q\\mathbf{v} \\times \\mathbf{B}$ experienced by a particle with charge $q$ moving in a magnetic field $\\mathbf{B}$. We call this new force gravitomagnetic dynamical friction and calculate its magnitude for a spinning black hole moving through a field of stars with Maxwellian velocity dispersion $\\sigma$, assuming that both $v$ and $\\sigma$ are much less than the speed of light $c$. We use post-Newtonian equations of motion accurate to $...

  20. Structural and Magnetic Anisotropy in Amorphous Terbium-Iron Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufnagel, Todd Clayton

    1995-01-01

    High density, removable media magnetooptic disk drives have recently begun to make significant gains in the information mass storage market. The media in these disks are amorphous rare-earth/transition-metal (RE-TM) alloys. One vital property of these materials is a large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy; that is, an easy axis of magnetization which is perpendicular to the plane of the film. A variety of theories, sometimes contradictory, have been proposed to account for this surprising presence of an anisotropic property in an amorphous material. Recent research indicates that there is an underlying atomic-scale structural anisotropy which is responsible for the observed magnetic anisotropy. Several different types of structural anisotropy have been proposed to account for the observed magnetic anisotropy, including pair-ordering anisotropy (anisotropic chemical short-range order) and bond orientation anisotropy (an anisotropy in coordination number or distances independent of chemical ordering). We have studied the structural origins of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in amorphous Tb-Fe thin films by employing high-energy and anomalous dispersion x-ray scattering. The as-deposited films show a clear structural anisotropy, with a preference for Tb-Fe near neighbors to align in the out-of-plane direction. These films also have a large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Upon annealing, the magnetic anisotropy energy drops significantly, and we see a corresponding reduction in the structural anisotropy. The radial distribution functions indicate that the number of Tb-Fe near-neighbors increases in the in-plane direction, but does not change in the out-of-plane direction. Therefore, the distribution of Tb-Fe near-neighbors becomes more uniform upon annealing. We propose that the observed reduction in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy energy is a result of this change in structure. Our results support the pair -ordering anisotropy model of the structural anisotropy

  1. Variable enstrophy flux and energy spectrum in two-dimensional turbulence with Ekman friction

    CERN Document Server

    Verma, Mahendra K

    2012-01-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations reveal that in the forward cascade regime, the energy spectrum of two-dimensional turbulence with Ekman friction deviates from Kraichnan's prediction of $k^{-3}$ power spectrum. In this letter we explain this observation using an analytic model based on variable enstrophy flux arising due to Ekman friction. We derive an expression for the enstrophy flux which exhibits a logarithmic dependence in the inertial range for the Ekman-friction dominated flows. The energy spectrum obtained using this enstrophy flux shows a power law scaling for large Reynolds number and small Ekman friction, but has an exponential behaviour for large Ekman friction and relatively small Reynolds number.

  2. Unconventional Behavior of Friction at the Nanoscale beyond Amontons' Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingrun; Gao, Wang

    2017-08-05

    By means of a many-body van der Waals (vdW)-corrected density functional theory approach, the atomic-scale friction of a prototypical tip-substrate system consisting of an Si tip and a graphene substrate is studied. In a loading-sliding process, the tip-substrate distance is found to be essential for nanofrictional behavior, through determining the competition between vdW contributions and electronic contributions. As the tip approaches the substrate, this competition results in a smooth transition of normal forces from attraction to repulsion, and the friction coefficient in turn undergoes a sign change from negative to positive with possible giant magnitude and strong anisotropy. The loading-sliding process does not introduce any chemical modification of the underlying system. These findings reveal the boundary of validity of Amontons' law, unify negative and giant friction coefficients, rationalize the experimentally observed anisotropy of nanofriction, and are universal when vdW interactions are crucial, all of which are helpful to establish a comprehensive picture of nanofriction. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Quantum tunneling with friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokieda, M.; Hagino, K.

    2017-05-01

    Using the phenomenological quantum friction models introduced by P. Caldirola [Nuovo Cimento 18, 393 (1941), 10.1007/BF02960144] and E. Kanai [Prog. Theor. Phys. 3, 440 (1948), 10.1143/ptp/3.4.440], M. D. Kostin [J. Chem. Phys. 57, 3589 (1972), 10.1063/1.1678812], and K. Albrecht [Phys. Lett. B 56, 127 (1975), 10.1016/0370-2693(75)90283-X], we study quantum tunneling of a one-dimensional potential in the presence of energy dissipation. To this end, we calculate the tunneling probability using a time-dependent wave-packet method. The friction reduces the tunneling probability. We show that the three models provide similar penetrabilities to each other, among which the Caldirola-Kanai model requires the least numerical effort. We also discuss the effect of energy dissipation on quantum tunneling in terms of barrier distributions.

  4. Friction in rail guns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of friction is included in the present equations describing the performance of an inductively driven rail gun. These equations, which have their basis in an empirical formulation, are applied to results from two different experiments. Only an approximate physical description of the problem is attempted, in view of the complexity of details in the interaction among forces of this magnitude over time periods of the order of milisecs.

  5. SEARCHES FOR LARGE-SCALE ANISOTROPY IN THE ARRIVAL DIRECTIONS OF COSMIC RAYS DETECTED ABOVE ENERGY OF 10(19) eV AT THE PIERRE AUGER OBSERVATORY AND THE TELESCOPE ARRAY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Batista, R. Alves; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Baeuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Diaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Hasankiadeh, Q. Dorosti; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Luis, P. Facal San; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Froehlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fuji, T.; Gaior, R.; Garcia, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Gomez Vitale, P. F.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gonzalez, N.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Horandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Islo, K.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kaeaepae, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kroemer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leao, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui De Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopez, R.; Lopez Agueera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Maccarone, M. C.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masias Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Micanovic, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafa, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Mueller, G.; Muenchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nozka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Ekala, J. P.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Greus, F. Salesa; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovanek, P.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Smiallkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijaervi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cardenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Silva, M. Zimbres; Ziolkowski, M.; Abbasi, R. U.; Abe, M.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M.; Anderson, R.; Azuma, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Cady, R.; Chae, M. J.; Cheon, B. G.; Chiba, J.; Chikawa, M.; Cho, W. R.; Fujii, T.; Fukushima, M.; Goto, T.; Hanlon, W.; Hayashi, Y.; Hayashida, N.; Hibino, K.; Honda, K.; Ikeda, D.; Inoue, N.; Ishii, T.; Ishimori, R.; Ito, H.; Ivanov, D.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kadota, K.; Kakimoto, F.; Kalashev, O.; Kasahara, K.; Kawai, H.; Kawakami, S.; Kawana, S.; Kawata, K.; Kido, E.; Kim, H. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. H.; Kitamura, S.; Kitamura, Y.; Kuzmin, V.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lan, J.; Lim, S. I.; Lundquist, J. P.; Machida, K.; Martens, K.; Matsuda, T.; Matsuyama, T.; Matthews, J. N.; Minamino, M.; Mukai, K.; Myers, I.; Nagasawa, K.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Nonaka, T.; Nozato, A.; Ogio, S.; Ogura, J.; Ohnishi, M.; Ohoka, H.; Oki, K.; Okuda, T.; Ono, M.; Oshima, A.; Ozawa, S.; Park, I. H.; Pshirkov, M. S.; Rodriguez, D. C.; Rubtsov, G.; Ryu, D.; Sagawa, H.; Sakurai, N.; Sampson, A. L.; Scott, L. M.; Shah, P. D.; Shibata, F.; Shibata, T.; Shimodaira, H.; Shin, B. K.; Smith, J. D.; Sokolsky, P.; Springer, R. W.; Stokes, B. T.; Stratton, S. R.; Stroman, T. A.; Suzawa, T.; Takamura, M.; Takeda, M.; Takeishi, R.; Taketa, A.; Takita, M.; Tameda, Y.; Tanaka, H.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, M.; Thomas, S. B.; Thomson, G. B.; Tinyakov, P.; Tkachev, I.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Troitsky, S.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsutsumi, K.; Uchihori, Y.; Udo, S.; Urban, F.; Vasiloff, G.; Wong, T.; Yamane, R.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamazaki, K.; Yang, J.; Yashiro, K.; Yoneda, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Yoshii, H.; Zollinger, R.; Zundel, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Spherical harmonic moments are well-suited for capturing anisotropy at any scale in the flux of cosmic rays. An unambiguous measurement of the full set of spherical harmonic coefficients requires full-sky coverage. This can be achieved by combining data from observatories located in both the norther

  6. SEARCHES FOR LARGE-SCALE ANISOTROPY IN THE ARRIVAL DIRECTIONS OF COSMIC RAYS DETECTED ABOVE ENERGY OF 10(19) eV AT THE PIERRE AUGER OBSERVATORY AND THE TELESCOPE ARRAY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Batista, R. Alves; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Baeuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Diaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Hasankiadeh, Q. Dorosti; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Luis, P. Facal San; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Froehlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fuji, T.; Gaior, R.; Garcia, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Gomez Vitale, P. F.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gonzalez, N.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Horandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Islo, K.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kaeaepae, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kroemer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leao, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui De Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopez, R.; Lopez Agueera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Maccarone, M. C.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masias Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Micanovic, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafa, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Mueller, G.; Muenchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nozka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Ekala, J. P.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Greus, F. Salesa; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovanek, P.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Smiallkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijaervi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cardenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Silva, M. Zimbres; Ziolkowski, M.; Abbasi, R. U.; Abe, M.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M.; Anderson, R.; Azuma, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Cady, R.; Chae, M. J.; Cheon, B. G.; Chiba, J.; Chikawa, M.; Cho, W. R.; Fujii, T.; Fukushima, M.; Goto, T.; Hanlon, W.; Hayashi, Y.; Hayashida, N.; Hibino, K.; Honda, K.; Ikeda, D.; Inoue, N.; Ishii, T.; Ishimori, R.; Ito, H.; Ivanov, D.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kadota, K.; Kakimoto, F.; Kalashev, O.; Kasahara, K.; Kawai, H.; Kawakami, S.; Kawana, S.; Kawata, K.; Kido, E.; Kim, H. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. H.; Kitamura, S.; Kitamura, Y.; Kuzmin, V.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lan, J.; Lim, S. I.; Lundquist, J. P.; Machida, K.; Martens, K.; Matsuda, T.; Matsuyama, T.; Matthews, J. N.; Minamino, M.; Mukai, K.; Myers, I.; Nagasawa, K.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Nonaka, T.; Nozato, A.; Ogio, S.; Ogura, J.; Ohnishi, M.; Ohoka, H.; Oki, K.; Okuda, T.; Ono, M.; Oshima, A.; Ozawa, S.; Park, I. H.; Pshirkov, M. S.; Rodriguez, D. C.; Rubtsov, G.; Ryu, D.; Sagawa, H.; Sakurai, N.; Sampson, A. L.; Scott, L. M.; Shah, P. D.; Shibata, F.; Shibata, T.; Shimodaira, H.; Shin, B. K.; Smith, J. D.; Sokolsky, P.; Springer, R. W.; Stokes, B. T.; Stratton, S. R.; Stroman, T. A.; Suzawa, T.; Takamura, M.; Takeda, M.; Takeishi, R.; Taketa, A.; Takita, M.; Tameda, Y.; Tanaka, H.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, M.; Thomas, S. B.; Thomson, G. B.; Tinyakov, P.; Tkachev, I.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Troitsky, S.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsutsumi, K.; Uchihori, Y.; Udo, S.; Urban, F.; Vasiloff, G.; Wong, T.; Yamane, R.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamazaki, K.; Yang, J.; Yashiro, K.; Yoneda, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Yoshii, H.; Zollinger, R.; Zundel, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Spherical harmonic moments are well-suited for capturing anisotropy at any scale in the flux of cosmic rays. An unambiguous measurement of the full set of spherical harmonic coefficients requires full-sky coverage. This can be achieved by combining data from observatories located in both the

  7. Anomalously large gap anisotropy in the [ital a]-[ital b] plane of Bi[sub 2]Sr[sub 2]CaCu[sub 2]O[sub 8+[delta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Z.; Dessau, D.S.; Wells, B.O.; King, D.M.; Spicer, W.E.; Arko, A.J.; Marshall, D.; Lombardo, L.W.; Kapitulnik, A.; Dickinson, P.; Doniach, S.; DiCarlo, J.; Loeser, T.; Park, C.H. (Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States) Solid State Electronics Laboratory and Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-4055 (United States) Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States))

    1993-03-08

    Superconducting gap anisotropy at least an order of magnitude larger than that of the conventional superconductors has been observed in the [ital a]-[ital b] plane of Bi[sub 2]Sr[sub 2]CaCu[sub 2]O[sub 8+[delta

  8. Flow stress anisotropy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, G.

    1996-01-01

    stress Variation in the rolling plane, which may be as high as 20%, are presented. The traditional Taylor model is applied to the data to account for the effect of texture. However, texture effects alone are not enough to explain all of the observed anisotropy. New models which take the combined effects...... of texture and deformation microstructure into account are presented. The models are based on the Taylor and Sachs models but modified with an anisotropic critical shear stress to account for the effect of the microstructure. The agreement between experimental data and model predictions is definitely better...

  9. Lateral-drag Casimir forces induced by anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Nefedov, Igor S

    2016-01-01

    We predict the existence of lateral drag forces near the flat surface of an absorbing slab of an anisotropic material. The forces originate from the fluctuations of the electromagnetic field, when the anisotropy axis of the material forms a certain angle with the surface. In this situation, the spatial spectra of the fluctuating electromagnetic fields becomes asymmetric, different for positive and negative transverse wave vectors components. Differently from the case of van der Waals interactions in which the forward-backward symmetry is broken due to the particle movement or in quantum noncontact friction where it is caused by the mutual motion of the bodies, in our case the lateral motion results merely from the anisotropy of the slab. This new effect, of particular significance in hyperbolic materials, could be used for the manipulation of nanoparticles.

  10. High Speed Friction Microscopy and Nanoscale Friction Coefficient Mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Bosse, James L.; Lee, Sungjun; Huey, Bryan D; Andersen, Andreas Sø; Sutherland, Duncan S

    2014-01-01

    As mechanical devices in the nano/micro length scale are increasingly employed, it is crucial to understand nanoscale friction and wear especially at technically relevant sliding velocities. Accordingly, a novel technique has been developed for Friction Coefficient Mapping (FCM), leveraging recent advances in high speed AFM. The technique efficiently acquires friction versus force curves based on a sequence of images at a single location, each with incrementally lower loads. As a result, true...

  11. CMB anisotropies from primordial inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, A

    2004-01-01

    Primordial inhomogeneous magnetic fields of the right strength can leave a signature on the CMB temperature anisotropy and polarization. Potentially observable contributions to polarization B-modes are generated by vorticity and gravitational waves sourced by the magnetic anisotropic stress. We compute the corresponding CMB transfer functions in detail including the effect of neutrinos. The shear rapidly causes the neutrino anisotropic stress to cancel the stress from the magnetic field, suppressing the production of gravitational waves and vorticity on super-horizon scales after neutrino decoupling. A significant large scale signal from tensor modes can only be produced before neutrino decoupling, and the actual amplitude is somewhat uncertain. Plausible values suggest primordial nearly scale invariant fields of ~ 10^(-10)G today may be observable from their large scale tensor anisotropy. They can be distinguished from primordial gravitational waves by their non-Gaussianity. Vector mode vorticity sources B-m...

  12. Engineering Curvature-Induced Anisotropy in Thin Ferromagnetic Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretiakov, Oleg A.; Morini, Massimiliano; Vasylkevych, Sergiy; Slastikov, Valeriy

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the effect of large curvature and dipolar energy in thin ferromagnetic films with periodically modulated top and bottom surfaces on magnetization behavior. We predict that the dipolar interaction and surface curvature can produce perpendicular anisotropy which can be controlled by engineering special types of periodic surface structures. Similar effects can be achieved by a significant surface roughness in the film. We demonstrate that, in general, the anisotropy can point in an arbitrary direction depending on the surface curvature. Furthermore, we provide simple examples of these periodic surface structures to show how to engineer particular anisotropies in thin films.

  13. Growth of Co Nanomagnet Arrays with Enhanced Magnetic Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Laura; Ilyn, Maxim; Magaña, Ana; Vitali, Lucia; Ortega, José Enrique

    2016-01-01

    A trigon structure formed by submonolayer gadolinium deposition onto Au(111) is revealed as a robust growth template for Co nanodot arrays. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and X‐Ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism measurements evidence that the Co nanoislands behave as independent magnetic entities with an out‐of‐plane easy axis of anisotropy and enhanced magnetic anisotropy values, as compared to other self‐organized Co nanodot superlattices. The large strain induced by the lattice mismatch at the interface between Co and trigons is discussed as the main reason for the increased magnetic anisotropy of the nanoislands. PMID:27711268

  14. Solitary structures with ion and electron thermal anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Khusroo, Murchana

    2015-01-01

    Formation of electrostatic solitary structures are analysed for a magnetised plasma with ion and electron thermal anisotropies. The ion thermal anisotropy is modelled with the help of the Chew-Goldberger-Low (CGL) double adiabatic equations of state while the electrons are treated as inertia-less species with an anisotropic bi-Maxwellian velocity distribution function. A negative electron thermal anisotropy $(T_{e\\perp}/T_e{\\parallel}>1)$ is found to help form large amplitude solitary structures which are in agreement with observational data.

  15. Magnetic anisotropy in nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenbach, M

    2001-01-01

    method for solving the LDA Kohn-Sham equation. This extended code allows us to perform fully relativistic calculations to enable us to investigate the spin orbit coupling effects leading to anisotropies and potentially non collinear ordering of magnetic moments in these systems of magnetic inclusions in copper. With this approach we find that depending on the orientation of the atoms along the 100 or 110 direction in copper the ground state orientation of the magnetic moments in the chain is either perpendicular or parallel to the chain direction, when the magnetic dipolar interaction energy is added to the final ab initio result. In this thesis we investigate the effect of magnetic anisotropies in nanostructured materials. The main emphasis in our work presented here is on systems that have an underlying one dimensional structure, like nanowires or atomic chains. In a simple classical one dimensional model we show the rich ground state structure of magnetic orientations one might expect to find in such syste...

  16. Friction laws for lubricated nanocontacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzio, R.; Boragno, C.; Valbusa, U.

    2006-09-01

    We have used friction force microscopy to probe friction laws for nanoasperities sliding on atomically flat substrates under controlled atmosphere and liquid environment, respectively. A power law relates friction force and normal load in dry air, whereas a linear relationship, i.e., Amontons' law, is observed for junctions fully immersed in model lubricants, namely, octamethylciclotetrasiloxane and squalane. Lubricated contacts display a remarkable friction reduction, with liquid and substrate specific friction coefficients. Comparison with molecular dynamics simulations suggests that load-bearing boundary layers at junction entrance cause the appearance of Amontons' law and impart atomic-scale character to the sliding process; continuum friction models are on the contrary of limited predictive power when applied to lubrication effects. An attempt is done to define general working conditions leading to the manifestation of nanoscale lubricity due to adsorbed boundary layers.

  17. Friction surfaced Stellite6 coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, K. Prasad; Damodaram, R. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering - Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Rafi, H. Khalid, E-mail: khalidrafi@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Ram, G.D. Janaki [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Reddy, G. Madhusudhan [Metal Joining Group, Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory (DMRL) Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500 058 (India); Nagalakshmi, R. [Welding Research Institute, Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited, Tiruchirappalli 620 014 (India)

    2012-08-15

    Solid state Stellite6 coatings were deposited on steel substrate by friction surfacing and compared with Stellite6 cast rod and coatings deposited by gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred arc welding processes. Friction surfaced coatings exhibited finer and uniformly distributed carbides and were characterized by the absence of solidification structure and compositional homogeneity compared to cast rod, gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred coatings. Friction surfaced coating showed relatively higher hardness. X-ray diffraction of samples showed only face centered cubic Co peaks while cold worked coating showed hexagonally close packed Co also. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stellite6 used as coating material for friction surfacing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Friction surfaced (FS) coatings compared with casting, GTA and PTA processes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Finer and uniformly distributed carbides in friction surfaced coatings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absence of melting results compositional homogeneity in FS Stellite6 coatings.

  18. Effects of electron temperature anisotropy on proton mirror instability evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Narges; Germaschewski, Kai; Raeder, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    Proton mirror modes are large amplitude nonpropagating structures frequently observed in the magnetosheath. It has been suggested that electron temperature anisotropy can enhance the proton mirror instability growth rate while leaving the proton cyclotron instability largely unaffected, therefore causing the proton mirror instability to dominate the proton cyclotron instability in Earth's magnetosheath. Here we use particle-in-cell simulations to investigate the electron temperature anisotropy effects on proton mirror instability evolution. Contrary to the hypothesis, electron temperature anisotropy leads to excitement of the electron whistler instability. Our results show that the electron whistler instability grows much faster than the proton mirror instability and quickly consumes the electron-free energy so that there is no electron temperature anisotropy left to significantly impact the evolution of the proton mirror instability.

  19. Effects of electron temperature anisotropy on proton mirror instability evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmadi, Narges; Raeder, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Proton mirror modes are large amplitude nonpropagating structures frequently observed in the magnetosheath. It has been suggested that electron temperature anisotropy can enhance the proton mirror instability growth rate while leaving the proton cyclotron instability largely unaffected, therefore causing the proton mirror instability to dominate the proton cyclotron instability in Earth's magnetosheath. Here, we use particle-in-cell simulations to investigate the electron temperature anisotropy effects on proton mirror instability evolution. Contrary to the hypothesis, electron temperature anisotropy leads to excitement of the electron whistler instability. Our results show that the electron whistler instability grows much faster than the proton mirror instability and quickly consumes the electron free energy, so that there is no electron temperature anisotropy left to significantly impact the evolution of the proton mirror instability.

  20. Characterization of the Frictional Response of Squamata Shed Skin in Comparison to Human skin

    CERN Document Server

    Abdel-Aal, H A

    2010-01-01

    Deterministic surfaces are constructs of which profile, topography and textures are integral to the function of the system they enclose. They are designed to yield a predetermined rubbing response. Developing such entities relies on controlling the structure of the rubbing interface so that, not only the surface is of optimized topography, but also is able to self-adjust its behavior according to the evolution of sliding conditions. Inspirations for such designs are frequently encountered in natural species. In particular, and from a tribological point of view, Squamate Reptiles, offer diverse examples where surface texturing, submicron and nano-scale features, achieves frictional regulation. In this paper, we study the frictional response of shed skin obtained from a Python regius snake. The study employed a specially designed tribo-acoustic probe capable of measuring the coefficient of friction and detecting the acoustical behavior of the skin in vivo. The results confirm the anisotropy of the frictional re...

  1. Solvent friction effects propagate over the entire protein molecule through low-frequency collective modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritsugu, Kei; Kidera, Akinori; Smith, Jeremy C

    2014-07-24

    Protein solvation dynamics has been investigated using atom-dependent Langevin friction coefficients derived directly from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. To determine the effect of solvation on the atomic friction coefficients, solution and vacuum MD simulations were performed for lysozyme and staphylococcal nuclease and analyzed by Langevin mode analysis. The coefficients thus derived are roughly correlated with the atomic solvent-accessible surface area (ASA), as expected from the fact that friction occurs as the result of collisions with solvent molecules. However, a considerable number of atoms with higher friction coefficients are found inside the core region. Hence, the influence of solvent friction propagates into the protein core. The internal coefficients have large contributions from the low-frequency modes, yielding a simple picture of the surface-to-core long-range damping via solvation governed by collective low-frequency modes. To make use of these findings in implicit-solvent modeling, we compare the all-atom friction results with those obtained using Langevin dynamics (LD) with two empirical representations: the constant-friction and the ASA-dependent (Pastor-Karplus) friction models. The constant-friction model overestimates the core and underestimates the surface damping whereas the ASA-dependent friction model, which damps protein atoms only on the solvent-accessible surface, reproduces well the friction coefficients for both the surface and core regions observed in the explicit-solvent MD simulations. Therefore, in LD simulation, the solvent friction coefficients should be imposed only on the protein surface.

  2. Micromechanical study of macroscopic friction and dissipation in idealised granular materials: the effect of interparticle friction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruyt, N.P.; Rothenburg, L.; Gutkowski, Witold; Kowalewski, Tomasz A.

    2004-01-01

    Using Discrete Element Method (DEM) simulations with varying interparticle friction coefficient, the relation between interparticle friction coefficient and macroscopic continuum friction and dissipation is investigated. As expected, macroscopic friction and dilatancy increase with interparticle fri

  3. Multi-scale characterization of topographic anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, S. G.; Koons, P. O.; Osti, B.; Upton, P.; Tucker, G. E.

    2016-05-01

    We present the every-direction variogram analysis (EVA) method for quantifying orientation and scale dependence of topographic anisotropy to aid in differentiation of the fluvial and tectonic contributions to surface evolution. Using multi-directional variogram statistics to track the spatial persistence of elevation values across a landscape, we calculate anisotropy as a multiscale, direction-sensitive variance in elevation between two points on a surface. Tectonically derived topographic anisotropy is associated with the three-dimensional kinematic field, which contributes (1) differential surface displacement and (2) crustal weakening along fault structures, both of which amplify processes of surface erosion. Based on our analysis, tectonic displacements dominate the topographic field at the orogenic scale, while a combination of the local displacement and strength fields are well represented at the ridge and valley scale. Drainage network patterns tend to reflect the geometry of underlying active or inactive tectonic structures due to the rapid erosion of faults and differential uplift associated with fault motion. Regions that have uniform environmental conditions and have been largely devoid of tectonic strain, such as passive coastal margins, have predominantly isotropic topography with typically dendritic drainage network patterns. Isolated features, such as stratovolcanoes, are nearly isotropic at their peaks but exhibit a concentric pattern of anisotropy along their flanks. The methods we provide can be used to successfully infer the settings of past or present tectonic regimes, and can be particularly useful in predicting the location and orientation of structural features that would otherwise be impossible to elude interpretation in the field. Though we limit the scope of this paper to elevation, EVA can be used to quantify the anisotropy of any spatially variable property.

  4. Friction and wear calculation methods

    CERN Document Server

    Kragelsky, I V; Kombalov, V S

    1981-01-01

    Friction and Wear: Calculation Methods provides an introduction to the main theories of a new branch of mechanics known as """"contact interaction of solids in relative motion."""" This branch is closely bound up with other sciences, especially physics and chemistry. The book analyzes the nature of friction and wear, and some theoretical relationships that link the characteristics of the processes and the properties of the contacting bodies essential for practical application of the theories in calculating friction forces and wear values. The effect of the environment on friction and wear is a

  5. Friction or Closure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundahl, Mikela

    2014-01-01

    . The anthropologist Anna Tsing has developed the concept-metaphor friction as a way to discuss the energy created when various actors narrate “the same” event(s) in different ways, and see the other participants’ accounts as fantasies or even fabrications. I will use my position as researcher and my relations...... is Stone Town in Zanzibar and the de-velopment and dissolution going on under the shadow of the UNESCO World Heritage flag; a growing tourism; a global and local increase in islamisation; and the political tension within the Tanzanian union. My main focus is narratives of the identity of Zanzibar since...

  6. No Giant Two-Ion Anisotropy in the Heavy-Rare-Earth Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1976-01-01

    A new Bose-operator expansion of tensor operators is applied to the heavy-rare-earth metals. The Er data for the cone phase have been analyzed successfully with single-ion anisotropy and isotropic exchange interaction. The Tb data can be understood on the same basis. The previously found large two......-ion anisotropy was due to an inadequate treatment of the large single-ion anisotropy leading to an incorrect expression for the spin-wave energy....

  7. Atomic-scale friction behavior of layered graphene and graphene-like BN materials modulated by interaction potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Chunqiang; Liu, Lei

    2017-08-01

    The understanding of fundamental issues related to friction at the atomic scale remains a great challenge due to the large difference between macroscopic and microscopic frictional behaviors. Here based on first-principles calculations, the applicability of macroscopic friction laws to the atomic scale is studied. The underlying mechanism that governs friction behavior is also explored. A completely new perspective of understanding the friction at the atomic scale is presented according to the observation of the applicability of friction law at the atomic scale and the variations of interaction potential induced by the number of layer and normal load.

  8. Seasonal anisotropy in handedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gregory V; Martin, Maryanne

    2008-01-01

    The preference for using either the left or the right hand has been linked to important human characteristics such as language lateralisation within the cerebral hemispheres, and evidence has been reported that the proportions of different types of handedness may be influenced by factors such as levels of maternal hormones and anxiety. Under such influences, it is possible in principle that distributions of handedness provide evidence of seasonal anisotropy, that is, variation in the direction of handedness for births in different parts of the year. The results of a number of studies are compared here, and shown to provide evidence of a significant tendency for the incidence of left-handed people to be higher among those born in the spring and ensuing months (March-July in the northern hemisphere) than among those born in the remainder of the year, at least among the male population.

  9. Friction analysis of kinetic schemes : the friction coefficient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lolkema, Juke S.

    1995-01-01

    Friction analysis is proposed as the application of general control analysis to single enzymes to describe the control of elementary kinetic steps on the overall catalytic rate. For each transition, a friction coefficient is defined that measures the sensitivity of the turnover rate to the free ener

  10. FRICTION ANALYSIS OF KINETIC SCHEMES - THE FRICTION COEFFICIENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LOLKEMA, JS

    1995-01-01

    Friction analysis is proposed as the application of general control analysis to single enzymes to describe the control of elementary kinetic steps on the overall catalytic rate. For each transition, a friction coefficient is defined that measures the sensitivity of the turnover rate to the free ener

  11. Friction analysis of kinetic schemes : the friction coefficient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lolkema, Juke S.

    1995-01-01

    Friction analysis is proposed as the application of general control analysis to single enzymes to describe the control of elementary kinetic steps on the overall catalytic rate. For each transition, a friction coefficient is defined that measures the sensitivity of the turnover rate to the free ener

  12. Detecting rupture precursors and determining the main fracture spread direction of rock with dynamic rock resistivity change anisotropy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@ In the past, domestic and abroad scientific workers have done a large number of experiment researches on a great number of researches of experiment for the relationship between electrical resistivity change and the load stress on rock (Geoelectric Testing Group, Department of Geophysics, Peking University and Research Division, Seismological Brigade of Lanzhou, 1978; Zhang, 1981; Chen, et al, 1983; Zhao, et al, 1983; Zhang, Lu, 1983; Zhang, et al, 1985; Brace, Orange, 1968; Kurite, 1986; Teisseyre, 1989), such as imitating dynamic fracture of rock, frictional sliding course, and observing its resistivity change shape with a lot of experimental workssuch as simulating the dynamic course of crustal rocks fracturing and frictional slipping along the fracture surface, and observing its resistivity change shape with experiment. They found that, in the fracture process of rock under loading, not only its resistivity shape change notably, and its direction changes also very clearly, and therefore many scientific workers have shown strong interest in anisotropy of resistivity change, and have done some researches onfor it.

  13. Slow frictional waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Sundaram, Narayan; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    Stick-slip, manifest as intermittent tangential motion between two dry solid surfaces, is a friction instability that governs diverse phenomena from automobile brake squeals to earthquakes. We show, using high-speed in situ imaging of an adhesive polymer interface, that low velocity stick-slip is fundamentally of three kinds, corresponding to passage of three different surface waves -- separation pulses, slip pulses and the well-known Schallamach waves. These waves, traveling much slower than elastic waves, have clear distinguishing properties. Separation pulses and Schallamach waves involve local interface separation, and propagate in opposite directions while slip pulses are characterized by a sharp stress front and do not display any interface detachment. A change in the stick-slip mode from separation to slip pulse is effected simply by increasing the normal force. Together, these three waves constitute all possible stick-slip modes in adhesive friction and are shown to have direct analogues in muscular locomotory waves in soft bodied invertebrates. A theory for slow wave propagation is also presented which is capable of explaining the attendant interface displacements, velocities and stresses.

  14. Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  15. Numerical Investigation of Developing Turbulent Flow in a Helical Square Duct with Large Curvature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Hui; Guo Liejin

    2001-01-01

    A fully elliptic numerical study has been carried out to investigate the three-dimensional turbulent developing flow in a helical square duct with large curvature. A two-layer zonal model is proposed and used, in which the whole region is divided into a viscosity-affected near wall layer and a fully turbulent region. A DSM closure is applied in the former, and a one-equation model is solved in the latter. The results presented in this paper cover a Reynolds number range of (1 ~ 10) x 104. The development of flow is found to be dominated by radial pressure gradient and Dean-type secondary motion. The distribution of Reynolds stresses in fully developed flow exhibit a complex pattern of turbulence anisotropy. The development of peripherally averaged friction factor and the distribution of local friction factor in fully developed flow are given and discussed.

  16. P-wave attenuation anisotropy in TI media and its application in fracture parameters inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yi-Yuan; Hu, Tian-Yue; He, Chuan; Tan, Yu-Yang

    2016-12-01

    The existence of aligned fractures in fluid-saturated rocks leads to obvious attenuation anisotropy and velocity anisotropy. Attenuation anisotropy analysis can be applied to estimate fracture density and scale, which provide important information for reservoir identification. This paper derives P-wave attenuation anisotropy in the ATI media where the symmetry axis is in the arbitrary direction theoretically and modifies the spectral ratio method to measure attenuation anisotropy in the ATI media, thus avoiding a large measurement error when applied to wide azimuth or full azimuth data. Fracture dip and azimuth can be estimated through attenuation anisotropy analysis. For small-scale fractures, fracture scale and fracture density can be determined with enhanced convergence if velocity and attenuation information are both used. We also apply the modified spectralratio method to microseismic field data from an oilfield in East China and extract the fracture dip through attenuation anisotropy analysis. The result agrees with the microseismic monitoring.

  17. Gaseous Dynamical Friction in Presence of Black Hole Radiative Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, KwangHo; Bogdanović, Tamara

    2017-04-01

    Dynamical friction is thought to be a principal mechanism responsible for orbital evolution of massive black holes (MBHs) in the aftermath of galactic mergers and an important channel for formation of gravitationally bound MBH binaries. We use 2D radiative hydrodynamic simulations to investigate the efficiency of dynamical friction in the presence of radiative feedback from an MBH moving through a uniform density gas. We find that ionizing radiation that emerges from the innermost parts of the MBH’s accretion flow strongly affects the dynamical friction wake and renders dynamical friction inefficient for a range of physical scenarios. MBHs in this regime tend to experience positive net acceleration, meaning that they speed up, contrary to the expectations for gaseous dynamical friction in absence of radiative feedback. The magnitude of this acceleration is however negligibly small and should not significantly alter the velocity of MBHs over relevant physical timescales. Our results suggest that suppression of dynamical friction is more severe at the lower mass end of the MBH spectrum which, compounded with inefficiency of the gas drag for lower mass objects in general, implies that <107 {M}ȯ MBHs have fewer means to reach the centers of merged galaxies. These findings provide formulation for a sub-resolution model of dynamical friction in presence of MBH radiative feedback that can be easily implemented in large scale simulations.

  18. CMB anisotropies: Total angular momentum method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wayne; White, Martin

    1997-07-01

    A total angular momentum representation simplifies the radiation transport problem for temperature and polarization anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Scattering terms couple only the quadrupole moments of the distributions and each moment corresponds directly to the observable angular pattern on the sky. We develop and employ these techniques to study the general properties of anisotropy generation from scalar, vector, and tensor perturbations to the metric and the matter, both in the cosmological fluids and from any seed perturbations (e.g., defects) that may be present. The simpler, more transparent form and derivation of the Boltzmann equations brings out the geometric and model-independent aspects of temperature and polarization anisotropy formation. Large angle scalar polarization provides a robust means to distinguish between isocurvature and adiabatic models for structure formation in principle. Vector modes have the unique property that the CMB polarization is dominated by magnetic-type parity at small angles (a factor of 6 in power compared with 0 for the scalars and 8/13 for the tensors) and hence potentially distinguishable independent of the model for the seed. The tensor modes produce a different sign from the scalars and vectors for the temperature-polarization correlations at large angles. We explore conditions under which one perturbation type may dominate over the others including a detailed treatment of the photon-baryon fluid before recombination.

  19. Microwave Anisotropies from Texture Seeded Structure Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Durrer, R; Zhou, Z H

    1994-01-01

    The cosmic microwave anisotropies in a scenario of large scale structure formation with cold dark matter and texture are discussed and compared with recent observational results of the COBE satellite. A couple of important statistical parameters are determined. The fluctuations are slightly non gaussian. The quadrupole anisotropy is $1.5\\pm 1.2\\times 10^{-5}$ and the fluctuations on a angular scale of 10 degrees are $ (3.8\\pm 2.6)\\times 10^{-5}$. The COBE are within about one standard deviation of the typical texture + CDM model discussed in this paper. Furthermore, we calculate fluctuations on intermediate scales (about 2 degrees) with the result $\\De T/T(\\theta \\sim 2^o) = 3.9\\pm 0.8)\\times 10^{-5}$. Collapsing textures are modeled by spherically symmetric field configurations. This leads to uncertainties of about a factor of~2.

  20. Study of lubrication behavior of pure water for hydrophobic friction pair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The perfluorooctyltrichlorosilane molecular layer was self-assembled on glass plate. The tribological properties of the molecular layer in water were studied with the method of ball on disk. An interesting phenomenon was found that low friction coefficients of 0.02―0.08 were obtained when the friction pair was lubricated with only a water droplet. Whereas, when the friction pair was encircled with large amount of water or fully immersed in water, the friction coefficient was higher than that under a droplet lubrication. A mechanism of water droplet lubrication was proposed that the surface tension caused by the solid-liquid-air three-phase interface makes water molecules enter into the contact zone, which separates the two friction surfaces and provides a low friction coefficient. However, water film can hardly form when more water encircles the friction pair, due to the attraction between water molecules.

  1. Modelling of the frictional behaviour of the snake skin covered by anisotropic surface nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, Alexander E.; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2016-03-01

    Previous experimental data clearly revealed anisotropic friction on the ventral scale surface of snakes. However, it is known that frictional properties of the ventral surface of the snake skin range in a very broad range and the degree of anisotropy ranges as well to a quite strong extent. This might be due to the variety of species studied, diversity of approaches used for the friction characterization, and/or due to the variety of substrates used as a counterpart in the experiments. In order to understand the interactions between the nanostructure arrays of the ventral surface of the snake skin, this study was undertaken, which is aimed at numerical modeling of frictional properties of the structurally anisotropic surfaces in contact with various size of asperities. The model shows that frictional anisotropy appears on the snake skin only on the substrates with a characteristic range of roughness, which is less or comparable with dimensions of the skin microstructure. In other words, scale of the skin relief should reflect an adaptation to the particular range of surfaces asperities of the substrate.

  2. Corrosion effects on friction factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magleby, H.L.; Shaffer, S.J.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents the results of NRC-sponsored material specimen tests that were performed to determine if corrosion increases the friction factors of sliding surfaces of motor-operated gate valves, which could require higher forces to close and open safety-related valves when subjected to their design basis differential pressures. Friction tests were performed with uncorroded specimens and specimens subjected to accelerated corrosion. Preliminary tests at ambient conditions showed that corrosion increased the friction factors, indicating the need for additional tests duplicating valve operating parameters at hot conditions. The additional tests showed friction factors of corroded specimens were 0.1 to 0.2 higher than for uncorroded specimens, and that the friction factors of the corroded specimens were not very dependent on contact stress or corrosion film thickness. The measured values of friction factors for the three corrosion films tested (simulating three operating times) were in the range of 0.3 to 0.4. The friction factor for even the shortest simulated operating time was essentially the same as the others, indicating that the friction factors appear to reach a plateau and that the plateau is reached quickly.

  3. Elastic model of dry friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larkin, A. I.; Khmelnitskii, D. E., E-mail: dekl2@cam.ac.uk [Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-15

    Friction of elastic bodies is connected with the passing through the metastable states that arise at the contact of surfaces rubbing against each other. Three models are considered that give rise to the metastable states. Friction forces and their dependence on the pressure are calculated. In Appendix A, the contact problem of elasticity theory is solved with adhesion taken into account.

  4. Friction in surface micromachined microengines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, S.L.; Sniegowski, J.J.; LaVigne, G.; McWhorter, P.J.

    1996-03-01

    Understanding the frictional properties of advanced Micro-Electro- Mechanical Systems (MEMS) is essential in order to develop optimized designs and fabrication processes, as well as to qualify devices for commercial applications. We develop and demonstrate a method to experimentally measure the forces associated with sliding friction of devices rotating on a hub. The method is demonstrated on the rotating output gear of the microengine recently developed at Sandia National Laboratories. In-situ measurements of an engine running at 18300 rpm give a coefficient of friction of 0.5 for radial (normal) forces less than 4 {mu}N. For larger forces the effective coefficient of friction abruptly increases, suggesting a fundamental change in the basic nature of the interaction between the gear and hub. The experimental approach we have developed to measure the frictional forces associated with the microengine is generically applicable to other MEMS devices.

  5. Is the magnetic anisotropy proportional to the orbital moment?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skomski, R; Kashyap, A; Enders, A

    2011-04-01

    The relation between orbital moment and magnetic anisotropy is investigated by model calculations, which show that only a part of the spin-orbit coupling contributes to the anisotropy. A large part of the anisotropy energy, about 50% for iron series elements and nearly 100% for rare-earths, is stored in the nonrelativistic part of the Hamiltonian. A feature important for x-ray magnetic circular dichroism is that the orbital moment of heavy atoms rotates with the spin moment, whereas in light atoms, the orbital moment is recreated in each different direction. In the discussion, we consider three examples of current interest in different areas of magnetism, namely, spin-orbit coupling in Gd3+ and Eu2+, surface anisotropy of Nd2Fe14B, and multiferroic magnetization switching using rare-earths. (C) 2011 American Institute of Physics. [doi:10.1063/1.3562445

  6. Tuning Exchange Anisotropy of Exchange-Biased System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yan; HU Jing-Guo; R.L.Stamps

    2008-01-01

    Exchange anisotropy in FM/AFM bilayers has given a lot of static magnetization properties such as enhanced coercivity and magnetization loop shifts.These phenomena are primarily from the effective anisotropies intro-duced into a ferromagnet by exchange coupling with a strongly anisotropic antiferromagnet.These effective anisotropies can also be used to explain the dynamic consequences of exchange-biased bilayers.In this article,the dynamic con-sequences such as exchange-induced susceptibility,exchange-induced permeability,and the corresponding domain wall characteristics in the exchange-biased structures of ferromagnet/antiferromagnetl/antiferromagnet2 are studied.The results show that the second antiferromagnetic layer can largely affect the dynamic consequences of exchange-biased bilayers.Especially in the ease of critical temperature,the effects become more obvious.Practically,the exchange anisotropy of biased bilayer system can be tuned by exchange coupling with the second antiferromagnetic layer.

  7. Dark matter electron anisotropy. A universal upper limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borriello, Enrico [Universita ' ' Federico II' ' , Napoli (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche; INFN, Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Maccione, Luca [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Cuoco, Alessandro [Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-12-15

    Indirect searches of particle Dark Matter (DM) with high energy Cosmic Rays (CR) are affected by large uncertainties, coming both from the DM side, and from poor understanding of the astrophysical backgrounds. We show that, on the contrary, the DM intrinsic degree of anisotropy in the arrival directions of high energy CR electrons and positrons does not suffer from these unknowns. Furthermore, if contributions from possible local sources are neglected, the intrinsic DM anisotropy sets the maximum degree of total anisotropy. As a consequence, if some anisotropy larger than the DM upper bound is detected, its origin could not be ascribed to DM, and would constitute an unambiguous evidence for the presence of astrophysical local discrete sources of high energy electrons and positrons. The Fermi-LAT will be able to probe such scenarios in the next years. (orig.)

  8. Tactile friction of topical formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skedung, L; Buraczewska-Norin, I; Dawood, N; Rutland, M W; Ringstad, L

    2016-02-01

    The tactile perception is essential for all types of topical formulations (cosmetic, pharmaceutical, medical device) and the possibility to predict the sensorial response by using instrumental methods instead of sensory testing would save time and cost at an early stage product development. Here, we report on an instrumental evaluation method using tactile friction measurements to estimate perceptual attributes of topical formulations. Friction was measured between an index finger and an artificial skin substrate after application of formulations using a force sensor. Both model formulations of liquid crystalline phase structures with significantly different tactile properties, as well as commercial pharmaceutical moisturizing creams being more tactile-similar, were investigated. Friction coefficients were calculated as the ratio of the friction force to the applied load. The structures of the model formulations and phase transitions as a result of water evaporation were identified using optical microscopy. The friction device could distinguish friction coefficients between the phase structures, as well as the commercial creams after spreading and absorption into the substrate. In addition, phase transitions resulting in alterations in the feel of the formulations could be detected. A correlation was established between skin hydration and friction coefficient, where hydrated skin gave rise to higher friction. Also a link between skin smoothening and finger friction was established for the commercial moisturizing creams, although further investigations are needed to analyse this and correlations with other sensorial attributes in more detail. The present investigation shows that tactile friction measurements have potential as an alternative or complement in the evaluation of perception of topical formulations. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Finger pad friction and its role in grip and touch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Michael J.; Johnson, Simon A.; Lefèvre, Philippe; Lévesque, Vincent; Hayward, Vincent; André, Thibaut; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    Many aspects of both grip function and tactile perception depend on complex frictional interactions occurring in the contact zone of the finger pad, which is the subject of the current review. While it is well established that friction plays a crucial role in grip function, its exact contribution for discriminatory touch involving the sliding of a finger pad is more elusive. For texture discrimination, it is clear that vibrotaction plays an important role in the discriminatory mechanisms. Among other factors, friction impacts the nature of the vibrations generated by the relative movement of the fingertip skin against a probed object. Friction also has a major influence on the perceived tactile pleasantness of a surface. The contact mechanics of a finger pad is governed by the fingerprint ridges and the sweat that is exuded from pores located on these ridges. Counterintuitively, the coefficient of friction can increase by an order of magnitude in a period of tens of seconds when in contact with an impermeably smooth surface, such as glass. In contrast, the value will decrease for a porous surface, such as paper. The increase in friction is attributed to an occlusion mechanism and can be described by first-order kinetics. Surprisingly, the sensitivity of the coefficient of friction to the normal load and sliding velocity is comparatively of second order, yet these dependencies provide the main basis of theoretical models which, to-date, largely ignore the time evolution of the frictional dynamics. One well-known effect on taction is the possibility of inducing stick–slip if the friction decreases with increasing sliding velocity. Moreover, the initial slip of a finger pad occurs by the propagation of an annulus of failure from the perimeter of the contact zone and this phenomenon could be important in tactile perception and grip function. PMID:23256185

  10. Student figures in friction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gritt B.

      This thesis analyses how ‘the student', as a contested figure, is negotiated and enacted in a period of extensive university reform in Denmark. Through a combination of historical and anthropological research, it focuses on students' changing participation in the shaping of Danish society......, students' room for participation in their own learning, influenced by demands for efficiency, flexibility and student-centred education. The thesis recasts the anthropological endeavour as one of ‘figuration work'. That is, ‘frictional events' are explored as moments when conflicting figures......, the university and their own education. Detailed studies explore, first, politically active students' various attempts to influence national educational policies; second, student participation in the development of the university, especially regarding debates over consumer conduct versus co-ownership; and third...

  11. Influences of anisotropy and inhomogeneity on supporting pressure of tunnel face with kinematical approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨小礼; 李闻韬; 潘秋景

    2015-01-01

    Based on the active failure mechanism generated by a spatial discretization technique, the stability of tunnel face was studied. With the help of the spatial discretization technique, not only the anisotropy and inhomogeneity of the cohesion but also the inhomogeneity of the internal friction angle was taken into account in the analysis of the supporting forces. From the perspective of upper bound theorem, the upper bound solutions of supporting pressure were derived. The influence of the anisotropy and heterogeneity on the supporting forces as well as the failure mechanisms was discussed. The results show that the spatial discretization characteristics of cohesion and internal frictional angle impose a significant effect on the supporting pressure, which indicates that above factors should be considered in the actual engineering.

  12. Secondary anisotropies of the CMB

    CERN Document Server

    Aghanim, Nabila; Silk, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The Cosmic Microwave Background fluctuations provide a powerful probe of the dark ages of the universe through the imprint of the secondary anisotropies associated with the reionisation of the universe and the growth of structure. We review the relation between the secondary anisotropies and and the primary anisotropies that are directly generated by quantum fluctuations in the very early universe. The physics of secondary fluctuations is described, with emphasis on the ionisation history and the evolution of structure. We discuss the different signatures arising from the secondary effects in terms of their induced temperature fluctuations, polarisation and statistics. The secondary anisotropies are being actively pursued at present, and we review the future and current observational status.

  13. Polarization singularity anisotropy: determining monstardom

    CERN Document Server

    Dennis, Mark R

    2008-01-01

    C points, that is isolated points of circular polarization in transverse fields of varying polarization, are classified morphologically into three distinct types, known as lemons, stars and monstars. These morphologies are interpreted here according to two natural parameters associated with the singularity, namely the anisotropy of the C point, and the polarization azimuth on the anisotropy axis. In addition to providing insight into singularity morphology, this observation applies to the densities of the various morphologies in isotropic random polarization speckle fields.

  14. Frictional velocity-weakening in landslides on Earth and on other planetary bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Antoine; Mangeney, Anne; Ampuero, Jean Paul

    2014-03-04

    One of the ultimate goals in landslide hazard assessment is to predict maximum landslide extension and velocity. Despite much work, the physical processes governing energy dissipation during these natural granular flows remain uncertain. Field observations show that large landslides travel over unexpectedly long distances, suggesting low dissipation. Numerical simulations of landslides require a small friction coefficient to reproduce the extension of their deposits. Here, based on analytical and numerical solutions for granular flows constrained by remote-sensing observations, we develop a consistent method to estimate the effective friction coefficient of landslides. This method uses a constant basal friction coefficient that reproduces the first-order landslide properties. We show that friction decreases with increasing volume or, more fundamentally, with increasing sliding velocity. Inspired by frictional weakening mechanisms thought to operate during earthquakes, we propose an empirical velocity-weakening friction law under a unifying phenomenological framework applicable to small and large landslides observed on Earth and beyond.

  15. Searches for Large-Scale Anisotropy in the Arrival Directions of Cosmic Rays Detected above Energy of $10^{19}$ eV at the Pierre Auger Observatory and the Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Auger, The Pierre; Aab, A; Abreu, P; Aglietta, M; Ahn, E J; Al, I; Albuquerque, I F M; Allekotte, I; Allen, J; Allison, P; Almela, A; Alvarez, J; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Alves, R; Ambrosio, M; Aminaei, A; Anchordoqui, L; Andringa, S; Aramo, C; Arqueros, F; Asorey, H; Assis, P; Aublin, J; Ave, M; Avenier, M; Avila, G; Badescu, A M; Barber, K B; Bäuml, J; Baus, C; Beatty, J J; Becker, K H; Bellido, J A; Berat, C; Bertou, X; Biermann, P L; Billoir, P; Blanco, M; Bleve, C; Blümer, H; Boháčová, M; Boncioli, D; Bonifazi, C; Bonino, R; Borodai, N; Brack, J; Brancus, I; Brogueira, P; Brown, W C; Buchholz, P; Bueno, A; Buitink, S; Buscemi, M; Caballero-Mora, K S; Caccianiga, B; Caccianiga, L; Candusso, M; Caramete, L; Caruso, R; Castellina, A; Cataldi, G; Cazon, L; Cester, R; Chavez, A G; Chiavassa, A; Chinellato, J A; Chudoba, J; Cilmo, M; Clay, R W; Cocciolo, G; Colalillo, R; Coleman, A; Collica, L; Coluccia, M R; Conceição, R; Contreras, F; Cooper, M J; Cordier, A; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Cronin, J; Curutiu, A; Dallier, R; Daniel, B; Dasso, S; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; de, R M; De, M; de, S J; de, J R T; De, I; de, J; de, V; del, L; Deligny, O; Dembinski, H; Dhital, N; Di, C; Di, A; Diaz, J C; Díaz, M L; Diogo, F; Dobrigkeit, C; Docters, W; D'Olivo, J C; Dorofeev, A; Dorosti, Q; Dova, M T; Ebr, J; Engel, R; Erdmann, M; Erfani, M; Escobar, C O; Espadanal, J; Etchegoyen, A; Facal, P; Falcke, H; Fang, K; Farrar, G; Fauth, A C; Fazzini, N; Ferguson, A P; Fernandes, M; Fick, B; Figueira, J M; Filevich, A; Filipčič, A; Fox, B D; Fratu, O; Fröhlich, U; Fuchs, B; Fuji, T; Gaior, R; García, B; Garcia, S T; Garcia-Gamez, D; Garcia-Pinto, D; Garilli, G; Gascon, A; Gate, F; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Giaccari, U; Giammarchi, M; Giller, M; Glaser, C; Glass, H; Gómez, M; Gómez, P F; Gonçalves, P; Gonzalez, J G; González, N; Gookin, B; Gorgi, A; Gorham, P; Gouffon, P; Grebe, S; Griffith, N; Grillo, A F; Grubb, T D; Guardincerri, Y; Guarino, F; Guedes, G P; Hampel, M R; Hansen, P; Harari, D; Harrison, T A; Hartmann, S; Harton, J L; Haungs, A; Hebbeker, T; Heck, D; Heimann, P; Herve, A E; Hill, G C; Hojvat, C; Hollon, N; Holt, E; Homola, P; Hörandel, J R; Horvath, P; Hrabovský, M; Huber, D; Huege, T; Insolia, A; Isar, P G; Islo, K; Jandt, I; Jansen, S; Jarne, C; Josebachuili, M; Kääpä, A; Kambeitz, O; Kampert, K H; Kasper, P; Katkov, I; Kégl, B; Keilhauer, B; Keivani, A; Kemp, E; Kieckhafer, R M; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Krause, R; Krohm, N; Krömer, O; Kruppke-Hansen, D; Kuempel, D; Kunka, N; La, G; LaHurd, D; Latronico, L; Lauer, R; Lauscher, M; Lautridou, P; Le, S; Leão, M S A B; Lebrun, D; Lebrun, P; Leigui, M A; Letessier-Selvon, A; Lhenry-Yvon, I; Link, K; López, R; Lopez, A; Louedec, K; Lozano, J; Lu, L; Lucero, A; Ludwig, M; Maccarone, M C; Malacari, M; Maldera, S; Mallamaci, M; Maller, J; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Mariazzi, A G; Marin, V; Mariş, I C; Marsella, G; Martello, D; Martin, L; Martinez, H; Martínez, O; Martraire, D; Masías, J J; Mathes, H J; Mathys, S; Matthews, J A J; Matthews, J; Matthiae, G; Maurel, D; Maurizio, D; Mayotte, E; Mazur, P O; Medina, C; Medina-Tanco, G; Melissas, M; Melo, D; Menichetti, E; Menshikov, A; Messina, S; Meyhandan, R; Mićanović, S; Micheletti, M I; Middendorf, L; Minaya, I A; Miramonti, L; Mitrica, B; Molina-Bueno, L; Mollerach, S; Monasor, M; Monnier, D; Montanet, F; Morello, C; Mostafá, M; Moura, C A; Muller, M A; Müller, G; Münchmeyer, M; Mussa, R; Navarra, G; Navas, S; Necesal, P; Nellen, L; Nelles, A; Neuser, J; Niechciol, M; Niemietz, L; Niggemann, T; Nitz, D; Nosek, D; Novotny, V; Nožka, L; Ochilo, L; Olinto, A; Oliveira, M; Pacheco, N; Pakk, D; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Palmieri, N; Papenbreer, P; Parente, G; Parra, A; Paul, T; Pech, M; Pȩkala, J; Pelayo, R; Pepe, I M; Perrone, L; Pesce, R; Petermann, E; Peters, C; Petrera, S; Petrolini, A; Petrov, Y; Phuntsok, J; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pieroni, P; Pimenta, M; Pirronello, V; Platino, M; Plum, M; Porcelli, A; Porowski, C; Prado, R R; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Purrello, V; Quel, E J; Querchfeld, S; Quinn, S; Rautenberg, J; Ravel, O; Ravignani, D; Revenu, B; Ridky, J; Riggi, S; Risse, M; Ristori, P; Rizi, V; Roberts, J; Rodrigues, W; Rodriguez, I; Rodriguez, G; Rodriguez, J; Rodríguez-Frías, M D; Ros, G; Rosado, J; Rossler, T; Roth, M; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Saffi, S J; Saftoiu, A; Salamida, F; Salazar, H; Saleh, A; Salesa, F; Salina, G; Sánchez, F; Sanchez-Lucas, P; Santo, C E; Santos, E; Santos, E M; Sarazin, F; Sarkar, B; Sarmento, R; Sato, R; Scharf, N; Scherini, V; Schieler, H; Schiffer, P; Scholten, O; Schoorlemmer, H; Schovánek, P; Schulz, A; Schulz, J; Schumacher, J; Sciutto, S J; Segreto, A; Settimo, M; Shadkam, A; Shellard, R C; Sidelnik, I; Sigl, G; Sima, O; Śmiał, A; Šmída, R; Snow, G R; Sommers, P; Sorokin, J; Squartini, R; Srivastava, Y N; Stanič, S; Stapleton, J; Stasielak, J; Stephan, M; Stutz, A; Suarez, F; Suomijärvi, T; Supanitsky, A D; Sutherland, M S; Swain, J; Szadkowski, Z; Szuba, M; Taborda, O A; Tapia, A; Tartare, M; Theodoro, V M; Timmermans, C; Todero, C J; Toma, G; Tomankova, L; Tomé, B; Tonachini, A; Torralba, G; Torres, D; Travnicek, P; Trovato, E; Tueros, M; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Urban, M; Valdés, J F; Valiño, I; Valore, L; van, G; van, A M; van, S; van, A; Varela, E; Vargas, B; Varner, G; Vázquez, J R; Vázquez, R A; Veberič, D; Verzi, V; Vicha, J; Videla, M; Villaseñor, L; Vlcek, B; Vorobiov, S; Wahlberg, H; Wainberg, O; Walz, D; Watson, A A; Weber, M; Weidenhaupt, K; Weindl, A; Werner, F; Widom, A; Wiencke, L; Wilczyńska, B; Wilczyński, H; Will, M; Williams, C; Winchen, T; Wittkowski, D; Wundheiler, B; Wykes, S; Yamamoto, T; Yapici, T; Younk, P; Yuan, G; Yushkov, A; Zamorano, B; Zas, E; Zavrtanik, D; Zavrtanik, M; Zaw, I; Zepeda, A; Zhou, J; Zhu, Y; Zimbres, M; Ziolkowski, M; Abbasi, R U; Abe, M; Abu-Zayyad, T; Allen, M; Anderson, R; Azuma, R; Barcikowski, E; Belz, J W; Bergman, D R; Blake, S A; Cady, R; Chae, M J; Cheon, B G; Chiba, J; Chikawa, M; Cho, W R; Fujii, T; Fukushima, M; Goto, T; Hanlon, W; Hayashi, Y; Hayashida, N; Hibino, K; Honda, K; Ikeda, D; Inoue, N; Ishii, T; Ishimori, R; Ito, H; Ivanov, D; Jui, C C H; Kadota, K; Kakimoto, F; Kalashev, O; Kasahara, K; Kawai, H; Kawakami, S; Kawana, S; Kawata, K; Kido, E; Kim, H B; Kim, J H; Kitamura, S; Kitamura, Y; Kuzmin, V; Kwon, Y J; Lan, J; Lim, S I; Lundquist, J P; Machida, K; Martens, K; Matsuda, T; Matsuyama, T; Matthews, J N; Minamino, M; Mukai, K; Myers, I; Nagasawa, K; Nagataki, S; Nakamura, T; Nonaka, T; Nozato, A; Ogio, S; Ogura, J; Ohnishi, M; Ohoka, H; Oki, K; Okuda, T; Ono, M; Oshima, A; Ozawa, S; Park, I H; Pshirkov, M S; Rodriguez, D C; Rubtsov, G; Ryu, D; Sagawa, H; Sakurai, N; Sampson, A L; Scott, L M; Shah, P D; Shibata, F; Shibata, T; Shimodaira, H; Shin, B K; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Stroman, T A; Suzawa, T; Takamura, M; Takeda, M; Takeishi, R; Taketa, A; Takita, M; Tameda, Y; Tanaka, H; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, M; Thomas, S B; Thomson, G B; Tinyakov, P; Tkachev, I; Tokuno, H; Tomida, T; Troitsky, S; Tsunesada, Y; Tsutsumi, K; Uchihori, Y; Udo, S; Urban, F; Vasiloff, G; Wong, T; Yamane, R; Yamaoka, H; Yamazaki, K; Yang, J; Yashiro, K; Yoneda, Y; Yoshida, S; Yoshii, H; Zollinger, R; Zundel, Z

    2014-01-01

    Spherical harmonic moments are well-suited for capturing anisotropy at any scale in the flux of cosmic rays. An unambiguous measurement of the full set of spherical harmonic coefficients requires full-sky coverage. This can be achieved by combining data from observatories located in both the northern and southern hemispheres. To this end, a joint analysis using data recorded at the Telescope Array and the Pierre Auger Observatory above $10^{19}$ eV is presented in this work. The resulting multipolar expansion of the flux of cosmic rays allows us to perform a series of anisotropy searches, and in particular to report on the angular power spectrum of cosmic rays above $10^{19}$ eV. No significant deviation from isotropic expectations is found throughout the analyses performed. Upper limits on the amplitudes of the dipole and quadrupole moments are derived as a function of the direction in the sky, varying between 7% and 13% for the dipole and between 7% and 10% for a symmetric quadrupole.

  16. Searches for large-scale anisotropy in the arrival directions of cosmic rays detected above energy of 10{sup 19} eV at the Pierre Auger observatory and the telescope array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aab, A. [Universität Siegen, Siegen (Germany); Abreu, P.; Andringa, S. [Laboratório de Instrumentação e Física Experimental de Partículas-LIP and Instituto Superior Técnico-IST, Universidade de Lisboa-UL (Portugal); Aglietta, M. [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino (INAF), Università di Torino and Sezione INFN, Torino (Italy); Ahn, E. J. [Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States); Al Samarai, I. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire d' Orsay (IPNO), Université Paris 11, CNRS-IN2P3, Orsay (France); Albuquerque, I. F. M. [Universidade de São Paulo, Instituto de Física, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Allekotte, I.; Asorey, H. [Centro Atómico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro (CNEA-UNCuyo-CONICET), San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Allen, J. [New York University, New York, NY (United States); Allison, P. [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Almela, A. [Universidad Tecnológica Nacional - Facultad Regional Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Castillo, J. Alvarez [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico); Alvarez-Muñiz, J. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Batista, R. Alves [Universität Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Ambrosio, M.; Aramo, C. [Università di Napoli " Federico II" and Sezione INFN, Napoli (Italy); Aminaei, A. [IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen (Netherlands); Anchordoqui, L. [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Arqueros, F. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration; Telescope Array Collaboration; and others

    2014-10-20

    Spherical harmonic moments are well-suited for capturing anisotropy at any scale in the flux of cosmic rays. An unambiguous measurement of the full set of spherical harmonic coefficients requires full-sky coverage. This can be achieved by combining data from observatories located in both the northern and southern hemispheres. To this end, a joint analysis using data recorded at the Telescope Array and the Pierre Auger Observatory above 10{sup 19} eV is presented in this work. The resulting multipolar expansion of the flux of cosmic rays allows us to perform a series of anisotropy searches, and in particular to report on the angular power spectrum of cosmic rays above 10{sup 19} eV. No significant deviation from isotropic expectations is found throughout the analyses performed. Upper limits on the amplitudes of the dipole and quadrupole moments are derived as a function of the direction in the sky, varying between 7% and 13% for the dipole and between 7% and 10% for a symmetric quadrupole.

  17. Searches for Large-Scale Anisotropy in the Arrival Directions of Cosmic Rays Detected above Energy of $10^{19}$ eV at the Pierre Auger Observatory and the Telescope Array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aab, Alexander; et al,

    2014-10-07

    Spherical harmonic moments are well-suited for capturing anisotropy at any scale in the flux of cosmic rays. An unambiguous measurement of the full set of spherical harmonic coefficients requires full-sky coverage. This can be achieved by combining data from observatories located in both the northern and southern hemispheres. To this end, a joint analysis using data recorded at the Telescope Array and the Pierre Auger Observatory above 1019 eV is presented in this work. The resulting multipolar expansion of the flux of cosmic rays allows us to perform a series of anisotropy searches, and in particular to report on the angular power spectrum of cosmic rays above 1019 eV. No significant deviation from isotropic expectations is found throughout the analyses performed. Upper limits on the amplitudes of the dipole and quadrupole moments are derived as a function of the direction in the sky, varying between 7% and 13% for the dipole and between 7% and 10% for a symmetric quadrupole.

  18. Microstructure and anisotropic mechanical behavior of friction stir welded AA2024 alloy sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhihan [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Friction Welding Technologies, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072, Shaanxi (China); Li, Wenya, E-mail: liwy@nwpu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Friction Welding Technologies, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072, Shaanxi (China); Li, Jinglong [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Friction Welding Technologies, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072, Shaanxi (China); Chao, Y.J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Vairis, A. [Mechanical Engineering Department, TEI of Crete, Heraklion, Crete 71004 (Greece)

    2015-09-15

    The anisotropic mechanical properties of friction stir welded (FSW) AA2024-T3 alloy joints were investigated based on the uniaxial tensile tests. The joint microstructure was examined by using electron back-scattered diffraction and transmission electron microscope. Results show that the evident anisotropic failure and yielding are present in the FSW joints. With the increase of loading angle from 0° to 90° the ultimate tensile strength and elongation of the specimens consistently decrease, or at first decrease and then increase, depending on the FSW process parameters. The specimen cut from the weld direction, i.e. a loading angle of 0°, exhibits the highest strength and elongation. - Highlights: • Microstructure and anisotropy of friction stir welded joints were studied. • The evident anisotropic failure and yielding are present in joints. • The lowest yield stress and UTS are at 45° and 60° loadings, respectively. • Rotation speed heavily impact on the anisotropy of joints.

  19. REDUCED ENGINE FRICTION AND WEAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ron Matthews

    2005-05-01

    This Final Technical Report discusses the progress was made on the experimental and numerical tasks over the duration of this project regarding a new technique for decreasing engine friction and wear via liner rotation. The experimental subtasks involved quantifying the reduction in engine friction for a prototype rotating liner engine relative to a comparable baseline engine. Both engine were single cylinder conversions of nominally identical production four-cylinder engines. Hot motoring tests were conducted initially and revealed that liner rotation decreased engine friction by 20% under motoring conditions. A well-established model was used to estimate that liner rotation should decrease the friction of a four-cylinder engine by 40% under hot motoring conditions. Hot motoring tear-down tests revealed that the crankshaft and valve train frictional losses were essentially the same for the two engines, as expected. However, the rotating liner engine had much lower (>70%) piston assembly friction compared to the conventional engine. Finally, we used the Instantaneous IMEP method to compare the crank-angle resolved piston assembly friction for the two engines. Under hot motoring conditions, these measurements revealed a significant reduction in piston assembly friction, especially in the vicinity of compression TDC when the lubrication regime transitions from hydrodynamic through mixed and into boundary friction. We have some remaining problems with these measurements that we expect to solve during the next few weeks. We will then perform these measurements under firing conditions. We also proposed to improve the state-of-the-art of numerical modeling of piston assembly friction for conventional engines and then to extend this model to rotating liner engines. Our research team first modeled a single ring in the Purdue ring-liner test rig. Our model showed good agreement with the test rig data for a range of speeds and loads. We then modeled a complete piston

  20. Frictional properties of confined polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, Vladimir N; Persson, Bo N J

    2008-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate, and b) polymer sliding on polymer. In the first setup the shear stresses are relatively...... independent of molecular length. For polymer sliding on polymer the friction is significantly larger, and dependent on the molecular chain length. In both cases, the shear stresses are proportional to the squeezing pressure and finite at zero load, indicating an adhesional contribution to the friction force...

  1. Multimodal Friction Ignition Tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Eddie; Howard, Bill; Herald, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The multimodal friction ignition tester (MFIT) is a testbed for experiments on the thermal and mechanical effects of friction on material specimens in pressurized, oxygen-rich atmospheres. In simplest terms, a test involves recording sensory data while rubbing two specimens against each other at a controlled normal force, with either a random stroke or a sinusoidal stroke having controlled amplitude and frequency. The term multimodal in the full name of the apparatus refers to a capability for imposing any combination of widely ranging values of the atmospheric pressure, atmospheric oxygen content, stroke length, stroke frequency, and normal force. The MFIT was designed especially for studying the tendency toward heating and combustion of nonmetallic composite materials and the fretting of metals subjected to dynamic (vibrational) friction forces in the presence of liquid oxygen or pressurized gaseous oxygen test conditions approximating conditions expected to be encountered in proposed composite material oxygen tanks aboard aircraft and spacecraft in flight. The MFIT includes a stainless-steel pressure vessel capable of retaining the required test atmosphere. Mounted atop the vessel is a pneumatic cylinder containing a piston for exerting the specified normal force between the two specimens. Through a shaft seal, the piston shaft extends downward into the vessel. One of the specimens is mounted on a block, denoted the pressure block, at the lower end of the piston shaft. This specimen is pressed down against the other specimen, which is mounted in a recess in another block, denoted the slip block, that can be moved horizontally but not vertically. The slip block is driven in reciprocating horizontal motion by an electrodynamic vibration exciter outside the pressure vessel. The armature of the electrodynamic exciter is connected to the slip block via a horizontal shaft that extends into the pressure vessel via a second shaft seal. The reciprocating horizontal

  2. Anisotropy tuning with the Wilson flow

    CERN Document Server

    Borsanyi, S; Fodor, Z; Katz, S D; Krieg, S; Kurth, T; Mages, S; Schafer, A; Szabo, K K

    2012-01-01

    We use the Wilson flow to define the gauge anisotropy at a given physical scale. We demonstrate the use of the anisotropic flow by performing the tuning of the bare gauge anisotropy in the tree-level Symanzik action for several lattice spacings and target anisotropies. We use this method to tune the anisotropy parameters in full QCD, where we also exploit the diminishing effect of a well chosen smearing on the renormalization of the fermion anisotropy.

  3. Physical modelling of elastic anisotropy in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furre, Anne-Kari

    1997-12-31

    During the last decades, anisotropy has become increasingly interesting in hydrocarbon prospecting. Knowledge of anisotropy in the subsurface can improve reservoir production and data interpretation. This thesis presents experimental studies of three different artificial anisotropic media: layered materials, isotropic matrix with stress-induced fractures, and layered media with controlled crack patterns at an oblique angle relative to layering. Layered media were constructed by varying grain size distributions for different layers, which resulted in acoustic and permeability anisotropy. The thin layer materials could be described by Backus modelling provided the wavelength was much larger than the layer periods. Frequency dependent scattering was observed for waves travelling normal to the layers. Saturated wave velocities were consistent with transverse isotropic Biot theory, but because the permeability anisotropy was small, no flow dependent attenuation anisotropy was observed. When sandstones were cemented under stress and then released, to simulate a vertical core or uplift process, predominantly horizontal cracks developed in the samples. On reloading to the cementing stress level, the velocities were below the initial values, which supports the theories of crack growth. In further triaxial tests on the same material a stress-dependent anisotropy occurred similar to what is often seen in natural samples taken from large depths. 70 refs., 200 figs., 56 tabs.

  4. Colossal anisotropy of the magnetic properties of doped lithium nitrodometalates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antropov, Vladimir P [Ames Laboratory; Antonov, Victor N [Ames Laboratory

    2014-09-01

    We present a first-principles investigation of the electronic structure and physical properties of doped lithium nitridometalates Li2(Li1-xMx)N (LiMN) with M = Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni. The diverse properties include the equilibrium magnetic moments, magneto-crystalline anisotropy, magneto-optical Kerr spectra, and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. We explain the colossal magnetic anisotropy in LiFeN by its unique electronic structure which ultimately leads to a series of unusual physical properties. The most unique property is a complete suppression of relativistic effects and freezing of orbital moments for in-plane orientation of the magnetization. This leads to the colossal spatial anisotropy of many magnetic properties including energy, Kerr, and dichroism effects. LiFeN is identified as an ultimate single-ion anisotropy system where a nearly insulating state can be produced by a spin orbital coupling alone. A very nontrivial strongly fluctuating and sign changing character of the magnetic anisotropy with electronic 3d-atomic doping is predicted theoretically. A large and highly anisotropic Kerr effect due to the interband transitions between atomic-like Fe 3d bands is found for LiFeN. A giant anisotropy of the x-ray magnetic circular dichroism for the Fe K spectrum and a very weak one for the Fe L2,3 spectra in LiFeN are also predicted.

  5. An Alternative Frictional Boundary Condition for Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gaoqiang; Feng, Zhili; Zhu, Yucan; Shi, Qingyu

    2016-09-01

    For better application of numerical simulation in optimization and design of friction stir welding (FSW), this paper presents a new frictional boundary condition at the tool/workpiece interface for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of FSW. The proposed boundary condition is based on an implementation of the Coulomb friction model. Using the new boundary condition, the CFD simulation yields non-uniform distribution of contact state over the tool/workpiece interface, as validated by the experimental weld macrostructure. It is found that interfacial sticking state is present over large area at the tool-workpiece interface, while significant interfacial sliding occurs at the shoulder periphery, the lower part of pin side, and the periphery of pin bottom. Due to the interfacial sticking, a rotating flow zone is found under the shoulder, in which fast circular motion occurs. The diameter of the rotating flow zone is smaller than the shoulder diameter, which is attributed to the presence of the interfacial sliding at the shoulder periphery. For the simulated welding condition, the heat generation due to friction and plastic deformation makes up 54.4 and 45.6% of the total heat generation rate, respectively. The simulated temperature field is validated by the good agreement to the experimental measurements.

  6. A Pedagogical Model of Static Friction

    CERN Document Server

    Pickett, Galen T

    2015-01-01

    While dry Coulombic friction is an elementary topic in any standard introductory course in mechanics, the critical distinction between the kinetic and static friction forces is something that is both hard to teach and to learn. In this paper, I describe a geometric model of static friction that may help introductory students to both understand and apply the Coulomb static friction approximation.

  7. Flexible Friction Stir Joining Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Zhili [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lim, Yong Chae [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mahoney, Murray [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States); Sanderson, Samuel [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States); Larsen, Steve [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States); Steel, Russel [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States); Fleck, Dale [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States); Fairchild, Doug P [ExxonMobil, Upstream Research Company (URC), Houston, TX (United States); Wasson, Andrew J [ExxonMobil, Upstream Research Company (URC), Houston, TX (United States); Babb, Jon [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States); Higgins, Paul [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States)

    2015-07-23

    Reported herein is the final report on a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) project with industry cost-share that was jointly carried out by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company (ExxonMobil), and MegaStir Technologies (MegaStir). The project was aimed to advance the state of the art of friction stir welding (FSW) technology, a highly energy-efficient solid-state joining process, for field deployable, on-site fabrications of large, complex and thick-sectioned structures of high-performance and high-temperature materials. The technology innovations developed herein attempted to address two fundamental shortcomings of FSW: 1) the inability for on-site welding and 2) the inability to weld thick section steels, both of which have impeded widespread use of FSW in manufacturing. Through this work, major advance has been made toward transforming FSW technology from a “specialty” process to a mainstream materials joining technology to realize its pervasive energy, environmental, and economic benefits across industry.

  8. Friction Material Composites Materials Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Sundarkrishnaa, K L

    2012-01-01

    Friction Material Composites is the first of the five volumes which strongly educates and updates engineers and other professionals in braking industries, research and test labs. It explains besides the formulation of design processes and its complete manufacturing input. This book gives an idea of mechanisms of friction and how to control them by designing .The book is  useful for designers  of automotive, rail and aero industries for designing the brake systems effectively with the integration of friction material composite design which is critical. It clearly  emphasizes the driving  safety and how serious designers should  select the design input. The significance of friction material component like brake pad or a liner as an integral part of the brake system of vehicles is explained. AFM pictures at nanolevel illustrate broadly the explanations given.

  9. Measuring the cosmological lepton asymmetry through the CMB anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Kinney, W H; Kinney, William H.; Riotto, Antonio

    1999-01-01

    A large lepton asymmetry in the Universe is still a viable possibility and leads to many interesting phenomena such as gauge symmetry nonrestoration at high temperature. We show that a large lepton asymmetry changes the predicted cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy and that any degeneracy in the relic neutrino sea will be measured to a precision of 1% or better when the CMB anisotropy is measured at the accuracy expected to result from the planned satellite missions MAP and Planck. In fact, the current measurements already put an upper limit on the lepton asymmetry of the Universe which is stronger than the one coming from considerations of primordial nucleosynthesis and structure formation.

  10. Simulating frictional contact in smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Jian; WU; Hao; GU; ChongShi; HUA; Hui

    2013-01-01

    Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a powerful tool for large deformation computation of soil flow. However, the method to simulate frictional contact in the framework of SPH is still absent and needs to be developed. This paper presents an algorithm to simulate frictional contact between soil and rigid or deformable structure in the framework of SPH. In this algo-rithm, the computational domain is divided into several sub-domains according to the existing contact boundaries, and contact forces are used as bridges of these sub-domains to fulfill problem solving. In the process of the SPH discretization for govern-ing equation of each sub-domain, the inherent problem of boundary deficiency of SPH is handled properly. Therefore, the par-ticles located at contact boundary can have precise acceleration, which is critical for contact detection. Then, based on the as-sumption that the SPH particle of soil can slightly penetrate into the structure, the contact forces along normal and tangential directions of the contact surface are computed by momentum principle, and the frictional force is modified if sliding occurs.Compared with previous methods, in which only particle-to-particle contact is considered or frictional sliding is just ignored,the method proposed in this study is more efficient and accurate, and is suitable for simulating interaction between soft materi-als and rigid or deformable structures, which are very common in geotechnical engineering. A number of numerical tests have been carried out to verify the accuracy and stability of the proposed algorithm, and the results have been compared with ana-lytical solutions or FEM results. The consistency obtained from these comparisons indicates that the algorithm is robust and can enhance the computing capability of SPH.

  11. Kinetic Friction Coefficient of Ice,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    For the hardest ice tested (xi = 0.33 described by Rabinowicz (1965), where To is inter- mm, H, = 1525 kPa), the calculated values of a preted as...material with a low elastic pressures. The frictional force was measured at modulus ( Rabinowicz 1965). It has been observed the application point of...tion 10, pp. 8-16. Barnes, P. and D. Tabor (1966) Plastic flow and Rabinowicz , E. (1965) Friction and Wear of Mate- pressure melting in the deformation

  12. Peak mass and dynamical friction

    CERN Document Server

    Del Popolo, A

    1995-01-01

    We show how the results given by several authors relatively to the mass of a density peak are changed when small scale substructure induced by dynamical friction are taken into account. The peak mass obtained is compared to the result of Peacock \\& Heavens (1990) and to the peak mass when dynamical friction is absent to show how these effects conspire to reduce the mass accreted by the peak.

  13. Tire/runway friction interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Thomas J.

    1990-01-01

    An overview is given of NASA Langley's tire/runway pavement interface studies. The National Tire Modeling Program, evaluation of new tire and landing gear designs, tire wear and friction tests, and tire hydroplaning studies are examined. The Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility is described along with some ground friction measuring vehicles. The major goals and scope of several joint FAA/NASA programs are identified together with current status and plans.

  14. Labor Supply and Optimization Frictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Jakob Egholt

    2015-01-01

    In this paper I investigate the nature of optimization frictions by studying the labor market of Danish students. This particular labor market is an interesting case study as it features a range of special institutional settings that affect students’ incentive to earn income and comparing outcomes...... theory. More concretely I find the dominate optimization friction to be individuals’ inattention about their earnings during the year, while real adjustment cost and gradual learning appears to be of less importance....

  15. Debris-bed friction of hard-bedded glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, D.; Iverson, N.R.; Hooyer, T.S.; Fischer, U.H.; Jackson, M.; Moore, P.L.

    2005-01-01

    [1] Field measurements of debris-bed friction on a smooth rock tablet at the bed of Engabreen, a hard-bedded, temperate glacier in northern Norway, indicated that basal ice containing 10% debris by volume exerted local shear traction of up to 500 kPa. The corresponding bulk friction coefficient between the dirty basal ice and the tablet was between 0.05 and 0.08. A model of friction in which nonrotating spherical rock particles are held in frictional contact with the bed by bed-normal ice flow can account for these measurements if the power law exponent for ice flowing past large clasts is 1. A small exponent (n glacier sliding at 20 m a-1 with a geothermally induced melt rate of 0.006 m a-1 and an effective pressure of 300 kPa can exceed 100 kPa. Debris-bed friction can therefore be a major component of sliding resistance, contradicting the common assumption that debris-bed friction is negligible. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Frictional Effects on Gear Tooth Contact Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng Li; Ken Mao

    2013-01-01

    The present paper concentrates on the investigations regarding the situations of frictional shear stress of gear teeth and the relevant frictional effects on bending stresses and transmission error in gear meshing. Sliding friction is one of the major reasons causing gear failure and vibration; the adequate consideration of frictional effects is essential for understanding gear contact behavior accurately. An analysis of tooth frictional effect on gear performance in spur gear is presented us...

  17. The BEAN experiment - An EISCAT study of ion temperature anisotropies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. W. McCrea

    Full Text Available Results are presented from a novel EISCAT special programme, SP-UK-BEAN, intended for the direct measurement of the ion temperature anisotropy during ion frictional heating events in the high-latitude F-region. The experiment employs a geometry which provides three simultaneous estimates of the ion temperature in a single F-region observing volume at a range of aspect angles from 0° to 36°. In contrast to most previous EISCAT experiments to study ion temperature anisotropies, field-aligned observations are made using the Sodankylä radar, while the Kiruna radar measures at an aspect angle of the order of 30°. Anisotropic effects can thus be studied within a small common volume whose size and altitude range is limited by the radar beamwidth, rather than in volumes which overlap but cover different altitudes. The derivation of line-of-sight ion temperature is made more complex by the presence of an unknown percentage of atomic and molecular ions at the observing altitude and the possibility of non-Maxwellian distortion of the ion thermal velocity distribution. The first problem has been partly accounted for by insisting that a constant value of electron temperature be maintained. This enables an estimate of the ion composition to be made, and facilitates the derivation of more realistic line-of-sight ion temperatures and temperature anisotropies. The latter problem has been addressed by assuming that the thermal velocity distribution remains bi-Maxwellian. The limitations of these approaches are discussed. The ion temperature anisotropies and temperature partition coefficients during two ion heating events give values intermediate between those expected for atomic and for molecular species. This result is consistent with an analysis which indicates that significant proportions of molecular ions (up to 50% were present at the times of greatest heating.

  18. Observations of the anisotropy of cosmic rays at TeV-PeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    BenZvi, S.

    2014-07-01

    During the past decade, multiple observatories have reported significant observations of the anisotropy of cosmic rays in the TeV energy band. The anisotropy has been observed at large scales and small scales in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. The source of the anisotropy is not well-understood, though both a galactic and a heliospheric origin have been suggested. We discuss recent observations of the shape and energy dependence of the anisotropy, with particular attention to measurements by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory in the Southern Hemisphere and the Milagro and High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatories in the Northern Hemisphere.

  19. Predicted Impacts of Proton Temperature Anisotropy on Solar Wind Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Kristopher G

    2015-01-01

    Particle velocity distributions measured in the weakly collisional solar wind are frequently found to be non-Maxwellian, but how these non-Maxwellian distributions impact the physics of plasma turbulence in the solar wind remains unanswered. Using numerical solutions of the linear dispersion relation for a collisionless plasma with a bi-Maxwellian proton velocity distribution, we present a unified framework for the four proton temperature anisotropy instabilities, identifying the associated stable eigenmodes, highlighting the unstable region of wavevector space, and presenting the properties of the growing eigenfunctions. Based on physical intuition gained from this framework, we address how the proton temperature anisotropy impacts the nonlinear dynamics of the \\Alfvenic fluctuations underlying the dominant cascade of energy from large to small scales and how the fluctuations driven by proton temperature anisotropy instabilities interact nonlinearly with each other and with the fluctuations of the large-scal...

  20. A New Maximum-Likelihood Technique for Reconstructing Cosmic-Ray Anisotropy at All Angular Scales

    CERN Document Server

    Ahlers, Markus; Desiati, Paolo; Díaz-Vélez, Juan Carlos; Fiorino, Daniel W; Westerhoff, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The arrival directions of TeV-PeV cosmic rays show weak but significant anisotropies with relative intensities at the level of one per mille. Due to the smallness of the anisotropies, quantitative studies require careful disentanglement of detector effects from the observation. We discuss an iterative maximum-likelihood reconstruction that simultaneously fits cosmic ray anisotropies and detector acceptance. The method does not rely on detector simulations and provides an optimal anisotropy reconstruction for ground-based cosmic ray observatories located in the middle latitudes. It is particularly well suited to the recovery of the dipole anisotropy, which is a crucial observable for the study of cosmic ray diffusion in our Galaxy. We also provide general analysis methods for recovering large- and small-scale anisotropies that take into account systematic effects of the observation by ground-based detectors.

  1. Radial arrangement of Janus-like setae permits friction control in spiders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Jonas O.; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic attachment is the key to move on steep surfaces, with mechanisms being still not well understood. The hunting spider Cupiennius salei (Arachnida, Ctenidae) possesses hairy attachment pads (claw tufts) at its distal legs, consisting of directional branched setae. The morphological investigation revealed that adhesive setae are arranged in a radial manner within the distal tarsus. Friction of claw tufts on smooth glass was measured to reveal the functional effect of seta arrangement within the pad. Measurements revealed frictional anisotropy in both longitudinal and transversal directions. Contact behaviour of adhesive setae was investigated in a reflection interference contrast microscope (RICM). Observations on living spiders showed, that only a small part of the hairy pads is in contact at the same time. Thus the direction of frictional forces is depending on leg placement and rotation. This may aid controlling the attachment to the substrate.

  2. Effect of boundary vibration on the frictional behavior of a dense sheared granular layer

    CERN Document Server

    Ferdowsi, B; Guyer, R A; Johnson, P A; Carmeliet, J

    2014-01-01

    We report results of 3D Discrete Element Method (DEM) simulations aiming at investigating the role of the boundary vibration in inducing frictional weakening in sheared granular layers. We study the role of different vibration amplitudes applied at various shear stress levels, for a granular layer in the stick-slip regime and in the steady-sliding regime. Results are reported in terms of friction drops and kinetic energy release associated with frictional weakening events. We find that larger vibration amplitude induces larger frictional weakening events. The results show evidence of a threshold below which no induced frictional weakening takes place. Friction drop size is found to be dependent on the shear stress at the time of vibration. A significant increase in the ratio between the number of slipping contacts to the number of sticking contacts in the granular layer is observed for large vibration amplitudes. These vibration-induced contact rearrangements enhance particle mobilization and induces a fricti...

  3. A method to change frictional characteristics based on ultrasonic micro driving technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Weishan; ZHANG Fan; LIU Junkao

    2006-01-01

    In order to reduce friction force and eliminate stick-slip phenomenon of a mechanic system at a low velocity, a method based on the ultrasonic micro driving technique to change the frictional characteristics is proposed. Exciting clockwise and anticlockwise microscopic elliptical motion of driving points on the ultrasonic actuator's two longitudinal bolt-clamped vibrators will generate ultrasonic lubrication action; furthermore, the friction can be actively controlled by adjusting the vibrators' vibrating amplitude. An experimental installation for friction control is designed using aerostatic guide, force sensors and a low speed moment motor.Fuzzy control theory is applied into this system. The experiments indicate the friction force has been reduced largely and the motion of the experimental system is stable. The friction coefficient is only about 0.0053 when the total mass of the ultrasonic actuator and load is3.8 kg and the motor's driving velocity is 0.5 mm/s.

  4. A Investigation of the Elastic and Dielectric Anisotropy of Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischman, Elmer Henry, Jr.

    This investigation was undertaken to learn more about the way in which fiber orientation and drying restraint affect the elastic and dielectric properties in all three principal directions of paper. It was found that both variables affect the in -plane elastic anisotropy by similar magnitudes. What was surprising, however, was that wet straining has the greatest effect in the z-direction. The z-direction stiffness was reduced 50% as a result of only a moderate 2.4% wet strain in the plane of the sheet. On the other hand, the dielectric anisotropy was affected very little by wet straining. In fact, the dielectric results could be explained in terms of mixture theories. The anisotropy in the dielectric constant when measured at microwave frequencies could largely be explained as being the result of fiber orientation alone without having to assume that the fiber has an anisotropic dielectric constant. From comparison of the elastic and dielectric results, it may be concluded that the mechanism by which wet straining enhances the elastic anisotropy does not involve a large fiber orientation in the direction of wet straining. From a practical standpoint, one could use the dielectric anisotropy measured at microwave frequencies as a measure of the fiber orientation distribution in the sheet. On the basis of the results presented here, this measurement should be quite insensitive to any stresses imposed on the sheet as it dries.

  5. Giant dielectric anisotropy via homogenization

    CERN Document Server

    Mackay, Tom G

    2014-01-01

    A random mixture of two isotropic dielectric materials, one composed of oriented spheroidal particles of relative permittivity $\\epsilon_a$ and the other composed of oriented spheroidal particles of relative permittivity $\\epsilon_b$, was considered in the long wavelength regime. The permittivity dyadic of the resulting homogenized composite material (HCM) was estimated using the Bruggeman homogenization formalism. The HCM was an orthorhombic biaxial material if the symmetry axes of the two populations of spheroids were mutually perpendicular and a uniaxial material if these two axes were mutually aligned. The degree of anisotropy of the HCM, as gauged by the ratio of the eigenvalues of the HCM's permittivity dyadic, increased as the shape of the constituent particles became more eccentric. The greatest degrees of HCM anisotropy were achieved for the limiting cases wherein the constituent particles were shaped as needles or discs. In these instances explicit formulas for the HCM anisotropy were derived from t...

  6. Friction in total hip joint prosthesis measured in vivo during walking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Damm

    Full Text Available Friction-induced moments and subsequent cup loosening can be the reason for total hip joint replacement failure. The aim of this study was to measure the in vivo contact forces and friction moments during walking. Instrumented hip implants with Al2O3 ceramic head and an XPE inlay were used. In vivo measurements were taken 3 months post operatively in 8 subjects. The coefficient of friction was calculated in 3D throughout the whole gait cycle, and average values of the friction-induced power dissipation in the joint were determined. On average, peak contact forces of 248% of the bodyweight and peak friction moments of 0.26% bodyweight times meter were determined. However, contact forces and friction moments varied greatly between individuals. The friction moment increased during the extension phase of the joint. The average coefficient of friction also increased during this period, from 0.04 (0.03 to 0.06 at contralateral toe off to 0.06 (0.04 to 0.08 at contralateral heel strike. During the flexion phase, the coefficient of friction increased further to 0.14 (0.09 to 0.23 at toe off. The average friction-induced power throughout the whole gait cycle was 2.3 W (1.4 W to 3.8 W. Although more parameters than only the synovia determine the friction, the wide ranges of friction coefficients and power dissipation indicate that the lubricating properties of synovia are individually very different. However, such differences may also exist in natural joints and may influence the progression of arthrosis. Furthermore, subjects with very high power dissipation may be at risk of thermally induced implant loosening. The large increase of the friction coefficient during each step could be caused by the synovia being squeezed out under load.

  7. The influence of high temperatures on the tribological properties of automotive friction materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Luke

    Temperatures of over 800C can be generated at the frictional interface within the brake systems of large vehicles, such high temperatures result in severe wear at the frictional interface, and can also lead to a very dangerous condition known as brake fade, characterised by a sharp fall in the coefficient of friction between the pad and disc, resulting in a catastrophic loss of braking efficiency. Common friction materials are very specialised composites often containing up to 15 components bound together within a phenolic resin matrix. The high temperature behaviour of the various constituents of friction materials were investigated using thermogravimetric analysis, focusing in particular on the thermal decomposition of the phenolic resin matrix material, where it has been firmly established that the thermal decomposition products of phenolic resin are the primary cause of brake fade. This has lead to the development of a novel approach for reducing fade in conventional resin based friction materials, involving a partial carbonisation to 400C. The high temperature wear characteristics of both modified and conventional friction materials were examined using standard dynamometer tests, as well as a 'continuous drag' type test machine, equipped with a heating facility. During this study a number of factors were identified as the main influences on the overall wear behaviour of friction materials. These included test temperature, sample test history, and the various effects of friction films, which were the subject of a detailed analysis. The formation of friction films was found to be an important facet of a successful friction material, producing a reduction in wear at the frictional interface. Films were examined and analysed using EDX, SEM, and X-ray diffraction techniques, which revealed the presence of a high proportion of magnetite (Fe3O4), containing iron which originated from the disc surface. It was established that the incorporation of iron in friction

  8. Is inner core seismic anisotropy a marker of plastic flow of cubic iron?

    CERN Document Server

    Lincot, A; Cardin, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates whether observations of seismic anisotropy are compatible with a cubic structure of the inner core Fe alloy. We assume that anisotropy is the result of plastic deformation within a large scale flow induced by preferred growth at the inner core equator. Based on elastic moduli from the literature, bcc- or fcc-Fe produce seismic anisotropy well below seismic observations ($\\textless{}0.4\\%$). A Monte-Carlo approach allows us to generalize this result to any form of elastic anisotropy in a cubic system. Within our model, inner core global anisotropy is not compatible with a cubic structure of Fe alloy. Hence, if the inner core material is indeed cubic, large scale coherent anisotropic structures, incompatible with plastic deformation induced by large scale flow, must be present.

  9. CMB Anisotropies Two Years after Cobe: Observations, Theory and the Future - Proceedings of the 1994 Cwru Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Lawrence M.

    1995-01-01

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * Preface * I. The Experimental Situation Two Years After COBE: Anisotropies, and the CMB Power Spectrum * COBE DMR Data, Signal and Noise: Color Plates * CMB Two Years After the COBE Discovery of Anisotropies * Comparison of Spectral Index Determinations * Two-Point Correlations in the COBE-DMR Two-Year Anisotropy Maps * A Preliminary Analysis of UCSB's South Pole 1993-94 Results * CMB Anisotropy Measurements During the Fourth Flight of MAX * Observations of the Anisotropy in the Cosmic Microwave Background by the Firs, SK93, and MSAM-I Experiments * The Python Microwave Background Anisotropy Experiment * II. Theoretical Implications and Cosmology: The Early Universe, Large Scale Structure and Dark Matter * Testing Inflationary Cosmology and Measuring Cosmological Parameters Using the Cosmic Microwave Background * Inflation Confronts the CMB: An Analysis Including the Effects of Foreground * Testing Inflation with MSAM, MAX Tenerife and COBE * CMBR Anisotropy Due to Gravitational Radiation in Inflationary Cosmologies * Black Holes From Blue Spectra * Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropies and the Geometry of the Universe * Ω and Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropies * CDM Cosmogony in an Open Universe * Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Anisotropy Induced by Cosmic Strings * Temperature Anisotropies in a Universe with Global Defects * The Nature Versus Nurture of Anisotropies * The Existence of Baryons at z = 1000 * Polarization-Temperature Correlations in the Microwave Background * III. Related Issues: BBN Limits on ΩB, and Comparing Theoretical Predictions and Observations * Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and ΩB: A Guide for CMB Interpreters * Quoting Experimental Information

  10. A Multi-scale Friction Model for Sheet Metal Forming Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, J.; Cid Alfaro, M.V.; Meinders, Vincent T.; Huetink, Han; Chang, K; Nam Han, H; Huh, H; Barlat, F; Lee, M

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a multi-scale friction model for large-scale forming simulations based on the surface changes on the micro-scale. The surface texture of a material changes when it is subjected to normal loading and stretching. Consequently, the frictional behavior between contacting surfaces,

  11. Relating friction on the human skin to the hydration and temperature of the skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veijgen, N.K.; Masen, M.A.; Heide, E. van der

    2013-01-01

    The human skin is constantly in interaction with materials and products. Therefore, skin friction is relevant to all people. In the literature, the frictional properties of the skin have been linked to a large variety of variables, like age, gender and hydration. The present study compares the data

  12. Relating friction on the human skin to the hydration and temperature of the skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veijgen, N.K.; Masen, Marc Arthur; van der Heide, Emile

    2013-01-01

    The human skin is constantly in interaction with materials and products. Therefore, skin friction is relevant to all people. In the literature, the frictional properties of the skin have been linked to a large variety of variables, like age, gender and hydration. The present study compares the data

  13. Versatile Friction Stir Welding/Friction Plug Welding System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A proposed system of tooling, machinery, and control equipment would be capable of performing any of several friction stir welding (FSW) and friction plug welding (FPW) operations. These operations would include the following: Basic FSW; FSW with automated manipulation of the length of the pin tool in real time [the so-called auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability]; Self-reacting FSW (SRFSW); SR-FSW with APT capability and/or real-time adjustment of the distance between the front and back shoulders; and Friction plug welding (FPW) [more specifically, friction push plug welding] or friction pull plug welding (FPPW) to close out the keyhole of, or to repair, an FSW or SR-FSW weld. Prior FSW and FPW systems have been capable of performing one or two of these operations, but none has thus far been capable of performing all of them. The proposed system would include a common tool that would have APT capability for both basic FSW and SR-FSW. Such a tool was described in Tool for Two Types of Friction Stir Welding (MFS- 31647-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 10 (October 2006), page 70. Going beyond what was reported in the cited previous article, the common tool could be used in conjunction with a plug welding head to perform FPW or FPPW. Alternatively, the plug welding head could be integrated, along with the common tool, into a FSW head that would be capable of all of the aforementioned FSW and FPW operations. Any FSW or FPW operation could be performed under any combination of position and/or force control.

  14. Anisotropy and Heterogeneity Interaction in Shear Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowski, M.; Schmid, D. W.

    2009-04-01

    Rocks are heterogeneous on many different scales and deformation may introduce a coexistence of heterogeneity and anisotropy in shear zones. A competent inclusion embedded in a laminated matrix is a typical example. Indisputably, the presence of a mechanical heterogeneity leads to a flow perturbation and consequently to a deflection of the lamination in its vicinity. Assuming a passive response of the matrix phase, the pattern formation around rigid objects has been modeled in two and three dimensions using analytical solutions. Yet, the laminas may be mechanically distinct, leading to an effectively anisotropic rheology of the matrix. The feedback of an evolving matrix structure on the inclusion motion cannot be precluded in this case. In our study elliptical inclusions of varying aspect ratios are embedded in a laminated linear viscous host and subject to a large simple shear deformation in finite element numerical simulations. Increasing the viscosity ratio of the weak and strong lamina significantly changes the pattern characteristics in the matrix. The structural evolution around an inclusion proves to have a major impact on the inclusion motion, leading to the stabilization of elongated inclusions at antithetic orientations. We provide a comparison of two different modeling approaches. In the first approach discrete layers are introduced in the matrix and the large strain evolution of individual minute layers is resolved. Next, the matrix is modeled as an anisotropic medium using an evolving director field that locally describes the anisotropy direction. The length scale of layering can be restored in this model using the micropolar medium formulation.

  15. Predicted impacts of proton temperature anisotropy on solar wind turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, K. G., E-mail: kristopher.klein@unh.edu [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 03824 (United States); Howes, G. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Particle velocity distributions measured in the weakly collisional solar wind are frequently found to be non-Maxwellian, but how these non-Maxwellian distributions impact the physics of plasma turbulence in the solar wind remains unanswered. Using numerical solutions of the linear dispersion relation for a collisionless plasma with a bi-Maxwellian proton velocity distribution, we present a unified framework for the four proton temperature anisotropy instabilities, identifying the associated stable eigenmodes, highlighting the unstable region of wavevector space and presenting the properties of the growing eigenfunctions. Based on physical intuition gained from this framework, we address how the proton temperature anisotropy impacts the nonlinear dynamics of the Alfvénic fluctuations underlying the dominant cascade of energy from large to small scales and how the fluctuations driven by proton temperature anisotropy instabilities interact nonlinearly with each other and with the fluctuations of the large-scale cascade. We find that the nonlinear dynamics of the large-scale cascade is insensitive to the proton temperature anisotropy and that the instability-driven fluctuations are unlikely to cause significant nonlinear evolution of either the instability-driven fluctuations or the turbulent fluctuations of the large-scale cascade.

  16. Predicted impacts of proton temperature anisotropy on solar wind turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, K. G.; Howes, G. G.

    2015-03-01

    Particle velocity distributions measured in the weakly collisional solar wind are frequently found to be non-Maxwellian, but how these non-Maxwellian distributions impact the physics of plasma turbulence in the solar wind remains unanswered. Using numerical solutions of the linear dispersion relation for a collisionless plasma with a bi-Maxwellian proton velocity distribution, we present a unified framework for the four proton temperature anisotropy instabilities, identifying the associated stable eigenmodes, highlighting the unstable region of wavevector space and presenting the properties of the growing eigenfunctions. Based on physical intuition gained from this framework, we address how the proton temperature anisotropy impacts the nonlinear dynamics of the Alfvénic fluctuations underlying the dominant cascade of energy from large to small scales and how the fluctuations driven by proton temperature anisotropy instabilities interact nonlinearly with each other and with the fluctuations of the large-scale cascade. We find that the nonlinear dynamics of the large-scale cascade is insensitive to the proton temperature anisotropy and that the instability-driven fluctuations are unlikely to cause significant nonlinear evolution of either the instability-driven fluctuations or the turbulent fluctuations of the large-scale cascade.

  17. On Anisotropy of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic-Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Kashti, Tamar

    2009-01-01

    We briefly summarize our study on anisotropy of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic-Rays (UHECRs), in which we define a statistics that measures the correlation between UHECRs and Large Scale Structure (LSS). We also comment here on recently published paper by Koers and Tinyakov that compared our statistics to improved KS statistics.

  18. Photoinduced Circular Anisotropy in Side-Chain Azobenzene Polyesters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolova, L.; Todorov, T.; Ivanov, M.;

    1997-01-01

    We report for the first time the inducing of large circular anisotropy in previously unoriented films of side-chain azobenzene polyesters on illumination with circularly polarized light at a wavelength of 488 nm. The circular dichroism and optical activity are measured simultaneously in real time...

  19. Flow stress anisotropy in aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Jensen, D.; Hansen, N.

    1990-01-01

    The plastic anisotropy of cold-rolled high purity aluminum (99.996%) and commercially pure aluminum (99.6%) has been investigated. Sample parameters were the initial grain size and the degree of plastic strain (ϵ < 3.00). Flow stresses (0.2% offset) were measured at room temperature by uniaxial t...

  20. The Reality of Casimir Friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimball A. Milton

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available For more than 35 years theorists have studied quantum or Casimir friction, which occurs when two smooth bodies move transversely to each other, experiencing a frictional dissipative force due to quantum electromagnetic fluctuations, which break time-reversal symmetry. These forces are typically very small, unless the bodies are nearly touching, and consequently such effects have never been observed, although lateral Casimir forces have been seen for corrugated surfaces. Partly because of the lack of contact with observations, theoretical predictions for the frictional force between parallel plates, or between a polarizable atom and a metallic plate, have varied widely. Here, we review the history of these calculations, show that theoretical consensus is emerging, and offer some hope that it might be possible to experimentally confirm this phenomenon of dissipative quantum electrodynamics.

  1. The Reality of Casimir Friction

    CERN Document Server

    Milton, K A; Brevik, I

    2015-01-01

    For more than 35 years theorists have studied quantum or Casimir friction, which occurs when two smooth bodies move transversely to each other, experiencing a frictional dissipative force due to quantum fluctuations. These forces are typically very small, unless the bodies are nearly touching, and consequently such effects have never been observed, although lateral Casimir forces have been seen for corrugated surfaces. Because of the lack of contact with phenomena, theoretical predictions for the frictional force between parallel plates, or between a polarizable atom and a metallic plate, have varied widely. Here we review the history of these calculations, show that theoretical consensus is emerging, and offer some hope that it might be possible to experimentally confirm this phenomenon of dissipative quantum electrodynamics.

  2. Magnetic Moment and Anisotropy of Individual Co Atoms on Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, F.; Dubout, Q.; Autès, G.; Patthey, F.; Calleja, F.; Gambardella, P.; Yazyev, O. V.; Brune, H.

    2013-12-01

    We report on the magnetic properties of single Co atoms on graphene on Pt(111). By means of scanning tunneling microscopy spin-excitation spectroscopy, we infer a magnetic anisotropy of K=-8.1meV with out-of-plane hard axis and a magnetic moment of 2.2μB. Co adsorbs on the sixfold graphene hollow site. Upon hydrogen adsorption, three differently hydrogenated species are identified. Their magnetic properties are very different from those of clean Co. Ab initio calculations support our results and reveal that the large magnetic anisotropy stems from strong ligand field effects due to the interaction between Co and graphene orbitals.

  3. The microphysics of phyllosilicate friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hartog, Sabine A. M.; Faulkner, Daniel R.; Spiers, Christopher J.

    2017-04-01

    Phyllosilicate-rich foliations in fault rocks are often thought to reduce overall fault strength and promote fault stability when forming an interconnected network. Indeed, laboratory measurements have shown that the average friction coefficient of dry phyllosilicates of 0.5 is reduced to 0.3 when wet or even 0.1 for smectite. A widely accepted interpretation of these observations is that the strength of phyllosilicates is controlled by breaking of interlayer bonds to form new cleavage surfaces when dry and by the low strength of surface-bound water films when wet. However, the correlation between phyllosilicate shear strength and interlayer bond strength, which formed the basis for this interpretation, was not reproduced in recent experiments (Behnsen and Faulkner, 2012) and is not supported by the latest calculations of the interlayer bond energies (Sakuma and Suehara, 2015). The accepted explanation for phyllosilicate friction also fails to account for the velocity dependence or (a-b) values, which decrease with temperature, reaching a minimum at intermediate temperatures, before increasing again at higher temperatures (Den Hartog et al., 2013, 2014). In this study, we developed a microphysical model for phyllosilicate friction, involving frictional sliding along atomically flat phyllosilicate grain interfaces, with overlapping grain edges forming barriers to sliding. Assuming that the amount of overlap is controlled by crystal plastic bending of grains into pores, together with rate-dependent edge-site cleavage, our model predicts most of the experimentally observed trends in frictional behaviour and provides a basis for extrapolation of laboratory friction data on phyllosilicates to natural conditions.

  4. Low temperature friction force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunckle, Christopher Gregory

    The application of friction force techniques within atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows for direct measurements of friction forces at a sliding, single-asperity interface. The temperature dependence of such single-asperity contacts provides key insight into the comparative importance of dissipative mechanisms that result in dry sliding friction. A variable temperature (VT), ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) AFM was used with an interface consisting of a diamond coated AFM tip and diamond-like carbon sample in a nominal sample temperature range of 90 to 275K. The results show that the coefficient of kinetic friction, mu k, has a linear dependence that is monotonically increasing with temperature varying from 0.28 to 0.38. To analyze this data it is necessary to correlate the sample temperature to the interface temperature. A detailed thermal model shows that the sample temperature measured by a macroscopic device can be very different from the temperature at the contact point. Temperature gradients intrinsic to the design of VT, UHV AFMs result in extreme, non-equilibrium conditions with heat fluxes on the order of gigawatts per squared meter through the interface, which produce a discontinuous step in the temperature profile due to thermal boundary impedance. The conclusion from this model is that measurements acquired by VT, UHV AFM, including those presented in this thesis, do not provide meaningful data on the temperature dependence of friction for single-asperities. Plans for future work developing an isothermal AFM capable of the same measurements without the introduction of temperature gradients are described. The experimental results and thermal analysis described in this thesis have been published in the Journal of Applied Physics, "Temperature dependence of single-asperity friction for a diamond on diamondlike carbon interface", J. App. Phys., 107(11):114903, 2010.

  5. Origin of azimuthal seismic anisotropy in oceanic plates and mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Thorsten W.; Conrad, Clinton P.; Schaeffer, Andrew J.; Lebedev, Sergei

    2014-09-01

    Seismic anisotropy is ubiquitous in the Earth's mantle but strongest in its thermo-mechanical boundary layers. Azimuthal anisotropy in the oceanic lithosphere and asthenosphere can be imaged by surface waves and should be particularly straightforward to relate to well-understood plate kinematics and large-scale mantle flow. However, previous studies have come to mixed conclusions as to the depth extent of the applicability of paleo-spreading and mantle flow models of anisotropy, and no simple, globally valid, relationships exist. Here, we show that lattice preferred orientation (LPO) inferred from mantle flow computations produces a plausible global background model for asthenospheric anisotropy underneath oceanic lithosphere. The same is not true for absolute plate motion (APM) models. A ˜200 km thick layer where the flow model LPO matches observations from tomography lies just below the ˜1200 °C isotherm of a half-space cooling model, indicating strong temperature-dependence of the processes that control the development of azimuthal anisotropy. We infer that the depth extent of shear, and hence the thickness of a relatively strong oceanic lithosphere, can be mapped this way. These findings for the background model, and ocean-basin specific deviations from the half-space cooling pattern, are found in all of the three recent and independent tomographic models considered. Further exploration of deviations from the background model may be useful for general studies of oceanic plate formation and dynamics as well as regional-scale tectonic analyses.

  6. Polarization of thermal bremsstrahlung emission due to electron pressure anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Komarov, S; Churazov, E; Schekochihin, A

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical plasmas are typically magnetized, with the Larmor radii of the charged particles many orders of magnitude smaller than their collisional mean free paths. The fundamental properties of such plasmas, e.g., conduction and viscosity, may depend on the instabilities driven by the anisotropy of the particle distribution functions and operating at scales comparable to the Larmor scales. We discuss a possibility that the pressure anisotropy of thermal electrons could produce polarization of thermal bremsstrahlung emission. In particular, we consider coherent large-scale motions in galaxy clusters to estimate the level of anisotropy driven by stretching of the magnetic-field lines by plasma flow and by heat fluxes associated with thermal gradients. Our estimate of the degree of polarization is $\\sim 0.1 \\%$ at energies $\\gtrsim kT$. While this value is too low for the forthcoming generation of X-ray polarimeters, it is potentially an important proxy for the processes taking place at extremely small scale...

  7. Finite-size anisotropy in statistically uniform porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Koza, Zbigniew; Khalili, Arzhang

    2009-01-01

    Anisotropy of the permeability tensor in statistically uniform porous media of sizes used in typical computer simulations is studied. Although such systems are assumed to be isotropic by default, we show that de facto their anisotropic permeability can give rise to significant changes of transport parameters such as permeability and tortuosity. The main parameter controlling the anisotropy is $a/L$, being the ratio of the obstacle to system size. Distribution of the angle $\\alpha$ between the external force and the volumetric fluid stream is found to be approximately normal, and the standard deviation of $\\alpha$ is found to decay with the system size as $(a/L)^{d/2}$, where $d$ is the space dimensionality. These properties can be used to estimate both anisotropy-related statistical errors in large-scale simulations and the size of the representative elementary volume.

  8. Irreversible magnetic processes under biaxial and uniaxial magnetic anisotropies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pokharel

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Irreversible magnetic processes have been investigated in magnetic systems with two different anisotropy symmetries (uniaxial and biaxial through angular measurement of the switching field, the irreversible susceptibility and the magnetic viscosity. These two systems consist of two-dimensional cobalt ferrite hetero-structures epitaxially grown on (100 and (110 MgO substrate. It is found that for uniaxial anisotropy the irreversible characteristics of the magnetization are large and display a strong angular dependence, which exhibits its maximum at the easy axis and drops quickly to vanish at the hard axis. However, for biaxial anisotropy the magnetization irreversible characteristics are considerably reduced and are less sensitive to the field angle.

  9. Dry frictional contact of metal asperities : A dislocation dynamics analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Fengwei; van der Giessen, Erik; Nicola, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Discrete dislocation plasticity simulations are performed to investigate the static frictional behavior of a metal asperity on a large single crystal, in contact with a rigid platen. The focus of this study is on understanding the relative importance of contact slip opposed to plasticity in a single

  10. Influence of Plasma Treatments on the Frictional Performance of Rubbers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthuizen, D.J.; Martinez-Martinez, D.; Pei, Y.T.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2012-01-01

    The frictional performance of several rubbers after pulsed-DC plasma treatments has been examined. In all cases, the treated rubbers showed better performance than the corresponding untreated ones. Stronger treatments, in terms of longer process time and/or higher substrate bias voltage, led to larg

  11. Science friction: data, metadata, and collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Paul N; Mayernik, Matthew S; Batcheller, Archer L; Bowker, Geoffrey C; Borgman, Christine L

    2011-10-01

    When scientists from two or more disciplines work together on related problems, they often face what we call 'science friction'. As science becomes more data-driven, collaborative, and interdisciplinary, demand increases for interoperability among data, tools, and services. Metadata--usually viewed simply as 'data about data', describing objects such as books, journal articles, or datasets--serve key roles in interoperability. Yet we find that metadata may be a source of friction between scientific collaborators, impeding data sharing. We propose an alternative view of metadata, focusing on its role in an ephemeral process of scientific communication, rather than as an enduring outcome or product. We report examples of highly useful, yet ad hoc, incomplete, loosely structured, and mutable, descriptions of data found in our ethnographic studies of several large projects in the environmental sciences. Based on this evidence, we argue that while metadata products can be powerful resources, usually they must be supplemented with metadata processes. Metadata-as-process suggests the very large role of the ad hoc, the incomplete, and the unfinished in everyday scientific work.

  12. Near Net Manufacturing Using Thin Gage Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Jennifer; Potter, David; Holquin, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) and near net spin forming of FSW aluminumn blanks were investigated for large-scale pressure vessel applications. With a specific focus on very thin gage 2xxx and 7xxx aluminum alloys, the program concentrated on the following: the criteria used for material selection, a potential manufacturing flow, and the effectiveness and associated risks of near net spin forming. Discussion will include the mechanical properties of the friction stir welds and the parent material from before and after the spin forming process. This effort was performed under a NASA Space Exploration initiative focused on increasing the affordability, reliability and performance of pressure vessels larger than 10 ft. diameter.

  13. SURFACE DYNAMIC FRICTION OF POLYMER GELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.P.Gong; G.Kagata; Y.Iwasaki; Y.Osada

    2000-01-01

    The sliding friction of various kinds of hydrogels has been studied and it was found that the frictional behaviors of the hydrogels do not conform to Amonton's law F =μW which well describes the friction of solids. The frictional force and its dependence on the load are quite different depending on the chemical structures of the gels, surface properties of the opposing substrates, and the measurement condition. The gel friction is explained in terms of interfacial interaction, either attractive or repulsive, between the polymer chain and the solid surface. According to this model, the friction is ascribed to the viscous flow of solvent at the interface in the repulsive case. In the attractive case, the force to detach the adsorbing chain from the substrate appears as friction. The surface adhesion between glass particles and gels measured by AFM showed a good correlation with the friction, which supported the repulsion-adsorption model proposed by the authors.

  14. The Friction of Saline Ice on Aluminium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Wallen-Russell

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The friction of ice on other materials controls loading on offshore structures and vessels in the Arctic. However, ice friction is complicated, because ice in nature exists near to its melting point. Frictional heating can cause local softening and perhaps melting and lubrication, thus affecting the friction and creating a feedback loop. Ice friction is therefore likely to depend on sliding speed and sliding history, as well as bulk temperature. The roughness of the sliding materials may also affect the friction. Here we present results of a series of laboratory experiments, sliding saline ice on aluminium, and controlling for roughness and temperature. We find that the friction of saline ice on aluminium μice-al=0.1 typically, but that this value varies with sliding conditions. We propose physical models which explain the variations in sliding friction.

  15. The anisotropy of multi-TeV cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingus, Brenda

    2013-02-01

    The arrival directions of cosmic rays will be isotropized by the deflection of these charged particles in the Galactic magnetic fields. For example, a 10 TeV proton in a typical Galactic field of 2 micro Gauss has a gyroradius of only 0.005 parsec (=1000 AU) which is much smaller than the distance to any postulated sources. However, observations of TeV cosmic rays by Milagro, Tibet III, ARGO, and IceCube, show anisotropies on both large and small angular scales. These observations require the detection of large numbers of cosmic rays because the anisotropies are less than a few parts in 1000. The large angular scale anisotropies, such as a dipole, could point to diffusion from a nearby source, but the smaller scale anisotropies of extent ~10 degrees are much more difficult to explain. Possibilities that have been explored in the literature include magnetic funneling of cosmic rays from nearby sources and acceleration by magnetic reconnection in the heliosphere's magnetotail. No matter what the mechanism, these observations provide new information about cosmic ray production, nearby magnetic fields, and how the cosmic rays observed at Earth are affected by their propagation.

  16. Mechanism for Self-Reacted Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venable, Richard; Bucher, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    A mechanism has been designed to apply the loads (the stirring and the resection forces and torques) in self-reacted friction stir welding. This mechanism differs somewhat from mechanisms used in conventional friction stir welding, as described below. The tooling needed to apply the large reaction loads in conventional friction stir welding can be complex. Self-reacted friction stir welding has become popular in the solid-state welding community as a means of reducing the complexity of tooling and to reduce costs. The main problems inherent in self-reacted friction stir welding originate in the high stresses encountered by the pin-and-shoulder assembly that produces the weld. The design of the present mechanism solves the problems. The mechanism includes a redesigned pin-and-shoulder assembly. The welding torque is transmitted into the welding pin by a square pin that fits into a square bushing with set-screws. The opposite or back shoulder is held in place by a Woodruff key and high-strength nut on a threaded shaft. The Woodruff key reacts the torque, while the nut reacts the tensile load on the shaft.

  17. Granular self-organization by autotuning of friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Deepak; Nitsure, Nitin; Bhattacharya, S; Ghosh, Shankar

    2015-09-15

    A monolayer of granular spheres in a cylindrical vial, driven continuously by an orbital shaker and subjected to a symmetric confining centrifugal potential, self-organizes to form a distinctively asymmetric structure which occupies only the rear half-space. It is marked by a sharp leading edge at the potential minimum and a curved rear. The area of the structure obeys a power-law scaling with the number of spheres. Imaging shows that the regulation of motion of individual spheres occurs via toggling between two types of motion, namely, rolling and sliding. A low density of weakly frictional rollers congregates near the sharp leading edge whereas a denser rear comprises highly frictional sliders. Experiments further suggest that because the rolling and sliding friction coefficients differ substantially, the spheres acquire a local time-averaged coefficient of friction within a large range of intermediate values in the system. The various sets of spatial and temporal configurations of the rollers and sliders constitute the internal states of the system. Experiments demonstrate and simulations confirm that the global features of the structure are maintained robustly by autotuning of friction through these internal states, providing a previously unidentified route to self-organization of a many-body system.

  18. Magnetic anisotropy of lecithin membranes. A new anisotropy susceptometer.

    OpenAIRE

    Scholz, F.; Boroske, E; Helfrich, W.

    1984-01-01

    Cylindrical giant vesicles prepared from egg lecithin and 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) are oriented in an external magnetic field and observed by phase contrast microscopy. The anisotropic part of the diamagnetic susceptibility of the lecithin membrane is determined from the distribution of angles between the magnetic field and the long cylinder axis due to thermal fluctuations. The anisotropy of DMPC is found to be larger by a factor of 2 than that of egg lecithin. This...

  19. Friction effects on lateral loading behavior of rigid piles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zania, Varvara; Hededal, Ole

    2012-01-01

    The adequacy of the p -y curves used in the current practice for the design of rigid pile foundations with large diameter, like in the case of monopile foundations of offshore wind turbines, has been widely questioned. The current study aims at analyzing the lateral behavior of rigid piles, while...... taking into account the shear frictional resistance along the pile. For this purpose efficient three dimensional finite element models of different diameter have been developed. The increase of the side friction and of the diameter of the pile is shown to alter the failure pattern and increase...... the lateral capacity of the pile. The obtained p - y curves demonstrate the importance of the aforementioned parameters in the design of rigid piles, as the reduction of friction along the interface reduces not only the ultimate load but also the stiffness of the soil-pile response. Read More: http...

  20. Chandrasekhar's Dynamical Friction and non-extensive statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, J M; de Souza, R E; Del Popolo, A; Delliou, Morgan Le; Lee, Xi-Guo

    2016-01-01

    The motion of a point like object of mass $M$ passing through the background potential of massive collisionless particles ($m << M$) suffers a steady deceleration named dynamical friction. In his classical work, Chandrasekhar assumed a Maxwellian velocity distribution in the halo and neglected the self gravity of the wake induced by the gravitational focusing of the mass $M$. In this paper, by relaxing the validity of the Maxwellian distribution due to the presence of long range forces, we derive an analytical formula for the dynamical friction in the context of the $q$-nonextensive kinetic theory. In the extensive limiting case ($q = 1$), the classical Gaussian Chandrasekhar result is recovered. As an application, the dynamical friction timescale for Globular Clusters spiraling to the galactic center is explicitly obtained. Our results suggest that the problem concerning the large timescale as derived by numerical $N$-body simulations or semi-analytical models can be understood as a departure from the ...

  1. Ginzburg-Landau theory of the superheating field anisotropy of layered superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liarte, Danilo B.; Transtrum, Mark K.; Sethna, James P.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the effects of material anisotropy on the superheating field of layered superconductors. We provide an intuitive argument both for the existence of a superheating field, and its dependence on anisotropy, for κ =λ /ξ (the ratio of magnetic to superconducting healing lengths) both large and small. On the one hand, the combination of our estimates with published results using a two-gap model for MgB2 suggests high anisotropy of the superheating field near zero temperature. On the other hand, within Ginzburg-Landau theory for a single gap, we see that the superheating field shows significant anisotropy only when the crystal anisotropy is large and the Ginzburg-Landau parameter κ is small. We then conclude that only small anisotropies in the superheating field are expected for typical unconventional superconductors near the critical temperature. Using a generalized form of Ginzburg Landau theory, we do a quantitative calculation for the anisotropic superheating field by mapping the problem to the isotropic case, and present a phase diagram in terms of anisotropy and κ , showing type I, type II, or mixed behavior (within Ginzburg-Landau theory), and regions where each asymptotic solution is expected. We estimate anisotropies for a number of different materials, and discuss the importance of these results for radio-frequency cavities for particle accelerators.

  2. Electromagnetic Instabilities Excited by Electron Temperature Anisotropy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆全明; 王连启; 周艳; 王水

    2004-01-01

    One-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations are performed to investigate the nonlinear evolution of electromagnetic instabilities excited by the electron temperature anisotropy in homogeneous plasmas with different parameters. The results show that the electron temperature anisotropy can excite the two right-hand electromagnetic instabilities, one has the frequency higher than Ωe, the other is the whistler instability with larger amplitude,and its frequency is below Ωe. Their dispersion relations are consistent with the prediction from the cold plasma theory. In the initial growth stage (prediction from linear theory), the frequency of the dominant mode (the mode whose amplitude is large enough) of the whistler wave almost does not change, but in the saturation stage the situation is different. In the case that the ratio of electron plasma frequency to cyclotron frequency is larger than 1, the frequency of the dominant mode of the whistler wave drifts from high to low continuously. However, for the case of the ratio smaller than 1, besides the original dominant mode of the whistler wave whose frequency is about 2.6ωe, another dominant mode whose frequency is about 1.55ωe also begins to be excited at definite time,and its amplitude increases with time until it exceeds the original dominant mode.

  3. CMB statistical anisotropy from noncommutative gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Shiraishi, Maresuke; Ricciardone, Angelo; Arroja, Frederico

    2014-01-01

    Primordial statistical anisotropy is a key indicator to investigate early Universe models and has been probed by the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies. In this paper, we examine tensor-mode CMB fluctuations generated from anisotropic gravitational waves, parametrised by $P_h({\\bf k}) = P_h^{(0)}(k) [ 1 + \\sum_{LM} f_L(k) g_{LM} Y_{LM} (\\hat{\\bf k}) ]$, where $P_h^{(0)}(k)$ is the usual scale-invariant power spectrum. Such anisotropic tensor fluctuations may arise from an inflationary model with noncommutativity of fields. It is verified that in this model, an isotropic component and a quadrupole asymmetry with $f_0(k) = f_2(k) \\propto k^{-2}$ are created and hence highly red-tilted off-diagonal components arise in the CMB power spectra, namely $\\ell_2 = \\ell_1 \\pm 2$ in $TT$, $TE$, $EE$ and $BB$, and $\\ell_2 = \\ell_1 \\pm 1$ in $TB$ and $EB$. We find that B-mode polarisation is more sensitive to such signals than temperature and E-mode polarisation due to the smallness of large-scale cosmic varian...

  4. Coordination Frictions and Job Heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kennes, John; le Maire, Christian Daniel

    This paper develops and extends a dynamic, discrete time, job to worker matching model in which jobs are heterogeneous in equilibrium. The key assumptions of this economic environment are (i) matching is directed and (ii) coordination frictions lead to heterogeneous local labor markets. We de- rive...

  5. Frictional heating of tribological contacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Johannes

    1995-01-01

    Wherever friction occurs, mechanical energy is transformed into heat. The tem­ perature rise associated with this heating can have an important influence on the tribological behaviour of the contacting components. Apart from determining per­ formance, thermal phenomena affect reliability and may cau

  6. Friction Sensitivity of Primary Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    potassium dinitrobenzofuroxan none tetrazene 407913 tetrazene 7902454 The mixes which were tested are: NOL 130 (basic lead styphnate , barium nitrate, lead...azide, tetrazene, and antimony sulfide); PA 100 (normal lead styphnate , barium nitrate, tetrazene, lead dioxide, calcium silicide, and antimony...styuhnate, basic lead styphnate , potassium dinitrobenzofuroxan, and tetrazene were tested to determine the- 10% and 50% probability of friction

  7. Friction of atomically stepped surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikken, R. J.; Thijsse, B. J.; Nicola, L.

    2017-03-01

    The friction behavior of atomically stepped metal surfaces under contact loading is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. While real rough metal surfaces involve roughness at multiple length scales, the focus of this paper is on understanding friction of the smallest scale of roughness: atomic steps. To this end, periodic stepped Al surfaces with different step geometry are brought into contact and sheared at room temperature. Contact stress that continuously tries to build up during loading, is released with fluctuating stress drops during sliding, according to the typical stick-slip behavior. Stress release occurs not only through local slip, but also by means of step motion. The steps move along the contact, concurrently resulting in normal migration of the contact. The direction of migration depends on the sign of the step, i.e., its orientation with respect to the shearing direction. If the steps are of equal sign, there is a net migration of the entire contact accompanied by significant vacancy generation at room temperature. The stick-slip behavior of the stepped contacts is found to have all the characteristic of a self-organized critical state, with statistics dictated by step density. For the studied step geometries, frictional sliding is found to involve significant atomic rearrangement through which the contact roughness is drastically changed. This leads for certain step configurations to a marked transition from jerky sliding motion to smooth sliding, making the final friction stress approximately similar to that of a flat contact.

  8. Rotary Engine Friction Test Rig Development Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    5  4.  Friction Rig Development 7  5.  AutoCAD ...Figure 4. Engine friction test rig AutoCAD model. ........................................................................8  Figure 5. Engine...top dead center. 8 5. AutoCAD Model Development A model of the rotary engine friction test rig was developed to determine the optimal

  9. Asbestos free friction composition for brake linings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arnab Ganguly; Raji George

    2008-02-01

    An asbestos free friction material composite for brake linings is synthesized containing fibrous reinforcing constituents, friction imparting and controlling additives, elastomeric additives, fire retarding components and a thermosetting resin. The composite shows exemplary friction characteristics and has great resistance to wear and shows good temperature stability.

  10. A thermodynamic model of sliding friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasse Makkonen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A first principles thermodynamic model of sliding friction is derived. The model predictions are in agreement with the observed friction laws both in macro- and nanoscale. When applied to calculating the friction coefficient the model provides a quantitative agreement with recent atomic force microscopy measurements on a number of materials.

  11. Analysis of the moment caused by friction of cardan joint. Cardan joint no friction kishinryoku kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, K.; Yagi, Shida, T. (Atsugi Unisia Corp., Kanagawa (Japan))

    1990-10-01

    Analyzing the vibromotive force, generated by the friction, in generation morphology, level, dynamical characteristics, etc., through measurement of joint unit friction simulation of frictional vibromotive force and on-platform measurement of propeller shaft in vibromotive force, the present report investigated the influence of friction on the vehicle in sound vibration performance. By a vibromotive force measurement system, internally equipped with a piezoelectric type force meter, frictional vibromotive force could be quantitatively grasped. The friction must be appropriately controlled, because the moment, generated by it, is expected to be put in the vehicle by intermediation of a supporting point and adversely influence the sound vibration performance. Apart from the above, elucidation was made of relation between the ordinal number components of rotation of vibromotive force and friction, calculation of reaction force at the supporting point by the frictional measurement, relation between the joint angle and frictional vibromotive force, second couple force due to the friction, etc. 3 refs., 15 figs.

  12. Where is magnetic anisotropy field pointing to?

    CERN Document Server

    Gutowski, Marek W

    2013-01-01

    The desired result of magnetic anisotropy investigations is the determination of value(s) of various anisotropy constant(s). This is sometimes difficult, especially when the precise knowledge of saturation magnetization is required, as it happens in ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) studies. In such cases we usually resort to `trick' and fit our experimental data to the quantity called \\emph{anisotropy field}, which is strictly proportional to the ratio of the searched anisotropy constant and saturation magnetization. Yet, this quantity is scalar, simply a number, and is therefore of little value for modeling or simulations of the magnetostatic or micromagnetic structures. Here we show how to `translate' the values of magnetic anisotropy constants into the complete vector of magnetic anisotropy field. Our derivation is rigorous and covers the most often encountered cases, from uniaxial to cubic anisotropy.

  13. Advanced adhesion and friction measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Huang, Wei; Wang, Xiaolei

    2017-03-01

    An advanced micro-force tester for investigating the micromechanical behavior of various patterned surfaces in dry and wet conditions is presented in this paper. The parallel slice-beam configuration of the tester not only eliminates the large load-dependent slope and tangential displacement at the free end that is found in a single beam system, but also performs a trans-scale deflection with high sensitivity and linearity for force sensing. Meanwhile, the simple structure is characterized by low cost, high efficiency, and ease of fabrication. An integrated nano- and micro-stage comprise the mobile table to produce a large stroke with high resolution, which is specifically required in wet adhesion testing because of the formation of a long liquid bridge. Preliminary experiments of adhesion and friction conducted using PDMS pillars with a plano-convex lens validated the feasibility of this setup.

  14. Superweak asthenosphere in light of upper mantle seismic anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Thorsten W.

    2017-05-01

    Earth's upper mantle includes a ˜200 km thick asthenosphere underneath the plates where viscosity and seismic velocities are reduced compared to the background. This zone of weakness matters for plate dynamics and may be required for the generation of plate tectonics itself. However, recent seismological and electromagnetic studies indicate strong heterogeneity in thinner layers underneath the plates which, if related to more extreme, global viscosity reductions, may require a revision of our understanding of mantle convection. Here, I use dynamically consistent mantle flow modeling and the constraints provided by azimuthal seismic anisotropy as well as plate motions to explore the effect of a range of global and local viscosity reductions. The fit between mantle flow model predictions and observations of seismic anisotropy is highly sensitive to radial and lateral viscosity variations. I show that moderate suboceanic viscosity reductions, to ˜0.01-0.1 times the upper mantle viscosity, are preferred by the fit to anisotropy and global plate motions, depending on layer thickness. Lower viscosities degrade the fit to azimuthal anisotropy. Localized patches of viscosity reduction, or layers of subducted asthenosphere, however, have only limited additional effects on anisotropy or plate velocities. This indicates that it is unlikely that regional observations of subplate anomalies are both continuous and indicative of dramatic viscosity reduction. Locally, such weak patches may exist and would be detectable by regional anisotropy analysis, for example. However, large-scale plate dynamics are most likely governed by broad continent-ocean asthenospheric viscosity contrasts rather than a thin, possibly high melt fraction layer.

  15. Slip versus Friction : Modifying the Navier condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsalis, Evangelos; Walther, Jens; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2006-03-01

    The modeling of fluid-solid interfaces remains one of the key challenges in fluid mechanics. The prevailing model, attributed to Navier, defines the fluid ``slip'' velocity as proportional to the wall shear and a parameter defined as the slip length. Several works have in turn proposed models for this slip length but no universal model for the slip velocity has been accepted. We present results from large scale molecular dynamics simulations of canonical flow problems, indicating, that the inadequacy of this classic model, stems from not properly accounting for the pressure field. We propose and validate a new model, based on the fundamental observation that the finite ``slip'' velocity is a result of an imbalance between fluid and solid intermolecular forces. An excess force on the fluid elements will lead to their acceleration which in turn may result in a slip velocity at the interface. We formulate the slip velocity in terms of fluid-solid friction Ff and propose a generalized boundary condition: Ff= Fs+ Fp= λuus+ λpp where p denotes the pressure, and λuand λp the viscous and static friction coefficients, for which universal constants are presented. We demonstrate that the present model can overcome difficulties encountered by the classical slip model in canonical flow configurations.

  16. Heliospheric influence on the anisotropy of TeV cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ming; Zuo, Pingbing [Department of Physics and Space Sciences, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States); Pogorelov, Nikolai, E-mail: mzhang@fit.edu [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research and Department of Space Science, University of Alabama in Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2014-07-20

    This paper provides a theory of using Liouville's theorem to map the anisotropy of TeV cosmic rays seen at Earth using the particle distribution function in the local interstellar medium (LISM). The ultimate source of cosmic ray anisotropy is the energy, pitch angle, and spatial dependence of the cosmic ray distribution function in the LISM. Because young nearby cosmic ray sources can make a special contribution to the cosmic ray anisotropy, the anisotropy depends on the source age, distance and magnetic connection, and particle diffusion of these cosmic rays, all of which make the anisotropy sensitive to the particle energy. When mapped through the magnetic and electric field of a magnetohydrodynamic model heliosphere, the large-scale dipolar and bidirectional interstellar anisotropy patterns become distorted if they are seen from Earth, resulting in many small structures in the observations. Best fits to cosmic ray anisotropy measurements have allowed us to estimate the particle density gradient and pitch angle anisotropies in the LISM. It is found that the heliotail, hydrogen deflection plane, and the plane perpendicular to the LISM magnetic field play a special role in distorting cosmic ray anisotropy. These features can lead to an accurate determination of the LISM magnetic field direction and polarity. The effects of solar cycle variation, the Sun's coronal magnetic field, and turbulence in the LISM and heliospheric magnetic fields are minor but clearly visible at a level roughly equal to a fraction of the overall anisotropy amplitude. The heliospheric influence becomes stronger at lower energies. Below 1 TeV, the anisotropy is dominated by small-scale patterns produced by disturbances in the heliosphere.

  17. Friction between a surrogate skin (Lorica Soft) and nonwoven fabrics used in hygiene products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falloon, Sabrina S.; Cottenden, Alan

    2016-09-01

    Incontinence pad wearers often suffer from sore skin, and a better understanding of friction between pads and skin is needed to inform the development of less damaging materials. This work investigated friction between a skin surrogate (Lorica Soft) and 13 nonwoven fabrics representing those currently used against the skin in commercial pads. All fabrics were found to behave consistently with Amontons’ law: coefficients of friction did not differ systematically when measured under two different loads. Although the 13 fabrics varied considerably in composition and structure, their coefficients of friction (static and dynamic) against Lorica Soft were remarkably similar, especially for the ten fabrics comprising just polypropylene (PP) fibres. The coefficients of friction for one PP fabric never differed by more than 15.7% from those of any other, suggesting that the ranges of fibre decitex (2.0-6.5), fabric area density (13-30 g m-2) and bonding area (11%-25%) they exhibited had only limited impact on their friction properties. It is likely that differences were largely attributable to variability in properties between multiple samples of a given fabric. Of the remaining fabrics, the one comprising polyester fibres had significantly higher coefficients of friction than the highest friction PP fabric (p < 0.005), while the one comprising PP fibres with a polyethylene sheath had significantly lower coefficients of friction than the lowest friction PP fabric (p < 10-8). However, fabrics differed in too many other ways to confidently attribute these differences in friction properties just to the choice of base polymer.

  18. Deciphering viscous flow of frictional melts with the mini-AMS method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferré, Eric C.; Chou, Yu-Min; Kuo, Ruo Lin; Yeh, En-Chao; Leibovitz, Natalie R.; Meado, Andrea L.; Campbell, Lucy; Geissman, John W.

    2016-09-01

    The anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) is widely used to analyze magmatic flow in intrusive igneous bodies including plutons, sills and dikes. This method, owing its success to the rapid nature of measurements, provides a proxy for the orientation of markers with shape anisotropy that flow and align in a viscous medium. AMS specimens typically are 25 mm diameter right cylinders or 20 mm on-a-side cubes, representing a volume deemed statistically representative. Here, we present new AMS results, based on significantly smaller cubic specimens, which are 3.5 mm on a side, hence∼250 times volumetrically smaller than conventional specimens. We show that, in the case of frictional melts, which inherently have an extremely small grain size, this small volume is in most cases sufficient to characterize the pseudotachylyte fabric, particularly when magnetite is present. Further, we demonstrate that the mini-AMS method provides new opportunities to investigate the details of frictional melt flow in these coseismic miniature melt bodies. This new method offers significant potential to investigate frictional melt flow in pseudotachylyte veins including contributions to the lubrication of faults at shallow to moderate depths.

  19. Statistical anisotropy in the inflationary universe

    CERN Document Server

    Shtanov, Yuri

    2009-01-01

    During cosmological inflation, quasiclassical perturbations are permanently generated on super-Hubble spatial scales, their power spectrum being determined by the fundamental principles of quantum field theory. By the end of inflation, they serve as primeval seeds for structure formation in the universe. At early stages of inflation, such perturbations break homogeneity and isotropy of the inflationary background. In the present paper, we perturbatively take into account this quasiclassical background inhomogeneity of the inflationary universe while considering the evolution of small-scale (sub-Hubble) quantum modes. As a result, the power spectrum of primordial perturbations develops statistical anisotropy, which can subsequently manifest itself in the large-scale structure and cosmic microwave background. The statistically anisotropic contribution to the primordial power spectrum is predicted to have almost scale-invariant form dominated by a quadrupole. Theoretical expectation of the magnitude of this anis...

  20. High temperature skin friction measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tcheng, Ping; Holmes, Harlan K.; Supplee, Frank H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Skin friction measurement in the NASA Langley hypersonic propulsion facility is described. The sensor configuration utilized an existing balance, modified to provide thermal isolation and an increased standoff distance. For test run times of about 20 sec and ambient-air cooling of the test section and balance, the modified balance performed satisfactorily, even when it was subjected to acoustic and structural vibration. The balance is an inertially balanced closed-loop servo system where the current to a moving-coil motor needed to restore or null the output from the position sensor is a measure of the force or skin friction tending to displace the moving element. The accuracy of the sensor is directly affected by the position sensor in the feedback loop, in this case a linear-variable differential transformer which has proven to be influenced by temperature gradients.

  1. Thermodynamic aspects of rock friction

    CERN Document Server

    Mitsui, Noa

    2013-01-01

    Rate- and state-dependent friction law for velocity-step tests is analyzed from a thermodynamic point of view. A simple macroscopic non-equilibrium thermodynamic model with a single internal variable reproduces instantaneous jump and relaxation. Velocity weakening appears as a consequence of a plasticity related nonlinear coefficient. Permanent part of displacement corresponds to plastic strain, and relaxation effects are analogous to creep in thermodynamic rheology.

  2. Fault rheology beyond frictional melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavallée, Yan; Hirose, Takehiro; Kendrick, Jackie E; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B

    2015-07-28

    During earthquakes, comminution and frictional heating both contribute to the dissipation of stored energy. With sufficient dissipative heating, melting processes can ensue, yielding the production of frictional melts or "pseudotachylytes." It is commonly assumed that the Newtonian viscosities of such melts control subsequent fault slip resistance. Rock melts, however, are viscoelastic bodies, and, at high strain rates, they exhibit evidence of a glass transition. Here, we present the results of high-velocity friction experiments on a well-characterized melt that demonstrate how slip in melt-bearing faults can be governed by brittle fragmentation phenomena encountered at the glass transition. Slip analysis using models that incorporate viscoelastic responses indicates that even in the presence of melt, slip persists in the solid state until sufficient heat is generated to reduce the viscosity and allow remobilization in the liquid state. Where a rock is present next to the melt, we note that wear of the crystalline wall rock by liquid fragmentation and agglutination also contributes to the brittle component of these experimentally generated pseudotachylytes. We conclude that in the case of pseudotachylyte generation during an earthquake, slip even beyond the onset of frictional melting is not controlled merely by viscosity but rather by an interplay of viscoelastic forces around the glass transition, which involves a response in the brittle/solid regime of these rock melts. We warn of the inadequacy of simple Newtonian viscous analyses and call for the application of more realistic rheological interpretation of pseudotachylyte-bearing fault systems in the evaluation and prediction of their slip dynamics.

  3. Structural and phase transformations in Hadfield steel upon frictional loading in liquid nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korshunov, L. G.; Sagaradze, V. V.; Chernenko, N. L.

    2016-08-01

    Structural transformations that occur in 110G13 steel (Hadfield) upon sliding friction in liquid nitrogen (-196°C) have been investigated by metallographic, electron-microscopic, and X-ray diffraction methods. The frictional action was performed through the reciprocating sliding of a cylindrical indenter of quenched 110G13 steel over a plate of the studied steel. A like friction pair was immersed into a bath with liquid nitrogen. It has been shown that the Hadfield steel quenched from 1100°C under the given temperature conditions of frictional loading retains the austenitic structure completely. The frictional action forms in a surface layer up to 10 μm thick the nanocrystalline structure with austenite grains 10-50 nm in size and a hardness 6 GPa. Upon subsequent low-temperature friction, the tempering of steel at 400°C (3 h) and at 600°C (5 min and 5 h) brings about the formation of a large amount (tens of vol %) of ɛ (hcp) martensite in steel. The formation of this phase under friction is supposedly a consequence of the reduction in the stacking fault energy of Hadfield steel, which is achieved due to the combined action of the following factors: low-temperature cooling, a decrease in the carbon content in the austenite upon tempering, and the presence of high compressive stresses in the friction-contact zone.

  4. A map of the cosmic microwave background radiation from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP), showing the large-scale fluctuations (the quadrupole and octopole) isolated by an analysis done partly by theorists at CERN.

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    A recent analysis, in part by theorists working at CERN, suggests a new view of the cosmic microwave background radiation. It seems the solar system, rather than the universe, causes the radiation's large-scale fluctuations, similar to the bass in a song.

  5. Friction characteristics of floppy disks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This note presents the principle and structure of a tribological measure for floppy disks.The precision of the force measuring system is 1 mN in loading and 3×10-6 N in friction.The resolution of the film thickness between head and floppy disk is 0.5 nm in the vertical and 1.5 nm in the horizontal direction.In order to investigate the tribological characteristics of floppy disks,six types of floppy disks have been tested and the floating properties of these disks are also studied with film measuring system.The experimental results of the surface morphology and friction coefficient of these floppy disks using the atomic force microscope/friction force mcroscope (AFM/FFM) are in accordance with the conclusion made by our own measuring system.The experimental results show that the air film thickness between head and disk is of the same order as the surface roughness of floppy disks.

  6. Galaxy clusters and microwave background anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Quilis, V; Sáez, D

    1995-01-01

    Previous estimates of the microwave background anisotropies produced by freely falling spherical clusters are discussed. These estimates are based on the Swiss-Cheese and Tolman-Bondi models. It is proved that these models give only upper limits to the anisotropies produced by the observed galaxy clusters. By using spherically symmetric codes including pressureless matter and a hot baryonic gas, new upper limits are obtained. The contributions of the hot gas and the pressureless component to the total anisotropy are compared. The effects produced by the pressure are proved to be negligible; hence, estimations of the cluster anisotropies based on N-body simulations are hereafter justified. After the phenomenon of violent relaxation, any realistic rich cluster can only produce small anisotropies with amplitudes of order 10^{-7}. During the rapid process of violent relaxation, the anisotropies produced by nonlinear clusters are expected to range in the interval (10^{-6},10^{-5}). The angular scales of these anis...

  7. Quantitative assessment of diffusional kurtosis anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, G Russell; Helpern, Joseph A; Tabesh, Ali; Jensen, Jens H

    2015-04-01

    Diffusional kurtosis imaging (DKI) measures the diffusion and kurtosis tensors to quantify restricted, non-Gaussian diffusion that occurs in biological tissue. By estimating the kurtosis tensor, DKI accounts for higher order diffusion dynamics, when compared with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and consequently can describe more complex diffusion profiles. Here, we compare several measures of diffusional anisotropy which incorporate information from the kurtosis tensor, including kurtosis fractional anisotropy (KFA) and generalized fractional anisotropy (GFA), with the diffusion tensor-derived fractional anisotropy (FA). KFA and GFA demonstrate a net enhancement relative to FA when multiple white matter fiber bundle orientations are present in both simulated and human data. In addition, KFA shows net enhancement in deep brain structures, such as the thalamus and the lenticular nucleus, where FA indicates low anisotropy. Thus, KFA and GFA provide additional information relative to FA with regard to diffusional anisotropy, and may be particularly advantageous for the assessment of diffusion in complex tissue environments.

  8. Magnetic Anisotropy in the Radula of Chiton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Jian-Gao; QIAN Xia; LIU Wei; LIU Chuan-lin; ZHAN Wen-Shan

    2000-01-01

    Radular teeth of chitons were studied by using magnetic torque-meter and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The magnetic torque curves give clear evidence of presence of strong uni-axial magnetic anisotropy. The easy axis is along the length direction of tongue-like radula. The TEM pattern shows that long chip-like magnetite nano-scaled particles packed in the radular teeth with both uni-axial shape anisotropy and magneto-crystalline anisotropy.

  9. Magnetic Anisotropy in the Radula of Chiton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian-Gao; Qian, Xia; Liu, Wei; Liu, Chuan-Lin; Zhan, Wen-Shan

    2000-07-01

    Radular teeth of chitons were studied by using magnetic torque-meter and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The magnetic torque curves give clear evidence of presence of strong uni-axial magnetic anisotropy. The easy axis is along the length direction of tongue-like radula. The TEM pattern shows that long chip-like magnetite nano-scaled particles packed in the radular teeth with both uni-axial shape anisotropy and magneto-crystalline anisotropy.

  10. Quantifying Stream Bed Gravel Mobility from Friction Angle Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, M. A.; Dunne, T.

    2012-12-01

    A method to measure friction angles using force gauges was field tested to determine its utility at quantifying critical shear stress in a gravel bedded reach of the San Joaquin River in California. Predictions of mobility from friction angles were compared with observations of the movement of tagged particles from locations for which local shear stress was quantified with a validated 2-D flow model. The observations of movement, distance of travel, and location of the end of travel were made after extended flow releases from Friant dam. Determining the critical shear stress for gravel bed material transport currently depends upon bedload sampling or tracer studies. Often, such measurements can only be made during occasional and untimely flow events, and at limited, suboptimal locations. Yet, theoretical studies conclude that the friction angle is an important control on the critical shear stress for mobility of any grain size, and therefore of the excess shear stress which strongly influences bedload transport rate. The ability to predict bed mobility at ungauged and unmonitored locations is also an important requirement for planning of flow regimes and channel design. Therefore, a method to measure friction angles that can be performed quickly in low flow conditions would prove useful for river management and research. To investigate this promising method friction angle surveys were performed at two riffle sites where differences in bed material size and distribution, and channel slope were observed. The friction angle surveys are sensitive enough to detect differences between the sites as well as spatially and temporally within a single riffle. Low friction angles were observed along the inside of a long bend where sand content was greater (by ~20%) than other surveyed locations. Friction angles decreased slightly after a depositional event associated with transient large woody debris and bank erosion, and increased again after a 5 year return interval flow

  11. Statistical Anisotropy from Anisotropic Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Soda, Jiro

    2012-01-01

    We review an inflationary scenario with the anisotropic expansion rate. An anisotropic inflationary universe can be realized by a vector field coupled with an inflaton, which can be regarded as a counter example to the cosmic no-hair conjecture. We show generality of anisotropic inflation and derive a universal property. We formulate cosmological perturbation theory in anisotropic inflation. Using the formalism, we show anisotropic inflation gives rise to the statistical anisotropy in primordial fluctuations. We also explain a method to test anisotropic inflation using the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB).

  12. Microwave background radiation anisotropy from scalar field gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stebbins, A. (NASA/Fermilab Astrophysics Center, Fermilab MS209, Box 500, Batavia, Illinois 60510-0500 (United States)); Veeraraghavan, S. (Physics Astronomy Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States) Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States))

    1993-09-15

    Analytic calculations of the cosmological density fluctuations and microwave background radiation anisotropies induced by gradients in a topologically trivial scalar field are presented. This anlaytic solution should provide a good test for numerical simulations of microwave anisotropy from scalar fields. To the extent that these results generalize to other scalar field models and configurations, they imply that (1) MBR measurements limit large-scale primordial variations greater than about 5[times]10[sup 16] GeV within our horizon, (2) the total scalar field variation is a fair predictor of the magnitude of the MBR anisotropy, but is only accurate to within a factor of about three, (3) scalar fields as well as other models of seeded perturbations produce a few times more anisotropy [Delta][ital T]/[ital T] for a given density fluctuation [delta][rho]/[rho] (on the same scale) than do primordial adiabatic perturbations, (4) models of scalar field seeds which produce a scale-invariant spectrum of perturbations seem to require galaxies to be more clustered than the mass on small scales, and (5) scalar fields do not tilt'' the Universe.

  13. Contribution of Long Wavelength Gravitational Waves to the CMB Anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    White, M

    1992-01-01

    We present an in depth discussion of the production of gravitational waves from an inflationary phase that could have occurred in the early universe, giving derivations for the resulting spectrum and energy density. We also consider the large-scale anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation coming from these waves. Assuming that the observed quadrupole anisotropy comes mostly from gravitational waves (consistent with the predictions of a flat spectrum of scalar density perturbations and the measured dipole anisotropy) we describe in detail how to derive a value for the scale of inflation of $(1.5-5)\\times 10^{16}$GeV, which is at a particularly interesting scale for particle physics. This upper limit corresponds to a 95\\% confidence level upper limit on the scale of inflation assuming only that the quadrupole anisotropy from gravitational waves is not cancelled by another source. Direct detection of gravitational waves produced by inflation near this scale will have to wait for the next generatio...

  14. Formation of Magnetic Anisotropy by Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Si Nyeon; Nam, Yoon Jae; Kim, Yang Doo; Choi, Jun Woo; Lee, Heon; Lim, Sang Ho

    2016-05-24

    Artificial interface anisotropy is demonstrated in alternating Co/Pt and Co/Pd stripe patterns, providing a means of forming magnetic anisotropy using lithography. In-plane hysteresis loops measured along two principal directions are explained in depth by two competing shape and interface anisotropies, thus confirming the formation of interface anisotropy at the Co/Pt and Co/Pd interfaces of the stripe patterns. The measured interface anisotropy energies, which are in the range of 0.2-0.3 erg/cm(2) for both stripes, are smaller than those observed in conventional multilayers, indicating a decrease in smoothness of the interfaces when formed by lithography. The demonstration of interface anisotropy in the Co/Pt and Co/Pd stripe patterns is of significant practical importance, because this setup makes it possible to form anisotropy using lithography and to modulate its strength by controlling the pattern width. Furthermore, this makes it possible to form more complex interface anisotropy by fabricating two-dimensional patterns. These artificial anisotropies are expected to open up new device applications such as multilevel bits using in-plane magnetoresistive thin-film structures.

  15. Surface magnetic anisotropy in amorphous alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejedor, M.; Rubio, H.; Elbaile, L.; Iglesias, R. (Univ. de Oviedo (Spain). Dept. de Fisica)

    1993-11-01

    The total in-plane magnetic anisotropy and the in-plane surface magnetic anisotropy constants have been measured in nearly-zero magnetostrictive amorphous ribbons in as-quenched state. The magnetostatic energy of a two-dimensional square-lattice of parallelepipeds or ellipsoids, whose dimensions are determined by the parameters characterizing the roughness, is evaluated. From the results obtained, they can conclude that the in-plane surface anisotropy can be magnetostatic in origin but it has little influence on the total in-plane magnetic anisotropy of the ribbon.

  16. CMB statistical anisotropy from noncommutative gravitational waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiraishi, Maresuke; Ricciardone, Angelo [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia ' ' G. Galilei' ' , Università degli Studi di Padova, via Marzolo 8, I-35131, Padova (Italy); Mota, David F. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Arroja, Frederico, E-mail: maresuke.shiraishi@pd.infn.it, E-mail: d.f.mota@astro.uio.no, E-mail: angelo.ricciardone@pd.infn.it, E-mail: arroja@pd.infn.it [INFN, Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo 8, I-35131, Padova (Italy)

    2014-07-01

    Primordial statistical anisotropy is a key indicator to investigate early Universe models and has been probed by the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies. In this paper, we examine tensor-mode CMB fluctuations generated from anisotropic gravitational waves, parametrised by P{sub h}(k) = P{sub h}{sup (0)}(k) [ 1 + ∑{sub LM} f{sub L}(k) g{sub LM} Y{sub LM} ( k-circumflex )], where P{sub h}{sup (0)}(k) is the usual scale-invariant power spectrum. Such anisotropic tensor fluctuations may arise from an inflationary model with noncommutativity of fields. It is verified that in this model, an isotropic component and a quadrupole asymmetry with f{sub 0}(k) = f{sub 2}(k) ∝ k{sup -2} are created and hence highly red-tilted off-diagonal components arise in the CMB power spectra, namely ℓ{sub 2} = ℓ{sub 1} ± 2 in TT, TE, EE and BB, and ℓ{sub 2} = ℓ{sub 1} ± 1 in TB and EB. We find that B-mode polarisation is more sensitive to such signals than temperature and E-mode polarisation due to the smallness of large-scale cosmic variance and we can potentially measure g{sub 00} = 30 and g{sub 2M} = 58 at 68% CL in a cosmic-variance-limited experiment. Such a level of signal may be measured in a PRISM like experiment, while the instrumental noise contaminates it in the Planck experiment. These results imply that it is impossible to measure the noncommutative parameter if it is small enough for the perturbative treatment to be valid. Our formalism and methodology for dealing with the CMB tensor statistical anisotropy are general and straightforwardly applicable to other early Universe models.

  17. On Temporal Variations of the Multi-TeV Cosmic Ray Anisotropy using the Tibet III Air Shower Array

    CERN Document Server

    Amenomori, M; Chen, D; Cui, S W; Danzengluobu,; Ding, L K; Ding, X H; Fan, C; Feng, C F; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Z Y; Gao, X Y; Geng, Q X; Gou, Q B; Guo, H W; He, H H; He, M; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Hu, Haibing; Hu, H B; Huang, J; Huang, Q; Jia, H Y; Jiang, L; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kato, C; Kawata, K; Labaciren,; Le, G M; Li, A F; Li, H C; Li, J Y; Liu, C; Lou, Y -Q; Lu, H; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Mu, J; Munakata, K; Nagai, A; Nanjo, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Ozawa, S; Saito, T; Saito, T Y; Sakata, M; Sako, T K; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Takita, M; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Torii, S; Tsuchiya, H; Udo, S; Wang, B; Wang, H; Wang, Y; Wang, Y G; Wu, H R; Xue, L; Yamamoto, Y; Yan, C T; Yang, X C; Yasue, S; Ye, Z H; Yu, G C; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhang, H M; Zhang, J L; Zhang, N J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Ying; Zhaxisangzhu,; Zhou, X X

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the large-scale two-dimensional sidereal anisotropy of multi-TeV cosmic rays by Tibet Air Shower Array, with the data taken from 1999 November to 2008 December. To explore temporal variations of the anisotropy, the data set is divided into nine intervals, each in a time span of about one year. The sidereal anisotropy of magnitude about 0.1% appears fairly stable from year to year over the entire observation period of nine years. This indicates that the anisotropy of TeV Galactic cosmic rays remains insensitive to solar activities since the observation period covers more than a half of the 23rd solar cycle.

  18. Strength of anisotropy in a granular material: Linear versus nonlinear contact model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Ragione, Luigi; Gammariello, Marica; Recchia, Giuseppina

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we deal with anisotropy in an idealized granular material made of a collection of frictional, elastic, contacting particles. We present a theoretical analysis for an aggregate of particles isotropically compressed and then sheared, in which two possible contacts laws between particles are considered: a linear contact law, where the contact stiffness is constant; and a nonlinear contact law, where the contact stiffness depends on the overlapping between particles. In the former case the anisotropy observed in the aggregate is associated with particle arrangement. In fact, although the aggregate is initially characterized by an isotropic network of contacts, during the loading, an anisotropic texture develops, which is measured by a fabric tensor. With a nonlinear contact law it is possible to develop anisotropy because contacting stiffnesses are different, depending on the orientation of the contact vectors with respect to the axis of the applied deformation. We find that before the peak load is reached, an aggregate made of particles with a linear contact law develops a much smaller anisotropy compared with that of an aggregate with a nonlinear law.

  19. Strength of anisotropy in a granular material: Linear versus nonlinear contact model

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Ragione, Luigi; Gammariello, Marica; Recchia, Giuseppina

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we deal with anisotropy in an idealized granular material made of a collection of frictional, elastic, contacting particles. We present a theoretical analysis for an aggregate of particles isotropically compressed and then sheared, in which two possible contacts laws between particles are considered: a linear contact law, where the contact stiffness is constant; and a nonlinear contact law, where the contact stiffness depends on the overlapping between particles. In the former case the anisotropy observed in the aggregate is associated with particle arrangement. In fact, although the aggregate is initially characterized by an isotropic network of contacts, during the loading, an anisotropic texture develops, which is measured by a fabric tensor. With a nonlinear contact law it is possible to develop anisotropy because contacting stiffnesses are different, depending on the orientation of the contact vectors with respect to the axis of the applied deformation. We find that before the peak load is reached, an aggregate made of particles with a linear contact law develops a much smaller anisotropy compared with that of an aggregate with a nonlinear law.

  20. Recognizing the threshold magnetic anisotropy for inclination shallowing: Implications for correcting inclination errors of sedimentary rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxiang eLi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Post-depositional compaction is an integral part of sedimentary rock formation and thus has been reasonably deemed as a major culprit for the long-recognized inclination-shallowing problem in sedimentary rocks. Although theoretical treatment elegantly envisions magnetic anisotropy (or oblate fabrics to correspond to the degree of compaction and the magnitude of inclination flattening, such correspondence has rarely been seen in nature quantitavely, which leaves the possibility of misidentification and/or over-correction for inclination shallowing using magnetic anisotropy. This is because the extent to which oblate magnetic fabrics are developed strongly enough for inclination to start becoming shallow is not yet known. Here, we present sedimentary paleomagnetic data from two ~6 m long gravity cores GHE24L and GHE27L from the northern slope of the South China Sea to examine the down-core changes in magnetic anisotropy and inclinations, and to explore the possible connection between the two parameters. The results show that oblate fabrics are dominantly developed at depths >~2m and the degree of anisotropy displays an overall gradual increase with depth. Inclination shallowing occurs in the > 5m segment of the relatively distal core GHE27L and the amount of shallowing largely correlates with the degree of anisotropy, suggesting a causal relation between the development of magnetic anisotropy and the degree of inclination shallowing. Examination of down-core changes in inclination and magnetic anisotropy suggests that a threshold anisotropy of PAMS~1.04 and PAAR~1.10 exists for inclination shallowing in the cores. For PAAR10° if particle anisotropy is <1.4. This study provides strong field evidence that complements and substantiates the theoretical model and suggests that the threshold anisotropy can be used as a first-order criterion to identify inclination errors of some sedimentary rocks.

  1. Correlations between Thermal and Sonic Anisotropy for Low-Permeable Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Yury; Chekhonin, Evgeny; Popov, Evgeny; Spasennykh, Mikhail; Ovcharenko, Yury; Zhukov, Vladislav; Martemyanov, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    Rock anisotropy plays an important role in geophysics. Knowledge of thermal anisotropy is necessary for reconstruction of thermal history of a basin and analysis of temperature logging data, while an acoustic anisotropy in sedimentary rocks has a significant impact on seismic processing and reservoir characterization. However, determination of anisotropy for real problems is a complex procedure usually. Common measurements on cores require sampling several plugs in different directions that led to the problem of rock heterogeneity influence. Moreover, full size cores will be destroyed in this case, that makes the approach time-consuming and not reliable often. Determination of anisotropy from sonic logging depends on the quality of the acoustic signal, borehole and mud conditions as well as the direction of the borehole with respect to the anisotropic axes of symmetry. To improve quality of rock anisotropy study we combined the sonic logging data with fast, non-contact non-destructive measurements of principal thermal conductivity tensor components on more than 2000 full-size cores. It provided a comprehensive analysis of variations in thermal and acoustic anisotropy along two wells drilled in low-permeable formations in West Siberia (Russia). Strong correlation between thermal and acoustic anisotropy was established within Bazhen formation (B.fm.). It can be used for prediction of acoustic anisotropy via results of thermal profiling on cores in the intervals, where quantitative analysis of sonic log is impossible (If core is absent, thermal anisotropy can be estimated on cavings and large cuttings using optical scanning method). The work was supported by the Russian Ministry of Education and Science, project No. RFMEFI58114X0008.

  2. Tunable interface anisotropy in a Pt/CO1-xFex/Pt multilayer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Yong-Yong; Shi Zhong; Zhou Shi-Ming; Rui Wen-Bin; Du Jun

    2013-01-01

    Interfacial magnetic anisotropy in a Pt/Co1-xFex/Pt multilayer is tuned by doping iron atoms into the cobalt layer.The perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and out-of-plane coercivity are found to decrease with increasing x.For a specific x,the out-of-plane coercivity acquires a maximal value as a function of the thickness of the CoFe layer.At low temperature,the coercivity is enhanced.Small coercivity but reasonably large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy can be obtained by controlling the x and CoFe layer thickness.

  3. Azimuthal anisotropy measurements by STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Li

    2014-06-15

    The recent study of centrality and transverse momentum (p{sub T}) dependence of inclusive charged hardron elliptic anisotropy (v{sub 2}) at midrapidity (|η|<1.0) in Au+Au collision at √(s{sub NN})=7.7,11.5,19.6,27, and39 GeV in STAR Beam Energy Scan program is presented. We show that the observed increase of inclusive v{sub 2} is mainly due to the average p{sub T} increase with energy. In Au+Au 200 GeV collisions, the triangular anisotropy (v{sub 3}) measurements highly depend on measurement methods; v{sub 3} is strongly dependent on Δη. The difference between two- and four-particle cumulants v{sub 2}{2} and v{sub 2}{4} for Au+Au and Cu+Cu collision at √(s{sub NN})=62.4 and 200 GeV is used to explore flow fluctuations. Furthermore, by exploiting the symmetry of average flow in pseudorapidity η about midrapidity, the Δη-dependent and independent components are separated using v{sub 2}{2} and v{sub 2}{4}.

  4. Effect of defects, magnetocrystalline anisotropy, and shape anisotropy on magnetic structure of iron thin films by magnetic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Xu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Microstructures of magnetic materials, including defects and crystallographic orientations, are known to strongly influence magnetic domain structures. Measurement techniques such as magnetic force microscopy (MFM thus allow study of correlations between microstructural and magnetic properties. The present work probes effects of anisotropy and artificial defects on the evolution of domain structure with applied field. Single crystal iron thin films on MgO substrates were milled by Focused Ion Beam (FIB to create different magnetically isolated squares and rectangles in [110] crystallographic orientations, having their easy axis 45° from the sample edge. To investigate domain wall response on encountering non-magnetic defects, a 150 nm diameter hole was created in the center of some samples. By simultaneously varying crystal orientation and shape, both magnetocrystalline anisotropy and shape anisotropy, as well as their interaction, could be studied. Shape anisotropy was found to be important primarily for the longer edge of rectangular samples, which exaggerated the FIB edge effects and provided nucleation sites for spike domains in non-easy axis oriented samples. Center holes acted as pinning sites for domain walls until large applied magnetic fields. The present studies are aimed at deepening the understanding of the propagation of different types of domain walls in the presence of defects and different crystal orientations.

  5. Friction and Wear in Timing Belt Drives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Stojanovic

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Timing belt tooth goes into contact with a drive pulley, stretched to the maximum, because of the previous tension. When the contact begins the peak of the belt tooth makes the contact with the outer surface of the pulley teeth. The process of the teeth entering into the contact zone is accompanied with the relative sliding of their side surfaces and appropriate friction force. The normal force value is changing with the parabolic function, which also leads to the changes of the friction force. The biggest value of the normal force and of the friction force is at the tooth root. Hollow between teeth and the tip of the pulley teeth are also in contact. Occasionally, the face surface of the belt and the flange are also in contact. The friction occurs in those tribomechanical systems, also. Values of these friction forces are lower compared with the friction force, which occurs at the teeth root.

  6. Static friction between rigid fractal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando; Huang, Pengyu; Hanaor, Dorian A H; Flores-Johnson, E A; Proust, Gwénaëlle; Gan, Yixiang; Shen, Luming

    2015-09-01

    Using spheropolygon-based simulations and contact slope analysis, we investigate the effects of surface topography and atomic scale friction on the macroscopically observed friction between rigid blocks with fractal surface structures. From our mathematical derivation, the angle of macroscopic friction is the result of the sum of the angle of atomic friction and the slope angle between the contact surfaces. The latter is obtained from the determination of all possible contact slopes between the two surface profiles through an alternative signature function. Our theory is validated through numerical simulations of spheropolygons with fractal Koch surfaces and is applied to the description of frictional properties of Weierstrass-Mandelbrot surfaces. The agreement between simulations and theory suggests that for interpreting macroscopic frictional behavior, the descriptors of surface morphology should be defined from the signature function rather than from the slopes of the contacting surfaces.

  7. Friction coefficient dependence on electrostatic tribocharging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgo, Thiago A. L.; Silva, Cristiane A.; Balestrin, Lia B. S.; Galembeck, Fernando

    2013-08-01

    Friction between dielectric surfaces produces patterns of fixed, stable electric charges that in turn contribute electrostatic components to surface interactions between the contacting solids. The literature presents a wealth of information on the electronic contributions to friction in metals and semiconductors but the effect of triboelectricity on friction coefficients of dielectrics is as yet poorly defined and understood. In this work, friction coefficients were measured on tribocharged polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), using three different techniques. As a result, friction coefficients at the macro- and nanoscales increase many-fold when PTFE surfaces are tribocharged, but this effect is eliminated by silanization of glass spheres rolling on PTFE. In conclusion, tribocharging may supersede all other contributions to macro- and nanoscale friction coefficients in PTFE and probably in other insulating polymers.

  8. Friction tensor concept for textured surfaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K R Y Simha; Anirudhan Pottirayil; Pradeep L Menezes; Satish V Kailas

    2008-06-01

    Directionality of grinding marks influences the coefficient of friction during sliding. Depending on the sliding direction the coefficient of friction varies between maximum and minimum for textured surfaces. For random surfaces without any texture the friction coefficient becomes independent of the sliding direction. This paper proposes the concept of a friction tensor analogous to the heat conduction tensor in anisotropic media. This implies that there exists two principal friction coefficients $\\mu_{1,2}$ analogous to the principal conductivities $k_{1,2}$. For symmetrically textured surfaces the principal directions are orthogonal with atleast one plane of symmetry. However, in the case of polished single crystalline solids in relative sliding motion, crystallographic texture controls the friction tensor.

  9. Experimental validation of a nonlinear μFE model based on cohesive-frictional plasticity for trabecular bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwiedrzik, J; Gross, T; Bina, M; Pretterklieber, M; Zysset, P; Pahr, D

    2016-04-01

    Trabecular bone is a porous mineralized tissue playing a major load bearing role in the human body. Prediction of age-related and disease-related fractures and the behavior of bone implant systems needs a thorough understanding of its structure-mechanical property relationships, which can be obtained using microcomputed tomography-based finite element modeling. In this study, a nonlinear model for trabecular bone as a cohesive-frictional material was implemented in a large-scale computational framework and validated by comparison of μFE simulations with experimental tests in uniaxial tension and compression. A good correspondence of stiffness and yield points between simulations and experiments was found for a wide range of bone volume fraction and degree of anisotropy in both tension and compression using a non-calibrated, average set of material parameters. These results demonstrate the ability of the model to capture the effects leading to failure of bone for three anatomical sites and several donors, which may be used to determine the apparent behavior of trabecular bone and its evolution with age, disease, and treatment in the future.

  10. On the Mechanical Friction Losses Occurring in Automotive Differential Gearboxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégory Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the automobile industry, the mechanical losses resulting from friction are largely responsible for various kinds of surface damage, such as the scuffing occurring in some mechanical assemblies. These scuffing processes seem to be due to a local loss of lubrication between certain mechanical elements of the same assembly, leading to a sharp increase in the friction, which can lead to a surface and volume damage in some of them, and even can cause, in the worst case, the whole destruction of the mechanical system if it has continued to operate. Predicting and checking the occurrence of this kind of undesirable phenomena, especially in some principal systems of the vehicle, represents nowadays, a crucial challenge in terms of automobile reliability and safety. This study focuses on the mechanical friction losses liable to occur in differential automobile gearboxes, which can lead in the long term to the scuffing of these mechanical systems. The friction losses involved were modeled, using a simple analytical approach, which is presented and discussed.

  11. Friction factor of annular Poiseuille flow in a transitional regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Ishida

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Annular Poiseuille flows in a transitional regime were investigated by direct numerical simulations with an emphasis on turbulent statistics including the friction factor that are affected by the presence of large-scale transitional structures. Five different radius ratios in the range of 0.1–0.8 and several friction Reynolds numbers in the range of 48–150 were analyzed to consider various flow states accompanied by characteristic transitional structures. Three characteristic structures, namely, turbulent–laminar coexistence referred to as “(straight puff,”“helical puff,” and “helical turbulence” were observed. The selection of the structures depends on both the radius ratio and the Reynolds number. The findings indicated that despite the transitional state with a turbulent–laminar coexistence, the helical turbulence resulted in a friction factor that was as high as the fully turbulent value. In contrast, with respect to the occurrence of streamwise-finite transitional structures, such as straight/helical puffs, the friction factor decreased in a stepwise manner toward a laminar level. The turbulent statistics revealed asymmetric distributions with respect to the wall-normal direction wherein the profiles and magnitudes were significantly influenced by the occurrence of transitional structures.

  12. Static and dynamic friction in sliding colloidal monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanossi, Andrea; Manini, Nicola; Tosatti, Erio

    2013-03-01

    In a recent experimental breakthrough, the controlled sliding of 2D colloidal crystals over perfectly regular, laser generated periodic or quasi-periodic `corrugation` potentials has been realized in Bechinger's group. Based on realistic MD simulations which reproduce the main experimentally observed features, we explore the potential impact of colloid monolayer sliding in nanotribology. The free motion of edge-spawned kinks and antikinks in smooth incommensurate sliding is contrasted with the kink-antikink pair nucleation at the large static friction threshold in the commensurate case. The Aubry pinning/depinning transition is also demonstrated, e.g., as a function of the corrugation amplitude. Simulated sliding data allow the extraction of frictional work directly from particles coordinates and velocities as a function of classic friction parameters, primarily speed, and corrugation strength. Analogies with sliding charge-density waves, driven Josephson systems, sliding of rare gas islands, and other novel features suggest further experiments and insights, which promote colloid sliding to a novel friction study instrument. Research partly sponsored by Sinergia Project CRSII2 136287/1.

  13. Anisotropy and Crystal Structure of the Cocos Plate,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-08-08

    velocity or of undulations of the Mohorovicic discontinuity, we developed techniques of observation that would provide us with a statistically large...by any simple geometry of the Mohorovicic discontinuity. We have applied these techniques in a variety of locations, since that time, and have con...the mantle anisotropy we observe can be created by syntectonic recrystallization of a peridotitic mantle at the Mohorovicic discontinuity close to a

  14. Rubber friction on (apparently) smooth lubricated surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mofidi, M; Prakash, B [Division of Machine Elements, Luleaa University of Technology, Luleaa SE-97187 (Sweden); Persson, B N J [IFF, FZ-Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Albohr, O [Pirelli Deutschland AG, 64733 Hoechst/Odenwald, Postfach 1120 (Germany)

    2008-02-27

    We study rubber sliding friction on hard lubricated surfaces. We show that even if the hard surface appears smooth to the naked eye, it may exhibit short-wavelength roughness, which may make the dominant contribution to rubber friction. That is, the observed sliding friction is mainly due to the viscoelastic deformations of the rubber by the counterface surface asperities. The results presented are of great importance for rubber sealing and other rubber applications involving (apparently) smooth surfaces.

  15. Low friction wear resistant graphene films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumant, Anirudha V.; Berman, Diana; Erdemir, Ali

    2017-02-07

    A low friction wear surface with a coefficient of friction in the superlubric regime including graphene and nanoparticles on the wear surface is provided, and methods of producing the low friction wear surface are also provided. A long lifetime wear resistant surface including graphene exposed to hydrogen is provided, including methods of increasing the lifetime of graphene containing wear surfaces by providing hydrogen to the wear surface.

  16. Rubber friction on (apparently) smooth lubricated surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mofidi, M.; Prakash, B.; Persson, B. N. J.; Albohr, O.

    2008-02-01

    We study rubber sliding friction on hard lubricated surfaces. We show that even if the hard surface appears smooth to the naked eye, it may exhibit short-wavelength roughness, which may make the dominant contribution to rubber friction. That is, the observed sliding friction is mainly due to the viscoelastic deformations of the rubber by the counterface surface asperities. The results presented are of great importance for rubber sealing and other rubber applications involving (apparently) smooth surfaces.

  17. Modelling cohesive, frictional and viscoplastic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alehossein, Habib; Qin, Zongyi

    2016-06-01

    Most materials in mining and civil engineering construction are not only viscoplastic, but also cohesive frictional. Fresh concrete, fly ash and mining slurries are all granular-frictional-visco-plastic fluids, although solid concrete is normally considered as a cohesive frictional material. Presented here is both a formulation of the pipe and disc flow rates as a function of pressure and pressure gradient and the CFD application to fresh concrete flow in L-Box tests.

  18. The role of friction in orthodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Mariana Ribeiro Pacheco; Wellington Corrêa Jansen; Dauro Douglas de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Sliding mechanics is widely used during orthodontic treatment. One of the disadvantages of this mechanics is the friction generated at the bracket/archwire interface, which may reduce the amount of desired orthodontic movement obtained. Due to the application and great acceptance of this type of mechanics, the role of friction in Orthodontics has been of interest for both clinicians and scientists. OBJECTIVE: Therefore, this article discussed how friction affects orthodontic too...

  19. The measurement of friction coefficient down to 1.8 K for LHC Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Artoos, K; Poncet, Alain; Savary, F; Veness, R J M

    1994-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) proposed for construction at CERN consists of a series of high field superconducting dipole magnet operating at 1.8K. The mechanical structure of these magnets contains many components in close contact. A knowledge of the friction coefficient between these components is required. Indeed, during assembly and cool down of the magnets, prestresses must be transferred to the superconducting coils. During operation, frictional heating may provoke loss of superconductivity. A machine has been built at CERN to measure the coefficient of friction from room temperature down to 1.8K. This paper describes the cryogenic tribometer and the results collected to date.

  20. How to teach friction: Experiments and models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, Ugo; Borghi, Lidia; De Ambrosis, Anna; Mascheretti, Paolo

    2007-12-01

    Students generally have difficulty understanding friction and its associated phenomena. High school and introductory college-level physics courses usually do not give the topic the attention it deserves. We have designed a sequence for teaching about friction between solids based on a didactic reconstruction of the relevant physics, as well as research findings about student conceptions. The sequence begins with demonstrations that illustrate different types of friction. Experiments are subsequently performed to motivate students to obtain quantitative relations in the form of phenomenological laws. To help students understand the mechanisms producing friction, models illustrating the processes taking place on the surface of bodies in contact are proposed.

  1. Noise and vibration in friction systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sergienko, Vladimir P

    2015-01-01

    The book analyzes the basic problems of oscillation processes and theoretical aspects of noise and vibration in friction systems. It presents generalized information available in literature data and results of the authors in vibroacoustics of friction joints, including car brakes and transmissions. The authors consider the main approaches to abatement of noise and vibration in non-stationary friction processes. Special attention is paid to materials science aspects, in particular to advanced composite materials used to improve the vibroacoustic characteristics of tribopairs The book is intended for researchers and technicians, students and post-graduates specializing in mechanical engineering, maintenance of machines and transport means, production certification, problems of friction and vibroacoustics.

  2. Frictional Effects on Gear Tooth Contact Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper concentrates on the investigations regarding the situations of frictional shear stress of gear teeth and the relevant frictional effects on bending stresses and transmission error in gear meshing. Sliding friction is one of the major reasons causing gear failure and vibration; the adequate consideration of frictional effects is essential for understanding gear contact behavior accurately. An analysis of tooth frictional effect on gear performance in spur gear is presented using finite element method. Nonlinear finite element model for gear tooth contact with rolling/sliding is then developed. The contact zones for multiple tooth pairs are identified and the associated integration situation is derived. The illustrated bending stress and transmission error results with static and dynamic boundary conditions indicate the significant effects due to the sliding friction between the surfaces of contacted gear teeth, and the friction effect can not be ignored. To understand the particular static and dynamic frictional effects on gear tooth contact analysis, some significant phenomena of gained results will also be discussed. The potentially significant contribution of tooth frictional shear stress is presented, particularly in the case of gear tooth contact analysis with both static and dynamic boundary conditions.

  3. Friction Stir Processing of Cast Superalloys Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR effort examines the feasibility of an innovative fabrication technology incorporating sand casting and friction stir processing (FSP) for producing...

  4. Job Heterogeneity and Coordination Frictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kennes, John; le Maire, Daniel

    the job ladder, how the identification of assortative matching is fundamentally different in directed and undirected search models, how our theory accounts for business cycle facts related to inter-temporal changes in job offer distributions, and how our model could also be used to identify......We develop a new directed search model of a frictional labor market with a continuum of heterogenous workers and firms. We estimate two versions of the model - auction and price posting - using Danish data on wages and productivities. Assuming heterogenous workers with no comparative advantage, we...

  5. Friction of Plastic Rotating Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-01

    for speeds eve ., the rdnge: 10 - 300 cm/s. Overwhelming evidence was presented to support a melt phenomena. Melt depth of: polymer, pins on a glass disk...Polymers," Proc. Roy. Soc., (London),. A291 (1966), p. 186. 24. Rabinowicz , S., et al., "The Effect of Hydrostatic Pressure on the Shear Yield Behavior of...34 Proc. Roy.,Soc., (London), A269. (19620 p. 368. 51. Carignan, F. J., and Rabinowicz , E., "Friction and Wear at ligh Sliding Speeds," ASLE Trans., 24

  6. Fractional trajectories: Decorrelation versus friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenkeson, A.; Beig, M. T.; Turalska, M.; West, B. J.; Grigolini, P.

    2013-11-01

    The fundamental connection between fractional calculus and subordination processes is explored and affords a physical interpretation of a fractional trajectory, that being an average over an ensemble of stochastic trajectories. Heretofore what has been interpreted as intrinsic friction, a form of non-Markovian dissipation that automatically arises from adopting the fractional calculus, is shown to be a manifestation of decorrelations between trajectories. We apply the general theory developed herein to the Lotka-Volterra ecological model, providing new insight into the final equilibrium state. The relaxation time to achieve this state is also considered.

  7. Effect of Ligand Substitution around the Dy(III) on the SMM Properties of Dual-Luminescent Zn-Dy and Zn-Dy-Zn Complexes with Large Anisotropy Energy Barriers: A Combined Theoretical and Experimental Magnetostructural Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costes, Jean Pierre; Titos-Padilla, Silvia; Oyarzabal, Itziar; Gupta, Tulika; Duhayon, Carine; Rajaraman, Gopalan; Colacio, Enrique

    2016-05-02

    The new dinuclear Zn(II)-Dy(III) and trinuclear Zn(II)-Dy(III)-Zn(II) complexes of formula [(LZnBrDy(ovan) (NO3)(H2O)](H2O)·0.5(MeOH) (1) and [(L(1)ZnBr)2Dy(MeOH)2](ClO4) (3) (L and L(1) are the dideprotonated forms of the N,N'-2,2-dimethylpropylenedi(3-methoxysalicylideneiminato and 2-{(E)-[(3-{[(2E,3E)-3-(hydroxyimino)butan-2-ylidene ]amino}-2,2-dimethylpropyl)imino]methyl}-6-methoxyphenol Schiff base compartmental ligands, respectively) have been prepared and magnetostructurally characterized. The X-ray structure of 1 indicates that the Dy(III) ion exhibits a DyO9 coordination sphere, which is made from four O atoms coming from the compartmental ligand (two methoxy terminal groups and two phenoxido bridging groups connecting Zn(II) and Dy(III) ions), other four atoms belonging to the chelating nitrato and ovanillin ligands, and the last one coming to the coordinated water molecule. The structure of 3 shows the central Dy(III) ion surrounded by two L(1)Zn units, so that the Dy(III) and Zn(II) ions are linked by phenoxido/oximato bridging groups. The Dy ion is eight-coordinated by the six O atoms afforded by two L(1) ligands and two O atoms coming from two methanol molecules. Alternating current (AC) dynamic magnetic measurements of 1, 3, and the previously reported dinuclear [LZnClDy(thd)2] (2) complex (where thd = 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionato ligand) indicate single molecule magnet (SMM) behavior for all these complexes with large thermal energy barriers for the reversal of the magnetization and butterfly-shaped hysteresis loops at 2 K. Ab initio calculations on 1-3 show a pure Ising ground state for all of them, which induces almost completely suppressed quantum tunnelling magnetization (QTM), and thermally assisted quantum tunnelling magnetization (TA-QTM) relaxations via the first excited Kramers doublet, leading to large energy barriers, thus supporting the observation of SMM behavior. The comparison between the experimental and theoretical

  8. An empirically based steady state friction law and implications for fault stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnuolo, E.; Nielsen, S.; Violay, M.; Di Toro, G.

    2016-04-01

    Empirically based rate-and-state friction laws (RSFLs) have been proposed to model the dependence of friction forces with slip and time. The relevance of the RSFL for earthquake mechanics is that few constitutive parameters define critical conditions for fault stability (i.e., critical stiffness and frictional fault behavior). However, the RSFLs were determined from experiments conducted at subseismic slip rates (V 0.1 m/s) remains questionable on the basis of the experimental evidence of (1) large dynamic weakening and (2) activation of particular fault lubrication processes at seismic slip rates. Here we propose a modified RSFL (MFL) based on the review of a large published and unpublished data set of rock friction experiments performed with different testing machines. The MFL, valid at steady state conditions from subseismic to seismic slip rates (0.1 µm/s arrest.

  9. Measurements of the anisotropy in permalloy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijkel, Kees J.

    1988-01-01

    A measurement system is described, which accurately determines the anisotropy field H/sub k/ and the orientation of the easy-axis in a permalloy film or in any material showing magnetization induced resistance anisotropy. An accuracy of 0.1% in H/sub k/ and 0.1 degrees in easy-axis orientation is re

  10. Knee synovial cyst presenting as iliotibial band friction syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, M L; Marshall, T; Donell, S T; Phillips, H

    2004-06-01

    We present the case of a 28-year-old competitive runner with iliotibial band (ITB) friction syndrome associated with a synovial cyst. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) did not demonstrate a fluid collection. However, open exploration revealed a large cyst beneath the ITB arising from the capsule of the knee proximal to the lateral meniscus. The cyst disappeared on extension. The pre-operative MRI scan may have revealed the cyst, if it had been taken with the knee flexed.

  11. Numerical Simulation of Friction Stir Welding by Natural Element Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Alfaro, I.; Fratini, L.; CUETO, Elias; Chinesta, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    International audience; In this work we address the problem of numerically simulating the Friction Stir Welding process. Due to the special characteristics of this welding method (i.e., high speed of the rotating pin, very large deformations, etc.) finite element methods (FEM) encounter several difficulties. While Lagrangian simulations suffer from mesh distortion, Eulerian or Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) ones still have difficulties due to the treatment of convective terms, the treatm...

  12. Control rod drop surveillance using two friction coefficients

    OpenAIRE

    Blázquez, Juan; Vallejo, I.; García-Berrocal Sánchez, Agustin; Balbás Antón, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    In the case of large burnup, a control rod (CR) guide tube in the pressurized water reactor of a commercial nuclear power plant might bend. As a consequence, a CR drop experiment may indicate an event of a CR partially inserted and whether the CR should be deemed inoperable. Early prevention of such an event can be achieved by measuring two friction coefficients: the hydraulic coefficient and the sliding coefficient. The hydraulic coefficient hardly changes, so that the curvature of the guide...

  13. Optical and diamagnetic anisotropy of graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exarhos, A. L.; Vora, P. M.; Lou, Z.; Johnson, A. T.; Kikkawa, J. M.

    2009-03-01

    We have recently shown that graphene oxide (GO) emits a broad photoluminescence (PL) band in both solid and aqueous preparations. The origin of this PL is not yet well understood, but for absorptive and emissive optical processes originating in the two dimensional GO plane, one expects an in-plane polarization. Studies of optical anisotropy can therefore help to clarify the origin of the PL. Here we use a method of optical nanomagnetometry (Torrens, et al, JACS 129, p. 252 (2007)) to extract these quantities, also determining the magnetic anisotropy. We find that when aqueous preparations of GO are placed in a magnetic field, diamagnetically induced alignment leads to marked linear polarization anisotropy of absorbance and photoluminescence. By taking six optical measurements at each magnetic field, we are able to extract the intrinsic polarization anisotropies of optical absorption and emission of GO flakes and to quantify the orbital diamagnetic anisotropy. We discuss how these quantities give insight into electronic delocalization in these systems.

  14. Anisotropy in solar wind plasma turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oughton, S; Matthaeus, W H; Wan, M; Osman, K T

    2015-05-13

    A review of spectral anisotropy and variance anisotropy for solar wind fluctuations is given, with the discussion covering inertial range and dissipation range scales. For the inertial range, theory, simulations and observations are more or less in accord, in that fluctuation energy is found to be primarily in modes with quasi-perpendicular wavevectors (relative to a suitably defined mean magnetic field), and also that most of the fluctuation energy is in the vector components transverse to the mean field. Energy transfer in the parallel direction and the energy levels in the parallel components are both relatively weak. In the dissipation range, observations indicate that variance anisotropy tends to decrease towards isotropic levels as the electron gyroradius is approached; spectral anisotropy results are mixed. Evidence for and against wave interpretations and turbulence interpretations of these features will be discussed. We also present new simulation results concerning evolution of variance anisotropy for different classes of initial conditions, each with typical background solar wind parameters.

  15. Adhesion wear mechanisms under dry friction of titanium alloys in vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebedeva, I.L.; Presnyakova, G.N. (Physico-Technical Inst. for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering, Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, Kharkov (Ukrainian SSR))

    1991-08-15

    Physicochemical processes taking place in the surface layers of titanium alloys were studied. For vacuum conditions, a range of external parameters was proved to exist where the alloys have high wear resistance and a low coefficient of friction. The transition from seizure, with tearing of the material at a large depth, to fatigue wear is related to surface hardening due to {alpha} {r reversible} {beta} transitions under friction. Thermodynamic parameters were calculated and the criteria of protective secondary structure formation defined. (orig.).

  16. A review of using computational fluid dynamic in simulating of friction stir welding and parametric studies

    OpenAIRE

    Hamza, Esam

    2016-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is still gradually evolving where it is newer than most thermomechanical processes and due to its ability to avoid many of the common defects in other welding techniques it has become largely used, particularly for those materials that are soft.[1]\\ud Since the invention of friction stir welding by The Welding Institute (TWI), Cambridge, UK, there have been many attempts to comprehend the physical phenomena that take place during this process. These phenomena can b...

  17. Texture induced microwave background anisotropies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrill, Julian; Copeland, Edmund J.; Liddle, Andrew R.; Stebbins, Albert; Veeraraghavan, Shoba

    1994-03-01

    We use numerical simulations to calculate the cosmic microwave background anisotropy induced by the evolution of a global texture field, with special emphasis on individual textures. Both spherically symmetric and general configurations are analyzed, and in the latter case we consider field configurations which exhibit unwinding events and also ones which do not. We compare the results given by evolving the field numerically under both the expanded core (XCORE) and non-linear sigma model (NLSM) approximations with the analytic predictions of the NLSM exact solution for a spherically symmetric self-similar (SSSS) unwinding. We find that the random unwinding configuration spots' typical peak height is 60-75\\% and angular size typically only 10% of those of the SSSS unwinding, and that random configurations without an unwinding event nonetheless may generate indistinguishable hot and cold spots. A brief comparison is made with other work.

  18. Seepage Anisotropy of Heterogeneous Body

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Ore dumps are heterogeneous bodies with anisotropic seepage characteristics because of the ore segregation.In an indoor experiment, a dump was constructed with three strata, where the horizontal and vertical seepage experiments were carried out.Horizontals flow are regarded as phreatic plan flows without penetration.Its seepage law satifies the Dupuit equation.With parallel lay seepage model, the equivalent seepage coefficient in the horizontal flow was obtained and was equivalent to the weighted mean of the seepage coefficient of each stratum.An unsaturated flow appeared in the vertical experiment, with a hydraulic gradient of 1.The vertical flow was equivalent to the seepage model that moved in vertical bedding; its equivalent seepage coefficient depended on the stratum with the minimum seepage coefficient.That the experiment showed clear anisotropy in a heterogeneous body was obvious with an anisotropic coefficient between 63 and 155, which is 25 to 100 times larger than that of a homogeneous body.

  19. CMB anisotropy science: a review

    CERN Document Server

    Challinor, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) provides us with our most direct observational window to the early universe. Observations of the temperature and polarization anisotropies in the CMB have played a critical role in defining the now-standard cosmological model. In this contribution we review some of the basics of CMB science, highlighting the role of observations made with ground-based and balloon-borne Antarctic telescopes. Most of the ingredients of the standard cosmological model are poorly understood in terms of fundamental physics. We discuss how current and future CMB observations can address some of these issues, focusing on two directly relevant for Antarctic programmes: searching for gravitational waves from inflation via B-mode polarization, and mapping dark matter through CMB lensing.

  20. Azimuthal anisotropy of Rayleigh waves beneath the Tibetan Plateau and adjacent areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The crustal and upper mantle azimuthal anisotropy of the Tibetan Plateau and adjacent areas was studied by Rayleigh wave tomography. We collected sufficient broadband digital seismograms trav-ersing the Tibetan Plateau and adjacent areas from available stations, including especially some data from the temporary stations newly deployed in Yunnan, eastern Tibet, and western Sichuan. They made an adequate path coverage in most regions to achieve a reasonable resolution for the inversion. The model resolution tests show that the anisotropic features of scope greater than 400 km and strength greater than 2% are reliable. The azimuthal anisotropy pattern inside the Tibetan Plateau was similar to the characteristic of tectonic partition. The crustal anisotropy strength is greater than 2% in most re-gions of East Tibet, and the anisotropy shows clockwise rotation surrounding the eastern Himalayan syntaxis. Vertically, the anisotropy direction indicates a coherent pattern within the upper crust, lower crust, and lithosphere mantle of the Tibetan Plateau, which also is consistent with GPS velocity field and SKS fast polarization directions. The result supports that the crust-mantle deformation beneath the Tibetan Plateau is vertically coherent. The anisotropy strength of crust and lithospheric upper mantle in Yunnan outside the Tibetan Plateau is lower than 2%, so SKS splitting from core-mantle boundary to station should largely be attributed to the anisotropy of asthenosphere.

  1. Azimuthal anisotropy of Rayleigh waves beneath the Tibetan Plateau and adjacent areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Wei; WANG ChunYong; HUANG ZhongXian

    2008-01-01

    The crustal and upper mantle azimuthal anisotropy of the Tibetan Plateau and adjacent areas was studied by Rayleigh wave tomography. We collected sufficient broadband digital seismograms traversing the Tibetan Plateau and adjacent areas from available stations, including especially some data from the temporary stations newly deployed in Yunnan, eastern Tibet, and western Sichuan. They made an adequate path coverage in most regions to achieve a reasonable resolution for the inversion. The model resolution tests show that the anisotropic features of scope greater than 400 km and strength greater than 2% are reliable. The azimuthal anisotropy pattern inside the Tibetan Plateau was similar to the characteristic of tectonic partition. The crustal anisotropy strength is greater than 2% in most regions of East Tibet, and the anisotropy shows clockwise rotation surrounding the eastern Himalayan syntaxis. Vertically, the anisotropy direction indicates a coherent pattern within the upper crust, lower crust, and lithosphere mantle of the Tibetan Plateau, which also is consistent with GPS velocity field and SKS fast polarization directions. The result supports that the crust-mantle deformation beneath the Tibetan Plateau is vertically coherent. The anisotropy strength of crust and lithospheric upper mantle in Yunnan outside the Tibetan Plateau is lower than 2%, so SKS splitting from core-mantle boundary to station should largely be attributed to the anisotropy of asthenosphere.

  2. The effect of lateral variations of friction on crustal faulting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cocco

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available We propose that lateral variations in fault friction control the heterogeneity of slip observed in large earthquakes, We model these variations using a rate and state-dependent friction law, where we differentiate velocity-weakening into strong and weak-seismic fields, and velocity-strengthening into compliant and viscous fields. The strong-seismic field comprises the seismic slip concentrations, or asperities. The two «intermediate» frictional fields, weak-seismic and compliant, modulate both the tectonic loading and the dynamic rupture process. During the interseismic period, the compliant and viscous regions slip aseismically while the strong-seismic regions remain locked, evolving into stress concentrations that fail only in main shocks. The weak-seismic regions contain most of the interseismic activity and aftershocks, but also «creep seismically», that is, most of the weak-seismic area slips aseismically, actuating the seismicity on the remaining area. This «mixed» frictional behavior can be obtained from a sufficiently heterogenous distribution for the critical slip distance. The interseismic slip provides an inherent rupture resistance: dynamic rupture fronts decelerate as they penetrate into these unloaded compliant or creeping weak-seismic areas, diffusing into broad areas of accelerated afterslip. Aftershocks occur in both the weak-seismic and compliant areas around the fault, but most of the stress is diffused through aseismic slip. Rapid afterslip on these peripheral areas can also produce aftershocks within the main shock rupture area, by reloading weak fault areas that slipped in the main shock and then healed. We test this frictional model by comparing the interevent seismicity and aftershocks to the coseismic slip distribution for the 1966 Parkfield, 1979 Coyote Lake, and 1984 Morgan Hill earthquakes.

  3. Comparison of Frictional Heating Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, Nicholas R [ORNL; Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare the predicted temperature rises using four well-known models for frictional heating under a few selected conditions in which similar variable inputs are provided to each model. Classic papers by Archard, Kuhlmann-Wilsdorf, Lim and Ashby, and Rabinowicz have been examined, and a spreadsheet (Excel ) was developed to facilitate the calculations. This report may be used in conjunction with that spreadsheet. It explains the background, assumptions, and rationale used for the calculations. Calculated flash temperatures for selected material combinations, under a range of applied loads and sliding speeds, are tabulated. The materials include AISI 52100 bearing steel, CDA 932 bronze, NBD 200 silicon nitride, Ti-6Al-4V alloy, and carbon-graphite material. Due to the assumptions made by the different models, and the direct way in which certain assumed quantities, like heat sink distances or asperity dimensions, enter into the calculations, frictional hearing results may differ significantly; however, they can be similar in certain cases in light of certain assumptions that are shared between the models.

  4. $\\Lambda$-inflation and CMB anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Lukash, V N

    2000-01-01

    We explore a broad class of three-parameter inflationary models, called the cosmic gravitational waves consistent with the Harrison-Zel'dovich spectrum of primordial cosmological perturbations, the non-power-law wing-like spectrum of matter density perturbations, high efficiency of these models to meet current observational tests, and others. We show that a parity contribution of the gravitational waves and adiabatic density perturbations into the large-scale temperature anisotropy, T/S $\\sim 1$, is a common feature of are reached in models where (i) the local spectrum shape of density perturbations is flat or slightly red ($n_S{}_\\sim^< 1$), and (ii) the residual potential energy of the inflaton is near the GUT scale ($V_0^{{1/4}} \\sim 10^{16} GeV$). The conditions to find large T/S in the paradigm of cosmic inflation and the relationship of T/S to the ratio of the power spectra, $r$, and to the inflationary $\\gamma$ and Hubble parameters, are discussed. We argue that a simple estimate, T/S$\\simeq 3r\\sime...

  5. Deformation behaviors of 21-6-9 stainless steel tube numerical control bending under different friction conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方军; 鲁世强; 王克鲁; 姚正军

    2015-01-01

    For contact dominated numerical control (NC) bending process of tube, the effect of friction on bending deformation behaviors should be focused on to achieve precision bending forming. A three dimensional (3D) elastic-plastic finite element (FE) model of NC bending process was established under ABAQUS/Explicit platform, and its reliability was validated by the experiment. Then, numerical study on bending deformation behaviors under different frictions between tube and various dies was explored from multiple aspects such as wrinkling, wall thickness change and cross section deformation. The results show that the large friction of wiper die−tube reduces the wrinkling wave ratioη and cross section deformation degreeΔD and increases the wall thinning degreeΔt. The large friction of mandrel−tube causes largeη,Δt andΔD, and the onset of wrinkling near clamp die. The large friction of pressure die−tube reducesΔt andΔD, and the friction on this interface has little effect onη. The large friction of bending die−tube reducesη andΔD, and the friction on this interface has little effect onΔt. The reasonable friction coefficients on wiper die−tube, mandrel−tube, pressure die−tube and bending die−tube of 21-6-9 (0Cr21Ni6Mn9N) stainless steel tube in NC bending are 0.05−0.15, 0.05−0.15, 0.25−0.35 and 0.25−0.35, respectively. The results can provide a guideline for applying the friction conditions to establish the robust bending environment for stable and precise bending deformation of tube bending.

  6. Lubrication and friction prediction in metal-on-metal hip implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, F C; Brockett, C; Williams, S; Udofia, I; Fisher, J; Jin, Z M

    2008-03-07

    A general methodology of mixed lubrication analysis and friction prediction for a conforming spherical bearing in hip implants was developed, with particular reference to a typical metal-on-metal hip replacement. Experimental measurement of frictional torque for a similar implant was carried out to validate the theoretical prediction. A ball-in-socket configuration was adopted to represent the articulation between the femoral head and the acetabular cup under cyclic operating conditions of representative load and motion. The mixed lubrication model presented in this study was first applied to identify the contact characteristics on the bearing surfaces, consisting of both fluid-film and boundary lubricated regions. The boundary lubricated contact was assumed to occur when the predicted fluid film thickness was less than a typical boundary protein layer absorbed on the bearing surfaces. Subsequently, the friction was predicted from the fluid-film lubricated region with viscous shearing due to both Couette and Poiseuille flows and the boundary protein layer contact region with a constant coefficient of friction. The predicted frictional torque of the typical metal-on-metal hip joint implant was compared with the experimental measurement conducted in a functional hip simulator and a reasonably good agreement was found. The mixed lubrication regime was found to be dominant for the conditions considered. Although the percentage of the boundary lubricated region was quite small, the corresponding contribution to friction was quite large and the resultant friction factor was quite high.

  7. Lubrication and friction prediction in metal-on-metal hip implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, F C; Brockett, C; Williams, S; Udofia, I; Fisher, J; Jin, Z M [Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering, School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: f.c.wang@bath.ac.uk

    2008-03-07

    A general methodology of mixed lubrication analysis and friction prediction for a conforming spherical bearing in hip implants was developed, with particular reference to a typical metal-on-metal hip replacement. Experimental measurement of frictional torque for a similar implant was carried out to validate the theoretical prediction. A ball-in-socket configuration was adopted to represent the articulation between the femoral head and the acetabular cup under cyclic operating conditions of representative load and motion. The mixed lubrication model presented in this study was first applied to identify the contact characteristics on the bearing surfaces, consisting of both fluid-film and boundary lubricated regions. The boundary lubricated contact was assumed to occur when the predicted fluid film thickness was less than a typical boundary protein layer absorbed on the bearing surfaces. Subsequently, the friction was predicted from the fluid-film lubricated region with viscous shearing due to both Couette and Poiseuille flows and the boundary protein layer contact region with a constant coefficient of friction. The predicted frictional torque of the typical metal-on-metal hip joint implant was compared with the experimental measurement conducted in a functional hip simulator and a reasonably good agreement was found. The mixed lubrication regime was found to be dominant for the conditions considered. Although the percentage of the boundary lubricated region was quite small, the corresponding contribution to friction was quite large and the resultant friction factor was quite high.

  8. The influence of resting periods on friction in the artificial hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassutt, Roman; Wimmer, Markus A; Schneider, Erich; Morlock, Michael M

    2003-02-01

    Insufficient tribologic performance of total joint components is a major cause of prostheses failure. Wear has been studied intensively using testing machines that apply continuous motions. Human locomotion, however, is not well represented by continuous motions alone. Singular events and resting periods are a substantial part of daily activities. Resting does influence adhesion in the artificial joint with possible effects on friction, wear, and loosening. The current study evaluated the effects of resting on the frictional properties of hip prosthesis components. The activity measurements of 32 patients with artificial hip replacements were analyzed for resting durations of the hip. A pin-on-ball screening device was used to determine friction after characteristic resting periods and during continuous oscillating motion. All common articulation pairings were investigated. Prolonged and frequent resting periods of the hip were found for the patients. Initial friction increased with increasing resting duration for all tested materials (between 41% and 191%). The metal-on-metal articulations showed the highest friction level (0.098 for sliding) and the highest increase (191%) in friction with resting duration (0.285 after resting periods of 60 seconds). A high static frictional moment after resting periods might present a risk for aseptic implant loosening. Therefore, large head diameters of metal-on-metal joints should be used with caution, especially when additional unfavorable risk factors such as obesity, weak bone-implant interface, or high activity level are present.

  9. Effects of Single-site Anisotropy on Mixed Diamond Chains with Spins 1 and 1/2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hida, Kazuo; Takano, Ken'ichi

    2011-10-01

    Effects of single-site anisotropy on mixed diamond chains with spins 1 and 1/2 are investigated in the ground states and at finite temperatures. There are phases where the ground state is a spin cluster solid, i.e., an array of uncorrelated spin-1 clusters separated by singlet dimers. The ground state is nonmagnetic for the easy-plane anisotropy, while it is paramagnetic for the easy-axis anisotropy. Also, there are the Néel, Haldane, and large-D phases, where the ground state is a single spin cluster of infinite size and the system is equivalent to the spin-1 Heisenberg chain with alternating anisotropy. The longitudinal and transverse susceptibilities and entropy are calculated at finite temperatures in the spin-cluster-solid phases. Their low-temperature behaviors are sensitive to anisotropy.

  10. Rolling Friction on a Wheeled Laboratory Cart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2012-01-01

    A simple model is developed that predicts the coefficient of rolling friction for an undriven laboratory cart on a track that is approximately independent of the mass loaded onto the cart and of the angle of inclination of the track. The model includes both deformation of the wheels/track and frictional torque at the axles/bearings. The concept of…

  11. On the Blasius correlation for friction factors

    CERN Document Server

    Trinh, Khanh Tuoc

    2010-01-01

    The Blasius empirical correlation for turbulent pipe friction factors is derived from first principles and extended to non-Newtonian power law fluids. Two alternative formulations are obtained that both correlate well with the experimental measurements of Dodge, Bogue and Yoo. Key words: Blasius, turbulent friction factor, power law fluids

  12. FACTORS INFLUENCING FRICTION OF PHOSPHATE COATINGS,

    Science.gov (United States)

    surface roughness, crystalline structure , and velocity. The coefficients of friction for manganese phosphate coatings did not differ to any practical...The coefficient of friction was independent of the applied load. Velocity during dynamic testing, surface finish, and crystalline structure influenced

  13. Gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor); Lawless, Kirby G. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool includes a pin and first and second annular shoulders coupled to the pin. At least one of the annular shoulders is coupled to the pin for gimbaled motion with respect thereto as the tool is rotated by a friction stir welding apparatus.

  14. The Gulf Stream: Inertia and friction

    OpenAIRE

    ASSAF, GAD

    2011-01-01

    The inertial theory of the Gulf Stream (Charney, 1955) is extended to include vertical friction in the cyclonic shear zone (the western side) of the stream. The vertical friction is assumed to be controlled by local Froude conditions.DOI: 10.1111/j.2153-3490.1977.tb00717.x

  15. Graphite friction coefficient for various conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The friction coefficient the graphite used in the Tsinghua University 10MW High Tem-perature Gas-Cooled Reactor was analyzed for various conditions. The variation of the graphitefriction coefficient was measured for various sliding velocities, sliding distances, normal loads, en-vironments and temperatures. A scanning elector microscope (SEM) was used to analyze the fric-tion surfaces.

  16. Wiping Metal Transfer in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Much evidence suggests that as the friction stir pin-tool moves along a weld seam the displacement of metal takes place by a wiping action at the surface of a plug of metal that rotates with the tool. The wiping model is explained and some consequences for the friction stir welding process are drawn.

  17. Optimization of artificial flockings by means of anisotropy measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Makiguchi, Motohiro

    2010-01-01

    An effective procedure to determine the optimal parameters appearing in artificial flockings is proposed in terms of optimization problems. We numerically examine genetic algorithms (GAs) to determine the optimal set of such parameters such as the weights for three essential interactions in BOIDS by Reynolds (1987) under `zero-collision' and `no-breaking-up' constraints. As a fitness function (the energy function) to be maximized by the GA, we choose the so-called the $\\textyen gamma$-value of anisotropy which can be observed empirically in typical flocks of starling. We confirm that the GA successfully finds the solution having a large $\\textyen gamma$-value leading-up to a strong anisotropy. The numerical experience shows that the procedure might enable us to make more realistic and efficient artificial flocking of starling even in our personal computers.

  18. Depth-varying azimuthal anisotropy in the Tohoku subduction channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Zhao, Dapeng

    2017-09-01

    We determine a detailed 3-D model of azimuthal anisotropy tomography of the Tohoku subduction zone from the Japan Trench outer-rise to the back-arc near the Japan Sea coast, using a large number of high-quality P and S wave arrival-time data of local earthquakes recorded by the dense seismic network on the Japan Islands. Depth-varying seismic azimuthal anisotropy is revealed in the Tohoku subduction channel. The shallow portion of the Tohoku megathrust zone (plate mainly exhibits trench-parallel FVDs, except for the top portion of the subducting Pacific slab where visible trench-normal FVDs are revealed. A qualitative tectonic model is proposed to interpret such anisotropic features, suggesting transposition of earlier fabrics in the oceanic lithosphere into subduction-induced new structures in the subduction channel.

  19. A convection model to explain anisotropy of the inner core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenk, H.-R. [Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of California, Berkeley (United States); Baumgardner, J. R. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (United States); Lebensohn, R. A. [CONICET, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, University of Rosario, Rosario, (Argentina); Tome, C. N. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (United States)

    2000-03-10

    Seismic evidence suggests that the solid inner core of the Earth may be anisotropic. Several models have been proposed to explain this anisotropy as the result of preferred orientation of crystals. They range from a large annealed single crystal, growth at the melt interface, to deformation-induced texture. In this study texture development by deformation during inner core convection is explored for {epsilon}-iron (hcp) and {gamma}-iron (fcc). Convection patterns for harmonic degree two were investigated in detail. In the model it is assumed that traces of potassium are uniformly dispersed in the inner core and act as a heat source. Both for fcc and hcp iron, crystal rotations associated with intracrystalline slip during deformation can plausibly explain a 1-3% anisotropy in P waves with faster velocities along the N-S axis and slower ones in the equatorial plane. The effect of single crystal elastic constants is explored. (c) 2000 American Geophysical Union.

  20. Late time CMB anisotropies constrain mini-charged particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrage, C.; Redondo, J.; Ringwald, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Jaeckel, J. [Univ. of Durham, Inst. for Particle Physics Phenomenology (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-15

    Observations of the temperature anisotropies induced as light from the CMB passes through large scale structures in the late universe are a sensitive probe of the interactions of photons in such environments. In extensions of the Standard Model which give rise to mini-charged particles, photons propagating through transverse magnetic fields can be lost to pair production of such particles. Such a decrement in the photon flux would occur as photons from the CMB traverse the magnetic fields of galaxy clusters. Therefore late time CMB anisotropies can be used to constrain the properties of mini- charged particles. We outline how this test is constructed, and present new constraints on mini-charged particles from observations of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in the Coma cluster. (orig.)

  1. Nonlinear spin control by terahertz-driven anisotropy fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baierl, S.; Hohenleutner, M.; Kampfrath, T.; Zvezdin, A. K.; Kimel, A. V.; Huber, R.; Mikhaylovskiy, R. V.

    2016-11-01

    Future information technologies, such as ultrafast data recording, quantum computation or spintronics, call for ever faster spin control by light. Intense terahertz pulses can couple to spins on the intrinsic energy scale of magnetic excitations. Here, we explore a novel electric dipole-mediated mechanism of nonlinear terahertz-spin coupling that is much stronger than linear Zeeman coupling to the terahertz magnetic field. Using the prototypical antiferromagnet thulium orthoferrite (TmFeO3), we demonstrate that resonant terahertz pumping of electronic orbital transitions modifies the magnetic anisotropy for ordered Fe3+ spins and triggers large-amplitude coherent spin oscillations. This mechanism is inherently nonlinear, it can be tailored by spectral shaping of the terahertz waveforms and its efficiency outperforms the Zeeman torque by an order of magnitude. Because orbital states govern the magnetic anisotropy in all transition-metal oxides, the demonstrated control scheme is expected to be applicable to many magnetic materials.

  2. Probing polarization states of primordial gravitational waves with CMB anisotropies

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, Shun; Taruya, Atsushi

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the polarization signature of primordial gravitational waves imprinted in cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies. The high-energy physics motivated by superstring theory or M-theory generically yield parity violating terms, which may produce a circularly polarized gravitational wave background (GWB) during inflation. In contrast to the standard prediction of inflation with un-polarized GWB, circularly polarized GWB generates non-vanishing TB and EB-mode power spectra of CMB anisotropies. We evaluate the TB and EB-mode power spectra taking into account the secondary effects and investigate the dependence of cosmological parameters. We then discuss current constraints on the circularly polarized GWB from large angular scales (l < 16) of the three year WMAP data. Prospects for future CMB experiments are also investigated based on a Monte Carlo analysis of parameter estimation, showing that the circular polarization degree, varepsilon, which is the asymmetry of the tensor power spectra betwe...

  3. Anisotropies in the gravitational wave background from preheating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethke, Laura; Figueroa, Daniel G; Rajantie, Arttu

    2013-07-05

    We investigate the anisotropies in the gravitational wave (GW) background produced at preheating after inflation. Using lattice field theory simulations of a massless preheating model, we show that the GW amplitude depends sensitively on the value of the decay product field χ coupled to the inflaton φ, with the only requisite that χ is light during inflation. We find a strong anisotropy in the amplitude of the GW background on large angular scales, the details of which strongly depend on the reheating dynamics. We expect similar conclusions for a wide class of inflationary models with light scalar fields. If future direct detection GW experiments are capable of detecting the GW produced by preheating, they should also be able to detect this effect. This could eventually provide a powerful way to distinguish between different inflationary and preheating scenarios.

  4. Trial manufacture of rotary friction tester and frictional force measurement of metals

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, T; Kanari, M; Tanzawa, S

    2002-01-01

    In the plasma confinement type fusion reactor, in-vessel structures such as a blanket module slide at the joints each other when plasma disruption occurs, and then frictional heat is generated there. Therefore, for the selection of material and the use as the design data, it is important to understand the frictional characteristics of metals and ceramic films in the vacuum. In the present study, we have manufactured a prototype of rotary friction tester and examined the performances of the tester. The frictional characteristics of metals in the room air was measured using the friction tester, and the results obtained are as follows. A drifting friction force for a constant time and a friction force during the idling were 98 mN and 225 mN, respectively. These values were sufficiently small as compared to pressing load (9.8 - 57.8 N) used in the friction test. In a friction force measurement of stainless steel, dynamic friction force obeyed Amontons' law which indicated that dynamic friction force is not depend...

  5. Subduction-controlled mantle flow and seismic anisotropy in South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiashun; Faccenda, Manuele; Liu, Lijun

    2017-07-01

    Seismic anisotropy records both the past and present deformation inside the solid Earth. In the mantle, seismic anisotropy is mainly attributed to the lattice preferred orientation (LPO) of mineral fabrics, caused by the shear deformation due to mantle flow. However, contributions from different tectonic processes remain debated, and a single geodynamic model that simultaneously explains the observed mantle structures and various seismic anisotropy measurements is still lacking. Here, we present a model for the Cenozoic subduction history in South America using a geodynamic simulation constrained by both past plate reconstructions and present mantle seismic structures. With a recently developed software package DRexS, we further predict azimuthal seismic anisotropy at different depths and generate synthetic shear wave splitting (SWS) measurements using the resulting mantle flow. Our results provide a good match to both depth-dependent surface wave anisotropy and various land-based SWS records. We find that the dominant control on seismic anisotropy in South America comes from subduction-induced mantle flow, where anisotropy below the subducting Nazca Plate aligns with plate-motion-induced Couette flow and that below the overriding South American Plate follows slab-induced Poiseuille flow. This large-scale mantle flow can be diverted by secondary slabs, such as that below the Antilles subduction zone. In contrast, the contribution to SWS from fossil continental anisotropy and from the effects due to mantle flow modulation by lithosphere thickness variation are minor. Upper-mantle fast seismic anomalies beneath the southern Atlantic margin should have close-to-neutral buoyancy in order to satisfy the observed seismic anisotropy.

  6. Velocity dependence of friction of confined polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, V.N.; Persson, B.N.J.

    2009-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: (a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate, and (b) polymer sliding on polymer. We discuss the velocity dependence of the frictional...... cases the frictional shear stress increases monotonically with the sliding velocity. For polymer sliding on polymer [case (b)] the friction is much larger, and the velocity dependence is more complex. For hydrocarbons with molecular lengths from 60 to 140 C-atoms, the number of monolayers of lubricant...... shows no dependence on the sliding velocity, and for the shortest hydrocarbon (20 C-atoms) the frictional shear stress increases nearly linearly with the sliding velocity....

  7. Anisotropy of rare-earth magnets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.Skomski; D.J.Sellmyer

    2009-01-01

    Rare-earth intermetallics such as Nd2FeI4B and Sm-Co are widely used as high-performance permanent magnets,because they combine high magnetocrystalline anisotropy with reasonable magnetization and Curie temperature.The anisotropy is a combined effect of spin-orbit coupling and electrostatic crystal-field interactions.The main contribution comes from the rare-earth 4f electrons,which are well-screened from the crystalline environment but exhibit a strong spin-orbit coupling.In this limit,the magnetocrystalline anisotropy has a very transparent physical interpretation,the anisotropy energy essentially being equal to the energy of Hund's-rules 4f ion in the crystal field.The corresponding expression for the lowest-order uniaxial anisotropy constant K1 is used to discuss rare-earth substitutions,which have recently attracted renewed interest due to shifts in the rare-earth production and demand.Specific phenomena reviewed in this article are the enhancement of the anisotropy of Sm2Fe17 due to interstitial nitrogen,the use of Sm-Co magnets for high-temperature applications,and the comparison of rare-earth single-ion anisotropy with other single-ion and two-ion mechanisms.

  8. How Modelling of Crystal Defects at the Atomic Scale can Provide Information on Seismic Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordier, P.; Carrez, P.; Goryaeva, A.; Gouriet, K.; Hirel, P.; Kraych, A.; Ritterbex, S.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic anisotropy represents one of the few sources of information about flow in the mantle that takes place at timescales that are barely accessible at human timescales. Seismic waves travelling through rocks at the speed of sound can reveal flow lines frozen in rocks over hundreds of million years. The interpretation of seismic anisotropy also needs to bridge length-scales since crystal defects are responsible for the plastic anisotropy that align crystals in a deforming rock thus revealing elastic anisotropy at the macroscopic scale. Knowing the easiest slip systems for a given crystal structure is thus the fundamental information needed. To obtain it we propose the following approach based on multiscale numerical modeling. As a first approach, we calculate generalized stacking faults which inform us about the easiest shear paths imposed by the crystal chemistry. This leads to a short list of potential slip systems for which lattice friction will be calculated. A further selection will be done by modeling the core structures of screw dislocations. The tendency for core spreading of screw dislocations impose a selection on potential glide planes which is further validated by modeling corresponding edge dislocations and their respective mobilities. Finally, we model the mobility of these dislocations under the conjugate influence of stress and temperature using the kink-pair model which is based on the activation enthalpy of the critical configuration which allows a dislocation to glide from one stable position to the next. The output of this model is the so-called critical resolved shear stress which is the onset of plastic glide at a given temperature and strain rate. Comparison between slip systems provides constraints on the plastic anisotropy. Examples are presented among the major phases of the Earth's mantle.

  9. FRICTION-BOON OR BANE IN ORTHODONTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Most fixed appliance techniques involve some degree of sliding between brackets and arch wires. A sound knowledge of the various factors affecting the magnitude of friction is of paramount importance to the clinician. The present study was performed to evaluate and compare the frictional resistance and characteristics between self-ligating brackets and pre-adjusted edgewise brackets with different types of ligation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Tidy's frictional test design was used to simulate retraction of tooth along with artificial saliva to simulate wet conditions in oral cavity. The jig with this assembly was mounted on the Instron machine with the cross head moving upwards at a speed of 5mm/min. The movable bracket was suspended from the load cell of the testing machine, while the jig was mounted on cross head of machine and the load cell readings were recorded on digital display. Following wires are used 0.016 HANT, 0.019X 0.025HANT, 0.019X 0.025 SS, 0.021X 0.025 SS wires are used. The brackets used were 0.022 slot Damon, 0.022 Smart clip and 0.022 slot MBT system. RESULTS: Self ligating brackets were shown to produce lesser friction when compared to the conventional brackets used with modules, and stainless steel ligatures. Damon self-ligating brackets produce a least friction of all the brackets used in the study. Stainless steel ligatures produced the least friction compared to elastomeric. CONCLUSION: Self ligation brackets produce lesser friction than the conventional brackets ligated with elastomeric modules and stainless steel ligature. Damon self-ligating brackets produce a least friction of all the brackets used in the study width of the bracket was also found to be directly proportional to the friction produced 0.0016HANT with elastomeric modules produce more friction due increase in flexibility of wire.

  10. Strong crustal seismic anisotropy in the Kalahari Craton based on Receiver Functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybo, Hans; Soliman, Mohammad Youssof Ahmad; Artemieva, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Earlier seismic studies of the Kalahari Craton in southern Africa infer deformation of upper mantle by flow with fast direction of seismic anisotropy being parallel to present plate motion, and/or report anisotropy frozen into the lithospheric mantle. We present evidence for very strong seismic...... is uniform within tectonic units and parallel to orogenic strike in the Limpopo and Cape fold belts. It is further parallel to the strike of major dyke swarms which indicates that a large part of the observed anisotropy is controlled by lithosphere fabrics and macroscopic effects. The directions of the fast...... that the crust and lithospheric mantle may have been coupled since cratonisation. If so, the apparent match between mantle anisotropy and the present plate motion is coincidental....

  11. Exchange anisotropy in the skyrmion host GaV4S8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, D.; Stasinopoulos, I.; Kézsmárki, I.; Fehér, T.; Tsurkan, V.; Krug von Nidda, H.-A.; Grundler, D.; Loidl, A.

    2017-02-01

    Using ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy at 34 GHz we explored the magnetic anisotropy of single-crystalline GaV4S8 in the field-polarized magnetic state. We describe the data in terms of an easy-axis type uniaxial anisotropy with an anisotropy constant {{K}1}=1.6\\cdot {{10}5} erg cm‑3 at 2 K, corresponding to a relative exchange anisotropy Δ J/J≈ 5 %, and about 1.0\\cdot {{10}5}~ erg cm‑3 near 11 K, i.e. at temperatures where the skyrmion-lattice phase was recently discovered. The relatively large value of K 1 explains the confinement of the skyrmion tubes to the easy axes. A distinct set of resonances in the spectra is attributed to the co-existence of different rhombohedral domains. Complementary broadband spectroscopy demonstrates that non-collinear spin states may sensitively be detected by electron spin resonance techniques.

  12. Multiscale model of global inner-core anisotropy induced by hcp-alloy plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardin, P.; Deguen, R.; Lincot, A.; Merkel, S.

    2016-12-01

    The Earth's solid inner core exhibits a global seismic anisotropy of several percents. It results from a coherent alignment of anisotropic Fe alloy crystals through the inner-core history that can be sampled by present-day seismic observations. By combining self-consistent polycrystal plasticity, inner-core formation models, Monte-Carlo search for elastic moduli, and simulations of seismic measurements, we introduce a multiscale model that can reproduce a global seismic anisotropy of several percents aligned with the Earth's rotation axis. Conditions for a successful model are an hexagonal close packed structure for the inner-core Fe alloy, plastic deformation by pyramidal slip, and large-scale flow induced by a low-degree inner-core formation model. For global anisotropies ranging between 1 and 3%, the elastic anisotropy in the single crystal ranges from 5 to 20% with larger velocities along the c axis.

  13. Experimental and numerical analysis of toughness anisotropy in AA2139 Al-alloy sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgeneyer, T.F., E-mail: thilo.morgeneyer@mines-paristech.fr [Mines ParisTech, Centre des materiaux, CNRS UMR 7633, BP87 91003 Evry Cedex (France)] [Alcan Centre de Recherches de Voreppe, BP 27, 38341 Voreppe Cedex (France); Besson, J.; Proudhon, H. [Mines ParisTech, Centre des materiaux, CNRS UMR 7633, BP87 91003 Evry Cedex (France); Starink, M.J.; Sinclair, I. [Materials Research Group, School of Engineering Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-15

    Toughness anisotropy of AA2139 (Al-Cu-Mg) in T351 and T8 conditions has been studied via mechanical testing of smooth and notched specimens of different geometries, loaded in the rolling direction (L) or in the transverse direction (T). Fracture mechanisms were investigated via scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron radiation computed tomography. Contributions to failure anisotropy are identified as: (i) anisotropic initial void shape and growth; (ii) plastic behaviour including isotropic/kinematic hardening and plastic anisotropy; and (iii) nucleation at a second population of second-phase particles leading to coalescence via narrow crack regions. A model based in part on the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman approach is constructed to describe and predict deformation behaviour, crack propagation and, in particular, toughness anisotropy. Model parameters are fitted using microstructural data and data on deformation and crack propagation for a range of small test samples. Its transferability has been shown by simulating tests of large M(T) samples.

  14. Field dependent magnetic anisotropy of Ga0.2Fe0.8 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Damon A.; McClure, A.; Kuster, C. M.; Rugheimer, P.; Idzerda, Y. U.

    2011-04-01

    Using longitudinal MOKE in combination with a variable strength rotating magnetic field, called the rotational MOKE (ROTMOKE) method, we show that the magnetic anisotropy for a Ga0.2Fe0.8 single crystal film with a thickness of 17 nm, grown on GaAs (001) with a thick ZnSe buffer layer, depends linearly on the strength of the applied magnetic field. The torque moment curves generated using ROTMOKE are well fit with a model that accounts for the uniaxial, cubic, or fourfold anisotropy, as well as additional terms with a linear dependence on the applied magnetic field. The uniaxial and cubic anisotropy fields, taken from both the hard and the easy axis scans, are seen to remain field independent. The field dependent terms are evidence of a large affect of the magnetostriction and its contribution to the effective magnetic anisotropy in GaxFe1-x thin films.

  15. Field dependent magnetic anisotropy of Fe1-xZnx thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Damon A.; McClure, A.; Kuster, C. M.; Rugheimer, P.; Idzerda, Y. U.

    2013-05-01

    Using longitudinal magneto-optical Kerr effect in combination with a variable strength rotating magnetic field, called the Rotational Magneto-Optic Kerr Effect (ROTMOKE) method, we show that the magnetic anisotropy for thin Fe82Zn18 single crystal films, grown on MgO(001) substrates, depends linearly on the strength of the applied magnetic field at low fields but is constant (saturates) at fields greater than 350 Oe. The torque moment curves generated using ROTMOKE are well fit with a model that accounts for the uniaxial and cubic anisotropy with the addition of a cubic anisotropy that depends linearly on the applied magnetic field. The field dependent term is evidence of a large effect on the effective magnetic anisotropy in Fe1-xZnx thin films by the magnetostriction.

  16. A study on turbulence modulation via an analysis of turbulence anisotropy-invariants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael; MANHART

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the turbulence modulation by particles in a turbulent two-phase channel flow via an analysis of turbulence anisotropy-invariants. The fluid turbulence is calculated by a large eddy simulation with a point-force two-way coupling model and particles are tracked by the Lagrangian trajectory method. The channel turbulence follows the two-component turbulence state within the viscous sub-layer region and outside the region the turbulence tends to follow the right curve of the anisotropy-invariant. The channel turbulence, interacting with heavy particles, is modulated to the two-component turbulence limit state near the wall and is separate from the axisymmetric turbulence state in the turbulence anisotropy-invariants map. The fluctuations of streamwise component are transferred to the other two components and hence the anisotropy decreases due to particle modulation. The study has deepened the understanding of the turbulence modulation mechanism in two-phase turbulent flows.

  17. Measuring the Alfvenic Nature of the Interstellar Medium: Velocity Anisotropy Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Burkhart, Blakesley; Leao, I C; de Medeiros, J R; Esquivel, A

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of the interstellar medium (ISM) are strongly affected by turbulence, which shows increased anisotropy in the presence of a magnetic field. We expand upon the Esquivel & Lazarian method to estimate the Alfven Mach number using the structure function anisotropy in velocity centroid data from position-position-velocity maps. We utilize 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of fully developed turbulence, with a large range of sonic and Alfvenic Mach numbers, to produce synthetic observations of velocity centroids with observational characteristics such as thermal broadening, cloud boundaries, noise, and radiative transfer effects of carbon monoxide. In addition, we investigate how the resulting anisotropy-Alfven Mach number dependency found in Esquivel & Lazarian (2011) might change when taking the second moment of the position-position-velocity cube or when using different expressions to calculate the velocity centroids. We find that the degree of anisotropy is related primarily to the m...

  18. Strong crustal seismic anisotropy in the Kalahari Craton based on Receiver Functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybo, Hans; Soliman, Mohammad Youssof Ahmad; Artemieva, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Earlier seismic studies of the Kalahari Craton in southern Africa infer deformation of upper mantle by flow with fast direction of seismic anisotropy being parallel to present plate motion, and/or report anisotropy frozen into the lithospheric mantle. We present evidence for very strong seismic...... is uniform within tectonic units and parallel to orogenic strike in the Limpopo and Cape fold belts. It is further parallel to the strike of major dyke swarms which indicates that a large part of the observed anisotropy is controlled by lithosphere fabrics and macroscopic effects. The directions of the fast...... that the crust and lithospheric mantle may have been coupled since cratonisation. If so, the apparent match between mantle anisotropy and the present plate motion is coincidental....

  19. Statistics of the microwave background anisotropies caused by the squeezed cosmological perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Grishchuk, L P

    1996-01-01

    It is likely that the observed large-angular-scale anisotropies in the microwave background radiation are induced by the cosmological perturbations of quantum-mechanical origin. Such perturbations are now placed in squeezed vacuum quantum states and, hence, are characterized by large variances of their amplitude. The statistical properties of the anisotropies should reflect the underlying statistics of the squeezed vacuum quantum states. The theoretical variances for the temperature angular correlation function are derived and described quantitatively. It is shown that they are indeed large. Unfortunately, these large theoretical statistical uncertainties will make the extraction of cosmological information from the measured anisotropies a much more difficult problem than we wanted it to be.

  20. Effect of anisotropy on small magnetic clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Hucht, Alfred; Sil, Shreekantha; Entel, Peter; 10.1103/PhysRevB.84.104438

    2012-01-01

    The effect of dipolar interaction and local uniaxial anisotropy on the magnetic response of small spin clusters where spins are located on the vertices of icosahedron, cuboctahedron, tetrahedron and square geometry have been investigated. We consider the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic spin-1/2 and spin-1 Heisenberg model with uniaxial anisotropy and dipolar interaction and apply numerical exact diagonalization technique in order to study the influence of frustration and anisotropy on the ground state properties of the spin-clusters. The ground state magnetization, spin-spin correlation and several thermodynamic quantities such as entropy and specific heat are calculated as a function of temperature and magnetic field.

  1. Spectroscopic signatures of quantum friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatt, Juliane; Bennett, Robert; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2016-12-01

    We present a formula for the spectroscopically accessible level shifts and decay rates of an atom moving at an arbitrary angle relative to a surface. Our Markov formulation leads to an intuitive analytic description whereby the shifts and rates are obtained from the coefficients of the Heisenberg equation of motion for the atomic flip operators but with complex Doppler-shifted (velocity-dependent) transition frequencies. Our results conclusively demonstrate that for the limiting case of parallel motion the shifts and rates are quadratic or higher in the atomic velocity. We show that a stronger, linear velocity dependence is exhibited by the rates and shifts for perpendicular motion, thus opening the prospect of experimentally probing the Markovian approach to the phenomenon of quantum friction.

  2. Friction Stir Welding and Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Carsley, John; Clarke, Kester D.; Krajewski, Paul E.

    2015-05-01

    With nearly twenty years of international research and collaboration in friction stir welding (FSW) and processing industrial applications have spread into nearly every feasible market. Currently applications exist in aerospace, railway, automotive, personal computers, technology, marine, cutlery, construction, as well as several other markets. Implementation of FSW has demonstrated diverse opportunities ranging from enabling new materials to reducing the production costs of current welding technologies by enabling condensed packaging solutions for traditional fabrication and assembly. TMS has sponsored focused instruction and communication in this technology area for more than fifteen years, with leadership from the Shaping and Forming Committee, which organizes a biannual symposium each odd year at the annual meeting. A focused publication produced from each of these symposia now comprises eight volumes detailing the primary research and development activities in this area over the last two decades. The articles assembled herein focus on both recent developments and technology reviews of several key markets from international experts in this area.

  3. Mapping Instabilities in Polymer Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Charles; Crosby, Alfred

    2005-03-01

    Schallamach waves are instabilities that occur as interfaces between a soft elastomer and rigid surface slide past each other.(1) The presence of Schallamach waves can lead to drastic changes in frictional properties. Although the occurrence of Schallamach waves has been studied for the past several decades, a general map relating fundamental material properties, geometry, and operating conditions (i.e. speed and temperature) has not been established. Using a combinatorial approach, we illustrate the role of modulus, testing velocity and surface energetics of crosslinked poly(dimethyl siloxane) on the generation Schallamach waves. This knowledge will be used with polymer patterning processes to fabricate responsive coatings for applications such as anti-fouling coatings. (1)Schallamach, A.;Wear 1971,17, 301-312.

  4. Dynamical Friction on extended perturbers

    CERN Document Server

    Esquivel, O

    2008-01-01

    Following a wave-mechanical treatment we calculate the drag force exerted by an infinite homogeneous background of stars on a perturber as this makes its way through the system. We recover Chandrasekhar's classical dynamical friction (DF) law with a modified Coulomb logarithm. We take into account a range of models that encompasses all plausible density distributions for satellite galaxies by considering the DF exerted on a Plummer sphere and a perturber having a Hernquist profile. It is shown that the shape of the perturber affects only the exact form of the Coulomb logarithm. The latter converges on small scales, because encounters of the test and field stars with impact parameters less than the size of the massive perturber become inefficient. We confirm this way earlier results based on the impulse approximation of small angle scatterings.

  5. Friction resistance for gas flow in smooth microtubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new tube-cutting method was used to measure the pressure and Mach number distribution along a microtube of 108.3 μm. Experiments were also performed concerning the average Fanning friction factors of five kinds of microtubes whose diameters range from 80.0 to 166.6 μm. It is found that the pressure distribution in a microtube becomes nonlinear at a high Mach number and the product of measured average Fanning friction factors Cf and Reynolds number Re is higher than 16. Numerical results show that the gas compressibility leads to a variation of the velocity profile from parabolic, and results in a large velocity gradient at the tube inner wall surface. The transition from laminar to turbulence in microtubes also occurs at Re≈2 300, and the phenomenon of early transition is not observed in the experiments.

  6. Friction resistance for gas flow in smooth microtubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜东兴; 李志信; 过增元

    2000-01-01

    A new tube-cutting method was used to measure the pressure and Mach number distribution along a microtube of 108.3 μm. Experiments were also performed concerning the average Fanning friction factors of five kinds of microtubes whose diameters range from 80.0 to 166.6 μm. It is found that the pressure distribution in a microtube becomes nonlinear at a high Mach number and the product of measured average Fanning friction factors 75, and Reynolds number Re is higher than 16. Numerical results show that the gas compressibility leads to a variation of the velocity profile from parabolic, and results in a large velocity gradient at the tube inner wall surface. The transition from laminar to turbulence in microtubes also occurs at Re ≈ 2 300, and the phenomenon of early transition is not observed in the experiments.

  7. Quantum tunneling at zero temperature in the strong friction regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolivar, A O

    2005-01-21

    In the large damping limit we derive a Fokker-Planck equation in configuration space (the so-called Smoluchowski equation) describing a Brownian particle immersed into a thermal environment and subjected to a nonlinear external force. We quantize this stochastic system and survey the problem of escape over a double-well potential barrier. Our finding is that the quantum Kramers rate does not depend on the friction coefficient at low temperatures; i.e., we predict a superfluidity phenomenon in overdamped open systems. Moreover, at zero temperature we show that the quantum escape rate does not vanish in the strong friction regime. This result, therefore, is in contrast with the work by Ankerhold et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 086802 (2001)

  8. Multiple solutions of stick and separation type in the Signorini model with Coulomb friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hild, P. [Univ. de Franche-Comte, 25 - Besancon (France). Lab. de Mathematiques

    2005-09-01

    This paper proves the existence of multiple solutions to the Coulomb friction problem with Signorini contact conditions in continuum linear elasticity. We consider a body lying on a rigid foundation and we propose a method in order to exhibit two solutions to the frictional contact problem when the friction coefficient is large enough: one solution which separates from the foundation and another one which remains stuck on the foundation. We apply the method to the simple class of problems with triangular bodies and linear displacement fields and we describe the cases in which such multiple solutions exist. Denoting by {mu} the friction coefficient, we come to the conclusion that such nonuniqueness cases may appear when {mu}>1. (orig.)

  9. Experimental investigation of frictional resistance reduction with air layer on the hull bottom of a ship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang Jinho

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to cope with recent high oil price and global warming, developments of air lubricated ships have been pursued to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to save fuel costs by reducing the frictional resistance. In this study, reduction in the frictional resistance by air lubrication with air layers generated on the lower surface of a flat plate was investigated experimentally in the large water tunnel of SSMB. The generated air layers were observed, and changes in the local frictional drag were measured at various flow rates of injected air. The results indicated that air lubrication with air layers might be useful in reducing the frictional resistance at specific conditions of air injection. Accordingly, resistance and self-propulsion tests for a 66K DWT bulk carrier were carried out in the towing tank of SSMB to estimate the expected net power savings.

  10. Finite element analysis of 3D elastic-plastic frictional contact problem for Cosserat materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S.; Xie, Z. Q.; Chen, B. S.; Zhang, H. W.

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to develop a finite element model for 3D elastic-plastic frictional contact problem of Cosserat materials. Because 3D elastic-plastic frictional contact problems belong to the unspecified boundary problems with nonlinearities in both material and geometric forms, a large number of calculations are needed to obtain numerical results with high accuracy. Based on the parametric variational principle and the corresponding quadratic programming method for numerical simulation of frictional contact problems, a finite element model is developed for 3D elastic-plastic frictional contact analysis of Cosserat materials. The problems are finally reduced to linear complementarity problems (LCP). Numerical examples show the feasibility and importance of the developed model for analyzing the contact problems of structures with materials which have micro-polar characteristics.

  11. Anisotropy above and below the subducting Nazca lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDougall, J. G.; Fischer, K. M.; Anderson, M. L.; Kincaid, C. R.

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this study is to constrain mantle flow above and below the subducting Nazca plate at latitudes of 30°-41° S. In this segment of the South American subduction zone, slab dip varies from flat slab subduction in the north to a dip of ~40° in the south, where the segment ends at a slab gap associated with Chile Ridge. We measured shear-wave splitting in over 280 S arrivals from local earthquakes recorded by the 2010 Chile RAMP IRIS/PASSCAL array (aftershock locations from Lange et al., 2010), the 2000-2002 CHARGE IRIS/PASSCAL array, and permanent stations PLCA (USGS/GTSN) and PEL (Geoscope). We also resolved splitting in 17 SK(K)S phases at PLCA and permanent station TRQA (IRIS/GSN). Splitting parameters for a subset of phases were determined using a range of filters; most were stable as a function of frequency. The results reported below correspond to a 0.05-2 Hz bandpass filter. Local S lag times range from 0.1-0.9 seconds. For back-arc stations above the area of steep subduction, lag times correlate with path length in the mantle wedge, indicating that wedge anisotropy dominates. Lag times from the Chile RAMP stations, which are located in the forearc between 33°S and 39°S and in general correspond to shorter paths, span a narrower range (0.1-0.4 seconds). Splitting fast polarizations at back-arc stations show a coherent variation with latitude. Fast polarizations vary from NE at 40°-41°S, to N (roughly slab-strike parallel) at 35°-36°S, to NE-ESE at 30°-33°S, curving as the slab flattens. Modeling of these local S splitting results reveals that the fast symmetry axis of anisotropy is sub-parallel to the overall trend of fast polarization directions at each station, and that the strength of anisotropy is equivalent to 10-30% of single crystal olivine anisotropy. At forearc stations, we observe roughly trench-parallel fast polarization directions (largely N-NE) with the exception of two areas of localized, yet robust trench-normal trends (E

  12. Stress, strain rate and anisotropy in Kyushu, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, M. K.; Aoki, Y.; Unglert, K.; Ohkura, T.; Umakoshi, K.; Shimizu, H.; Iguchi, M.; Tameguri, T.; Ohminato, T.; Mori, J.

    2016-04-01

    Seismic anisotropy, the directional dependence of wave speeds, may be caused by stress-oriented cracks or by strain-oriented minerals, yet few studies have quantitatively compared anisotropy to stress and strain over large regions. Here we compare crustal stress and strain rates on the Island of Kyushu, Japan, as measured from inversions of focal mechanisms, GPS and shear wave splitting. Over 85,000 shear wave splitting measurements from local and regional earthquakes are obtained from the NIED network between 2004 and 2012, and on Aso, Sakurajima, Kirishima and Unzen volcano networks. Strain rate measurements are made from the Japanese Geonet stations. JMA-determined S arrival times processed with the MFAST shear wave splitting code measure fast polarisations (Φ), related to the orientation of the anisotropic medium and time delays (dt), related to the path length and the percent anisotropy. We apply the TESSA 2-D delay time tomography and spatial averaging code to the highest quality events, which have nearly vertical incidence angles, separating the 3455 shallow (depth = 40 km) earthquakes. Using square grids with 30 km sides for all the inversions, the best correlations are observed between splitting from shallow earthquakes and stress. Axes of maximum horizontal stress (SHmax) and Φ correlate with a coefficient c of 0.56, significant at the 99% confidence level. Their mean difference is 31.9°. Axes of maximum compressional strain rate and SHmax are also well aligned, with an average difference of 28°, but they do not correlate with each other, meaning that where they differ, the difference is not systematic. Anisotropy strength is negatively correlated with the stress ratio parameter determined from focal mechanism inversion (c = - 0.64; significant at the 99% confidence level). The anisotropy and stress results are consistent with stress-aligned microcracks in the crust in a dominantly strike-slip regime. Eigenvalues of maximum horizontal strain rate

  13. Anisotropy in the Interaction of Ultracold Dysprosium

    CERN Document Server

    Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2011-01-01

    The nature of the interaction between ultracold atoms with a large orbital and spin angular momentum has attracted considerable attention. It was suggested that such interactions can lead to the realization of exotic states of highly correlated matter. Here, we report on a theoretical study of the competing anisotropic dispersion, magnetic dipole-dipole, and electric quadrupole-quadrupole forces between two dysprosium atoms. Each dysprosium atom has an orbital angular momentum L=6 and magnetic moment $\\mu=10\\mu_B$. We show that the dispersion coefficients of the ground state adiabatic potentials lie between 1865 a.u. and 1890 a.u., creating a non-negligible anisotropy with a spread of 25 a.u. and that the electric quadrupole-quadrupole interaction is weak compared to the other interactions. We also find that for interatomic separations $R< 50\\,a_0$ both the anisotropic dispersion and magnetic dipole-dipole potential are larger than the atomic Zeeman splittings for external magnetic fields of order 10 G to ...

  14. Anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility of gallium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankey, T.

    1960-01-01

    The bulk magnetic susceptibilities of single gallium crystals and polycrystalline gallium spheres were measured at 25??C. The following anisotropic diamagnetic susceptibilities were found: a axis (-0.119??0. 001)??10-6 emu/g, b axis (-0.416??0.002)??10 -6 emu/g, and c axis (-0.229??0.001) emu/g. The susceptibility of the polycrystalline spheres, assumed to be the average value for the bulk susceptibility of gallium, was (-0.257??0.003)??10-6 emu/g at 25??C, and (-0.299??0.003)??10-6 emu/g at -196??C. The susceptibility of liquid gallium was (0.0031??0.001) ??10-6 emu/g at 30??C and 100??C. Rotational diagrams of the susceptibilities in the three orthogonal planes of the unit cell were not sinusoidal. The anisotropy in the single crystals was presumably caused by the partial overlap of Brillouin zone boundaries by the Fermi-energy surface. The large change in susceptibility associated with the change in state was attributed to the absence of effective mass influence in the liquid state. ?? 1960 The American Institute of Physics.

  15. Temperature dependent effective friction coefficient estimation in friction stir welding with the bobbin tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijajlović Miroslav M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The friction coefficient in many friction stir welding researches is generally used as an effective, constant value without concern on the adaptable and changeable nature of the friction during welding sequence. This is understandable because the main problem in analyzing friction in friction stir welding are complex nature of the friction processes, case-dependent and time dependent contact between the bodies, influence of the temperature, sliding velocity, etc. This paper is presenting a complex experimental-numerical-analytical model for estimating the effective friction coefficient on contact of the bobbin tool and welding plates during welding, considering the temperature at the contact as the most influencing parameter on friction. The estimation criterion is the correspondence of the experimental temperature and temperature from the numerical model. The estimation procedure is iterative and parametric - the heat transport parameters and friction coefficient are adapted during the estimation procedure in a realistic manner to achieve relative difference between experimental and model’s temperature lower than 3%. The results show that friction coefficient varies from 0.01 to 0.21 for steel-aluminium alloy contact and temperature range from 406°C to 22°C.

  16. Thermal activation in boundary lubricated friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael, P.C. [Francis Bitter National Magnet Lab. and Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States); Rabinowicz, E. [Francis Bitter National Magnet Lab. and Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States); Iwasa, Y. [Francis Bitter National Magnet Lab. and Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The friction coefficients for copper pairs lubricated with fatty acids and fluorinated fatty acids have been measured over a wide range of sliding speeds and temperatures. Sliding speeds in the range 10{sup -7}-10{sup -2} m s{sup -1} and temperatures in the range 4.2-300 K were used. The friction coefficients near 300 K are generally low and increase with sliding speed, while the friction coefficients at low temperatures are markedly higher and relatively independent of velocity. Each lubricant`s friction vs. velocity behavior over the temperature range 150-300 K can be described by a friction-velocity master curve derived from a thermal activation model for the lubricant`s shear strength. The activation energies deduced from this friction model are identical to those obtained in the same temperature range for a vibrational mode associated with low temperature mechanical relaxations in similarly structured polymers. These results suggest that thermally activated interfacial shear is responsible for the fatty acids` positive-sloped friction vs. velocity characteristics at low sliding speeds near room temperature. (orig.)

  17. Load-Dependent Friction Hysteresis on Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhijiang; Egberts, Philip; Han, Gang Hee; Johnson, A T Charlie; Carpick, Robert W; Martini, Ashlie

    2016-05-24

    Nanoscale friction often exhibits hysteresis when load is increased (loading) and then decreased (unloading) and is manifested as larger friction measured during unloading compared to loading for a given load. In this work, the origins of load-dependent friction hysteresis were explored through atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments of a silicon tip sliding on chemical vapor deposited graphene in air, and molecular dynamics simulations of a model AFM tip on graphene, mimicking both vacuum and humid air environmental conditions. It was found that only simulations with water at the tip-graphene contact reproduced the experimentally observed hysteresis. The mechanisms underlying this friction hysteresis were then investigated in the simulations by varying the graphene-water interaction strength. The size of the water-graphene interface exhibited hysteresis trends consistent with the friction, while measures of other previously proposed mechanisms, such as out-of-plane deformation of the graphene film and irreversible reorganization of the water molecules at the shearing interface, were less correlated to the friction hysteresis. The relationship between the size of the sliding interface and friction observed in the simulations was explained in terms of the varying contact angles in front of and behind the sliding tip, which were larger during loading than unloading.

  18. Assessment of semi-active friction dampers

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Marcelo Braga; Coelho, Humberto Tronconi; Lepore Neto, Francisco Paulo; Mafhoud, Jarir

    2017-09-01

    The use of friction dampers has been widely proposed for a variety of mechanical systems for which applying viscoelastic materials, fluid based dampers or other viscous dampers is impossible. An important example is the application of friction dampers in aircraft engines to reduce the blades' vibration amplitudes. In most cases, friction dampers have been studied in a passive manner, but significant improvements can be achieved by controlling the normal force in the contact region. The aim of this paper is to present and study five control strategies for friction dampers based on three different hysteresis cycles by using the Harmonic Balance Method (HBM), a numerical and experimental analysis. The first control strategy uses the friction force as a resistance when the system is deviating from its equilibrium position. The second control strategy maximizes the energy removal in each harmonic oscillation cycle by calculating the optimal normal force based on the last displacement peak. The third control strategy combines the first strategy with the homogenous modulation of the friction force. Finally, the last two strategies attempt to predict the system's movement based on its velocity and acceleration and our knowledge of its physical properties. Numerical and experimental studies are performed with these five strategies, which define the performance metrics. The experimental testing rig is fully identified and its parameters are used for numerical simulations. The obtained results show the satisfactory performance of the friction damper and selected strategy and the suitable agreement between the numerical and experimental results.

  19. Cellulose and the Control of Growth Anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobias I. Baskin

    2004-04-01

    The authors research aims to understand morphogenesis, focusing on growth anisotropy, a process that is crucial to make organs with specific and heritable shapes. For the award, the specific aims were to test hypotheses concerning how growth anisotropy is controlled by cell wall structure, particularly by the synthesis and alignment of cellulose microfibrils, the predominant mechanical element in the cell wall. This research has involved characterizing the basic physiology of anisotropic expansion, including measuring it at high resolution; and second, characterizing the relationship between growth anisotropy, and cellulose microfibrils. Important in this relationship and also to the control of anisotropic expansion are structures just inside the plasma membrane called cortical microtubules, and the research has also investigated their contribution to controlling anisotropy and microfibril alignment. In addition to primary experimental papers, I have also developed improved methods relating to these objectives as well as written relevant reviews. Major accomplishments in each area will now be described.

  20. Elastic anisotropy of Earth's inner core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belonoshko, Anatoly B; Skorodumova, Natalia V; Rosengren, Anders; Johansson, Börje

    2008-02-08

    Earth's solid-iron inner core is elastically anisotropic. Sound waves propagate faster along Earth's spin axis than in the equatorial plane. This anisotropy has previously been explained by a preferred orientation of the iron alloy hexagonal crystals. However, hexagonal iron becomes increasingly isotropic on increasing temperature at pressures of the inner core and is therefore unlikely to cause the anisotropy. An alternative explanation, supported by diamond anvil cell experiments, is that iron adopts a body-centered cubic form in the inner core. We show, by molecular dynamics simulations, that the body-centered cubic iron phase is extremely anisotropic to sound waves despite its high symmetry. Direct simulations of seismic wave propagation reveal an anisotropy of 12%, a value adequate to explain the anisotropy of the inner core.

  1. Magnetic anisotropies of rare-earth compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewenhaupt, M.; Rotter, M.; Kramp, S.

    2000-03-01

    There are two kinds of magnetic anisotropy in rare-earth compounds: the single-ion anisotropy caused by the crystal field (CF) and the anisotropy of the two-ion interactions. Both types of anisotropy have to be considered to arrive at a consistent description of the magnetic properties of the orthorhombic intermetallic compound NdCu 2. From the analysis of NdCu 2 we can derive predictions for the type of ordering in other isostructural RCu 2 compounds, that agree well with experimental results: If the magnetic moments point into the crystallographic b-direction, an ordering wave vector of (2/3 0 0) is expected. If the moments are oriented perpendicular to b then the ordering wave vector is (2/3 1 0) .

  2. Microwave Background Anisotropies from Scaling Seed Perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Durrer, R; Durrer, Ruth; Sakellariadou, Mairi

    1997-01-01

    We study microwave background anisotropies induced by scaling seed perturbations in a universe dominated by cold dark matter. Using a gauge invariant linear perturbation analysis, we solve the perturbation equations on super-horizon scales, for CMB anisotropies triggered by generic gravitational seeds. We find that perturbations induced by seeds -- under very mild restrictions -- are nearly isocurvature. Thus, compensation, which is mainly the consequence of physically sensible initial conditions, is very generic. We then restrict our study to the case of scaling sources, motivated by global scalar fields. We parameterize the energy momentum tensor of the source by ``seed functions'' and calculate the Sachs-Wolfe and acoustic contributions to the CMB anisotropies. We discuss the dependence of the anisotropy spectrum on the parameters of the model considered. Even within the restricted class of models investigated in this work, we find a surprising variety of results for the position and height of the first ac...

  3. Higher-order anisotropies in the Buda-Lund model: Disentangling flow and density field anisotropies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loekoes, Sandor [Eoetvoes Lorand University, Budapest (Hungary); Csanad, Mate [Eoetvoes Lorand University, Budapest (Hungary); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Tomasik, Boris [Univerzita Mateja Bela, Banska Bystrica (Slovakia); Czech Technical University in Prague, FNSPE, Prague (Czech Republic); Csoergo, Tamas [Wigner RCP, Budapest (Hungary); KRF, Gyoengyoes (Hungary)

    2016-10-15

    The Buda-Lund hydro model describes an expanding ellipsoidal fireball, and fits the observed elliptic flow and oscillating HBT radii successfully. Due to fluctuations in energy depositions, the fireball shape however fluctuates on an event-by-event basis. The transverse plane asymmetry can be translated into a series of multipole anisotropy coefficients. These anisotropies then result in measurable momentum-space anisotropies, to be measured with respect to their respective symmetry planes. In this paper we detail an extension of the Buda-Lund model to multipole anisotropies and investigate the resulting flow coefficients and oscillations of HBT radii. (orig.)

  4. Higher order anisotropies in the Buda-Lund model -- disentangling flow and density field anisotropies

    CERN Document Server

    Lökös, Sándor; Csörgő, Tamás; Tomášik, Boris

    2016-01-01

    The Buda-Lund hydro model describes an expanding ellipsoidal fireball, and fits the observed elliptic flow and oscillating HBT radii successfully. Due to fluctuations in energy depositions, the fireball shape however fluctuates on an event-by-event basis. The transverse plane asymmetry can be translated into a series of multipole anisotropy coefficients. These anisotropies then result in measurable momentum-space anisotropies, to be measured with respect to their respective symmetry planes. In this paper we detail an extension of the Buda-Lund model to multipole anisotropies and investigate the resulting flow coefficients and oscillations of HBT radii.

  5. Coordinated Water Under Confinement Eases Sliding Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defante, Adrian; Dhopotkar, Nishad; Dhinojwala, Ali

    Water is essential to a number of interfacial phenomena such as the lubrication of knee joints, protein folding, mass transport, and adsorption processes. We have used a biaxial friction cell to quantify underwater friction between a hydrophobic elastomeric lens and a hydrophobic self-assembled monolayer in the presence of surfactant solutions. To gain an understanding of the role of water in these processes we have coupled this measurement with surface sensitive sum frequency generation to directly probe the molecular constitution of the confined contact interface. We observe that role of confined coordinated water between two hydrophobic substrates covered with surfactants is the key to obtaining a low coefficient of friction.

  6. An inquiry-based laboratory on friction

    CERN Document Server

    Montalbano, Vera

    2013-01-01

    Sliding friction is usually introduced in high school, but rarely through activities in laboratory. A qualitative introduction to friction is presented by proposing exploration of different kind of materials in order to suggest which aspects can be relevant and which interaction is involved. Different quantitative experiments are proposed for studying Leonardo's laws for friction. The learning path was tested with two high school classes during an instruction trip at department. Students were engaged in the inquiry-based introductory activity and seemed to realize with care the measurements. However, the analysis of their reports shows some learning difficulties.

  7. Methods and Devices used to Measure Friction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeswiet, Jack; Arentoft, Mogens; Henningsen, Poul

    2004-01-01

    The physical condition at the work-piece/die boundary, in both bulk forming and sheet forming is, arguably, the single most important physical parameter influencing the processing of metals, yet it remains the least understood. Hence the need for basic research into metal-die interface mechanisms....... To gain a good understanding of the mechanisms at the interface and to be able to verify the friction and tribology models that exist, friction sensors are needed. Designing sensors to measure friction-stress in metal working has been pursued by many researchers. This paper surveys methods, which have...

  8. Quantized friction across ionic liquid thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alexander M.; Lovelock, Kevin R. J.; Gosvami, Nitya Nand; Welton, Tom; Perkin, Susan

    Ionic liquids, salts in the liquid state under ambient conditions, are of great interest as precision lubricants. Ionic liquids form layered structures at surfaces, yet it is not clear how this nano-structure relates to their lubrication properties. We measured the friction force between atomically smooth solid surfaces across ionic liquid films of controlled thickness in terms of the number of ion layers. Multiple friction-load regimes emerge, each corresponding to a different number of ion layers in the film. In contrast to molecular liquids, the friction coefficients differ for each layer due to their varying composition.

  9. Forming of aluminium alloy friction stir welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni, Carlo

    2016-10-01

    The present paper aims at investigating, through analytical models, numerical models and experiments, the effect of the warm deformation phase, realised with an in temperature upsetting, on the weld previously performed by friction stir lap welding on aluminium alloy blanks. The investigation allows to show the deformation zones after upsetting that determine the homogenisation of the weld section. The analytical model allows to relate the friction factor with the upsetting load. The presence on the weld of not elevated friction factor values determines the deformation and localisation levels very useful for the weld. Such methodology allows to improve the weld itself with the forming phase.

  10. Study on the Friction Coefficient in Grinding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The friction between the abrasive grains and workpi ec e is a crutial factor determining the main grinding output. Few studies have bee n carried out investigating the values of the friction coefficient in grinding, due to the difficulty of direct measurement. In this paper, a mathematical model of the friction coefficient in grinding has been established with the aid of a new grinding parameter C ge, which has close relations to wheel wear rate Z s, metal removal rate Z w, specific energy u and gr...

  11. Quantized friction across ionic liquid thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alexander M; Lovelock, Kevin R J; Gosvami, Nitya Nand; Welton, Tom; Perkin, Susan

    2013-10-07

    Ionic liquids - salts in the liquid state under ambient conditions - are of great interest as precision lubricants. Ionic liquids form layered structures at surfaces, yet it is not clear how this nano-structure relates to their lubrication properties. We measured the friction force between atomically smooth solid surfaces across ionic liquid films of controlled thickness in terms of the number of ion layers. Multiple friction-load regimes emerge, each corresponding to a different number of ion layers in the film. In contrast to molecular liquids, the friction coefficients differ for each layer due to their varying composition.

  12. Estimation of the Threshold Friction Velocities over Various Dust Storm Source Areas in Northwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Hao; ZHANG Hongsheng

    2010-01-01

    The emission of dust particles into the atmosphere is governed by the aerodynamic and resistant factors, which are quantified by the friction velocity u. and the threshold friction velocity u*t, respectively. The threshold friction velocity u*t influences the vertical dust flux and dust transport. Based on the micro-meteorological data obtained in the springs of 2004 and 2006 over Hunshandake desert area, Loess Plateau, and Gobi desert area, the relationship between dust concentration and friction velocity for the dust events that occurred over Hunshandake desert area was investigated, and the threshold friction velocities over the three different dust source areas were estimated. The results show that the value of dust concentration is low during the pre-emission stage of a dust storm event, and the rapid increase of friction velocity provides favor-able dynamic conditions for dust emission. During the dust emission stage, the dust concentration increases sharply due to mechanical and thermal turbulent mixing. At the calm-down stage, the dust concentration drops nearly linearly with the decreasing friction velocity, on account of the gravitational deposition of larger dust particles. When the dust concentration is higher than 200 μgm-3, it is considered as a dust emission process. According to the criteria, the values of threshold friction velocity over Hunshandake desert area and Gobi region are 0.6 and 0.45 m s-1, respectively. The threshold friction velocity over Loess Plateau depends on the wind direction, due to the complex terrain and inhomogeneous surface. The northwest wind shows the effects of the Mu Us desert in the northwest. The corresponding u*t is 0.35 m s-1. The south wind exhibits the characteristics of the Loess hilly dunes in the south, and the u*t is 0.7 m s-1. The large roughness length of the Loess hilly dunes and the large inter-particle cohesion for the clay soil texture increases the local friction velocity. Different threshold friction

  13. High friction and low wear properties of laser-textured ceramic surface under dry friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Youqiang; Deng, Jianxin; Wu, Ze; Wu, Fengfang

    2017-08-01

    Two kinds of grooved textures with different spacing were fabricated on Al2O3/TiC ceramic surface by an Nd:YAG laser. The dry tribological properties of the textured samples were investigated by carrying out unidirectional rotary sliding friction and wear tests using a ball-on-disk tribometer. Results show that the laser textured samples exhibit higher friction coefficient and excellent wear resistance compared with the smooth sample under dry friction conditions. Furthermore, the texture morphology and spacing have a significant influence on the tribological properties. The sample with small texture spacing may be beneficial to increasing the friction coefficient, and the wavy-grooved sample exhibits the highest friction coefficient and shallowest wear depth. The increasing friction coefficient and anti-wear properties are attributed to the combined effects of the increased surface roughness, reduced real contact area, micro-cutting effect by the texture edges and entrapment of wear debris.

  14. Swing Friction Behavior of the Contact Interface Between CoCrMo and UHMWPE Under Dynamic Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kai; Zhang, Dekun; Yang, Xuehui; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Qingliang; Qi, Jianwei

    2016-12-01

    CoCrMo alloy and UHMWPE have been widely used in knee joint prosthesis implantation materials. In this paper, swing friction behavior of the contact interface between CoCrMo alloy and UHMWPE is studied under dynamic loading. Swing friction characteristic and damage mechanism are discussed. The results show that swing friction coefficients increase with the rising of maximum normal load and swing angular amplitude. Unloading-standing could play alleviative roles in friction and wear to a large degree. As the cycle number gradually increases, the surface roughness of UHMWPE decreases, while the roughness of CoCrMo increases. During the swing friction, the main damage mechanism of CoCrMo is abrasive wear and the main damage mechanisms of UHMWPE are abrasive wear, fatigue wear and plastic deformation. Besides, it is easier to generate surface damages with small angle and heavy load.

  15. Adhesion and friction of the smooth attachment system of the cockroach Gromphadorhina portentosa and the influence of the application of fluid adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Betz

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Two different measurement techniques were applied to study the attachment of the smooth foot pads of the Madagascar hissing cockroach Gromphadorhina portentosa. The attachment of the non-manipulated adhesive organs was compared with that of manipulated ones (depletion or substitution by artificial secretions. From measurements of the friction on a centrifuge, it can be concluded that on nanorough surfaces, the insect appears to benefit from employing emulsions instead of pure oils to avoid excessive friction. Measurements performed with a nanotribometer on single attachment organs showed that, in the non-manipulated euplantulae, friction was clearly increased in the push direction, whereas the arolium of the fore tarsus showed higher friction in the pull direction. The surface of the euplantulae shows an imbricate appearance, whereupon the ledges face distally, which might contribute to the observed frictional anisotropy in the push direction. Upon depletion of the tarsal adhesion-mediating secretion or its replacement by oily fluids, in several cases, the anisotropic effect of the euplantula disappeared due to the decrease of friction forces in push-direction. In the euplantulae, adhesion was one to two orders of magnitude lower than friction. Whereas the tenacity was slightly decreased with depleted secretion, it was considerably increased after artificial application of oily liquids. In terms of adhesion, it is concluded that the semi-solid consistence of the natural adhesion-mediating secretion facilitates the detachment of the tarsus during locomotion. In terms of friction, on smooth to nanorough surfaces, the insects appear to benefit from employing emulsions instead of pure oils to avoid excessive friction forces, whereas on rougher surfaces the tarsal fluid rather functions in improving surface contact by keeping the cuticle compliable and compensating surface asperities of the substratum.

  16. Radial anisotropy beneath northeast Tibet, implications for lithosphere deformation at a restraining bend in the Kunlun fault and its vicinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lun; Li, Aibing; Murphy, Michael A.; Fu, Yuanyuan V.

    2016-09-01

    Three-dimensional shear wave velocity and radial anisotropy models of the crust and upper mantle beneath the NE Tibetan plateau are constructed from new measurements of Love wave dispersions (20-77s) and previously obtained Rayleigh wave dispersions (20-87s) using a two-plane-wave method. The mid-lower crust is characterized with positive anisotropy (VSH > VSV) with large strength beneath the Qinling and Qilian Mountains and small values beneath the Anyemaqen Mountain. The large positive anisotropy can be explained by horizontal alignment of anisotropic minerals in the mid-lower crust due to crustal flow. The mantle lithosphere above 90 km is largely isotropic while weak positive anisotropy appears beneath 90 km, which probably marks the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). A low shear wave velocity anomaly and relatively negative radial anisotropy are imaged in the entire lithosphere beneath the restraining bend in the eastern Kunlun fault, consistent with a weak lithosphere experiencing vertical thickening under horizontal compression. The asthenosphere at the restraining bend is characterized by significant low velocity and positive radial anisotropy, reflecting that the asthenosphere here is probably hotter, has more melts, and deforms more easily than the surrounding region. We propose that the lithosphere at the restraining bend was vertically thickened and subsequently delaminated locally, and induced asthenosphere upwelling. This model explains the observations of velocity and anisotropy anomalies in the lithosphere and asthenosphere as well as geological observations of rapid rock uplift at the restraining bend of the Kunlun fault.

  17. Ultra Low Energy Switching of Ferromagnet with Perpendicular Anisotropy on Topological Insulator by Voltage Controlled Magnetic Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Bahniman; Pramanik, Tanmoy; Dey, Rik; Roy, Urmimala; Register, Leonard; Banerjee, Sanjay

    2015-03-01

    We propose and demonstrate, through simulation, an ultra low energy memory device on a topological insulator thin film. The device consists of a thin layer of Fe deposited on the surface of a topological insulator, Bi2Se3. The top surface of Fe is covered with MgO so that the ferromagnetic layer has perpendicular anisotropy. Current is passed on the surface of the topological insulator which switches the magnetization of the Fe ferromagnet through strong exchange interaction, between electrons contributing to the surface current on the Bi2Se3 and the d electrons in the ferromagnet, and spin transfer torque due to shunting of current through the ferromagnet. Voltage controlled magnetic anisotropy enables ultra low energy switching. Our micromagnetic simulations, predict switching time of the order of 2.4 ns and switching energy of the order of 0.16 fJ for a ferromagnetic bit with thermal stability of 90 kBT. The proposed structure combines the advantages of both large spin torque from topological insulators and those of perpendicular anisotropy materials. This work is supported by NRI SWAN and NSF NASCENT Center.

  18. Frictional torque numbers for ball cup and journal bearings

    OpenAIRE

    Ligterink, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Plastic bearing material wears in ball cup and journal bearings. Contact areas in the ball cup and the journal bearing increase. The frictional torque needed to rotate the ball or journal also increases. When the coefficient of friction is assumed to be constant during wearing out, the frictional torque increases to a maximum of 1.273 times the frictional torque at zero wear.

  19. The Plunge Phase of Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, John C.

    2005-01-01

    The many advantages of Friction Stir Welding have led to a relatively rapid acceptance in the often conservative welding community. Because the process is so different from traditional fusion welding, with which most investigators are most familiar, there remain many aspects of FSW for which there is no clear consensus. For example, the well known onion rings seen in transverse sections have been variously interpreted as grain size variations, variation in density of second phase particles and parts of the carousel of material rotating with the pin that have been shed from the carousel. Using Orientation Imaging Microscopy, Schneider has recently noted that the onion rings have a different orientation (and hence etch differently) than the surrounding material, and this orientation is consistent with slip plane orientations at the edge of the carousel. Likewise, the forces and torque exerted by the FSW tool on the work piece largely remain unaccounted for. Although these forces are routinely measured by investigators with commercial instrumented welders, they are rarely reported or even qualitatively analyzed. This paper will introduce a model based on a carousel or disk of material that rotates with the tool to estimate the torque and plunge force required to plunge a tool into the work piece. A stationary tool is modeled rather than the moving tool because effects such as thermal transients and metallurgical changes in the sample (primarily aging in aluminum) can be more easily accounted for. It is believed, however, that with some modifications the model should be applicable to a moving tool also.

  20. Ferrimagnetic Properties of Bond Dilution Mixed Blume-Capel Model with Random Single-Ion Anisotropy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Lei; YAN Shi-Lei

    2005-01-01

    We study the ferrimagnetic properties of spin 1/2 and spin-1 systems by means of the effective field theory.The system is considered in the framework of bond dilution mixed Blume-Capel model (BCM) with random single-ion anisotropy. The investigation of phase diagrams and magnetization curves indicates the existence of induced magnetic ordering and single or multi-compensation points. Special emphasis is placed on the influence of bond dilution and random single-ion anisotropy on normal or induced magnetic ordering states and single or multi-compensation points.Normal magnetic ordering states take on new phase diagrams with increasing randomness (bond and anisotropy), while anisotropy induced magnetic ordering states are always occurrence no matter whether concentration of anisotropy is large or small. Existence and disappearance of compensation points rely strongly on bond dilution and random single-ion anisotropy.Some results have not been revealed in Previous papers and predicted by Néel theory of ferrimagnetism.

  1. Effects of anisotropy of turbulent convection in mean-field solar dynamo models

    CERN Document Server

    Pipin, V V

    2013-01-01

    We study how anisotropy of turbulent convection affects diffusion of large-scale magnetic fields and the dynamo process on the Sun. The effect of anisotropy is calculated in a mean-field magneto-hydrodynamics framework using the minimal $\\tau$-approximation. We examine two types of mean-field dynamo models: the well-known benchmark flux-transport model, and a distributed-dynamo model with the subsurface rotational shear layer. For both models we investigate effects of the double-cell meridional circulation, recently suggested by helioseismology. We introduce a parameter of anisotropy as a ratio of the radial and horizontal intensity of turbulent mixing, to characterize the anisotropy effects. It is found that the anisotropy of turbulent convection affects the distribution of magnetic fields inside the convection zone. The concentration of the magnetic flux near the bottom and top boundaries of the convection zone is greater when the anisotropy is stronger. It is shown that the critical dynamo number and the d...

  2. Implicit frictional-contact model for soft particle systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezamabadi, Saeid; Radjai, Farhang; Averseng, Julien; Delenne, Jean-Yves

    2015-10-01

    We introduce a novel numerical approach for the simulation of soft particles interacting via frictional contacts. This approach is based on an implicit formulation of the Material Point Method, allowing for large particle deformations, combined with the Contact Dynamics method for the treatment of unilateral frictional contacts between particles. This approach is both precise due to the treatment of contacts with no regularization and artificial damping parameters, and robust due to implicit time integration of both bulk degrees of freedom and relative contact velocities at the nodes representing the contact points. By construction, our algorithm is capable of handling arbitrary particle shapes and deformations. We illustrate this approach by two simple 2D examples: a Hertz contact and a rolling particle on an inclined plane. We also investigate the compaction of a packing of circular particles up to a solid fraction well above the jamming limit of hard particles. We find that, for the same level of deformation, the solid fraction in a packing of frictional particles is above that of a packing of frictionless particles as a result of larger particle shape change.

  3. Repair welding process of friction stir welding groove defect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hui-jie; ZHANG Hui-jie

    2009-01-01

    The groove defect formed in the friction stir welding dramatically deteriorates weld appearances and mechanical properties of the joints owing to its larger size and penetration. Therefore, the friction stir repair welding was utilized to remove such a groove defect, and the focus was placed on the mechanical properties and microstructural characteristics of the repair joints so as to obtain an optimum repair welding process. The experimental results indicate that the groove defect can be removed by friction stir repair welding, and the offset repair welding process is superior to the symmetrical repair welding process. In the symmetrical repair welding process, a large number of fine cavity defects and an obvious aggregation of hard-brittle phase Al2Cu occur, accordingly the mechanical properties of the repair joint are weakened, and the fracture feature of repair joint is partially brittle and partially plastic. A good-quality repair joint can be obtained by the offset repair welding process, and the repair joint is fractured near the interface between the weld nugget zone and thermal-mechanically affected zone.

  4. Frictional sliding in layered rock: laboratory-scale experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buescher, B.J.; Perry, K.E. Jr.; Epstein, J.S.

    1996-09-01

    The work is part of the rock mechanics effort for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Program. The laboratory-scale experiments are intended to provide high quality data on the mechanical behavior of jointed structures that can be used to validate complex numerical models for rock-mass behavior. Frictional sliding between simulated rock joints was studied using phase shifting moire interferometry. A model, constructed from stacks of machined and sandblasted granite plates, contained a central hole bore normal to the place so that frictional slip would be induced between the plates near the hole under compressive loading. Results show a clear evolution of slip with increasing load. Since the rock was not cycled through loading- unloading, the quantitative differences between the three data sets are probably due to a ``wearing-in`` effect. The highly variable spatial frequency of the data is probably due to the large grain size of the granite and the stochastic frictional processes. An unusual feature of the evolution of slip with increasing load is that as the load gets larger, some plates seem to return to a null position. Figs, 6 refs.

  5. Experimental study of error sources in skin-friction balance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental study has been performed to determine potential error sources in skin-friction balance measurements. A floating-element balance, large enough to contain the instrumentation needed to systematically investigate these error sources has been constructed and tested in the thick turbulent boundary layer on the sidewall of a large supersonic wind tunnel. Test variables include element-to-case misalignment, gap size, and Reynolds number. The effects of these variables on the friction, lip, and normal forces have been analyzed. It was found that larger gap sizes were preferable to smaller ones; that small element recession below the surrounding test surface produced errors comparable to the same amount of protrusion above the test surface; and that normal forces on the element were, in some cases, large compared to the friction force.

  6. Surface defects and temperature on atomic friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajardo, O Y; Mazo, J J, E-mail: yovany@unizar.es [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada and Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2011-09-07

    We present a theoretical study of the effect of surface defects on atomic friction in the stick-slip dynamical regime of a minimalistic model. We focus on how the presence of defects and temperature change the average properties of the system. We have identified two main mechanisms which modify the mean friction force of the system when defects are considered. As expected, defects change the potential profile locally and thus affect the friction force. But the presence of defects also changes the probability distribution function of the tip slip length and thus the mean friction force. We corroborated both effects for different values of temperature, external load, dragging velocity and damping. We also show a comparison of the effects of surface defects and surface disorder on the dynamics of the system. (paper)

  7. Shell Galaxies, Dynamical Friction, and Dwarf Disruption

    CERN Document Server

    Ebrova, Ivana; Canalizo, Gabriela; Bennert, Nicola; Jilkova, Lucie

    2009-01-01

    Using N-body simulations of shell galaxies created in nearly radial minor mergers, we investigate the error of collision dating, resulting from the neglect of dynamical friction and of gradual disruption of the cannibalized dwarf.

  8. Frictional Sliding without Geometrical Reflection Symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldam, Michael; Bar-Sinai, Yohai; Svetlizky, Ilya; Brener, Efim A.; Fineberg, Jay; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics of frictional interfaces plays an important role in many physical systems spanning a broad range of scales. It is well known that frictional interfaces separating two dissimilar materials couple interfacial slip and normal stress variations, a coupling that has major implications on their stability, failure mechanism, and rupture directionality. In contrast, it is traditionally assumed that interfaces separating identical materials do not feature such a coupling because of symmetry considerations. We show, combining theory and experiments, that interfaces that separate bodies made of macroscopically identical materials but lack geometrical reflection symmetry generically feature such a coupling. We discuss two applications of this novel feature. First, we show that it accounts for a distinct, and previously unexplained, experimentally observed weakening effect in frictional cracks. Second, we demonstrate that it can destabilize frictional sliding, which is otherwise stable. The emerging framework is expected to find applications in a broad range of systems.

  9. Frictional sliding with geometrically broken reflection symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Aldam, Michael; Svetlizky, Ilya; Brener, Efim A; Fineberg, Jay; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of frictional interfaces play an important role in many physical systems spanning a broad range of scales. It is well-known that frictional interfaces separating two dissimilar materials couple interfacial slip and normal stress variations, a coupling that has major implications on their stability, failure mechanism and rupture directionality. In contrast, interfaces separating identical materials are traditionally assumed not to feature such a coupling due to symmetry considerations. We show, combining theory and experiments, that interfaces which separate bodies made of identical materials, but lack geometric reflection symmetry, generically feature such a coupling. We discuss two applications of this novel feature. First, we show that it accounts for a distinct and previously unexplained weakening effect in frictional cracks observed experimentally. Second, we demonstrate that it can destabilize frictional sliding which is otherwise stable. The emerging framework is expected to find applicatio...

  10. Permeability equipment for porous friction surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standiford, D. L.; Graul, R. A.; Lenke, L. R.

    1985-04-01

    Hydroplaning is the loss of traction between tires and pavement due to the presence of a layer of water. This loss of traction can result in loss of vehicle control. A porous friction surface (PFS) applied over an existing pavement permits the water to drain laterally and vertically away from the tire path, effectively lowering hydroplaning potential. Equipment used to measure pavement drainage (permeability) is discussed with respect to usage on porous friction surface. Background information on hydroplaning, flow theory, and PFS field performance as they are affected by permeability are also presented. Two dynamic test devices and four static devices are considered for measuring PFS permeability. Permeability tests are recommended to measure PFS permeability for maintenance purposes and construction control. Dynamic devices cited could possibly estimate hydroplaning potential; further research must be done to determine this. Permeability devices cannot be used to accurately estimate friction of a pavement surface, however, decreased permeability of a pavement infers a decrease in friction.

  11. Torque Control of Friction Stir Welding Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Longhurst Engineering, PLC and Vanderbilt University propose the innovation of torque control of friction stir welding (FSW) as a replacement to force control of...

  12. Transient effects in friction fractal asperity creep

    CERN Document Server

    Goedecke, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Transient friction effects determine the behavior of a wide class of mechatronic systems. Classic examples are squealing brakes, stiction in robotic arms, or stick-slip in linear drives. To properly design and understand mechatronic systems of this type, good quantitative models of transient friction effects are of primary interest. The theory developed in this book approaches this problem bottom-up, by deriving the behavior of macroscopic friction surfaces from the microscopic surface physics. The model is based on two assumptions: First, rough surfaces are inherently fractal, exhibiting roughness on a wide range of scales. Second, transient friction effects are caused by creep enlargement of the real area of contact between two bodies. This work demonstrates the results of extensive Finite Element analyses of the creep behavior of surface asperities, and proposes a generalized multi-scale area iteration for calculating the time-dependent real contact between two bodies. The toolset is then demonstrated both...

  13. Friction Stir Processing of Cast Superalloys Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I effort examines the feasibility of an innovative fabrication technology incorporating sand casting and friction stir processing (FSP) for producing...

  14. Composites materials for friction and braking application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crăciun, A. L.; Pinca-Bretotean, C.; Birtok-Băneasă, C.; Josan, A.

    2017-05-01

    The brake pads are an important component in the braking system of automotive. Materials used for brake pads should have stable and reliable frictional and wear properties under varying conditions of load, velocity, temperature and high durability. These factors must be satisfied simultaneously which makes it difficult to select effective brake pads material. The paper presents the results of the study for characterisation of the friction product used for automotive brake pads. In the study it was developed four frictional composites by using different percentages of coconut fibres (0%, 5%, 10%, 15%) reinforcement in aluminium matrix. The new composites tested in the laboratory, modelling appropriate percentage ratio between matrix and reinforcement volume and can be obtained with low density, high hardness properties, good thermal stability, higher ability to hold the compressive force and have a stable friction coefficient. These characteristics make them useful in automotive industry.

  15. Friction and friction-generated temperature at a polymer-metal interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, H. L.; Burks, H. D.

    1974-01-01

    Results of friction and thermal tests of molded polyimide and pyrrone polymers are presented. The coefficient of sliding friction up to surface velocities of 2 m/sec and the coefficient of thermal expansion from 300 to 500 K were measured. An apparatus was constructed to measure simultaneously the coefficient of sliding friction and the friction-generated temperature. Measurements were made at a nominal pressure-velocity product of 0.25 MN/msec and at temperatures between 300 and 500 K.

  16. Sliding without slipping under Coulomb friction: opening waves and inversion of frictional force

    CERN Document Server

    Yastrebov, Vladislav A

    2015-01-01

    An elastic layer slides on a rigid flat governed by Coulomb's friction law. We demonstrate that if the coefficient of friction is high enough, the sliding localizes within stick-slip pulses, which transform into opening waves propagating at intersonic speed in the direction of sliding or, for high Poisson's ratios, at supersonic speed in the opposite one. This sliding mode, characterized by small frictional dissipation, rapidly relaxes the shear elastic energy via stress waves and enables the contact surface slide ahead of the top one, resulting in inversion of the frictional force direction.

  17. A review of dynamics modelling of friction wedge suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qing; Cole, Colin; Spiryagin, Maksym; Sun, Yan Quan

    2014-11-01

    Three-piece bogies with friction wedge suspensions are the most widely used bogies in heavy haul trains. Fiction wedge suspensions play a key role in these wagon systems. This article reviews current techniques in dynamic modelling of friction wedge suspension with various motivations: to improve dynamic models of friction wedge suspensions so as to improve general wagon dynamics simulations; to seek better friction wedge suspension models for wagon stability assessments in complex train systems; to improve the modelling of other friction devices, such as friction draft gear. Relevant theories and friction wedge suspension models developed by using commercial simulation packages and in-house simulation packages are reviewed.

  18. Friction and adhesion of hierarchical carbon nanotube structures for biomimetic dry adhesives: multiscale modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shihao; Jiang, Haodan; Xia, Zhenhai; Gao, Xiaosheng

    2010-09-01

    With unique hierarchical fibrillar structures on their feet, gecko lizards can walk on vertical walls or even ceilings. Recent experiments have shown that strong binding along the shear direction and easy lifting in the normal direction can be achieved by forming unidirectional carbon nanotube array with laterally distributed tips similar to gecko's feet. In this study, a multiscale modeling approach was developed to analyze friction and adhesion behaviors of this hierarchical fibrillar system. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube array with laterally distributed segments at the end was simulated by coarse grained molecular dynamics. The effects of the laterally distributed segments on friction and adhesion strengths were analyzed, and further adopted as cohesive laws used in finite element analysis at device scale. The results show that the laterally distributed segments play an essential role in achieving high force anisotropy between normal and shear directions in the adhesives. Finite element analysis reveals a new friction-enhanced adhesion mechanism of the carbon nanotube array, which also exists in gecko adhesive system. The multiscale modeling provides an approach to bridge the microlevel structures of the carbon nanotube array with its macrolevel adhesive behaviors, and the predictions from this modeling give an insight into the mechanisms of gecko-mimicking dry adhesives.

  19. Linearization of friction effects in vibration of two rotating blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajžman M.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed at modelling of friction effects in blade shrouding which are realized by means of friction elements placed between blades. In order to develop a methodology of modelling, two blades with one friction element in between are considered only. Flexible blades fixed to a rotating disc are discretized by FEM using 1D Rayleigh beam elements derived in rotating space as well as the friction element modelled as a rigid body. The blades and the friction element are connected through two concurrent friction planes, where the friction forces arise on the basis of centrifugal force acting on the friction element. The linearization of friction is performed using the harmonic balance method to determine equivalent damping coefficients in dependence on the amplitudes of relative slip motion between the blades and the friction element. The methodology is applied to a model of two real blades and will be extended for the whole bladed disc with shrouding.

  20. Comparisons of friction models in bulk metal forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Xincai

    2002-01-01

    A friction model is one of the key input boundary conditions in finite element simulations. It is said that the friction model plays an important role in controlling the accuracy of necessary output results predicted. Among the various friction models, which one is of higher accuracy is still...... unknown and controversial. In this paper, finite element analyses applying five different friction models to experiments of upsetting of AA 6082 lubricated with four lubricants are presented. Frictional parameter values are determined by fitness of data of friction area ratio from finite element analysis...... to experimental results. It is found that calibration curves of the friction area ratio for all of the five chosen friction models used in the finite element simulation do fit the experimental results. Usually, calbration curves of the friction area ratio are more sensitive to friction at the tool...

  1. Comparing numerically exact and modelled static friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krengel Dominik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently there exists no mechanically consistent “numerically exact” implementation of static and dynamic Coulomb friction for general soft particle simulations with arbitrary contact situations in two or three dimension, but only along one dimension. We outline a differential-algebraic equation approach for a “numerically exact” computation of friction in two dimensions and compare its application to the Cundall-Strack model in some test cases.

  2. THE FRICTION OF QUARTZ IN HIGH VACUUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    the effects of surface cleanliness . Ultra-high vacuums (to 10 to the minus 10th power torr) and high temperatures (to 350 deg C) were combined with...chemical cleaning and careful handling techniques to produce the maximum surface cleanliness . The coefficient of static friction under varying...on 30-40 mesh glass balls. The coefficient of friction of smooth quartz was found to vary from 0.1 to 1.0 depending on the surface cleanliness . The

  3. 摩擦式吊具的力学分析%Mechanical Analysis of Friction Spreader

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许峰

    2016-01-01

    Friction spreader uses wirerope to lift and drive,the rope will not only exhibit large deformation and flexible change,but also produce nonlinear contact sport accompanied by friction between the pulleys.Accurate analysis of the phenomenon of friction spreader in its movement has become a key point of the study of mechanical properties of friction.This article will focus on mechanics phenomena reflected in the movement of friction spreader and analyze in terms of speed, acceleration, and friction coefficient.%摩擦式吊具提升与传动的载体是钢丝绳,在其运动过程中,钢丝绳不仅会表现出大的变形和柔性变化,而且伴随着与滑轮之间的摩擦,还会产生非线性的接触运动。准确具体地对摩擦式吊具进行其运动中的力学原理及现象进行分析,已然成为摩擦式力学特性研究的关键点。本文将针对摩擦式吊具在运动中体现出来的力学现象,在速度、加速度、摩擦系数等方面进行分析。

  4. A hierarchical estimator development for estimation of tire-road friction coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xudong; Göhlich, Dietmar

    2017-01-01

    The effect of vehicle active safety systems is subject to the friction force arising from the contact of tires and the road surface. Therefore, an adequate knowledge of the tire-road friction coefficient is of great importance to achieve a good performance of these control systems. This paper presents a tire-road friction coefficient estimation method for an advanced vehicle configuration, four-motorized-wheel electric vehicles, in which the longitudinal tire force is easily obtained. A hierarchical structure is adopted for the proposed estimation design. An upper estimator is developed based on unscented Kalman filter to estimate vehicle state information, while a hybrid estimation method is applied as the lower estimator to identify the tire-road friction coefficient using general regression neural network (GRNN) and Bayes' theorem. GRNN aims at detecting road friction coefficient under small excitations, which are the most common situations in daily driving. GRNN is able to accurately create a mapping from input parameters to the friction coefficient, avoiding storing an entire complex tire model. As for large excitations, the estimation algorithm is based on Bayes' theorem and a simplified “magic formula” tire model. The integrated estimation method is established by the combination of the above-mentioned estimators. Finally, the simulations based on a high-fidelity CarSim vehicle model are carried out on different road surfaces and driving maneuvers to verify the effectiveness of the proposed estimation method. PMID:28178332

  5. Analytical and numerical analysis of frictional damage in quasi brittle materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Q. Z.; Zhao, L. Y.; Shao, J. F.

    2016-07-01

    Frictional sliding and crack growth are two main dissipation processes in quasi brittle materials. The frictional sliding along closed cracks is the origin of macroscopic plastic deformation while the crack growth induces a material damage. The main difficulty of modeling is to consider the inherent coupling between these two processes. Various models and associated numerical algorithms have been proposed. But there are so far no analytical solutions even for simple loading paths for the validation of such algorithms. In this paper, we first present a micro-mechanical model taking into account the damage-friction coupling for a large class of quasi brittle materials. The model is formulated by combining a linear homogenization procedure with the Mori-Tanaka scheme and the irreversible thermodynamics framework. As an original contribution, a series of analytical solutions of stress-strain relations are developed for various loading paths. Based on the micro-mechanical model, two numerical integration algorithms are exploited. The first one involves a coupled friction/damage correction scheme, which is consistent with the coupling nature of the constitutive model. The second one contains a friction/damage decoupling scheme with two consecutive steps: the friction correction followed by the damage correction. With the analytical solutions as reference results, the two algorithms are assessed through a series of numerical tests. It is found that the decoupling correction scheme is efficient to guarantee a systematic numerical convergence.

  6. Modeling elastic anisotropy in strained heteroepitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Dixit, Gopal; Ranganathan, Madhav

    2017-09-01

    Using a continuum evolution equation, we model the growth and evolution of quantum dots in the heteroepitaxial Ge on Si(0 0 1) system in a molecular beam epitaxy unit. We formulate our model in terms of evolution due to deposition, and due to surface diffusion which is governed by a free energy. This free energy has contributions from surface energy, curvature, wetting effects and elastic energy due to lattice mismatch between the film and the substrate. In addition to anisotropy due to surface energy which favors facet formation, we also incorporate elastic anisotropy due to an underlying crystal lattice. The complicated elastic problem of the film-substrate system subjected to boundary conditions at the free surface, interface and the bulk substrate is solved by perturbation analysis using a small slope approximation. This permits an analysis of effects at different orders in the slope and sheds new light on the observed behavior. Linear stability analysis shows the early evolution of the instability towards dot formation. The elastic anisotropy causes a change in the alignment of dots in the linear regime, whereas the surface energy anisotropy changes the dot shapes at the nonlinear regime. Numerical simulation of the full nonlinear equations shows the evolution of the surface morphology. In particular, we show, for parameters of the Ge0.25 Si0.75 on Si(0 0 1), the surface energy anisotropy dominates the shapes of the quantum dots, whereas their alignment is influenced by the elastic energy anisotropy. The anisotropy in elasticity causes a further elongation of the islands whose coarsening is interrupted due to facets on the surface.

  7. Modeling elastic anisotropy in strained heteroepitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Gopal Krishna; Ranganathan, Madhav

    2017-09-20

    Using a continuum evolution equation, we model the growth and evolution of quantum dots in the heteroepitaxial Ge on Si(0 0 1) system in a molecular beam epitaxy unit. We formulate our model in terms of evolution due to deposition, and due to surface diffusion which is governed by a free energy. This free energy has contributions from surface energy, curvature, wetting effects and elastic energy due to lattice mismatch between the film and the substrate. In addition to anisotropy due to surface energy which favors facet formation, we also incorporate elastic anisotropy due to an underlying crystal lattice. The complicated elastic problem of the film-substrate system subjected to boundary conditions at the free surface, interface and the bulk substrate is solved by perturbation analysis using a small slope approximation. This permits an analysis of effects at different orders in the slope and sheds new light on the observed behavior. Linear stability analysis shows the early evolution of the instability towards dot formation. The elastic anisotropy causes a change in the alignment of dots in the linear regime, whereas the surface energy anisotropy changes the dot shapes at the nonlinear regime. Numerical simulation of the full nonlinear equations shows the evolution of the surface morphology. In particular, we show, for parameters of the [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text] on Si(0 0 1), the surface energy anisotropy dominates the shapes of the quantum dots, whereas their alignment is influenced by the elastic energy anisotropy. The anisotropy in elasticity causes a further elongation of the islands whose coarsening is interrupted due to [Formula: see text] facets on the surface.

  8. Network-Configurations of Dynamic Friction Patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Ghaffari, H O

    2012-01-01

    The complex configurations of dynamic friction patterns-regarding real time contact areas- are transformed into appropriate networks. With this transformation of a system to network space, many properties can be inferred about the structure and dynamics of the system. Here, we analyze the dynamics of static friction, i.e. nucleation processes, with respect to "friction networks". We show that networks can successfully capture the crack-like shear ruptures and possible corresponding acoustic features. We found that the fraction of triangles remarkably scales with the detachment fronts. There is a universal power law between nodes' degree and motifs frequency (for triangles, it reads T(k)\\proptok{\\beta} ({\\beta} \\approx2\\pm0.4)). We confirmed the obtained universality in aperture-based friction networks. Based on the achieved results, we extracted a possible friction law in terms of network parameters and compared it with the rate and state friction laws. In particular, the evolutions of loops are scaled with p...

  9. Role of Friction in Cold Ring Rolling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He YANG; Lianggang GUO; Mei ZHAN

    2005-01-01

    Cold ring rolling is an advanced but complex metal forming process under coupled effects with multi-factors, such as geometry sizes of rolls and ring blank, material, forming process parameters and friction, etc. Among these factors,friction between rolls and ring blank plays animportant role in keeping the stable forming of cold ring rolling. An analytical method was firstly presented for proximately determining the critical friction coefficient of stable forming and then a method was proposed to determine thecritical friction coefficient by combining analytical method with numerical simulation. And the influence of friction coefficient on the quality of end-plane and side spread of ring,rolling force, rolling moment and metal flow characteristic in the cold ring rolling process have been explored using the three dimensional (3D) numerical simulation based on the elastic-plastic dynamic finite element method (FEM)under the ABAQUS software environment, and the results show that increasing the friction on the contact surfaces between rolls and ring blank is useful not only for improving the stability of cold ring rolling but also for improving the geometry and dimension precision of deformed ring.

  10. Methods and devices used to measure friction in rolling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeswiet, J.; Arentoft, Mogens; Henningsen, Poul

    2006-01-01

    a good understanding of the mechanisms at the interface and to be able to verify the friction and tribology models that exist, friction sensors are needed. Designing sensors to measure frictional stress in metal working has been pursued by many researchers. This paper surveys methods that have been used...... to measure friction in rolling in the past and discusses some of the recent sensor designs that can now be used to measure friction both in production situations and for research purposes....

  11. Numerical implementation of a state variable model for friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korzekwa, D.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Boyce, D.E. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1995-03-01

    A general state variable model for friction has been incorporated into a finite element code for viscoplasticity. A contact area evolution model is used in a finite element model of a sheet forming friction test. The results show that a state variable model can be used to capture complex friction behavior in metal forming simulations. It is proposed that simulations can play an important role in the analysis of friction experiments and the development of friction models.

  12. Nano-Sized Grain Refinement Using Friction Stir Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    friction stir weld is a very fine grain microstructure produced as a result of dynamic recrystallization. The friction stir ... Friction Stir Processing, Magnesium, Nano-size grains Abstract A key characteristic of a friction stir weld is a very fine grain microstructure...state process developed on the basis of the friction stir welding (FSW) technique invented by The Welding Institute (TWI) in 1991 [2]. During

  13. Unidirectional superscattering by multilayered cavities of effective radial anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Wei; Shi, Jianhua; Hu, Haojun

    2016-01-01

    We achieve unidirectional forward superscattering by multilayered spherical cavities which are effectively radially anisotropic. It is demonstrated that, relying on the large effective anisotropy, the electric and magnetic dipoles can be tuned to spectrally overlap in such cavities, which satisfies the Kerker's condition of simultaneous backward scattering suppression and forward scattering enhancement. We show such scattering pattern shaping can be obtained in both all-dielectric and plasmonic multilayered cavities, and believe that the mechanism we have revealed provides extra freedom for scattering shaping, which may play a significant role in many scattering related applications and also in optoelectronic devices made up of intrinsically anisotropic two dimensional materials.

  14. NANO-MULTILAYERS WITH HIGH PERPENDICULAR ANISOTROPY FOR MAGNETIC RECORDING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T. Yang; B.H. Li; K. Kang; T. Suzuki

    2003-01-01

    (FePt/Ag)n nano-multilayers were deposited on MgO (100) single crystal with laser ablation and then subjected to annealing. FePt L1o grains with (001) texture and thus a large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy constant Ku of the order of 106J/m3 were formed. A thick Ag layer is found to be favorable for decreasing the dispersion of the easy axis for magnetization. The measurement of time decay of magnetization gave rise to a small activation volume of the order of 10-25 m3, showing the promising of being the recording medium for future high density perpendicular recording.

  15. Simulation of the in-plane plastic anisotropy of ultrafine grained aluminum sheets produced by accumulative roll bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beausir, Benoit; Juliane, Scharnweber; Carl-Georg, Oertel; Werner, Skrotzki [Institut fuer Strukturphysik, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Joern, Jaschinski [Institut fuer Leichtbau und Kunststofftechnik, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Heinz-Guenter, Brokmeier [GKSS Forschungszentrum, Max-Planck-Strasse, D-21494 Geesthacht (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Besides grain refinement accumulative roll bonding (ARB) leads to the formation of a texture composed of rolling and shear components. The shear components produced by friction between the rolls and the sheet are found in the surface layers. During subsequent ARB cycles, due to the bonding process the surface shear texture extends into the bulk of the sheet. Eight cycles of ARB were performed on two aluminum alloys, AA1050 and AA6016. The plastic anisotropy was investigated by tensile deformation via Lankford parameter. The global texture of the sheets was measured by neutron diffraction and used as input of the viscoplastic self-consistent model to simulate the in-plane plastic anisotropy. Simulation results are compared with those from experiment and discussed with regard to texture, strain rate sensitivity, grain shape and slip system activity.

  16. Low-Engine-Friction Technology for Advanced Natural-Gas Reciprocating Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Victor Wong; Tian Tian; G. Smedley; L. Moughon; Rosalind Takata; J. Jocsak

    2006-11-30

    This program aims at improving the efficiency of advanced natural-gas reciprocating engines (ANGRE) by reducing piston and piston ring assembly friction without major adverse effects on engine performance, such as increased oil consumption and wear. An iterative process of simulation, experimentation and analysis has been followed towards achieving the goal of demonstrating a complete optimized low-friction engine system. In this program, a detailed set of piston and piston-ring dynamic and friction models have been adapted and applied that illustrate the fundamental relationships among mechanical, surface/material and lubricant design parameters and friction losses. Demonstration of low-friction ring-pack designs in the Waukesha VGF 18GL engine confirmed ring-pack friction reduction of 30-40%, which translates to total engine FEMP (friction mean effective pressure) reduction of 7-10% from the baseline configuration without significantly increasing oil consumption or blow-by flow. The study on surface textures, including roughness characteristics, cross hatch patterns, dimples and grooves have shown that even relatively small-scale changes can have a large effect on ring/liner friction, in some cases reducing FMEP by as much as 30% from a smooth surface case. The measured FMEP reductions were in good agreement with the model predictions. The combined analysis of lubricant and surface design indicates that low-viscosity lubricants can be very effective in reducing friction, subject to component wear for extremely thin oils, which can be mitigated with further lubricant formulation and/or engineered surfaces. Hence a combined approach of lubricant design and appropriate wear reduction offers improved potential for minimum engine friction loss. Testing of low-friction lubricants showed that total engine FMEP reduced by up to {approx}16.5% from the commercial reference oil without significantly increasing oil consumption or blow-by flow. Piston friction studies

  17. Low-Engine-Friction Technology for Advanced Natural-Gas Reciprocating Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Victor Wong; Tian Tian; G. Smedley; L. Moughon; Rosalind Takata; J. Jocsak

    2006-11-30

    This program aims at improving the efficiency of advanced natural-gas reciprocating engines (ANGRE) by reducing piston and piston ring assembly friction without major adverse effects on engine performance, such as increased oil consumption and wear. An iterative process of simulation, experimentation and analysis has been followed towards achieving the goal of demonstrating a complete optimized low-friction engine system. In this program, a detailed set of piston and piston-ring dynamic and friction models have been adapted and applied that illustrate the fundamental relationships among mechanical, surface/material and lubricant design parameters and friction losses. Demonstration of low-friction ring-pack designs in the Waukesha VGF 18GL engine confirmed ring-pack friction reduction of 30-40%, which translates to total engine FEMP (friction mean effective pressure) reduction of 7-10% from the baseline configuration without significantly increasing oil consumption or blow-by flow. The study on surface textures, including roughness characteristics, cross hatch patterns, dimples and grooves have shown that even relatively small-scale changes can have a large effect on ring/liner friction, in some cases reducing FMEP by as much as 30% from a smooth surface case. The measured FMEP reductions were in good agreement with the model predictions. The combined analysis of lubricant and surface design indicates that low-viscosity lubricants can be very effective in reducing friction, subject to component wear for extremely thin oils, which can be mitigated with further lubricant formulation and/or engineered surfaces. Hence a combined approach of lubricant design and appropriate wear reduction offers improved potential for minimum engine friction loss. Testing of low-friction lubricants showed that total engine FMEP reduced by up to {approx}16.5% from the commercial reference oil without significantly increasing oil consumption or blow-by flow. Piston friction studies

  18. Friction Stir Processing for Efficient Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mr. Christopher B. Smith; Dr. Oyelayo Ajayi

    2012-01-31

    Friction at contacting surfaces in relative motion is a major source of parasitic energy loss in machine systems and manufacturing processes. Consequently, friction reduction usually translates to efficiency gain and reduction in energy consumption. Furthermore, friction at surfaces eventually leads to wear and failure of the components thereby compromising reliability and durability. In order to reduce friction and wear in tribological components, material surfaces are often hardened by a variety of methods, including conventional heat treatment, laser surface hardening, and thin-film coatings. While these surface treatments are effective when used in conjunction with lubrication to prevent failure, they are all energy intensive and could potentially add significant cost. A new concept for surface hardening of metallic materials and components is Friction Stir Processing (FSP). Compared to the current surface hardening technologies, FSP is more energy efficient has no emission or waste by products and may result in better tribological performance. FSP involves plunging a rotating tool to a predetermined depth (case layer thickness) and translating the FSP tool along the area to be processed. This action of the tool produces heating and severe plastic deformation of the processed area. For steel the temperature is high enough to cause phase transformation, ultimately forming hard martensitic phase. Indeed, FSP has been used for surface modification of several metals and alloys so as to homogenize the microstructure and refine the grain size, both of which led to improved fatigue and corrosion resistance. Based on the effect of FSP on near-surface layer material, it was expected to have beneficial effects on friction and wear performance of metallic materials. However, little or no knowledge existed on the impact of FSP concerning friction and wear performance the subject of the this project and final report. Specifically for steel, which is the most dominant

  19. Investigation of friction affected by additives in turbulent flows in pipelines; Investigacao da reducao de arrasto por aditivos em escoamentos turbulentos em dutos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreotti, Marcelo; Cunha, Francisco Ricardo da; Sousa, Aldo Joao de [Universidade de Brasilia, DF (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica; Universidade de Brasilia, DF (Brazil). Vortex: Grupo de Mecanica dos Fluidos de Escoamentos Complexos]. E-mails: andreotti@unb.br; frcunha@unb.br; aldo@unb.br

    2003-06-01

    The present study concerns reduction of friction in turbulent flows. This friction-reducing effect is obtained by adding fibers or polymers with high molecular weight that generate a tension anisotropy in the flow in the flow, diminishing the transport efficiency of momentum carried due to turbulent fluctuations. An analysis is undertaken based on a nonlinear constitutive model, which takes into account the rate of extra deformation of the flow in the direction of local orientation of the additives. The model is applied to develop an extension of the theory of Karman-Prandtl. The objective is to investigate a first effect of the additives on the flow. The results predicted by the model were adjusted by means of experimental data, showing a 65% reduction in the friction factor for a concentration of 350 ppm of Polyacrylamide. (author)

  20. The sidereal anisotropy of multi-TeV cosmic rays in an expanding Local Interstellar Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Mizoguchi, Y; Takita, M; Kota, J

    2009-01-01

    The sidereal anisotropy of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity observed with the Tibet Air Shower (AS) experiment still awaits theoretical interpretation. The observed global feature of the anisotropy is well reproduced by a superposition of the bi-directional and uni-directional flows (BDF and UDF, respectively) of GCRs. If the orientation of the deduced BDF represents the orientation of the local interstellar magnetic field (LISMF), as indicated by best-fitting a model to the data, the UDF deviating from the BDF orientation implies a significant contribution from the streaming perpendicular to the LISMF. This perpendicular streaming is probably due to the drift anisotropy, because the contribution from the perpendicular diffusion is expected to be much smaller than the drift effect. The large amplitude deduced for the UDF indicates a large spatial gradient of the GCR density. We suggest that such a density gradient can be expected at the heliosphere sitting close to the boundary of the Local Interstellar Cl...