WorldWideScience

Sample records for large fluence radiation

  1. Photoluminescence in large fluence radiation irradiated space silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hisamatsu, Tadashi; Kawasaki, Osamu; Matsuda, Sumio [National Space Development Agency of Japan, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan). Tsukuba Space Center; Tsukamoto, Kazuyoshi

    1997-03-01

    Photoluminescence spectroscopy measurements were carried out for silicon 50{mu}m BSFR space solar cells irradiated with 1MeV electrons with a fluence exceeding 1 x 10{sup 16} e/cm{sup 2} and 10MeV protons with a fluence exceeding 1 x 10{sup 13} p/cm{sup 2}. The results were compared with the previous result performed in a relative low fluence region, and the radiation-induced defects which cause anomalous degradation of the cell performance in such large fluence regions were discussed. As far as we know, this is the first report which presents the PL measurement results at 4.2K of the large fluence radiation irradiated silicon solar cells. (author)

  2. A fluence device for precise radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnott, R.G.T.; Peak, M.J.

    1979-01-01

    An instrument is described which has been designed to ensure precise positioning of samples and sensing devices in three dimensions at all times during irradiation procedures. The system, which is both robust and sensitive, overcomes difficulties experienced when slight variations in the positioning of a sample under irradiation results in large changes in fluence. (UK)

  3. Vectorial and plane energy fluences - useful concepts in radiation physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, C.A.

    1977-06-01

    The vectorial physical quantities describing the radiation field are defined in this report. The use of these quantities is rare in the radiation dosimetry literature since a knowledge of the directions of motion of the ionizing particle is often uninteresting when determining absorbed doses. However the plane energy fluence rate is a useful quantity in cases with plane irradiation geometries. The plane energy fluence rate is closely related to the vectorial energy fluence rate. The backscattering properties of a medium can be expressed in terms either of its albedo or its reflection-coefficient (backscatter-coefficient). These quantities are discussed in order to derive useful relations between the plane energy fluence and the energy fluence at points on an extended plane surface. Examples are also given of erroneous use of energy fluence instead of vectorial or plane energy fluence. The examples are taken from roentgen diagnostic examinations. To prevent further mistakes it could be valuable if the quantities of vectorial and plane fluences were introduced in text books in radiation dosimetry. Awaiting for this, this report may hopefully be useful. (E.R.)

  4. Dosimetric And Fluence Measurements At Hadron Facilities For LHC Radiation Damage Studies

    CERN Document Server

    León-Florián, E

    2001-01-01

    Dosimetry plays an essential role in experiments assessing radiation damage and hardness for the components of detectors to be operated at the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC), CERN (European Laboratory for Particle Physics), Geneva, Switzerland. Dosimetry is used both for calibration of the radiation fields and estimate of fluences and doses during the irradiation tests. The LHC environment will result in a complex radiation field composed of hadrons (mainly neutrons, pions and protons) and photons, each having an energy spectrum ranging from a few keV to several hundreds of MeV or several GeV, even. In this thesis, are exposed the results of measurements of particle fluences and doses at different hadron irradiation facilities: SARA, πE1-PSI and ZT7PS used for testing the radiation hardness of materials and equipment to be used in the future experiments at LHC. These measurements are applied to the evaluation of radiation damage inflicted to various semiconductors (such as silicon) and electronics ...

  5. Deduction of solar neutron fluences from large gamma-ray flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimori, Masato; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Kazuyoshi.

    1986-01-01

    Solar neutron fluences from large gamma-ray flares are deduced from accelerated proton spectra and numbers derived from the gamma-ray observations. The deduced solar neutron fluences range from 1 to 200 neutrons cm -2 . The present result indicates a possibility that high sensitivity ground-based neutron monitors can detect solar neutron events, just as detected by the Jungfraujoch and Rome neutron monitors. (author)

  6. Ultra High Fluence Radiation Monitoring Technology for the Future Circular Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gorine, Georgi; Mandic, Igor; Jazbec, Anže; Snoj, Luka; Capeans, Mar; Moll, Michael; Bouvet, Didier; Ravotti, Federico; Sallese, Jean-Michel

    2018-01-01

    The Future Circular Collider (FCC) is foreseen as the next generation ~100 km long synchrotron to be built in the Geneva area starting 2050. This machine is expected to reach an energy level of 100 TeV generating unprecedented radiation levels >100 times higher than in today`s Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Current Radiation Monitoring system, like the RADMONs employed in the LHC, will not be capable to function and withstand this harsh environment. The development of a new Ultra High Fluence and Dose Radiation Sensor is a key element to allow irradiation tests of FCC equipment and, at a later stage, to monitor radiation levels in the FCC itself. In this paper, we present an innovative dosimetry solution based on thin layers of metals, which resistivity is shown to increase significantly due to the accumulated displacement damage. After describing the fabrication techniques used to manufacture these Radiation Dependent Resistors (RDR), we show and discuss the results of the irradiation experiments carried out ...

  7. Photon-Fluence-Weighted let for Radiation Fields Subjected to Epidemiological Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Michiya

    2017-08-01

    In order to estimate the uncertainty of the radiation risk associated with the photon energy in epidemiological studies, photon-fluence-weighted LET values were quantified for photon radiation fields with the target organs and irradiation conditions taken into consideration. The photon fluences giving a unit absorbed dose to the target organ were estimated by using photon energy spectra together with the dose conversion coefficients given in ICRP Publication 116 for the target organs of the colon, bone marrow, stomach, lung, skin and breast with three irradiation geometries. As a result, it was demonstrated that the weighted LET values did not show a clear difference among the photon radiation fields subjected to epidemiological studies, regardless of the target organ and the irradiation geometry.

  8. Epitaxial silicon detectors for particle tracking-Radiation tolerance at extreme hadron fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindstroem, Gunnar; Dolenc, Irena; Fretwurst, Eckhart; Hoenniger, Frank; Kramberger, Gregor; Moll, Michael; Nossarzewska, Elsbieta; Pintilie, Ioana; Roeder, Ralf

    2006-01-01

    Diodes processed on n-type epitaxial silicon with a thickness of 25, 50 and 75 μm had been irradiated with reactor neutrons and high-energy protons (24 GeV/c) up to integrated fluences of Φ eq =10 16 cm -2 . Systematic experiments on radiation-induced damage effects revealed the following results: in contrast to standard and oxygen-enriched float zone (FZ) silicon devices no space charge sign inversion was observed after irradiation. It is shown that the radiation-generated concentration of deep acceptors, dominating the behavior of n-type FZ diodes, is compensated by creation of shallow donors. Thus a positive space charge is maintained throughout the irradiation up to the highest fluence and even during prolonged elevated-temperature annealing cycles. Defect analysis studies using thermally stimulated current measurements attribute the effect to a damage-induced shallow donor at E C -0.23 eV. It is argued that, as in the case of thermal donors, oxygen dimers, out diffusing from the Cz substrate during the diode processing, are responsible precursers. Results from extensive annealing experiments at elevated temperatures are verified by comparison with prolonged room-temperature annealing. These results showed that in contrast to FZ detectors, which always have to be cooled, room-temperature storage during beam off periods of future elementary particle physics experiments would even be beneficial for n-type epi-silicon detectors. A dedicated experiment at CERN-PS had successfully proven this expectation. It was verified, that in such a scenario the depletion voltage for the epi-detector could always be kept at a moderate level throughout the full S-LHC operation (foreseen upgrade of the large hadron collider). Practically no difference with respect to FZ-silicon devices was found in the damage-induced bulk generation current. The charge trapping measured with 90 Sr electrons (mip's) is also almost identical to what was expected. A charge collection efficiency of

  9. Epitaxial silicon detectors for particle tracking-Radiation tolerance at extreme hadron fluences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindstroem, Gunnar [Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, 22761 (Germany)]. E-mail: gunnar.lindstroem@desy.de; Dolenc, Irena [Jozef Stefan Institute, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, 100 (Slovenia); Fretwurst, Eckhart [Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, 22761 (Germany); Hoenniger, Frank [Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, 22761 (Germany); Kramberger, Gregor [Jozef Stefan Institute, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, 100 (Slovenia); Moll, Michael [CERN, Geneva, 1211 (Switzerland); Nossarzewska, Elsbieta [ITME, Institute for Electronocs Materials Technology, Warsaw, 01919 (Poland); Pintilie, Ioana [National Institute of Materials Physics, Bucharest, 077125 (Romania); Roeder, Ralf [CiS Institute for Microsensors gGmbH, Erfurt, 99099 (Germany)

    2006-11-30

    Diodes processed on n-type epitaxial silicon with a thickness of 25, 50 and 75 {mu}m had been irradiated with reactor neutrons and high-energy protons (24 GeV/c) up to integrated fluences of {phi} {sub eq}=10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}. Systematic experiments on radiation-induced damage effects revealed the following results: in contrast to standard and oxygen-enriched float zone (FZ) silicon devices no space charge sign inversion was observed after irradiation. It is shown that the radiation-generated concentration of deep acceptors, dominating the behavior of n-type FZ diodes, is compensated by creation of shallow donors. Thus a positive space charge is maintained throughout the irradiation up to the highest fluence and even during prolonged elevated-temperature annealing cycles. Defect analysis studies using thermally stimulated current measurements attribute the effect to a damage-induced shallow donor at E {sub C}-0.23 eV. It is argued that, as in the case of thermal donors, oxygen dimers, out diffusing from the Cz substrate during the diode processing, are responsible precursers. Results from extensive annealing experiments at elevated temperatures are verified by comparison with prolonged room-temperature annealing. These results showed that in contrast to FZ detectors, which always have to be cooled, room-temperature storage during beam off periods of future elementary particle physics experiments would even be beneficial for n-type epi-silicon detectors. A dedicated experiment at CERN-PS had successfully proven this expectation. It was verified, that in such a scenario the depletion voltage for the epi-detector could always be kept at a moderate level throughout the full S-LHC operation (foreseen upgrade of the large hadron collider). Practically no difference with respect to FZ-silicon devices was found in the damage-induced bulk generation current. The charge trapping measured with {sup 90}Sr electrons (mip's) is also almost identical to what was expected

  10. Evaluation of fluence to dose equivalent conversion factors for high energy radiations, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Osamu; Uehara, Takashi; Yoshizawa, Nobuaki; Iwai, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shun-ichi.

    1992-09-01

    Computer code system and basic data have been investigated for evaluating fluence to dose equivalent conversion factors for photons and neutrons up to 10 GeV. The present work suggested that the conversion factors would be obtained by incorporating effective quality factors of charged particles into the HERMES (High Energy Radiation Monte Carlo Elaborate System) code system. The effective quality factors for charged particles were calculated on the basis of the Q-L relationships specified in the ICRP Publication-60. (author)

  11. Analysis of radiation damage to Si solar cells under high-fluence electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Masafumi; Taylor, S.J.; Yang, Ming-Ju; Matsuda, Sumio; Kawasaki, Osamu; Hisamatsu, Tadashi.

    1996-01-01

    Radiation testing of Si n + -p-p + space solar cells has revealed an anomalous increase in short-circuit current I sc , followed by an abrupt decrease and cell failure, induced by high-fluence (>10 16 cm -2 ) electron irradiation. A model which can be used to explain these phenomena by expressing the change in majority-carrier concentration p of the base region as a function of the electron fluence has been proposed in addition to the well-known model in which I sc is decreased due to minority-carrier lifetime reduction with irradiation. The reduction in p due to majority-carrier trapping by radiation-induced defects has two effects; one is broadening of the depletion layer which contributes to the increase in the generated photocurrent and that in the recombination-generation current in the depletion layer, and the second is an increase in the resistivity of the base layer resulting in an abrupt decrease of I sc and failure of the solar cells. (author)

  12. Fluence-based and microdosimetric event-based methods for radiation protection in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, S.B.

    2002-01-01

    The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) has recently published a report (Report no.137) that discusses various aspects of the concepts used in radiation protection and the difficulties in measuring the radiation environment in spacecraft for the estimation of radiation risk to space travelers. Two novel dosimetric methodologies, fluence-based and microdosimetric event-based methods, are discussed and evaluated, along with the more conventional quality factor/linear energy transfer (LET) method. It was concluded that for the present, any reason to switch to a new methodology is not compelling. It is suggested that because of certain drawbacks in the presently-used conventional method, these alternative methodologies should be kept in mind. As new data become available and dosimetric techniques become more refined, the question should be revisited and that in the future, significant improvement might be realized. In addition, such concepts as equivalent dose and organ dose equivalent are discussed and various problems regarding the measurement/estimation of these quantities are presented. (author)

  13. Fluorescence spectra of Rhodamine 6G for high fluence excitation laser radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Hung, J; Olaizola, A M

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescence spectral changes of Rhodamine 6G in ethanol and glycerol solutions and deposited as a film on a silica surface have been studied using a wide range of pumping field fluence at 532 nm at room temperature. Blue shift of the fluorescence spectra and fluorescence quenching of the dye molecule in solution are observed at high excitation fluence values. Such effects are not reported for the film sample. The effects are interpreted as the result of population redistribution in the solute-solvent molecular system induced by the high fluence field and the fluence dependence of the radiationless decay mechanism.

  14. A novel linear programming approach to fluence map optimization for intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romeijn, H Edwin; Ahuja, Ravindra K; Dempsey, James F; Kumar, Arvind; Li, Jonathan G

    2003-01-01

    We present a novel linear programming (LP) based approach for efficiently solving the intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fluence-map optimization (FMO) problem to global optimality. Our model overcomes the apparent limitations of a linear-programming approach by approximating any convex objective function by a piecewise linear convex function. This approach allows us to retain the flexibility offered by general convex objective functions, while allowing us to formulate the FMO problem as a LP problem. In addition, a novel type of partial-volume constraint that bounds the tail averages of the differential dose-volume histograms of structures is imposed while retaining linearity as an alternative approach to improve dose homogeneity in the target volumes, and to attempt to spare as many critical structures as possible. The goal of this work is to develop a very rapid global optimization approach that finds high quality dose distributions. Implementation of this model has demonstrated excellent results. We found globally optimal solutions for eight 7-beam head-and-neck cases in less than 3 min of computational time on a single processor personal computer without the use of partial-volume constraints. Adding such constraints increased the running times by a factor of 2-3, but improved the sparing of critical structures. All cases demonstrated excellent target coverage (>95%), target homogeneity (<10% overdosing and <7% underdosing) and organ sparing using at least one of the two models

  15. The determination of fast neutron fluence in radiation stability tests of steel samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogel, J.; Vespalec, R.

    1979-01-01

    The activation method is described of determining fast neutron fluence. Samples of steel designed for WWER type reactor pressure vessels were irradiated in the CHOUCA-rigs in the core of the WWR-S reactor. The neutron spectrum was measured by the multiple activation foil method and the effective cross sections of fluence monitors were calculated. The fluences obtained from the reactions 54 Fe(n,p) 54 Mn and 63 Cu(n,α) 60 Co are presented and the method is discussed. (author)

  16. Penalized likelihood fluence optimization with evolutionary components for intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baydush, Alan H.; Marks, Lawrence B.; Das, Shiva K.

    2004-01-01

    A novel iterative penalized likelihood algorithm with evolutionary components for the optimization of beamlet fluences for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is presented. This algorithm is designed to be flexible in terms of the objective function and automatically escalates dose, as long as the objective function increases and all constraints are met. For this study, the objective function employed was the product of target equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and fraction of target tissue within set homogeneity constraints. The likelihood component of the algorithm iteratively attempts to minimize the mean squared error between a homogeneous dose prescription and the actual target dose distribution. The updated beamlet fluences are then adjusted via a quadratic penalty function that is based on the dose-volume histogram (DVH) constraints of the organs at risk. The evolutionary components were included to prevent the algorithm from converging to a local maximum. The algorithm was applied to a prostate cancer dataset, with especially difficult DVH constraints on bladder, rectum, and femoral heads. Dose distributions were generated for manually selected sets of three-, four-, five-, and seven-field treatment plans. Additionally, a global search was performed to find the optimal orientations for an axial three-beam plan. The results from this optimal orientation set were compared to results for manually selected orientation (gantry angle) sets of 3- (0 deg., 90 deg., 270 deg. ), 4- (0 deg., 90 deg., 180 deg., 270 deg. ), 5- (0 deg., 50 deg., 130 deg., 230 deg., 310 deg.), and 7- (0 deg., 40 deg., 90 deg., 140 deg., 230 deg., 270 deg., 320 deg. ) field axial treatment plans. For all the plans generated, all DVH constraints were met and average optimization computation time was approximately 30 seconds. For the manually selected orientations, the algorithm was successful in providing a relatively homogeneous target dose distribution, while simultaneously satisfying

  17. Radiation clusters formation and evolution in FCC metals at low-temperature neutron irradiation up to small damage fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, A.V.; Shcherbakov, E.N.; Asiptsov, O.I.; Skryabin, L.A.; Portnykh, I.A.

    2006-01-01

    Methods of transmission electron microscopy and precision size measurements are used to study the formation of radiation-induced clusters in FCC metals (Ni, Pt, austenitic steels EhI-844, ChS-68) irradiated with fast neutron (E>0.1 MeV) fluences from 7 x 10 21 up to 3.5 x 10 22 m -2 at a temperature of 310 K. Using statistical thermodynamic methods the process of radiation clusters formation and evolution is described quantitatively. The change in the concentration of point defects under irradiation as well as size variations of irradiated specimens on annealing are calculated [ru

  18. Radiance and particle fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papiez, L.; Battista, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Units and Measurements (ICRU) has defined fluence in terms of the number of the radiation particles crossing a small sampling sphere. A second definition has been proposed in which the length of track segments contained within any sampling volume are used to calculate the incident fluence. This approach is often used in Monte Carlo simulations of individual particle tracks, allowing the fluence to be scored in small volumes of any shape. In this paper we stress that the second definition generalizes the classical (ICRU) concept of fluence. We also identify the assumptions inherent in the two definitions of fluence and prove their equivalence for the case of straight-line particle trajectories. (author)

  19. The vessel fluence; Fluence cuve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This book presents the proceedings of the technical meeting on the reactors vessels fluence. They are grouped in eight sessions: the industrial context and the stakes of the vessels control; the organization and the methodology for the fluence computation; the concerned physical properties; the reference computation methods; the fluence monitoring in an industrial context; vessels monitoring under irradiation; others methods in the world; the research and development programs. (A.L.B.)

  20. Hypopigmentation Induced by Frequent Low-Fluence, Large-Spot-Size QS Nd:YAG Laser Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yisheng; Lee, Siong See Joyce; Goh, Chee Leok

    2015-12-01

    The Q-switched 1064-nm neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (QS 1064-nm Nd:YAG) laser is increasingly used for nonablative skin rejuvenation or "laser toning" for melasma. Multiple and frequent low-fluence, large-spot-size treatments are used to achieve laser toning, and these treatments are associated with the development of macular hypopigmentation as a complication. We present a case series of three patients who developed guttate hypomelanotic macules on the face after receiving laser toning treatment with QS 1064-nm Nd:YAG.

  1. Fluence to Dose Equivalent Conversion Coefficients for Evaluation of Accelerator Radiation Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Ralph H.; Zeman, Gary H.

    2001-01-01

    The derivation of a set of conversion functions for the expression of neutron fluence measurements in terms of Effective Dose, E, is described. Four functions in analytical form are presented, covering the neutron energy range from 2.5 10-8 to 10+4 MeV, for the interpretation of fluence measurements in the typical irradiation conditions experienced around high-energy proton accelerators such as the Bevatron. For neutron energies below 200 MeV the analytical functions were modeled after the ISO and ROT conversion coefficients in ICRU 57. For neutron energies above 200 MeV, the analytical function was derived from an analysis of recent published data. Sample calculations using either the analytical expressions or the tabulated conversion coefficients from which the analytical expressions are derived show agreement to better than plus/minus 5%

  2. On the use of quality factors and fluence to dose rate conversion in human radiation exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondhaus, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    It is shown that various combinations of numbers and factors arrive at estimates of dose and dose effectiveness from values of fluence; but as yet it has not been possible to use biological data with the same degree of precision to estimate the physical data. It would seem that the most reasonable way to use the human data that exist is to apply them as far as possible to the human animal as a whole.

  3. Combined Bulk and Surface Radiation Damage Effects at Very High Fluences in Silicon Detectors: Measurements and TCAD Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Moscatelli, F; Morozzi, A; Mendicino, R; Dalla Betta, G F; Bilei, G M

    2016-01-01

    In this work we propose a new combined TCAD radiation damage modelling scheme, featuring both bulk and surface radiation damage effects, for the analysis of silicon detectors aimed at the High Luminosity LHC. In particular, a surface damage model has been developed by introducing the relevant parameters (NOX, NIT) extracted from experimental measurements carried out on p-type substrate test structures after gamma irradiations at doses in the range 10-500 Mrad(Si). An extended bulk model, by considering impact ionization and deep-level cross-sections variation, was included as well. The model has been validated through the comparison of the simulation findings with experimental measurements carried out at very high fluences (2×1016 1 MeV equivalent n/cm2) thus fostering the application of this TCAD approach for the design and optimization of the new generation of silicon detectors to be used in future HEP experiments.

  4. Prediction of the Response of the Commercial BPW34FS Silicon p-i-n Diode Used as Radiation Monitoring Sensors up to Very High Fluences

    CERN Document Server

    Mekki, J; Glaser, M; Moll, M; Dusseau, L

    2010-01-01

    The effect of radiation damage on Silicon p-i-n diodes has been studied. I-V characteristics of BPW34FS silicon p-i-n diodes irradiated with 24 GeV/c protons up to 6.3 x 10(15) n(eq)/cm(2) have been measured and analyzed. A parameterization predicting the radiation response in the fluence range relevant for the use of the diodes as radiation monitors in Super-LHC experiments is presented.

  5. Ultraviolet radiation after exposure to a low-fluence IPL home-use device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen-Petersen, Daniel; Erlendsson, Andres M; Nash, J F

    2015-01-01

    The prevailing advice is to avoid sun exposure after intense pulsed light (IPL) hair removal. However, no systematic evaluation of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) after IPL hair removal exits. Therefore, we investigated the occurrence of side effects in subjects receiving solar-simulated UVR after...

  6. High energy radiation fluences in the ISS-USLab: Ion discrimination and particle abundances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaconte, Veronica; Casolino, Marco; Di Fino, Luca; La Tessa, Chiara; Larosa, Marianna; Narici, Livio; Picozza, Piergiorgio

    2010-01-01

    The ALTEA (Anomalous Long Term Effects on Astronauts) detector was used to characterize the radiation environment inside the USLab of the International Space Station (ISS), where it measured the abundances of ions from Be to Fe. We compare the ALTEA results with Alteino results obtained in the PIRS module of the Russian segment of the ISS, and normalize to the high energy Si abundances given by Simpson. These are the first particle spectral measurements, which include ions up to Fe, performed in the USLab. The small differences observed between those made inside the USLab and the Simpson abundances can be attributed to the transport through the spacecraft hull. However, the low abundance of Fe cannot be attributed to only this process.

  7. Test measurements on a secco white-lead containing model samples to assess the effects of exposure to low-fluence UV laser radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raimondi, Valentina, E-mail: v.raimondi@ifac.cnr.it [‘Nello Carrara’ Applied Physics Institute - National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Andreotti, Alessia; Colombini, Maria Perla [Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry Department (DCCI) - University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Cucci, Costanza [‘Nello Carrara’ Applied Physics Institute - National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Cuzman, Oana [Institute for the Conservation and Promotion of Cultural Heritage - National Research Council (CNR-ICVBC), Firenze (Italy); Galeotti, Monica [Opificio delle Pietre Dure (OPD), Firenze (Italy); Lognoli, David; Palombi, Lorenzo; Picollo, Marcello [‘Nello Carrara’ Applied Physics Institute - National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Tiano, Piero [Institute for the Conservation and Promotion of Cultural Heritage - National Research Council (CNR-ICVBC), Firenze (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • A set of a secco model samples was prepared using white lead and four different organic binders (animal glue and whole egg, whole egg, skimmed milk, egg-oil tempera). • The samples were irradiated with low-fluence UV laser pulses (0.1–1 mJ/cm{sup 2}). • The effects of laser irradiation were analysed by using different techniques. • The analysis did not point out changes due to low-fluence laser irradiation. • High fluence (88 mJ/cm{sup 2}) laser radiation instead yielded a chromatic change ascribed to the inorganic component. - Abstract: Laser-induced fluorescence technique is widely used for diagnostic purposes in several applications and its use could be of advantage for non-invasive on-site characterisation of pigments or other compounds in wall paintings. However, it is well known that long-time exposure to UV and VIS radiation can cause damage to wall paintings. Several studies have investigated the effects of lighting, e.g., in museums: however, the effects of low-fluence laser radiation have not been studied much so far. This paper investigates the effects of UV laser radiation using fluences in the range of 0.1 mJ/cm{sup 2}–1 mJ/cm{sup 2} on a set of a secco model samples prepared with lead white and different type of binders (animal glue and whole egg, whole egg, skimmed milk, egg-oil tempera). The samples were irradiated using a Nd:YAG laser (emission wavelength at 355 nm; pulse width: 5 ns) by applying laser fluences between 0.1 mJ/cm{sup 2} and 1 mJ/cm{sup 2} and a number of laser pulses between 1 and 500. The samples were characterised before and after laser irradiation by using several techniques (colorimetry, optical microscopy, fibre optical reflectance spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy Attenuated Total Reflectance microscopy and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry), to detect variations in the morphological and physico-chemical properties. The results did not point out significant changes in the sample properties after

  8. Test measurements on a secco white-lead containing model samples to assess the effects of exposure to low-fluence UV laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raimondi, Valentina; Andreotti, Alessia; Colombini, Maria Perla; Cucci, Costanza; Cuzman, Oana; Galeotti, Monica; Lognoli, David; Palombi, Lorenzo; Picollo, Marcello; Tiano, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A set of a secco model samples was prepared using white lead and four different organic binders (animal glue and whole egg, whole egg, skimmed milk, egg-oil tempera). • The samples were irradiated with low-fluence UV laser pulses (0.1–1 mJ/cm 2 ). • The effects of laser irradiation were analysed by using different techniques. • The analysis did not point out changes due to low-fluence laser irradiation. • High fluence (88 mJ/cm 2 ) laser radiation instead yielded a chromatic change ascribed to the inorganic component. - Abstract: Laser-induced fluorescence technique is widely used for diagnostic purposes in several applications and its use could be of advantage for non-invasive on-site characterisation of pigments or other compounds in wall paintings. However, it is well known that long-time exposure to UV and VIS radiation can cause damage to wall paintings. Several studies have investigated the effects of lighting, e.g., in museums: however, the effects of low-fluence laser radiation have not been studied much so far. This paper investigates the effects of UV laser radiation using fluences in the range of 0.1 mJ/cm 2 –1 mJ/cm 2 on a set of a secco model samples prepared with lead white and different type of binders (animal glue and whole egg, whole egg, skimmed milk, egg-oil tempera). The samples were irradiated using a Nd:YAG laser (emission wavelength at 355 nm; pulse width: 5 ns) by applying laser fluences between 0.1 mJ/cm 2 and 1 mJ/cm 2 and a number of laser pulses between 1 and 500. The samples were characterised before and after laser irradiation by using several techniques (colorimetry, optical microscopy, fibre optical reflectance spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy Attenuated Total Reflectance microscopy and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry), to detect variations in the morphological and physico-chemical properties. The results did not point out significant changes in the sample properties after irradiation in the proposed

  9. Fluence map segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenwald, J.-C.

    2008-01-01

    The lecture addressed the following topics: 'Interpreting' the fluence map; The sequencer; Reasons for difference between desired and actual fluence map; Principle of 'Step and Shoot' segmentation; Large number of solutions for given fluence map; Optimizing 'step and shoot' segmentation; The interdigitation constraint; Main algorithms; Conclusions on segmentation algorithms (static mode); Optimizing intensity levels and monitor units; Sliding window sequencing; Synchronization to avoid the tongue-and-groove effect; Accounting for physical characteristics of MLC; Importance of corrections for leaf transmission and offset; Accounting for MLC mechanical constraints; The 'complexity' factor; Incorporating the sequencing into optimization algorithm; Data transfer to the treatment machine; Interface between R and V and accelerator; and Conclusions on fluence map segmentation (Segmentation is part of the overall inverse planning procedure; 'Step and Shoot' and 'Dynamic' options are available for most TPS (depending on accelerator model; The segmentation phase tends to come into the optimization loop; The physical characteristics of the MLC have a large influence on final dose distribution; The IMRT plans (MU and relative dose distribution) must be carefully validated). (P.A.)

  10. Low dose/low fluence ionizing radiation-induced biological effects: The role of intercellular communication and oxidative metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzam, Edouard

    Mechanistic investigations have been considered critical to understanding the health risks of exposure to ionizing radiation. To gain greater insight in the biological effects of exposure to low dose/low fluence space radiations with different linear energy transfer (LET) properties, we examined short and long-term biological responses to energetic protons and high charge (Z) and high energy (E) ions (HZE particles) in human cells maintained in culture and in targeted and non-targeted tissues of irradiated rodents. Particular focus of the studies has been on mod-ulation of gene expression, proliferative capacity, induction of DNA damage and perturbations in oxidative metabolism. Exposure to mean doses of 1000 MeV/nucleon iron ions, by which a small to moderate proportion of cells in an exposed population is targeted through the nucleus by an HZE particle, induced stressful effects in the irradiated and non-irradiated cells in the population. Direct intercellular communication via gap-junctions was a primary mediator of the propagation of stressful effects from irradiated to non-irradiated cells. Compromised prolif-erative capacity, elevated level of DNA damage and oxidative stress evaluated by measurements of protein carbonylation, lipid peroxidation and activity of metabolic enzymes persisted in the progeny of irradiated and non-irradiated cells. In contrast, progeny of cells exposed to high or low doses from 150-1000 MeV protons retained the ability to form colonies and harbored similar levels of micronuclei, a surrogate form of DNA damage, as control, which correlated with normal reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Importantly, a significant increase in the spontaneous neoplastic transformation frequency was observed in progeny of bystander mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) co-cultured with MEFs irradiated with energetic iron ions but not protons. Of particular significance, stressful effects were detected in non-targeted tissues of rats that received partial

  11. Neutron fluence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    For research reactor work dealing with such subjects as radiation effects on solids and such disciplines as radiochemistry and radiobiology, the radiation dose or neutron fluence is an essential parameter in evaluating results. Unfortunately it is very difficult to determine. Even when the measurements have been accurate, it is difficult to compare results obtained in different experiments because present methods do not always reflect the dependence of spectra or of different types of radiation on the induced processes. After considering the recommendations of three IAEA Panels, on 'In-pile dosimetry' held in July 1964, on 'Neutron fluence measurements' in October 1965, and on 'In-pile dosimetry' in November 1966, the Agency established a Working Group on Reactor Radiation Measurements. This group consisted of eleven experts from ten different Member States and two staff members of the Agency. In the measurement of energy absorbed by materials from neutrons and gamma rays, there are various reports and reviews scattered throughout the literature. The group, however, considered that the time was ripe for all relevant information to be evaluated and gathered together in the form of a practical guide, with the aim of promoting consistency in the measurement and reporting of reactor radiation. The group arranged for the material to be divided into two manuals, which are expected to be useful both for experienced workers and for beginners

  12. Test measurements on a secco white-lead containing model samples to assess the effects of exposure to low-fluence UV laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, Valentina; Andreotti, Alessia; Colombini, Maria Perla; Cucci, Costanza; Cuzman, Oana; Galeotti, Monica; Lognoli, David; Palombi, Lorenzo; Picollo, Marcello; Tiano, Piero

    2015-05-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence technique is widely used for diagnostic purposes in several applications and its use could be of advantage for non-invasive on-site characterisation of pigments or other compounds in wall paintings. However, it is well known that long-time exposure to UV and VIS radiation can cause damage to wall paintings. Several studies have investigated the effects of lighting, e.g., in museums: however, the effects of low-fluence laser radiation have not been studied much so far. This paper investigates the effects of UV laser radiation using fluences in the range of 0.1 mJ/cm2-1 mJ/cm2 on a set of a secco model samples prepared with lead white and different type of binders (animal glue and whole egg, whole egg, skimmed milk, egg-oil tempera). The samples were irradiated using a Nd:YAG laser (emission wavelength at 355 nm; pulse width: 5 ns) by applying laser fluences between 0.1 mJ/cm2 and 1 mJ/cm2 and a number of laser pulses between 1 and 500. The samples were characterised before and after laser irradiation by using several techniques (colorimetry, optical microscopy, fibre optical reflectance spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy Attenuated Total Reflectance microscopy and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry), to detect variations in the morphological and physico-chemical properties. The results did not point out significant changes in the sample properties after irradiation in the proposed range of laser fluences.

  13. Determination of neutron fluence and radiation brittleness temperature of WWER-440 and WWER-1000 pressure vessels in Kozloduy NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilieva, K.; Apostolov, T.; Belousov, S.; Petrova, T.; Antonov, S.; Ivanov, K.; Prodanova, R.

    1993-01-01

    In Units 1-4 of Kozloduy NPP (WWER-440/230), the weld 4 of RPV undergoes the most severe irradiation embrittlement. Neither witness-samples, nor detectors are designed for these reactors. Transport calculations of fast neutron fluence on WWER-440 RPV and ex-vessel measurements by threshold activation detectors are the primary means for adequate assessment of metal state and for prognosis concerning the reactor life span. In WWER-1000 reactors (Units 5-6) the maximum neutron fluence occurs on the weld 3. The systematical observation of metal state is performed through witness-samples and threshold activation detectors ( 54 Fe (n,p), 63 Cu (n,α), 93 Nb (n,n')) placed above the reactor top edge and at the first vessel ring level. There are big differences in energy spectrum and integral neutron flux falling onto the weld 3, the RPV base metal and the staff detectors. This requires additional neutron measurements in the air gap between the RPV and the thermal insulation. (author)

  14. Radiation annealing mechanisms of low-alloy reactor pressure vessel steels dependent on irradiation temperature and neutron fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pachur, D.

    1982-01-01

    Heat treatment after irradiation of reactor pressure vessel steels showed annealing of irradiation embrittlement. Depending on the irradiation temperature, the embrittlement started to anneal at about 220 0 C and was completely annealed at 500 0 C with 4 h of annealing time. The annealing behavior was normally measured in terms of the Vickers hardness increase produced by irradiation relative to the initial hardness as a function of the annealing temperature. Annealing results of other mechanical properties correspond to hardness results. During annealing, various recovery mechanisms occur in different temperature ranges. These are characterized by activation energies from 1.5 to 2.1 eV. The individual mechanisms were determined by the different time dependencies at various temperatures. The relative contributions of the mechanisms showed a neutron fluence dependence, with the lower activation energy mechanisms being predominant at low fluence and vice versa. In the temperature range where partial annealing of a mechanism took place during irradiation, an increase in activation energy was observed. Trend curves for the increase in transition temperature with irradiation, for the relative increase of Vickers hardness and yield strength, and for the relative decrease of Charpy-V upper shelf energy are interpreted by the behavior of different mechanisms

  15. Pneumatic radiator of transition radiation for large working area arrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikhlyarov, K.K.; Gavalyan, V.G.

    1993-01-01

    An unconventional approach to the constructions of large area regular radiator of X-rays transition radiation is proposed based on the use of a pack of hermetically sealed bags, in which elastic helium layers are formed. A prototype of such a radiator of about 1m 2 area was made for test of the proposed device. 9 refs

  16. Phototransistor response under a neutron fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Luiz A.P.; Barros, Fabio R.; Ursulino, Luciano C.; Silva Junior, Eronides F.; Antonio Filho, Joao

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this communication is to show some effects on a bipolar phototransistor after it has been under a neutron fluence. Unlike a transistor, a phototransistor is designed so that the collector has a large area and consequently it has a higher radiation detection probability. Then, it is possible to have a certain number of interactions so that any changes in the internal structure of the phototransistor can be observed after a neutron irradiation. If a phototransistor is under a certain spectra of neutron fluence the interaction depends on the cross section of the either silicon chip or its encapsulation, and recoil protons could be the charged particle responsible for changes in the semiconductor structure. Furthermore, neutron irradiation could give to the device a state of vanishing in its electrical characteristic which can be performed tracing the current versus voltage curve (I x V). The experimental arrangement basically consists of a photonic device, a neutron-gamma radiation source and a Flip-Flop electrometer second generation (EFF-2G). One of the main parameters of evaluation was the phototransistor dark current. In fact, the first results demonstrate that when the phototransistor is neutron irradiated there is a significant variation in its I x V characteristic curve. (author)

  17. Deuterons at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: Conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, effective dose and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, K.; Parker, D. E.; Friedberg, W.

    2011-01-01

    Conversion coefficients were calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-equivalent dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent for isotropic exposure of an adult female and an adult male to deuterons ( 2 H + ) in the energy range 10 MeV -1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). Coefficients were calculated using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.C and BodyBuilder TM 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms. Phantoms were modified to allow calculation of the effective dose to a Reference Person using tissues and tissue weighting factors from 1990 and 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Coefficients for the equivalent and effective dose incorporated a radiation weighting factor of 2. At 15 of 19 energies for which coefficients for the effective dose were calculated, coefficients based on ICRP 1990 and 2007 recommendations differed by < 3 %. The greatest difference, 47 %, occurred at 30 MeV. (authors)

  18. IMRT fluence map editing to control hot and cold spots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor Cook, J.; Tobler, Matt; Leavitt, Dennis D.; Watson, Gordon

    2005-01-01

    Manually editing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fluence maps effectively controls hot and cold spots that the IMRT optimization cannot control. Many times, re-optimizing does not reduce the hot spots or increase the cold spots. In fact, re-optimizing only places the hot and cold spots in different locations. Fluence-map editing provides manual control of dose delivery and provides the best treatment plan possible. Several IMRT treatments were planned using the Varian Eclipse planning system. We compare the effects on dose distributions between fluence-map editing and re-optimization, discuss techniques for fluence-map editing, and analyze differences between fluence editing on one beam vs. multiple beams. When editing a beam's fluence map, it is essential to choose a beam that least affects dose to the tumor and critical structures. Editing fluence maps gives an advantage in treatment planning and provides controlled delivery of IMRT dose

  19. Tritons at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: Conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, effective dose, and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, K.; Parker, D. E.; Friedberg, W.

    2010-01-01

    Conversion coefficients were calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-equivalent dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent for isotropic exposure of an adult female and an adult male to tritons ( 3 H + ) in the energy range of 10 MeV to 1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). Coefficients were calculated using Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.C and BodyBuilder TM 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms. Phantoms were modified to allow calculation of effective dose to a Reference Person using tissues and tissue weighting factors from 1990 and 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and calculation of gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. At 15 of the 19 energies for which coefficients for effective dose were calculated, coefficients based on ICRP 2007 and 1990 recommendations differed by less than 3%. The greatest difference, 43%, occurred at 30 MeV. Published by Oxford Univ. Press on behalf of the US Government 2010. (authors)

  20. Helions at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: Conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, effective dose and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, K.; Parker, D. E.; Friedberg, W.

    2010-01-01

    Conversion coefficients were calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-equivalent dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent, for isotropic exposure of an adult male and an adult female to helions ( 3 He 2+ ) in the energy range of 10 MeV to 1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). Calculations were performed using Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.C and BodyBuilder TM 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms modified to allow calculation of effective dose using tissues and tissue weighting factors from either the 1990 or 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. At 15 of the 19 energies for which coefficients for effective dose were calculated, coefficients based on ICRP 2007 and 1990 recommendations differed by less than 2%. The greatest difference, 62%, occurred at 100 MeV. Published by Oxford Univ. Press on behalf of the U.S. Government 2010. (authors)

  1. Treatment of melasma with low fluence, large spot size, 1064-nm Q-switched neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser for the treatment of melasma in Fitzpatrick skin types II-IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Alia S; Hussain, Mussarat; Goldberg, David J

    2011-12-01

    Melasma is a common condition affecting over six million American women. Treatment of dermal or combined melasma is difficult and does not respond well to conventional topical therapies. Various light sources have been used recently in the treatment of melasma including fractionated ablative and non-ablative lasers as well as intense pulse light. We report the use of low fluence, large spot size Q-switched, Nd:Yag laser for the treatment of melasma in skin types II-IV.

  2. Large numbers hypothesis. II - Electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    This paper develops the theory of electromagnetic radiation in the units covariant formalism incorporating Dirac's large numbers hypothesis (LNH). A direct field-to-particle technique is used to obtain the photon propagation equation which explicitly involves the photon replication rate. This replication rate is fixed uniquely by requiring that the form of a free-photon distribution function be preserved, as required by the 2.7 K cosmic radiation. One finds that with this particular photon replication rate the units covariant formalism developed in Paper I actually predicts that the ratio of photon number to proton number in the universe varies as t to the 1/4, precisely in accord with LNH. The cosmological red-shift law is also derived and it is shown to differ considerably from the standard form of (nu)(R) - const.

  3. Integration of radiation and physical safety in large radiator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, P.P.M.; Benedito, A.M.; Lima, C.M.A.; Silva, F.C.A. da

    2017-01-01

    Growing international concern about radioactive sources after the Sept. 11, 2001 event has led to a strengthening of physical safety. There is evidence that the illicit use of radioactive sources is a real possibility and may result in harmful radiological consequences for the population and the environment. In Brazil there are about 2000 medical, industrial and research facilities with radioactive sources, of which 400 are Category 1 and 2 classified by the - International Atomic Energy Agency - AIEA, where large irradiators occupy a prominent position due to the very high cobalt-60 activities. The radiological safety is well established in these facilities, due to the intense work of the authorities in the Country. In the paper the main aspects on radiological and physical safety applied in the large radiators are presented, in order to integrate both concepts for the benefit of the safety as a whole. The research showed that the items related to radiation safety are well defined, for example, the tests on the access control devices to the irradiation room. On the other hand, items related to physical security, such as effective control of access to the company, use of safety cameras throughout the company, are not yet fully incorporated. Integration of radiation and physical safety is fundamental for total safety. The elaboration of a Brazilian regulation on the subject is of extreme importance

  4. Estimates of neutron fluence for the SDC detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Job, P.K.; Price, L.E.; Handler, T.; Gabriel, T.A.

    1994-01-01

    The high energy and high luminosity of SSC cause radiation problems to detectors. Almost all the radiation in the SDC detector comes from the 20 TeV on 20 TeV pp collisions. The design luminosity corresponds to 10 8 collisions per second. This luminosity is maintained for 10 7 seconds (one SSC year). It is important to know the radiation fields experienced by the tracking volume, calorimeter, electronics and the phototubes. The loss of light due to the radiation damage to the scintillators can adversely affect the physics performance of the calorimeter. Studies have been carried out earlier to estimate the radiation dose in the SDC detector. In this note the authors use ISAJET in combination with CALOR89 to make an accurate prediction of neutron fluence at the various locations of the SDC detector. The low energy neutrons are important because they can produce radioactive nuclides in large quantities. In CALOR89 the low energy neutron fluence is accurately estimated by MORSE code

  5. Studies for improvement of WWER-440 neutron fluence determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilieva, Kr.; Belousov, S.; Apostolov, T.

    2001-01-01

    For assessment of radiation embrittlement and prediction of reactor vessel lifetime with reasonable conservatism a 'best estimated' neutron fluence is necessary. New studies purposed to improve the fluence determination are presented: 1) study on the reliability of multigroup presentation of the neutron cross sections, and 2) impact of negative gradient of reactor power in the periphery assemblies on the neutron fluence evaluation. The results of these studies are base for improvement of neutron fluence determination methodology applied by the INRNE, BAS at Kozloduy NPP. (author)

  6. Stereotactic radiation therapy for large vestibular schwannomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandl, Ellen S.; Meijer, Otto W.M.; Slotman, Ben J.; Vandertop, W. Peter; Peerdeman, Saskia M.

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the morbidity and tumor-control rate in the treatment of large vestibular schwannomas (VS) after stereotactic radiation therapy in our institution. Material and methods: Twenty-five consecutive patients (17 men, 8 women) with large VS (diameter 3.0 cm or larger), treated with stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) between 1992 and 2007, were retrospectively studied after a mean follow-up period of three years with respect to tumor-control rate and complications. Results: Actuarial 5-year maintenance of pre-treatment hearing level probability of 30% was achieved. Five of 17 patients suffered permanent new facial nerve dysfunction. The actuarial 5-year facial nerve preservation probability was 80%. Permanent new trigeminal nerve neuropathy occurred in two of 15 patients, resulting in an actuarial 5-year trigeminal nerve preservation probability of 85%. Tumor progression occurred in four of 25 (16%) patients. The overall 5-year tumor control probability was 82%. Conclusion: Increased morbidity rates were found in patients with large VS treated with SRT or SRS compared to the published series on regular sized VS and other smaller retrospective studies on large VS.

  7. Laser-induced plasma from pure and doped water-ice at high fluence by ultraviolet and infrared radiation - art. no. 70050X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Matei, A.; Rodrigo, Katarzyna Agnieszka

    2008-01-01

    Ice made of ultrapure water or water doped with 1 % polymer (polyethylene glycol, "PEG") was irradiated by laser light with fluences between 2 and 80 J/cm(2) in the ultraviolet (UV) regime at 355 nm and in the infrared (IR) regime at 1064 nm in vacuum. In the UV regime there is a threshold for pl...... of ionization breakdown at the ice surface....

  8. Spectral distribution of particle fluence in small field detectors and its implication on small field dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmakhlouf, Hamza; Andreo, Pedro

    2017-02-01

    Correction factors for the relative dosimetry of narrow megavoltage photon beams have recently been determined in several publications. These corrections are required because of the several small-field effects generally thought to be caused by the lack of lateral charged particle equilibrium (LCPE) in narrow beams. Correction factors for relative dosimetry are ultimately necessary to account for the fluence perturbation caused by the detector. For most small field detectors the perturbation depends on field size, resulting in large correction factors when the field size is decreased. In this work, electron and photon fluence differential in energy will be calculated within the radiation sensitive volume of a number of small field detectors for 6 MV linear accelerator beams. The calculated electron spectra will be used to determine electron fluence perturbation as a function of field size and its implication on small field dosimetry analyzed. Fluence spectra were calculated with the user code PenEasy, based on the PENELOPE Monte Carlo system. The detectors simulated were one liquid ionization chamber, two air ionization chambers, one diamond detector, and six silicon diodes, all manufactured either by PTW or IBA. The spectra were calculated for broad (10 cm × 10 cm) and narrow (0.5 cm × 0.5 cm) photon beams in order to investigate the field size influence on the fluence spectra and its resulting perturbation. The photon fluence spectra were used to analyze the impact of absorption and generation of photons. These will have a direct influence on the electrons generated in the detector radiation sensitive volume. The electron fluence spectra were used to quantify the perturbation effects and their relation to output correction factors. The photon fluence spectra obtained for all detectors were similar to the spectrum in water except for the shielded silicon diodes. The photon fluence in the latter group was strongly influenced, mostly in the low-energy region, by

  9. Investigating multi-objective fluence and beam orientation IMRT optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potrebko, Peter S.; Fiege, Jason; Biagioli, Matthew; Poleszczuk, Jan

    2017-07-01

    Radiation Oncology treatment planning requires compromises to be made between clinical objectives that are invariably in conflict. It would be beneficial to have a ‘bird’s-eye-view’ perspective of the full spectrum of treatment plans that represent the possible trade-offs between delivering the intended dose to the planning target volume (PTV) while optimally sparing the organs-at-risk (OARs). In this work, the authors demonstrate Pareto-aware radiotherapy evolutionary treatment optimization (PARETO), a multi-objective tool featuring such bird’s-eye-view functionality, which optimizes fluence patterns and beam angles for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning. The problem of IMRT treatment plan optimization is managed as a combined monolithic problem, where all beam fluence and angle parameters are treated equally during the optimization. To achieve this, PARETO is built around a powerful multi-objective evolutionary algorithm, called Ferret, which simultaneously optimizes multiple fitness functions that encode the attributes of the desired dose distribution for the PTV and OARs. The graphical interfaces within PARETO provide useful information such as: the convergence behavior during optimization, trade-off plots between the competing objectives, and a graphical representation of the optimal solution database allowing for the rapid exploration of treatment plan quality through the evaluation of dose-volume histograms and isodose distributions. PARETO was evaluated for two relatively complex clinical cases, a paranasal sinus and a pancreas case. The end result of each PARETO run was a database of optimal (non-dominated) treatment plans that demonstrated trade-offs between the OAR and PTV fitness functions, which were all equally good in the Pareto-optimal sense (where no one objective can be improved without worsening at least one other). Ferret was able to produce high quality solutions even though a large number of parameters

  10. Radiation Response of Forward Biased Float Zone and Magnetic Czochralski Silicon Detectors of Different Geometry for 1-MeV Neutron Equivalent Fluence Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Mekki, J; Dusseau, Laurent; Roche, Nicolas Jean-Henri; Saigne, Frederic; Mekki, Julien; Glaser, Maurice

    2010-01-01

    Aiming at evaluating new options for radiation monitoring sensors in LHC/SLHC experiments, the radiation responses of FZ and MCz custom made silicon detectors of different geometry have been studied up to about 4 x 10(14) n(eq)/cm(2). The radiation response of the devices under investigation is discussed in terms of material type, thickness and active area influence.

  11. Radiation protection in large linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliva, Jose de Jesus Rivero

    2013-01-01

    The electron linear accelerators can be used in industrial applications that require powerful sources of ionizing radiation. They have the important characteristic of not representing a radiation hazard when the accelerators remain electrically disconnected. With the plant in operation, a high reliability defense in depth reduces the risk of radiological accidents to extremely small levels. It is practically impossible that a person could enter into the radiation bunker with the accelerators connected. Aceletron Irradiacao Industrial, located in Rio de Janeiro, offers services of irradiation by means of two powerful electron linear accelerators, with 15 kW power and 10 MeV electron energy. Despite the high level of existing radiation safety, a simplified risk study is underway to identify possible sequences of radiological accidents. The study is based on the combined application of the event and fault trees techniques. Preliminary results confirm that there is a very small risk of entering into the irradiation bunker with the accelerators in operation, but the risk of an operator entering into the bunker during a process interruption and remaining there without notice after the accelerators were restarted may be considerably larger. Based on these results the Company is considering alternatives to reduce the likelihood of human error of this type that could lead to a radiological accident. The paper describes the defense in depth of the irradiation process in Aceletron Irradiacao Industrial, as well as the models and preliminary results of the ongoing risk analysis, including the additional safety measures which are being evaluated. (author)

  12. Fluence determination by scattering measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Albergo, S; Potenza, R; Tricomi, A; Pillon, M; Angarano, M M; Creanza, D; De Palma, M

    2000-01-01

    An alternative method to determine particle fluence is proposed, which is particularly suitable for irradiations with low-energy charged-particle beams. The fluence is obtained by measuring the elastic scattering produced by a composite thin target placed upstream of the sample. The absolute calibration is performed by comparison with the measured radioactivation of vanadium and copper samples. The composite thin target, made of aluminium, carbon and gold, allows not only the fluence to be measured, but also a continuous monitoring of the beam space distribution. Experimental results with a 27 MeV proton beam are reported and compared with Monte Carlo simulations. (7 refs).

  13. Comparison of sources of exit fluence variation for IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, Joseph K; Gordon, J James; Wang Song; Siebers, Jeffrey V; Clews, Luke; Greer, Peter B

    2009-01-01

    The fluence exiting a patient during beam delivery can be used as treatment delivery quality assurance, either by direct comparison with expected exit fluences or by backprojection to reconstruct the patient dose. Multiple possible sources of measured exit fluence deviations exist, including changes in the beam delivery and changes in the patient anatomy. The purpose of this work is to compare the deviations caused by these sources. Machine delivery-related variability is measured by acquiring multiple dosimetric portal images (DPIs) of several test fields without a patient/phantom in the field over a time period of 2 months. Patient anatomy-related sources of fluence variability are simulated by computing transmission DPIs for a prostate patient using the same incident fluence for 11 different computed tomography (CT) images of the patient anatomy. The standard deviation (SD) and maximum deviation of the exit fluence, averaged over 5 mm x 5 mm square areas, is calculated for each test set. Machine delivery fluence SDs as large as 1% are observed for a sample patient field and as large as 2.5% for a picket-fence dMLC test field. Simulations indicate that day-to-day patient anatomy variations induce exit fluence SDs as large as 3.5%. The largest observed machine delivery deviations are 4% for the sample patient field and 7% for the picket-fence field, while the largest difference for the patient anatomy-related source is 8.5%. Since daily changes in patient anatomy can result in substantial exit fluence deviations, care should be taken when applying fluence back-projection to ensure that such deviations are properly attributed to their source. (note)

  14. ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker - large piece

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The ATLAS transition radiation tracker is made of 300'000 straw tubes, up to 144cm long. Filled with a gas mixture and threaded with a wire, each straw is a complete mini-detector in its own right. An electric field is applied between the wire and the outside wall of the straw. As particles pass through, they collide with atoms in the gas, knocking out electrons. The avalanche of electrons is detected as an electrical signal on the wire in the centre. The tracker plays two important roles. Firstly, it makes more position measurements, giving more dots for the computers to join up to recreate the particle tracks. Also, together with the ATLAS calorimeters, it distinguishes between different types of particles depending on whether they emit radiation as they make the transition from the surrounding foil into the straws.

  15. Fluence complexity for IMRT field and simplification of IMRT verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanushova, Tereza; Vondarchek, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) requires dosimetric verification of each patient’s plan, which is time consuming. This work deals with the idea of minimizing the number of fields for control, or even replacing plan verification by machine quality assurance (QA). We propose methods for estimation of fluence complexity in an IMRT field based on dose gradients and investigate the relation between results of gamma analysis and this quantity. If there is a relation, it might be possible to only verify the most complex field of a plan. We determine the average fluence complexity in clinical fields and design a test fluence corresponding to this amount of complexity which might be used in daily QA and potentially replace patient-related verification. Its applicability is assessed in clinical practice. The relation between fluence complexity and results of gamma analysis has been confirmed for plans but not for single fields. There is an agreement between the suggested test fluence and clinical fields in the average gamma parameter. A critical value of average gamma has been specified for the test fluence as a criterion for distinguishing between poorly and well deliverable plans. It will not be possible to only verify the most complex field of a plan but verification of individual plans could be replaced by a morning check of the suggested test fluence, together with a well-established set of QA tests. (Author)

  16. Probability model for worst case solar proton event fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xapsos, M.A.; Summers, G.P.; Barth, J.L.; Stassinopoulos, E.G.; Burke, E.A.

    1999-01-01

    The effects that solar proton events have on microelectronics and solar arrays are important considerations for spacecraft in geostationary orbits, polar orbits and on interplanetary missions. A predictive model of worst case solar proton event fluences is presented. It allows the expected worst case event fluence to be calculated for a given confidence level and for periods of time corresponding to space missions. The proton energy range is from >1 to >300 MeV, so that the model is useful for a variety of radiation effects applications. For each proton energy threshold, the maximum entropy principle is used to select the initial distribution of solar proton event fluences. This turns out to be a truncated power law, i.e., a power law for smaller event fluences that smoothly approaches zero at a maximum fluence. The strong agreement of the distribution with satellite data for the last three solar cycles indicates this description captures the essential features of a solar proton event fluence distribution. Extreme value theory is then applied to the initial distribution of events to obtain the model of worst case fluences

  17. Expected neutrino fluence from short Gamma-Ray Burst 170817A and off-axis angle constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biehl, D.; Heinze, J.; Winter, W.

    2018-05-01

    We compute the expected neutrino fluence from SGRB 170817A, associated with the gravitational wave event GW 170817, directly based on Fermi observations in two scenarios: structured jet and off-axis (observed) top-hat jet. While the expected neutrino fluence for the structured jet case is very small, large off-axis angles imply high radiation densities in the jet, which can enhance the neutrino production efficiency. In the most optimistic allowed scenario, the neutrino fluence can reach only 10-4 of the sensitivity of the neutrino telescopes. We furthermore demonstrate that the fact that gamma-rays can escape limits the baryonic loading (energy in protons versus photons) and the off-axis angle for the internal shock scenario. In particular, for a baryonic loading of 10, the off-axis angle is more strongly constrained by the baryonic loading than by the time delay between the gravitational wave event and the onset of the gamma-ray emission.

  18. Radiations: large scale monitoring in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linton, M.; Khalatbari, A.

    2011-01-01

    As the consequences of radioactive leaks on their health are a matter of concern for Japanese people, a large scale epidemiological study has been launched by the Fukushima medical university. It concerns the two millions inhabitants of the Fukushima Prefecture. On the national level and with the support of public funds, medical care and follow-up, as well as systematic controls are foreseen, notably to check the thyroid of 360.000 young people less than 18 year old and of 20.000 pregnant women in the Fukushima Prefecture. Some measurements have already been performed on young children. Despite the sometimes rather low measures, and because they know that some parts of the area are at least as much contaminated as it was the case around Chernobyl, some people are reluctant to go back home

  19. The development report of an intelligent neutron fluence integration monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Zongbing; Wei Ying

    1996-10-01

    An intelligent neutron fluence integration monitor is introduced. It is used to measure the received neutron fluence of the monocrystalline silicon in reactor radiation channel. The significance of study and specifications of the instrument are briefly described. The emphasis is on the working principle, structure and characteristics of the instrument is intelligent due to use of monolithic microcomputer. It has many advantages proved in the actual practice, such as powerful function, high accuracy, diversity of application, high level automatization, easy to operate, high reliability, etc. After using this instrument the monocrystalline silicon radiation technology is improved and the efficiency of production is raised. (1 fig.)

  20. Dependence of the absorption of pulsed CO2-laser radiation by silane on wavenumber, fluence, pulse duration, temperature, optical path length, and pressure of absorbing and nonabsorbing gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blazejowski, J.; Gruzdiewa, L.; Rulewski, J.; Lampe, F.W.

    1995-01-01

    The absorption of three lines [P(20), 944.2 cm -1 ; P(14), 949.2 cm -1 ; and R(24), 978.5 cm -1 ] of the pulsed CO 2 laser (00 0 1--10 0 0 transition) by SiH 4 was measured at various pulse energy, pulse duration, temperature, optical path length, and pressure of the compound and nonabsorbing foreign gases. In addition, low intensity infrared absorption spectrum of silane was compared with high intensity absorption characteristics for all lines of the pulsed CO 2 laser. The experimental dependencies show deviations from the phenomenological Beer--Lambert law which can be considered as arising from the high intensity of an incident radiation and collisions of absorbing molecules with surroundings. These effects were included into the expression, being an extended form of the Beer--Lambert law, which reasonably approximates all experimental data. The results, except for extending knowledge on the interaction of a high power laser radiation with matter, can help understanding and planning processes leading to preparation of silicon-containing technologically important materials

  1. Charged particle mutagenesis at low dose and fluence in mouse splenic T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grygoryev, Dmytro [Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239 (United States); Gauny, Stacey [Biological Systems and Engineering Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lasarev, Michael; Ohlrich, Anna [Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239 (United States); Kronenberg, Amy [Biological Systems and Engineering Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Turker, Mitchell S., E-mail: turkerm@ohsu.edu [Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239 (United States); Molecular and Medical Genetics, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Densely ionizing forms of space radiation induce mutations in splenic T cells at low fluence. • Large interstitial deletions and discontinuous LOH patterns are radiation signature mutations. • Space radiation mutagenesis suggests a cancer risk from deep space travel. - Abstract: High-energy heavy charged particles (HZE ions) found in the deep space environment can significantly affect human health by inducing mutations and related cancers. To better understand the relation between HZE ion exposure and somatic mutation, we examined cell survival fraction, Aprt mutant frequencies, and the types of mutations detected for mouse splenic T cells exposed in vivo to graded doses of densely ionizing {sup 48}Ti ions (1 GeV/amu, LET = 107 keV/μm), {sup 56}Fe ions (1 GeV/amu, LET = 151 keV/μm) ions, or sparsely ionizing protons (1 GeV, LET = 0.24 keV/μm). The lowest doses for {sup 48}Ti and {sup 56}Fe ions were equivalent to a fluence of approximately 1 or 2 particle traversals per nucleus. In most cases, Aprt mutant frequencies in the irradiated mice were not significantly increased relative to the controls for any of the particles or doses tested at the pre-determined harvest time (3–5 months after irradiation). Despite the lack of increased Aprt mutant frequencies in the irradiated splenocytes, a molecular analysis centered on chromosome 8 revealed the induction of radiation signature mutations (large interstitial deletions and complex mutational patterns), with the highest levels of induction at 2 particles nucleus for the {sup 48}Ti and {sup 56}Fe ions. In total, the results show that densely ionizing HZE ions can induce characteristic mutations in splenic T cells at low fluence, and that at least a subset of radiation-induced mutant cells are stably retained despite the apparent lack of increased mutant frequencies at the time of harvest.

  2. Radiation protection in category III large gamma irradiators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Neivaldo; Furlan, Gilberto Ribeiro; Itepan, Natanael Marcio

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses the advantages of category III large gamma irradiator compared to the others, with emphasis on aspects of radiological protection, in the industrial sector. This category is a kind of irradiators almost unknown to the regulators authorities and the industrial community, despite its simple construction and greater radiation safety intrinsic to the model, able to maintain an efficiency of productivity comparable to those of category IV. Worldwide, there are installed more than 200 category IV irradiators and there is none of a category III irradiator in operation. In a category III gamma irradiator, the source remains fixed in the bottom of the tank, always shielded by water, negating the exposition risk. Taking into account the benefits in relation to radiation safety, the category III large irradiators are highly recommended for industrial, commercial purposes or scientific research. (author)

  3. Isotopic dependence of GCR fluence behind shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Saganti, Premkumar; Hu, Xiaodong; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Cleghorn, Timothy; Zeitlin, Cary; Tripathi, Ram K.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we consider the effects of the isotopic composition of the primary galactic cosmic rays (GCR), nuclear fragmentation cross sections, and isotopic-grid on the solution to transport models used for shielding studies. Satellite measurements are used to describe the isotopic composition of the GCR. For the nuclear interaction data-base and transport solution, we use the quantum multiple scattering theory of nuclear fragmentation (QMSFRG) and high-charge and energy (HZETRN) transport code, respectively. The QMSFRG model is shown to accurately describe existing fragmentation data including proper description of the odd-even effects as function of the iso-spin dependence on the projectile nucleus. The principle finding of this study is that large errors (±100%) will occur in the mass-fluence spectra when comparing transport models that use a complete isotopic-grid (∼170 ions) to ones that use a reduced isotopic-grid, for example the 59 ion-grid used in the HZETRN code in the past; however, less significant errors (<+/-20%) occur in the elemental-fluence spectra. Because a complete isotopic-grid is readily handled on small computer workstations and is needed for several applications studying GCR propagation and scattering, it is recommended that they be used for future GCR studies

  4. Measured Thermal and Fast Neutron Fluence Rates for ATF-1 Holders During ATR Cycle 157D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Larry Don [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Miller, David Torbet [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>1MeV) neutron fluence rate data for the ATF-1 holders located in core for ATR Cycle 157D which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML) as requested by the Power Reactor Programs (ATR Experiments) Radiation Measurements Work Order. This report contains measurements of the fluence rates corresponding to the particular elevations relative to the 80-ft. core elevation. The data in this report consist of (1) a table of the ATR power history and distribution, (2) a hard copy listing of all thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, and (3) plots of both the thermal and fast neutron fluence rates. The fluence rates reported are for the average power levels given in the table of power history and distribution.

  5. Comprehensive fluence model for absolute portal dose image prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chytyk, K.; McCurdy, B. M. C.

    2009-01-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) continue to be investigated as treatment verification tools, with a particular focus on intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). This verification could be accomplished through a comparison of measured portal images to predicted portal dose images. A general fluence determination tailored to portal dose image prediction would be a great asset in order to model the complex modulation of IMRT. A proposed physics-based parameter fluence model was commissioned by matching predicted EPID images to corresponding measured EPID images of multileaf collimator (MLC) defined fields. The two-source fluence model was composed of a focal Gaussian and an extrafocal Gaussian-like source. Specific aspects of the MLC and secondary collimators were also modeled (e.g., jaw and MLC transmission factors, MLC rounded leaf tips, tongue and groove effect, interleaf leakage, and leaf offsets). Several unique aspects of the model were developed based on the results of detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the linear accelerator including (1) use of a non-Gaussian extrafocal fluence source function, (2) separate energy spectra used for focal and extrafocal fluence, and (3) different off-axis energy spectra softening used for focal and extrafocal fluences. The predicted energy fluence was then convolved with Monte Carlo generated, EPID-specific dose kernels to convert incident fluence to dose delivered to the EPID. Measured EPID data were obtained with an a-Si EPID for various MLC-defined fields (from 1x1 to 20x20 cm 2 ) over a range of source-to-detector distances. These measured profiles were used to determine the fluence model parameters in a process analogous to the commissioning of a treatment planning system. The resulting model was tested on 20 clinical IMRT plans, including ten prostate and ten oropharyngeal cases. The model predicted the open-field profiles within 2%, 2 mm, while a mean of 96.6% of pixels over all

  6. Large single-crystal diamond substrates for ionizing radiation detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girolami, Marco; Bellucci, Alessandro; Calvani, Paolo; Trucchi, Daniele M. [Istituto di Struttura della Materia (ISM), Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Sede Secondaria di Montelibretti, Monterotondo Stazione, Roma (Italy)

    2016-10-15

    The need for large active volume detectors for ionizing radiations and particles, with both large area and thickness, is becoming more and more compelling in a wide range of applications, spanning from X-ray dosimetry to neutron spectroscopy. Recently, 8.0 x 8.0 mm{sup 2} wide and 1.2 mm thick single-crystal diamond plates have been put on the market, representing a first step to the fabrication of large area monolithic diamond detectors with optimized charge transport properties, obtainable up to now only with smaller samples. The more-than-double thickness, if compared to standard plates (typically 500 μm thick), demonstrated to be effective in improving the detector response to highly penetrating ionizing radiations, such as γ-rays. Here we report on the first measurements performed on large active volume single-crystal diamond plates, both in the dark and under irradiation with optical wavelengths (190-1100 nm), X-rays, and radioactive γ-emitting sources ({sup 57}Co and {sup 22}Na). (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Application of large radiation sources in chemical processing industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurthy, K.

    1977-01-01

    Large radiation sources and their application in chemical processing industry are described. A reference has also been made to the present developments in this field in India. Radioactive sources, notably 60 Co, are employed in production of wood-plastic and concrete-polymer composites, vulcanised rubbers, polymers, sulfochlorinated paraffin hydrocarbons and in a number of other applications which require deep penetration and high reliability of source. Machine sources of electrons are used in production of heat shrinkable plastics, insulation materials for cables, curing of paints etc. Radiation sources have also been used for sewage hygienisation. As for the scene in India, 60 Co sources, gamma chambers and batch irradiators are manufactured. A list of the on-going R and D projects and organisations engaged in research in this field is given. (M.G.B.)

  8. Nonlocal ultrafast magnetization dynamics in the high fluence limit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, K.C.; Malinowski, G.; Dalla Longa, F.; Koopmans, B.

    2011-01-01

    In order to explain a number of recent experimental observations of laser-induced femtosecond demagnetization in the large fluence limit, we discuss the consequences of a recently proposed nonlocal approach. A microscopic description of spin flip scattering is implemented in an effective three

  9. Dark Radiation predictions from general Large Volume Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebecker, Arthur; Mangat, Patrick; Rompineve, Fabrizio; Witkowski, Lukas T.

    2014-09-01

    Recent observations constrain the amount of Dark Radiation (Δ N eff ) and may even hint towards a non-zero value of Δ N eff . It is by now well-known that this puts stringent constraints on the sequestered Large Volume Scenario (LVS), i.e. on LVS realisations with the Standard Model at a singularity. We go beyond this setting by considering LVS models where SM fields are realised on 7-branes in the geometric regime. As we argue, this naturally goes together with high-scale supersymmetry. The abundance of Dark Radiation is determined by the competition between the decay of the lightest modulus to axions, to the SM Higgs and to gauge fields, and leads to strict constraints on these models. Nevertheless, these constructions can in principle meet current DR bounds due to decays into gauge bosons alone. Further, a rather robust prediction for a substantial amount of Dark Radiation can be made. This applies both to cases where the SM 4-cycles are stabilised by D-terms and are small `by accident', i.e. tuning, as well as to fibred models with the small cycles stabilised by loops. In these constructions the DR axion and the QCD axion are the same field and we require a tuning of the initial misalignment to avoid Dark Matter overproduction. Furthermore, we analyse a closely related setting where the SM lives at a singularity but couples to the volume modulus through flavour branes. We conclude that some of the most natural LVS settings with natural values of model parameters lead to Dark Radiation predictions just below the present observational limits. Barring a discovery, rather modest improvements of present Dark Radiation bounds can rule out many of these most simple and generic variants of the LVS.

  10. Interior point algorithms: guaranteed optimality for fluence map optimization in IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleman, Dionne M [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King' s College Road, Toronto, ON M5S 3G8 (Canada); Glaser, Daniel [Division of Optimization and Systems Theory, Department of Mathematics, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Romeijn, H Edwin [Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2117 (United States); Dempsey, James F, E-mail: aleman@mie.utoronto.c, E-mail: romeijn@umich.ed, E-mail: jfdempsey@viewray.co [ViewRay, Inc. 2 Thermo Fisher Way, Village of Oakwood, OH 44146 (United States)

    2010-09-21

    One of the most widely studied problems of the intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning problem is the fluence map optimization (FMO) problem, the problem of determining the amount of radiation intensity, or fluence, of each beamlet in each beam. For a given set of beams, the fluences of the beamlets can drastically affect the quality of the treatment plan, and thus it is critical to obtain good fluence maps for radiation delivery. Although several approaches have been shown to yield good solutions to the FMO problem, these solutions are not guaranteed to be optimal. This shortcoming can be attributed to either optimization model complexity or properties of the algorithms used to solve the optimization model. We present a convex FMO formulation and an interior point algorithm that yields an optimal treatment plan in seconds, making it a viable option for clinical applications.

  11. Interior point algorithms: guaranteed optimality for fluence map optimization in IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleman, Dionne M; Glaser, Daniel; Romeijn, H Edwin; Dempsey, James F

    2010-01-01

    One of the most widely studied problems of the intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning problem is the fluence map optimization (FMO) problem, the problem of determining the amount of radiation intensity, or fluence, of each beamlet in each beam. For a given set of beams, the fluences of the beamlets can drastically affect the quality of the treatment plan, and thus it is critical to obtain good fluence maps for radiation delivery. Although several approaches have been shown to yield good solutions to the FMO problem, these solutions are not guaranteed to be optimal. This shortcoming can be attributed to either optimization model complexity or properties of the algorithms used to solve the optimization model. We present a convex FMO formulation and an interior point algorithm that yields an optimal treatment plan in seconds, making it a viable option for clinical applications.

  12. Role of radiation therapy in large cell lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stryker, J.A.; Bartholomew, M.J.; Beatty, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper compares the results of treatment for large cell lymphoma with use of radiation therapy (RT), chemotherapy (CT), or both. The authors retrospectively studied 142 patients with large cell lymphoma. Seventy-two has stage I or II disease and 70, stage III or IV; 37% had B symptoms. CT was used in 66 patients, RT in 22, both in 46, and surgery with or without RT or CT in eight. CT regimens were CHOP, 38 patients; C-MOPP/COPP, 25; CHOP-bleo/BACOP, 15; COP-BLAN-MEL, 8; M-BACOD, 8; COP/CVP, 5; COP-BLAM, 5; and other regimens, 12. Statistical analysis showed that age, stage B symptoms, and treatment were significant variables determining survival. In stages I and II, the 5-year survival rate with RT plus CT was 65%; with CT, 35%; and with RT, 9% (P = < .01)

  13. Protocol for Determining Ultraviolet Light Emitting Diode (UV-LED) Fluence for Microbial Inactivation Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheyrandish, Ataollah; Mohseni, Madjid; Taghipour, Fariborz

    2018-06-15

    Determining fluence is essential to derive the inactivation kinetics of microorganisms and to design ultraviolet (UV) reactors for water disinfection. UV light emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) are emerging UV sources with various advantages compared to conventional UV lamps. Unlike conventional mercury lamps, no standard method is available to determine the average fluence of the UV-LEDs, and conventional methods used to determine the fluence for UV mercury lamps are not applicable to UV-LEDs due to the relatively low power output, polychromatic wavelength, and specific radiation profile of UV-LEDs. In this study, a method was developed to determine the average fluence inside a water suspension in a UV-LED experimental setup. In this method, the average fluence was estimated by measuring the irradiance at a few points for a collimated and uniform radiation on a Petri dish surface. New correction parameters were defined and proposed, and several of the existing parameters for determining the fluence of the UV mercury lamp apparatus were revised to measure and quantify the collimation and uniformity of the radiation. To study the effect of polychromatic output and radiation profile of the UV-LEDs, two UV-LEDs with peak wavelengths of 262 and 275 nm and different radiation profiles were selected as the representatives of typical UV-LEDs applied to microbial inactivation. The proper setup configuration for microorganism inactivation studies was also determined based on the defined correction factors.

  14. Photon energy-fluence correction factor in low energy brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antunes, Paula C.G.; Yoriyaz, Hélio; Vijande, Javier; Giménez-Alventosa, Vicent; Ballester, Facundo

    2017-01-01

    The AAPM TG-43 brachytherapy dosimetry formalism has become a standard for brachytherapy dosimetry worldwide; it implicitly assumes that charged-particle equilibrium (CPE) exists for the determination of absorbed dose to water at different locations. At the time of relating dose to tissue and dose to water, or vice versa, it is usually assumed that the photon fluence in water and in tissues are practically identical, so that the absorbed dose in the two media can be related by their ratio of mass energy-absorption coefficients. The purpose of this work is to study the influence of photon energy-fluence in different media and to evaluate a proposal for energy-fluence correction factors for the conversion between dose-to-tissue (D tis ) and dose-to-water (D w ). State-of-the art Monte Carlo (MC) calculations are used to score photon fluence differential in energy in water and in various human tissues (muscle, adipose and bone) in two different codes, MCNP and PENELOPE, which in all cases include a realistic modeling of the 125 I low-energy brachytherapy seed in order to benchmark the formalism proposed. A correction is introduced that is based on the ratio of the water-to-tissue photon energy-fluences using the large-cavity theory. In this work, an efficient way to correlate absorbed dose to water and absorbed dose to tissue in brachytherapy calculations at clinically relevant distances for low-energy photon emitting seed is proposed. The energy-fluence based corrections given in this work are able to correlate absorbed dose to tissue and absorbed dose to water with an accuracy better than 0.5% in the most critical cases. (author)

  15. Photon energy-fluence correction factor in low energy brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antunes, Paula C.G.; Yoriyaz, Hélio [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Vijande, Javier; Giménez-Alventosa, Vicent; Ballester, Facundo, E-mail: pacrisguian@gmail.com [Department of Atomic, Molecular, and Nuclear Physics and Instituto de Física Corpuscular (UV-CSIC), University of Valencia (Spain)

    2017-07-01

    The AAPM TG-43 brachytherapy dosimetry formalism has become a standard for brachytherapy dosimetry worldwide; it implicitly assumes that charged-particle equilibrium (CPE) exists for the determination of absorbed dose to water at different locations. At the time of relating dose to tissue and dose to water, or vice versa, it is usually assumed that the photon fluence in water and in tissues are practically identical, so that the absorbed dose in the two media can be related by their ratio of mass energy-absorption coefficients. The purpose of this work is to study the influence of photon energy-fluence in different media and to evaluate a proposal for energy-fluence correction factors for the conversion between dose-to-tissue (D{sub tis}) and dose-to-water (D{sub w}). State-of-the art Monte Carlo (MC) calculations are used to score photon fluence differential in energy in water and in various human tissues (muscle, adipose and bone) in two different codes, MCNP and PENELOPE, which in all cases include a realistic modeling of the {sup 125}I low-energy brachytherapy seed in order to benchmark the formalism proposed. A correction is introduced that is based on the ratio of the water-to-tissue photon energy-fluences using the large-cavity theory. In this work, an efficient way to correlate absorbed dose to water and absorbed dose to tissue in brachytherapy calculations at clinically relevant distances for low-energy photon emitting seed is proposed. The energy-fluence based corrections given in this work are able to correlate absorbed dose to tissue and absorbed dose to water with an accuracy better than 0.5% in the most critical cases. (author)

  16. Possible implications of large scale radiation processing of food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagorski, Z.P.

    1990-01-01

    Large scale irradiation has been discussed in terms of the participation of processing cost in the final value of the improved product. Another factor has been taken into account and that is the saturation of the market with the new product. In the case of successful projects the participation of irradiation cost is low, and the demand for the better product is covered. A limited availability of sources makes the modest saturation of the market difficult with all food subjected to correct radiation treatment. The implementation of the preservation of food needs a decided selection of these kinds of food which comply to all conditions i.e. of acceptance by regulatory bodies, real improvement of quality and economy. The last condition prefers the possibility of use of electron beams of low energy. The best fulfilment of conditions for successful processing is observed in the group of dry food, in expensive spices in particular. (author)

  17. Possible implications of large scale radiation processing of food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagórski, Z. P.

    Large scale irradiation has been discussed in terms of the participation of processing cost in the final value of the improved product. Another factor has been taken into account and that is the saturation of the market with the new product. In the case of succesful projects the participation of irradiation cost is low, and the demand for the better product is covered. A limited availability of sources makes the modest saturation of the market difficult with all food subjected to correct radiation treatment. The implementation of the preservation of food needs a decided selection of these kinds of food which comply to all conditions i.e. of acceptance by regulatory bodies, real improvement of quality and economy. The last condition prefers the possibility of use of electron beams of low energy. The best fullfilment of conditions for succesful processing is observed in the group of dry food, in expensive spices in particular.

  18. Radiation protection at the LHC, CERN's large hadron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, K.M.; Hoefert, M.; Stevenson, G.R.

    1996-01-01

    After a brief description of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which will produce 7 TeV on 7 TeV proton collisions, some of the radiological questions it raises will be discussed. The machine will be built in the 27 km circumference ring-tunnel of an existing collider at CERN. It aims to achieve collision rates of 10 9 per second in two of its high-energy particle detectors. This requires two high-intensity beams of more than 10 14 protons each. Shielding, access control and activation in addition to the high power in the proton-proton collisions must be taken into account. The detectors and local electronics of the particle physics experiments, which will surround these collisions, will have to be radiation resistant. Some of the environmental issues raised by the project will be discussed. (author)

  19. Superconductivity in irradiated A-15 compounds at low fluences. I. Neutron-irradiated V3Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, R.; Caton, R.; Pande, C.S.

    1978-01-01

    The behavior of the superconducting transition temperature T/sub c/ of single-crystal and polycrystalline V 3 Si was investigated as a function of low-fluence neutron irradiation. It is found that the initial degradation of T/sub c/ is sample-dependent, some specimens showing no degradation in T/sub c/ up to a fluence of 2 x 10 18 n/cm 2 . This and many other earlier observations on low-fluence behavior are explained in terms of a recently proposed model of radiation damage in A-15 compounds

  20. Neutron fluence measurement in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camacho L, M.E.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of present work is to determine the fluence of neutrons in nuclear facilities using two neutron detectors designed and built at Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ), Mexico. The two neutron detectors are of the passive type, based on solid state nuclear tracks detectors (SSNTD). One of the two neutron detectors was used to determine the fluence distribution of the ports at the nuclear research reactor TRIGA Mark III, which belongs to ININ. In these facilities is important to know the neutron fluence distribution characteristic to carried out diverse kind of research activities. The second neutron detector was employed in order to carry out environmental neutron surveillance. The detector has the property to separate the thermal, intermediate and fast components of the neutron fluence. This detector was used to measure the neutron fluence at hundred points around the primary container of the first Mexican Nuclear Power plant 'Laguna Verde'. This last detector was also used to determine the neutron fluence in some points of interest, around and inside a low scattering neutron room at the 'Centro de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes' of the ININ, to know the background neutron field produced by the neutron sources used there. The design of the two neutron detector and the results obtained for each of the surveying facilities, are described in this work. (Author)

  1. Aerial radiation survey techniques for efficient characterization of large areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sydelko, T.; Riedhauser, S.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Accidental or intentional releases of radioactive isotopes over potentially very large surface areas can pose serious health risks to humans and ecological receptors. Timely and appropriate responses to these releases depend upon rapid and accurate characterization of impacted areas. These characterization efforts can be adversely impacted by heavy vegetation, rugged terrain, urban environments, and the presence of unknown levels of radioactivity. Aerial survey techniques have proven highly successful in measuring gamma emissions from radiological contaminates of concern quickly, efficiently, and safely. Examples of accidental releases include the unintentional distribution of uranium mining ores during transportation, the loss of uranium processing and waste materials, unintentional nuclear power plant emissions into the atmosphere, and the distribution of isotopes during major flooding events such as the one recently occurring in New Orleans. Intentional releases have occurred during the use of deleted uranium ammunition test firing and war time use by military organizations. The threat of radiological dispersion device (dirty bomb) use by terrorists is currently a major concern of many major cities worldwide. The U.S. Department of Energy, in cooperation with its Remote Sensing Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory, has developed a sophisticated aerial measurement system for identifying the locations, types, and quantities of gamma emitting radionuclides over extremely large areas. Helicopter mounted Nal detectors are flown at low altitude and constant speed along parallel paths measuring the full spectrum of gamma activity. Analytical procedures are capable of distinguishing between radiological contamination and changes in natural background emissions. Mapped and tabular results of these accurate, timely and cost effective aerial gamma radiation surveys can be used to assist with emergency response actions, if necessary, and to focus more

  2. Passive detectors for neutron fluence measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, P.D.

    1985-01-01

    The use of neutron activation detectors (slow neutron detectors and threshold detectors) and fission track detectors for radiological protection purposes, principally in criticality dosimetry, dosimetry of pulsed accelerators and calibration of neutron fluxes is discussed. References are given to compilations of cross sections. For the determination of the activity induced, either beta ray or gamma ray counting may be used. For beta-ray counting, thin foils are usually necessary which result in low neutron sensitivity. When fission track detectors are used, it is necessary to know the efficiency of track registration. Alternatively, a detector-counter system may be calibrated by exposure to a known flux of monoenergetic neutrons. Usually, the sensitivity of activation detectors is low because small foils are used. For criticality dosimetry, calibration work and shielding studies on accelerators, low sensitivity is acceptable. However, there are some instances where, by the use of long integration times, or very large quantities of detector material with gamma ray detection, neutron fluences in operational areas have been measured. (author)

  3. Currents and radiation from the large D black hole membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, Sayantani; Mandal, Anup Kumar [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur,Kalyanpur, Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh 208016 (India); Mandlik, Mangesh [Department of Theoretical Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research,1, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400005 (India); Mehta, Umang [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay,JVLR, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400076 (India); Minwalla, Shiraz [Department of Theoretical Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research,1, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400005 (India); Sharma, Utkarsh [Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay,JVLR, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400076 (India); Thakur, Somyadip [Department of Theoretical Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research,1, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400005 (India)

    2017-05-18

    It has recently been demonstrated that black hole dynamics in a large number of dimensions D reduces to the dynamics of a codimension one membrane propagating in flat space. In this paper we define a stress tensor and charge current on this membrane and explicitly determine these currents at low orders in the expansion in (1/D). We demonstrate that dynamical membrane equations of motion derived in earlier work are simply conservation equations for our stress tensor and charge current. Through the paper we focus on solutions of the membrane equations which vary on a time scale of order unity. Even though the charge current and stress tensor are not parametrically small in such solutions, we show that the radiation sourced by the corresponding membrane currents is generically of order (1/(D{sup D})). In this regime it follows that the ‘near horizon’ membrane degrees of freedom are decoupled from asymptotic flat space at every perturbative order in the (1/D) expansion. We also define an entropy current on the membrane and use the Hawking area theorem to demonstrate that the divergence of the entropy current is point wise non negative. We view this result as a local form of the second law of thermodynamics for membrane motion.

  4. Measured thermal and fast neutron fluence rates ATR Cycle 101-B, October 11, 1993--November 27, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, R.K.; Rogers, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>lMeV) neutron fluence rate data for ATR Cycle 101-B which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML) as requested by the Power Reactor Programs (ATR Experiments) Radiation Measurements Work Order. This report contains fluence rate values corresponding to the particular elevations (relative to the 80 ft. core elevation) where the measurements were taken. The data in this report consists of (1) a table of the ATR power history and distribution, (2) a hard copy listing of all thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, (3) plots of both the thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, and (4) a magnetic record (3.5 inch diskette) containing a listing of only the fast neutron fluence rates, their assigned elevations proper header identification of all monitor positions contained herein

  5. Incorporating the effects of lateral spread of the primary fluence, into compensator design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reece, P.J.; Hoban, P.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: In this study we extended ideas developed by Faddegon and Pfalzner on the construction of patient specific compensating filters. Their research was essentially focused on formulating a general method for creating compensators using a 3D planning system. In their work Faddegon and Pfalzner utilized a simple attenuation model to convert transmission arrays into filter thickness arrays. The compensators constructed from these arrays produce the primary fluence required to give a uniform dose distribution at a specified depth. This technique does not account for local geometric variations hi compensator scattering conditions. Therefore we have devised a method to incorporate the effects of lateral spread of the primary fluence passing through the compensating filter. A 2D Gaussian kernel, generated from Monte Carlo measurements, was used to model the spread of the primary fluence in the compensating filter. A 'maximum likelihood' optimisation algorithm was employed to deconvolve the kernel from the desired primary fluence to produce a more realistic incident fluence and compensator thickness array. The CMS FOCUS planning system was used to generate transmission maps corresponding to the desired influence of the compensating filter. Two compensating filters were constructed for each map, one using the standard attenuation method and the other with our method. For each method, an assessment was made using film dosimetry, on the degree of correlation between the desired primary fluence and the primary fluence produced by the compensating filter. Our results indicate that for compensating filters which are relatively uniform in thickness, there is good agreement between desired and delivered fluence maps for both methods. For non-uniform compensating filters the attenuation method deviates more notably from the desired fluence map. As expected, both methods also show significant deviations around the edges of the filter. It is anticipated that the work done here

  6. SU-F-T-261: Reconstruction of Initial Photon Fluence Based On EPID Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seliger, T; Engenhart-Cabillic, R [Philipp University of Marburg, Marburg (Germany); Czarnecki, D; Maeder, U; Zink, K [Technische Hochschule Mittelhessen - University of Applied Sciences, Giessen (Germany); Kussaether, R [MedCom GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Poppe, B [University Hospital for Medical Radiation Physics, Pius-Hospital, Medical Campus, Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Verifying an algorithm to reconstruct relative initial photon fluence for clinical use. Clinical EPID and CT images were acquired to reconstruct an external photon radiation treatment field. The reconstructed initial photon fluence could be used to verify the treatment or calculate the applied dose to the patient. Methods: The acquired EPID images were corrected for scatter caused by the patient and the EPID with an iterative reconstruction algorithm. The transmitted photon fluence behind the patient was calculated subsequently. Based on the transmitted fluence the initial photon fluence was calculated using a back-projection algorithm which takes the patient geometry and its energy dependent linear attenuation into account. This attenuation was gained from the acquired cone-beam CT or the planning CT by calculating a water-equivalent radiological thickness for each irradiation direction. To verify the algorithm an inhomogeneous phantom consisting of three inhomogeneities was irradiated by a static 6 MV photon field and compared to a reference flood field image. Results: The mean deviation between the reconstructed relative photon fluence for the inhomogeneous phantom and the flood field EPID image was 3% rising up to 7% for off-axis fluence. This was probably caused by the used clinical EPID calibration, which flattens the inhomogeneous fluence profile of the beam. Conclusion: In this clinical experiment the algorithm achieved good results in the center of the field while it showed high deviation of the lateral fluence. This could be reduced by optimizing the EPID calibration, considering the off-axis differential energy response. In further progress this and other aspects of the EPID, eg. field size dependency, CT and dose calibration have to be studied to realize a clinical acceptable accuracy of 2%.

  7. Expected Particle Fluences and Performance of the LHCb Trigger Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Siegler, M; Needham, M; Steinkamp, O

    2004-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of the expected 1 MeV-neutron equivalent fluence in the Trigger Tracker (TT) station of the LHCb detector have been used to investigate the effect of radiation damage on the performance of the detector. The build-up of leakage currents and the corresponding increase in electronic noise has been investigated, as well as the effect of bulk damage on the full-depletion voltage of the sensors and the risk of thermal runaway due to the power generated due to the leakage currents.

  8. Time-resolved angular distributions of plume ions from silver at low and medium laser fluence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Schou, Jørgen

    Even at moderate fluence (0.6 -2.4 J/cm2) laser impact on metals in the UV regime results in a significant number of ions emitted from the surface. The ablated particles are largely neutrals at the lowest fluence, but the fraction of ions increases strongly with fluence. We have irradiated silver...... in a vacuum chamber (~ 10-7 mbar) with a Nd:YAG laser at a wavelength of 355 nm and made detailed measurements of the time-resolved angular distribution. The ion flow in different directions has been measured with a hemispherical array of Langmuir probes, by which the time-of-flight spectra, as well...

  9. Three-dimensional RAMA fluence methodology benchmarking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, S. P.; Carter, R. G.; Watkins, K. E.; Jones, D. B.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the benchmarking of the RAMA Fluence Methodology software, that has been performed in accordance with U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 1.190. The RAMA Fluence Methodology has been developed by TransWare Enterprises Inc. through funding provided by the Electric Power Research Inst., Inc. (EPRI) and the Boiling Water Reactor Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP). The purpose of the software is to provide an accurate method for calculating neutron fluence in BWR pressure vessels and internal components. The Methodology incorporates a three-dimensional deterministic transport solution with flexible arbitrary geometry representation of reactor system components, previously available only with Monte Carlo solution techniques. Benchmarking was performed on measurements obtained from three standard benchmark problems which include the Pool Criticality Assembly (PCA), VENUS-3, and H. B. Robinson Unit 2 benchmarks, and on flux wire measurements obtained from two BWR nuclear plants. The calculated to measured (C/M) ratios range from 0.93 to 1.04 demonstrating the accuracy of the RAMA Fluence Methodology in predicting neutron flux, fluence, and dosimetry activation. (authors)

  10. Thermal radiation from large bolides and impact plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetsov, V.; Shuvalov, V.

    2017-09-01

    Numerical simulations of the impacts of asteroids and comets from 20 m to 3 km in diameter have been carried out and thermal radiation fluxes on the ground and luminous efficiencies of the impacts have been calculated. It was assumed that the cosmic objects have no strength, deform, fragment, and vaporize in the atmosphere. After the impact on the ground, formation of craters and plumes was simulated taking into account internal friction of destroyed rocks and a wake formed in the atmosphere. The equations of radiative transfer, added to the equations of gas dynamics, were used in the approximation of radiative heat diffusion or, if the Rosseland optical depth of a radiating volume of gas and vapor was less than unity, in the approximation of volume emission. Radiation fluxes on the Earth's surface were calculated by integrating the equation of radiative transfer along rays passing through a luminous area. Direct thermal radiation from fireballs and impact plumes produced by asteroids and comets larger than 50 m in diameter is dangerous for people, animals, plants, economic objects. Forest fires can be ignited on the ground within a radius of roughly 1000 times the body's diameter (for diameters of the order or smaller than 1 km), 50-m-diameter bodies can ignite forest fires within a radius of up to 40 km and 3-km asteroids - within 1700 km.

  11. Neutron fluence spectrometry using disk activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loevestam, Goeran; Hult, Mikael; Fessler, Andreas; Gasparro, Joel; Kockerols, Pierre; Okkinga, Klaas; Tagziria, Hamid; Vanhavere, Filip; Wieslander, J.S. Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    A simple and robust detector for spectrometry of environmental neutrons has been developed. The technique is based on neutron activation of a series of different metal disks followed by low-level gamma-ray spectrometry of the activated disks and subsequent neutron spectrum unfolding. The technique is similar to foil activation but here the applied neutron fluence rates are much lower than usually in the case of foil activation. The detector has been tested in quasi mono-energetic neutron fields with fluence rates in the order of 1000-10000 cm -2 s -1 , where the obtained spectra showed good agreement with spectra measured using a Bonner sphere spectrometer. The detector has also been tested using an AmBe source and at a neutron fluence rate of about 40 cm -2 s -1 , again, a good agreement with the assumed spectrum was achieved

  12. Neutron fluence spectrometry using disk activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loevestam, Goeran [EC-JRC-Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel (Belgium)], E-mail: goeran.loevestam@ec.europa.eu; Hult, Mikael; Fessler, Andreas; Gasparro, Joel; Kockerols, Pierre; Okkinga, Klaas [EC-JRC-Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Tagziria, Hamid [EC-JRC-Institute for the Protection and the Security of the Citizen (IPSC), Via E. Fermi 1, I-21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See,) (Italy); Vanhavere, Filip [SCK-CEN, Boeretang, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Wieslander, J.S. Elisabeth [EC-JRC-Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FIN-40014, University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2009-01-15

    A simple and robust detector for spectrometry of environmental neutrons has been developed. The technique is based on neutron activation of a series of different metal disks followed by low-level gamma-ray spectrometry of the activated disks and subsequent neutron spectrum unfolding. The technique is similar to foil activation but here the applied neutron fluence rates are much lower than usually in the case of foil activation. The detector has been tested in quasi mono-energetic neutron fields with fluence rates in the order of 1000-10000 cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, where the obtained spectra showed good agreement with spectra measured using a Bonner sphere spectrometer. The detector has also been tested using an AmBe source and at a neutron fluence rate of about 40 cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, again, a good agreement with the assumed spectrum was achieved.

  13. A large area transition radiation detector for the NOMAD experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassompierre, G.; Bermond, M.; Berthet, M.; Bertozzi, T.; Détraz, C.; Dubois, J.-M.; Dumps, L.; Engster, C.; Fazio, T.; Gaillard, G.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Gouanère, M.; Manola-Poggioli, E.; Mossuz, L.; Mendiburu, J.-P.; Nédélec, P.; Palazzini, E.; Pessard, H.; Petit, P.; Petitpas, P.; Placci, A.; Sillou, D.; Sottile, R.; Valuev, V.; Verkindt, D.; Vey, H.; Wachnik, M.

    1998-02-01

    A transition radiation detector to identify electrons at 90% efficiency with a rejection factor against pions of 10 3 on an area of 2.85 × 2.85 m 2 has been constructed for the NOMAD experiment. Each of its 9 modules includes a 315 plastic foil radiator and a detector plane of 176 vertical straw tubes filled with a xenon-methane gas mixture. Details of the design, construction and operation of the detector are given.

  14. A large area transition radiation detector for the NOMAD experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bassompierre, Gabriel; Berthet, M; Bertozzi, T; Détraz, C; Dubois, J M; Dumps, Ludwig; Engster, Claude; Fazio, T; Gaillard, G; Gaillard, Jean-Marc; Gouanère, M; Manola-Poggioli, E; Mossuz, L; Mendiburu, J P; Nédélec, P; Palazzini, E; Pessard, H; Petit, P; Petitpas, P; Placci, Alfredo; Sillou, D; Sottile, R; Valuev, V Yu; Verkindt, D; Vey, H; Wachnik, M

    1997-01-01

    A transition radiation detector to identify electrons at 90% efficiency with a rejection factor against pions of 10 3 on an area of 2.85 × 2.85 m 2 has been constructed for the NOMAD experiment. Each of its 9 modules includes a 315 plastic foil radiator and a detector plane of 176 vertical straw tubes filled with a xenon-methane gas mixture. Details of the design, construction and operation of the detector are given.

  15. Investigation of neutron fluence using fluence monitors for irradiation test at WWR-K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanova, N.K.; Takemoto, N.

    2013-01-01

    Irradiation test of a Si ingot is planned using WWR-K in Institute of Nuclear Physics Republic of Kazakhstan (INP RK) to develop an irradiation technology for Si semiconductor production by Neutron Transmutation Doping (NTD) method in the framework of an international cooperation between INP RK and Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Japan. It is possible to irradiate the Si ingot of 6 inch in diameter at the K-23 irradiation channel in the WWR-K. The preliminary irradiation test using 4 Al ingots was performed to evaluate the actual neutronic irradiation field at the K-23 channel in the WWR-K. Each Al ingot has the same dimension as the Si ingot, and 15 fluence monitors are equipped in it. Iron wire and aluminum-cobalt wire are inserted into them, and it is possible to evaluate both fast and thermal neutron fluxes by measurement of these radiation activities after irradiation. This report described the results of the preliminary irradiation test and the neutronic calculations by Monte Carlo method in order to evaluate the neutronic irradiation field in the irradiation position for the silicon ingot at the channel in the WWR-K. (authors)

  16. Dyed grafted films for large-dose radiation dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel Rehim, F; El-Sawy, N M; Abdel-Fattah, A A [National Centre for Radiation Research and Technology, Cairo (Egypt)

    1993-07-01

    By radiation-induced polymerization of acrylic acid onto poly(ethylene-tetrafluoroethylene) (ET) copolymer film and reacting the resulted grafted film with both Rhodamine B (RB) and Malachite Green (MG), new dosimeter films have been developed for high-dose gamma radiation applications in the range of absorbed doses from 10 to 180 kGy. The radiation-induced color bleaching has been analysed with visible spectrophotometry, either at the maximum of the absorption band peaking at 559 nm (for ETRB) or that peaking at 627 nm (for ETMG). The effects of different conditions of absorbed dose rate, temperature and relative humidity during irradiation and post-irradiation storage on dosimeter performance are discussed. (author).

  17. Deuterium accumulation in tungsten at high fluences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zibrov, Mikhail [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); FOM Institute DIFFER, De Zaale 20, 5612 AJ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Balden, Martin; Matej, Matej [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Bystrov, Kirill; Morgan, Thomas [FOM Institute DIFFER, De Zaale 20, 5612 AJ Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2016-07-01

    The data on the deuterium (D) retention in tungsten (W) at high fluences (≥ 10{sup 27} D/m{sup 2}) are scarce and the existing results are contradictory. Since retention in W is known to be flux-dependent, the laboratory experiments addressing this issue should be carried out in reactor-relevant conditions (high fluxes of low-energy ions). In this work the samples made of polycrystalline W were exposed to D plasmas in the linear plasma generator Pilot-PSI at temperatures ranging from 360 K to 1140 K to fluences in the range of 0.3-8.7 x 10{sup 27} D/m{sup 2}. It was observed that at exposure temperatures of 360 K and 580 K the D retention was only slightly dependent on the ion fluence. In addition, the presence of blister-like structures was found after the exposures, and their density and size distributions were also only weakly dependent on the fluence. In the case of exposure at 1140 K no surface modifications of the samples after plasma exposure were detected and the concentrations of retained D were very small. At all temperatures used the total amounts of retained D were smaller compared to those obtained by other researchers at lower ion flux densities, which indicates that the incident ion flux may play an important role in the total D retention in W.

  18. Delayed radiation effects at the small and large intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunder, S.

    1982-01-01

    The work deals with 56 patients treated within a period of 15 years for delayed radiation damage to the intestine. Gynecologic carcinomas were most frequently the basic disease. By the time the complaints occurred, which mostly took the form of an ileus, the radiation therapy dated back 4 months to 38 years. The mean age of the patients was 60 years. The report points out the diagnostical problem as well as clinical, radiographic and histological findings. Especially hydronephrosis and renal failure were observed as additional radiation sequelae. Whenever possible, resection of the intestinal segment concerned should be carried through. The portion of radiological patients who attracted the disorder was of 72 per cent, with a lethal result in 37 per cent. Half the patients died from an imperfect anastomosis followed by peritonitis. In 16 per cent of the patients recidivations of the malignant basic disease occurred. Whether treatment of radiation damage of the intestine is successful depends on the care taken to give a diagnosis and on the assessment of the intestinal segment damaged. As the actinic injury tends to aggravate early surgical intervention is recommended. Because the treatment of malignant tumours by irradiation is partly quite successful, injuries to the intestine must to some extent be put up with. (orig./MG) [de

  19. Preoperative radiation therapy and iododeoxyuridine for large retroperitoneal sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, John M.; Sondak, Vernon K.; Weiss, Sharon A.; Sussman, Jeffrey J.; Chang, Alfred E.; Lawrence, Theodore S.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Local failure is frequent after conventional therapy for patients with retroperitoneal sarcomas. A Phase I/II multimodality approach was used, combining iododeoxyuridine (IdUrd) and radiation therapy, followed by attempted surgical resection, with the goal of improving local control. Methods and Materials: Patients with retroperitoneal sarcomas were treated with three to five consecutive cycles of treatment. Each 14-day cycle consisted of a continuous intravenous infusion of IdUrd on days 1-5, twice a day radiation therapy (1.25 Gy/fraction) on days 8-12, and a break on day 13 and 14. Surgical resection was attempted after three or five cycles. Patients resected after three cycles received an additional two cycles of treatment with radiation directed to the tumor bed. IdUrd dose was escalated in Phase I fashion (1000 mg/m 2 /day, 1333 mg/m 2 /day, and 1600 mg/m 2 /day). The median potential follow-up was 31 months. Results: Sixteen patients (13 with high grade tumors) were treated. The median maximum tumor size was 17 cm. Resection margins were negative in four patients, microscopically positive in four patients, and grossly positive in three patients. Five patients were not resected. The only grade 4 acute toxicity observed was vomiting which occurred in three patients receiving upper abdominal radiation. Postsurgical and long-term complications were rare. Median survival overall and for resected patients were 18 and 32 months, respectively. Local control was observed in three out of four patients with negative margins (9, 40+, and 51+ months), two out of four patients with microscopically positive margins (4 and 22 months), and one out of three patients with grossly positive margins (46+ months). The overall freedom from local progression was 45% at 24 months. Conclusion: Retroperitoneal sarcomas can be resected after preoperative radiation therapy and IdUrd, with encouraging local control in patients resected with negative or microscopically positive

  20. Measured thermal and fast neutron fluence rates for ATF-1 holders during ATR cycle 160A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, B. J.; Miller, D. T.

    2017-01-01

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>1MeV) neutron fluence rate data for the ATF-1 holders located in core for ATR Cycle 160A which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML).

  1. Measured thermal and fast neutron fluence rates for ATF-1 holders during ATR cycle 160A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, B. J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Miller, D. T. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-06-06

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>1MeV) neutron fluence rate data for the ATF-1 holders located in core for ATR Cycle 160A which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML).

  2. Coupled radiative gasdynamic interaction and non-equilibrium dissociation for large-scale returned space vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surzhikov, S.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: It has been shown that different coupled vibrational dissociation models, being applied for solving coupled radiative gasdynamic problems for large size space vehicles, exert noticeable effect on radiative heating of its surface at orbital entry on high altitudes (h ⩾ 70 km). This influence decreases with decreasing the space vehicles sizes. Figure shows translational (solid lines) and vibrational (dashed lines) temperatures in shock layer with (circle markers) and without (triangles markers) radiative-gasdynamic interaction for one trajectory point of entering space vehicle. Highlights: ► Nonequilibrium dissociation processes exert effect on radiation heating of space vehicles (SV). ► The radiation gas dynamic interaction enhances this influence. ► This influence increases with increasing the SV sizes. - Abstract: Radiative aerothermodynamics of large-scale space vehicles is considered for Earth orbital entry at zero angle of attack. Brief description of used radiative gasdynamic model of physically and chemically nonequilibrium, viscous, heat conductive and radiative gas of complex chemical composition is presented. Radiation gasdynamic (RadGD) interaction in high temperature shock layer is studied by means of numerical experiment. It is shown that radiation–gasdynamic coupling for orbital space vehicles of large size is important for high altitude part of entering trajectory. It is demonstrated that the use of different models of coupled vibrational dissociation (CVD) in conditions of RadGD interaction gives rise temperature variation in shock layer and, as a result, leads to significant variation of radiative heating of space vehicle.

  3. Large bowel cancer: Indications for and results of radiation as primary or adjuvant treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunderson, L.L.; Rich, T.A.

    1987-01-01

    The intent of this chapter is to develop a logical approach to the use of radiation with large bowel cancer. Incidence and areas of failure after operation alone are outlined by site and stage with implications for adjuvant therapy. Results of series utilizing radiation are presented, and the potential for the future is discussed

  4. Low-Power Large-Area Radiation Detector for Space Science Measurements

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this task is to develop a low-power, large-area detectors from SiC, taking advantage of very low thermal noise characteristics and high radiation...

  5. Experimental and Monte Carlo studies of fluence corrections for graphite calorimetry in low- and high-energy clinical proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lourenço, Ana; Thomas, Russell; Bouchard, Hugo; Kacperek, Andrzej; Vondracek, Vladimir; Royle, Gary; Palmans, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine fluence corrections necessary to convert absorbed dose to graphite, measured by graphite calorimetry, to absorbed dose to water. Fluence corrections were obtained from experiments and Monte Carlo simulations in low- and high-energy proton beams. Methods: Fluence corrections were calculated to account for the difference in fluence between water and graphite at equivalent depths. Measurements were performed with narrow proton beams. Plane-parallel-plate ionization chambers with a large collecting area compared to the beam diameter were used to intercept the whole beam. High- and low-energy proton beams were provided by a scanning and double scattering delivery system, respectively. A mathematical formalism was established to relate fluence corrections derived from Monte Carlo simulations, using the FLUKA code [A. Ferrari et al., “FLUKA: A multi-particle transport code,” in CERN 2005-10, INFN/TC 05/11, SLAC-R-773 (2005) and T. T. Böhlen et al., “The FLUKA Code: Developments and challenges for high energy and medical applications,” Nucl. Data Sheets 120, 211–214 (2014)], to partial fluence corrections measured experimentally. Results: A good agreement was found between the partial fluence corrections derived by Monte Carlo simulations and those determined experimentally. For a high-energy beam of 180 MeV, the fluence corrections from Monte Carlo simulations were found to increase from 0.99 to 1.04 with depth. In the case of a low-energy beam of 60 MeV, the magnitude of fluence corrections was approximately 0.99 at all depths when calculated in the sensitive area of the chamber used in the experiments. Fluence correction calculations were also performed for a larger area and found to increase from 0.99 at the surface to 1.01 at greater depths. Conclusions: Fluence corrections obtained experimentally are partial fluence corrections because they account for differences in the primary and part of the secondary

  6. Experimental and Monte Carlo studies of fluence corrections for graphite calorimetry in low- and high-energy clinical proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lourenço, Ana, E-mail: am.lourenco@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom and Division of Acoustics and Ionising Radiation, National Physical Laboratory, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Thomas, Russell; Bouchard, Hugo [Division of Acoustics and Ionising Radiation, National Physical Laboratory, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Kacperek, Andrzej [National Eye Proton Therapy Centre, Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Wirral CH63 4JY (United Kingdom); Vondracek, Vladimir [Proton Therapy Center, Budinova 1a, Prague 8 CZ-180 00 (Czech Republic); Royle, Gary [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Palmans, Hugo [Division of Acoustics and Ionising Radiation, National Physical Laboratory, Teddington TW11 0LW, United Kingdom and Medical Physics Group, EBG MedAustron GmbH, A-2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine fluence corrections necessary to convert absorbed dose to graphite, measured by graphite calorimetry, to absorbed dose to water. Fluence corrections were obtained from experiments and Monte Carlo simulations in low- and high-energy proton beams. Methods: Fluence corrections were calculated to account for the difference in fluence between water and graphite at equivalent depths. Measurements were performed with narrow proton beams. Plane-parallel-plate ionization chambers with a large collecting area compared to the beam diameter were used to intercept the whole beam. High- and low-energy proton beams were provided by a scanning and double scattering delivery system, respectively. A mathematical formalism was established to relate fluence corrections derived from Monte Carlo simulations, using the FLUKA code [A. Ferrari et al., “FLUKA: A multi-particle transport code,” in CERN 2005-10, INFN/TC 05/11, SLAC-R-773 (2005) and T. T. Böhlen et al., “The FLUKA Code: Developments and challenges for high energy and medical applications,” Nucl. Data Sheets 120, 211–214 (2014)], to partial fluence corrections measured experimentally. Results: A good agreement was found between the partial fluence corrections derived by Monte Carlo simulations and those determined experimentally. For a high-energy beam of 180 MeV, the fluence corrections from Monte Carlo simulations were found to increase from 0.99 to 1.04 with depth. In the case of a low-energy beam of 60 MeV, the magnitude of fluence corrections was approximately 0.99 at all depths when calculated in the sensitive area of the chamber used in the experiments. Fluence correction calculations were also performed for a larger area and found to increase from 0.99 at the surface to 1.01 at greater depths. Conclusions: Fluence corrections obtained experimentally are partial fluence corrections because they account for differences in the primary and part of the secondary

  7. Novel results on fluence dependence and annealing behavior of oxygenated and non-oxygenated silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez, C; Lozano, M; Campabadal, F; Santander, J; Fonseca, L; Ullán, M; Moreno, A J D

    2002-01-01

    This work presents the latest results on electrical properties degradation of silicon radiation detectors manufactured at the Institut de Microelectronica de Barcelona (IMB-CNM) subjected to proton irradiation at CERN, Switzerland, for high-energy physics (HEP) applications. The evolution of full depletion voltage and leakage current with fluence as well as their annealing behavior with time were studied. The results obtained extend the previous understanding of the role played by technology and oxygenated material in hardening silicon radiation detectors. (15 refs).

  8. Novel results on fluence dependence and annealing behaviour of oxygenated and non-oxygenated silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez, C; Lozano, M; Campabadal, F; Santander, J; Fonseca, L; Ullán, M; Moreno, A

    2002-01-01

    This work presents the latest results on electrical properties degradation of silicon radiation detectors manufactured at IMB-CNM (Institut de Microelectronica de Barcelona) subjected to proton irradiation at CERN for high energy physics applications. The evolution of full depletion voltage and leakage current with fluence, as well as their annealing behaviour with time, were studied. The results obtained extend the previous understanding of the role played by technology and oxygenated material in hardening silicon radiation detectors. (15 refs).

  9. Violation of the factorization theorem in large-angle radiative Bhabha scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbuzov, A.B.; Kuraev, Eh.A.; Shajkhatdenov, B.G.

    1998-01-01

    The lowest order QED radiative corrections to the radiative large-angle Bhabha scattering process in the region where all the kinematical invariants are large compared to the electron mass are considered. We show that the leading logarithmic corrections do not factor before the Born cross section, contrary to the picture assumed in the renormalization group approach. Estimation of the leading and nonleading contributions for typical kinematics of the hard process for energy of Φ factory is done

  10. The fluence research of filter material for fast neutron fluence measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Xiding

    2010-01-01

    When the fast neutron fluence is measured by radioactivation techniques in the nuclear reactor the fast neutron is also filtered a little by the thermal neutron filter material, and if the filter material thickness increase the filtered fast neutron increases therewith. For fast neutron fluenc measurement, there are only cadmium, boron and gadolinium three elements filtering fluence can be calculated ordinarily. In order to calculate the filtered fast neutron fluence of the all elements in the filter material, the many total cross sections of nuclides had checked out from nuclear cross section data library, converted them into the same energy group structure, then element's total cross section, compound's total cross section and multilayer filters' total cross section had calculated from these total cross sections with same energy group structure, a new cross section data library can be obtained lastly through merging these cross sections into the old cross section data library used for neutron fluence measurement. The calculation analysis indicates that the results of the unit 2 surveillance capsule U of DAYA Bay NPP and the unit 1 surveillance capsule A of the Second Nuclear Power Plant of Qinshan by considering the all elements subtracting iron are smaller about 1.5% and 2.6% respectively than the ones only to consider cadmium, boron. The old measured results accord with the new values under the measurement uncertainty, are reliable. The new results are more accuracy. (authors)

  11. Assessment of personal exposures to optical radiation in large entertainment venues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonner, R.; O'Hagan, J. B.; Khazova, M.

    2012-01-01

    Workplace exposure to optical radiation from artificial sources is regulated in Europe under the Artificial Optical Radiation Directive 2006/25/EC implemented in the UK as The Control of Artificial Optical Radiation at Work Regulations 2010. The entertainment environment often presents an extremely complex situation for the assessment of occupational exposures. Multiple illumination sources, continuously changing illumination conditions and people moving during performances add further complexity to the assessment. This document proposes a methodology for assessing the risks arising from exposure to optical radiation and presents detailed case studies of practical assessment for two large entertainment venues. (authors)

  12. Burnup influence on the VVER-1000 reactor vessel neutron fluence evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panayotov, I.; Mihaylov, N.; Ilieva, K.; Kirilova, D.; Manolova, M.

    2009-01-01

    The neutron fluence of the vessels of the reactors is determined regularly accordingly the RPV Surveillance Program of the Kozloduy NPP Unit 5 and 6 in order to assess the state of the metal vessel and their radiation damaging. The calculations are carried out by the method of discrete ordinates used in the TORT program for operated reactor cycles. An average reactor spectrum corresponding to fresh U-235 fuel is used as an input neutron source. The impact of the burn up of the fuel on the neutron fluence of VVER-1000 reactor vessel is evaluated. The calculations of isotopic concentrations of U-235 and Pu-239 corresponding to 4 years burn up were performed by the module SAS2H of the code system SCALE 4.4. Since fresh fuel or 4 years burn up fuel assembly are placed in periphery of reactor core the contribution of Pu-239 of first year burn up and of 4 years burn up is taken in consideration. Calculations of neutron fluence were performed with neutron spectrum for fresh fuel, for 1 year and for 4 years burn up fuel. Correction factors for neutron fluence at the inner surface of the reactor vessel, in 1/4 depth of the vessel and in the air behind the vessel were obtained. The correction coefficient could be used when the neutron fluence is assessed so in verification when the measured activity of ex-vessel detectors is compared with calculated ones. (authors)

  13. Burnup influence on the WWER-1000 reactor vessel neutron fluence evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panayotov, I.; Mihaylov, N.; Ilieva, K.; Kirilova, D.; Manolova, M.

    2009-01-01

    The neutron fluence of the vessels of the reactors is determined regularly accordingly the RPV Surveillance Program of Kozloduy NPP Unit 5 and 6 in order to assess the state of the metal vessel and their radiation damaging. The calculations are carried out by the method of discrete ordinates used in the TORT program for operated reactor cycles. An average reactor spectrum corresponding to fresh U-235 fuel is used as an input neutron source. The impact of the burn up of the fuel on the neutron fluence of WWER-1000 reactor vessel is evaluated. The calculations of isotopic concentrations of U-235 and Pu-239 corresponding to 4 years burn up were performed by the module SAS2H of the code system SCALE 4.4. Since fresh fuel or 4 years burn up fuel assembly are placed in periphery of reactor core the contribution of Pu-239 of first year burn up and of 4 years burn up is taken in consideration. Calculations of neutron fluence were performed with neutron spectrum for fresh fuel, for 1 year and for 4 years burn up fuel. Correction factors for neutron fluence at the inner surface of the reactor vessel, in ? depth of the vessel and in the air behind the vessel were obtained. The correction coefficient could be used when the neutron fluence is assessed so in verification when the measured activity of ex-vessel detectors is compared with calculated ones. (Authors)

  14. Constant-Fluence Area Scaling for Laser Propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinko, John E.

    2008-01-01

    A series of experiments was conducted on polyoxymethylene (POM, trade name Delrin registered ) propellants in air at atmospheric pressure. A TEA CO 2 laser with maximum output power up to 20 J was used to deliver 300 ns pulses of 10.6 μm radiation to POM targets. Ablation at a constant fluence and a range of spot areas was achieved by varying combinations of the laser energy and spot size. Relevant empirical scaling laws governing laser propulsion parameters such as the momentum coupling coefficient (C m ) and specific impulse (I sp ) for spot areas within a range of about 0.05-0.25 cm 2 are presented. Experimental measurements of imparted impulse, C m , I sp , and ablated mass per pulse were made using dynamic piezoelectric force sensors and a scientific balance. Finally, Schlieren ICCD imaging of shock waves and vapor plumes was performed and analyzed

  15. Radiation Transport in Random Media With Large Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Aaron; Prinja, Anil; Franke, Brian

    2017-09-01

    Neutral particle transport in media exhibiting large and complex material property spatial variation is modeled by representing cross sections as lognormal random functions of space and generated through a nonlinear memory-less transformation of a Gaussian process with covariance uniquely determined by the covariance of the cross section. A Karhunen-Loève decomposition of the Gaussian process is implemented to effciently generate realizations of the random cross sections and Woodcock Monte Carlo used to transport particles on each realization and generate benchmark solutions for the mean and variance of the particle flux as well as probability densities of the particle reflectance and transmittance. A computationally effcient stochastic collocation method is implemented to directly compute the statistical moments such as the mean and variance, while a polynomial chaos expansion in conjunction with stochastic collocation provides a convenient surrogate model that also produces probability densities of output quantities of interest. Extensive numerical testing demonstrates that use of stochastic reduced-order modeling provides an accurate and cost-effective alternative to random sampling for particle transport in random media.

  16. Work for radiation shielding concrete in large-scaled radiation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konomi, Shinzo; Sato, Shoni; Otake, Takao.

    1980-01-01

    This paper reports the radiation shielding concrete work in the construction of radiation laboratory facilities of Electrotechnical Laboratory, a Japanese Government agency for the research and development of electronic technology. The radiation shielding walls of the facilities are made of ordinary concrete, heavy weight concrete and raw iron ore. This paper particularly relates the use of ordinary concrete which constitutes the majority of such concretes. The concrete mix was determined so as to increase its specific gravity for better shielding effect, to improve mass concrete effect and to advance good workability. The tendency of the concrete to decrease its specific gravity and the temperature variations were also made on how to place concrete to secure good shielding effect and uniform quality. (author)

  17. Application of the adjoint function methodology for neutron fluence determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haghighat, A.; Nanayakkara, B.; Livingston, J.; Mahgerefteh, M.; Luoma, J.

    1991-01-01

    In previous studies, the neutron fluence at a reactor pressure vessel has been estimated based on consolidation of transport theory calculations and experimental data obtained from in-vessel capsules and/or cavity dosimeters. Normally, a forward neutron transport calculation is performed for each fuel cycle and the neutron fluxes are integrated over the reactor operating time to estimate the neutron fluence. Such calculations are performed for a geometrical model which is composed of one-eighth (0 to 45 deg) of the reactor core and its surroundings; i.e., core barrel, thermal shield, downcomer, reactor vessel, cavity region, concrete wall, and instrumentation well. Because the model is large, transport theory calculations generally require a significant amount of computer memory and time; hence, more efficient methodologies such as the adjoint transport approach have been proposed. These studies, however, do not address the necessary sensitivity studies needed for adjoint function calculations. The adjoint methodology has been employed to estimate the activity of a cavity dosimeter and that of an in-vessel capsule. A sensitivity study has been performed on the mesh distribution used in and around the cavity dosimeter and the in-vessel capsule. Further, since a major portion of the detector response is due to the neutrons originated in the peripheral fuel assemblies, a study on the use of a smaller calculational model has been performed

  18. The plasma focus as a large fluence neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucker, O.; Bostick, W.; Long, J.; Luce, J.; Sahlin, H.

    1977-01-01

    A continuously operated, 1 pps, dense-plasma-focus device capable of delivering a minimum of 10 15 neutrons per pulse for material testing purposes is described. With I 5 scaling, predicted from analysis of existing machines, yields of 10 16 -10 17 neutrons per pulse are postulated. The average power consumption, which has become a major issue as a result of the energy crisis is shown to be highly favorable. A novel approach to the capacitor bank and switch design allowing repetitive operation is discussed. (Auth.)

  19. Effects of high thermal neutron fluences on Type 6061 aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, J.R.; Czajkowski, C.J.; Farrell, K.

    1992-01-01

    The control rod drive follower tubes of the High Flux Beam Reactor are contructed from precipitation-hardened 6061-T6 aluminum alloy and they operate in the high thermal neutron flux regions of the core. It is shown that large thermal neutron fluences up to ∼4 x 10 23 n/cm 2 at 333K cause large increases in tensile strength and relatively modest decreases in tensile elongation while significantly reducing the notch impact toughness at room temperature. These changes are attributed to the development of a fine distribution of precipitates of amorphous silicon of which about 8% is produced radiogenically. A proposed role of thermal-to-fast flux ratio is discussed

  20. The effect of high-resolution fluences by couch shift between arcs on the VMAT plan quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung In; Park, So Yeon; Choi, Chang Heon; Park, Jong Min [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Wu, Hong Gyun [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Various studies have demonstrated the dosimetric advantages of multi-leaf collimators (MLCs) with fine leaf widths for both intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), which can generate high resolution fluences. However, a practical disadvantage of MLCs with fine leaf widths is a limited field length in the longitudinal direction. This is because the numbers of leaves and motors are limited due to spatial constraints within the treatment head. We propose an alternative way to generate high resolution fluences of a VMAT plan without MLCs with fine leaf widths for the treatment of large H and N target volumes. With the Millennium 120 MLC with inner leaf widths of 5 mm, we simulate 2.5 mm inner leaf widths by a 2.5 mm shift of the patient couch in the longitudinal direction between arcs. In this way, we acquire not only the improved dosimetric effects of the MLCs with fine leaf widths, but also the full coverage of the H and N target volumes. The HAS plan was better than the others in terms of normal tissue sparing and plan efficiency.

  1. SU-F-T-289: MLC Fluence Sonogram Based Delivery Quality Assurance for Bilateral Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiyagarajan, Rajesh; Karrthick, KP; Kataria, Tejinder; Mahendran, Ramu; Selvan, Tamil; Duraikannu, Palani [Division of Radiation Oncology, Medanta The Medicity, Gurgaon, Haryana (India); Raj, Nambi [Department of Physics, School of Advanced sciences, VIT University, Vellore (India); Arunai, N

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Performing DQA for Bilateral (B-L) breast tomotherapy is a challenging task due to the limitation of any commercially available detector array or film. Aim of this study is to perform DQA for B-L breast tomotherapy plan using MLC fluence sinogram. Methods: Treatment plan was generated on Tomotherapy system for B-L breast tumour. B-L breast targets were given 50.4 Gy prescribed over 28 fractions. Plan is generated with 6 MV photon beam & pitch was set to 0.3. As the width of the total target is 39 cm (left & right) length is 20 cm. DQA plan delivered without any phantom on the mega voltage computed tomography (MCVT) detector system. The pulses recorded by MVCT system were exported to the delivery analysis software (Tomotherapy Inc.) for reconstruction. The detector signals are reconstructed to a sonogram and converted to MLC fluence sonogram. The MLC fluence sinogram compared with the planned fluence sinogram. Also point dose measured with cheese phantom and ionization chamber to verify the absolute dose component Results: Planned fluence sinogram and reconstructed MLC fluence sinogram were compared using Gamma metric. MLC positional difference and intensity of the beamlet were used as parameters to evaluate gamma. 3 mm positional difference and 3% beamlet intensity difference were used set for gamma calculation. A total of 26784 non-zero beamlets were included in the analysis out of which 161 beamlets had gamma more than 1. The gamma passing rate found to be 99.4%. Point dose measurements were within 1.3% of the calculated dose. Conclusion: MLC fluence sinogram based delivery quality assurance performed for bilateral breast irradiation. This would be a suitable alternate for large volume targets like bilateral breast, Total body irradiation etc. However conventional method of DQA should be used to validate this method periodically.

  2. Radiation Therapy for Primary Cutaneous Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma: An International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group Multi-institutional Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Million, Lynn, E-mail: lmillion@stanford.edu [Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Yi, Esther J.; Wu, Frank; Von Eyben, Rie [Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Campbell, Belinda A. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Dabaja, Bouthaina [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tsang, Richard W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ng, Andrea [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wilson, Lynn D. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology/Radiation Oncology, Yale School of Medicine, Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Ricardi, Umberto [Department of Oncology, University of Turin, Turin (Italy); Kirova, Youlia [Institut Curie, Paris (France); Hoppe, Richard T. [Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: To collect response rates of primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma, a rare cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, to radiation therapy (RT), and to determine potential prognostic factors predictive of outcome. Methods and Materials: The study was a retrospective analysis of patients with primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma who received RT as primary therapy or after surgical excision. Data collected include initial stage of disease, RT modality (electron/photon), total dose, fractionation, response to treatment, and local recurrence. Radiation therapy was delivered at 8 participating International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group institutions worldwide. Results: Fifty-six patients met the eligibility criteria, and 63 tumors were treated: head and neck (27%), trunk (14%), upper extremities (27%), and lower extremities (32%). Median tumor size was 2.25 cm (range, 0.6-12 cm). T classification included T1, 40 patients (71%); T2, 12 patients (21%); and T3, 4 patients (7%). The median radiation dose was 35 Gy (range, 6-45 Gy). Complete clinical response (CCR) was achieved in 60 of 63 tumors (95%) and partial response in 3 tumors (5%). After CCR, 1 tumor recurred locally (1.7%) after 36 Gy and 7 months after RT. This was the only patient to die of disease. Conclusions: Primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma is a rare, indolent cutaneous lymphoma with a low death rate. This analysis, which was restricted to patients selected for treatment with radiation, indicates that achieving CCR was independent of radiation dose. Because there were too few failures (<2%) for statistical analysis on dose response, 30 Gy seems to be adequate for local control, and even lower doses may suffice.

  3. New approach for absolute fluence distribution calculations in Monte Carlo simulations of light propagation in turbid media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Böcklin, Christoph; Baumann, Dirk; Fröhlich, Jürg

    2014-01-01

    A novel way to attain three dimensional fluence rate maps from Monte-Carlo simulations of photon propagation is presented in this work. The propagation of light in a turbid medium is described by the radiative transfer equation and formulated in terms of radiance. For many applications, particularly in biomedical optics, the fluence rate is a more useful quantity and directly derived from the radiance by integrating over all directions. Contrary to the usual way which calculates the fluence rate from absorbed photon power, the fluence rate in this work is directly calculated from the photon packet trajectory. The voxel based algorithm works in arbitrary geometries and material distributions. It is shown that the new algorithm is more efficient and also works in materials with a low or even zero absorption coefficient. The capabilities of the new algorithm are demonstrated on a curved layered structure, where a non-scattering, non-absorbing layer is sandwiched between two highly scattering layers

  4. Neutron Fluence And DPA Rate Analysis In Pebble-Bed HTR Reactor Vessel Using MCNP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzah, Amir; Suwoto; Rohanda, Anis; Adrial, Hery; Bakhri, Syaiful; Sunaryo, Geni Rina

    2018-02-01

    In the Pebble-bed HTR reactor, the distance between the core and the reactor vessel is very close and the media inside are carbon and He gas. Neutron moderation capability of graphite material is theoretically lower than that of water-moderated reactors. Thus, it is estimated much more the fast neutrons will reach the reactor vessel. The fast neutron collisions with the atoms in the reactor vessel will result in radiation damage and could be reducing the vessel life. The purpose of this study was to obtain the magnitude of neutron fluence in the Pebble-bed HTR reactor vessel. Neutron fluence calculations in the pebble-bed HTR reactor vessel were performed using the MCNP computer program. By determining the tally position, it can be calculated flux, spectrum and neutron fluence in the position of Pebble-bed HTR reactor vessel. The calculations results of total neutron flux and fast neutron flux in the reactor vessel of 1.82x108 n/cm2/s and 1.79x108 n/cm2/s respectively. The fast neutron fluence in the reactor vessel is 3.4x1017 n/cm2 for 60 years reactor operation. Radiation damage in stainless steel material caused by high-energy neutrons (> 1.0 MeV) will occur when it has reached the neutron flux level of 1.0x1024 n/cm2. The neutron fluence results show that there is no radiation damage in the Pebble-bed HTR reactor vessel, so it is predicted that it will be safe to operate at least for 60 years.

  5. Neutron fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for embryo and fetus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.; Meyerhof, D.; Vlahovich, S.

    2004-01-01

    A problem of concern in radiation protection is the exposure of pregnant women to ionising radiation, because of the high radiosensitivity of the embryo and fetus. External neutron exposure is of concern when pregnant women travel by aeroplane. Dose assessments for neutrons frequently rely on fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients. While neutron fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for adults are recommended in International Commission on Radiological Protection publications and International Commission on Radiological Units and Measurements reports, conversion coefficients for embryos and fetuses are not given in the publications. This study undertakes Monte Carlo calculations to determine the mean absorbed doses to the embryo and fetus when the mother is exposed to neutron fields. A new set of mathematical models for the embryo and fetus has been developed at Health Canada and is used together with mathematical phantoms of a pregnant female developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Monoenergetic neutrons from 1 eV to 10 MeV are considered in this study. The irradiation geometries include antero-posterior (AP), postero-anterior (PA), lateral (LAT), rotational (ROT) and isotropic (ISO) geometries. At each of these standard irradiation geometries, absorbed doses to the fetal brain and body are calculated; for the embryo at 8 weeks and the fetus at 3, 6 or 9 months. Neutron fluence-to-absorbed dose conversion coefficients are derived for the four age groups. Neutron fluence-to-equivalent dose conversion coefficients are given for the AP irradiations which yield the highest radiation dose to the fetal body in the neutron energy range considered here. The results indicate that for neutrons <10 MeV more protection should be given to pregnant women in the first trimester due to the higher absorbed dose per unit neutron fluence to the fetus. (authors)

  6. Neutron fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for embryo and fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Meyerhof, Dorothy; Vlahovich, Slavica

    2004-01-01

    A problem of concern in radiation protection is the exposure of pregnant women to ionising radiation, because of the high radiosensitivity of the embryo and fetus. External neutron exposure is of concern when pregnant women travel by aeroplane. Dose assessments for neutrons frequently rely on fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients. While neutron fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for adults are recommended in International Commission on Radiological Protection publications and International Commission on Radiological Units and Measurements reports, conversion coefficients for embryos and fetuses are not given in the publications. This study undertakes Monte Carlo calculations to determine the mean absorbed doses to the embryo and fetus when the mother is exposed to neutron fields. A new set of mathematical models for the embryo and fetus has been developed at Health Canada and is used together with mathematical phantoms of a pregnant female developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Monoenergetic neutrons from 1 eV to 10 MeV are considered in this study. The irradiation geometries include antero-posterior (AP), postero-anterior (PA), lateral (LAT), rotational (ROT) and isotropic (ISO) geometries. At each of these standard irradiation geometries, absorbed doses to the fetal brain and body are calculated; for the embryo at 8 weeks and the fetus at 3, 6 or 9 months. Neutron fluence-to-absorbed dose conversion coefficients are derived for the four age groups. Neutron fluence-to-equivalent dose conversion coefficients are given for the AP irradiations which yield the highest radiation dose to the fetal body in the neutron energy range considered here. The results indicate that for neutrons <10 MeV more protection should be given to pregnant women in the first trimester due to the higher absorbed dose per unit neutron fluence to the fetus.

  7. Application of large radiation sources in Asia and the Pacific - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iya, V.K.

    1977-01-01

    The current status of the applications of large radiation sources on industrial scale in the countries of Asia and the Pacific Region has been reviewed. The present R and D programmes and the major centres engaged in these programmes are described. So far as commercialization is considered, radiation processing industry is now well established in Japan, Australia, India and Israel. The major industrial uses of large radiation sources have been for : (1) sterilization of medical products, (2) food preservation, (3) cross-linking of polyethylene and (4) production of composite materials from polymer and wood or bamboo or bagasse. A table is given which indicates the current status of clearance of irradiated food in the countries under consideration. Finally, technological requirements in these countries for development and application of radiation processing are spelled out and discussed. (M.G.B.)

  8. Report of preliminary investigations on the next-generation large-scale synchrotron radiation facility projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The Special Committee for Future Project of the Japanese Society for Synchrotron Radiation Research investigated the construction-projects of the large-scaled synchrotron radiation facilities which are presently in progress in Japan. As a result, the following both projects are considered the very valuable research-project which will carry the development of Japan's next-generation synchrotron radiation science: 1. the 8 GeV synchrotron radiation facilities (SPring-8) projected to be constructed by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research under the sponsorship of Science Technology Agency at Harima Science Park City, Hyogo Pref., Japan. 2. The project to utilize the Tristan Main Ring (MR) of the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics as the radiation source. Both projects are unique in research theme and technological approach, and complemental each other. Therefore it has been concluded that both projects should be aided and ratified by the Society. (M.T.)

  9. Carcinoma of the large bowel after a single massive dose of radiation in healthy teenagers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotmensch, S.; Avigad, I.; Soffer, E.E.; Horowitz, A.; Bar-Meir, S.; Confino, R.; Czerniak, A.; Wolfstein, I.

    1986-01-01

    Three healthy teenagers were exposed to a single pelvic x-ray irradiation as part of sterilization experiments performed in the Auschwitz concentration camp in 1943. Single and multiple carcinomas of the colon and rectum developed 40 years later in the radiation field. Histologic examination of surgical specimens revealed severe radiation-induced changes in all layers of tumor-adjacent areas. In contrast to previous reports of radiation-induced large bowel cancers, these women had not undergone repeated courses of radiation, had no known co-existing disease that might raise the risk for colonic and rectal malignancies, and had an extremely long and remarkably similar latency period. These cases emphasize the need for long-term surveillance in previously radiated patients. Since thousands of teenagers were subjected to similar sterilization experiments, awareness of this association might help in the early diagnosis of additional cases

  10. Time-resolved and integrated angular distributions of plume ions from silver at low and medium laser fluence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Schou, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Laser impact on metals in the UV regime results in a significant number of ablated plume ions even at moderate fluence (0.7–2.4 J/cm2). The ablated particles are largely neutrals at the lowest fluence, but the fraction of ions increases strongly with fluence. The ion flow in different directions...... from a silver target irradiated by a laser beam at a wavelength of 355 nm in vacuum was measured with a hemispherical array of Langmuir probes. The time-of-flight spectra in all directions, as well as the total angular yield were determined. The angular distribution peaks strongly in forward direction...

  11. Calculations of electron fluence correction factors using the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegbahn, E A; Nilsson, B; Fernandez-Varea, J M; Andreo, P

    2003-01-01

    In electron-beam dosimetry, plastic phantom materials may be used instead of water for the determination of absorbed dose to water. A correction factor φ water plastic is then needed for converting the electron fluence in the plastic phantom to the fluence at an equivalent depth in water. The recommended values for this factor given by AAPM TG-25 (1991 Med. Phys. 18 73-109) and the IAEA protocols TRS-381 (1997) and TRS-398 (2000) disagree, in particular at large depths. Calculations of the electron fluence have been done, using the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE, in semi-infinite phantoms of water and common plastic materials (PMMA, clear polystyrene, A-150, polyethylene, Plastic water TM and Solid water TM (WT1)). The simulations have been carried out for monoenergetic electron beams of 6, 10 and 20 MeV, as well as for a realistic clinical beam. The simulated fluence correction factors differ from the values in the AAPM and IAEA recommendations by up to 2%, and are in better agreement with factors obtained by Ding et al (1997 Med. Phys. 24 161-76) using EGS4. Our Monte Carlo calculations are also in good accordance with φ water plastic values measured by using an almost perturbation-free ion chamber. The important interdependence between depth- and fluence-scaling corrections for plastic phantoms is discussed. Discrepancies between the measured and the recommended values of φ water plastic may then be explained considering the different depth-scaling rules used

  12. Surface damage on polycrystalline β-SiC by xenon ion irradiation at high fluence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillet, J.; Gavarini, S.; Millard-Pinard, N.; Garnier, V.; Peaucelle, C.; Jaurand, X.; Duranti, A.; Bernard, C.; Rapegno, R.; Cardinal, S.; Escobar Sawa, L.; De Echave, T.; Lanfant, B.; Leconte, Y.

    2018-05-01

    Polycrystalline β-silicon carbide (β-SiC) pellets were prepared by Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS). These were implanted at room temperature with 800 keV xenon at ion fluences of 5.1015 and 1.1017 cm-2. Microstructural modifications were studied by electronic microscopy (TEM and SEM) and xenon profiles were determined by Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS). A complete amorphization of the implanted area associated with a significant oxidation is observed for the highest fluence. Large xenon bubbles formed in the oxide phase are responsible of surface swelling. No significant gas release has been measured up to 1017 at.cm-2. A model is proposed to explain the different steps of the oxidation process and xenon bubbles formation as a function of ion fluence.

  13. A neutron source of variable fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachet, Guy; Demichel, Pascal; Prigent, Yvon; Riche, J.C.

    1975-01-01

    The invention concerns a variable fluence neutron source, like those that use in the known way a reaction between a radioactive emitter and a target, particularly of type (α,n). The emitter being in powder form lies in a carrier fluid forming the target, inside a closed containment. Facilities are provided to cause the fluidisation of the emitter by the carrier fluid in the containment. The fluidisation of the emitting powder is carried out by a booster with blades, actuated from outside by a magnetic coupling. The powder emitter is a α emitter selected in the group of curium, plutonium, thorium, actinium and americium oxides and the target fluid is formed of compounds of light elements selected from the group of beryllium, boron, fluorine and oxygen 18. The target fluid is a gas used under pressure or H 2 O water highly enriched in oxygen 18 [fr

  14. A new deconvolution approach to robust fluence for intensity modulation under geometrical uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengcheng; De Crevoisier, Renaud; Simon, Antoine; Haigron, Pascal; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis; Li, Baosheng; Shu, Huazhong

    2013-09-01

    This work addresses random geometrical uncertainties that are intrinsically observed in radiation therapy by means of a new deconvolution method combining a series expansion and a Butterworth filter. The method efficiently suppresses high-frequency components by discarding the higher order terms of the series expansion and then filtering out deviations on the field edges. An additional approximation is made in order to set the fluence values outside the field to zero in the robust profiles. This method is compared to the deconvolution kernel method for a regular 2D fluence map, a real intensity-modulated radiation therapy field, and a prostate case. The results show that accuracy is improved while fulfilling clinical planning requirements.

  15. A new deconvolution approach to robust fluence for intensity modulation under geometrical uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Pengcheng; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis; Shu Huazhong; De Crevoisier, Renaud; Simon, Antoine; Haigron, Pascal; Li Baosheng

    2013-01-01

    This work addresses random geometrical uncertainties that are intrinsically observed in radiation therapy by means of a new deconvolution method combining a series expansion and a Butterworth filter. The method efficiently suppresses high-frequency components by discarding the higher order terms of the series expansion and then filtering out deviations on the field edges. An additional approximation is made in order to set the fluence values outside the field to zero in the robust profiles. This method is compared to the deconvolution kernel method for a regular 2D fluence map, a real intensity-modulated radiation therapy field, and a prostate case. The results show that accuracy is improved while fulfilling clinical planning requirements. (paper)

  16. Radiation problems in the design of the large electron-positron collider (LEP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fasso, A.; Goebel, K.; Hoefert, M.; Rau, G.; Schoenbacher, H.; Stevenson, G.R.; Sullivan, A.H.; Swanson, W.P.; Tuyn, J.W.N.

    1984-01-01

    This is a comprehensive review of the radiation problems taken into account in the design studies for the Large Electron-Positron collider (LEP) now under construction at CERN. It provides estimates and calculations of the magnitude of the most important hazards, including those from non-ionizing radiations and magnetic fields as well as from ionizing radiation, and describes the measures to be taken in the design, construction, and operation to limit them. Damage to components is considered as well as the risk to people. More general explanations are given of the physical processes and technical parameters that influence the production and effects of radiation, and a comprehensive bibliography provides access to the basic theories and other discussions of the subject. The report effectively summarizes the findings of the Working Group on LEP radiation problems and parallels the results of analogous studies made for the previous large accelerator. The concluding chapters describe the LEP radiation protection system, which is foreseen to reduce doses far below the legal limits for all those working with the machine or living nearby, and summarize the environmental impact. Costs are also briefly considered. (orig.)

  17. Direct Computation of Sound Radiation by Jet Flow Using Large-scale Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankbadi, R. R.; Shih, S. H.; Hixon, D. R.; Povinelli, L. A.

    1995-01-01

    Jet noise is directly predicted using large-scale equations. The computational domain is extended in order to directly capture the radiated field. As in conventional large-eddy-simulations, the effect of the unresolved scales on the resolved ones is accounted for. Special attention is given to boundary treatment to avoid spurious modes that can render the computed fluctuations totally unacceptable. Results are presented for a supersonic jet at Mach number 2.1.

  18. The linac control system for the large-scale synchrotron radiation facility (SPring-8)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakaki, Hironao; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Itoh, Yuichi [Atomic Energy General Services Corporation, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Terashima, Yasushi [Information Technology System Co., Ltd. (ITECS), Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-09-01

    The linac for large-scale synchrotron radiation facilities has been operated since August of 1996. The linac deal with the user requests without any big troubles. In this report, the control system development policy, details, and the operation for the linac are presented. It is also described so that these experiences can be used for control system of a large scale proton accelerators which will be developed in the High Intensity Proton Accelerator Project. (author)

  19. Method for determining correction factors induced by irradiation of ionization chamber cables in large radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, L.L.C.

    1988-01-01

    A simple method was developed to be suggested to hospital physicists in order to be followed during large radiation field dosimetry, to evaluate the effects of cables, connectors and extension cables irradiation and to determine correction factors for each system or geometry. All quality control tests were performed according to the International Electrotechnical Commission for three clinical dosimeters. Photon and electron irradiation effects for cables, connectors and extention cables were investigated under different experimental conditions by means of measurements of chamber sensitivity to a standard radiation source of 90 Sr. The radiation induced leakage current was also measured for cables, connectors and extension cables irradiated by photons and electrons. All measurements were performed at standard dosimetry conditions. Finally, measurements were performed in large fields. Cable factors and leakage factors were determined by the relation between chamber responses for irradiated and unirradiated cables. (author) [pt

  20. A new method for the determination of unknown neutron fluence for 14.0 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, Fariha [Physics Reasearch Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)]. E-mail: fariha@pinstech.org.pk; Khan, Ehsan U. [Department of Physics, CIIT, Islamabad (Pakistan); Qureshi, Imtinan [Physics Reasearch Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Husaini, Syed N. [Physics Reasearch Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Ahmad, Waqar [Physics Reasearch Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Rajput, Usman [Physics Reasearch Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Raza, Qaiser [Applied Physics Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2006-11-15

    Measuring the correct neutron fluence in various energy intervals in and around the neutron sources is important for the purpose of personnel and environmental neutron dosimetry. In this paper, we present a new method for the measurement of the fluence of mono-energetic neutrons having the energy of 14.0 MeV. The samples exposed to neutrons from the 14.0 MeV neutron generator at PINSTECH with various fluence values ranging from 10{sup 7} to 10{sup 10} n cm{sup -2} were etched for 10 min in 6 N NaOH at 70.0{+-}1.0 {sup o}C and the transmittance of UV radiation was measured using a spectrophotometer. This procedure was repeated 20 times after etching the same sample each time for increasing time intervals till the stage when transmittance reached the constant minimum value. An exponential decay of the transmittance has been observed with respect to the increasing etching time interval in each of the samples exposed to various neutron fluence. Further, it has also been observed that there is a linear relationship between the transmittance decay constant and neutron fluence. Hence, the linear graph can be used as a calibration for measuring the unknown fluence of 14.0 MeV neutrons.

  1. Very large amounts of radiation are needed to change cancer frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, A.; Couch, L.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: A marked radio-phobia or excessive fear of radiation exposure is shared by the general public. A major factor in this fear is that the perception that each and every radiation-induced ionization increases the risk for cancer, thus even the smallest radiation exposure needs to be avoided. It is important to realize that this is not the case. It requires very large amounts of radiation delivered to large populations to produce an increase in cancer frequency. This has been demonstrated in many in experimental systems, animal studies and in human populations. If either the population size or the dose is reduced it is not possible to detect an increase in cancer frequency. This paper deals with real radiation-induced increases in cancer frequency that are statistically significant, rather than in extrapolated or calculated small increases in radiation-induced risks using linear models. Further, it demonstrates that there are barriers below which increases in cancer cannot be detected. Finally, the manuscript helps explain that there are transitions in the mechanisms of biological action as a function of radiation dose with very different mechanisms being triggered at high and at low doses. These transitions suggest the need for paradigm shifts. Concepts such as hit theory, independence in individual cellular responses and single mutations being responsible for cancer need to be re-evaluated. New paradigms such as b ystander effects , showing that the size of the responding target is much larger than the hit target, adaptive response demonstrating that cell/cell communication modifies individual cellular responses and genomic instability that is not dependent on radiation induced mutations in individual cells

  2. Low-intensity red and infrared laser effects at high fluences on Escherichia coli cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barboza, L.L.; Campos, V.M.A.; Magalhaes, L.A.G. [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria; Paoli, F. [Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora (UFJF), Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Morfologia; Fonseca, A.S., E-mail: adnfonseca@ig.com.br [Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Ciencias Fisiologicas

    2015-10-15

    Semiconductor laser devices are readily available and practical radiation sources providing wavelength tenability and high monochromaticity. Low-intensity red and near-infrared lasers are considered safe for use in clinical applications. However, adverse effects can occur via free radical generation, and the biological effects of these lasers from unusually high fluences or high doses have not yet been evaluated. Here, we evaluated the survival, filamentation induction and morphology of Escherichia coli cells deficient in repair of oxidative DNA lesions when exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers at unusually high fluences. Cultures of wild-type (AB1157), endonuclease III-deficient (JW1625-1), and endonuclease IV-deficient (JW2146-1) E. coli, in exponential and stationary growth phases, were exposed to red and infrared lasers (0, 250, 500, and 1000 J/cm{sup 2}) to evaluate their survival rates, filamentation phenotype induction and cell morphologies. The results showed that low-intensity red and infrared lasers at high fluences are lethal, induce a filamentation phenotype, and alter the morphology of the E. coli cells. Low-intensity red and infrared lasers have potential to induce adverse effects on cells, whether used at unusually high fluences, or at high doses. Hence, there is a need to reinforce the importance of accurate dosimetry in therapeutic protocols. (author)

  3. Radiation from Large Gas Volumes and Heat Exchange in Steam Boiler Furnaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarov, A. N., E-mail: tgtu-kafedra-ese@mail.ru [Tver State Technical University (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    Radiation from large cylindrical gas volumes is studied as a means of simulating the flare in steam boiler furnaces. Calculations of heat exchange in a furnace by the zonal method and by simulation of the flare with cylindrical gas volumes are described. The latter method is more accurate and yields more reliable information on heat transfer processes taking place in furnaces.

  4. Effect of high fluence neutron irradiation on transport properties of thermoelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Leonard, K. J.

    2017-07-01

    Thermoelectric materials were subjected to high fluence neutron irradiation in order to understand the effect of radiation damage on transport properties. This study is relevant to the NASA Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) program in which thermoelectric elements are exposed to radiation over a long period of time in space missions. Selected n-type and p-type bismuth telluride materials were irradiated at the High Flux Isotope Reactor with a neutron fluence of 1.3 × 1018 n/cm2 (E > 0.1 MeV). The increase in the Seebeck coefficient in the n-type material was partially off-set by an increase in electrical resistivity, making the power factor higher at lower temperatures. For the p-type materials, although the Seebeck coefficient was not affected by irradiation, electrical resistivity decreased slightly. The figure of merit, zT, showed a clear drop in the 300-400 K range for the p-type material and an increase for the n-type material. Considering that the p-type and n-type materials are connected in series in a module, the overall irradiation damages at the device level were limited. These results, at neutron fluences exceeding a typical space mission, are significant to ensure that the radiation damage to thermoelectrics does not affect the performance of RTGs.

  5. Online measurement of fluence and position for protontherapy beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benati, C.; Boriano, A.; Bourhaleb, F.; Cirio, R.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cornelius, I.; Cuttone, G.; Donetti, M.; Garelli, E.; Giordanengo, S.; Guérin, L.; La Rosa, A.; Luparia, A.; Marchetto, F.; Martin, F.; Meyroneinc, S.; Peroni, C.; Pittà, G.; Raffaele, L.; Sabini, M. G.; Valastro, L.

    2004-09-01

    Tumour therapy with proton beams has been used for several decades in many centres with very good results in terms of local control and overall survival. Typical pathologies treated with this technique are located in head and neck, eye, prostate and in general at big depths or close to critical organs. The Experimental Physics Department of the University of Turin and the local Section of INFN, in collaboration with INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud Catania and Centre de Protontherapie de Orsay Paris, have developed detector systems that allow the measurement of beam position and fluence, obtained in real time during beam delivery. The centre in Catania (CATANA: Centro di AdroTerapia ed Applicazioni Nucleari Avanzate) has been treating patients with eye pathologies since spring 2002 using a superconducting cyclotron accelerating protons up to 62 MeV.This kind of treatments need high-resolution monitor systems and for this reason we have developed a 256-strip segmented ionisation chamber, each strip being 400 μm wide, with a total sensitive area 13×13 cm2. The Centre de Protontherapie de Orsay (CPO) has been operational since 1991 and features a synchrocyclotron used for eye and head and neck tumours with proton beams up to 200 MeV. The monitor system has to work on a large surface and for this purpose we have designed a pixel-segmented ionisation chamber, each pixel being 5×5 mm2, for a total active area of 16×16 cm2. The results obtained with two prototypes of the pixel and strip chambers demonstrate that the detectors allow the measurement of fluence and centre of gravity as requested by clinical specifications.

  6. Simulation of high fluence swelling behavior in technological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Powell, R.W.; Diamond, S.; Lauritzen, T.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Sprague, J.A.; Keefer, D.

    1977-06-01

    The U.S. Breeder Reactor Program is employing charged particle irradiation experiments at accelerated displacement rates to simulate neutron-induced microstructural changes in materials of technological interest. Applications of the simulation technique range from the study of fundamental microstructural mechanisms to the development of predictions of the high fluence swelling behavior of candidate alloys for breeder reactor ducts and fuel cladding. An exact equivalence probably cannot be established between all facets of the microstructural evolution which occurs in the disparate charged-particle and neutron environments. To aid in the correlation of data developed in the two environments an assessment has been made of the factors influencing the simulation process. A series of intercorrelation programs and analysis activities have been conducted to identify and explore the relevant phenomena. The factors found to exert substantial influence on the correlation process fall into two categories, one which deals with those variables which are atypical of the neutron environment and one which deals with the additional factors which arise due to the large differences in displacement rate of the two irradiation environments. While the various simulation techniques have been invaluable in determining the basic mechanisms and parametric dependencies of swelling, the potential of these tools in the confident prediction of swelling at high neutron fluence has yet to be realized. The basic problem lies in the inability of the simulation technique to reproduce the early microstructural development in the period that precedes and encompasses the incubation of voids. The concepts of temperature shift and dose equivalency have also been found to be more complicated than previously imagined. Preconditioning of metals in a neutron environment prior to simulation testing is now being employed in order to provide more appropriate starting microstructures

  7. A radiation service centre for research and large-scale irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Offermann, B.P.; Hofmann, E.G.

    1978-01-01

    In the near future radiation processing of food may change from the present laboratory-scale to large industrial application. This step will require large irradiation facilities with high flexibility, a safe dose control system and simple food-handling systems. Some design parameters of such an irradiation facility have already been realized at the AEG-Telefunken Radiation Service Centre in Wedel. This centre came into operation in autumn 1976. It is equipped with one research-type high-power X-ray unit (200kV/32mA) and one industrial-type electron accelerator (1500kV/37.5kW). Handling systems are available for radiation crosslinking of wire and cable insulations, of plastic films, for irradiation treatment of components and parts of different types and coatings as also of sewage sludge and waste water. Some of these handling systems can be used for food irradiation too. Other handling systems will be added sometime later. As an additional service the Company's existing material and environmental testing laboratory will be available. The centre is already being used by many interested companies to investigate the effects of radiation on a broad range of organic and inorganic materials, to develop special processing equipment, to process supplied products and to perform R and D work and contracts. The service centre fills an existing gap and will have an impact on the commercialization of radiation processing techniques in Europe. (author)

  8. IAEA Conference on Large Radiation Sources in Industry (Warsaw 1959): Which technologies of radiation processing survived and why?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagorski, Z.P.

    1999-01-01

    The IAEA has organized in Warsaw an International Conference on Large Radiation Sources in Industry from 8 to 12 September 1959. Proceedings of the Conference have been published in two volumes of summary amount of 925 pages. This report presents analysis, which technologies presented at the Conference have survived and why. The analysis is interesting because already in the fifties practically full range of possibilities of radiation processing was explored, and partially implemented. Not many new technologies were presented at the next IAEA Conferences on the same theme. Already at the time of the Warsaw Conference an important role of economy of the technology has recognized. The present report selects the achievements of the Conference into two groups: the first concerns technologies which have not been implemented in the next decades and the second group which is the basis of highly profitable, unsubsidized commercial production. The criterion of belonging of the technology to the second group, is the value of the quotient of the cost of the ready, saleable product diminished by the cost of a raw material before processing, to the expense of radiation processing, being the sum of irradiation cost and such operations as transportation of the object to and from the irradiation facility. Low value of the quotient, as compared to successful technologies is prophesying badly as concerns the future of the commercial proposal. A special position among objects of radiation processing is occupied by radiation processing technologies direct towards the protection or improving of the environment. Market economy does not apply here and the implementation has to be subsidized. (author)

  9. Preliminary Study of Position-Sensitive Large-Area Radiation Portal Monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Chang Hwy; Kim, Hyunok; Moon, Myung Kook [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jongyul [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong Won; Lim, Yong Kon [Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    An RPM, which is a passive inspection method, is a system for monitoring the movement of radioactive materials at an airport, seaport, border, etc. To detect a γ-ray, an RPM using the plastic scintillator is generally used. The method of γ-ray detection using an RPM with a plastic scintillator is to measure lights generated by an incident γ-ray in the scintillator. Generally, a large-area RPM uses one or two photomultiplier tubes (PMT) for light collection. However, in this study, we developed a 4-ch RPM that can measure the radiation signal using 4 PMTs. The reason for using 4 PMTs is to calculate the position of the radiation source. In addition, we developed an electric device for acquisition of a 4-ch output signal at the same time. To estimate the performance of the developed RPM, we performed an RPM test using a {sup 60}Co γ-ray check source. In this study, we performed the development of a 4-ch RPM. The major function of the typical RPM is to measure the radiation. However, we developed a position-sensitive 4-ch RPM, which can be used to measure the location of the radiation source, as well as the radiation measurement, at the same time. In the future, we plan to develop an algorithm for a position detection of the radiation. In addition, an algorithm will be applied to an RPM.

  10. Radiations: large scale monitoring in Japan; Radiations: suivi a grande echelle au Japon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linton, M.; Khalatbari, A.

    2011-10-15

    As the consequences of radioactive leaks on their health are a matter of concern for Japanese people, a large scale epidemiological study has been launched by the Fukushima medical university. It concerns the two millions inhabitants of the Fukushima Prefecture. On the national level and with the support of public funds, medical care and follow-up, as well as systematic controls are foreseen, notably to check the thyroid of 360.000 young people less than 18 year old and of 20.000 pregnant women in the Fukushima Prefecture. Some measurements have already been performed on young children. Despite the sometimes rather low measures, and because they know that some parts of the area are at least as much contaminated as it was the case around Chernobyl, some people are reluctant to go back home

  11. Large enhancement of highly energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt and its transport into the inner radiation belt inferred from MDS-1 satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, T.; Matsumoto, H.

    2016-03-01

    We have examined a large increase of relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt and its penetration into the inner radiation belt over slot region using the MDS-1 satellite observations. Result of analyses demonstrates that a large increase took place in the spring and autumn seasons, and we have newly confirmed that the penetration of outer belt electrons to the inner radiation zone took place during the big magnetic storms by examining a pitch angle distribution of the penetrating electrons.

  12. Neutron fluence determination for operation effectiveness assessment and prediction of WWER pressure vessel lifetime at the Kozloduy NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apostolov, T; Ilieva, K; Belousov, S; Petrova, T; Antonov, S; Ivanov, K; Prodanova, R; Penev, I; Taskaev, E [Bylgarska Akademiya na Naukite, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. za Yadrena Izsledvaniya i Yadrena Energetika; Ivanov, I; Tsokov, P; Nelov, N; Lilkov, B; Tsocheva, V; Monev, M; Velichkov, V; Kharalampieva, Ts [Kombinat Atomna Energetika, Kozloduj (Bulgaria)

    1996-12-31

    Embrittlement processes in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) metal have been investigated by neutron dosimetry. A software package for fluence calculations has been developed and used for evaluation of the accumulated neutron fluence, the critical temperature of radiation embrittlement and the RPV lifetime. A digital reactivity meter DR-8 has been introduced for continuous neutron fluence monitoring. Estimates of the neutron fluence and the radiation state of all 6 units of the Kozloduy NPP are presented. The Unit 4 RPV is in the best state regarding metal embrittlement, while the Units 2 and 3 can be safely operated up to the end of their design lifetime only using dummy cassettes. The neutron fluence accumulation in the Unit 1 RPV is quite big and can not be reduced with annealing. Activity measurements of the Unit 1 internal wall shavings are made after the 14-th cycle which show a good agreement with calculated values (1.10{sup 5} Bq/g). The critical embrittlement temperature of the Units 1 - 4 is estimated as a function of the working cycles. 11 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Fluence inhomogeneities due to a ripple filter induced Moiré effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringbæk, Toke Printz; Brons, Stephan; Naumann, Jakob; Ackermann, Benjamin; Horn, Julian; Latzel, Harald; Scheloske, Stefan; Galonska, Michael; Bassler, Niels; Zink, Klemens; Weber, Uli

    2015-02-07

    At particle therapy facilities with pencil beam scanning, the implementation of a ripple filter (RiFi) broadens the Bragg peak, so fewer energy steps from the accelerator are required for a homogeneous dose coverage of the planning target volume (PTV). However, sharply focusing the scanned pencil beams at the RiFi plane by ion optical settings can lead to a Moiré effect, causing fluence inhomogeneities at the isocenter. This has been experimentally proven at the Heidelberg Ionenstrahl-Therapiezentrum (HIT), Universitätsklinikum Heidelberg, Germany. 150 MeV u(-1) carbon-12 ions are used for irradiation with a 3 mm thick RiFi. The beam is focused in front of and as close to the RiFi plane as possible. The pencil beam width is estimated to be 0.78 mm at a 93 mm distance from the RiFi. Radiographic films are used to obtain the fluence profile 30 mm in front of the isocenter, 930 mm from the RiFi. The Monte Carlo (MC) code SHIELD-HIT12A is used to determine the RiFi-induced inhomogeneities in the fluence distribution at the isocenter for a similar setup, pencil beam widths at the RiFi plane ranging from σχ(RiFi to 1.2 mm and for scanning step sizes ranging from 1.5 to 3.7 mm. The beam application and monitoring system (BAMS) used at HIT is modelled and simulated. When the width of the pencil beams at the RiFi plane is much smaller than the scanning step size, the resulting inhomogeneous fluence distribution at the RiFi plane interfers with the inhomogeneous RiFi mass distribution and fluence inhomogeneity can be observed at the isocenter as large as an 8% deviation from the mean fluence. The inverse of the fluence ripple period at the isocenter is found to be the difference between the inverse of the RiFi period and the inverse of the scanning step size. We have been able to use MC simulations to reproduce the spacing of the ripple stripes seen in films irradiated at HIT. Our findings clearly indicate that pencil beams sharply focused near the RiFi plane result in

  14. Rapid-relocation model for describing high-fluence retention of rare gases implanted in solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmaack, K.

    2009-09-01

    to be due to bombardment induced relocation and reemission, only the remaining 10% (or less) can be attributed to sputter erosion. The relocation efficiency is interpreted as the 'speed' of radiation enhanced diffusion towards the surface. The directionality of diffusion is attributed to the gradient of the defect density on the large-depth side of the damage distribution where most of the implanted rare gas atoms come to rest. Based on SRIM calculations, two representative parameters are defined, the peak number of lattice displacements, Nd,m, and the spacing, △ zr,d, between the peaks of the range and the damage distributions. Support in favour of rapid rare gas relocation by radiation enhanced diffusion is provided by the finding that the relocation efficiencies for Ar and Xe, which vary by up to one order of magnitude, scale as Ψ=kN/Δz, independent to the implantation energy (10-80 keV Ar, 10-500 keV Xe), within an error margin of only ± 15%. The parameter k contains the properties of the implanted rare gas atoms. A recently described computer simulation model, which assumed that the pressure established by the implanted gas drives reemission, is shown to reproduce measured Xe profiles quite well, but only at that energy at which the fitting parameter of the model was determined (140 keV). Using the same parameter at other energies, deviations by up to a factor of four are observed.

  15. Characterization of saturation of CR-39 detector at high alpha-particle fluence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. El Ghazaly

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of saturation in the CR-39 detector reduces and limits its detection dynamic range; nevertheless, this range could be extended using spectroscopic techniques and by measuring the net bulk rate of the saturated CR-39 detector surface. CR-39 detectors were irradiated by 1.5 MeV high alpha-particle fluence varying from 0.06 × 108 to 7.36 × 108 alphas/cm2 from Am-241 source; thereafter, they were etched in a 6.25N NaOH solution at a temperature of 70°C for different durations. Net bulk etch rate measurement of the 1.5 MeV alpha-irradiated CR-39 detector surface revealed that rate increases with increasing etching time and reaches its maximum value at the end of the alpha-particle range. It is also correlated with the alpha-particle fluence. The measurements of UV–Visible (UV–Vis absorbance at 500 and 600 nm reveal that the absorbance is linearly correlated with the fluence of alpha particles at the etching times of 2 and 4 hour. For extended etching times of 6, 10, and 14.5 hour, the absorbance is saturated for fluence values of 4.05 × 108, 5.30 × 108, and 7.36 × 108 alphas/cm2. These new methods pave the way to extend the dynamic range of polymer-based solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs in measurement of high fluence of heavy ions as well as in radiation dosimetry. Keywords: Alpha Particle, Bulk Etch Rate, CR-39 Detector, Saturated Regime, UV–Vis Spectroscopy

  16. Measured thermal and fast neutron fluence rates for ATF-1 holders during ATR cycle 158B/159A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Larry Don [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Miller, David Torbet [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Walker, Billy Justin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-11-01

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>1MeV) neutron fluence rate data for the ATF-1 holders located in core for ATR Cycle 158B/159A which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML).

  17. Quantitation of the late effects of x radiation on the large intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, W.C.; Gomez, L.S.; Yuhas, J.M.; Kligerman, M.M.

    1980-01-01

    A model for quantitating late effects of x radiation on the large intestine utilizing the rectum of the Sprague-Dawley rat is reported. This model was constructed prefatory to establishing relative biological effectiveness for negative pions as a component of preclinical trials at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. The endpoint involves microscopic evaluation of the severity of the experimental lesion, compared with surgically resected bowel lesions we have studied following clinical radiation exposure of the bowel. Individual components of the overall lesion include mucosal ulceration, a typical epithelial regeneration, colitis cystica profunda, fibrosis, and vascular sclerosis. Dose response curves were established for animals receiving 1, 2, 5 and 10 fractions with groups sacrificed at both four and 12 months after completion of radiation exposures

  18. Solid phase epitaxy of amorphous silicon carbide: Ion fluence dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, I.-T.; Ishimaru, Manabu; Hirotsu, Yoshihiko; Sickafus, Kurt E.

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of radiation damage and impurity concentration on solid phase epitaxial growth of amorphous silicon carbide (SiC) as well as microstructures of recrystallized layer using transmission electron microscopy. Single crystals of 6H-SiC with (0001) orientation were irradiated with 150 keV Xe ions to fluences of 10 15 and 10 16 /cm 2 , followed by annealing at 890 deg. C. Full epitaxial recrystallization took place in a specimen implanted with 10 15 Xe ions, while retardation of recrystallization was observed in a specimen implanted with 10 16 /cm 2 Xe ions. Atomic pair-distribution function analyses and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy results suggested that the retardation of recrystallization of the 10 16 Xe/cm 2 implanted sample is attributed to the difference in amorphous structures between the 10 15 and 10 16 Xe/cm 2 implanted samples, i.e., more chemically disordered atomistic structure and higher Xe impurity concentration in the 10 16 Xe/cm 2 implanted sample

  19. Considerations for Observational Research Using Large Data Sets in Radiation Oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagsi, Reshma, E-mail: rjagsi@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Bekelman, Justin E. [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Medical Ethics and Health Policy, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Chen, Aileen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Chen, Ronald C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Hoffman, Karen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tina Shih, Ya-Chen [Department of Medicine, Section of Hospital Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Smith, Benjamin D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, and Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Yu, James B. [Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The radiation oncology community has witnessed growing interest in observational research conducted using large-scale data sources such as registries and claims-based data sets. With the growing emphasis on observational analyses in health care, the radiation oncology community must possess a sophisticated understanding of the methodological considerations of such studies in order to evaluate evidence appropriately to guide practice and policy. Because observational research has unique features that distinguish it from clinical trials and other forms of traditional radiation oncology research, the International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics assembled a panel of experts in health services research to provide a concise and well-referenced review, intended to be informative for the lay reader, as well as for scholars who wish to embark on such research without prior experience. This review begins by discussing the types of research questions relevant to radiation oncology that large-scale databases may help illuminate. It then describes major potential data sources for such endeavors, including information regarding access and insights regarding the strengths and limitations of each. Finally, it provides guidance regarding the analytical challenges that observational studies must confront, along with discussion of the techniques that have been developed to help minimize the impact of certain common analytical issues in observational analysis. Features characterizing a well-designed observational study include clearly defined research questions, careful selection of an appropriate data source, consultation with investigators with relevant methodological expertise, inclusion of sensitivity analyses, caution not to overinterpret small but significant differences, and recognition of limitations when trying to evaluate causality. This review concludes that carefully designed and executed studies using observational data that possess these qualities hold

  20. Considerations for Observational Research Using Large Data Sets in Radiation Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagsi, Reshma; Bekelman, Justin E.; Chen, Aileen; Chen, Ronald C.; Hoffman, Karen; Tina Shih, Ya-Chen; Smith, Benjamin D.; Yu, James B.

    2014-01-01

    The radiation oncology community has witnessed growing interest in observational research conducted using large-scale data sources such as registries and claims-based data sets. With the growing emphasis on observational analyses in health care, the radiation oncology community must possess a sophisticated understanding of the methodological considerations of such studies in order to evaluate evidence appropriately to guide practice and policy. Because observational research has unique features that distinguish it from clinical trials and other forms of traditional radiation oncology research, the International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics assembled a panel of experts in health services research to provide a concise and well-referenced review, intended to be informative for the lay reader, as well as for scholars who wish to embark on such research without prior experience. This review begins by discussing the types of research questions relevant to radiation oncology that large-scale databases may help illuminate. It then describes major potential data sources for such endeavors, including information regarding access and insights regarding the strengths and limitations of each. Finally, it provides guidance regarding the analytical challenges that observational studies must confront, along with discussion of the techniques that have been developed to help minimize the impact of certain common analytical issues in observational analysis. Features characterizing a well-designed observational study include clearly defined research questions, careful selection of an appropriate data source, consultation with investigators with relevant methodological expertise, inclusion of sensitivity analyses, caution not to overinterpret small but significant differences, and recognition of limitations when trying to evaluate causality. This review concludes that carefully designed and executed studies using observational data that possess these qualities hold

  1. Effects of laser fluence on silicon modification by four-beam laser interference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Le; Li, Dayou; Wang, Zuobin; Yue, Yong; Zhang, Jinjin; Yu, Miao; Li, Siwei

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the effects of laser fluence on silicon modification by four-beam laser interference. In this work, four-beam laser interference was used to pattern single crystal silicon wafers for the fabrication of surface structures, and the number of laser pulses was applied to the process in air. By controlling the parameters of laser irradiation, different shapes of silicon structures were fabricated. The results were obtained with the single laser fluence of 354 mJ/cm 2 , 495 mJ/cm 2 , and 637 mJ/cm 2 , the pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz, the laser exposure pulses of 30, 100, and 300, the laser wavelength of 1064 nm, and the pulse duration of 7–9 ns. The effects of the heat transfer and the radiation of laser interference plasma on silicon wafer surfaces were investigated. The equations of heat flow and radiation effects of laser plasma of interfering patterns in a four-beam laser interference distribution were proposed to describe their impacts on silicon wafer surfaces. The experimental results have shown that the laser fluence has to be properly selected for the fabrication of well-defined surface structures in a four-beam laser interference process. Laser interference patterns can directly fabricate different shape structures for their corresponding applications

  2. High-energy and high-fluence proton irradiation effects in silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, M.; Taylor, S.J.; Yang, M.; Matsuda, S.; Kawasaki, O.; Hisamatsu, T.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined proton irradiation damage in high-energy (1 endash 10 MeV) and high-fluence (approx-gt 10 13 cm -2 ) Si n + -p-p + structure space solar cells. Radiation testing has revealed an anomalous increase in short-circuit current I sc followed by an abrupt decrease and cell failure, induced by high-fluence proton irradiation. We propose a model to explain these phenomena by expressing the change in carrier concentration p of the base region as a function of the proton fluence in addition to the well-known model where the short-circuit current is decreased by minority-carrier lifetime reduction after irradiation. The reduction in carrier concentration due to majority-carrier trapping by radiation-induced defects has two effects. First, broadening of the depletion layer increases both the generation endash recombination current and also the contribution of the photocurrent generated in this region to the total photocurrent. Second, the resistivity of the base layer is increased, resulting in the abrupt decrease in the short circuit current and failure of the solar cells. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  3. Robust fluence map optimization via alternating direction method of multipliers with empirical parameter optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Hao

    2016-01-01

    For the treatment planning during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), beam fluence maps can be first optimized via fluence map optimization (FMO) under the given dose prescriptions and constraints to conformally deliver the radiation dose to the targets while sparing the organs-at-risk, and then segmented into deliverable MLC apertures via leaf or arc sequencing algorithms. This work is to develop an efficient algorithm for FMO based on alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM). Here we consider FMO with the least-square cost function and non-negative fluence constraints, and its solution algorithm is based on ADMM, which is efficient and simple-to-implement. In addition, an empirical method for optimizing the ADMM parameter is developed to improve the robustness of the ADMM algorithm. The ADMM based FMO solver was benchmarked with the quadratic programming method based on the interior-point (IP) method using the CORT dataset. The comparison results suggested the ADMM solver had a similar plan quality with slightly smaller total objective function value than IP. A simple-to-implement ADMM based FMO solver with empirical parameter optimization is proposed for IMRT or VMAT. (paper)

  4. Partially acoustic dark matter, interacting dark radiation, and large scale structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chacko, Zackaria [Maryland Center for Fundamental Physics, Department of Physics, University of Maryland,Stadium Dr., College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Cui, Yanou [Maryland Center for Fundamental Physics, Department of Physics, University of Maryland,Stadium Dr., College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California-Riverside,University Ave, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Perimeter Institute, 31 Caroline Street, North Waterloo, Ontario N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Hong, Sungwoo [Maryland Center for Fundamental Physics, Department of Physics, University of Maryland,Stadium Dr., College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Okui, Takemichi [Department of Physics, Florida State University,College Avenue, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Tsai, Yuhsinz [Maryland Center for Fundamental Physics, Department of Physics, University of Maryland,Stadium Dr., College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2016-12-21

    The standard paradigm of collisionless cold dark matter is in tension with measurements on large scales. In particular, the best fit values of the Hubble rate H{sub 0} and the matter density perturbation σ{sub 8} inferred from the cosmic microwave background seem inconsistent with the results from direct measurements. We show that both problems can be solved in a framework in which dark matter consists of two distinct components, a dominant component and a subdominant component. The primary component is cold and collisionless. The secondary component is also cold, but interacts strongly with dark radiation, which itself forms a tightly coupled fluid. The growth of density perturbations in the subdominant component is inhibited by dark acoustic oscillations due to its coupling to the dark radiation, solving the σ{sub 8} problem, while the presence of tightly coupled dark radiation ameliorates the H{sub 0} problem. The subdominant component of dark matter and dark radiation continue to remain in thermal equilibrium until late times, inhibiting the formation of a dark disk. We present an example of a simple model that naturally realizes this scenario in which both constituents of dark matter are thermal WIMPs. Our scenario can be tested by future stage-IV experiments designed to probe the CMB and large scale structure.

  5. Partially acoustic dark matter, interacting dark radiation, and large scale structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacko, Zackaria; Cui, Yanou; Hong, Sungwoo; Okui, Takemichi; Tsai, Yuhsinz

    2016-01-01

    The standard paradigm of collisionless cold dark matter is in tension with measurements on large scales. In particular, the best fit values of the Hubble rate H 0 and the matter density perturbation σ 8 inferred from the cosmic microwave background seem inconsistent with the results from direct measurements. We show that both problems can be solved in a framework in which dark matter consists of two distinct components, a dominant component and a subdominant component. The primary component is cold and collisionless. The secondary component is also cold, but interacts strongly with dark radiation, which itself forms a tightly coupled fluid. The growth of density perturbations in the subdominant component is inhibited by dark acoustic oscillations due to its coupling to the dark radiation, solving the σ 8 problem, while the presence of tightly coupled dark radiation ameliorates the H 0 problem. The subdominant component of dark matter and dark radiation continue to remain in thermal equilibrium until late times, inhibiting the formation of a dark disk. We present an example of a simple model that naturally realizes this scenario in which both constituents of dark matter are thermal WIMPs. Our scenario can be tested by future stage-IV experiments designed to probe the CMB and large scale structure.

  6. Hawking Radiation-Quasinormal Modes Correspondence for Large AdS Black Holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dao-Quan Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well-known that the nonstrictly thermal character of the Hawking radiation spectrum generates a natural correspondence between Hawking radiation and black hole quasinormal modes. This main issue has been analyzed in the framework of Schwarzschild black holes, Kerr black holes, and nonextremal Reissner-Nordstrom black holes. In this paper, by introducing the effective temperature, we reanalyze the nonstrictly thermal character of large AdS black holes. The results show that the effective mass corresponding to the effective temperature is approximatively the average one in any dimension. And the other effective quantities can also be obtained. Based on the known forms of frequency in quasinormal modes, we reanalyze the asymptotic frequencies of the large AdS black hole in three and five dimensions. Then we get the formulas of the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy and the horizon’s area quantization with functions of the quantum “overtone” number n.

  7. Post-mastectomy radiation in large node-negative breast tumors: Does size really matter?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floyd, Scott R.; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2009-01-01

    Treatment decisions regarding local control can be particularly challenging for T3N0 breast tumors because of difficulty in estimating rates of local failure after mastectomy. Reports in the literature detailing the rates of local failure vary widely, likely owing to the uncommon incidence of this clinical situation. The literature regarding this clinical scenario is reviewed, including recent reports that specifically address the issue of local failure rates after mastectomy in the absence of radiation for large node-negative breast tumors.

  8. Large scale geometry and evolution of a universe with radiation pressure and cosmological constant

    CERN Document Server

    Coquereaux, Robert; Coquereaux, Robert; Grossmann, Alex

    2000-01-01

    In view of new experimental results that strongly suggest a non-zero cosmological constant, it becomes interesting to revisit the Friedmann-Lemaitre model of evolution of a universe with cosmological constant and radiation pressure. In this paper, we discuss the explicit solutions for that model, and perform numerical explorations for reasonable values of cosmological parameters. We also analyse the behaviour of redshifts in such models and the description of ``very large scale geometrical features'' when analysed by distant observers.

  9. Electrical and optical analyses of low fluence fast neutron damage to JFETs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, A.; Charles, J.P.; Kerns, S.E.; Kerns, D.V. Jr.; Bardonnie, M. de la; Mialhe, P.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of fast neutron irradiation (30 MeV) on silicon n-channel JFETs are studied. Electrical parameters of the gate-channel junction are analysed at 3 fluences: 4,06*10 10 , 8,12*10 10 and 1,22*10 11 n/cm 2 for a flux of 2,82*10 6 n/s*cm 2 and using a custom software. Electrical parameter changes are attributed to bulk semi-conductor defects. Irradiation effects on passivation overlayers are evacuate using analysis of gate-channel junction electroluminescence. This study shows that even for low neutron fluences (10 11 n/cm 2 ), n-channel JFETs, characterized in direct conducting mode and submitted to neutron radiation, present a decrease in the reverse saturation current associated with recombination. (A.C.)

  10. Accuracy of helium accumulation fluence monitor for fast reactor dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Chikara; Aoyama, Takafumi [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1998-03-01

    A helium (He) accumulation fluence monitor (HAFM) has been developed for fast reactor dosimetry. In order to evaluate the measurement accuracy of neutron fluence by the HAFM method, the HAFMs of enriched boron (B) and beryllium (Be) were irradiated in the Fast Neutron Source Reactor `YAYOI`. The number of He atoms produced in the HAFMs were measured and compared with the calculated values. As a result of this study, it was confirmed that the neutron fluence could be measured within 5 % by the HAFM method, and that met the required accuracy for fast reactor dosimetry. (author)

  11. The key network communication technology in large radiation image cooperative process system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zheng; Kang Kejun; Gao Wenhuan; Wang Jingjin

    1998-01-01

    Large container inspection system (LCIS) based on radiation imaging technology is a powerful tool for the customs to check the contents inside a large container without opening it. An image distributed network system is composed of operation manager station, image acquisition station, environment control station, inspection processing station, check-in station, check-out station, database station by using advanced network technology. Mass data, such as container image data, container general information, manifest scanning data, commands and status, must be on-line transferred between different stations. Advanced network communication technology is presented

  12. Sampling strategy for a large scale indoor radiation survey - a pilot project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strand, T.; Stranden, E.

    1986-01-01

    Optimisation of a stratified random sampling strategy for large scale indoor radiation surveys is discussed. It is based on the results from a small scale pilot project where variances in dose rates within different categories of houses were assessed. By selecting a predetermined precision level for the mean dose rate in a given region, the number of measurements needed can be optimised. The results of a pilot project in Norway are presented together with the development of the final sampling strategy for a planned large scale survey. (author)

  13. Changes in the relationship between solar radiation and sunshine duration in large cities of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jiandong; Linderholm, Hans; Chen, Deliang; Zhou, Xiuji; Flerchinger, Gerald N.; Yu, Qiang; Du, Jun; Wu, Dingrong; Shen, Yanbo; Yang, Zhenbin

    2015-01-01

    Based on the linear relationship between solar radiation and sunshine duration, the Angstrom model is widely used to estimate solar radiation from routinely observed meteorological variables for energy exploitation. However, the relationship may have changed in quickly developing regions in the recent decades under global “dimming” and “brightening” context, with increasing aerosols due to industrial pollutions. Solar radiation stations under different climate conditions in six large cities in China are selected to test this hypothesis. Analysis of the related meteorological items shows that Guiyang has the lowest solar radiation with the average annual value of 10.5 MJm −2 d −1 , while Lhasa on the Tibetan Plateau has the highest of 20.1 MJm −2 d −1 . Both radiation and sunshine hours decreased from 1961 to 2010, but at different rates. A moving linear regression method is used to investigate the changes in the relationship between radiation and sunshine duration, the results indicate an abrupt change in the correlation coefficients in 1980–1990s, which can be attributed to the aerosol load resulting from air pollution caused by the industrial development in 1980s under China's Open Door Policy. The sky condition has been changing from clean to dirty, thus the relationship between solar radiation and duration changes in the 1980's and has recovered in the recent decades. This finding implies that it might not necessarily be right to use long data sets for model calibration. Further investigation confirms that the Angstrom model performs the best with higher NSE (nash-sutcliffe efficiency) of 0.914 and lower MAPE (mean absolute percentage error) and RMSE (root mean square error) values of 13.7 w/m 2 and 23.9 w/m 2 respectively, when calibrated with a 10-year data set. In contrast, the model performs worst when it is calibrated with a 40-year data set, with NSE, MAPE and RMSE values of 0.891, 15.1 w/m 2 and 25.3 w/m 2 , respectively

  14. A deployable in vivo EPR tooth dosimeter for triage after a radiation event involving large populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Benjamin B.; Dong, Ruhong; Flood, Ann Barry; Grinberg, Oleg; Kmiec, Maciej; Lesniewski, Piotr N.; Matthews, Thomas P.; Nicolalde, Roberto J.; Raynolds, Tim; Salikhov, Ildar K.; Swartz, Harold M.

    2011-01-01

    In order to meet the potential need for emergency large-scale retrospective radiation biodosimetry following an accident or attack, we have developed instrumentation and methodology for in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to quantify concentrations of radiation-induced radicals within intact teeth. This technique has several very desirable characteristics for triage, including independence from confounding biologic factors, a non-invasive measurement procedure, the capability to make measurements at any time after the event, suitability for use by non-expert operators at the site of an event, and the ability to provide immediate estimates of individual doses. Throughout development there has been a particular focus on the need for a deployable system, including instrumental requirements for transport and field use, the need for high throughput, and use by minimally trained operators. Numerous measurements have been performed using this system in clinical and other non-laboratory settings, including in vivo measurements with unexposed populations as well as patients undergoing radiation therapies. The collection and analyses of sets of three serially-acquired spectra with independent placements of the resonator, in a data collection process lasting approximately 5 min, provides dose estimates with standard errors of prediction of approximately 1 Gy. As an example, measurements were performed on incisor teeth of subjects who had either received no irradiation or 2 Gy total body irradiation for prior bone marrow transplantation; this exercise provided a direct and challenging test of our capability to identify subjects who would be in need of acute medical care. -- Highlights: → Advances in radiation biodosimetry are needed for large-scale emergency response. → Radiation-induced radicals in tooth enamel can be measured using in vivo EPR. → A novel transportable spectrometer was applied in the laboratory and at remote sites. → The current

  15. A deployable in vivo EPR tooth dosimeter for triage after a radiation event involving large populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Benjamin B., E-mail: Benjamin.B.Williams@dartmouth.edu [Dartmouth Physically Based Biodosimetry Center for Medical Countermeasures Against Radiation (Dart-Dose CMCR), Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH 03768 (United States); Section of Radiation Oncology, Department of Medicine, Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH (United States); Dong, Ruhong [Dartmouth Physically Based Biodosimetry Center for Medical Countermeasures Against Radiation (Dart-Dose CMCR), Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH 03768 (United States); Flood, Ann Barry [Dartmouth Physically Based Biodosimetry Center for Medical Countermeasures Against Radiation (Dart-Dose CMCR), Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH 03768 (United States); Clin-EPR, LLC, Lyme, NH (United States); Grinberg, Oleg [Clin-EPR, LLC, Lyme, NH (United States); Kmiec, Maciej; Lesniewski, Piotr N.; Matthews, Thomas P.; Nicolalde, Roberto J.; Raynolds, Tim [Dartmouth Physically Based Biodosimetry Center for Medical Countermeasures Against Radiation (Dart-Dose CMCR), Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH 03768 (United States); Salikhov, Ildar K. [Clin-EPR, LLC, Lyme, NH (United States); Swartz, Harold M. [Dartmouth Physically Based Biodosimetry Center for Medical Countermeasures Against Radiation (Dart-Dose CMCR), Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH 03768 (United States); Clin-EPR, LLC, Lyme, NH (United States)

    2011-09-15

    In order to meet the potential need for emergency large-scale retrospective radiation biodosimetry following an accident or attack, we have developed instrumentation and methodology for in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to quantify concentrations of radiation-induced radicals within intact teeth. This technique has several very desirable characteristics for triage, including independence from confounding biologic factors, a non-invasive measurement procedure, the capability to make measurements at any time after the event, suitability for use by non-expert operators at the site of an event, and the ability to provide immediate estimates of individual doses. Throughout development there has been a particular focus on the need for a deployable system, including instrumental requirements for transport and field use, the need for high throughput, and use by minimally trained operators. Numerous measurements have been performed using this system in clinical and other non-laboratory settings, including in vivo measurements with unexposed populations as well as patients undergoing radiation therapies. The collection and analyses of sets of three serially-acquired spectra with independent placements of the resonator, in a data collection process lasting approximately 5 min, provides dose estimates with standard errors of prediction of approximately 1 Gy. As an example, measurements were performed on incisor teeth of subjects who had either received no irradiation or 2 Gy total body irradiation for prior bone marrow transplantation; this exercise provided a direct and challenging test of our capability to identify subjects who would be in need of acute medical care. -- Highlights: > Advances in radiation biodosimetry are needed for large-scale emergency response. > Radiation-induced radicals in tooth enamel can be measured using in vivo EPR. > A novel transportable spectrometer was applied in the laboratory and at remote sites. > The current instrument

  16. Radiation effects in concrete for nuclear power plants – Part I: Quantification of radiation exposure and radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, K.G.; Remec, I.; Pape, Y. Le

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Neutron and gamma rays fields in concrete biological shield are calculated. • An extensive database on irradiated concrete properties has been collected. • Concrete mechanical properties decrease beyond 1.0 × 10 19 n/cm 2 fluence. • Loss of properties appears correlated with radiation induced-aggregate swelling. • Commercial reactor bio-shield may experience long-term irradiation damage. - Abstract: A large fraction of light water reactor (LWR) construction utilizes concrete, including safety-related structures such as the biological shielding and containment building. Concrete is an inherently complex material, with the properties of concrete structures changing over their lifetime due to the intrinsic nature of concrete and influences from local environment. As concrete structures within LWRs age, the total neutron fluence exposure of the components, in particular the biological shield, can increase to levels where deleterious effects are introduced as a result of neutron irradiation. This work summarizes the current state of the art on irradiated concrete, including a review of the current literature and estimates the total neutron fluence expected in biological shields in typical LWR configurations. It was found a first-order mechanism for loss of mechanical properties of irradiated concrete is due to radiation-induced swelling of aggregates, which leads to volumetric expansion of the concrete. This phenomena is estimated to occur near the end of life of biological shield components in LWRs based on calculations of estimated peak neutron fluence in the shield after 80 years of operation

  17. Neutron fluence determination for light water reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.

    1994-01-01

    A general description of limitations that exist in pressure vessel neutron fluence determinations for commercial light water reactors is presented. Complexity factors that arise in light water reactor pressure vessel neutron fluence calculations are identified and used to analyze calculational limitations. Two broad categories of calculational limitations are introduced, namely benchmark field limitations and deep penetration limitations. Explicit examples of limitations that can arise in each of these two broad categories are presented. These limitations are used to show that the recent draft regulatory guide for the determination of pressure vessel neutron fluence, developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is based upon procedures and assumptions that are not valid. To eliminate the complexity and limitations of calculational methods, it is recommended that the determination of light water reactor pressure vessel neutron fluence be based upon experiment. Recommendations for improved methods of pressure vessel surveillance neutron dosimetry are advanced

  18. Ringhals unit 3 and 4 - Fluence determination in a historic and future perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, E.L. [Primary Systems Inspection and Repair, Vattenfall/Ringhals AB, 432 85 Vaeroebacka (Sweden); Rouden, J. [Material and Analytical Services, Vattenfall/Ringhals AB, 432 85 Vaeroebacka (Sweden); Efsing, P. [Materials Mechanics, Research and Nuclear Development, Vattenfall/Ringhals AB, 432 85 Vaeroebacka (Sweden)

    2011-07-01

    Document available in abstract form only, full text of document follows: The Ringhals site is situated on the Swedish southwest coastline. At the site, there are four operating nuclear power plants. Historically, the Swedish policy has been that the nuclear power plants were to be closed in 2010. The present position is to operate the units until their technical and economic lifetime has run out. The units shall be maintained and invested in to ensure a lifetime of at least 50 years, but the actions taken shall not limit the time to this date. When the initial surveillance capsules were evaluated, it was noted that the material properties of the weld material of unit 3 and 4 showed some deviations from the expected behaviour. Currently there is an extensive project running for re-evaluating the embrittlement situation from a long-term operating perspective. One part of the project is aimed at more accurately determining the fluence levels of the reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). The basis for the early evaluations of the dosimeters in the surveillance capsules and the corresponding fluence evaluation had an operating lifetime of 25 years as a target value. Therefore, the accuracy and refinement of the measurement and calculation were taken to be good enough to suit this life span. Looking back at the results from the dosimetry measurements there are a few discrepancies. Some of the dosimeters were disintegrated and some measurements had comparatively large uncertainties. When starting this project there were some re-evaluations done with the old fluence prediction model. For every new run and refinement there appeared new difficulties, and the decision was to start the evaluation from scratch. Then there are two questions remaining regarding the fluence: What is the current fluence level? What will the resulting fluence be after 60 years of operation, when we have up-rated output power of both reactors? This paper aims to describe the view of the fluence evaluation

  19. Reliable detection of fluence anomalies in EPID-based IMRT pretreatment quality assurance using pixel intensity deviations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, J. J.; Gardner, J. K.; Wang, S.; Siebers, J. V.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This work uses repeat images of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fields to quantify fluence anomalies (i.e., delivery errors) that can be reliably detected in electronic portal images used for IMRT pretreatment quality assurance. Methods: Repeat images of 11 clinical IMRT fields are acquired on a Varian Trilogy linear accelerator at energies of 6 MV and 18 MV. Acquired images are corrected for output variations and registered to minimize the impact of linear accelerator and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) positioning deviations. Detection studies are performed in which rectangular anomalies of various sizes are inserted into the images. The performance of detection strategies based on pixel intensity deviations (PIDs) and gamma indices is evaluated using receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results: Residual differences between registered images are due to interfraction positional deviations of jaws and multileaf collimator leaves, plus imager noise. Positional deviations produce large intensity differences that degrade anomaly detection. Gradient effects are suppressed in PIDs using gradient scaling. Background noise is suppressed using median filtering. In the majority of images, PID-based detection strategies can reliably detect fluence anomalies of ≥5% in ∼1 mm 2 areas and ≥2% in ∼20 mm 2 areas. Conclusions: The ability to detect small dose differences (≤2%) depends strongly on the level of background noise. This in turn depends on the accuracy of image registration, the quality of the reference image, and field properties. The longer term aim of this work is to develop accurate and reliable methods of detecting IMRT delivery errors and variations. The ability to resolve small anomalies will allow the accuracy of advanced treatment techniques, such as image guided, adaptive, and arc therapies, to be quantified.

  20. Recoil mixing in high-fluence ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littmark, U.; Hofer, W.O.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of recoil mixing on the collection and depth distribution of implanted projectiles during high-fluence irradiation of a random solid is investigated by model calculations based on a previously published transport theoretical approach to the general problem of recoil mixing. The most pronounced effects are observed in the maximum implantable amount of projectiles and in the critical fluence for saturation. Both values are significantly increased by recoil mixing. (Auth.)

  1. Fast fluence measurement for JOYO irradiation field using niobium dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Chikara

    2004-03-01

    Neutron fluence and spectrum are key parameters in various irradiation tests and material surveillance tests so they need to be evaluated accurately. The reactor dosimetry test has been conducted by the multiple foil activation method, and a niobium dosimeter has been developed for measurement of fast neutron fluence in the experimental fast reactor JOYO. The inelastic scattering reaction of 93 Nb has a low threshold energy, about 30 keV, and the energy distribution of reaction cross section is similar to the displacement cross section for iron. Therefore, a niobium dosimeter is suitable for evaluation of the fast neutron fluence and the displacement per atom for iron. Moreover, a niobium dosimeter is suited to measure neutron fluence in long-term irradiation test because 93 Nb, which is produced by the reaction, has a long half-life (16.4 years). This study established a high precision measurement technique using the niobium reaction rate. The effect of self-absorption was decreased by the solution and evaporation to dryness of niobium dosimeter. The dosimeter weight was precisely measured using the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. This technique was applied to JOYO dosimetry. The fast neutron fluences (E > 0.1 MeV) found by measuring the reaction rate in the niobium dosimeter were compared with the values evaluated using the multiple foil activation method. The ratio of measured fast neutron fluences by means of niobium dosimeter and multiple foil activation method range from 0.97 to 1.03 and agree within the experimental uncertainty. The measurement errors of fast neutron fluence by niobium dosimeter range from 4.5% (fuel region) to 10.1% (in-vessel storage rack). As a result of this study, the high precision measurement of fast neutron fluence by niobium dosimeters was confirmed. The accuracy of fast reactor dosimetry will be improved by application of niobium dosimeters to the irradiation tests in the JOYO MK-III core. (author)

  2. Neutron dosimetry intercomparison run for verification of the neutron fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penev, I.; Kinova, L.

    2001-01-01

    For the neutron fluence verification the intercomparison runs Balakovo and KORPUS have been carried out. The participation in the international intercomparison runs shows that in order to more precisely verify the calculated values of the neutron fluence more intercomparison exercises are necessary. Due to such exercises the results improved after calibration of Nb performed and are in a very good agreement with RIIAR results in spite of the different approaches in the determination of its activity

  3. Radiative and Dynamical Feedbacks Limit the Climate Response to Extremely Large Volcanic Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, D. C.; Vidal, C. M.; Keeble, J. M.; Griffiths, P. T.; Archibald, A. T.

    2017-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions are a major cause of chemical and climatic perturbations to the atmosphere, injecting chemically and radiatively active species such as sulfur dioxide (SO2) into the stratosphere. The rate determining step for sulfate aerosol production is SO2 + OH +M → HSO3 +M. This means that chemical feedbacks on the hydroxyl radical, OH, can modulate the production rate of sulfate aerosol and hence the climate effects of large volcanic eruptions. Radiative feedbacks due to aerosols, ozone and sulfur dioxide and subsequent dynamical changes also affect the evolution of the aerosol cloud. Here we assess the role of radiative and chemical feedbacks on sulfate aerosol production using UM-UKCA, a chemistry-climate model coupled to GLOMAP, a prognostic modal aerosol model. A 200 Tg (10x Pinatubo) emission scenario is investigated. Accounting for radiative feedbacks, the SO2 lifetime is 55 days compared to 26 days in the baseline 20 Tg (1x Pinatubo) simulation. By contrast, if all radiative feedbacks are neglected the lifetime is 73 days. Including radiative feedbacks reduces the SO2 lifetime: heating of the lower stratosphere by aerosol increases upwelling and increases transport of water vapour across the tropopause, increasing OH concentrations. The maximum effective radius of the aerosol particles increases from 1.09 µm to 1.34 µm as the production of aerosol is quicker. Larger and fewer aerosol particles are produced which are less effective at scattering shortwave radiation and will more quickly sediment from the stratosphere. As a result, the resulting climate cooling by the eruption will be less strong when accounting for these radiative feedbacks. We illustrate the consequences of these effects for the 1257 Samalas eruption, the largest common era volcanic eruption, using UM-UKCA in a coupled atmosphere-ocean configuration. As a potentially halogen rich eruption, we investigate the differing ozone response to halogen-rich and halogen

  4. Measured thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, ATR Cycle 102-A, 11/28/93 thru 1/16/94

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, R.K.; Rogers, J.W.

    1994-02-01

    This report contains the thermal (2,200 m/s) and fast (E > 1MeV) neutron fluence rate data for ATR Cycle 102-A which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML) as requested by the Power Reactor Programs (ATR Experiments) Radiation Measurements Work Order. This report contains fluence rate values corresponding to the particular elevations (relative to the 80 ft. core elevation) where the measurements were taken. The data in this report consists of (1) a table of the ATR power history and distribution, (2) a hard copy listing of all thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, (3) plots of both the thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, and (4) a magnetic record (3.5 inch diskette) containing a listing of only the fast neutron fluence rates, their assigned elevations and proper header identification of all monitor positions contained herein. The fluence rates reported are for the average power levels given in the table of power history and distribution. All ''H'' holder monitoring wires for this cycle are 54 inches long. All ''SR'' holder monitor wires for this cycle are 55 inches long. This length allows measurement of the full core region and makes the first count elevation 24.73 inches above core midplane. Due to the safety rod problems in the west lobe, ''BR'' holders were used in the W-1, 2, 3, and 4 positions. All ''BR'' holder monitor wires for this cycle are 56.25 inches long. The distance from the end of the wires to the first count position was 4.25 inches for all wires counted from this cycle

  5. Measured thermal and fast neutron fluence rates ATR Cycle 99-A, November 23, 1992--January 23, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, R.K.; Rogers, J.W.

    1993-03-01

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>me) neutron fluence rate data for ATR Cycle 99-A which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML) as requested by the Power ReactorPrograms (ATR Experiments) Radiation Measurements Work Order. This report contains fluence rate values corresponding to the particular elevations (relative to the 80 ft. core elevation) where the measurements were taken. The data in this report consists of (1) a table of the ATR power history and distribution, (2) a hard copy listing of all thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, (3) plots of both the thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, and (4) a magnetic record (3.5 inch diskette) containing a listing of only the fast neutron fluence rates, their assigned elevations and proper header identification of all monitor positions contained herein. The fluence rates reported are for the average power levels given in the table of power history and distribution. All ''H'' holder monitor wires for this cycle are 54 inches long. All ''SR'' holder monitor wires for this cycle are 55 inches long. This length allows measurement of the full core region and makes the first count elevation 24.73 inches above core midplane. Due to the safety rod problems in the west lobe, ''BR'' holders were used in the W-1, 2, 3, and 4 positions. All ''BR'' holder monitor wires for this cycle are 56.25 inches long. The distance from the end of the wires to the first count position was 4.25 inches for all wires counted from this cycle

  6. Exploring the Large Scale Anisotropy in the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation at 170 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganga, Kenneth Matthew

    1994-01-01

    In this thesis, data from the Far Infra-Red Survey (FIRS), a balloon-borne experiment designed to measure the large scale anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation, are analyzed. The FIRS operates in four frequency bands at 170, 280, 480, and 670 GHz, using an approximately Gaussian beam with a 3.8 deg full-width-at-half-maximum. A cross-correlation with the COBE/DMR first-year maps yields significant results, confirming the DMR detection of anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation. Analysis of the FIRS data alone sets bounds on the amplitude of anisotropy under the assumption that the fluctuations are described by a Harrison-Peebles-Zel'dovich spectrum and further analysis sets limits on the index of the primordial density fluctuations for an Einstein-DeSitter universe. Galactic dust emission is discussed and limits are set on the magnitude of possible systematic errors in the measurement.

  7. REIONIZATION ON LARGE SCALES. I. A PARAMETRIC MODEL CONSTRUCTED FROM RADIATION-HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battaglia, N.; Trac, H.; Cen, R.; Loeb, A.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new method for modeling inhomogeneous cosmic reionization on large scales. Utilizing high-resolution radiation-hydrodynamic simulations with 2048 3 dark matter particles, 2048 3 gas cells, and 17 billion adaptive rays in a L = 100 Mpc h –1 box, we show that the density and reionization redshift fields are highly correlated on large scales (∼> 1 Mpc h –1 ). This correlation can be statistically represented by a scale-dependent linear bias. We construct a parametric function for the bias, which is then used to filter any large-scale density field to derive the corresponding spatially varying reionization redshift field. The parametric model has three free parameters that can be reduced to one free parameter when we fit the two bias parameters to simulation results. We can differentiate degenerate combinations of the bias parameters by combining results for the global ionization histories and correlation length between ionized regions. Unlike previous semi-analytic models, the evolution of the reionization redshift field in our model is directly compared cell by cell against simulations and performs well in all tests. Our model maps the high-resolution, intermediate-volume radiation-hydrodynamic simulations onto lower-resolution, larger-volume N-body simulations (∼> 2 Gpc h –1 ) in order to make mock observations and theoretical predictions

  8. Development of the processing software package for RPV neutron fluence determination methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belousov, S.; Kirilova, K.; Ilieva, K.

    2001-01-01

    According to the INRNE methodology the neutron transport calculation is carried out by two steps. At the first step reactor core eigenvalue calculation is performed. This calculation is used for determination of the fixed source for the next step calculation of neutron transport from the reactor core to the RPV. Both calculation steps are performed by state of the art and tested codes. The interface software package DOSRC developed at INRNE is used as a link between these two calculations. The package transforms reactor core calculation results to neutron source input data in format appropriate for the neutron transport codes (DORT, TORT and ASYNT) based on the discrete ordinates method. These codes are applied for calculation of the RPV neutron flux and its responses - induced activity, radiation damage, neutron fluence etc. Fore more precise estimation of the neutron fluence, the INRNE methodology has been supplemented by the next improvements: - implementation of more advanced codes (PYTHIA/DERAB) for neutron-physics parameter calculations; - more detailed neutron source presentation; - verification of neutron fluence by statistically treated experimental data. (author)

  9. Cryogenic and radiation hard ASIC design for large format NIR/SWIR detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peng; Dupont, Benoit; Dierickx, Bart; Müller, Eric; Verbruggen, Geert; Gielis, Stijn; Valvekens, Ramses

    2014-10-01

    An ASIC is developed to control and data quantization for large format NIR/SWIR detector arrays. Both cryogenic and space radiation environment issue are considered during the design. Therefore it can be integrated in the cryogenic chamber, which reduces significantly the vast amount of long wires going in and out the cryogenic chamber, i.e. benefits EMI and noise concerns, as well as the power consumption of cooling system and interfacing circuits. In this paper, we will describe the development of this prototype ASIC for image sensor driving and signal processing as well as the testing in both room and cryogenic temperature.

  10. Cryogenic and radiation-hard asic for interfacing large format NIR/SWIR detector arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peng; Dupont, Benoit; Dierickx, Bart; Müller, Eric; Verbruggen, Geert; Gielis, Stijn; Valvekens, Ramses

    2017-11-01

    For scientific and earth observation space missions, weight and power consumption is usually a critical factor. In order to obtain better vehicle integration, efficiency and controllability for large format NIR/SWIR detector arrays, a prototype ASIC is designed. It performs multiple detector array interfacing, power regulation and data acquisition operations inside the cryogenic chambers. Both operation commands and imaging data are communicated via the SpaceWire interface which will significantly reduce the number of wire goes in and out the cryogenic chamber. This "ASIC" prototype is realized in 0.18um CMOS technology and is designed for radiation hardness.

  11. Molecular evidence for the induction of large interstitial deletions on mouse chromosome 8 by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turker, Mitchell S.; Pieretti, Maura; Kumar, Sudha

    1997-01-01

    The P19H22 mouse embryonal carcinoma cell line is characterized by a hemizygous deficiency for the chromosome 8 encoded aprt (adenine phosphoribosyltransferase) gene and heterozygosity for many chromosome 8 loci. We have previously demonstrated that this cell line is suitable for mutational studies because it is permissive of events ranging in size from base-pair substitutions at the aprt locus to apparent loss of chromosome 8. Large mutational events, defined by loss of the remaining aprt allele, were found to predominate in spontaneous mutants and those induced by ionizing radiation. In this study we have used a PCR based assay to screen for loss of heterozygosity at microsatellite loci both proximal and distal to aprt in 137 Cs-induced and spontaneous aprt mutants. This approach allowed us to distinguish apparent interstitial deletional events from apparent recombinational events. Significantly, 32.5% (26 of 80) of the mutational events induced by 137 Cs appeared to be interstitial deletions as compared with 7.7% (6 of 78) in the spontaneous group. This difference was statistically significant (p 137 Cs caused a significant number of deletion mutations. Most 137 Cs-induced interstitial deletions were larger than 6 cM, whereas none of the spontaneous deletions were larger than 6 cM. These results provide further support for the notion that ionizing radiation induces deletion mutations and validate the use of the P19H22 cell line for the study of events induced by ionizing radiation

  12. Analysis of noise radiation mechanisms in hot subsonic jet from a validated large eddy simulation solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorteau, Mathieu, E-mail: mathieu.lorteau@onera.fr; Cléro, Franck, E-mail: franck.clero@onera.fr; Vuillot, François, E-mail: francois.vuillot@onera.fr [Onera–The French Aerospace Lab, F-92322 Châtillon (France)

    2015-07-15

    In the framework of jet noise computation, a numerical simulation of a subsonic turbulent hot jet is performed using large-eddy simulation. A geometrical tripping is used in order to trigger the turbulence at the nozzle exit. In a first part, the validity of the simulation is assessed by comparison with experimental measurements. The mean and rms velocity fields show good agreement, so do the azimuthal composition of the near pressure field and the far field spectra. Discrepancies remain close to the nozzle exit which lead to a limited overestimation of the pressure levels in both near and far fields, especially near the 90{sup ∘} angular sector. Two point correlation analyses are then applied to the data obtained from the simulation. These enable to link the downstream acoustic radiation, which is the main direction of radiation, to pressure waves developing in the shear layer and propagating toward the potential core end. The intermittency of the downstream acoustic radiation is evidenced and related to the coherent structures developing in the shear layer.

  13. Rapid monitoring of large groups of internally contaminated people following a radiation accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    In the management of an emergency, it is necessary to assess the radiation exposures of people in the affected areas. An essential component in the programme is the monitoring of internal contamination. Existing fixed installations for the assessment of incorporated radionuclides may be of limited value in these circumstances because they may be inconveniently sited, oversensitive for the purpose, or inadequately equipped and staffed to cope with the large numbers referred to them. The IAEA considered it important to produce guidance on rapid monitoring of large groups of internally contaminated people. The purpose of this document is to provide Member States with an overview on techniques that can be applied during abnormal or accidental situations. Refs and figs

  14. CERN 's large hadron collider : Radiation protection aspects of design and commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forkel-Wirth, Doris; Brugger, Markus; Menzel, Hans; Roesler, Stefan; Vincke, Heinz; Vincke, Helmut

    2008-01-01

    Full text: CERN, the world's largest particle physics laboratory provides high energy hadron beams for experiments exploring matter. For this purpose various accelerators are operated and in 2008 the last link will be added to the accelerator chain: beam will be injected into CERN 's new 'flagship', the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). From then on high energy physics experiments will exploit the LHC 's colliding beams of protons and lead ions with a center of mass energy of 14 TeV and 1150 TeV, respectively. Radiation Protection aspects were taken into account during the whole duration of the design phase. Conservative design constraints were defined in 1996; some years later some of them, in particular with respect to the dose to occupational exposed workers, had to be readjusted to account for the latest development in CERN 's radiation protection rules and regulations. Numerous radiation protection studies had been performed to ensure a lay-out of the machine and its experiments in compliance with these constraints. These studies assessed all radiation risks related to the various beam-operation modes of the accelerator. In all cases external exposure was identified as the major risk: due to high energetic, mixed radiation fields during beam-on and due to beta and gamma radiation fields caused by induced radioactivity during beam-off. Counter measures were implemented like an optimized beam operation to limit beam losses, installation of thick shielding, prohibition of access to the major part of the LHC underground areas during beam-operation and optimization of the equipment and its handling during maintenance and repair. Detailed Monte Carlo simulations were performed to derive from the various beam loss scenarios the dose rates the workers will be exposed to. Individual and collective doses were projected based on the calculations and the maintenance scenarios provided by the teams concerned. In an iterative way the lay-out of the various regions were optimized

  15. Neutron fluence measurement in the cavity of Balakovo nuclear power plant, unit 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voorbraak, W.P.; Baard, J.H.; Paardekooper, A.; Nolthenius, H.J.

    1996-12-01

    An international benchmark exercise has been organized by the Russian GOSATOMNADZOR. The aim was to reduce the uncertainty of fluence measurements in Nuclear Power Plants in particular VVER-1000 reactors. The benchmark was set up in the cavity of the Balakovo NPP 3. Eight institutes were involved. This report presents the results obtained by ECN. From this report, it can be concluded that the results of the relative large monitor set (13 different reaction rates with overlapping response regions) point to possible imperfections in the calculated neutron spectra. However the experimental information is not powerful enough to reduce the uncertainty of the neutron fluence rate especially in the energy region between 0.1 and 0.5 MeV below 50 percent. (orig.)

  16. Estimation of saturation activities for activation experiments in CHARM and CSBF using Fluence Conversion Coefficients

    CERN Document Server

    Guerin, Helene Chloe; Iliopoulou, Elpida; CERN. Geneva. HSE Department

    2017-01-01

    As summer student at CERN, I have been working in the Radiation Protection group for 10 weeks. I worked with the \\textsc{Fluka} Monte Carlo simulation code, using Fluence Conversion Coefficients method to perform simulations to estimate the saturation activities for activation experiments in the \\textsc{CSBF} and the \\textsc{Charm} facility in the East Experimental Area. The provided results will be used to plan a Monte Carlo benchmark in the \\textsc{CSBF} during a beam period at the end of August 2017.

  17. Evaluation of the fluence to dose conversion coefficients for high energy neutrons using a voxel phantom coupled with the GEANT4 code

    CERN Document Server

    Paganini, S

    2005-01-01

    Crews working on present-day jet aircraft are a large occupationally exposed group with a relatively high average effective dose from Galactic cosmic radiation. Crews of future high-speed commercial flying at higher altitudes would be even more exposed. To help reduce the significant uncertainties in calculations of such exposures, the male adult voxels phantom MAX, developed in the Nuclear Energy Department of Pernambuco Federal University in Brazil, has been coupled with the Monte Carlo simulation code GEANT4. This toolkit, distributed and upgraded from the international scientific community of CERN/Switzerland, simulates thermal to ultrahigh energy neutrons transport and interactions in the matter. The high energy neutrons are pointed as the component that contribute about 70% of the neutron effective dose that represent the 35% to 60% total dose at aircraft altitude. In this research calculations of conversion coefficients from fluence to effective dose are performed for neutrons of energies from 100 MeV ...

  18. Uncooled Radiation Hard Large Area SiC X-ray and EUV Detectors and 2D Arrays, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project seeks to design, fabricate, characterize and commercialize large area, uncooled and radiative hard 4H-SiC EUV ? soft X-ray detectors capable of ultra...

  19. Fluence scan: an unexplored property of a laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalupsky, Jaromir; Hajkova, Vera; Burian, Tomas; Juha, Libor; Polcar, Tomas; Gaudin, Jerome; Nagasono, Mitsuru; Yabashi, Makina; Sobierajski, Ryszard; Krzywinski, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    We present an extended theoretical background of so-called fluence scan (f-scan or F-scan) method, which is frequently being used for offline characterization of focused short-wavelength (EUV, soft X-ray, and hard X-ray) laser beams [J. Chalupsky et al., Opt. Express 18, 27836 (2010)]. The method exploits ablative imprints in various solids to visualize iso-fluence beam contours at different fluence and/or clip levels. An f-scan curve (clip level as a function of the corresponding iso-fluence contour area) can be generated for a general non-Gaussian beam. As shown in this paper, fluence scan encompasses important information about energy distribution within the beam profile, which may play an essential role in laser-matter interaction research employing intense non-ideal beams. Here we for the first time discuss fundamental properties of the f-scan function and its inverse counterpart (if-scan). Furthermore, we extensively elucidate how it is related to the effective beam area, energy distribution, and to the so called Liu's dependence [J.M. Liu, Opt. Lett. 7, 196 (1982)]. A new method of the effective area evaluation based on weighted inverse f-scan fit is introduced and applied to real data obtained at the SCSS (SPring-8 Compact SASE Source) facility. (authors)

  20. Measuring neutron fluences and gamma/x-ray fluxes with CCD cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yates, G.J.; Smith, G.W.; Zagarino, P.; Thomas, M.C.

    1991-01-01

    The capability to measure bursts of neutron fluences and gamma/x-ray fluxes directly with charge coupled device (CCD) cameras while being able to distinguish between the video signals produced by these two types of radiation, even when they occur simultaneously, has been demonstrated. Volume and area measurements of transient radiation-induced pixel charge in English Electric Valve (EEV) Frame Transfer (FT) charge coupled devices (CCDs) from irradiation with pulsed neutrons (14 MeV) and Bremsstrahlung photons (4--12 MeV endpoint) are utilized to calibrate the devices as radiometric imaging sensors capable of distinguishing between the two types of ionizing radiation. Measurements indicate ∼.05 V/rad responsivity with ≥1 rad required for saturation from photon irradiation. Neutron-generated localized charge centers or ''peaks'' binned by area and amplitude as functions of fluence in the 10 5 to 10 7 n/cm 2 range indicate smearing over ∼1 to 10% of CCD array with charge per pixel ranging between noise and saturation levels

  1. Effective dose per unit fluence calculated for adults and a 7 year old girl in broad antero-posterior beams of monoenergetic electrons of 0.1 to 10 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, F.W.; Zoetelief, J.

    1997-01-01

    For broad antero-posterior beams of monoenergetic (0.1-10 MeV) electrons, organ doses per unit fluence were computed through Monte Carlo simulation with reference to male and female adult and a 7 year old girl. Effective doses (E) per unit fluence were calculated for the three phantoms and for an average adult. E increases from about 8 x 10 -14 to about 1.2 x 10 -10 Sv.cm 2 with increasing electron energy. Uncertainties were (often much) better than 6% for the adults, and 18% for the child. E as calculated for the average adult may be used for both males and females as under- or overestimations stay within 25% from E for the average adult. The child's radiation risk is underestimated for electron energies in the range of 0.6 to 3 MeV. This underestimation up to a factor of about 20 is unacceptable for radiological protection purposes. The present results were compared with literature data on operational quantities associated with radiation hazard from weakly penetrating radiation. Neither directional nor personal dose equivalent appears to be a realistic quantity in this case. Both would yield an unnecessarily large safety factor for radiological protection. (author)

  2. Fluence dependence of disorder depth profiles in Pb implanted Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christodoulides, C.E.; Kadhim, N.J.; Carter, G.

    1980-01-01

    The total, depth integrated disorder, induced by Pb implantation into Si at room temperature, initially increases rapidly with implantation fluence and then reaches a quasi saturation level where the increase with fluence is slow. Measurements of the depth distributions of the disorder, using high resolution low angle exit Rutherford Backscattering/Channelling analysis, suggest that the quasi saturation results from overlapping of disordered zones generated deep in the tail of the disorder-depth profiles. The depth of the disordered solid-crystal boundary, xsub(D), increases with ion fluence PHI, according to the relation xsub(D) = x bar + f(PHI).σ, where x bar is the most probable projected depth and σ the projected standard deviation of disorder generation. It is shown that this relationship is consistent with an approximately Gaussian depth distribution of disorder production. (author)

  3. Safety factors for neutron fluences in NPP safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demekhin, V.L.; Bukanov, V.N.; Il'kovich, V.V.; Pugach, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    In accordance with global practice and a number of existing regulations, the use of conservative approach is required for the calculations related to nuclear safety assessment of NPP. It implies the need to consider the determination of neutron fluence errors that is rather complicated. It is proposed to carry out the consideration by the way of multiplying the neutron fluences obtained with transport calculations by safety factors. The safety factor values are calculated by the developed technique based on the theory of errors, features of the neutron transport calculation code and the results obtained with the code. It is shown that the safety factor value is equal 1.18 with the confidence level of not less than 0.95 for the majority of VVER-1000 reactor places where neutron fluences are determined by MCPV code, and its maximum value is 1.25

  4. Spectral fluence of neutrons generated by radiotherapeutic Linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kralik, Miloslav; Solc, Jaroslav; Smoldasova, Jana; Vondracek, Vladimir; Farkasova, Estera; Ticha, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Spectral fluences of neutrons generated in the heads of the radiotherapeutic linacs Varian Clinac 2100 C/D and Siemens ARTISTE were measured by means of the Bonner spheres spectrometer whose active detector of thermal neutrons was replaced by an activation detector, i.e. a tablet made of pure manganese. Measurements with different collimator settings reveal an interesting dependence of neutron fluence on the area defined by the collimator jaws. The determined neutron spectral fluences were used to derive ambient dose equivalent rate along the treatment coach. To clarify at which components of the linac neutrons are mainly created, the measurements were complemented with MCNPX calculations based on a realistic model of the Varian Clinac. (authors)

  5. The irradiation creep characteristics of graphite to high fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, C.R.; Cundy, M.; Kleist, G.

    1988-01-01

    High-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) have massive blocks of graphite with thermal and neutron-flux gradients causing high internal stresses. Thermal stresses are transient; however, stresses generated by differential growth due to neutron damage continue to increase with time. Fortunately, graphite also experiences creep under irradiation allowing relaxation of stresses to nominally safe levels. Because of complexity of irradiation creep experiments, data demonstrating this phenomenon are generally limited to fairly low fluences compared to the overall fluences expected in most reactors. Notable exceptions have been experiments at 300/degree/C and 500/degree/C run at Petten under tension and compression creep stresses to fluences greater than 4 /times/ 10 26 (E > 50 keV) neutrons/m 2 . This study complements the previous results by extending the irradiation temperature to 900/degree/C. 2 refs., 3 figs

  6. Nickel Foil as Transmutation Detector for Neutron Fluence Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klupák Vít

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation detectors are very often used for determination of the neutron fluence in reactor dosimetry. However, there are few disadvantages concerning these detectors; it is the demand of the knowledge of the irradiation history and a loss of information due to a radioactive decay in time. Transmutation detectors TMD could be a solution in this case. The transmutation detectors are materials in which stable or long-lived nuclides are produced by nuclear reactions with neutrons. From a measurement of concentration of these nuclides, neutron fluence can be evaluated regardless of the cooling time.

  7. RAMA Methodology for the Calculation of Neutron Fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villescas, G.; Corchon, F.

    2013-01-01

    he neutron fluence plays an important role in the study of the structural integrity of the reactor vessel after a certain time of neutron irradiation. The NRC defined in the Regulatory Guide 1.190, the way must be estimated neutron fluence, including uncertainty analysis of the validation process (creep uncertainty is ? 20%). TRANSWARE Enterprises Inc. developed a methodology for calculating the neutron flux, 1,190 based guide, known as RAMA. Uncertainty values obtained with this methodology, for about 18 vessels, are less than 10%.

  8. Relating Solar Energetic Particle Event Fluences to Peak Intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, Stephen W.; Ling, Alan G.

    2018-02-01

    Recently we (Kahler and Ling, Solar Phys. 292, 59, 2017: KL) have shown that time-intensity profiles [I(t)] of 14 large solar energetic particle (SEP) events can be fitted with a simple two-parameter fit, the modified Weibull function, which is characterized by shape and scaling parameters [α and β]. We now look for a simple correlation between an event peak energy intensity [Ip] and the time integral of I(t) over the event duration: the fluence [F]. We first ask how the ratio of F/Ip varies for the fits of the 14 KL events and then examine that ratio for three separate published statistical studies of SEP events in which both F and Ip were measured for comparisons of those parameters with various solar-flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) parameters. The three studies included SEP energies from a 4 - 13 MeV band to E > 100 MeV. Within each group of SEP events, we find a very robust correlation (CC > 0.90) in log-log plots of F versus Ip over four decades of Ip. The ratio increases from western to eastern longitudes. From the value of Ip for a given event, F can be estimated to within a standard deviation of a factor of {≤} 2. Log-log plots of two studies are consistent with slopes of unity, but the third study shows plot slopes of { 10 MeV to {>} 100 MeV. This difference is not explained.

  9. Naturally large radiative lepton flavor violating Higgs decay mediated by lepton-flavored dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Seungwon; Kang, Zhaofeng

    2016-01-01

    In the standard model (SM), lepton flavor violating (LFV) Higgs decay is absent at renormalizable level and thus it is a good probe to new physics. In this article we study a type of new physics that could lead to large LFV Higgs decay, i.e., a lepton-flavored dark matter (DM) model which is specified by a Majorana DM and scalar lepton mediators. Different from other similar models with similar setup, we introduce both left-handed and right-handed scalar leptons. They allow large LFV Higgs decay and thus may explain the tentative Br(h→τμ)∼1% experimental results from the LHC. In particular, we find that the stringent bound from τ→μγ can be naturally evaded. One reason, among others, is a large chirality violation in the mediator sector. Aspects of relic density and especially radiative direct detection of the leptonic DM are also investigated, stressing the difference from previous lepton-flavored DM models.

  10. Large signal S-parameters: modeling and radiation effects in microwave power transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, E.D. Jr.; Chaffin, R.J.; Gwyn, C.W.

    1973-01-01

    Microwave power transistors are usually characterized by measuring the source and load impedances, efficiency, and power output at a specified frequency and bias condition in a tuned circuit. These measurements provide limited data for circuit design and yield essentially no information concerning broadbanding possibilities. Recently, a method using large signal S-parameters has been developed which provides a rapid and repeatable means for measuring microwave power transistor parameters. These large signal S-parameters have been successfully used to design rf power amplifiers. Attempts at modeling rf power transistors have in the past been restricted to a modified Ebers-Moll procedure with numerous adjustable model parameters. The modified Ebers-Moll model is further complicated by inclusion of package parasitics. In the present paper an exact one-dimensional device analysis code has been used to model the performance of the transistor chip. This code has been integrated into the SCEPTRE circuit analysis code such that chip, package and circuit performance can be coupled together in the analysis. Using []his computational tool, rf transistor performance has been examined with particular attention given to the theoretical validity of large-signal S-parameters and the effects of nuclear radiation on device parameters. (auth)

  11. Power Generation from a Radiative Thermal Source Using a Large-Area Infrared Rectenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shank, Joshua; Kadlec, Emil A.; Jarecki, Robert L.; Starbuck, Andrew; Howell, Stephen; Peters, David W.; Davids, Paul S.

    2018-05-01

    Electrical power generation from a moderate-temperature thermal source by means of direct conversion of infrared radiation is important and highly desirable for energy harvesting from waste heat and micropower applications. Here, we demonstrate direct rectified power generation from an unbiased large-area nanoantenna-coupled tunnel diode rectifier called a rectenna. Using a vacuum radiometric measurement technique with irradiation from a temperature-stabilized thermal source, a generated power density of 8 nW /cm2 is observed at a source temperature of 450 °C for the unbiased rectenna across an optimized load resistance. The optimized load resistance for the peak power generation for each temperature coincides with the tunnel diode resistance at zero bias and corresponds to the impedance matching condition for a rectifying antenna. Current-voltage measurements of a thermally illuminated large-area rectenna show current zero crossing shifts into the second quadrant indicating rectification. Photon-assisted tunneling in the unbiased rectenna is modeled as the mechanism for the large short-circuit photocurrents observed where the photon energy serves as an effective bias across the tunnel junction. The measured current and voltage across the load resistor as a function of the thermal source temperature represents direct current electrical power generation.

  12. Contribution to the pathogenesis of radiation-induced injury to large arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zidar, Nina; Ferluga, Dusan; Hvala, Asta; Popovic, Mara; Soba, Erika

    1997-01-01

    We report a case of a 35-year-old man who died of a brain infarct 20 months after radiotherapy for carcinoma of the tonsil with metastases to the cervical lymph nodes. Histology revealed mild atherosclerosis, necrotizing vasculitis, and occlusive thrombosis of the internal carotid artery. Significant changes were observed in the vasa vasorum; swelling and detachment of the endothelium, subendothelial oedema, hyaline change, fibrinoid necrosis of the vessel walls with mononuclear cellular infiltration, accompanied by focal haemorrhages and chronic inflammation in the periadventitial soft tissue. We believe that these changes of the vasa vasorum and necrotizing vasculitis are causally related and that vasculitis represents focal ischaemic necroses with inflammatory reaction. Our findings support the hypothesis, based on experimental studies, that injury to the vasa vasorum is an important mechanism in the development of radiation-induced vasculopathy of large arteries. They also suggest an evolution of the injury to the vasa vasorum and periadventitial tissue from the early lesions described in our patient, to late stages resulting in dense periadventitial fibrosis as reported previously. We suggest that injury to the vasa vasorum and the consequent ischaemic lesions of the arterial wall are morphological features distinguishing radiation-induced arterial injury from spontaneous atherosclerosis. (author)

  13. Inspecting the medical use of radiation at five large hospitals in 2004 - to new radiation protection regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widmark, Anders; Bjerke, Hans; Unhjem, Jan Frede; Friberg, Eva; Hult, Elin Agathe; Boerretzen, Ingelin; Olerud, Hilde

    2005-01-01

    An audit has been performed in five health enterprises. The audit was carried out in relation to new radiation protection legislation and comprised all use of medical radiation at the enterprises. This report summarizes some of the findings and also gives an evaluation on the level of implementation of the legislation and what challenges that are left for the enterprises. (Author)

  14. BPW34 Commercial p-i-n Diodes for High-Level 1-MeV Neutron Equivalent Fluence Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Ravotti, F; Moll, M; Saigne, F

    2008-01-01

    The BPW34 p-i-n diode was characterized at CERN in view of its utilization as radiation monitor at the LHC to cover the broad 1-MeV neutron equivalent fluence (Phieq) range expected for the LHC machine and experiments during operation. Electrical measurements for both forward and reverse bias were used to characterize the device and to understand its behavior under irradiation. When the device is powered forward, a sensitivity to fast hadrons for Phieq > 2 times1012 cm-2 has been observed. With increasing particle fluences the forward I- V characteristics of the diode shifts towards higher voltages. At Phieq > 3times1013 cm-2, the forward characteristic starts to bend back assuming a thyristor-like behavior. An explanation for this phenomenon is given in this article. Finally, detailed radiation-response curves for the forward bias-operation and annealing studies of the diode's forward voltage are presented for proton, neutron and gamma irradiation.

  15. Anisotropy of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation on Large and Medium Angular Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Anthony; Timbie, Peter

    1998-01-01

    This grant has supported work at Brown University on measurements of the 2.7 K Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMB). The goal has been to characterize the spatial variations in the temperature of the CMB in order to understand the formation of large-scale structure in the universe. We have concurrently pursued two measurements using millimeter-wave telescopes carried aloft by scientific balloons. Both systems operate over a range of wavelengths, chosen to allow spectral removal of foreground sources such as the atmosphere, Galaxy, etc. The angular resolution of approx. 25 arcminutes is near the angular scale at which the most structure is predicted by current models to be visible in the CMB angular power spectrum. The main goal is to determine the angular scale of this structure; in turn we can infer the density parameter, Omega, for the universe as well as other cosmological parameters, such as the Hubble constant.

  16. Measurement of the large-scale anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation at 3mm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, G.L.

    1983-12-01

    A balloon-borne differential radiometer has measured the large-scale anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) with high sensitivity. The antenna temperature dipole anistropy at 90 GHz (3 mm wavelength) is 2.82 +- 0.19 mK, corresponding to a thermodynamic anistropy of 3.48 +- mK for a 2.7 K blackbody CBR. The dipole direction, 11.3 +- 0.1 hours right ascension and -5.7 0 +- 1.8 0 declination, agrees well with measurements at other frequencies. Calibration error dominates magnitude uncertainty, with statistical errors on dipole terms being under 0.1 mK. No significant quadrupole power is found, placing a 90% confidence-level upper limit of 0.27 mK on the RMS thermodynamic quadrupolar anistropy. 22 figures, 17 tables

  17. Enhancement of natural radiation and population exposures due to the activity of large steelworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niewiadomski, T; Godek, J; Jasinska, M; Wasiolek, P [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland)

    1984-09-01

    Radionuclide releases and resulting population exposures from large industrial plants have recently become a subject of some public concern. Methods for assessing these effects were developed and, as an example, a complex of large steelworks located in the vicinity of the city of Krakow was investigated. The following critical pathways were considered: atmospheric release, and use of fly ash for production of building materials. For assessing annual average radionuclide concentrations in air and in soil around the works, a computer program was developed while other mathematical methods were applied to the assessment of maximum individual effective dose equivalent commitments (EDEC) due to inhalation, ingestion, and external gamma radiation. In order to acquire data for calculations many samples of raw materials, coal, ash, and dust were analysed as to their radionuclide concentration. The total individual EDEC at the place of maximum immission was estimated to be about 100 ..mu..Sv a/sup -1/ (i.e., about 6% of the natural exposure in this region), this being mainly due to ingestion (ca. 65 ..mu..Sv a/sup -1/) and to gamma radiation (ca. 30 ..mu..Sv a/sup -1/). The enhancement of dose rates over the ponds and of radioactivity concentration of liquid discharges from the ponds was found to be negligible. Dose rates in houses built entirely of fly ash were estimated to be higher than those in red-brick houses by not more than 0.2 ..mu..Sv a/sup -1/. The collective EDEC from the operational discharge of the steelworks is less than 11 man Sv a/sup -1/ and that of use of fly-ash prefabricated elements will be in the future less than 45 man Sv a/sup -1/.

  18. Solar cell radiation handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, H. Y.; Carter, J. R., Jr.; Anspaugh, B. E.; Downing, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    The handbook to predict the degradation of solar cell electrical performance in any given space radiation environment is presented. Solar cell theory, cell manufacturing and how they are modeled mathematically are described. The interaction of energetic charged particles radiation with solar cells is discussed and the concept of 1 MeV equivalent electron fluence is introduced. The space radiation environment is described and methods of calculating equivalent fluences for the space environment are developed. A computer program was written to perform the equivalent fluence calculations and a FORTRAN listing of the program is included. Data detailing the degradation of solar cell electrical parameters as a function of 1 MeV electron fluence are presented.

  19. Development and characterization of multi-sensory fluence rate probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomerleau-Dalcourt, Natalie; Lilge, Lothar

    2006-01-01

    Multi-sensory fluence rate probes (MSPs) yield several simultaneous measurements of photodynamic therapy (PDT) treatment light fluence from a single interstitial probe. Fluorescent sensors are embedded at desired positions along the axis of the optical fibre. A single fluorescence emission spectrum is obtained and decomposed using a partial least squares (PLS)-based analysis to yield the fluence at each sensor's location. The responsivity, linearity and possible photodegradation of each fluorophore chosen for the MSPs were evaluated using single-sensor probes. The performance of two- and three-sensor MSPs was evaluated experimentally. Individual fluorescence spectra collected from each sensor on the MSP were used to construct the training set necessary for the PLS-based analysis. The MSPs' responsivity, spatial resolution and accuracy were evaluated relative to a single scattering-tip detector. Three-fluorophore MSPs permitted three simultaneous measurements of the fluence rate gradient in a tissue-like phantom, with an average accuracy of 6.7%. No appreciable photodegradation or cross-talk was observed

  20. Fluence-rate effects on irradiation embrittlement and composition and temperature effects on annealing/reirradiation sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawthorne, J.R.; Hiser, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    Recent MEA investigation on the effect of neutron fluence rate on radiation-induced embrittlement accrual and the contributions of metallurgical variables to postirradiation annealing and re-irradiation behavior are reviewed. Studies of fluence-rate effects involved experiments in the UBR test reactor and separately, radiation sensitivity determinations for the decommissioned Gundremmingen (KRB-A) vessel material. Annealing-reirradiation studies employed 399 0 C and 454 0 C heat treatments. Material composition is shown to play a major role in postirradiation annealing recovery. Results illustrate effects of variable copper and variable nickel contents on recoveray of steel plate having low phosphorus levels. Composition effects on recovery were also observed for prototypic welds depicting high/low copper and high/low nickel contents and three flux types. The welds, in addition, indicate major differences in re-irradiation sensitivity. The UBR investigations revealed a significant difference in fluence rate sensitivity between the ASTM A 302-B reference plate and a submerged-arc (S/A) Linde 80 weld. Studies of the Gundremmingen reactor vessel, representing a joint USA-FRG-UK undertaking revealed an anomaly in strong vs. weak test orientation radiation sensitivity. (orig./HP)

  1. Background radiation fields as a probe of the large-scale matter distribution in the Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, N [Cambridge Univ. (UK). Inst. of Astronomy

    1982-03-01

    A 'Swiss Cheese' model is used to calculate to order of magnitude the temperature fluctuation of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) in a lumpy universe. The calculations are valid in a Friedmann background of arbitrary ..cap omega.. provided that matter has been dominant since the photons were last scattered. The inhomogeneities may be larger than the curvature scale, as is required to deal with fluctuations on a large angular scale in a low-density universe. This model is combined with observational limits on the fluctuations in the CMB to yield an upper limit to the present spectrum of inhomogeneities. The absence of any quadrupole anisotropy approximately > 3 x 10/sup -4/ sets a limit on the amplitude of lumps on scales very much greater than the present horizon. It is seen that, as shown by Peebles, for ..cap omega.. = 1 and a simple (Poisson) model the predicted ..delta..T/T(theta) is in remarkable accord with the recent measurements of quadrupole and 6/sup 0/ anisotropy. For a low-density model the predicted ..delta..T/T(theta) for large angles is markedly different. The limits on inhomogeneity from the isotropy of the X-ray background are briefly considered and they are found to be consistent with the microwave limits.

  2. Background radiation fields as a probe of the large-scale matter distribution in the Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, N.

    1982-01-01

    A 'Swiss Cheese' model is used to calculate to order of magnitude the temperature fluctuation of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) in a lumpy universe. The calculations are valid in a Friedmann background of arbitrary Ω provided that matter has been dominant since the photons were last scattered. The inhomogeneities may be larger than the curvature scale, as is required to deal with fluctuations on a large angular scale in a low-density universe. This model is combined with observational limits on the fluctuations in the CMB to yield an upper limit to the present spectrum of inhomogeneities. The absence of any quadrupole anisotropy approximately > 3 x 10 -4 sets a limit on the amplitude of lumps on scales very much greater than the present horizon. It is seen that, as shown by Peebles, for Ω = 1 and a simple (Poisson) model the predicted ΔT/T(theta) is in remarkable accord with the recent measurements of quadrupole and 6 0 anisotropy. For a low-density model the predicted ΔT/T(theta) for large angles is markedly different. The limits on inhomogeneity from the isotropy of the X-ray background are briefly considered and they are found to be consistent with the microwave limits. (author)

  3. Development of a Secondary Neutron Fluence Standard at GELINA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyse, Jan; Eykens, Roger; Moens, Andre; Plompen, Arjan J.M.; Schillebeeckx, Peter; Wynants, Ruud; Anastasiou, Maria

    2013-06-01

    The MetroFission project, a Joint Research Project within the European Metrology Research Program, aims at addressing a number of metrological problems involved in the design of proposed Generation IV nuclear reactors. One of the objectives of this multidisciplinary project is the improvement of neutron cross section measurement techniques in order to arrive at uncertainties as required for the design and safety assessment of new generation power plants and fuel cycles. This objective is in line with the 'Uncertainty and target accuracy assessment for innovative systems using recent covariance data evaluations' published by a working party of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency in 2008. These requests are often very challenging, being at or beyond the state-of-the-art in neutron measurements, which is set by self-normalizing methods and the neutron data standards used at laboratories where the data are measured. A secondary neutron fluence standard has been developed and calibrated at the neutron time-of-flight facility GELINA of the JRC's Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM). It consists of a flux monitor, a reference ionization chamber containing a 10 B layer and a 235 U layer, and a parallel plate ionization chamber with 8 well characterized 235 U deposits. These devices are used to determine the neutron fluence, based on the well-known neutron induced fission reaction on 235 U. All deposits have been prepared and characterized at the IRMM target preparation lab. The secondary fluence standard at the GELINA facility can be used for reliable determination of the efficiency of fluence measurement devices used in neutron data measurements at IRMM and elsewhere. It is an essential tool to reliably calibrate fluence normalization devices used in neutron time-of-flight cross section measurements. (authors)

  4. Fluence compensated photoacoustic tomography in small animals (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Altaf; Pool, Martin; Daoudi, Khalid; de Vries, Liesbeth G.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2017-03-01

    Light fluence inside turbid media can be experimentally mapped by measuring ultrasonically modulated light (Acousto-optics). To demonstrate the feasibility of fluence corrected Photoacoustic (PA) imaging, we have realized a tri-modality (i.e. photoacoustic, acousto-optic and ultrasound) tomographic small animal imaging system. Wherein PA imaging provides high resolution map of absorbed optical energy density, Acousto-optics yields the fluence distribution map in the corresponding PA imaging plane and Ultrasound provides morphological information. Further, normalization of the PA image with the acousto-optically measured fluence map results in an image that directly represents the optical absorption. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is commonly found overexpressed in human cancers, among which breast cancers, resulting in a more aggressive tumor phenotype. Identification of HER2-expression is clinically relevant, because cancers overexpressing this marker are amenable to HER2-directed therapies, among which antibodies trastuzumab and pertuzumab. Here, we investigate the feasibility and advantage of acousto-optically assisted fluence compensated PA imaging over PA imaging alone in visualizing and quantifying HER2 expression. For this experiment, nude mice were xenografted with human breast cancer cell lines SKBR3 and BT474 (both HER2 overexpressing), as well as HER2-negative MDA-MB-231. To visualize HER2 expression in these mice, HER2 monoclonal antibody pertuzumab (Perjeta®, Roche), was conjugated to near-infrared dye IRDye 800CW (800CW, LICOR Biosciences) at a ratio of 1∶2 antibody to 800CW. When xenograft tumors measured ≥ 100 mm3, mice received 100 µg 800CW-pertuzumab intravenously. Three days post injection, mice were scanned for fluorescence signal with an IVIS scanner. After fluorescence scans, mice were euthanized and imaged in our PA tomographic imaging system.

  5. Measuring neutron fluences and gamma/x-ray fluxes with CCD cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yates, G.J.; Smith, G.W.; Zagarino, P.; Thomas, M.C.

    1991-01-01

    Volume and area measurements of transient radiation-induced pixel charge in English Electric Valve (EEV) Frame Transfer (FT) charge coupled devices (CCDs) from irradiation with pulsed neutrons (14 MeV) and Bremsstrahlung photons (16-MeV endpoint) are utilized to calibrate the devices as radiometric imaging sensors capable of distinguishing between the two types of ionizing radiation. Measurements indicate ∼0.5 V/rad responsivity with ≥1 rad required for saturation from photon irradiation. Neutron-generated localized charge centers or ''peaks'' binned by area and amplitude as functions of fluence in the 10 5 to 10 7 n/cm 2 range indicate smearing over ∼1 to 10% of CCD array with charge per pixel ranging between noise and saturation levels. 9 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs

  6. Measures for minimizing radiation hazardous to the environment in the advent of large-scale space commercialization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, S.N.

    1990-01-01

    The nature of hazardous effects from radio-frequency (RF), light, infrared, and nuclear radiation on human and other biological species in the advent of large-scale space commercialization is considered. Attention is focused on RF/microwave radiation from earth antennas and domestic picture phone communication links, exposure to microwave radiation from space solar-power satellites, and the continuous transmission of information from spacecraft as well as laser radiation from space. Measures for preventing and/or reducing these effects are suggested, including the use of interlocks for cutting off radiation toward ground, off-pointing microwave energy beams in cases of altitude failure, limiting the satellite off-axis gain data-rate product, the use of reflective materials on buildings and in personnel clothing to protect from space-borne lasers, and underwater colonies in cases of high-power lasers. For nuclear-power satellites, deposition in stable points in the solar system is proposed. 12 refs

  7. Measurement of anisotropy in the cosmic background radiation on a large angular scale at 33 GHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorenstein, M.V.

    1978-11-01

    Results of a measurement of anisotropy in the 3 0 K cosmic background radiation on a large-angular-scale are presented. Observations were carried out with a dual-antenna microwave radiometer operating at 33 GHz (0.89 cm wavelength) flown on board a U-2 aircraft to 20-km altitude. In eleven flights, between December 1976 and May 1978, the radiometer measured differential intensity between pairs of directions distributed over most of the northern celestial hemisphere with an rms sensitivity of +- 46m 0 K/√Hz. The measurements show clear evidence of anisotropy that is readily interpreted as due to the motion of the earth relative to the sources of the radiation; the anisotropy is well fit by a cosine distribution of amplitude 3.61 +- 0.54 millireverse arrowreverse arrow-degrees Kelvin (m 0 K), one part in 800 of 3 0 K, implying a velocity of 361 +- 54 km/sec toward the direction 11.23 +- 0.46 hours right ascension, and 19.0 +- 7.5 0 declination. A simultaneous fit to a combined hypothesis of dipole (cos theta) and quadrupole (cos 2 theta) angular distributions places a 1 m 0 K limit on the amplitude of most components of quadruple anisotropy with 90% confidence. Additional analysis places a 0.5 m 0 K limit on uncorrelated fluctuations (sky-roughness) in the 3 0 K background on an angular scale of the antenna beam width, about 7 0 . This thesis describes the equipment development through three engineering flights and the data acquisition in eleven additional flights. The astrophysical results are then presented from the statistical analysis of the reduced data

  8. Large arrays of discrete ionizing radiation detectors multiplexed using fluorescent optical converters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koslow, E.E.; Edelman, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    This invention provides a radiation imaging system employing arrays of scintillators. An object of the invention is to produce a detector with high spatial resolution, high gamma-photon absorption efficiency, excellent source and detector scatter rejection, and utilizing low-cost solid state opto-electronic devices. In one embodiment, it provides a radiation detection and conversion apparatus having an array of optically isolated radiation sensitive elements that emit optical radiation upon absorption of ionizing radiation. An array of channels, comprising a material that absorbs and traps the radiation emitted and transports it or radiation that has been shifted to longer wavelengths, is placed near the radiation-sensitive elements. Electro-optical detectors that convert the transported radiation into electrical signals are coupled to the channels. The activation of one of the electro-optical devices by radiation from one of the channels indicates that at least one of the radiation-sensitive elements near that channel has absorbed a quantity of radiation

  9. Feasibility and Acute Toxicity of Hypofractionated Radiation in Large-breasted Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorn, Paige L., E-mail: pdorn@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Hospitals, Chicago, IL (United States); Corbin, Kimberly S.; Al-Hallaq, Hania; Hasan, Yasmin; Chmura, Steven J. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Hospitals, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of and acute toxicity associated with hypofractionated whole breast radiation (HypoRT) after breast-conserving surgery in patients excluded from or underrepresented in randomized trials comparing HypoRT with conventional fractionation schedules. Methods and Materials: A review was conducted of all patients consecutively treated with HypoRT at University of Chicago. All patients were treated to 42.56 Gy in 2.66 Gy daily fractions in either the prone or supine position. Planning was performed in most cases using wedges and large segments or a 'field-in-field' technique. Breast volume was estimated using volumetric measurements of the planning target volume (PTV). Dosimetric parameters of heterogeneity (V105, V107, V110, and maximum dose) were recorded for each treatment plan. Acute toxicity was scored for each treated breast. Results: Between 2006 and 2010, 78 patients were treated to 80 breasts using HypoRT. Most women were overweight or obese (78.7%), with a median body mass index of 29.2 kg/m{sup 2}. Median breast volume was 1,351 mL. Of the 80 treated breasts, the maximum acute skin toxicity was mild erythema or hyperpigmentation in 70.0% (56/80), dry desquamation in 21.25% (17/80), and focal moist desquamation in 8.75% (7/80). Maximum acute toxicity occurred after the completion of radiation in 31.9% of patients. Separation >25 cm was not associated with increased toxicity. Breast volume was the only patient factor significantly associated with moist desquamation on multivariable analysis (p = 0.01). Patients with breast volume >2,500 mL experienced focal moist desquamation in 27.2% of cases compared with 6.34% in patients with breast volume <2,500 mL (p = 0.03). Conclusions: HypoRT is feasible and safe in patients with separation >25 cm and in patients with large breast volume when employing modern planning and positioning techniques. We recommend counseling regarding expected increases in skin toxicity in women

  10. Feasibility and Acute Toxicity of Hypofractionated Radiation in Large-breasted Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorn, Paige L.; Corbin, Kimberly S.; Al-Hallaq, Hania; Hasan, Yasmin; Chmura, Steven J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of and acute toxicity associated with hypofractionated whole breast radiation (HypoRT) after breast-conserving surgery in patients excluded from or underrepresented in randomized trials comparing HypoRT with conventional fractionation schedules. Methods and Materials: A review was conducted of all patients consecutively treated with HypoRT at University of Chicago. All patients were treated to 42.56 Gy in 2.66 Gy daily fractions in either the prone or supine position. Planning was performed in most cases using wedges and large segments or a “field-in-field” technique. Breast volume was estimated using volumetric measurements of the planning target volume (PTV). Dosimetric parameters of heterogeneity (V105, V107, V110, and maximum dose) were recorded for each treatment plan. Acute toxicity was scored for each treated breast. Results: Between 2006 and 2010, 78 patients were treated to 80 breasts using HypoRT. Most women were overweight or obese (78.7%), with a median body mass index of 29.2 kg/m 2 . Median breast volume was 1,351 mL. Of the 80 treated breasts, the maximum acute skin toxicity was mild erythema or hyperpigmentation in 70.0% (56/80), dry desquamation in 21.25% (17/80), and focal moist desquamation in 8.75% (7/80). Maximum acute toxicity occurred after the completion of radiation in 31.9% of patients. Separation >25 cm was not associated with increased toxicity. Breast volume was the only patient factor significantly associated with moist desquamation on multivariable analysis (p = 0.01). Patients with breast volume >2,500 mL experienced focal moist desquamation in 27.2% of cases compared with 6.34% in patients with breast volume 25 cm and in patients with large breast volume when employing modern planning and positioning techniques. We recommend counseling regarding expected increases in skin toxicity in women with a PTV volume >2,500 mL.

  11. Radiation Therapy of Large Intact Breasts Using a Beam Spoiler or Photons with Mixed Energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lief, Eugene P.; Hunt, Margie A.; Hong, Linda X.; Amols, Howard I.

    2007-01-01

    Radiation treatment of large intact breasts with separations of more than 24 cm is typically performed using x-rays with energies of 10 MV and higher, to eliminate high-dose regions in tissue. The disadvantage of the higher energy beams is the reduced dose to superficial tissue in the buildup region. We evaluated 2 methods of avoiding this underdosage: (1) a beam spoiler: 1.7-cm-thick Lucite plate positioned in the blocking tray 35 cm from the isocenter, with 15-MV x-rays; and (2) combining 6- and 15-MV x-rays through the same portal. For the beam with the spoiler, we measured the dose distribution for normal and oblique incidence using a film and ion chamber in polystyrene, as well as a scanning diode in a water tank. In the mixed-energy approach, we calculated the dose distributions in the buildup region for different proportions of 6- and 15-MV beams. The dose enhancement due to the beam spoiler exhibited significant dependence upon the source-to-skin distance (SSD), field size, and the angle of incidence. In the center of a 20 x 20-cm 2 field at 90-cm SSD, the beam spoiler raises the dose at 5-mm depth from 77% to 87% of the prescription, while maintaining the skin dose below 57%. Comparison of calculated dose with measurements suggested a practical way of treatment planning with the spoiler-usage of 2-mm 'beam' bolus-a special option offered by in-house treatment planning system. A second method of increasing buildup doses is to mix 6- and 15-MV beams. For example, in the case of a parallel-opposed irradiation of a 27-cm-thick phantom, dose to D max for each energy, with respect to midplane, is 114% for pure 6-, 107% for 15-MV beam with the spoiler, and 108% for a 3:1 mixture of 15- and 6-MV beams. Both methods are practical for radiation therapy of large intact breasts

  12. Fluence-dependent sputtering yield of micro-architectured materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthes, Christopher S.R.; Ghoniem, Nasr M., E-mail: ghoniem@ucla.edu; Li, Gary Z.; Matlock, Taylor S.; Goebel, Dan M.; Dodson, Chris A.; Wirz, Richard E.

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Sputtering yield is shown to be transient and heavily dependent on surface architecture. • Fabricated nano- and Microstructures cause geometric re-trapping of sputtered material, which leads to a self-healing mechanism. • Initially, the sputtering yield of micro-architectured Mo is approximately 1/2 the value as that of a planar surface. • The study demonstrates that the sputtering yield is a dynamic property, dependent on the surface structure of a material. • A developed phenomenological model mathematically describes the transient behavior of the sputtering yield as a function of plasma fluence. - Abstract: We present an experimental examination of the relationship between the surface morphology of Mo and its instantaneous sputtering rate as function of low-energy plasma ion fluence. We quantify the dynamic evolution of nano/micro features of surfaces with built-in architecture, and the corresponding variation in the sputtering yield. Ballistic deposition of sputtered atoms as a result of geometric re-trapping is observed, and re-growth of surface layers is confirmed. This provides a self-healing mechanism of micro-architectured surfaces during plasma exposure. A variety of material characterization techniques are used to show that the sputtering yield is not a fundamental property, but that it is quantitatively related to the initial surface architecture and to its subsequent evolution. The sputtering yield of textured molybdenum samples exposed to 300 eV Ar plasma is roughly 1/2 of the corresponding value for flat samples, and increases with ion fluence. Mo samples exhibited a sputtering yield initially as low as 0.22 ± 5%, converging to 0.4 ± 5% at high fluence. The sputtering yield exhibits a transient behavior as function of the integrated ion fluence, reaching a steady-state value that is independent of initial surface conditions. A phenomenological model is proposed to explain the observed transient sputtering phenomenon, and to

  13. A large dynamic range radiation-tolerant analog memory in a quarter- micron CMOS technology

    CERN Document Server

    Anelli, G; Rivetti, A

    2001-01-01

    An analog memory prototype containing 8*128 cells has been designed in a commercial quarter-micron CMOS process. The aim of this work is to investigate the possibility of designing large dynamic range mixed-mode switched capacitor circuits for high-energy physics (HEP) applications in deep submicron CMOS technologies. Special layout techniques have been used to make the circuit radiation tolerant. The memory cells employ gate-oxide capacitors for storage, permitting a very high density. A voltage write-voltage read architecture has been chosen to minimize the sensitivity to absolute capacitor values. The measured input voltage range is 2.3 V (the power supply voltage V/sub DD/ is equal to 2.5 V), with a linearity of almost 8 bits over 2 V. The dynamic range is more than 11 bits. The pedestal variation is +or-0.5 mV peak-to-peak. The noise measured, which is dominated by the noise of the measurement setup, is around 0.8 mV rms. The characteristics of the memory have been measured before irradiation and after 1...

  14. A large dynamic range radiation tolerant analog memory in a quarter micron CMOS technology

    CERN Document Server

    Anelli, G; Rivetti, A

    2000-01-01

    A 8*128 cell analog memory prototype has been designed in a commercial 0.25 jam CMOS process. The aim of this work was to investigate the possibility of designing large dynamic range mixed- mode switched capacitor circuits for High-Energy Physics (HEP) applications in deep submicron CMOS technologies. Special layout techniques have been used to make the circuit radiation tolerant left bracket 1 right bracket . The memory cells employ gate-oxide capacitors for storage, allowing for a very high density. A voltage write - voltage read architecture has been chosen to minimize the sensitivity to absolute capacitor values. The measured input voltage range is 2.3 V (V//D//D = 2.5 V), with a linearity of at least 7.5 bits over 2 V. The dynamic range is more than 11 bits. The pedestal variation is plus or minus 0.5 mV peak-to-peak. The noise measured, which is dominated by the noise of the measurement setup, is around 0.8 mV rms. The characteristics of the memory have been measured before irradiation and after lOMrd (...

  15. Is there a large risk of radiation? A critical review of pessimistic claims

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shihab-Eldin, A.; Shlyakhter, A.; Wilson, R.

    1992-07-01

    A number of situations where it has been claimed that moderate radiation doses cause leukemia or other cancers are carefully reviewed. We look at cases in the United States, Great Britain, and the Soviet Union. Usually it can be demonstrated that there is an alternative, more probable, explanation for the effect seen. In several cases the authors of the papers have fallen into statistical traps. The most frequent is a posteriori selection of cohort boundaries in both space and time: a trap illustrated dramatically by Feynman. The next most common trap is to arbitrarily select one out of many ways of looking at the data, against which we were warned by Tippett. Several cohorts are compared with respect to the number of persons at risk, average dose, and the number of cancers expected. Of these, only the cohort of A-bomb survivors in Japan and the recently unclassified data on the very large occupational doses for early Soviet nuclear workers at Chelyabinsk provide evidence of clearly visible excess cancers

  16. Is there a large risk of radiation A critical review of pessimistic claims

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shihab-Eldin, A.; Shlyakhter, A.; Wilson, R. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics)

    1992-07-01

    A number of situations where it has been claimed that moderate radiation doses cause leukemia or other cancers are carefully reviewed. We look at cases in the United States, Great Britain, and the Soviet Union. Usually it can be demonstrated that there is an alternative, more probable, explanation for the effect seen. In several cases the authors of the papers have fallen into statistical traps. The most frequent is a posteriori selection of cohort boundaries in both space and time: a trap illustrated dramatically by Feynman. The next most common trap is to arbitrarily select one out of many ways of looking at the data, against which we were warned by Tippett. Several cohorts are compared with respect to the number of persons at risk, average dose, and the number of cancers expected. Of these, only the cohort of A-bomb survivors in Japan and the recently unclassified data on the very large occupational doses for early Soviet nuclear workers at Chelyabinsk provide evidence of clearly visible excess cancers.

  17. Is there a large risk of radiation? A critical review of pessimistic claims

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shihab-Eldin, A.; Shlyakhter, A.; Wilson, R. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1992-07-01

    A number of situations where it has been claimed that moderate radiation doses cause leukemia or other cancers are carefully reviewed. We look at cases in the United States, Great Britain, and the Soviet Union. Usually it can be demonstrated that there is an alternative, more probable, explanation for the effect seen. In several cases the authors of the papers have fallen into statistical traps. The most frequent is a posteriori selection of cohort boundaries in both space and time: a trap illustrated dramatically by Feynman. The next most common trap is to arbitrarily select one out of many ways of looking at the data, against which we were warned by Tippett. Several cohorts are compared with respect to the number of persons at risk, average dose, and the number of cancers expected. Of these, only the cohort of A-bomb survivors in Japan and the recently unclassified data on the very large occupational doses for early Soviet nuclear workers at Chelyabinsk provide evidence of clearly visible excess cancers.

  18. A High Density Low Cost Digital Signal Processing Module for Large Scale Radiation Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Hui; Hennig, Wolfgang; Walby, Mark D.; Breus, Dimitry; Harris, Jackson T.; Grudberg, Peter M.; Warburton, William K.

    2013-06-01

    A 32-channel digital spectrometer PIXIE-32 is being developed for nuclear physics or other radiation detection applications requiring digital signal processing with large number of channels at relatively low cost. A single PIXIE-32 provides spectrometry and waveform acquisition for 32 input signals per module whereas multiple modules can be combined into larger systems. It is based on the PCI Express standard which allows data transfer rates to the host computer of up to 800 MB/s. Each of the 32 channels in a PIXIE-32 module accepts signals directly from a detector preamplifier or photomultiplier. Digitally controlled offsets can be individually adjusted for each channel. Signals are digitized in 12-bit, 50 MHz multi-channel ADCs. Triggering, pile-up inspection and filtering of the data stream are performed in real time, and pulse heights and other event data are calculated on an event-by event basis. The hardware architecture, internal and external triggering features, and the spectrometry and waveform acquisition capability of the PIXIE- 32 as well as its capability to distribute clock and triggers among multiple modules, are presented. (authors)

  19. The activation method for determining neutron spectra and fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogel, J.; Vespalec, R.

    1980-01-01

    3 mm thick foils of 4 and 17 mm in diameter were used for measurements. NaI scintillation detectors 45 mm in diameter by 50 mm thick and 40 mm in diameter by 1 mm thick, and a Ge-Li spectrometer of 53 cm 3 in volume were used for gamma detection. A photopeak or a certain part of the integral spectrum was measured for each radionuclide. Computer code PIKAR was applied in automatic calculation of a simple gamma spectrum obtained using the semiconductor spectrometer. The FACT code was used for calculating foil activity. Codes SAND II and RFSP were used for neutron spectra unfolding. Ge-Li detector spectrometry was used for determining neutron fluence. Code FLUE was used for determining the mean value of neutron flux density and fluence. (J.P.)

  20. Determination of fast neutron fluence at WWER-1000 pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valenta, V. et al.

    1989-01-01

    The influence function method is an effective tool making it possible, by means of tabulated values to rapidly perform three-dimensional calculations of fast neutron fluences for various reactor core loadings and for various nuclear power plant units. The procedure for determining the spatial dependence of the fast neutron fluences in a WWER-1000 pressure vessel is described. For this, the reactor core is divided into sufficiently fine volume elements within which the neutron source can be regarded as coordinate-independent. The influence functions point to a substantial role of sources lying at the reactor core periphery. In WWER-1000 reactors, only 1 or 2 rows of peripheral assemblies are important. The influence function method makes possible a rapid and easy determination of preconditions for the assessment of the residual lifetime of the pressure vessel based on the actual reactor core loadings. (Z.M.). 7 figs., 8 refs

  1. Study of the effects of low-fluence laser irradiation on wall paintings: Test measurements on fresco model samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raimondi, Valentina, E-mail: v.raimondi@ifac.cnr.it [‘Nello Carrara’Applied Physics Institute-National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Cucci, Costanza [‘Nello Carrara’Applied Physics Institute-National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Cuzman, Oana [Institute for the Conservation and Promotion of Cultural Heritage-National Research Council (CNR-ICVBC), Firenze (Italy); Fornacelli, Cristina [‘Nello Carrara’Applied Physics Institute-National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Galeotti, Monica [Opificio delle Pietre Dure (OPD), Firenze (Italy); Gomoiu, Ioana [National University of Art, Bucharest (Romania); Lognoli, David [‘Nello Carrara’Applied Physics Institute-National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Mohanu, Dan [National University of Art, Bucharest (Romania); Palombi, Lorenzo; Picollo, Marcello [‘Nello Carrara’Applied Physics Institute-National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Tiano, Piero [Institute for the Conservation and Promotion of Cultural Heritage-National Research Council (CNR-ICVBC), Firenze (Italy)

    2013-11-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence is widely applied in several fields as a diagnostic tool to characterise organic and inorganic materials and could be also exploited for non-invasive remote investigation of wall paintings using the fluorescence lidar technique. The latter relies on the use of a low-fluence pulsed UV laser and a telescope to carry out remote spectroscopy on a given target. A first step to investigate the applicability of this technique is to assess the effects of low-fluence laser radiation on wall paintings. This paper presents a study devoted to investigate the effects of pulsed UV laser radiation on a set of fresco model samples prepared using different pigments. To irradiate the samples we used a tripled-frequency Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (emission wavelength: 355 nm; pulse width: 5 ns). We varied the laser fluence from 0.1 mJ/cm{sup 2} to 1 mJ/cm{sup 2} and the number of laser pulses from 1 to 500 shots. We characterised the investigated materials using several diagnostic and analytical techniques (colorimetry, optical microscopy, fibre optical reflectance spectroscopy and ATR-FT-IR microscopy) to compare the surface texture and their composition before and after laser irradiation. Results open good prospects for a non-invasive investigation of wall paintings using the fluorescence lidar technique.

  2. Study of the effects of low-fluence laser irradiation on wall paintings: Test measurements on fresco model samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, Valentina; Cucci, Costanza; Cuzman, Oana; Fornacelli, Cristina; Galeotti, Monica; Gomoiu, Ioana; Lognoli, David; Mohanu, Dan; Palombi, Lorenzo; Picollo, Marcello; Tiano, Piero

    2013-11-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence is widely applied in several fields as a diagnostic tool to characterise organic and inorganic materials and could be also exploited for non-invasive remote investigation of wall paintings using the fluorescence lidar technique. The latter relies on the use of a low-fluence pulsed UV laser and a telescope to carry out remote spectroscopy on a given target. A first step to investigate the applicability of this technique is to assess the effects of low-fluence laser radiation on wall paintings. This paper presents a study devoted to investigate the effects of pulsed UV laser radiation on a set of fresco model samples prepared using different pigments. To irradiate the samples we used a tripled-frequency Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (emission wavelength: 355 nm; pulse width: 5 ns). We varied the laser fluence from 0.1 mJ/cm2 to 1 mJ/cm2 and the number of laser pulses from 1 to 500 shots. We characterised the investigated materials using several diagnostic and analytical techniques (colorimetry, optical microscopy, fibre optical reflectance spectroscopy and ATR-FT-IR microscopy) to compare the surface texture and their composition before and after laser irradiation. Results open good prospects for a non-invasive investigation of wall paintings using the fluorescence lidar technique.

  3. Study of the effects of low-fluence laser irradiation on wall paintings: Test measurements on fresco model samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raimondi, Valentina; Cucci, Costanza; Cuzman, Oana; Fornacelli, Cristina; Galeotti, Monica; Gomoiu, Ioana; Lognoli, David; Mohanu, Dan; Palombi, Lorenzo; Picollo, Marcello; Tiano, Piero

    2013-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence is widely applied in several fields as a diagnostic tool to characterise organic and inorganic materials and could be also exploited for non-invasive remote investigation of wall paintings using the fluorescence lidar technique. The latter relies on the use of a low-fluence pulsed UV laser and a telescope to carry out remote spectroscopy on a given target. A first step to investigate the applicability of this technique is to assess the effects of low-fluence laser radiation on wall paintings. This paper presents a study devoted to investigate the effects of pulsed UV laser radiation on a set of fresco model samples prepared using different pigments. To irradiate the samples we used a tripled-frequency Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (emission wavelength: 355 nm; pulse width: 5 ns). We varied the laser fluence from 0.1 mJ/cm 2 to 1 mJ/cm 2 and the number of laser pulses from 1 to 500 shots. We characterised the investigated materials using several diagnostic and analytical techniques (colorimetry, optical microscopy, fibre optical reflectance spectroscopy and ATR-FT-IR microscopy) to compare the surface texture and their composition before and after laser irradiation. Results open good prospects for a non-invasive investigation of wall paintings using the fluorescence lidar technique.

  4. Divergence of Cs-137 sources fluence used in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vianello, E.A.; Almeida, C.E. de

    1998-01-01

    In this work the experimental determination of correction factor for fluence divergence (kln) of linear Cs-137 sources CDCS J4, with Farmer ionization chamber model 2571 in a central and perpendicular plan to source axis, for distances range from 1 to 7 cm., has been presented. The experimental results were compared to calculating by Kondo and Randolph (1960) isotropic theory and Bielajew (1990) anisotropic theory. (Author)

  5. Correlating Fast Fluence to dpa in Atypical Locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drury Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Damage to a nuclear reactor's materials by high-energy neutrons causes changes in the ductility and fracture toughness of the materials. The reactor vessel and its associated piping's ability to withstand stress without brittle fracture are paramount to safety. Theoretically, the material damage is directly related to the displacements per atom (dpa via the residual defects from induced displacements. However in practice, the material damage is based on a correlation to the high-energy (E > 1.0 MeV neutron fluence. While the correlated approach is applicable when the material in question has experienced the same neutron spectrum as test specimens which were the basis of the correlation, this approach is not generically acceptable. Using Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates transport codes, the energy dependent neutron flux is determined throughout the reactor structures and the reactor vessel. Results from the models provide the dpa response in addition to the high-energy neutron flux. Ratios of dpa to fast fluence are calculated throughout the models. The comparisons show a constant ratio in the areas of historical concern and thus the validity of the correlated approach to these areas. In regions above and below the fuel however, the flux spectrum has changed significantly. The correlated relationship of material damage to fluence is not valid in these regions without adjustment. An adjustment mechanism is proposed.

  6. Correlating Fast Fluence to dpa in Atypical Locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Thomas H.

    2016-02-01

    Damage to a nuclear reactor's materials by high-energy neutrons causes changes in the ductility and fracture toughness of the materials. The reactor vessel and its associated piping's ability to withstand stress without brittle fracture are paramount to safety. Theoretically, the material damage is directly related to the displacements per atom (dpa) via the residual defects from induced displacements. However in practice, the material damage is based on a correlation to the high-energy (E > 1.0 MeV) neutron fluence. While the correlated approach is applicable when the material in question has experienced the same neutron spectrum as test specimens which were the basis of the correlation, this approach is not generically acceptable. Using Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates transport codes, the energy dependent neutron flux is determined throughout the reactor structures and the reactor vessel. Results from the models provide the dpa response in addition to the high-energy neutron flux. Ratios of dpa to fast fluence are calculated throughout the models. The comparisons show a constant ratio in the areas of historical concern and thus the validity of the correlated approach to these areas. In regions above and below the fuel however, the flux spectrum has changed significantly. The correlated relationship of material damage to fluence is not valid in these regions without adjustment. An adjustment mechanism is proposed.

  7. Time changes of vertical profile of neutron fluence rate in LVR-15 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viererbl, L.; Stehno, J.; Erben, O.; Lahodova, Z.; Marek, M.

    2003-01-01

    The LVR-15 reactor is a light water research type reactor, which is situated, in Nuclear Research Institute, Rez near Prague. The reactor is used as a multipurpose facility. For some experiments and material productions, e.g. for homogeneity of silicon resistance in production of radiation doped silicon, the time changes of vertical profile of neutron fluence rate are particularly important. The assembly used for silicon irradiation has two self-powered neutron detectors installed in a vertical irradiation channel in LVR-15 reactor. Vertical profile of thermal neutron fluence rate was automatically scanned during reactor operation. The results of measurements made in 2002 and 2003 with these detectors are presented. A set of vertical profile measurements was made during two 21-days reactor cycles. During the cycle the vertical profile slightly changes both in the position of its maximum and in the shape. The time dependences of the position of profile maximum and the profile width at half maximum during the cycle are given. (author)

  8. Laser Fluence Recognition Using Computationally Intelligent Pulsed Photoacoustics Within the Trace Gases Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukić, M.; Ćojbašić, Ž.; Rabasović, M. D.; Markushev, D. D.; Todorović, D. M.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, the possibilities of computational intelligence applications for trace gas monitoring are discussed. For this, pulsed infrared photoacoustics is used to investigate SF6-Ar mixtures in a multiphoton regime, assisted by artificial neural networks. Feedforward multilayer perceptron networks are applied in order to recognize both the spatial characteristics of the laser beam and the values of laser fluence Φ from the given photoacoustic signal and prevent changes. Neural networks are trained in an offline batch training regime to simultaneously estimate four parameters from theoretical or experimental photoacoustic signals: the laser beam spatial profile R(r), vibrational-to-translational relaxation time τ _{V-T} , distance from the laser beam to the absorption molecules in the photoacoustic cell r* and laser fluence Φ . The results presented in this paper show that neural networks can estimate an unknown laser beam spatial profile and the parameters of photoacoustic signals in real time and with high precision. Real-time operation, high accuracy and the possibility of application for higher intensities of radiation for a wide range of laser fluencies are factors that classify the computational intelligence approach as efficient and powerful for the in situ measurement of atmospheric pollutants.

  9. Plasma instability control toward high fluence, high energy x-ray continuum source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Patrick; Kirkwood, Robert; Wilks, Scott; Blue, Brent

    2017-10-01

    X-ray source development at Omega and NIF seeks to produce powerful radiation with high conversion efficiency for material effects studies in extreme fluence environments. While current K-shell emission sources can achieve tens of kJ on NIF up to 22 keV, the conversion efficiency drops rapidly for higher Z K-alpha energies. Pulsed power devices are efficient generators of MeV bremsstrahlung x-rays but are unable to produce lower energy photons in isolation, and so a capability gap exists for high fluence x-rays in the 30 - 100 keV range. A continuum source under development utilizes instabilities like Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) to generate plasma waves that accelerate electrons into high-Z converter walls. Optimizing instabilities using existing knowledge on their elimination will allow sufficiently hot and high yield electron distributions to create a superior bremsstrahlung x-ray source. An Omega experiment has been performed to investigate the optimization of SRS and high energy x-rays using Au hohlraums with parylene inner lining and foam fills, producing 10× greater x-ray yield at 50 keV than conventional direct drive experiments on the facility. Experiment and simulation details on this campaign will be presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the US DoE by LLNL under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. Realization of fluence field modulated CT on a clinical TomoTherapy megavoltage CT system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szczykutowicz, Timothy P; Hermus, James; Geurts, Mark; Smilowitz, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The multi-leaf collimator (MLC) assembly present on TomoTherapy (Accuray, Madison WI) radiation therapy (RT) and mega voltage CT machines is well suited to perform fluence field modulated CT (FFMCT). In addition, there is a demand in the RT environment for FFMCT imaging techniques, specifically volume of interest (VOI) imaging.A clinical TomoTherapy machine was programmed to perform VOI. Four different size ROIs were placed at varying distances from isocenter. Projections intersecting the VOI received ‘full dose’ while those not intersecting the VOI received 30% of the dose (i.e. the incident fluence for non VOI projections was 30% of the incident fluence for projections intersecting the VOI). Additional scans without fluence field modulation were acquired at ‘full’ and 30% dose. The noise (pixel standard deviation) and mean CT number were measured inside the VOI region and compared between the three scans. Dose maps were generated using a dedicated TomoTherapy treatment planning dose calculator.The VOI-FFMCT technique produced an image noise 1.05, 1.00, 1.03, and 1.05 times higher than the ‘full dose’ scan for ROI sizes of 10 cm, 13 cm, 10 cm, and 6 cm respectively within the VOI region. The VOI-FFMCT technique required a total imaging dose equal to 0.61, 0.69, 0.60, and 0.50 times the ‘full dose’ acquisition dose for ROI sizes of 10 cm, 13 cm, 10 cm, and 6 cm respectively within the VOI region.Noise levels can be almost unchanged within clinically relevant VOIs sizes for RT applications while the integral imaging dose to the patient can be decreased, and/or the image quality in RT can be dramatically increased with no change in dose relative to non-FFMCT RT imaging. The ability to shift dose away from regions unimportant for clinical evaluation in order to improve image quality or reduce imaging dose has been demonstrated. This paper demonstrates that FFMCT can be performed using the MLC on a clinical TomoTherapy machine for the

  11. A new Recoil Proton Telescope for energy and fluence measurement of fast neutron fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebreton, Lena; Bachaalany, Mario [IRSN / LMDN (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete nucleaire / Laboratoire de Metrologie et de dosimetrie des neutrons), Cadarache Bat.159, 13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance, (France); Husson, Daniel; Higueret, Stephane [IPHC / RaMsEs (Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien / Radioprotection et Mesures Environnementales), 23 rue du loess - BP28, 67037 Strasbourg cedex 2, (France)

    2015-07-01

    The spectrometer ATHENA (Accurate Telescope for High Energy Neutron metrology Applications), is being developed at the IRSN / LMDN (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete nucleaire / Laboratoire de Metrologie et de dosimetrie des neutrons) and aims at characterizing energy and fluence of fast neutron fields. The detector is a Recoil Proton Telescope and measures neutron fields in the range of 5 to 20 MeV. This telescope is intended to become a primary standard for both energy and fluence measurements. The neutron detection is achieved by a polyethylene radiator for n-p conversion, three 50{sub m} thick silicon sensors that use CMOS technology for the proton tracking and a 3 mm thick silicon diode to measure the residual proton energy. This first prototype used CMOS sensors called MIMOSTAR, initially developed for heavy ion physics. The use of CMOS sensors and silicon diode increases the intrinsic efficiency of the detector by a factor of ten compared with conventional designs. The first prototype has already been done and was a successful study giving the results it offered in terms of energy and fluence measurements. For mono energetic beams going from 5 to 19 MeV, the telescope offered an energy resolution between 5 and 11% and fluence difference going from 5 to 7% compared to other home standards. A second and final prototype of the detector is being designed. It will hold upgraded CMOS sensors called FastPixN. These CMOS sensors are supposed to run 400 times faster than the older version and therefore give the telescope the ability to support neutron flux in the order of 107 to 108cm{sup 2}:s{sup 1}. The first prototypes results showed that a 50 m pixel size is enough for a precise scattering angle reconstruction. Simulations using MCNPX and GEANT4 are already in place for further improvements. A DeltaE diode will replace the third CMOS sensor and will be installed right before the silicon diode for a better recoil proton selection. The final prototype with

  12. Transperineal in vivo fluence-rate dosimetry in the canine prostate during SnET2-mediated PDT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lilge, Lothar; Pomerleau-Dalcourt, Natalie; Douplik, Alexander; Selman, Steven H; Keck, Rick W; Szkudlarek, Maria; Pestka, Maciej; Jankun, Jerzy

    2004-01-01

    Advances in photodynamic therapy (PDT) treatment for prostate cancer can be achieved either by improving selectivity of the photosensitizer towards prostate gland tissue or improving the dosimetry by means of individualized treatment planning using currently available photosensitizers. The latter approach requires the ability to measure, among other parameters, the fluence rate at different positions within the prostate and the ability to derive the tissue optical properties. Here fibre optic probes are presented capable of measuring the fluence rate throughout large tissue volumes and a method to derive the tissue optical properties for different volumes of the prostate. The responsivity of the sensors is sufficient to detect a fluence rate of 0.1 mW cm -2 . The effective attenuation coefficient in the canine prostate at 660 nm is higher at the capsule (2.15 ± 0.19 cm -1 ) than in proximity of the urethra (1.84 ± 0.36 cm -1 ). Significant spatial and temporal intra- and inter-canine variability in the tissue optical properties was noted, highlighting the need for individualized monitoring of the fluence rate for improved dosimetry

  13. Diamond and silicon pixel detectors in high radiation environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsung, Jieh-Wen

    2012-10-15

    Diamond pixel detector is a promising candidate for tracking of collider experiments because of the good radiation tolerance of diamond. The diamond pixel detector must withstand the radiation damage from 10{sup 16} particles per cm{sup 2}, which is the expected total fluence in High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider. The performance of diamond and silicon pixel detectors are evaluated in this research in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Single-crystal diamond pixel detectors with the most recent readout chip ATLAS FE-I4 are produced and characterized. Based on the results of the measurement, the SNR of diamond pixel detector is evaluated as a function of radiation fluence, and compared to that of planar-silicon ones. The deterioration of signal due to radiation damage is formulated using the mean free path of charge carriers in the sensor. The noise from the pixel readout circuit is simulated and calculated with leakage current and input capacitance to the amplifier as important parameters. The measured SNR shows good agreement with the calculated and simulated results, proving that the performance of diamond pixel detectors can exceed the silicon ones if the particle fluence is more than 10{sup 15} particles per cm{sup 2}.

  14. Diamond and silicon pixel detectors in high radiation environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsung, Jieh-Wen

    2012-10-01

    Diamond pixel detector is a promising candidate for tracking of collider experiments because of the good radiation tolerance of diamond. The diamond pixel detector must withstand the radiation damage from 10 16 particles per cm 2 , which is the expected total fluence in High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider. The performance of diamond and silicon pixel detectors are evaluated in this research in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Single-crystal diamond pixel detectors with the most recent readout chip ATLAS FE-I4 are produced and characterized. Based on the results of the measurement, the SNR of diamond pixel detector is evaluated as a function of radiation fluence, and compared to that of planar-silicon ones. The deterioration of signal due to radiation damage is formulated using the mean free path of charge carriers in the sensor. The noise from the pixel readout circuit is simulated and calculated with leakage current and input capacitance to the amplifier as important parameters. The measured SNR shows good agreement with the calculated and simulated results, proving that the performance of diamond pixel detectors can exceed the silicon ones if the particle fluence is more than 10 15 particles per cm 2 .

  15. Measured thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, ATR Cycle 100-BC, April 23, 1993--May 13, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, L.D.; Murray, R.K.; Rogers, J.W.

    1993-07-01

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>1MeV) neutron fluence rate data for ATR Cycle 100-BC which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML) as requested by the Power Reactor Programs (ATR Experiments) Radiation Measurements Work Order. This report contains fluence rate values corresponding to the particular elevations (relative to the 80 ft. core elevation) where the measurements were taken. The data in this report consists of (1) a table of the ATR power history and distribution, (2) a hard copy listing of all thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, (3) plots of both the thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, and (4) a magnetic record (3.5 inch diskette) containing a listing of only the fast neutron fluence rates, their assigned elevations and proper header identification of all monitor positions contained herein. The fluence rates reported are for the average power levels given in the table of power history and distribution. All open-quotes Hclose quotes holder monitor wires for this cycle are 54 inches long. All open-quotes SRclose quotes holder monitor wires for this cycle are 55 inches long. This length allows measurement of the full core region and makes the first count elevation 24.73 inches above core midplane. Due to the safety rod problems in the west lobe, open-quotes BRclose quotes holders were used in the W-1, 2, 3, and 4 positions. All open-quotes BRclose quotes holder monitor wires for this cycle are 56.25 inches long. The distance from the end of the wires to the first count position was 4.25 inches for all wires counted from this cycle. The results from the measurements in the W-1, 2, 3, 4 monitor positions indicate that the safety rod followers were rotated to a different azimuthal orientation relative to the normal orientation. The results indicate that the rotation was counterclockwise from their normal orientation. This is the same condition observed starting with Cycle 99-B

  16. Radiation damage in proton-irradiated epitaxial silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, Joern

    2009-07-01

    In this work radiation hardness of 75 μm, 100 μm and 150 μm thick epitaxial silicon pad diodes of both standard and oxygenated material was investigated. Damage after 24 GeV/c proton irradiation in a 1MeV neutron equivalent fluence range between 10 14 cm -2 and 10 16 cm -2 was studied and isothermal annealing experiments at 80 C were carried out. Standard CV/IV measurements could be performed up to 4 x 10 15 cm -2 . The volume-normalised reverse current was found to increase linearly with fluence with a slope independent of the thickness and impurity concentration. However, due to large fluctuations the fluences had to be renormalised using the current-related damage parameter. Concerning the depletion voltage, nearly all materials remained at a moderate level up to 4 x 10 15 cm -2 . During short-term annealing acceptors annealed out, whereas others were introduced during the long-term annealing. The stable damage was characterised by donor removal at low fluences and fluence-proportional predominant donor introduction for highly irradiated diodes, depending on the oxygen level. No type inversion was observed. Time-resolved measurements with a new 670 nm laser-TCT setup made the determination of the trapping time constant with the charge correction method possible. The results agreed with expectations and showed a linear increase of trapping probability with fluence. The electric field exhibited a double peak structure in highly irradiated diodes. Charge collection efficiency measurements with α-particles were independent of oxygen concentration, but showed an improved efficiency for thinner diodes. A comparison to simulation revealed systematic discrepancies. A non-constant trapping time parameter was proposed as possible solution. (orig.)

  17. Radiation damage in proton-irradiated epitaxial silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lange, Joern

    2009-07-15

    In this work radiation hardness of 75 {mu}m, 100 {mu}m and 150 {mu}m thick epitaxial silicon pad diodes of both standard and oxygenated material was investigated. Damage after 24 GeV/c proton irradiation in a 1MeV neutron equivalent fluence range between 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} and 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} was studied and isothermal annealing experiments at 80 C were carried out. Standard CV/IV measurements could be performed up to 4 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. The volume-normalised reverse current was found to increase linearly with fluence with a slope independent of the thickness and impurity concentration. However, due to large fluctuations the fluences had to be renormalised using the current-related damage parameter. Concerning the depletion voltage, nearly all materials remained at a moderate level up to 4 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. During short-term annealing acceptors annealed out, whereas others were introduced during the long-term annealing. The stable damage was characterised by donor removal at low fluences and fluence-proportional predominant donor introduction for highly irradiated diodes, depending on the oxygen level. No type inversion was observed. Time-resolved measurements with a new 670 nm laser-TCT setup made the determination of the trapping time constant with the charge correction method possible. The results agreed with expectations and showed a linear increase of trapping probability with fluence. The electric field exhibited a double peak structure in highly irradiated diodes. Charge collection efficiency measurements with {alpha}-particles were independent of oxygen concentration, but showed an improved efficiency for thinner diodes. A comparison to simulation revealed systematic discrepancies. A non-constant trapping time parameter was proposed as possible solution. (orig.)

  18. Atomic structure from large-area, low-dose exposures of materials: A new route to circumvent radiation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, J.C., E-mail: jannik.meyer@univie.ac.at; Kotakoski, J.; Mangler, C.

    2014-10-15

    Beam-induced structural modifications are a major nuisance in the study of materials by high-resolution electron microscopy. Here, we introduce a new approach to circumvent the radiation damage problem by a statistical treatment of large, noisy, low-dose data sets of non-periodic configurations (e.g. defects) in the material. We distribute the dose over a mixture of different defect structures at random positions and with random orientations, and recover representative model images via a maximum likelihood search. We demonstrate reconstructions from simulated images at such low doses that the location of individual entities is not possible. The approach may open a route to study currently inaccessible beam-sensitive configurations. - Highlights: • A new approach to circumvent radiation damage. • Statistical treatment of large noisy data sets. • Analysis of radiation sensitive material defects.

  19. Compaction in optical fibres and fibre Bragg gratings under nuclear reactor high neutron and gamma fluence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remy, L.; Cheymol, G. [CEA, French Nuclear Energy Commission, Nuclear Energy Division, DPC/SEARS/LISL Bat 467 CEA Saclay 91191 Gif/Yvette Cedex (France); Gusarov, A. [SCK.CEN - Belgian Nuclear Research center, Boeretang 200 2400 Mol (Belgium); Morana, A.; Marin, E.; Girard, S. [Universite de Saint-Etienne, Laboratoire Hubert Curien, UMR CNRS5516, 18, rue du Pr. Lauras, F-42000 Saint-Etienne (France)

    2015-07-01

    In the framework of the development by CEA and SCK.CEN of a Fabry Perot Sensor (FPS) able to measure dimensional changes in Material Testing Reactor (MTR), the first goal of the SAKE 1 (Smirnof extention - Additional Key-tests on Elongation of glass fibres) irradiation was to measure the linear compaction of single mode fibres under high fast neutron fluence. Indeed, the compaction of the fibre which forms one side of the Fabry Perot cavity, may in particular cause a noticeable measurement error. An accurate quantification of this effect is then required to predict the radiation-induced drift and optimize the sensor design. To achieve this, an innovative approach was used. Approximately seventy uncoated fibre tips (length: 30 to 50 mm) have been prepared from several different fibre samples and were installed in the SCK.CEN BR2 reactor (Mol Belgium). After 22 days of irradiation a total fast (E > 1 MeV) fluence of 3 to 5x10{sup 19} n{sub fast}/cm{sup 2}, depending on the sample location, was accumulated. The temperature during irradiation was 291 deg. C, which is not far from the condition of the intended FPS use. A precise measurement of each fibre tip length was made before the irradiation and compared to the post irradiation measurement highlighting a decrease of the fibres' length corresponding to about 0.25% of linear compaction. The amplitude of the changes is independent of the capsule, which could mean that the compaction effect saturates even at the lowest considered fluence. In the prospect of performing distributed temperature measurement in MTR, several fibre Bragg gratings written using a femtosecond laser have been also irradiated. All the gratings were written in radiation hardened fibres, and underwent an additional treatment with a procedure enhancing their resistance to ionizing radiations. A special mounting made it possible to test the reflection and the transmission of the gratings on fibre samples cut down to 30 to 50 mm. The comparison

  20. Online radiation dose measurement system for ATLAS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandic, I.; Cindro, V.; Dolenc, I.; Gorisek, A.; Kramberger, G. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Mikuz, M. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana (Slovenia); Bronner, J.; Hartet, J. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitat Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, Freiburg (Germany); Franz, S. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2009-07-01

    In experiments at Large Hadron Collider, detectors and electronics will be exposed to high fluxes of photons, charged particles and neutrons. Damage caused by the radiation will influence performance of detectors. It will therefore be important to continuously monitor the radiation dose in order to follow the level of degradation of detectors and electronics and to correctly predict future radiation damage. A system for online radiation monitoring using semiconductor radiation sensors at large number of locations has been installed in the ATLAS experiment. Ionizing dose in SiO{sub 2} will be measured with RadFETs, displacement damage in silicon in units of 1-MeV(Si) equivalent neutron fluence with p-i-n diodes. At 14 monitoring locations where highest radiation levels are expected the fluence of thermal neutrons will be measured from current gain degradation in dedicated bipolar transistors. The design of the system and tests of its performance in mixed radiation field is described in this paper. First results from this test campaign confirm that doses can be measured with sufficient sensitivity (mGy for total ionizing dose measurements, 10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2} for NIEL (non-ionizing energy loss) measurements, 10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2} for thermal neutrons) and accuracy (about 20%) for usage in the ATLAS detector

  1. Online radiation dose measurement system for ATLAS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandic, I.; Cindro, V.; Dolenc, I.; Gorisek, A.; Kramberger, G.; Mikuz, M.; Bronner, J.; Hartet, J.; Franz, S.

    2009-01-01

    In experiments at Large Hadron Collider, detectors and electronics will be exposed to high fluxes of photons, charged particles and neutrons. Damage caused by the radiation will influence performance of detectors. It will therefore be important to continuously monitor the radiation dose in order to follow the level of degradation of detectors and electronics and to correctly predict future radiation damage. A system for online radiation monitoring using semiconductor radiation sensors at large number of locations has been installed in the ATLAS experiment. Ionizing dose in SiO 2 will be measured with RadFETs, displacement damage in silicon in units of 1-MeV(Si) equivalent neutron fluence with p-i-n diodes. At 14 monitoring locations where highest radiation levels are expected the fluence of thermal neutrons will be measured from current gain degradation in dedicated bipolar transistors. The design of the system and tests of its performance in mixed radiation field is described in this paper. First results from this test campaign confirm that doses can be measured with sufficient sensitivity (mGy for total ionizing dose measurements, 10 9 n/cm 2 for NIEL (non-ionizing energy loss) measurements, 10 12 n/cm 2 for thermal neutrons) and accuracy (about 20%) for usage in the ATLAS detector

  2. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The chapter one presents the composition of matter and atomic theory; matter structure; transitions; origin of radiation; radioactivity; nuclear radiation; interactions in decay processes; radiation produced by the interaction of radiation with matter

  3. Radiation tests of photodiodes for the ATLAS SCT and PIXEL opto- links

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, L S; Lee, S C; Su, D S; Teng, P K

    2005-01-01

    In previous research, epitaxial Si PIN photodiodes produced by Centronic which will be used in the ATLAS semiconductor tracker have been irradiated with 1 MeV neutrons and 24 GeV protons with fluences up to an equivalent of $10^{15}$ 1 MeV neutrons (1,2) . In this work 30 MeV proton beams were used to irradiate Centronic and Truelight epitaxial Si PIN diodes with accumulated fluences of up to 2.1 multiplied by $10^{14}$-30 MeV p $cm^{-2}$, an equivalent of 5.7 multiplied by $10^{14} cm^{-2}$ 1 MeV neutrons, to reach the pixel radiation environment. The responsivity was measured with different levels of fluence in order to study the responsivity behaviour of two different types of photodiodes. The responsivity behaviour of these two photodiodes was similar: a linear degradation at large fluences, greater than $10^{14}$ 30 MeV p $cm^{-2}$, but with different slopes. The response of the Centronic PIN diode showed a degradation to 73% after a proton fluence of $10^{13}$ p $cm^{-2}$ of 30 MeV and a linear degradat...

  4. Non-destructive screening method for radiation hardened performance of large scale integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Dong; Xi Shanbin; Guo Qi; Ren Diyuan; Li Yudong; Sun Jing; Wen Lin

    2013-01-01

    The space radiation environment could induce radiation damage on the electronic devices. As the performance of commercial devices is generally superior to that of radiation hardened devices, it is necessary to screen out the devices with good radiation hardened performance from the commercial devices and applying these devices to space systems could improve the reliability of the systems. Combining the mathematical regression analysis with the different physical stressing experiments, we investigated the non-destructive screening method for radiation hardened performance of the integrated circuit. The relationship between the change of typical parameters and the radiation performance of the circuit was discussed. The irradiation-sensitive parameters were confirmed. The pluralistic linear regression equation toward the prediction of the radiation performance was established. Finally, the regression equations under stress conditions were verified by practical irradiation. The results show that the reliability and accuracy of the non-destructive screening method can be elevated by combining the mathematical regression analysis with the practical stressing experiment. (authors)

  5. Development of radiation-tolerant components for the quench detection system at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitterling, Oliver

    2017-04-03

    This works describes the results of a three year project to improve the radiation tolerance of the Quench Protection System of the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Radiation-induced premature beam aborts have been a limiting factor for accelerator availability in the recent years. Furthermore, the future upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider to its High Luminosity phase will further increase the radiation load and has higher requirements for the overall machine availability. Therefore equipment groups like the Quench protection groups have used the last years to redesign many of their systems to fulfill those requirements. In support of the development of radiation-tolerant systems, several proton beam irradiation campaigns were conducted to determine the inherent radiation tolerance of a selection of varied electronic components. Using components from this selection a new Quench Protection System for the 600 A corrector magnets was developed. The radiation tolerance of this system was further improved by developing a filter and error correction system for all discovered failure modes. Furthermore, compliance of the new system with the specification was shown by simulating the behavior of the system using data taken from the irradiation campaigns. The resulting system is operational since the beginning of 2016 and has in the first 9 months of operation not shown a single radiation-induced failure. Using results from simulations and irradiation campaigns the predicted failure cross section for the full new 600 A Quench Protection System is 4.358±0.564.10{sup -10} cm{sup 2} which is one order of magnitude lower than the target set during the development of this system.

  6. Development of radiation-tolerant components for the quench detection system at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitterling, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    This works describes the results of a three year project to improve the radiation tolerance of the Quench Protection System of the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Radiation-induced premature beam aborts have been a limiting factor for accelerator availability in the recent years. Furthermore, the future upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider to its High Luminosity phase will further increase the radiation load and has higher requirements for the overall machine availability. Therefore equipment groups like the Quench protection groups have used the last years to redesign many of their systems to fulfill those requirements. In support of the development of radiation-tolerant systems, several proton beam irradiation campaigns were conducted to determine the inherent radiation tolerance of a selection of varied electronic components. Using components from this selection a new Quench Protection System for the 600 A corrector magnets was developed. The radiation tolerance of this system was further improved by developing a filter and error correction system for all discovered failure modes. Furthermore, compliance of the new system with the specification was shown by simulating the behavior of the system using data taken from the irradiation campaigns. The resulting system is operational since the beginning of 2016 and has in the first 9 months of operation not shown a single radiation-induced failure. Using results from simulations and irradiation campaigns the predicted failure cross section for the full new 600 A Quench Protection System is 4.358±0.564.10 -10 cm 2 which is one order of magnitude lower than the target set during the development of this system.

  7. SIFT: A method to verify the IMRT fluence delivered during patient treatment using an electronic portal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Sandra C.; Dirkx, Maarten L.P.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Boer, Hans C.J. de

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy patients are increasingly treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and high tumor doses. As part of our quality control program to ensure accurate dose delivery, a new method was investigated that enables the verification of the IMRT fluence delivered during patient treatment using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID), irrespective of changes in patient geometry. Methods and materials: Each IMRT treatment field is split into a static field and a modulated field, which are delivered in sequence. Images are acquired for both fields using an EPID. The portal dose image obtained for the static field is used to determine changes in patient geometry between the planning CT scan and the time of treatment delivery. With knowledge of these changes, the delivered IMRT fluence can be verified using the portal dose image of the modulated field. This method, called split IMRT field technique (SIFT), was validated first for several phantom geometries, followed by clinical implementation for a number of patients treated with IMRT. Results: The split IMRT field technique allows for an accurate verification of the delivered IMRT fluence (generally within 1% [standard deviation]), even if large interfraction changes in patient geometry occur. For interfraction radiological path length changes of 10 cm, deliberately introduced errors in the delivered fluence could still be detected to within 1% accuracy. Application of SIFT requires only a minor increase in treatment time relative to the standard IMRT delivery. Conclusions: A new technique to verify the delivered IMRT fluence from EPID images, which is independent of changes in the patient geometry, has been developed. SIFT has been clinically implemented for daily verification of IMRT treatment delivery

  8. Task-Driven Optimization of Fluence Field and Regularization for Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction in Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Grace J; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H; Stayman, J Webster

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents a joint optimization of dynamic fluence field modulation (FFM) and regularization in quadratic penalized-likelihood reconstruction that maximizes a task-based imaging performance metric. We adopted a task-driven imaging framework for prospective designs of the imaging parameters. A maxi-min objective function was adopted to maximize the minimum detectability index ( ) throughout the image. The optimization algorithm alternates between FFM (represented by low-dimensional basis functions) and local regularization (including the regularization strength and directional penalty weights). The task-driven approach was compared with three FFM strategies commonly proposed for FBP reconstruction (as well as a task-driven TCM strategy) for a discrimination task in an abdomen phantom. The task-driven FFM assigned more fluence to less attenuating anteroposterior views and yielded approximately constant fluence behind the object. The optimal regularization was almost uniform throughout image. Furthermore, the task-driven FFM strategy redistribute fluence across detector elements in order to prescribe more fluence to the more attenuating central region of the phantom. Compared with all strategies, the task-driven FFM strategy not only improved minimum by at least 17.8%, but yielded higher over a large area inside the object. The optimal FFM was highly dependent on the amount of regularization, indicating the importance of a joint optimization. Sample reconstructions of simulated data generally support the performance estimates based on computed . The improvements in detectability show the potential of the task-driven imaging framework to improve imaging performance at a fixed dose, or, equivalently, to provide a similar level of performance at reduced dose.

  9. The ionizing radiation environment of LDEF prerecovery predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, John W., Jr.; Derrickson, James H.; Parnell, T. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Harmon, A.; Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.; Heinrich, Wolfgang

    1991-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was exposed to several sources of ionizing radiation while in orbit. The principal ones were trapped belt protons and electrons, galactic cosmic rays, and albedo particles (protons and neutrons) from the atmosphere. Large solar flares in 1989 may have caused a small contribution. Prior to the recovery of the spacecraft, a number of calculations and estimates were made to predict the radiation exposure of the spacecraft and experiments. These were made to assess whether measurable radiation effects might exist, and to plan the analysis of the large number of radiation measurements available on the LDEF. Calculations and estimates of total dose, particle fluences, linear energy transfer spectra, and induced radioactivity were made. The principal sources of radiation is described, and the preflight predictions are summarized.

  10. Measurement of thermal neutron fluence with CaSO4 thermoluminescent phosphors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jinhua; Su Jingling; Wei Zemin

    1984-01-01

    During neutron irradiation, some TL phosphors were activated. After leaving the irradiation field the TL phosphor produced self-irradiation. The TL output of self-dose was only related to the original neutron fluence and independent of the γ-radiation. Several CaSO 4 TL phosphors were made. They were CaSO 4 :Dy, CaSO 4 :Dy-Teflon, CaSO 4 :Dy mixed with Dy 2 O 3 , CaSO 4 :Mn mixed with Dy 2 O 3 . The linearity, and lower detection limits of these TL phosphors were measured. The thermal neutron response of CaSO 4 :Mn mixed with Dy 2 O 3 was 64 R/(10 10 cm -2 ) and the lower detection limit was 1.3x10 5 cm -2

  11. Focusing of white synchrotron radiation using large-acceptance cylindrical refractive lenses made of single – crystal diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polikarpov, M., E-mail: polikarpov.maxim@mail.ru [Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University, Nevskogo 14a, 23600 Kaliningrad (Russian Federation); Snigireva, I. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 71 avenue des Martyrs, Grenoble 38043 (France); Snigirev, A. [Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University, Nevskogo 14a, 23600 Kaliningrad (Russian Federation); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 71 avenue des Martyrs, Grenoble 38043 (France)

    2016-07-27

    Large-aperture cylindrical refractive lenses were manufactured by laser cutting of single-crystal diamond. Five linear single lenses with apertures of 1 mm and the depth of the structure of 1.2 mm were fabricated and tested at the ESRF ID06 beamline performing the focusing of white-beam synchrotron radiation. Uniform linear focus was stable during hours of exposure, representing such lenses as pre-focusing and collimating devices suitable for the front-end sections of today synchrotron radiation sources.

  12. Focusing of white synchrotron radiation using large-acceptance cylindrical refractive lenses made of single – crystal diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polikarpov, M.; Snigireva, I.; Snigirev, A.

    2016-01-01

    Large-aperture cylindrical refractive lenses were manufactured by laser cutting of single-crystal diamond. Five linear single lenses with apertures of 1 mm and the depth of the structure of 1.2 mm were fabricated and tested at the ESRF ID06 beamline performing the focusing of white-beam synchrotron radiation. Uniform linear focus was stable during hours of exposure, representing such lenses as pre-focusing and collimating devices suitable for the front-end sections of today synchrotron radiation sources.

  13. Examinations on cases of surgery for radiation-induced disorders of large intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiba, Tadaaki [Toho Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-11-01

    Author`s experience of surgery for radiation colitis was examined and discussed on the primary disease, radiation dose, major symptoms, surgical techniques, results and post-operative complication. Patients were 1 male and 21 females of the average age of 59.5 y. The primary diseases were bladder cancer for the male and uterine cancer for the females. The radiation dose ranged from 35-120 Gy and was 63.4 Gy in a mean. The symptoms for surgery were 14 ileuses, 4 intestinal hemorrhages, 1 perforation and 3 burrows. Colostomy was performed for 18 cases; enterostomy, 2; anastomosis, 1; and enterectomy, 1, which resulted in improvement of symptoms in 5 cases, 0, 1 and 1, respectively. The author concluded that radiation colitis should be treated preventively. (K.H.)

  14. Benefit of Consolidative Radiation Therapy for Primary Bone Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Randa; Allen, Pamela K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Rodriguez, Alma [Department of Lymphoma and Myeloma, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Shihadeh, Ferial; Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Arzu, Isadora; Reed, Valerie K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Oki, Yasuhiro; Westin, Jason R.; Fayad, Luis E.; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey [Department of Lymphoma and Myeloma, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dabaja, Bouthaina, E-mail: bdabaja@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: Outcomes for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) differ according to the site of presentation. With effective chemotherapy, the need for consolidative radiation therapy (RT) is controversial. We investigated the influence of primary bone presentation and receipt of consolidative RT on progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with DLBCL. Methods and Materials: We identified 102 patients with primary bone DLBCL treated consecutively from 1988 through 2013 and extracted clinical, pathologic, and treatment characteristics from the medical records. Survival outcomes were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method, with factors affecting survival determined by log-rank tests. Univariate and multivariate analyses were done with a Cox regression model. Results: The median age was 55 years (range, 16-87 years). The most common site of presentation was in the long bones. Sixty-five patients (63%) received R-CHOP–based chemotherapy, and 74 (72%) received rituximab. RT was given to 67 patients (66%), 47 with stage I to II and 20 with stage III to IV disease. The median RT dose was 44 Gy (range, 24.5-50 Gy). At a median follow-up time of 82 months, the 5-year PFS and OS rates were 80% and 82%, respectively. Receipt of RT was associated with improved 5-year PFS (88% RT vs 63% no RT, P=.0069) and OS (91% vs 68%, P=.0064). On multivariate analysis, the addition of RT significantly improved PFS (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.14, P=.014) with a trend toward an OS benefit (HR=0.30, P=.053). No significant difference in PFS or OS was found between patients treated with 30 to 35 Gy versus ≥36 Gy (P=.71 PFS and P=.31 OS). Conclusion: Patients with primary bone lymphoma treated with standard chemotherapy followed by RT can have excellent outcomes. The use of consolidative RT was associated with significant benefits in both PFS and OS.

  15. Benefit of Consolidative Radiation Therapy for Primary Bone Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, Randa; Allen, Pamela K.; Rodriguez, Alma; Shihadeh, Ferial; Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Arzu, Isadora; Reed, Valerie K.; Oki, Yasuhiro; Westin, Jason R.; Fayad, Luis E.; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Dabaja, Bouthaina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Outcomes for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) differ according to the site of presentation. With effective chemotherapy, the need for consolidative radiation therapy (RT) is controversial. We investigated the influence of primary bone presentation and receipt of consolidative RT on progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with DLBCL. Methods and Materials: We identified 102 patients with primary bone DLBCL treated consecutively from 1988 through 2013 and extracted clinical, pathologic, and treatment characteristics from the medical records. Survival outcomes were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method, with factors affecting survival determined by log-rank tests. Univariate and multivariate analyses were done with a Cox regression model. Results: The median age was 55 years (range, 16-87 years). The most common site of presentation was in the long bones. Sixty-five patients (63%) received R-CHOP–based chemotherapy, and 74 (72%) received rituximab. RT was given to 67 patients (66%), 47 with stage I to II and 20 with stage III to IV disease. The median RT dose was 44 Gy (range, 24.5-50 Gy). At a median follow-up time of 82 months, the 5-year PFS and OS rates were 80% and 82%, respectively. Receipt of RT was associated with improved 5-year PFS (88% RT vs 63% no RT, P=.0069) and OS (91% vs 68%, P=.0064). On multivariate analysis, the addition of RT significantly improved PFS (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.14, P=.014) with a trend toward an OS benefit (HR=0.30, P=.053). No significant difference in PFS or OS was found between patients treated with 30 to 35 Gy versus ≥36 Gy (P=.71 PFS and P=.31 OS). Conclusion: Patients with primary bone lymphoma treated with standard chemotherapy followed by RT can have excellent outcomes. The use of consolidative RT was associated with significant benefits in both PFS and OS

  16. Neutron fluence in a 18 MeV Electron Accelerator for Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paredes G, L.C.

    2001-01-01

    An investigation was made on the theoretical fundamentals for the determination of the neutron fluence in a linear electron accelerator for radiotherapy applications and the limit values of leakage neutron radiation established by guidelines and standards in radiation protection for these type of accelerators. This investigation includes the following parts: a) Exhaustive bibliographical review on the topics mentioned above, in order to combine and to update the necessary basic information to facilitate the understanding of this subject; b) Analysis of the accelerator operation and identification of its main components, specially in the accelerator head; c) Study of different types of targets and its materials for the Bremsstrahlung production which is based on the electron initial energy, the thickness of the target, and its angular distribution and energy, which influences in the neutron generation by means of the photonuclear and electro disintegration reactions; d) Analysis of the neutron yield based on the target type and its thickness, the energy of electrons and photons; e) Analysis of the neutron energy spectra generated in the accelerator head, inside and outside the treatment room; f) Study of the dosimetry fundamentals for neutron and photon mixed fields, the dosimeter selection criteria and standards applied for these applications, specially the Panasonic U D-809 thermoluminescent dosemeter and C R-39 nuclear track dosimeter; g) Theoretical calculation of the neutron yield using a simplified geometric model for the accelerator head with spherical cell, which considers the target, primary collimator, flattener filter, movable collimators and the head shielding as the main components for radiation production. The cases with W and Pb shielding for closed movable collimators and an irradiation field of 20 x 20 cm 2 were analyzed and, h) Experimental evaluation of the leakage neutron radiation from the patient and head planes, observing that the accelerator

  17. Thickness optimization of various moderator materials for maximization of thermal neutron fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhang, Prosenjit; Verma, Rishi; Shyam, Anurag

    2015-01-01

    Plasma focus device is widely being used as pulsed neutron source for variety of applications. Measurements of neutron yield by largely preferred Helium-3 proportional counter and Silver activation counter are mainly sensitive to thermal neutrons and are typically used with a neutron moderator. Thermalization of neutron is based on scattering reaction and hydrogenous materials are the best thermalizing medium. The efficiency of aforementioned neutron detectors is considerably affected by physical and geometrical properties of thermalizing medium i.e. moderator material, its thickness and shape. In view of the same, simulations have been performed to explore the effective utilization of Polyethylene, Perspex and Light water as moderating mediums for cylindrical and spherical geometry. In this study, estimated thermal fluence value up to 0.5 eV has been considered as the benchmark factor for comparing efficient thermalization by specific material, its thickness and shape. In either of the shapes being cylindrical or spherical, use of Polyethylene as moderating medium has resulted in minimum optimum thickness along with highest thermal fluence. (author)

  18. Status of the design concepts for a high fluence fast pulse reactor (HFFPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philbin, J.S.; Nelson, W.E.; Rosenstroch, B.

    1978-10-01

    The report describes progress that has been made on the design of a High Fluence Fast Pulse Reactor (HFFPR) through the end of calendar year 1977. The purpose of this study is to present design concepts for a test reactor capable of accommodating large scale reactor safety tests. These concepts for reactor safety tests are adaptations of reactor concepts developed earlier for DOE/OMA for the conduct of weapon effects tests. The preferred driver core uses fuel similar to that developed for Sandia's ACPR upgrade. It is a BeO/UO 2 fuel that is gas cooled and has a high volumetric heat capacity. The present version of the design can drive large (217) pin bundles of prototypically enriched mixed oxide fuel well beyond the fuel's boiling point. Applicability to specific reactor safety accident scenarios and subsequent design improvements will be presented in future reports on this subject

  19. Environmental Monitoring and Characterization of Radiation Sources on UF Campus Using a Large Volume NaI Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, Jesse A.; Gardiner, Hannah E.; Jordan, Kelly A.; Baciak, James E.

    2016-09-01

    Environmental radiation surveys are important for applications such as safety and regulations. This is especially true for areas exposed to emissions from nuclear reactors, such as the University of Florida Training Reactor (UFTR). At the University of Florida, surveys are performed using the RSX-1 NaI detector, developed by Radiation Solutions Inc. The detector uses incoming gamma rays and an Advanced Digital Spectrometer module to produce a linear energy spectrum. These spectra can then be analyzed in real time with a personal computer using the built in software, RadAssist. We report on radiation levels around the University of Florida campus using two mobile detection platforms, car-borne and cart-borne. The car-borne surveys provide a larger, broader map of campus radiation levels. On the other hand, cart-borne surveys provide a more detailed radiation map because of its ability to reach places on campus cars cannot go. Throughout the survey data, there are consistent radon decay product energy peaks in addition to other sources such as medical I-131 found in a large crowd of people. Finally, we investigate further applications of this mobile detection platform, such as tracking the Ar-41 plume emitted from the UFTR and detection of potential environmental hazards.

  20. Radiation protection in category III large gamma irradiators; Radioprotecao em irradiadores de grande porte de categoria III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Neivaldo; Furlan, Gilberto Ribeiro, E-mail: neivaldo@cena.usp.b, E-mail: gilfurlan@cena.usp.b [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Itepan, Natanael Marcio, E-mail: natanael.itepan@unianhanguera.edu.b [Universidade Anhanguera, Goiania, GO (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    This article discusses the advantages of category III large gamma irradiator compared to the others, with emphasis on aspects of radiological protection, in the industrial sector. This category is a kind of irradiators almost unknown to the regulators authorities and the industrial community, despite its simple construction and greater radiation safety intrinsic to the model, able to maintain an efficiency of productivity comparable to those of category IV. Worldwide, there are installed more than 200 category IV irradiators and there is none of a category III irradiator in operation. In a category III gamma irradiator, the source remains fixed in the bottom of the tank, always shielded by water, negating the exposition risk. Taking into account the benefits in relation to radiation safety, the category III large irradiators are highly recommended for industrial, commercial purposes or scientific research. (author)

  1. Measurement of environmental gamma radiation by means of a large volume ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauthier, Daniel; Caput, Claude.

    1980-02-01

    A device for the measurement of the intensity of environmental gamma radiation has been realized and set up inside a vehicle especially fitted to that purpose. Because of its characteristics of sensitivity and time of response light and very local anomalies due for instance to foreign materials or punctual geological bassets can be detected and maps of dose rates at a regional scale can be drawn up. Such maps drawn before and after the operation of nuclear plants make it possible to assess their impact on environmental radiation levels [fr

  2. On-Site Determination and Monitoring of Real-Time Fluence Delivery for an Operating UV Reactor Based on a True Fluence Rate Detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengkai; Li, Wentao; Qiang, Zhimin; Blatchley, Ernest R

    2017-07-18

    At present, on-site fluence (distribution) determination and monitoring of an operating UV system represent a considerable challenge. The recently developed microfluorescent silica detector (MFSD) is able to measure the approximate true fluence rate (FR) at a fixed position in a UV reactor that can be compared with a FR model directly. Hence it has provided a connection between model calculation and real-time fluence determination. In this study, an on-site determination and monitoring method of fluence delivery for an operating UV reactor was developed. True FR detectors, a UV transmittance (UVT) meter, and a flow rate meter were used for fundamental measurements. The fluence distribution, as well as reduction equivalent fluence (REF), 10th percentile dose in the UV fluence distribution (F 10 ), minimum fluence (F min ), and mean fluence (F mean ) of a test reactor, was calculated in advance by the combined use of computational fluid dynamics and FR field modeling. A field test was carried out on the test reactor for disinfection of a secondary water supply. The estimated real-time REF, F 10 , F min , and F mean decreased 73.6%, 71.4%, 69.6%, and 72.9%, respectively, during a 6-month period, which was attributable to lamp output attenuation and sleeve fouling. The results were analyzed with synchronous data from a previously developed triparameter UV monitoring system and water temperature sensor. This study allowed demonstration of an accurate method for on-site, real-time fluence determination which could be used to enhance the security and public confidence of UV-based water treatment processes.

  3. Effects of laser energy fluence on the onset and growth of the Rayleigh–Taylor instabilities and its influence on the topography of the Fe thin film grown in pulsed laser deposition facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, S.; Rawat, R. S.; Wang, Y.; Lee, S.; Tan, T. L.; Springham, S. V.; Lee, P.; Zakaullah, M.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of laser energy fluence on the onset and growth of Rayleigh–Taylor (RT) instabilities in laser induced Fe plasma is investigated using time-resolved fast gated imaging. The snow plow and shock wave models are fitted to the experimental results and used to estimate the ablation parameters and the density of gas atoms that interact with the ablated species. It is observed that RT instability develops during the interface deceleration stage and grows for a considerable time for higher laser energy fluence. The effects of RT instabilities formation on the surface topography of the Fe thin films grown in pulsed laser deposition system are investigated (i) using different laser energy fluences for the same wavelength of laser radiation and (ii) using different laser wavelengths keeping the energy fluence fixed. It is concluded that the deposition achieved under turbulent condition leads to less smooth deposition surfaces with bigger sized particle agglomerates or network.

  4. Radiation damage measurements in room temperature semiconductor radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franks, L.A.; Olsen, R.W.; James, R.B.; Brunett, B.A.; Walsh, D.S.; Doyle, B.L.; Vizkelethy, G.; Trombka, J.I.

    1998-01-01

    The literature of radiation damage measurements on cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), cadmium telluride (CT), and mercuric iodide (HgI 2 ) is reviewed and in the case of CZT supplemented by new alpha particle data. CZT strip detectors exposed to intermediate energy (1.3 MeV) proton fluences exhibit increased interstrip leakage after 10 10 p/cm 2 and significant bulk leakage after 10 12 p/cm 2 . CZT exposed to 200 MeV protons shows a two-fold loss in energy resolution after a fluence of 5 x 10 9 p/cm 2 in thick (3 mm) planar devices but little effect in 2 mm devices. No energy resolution effects were noted from moderated fission spectrum of neutrons after fluences up to 10 10 n/cm 2 , although activation was evident. Exposures of CZT to 5 MeV alpha particle at fluences up to 1.5 x 10 10 α/cm 2 produced a near linear decrease in peak position with fluence and increases in FWHM beginning at about 7.5 x 10 9 α/cm 2 . CT detectors show resolution losses after fluences of 3 x 10 9 p/cm 2 at 33 MeV for chlorine-doped detectors. Indium doped material may be more resistant. Neutron exposures (8 MeV) caused resolution losses after fluences of 2 x 10 10 n/cm 2 . Mercuric iodide has been studied with intermediate energy protons (10 to 33 MeV) at fluences up to 10 12 p/cm 2 and with 1.5 GeV protons at fluences up to 1.2 x 10 8 p/cm 2 . Neutron exposures at 8 MeV have been reported at fluences up to 10 15 n/cm 2 . No radiation damage was reported under these irradiation conditions

  5. Radiation protection in large linear accelerators; Seguranca radiologica de aceleradores lineares de grande porte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliva, Jose de Jesus Rivero, E-mail: rivero@con.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Sousa, Fernando Nuno Carneiro de, E-mail: fernandonunosousa@gmail.com [Aceletron Irradiacao lndustrial, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The electron linear accelerators can be used in industrial applications that require powerful sources of ionizing radiation. They have the important characteristic of not representing a radiation hazard when the accelerators remain electrically disconnected. With the plant in operation, a high reliability defense in depth reduces the risk of radiological accidents to extremely small levels. It is practically impossible that a person could enter into the radiation bunker with the accelerators connected. Aceletron Irradiacao Industrial, located in Rio de Janeiro, offers services of irradiation by means of two powerful electron linear accelerators, with 15 kW power and 10 MeV electron energy. Despite the high level of existing radiation safety, a simplified risk study is underway to identify possible sequences of radiological accidents. The study is based on the combined application of the event and fault trees techniques. Preliminary results confirm that there is a very small risk of entering into the irradiation bunker with the accelerators in operation, but the risk of an operator entering into the bunker during a process interruption and remaining there without notice after the accelerators were restarted may be considerably larger. Based on these results the Company is considering alternatives to reduce the likelihood of human error of this type that could lead to a radiological accident. The paper describes the defense in depth of the irradiation process in Aceletron Irradiacao Industrial, as well as the models and preliminary results of the ongoing risk analysis, including the additional safety measures which are being evaluated. (author)

  6. Test of Fibre Bragg Gratings samples under High Fast Neutrons Fluence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheymol, G.; Remy, L.; Gusarov, A.; Kinet, D.; Mégret, P.; Laffont, G.; Blanchet, T.; Morana, A.; Marin, E.; Girard, S.

    2018-01-01

    Optical fibre sensors (OFS) are worthy of interest for measurements in nuclear reactor thanks to their unique features, particularly compact size and remote multi-point sensing for some of them. But besides non negligible constraints associated with the high temperature environment of the experiments of interest, it is well known that the performances of OFS can be severely affected by high level of radiations. The Radiation Induced Attenuation (RIA) in the fibre is probably most known effect, which can be to some extent circumvented by using rad hard fibres to limit the dynamic loss. However, when the fast neutron fluence reaches 1018 to 1019 n/cm2, the density and index variations associated to structural changes may deteriorate drastically the performances of OFS even if they are based on rad hard fibres, by causing direct errors in the measurements of temperature and/or strain changes. The aim of the present study is to access the effect of nuclear radiations on the Fabry Perot (FP) and of Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors through the comparison of measurements made on these OFS - or part of them - before and after irradiation [1]. In the context of development of OFS for high irradiation environment and especially for Material Testing Reactors (MTRs), Sake 2 experiment consists in an irradiation campaign at high level of gamma and neutron fluxes conducted on samples of fibre optics - bare or functionalised with FBG. The irradiation was performed at two levels of fast neutron fluence: 1 and 3.1019 n/cm2 (E>1MeV), at 250°± 25°C, in the SCK•CEN BR2 reactor (Mol Belgium). An irradiation capsule was designed to allow irradiation at the specified temperature without active control. The neutron fluence was measured with activation dosimeters and the results were compared with MCPN computations. Investigation of bare samples gives information on the density changes, while for the FBGs both density and refractive index perturbation are involved. Some results for

  7. Patterns of Care Among Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy for Bone Metastases at a Large Academic Institution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellsworth, Susannah G. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Alcorn, Sara R., E-mail: salcorn2@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Hales, Russell K.; McNutt, Todd R.; DeWeese, Theodore L. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Smith, Thomas J. [Department of Medical Oncology and Harry J. Duffey Family Program in Palliative Care, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: This study evaluates outcomes and patterns of care among patients receiving radiation therapy (RT) for bone metastases at a high-volume academic institution. Methods and Materials: Records of all patients whose final RT course was for bone metastases from April 2007 to July 2012 were identified from electronic medical records. Chart review yielded demographic and clinical data. Rates of complicated versus uncomplicated bone metastases were not analyzed. Results: We identified 339 patients whose final RT course was for bone metastases. Of these, 52.2% were male; median age was 65 years old. The most common primary was non-small-cell lung cancer (29%). Most patients (83%) were prescribed ≤10 fractions; 8% received single-fraction RT. Most patients (52%) had a documented goals of care (GOC) discussion with their radiation oncologist; hospice referral rates were higher when patients had such discussions (66% with vs 50% without GOC discussion, P=.004). Median life expectancy after RT was 96 days. Median survival after RT was shorter based on inpatient as opposed to outpatient status at the time of consultation (35 vs 136 days, respectively, P<.001). Hospice referrals occurred for 56% of patients, with a median interval between completion of RT and hospice referral of 29 days and a median hospice stay of 22 days. Conclusions: These data document excellent adherence to American Society for Radiation Oncolology Choosing Wisely recommendation to avoid routinely using >10 fractions of palliative RT for bone metastasis. Nonetheless, single-fraction RT remains relatively uncommon. Participating in GOC discussions with a radiation oncologist is associated with higher rates of hospice referral. Inpatient status at consultation is associated with short survival.

  8. A mechanism for large divertor plasma energy loss via lithium radiation in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rognlien, T. D.; Meier, E. T.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.

    2012-10-01

    Lithium has been used as a wall-conditioning element in a number of tokamaks over the years, including TFTR, FTU, and NSTX, where core plasma energy confinement and particle control are often found to improve following such conditioning. Here the possible role of Li in providing substantial energy loss for divertor plasmas via line radiation is reported. A multi-charge-state 2D UEDGE fluid model is used where the hydrogenic and Li ions and neutrals are each evolved as separate species and separate equations are solved for the electron and ion temperatures. It is shown that a sufficient level of Li neutrals evolving from the divertor surface via sputtering or evaporation can induce energy detachment of the divertor plasma, yielding a strongly radiating zone near the divertor where ionization and recombination from/to neutral Li can radiate most of the power flowing into the scrape-off layer while maintaining low core contamination. A local peaking of Li emissivity for electron temperatures near 1 eV appears to play an important role in the detachment of the mixed deuterium/Li plasma. Evidence of such behavior from NSTX discharges will be discussed.

  9. Limitations on the application of optimization methods in the design of radiation protection in large installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hock, R.; Brauns, J.; Steinicke, P.

    1986-01-01

    In a society where prices of goods are not regulated, optimization is best achieved by competition and not by the decisions of an authority. In order to improve its competitive position, a company may attach increasing importance to cost-benefit analyses both internally and in its discussions with customers. Some limitations and problems of this methodology are analysed in the paper. It is concluded that an increase in design effort (analysis of more options) beyond a planned level, in order to reduce radiation exposure, can only be justified in rational terms if exposure limits are involved. An increase in design effort could also be justified if solutions with lower equipment and operating costs but higher radiation exposure were acceptable. Because of the high competitive value of radiation protection, however, it is difficult to gain acceptance for such optimization. The cost of the investigation itself requires optimal procedures for the optimization process and therefore limitation of the number of options to be analysed. This is demonstrated for the example of a shielding wall. Another problem is the probabilistic nature of many of the parameters involved. In most cases this probability distribution is only inaccurately known. Deterministic 'design basis assumptions' therefore have to be made. The choice of these assumptions may greatly influence the result of the optimization, as demonstrated in an example taken from practice. (author)

  10. A polymer, random walk model for the size-distribution of large DNA fragments after high linear energy transfer radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, A. L.; Brenner, D.; Hlatky, L. R.; Sachs, R. K.

    2000-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) produced by densely ionizing radiation are not located randomly in the genome: recent data indicate DSB clustering along chromosomes. Stochastic DSB clustering at large scales, from > 100 Mbp down to simulations and analytic equations. A random-walk, coarse-grained polymer model for chromatin is combined with a simple track structure model in Monte Carlo software called DNAbreak and is applied to data on alpha-particle irradiation of V-79 cells. The chromatin model neglects molecular details but systematically incorporates an increase in average spatial separation between two DNA loci as the number of base-pairs between the loci increases. Fragment-size distributions obtained using DNAbreak match data on large fragments about as well as distributions previously obtained with a less mechanistic approach. Dose-response relations, linear at small doses of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, are obtained. They are found to be non-linear when the dose becomes so large that there is a significant probability of overlapping or close juxtaposition, along one chromosome, for different DSB clusters from different tracks. The non-linearity is more evident for large fragments than for small. The DNAbreak results furnish an example of the RLC (randomly located clusters) analytic formalism, which generalizes the broken-stick fragment-size distribution of the random-breakage model that is often applied to low-LET data.

  11. Study of surface properties of ATLAS12 strip sensors and their radiation resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikestikova, M.; Allport, P. P.; Baca, M.; Broughton, J.; Chisholm, A.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Pyatt, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Wilson, J. A.; Kierstead, J.; Kuczewski, P.; Lynn, D.; Hommels, L. B. A.; Ullan, M.; Bloch, I.; Gregor, I. M.; Tackmann, K.; Hauser, M.; Jakobs, K.; Kuehn, S.; Mahboubi, K.; Mori, R.; Parzefall, U.; Clark, A.; Ferrere, D.; Sevilla, S. Gonzalez; Ashby, J.; Blue, A.; Bates, R.; Buttar, C.; Doherty, F.; McMullen, T.; McEwan, F.; O'Shea, V.; Kamada, S.; Yamamura, K.; Ikegami, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Takubo, Y.; Unno, Y.; Takashima, R.; Chilingarov, A.; Fox, H.; Affolder, A. A.; Casse, G.; Dervan, P.; Forshaw, D.; Greenall, A.; Wonsak, S.; Wormald, M.; Cindro, V.; Kramberger, G.; Mandić, I.; Mikuž, M.; Gorelov, I.; Hoeferkamp, M.; Palni, P.; Seidel, S.; Taylor, A.; Toms, K.; Wang, R.; Hessey, N. P.; Valencic, N.; Hanagaki, K.; Dolezal, Z.; Kodys, P.; Bohm, J.; Stastny, J.; Bevan, A.; Beck, G.; Milke, C.; Domingo, M.; Fadeyev, V.; Galloway, Z.; Hibbard-Lubow, D.; Liang, Z.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Seiden, A.; To, K.; French, R.; Hodgson, P.; Marin-Reyes, H.; Parker, K.; Jinnouchi, O.; Hara, K.; Sato, K.; Hagihara, M.; Iwabuchi, S.; Bernabeu, J.; Civera, J. V.; Garcia, C.; Lacasta, C.; Marti i Garcia, S.; Rodriguez, D.; Santoyo, D.; Solaz, C.; Soldevila, U.

    2016-09-01

    A radiation hard n+-in-p micro-strip sensor for the use in the Upgrade of the strip tracker of the ATLAS experiment at the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) has been developed by the "ATLAS ITk Strip Sensor collaboration" and produced by Hamamatsu Photonics. Surface properties of different types of end-cap and barrel miniature sensors of the latest sensor design ATLAS12 have been studied before and after irradiation. The tested barrel sensors vary in "punch-through protection" (PTP) structure, and the end-cap sensors, whose stereo-strips differ in fan geometry, in strip pitch and in edge strip ganging options. Sensors have been irradiated with proton fluences of up to 1×1016 neq/cm2, by reactor neutron fluence of 1×1015 neq/cm2 and by gamma rays from 60Co up to dose of 1 MGy. The main goal of the present study is to characterize the leakage current for micro-discharge breakdown voltage estimation, the inter-strip resistance and capacitance, the bias resistance and the effectiveness of PTP structures as a function of bias voltage and fluence. It has been verified that the ATLAS12 sensors have high breakdown voltage well above the operational voltage which implies that different geometries of sensors do not influence their stability. The inter-strip isolation is a strong function of irradiation fluence, however the sensor performance is acceptable in the expected range for HL-LHC. New gated PTP structure exhibits low PTP onset voltage and sharp cut-off of effective resistance even at the highest tested radiation fluence. The inter-strip capacitance complies with the technical specification required before irradiation and no radiation-induced degradation was observed. A summary of ATLAS12 sensors tests is presented including a comparison of results from different irradiation sites. The measured characteristics are compared with the previous prototype of the sensor design, ATLAS07.

  12. Breast Cancer Laterality Does Not Influence Survival in a Large Modern Cohort: Implications for Radiation-Related Cardiac Mortality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutter, Charles E., E-mail: charles.rutter@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Chagpar, Anees B. [Department of Surgery, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy and Effectiveness Research Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Evans, Suzanne B. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy and Effectiveness Research Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Objectives: Radiation therapy for left-sided breast cancer has been associated with an elevated risk of cardiac mortality, based on studies predating treatment planning based on computed tomography. This study assessed the impact of tumor laterality on overall survival (OS) in a large cohort treated with modern techniques, to indirectly determine whether left-sided treatment remains associated with increased cardiac mortality. Methods and Materials: Patients treated for breast cancer with breast conserving surgery and adjuvant external beam radiation therapy were identified in the National Cancer Database, and OS was compared based on tumor laterality using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Separate analyses were performed for noninvasive and invasive carcinoma and for breast-only and breast plus regional nodal radiation therapy. Multivariate regression analysis of OS was performed with demographic, pathologic, and treatment variables as covariates to adjust for factors associated with breast cancer–specific survival. Results: We identified 344,831 patients whose cancer was diagnosed from 1998 to 2006 with a median follow-up time of 6.04 years (range, 0-14.17 years). Clinical, tumor, and treatment characteristics were similar between laterality groups. Regional nodal radiation was used in 14.2% of invasive cancers. No OS difference was noted based on tumor laterality for patients treated with breast-only (hazard ratio [HR] 0.984, P=.132) and breast plus regional nodal radiation therapy (HR 1.001, P=.957). In multivariate analysis including potential confounders, OS was identical between left and right sided cancers (HR 1.002, P=.874). No significant OS difference by laterality was observed when analyses were restricted to patients with at least 10 years of follow-up (n=27,725), both in patients treated with breast-only (HR 0.955, P=.368) and breast plus regional nodal radiation therapy (HR 0.859, P=.155). Conclusions: Radiation therapy for left-sided breast cancer does

  13. Large intracranial vessel occlusive vasculopathy after radiation therapy in children: clinical features and usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omura, Motoko; Aida, Noriko; Sekido, Kenichi; Kakehi, Masae; Matsubara, Sho

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the relationship between large intracranial vessel occlusive vasculopathy (vasculopathy) and radiation therapy, and to clarify the clinical efficacy of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the diagnosis and screening of the vasculopathy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively evaluated the medical records and serial MR images for 32 pediatric patients, in whom radiation therapy had been given to fields including the circle of Willis and major cerebral arteries. All children had periodically undergone follow-up neurologic assessment and MR imaging examinations at Kanagawa Children's Medical Center for more than one year after radiation therapy (range 1.3-14 years). Patients who had not remained free of tumor progression up to the time of final evaluation were excluded. Results: Vasculopathy developed in 6 of 32 patients 2-13 years after radiation therapy. Three of them presented with transient ischemic attacks (TIA) and the other three showed infarctions without preceding TIA. Steno-occlusive changes of major cerebral arteries were identified by MR imaging in all six patients, but not obtained in the remaining 26 patients. In the patients with TIA, MR imaging demonstrated steno-occlusive changes at the time of TIA, before irreversible infarction. They have been doing well subsequent to encephaloduraoarteriosyn-angiosis. In the three patients who presented infarction without preceding TIA, MR imaging did not demonstrate the vascular change before the onset of infarction, and two of them developed neurologic deficits. The mean exposure dose for the circle of Willis and major cerebral arteries in these six patients was significantly higher than that in the remaining 26 patients without this sequela (61Gy vs. 50Gy, p < 0.05). The mean age at radiation therapy of the six patients was lower, but the difference was not significant. Conclusion: The incidence of vasculopathy after radiation therapy has a considerable correlation with radiation dose and

  14. Database of episode-integrated solar energetic proton fluences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Zachary D.; Adams, James H.; Xapsos, Michael A.; Stauffer, Craig A.

    2018-04-01

    A new database of proton episode-integrated fluences is described. This database contains data from two different instruments on multiple satellites. The data are from instruments on the Interplanetary Monitoring Platform-8 (IMP8) and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) series. A method to normalize one set of data to one another is presented to create a seamless database spanning 1973 to 2016. A discussion of some of the characteristics that episodes exhibit is presented, including episode duration and number of peaks. As an example of what can be understood about episodes, the July 4, 2012 episode is examined in detail. The coronal mass ejections and solar flares that caused many of the fluctuations of the proton flux seen at Earth are associated with peaks in the proton flux during this episode. The reasoning for each choice is laid out to provide a reference for how CME and solar flares associations are made.

  15. The Meteoroid Fluence at Mars Due to Comet Siding Spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorhead, Althea V.

    2014-01-01

    Long-period comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) is headed for a close encounter with Mars on 2014 Oct 19. A collision between the comet and the planet has been ruled out, but the comets coma may envelop Mars and its man-made satellites. We present an analytic model of the dust component of cometary comae that describes the spatial distribution of cometary dust and meteoroids and their size distribution. If the coma reaches Mars, we estimate a total incident particle fluence on the planet and its satellites of 0.01 particles per square meter. We compare our model with numerical simulations, data from past comet missions, and recent Siding Spring observations.

  16. Database of episode-integrated solar energetic proton fluences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson Zachary D.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A new database of proton episode-integrated fluences is described. This database contains data from two different instruments on multiple satellites. The data are from instruments on the Interplanetary Monitoring Platform-8 (IMP8 and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES series. A method to normalize one set of data to one another is presented to create a seamless database spanning 1973 to 2016. A discussion of some of the characteristics that episodes exhibit is presented, including episode duration and number of peaks. As an example of what can be understood about episodes, the July 4, 2012 episode is examined in detail. The coronal mass ejections and solar flares that caused many of the fluctuations of the proton flux seen at Earth are associated with peaks in the proton flux during this episode. The reasoning for each choice is laid out to provide a reference for how CME and solar flares associations are made.

  17. Online measurement of fluence and position for protontherapy beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benati, C.; Boriano, A.

    2004-01-01

    Tumour therapy with proton beams has been used for several decades in many centers with very good results in terms of local control and overall survival. Typical pathologies treated with this technique are located in head and neck, eye, prostate and in general at big depths or close to critical organs. The Experimental Physics Department of the University of Turin and the local Section of INFN, in collaboration with INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud Catania and Centre de Protontherapie de Orsay Paris, have developed detector systems that allow the measurement of beam position and fluence, obtained in real time during beam delivery. The Centre in Catania (CATANA: Centro di AdroTerapia ed Applicazioni Nucleari Avanzate) has been treating patients with eye pathologies since spring 2002 using a superconducting cyclotron accelerating protons up to 62 MeV

  18. Online measurement of fluence and position for protontherapy beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benati, C.; Boriano, A. [Torino Univ., Torino (Italy). Dipartimento di Fisica Sperimentale; Bourhaleb, F. [TERA Foundation, Novara (Italy)] [and others

    2004-10-01

    Tumour therapy with proton beams has been used for several decades in many centers with very good results in terms of local control and overall survival. Typical pathologies treated with this technique are located in head and neck, eye, prostate and in general at big depths or close to critical organs. The Experimental Physics Department of the University of Turin and the local Section of INFN, in collaboration with INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud Catania and Centre de Protontherapie de Orsay Paris, have developed detector systems that allow the measurement of beam position and fluence, obtained in real time during beam delivery. The Centre in Catania (CATANA: Centro di AdroTerapia ed Applicazioni Nucleari Avanzate) has been treating patients with eye pathologies since spring 2002 using a superconducting cyclotron accelerating protons up to 62 MeV.

  19. Application of damage functions to CTR component fluence limit predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simons, R.L.; Doran, D.G.

    1975-01-01

    Material behavior observed under irradiation conditions in test reactors is not always directly applicable to the design of reactor components such as CTR first wall because of differences in the damage effectiveness of test reactor and service spectra. The interpolation and, under some conditions, extrapolation of material property change data from test conditions to different neutron spectra in service conditions can be accomplished using semi-empirical damage functions. The derivation and application of damage functions to CTR conditions is reviewed. Since limited amounts of data are available for applications to CTR design spectra, considerable attention is placed on the effectiveness of various available and proposed neutron sources in determining a damage function and subsequent fluence limit prediction. Neutron sources included in this study were EBR-II, HIFR, LAMPF (Be and Cu targets), high energy deuterons incident on Be (D-Be), and 14 MeV neutrons (D-T)

  20. High fluence effects on ion implantation stopping and range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvi, S.; Tek, Z.; Oeztarhan, A.; Akbas, N.; Brown, I.G.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a code STOPPO which can be used to modify the more-widely used ion implantation codes to more accurately predict the mean nuclear and electronic stopping power, preferential sputtering and range of heavy ions in monatomic target materials. In our simulations an effective atomic number and effective atomic mass are introduced into conveniently available analytical stopping cross-sections and a better fitting function for preferential sputtering yield is carefully evaluated for each ion implantation. The accuracy of the code confirmed experimentally by comparison with measured Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) concentration profiles for 130 keV Zr ions implanted into Be to fluences of 1 x 10 17 , 2 x 10 17 and 4 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 . We find a steady increase in the mean nuclear and electronic stopping powers of the target; the increase in nuclear stopping power is much greater than the increase in electronic stopping power

  1. A large area transition radiation detector to measure the energy of muons in the Gran Sasso underground laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbarito, E.; Bellotti, R.; Cafagna, F.; Castellano, M.; De Cataldo, G.; De Marzo, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fusco, P.; Giglietto, N.; Guarnaccia, P.; Mazziotta, M.N.; Mongelli, M.; Montaruli, T.; Perchiazzi, M.; Raino, A.; Sacchetti, A.; Spinelli, P.

    1995-01-01

    We have designed and built a transition radiation detector of 36 m 2 area in order to measure the residual energy of muons penetrating in the Gran Sasso cosmic ray underground laboratory up to the TeV region. It consists of three adjacent modules, each of 2x6 m 2 area. Polystyrene square tubes, filled with a argon-carbon dioxide gas mixture, and polyethylene foam layers are used as proportional detectors and radiators respectively. We cover such a large surface with only 960 channels that provide adequate energy resolution and particle tracking for the astroparticle physics items to investigate. The detector has been calibrated using a reduced size prototype in a test beam. Results from one module exposed to cosmic rays at sea level are shown. (orig.)

  2. Radiation Effect on Body Weight and Hematological Changes of Hybrid Mice by Conventional Fraction, Large Abdominal Field Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sung Heon; Shin, Sei One; Kim, Myung Se

    1985-01-01

    Radiation effect on mammals, especially on hematologic changes, has been studied since discovery of x-ray. Various experimental animals were tried for radiobiological studies. 72 hybrid mice with conventional fraction (5X/week), large abdominal field (2 x 3cm, from symphysis pubic to xyphoid process) were used. Body weight was declined gradually by increasing irradiation doses, nadir was about 29.7% in male ; 30.4% in female at 6000 rad irradiation group. Hemoglobin value was nearly normal throughout entire treatment. Significant dropping of WBC count was noted to 40-50% of pretreatment values by only 1000 rad irradiation. Change of differential count was interesting; lymphocyte proportion showed gradual reduction, instead of gradual increasing of segmented neutrophil. Those proportion were reversed after 6000 rad irradiation. Urinary protein tests showed + - +++, showing no correlation with dosage. Application. of our study in clinical combination therapy (radiation + chemotherapy) was discussed

  3. Fractal characterization of the silicon surfaces produced by ion beam irradiation of varying fluences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, R.P. [Department of Physics, University of Allahabad, Allahabad, UP 211002 (India); Kumar, T. [Department of Physics, Central University of Haryana, Jant-Pali, Mahendergarh, Haryana 123029 (India); Mittal, A.K. [Department of Physics, University of Allahabad, Allahabad, UP 211002 (India); K Banerjee Centre of Atmospheric and Ocean Studies, University of Allahabad, Allahabad, UP 211002 (India); Dwivedi, S., E-mail: suneetdwivedi@gmail.com [K Banerjee Centre of Atmospheric and Ocean Studies, University of Allahabad, Allahabad, UP 211002 (India); Kanjilal, D. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, PO Box 10502, New Delhi 110 067 (India)

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • Fractal analysis of Si(1 0 0) surface morphology at varying ion fluences. • Autocorrelation function and height–height correlation function as fractal measures. • Surface roughness and lateral correlation length increases with ion fluence. • Ripple pattern of the surfaces is found at higher ion fluences. • Wavelength of the ripple surfaces is computed for each fluence. - Abstract: Si (1 0 0) is bombarded with 200 keV Ar{sup +} ion beam at oblique incidence with fluences ranging from 3 × 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} to 3 × 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2}. The surface morphology of the irradiated surfaces is captured by the atomic force microscopy (AFM) for each ion fluence. The fractal analysis is performed on the AFM images. The autocorrelation function and height–height correlation function are used as fractal measures. It is found that the average roughness, interface width, lateral correlation length as well as roughness exponent increase with ions fluence. The analysis reveals the ripple pattern of the surfaces at higher fluences. The wavelength of the ripple surfaces is computed for each ion fluence.

  4. Irradiation embrittlement of some 15Kh2MFA pressure vessel steels under varying neutron fluence rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valo, M; Bars, B [Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Ahlstrand, A [Imatran Voima Oy (IVO), Helsinki (Finland)

    1994-12-31

    Irradiation sensitivity of two forging materials was measured with Charpy-V and fracture mechanic tests, and with different fluence, fluence rate and irradiation time values. Irradiation sensitivity of the materials was found to be less or equal to the current Russian standard, and appears to be well described by the fluence parameter only. A slight additional effect on embrittlement from a long term low fluence irradiation is noticed, but it stays within the total scatter band of data. 7 refs., 17 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Heavy Ion Irradiation Fluence Dependence for Single-Event Upsets of NAND Flash Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dakai; Wilcox, Edward; Ladbury, Raymond; Kim, Hak; Phan, Anthony; Seidleck, Christina; LaBel, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the single-event effect (SEE) susceptibility of the Micron 16 nm NAND flash, and found the single-event upset (SEU) cross section varied inversely with fluence. The SEU cross section decreased with increasing fluence. We attribute the effect to the variable upset sensitivities of the memory cells. The current test standards and procedures assume that SEU follow a Poisson process and do not take into account the variability in the error rate with fluence. Therefore, heavy ion irradiation of devices with variable upset sensitivity distribution using typical fluence levels may underestimate the cross section and on-orbit event rate.

  6. Large enhancement of radiative strength for soft transitions in the quasicontinuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voinov, A; Algin, E; Agvaanluvsan, U; Belgya, T; Chankova, R; Guttormsen, M; Mitchell, G E; Rekstad, J; Schiller, A; Siem, S

    2004-10-01

    Radiative strength functions (RSFs) for the (56,57)Fe nuclei below the separation energy are obtained from the 57Fe(3He,alphagamma)56Fe and 57Fe(3He,3He'gamma)57Fe reactions, respectively. An enhancement of more than a factor of 10 over common theoretical models of the soft (E(gamma) less than or approximately equal 2 MeV) RSF for transitions in the quasicontinuum (several MeV above the yrast line) is observed. Two-step cascade intensities with soft primary transitions from the 56Fe(n,2gamma)57Fe reaction confirm the enhancement.

  7. Estimates of Radiation Dose Rates Near Large Diameter Sludge Containers in T Plant

    CERN Document Server

    Himes, D A

    2002-01-01

    Dose rates in T Plant canyon during the handling and storage of large diameter storage containers of K Basin sludge were estimated. A number of different geometries were considered from which most operational situations of interest can be constructed.

  8. Standard Test Method for Determining Thermal Neutron Reaction Rates and Thermal Neutron Fluence Rates by Radioactivation Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 The purpose of this test method is to define a general procedure for determining an unknown thermal-neutron fluence rate by neutron activation techniques. It is not practicable to describe completely a technique applicable to the large number of experimental situations that require the measurement of a thermal-neutron fluence rate. Therefore, this method is presented so that the user may adapt to his particular situation the fundamental procedures of the following techniques. 1.1.1 Radiometric counting technique using pure cobalt, pure gold, pure indium, cobalt-aluminum, alloy, gold-aluminum alloy, or indium-aluminum alloy. 1.1.2 Standard comparison technique using pure gold, or gold-aluminum alloy, and 1.1.3 Secondary standard comparison techniques using pure indium, indium-aluminum alloy, pure dysprosium, or dysprosium-aluminum alloy. 1.2 The techniques presented are limited to measurements at room temperatures. However, special problems when making thermal-neutron fluence rate measurements in high-...

  9. Naphthalene degradation in seawater by UV irradiation: The effects of fluence rate, salinity, temperature and initial concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, Liang; Chen, Bing; Zhang, Baiyu; Zheng, Jisi; Liu, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The removal of naphthalene follows first order kinetics in seawater. • Irradiance and temperature are the most influential factors. • An increase in irradiance can linearly promote photodegradation. • High salinity suppresses the photodegradation of naphthalene. - Abstract: A large amount of oil pollution at sea is produced by the operational discharge of oily wastewater. The removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from such sources using UV irradiation has become attractive, yet the photolysis mechanism in seawater has remained unclear. This study examines the photodegradation kinetics of naphthalene in natural seawater through a full factorial design of experiments (DOE). The effects of fluence rate, salinity, temperature and initial concentration are investigated. Results show that fluence rate, temperature and the interaction between temperature and initial concentration are the most influential factors. An increase in fluence rate can linearly promote the photodegradation process. Salinity increasingly impedes the removal of naphthalene because of the existence of free-radical scavengers and photon competitors. The results will help understand the photolysis mechanism of PAHs and develop more effective methods for treating oily seawater generated from offshore industries

  10. Temperature dependence of the radiation induced change of depletion voltage in silicon PIN detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziock, H.J.; Holzscheiter, K.; Morgan, A.; Palounek, A.P.T.; Ellison, J.; Heinson, A.P.; Mason, M.; Wimpenny, S.J.; Barberis, E.; Cartiglia, N.; Grillo, A.; O'Shaughnessy, K.; Rahn, J.; Rinaldi, P.; Rowe, W.A.; Sadrozinski, H.F.W.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, E.; Webster, A.; Wichmann, R.; Wilder, M.; Coupal, D.; Pal, T.

    1993-01-01

    The silicon microstrip detectors that will be used in the SDC experiment at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) will be exposed to very large fluences of charged particles, neutrons, and gammas. The authors present a study of how temperature affects the change in the depletion voltage of silicon PIN detectors damaged by radiation. They study the initial radiation damage and the short-term and long-term annealing of that damage as a function of temperature in the range from -10 degrees C to +50 degrees C, and as a function of 800 MeV proton fluence up to 1.5 x 10 14 p/cm 2 . They express the pronounced temperature dependencies in a simple model in terms of two annealing time constants which depend exponentially on the temperature

  11. Short-wavelength ablation of polymers in the high-fluence regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liberatore, Chiara; Juha, Libor; Vyšín, Ludek; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomas; Mann, Klaus; Müller, Matthias; Pina, Ladislav; Rocca, Jorge J

    2014-01-01

    Short-wavelength ablation of poly(1,4-phenylene ether-ether-sulfone) (PPEES) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) was investigated using extreme ultraviolet (XUV) and soft x-ray (SXR) radiation from plasma-based sources. The initial experiment was performed with a 10 Hz desktop capillary-discharge XUV laser lasing at 46.9 nm. The XUV laser beam was focused onto the sample by a spherical mirror coated with a Si/Sc multilayer. The same materials were irradiated with 13.5 nm radiation emitted by plasmas produced by focusing an optical laser beam onto a xenon gas-puff target. A Schwarzschild focusing optics coated with a Mo/Si multilayer was installed at the source to achieve energy densities exceeding 0.1 J cm −2 in the tight focus. The existing experimental system at the Laser Laboratorium Göttingen was upgraded by implementing a 1.2 J driving laser. An increase of the SXR fluence was secured by improving the alignment technique. (paper)

  12. Effect of He+ fluence on surface morphology and ion-irradiation induced defect evolution in 7075 aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Kai; Ma, Qian; Wan, Hao; Yang, Bin; Ge, Junjie; Zhang, Lingyu; Si, Naichao

    2018-02-01

    The evolution of microstructure for 7075 aluminum alloys with 50 Kev helium ions irradiation were studied by using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The fluences of 1 × 1015, 1 × 1016 and 1 × 1017 ions cm-2 were selected, and irradiation experiments were conducted at room temperatures. The transmission process of He+ ions was simulated by using SRIM software, including distribution of ion ranges, energy losses and atomic displacements. Experimental results show that irradiated pits and micro-cracks were observed on irradiation sample surface, and the size of constituent particles (not including Mg2Si) decreased with the increasing dose. The x-ray diffraction results of the pair of peaks is better resolved in irradiated samples might indicate that the stressed structure consequence due to crystal defects (vacancies and interstitials) after He+ implantation. TEM observation indicated that the density of MgZn2 phase was significantly reduced after helium ion irradiation which is harmful to strength. Besides, the development of compressive stress produced a large amount of dislocation defects in the 1015 ions cm-2 sample. Moreover, higher fluence irradiation produced more dislocations in sample. At fluence of 1016 ions cm-2, dislocation wall formed by dislocation slip and aggregation in the interior of grains, leading to the refinement of these grains. As fluence increased to 1017 ions cm-2, dislocation loops were observed in pinned dislocation. Moreover, dislocation as effective defect sink, irradiation-induced vacancy defects aggregated to these sinks, and resulted in the formation of helium bubbles in dislocation.

  13. Vapor transport deposition of large-area polycrystalline CdTe for radiation image sensor application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Keedong; Cha, Bokyung; Heo, Duchang; Jeon, Sungchae [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, 111 Hanggaul-ro, Ansan-si, Gyeonggi-do 426-170 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-15

    Vapor transport deposition (VTD) process delivers saturated vapor to substrate, resulting in high-throughput and scalable process. In addition, VTD can maintain lower substrate temperature than close-spaced sublimation (CSS). The motivation of this work is to adopt several advantages of VTD for radiation image sensor application. Polycrystalline CdTe films were obtained on 300 mm x 300 mm indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass. The polycrystalline CdTe film has columnar structure with average grain size of 3 μm ∝ 9 μm, which can be controlled by changing the substrate temperature. In order to analyze electrical and X-ray characteristics, ITO-CdTe-Al sandwich structured device was fabricated. Effective resistivity of the polycrystalline CdTe film was ∝1.4 x 10{sup 9}Ωcm. The device was operated under hole-collection mode. The responsivity and the μτ product estimated to be 6.8 μC/cm{sup 2}R and 5.5 x 10{sup -7} cm{sup 2}/V. The VTD can be a process of choice for monolithic integration of CdTe thick film for radiation image sensor and CMOS/TFT circuitry. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Induction of Chromosomal Aberrations at Fluences of Less Than One HZE Particle per Cell Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, Megumi; Chappell, Lori J.; Wang, Minli; George, Kerry A.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2014-01-01

    The assumption of a linear dose response used to describe the biological effects of high LET radiation is fundamental in radiation protection methodologies. We investigated the dose response for chromosomal aberrations for exposures corresponding to less than one particle traversal per cell nucleus by high energy and charge (HZE) nuclei. Human fibroblast and lymphocyte cells where irradiated with several low doses of <0.1 Gy, and several higher doses of up to 1 Gy with O (77 keV/ (long-s)m), Si (99 keV/ (long-s)m), Fe (175 keV/ (long-s)m), Fe (195 keV/ (long-s)m) or Fe (240 keV/ (long-s)m) particles. Chromosomal aberrations at first mitosis were scored using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome specific paints for chromosomes 1, 2 and 4 and DAPI staining of background chromosomes. Non-linear regression models were used to evaluate possible linear and non-linear dose response models based on these data. Dose responses for simple exchanges for human fibroblast irradiated under confluent culture conditions were best fit by non-linear models motivated by a non-targeted effect (NTE). Best fits for the dose response data for human lymphocytes irradiated in blood tubes were a NTE model for O and a linear response model fit best for Si and Fe particles. Additional evidence for NTE were found in low dose experiments measuring gamma-H2AX foci, a marker of double strand breaks (DSB), and split-dose experiments with human fibroblasts. Our results suggest that simple exchanges in normal human fibroblasts have an important NTE contribution at low particle fluence. The current and prior experimental studies provide important evidence against the linear dose response assumption used in radiation protection for HZE particles and other high LET radiation at the relevant range of low doses.

  15. CVD diamond detectors for ionizing radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Friedl, M; Bauer, C; Berfermann, E; Bergonzo, P; Bogani, F; Borchi, E; Brambilla, A; Bruzzi, Mara; Colledani, C; Conway, J; Dabrowski, W; Delpierre, P A; Deneuville, A; Dulinski, W; van Eijk, B; Fallou, A; Fizzotti, F; Foulon, F; Gan, K K; Gheeraert, E; Grigoriev, E; Hallewell, G D; Hall-Wilton, R; Han, S; Hartjes, F G; Hrubec, Josef; Husson, D; Kagan, H; Kania, D R; Kaplon, J; Karl, C; Kass, R; Knöpfle, K T; Krammer, Manfred; Lo Giudice, A; Lü, R; Manfredi, P F; Manfredotti, C; Marshall, R D; Meier, D; Mishina, M; Oh, A; Pan, L S; Palmieri, V G; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Peitz, A; Pirollo, S; Polesello, P; Pretzl, Klaus P; Re, V; Riester, J L; Roe, S; Roff, D G; Rudge, A; Schnetzer, S R; Sciortino, S; Speziali, V; Stelzer, H; Stone, R; Tapper, R J; Tesarek, R J; Thomson, G B; Trawick, M L; Trischuk, W; Vittone, E; Walsh, A M; Wedenig, R; Weilhammer, Peter; Ziock, H J; Zöller, M

    1999-01-01

    In future HEP accelerators, such as the LHC (CERN), detectors and electronics in the vertex region of the experiments will suffer from extreme radiation. Thus radiation hardness is required for both detectors and electronics to survive in this harsh environment. CVD diamond, which is investigated by the RD42 Collaboration at CERN, can meet these requirements. Samples of up to 2*4 cm/sup 2/ have been grown and refined for better charge collection properties, which are measured with a beta source or in a test beam. A large number of diamond samples has been irradiated with hadrons to fluences of up to 5*10/sup 15/ cm/sup -2/ to study the effects of radiation. Both strip and pixel detectors were prepared in various geometries. Samples with strip metallization have been tested with both slow and fast readout electronics, and the first diamond pixel detector proved fully functional with LHC electronics. (16 refs).

  16. CVD diamond detectors for ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedl, M. E-mail: markus.friedl@cern.ch; Adam, W.; Bauer, C.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; Eijk, B. van; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Gan, K.K.; Gheeraert, E.; Grigoriev, E.; Hallewell, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Karl, C.; Kass, R.; Knoepfle, K.T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Manfredi, P.F.; Manfredotti, C.; Marshall, R.D.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Oh, A.; Pan, L.S.; Palmieri, V.G.; Pernegger, H.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Pirollo, S.; Polesello, P.; Pretzl, K.; Re, V.; Riester, J.L.; Roe, S.; Roff, D.; Rudge, A.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Speziali, V.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Tapper, R.J.; Tesarek, R.; Thomson, G.B.; Trawick, M.; Trischuk, W.; Vittone, E.; Walsh, A.M.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; Ziock, H.; Zoeller, M

    1999-10-01

    In future HEP accelerators, such as the LHC (CERN), detectors and electronics in the vertex region of the experiments will suffer from extreme radiation. Thus radiation hardness is required for both detectors and electronics to survive in this harsh environment. CVD diamond, which is investigated by the RD42 Collaboration at CERN, can meet these requirements. Samples of up to 2x4 cm{sup 2} have been grown and refined for better charge collection properties, which are measured with a {beta} source or in a test beam. A large number of diamond samples has been irradiated with hadrons to fluences of up to 5x10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} to study the effects of radiation. Both strip and pixel detectors were prepared in various geometries. Samples with strip metallization have been tested with both slow and fast readout electronics, and the first diamond pixel detector proved fully functional with LHC electronics. (author)

  17. CVD diamond detectors for ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedl, M.; Adam, W.; Bauer, C.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; van Eijk, B.; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Gan, K. K.; Gheeraert, E.; Grigoriev, E.; Hallewell, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Karl, C.; Kass, R.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Manfredi, P. F.; Manfredotti, C.; Marshall, R. D.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Oh, A.; Pan, L. S.; Palmieri, V. G.; Pernegger, H.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Pirollo, S.; Polesello, P.; Pretzl, K.; Re, V.; Riester, J. L.; Roe, S.; Roff, D.; Rudge, A.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Speziali, V.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Tapper, R. J.; Tesarek, R.; Thomson, G. B.; Trawick, M.; Trischuk, W.; Vittone, E.; Walsh, A. M.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; Ziock, H.; Zoeller, M.; RD42 Collaboration

    1999-10-01

    In future HEP accelerators, such as the LHC (CERN), detectors and electronics in the vertex region of the experiments will suffer from extreme radiation. Thus radiation hardness is required for both detectors and electronics to survive in this harsh environment. CVD diamond, which is investigated by the RD42 Collaboration at CERN, can meet these requirements. Samples of up to 2×4 cm2 have been grown and refined for better charge collection properties, which are measured with a β source or in a testbeam. A large number of diamond samples has been irradiated with hadrons to fluences of up to 5×10 15 cm-2 to study the effects of radiation. Both strip and pixel detectors were prepared in various geometries. Samples with strip metallization have been tested with both slow and fast readout electronics, and the first diamond pixel detector proved fully functional with LHC electronics.

  18. Radiation zoning for vacuum equipment of the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mahner, E; Cruikshank, P; Forkel-Wirth, D; Jiménez, J M

    2010-01-01

    Beam losses in high-energy particle accelerators are responsible for beam lifetime degradation. In the LHC beam losses will create a shower of particles while interacting with materials from the beam pipes and surroundings, resulting in a partial activation of material in the tunnel. Efforts have been made during the accelerator design to monitor and to reduce the activation induced by beam losses. Traceability for all vacuum components has been established providing a tool to follow-up individually each component or subcomponents installed in the tunnel, regardless of their future destination e.g. recycling or disposal. In the latter case, the history of vacuum components will allow calculating the beam-induced activation and permit comparisons with in-situ and ex-situ measurements. This zoning will also help to reduce collective and individual radiation doses to personnel during interventions. The paper presents the vacuum system layout and describes the LHC vacuum zoning and its implementation using an ORA...

  19. Attenuation of Reactor Gamma Radiation and Fast Neutrons Through Large Single-Crystal Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M.

    2009-01-01

    A generalized formula is given which, for neutron energies in the range 10-4< E< 10 eV and gamma rays with average energy 2 MeV , permits calculation of the transmission properties of several single crystal materials important for neutron scattering instrumentation. A computer program Filter was developed which permits the calculation of attenuation of gamma radiation, nuclear capture, thermal diffuse and Bragg-scattering cross-sections as a function of materials constants, temperature and neutron energy. The applicability of the deduced formula along with the code checked from the obtained agreement between the calculated and experimental neutron transmission through various single-crystals A feasibility study for use of Si, Ge, Pb, Bi and sapphire is detailed in terms of optimum crystal thickness, mosaic spread and cutting plane for efficient transmission of thermal reactor neutrons and for rejection of the accompanying fast neutrons and gamma rays.

  20. Electron scattering in large water clusters from photoelectron imaging with high harmonic radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartmann, Thomas E; Hartweg, Sebastian; Ban, Loren; Chasovskikh, Egor; Yoder, Bruce L; Signorell, Ruth

    2018-06-06

    Low-energy electron scattering in water clusters (H2O)n with average cluster sizes of n < 700 is investigated by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy using high harmonic radiation at photon energies of 14.0, 20.3, and 26.5 eV for ionization from the three outermost valence orbitals. The measurements probe the evolution of the photoelectron anisotropy parameter β as a function of cluster size. A remarkably steep decrease of β with increasing cluster size is observed, which for the largest clusters reaches liquid bulk values. Detailed electron scattering calculations reveal that neither gas nor condensed phase scattering can explain the cluster data. Qualitative agreement between experiment and simulations is obtained with scattering calculations that treat cluster scattering as an intermediate case between gas and condensed phase scattering.

  1. Creation of an atlas of filter positions for fluence field modulated CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szczykutowicz, Timothy P., E-mail: TSzczykutowicz@uwhealth.org [Departments of Radiology and Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Hermus, James [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1550 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Fluence field modulated CT (FFMCT) and volume of interest (VOI) CT imaging applications require adjustment of the profile of the x-ray fluence incident on a patient as a function of view angle. Since current FFMCT prototypes can theoretically take on an infinite number of configurations, measuring a calibration data set for all possible positions would not be feasible. The present work details a methodology for calculating an atlas of configurations that will span all likely body regions, patient sizes, patient positioning, and imaging modes. The hypothesis is that there exists a finite number of unique modulator configurations that effectively span the infinite number of possible fluence profiles with minimal loss in performance. Methods: CT images of a head, shoulder, thorax, abdominal, wrist, and leg anatomical slices were dilated and contracted to model small, medium, and large sized patients. Additionally, the images were positioned from iso-center by three different amounts. The modulator configurations required to compensate for each image were computed assuming a FFMCT prototype, digital beam attenuator, (DBA), was set to equalize the detector exposure. Each atlas configuration should be different from the other atlas configurations. The degree of difference was quantified using the sum of the absolute differences in filter thickness between configurations. Using this metric, a set of unique wedge configurations for which no two configurations have a metric value smaller than some threshold can be constructed. Differences in the total number of incident photons between the unconstrained filters and the atlas were studied as a function of the number of atlas positions for each anatomical site and size/off-centering combination. Results: By varying the threshold used in creating the atlas, it was found that roughly 322 atlas positions provided an incident number of photons within 20% of using 19 440 unique filters (the number of atlas entries

  2. Creation of an atlas of filter positions for fluence field modulated CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szczykutowicz, Timothy P.; Hermus, James

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Fluence field modulated CT (FFMCT) and volume of interest (VOI) CT imaging applications require adjustment of the profile of the x-ray fluence incident on a patient as a function of view angle. Since current FFMCT prototypes can theoretically take on an infinite number of configurations, measuring a calibration data set for all possible positions would not be feasible. The present work details a methodology for calculating an atlas of configurations that will span all likely body regions, patient sizes, patient positioning, and imaging modes. The hypothesis is that there exists a finite number of unique modulator configurations that effectively span the infinite number of possible fluence profiles with minimal loss in performance. Methods: CT images of a head, shoulder, thorax, abdominal, wrist, and leg anatomical slices were dilated and contracted to model small, medium, and large sized patients. Additionally, the images were positioned from iso-center by three different amounts. The modulator configurations required to compensate for each image were computed assuming a FFMCT prototype, digital beam attenuator, (DBA), was set to equalize the detector exposure. Each atlas configuration should be different from the other atlas configurations. The degree of difference was quantified using the sum of the absolute differences in filter thickness between configurations. Using this metric, a set of unique wedge configurations for which no two configurations have a metric value smaller than some threshold can be constructed. Differences in the total number of incident photons between the unconstrained filters and the atlas were studied as a function of the number of atlas positions for each anatomical site and size/off-centering combination. Results: By varying the threshold used in creating the atlas, it was found that roughly 322 atlas positions provided an incident number of photons within 20% of using 19 440 unique filters (the number of atlas entries

  3. Simplified field-in-field technique for a large-scale implementation in breast radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier-Bidoz, Nathalie; Kirova, Youlia M.; Campana, Francois; Dendale, Rémi; Fourquet, Alain

    2012-01-01

    We wanted to evaluate a simplified “field-in-field” technique (SFF) that was implemented in our department of Radiation Oncology for breast treatment. This study evaluated 15 consecutive patients treated with a simplified field in field technique after breast-conserving surgery for early-stage breast cancer. Radiotherapy consisted of whole-breast irradiation to the total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions, and a boost of 16 Gy in 8 fractions to the tumor bed. We compared dosimetric outcomes of SFF to state-of-the-art electronic surface compensation (ESC) with dynamic leaves. An analysis of early skin toxicity of a population of 15 patients was performed. The median volume receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose was 763 mL (range, 347–1472) for SFF vs. 779 mL (range, 349–1494) for ESC. The median residual 107% isodose was 0.1 mL (range, 0–63) for SFF and 1.9 mL (range, 0–57) for ESC. Monitor units were on average 25% higher in ESC plans compared with SFF. No patient treated with SFF had acute side effects superior to grade 1-NCI scale. SFF created homogenous 3D dose distributions equivalent to electronic surface compensation with dynamic leaves. It allowed the integration of a forward planned concomitant tumor bed boost as an additional multileaf collimator subfield of the tangential fields. Compared with electronic surface compensation with dynamic leaves, shorter treatment times allowed better radiation protection to the patient. Low-grade acute toxicity evaluated weekly during treatment and 2 months after treatment completion justified the pursuit of this technique for all breast patients in our department.

  4. Role of Radiation Therapy in Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ng, Andrea K; Yahalom, Joachim; Goda, Jayant S

    2018-01-01

    Approximately 30% to 40% of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) will have either primary refractory disease or relapse after chemotherapy. In transplant-eligible patients, those with disease sensitive to salvage chemotherapy will significantly benefit from high-dose therapy with a...

  5. An investigation on detection and measurement of fusion neutron spectrum and radiation flux in large tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jinwei; Li Wenzhong; Zhang Wei

    2003-01-01

    The detection methods, detectors and spectrometers of D-D and D-T fusion neutron have been overviewed in large tokamaks. Some options are proposed for developing new detection systems of fusion neutrons suitable to the HL-2A tokamak. (authors)

  6. Calibration of a plastic detector PVT of large dimensions for the detection gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armenteros Carmona, J. C.; Suarez navarro, M. J.; Gonzalez-gonzalez, J. A.; Pujol, L.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the development work on the porch Rad Sentry Canberra brand that uses 2 plastic scintillation detectors PVT large (172 x 32 x 4 cm). In this paper we present the different calibration necessary for the proper functioning of equipment: channel-energy calibration, energy resolution, and efficiency-energy.

  7. On-Line Radiation Test Facility for Industrial Equipment needed for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Rausch, R

    1999-01-01

    The future Large Hadron Collider to be built at CERN will use superconducting magnets cooled down to 1.2 K. To preserve the superconductivity, the energy deposition dose levels in equipment located outside the cryostat, in the LHC tunnel, are calculated to be of the order of 1 to 10 Gy per year. At such dose levels, no major radiation-damage problems are to be expected, and the possibility of installing Commercial Of The Shelf (COTS) electronic equipment in the LHC tunnel along the accelerator is considered. To this purpose, industrial electronic equipment and circuits have to be qualified and tested against radiation to insure their long term stability and reliability. An on-line radiation test facility has been setup at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and a program of on-line tests for electronic equipment is ongoing. Equipment tested includes Industrial Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) from several manufacturers, standard VME modules, Fieldbuses like Profibus, WorldFIP and CAN, various electro...

  8. The application of the Monte Carlo code FLUKA in radiation protection studies for the large hadron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battistoni, Giuseppe; Broggi, Francesco; Brugger, Markus

    2010-01-01

    The multi-purpose particle interaction and transport code FLUKA is integral part of all radiation protection studies for the design and operation of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. It is one of the very few codes available for this type of calculations which is capable to calculate in one and the same simulation proton-proton and heavy ion collisions at LHC energies as well as the entire hadronic and electromagnetic particle cascade initiated by secondary particles in detectors and beam-line components from TeV energies down to energies of thermal neutrons. The present paper reviews these capabilities of FLUKA in giving details of relevant physics models along with examples of radiation protection studies for the LHC such as shielding studies for underground areas occupied by personnel during LHC operation and the simulation of induced radioactivity around beam loss points. Integral part of the FLUKA development is a careful benchmarking of specific models as well as the code performance in complex, real life applications which is demonstrated with examples of studies relevant to radiation protection at the LHC. (author)

  9. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detectors: Material parameters; radiation hardness; charge collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, S.

    1991-01-01

    Properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n diodes relevant to radiation detection applications were studied. The interest in using this material for radiation detection applications in physics and medicine was motivated by its high radiation hardness and the fact that it can be deposited over large area at relatively low cost. Thick, fully depleted a-Si:H diodes are required for sufficient energy deposition by a charged particle and better signal to noise ratio. A sizeable electric field is essential for charge collection in a -Si:H diodes. The large density of ionized defects that exist in the i layer when the diode is under DC bias causes the electric field to be uniform. Material parameters, namely carrier mobility and lifetime and the ionized defect density in thick a-Si:H p-i-n diodes were studied by the transient photoconductivity method. The increase in diode leakage current with reverse bias over the operating bias was consistent with the Poole-Frenkel effect, involving excitation of carriers from neutral defects. The diode noise over the operating voltage range was completely explained in terms of the shot noise component for CR-(RC) 4 (pseudo-Gaussian) shaping at 3 μs shaping time and the noise component at 0 V bias (delta and thermal noise) added in quadrature. Irradiation with 1 Mev neutrons produced no significant degradation in leakage current and noise at fluences exceeding 4 x 10 14 cm -2 . Irradiation with 1.4 Mev proton fluence of 1 x 10 14 cm -2 decreased carrier lifetime by a factor of ∼4. Degradation in leakage current and noise became significant at proton fluence of ∼10 13 cm -2

  10. The influence of large deletions on the mutation frequency induced by tritiated water and X-radiation in male Drosophila melanogaster post-meiotic germ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fossett, N.G.; Byrne, B.J.; Kelley, S.J.; Tucker, A.B.; Arbour-Reily, P.; Lee, W.R.

    1994-01-01

    Tritium beta radiation ( 3 H β-radiation) in the form of tritiated water was used to induce mutations at the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) locus in male Drosophila melanogaster post-meiotic germ cells. All 23 Adh null mutations were large deletions (>20 kb), determined by genetic complementation and Southern blot analyses. 27 Adh null mutations have been induced by 100-kVp X-rays and have been genetically and molecularly characterized. In contrast to 3 H β-radiation, 100-kVp X-rays induced a bimodal distribution of Adh null mutations, intragenic mutations, ≤250 bp, and large deletions, >100 kb. A statistically significant difference was observed between the frequency of large deletions (23/23 or 1.0) induced by 3 H β-radiation and the frequency of large deletions (19/27 or 0.7) induced by 100-kVp X-rays. However, a statistical difference was not observed between the size distribution of the large deletions induced by 3 H β-radiation and X-rays. The relative deletion frequency (RDF) induced by 3 H β-radiation and 100-kVp X-rays was (1.0/0.7=1.4). The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of these two radiation sources was 1.4, determined from the ratio of the regression coefficients of the respective 3 H β-radiation and X-ray sex-linked recessive lethal (SLRL) dose-response data. The large difference in size between the two classes of X-ray-induced Adh null mutations and the increase in mutation frequency and deletion frequency for 3 H β-radiation with respect to X-rays may indicate that the relative deletion frequency (RDF) is the molecular biological basis for the increase in the RBE for radiation sources with a mean LET value ≤10 keV/μm

  11. Temperature Distribution and Influence Mechanism on Large Reflector Antennas under Solar Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. S.; Yuan, S.; Liu, X.; Xu, Q.; Wang, M.; Zhu, M. B.; Chen, G. D.; Duan, Y. H.

    2017-10-01

    The solar impact on antenna must be lessened for the large reflector antenna operating at high frequencies to have great electromagnetic performances. Therefore, researching the temperature distribution and its influence on large reflector antenna is necessary. The variation of solar incidence angle is first calculated. Then the model is simulated by the I-DEAS software, with the temperature, thermal stress, and thermal distortion distribution through the day obtained. In view of the important influence of shadow on antenna structure, a newly proposed method makes a comprehensive description of the temperature distribution on the reflector and its influence through the day by dividing a day into three different periods. The sound discussions and beneficial summary serve as the scientific foundation for the engineers to compensate the thermal distortion and optimize the antenna structure.

  12. Large radiative corrections to the effective potential and the gauge hierarchy problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachrajda, C.T.C.

    1982-01-01

    We study the higher order corrections to the effective potential in a simple toy model and in the SU(5) grand unified theory, with a view to seeing what their effects are on the stability equations, and hence on the gauge hierarchy problem for these theories. These corrections contain powers of log (v 2 /h 2 ), where v and h are the large and small vacuum expectation values respectively, and hence cannot a priori be neglected. Nevertheless, after summing these large logarithms we find that the stability equations always contain two equations for v (i.e. these equations are independent of h) and hence can only be satisfied by a special (and hence unnatural) choice of parameters. This we claim is the precise statement of the gauge hierarchy problem. (orig.)

  13. Large scale facilities for synchrotron radiation and neutrons. New possibilities for Denmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feidenhans'l, R.

    2003-02-01

    New large-scale facilities for investigating the structure and dynamics of matter and biological systems are currently under construction or are being planned at many locations around Europe. These facilities are likely to have a large impact on the science landscape in Europe, and more locally, as some will be located in the immediate neighbourhood of Denmark. The facilities will enable new analytical capabilities of matter, which will push the frontiers of science and technology in many areas of research of importance for Denmark. This report provides an overview of the new facilities (including very rough funding estimates) of importance for Danish science, describes possible ways of engaging in the various projects and identifies potential user groups. The report also includes a summary of the status of the current use of existing facilities as a benchmark. This is done by showing different cross sections through this multiple parameter space of activities. The intention is that the report should serve as guideline for making a long-term national strategy for the exploitation of large-scale facilities in order to help to optimise their impact on science, education and industry within Denmark, and to safeguard the prominent internationally leading role that Denmark has in this area. (LN)

  14. Direct evidence for radiative charge transfer after inner-shell excitation and ionization of large clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans, Andreas; Stumpf, Vasili; Holzapfel, Xaver; Wiegandt, Florian; Schmidt, Philipp; Ozga, Christian; Reiß, Philipp; Ben Ltaief, Ltaief; Küstner-Wetekam, Catmarna; Jahnke, Till; Ehresmann, Arno; Demekhin, Philipp V.; Gokhberg, Kirill; Knie, André

    2018-01-01

    We directly observe radiative charge transfer (RCT) in Ne clusters by dispersed vacuum-ultraviolet photon detection. The doubly ionized Ne2+-{{{N}}{{e}}}n-1 initial states of RCT are populated after resonant 1s-3p photoexcitation or 1s photoionization of Ne n clusters with ≈ 2800. These states relax further producing Ne+-Ne+-{{{N}}{{e}}}n-2 final states, and the RCT photon is emitted. Ab initio calculations assign the observed RCT signal to the{}{{{N}}{{e}}}2+(2{{{p}}}-2{[}1{{D}}]){--}{{{N}}{{e}}}n-1 initial state, while transitions from other possible initial states are proposed to be quenched by competing relaxation processes. The present results are in agreement with the commonly discussed scenario, where the doubly ionized atom in a noble gas cluster forms a dimer which dissipates its vibrational energy on a picosecond timescale. Our study complements the picture of the RCT process in weakly bound clusters, providing information which is inaccessible by charged particle detection techniques.

  15. Large-volume and room-temperature gamma spectrometer for environmental radiation monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Coulon

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of a room-temperature gamma spectrometer is an issue in environmental radiation monitoring. To monitor radionuclides released around a nuclear power plant, suitable instruments giving fast and reliable information are required. High-pressure xenon (HPXe chambers have range of resolution and efficiency equivalent to those of other medium resolution detectors such as those using NaI(Tl, CdZnTe, and LaBr3:Ce. An HPXe chamber could be a cost-effective alternative, assuming temperature stability and reliability. The CEA LIST actively studied and developed HPXe-based technology applied for environmental monitoring. Xenon purification and conditioning was performed. The design of a 4-L HPXe detector was performed to minimize the detector capacitance and the required power supply. Simulations were done with the MCNPX2.7 particle transport code to estimate the intrinsic efficiency of the HPXe detector. A behavioral study dealing with ballistic deficits and electronic noise will be utilized to provide perspective for further analysis.

  16. Elaboration of a program for monitoring the ionizing radiations in a large hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carreira, Mauricio Costa

    1996-11-01

    Personnel monitoring data collected in the Radiotherapy, Diagnostic Radiology and Hemodynamics Departments of the Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirao Preto - USP during the interval from 1986 to 1995 were analyzed. The data were classified according to the profession of the workers and compared to those collected in a previous period (1973-1982). Internationally established criteria, published published in the ICRP 35 and 60 were used together with additional Brazilian criteria (CNEN NE 3.01) to optimize personnel monitoring such that the required radioprotection is provided. The results show that 80% of the workers need not be monitored because their doses will not exceed 3/10 the annual limits. An economy of about US$10,200 in monitoring cost per year could be realized as well as reduction in the hospital clerical costs expended to maintain the records. The improvements gaining by reducing the number of monitored persons will not compromise the safety standard required for radiation protection. (author)

  17. Microstructural interpretation of the fluence and temperature dependence of the mechanical properties of irradiated AISI 316

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.D.; Garner, F.A.; Brager, H.R.; Fish, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of annealed and 20% cold-worked AISI 316 irradiated in EBR-II were determined for the temperature regime of 370 to 760 0 C for fluences up to 8.4 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV). At irradiation temperatures below about 500 0 C, both annealed and cold-worked material exhibit a substantial increase in the flow stress with increasing fluence. Furthermore, both materials eventually exhibit the same flow stress, which is independent of fluence. At temperatures in the range of 538 to 650 0 C, the cold-worked material exhibits a softening with increasing fluence. Annealed AISI 316 in this temperature regime exhibits hardening and at a fluence of 2 to 3 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) reaches the same value of flow stress as the cold-worked material

  18. Ge nano-layer fabricated by high-fluence low-energy ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Tiecheng; Dun Shaobo; Hu Qiang; Zhang Songbao; An Zhu; Duan Yanmin; Zhu Sha; Wei Qiangmin; Wang Lumin

    2006-01-01

    A Ge nano-layer embedded in the surface layer of an amorphous SiO 2 film was fabricated by high-fluence low-energy ion implantation. The component, phase, nano-structure and luminescence properties of the nano-layer were studied by means of Rutherford backscattering, glancing incident X-ray diffraction, laser Raman scattering, transmission electron microscopy and photoluminescence. The relation between nano-particle characteristics and ion fluence was also studied. The results indicate that nano-crystalline Ge and nano-amorphous Ge particles coexist in the nano-layer and the ratio of nano-crystalline Ge to nano-particle Ge increases with increasing ion fluence. The intensity of photoluminescence from the nano-layer increases with increasing ion fluence also. Prepared with certain ion fluences, high-density nano-layers composed of uniform-sized nano-particles can be observed

  19. THE FLUENCE AND DISTANCE DISTRIBUTIONS OF FAST RADIO BURSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedantham, H. K.; Ravi, V.; Hallinan, G.; Shannon, R. M.

    2016-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRB) are millisecond-duration radio pulses with apparent extragalactic origins. All but two of the FRBs have been discovered using the Parkes dish, which employs multiple beams formed by an array of feed horns on its focal plane. In this paper, we show that (i) the preponderance of multiple-beam detections and (ii) the detection rates for varying dish diameters can be used to infer the index α of the cumulative fluence distribution function (the log N –log F function: α = 1.5 for a non-evolving population in a Euclidean universe). If all detected FRBs arise from a single progenitor population, multiple-beam FRB detection rates from the Parkes telescope yield the constraint 0.52 < α < 1.0 with 90% confidence. Searches at other facilities with different dish sizes refine the constraint to 0.5 < α < 0.9. Our results favor FRB searches with smaller dishes, because for α < 1 the gain in field of view for a smaller dish is more important than the reduction in sensitivity. Further, our results suggest that (i) FRBs are not standard candles, and (ii) the distribution of distances to the detected FRBs is weighted toward larger distances. If FRBs are extragalactic, these results are consistent with a cosmological population, which would make FRBs excellent probes of the baryonic content and geometry of the universe.

  20. Comparison of embrittlement trend curves to high fluence surveillance results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogaert, A.S.; Gerard, R.; Chaouadi, R.

    2011-01-01

    In the regulatory justification of the integrity of the reactor pressure vessels (RPV) for long term operation, use is made of predictive formulas (also called trend curves) to evaluate the RPV embrittlement (expressed in terms of RTNDT shifts) in function of fluence, chemical composition and in some cases temperature, neutron flux or product form. It has been shown recently that some of the existing or proposed trend curves tend to underpredict high dose embrittlement. Due to the scarcity of representative surveillance data at high dose, some test reactor results were used in these evaluations and raise the issue of representativeness of the accelerated test reactor irradiations (dose rate effects). In Belgium the surveillance capsules withdrawal schedule was modified in the nineties in order to obtain results corresponding to 60 years of operation or more with the initial surveillance program. Some of these results are already available and offer a good opportunity to test the validity of the predictive formulas at high dose. In addition, advanced surveillance methods are used in Belgium like the Master Curve, increased tensile tests, and microstructural investigations. These techniques made it possible to show the conservatism of the regulatory approach and to demonstrate increased margins, especially for the first generation units. In this paper the surveillance results are compared to different predictive formulas, as well as to an engineering hardening model developed at SCK.CEN. Generally accepted property-to-property correlations are critically revisited. Conclusions are made on the reliability and applicability of the embrittlement trend curves. (authors)

  1. Flux and fluence determination using the material scrapings approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basha, H.S.; Manahan, M.P.

    1992-01-01

    The conventional approach to flux determination is to use high-purity dosimeters to characterize the neutron field. This paper presents an alternative approach called the scraping method. This method consists of taking scraping samples from an in-service component and using this material to measure the specific activity for various reactions. This approach enables the determination of the neutron flux and fluence incident on any component for which small chips of material can be safely obtained. It offers a capability for determining the neutron flux for components such as reactor internals without destructively removing them from service. The scrapings methodology was benchmarked by comparison with the results obtained using conventional dosimetry data from the San Onofre nuclear generation station Unit 2 (SONGS-2). Additionally, since the goal of any reactor physics analysis is to reduce uncertainty to the extent practical, it is important that the best available cross-section library be used. The fast flux calculated-to-experimental (C/E) ratios at the SONGS-297-deg in-vessel surveillance capsule and the REACTOR-X 90-deg ex-vessel dosimetry positions were studied for several cross-section libraries, including BIGLE-80, SAILOR, and ELXSIR. REACTOR-X is a pressurized water reactor power plant currently operating in the US

  2. Deuterium trapping in carbon fiber composites under high fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airapetov, A.A.; Begrambekov, L.B.; Kuzmin, A.A.; Shigin, P.A.; Zakharov, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    The paper is devoted to investigation of deuterium trapping in CFC, dance graphite MPG-8 and pyrolytic graphite (PG) under plasma ion- and electron irradiation. Number of specific features of deuterium trapping and retention under plasma ion and electron irradiation is presented and discussed. In particular it is shown that 1) deuterium trapping takes place even when energy of impinging ions approaches zero; 2) deuterium is trapped under irradiation by plasma electrons; 3) under irradiation at equal fluences deuterium trapping is higher, when ion flux is smaller. High energy ion penetrating the surfaces are trapped in the traps created at the expense of their kinetic energy. The process may be named 'kinetic trapping'. Under low energy (smaller than 200 eV) electron and/or ion irradiation the energy of inelastic interaction on the surface provides creation of active centers, which initiate dissociation of deuterium sorbed on the surface, penetration of deuterium atoms into graphite and their trapping in specific low energy traps. The term 'potential trapping' is proposed for this type of trapping. Under high energy irradiation such atoms can fill the traps formed through kinetic mechanism. Origination of moveable deuterium atoms from the layer of surface sorption seems to be time dependent process and it is a reason of increase of trapping along with irradiation time. New features of deuterium trapping and retention in graphite evaluated in this study offer new opportunities for analysis and correct estimation of hydrogen isotope trapping and retention in tokamaks having graphite tiles. (authors)

  3. Fluence-convolution broad-beam (FCBB) dose calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Weiguo; Chen Mingli, E-mail: wlu@tomotherapy.co [TomoTherapy Inc., 1240 Deming Way, Madison, WI 53717 (United States)

    2010-12-07

    IMRT optimization requires a fast yet relatively accurate algorithm to calculate the iteration dose with small memory demand. In this paper, we present a dose calculation algorithm that approaches these goals. By decomposing the infinitesimal pencil beam (IPB) kernel into the central axis (CAX) component and lateral spread function (LSF) and taking the beam's eye view (BEV), we established a non-voxel and non-beamlet-based dose calculation formula. Both LSF and CAX are determined by a commissioning procedure using the collapsed-cone convolution/superposition (CCCS) method as the standard dose engine. The proposed dose calculation involves a 2D convolution of a fluence map with LSF followed by ray tracing based on the CAX lookup table with radiological distance and divergence correction, resulting in complexity of O(N{sup 3}) both spatially and temporally. This simple algorithm is orders of magnitude faster than the CCCS method. Without pre-calculation of beamlets, its implementation is also orders of magnitude smaller than the conventional voxel-based beamlet-superposition (VBS) approach. We compared the presented algorithm with the CCCS method using simulated and clinical cases. The agreement was generally within 3% for a homogeneous phantom and 5% for heterogeneous and clinical cases. Combined with the 'adaptive full dose correction', the algorithm is well suitable for calculating the iteration dose during IMRT optimization.

  4. FOKN: a relativistic Fokker-Planck code with large angle scattering and radiation losses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, G.; Scharlemann, T.; Wood, L.; Weaver, T.; Chu, T.; Lee, G.

    1976-07-01

    FOKN is a computer code which employs a relativistic Fokker-Planck algorithm to evolve the distribution functions of the various mutually interacting components of a multi-species plasma forward in time, with the optional addition of high angle, large energy and momentum transfer interactions between the various charged species of the plasma. As a computational expediency, the latter processes are handled by transfer matrices which are generated separately by another code, RNUX, so that once specific transfer matrices are generated, they can be used over and over by FOKN provided the group structures are compatible

  5. Calibrating an optical scanner for quality assurance of large area radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadzhinova, A.; Hildén, T.; Berdova, M.; Lauhakangas, R.; Heino, J.; Tuominen, E.; Franssila, S.; Hæggström, E.; Kassamakov, I.

    2014-11-01

    A gas electron multiplier (GEM) is a particle detector used in high-energy physics. Its main component is a thin copper-polymer-copper sandwich that carries Ø =70  ±  5 µm holes. Quality assurance (QA) is needed to guarantee both long operating life and reading fidelity of the GEM. Absence of layer defects and conformity of the holes to specifications is important. Both hole size and shape influence the detector’s gas multiplication factor and hence affect the collected data. For the scanner the required lateral measurement tolerance is ± 5 µm. We calibrated a high aspect ratio optical scanning system (OSS) to allow ensuring the quality of large GEM foils. For the calibration we microfabricated transfer standards, which were imaged with the OSS and which were compared to corresponding scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. The calibration fulfilled the ISO/IEC 17025 and UKAS M3003 requirements: the calibration factor was 1.01  ±  0.01, determined at 95% confidence level across a 950  ×  950 mm2 area. The proposed large-scale scanning technique can potentially be valuable in other microfabricated products too.

  6. Radiation-hard Silicon Photonics for Future High Energy Physics Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2089774; Troska, Jan

    Collisions of proton beams in the Large Hadron Collider at CERN produce very high radiation levels in the innermost parts of the particle detectors and enormous amounts of measurement data. Thousands of radiation-hard optical links based on directly-modulated laser diodes are thus installed in the particle detectors to transmit the measurement data to the processing electronics. The radiation levels in the innermost regions of future particle detectors will be much higher than they are now. Alternative solutions to laser-based radiation-hard optical links have to be found since the performance of laser diodes decreases beyond the operation margin of the system when irradiated to sufficiently high radiation levels. Silicon Photonics (SiPh) is currently being investigated as a promising alternative technology. First tests have indeed shown that SiPh Mach-Zehnder modulators (MZMs) are relatively insensitive to a high neutron fluence. However, they showed a strong degradation when exposed to ionizing radiation. ...

  7. Response of Ni/4H-SiC Schottky barrier diodes to alpha-particle irradiation at different fluences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omotoso, E., E-mail: ezekiel.omotoso@up.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X20, Hatfield 0028 (South Africa); Departments of Physics, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife 220005 (Nigeria); Meyer, W.E.; Auret, F.D.; Diale, M.; Ngoepe, P.N.M. [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X20, Hatfield 0028 (South Africa)

    2016-01-01

    Irradiation experiments have been carried out on 1.9×10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} nitrogen-doped 4H-SiC at room temperature using 5.4 MeV alpha-particle irradiation over a fluence ranges from 2.6×10{sup 10} to 9.2×10{sup 11} cm{sup −2}. Current–voltage (I–V), capacitance–voltage (C–V) and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements have been carried out to study the change in characteristics of the devices and free carrier removal rate due to alpha-particle irradiation, respectively. As radiation fluence increases, the ideality factors increased from 1.20 to 1.85 but the Schottky barrier height (SBH{sub I–V}) decreased from 1.47 to 1.34 eV. Free carrier concentration, N{sub d} decreased with increasing fluence from 1.7×10{sup 16} to 1.1×10{sup 16} cm{sup −2} at approximately 0.70 μm depth. The reduction in N{sub d} shows that defects were induced during the irradiation and have effect on compensating the free carrier. The free carrier removal rate was estimated to be 6480±70 cm{sup −1}. Alpha-particle irradiation introduced two electron traps (E{sub 0.39} and E{sub 0.62}), with activation energies of 0.39±0.03 eV and 0.62±0.08 eV, respectively. The E{sub 0.39} as attribute related to silicon or carbon vacancy, while the E{sub 0.62} has the attribute of Z{sub 1}/Z{sub 2}.

  8. Online Radiation Dose Measurement System for ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Mandić, I; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Particle detectors and readout electronics in the high energy physics experiment ATLAS at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN operate in radiation field containing photons, charged particles and neutrons. The particles in the radiation field originate from proton-proton interactions as well as from interactions of these particles with material in the experimental apparatus. In the innermost parts of ATLAS detector components will be exposed to ionizing doses exceeding 100 kGy. Energetic hadrons will also cause displacement damage in silicon equivalent to fluences of several times 10e14 1 MeV-neutrons per cm2. Such radiation doses can have severe influence on the performance of detectors. It is therefore very important to continuously monitor the accumulated doses to understand the detector performance and to correctly predict the lifetime of radiation sensitive components. Measurements of doses are important also to verify the simulations and represent a crucial input into the models used for predicting future ...

  9. Infrastructure of radiation oncology in France: A large survey of evolution of external beam radiotherapy practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggieri-Pignon, Sophie; Pignon, Thierry; Marty, Michel; Rodde-Dunet, Marie-Helene; Destembert, Brigitte; Fritsch, Beatrice

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To study the structural characteristics of radiation oncology facilities for France and to examine how technological evolutions had to be taken into account in terms of accessibility and costs. This study was initiated by the three health care financing administrations that cover health care costs for the French population. The needs of the population in terms of the geographic distribution of the facilities were also investigated. The endpoint was to make proposals to enable an evolution of the practice of radiotherapy (RT) in France. Methods and materials: A survey designed by a multidisciplinary committee was distributed in all RT facilities to collect data on treatment machines, other equipment, personnel, new patients, and new treatments. Medical advisors ensured site visits in each facility. The data were validated at the regional level and aggregated at the national level for analysis. Results: A total of 357 machines had been installed in 179 facilities: 270 linear accelerators and 87 cobalt units. The distribution of facilities and megavoltage units per million inhabitants over the country was good, although some disparities existed between areas. It appeared that most megavoltage units had not benefited from technological innovation, because 25% of the cobalt units and 57% of the linear accelerators were between 6 and 15 years old. Computed tomography access for treatment preparation was not sufficient, and complete data management systems were scarce (15% of facilities). Seven centers had no treatment planning system. Electronic portal imaging devices were available in 44.7% of RT centers and in vivo dosimetry in 35%. A lack of physicians and medical physicists was observed; consequently, the workload exceeded the normal standard recommended by the French White Book. Discrepancies were found between the number of patients treated per machine per year in each area (range, 244.5-604). Most treatments were delivered in smaller facilities (61

  10. Radiation damage in urania crystals implanted with low-energy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Tien Hien, E-mail: tien-hien.nguyen@u-psud.fr [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière (CSNSM – UMR 8609), CNRS-IN2P3-Université Paris-Sud, Bâtiments 104-108, 91405 Orsay Campus (France); Garrido, Frédérico; Debelle, Aurélien; Mylonas, Stamatis [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière (CSNSM – UMR 8609), CNRS-IN2P3-Université Paris-Sud, Bâtiments 104-108, 91405 Orsay Campus (France); Nowicki, Lech [The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Thomé, Lionel; Bourçois, Jérôme; Moeyaert, Jérémy [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière (CSNSM – UMR 8609), CNRS-IN2P3-Université Paris-Sud, Bâtiments 104-108, 91405 Orsay Campus (France)

    2014-05-01

    Implantations with low-energy ions (470-keV Xe and 500-keV La with corresponding ion range Rp ∼ 85 nm and range straggling ΔRp ∼ 40 nm) have been performed to investigate both radiation and chemical effects due to the incorporation of different species in UO{sub 2} (urania) crystals. The presence of defects was monitored in situ after each implantation fluence step by the RBS/C technique. Channelling data were analysed afterwards by Monte-Carlo simulations with a model of defects involving (i) randomly displaced atoms (RDA) and (ii) distorted rows, i.e. bent channels (BC). While increasing the ion fluence, the accumulation of RDA leads to a steep increase of the defect fraction in the range from 4 to 7 dpa regardless of the nature of bombarding ions followed by a saturation plateau over a large dpa range. A clear difference of 6% in the yield of saturation plateaus between irradiation with Xe and La ions was observed. Conversely, the evolutions of the fraction of BC showed a similar regular increase with increasing ion fluence for both ions. Moreover, this increase is shifted to a larger fluence in comparison to the sharp increase step of RDA. This phenomenon indicates a continuous structural modification of UO{sub 2} crystals under irradiation unseen by the measurement of RDA.

  11. Electrical characterization of 10B doped diamond irradiated with low thermal neutron fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, M.L.; Reed, M.J.; Jagannadham, K.; Verghese, K.; Bedair, S.M.; El-Masry, N.; Butler, J.E.

    2004-01-01

    A sample of 10 B isotope doped diamond was neutron irradiated to a thermal fluence of 1.3x10 19 neutron cm -2 . The diamond sample was cooled continuously during irradiation in a nuclear reactor. 7 Li is formed by nuclear transmutation reaction from 10 B. Characterization for electrical conductance in the temperature range of 160 K 10 B doped sample and the 10 B doped and irradiated sample. The unirradiated diamond sample showed p-type conductance at higher temperature (T>200 K) and p-type surface conductance at lower temperature (T 7 Li that is formed by nuclear transmutation reaction from 10 B atoms. Also, compensation of n-type carriers from 7 Li by p-type carriers from 10 B is used to interpret the conductance above 400 K. A low concentration of radiation induced defects, absence of defect complexes, and the low activation energy of n-type 7 Li are thought responsible for the observed variation of conductance in the irradiated diamond. The present results illustrate that neutron transmutation from 10 B doped diamond is a useful method to achieve n-type conductivity in diamond

  12. Radiation protection considerations in the design of the LHC, CERN's large hadron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefert, M.; Huhtinen, M.; Moritz, L.E.; Nakashima, H.; Potter, K.M.; Rollet, S.; Stevenson, G.R.; Zazula, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the radiological concerns which are being taken into account in the design of the LHC (CERN's future Large Hadron Collider). The machine will be built in the 27 km circumference ring tunnel of the existing LEP collider at CERN. The high intensity of the circulating beams (each containing more than 10 14 protons at 7 TeV) determines the thickness specification of the shielding of the main-ring tunnel, the precautions to be taken in the design of the beam dumps and their associated caverns and the radioactivity induced by the loss of protons in the main ring by inelastic beam-gas interactions. The high luminosity of the collider is designed to provide inelastic collision rates of 10 9 per second in each of the two principal detector installations, ATLAS and CMS. These collisions determine the shielding of the experimental areas, the radioactivity induced in both the detectors and in the machine components on either side of the experimental installations and, to some extent, the radioactivity induced in the beam-cleaning (scraper) systems. Some of the environmental issues raised by the project will be discussed. (author)

  13. Radiation field mapping using a mechanical-electronic detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czayka, M., E-mail: mczayka@kent.ed [College of Technology, Kent State University-Ashtabula 3300 Lake Road West, Ashtabula, OH 44004 (United States); Program on Electron Beam Technology, Kent State University, P.O. Box 1028, Middlefield, OH 44062 (United States); Fisch, M. [Program on Electron Beam Technology, Kent State University, P.O. Box 1028, Middlefield, OH 44062 (United States); College of Technology, Kent State University, P.O. Box 5190, Kent, OH 44242-0001 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    A method of radiation field mapping of a scanned electron beam using a Faraday-type detector and an electromechanical linear translator is presented. Utilizing this arrangement, fluence and fluence rate measurements can be made at different locations within the radiation field. The Faraday-type detector used in these experiments differs from most as it consists of a hollow stainless steel sphere. Results are presented in two- and three-dimensional views of the radiation field.

  14. Ultra-fast fluence optimization for beam angle selection algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangert, M.; Ziegenhein, P.; Oelfke, U.

    2014-03-01

    Beam angle selection (BAS) including fluence optimization (FO) is among the most extensive computational tasks in radiotherapy. Precomputed dose influence data (DID) of all considered beam orientations (up to 100 GB for complex cases) has to be handled in the main memory and repeated FOs are required for different beam ensembles. In this paper, the authors describe concepts accelerating FO for BAS algorithms using off-the-shelf multiprocessor workstations. The FO runtime is not dominated by the arithmetic load of the CPUs but by the transportation of DID from the RAM to the CPUs. On multiprocessor workstations, however, the speed of data transportation from the main memory to the CPUs is non-uniform across the RAM; every CPU has a dedicated memory location (node) with minimum access time. We apply a thread node binding strategy to ensure that CPUs only access DID from their preferred node. Ideal load balancing for arbitrary beam ensembles is guaranteed by distributing the DID of every candidate beam equally to all nodes. Furthermore we use a custom sorting scheme of the DID to minimize the overall data transportation. The framework is implemented on an AMD Opteron workstation. One FO iteration comprising dose, objective function, and gradient calculation takes between 0.010 s (9 beams, skull, 0.23 GB DID) and 0.070 s (9 beams, abdomen, 1.50 GB DID). Our overall FO time is < 1 s for small cases, larger cases take ~ 4 s. BAS runs including FOs for 1000 different beam ensembles take ~ 15-70 min, depending on the treatment site. This enables an efficient clinical evaluation of different BAS algorithms.

  15. Ultra-fast fluence optimization for beam angle selection algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangert, M; Ziegenhein, P; Oelfke, U

    2014-01-01

    Beam angle selection (BAS) including fluence optimization (FO) is among the most extensive computational tasks in radiotherapy. Precomputed dose influence data (DID) of all considered beam orientations (up to 100 GB for complex cases) has to be handled in the main memory and repeated FOs are required for different beam ensembles. In this paper, the authors describe concepts accelerating FO for BAS algorithms using off-the-shelf multiprocessor workstations. The FO runtime is not dominated by the arithmetic load of the CPUs but by the transportation of DID from the RAM to the CPUs. On multiprocessor workstations, however, the speed of data transportation from the main memory to the CPUs is non-uniform across the RAM; every CPU has a dedicated memory location (node) with minimum access time. We apply a thread node binding strategy to ensure that CPUs only access DID from their preferred node. Ideal load balancing for arbitrary beam ensembles is guaranteed by distributing the DID of every candidate beam equally to all nodes. Furthermore we use a custom sorting scheme of the DID to minimize the overall data transportation. The framework is implemented on an AMD Opteron workstation. One FO iteration comprising dose, objective function, and gradient calculation takes between 0.010 s (9 beams, skull, 0.23 GB DID) and 0.070 s (9 beams, abdomen, 1.50 GB DID). Our overall FO time is < 1 s for small cases, larger cases take ∼ 4 s. BAS runs including FOs for 1000 different beam ensembles take ∼ 15–70 min, depending on the treatment site. This enables an efficient clinical evaluation of different BAS algorithms.

  16. Motion-encoded dose calculation through fluence/sinogram modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Weiguo; Olivera, Gustavo H.; Mackie, Thomas R.

    2005-01-01

    Conventional radiotherapy treatment planning systems rely on a static computed tomography (CT) image for planning and evaluation. Intra/inter-fraction patient motions may result in significant differences between the planned and the delivered dose. In this paper, we develop a method to incorporate the knowledge of intra/inter-fraction patient motion directly into the dose calculation. By decomposing the motion into a parallel (to beam direction) component and perpendicular (to beam direction) component, we show that the motion effects can be accounted for by simply modifying the fluence distribution (sinogram). After such modification, dose calculation is the same as those based on a static planning image. This method is superior to the 'dose-convolution' method because it is not based on 'shift invariant' assumption. Therefore, it deals with material heterogeneity and surface curvature very well. We test our method using extensive simulations, which include four phantoms, four motion patterns, and three plan beams. We compare our method with the 'dose-convolution' and the 'stochastic simulation' methods (gold standard). As for the homogeneous flat surface phantom, our method has similar accuracy as the 'dose-convolution' method. As for all other phantoms, our method outperforms the 'dose-convolution'. The maximum motion encoded dose calculation error using our method is within 4% of the gold standard. It is shown that a treatment planning system that is based on 'motion-encoded dose calculation' can incorporate random and systematic motion errors in a very simple fashion. Under this approximation, in principle, a planning target volume definition is not required, since it already accounts for the intra/inter-fraction motion variations and it automatically optimizes the cumulative dose rather than the single fraction dose

  17. Searching for signatures of dark matter-dark radiation interaction in observations of large-scale structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhen; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Knox, Lloyd

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we conduct a search in the latest large-scale structure measurements for signatures of the dark matter-dark radiation interaction proposed by Buen-Abad et al. (2015). We show that prior claims of an inference of this interaction at ˜3 σ significance rely on a use of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich cluster mass function that ignores uncertainty in the mass-observable relationship. Including this uncertainty we find that the inferred level of interaction remains consistent with the data, but so does zero interaction; i.e., there is no longer a preference for nonzero interaction. We also point out that inference of the shape and amplitude of the matter power spectrum from Ly α forest measurements is highly inconsistent with the predictions of the Λ CDM model conditioned on Planck cosmic microwave background temperature, polarization, and lensing power spectra, and that the dark matter-dark radiation model can restore that consistency. We also phenomenologically generalize the model of Buen-Abad et al. (2015) to allow for interaction rates with different scalings with temperature, and find that the original scaling is preferred by the data.

  18. Biphasic Fluence-Response Curves for Phytochrome-Mediated Kalanchoë Seed Germination 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rethy, Roger; Dedonder, Andrée; De Petter, Edwin; Van Wiemeersch, Luc; Fredericq, Henri; De Greef, Jan; Steyaert, Herman; Stevens, Hilde

    1987-01-01

    The fluence-response curves for the effect of two red pulses separated by 24 hours on the germination of Kalanchoe blossfeldiana Poelln. cv Vesuv seeds, incubated on gibberellic acid (GA3) are biphasic for suboptimal concentrations. The response in the low fluence range corresponds with a classical red/far-red reversible phytochrome mediated reaction. GA3 induces an additional response in the very low fluence range, which is also phytochrome mediated. The sensitivity to phytochrome-far-red absorbing form (Pfr), however, is increased about 20,000-fold, so that even far-red fluences become saturating. Both in the very low and low fluence response range, the maximal responses induced by saturating fluences are modulated by the GA3 concentration. GA3 having no direct influence on the phytochrome phototransformations, alters the Pfr requirement and determines the responding seed population fraction in the very low and low fluence range. The effet of GA3 appears to be on the transduction chain of the phytochrome signal. PMID:16665187

  19. The vascular disrupting agent ZD6126 shows increased antitumor efficacy and enhanced radiation response in large, advanced tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemann, Dietmar W.; Rojiani, Amyn M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: ZD6126 is a vascular-targeting agent that induces selective effects on the morphology of proliferating and immature endothelial cells by disrupting the tubulin cytoskeleton. The efficacy of ZD6126 was investigated in large vs. small tumors in a variety of animal models. Methods and Materials: Three rodent tumor models (KHT, SCCVII, RIF-1) and three human tumor xenografts (Caki-1, KSY-1, SKBR3) were used. Mice bearing leg tumors ranging in size from 0.1-2.0 g were injected intraperitoneally with a single 150 mg/kg dose of ZD6126. The response was assessed by morphologic and morphometric means as well as an in vivo to in vitro clonogenic cell survival assay. To examine the impact of tumor size on the extent of enhancement of radiation efficacy by ZD6126, KHT sarcomas of three different sizes were irradiated locally with a range of radiation doses, and cell survival was determined. Results: All rodent tumors and human tumor xenografts evaluated showed a strong correlation between increasing tumor size and treatment effect as determined by clonogenic cell survival. Detailed evaluation of KHT sarcomas treated with ZD6126 showed a reduction in patent tumor blood vessels that was ∼20% in small ( 90% in large (>1.0 g) tumors. Histologic assessment revealed that the extent of tumor necrosis after ZD6126 treatment, although minimal in small KHT sarcomas, became more extensive with increasing tumor size. Clonogenic cell survival after ZD6126 exposure showed a decrease in tumor surviving fraction from approximately 3 x 10 -1 to 1 x 10 -4 with increasing tumor size. When combined with radiotherapy, ZD6126 treatment resulted in little enhancement of the antitumor effect of radiation in small (<0.3 g) tumors but marked increases in cell kill in tumors larger than 1.0 g. Conclusions: Because bulky neoplastic disease is typically the most difficult to manage, the present findings provide further support for the continued development of vascular disrupting agents such as

  20. Biology relevant to space radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1997-01-01

    There are only very limited data on the health effects to humans from the two major components of the radiations in space, namely protons and heavy ions. As a result, predictions of the accompanying effects must be based either on (1) data generated through studies of experimental systems exposed on earth at rates and fluences higher than those in space, or (2) extrapolations from studies of gamma and x rays. Better information is needed about the doses, dose rates, and the energy and LET spectra of the radiations at the organ level that are anticipated to be encountered during extended space missions. In particular, there is a need for better estimates of the relationship between radiation quality and biological effects. In the case of deterministic effects, it is the threshold that is important. The possibility of the occurrence of a large solar particle event (SPE) requires that such effects be considered during extended space missions. Analyses suggest, however, that it is feasible to provide sufficient shielding so as to reduce such effects to acceptable levels, particularly if the dose rates can be limited. If these analyses prove correct, the primary biological risks will be the stochastic effects (latent cancer induction). The contribution of one large SPE to the risk of stochastic effects while undesirable will not be large in comparison to the potential total dose on a mission of long duration

  1. Radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pujol Mora, J.

    1999-01-01

    The exposition to ionizing radiations is a constant fact in the life of the human being and its utilization as diagnostic and therapeutic method is generalized. However, it is notorious how as years go on, the fear to the ionizing radiation seems to persist too, and this fact is not limited to the common individual, but to the technical personnel and professional personnel that labors with them same. (S. Grainger) [es

  2. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    The basic facts about radiation are explained, along with some simple and natural ways of combating its ill-effects, based on ancient healing wisdom as well as the latest biochemical and technological research. Details are also given of the diet that saved thousands of lives in Nagasaki after the Atomic bomb attack. Special comment is made on the use of radiation for food processing. (U.K.)

  3. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of the effect of the mean energy and FWHM of the initial electron fluence on the Bremsstrahlung photon spectra of linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juste, B.; Miró, R.; Verdú, G.; Macián, R.

    2012-01-01

    A calculation of the correct dose in radiation therapy requires an accurate description of the radiation source because uncertainties in characterization of the linac photon spectrum are propagated through the dose calculations. Unfortunately, detailed knowledge of the initial electron beam parameters is not readily available, and many researchers adjust the initial electron fluence values by trial-and-error methods. The main goal of this work was to develop a methodology to characterize the fluence of initial electrons before they hit the tungsten target of an Elekta Precise medical linear accelerator. To this end, we used a Monte Carlo technique to analyze the influence of the characteristics of the initial electron beam on the distribution of absorbed dose from a 6 MV linac photon beam in a water phantom. The technique is based on calculations with Software for Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis (SUSA) and Monte Carlo simulations with the MCNP5 transport code. The free parameters used in the SUSA calculations were the mean energy and full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) of the initial electron distribution. A total of 93 combinations of these parameters gave initial electron fluence configurations. The electron spectra thus obtained were used in a simulation of the electron transport through the target of the linear accelerator, which produced different photon (Bremsstrahlung) spectra. The simulated photon spectra were compared with the 6-MV photon spectrum provided by the linac manufacturer (Elekta). This comparison revealed how the mean energy and FWHM of the initial electron fluence affect the spectrum of the generated photons. This study has made it possible to fine-tune the examined electron beam parameters to obtain the resulted absorbed doses with acceptable accuracy (error <1%). - Highlights: ► Mean energy and radial spread are important parameters for simulating the incident electron beam in radiation therapy. ► Errors in determining the electron

  4. Review of the Palisades pressure vessel accumulated fluence estimate and of the least squares methodology employed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, P.J.

    1998-05-01

    This report provides a review of the Palisades submittal to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission requesting endorsement of their accumulated neutron fluence estimates based on a least squares adjustment methodology. This review highlights some minor issues in the applied methodology and provides some recommendations for future work. The overall conclusion is that the Palisades fluence estimation methodology provides a reasonable approach to a open-quotes best estimateclose quotes of the accumulated pressure vessel neutron fluence and is consistent with the state-of-the-art analysis as detailed in community consensus ASTM standards

  5. Review of the Palisades pressure vessel accumulated fluence estimate and of the least squares methodology employed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, P.J.

    1998-05-01

    This report provides a review of the Palisades submittal to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission requesting endorsement of their accumulated neutron fluence estimates based on a least squares adjustment methodology. This review highlights some minor issues in the applied methodology and provides some recommendations for future work. The overall conclusion is that the Palisades fluence estimation methodology provides a reasonable approach to a {open_quotes}best estimate{close_quotes} of the accumulated pressure vessel neutron fluence and is consistent with the state-of-the-art analysis as detailed in community consensus ASTM standards.

  6. Dependence of laser assisted cleaning of clad surfaces on the laser fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilaya, J.P.; Raote, P.; Sai Prasad, M.B.; Biswas, D.J.; Aniruddha Kumar

    2005-01-01

    The decontamination factor is studied as a function of laser fluence for three kinds of clad surfaces viz., plain zircaloy, autoclaved zircaloy and SS with cesium as the test contamination. It has been found that the decontamination factor exhibits a maximal behaviour with the laser fluence and its maximum value occurs at different laser fluences in the three cases. The maximal behaviour is attributed to reduced coupling of energy from the laser beam to the substrate due to the initiation of surface-assisted optical breakdown. The results obtained in the experiment carried out in helium environment qualitatively support this explanation (author)

  7. Solid State Track Recorder fission rate measurements at high neutron fluence and high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruddy, F.H.; Roberts, J.H.; Gold, R.

    1985-01-01

    Solid State Track Recorder (SSTR) techniques have been used to measure 239-Pu, 235-U, and 237-Np fission rates for total neutron fluences approaching 5 x 10 17 n/cm 2 at temperatures in the range 680 to 830 0 F. Natural quartz crystal SSTRs were used to withstand the high temperature environment and ultra low-mass fissionable deposits of the three isotopes were required to yield scannable track densities at the high neutron fluences. The results of these high temperature, high neutron fluence measurements are reported

  8. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winther, J.F.; Ulbak, K.; Dreyer, L.; Pukkala, E.; Oesterlind, A.

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to solar and ionizing radiation increases the risk for cancer in humans. Some 5% of solar radiation is within the ultraviolet spectrum and may cause both malignant melanoma and non-melanocytic skin cancer; the latter is regarded as a benign disease and is accordingly not included in our estimation of avoidable cancers. Under the assumption that the rate of occurrence of malignant melanoma of the buttocks of both men and women and of the scalp of women would apply to all parts of the body in people completely unexposed to solar radiation, it was estimated that approximately 95% of all malignant melanomas arising in the Nordic populations around the year 2000 will be due to exposure to natural ultraviolet radiation, equivalent to an annual number of about 4700 cases, with 2100 in men and 2600 in women, or some 4% of all cancers notified. Exposure to ionizing radiation in the Nordic countries occurs at an average effective dose per capita per year of about 3 mSv (Iceland, 1.1 mSv) from natural sources, and about 1 mSv from man-made sources. While the natural sources are primarily radon in indoor air, natural radionuclides in food, cosmic radiation and gamma radiation from soil and building materials, the man-made sources are dominated by the diagnostic and therapeutic use of ionizing radiation. On the basis of measured levels of radon in Nordic dwellings and associated risk estimates for lung cancer derived from well-conducted epidemiological studies, we estimated that about 180 cases of lung cancer (1% of all lung cancer cases) per year could be avoided in the Nordic countries around the year 2000 if indoor exposure to radon were eliminated, and that an additional 720 cases (6%) could be avoided annually if either radon or tobacco smoking were eliminated. Similarly, it was estimated that the exposure of the Nordic populations to natural sources of ionizing radiation other than radon and to medical sources will each give rise to an annual total of 2120

  9. Radiation resistant quench protection diodes for the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagedorn, D.; Coull, L.

    1994-01-01

    The quench protection diodes for the proposed Large Hadron Collider at CERN will be located inside the He-II vessel of the short straight section of one half cell, where they could be exposed to a radiation dose of about 50 kGy and a total neutron fluence of about 10 15 n/cm 2 over 10 years at temperatures of about 2 K. To investigate the influence of irradiation on the electrical characteristics of the diodes, newly developed diodes of thin base region of the diffusion type and of the epitaxial type have been submitted to irradiation tests at liquid nitrogen temperature in a target area of the SPS accelerator at CERN. The degradation of the electrical characteristics of the diodes for a radiation dose up to about 20 kGy and neutron fluence of up to about 5 10 14 n/cm 2 and the effect of carrier injection and thermal annealing after irradiation have been measured. The test results show that only the thin base diodes of the epitaxial type are really radiation resistant. A compromise must be found between required blocking characteristics and radiation resistance. Annealing by carrier injection and occasional warm up to room temperature can extend the service life of irradiated diodes quite substantially

  10. Assessment of temporal trend of radiation dose to the public living in the large area contaminated with radioactive materials after a nuclear power plant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Go, A Ra; Kim, Min Jun; Kim, Kwang Pyo [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Nam Chan; Seol, Jeung Gun [Radiation Safety Team, Korea Electric Power Corporation Nuclear Fuel, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    It has been about 5 years since the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident, which contaminated large area with radioactive materials. It is necessary to assess radiation dose to establish evacuation areas and to set decontamination goal for the large contaminated area. In this study, we assessed temporal trend of radiation dose to the public living in the large area contaminated with radioactive materials after the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident. The dose assessment was performed based on Chernobyl model and RESRAD model for two evacuation lift areas, Kawauchi and Naraha. It was reported that deposition densities in the areas were 4.3-96 kBq m{sup -2} for {sup 134}Cs, 1.4-300 kBq m{sup -2} for {sup 137}Cs, respectively. Radiation dose to the residents depended on radioactive cesium concentrations in the soil, ranging 0.11-2.4 mSv y{sup -1} at Kawauchi area and 0.69-1.1 mSv y{sup -1} at Naraha area in July 2014. The difference was less than 5% in radiation doses estimated by two different models. Radiation dose decreased with calendar time and the decreasing slope varied depending on dose assessment models. Based on the Chernobyl dosimetry model, radiation doses decreased with calendar time to about 65% level of the radiation dose in 2014 after 1 year, 11% level after 10 years, and 5.6% level after 30 years. RESRAD dosimetry model more slowly decreased radiation dose with time to about 85% level after 1 year, 40% level after 10 years, and 15% level after 30 years. The decrease of radiation dose can be mainly attributed into radioactive decays and environmental transport of the radioactive cesium. Only environmental transports of radioactive cesium without consideration of radioactive decays decreased radiation dose additionally 43% after 1 year, 72% after 3 years, 80% after 10 years, and 83% after 30 years. Radiation doses estimated with cesium concentration in the soil based on Chernobyl dosimetry model were compared with directly measured radiation doses

  11. Nonuniform radiation damage in permanent magnet quadrupoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danly, C R; Merrill, F E; Barlow, D; Mariam, F G

    2014-08-01

    We present data that indicate nonuniform magnetization loss due to radiation damage in neodymium-iron-boron Halbach-style permanent magnet quadrupoles. The proton radiography (pRad) facility at Los Alamos uses permanent-magnet quadrupoles for magnifying lenses, and a system recently commissioned at GSI-Darmsdadt uses permanent magnets for its primary lenses. Large fluences of spallation neutrons can be produced in close proximity to these magnets when the proton beam is, intentionally or unintentionally, directed into the tungsten beam collimators; imaging experiments at LANL's pRad have shown image degradation with these magnetic lenses at proton beam doses lower than those expected to cause damage through radiation-induced reduction of the quadrupole strength alone. We have observed preferential degradation in portions of the permanent magnet quadrupole where the field intensity is highest, resulting in increased high-order multipole components.

  12. Nonuniform radiation damage in permanent magnet quadrupoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danly, C. R.; Merrill, F. E.; Barlow, D.; Mariam, F. G.

    2014-01-01

    We present data that indicate nonuniform magnetization loss due to radiation damage in neodymium-iron-boron Halbach-style permanent magnet quadrupoles. The proton radiography (pRad) facility at Los Alamos uses permanent-magnet quadrupoles for magnifying lenses, and a system recently commissioned at GSI-Darmsdadt uses permanent magnets for its primary lenses. Large fluences of spallation neutrons can be produced in close proximity to these magnets when the proton beam is, intentionally or unintentionally, directed into the tungsten beam collimators; imaging experiments at LANL’s pRad have shown image degradation with these magnetic lenses at proton beam doses lower than those expected to cause damage through radiation-induced reduction of the quadrupole strength alone. We have observed preferential degradation in portions of the permanent magnet quadrupole where the field intensity is highest, resulting in increased high-order multipole components

  13. Nonuniform radiation damage in permanent magnet quadrupoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danly, C. R.; Merrill, F. E.; Barlow, D.; Mariam, F. G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    We present data that indicate nonuniform magnetization loss due to radiation damage in neodymium-iron-boron Halbach-style permanent magnet quadrupoles. The proton radiography (pRad) facility at Los Alamos uses permanent-magnet quadrupoles for magnifying lenses, and a system recently commissioned at GSI-Darmsdadt uses permanent magnets for its primary lenses. Large fluences of spallation neutrons can be produced in close proximity to these magnets when the proton beam is, intentionally or unintentionally, directed into the tungsten beam collimators; imaging experiments at LANL’s pRad have shown image degradation with these magnetic lenses at proton beam doses lower than those expected to cause damage through radiation-induced reduction of the quadrupole strength alone. We have observed preferential degradation in portions of the permanent magnet quadrupole where the field intensity is highest, resulting in increased high-order multipole components.

  14. Temperature and fluence effects in lead implanted cobalt single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansen, A.; Sarholt-Kristensen, L.; Johnson, E.; Steenstrup, S.; Chernysh, V.S.

    1988-01-01

    The channeled sputtering yields of the hcp and fcc phases of cobalt depend on the crystal structure and the radiation induced damage. Earlier irradiations of cobalt with argon ions channeled in the hcp direction give sputtering yields higher than expected in the temperature range 100-350deg C. This effect was attributed to a combination of radiation induced damage and a possible implantation induced hcp --> fcc phase transition. Sputtering yields for cobalt single crystals irradiated with 150 keV Pb + ions along the direction of the hcp phase and the direction of the fcc phase have been measured using the weightloss method. The radiation damage and the amount of lead retained in the implanted surface has been investigated by 'in situ' RBS/channeling analysis. Measured partial sputtering yields of lead ≅ 1 atom/ion indicate preferential sputtering of lead atoms. (orig.)

  15. Particle interaction and displacement damage in silicon devices operated in radiation environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroy, Claude; Rancoita, Pier-Giorgio

    2007-01-01

    Silicon is used in radiation detectors and electronic devices. Nowadays, these devices achieving submicron technology are parts of integrated circuits of large to very large scale integration (VLSI). Silicon and silicon-based devices are commonly operated in many fields including particle physics experiments, nuclear medicine and space. Some of these fields present adverse radiation environments that may affect the operation of the devices. The particle energy deposition mechanisms by ionization and non-ionization processes are reviewed as well as the radiation-induced damage and its effect on device parameters evolution, depending on particle type, energy and fluence. The temporary or permanent damage inflicted by a single particle (single event effect) to electronic devices or integrated circuits is treated separately from the total ionizing dose (TID) effect for which the accumulated fluence causes degradation and from the displacement damage induced by the non-ionizing energy-loss (NIEL) deposition. Understanding of radiation effects on silicon devices has an impact on their design and allows the prediction of a specific device behaviour when exposed to a radiation field of interest

  16. Advances in in vivo EPR Tooth Biodosimetry: Meeting the targets for initial triage following a large-scale radiation event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flood, Ann Barry; Schreiber, Wilson; Du, Gaixin; Wood, Victoria A.; Kmiec, Maciej M.; Petryakov, Sergey V.; Williams, Benjamin B.; Swartz, Harold M.; Demidenko, Eugene; Boyle, Holly K.; Dong, Ruhong; Geimer, Shireen; Jarvis, Lesley A.; Kobayashi, Kyo; Nicolalde; Roberto, J.; Crist, Jason; Gupta, Ankit; Raynolds, Timothy; Brugger, Spencer; Budzioh, Pawel; Carr, Brandon; Feldman, Matthew; Gimi, Barjor; Grinberg, Oleg; Krymov, Vladimir; Lesniewski, Piotr; Mariani, Michael; Meaney, Paul M.; Rychert, Kevin M.; Salikhov, Ildar; Tipikin, Dmitriy S.; Tseytlin, Mark; Edwards, Brian R.; Herring, Christopher D.; Lindsay, Catherine; Rosenbaum, Traci; Ali, Arif; Carlson, David; Froncisz, Wojciech; Hirata, Hiroshi; Sidabras, Jason; Swarts, Steven G.

    2016-01-01

    Several important recent advances in the development and evolution of in vivo Tooth Biodosimetry using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) allow its performance to meet or exceed the U.S. targeted requirements for accuracy and ease of operation and throughput in a large-scale radiation event. Ergonomically based changes to the magnet, coupled with the development of rotation of the magnet and advanced software to automate collection of data, have made it easier and faster to make a measurement. From start to finish, measurements require a total elapsed time of 5 min, with data acquisition taking place in less than 3 min. At the same time, the accuracy of the data for triage of large populations has improved, as indicated using the metrics of sensitivity, specificity and area under the ROC curve. Applying these standards to the intended population, EPR in vivo Tooth Biodosimetry has approximately the same diagnostic accuracy as the purported 'gold standard' (dicentric chromosome assay). Other improvements include miniaturisation of the spectrometer, leading to the creation of a significantly lighter and more compact prototype that is suitable for transporting for Point of Care (POC) operation and that can be operated off a single standard power outlet. Additional advancements in the resonator, including use of a disposable sensing loop attached to the incisor tooth, have resulted in a biodosimetry method where measurements can be made quickly with a simple 5-step workflow and by people needing only a few minutes of training (which can be built into the instrument as a training video). In sum, recent advancements allow this prototype to meet or exceed the US Federal Government's recommended targets for POC biodosimetry in large-scale events. (authors)

  17. Development of neutron fluence measurement and evaluation technology for the test materials in the capsule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, U.; Choi, S. H.; Kang, H. D. [Kyungsan University, Kyungsan (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    The four kinds of the fluence monitor considered by self-shielding are design and fabricated for evaluation of neutron irradiation fluence. They are equipped with dosimeters consisting of Ni, Fe and Ti wires and so forth. The nuclear reaction rate is obtained by measurement on dosimeter using the spectroscopic analysis of induced {gamma}-ray. We established the nuetron fluence evaluating technology that is based on the measurement of the reaction rate considering reactor's irradiation history, burn-out, self-shielding in fluence monitor, and the influence of impurity in dosimeter. The distribution of high energy neutron flux on the vertical axis of the capsule shows fifth order polynomial equation and is good agree with theoretical value in the error range of 30% by MCNP/4A code. 22 refs., 50 figs., 27 tabs. (Author)

  18. Opto-microwave, Butler matrixes based front-end for a multi-beam large direct radiating array antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piqueras, M. A.; Mengual, T.; Navasquillo, O.; Sotom, M.; Caille, G.

    2017-11-01

    The evolution of broadband communication satellites shows a clear trend towards beam forming and beamswitching systems with efficient multiple access schemes with wide bandwidths, for which to be economically viable, the communication price shall be as low as possible. In such applications, the most demanding antenna concept is the Direct Radiating Array (DRA) since its use allows a flexible power allocation between beams and may afford failures in their active chains with low impact on the antenna radiating pattern. Forming multiple antenna beams, as for `multimedia via satellite' missions, can be done mainly in three ways: in microwave domain, by digital or optical processors: - Microwave beam-formers are strongly constrained by the mass and volume of microwave devices and waveguides - the bandwidth of digital processors is limited due to power consumption and complexity constraints. - The microwave photonics is an enabling technology that can improve the antenna feeding network performances, overcoming the limitations of the traditional technology in the more demanding scenarios, and may overcome the conventional RF beam-former issues, to generate accurately the very numerous time delays or phase shifts required in a DRA with a large number of beams and of radiating elements. Integrated optics technology can play a crucial role as an alternative technology for implementing beam-forming structures for satellite applications thanks to the well known advantages of this technology such as low volume and weight, huge electrical bandwidth, electro-magnetic interference immunity, low consumption, remote delivery capability with low-attenuation (by carrying all microwave signals over optical fibres) and the robustness and precision that exhibits integrated optics. Under the ESA contract 4000105095/12/NL/RA the consortium formed by DAS Photonics, Thales Alenia Space and the Nanophotonic Technology Center of Valencia is developing a three-dimensional Optical Beamforming

  19. Femtosecond laser fluence based nanostructuring of W and Mo in ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Shazia; Rafique, Muhammad Shahid; Nathala, Chandra Sekher; Ajami, Ali Asghar; Husinsky, Wolfgang

    2017-05-01

    The effect of femtosecond laser fluence on nanostructuring of Tungsten (W) and Molybdenum (Mo) has been investigated after ablation in ethanol environment. A Ti: Sapphire laser (800 nm, 30 fs) at fluences ranging from 0.6 to 5.7 J cm-2 was employed to ablate targets. The growth of structures on the surface of irradiated targets is investigated by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) analysis. The SEM was performed for both central as well as the peripheral ablated regions. It is observed that both the development and shape of nanoscale features is dependent upon deposited energies to the target surface as well as nature of material. Nanostructures grown on Mo are more distinct and well defined as compared to W. At central ablated areas of W, unorganized Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS) are grown at low fluences, whereas, nonuniform melting along with cracking is observed at higher fluences. In case of Mo, well-defined and organized LIPSS are observed for low fluences. With increasing fluence, LIPSS become unorganized and broken with an appearance of cracks and are completely vanished with the formation of nanoscale cavities and conical structures. In case of peripheral ablated areas broken and bifurcated LIPSS are grown for all fluences for both materials. The, ablated diameter, ablation depth, ablation rate and the dependence of periodicity of LIPSS on the laser fluence are also estimated for both W and Mo. Parametric instabilities of laser-induced plasma along with generation and scattering of surface plasmons is considered as a possible cause for the formation of LIPSS. For ethanol assisted ablation, the role of bubble cavitation, precipitation, confinement and the convective flow is considered to be responsible for inducing increased hydrodynamic instabilities at the liquid-solid interface.

  20. Femtosecond laser fluence based nanostructuring of W and Mo in ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bashir, Shazia, E-mail: shaziabashir@gcu.edu.pk [Institute of Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria); Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, Government College University Lahore (Pakistan); Rafique, Muhammad Shahid [Institute of Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria); Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology Lahore (Pakistan); Nathala, Chandra Sekher [Institute of Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria); Ajami, Ali Asghar [Institute of Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria); Faculty of Physics, Semnan University, Semnan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Husinsky, Wolfgang [Institute of Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria)

    2017-05-15

    The effect of femtosecond laser fluence on nanostructuring of Tungsten (W) and Molybdenum (Mo) has been investigated after ablation in ethanol environment. A Ti: Sapphire laser (800 nm, 30 fs) at fluences ranging from 0.6 to 5.7 J cm{sup −2} was employed to ablate targets. The growth of structures on the surface of irradiated targets is investigated by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) analysis. The SEM was performed for both central as well as the peripheral ablated regions. It is observed that both the development and shape of nanoscale features is dependent upon deposited energies to the target surface as well as nature of material. Nanostructures grown on Mo are more distinct and well defined as compared to W. At central ablated areas of W, unorganized Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS) are grown at low fluences, whereas, nonuniform melting along with cracking is observed at higher fluences. In case of Mo, well-defined and organized LIPSS are observed for low fluences. With increasing fluence, LIPSS become unorganized and broken with an appearance of cracks and are completely vanished with the formation of nanoscale cavities and conical structures. In case of peripheral ablated areas broken and bifurcated LIPSS are grown for all fluences for both materials. The, ablated diameter, ablation depth, ablation rate and the dependence of periodicity of LIPSS on the laser fluence are also estimated for both W and Mo. Parametric instabilities of laser-induced plasma along with generation and scattering of surface plasmons is considered as a possible cause for the formation of LIPSS. For ethanol assisted ablation, the role of bubble cavitation, precipitation, confinement and the convective flow is considered to be responsible for inducing increased hydrodynamic instabilities at the liquid-solid interface.

  1. Evaluating a radiation monitor for mixed-field environments based on SRAM technology

    CERN Document Server

    Tsiligiannis, G; Bosio, A; Girard, P; Pravossoudovitch, S; Todri, A; Virazel, A; Mekki, J; Brugger, M; Wrobel, F; Saigne, F

    2014-01-01

    Instruments operating in particle accelerators and colliders are exposed to radiations that are composed of particles of different types and energies. Several of these instruments often embed devices that are not hardened against radiation effects. Thus, there is a strong need for mon- itoring the levels of radiation inside the mixed-field radiation areas, throughout different positions. Different metrics exist for measuring the radiation damage induced to electronic devices, such as the Total Ionizing Dose (TID), the Displacement Damage (DD) and of course the fluence of parti- cles for estimating the error rates of the electronic devices among other applications. In this paper, we propose an SRAM based monitor, that is used to define the fluence of High Energy Hadrons (HEH) by detecting Single Event Upsets in the memory array. We evaluated the device by testing it inside the H4IRRAD area of CERN, a test area that reproduces the radiation conditions inside the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) tunnel and its shield...

  2. Radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer: evaluation of complications and influence of radiation timing on outcomes in a large, population-based cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E Hegarty

    Full Text Available To evaluate the influence of timing of salvage and adjuvant radiation therapy on outcomes after prostatectomy for prostate cancer.Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare linked database, we identified prostate cancer patients diagnosed during 1995-2007 who had one or more adverse pathological features after prostatectomy. The final cohort of 6,137 eligible patients included men who received prostatectomy alone (n = 4,509 or with adjuvant (n = 894 or salvage (n = 734 radiation therapy. Primary outcomes were genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and erectile dysfunction events and survival after treatment(s.Radiation therapy after prostatectomy was associated with higher rates of gastrointestinal and genitourinary events, but not erectile dysfunction. In adjusted models, earlier treatment with adjuvant radiation therapy was not associated with increased rates of genitourinary or erectile dysfunction events compared to delayed salvage radiation therapy. Early adjuvant radiation therapy was associated with lower rates of gastrointestinal events that salvage radiation therapy, with hazard ratios of 0.80 (95% CI, 0.67-0.95 for procedure-defined and 0.70 (95% CI, 0.59, 0.83 for diagnosis-defined events. There was no significant difference between ART and non-ART groups (SRT or RP alone for overall survival (HR = 1.13 95% CI = (0.96, 1.34 p = 0.148.Radiation therapy after prostatectomy is associated with increased rates of gastrointestinal and genitourinary events. However, earlier radiation therapy is not associated with higher rates of gastrointestinal, genitourinary or sexual events. These findings oppose the conventional belief that delaying radiation therapy reduces the risk of radiation-related complications.

  3. Optical properties tailoring by high fluence implantation of Ag ions on sapphire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, C.; Silva, R.C. da; Wemans, A.; Maneira, M.J.P.; Kozanecki, A.; Alves, E.

    2006-01-01

    Optical and structural properties of single crystalline α-Al 2 O 3 were changed by the implantation of high fluences of Ag ions. Colourless transparent (101-bar 0) sapphire samples were implanted at room temperature with 160keV silver ions and fluences up to 1x10 17 Agcm -2 . Surface amorphization is observed at the fluence of 6x10 16 Agcm -2 . Except for the lower fluences (below 6x10 16 Agcm -2 ) the optical absorption spectra reveal the presence of a band peaking in the region 450-500nm, depending on the retained fluence. This band has been attributed to the presence of silver colloids, being thus 1x10 16 Agcm -2 below the threshold for colloid formation during the implantation. Annealing in oxidizing atmosphere promotes the recrystallization along with segregation of Ag followed by loss through evaporation. Recrystallization is retarded for annealing in reducing atmosphere and the Ag profile displays now a double peak structure after evaporation. Playing with the implantation fluence, temperature and annealing atmosphere controllable shifts of the position and intensity of the optical bands in the visible were achieved

  4. Neutron Fluence Evaluation using an Am-Be Neutron Sources Assembly and P ADC Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seddik, U.

    2008-01-01

    An assembly of four 241 Am-Be sources has been constructed at Nuclear Reactions Unit (NRU) of Nuclear Research Center (NRU) to perform analysis of different materials using thermal and fast neutrons. In the present paper, we measure the value of transmittance (T) in percentage of etched CR-39 detectors using a spectrophotometer at different neutron fluences ,to relate the transmittance of the detector with the neutron fluence values. The exposed samples to neutrons with accumulated fluence of order between 10 10 and 10 12 cm -2 were etched for 15 time intervals between 10-600 min in 6.25 N NaOH at 70 degree C. The etched samples were analyzed using Tech 8500 II spectrophotometer. A trend of the sample transmission and the etching time is observed which is different for each fluence value. A linear relation between the transmittance decay constant and the neutron fluence is observed which could be used as a calibration to determine unknown neutron fluence

  5. Neutron fluence measurement in nuclear facilities.; Medicion de flujos de neutrones en instalaciones nucleares.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho L, M E

    1997-12-01

    The objective of present work is to determine the fluence of neutrons in nuclear facilities using two neutron detectors designed and built at Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ), Mexico. The two neutron detectors are of the passive type, based on solid state nuclear tracks detectors (SSNTD). One of the two neutron detectors was used to determine the fluence distribution of the ports at the nuclear research reactor TRIGA Mark III, which belongs to ININ. In these facilities is important to know the neutron fluence distribution characteristic to carried out diverse kind of research activities. The second neutron detector was employed in order to carry out environmental neutron surveillance. The detector has the property to separate the thermal, intermediate and fast components of the neutron fluence. This detector was used to measure the neutron fluence at hundred points around the primary container of the first Mexican Nuclear Power plant `Laguna Verde`. This last detector was also used to determine the neutron fluence in some points of interest, around and inside a low scattering neutron room at the `Centro de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes` of the ININ, to know the background neutron field produced by the neutron sources used there. The design of the two neutron detector and the results obtained for each of the surveying facilities, are described in this work. (Author).

  6. Large-area homogeneous periodic surface structures generated on the surface of sputtered boron carbide thin films by femtosecond laser processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra, R., E-mail: ricardo.serra@dem.uc.pt [SEG-CEMUC, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, Rua Luís Reis Santos, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Oliveira, V. [ICEMS-Instituto de Ciência e Engenharia de Materiais e Superfícies, Avenida Rovisco Pais no 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa, Avenida Conselheiro Emídio Navarro no 1, 1959-007 Lisbon (Portugal); Oliveira, J.C. [SEG-CEMUC, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, Rua Luís Reis Santos, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Kubart, T. [The Ångström Laboratory, Solid State Electronics, P.O. Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Vilar, R. [Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa, Avenida Conselheiro Emídio Navarro no 1, 1959-007 Lisbon (Portugal); Instituto Superior Técnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais no 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Cavaleiro, A. [SEG-CEMUC, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, Rua Luís Reis Santos, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Large-area LIPSS were formed by femtosecond laser processing B-C films surface. • The LIPSS spatial period increases with laser fluence (140–200 nm). • Stress-related sinusoidal-like undulations were formed on the B-C films surface. • The undulations amplitude (down to a few nanometres) increases with laser fluence. • Laser radiation absorption increases with surface roughness. - Abstract: Amorphous and crystalline sputtered boron carbide thin films have a very high hardness even surpassing that of bulk crystalline boron carbide (≈41 GPa). However, magnetron sputtered B-C films have high friction coefficients (C.o.F) which limit their industrial application. Nanopatterning of materials surfaces has been proposed as a solution to decrease the C.o.F. The contact area of the nanopatterned surfaces is decreased due to the nanometre size of the asperities which results in a significant reduction of adhesion and friction. In the present work, the surface of amorphous and polycrystalline B-C thin films deposited by magnetron sputtering was nanopatterned using infrared femtosecond laser radiation. Successive parallel laser tracks 10 μm apart were overlapped in order to obtain a processed area of about 3 mm{sup 2}. Sinusoidal-like undulations with the same spatial period as the laser tracks were formed on the surface of the amorphous boron carbide films after laser processing. The undulations amplitude increases with increasing laser fluence. The formation of undulations with a 10 μm period was also observed on the surface of the crystalline boron carbide film processed with a pulse energy of 72 μJ. The amplitude of the undulations is about 10 times higher than in the amorphous films processed at the same pulse energy due to the higher roughness of the films and consequent increase in laser radiation absorption. LIPSS formation on the surface of the films was achieved for the three B-C films under study. However, LIPSS are formed under

  7. Large-area homogeneous periodic surface structures generated on the surface of sputtered boron carbide thin films by femtosecond laser processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serra, R.; Oliveira, V.; Oliveira, J.C.; Kubart, T.; Vilar, R.; Cavaleiro, A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Large-area LIPSS were formed by femtosecond laser processing B-C films surface. • The LIPSS spatial period increases with laser fluence (140–200 nm). • Stress-related sinusoidal-like undulations were formed on the B-C films surface. • The undulations amplitude (down to a few nanometres) increases with laser fluence. • Laser radiation absorption increases with surface roughness. - Abstract: Amorphous and crystalline sputtered boron carbide thin films have a very high hardness even surpassing that of bulk crystalline boron carbide (≈41 GPa). However, magnetron sputtered B-C films have high friction coefficients (C.o.F) which limit their industrial application. Nanopatterning of materials surfaces has been proposed as a solution to decrease the C.o.F. The contact area of the nanopatterned surfaces is decreased due to the nanometre size of the asperities which results in a significant reduction of adhesion and friction. In the present work, the surface of amorphous and polycrystalline B-C thin films deposited by magnetron sputtering was nanopatterned using infrared femtosecond laser radiation. Successive parallel laser tracks 10 μm apart were overlapped in order to obtain a processed area of about 3 mm 2 . Sinusoidal-like undulations with the same spatial period as the laser tracks were formed on the surface of the amorphous boron carbide films after laser processing. The undulations amplitude increases with increasing laser fluence. The formation of undulations with a 10 μm period was also observed on the surface of the crystalline boron carbide film processed with a pulse energy of 72 μJ. The amplitude of the undulations is about 10 times higher than in the amorphous films processed at the same pulse energy due to the higher roughness of the films and consequent increase in laser radiation absorption. LIPSS formation on the surface of the films was achieved for the three B-C films under study. However, LIPSS are formed under different

  8. Empirical assessment of the detection efficiency of CR-39 at high proton fluence and a compact, proton detector for high-fluence applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, M. J., E-mail: mrosenbe@mit.edu; Séguin, F. H.; Waugh, C. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Orozco, D.; Frenje, J. A.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Hohenberger, M.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); LePape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Bionta, R. M.; Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-04-15

    CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors are widely used in physics and in many inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, and under ideal conditions these detectors have 100% detection efficiency for ∼0.5–8 MeV protons. When the fluence of incident particles becomes too high, overlap of particle tracks leads to under-counting at typical processing conditions (5 h etch in 6N NaOH at 80 °C). Short etch times required to avoid overlap can cause under-counting as well, as tracks are not fully developed. Experiments have determined the minimum etch times for 100% detection of 1.7–4.3-MeV protons and established that for 2.4-MeV protons, relevant for detection of DD protons, the maximum fluence that can be detected using normal processing techniques is ≲3 × 10{sup 6} cm{sup −2}. A CR-39-based proton detector has been developed to mitigate issues related to high particle fluences on ICF facilities. Using a pinhole and scattering foil several mm in front of the CR-39, proton fluences at the CR-39 are reduced by more than a factor of ∼50, increasing the operating yield upper limit by a comparable amount.

  9. Neutron Radiation Shielding For The NIF Streaked X-Ray Detector (SXD) Diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, P; Holder, J; Young, B; Kalantar, D; Eder, D; Kimbrough, J

    2006-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is preparing for the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) scheduled in 2010. The NIC is comprised of several ''tuning'' physics subcampaigns leading up to a demonstration of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) ignition. In some of these experiments, time-resolved x-ray imaging of the imploding capsule may be required to measure capsule trajectory (shock timing) or x-ray ''bang-time''. A capsule fueled with pure tritium (T) instead of a deutriun-tritium (DT) mixture is thought to offer useful physics surrogacy, with reduced yields of up to 5e14 neutrons. These measurements will require the use of the NIF streak x-ray detector (SXD). The resulting prompt neutron fluence at the planned SXD location (∼1.7 m from the target) would be ∼1.4e9/cm 2 . Previous measurements suggest the onset of significant background at a neutron fluence of ∼ 1e8/cm 2 . The radiation damage and operational upsets which starts at ∼1e8 rad-Si/sec must be factored into an integrated experimental campaign plan. Monte Carlo analyses were performed to predict the neutron and gamma/x-ray fluences and radiation doses for the proposed diagnostic configuration. A possible shielding configuration is proposed to mitigate radiation effects. The primary component of this shielding is an 80 cm thickness of Polyethylene (PE) between target chamber center (TCC) and the SXD diagnostic. Additionally, 6-8 cm of PE around the detector provide from the large number of neutrons that scatter off the inside of the target chamber. This proposed shielding configuration reduces the high-energy neutron fluence at the SXD by approximately a factor ∼50

  10. Neutron Radiation Shielding For The NIF Streaked X-Ray Detector (SXD) Diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, P; Holder, J; Young, B; Kalantar, D; Eder, D; Kimbrough, J

    2006-11-02

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is preparing for the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) scheduled in 2010. The NIC is comprised of several ''tuning'' physics subcampaigns leading up to a demonstration of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) ignition. In some of these experiments, time-resolved x-ray imaging of the imploding capsule may be required to measure capsule trajectory (shock timing) or x-ray ''bang-time''. A capsule fueled with pure tritium (T) instead of a deutriun-tritium (DT) mixture is thought to offer useful physics surrogacy, with reduced yields of up to 5e14 neutrons. These measurements will require the use of the NIF streak x-ray detector (SXD). The resulting prompt neutron fluence at the planned SXD location ({approx}1.7 m from the target) would be {approx}1.4e9/cm{sup 2}. Previous measurements suggest the onset of significant background at a neutron fluence of {approx} 1e8/cm{sup 2}. The radiation damage and operational upsets which starts at {approx}1e8 rad-Si/sec must be factored into an integrated experimental campaign plan. Monte Carlo analyses were performed to predict the neutron and gamma/x-ray fluences and radiation doses for the proposed diagnostic configuration. A possible shielding configuration is proposed to mitigate radiation effects. The primary component of this shielding is an 80 cm thickness of Polyethylene (PE) between target chamber center (TCC) and the SXD diagnostic. Additionally, 6-8 cm of PE around the detector provide from the large number of neutrons that scatter off the inside of the target chamber. This proposed shielding configuration reduces the high-energy neutron fluence at the SXD by approximately a factor {approx}50.

  11. Order made in implementation of Section 23 of Decree no 75-306 of 28 April 1975 on the protection of workers against the hazards of ionizing radiations in large nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This Order was made in implementation of Decree No 75-306 of 28 April 1975 on the Protection of Workers Against the Hazards of Ionizing Radiations in Large Nuclear Installations and approves the methods for controlling radiation sources and the atmosphere in large nuclear installations which are elaborated by the Central Service for Protection Against Ionizing Radiations. (NEA) [fr

  12. Advances towards using finger/toenail dosimetry to triage a large population after potential exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Xiaoming; Gui Jiang; Matthews, Thomas P.; Williams, Benjamin B.; Swarts, Steven G.; Grinberg, Oleg; Sidabras, Jason; Wilcox, Dean E.; Swartz, Harold M.

    2011-01-01

    Rapid and accurate retrospective dosimetry is of critical importance and strategic value for the emergency medical response to a large-scale radiological/nuclear event. One technique that has the potential for rapid and accurate dosimetry measurements is electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of relatively stable radiation-induced signals (RIS) in fingernails and toenails. Two approaches are being developed for EPR nail dosimetry. In the approach using ex vivo measurements on nail clippings, accurate estimation of the dose-dependent amplitude of the RIS is complicated by the presence of mechanically-induced signals (MIS) that are generated during the nail clipping. Recent developments in ex vivo nail dosimetry, including a thorough characterization of the MIS and an appreciation of the role of hydration and the development of effective analytic techniques, have led to improvements in the accuracy and precision of this approach. An in vivo nail dosimetry approach is also very promising, as it eliminates the problems of MIS from the clipping and it has the potential to be an effective and efficient approach for field deployment. Two types of EPR resonators are being developed for in vivo measurements of fingernails and toenails.

  13. Performance of n-in-p pixel detectors irradiated at fluences up to $5x10^{15} n_{eq}/cm^{2}$ for the future ATLAS upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00219560; La Rosa, A.; Nisius, R.; Pernegger, H.; Richter, R.H.; Weigell, P.

    We present the results of the characterization of novel n-in-p planar pixel detectors, designed for the future upgrades of the ATLAS pixel system. N-in-p silicon devices are a promising candidate to replace the n-in-n sensors thanks to their radiation hardness and cost effectiveness, that allow for enlarging the area instrumented with pixel detectors. The n-in-p modules presented here are composed of pixel sensors produced by CiS connected by bump-bonding to the ATLAS readout chip FE-I3. The characterization of these devices has been performed with the ATLAS pixel read-out systems, TurboDAQ and USBPIX, before and after irradiation with 25 MeV protons and neutrons up to a fluence of 5x10**15 neq /cm2. The charge collection measurements carried out with radioactive sources have proven the feasibility of employing this kind of detectors up to these particle fluences. The collected charge has been measured to be for any fluence in excess of twice the value of the FE-I3 threshold, tuned to 3200 e. The first result...

  14. High power radiation guiding systems for laser driven accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutolo, A.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews the main problems encountered in the design of an optical system for transmitting high fluence radiation in a laser driven accelerator. Particular attention is devoted to the analysis of mirror and waveguide systems. (orig.)

  15. Molecular pathways in the bystander response of cells exposed to very low fluences of alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, J.B.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: We have examined biological effects in cell populations exposed to very low mean doses of alpha radiation by which only a small fraction of the cells are actually traversed by an alpha particle. We showed earlier that an enhanced frequency of sister chromatid exchanges and HPRT mutations occur in the non-irradiated, 'bystander' cells. The frequency of mutations induced by a single alpha particle traversing the nucleus of a cell was increased nearly fivefold at the lowest fluence studied, a result of mutations occurring in bystander cells. This was associated with a similar increase in the induction of micronuclei, indicating the induction of DNA damage in bystander cells. In order to gain information concerning molecular pathways, we studied changes in gene expression in bystander cells in confluent cultures of human diploid fibroblasts or mouse embryo-derived fibroblasts (MEFs) by western analysis and in-situ immunofluorescence. The expression levels of p53, p21 Waf1 and p34 cdc2 were significantly modulated in bystander cells. The upregulation of p53 and p21 Waf1 did not occur in cultures irradiated at low density, and was markedly reduced in the presence of the gap junction inhibitor lindane. The importance of gap-junction mediated intercellular communication was confirmed in connexin-43 knockout MEFs. Western blot analyses and electrophoretic mobility shift assays indicate that the bystander response is suppressed by incubation with superoxide dismutase as well as an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase, and is associated with the induction of NFKB, suggesting the effect is mediated by oxidative stress. The stress-activated protein kinase p38 and its downstream effector ATF2 are also induced in bystander cells independent of oxidative stress. These results will be discussed in terms of whether activation of the p53 damage response pathway is the direct result of signaling from irradiated cells, or rather is a consequence of DNA induced damage in the bystander

  16. Influence of laser fluence in ArF-excimer laser assisted crystallisation of a-SiGe:H films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiussi, S.; Lopez, E.; Serra, J.; Gonzalez, P.; Serra, C.; Leon, B.; Fabbri, F.; Fornarini, L.; Martelli, S.

    2003-01-01

    Polycrystalline silicon germanium (poly-SiGe) coatings are drawing increasing attention as active layers in solar cells, bolometers and various microelectronic devices. As a consequence, alternative low-cost production techniques, capable to produce such alloys with uniform and controlled grain size, become more and more attractive. Excimer laser assisted crystallisation, already assessed in thin film transistor production, has proved to be a valuable 'low-thermal budget' technique for the crystallisation of amorphous silicon. Main advantages are the high process quality and reproducibility as well as the possibility of tailoring the grain size in both, small selected regions and large areas. The feasibility of this technique for producing poly-SiGe films has been studied irradiating hydrogenated amorphous SiGe films with spatially uniform ArF-laser pulses of different fluences. Surface morphology, structure and chemical composition have been extensively characterised, demonstrating the need of using a 'step-by-step' process and a careful adjustment of both, total number of shots and laser fluence at each 'step' in order to diminish segregation effects and severe damages of the film surface and of segregation effects

  17. Local Control and Toxicity in a Large Cohort of Central Lung Tumors Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modh, Ankit; Rimner, Andreas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Williams, Eric [Department of Medical Physics Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Foster, Amanda; Shah, Mihir [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Shi, Weiji; Zhang, Zhigang [Department of Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Gelblum, Daphna Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Rosenzweig, Kenneth E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Yorke, Ellen D.; Jackson, Andrew [Department of Medical Physics Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wu, Abraham J., E-mail: wua@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in central lung tumors has been associated with higher rates of severe toxicity. We sought to evaluate toxicity and local control in a large cohort and to identify predictive dosimetric parameters. Methods and Materials: We identified patients who received SBRT for central tumors according to either of 2 definitions. Local failure (LF) was estimated using a competing risks model, and multivariate analysis (MVA) was used to assess factors associated with LF. We reviewed patient toxicity and applied Cox proportional hazard analysis and log-rank tests to assess whether dose-volume metrics of normal structures correlated with pulmonary toxicity. Results: One hundred twenty-five patients received SBRT for non-small cell lung cancer (n=103) or metastatic lesions (n=22), using intensity modulated radiation therapy. The most common dose was 45 Gy in 5 fractions. Median follow-up was 17.4 months. Incidence of toxicity ≥ grade 3 was 8.0%, including 5.6% pulmonary toxicity. Sixteen patients (12.8%) experienced esophageal toxicity ≥ grade 2, including 50% of patients in whom PTV overlapped the esophagus. There were 2 treatment-related deaths. Among patients receiving biologically effective dose (BED) ≥80 Gy (n=108), 2-year LF was 21%. On MVA, gross tumor volume (GTV) was significantly associated with LF. None of the studied dose-volume metrics of the lungs, heart, proximal bronchial tree (PBT), or 2 cm expansion of the PBT (“no-fly-zone” [NFZ]) correlated with pulmonary toxicity ≥grade 2. There were no differences in pulmonary toxicity between central tumors located inside the NFZ and those outside the NFZ but with planning target volume (PTV) intersecting the mediastinum. Conclusions: Using moderate doses, SBRT for central lung tumors achieves acceptable local control with low rates of severe toxicity. Dosimetric analysis showed no significant correlation between dose to the lungs, heart, or NFZ and

  18. Dynamics of three-dimensional radiative structures during RMP assisted detached plasmas on the large helical device and its comparison with EMC3-EIRENE modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Shwetang N.; Peterson, Byron J.; Kobayashi, Masahiro; Ida, Katsumi; Mukai, Kiyofumi; Sano, Ryuichi; Miyazawa, Junichi; Tanaka, Hirohiko; Masuzaki, Suguru; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi; Motojima, Gen; Ohno, Noriyasu; LHD Experiment Group

    2016-04-01

    The resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) island introduced in the stochastic edge of the large helical device (LHD) plasma plays an important role in the stabilization of the plasma detachment (Kobayashi et al 2013 Nucl. Fusion 53 093032). The plasma enters in the sustained detachment phase in the presence of an RMP once the line averaged density exceeds a critical value with a given input power. During detachment the enhanced radiation from the stochastic edge of the LHD undergoes several spatiotemporal changes which are studied quantitatively by an infrared imaging video bolometer (IRVB) diagnostic. The experimental results are compared qualitatively and quantitatively with the radiation predicted by the 3D transport simulation with fluid model, EMC3-EIRENE. A fair amount of qualitative agreement, before and after the detachment, is reported. The issue of overestimated radiation from the model is addressed by changing the free parameters in the EMC3-EIRENE code till the total radiation and the radiation profiles match closely, within a factor of two with the experimental observations. A better quantitative match between the model and the experiment is achieved at higher cross-field impurity diffusion coefficient and lower sputtering coefficient after the detachment. In this article a comparison, the first of its kind, is established between the quantified radiation from the experiments and the synthetic image obtained from the simulation code. This exercise is aimed towards validating the model assumptions against the experimentally measured radiation.

  19. CALCULATION OF FLUENCE-TO-EFFECTIVE DOSE CONVERSION COEFFICIENTS FOR THE OPERATIONAL QUANTITY PROPOSED BY ICRU RC26.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Akira

    2017-07-01

    Fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients have been calculated for photons, neutrons, electrons, positrons, protons, muons, pions and helium ions for various incident angles of radiations. The aim of this calculation is to provide a set of conversion coefficients to the Report Committee 26 (RC26) of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) for use in defining personal dose equivalent for individual monitoring. The data sets comprise effective dose conversion coefficients for incident angles of radiations from 0° to ±90° in steps of 15° and at ±180°. Conversion coefficients for rotational, isotropic, superior hemisphere semi-isotropic and inferior hemisphere semi-isotropic irradiations are also included. Numerical data of the conversion coefficients are presented as supplementary data. The conversion coefficients are used to define the personal dose equivalent, which is being considered by the ICRU RC26, as the operational quantity for individual monitoring. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Electron fluence to dose equivalent conversion factors calculated with EGS3 for electrons and positrons with energies from 100 keV to 20 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, D.W.O.

    1983-01-01

    At NRC the general purpose Monte-Carlo electron-photon transport code EGS3 is being applied to a variety of radiation dosimetry problems. To test its accuracy at low energies a detailed set of depth-dose curves for electrons and photons has been generated and compared to previous calculations. It was found that by changing the default step-size algorithm in EGS3, significant changes were obtained for incident electron beam cases. It was found that restricting the step-size to a 4% energy loss was appropriate below incident electron beam energies of 10 MeV. With this change, the calculated depth-dose curves were found to be in reasonable agreement with other calculations right down to incident electron energies of 100 keV although small (less than or equal to 10%) but persistent discrepancies with the NBS code ETRAN were obtained. EGS3 predicts higher initial dose and shorter range than ETRAN. These discrepancies are typical of a wide range of energies as is the better agreement with the results of Nahum. Data is presented for the electron fluence to maximal dose equivalent in a 30 cm thick slab of ICRU 4-element tissue irradiated by broad parallel beams of electrons incident normal to the surface. On their own, these values only give an indication of the dose equivalent expected from a spectrum of electrons since one needs to fold the spectrum maximal dose equivalent value. Calculations have also been done for incident positron beams. Despite the large statistical uncertainties, maximal dose equivalent although their values are 5 to 10% lower in a band around 10 MeV

  1. Modeling Radiation Damage to Pixel Sensors in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ducourthial, Audrey; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Silicon pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). As the closest detector component to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of $10^{15} n_{eq}/cm^2$ and the HL-HLC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. Simulating radiation damage is critical in order to make accurate predictions for current future detector performance that will enable searches for new particles and forces as well as precision measurements of Standard Model particles such as the Higgs boson. We present a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the ATLAS pixel sensors for the first time. In addition to thoroughly describing the setup, we present first predictions for basic pixel cluster properties alongside...

  2. Modeling Radiation Damage to Pixel Sensors in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Rossini, Lorenzo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Silicon pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). As the closest detector component to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of 10^15 neq/cm^2 and the HL-HLC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. Simulating radiation damage is critical in order to make accurate predictions for current and future detector performance that will enable searches for new particles and forces as well as precision measurements of Standard Model particles such as the Higgs boson. We present a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the ATLAS pixel sensors for the first time and considers both planar and 3D sensor designs. In addition to thoroughly describing the setup, we compare predictions for b...

  3. Modeling radiation damage to pixel sensors in the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ducourthial, Audrey; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Silicon pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). As the closest detector component to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of $10^{15}n_{eq}/cm^2$ and the HL-HLC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. Simulating radiation damage is critical in order to make accurate predictions for current future detector performance that will enable searches for new particles and forces as well as precision measurements of Standard Model particles such as the Higgs boson. We present a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the ATLAS pixel sensors for the first time. In addition to thoroughly describing the setup, we present first predictions for basic pixel cluster properties alongside ...

  4. Modeling radiation damage to pixel sensors in the ATLAS detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducourthial, A.

    2018-03-01

    Silicon pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) . As the closest detector component to the interaction point, these detectors will be subject to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) [1], the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of 1015 neq/cm2 and the HL-LHC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. Simulating radiation damage is essential in order to make accurate predictions for current and future detector performance that will enable searches for new particles and forces as well as precision measurements of Standard Model particles such as the Higgs boson. We present a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects on the ATLAS pixel sensors for the first time. In addition to thoroughly describing the setup, we present first predictions for basic pixel cluster properties alongside early studies with LHC Run 2 proton-proton collision data.

  5. Modeling Radiation Damage to Pixel Sensors in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Rossini, Lorenzo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Silicon pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). As the closest detector component to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the High- Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of 10^15 neq/cm2 and the HL-HLC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. Simulating radiation damage is critical in order to make accurate predictions for current future detector performance that will enable searches for new particles and forces as well as precision measurements of Standard Model particles such as the Higgs boson. We present a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the ATLAS pixel sensors for the first time and considers both planar and 3D sensor designs. In addition to thoroughly describing the setup, we compare predictions for basic...

  6. Ionization chamber with build-up cup spectral sensitivity to megavoltage (0.5-20 MeV) photon fluences in free air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorlachev, G.E.

    2002-01-01

    In-air measurements of photon beam properties, used in radiation therapy, is common practice for determining radiation output dependence from the field size, known as head scatter factors (HSF). PMMA and brass build-up caps are most popular miniphantoms for providing electron equilibrium. Discrepancies up to 2% in HSF measurements by different combinations of detectors and equilibrium caps have been published. One of the main reasons of those discrepancies is the detector system spectral sensitivity and differences in primary and scatter radiation spectra. In the light of new model based dose calculation methods direct radiation fluence measurement is of great interest. So, understanding of detector spectral sensitivity is important task for modern dosimetry of radiation therapy. In the present study Monte Carlo (MC) method was employed to calculate ionization chamber response to monoenergetic photon fluences, normalized to water kerma units. Simulation was done using EGS4 package. Electron transport was performed with ESTEPE equal to 4%. PEGS cross sections were generated for maximal energy 20 MeV with cutoff kinetic energy 10 KeV both for photons and electrons. Scanditronix RK-05 ionization chamber was chosen as a prototype. Eight cylindrical miniphantoms, representing four materials (PMMA, Al, Cu, Pb) and two front wall thickness, were simulated. Results are presented. Miniphantom front wall thicknesses in each case are shown in the figure. Diameter depends on the material and equal respectively: PMMA - 4, Al - 2.5, Cu - 1.5, and PB - 1.5 cm. Ionization chamber outer diameter is equal to 0.7 cm. Detector sensitivity has considerable energy dependence. Two effects explain it. First is the radiation attenuation in the miniphantom. Second is pair production, which dominates in high atomic number miniphantoms for energies above 5 MeV. Depending on the miniphantom material detector response changes from 1.5 to 5 times in the energy range from 0.5 to 20 MeV. Correct

  7. A study of the impact of radiation exposure on the uniformity of large CsI(Tl) crystals for the BaBar detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Kim, Peter; Kocian, Martin; Perl, Martin; Rogers, Howard; Schindler, Rafe H.; Wisniewski, William J.

    2004-01-01

    We describe an apparatus that allows simultaneous exposure of large CsI(Tl) crystals to ionizing radiation and precise measurement of the longitudinal changes in light yield of the crystals. We present herein the results from this device for exposures up to 10krad

  8. Tailoring of refractive index profiles in LiNbO3 optical waveguides by low-fluence swift-ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz, T; Mendez, A; Carrascosa, M; Carnicero, J; GarcIa-Cabanes, A; Olivares, J; Agullo-Lopez, F; GarcIa-Navarro, A; GarcIa, G

    2007-01-01

    Proton-exchange LiNbO 3 planar optical waveguides have been irradiated with swift ions (Cl 30 MeV) at very low fluences in the range 5 x 10 10 -5 x 10 12 cm -2 . Large modifications in the refractive index profiles, and therefore in the optical performance, have been obtained due to the generation of amorphous nano-tracks by the individual ion impacts. Moreover, a fine tuning of the refractive index can be achieved by a suitable control of the fluence (δn/δφ ∼ 10 -14 cm 2 or δn ∼ 10 -5 for δφ = 10 9 cm -2 ). An effective medium approach has been used to account for those changes and determine the amorphous fraction of material. The results have been compared with information extracted from complementary RBS channelling experiments. From the calculated amorphous fractions a radius of ∼2 nm for the amorphous tracks have been estimated

  9. Microstructure and fracture toughness of irradiated stainless steel retrieved from the field: the potential role of radiation-induced clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, P.; Soneda, N.; Nishida, K.; Dohi, K.; Marquis, E.A.; Chen, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The microstructures of six material/fluence combinations of stainless steels retrieved from BWR components (top guide and control rods) have been examined by atom probe tomography; the irradiated microstructure had been already characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The fracture toughness of two material/fluence combinations had been previously measured. The aggregate results strongly suggest that radiation-induced clusters play a significant role in the degradation of fracture toughness that occurs at fluences below ∼ 13 dpa. Because TEM has not been able to consistently identify and quantify the nano-sized clusters in this fluence range, it has not highlighted the potential role of radiation-induced clusters. (authors)

  10. Method for generation of THz frequency radiation and sensing of large amplitude material strain waves in piezoelectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Evan J.; Armstrong, Michael R.

    2010-09-07

    Strain waves of THz frequencies can coherently generate radiation when they propagate past an interface between materials with different piezoelectric coefficients. Such radiation is of detectable amplitude and contains sufficient information to determine the time-dependence of the strain wave with unprecedented subpicosecond, nearly atomic time and space resolution.

  11. Nitrogen ion induced nitridation of Si(111) surface: Energy and fluence dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Praveen [Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore 560064 (India); ISOM, Universidad Politecnia de Madrid, 28040 (Spain); Kumar, Mahesh [Physics and Energy Harvesting Group, National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi 110012 (India); Nötzel, R. [ISOM, Universidad Politecnia de Madrid, 28040 (Spain); Shivaprasad, S.M., E-mail: smsprasad@jncasr.ac.in [Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore 560064 (India)

    2014-06-01

    We present the surface modification of Si(111) into silicon nitride by exposure to energetic N{sub 2}{sup +} ions. In-situ UHV experiments have been performed to optimize the energy and fluence of the N{sub 2}{sup +} ions to form silicon nitride at room temperature (RT) and characterized in-situ by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We have used N{sub 2}{sup +} ion beams in the energy range of 0.2–5.0 keV of different fluence to induce surface reactions, which lead to the formation of Si{sub x}N{sub y} on the Si(111) surface. The XPS core level spectra of Si(2p) and N(1s) have been deconvoluted into different oxidation states to extract qualitative information, while survey scans have been used for quantifying of the silicon nitride formation, valence band spectra show that as the N{sub 2}{sup +} ion fluence increases, there is an increase in the band gap. The secondary electron emission spectra region of photoemission is used to evaluate the change in the work function during the nitridation process. The results show that surface nitridation initially increases rapidly with ion fluence and then saturates. - Highlights: • A systematic study for the formation of silicon nitride on Si(111). • Investigation of optimal energy and fluence for energetic N{sub 2}{sup +} ions. • Silicon nitride formation at room temperature on Si(111)

  12. Fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients from a Saudi population based phantom for monoenergetic photon beams from 10 keV to 20 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Andy K; Hussein, Mohammed Adel; Altaher, Khalid Mohammed; Farid, Khalid Yousif; Amer, Mamun; Aldhafery, Bander Fuhaid; Alghamdi, Ali A

    2015-01-01

    Fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients are important quantities for radiation protection, derived from Monte Carlo simulations of the radiation particles through a stylised phantom or voxel based phantoms. The voxel phantoms have been developed for many ethnic groups for their accurate reflection of the anatomy. In this study, we used the Monte Carlo code MCNPX to calculate the photon fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients with a voxel phantom based on the Saudi Arabian male population. Six irradiation geometries, anterior–posterior (AP), posterior–anterior (PA), left lateral (LLAT), right lateral (RLAT), rotational (ROT) and isotropic (ISO) were simulated for monoenergetic photon beams from 10 keV to 20 MeV. We compared the coefficients with the reference values in ICRP Publication 116. The coefficients in the AP and PA geometries match the reference values to 9% and 12% on average as measured by root mean square while those in the LLAT, RLAT ROT and ISO geometries differ, mostly below, from the reference by 23, 22, 15 and 16%, respectively. The torso of the Saudi phantom is wider than the ICRP reference male phantom and likely to cause more attenuation to the lateral beam. The ICRP reference coefficients serve well for the Saudi male population as conservative estimations for the purpose of radiation protection. (paper)

  13. The Montbeliard Radiation Protection Pilot Project: a global approach of radiation protection addressing occupational, public and patient exposures at the level of a large urban community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schieber, Caroline; Lochard, Jacques; Badajoz, Coralie; Bataille, Celine; Croueail, Pascal; Klein, Didier; Klopfenstein, Jean-Francois; Makovicka, Libor

    2008-01-01

    The Montbeliard Radiation Protection Pilot Project started in March 2004, at the initiative of the Inter- City Council of the Montbeliard Country in cooperation with CEPN. It aims at improving the radiation protection of the inhabitants of the Montbeliard Country in the various exposure situations which can be potentially encountered on the territory (hospital, dwellings, environment,...) as well as at promoting the creation of a pole of competence in the field of radiation protection in the Montbeliard Country. The project relies on the involvement of all relevant stakeholders at the local, national and international level. This paper provides with a quick insight of the project organisation, followed by a synthetic description of the main achievements of the various project areas. (author)

  14. Journey Toward High Reliability: A Comprehensive Safety Program to Improve Quality of Care and Safety Culture in a Large, Multisite Radiation Oncology Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhouse, Kristina Demas; Volz, Edna; Maity, Amit; Gabriel, Peter E; Solberg, Timothy D; Bergendahl, Howard W; Hahn, Stephen M

    2016-05-01

    High-reliability organizations (HROs) focus on continuous identification and improvement of safety issues. We sought to advance a large, multisite radiation oncology department toward high reliability through the implementation of a comprehensive safety culture (SC) program at the University of Pennsylvania Department of Radiation Oncology. In 2011, with guidance from safety literature and experts in HROs, we designed an SC framework to reduce radiation errors. All state-reported medical events (SRMEs) from 2009 to 2016 were retrospectively reviewed and plotted on a control chart. Changes in SC grade were assessed using the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Hospital Survey. Outcomes measured included the number of radiation treatment fractions and days between SRMEs, as well as SC grade. Multifaceted safety initiatives were implemented at our main academic center and across all network sites. Postintervention results demonstrate increased staff fundamental safety knowledge, enhanced peer review with an electronic system, and special cause variation of SRMEs on control chart analysis. From 2009 to 2016, the number of days and fractions between SRMEs significantly increased, from a mean of 174 to 541 days (P safety framework. Our multifaceted initiatives, focusing on culture and system changes, can be successfully implemented in a large academic radiation oncology department to yield measurable improvements in SC and outcomes. Copyright © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  15. Lethality in repair-proficient Escherichia coli after 365nm ultraviolet light irradiation is dependent on fluence rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peak, J.G.; Peak, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    Reciprocity (total applied fluence produces the same response, regardless of the fluence rate) for the lethal effects caused by 365 and 254 nm ultraviolet light (UV) was studied for repair-proficient and -deficient Escherichia coli strains. In the repair-proficient strain, E. coli WP2 uvr A + recA + , reciprocity after 365 nm UV was only observed at fluence rates of about 750 Wm -2 and above. Below this rate, the cells became increasingly sensitive as the fluence rate was decreased. Similar lack of reciprocity was obtained whether the cells were exposed at 0 or 25 0 C. The double repair-defective mutant, E. coli WP100 uvr A recA, showed complete reciprocity after 365 nm UV over the same range of fluence rates measured for the repair-proficient strain. For 254 nm UV, complete reciprocity occurred in both strains over a range of fluence rates differing by an order of magnitude. (author)

  16. Irradiation induced creep in graphite with respect to the flux effect and the high fluence behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cundy, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    In accelerated irradiation creep tests, performed in the HFR Petten, in a fast neutron flux of about 2x10 4 cm -2 s -1 and at temperatures of 300 and 500 0 C, a fast neutron fluence in excess of 20x10 21 cm -2 (EDN) has been attained so far. As a supplement to this, an analogous creep test was conducted in a fast neutron flux lower by a factor of four which is more typical for the service conditions in a HTR, with a maximum fast fluence of only 4x10 21 cm -2 (EDN). This experiment was aimed at answering the question if, for equal fast fluence, enhanced irradiation creep and Wigner dimensional change would take place in a reduced fast neutron flux. This problem has more generally been addressed to as the ''flux effect'' or the ''equivalent temperature concept''. (orig./IHOE)

  17. Tissue effects of Ho:YAG laser with varying fluences and pulse widths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vari, Sandor G.; van der Veen, Maurits J.; Pergadia, Vani R.; Shi, Wei-Qiang; Duffy, J. T.; Weiss, Andrew B.; Fishbein, Michael C.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1994-02-01

    We investigated the effect of varying fluence and pulse width on the ablation rate and consequent thermal damage of the Ho:YAG (2.130 micrometers ) laser. The rate of ablation on fresh bovine knee joint tissues, fibrous cartilage, hyaline cartilage, and bone in saline was determined after varying the fluence (160 - 640 J/cm2) and pulse width (150, 250, 450 microsecond(s) ec, FWHM) at a repetition rate of 2 Hz. A 400/440 micrometers fiber was used. The ablation rate increased linearly with the fluence. In fibrocartilage, different pulse durations generated significant changes in the ablation rates, but showed minor effects on hyaline cartilage and bone. The heat of ablation for all three tissue types decreased after lengthening the pulse.

  18. Heavy Ion Irradiation Fluence Dependence for Single-Event Upsets in a NAND Flash Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dakai; Wilcox, Edward; Ladbury, Raymond L.; Kim, Hak; Phan, Anthony; Seidleck, Christina; Label, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the single-event effect (SEE) susceptibility of the Micron 16 nm NAND flash, and found that the single-event upset (SEU) cross section varied inversely with cumulative fluence. We attribute the effect to the variable upset sensitivities of the memory cells. Furthermore, the effect impacts only single cell upsets in general. The rate of multiple-bit upsets remained relatively constant with fluence. The current test standards and procedures assume that SEU follow a Poisson process and do not take into account the variability in the error rate with fluence. Therefore, traditional SEE testing techniques may underestimate the on-orbit event rate for a device with variable upset sensitivity.

  19. Fast reactor fluence dosimetry. Technical progress report, January--November 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The objectives of this task are to: (1) develop and demonstrate the use of 10 B and 6 Li helium accumulation fluence monitors (HAFM's) as a reliable and accurate method of measuring reactor neutron fluence; (2) develop and apply an expanded set of HAFM's which will provide fluence responses in different but overlapping neutron energy ranges; (3) identify, through the precise measurement of spectrum-integrated helium production cross sections, those elements which produce significant helium when used individually or as components of advanced alloys in FTR and LMFBR neutron environments, so that their use might be eliminated, minimized, or controlled; (4) use this information to predict, with confidence, the helium production rate for any alloy or material considered for fast reactor use, and (5) maintain a centralized helium measurements laboratory available to the research community, and upgrade the sample throughput capacity to handle FTR dosimetry requirements

  20. Neutron fluence rate and energy spectrum in SPRR-300 reactor thermal column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dou Haifeng; Dai Junlong

    2006-01-01

    In order to modify the simple one-dimension model, the neutron fluence rate distribution calculated with ANISN code ws checked with that calculated with MCNP code. To modify the error caused by ignoring the neutron landscape orientation leaking, the reflector that can't be modeled in a simple one-dimension model was dealt by extending landscape orientation scale. On this condition the neutron fluence rate distribution and the energy spectrum in the thermal column of SPRR-300 reactor were calculated with one-dimensional code ANISN, and the results of Cd ratio are well accorded with the experimental results. The deviation between them is less than 5% and it isn't above 10% in one or two special positions. It indicates that neutron fluence rate distribution and energy spectrum in the thermal column can be well calculated with one-dimensional code ANISN. (authors)

  1. Does trans-lesion synthesis explain the UV-radiation resistance of DNA synthesis in C.elegans embryos?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, Phil; Reddy, Jennifer; Svendsen, Betty-Ann

    1991-01-01

    Over 10-fold larger fluences were required to inhibit both DNA synthesis and cell division in wild-type C.elegans embryos as compared with other model systems or C.elegans rad mutants. In addition, unlike in other organisms, the molecular weight of daughter DNA strands was reduced only after large, superlethal fluences. The molecular weight of nascent DNA fragments exceeded the interdimer distance by up to 19-fold, indicating that C.elegans embryos can replicate through non-instructional lesions. This putative trans-lesion synthetic capability may explain the refractory nature of UV-radiation on embryonic DNA synthesis and nuclear division in C.elegans. (author). 42 refs.; 7 figs

  2. Does trans-lesion synthesis explain the UV-radiation resistance of DNA synthesis in C. elegans embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, Phil; Reddy, Jennifer; Svendsen, Betty-Ann [Texas Christian Univ., Fort Worth, TX (United States). Dept. of Biology

    1991-09-01

    Over 10-fold larger fluences were required to inhibit both DNA synthesis and cell division in wild-type C.elegans embryos as compared with other model systems or C.elegans rad mutants. In addition, unlike in other organisms, the molecular weight of daughter DNA strands was reduced only after large, superlethal fluences. The molecular weight of nascent DNA fragments exceeded the interdimer distance by up to 19-fold, indicating that C.elegans embryos can replicate through non-instructional lesions. This putative trans-lesion synthetic capability may explain the refractory nature of UV-radiation on embryonic DNA synthesis and nuclear division in C.elegans. (author). 42 refs.; 7 figs.

  3. Radiation effects on video imagers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yates, G.J.; Bujnosek, J.J.; Jaramillo, S.A.; Walton, R.B.; Martinez, T.M.; Black, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    Radiation sensitivity of several photoconductive, photoemissive, and solid state silicon-based video imagers was measured by analyzing stored photocharge induced by irradiation with continuous and pulsed sources of high energy photons and neutrons. Transient effects as functions of absorbed dose, dose rate, fluences, and ionizing particle energy are presented

  4. Upper limits of the photon fluence rate on CT detectors: Case study on a commercial scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Mats, E-mail: mats.persson@mi.physics.kth.se; Bornefalk, Hans; Danielsson, Mats [Department of Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm SE-10691 (Sweden); Bujila, Robert; Nowik, Patrik; Andersson, Henrik [Unit of X-ray Physics, Section of Imaging Physics Solna, Department of Medical Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm SE-17176 (Sweden); Kull, Love [Medical Radiation Physics, Sunderby Hospital, Luleå SE-97180 (Sweden); Andersson, Jonas [Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics, Umeå University, Umeå SE-90185 (Sweden)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: The highest photon fluence rate that a computed tomography (CT) detector must be able to measure is an important parameter. The authors calculate the maximum transmitted fluence rate in a commercial CT scanner as a function of patient size for standard head, chest, and abdomen protocols. Methods: The authors scanned an anthropomorphic phantom (Kyoto Kagaku PBU-60) with the reference CT protocols provided by AAPM on a GE LightSpeed VCT scanner and noted the tube current applied with the tube current modulation (TCM) system. By rescaling this tube current using published measurements on the tube current modulation of a GE scanner [N. Keat, “CT scanner automatic exposure control systems,” MHRA Evaluation Report 05016, ImPACT, London, UK, 2005], the authors could estimate the tube current that these protocols would have resulted in for other patient sizes. An ECG gated chest protocol was also simulated. Using measured dose rate profiles along the bowtie filters, the authors simulated imaging of anonymized patient images with a range of sizes on a GE VCT scanner and calculated the maximum transmitted fluence rate. In addition, the 99th and the 95th percentiles of the transmitted fluence rate distribution behind the patient are calculated and the effect of omitting projection lines passing just below the skin line is investigated. Results: The highest transmitted fluence rates on the detector for the AAPM reference protocols with centered patients are found for head images and for intermediate-sized chest images, both with a maximum of 3.4 ⋅ 10{sup 8} mm{sup −2} s{sup −1}, at 949 mm distance from the source. Miscentering the head by 50 mm downward increases the maximum transmitted fluence rate to 5.7 ⋅ 10{sup 8} mm{sup −2} s{sup −1}. The ECG gated chest protocol gives fluence rates up to 2.3 ⋅ 10{sup 8} − 3.6 ⋅ 10{sup 8} mm{sup −2} s{sup −1} depending on miscentering. Conclusions: The fluence rate on a CT detector reaches 3 ⋅ 10{sup 8

  5. Neutron fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors: a comparison of data sets and interpolation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sims, C.S.; Killough, G.G.

    1983-01-01

    Various segments of the health physics community advocate the use of different sets of neutron fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors as a function of energy and different methods of interpolation between discrete points in those data sets. The major data sets and interpolation methods are used to calculate the spectrum average fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors for five spectra associated with the various shielded conditions of the Health Physics Research Reactor. The results obtained by use of the different data sets and interpolation methods are compared and discussed. (author)

  6. Measurement of angular distribution of cosmic-ray muon fluence rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Jeng-Wei; Chen, Yen-Fu; Sheu, Rong-Jiun; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2010-01-01

    In this work a Berkeley Lab cosmic ray detector was used to measure the angular distribution of the cosmic-ray muon fluence rate. Angular response functions of the detector at each measurement orientation were calculated by using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code, where no energy attenuation was taken into account. Coincidence counting rates were measured at ten orientations with equiangular intervals. The muon angular fluence rate spectrum was unfolded from the measured counting rates associated with the angular response functions using both the MAXED code and the parameter adjusting method.

  7. Circuit designs for measuring reactor period, peak power, and pulse fluence on TRIGA and other pulse reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.D.; Thome, F.V.; Williams, R.L.

    1976-01-01

    Inexpensive circuits for use in evaluating reactor pulse prompt period, peak power, and pulse fluence (NVT) are presented. In addition to low cost, these circuits are easily assembled and calibrated and operate with a high degree of accuracy. The positive period measuring system has been used in evaluating reactivity additions as small as 5 cents (with an accuracy of ±0.1 cents) and as large as $4.50 (accuracy ±2 cents). Reactor peak power is measured digitally with a system accuracy of ±0.04% of a 10 Volt input (±4 mV). The NVT circuit measures over a 2-1/2 decade range, has 3 place resolution and an accuracy of better than 1%. (author)

  8. Study of surface properties of ATLAS12 strip sensors and their radiation resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikestikova, M., E-mail: mikestik@fzu.cz [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Institute of Physics, Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Allport, P.P.; Baca, M.; Broughton, J.; Chisholm, A.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Pyatt, S.; Thomas, J.P.; Wilson, J.A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Kierstead, J.; Kuczewski, P.; Lynn, D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Physics Department and Instrumentation Division, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Hommels, L.B.A. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Ullan, M. [Centro Nacional de Microelectronica (IMB-CNM, CSIC), Campus UAB-Bellaterra, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Bloch, I.; Gregor, I.M.; Tackmann, K. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Hauser, M.; Jakobs, K.; Kuehn, S. [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); and others

    2016-09-21

    A radiation hard n{sup +}-in-p micro-strip sensor for the use in the Upgrade of the strip tracker of the ATLAS experiment at the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) has been developed by the “ATLAS ITk Strip Sensor collaboration” and produced by Hamamatsu Photonics. Surface properties of different types of end-cap and barrel miniature sensors of the latest sensor design ATLAS12 have been studied before and after irradiation. The tested barrel sensors vary in “punch-through protection” (PTP) structure, and the end-cap sensors, whose stereo-strips differ in fan geometry, in strip pitch and in edge strip ganging options. Sensors have been irradiated with proton fluences of up to 1×10{sup 16} n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}, by reactor neutron fluence of 1×10{sup 15} n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2} and by gamma rays from {sup 60}Co up to dose of 1 MGy. The main goal of the present study is to characterize the leakage current for micro-discharge breakdown voltage estimation, the inter-strip resistance and capacitance, the bias resistance and the effectiveness of PTP structures as a function of bias voltage and fluence. It has been verified that the ATLAS12 sensors have high breakdown voltage well above the operational voltage which implies that different geometries of sensors do not influence their stability. The inter-strip isolation is a strong function of irradiation fluence, however the sensor performance is acceptable in the expected range for HL-LHC. New gated PTP structure exhibits low PTP onset voltage and sharp cut-off of effective resistance even at the highest tested radiation fluence. The inter-strip capacitance complies with the technical specification required before irradiation and no radiation-induced degradation was observed. A summary of ATLAS12 sensors tests is presented including a comparison of results from different irradiation sites. The measured characteristics are compared with the previous prototype of the sensor design, ATLAS07. - Highlights:

  9. Some observations of the variations in natural gamma radiation due to rainfall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, S.

    1980-01-01

    Results of observations of variations in natural gamma-radiation flux densities due to rainfall are presented and discussed in relation to rate of rainfall. Variations of fluences with amounts of rainfall are also described. It is concluded that the frequency distribution of the ratio of the fluence to the amount of rainfall has a trend to be lognormal

  10. Aging and Embrittlement of High Fluence Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Was, gary; Jiao, Zhijie; der ven, Anton Van; Bruemmer, Stephen; Edwards, Dan

    2012-12-31

    Irradiation of austenitic stainless steels results in the formation of dislocation loops, stacking fault tetrahedral, Ni-Si clusters and radiation-induced segregation (RIS). Of these features, it is the formation of precipitates which is most likely to impact the mechanical integrity at high dose. Unlike dislocation loops and RIS, precipitates exhibit an incubation period that can extend from 10 to 46 dpa, above which the cluster composition changes and a separate phase, (G-phase) forms. Both neutron and heavy ion irradiation showed that these clusters develop slowly and continue to evolve beyond 100 dpa. Overall, this work shows that the irradiated microstructure features produced by heavy ion irradiation are remarkably comparable in nature to those produced by neutron irradiation at much lower dose rates. The use of a temperature shift to account for the higher damage rate in heavy ion irradiation results in a fairly good match in the dislocation loop microstructure and the precipitate microstructure in austenitic stainless steels. Both irradiations also show segregation of the same elements and in the same directions, but to achieve comparable magnitudes, heavy ion irradiation must be conducted at a much higher temperature than that which produces a match with loops and precipitates. First-principles modeling has confirmed that the formation of Ni-Si precipitates under irradiation is likely caused by supersaturation of solute to defect sinks caused by highly correlated diffusion of Ni and Si. Thus, the formation and evolution of Ni-Si precipitates at high dose in austenitic stainless steels containing Si is inevitable.

  11. Neutron Fluence and Energy Reconstruction with the LNE-IRSN/MIMAC Recoil Detector MicroTPC at 27 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maire, D.; Lebreton, L.; Querre, Ph. [Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety - IRSN, site of Cadarache, 13115 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Bosson, G.; Guillaudin, O.; Muraz, J.F.; Riffard, Q.; Santos, D. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie - LPSCCNRSIN2P3/ UJF/INP, 38000 Grenoble (France)

    2015-07-01

    The French Institute for Radiation protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), designated by the French Metrology Institute (LNE) for neutron metrology, is developing a time projection chamber using a Micromegas anode: microTPC. This work is carried out in collaboration with the Laboratory of Subatomic Physics and Cosmology (LPSC). The aim is to characterize the energy distribution of neutron fluence in the energy range 8 keV - 5 MeV with a primary procedure. The time projection chambers are gaseous detectors able to measure charged particles energy and to reconstruct their track if a pixelated anode is used. In our case, the gas is used as a (n, p) converter in order to detect neutrons down to few keV. Coming from elastic collisions with neutrons, recoil protons lose a part of their kinetic energy by ionizing the gas. The ionization electrons are drifted toward a pixelated anode (2D projection), read at 50 MHz by a self-triggered electronic system to obtain the third track dimension. The neutron energy is reconstructed event by event thanks to proton scattering angle and proton energy measurements. The scattering angle is deduced from the 3D track. The proton energy is obtained by charge collection measurements, knowing the ionization quenching factor (i.e. the part of proton kinetic energy lost by ionizing the gas). The fluence is calculated thanks to the detected events number and the simulation of the detector response. The μTPC is a new reliable detector able to measure energy distribution of the neutron fluence without unfolding procedure or prior neutron calibration contrary to usual gaseous counters. The microTPC is still being developed and measurements have been carried out at the AMANDE facility, with neutrons energies going from 8 keV to 565 keV. After the context and the μ-TPC working principle presentation, measurements of the neutron energy and fluence at 27 keV and 144 keV are shown and compared to the complete detector response simulation. This work

  12. First Results from the Online Radiation Dose Monitoring System in ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Mandić, I; The ATLAS collaboration; Deliyergiyev, M; Gorišek, A; Kramberger, G; Mikuž, M; Franz, S; Hartert, J; Dawson, I; Miyagawa, P; Nicolas, L

    2011-01-01

    High radiation doses which will accumulate in components of ATLAS experiment during data taking will causes damage to detectors and readout electronics. It is therefore important to continuously monitor the doses to estimate the level of degradation caused by radiation. Online radiation monitoring system measures ionizing dose in SiO2 , displacement damage in silicon in terms of 1-MeV(Si) equivalent neutron fluence and fluence of thermal neutrons at several locations in ATLAS detector. In this paper design of the system, results of measurements and comparison of measured integrated doses and fluences with predictions from FLUKA simulation will be shown.

  13. Establishment of radiation doses for pediatric X-ray examinations in a large pediatric hospital in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olgar, T.; Sahmaran, T.

    2017-01-01

    Pediatric patients are more sensitive to ionizing radiation when compared with adults. The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiation doses for some common pediatric x-ray examinations performed with various digital radiography systems. Quality control tests of the digital radiography systems were carried out according to international published protocols before the pediatric dose measurements. Radiation dose measurement was performed by using the x-ray tube outputs and thermoluminescent dosimeter dose measurement methods. In the present study, radiation doses were assessed for 247 chest, 230 pelvis, 194 skull and 73 abdomen x-ray examinations and in total 744 pediatric patients doses were measured. Pediatric patients were classified into four age groups 0-1, 1-5, 5-10 and 10-15 years as given by European Commission guidance. Effective doses were determined for each examination using a PCXMC 2.0 Monte Carlo program. The mean measured entrance skin doses for the age interval 1-5 years and AP projection by using tube output measurement methods were 149 μGy for chest, 304 μGy for pelvis, 387 μGy for skull and 199 μGy for abdomen examinations. The radiation dose results obtained in this study were in the range of the published results in the literature. (authors)

  14. Lineage diversification and morphological evolution in a large-scale continental radiation: The neotropical ovenbirds and woodcreepers (Aves: Furnariidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derryberry, Elizabeth P.; Claramunt, Santiago; Derryberry, Graham; Chesser, R. Terry; Cracraft, Joel; Aleixo, Alexandre; Pérez-Emán, Jorge; Remsen, J.V.; Brumfield, Robb T.

    2011-01-01

    Patterns of diversification in species-rich clades provide insight into the processes that generate biological diversity. We tested different models of lineage and phenotypic diversification in an exceptional continental radiation, the ovenbird family Furnariidae, using the most complete species-level phylogenetic hypothesis produced to date for a major avian clade (97% of 293 species). We found that the Furnariidae exhibit nearly constant rates of lineage accumulation but show evidence of constrained morphological evolution. This pattern of sustained high rates of speciation despite limitations on phenotypic evolution contrasts with the results of most previous studies of evolutionary radiations, which have found a pattern of decelerating diversity-dependent lineage accumulation coupled with decelerating or constrained phenotypic evolution. Our results suggest that lineage accumulation in tropical continental radiations may not be as limited by ecological opportunities as in temperate or island radiations. More studies examining patterns of both lineage and phenotypic diversification are needed to understand the often complex tempo and mode of evolutionary radiations on continents.

  15. In vitro radiation and chemotherapy sensitivity of established cell lines of human small cell lung cancer and its large cell morphological variants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carney, D.N.; Mitchell, J.B.; Kinsella, T.J.

    1983-01-01

    The in vitro response to radiation and chemotherapeutic drugs of cell lines established from 7 patients with small cell (SC) lung cancer were tested using a soft agarose clonogenic assay. Five cell lines retained the typical morphological and biochemical amine precursor uptake decarboxylation characteristics of SC, while two cell lines had undergone ''transformation'' to large cell (LC) morphological variants with loss of amine precursor uptake decarboxylation cell characteristics of SC. The radiation survival curves for the SC lines were characterized by D0 values ranging from 51 to 140 rads and extrapolation values (n) ranging from 1.0 to 3.3. While the D0 values of the radiation survival curves of the LC variants were similar (91 and 80 rads), the extrapolation values were 5.6 and 11.1 In vitro chemosensitivity testing of the cell lines revealed an excellent correlation between prior treatment status of the patient and in vitro sensitivity or resistance. No correlation was observed between in vitro chemosensitivity and radiation response. These data suggest that transformation of SC to LC with loss of amine precursor uptake and decarboxylation characteristics is associated with a marked increase in radiation resistance (n) in vitro. The observation of a 2- to 5-fold increase in survival of the LC compared to the SC lines following 200 rads suggests that the use of larger daily radiation fractions and/or radiation-sensitizing drugs might lead to a significantly greater clinical response in patients with LC morphology. This clinical approach may have a major impact on patient response and survival

  16. Radiation Levels around the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Mala, P; Calviani, M; Nordt, A

    2013-01-01

    This work discuss on the radiation levels measured around the LHC machine during the 2012 operational year. The doses and particle fluences are measured primarily by RadMon detectors – about 300 RadMons are installed around the accelerator – and by thermoluminescent detectors. In addition, BLMs, IG5/PMI ionisation chambers as well as FGCs can be used for corresponding cumulated dose evaluations. The probability of SEE depends directly on the high-energy hadron (HEH) fluence, so this is the main parameter that is calculated based on RadMons counts.

  17. Impact of iterative reconstruction on image quality and radiation dose in multidetector CT of large body size adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, Gaurav S.; Uppot, Raul N.; Kambadakone, Avinash R.; Yu, Elaine W.; Sahani, Dushyant V.

    2012-01-01

    To compare image quality and radiation dose using Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction (ASiR) and Filtered Back Projection (FBP) in patients weighing ≥91 kg. In this Institution Review Board-approved retrospective study, single-phase contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic CT examinations of 100 adults weighing ≥91 kg (mean body weight: 107.6 ± 17.4 kg range: 91-181.9 kg) with (1) ASiR and (2) FBP were reviewed by two readers in a blinded fashion for subjective measures of image quality (using a subjective standardized numerical scale and objective noise) and for radiation exposure. Imaging parameters and radiation dose results of the two techniques were compared within weight and BMI sub-categories. All examinations were found to be of adequate quality. Both subjective (mean = 1.4 ± 0.5 vs. 1.6 ± 0.6, P < 0.05) and objective noise (13.0 ± 3.2 vs.19.5 ± 5.7, P < 0.0001) were lower with ASiR. Average radiation dose reduction of 31.5 % was achieved using ASiR (mean CTDIvol. ASiR: 13.5 ± 7.3 mGy; FBP: 19.7 ± 9.0 mGy, P < 0.0001). Other measures of image quality were comparable between the two techniques. Trends for all parameters were similar in patients across weight and BMI sub-categories. In obese individuals, abdominal CT images reconstructed using ASiR provide diagnostic images with reduced image noise at lower radiation dose. circle CT images in obese adults are noisy, even with high radiation dose. (orig.)

  18. Impact of iterative reconstruction on image quality and radiation dose in multidetector CT of large body size adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, Gaurav S.; Uppot, Raul N.; Kambadakone, Avinash R. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Abdominal Imaging and Intervention, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Yu, Elaine W. [Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Sahani, Dushyant V. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Abdominal Imaging and Intervention, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Division of Abdominal Imaging and Intervention, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-08-15

    To compare image quality and radiation dose using Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction (ASiR) and Filtered Back Projection (FBP) in patients weighing {>=}91 kg. In this Institution Review Board-approved retrospective study, single-phase contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic CT examinations of 100 adults weighing {>=}91 kg (mean body weight: 107.6 {+-} 17.4 kg range: 91-181.9 kg) with (1) ASiR and (2) FBP were reviewed by two readers in a blinded fashion for subjective measures of image quality (using a subjective standardized numerical scale and objective noise) and for radiation exposure. Imaging parameters and radiation dose results of the two techniques were compared within weight and BMI sub-categories. All examinations were found to be of adequate quality. Both subjective (mean = 1.4 {+-} 0.5 vs. 1.6 {+-} 0.6, P < 0.05) and objective noise (13.0 {+-} 3.2 vs.19.5 {+-} 5.7, P < 0.0001) were lower with ASiR. Average radiation dose reduction of 31.5 % was achieved using ASiR (mean CTDIvol. ASiR: 13.5 {+-} 7.3 mGy; FBP: 19.7 {+-} 9.0 mGy, P < 0.0001). Other measures of image quality were comparable between the two techniques. Trends for all parameters were similar in patients across weight and BMI sub-categories. In obese individuals, abdominal CT images reconstructed using ASiR provide diagnostic images with reduced image noise at lower radiation dose. circle CT images in obese adults are noisy, even with high radiation dose. (orig.)

  19. Application of an experimental irradiation facility type K-120 for the radiation treatment of agricultural products in large quantity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenger, V.; Foeldiak, G.; Horvath, I.; Hargittai, P.; Bartfai, Cs.

    1979-01-01

    During experimental and pilot irradiation carried out by the 60 Co irradiation facility type K-120 of the Institute of Isotopes of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences an irradiation technology for the treatment of agricultural and food products of considerable density has been developed. Applying transport containers of commercial size the intermittent radiation treatment of great quantity products was made possible with homogeneous dose distribution. The radiation technical characteristics, the utilization coefficient and the capacity of the facility for every agricultural product were calculated. (author)

  20. Evaluation of the Fluence Conversion Factor for 32P in Sulfur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, C. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-18

    When 32S is exposed to neutrons it undergoes a 32S(n,p)32P reaction with a neutron cross section as shown in Figure 1. This reaction may be used to characterize the neutron fluence for neutrons greater than 3 MeV.

  1. Determination of fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients by means of artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto B, T. G.; Rivera P, E.; De Leon M, H. A.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R.; Gallego, E.; Lorente, A.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper is presented an Artificial Neural Network (Ann) that has been designed, trained and validated to determinate the effective dose e, ambient dose equivalent h(10) and personal dose equivalent hp(10,θ) fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients at different positions, having as only input data 7 count rates obtained with a Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (Bss) system. A set of 211 neutron spectra and the fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients published by the International Atomic Energy Agency were used to train and validate the Ann. This set was divided into 2 subsets, one of 181 elements to train the Ann and the remaining 30 to validate it. The Ann was trained using Bss count rates as input data and the fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients as output data. The network was validated and tested with the set of 30 elements that were not used during the training process. Good results were obtained proving that Ann are a good choice for calculating the fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients having as only data the count rates obtained with a Bss. (Author)

  2. International intercomparison of fluence of fast neutrons using 115In(n,γ) activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesiecki, H.; Cosack, M.

    1985-07-01

    The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) has participated in an international intercomparison of fluence measurements of fast neutrons. This was organized under the auspices of the ''Comite Consultatif pour les Etalons de Mesure des Rayonnements Ionisants (CCEMRI)'', Sect. 3 (Mesures Neutronique). The National Physical Laboratory (NPL), Teddington, UK volunteered to assume responsibility for the experimental realization and final evaluation. This report deals with the measurements performed at the PTB for the neutron fluence intercomparison at neutron energies of Esub(n) = 144 keV and 570 keV which was based on the 115 In(n,γ) 116 Insup(m) reaction. The count rate of a 4πβ-counter which had to be used to determine the activation of the In sample was to be compared with the neutron fluence by which the sample was irradiated. A description of the neutron production, the fluence determination, the 4πβ-counting, and the evaluation of the results will be given. (orig.) [de

  3. Atomic mixing effects on high fluence Ge implantation into Si at 40 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gras-Marti, A.; Jimenez-Rodriguez, J.J.; Peon-Fernandez, J.; Rodriguez-Vidal, M.; Tognetti, N.P.; Carter, G.; Nobes, M.J.; Armour, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    Ion implanted profiles of 40 keV Ge + into Si at fluences ranging from approx. equal to 10 15 ions/cm 2 up to saturation have been measured using the RBS technique. The profiles compare well with the predictions of an analytical model encompasing sputter erosion plus atomic relocation. (orig.)

  4. Poster - 52: Smoothing constraints in Modulated Photon Radiotherapy (XMRT) fluence map optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGeachy, Philip; Villarreal-Barajas, Jose Eduardo; Zinchenko, Yuriy; Khan, Rao

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Modulated Photon Radiotherapy (XMRT), which simultaneously optimizes photon beamlet energy (6 and 18 MV) and fluence, has recently shown dosimetric improvement in comparison to conventional IMRT. That said, the degree of smoothness of resulting fluence maps (FMs) has yet to be investigated and could impact the deliverability of XMRT. This study looks at investigating FM smoothness and imposing smoothing constraint in the fluence map optimization. Methods: Smoothing constraints were modeled in the XMRT algorithm with the sum of positive gradient (SPG) technique. XMRT solutions, with and without SPG constraints, were generated for a clinical prostate scan using standard dosimetric prescriptions, constraints, and a seven coplanar beam arrangement. The smoothness, with and without SPG constraints, was assessed by looking at the absolute and relative maximum SPG scores for each fluence map. Dose volume histograms were utilized when evaluating impact on the dose distribution. Results: Imposing SPG constraints reduced the absolute and relative maximum SPG values by factors of up to 5 and 2, respectively, when compared with their non-SPG constrained counterparts. This leads to a more seamless conversion of FMS to their respective MLC sequences. This improved smoothness resulted in an increase to organ at risk (OAR) dose, however the increase is not clinically significant. Conclusions: For a clinical prostate case, there was a noticeable improvement in the smoothness of the XMRT FMs when SPG constraints were applied with a minor increase in dose to OARs. This increase in OAR dose is not clinically meaningful.

  5. Neutron irradiation effects on intermetallic precipitates in Zircaloy as a function of fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etoh, Y.; Shimada, S.

    1993-01-01

    Intermetallic precipitates in Zircaloy-2 and -4, recrystallized at the α-phase temperature, have been examined using analytical electron microscopy. The specimens were irradiated in BWRs up to a fast neutron fluence of 1.4x10 26 n/m 2 (E>1 MeV). Neutron irradiation induces a crystalline-to-amorphous transition, depleting Fe in the amorphous phase of Zr(Fe, Cr) 2 precipitates in the alloys. Amorphization starts from the periphery of the precipitates and all of them are totally amorphized at higher fluences than 1.2x10 26 n/m 2 . The width of the Fe-depleted zone increases in proportion to the 0.45 power of fluence. This result indicates that diffusion of Fe is the rate-controlling process for Fe depletion in Zr(Fe, Cr) 2 precipitates. Dissolution of Zr 2 (Fe, Ni) precipitates in Zircaloy-2 occurs during neutron irradiation. At a high fluence, such as 1.2x10 26 n/m 2 , Zr 2 (Fe, Ni) precipitates are almost completely dissolved into the matrix and the dissolution rate of Fe is faster than that of Ni. (orig.)

  6. Monitoring of the Irradiated Neutron Fluence in the Neutron Transmutation Doping Process of Hanaro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myong-Seop; Park, Sang-Jun

    2009-08-01

    Neutron transmutation doping (NTD) for silicon is a process of the creation of phosphorus impurities in intrinsic or extrinsic silicon by neutron irradiation to obtain silicon semiconductors with extremely uniform dopant distribution. HANARO has two vertical holes for the NTD, and the irradiation for 5 and 6 inch silicon ingots has been going on at one hole. In order to achieve the accurate neutron fluence corresponding to the target resistivity, the real time neutron flux is monitored by self-powered neutron detectors. After irradiation, the total irradiation fluence is confirmed by measuring the absolute activity of activation detectors. In this work, a neutron fluence monitoring method using zirconium foils with the mass of 10 ~ 50 mg was applied to the NTD process of HANARO. We determined the proportional constant of the relationship between the resistivity of the irradiated silicon and the neutron fluence determined by using zirconium foils. The determined constant for the initially n-type silicon was 3.126 × 1019 n·Ω/cm. It was confirmed that the difference between this empirical value and the theoretical one was only 0.5%. Conclusively, the practical methodology to perform the neutron transmutation doping of silicon was established.

  7. Poster - 52: Smoothing constraints in Modulated Photon Radiotherapy (XMRT) fluence map optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGeachy, Philip; Villarreal-Barajas, Jose Eduardo; Zinchenko, Yuriy; Khan, Rao [Department of Medical Physics, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, CAN, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, CAN, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, CAN, Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: Modulated Photon Radiotherapy (XMRT), which simultaneously optimizes photon beamlet energy (6 and 18 MV) and fluence, has recently shown dosimetric improvement in comparison to conventional IMRT. That said, the degree of smoothness of resulting fluence maps (FMs) has yet to be investigated and could impact the deliverability of XMRT. This study looks at investigating FM smoothness and imposing smoothing constraint in the fluence map optimization. Methods: Smoothing constraints were modeled in the XMRT algorithm with the sum of positive gradient (SPG) technique. XMRT solutions, with and without SPG constraints, were generated for a clinical prostate scan using standard dosimetric prescriptions, constraints, and a seven coplanar beam arrangement. The smoothness, with and without SPG constraints, was assessed by looking at the absolute and relative maximum SPG scores for each fluence map. Dose volume histograms were utilized when evaluating impact on the dose distribution. Results: Imposing SPG constraints reduced the absolute and relative maximum SPG values by factors of up to 5 and 2, respectively, when compared with their non-SPG constrained counterparts. This leads to a more seamless conversion of FMS to their respective MLC sequences. This improved smoothness resulted in an increase to organ at risk (OAR) dose, however the increase is not clinically significant. Conclusions: For a clinical prostate case, there was a noticeable improvement in the smoothness of the XMRT FMs when SPG constraints were applied with a minor increase in dose to OARs. This increase in OAR dose is not clinically meaningful.

  8. Determination of fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients by means of artificial neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto B, T. G.; Rivera P, E.; De Leon M, H. A.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Gallego, E.; Lorente, A., E-mail: tzinnia.soto@gmail.com [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Jose Gutierrez Abascal No. 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-10-15

    In this paper is presented an Artificial Neural Network (Ann) that has been designed, trained and validated to determinate the effective dose e, ambient dose equivalent h(10) and personal dose equivalent hp(10,{theta}) fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients at different positions, having as only input data 7 count rates obtained with a Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (Bss) system. A set of 211 neutron spectra and the fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients published by the International Atomic Energy Agency were used to train and validate the Ann. This set was divided into 2 subsets, one of 181 elements to train the Ann and the remaining 30 to validate it. The Ann was trained using Bss count rates as input data and the fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients as output data. The network was validated and tested with the set of 30 elements that were not used during the training process. Good results were obtained proving that Ann are a good choice for calculating the fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients having as only data the count rates obtained with a Bss. (Author)

  9. Calculation of fluence rate distributions in a pre design clinical facility for BNCT at the LFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peeters, T.T.J.M.; Freudenreich, W.E.

    1995-12-01

    In a previous study [1], it was demonstrated that the creation of a thermal neutron facility for clinical BNCT in the LFR is feasible. Monte Carlo calculations had shown that the neutron fluence rates and gamma dose rates at the detector position of a model representing a first outline of a clinical facility met all requirements that are necessary for clinical BNCT. In order to gain more information about the neutron fluence rates at several positions, a second step is required. Calculations have been performed for the free beam and for a tumour bearing phantom at 5 cm and 10 cm distance from the irradiation window. Due to thermalization and back scattering, the thermal fluence rates in the tumour at 5 and 10 cm distance from the bismuth shield appeared to be approximately twice as high as the thermal fluence rates in the free beam at the corresponding positions of 5 to 6 cm and 10 to 11 cm from the irradiation window. (orig.)

  10. Towards a laser fluence dependent nanostructuring of thin Au films on Si by nanosecond laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruffino, F.; Pugliara, A.; Carria, E.; Romano, L.; Bongiorno, C.; Fisicaro, G.; La Magna, A.; Spinella, C.; Grimaldi, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Au nanoclusters are produced by nanosecond laser irradiations of thin Au film on Si. ► The shape, size, and surface density of the Au nanoclusters are tunable by laser fluence. ► The formation dynamic of the Au nanoclusters under nanosecond laser irradiation is analyzed. - Abstract: In this work, we study the nanostructuring effects of nanosecond laser irradiations on 5 nm thick Au film sputter-deposited on Si. After deposition of Au on Si substrate, nanosecond laser irradiations were performed increasing the laser fluence from 750 to 1500 mJ/cm 2 . Several analyses techniques, such as Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy were crossed to study the morphological evolution of the Au film as a function of laser fluence. In particular, the formation of Au nanoparticles was observed. The analyses allowed a quantitative evaluation of the evolution of the nanoparticles size, surface density, and shape as a function of the laser fluence. Therefore, a control the structural properties of the Au nanoparticles is reached, for example, for applications in Si nanowires growth or plasmonics.

  11. High-accuracy fluence determination in ion beams using fluorescent nuclear track detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osinga, J.-M.; Akselrod, M.S.; Herrmann, Rochus

    2013-01-01

    We present an approach to use Al2O3:C,Mg-based fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTDs) and confocal laser scanning microscopy as a semiautomatic tool for fluence measurements in clinical ion beams. The method was found to cover a linear energy transfer (LET) range from at least L∞(Al2O3) = 0...

  12. Development of a simple, low cost, indirect ion beam fluence measurement system for ion implanters, accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, K.; Balaji, S.; Saravanan, K.; Navas, J.; David, C.; Panigrahi, B. K.

    2018-02-01

    We developed a simple, low cost user-friendly automated indirect ion beam fluence measurement system for ion irradiation and analysis experiments requiring indirect beam fluence measurements unperturbed by sample conditions like low temperature, high temperature, sample biasing as well as in regular ion implantation experiments in the ion implanters and electrostatic accelerators with continuous beam. The system, which uses simple, low cost, off-the-shelf components/systems and two distinct layers of in-house built softwarenot only eliminates the need for costly data acquisition systems but also overcomes difficulties in using properietry software. The hardware of the system is centered around a personal computer, a PIC16F887 based embedded system, a Faraday cup drive cum monitor circuit, a pair of Faraday Cups and a beam current integrator and the in-house developed software include C based microcontroller firmware and LABVIEW based virtual instrument automation software. The automatic fluence measurement involves two important phases, a current sampling phase lasting over 20-30 seconds during which the ion beam current is continuously measured by intercepting the ion beam and the averaged beam current value is computed. A subsequent charge computation phase lasting 700-900 seconds is executed making the ion beam to irradiate the samples and the incremental fluence received by the sampleis estimated usingthe latest averaged beam current value from the ion beam current sampling phase. The cycle of current sampling-charge computation is repeated till the required fluence is reached. Besides simplicity and cost-effectiveness, other important advantages of the developed system include easy reconfiguration of the system to suit customisation of experiments, scalability, easy debug and maintenance of the hardware/software, ability to work as a standalone system. The system was tested with different set of samples and ion fluences and the results were verified using

  13. Radiation hard silicon microstrip detectors for use in ATLAS at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansen, Lars Gimmestad

    2005-07-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (Geneva, Switzerland) will accelerate protons in colliding beams to a center of mass energy of 14 TeV at very high luminosities. The ATLAS detector is being built to explore the physics in this unprecedented energy range. Tracking of charged particles in high-energy physics (HEP) experiments requires a high spatial resolution and fast signal readout, all with as little material as possible. Silicon microstrip detectors meet these requirements well and have been chosen for the Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) which is part of the inner tracking system of ATLAS and has a total area of 61 m2. During the 10 years of operation at LHC, the total fluence received by the detectors is sufficiently large that they will suffer a severe degradation from radiation induced damage. The damage affects both the physics performance of the detectors as well as their operability and a great challenge has been to develop radiation hard detectors for this environment. An extensive irradiation programme has been carried out where detectors of various designs, including defect engineering by oxygen enriched silicon, have been irradiated to the expected fluence. A subsequent thermal annealing period is included to account for a realistic annual maintenance schedule at room temperature, during which the radiation induced defects alter the detector properties significantly. This thesis presents work that has been carried out in the Bergen ATLAS group with results both from the irradiation programme and from detector testing during the module production. (Author)

  14. Radiation hard silicon microstrip detectors for use in ATLAS at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansen, Lars Gimmestad

    2005-06-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (Geneva, Switzerland) will accelerate protons in colliding beams to a center of mass energy of 14 TeV at very high luminosities. The ATLAS detector is being built to explore the physics in this unprecedented energy range. Tracking of charged particles in high-energy physics (HEP) experiments requires a high spatial resolution and fast signal readout, all with as little material as possible. Silicon microstrip detectors meet these requirements well and have been chosen for the Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) which is part of the inner tracking system of ATLAS and has a total area of 61 m2. During the 10 years of operation at LHC, the total fluence received by the detectors is sufficiently large that they will suffer a severe degradation from radiation induced damage. The damage affects both the physics performance of the detectors as well as their operability and a great challenge has been to develop radiation hard detectors for this environment. An extensive irradiation programme has been carried out where detectors of various designs, including defect engineering by oxygen enriched silicon, have been irradiated to the expected fluence. A subsequent thermal annealing period is included to account for a realistic annual maintenance schedule at room temperature, during which the radiation induced defects alter the detector properties significantly. This thesis presents work that has been carried out in the Bergen ATLAS group with results both from the irradiation programme and from detector testing during the module production. (Author)

  15. Development of n+-in-p large-area silicon microstrip sensors for very high radiation environments – ATLAS12 design and initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unno, Y.; Edwards, S.O.; Pyatt, S.; Thomas, J.P.; Wilson, J.A.; Kierstead, J.; Lynn, D.; Carter, J.R.; Hommels, L.B.A.; Robinson, D.; Bloch, I.; Gregor, I.M.; Tackmann, K.; Betancourt, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kuehn, S.; Mori, R.; Parzefall, U.; Wiik-Fucks, L.; Clark, A.

    2014-01-01

    We have been developing a novel radiation-tolerant n + -in-p silicon microstrip sensor for very high radiation environments, aiming for application in the high luminosity large hadron collider. The sensors are fabricated in 6 in., p-type, float-zone wafers, where large-area strip sensor designs are laid out together with a number of miniature sensors. Radiation tolerance has been studied with ATLAS07 sensors and with independent structures. The ATLAS07 design was developed into new ATLAS12 designs. The ATLAS12A large-area sensor is made towards an axial strip sensor and the ATLAS12M towards a stereo strip sensor. New features to the ATLAS12 sensors are two dicing lines: standard edge space of 910 μm and slim edge space of 450 μm, a gated punch-through protection structure, and connection of orphan strips in a triangular corner of stereo strips. We report the design of the ATLAS12 layouts and initial measurements of the leakage current after dicing and the resistivity of the wafers

  16. Blanchability and sensory quality of large runner peanuts blanched in a radiant wall oven using infrared radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettler, Katrina; Adhikari, Koushik; Singh, Rakesh K

    2017-10-01

    The main factors behind the growing popularity of infrared radiation heating in food processing include its energy efficiency, food quality retention and process speed, as well as the simplicity of equipment. Infrared radiation was employed as an alternative heat treatment to the conventional hot air method used in peanut blanching. The present study aimed to investigate the application of infrared heating for blanching peanuts and determine their blanchability and sensory quality under various processing conditions. The total blanchabilities (expressed as a percentage of total blanched) of the infrared radiation trials (radiant wall oven) at 343 °C for 1.5 min, 316 °C for 1.5 min, 288 °C for 1.5 min and 343 °C for 1 min did not differ significantly compared to the hot air control trials (impingement oven) at 100 °C for 30 and 20 min. All infrared trials had significantly lower (P infrared samples demonstrated the possible initiation of oxidation for the conventionally blanched sample at 18 weeks of storage at 24 °C (room temperature), with no indication of oxidation in the infrared samples stored at the same temperature. Infrared radiation peanut blanching is a viable alternative to conventional hot air blanching because of the shorter process time and longer shelf-life, as evident from the sensory storage study. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. SU-E-T-436: Fluence-Based Trajectory Optimization for Non-Coplanar VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smyth, G; Bamber, JC; Bedford, JL [Joint Department of Physics at The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Evans, PM [Centre for Vision, Speech and Signal Processing, University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Saran, FH; Mandeville, HC [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate a fluence-based trajectory optimization technique for non-coplanar VMAT for brain cancer. Methods: Single-arc non-coplanar VMAT trajectories were determined using a heuristic technique for five patients. Organ at risk (OAR) volume intersected during raytracing was minimized for two cases: absolute volume and the sum of relative volumes weighted by OAR importance. These trajectories and coplanar VMAT formed starting points for the fluence-based optimization method. Iterative least squares optimization was performed on control points 24° apart in gantry rotation. Optimization minimized the root-mean-square (RMS) deviation of PTV dose from the prescription (relative importance 100), maximum dose to the brainstem (10), optic chiasm (5), globes (5) and optic nerves (5), plus mean dose to the lenses (5), hippocampi (3), temporal lobes (2), cochleae (1) and brain excluding other regions of interest (1). Control point couch rotations were varied in steps of up to 10° and accepted if the cost function improved. Final treatment plans were optimized with the same objectives in an in-house planning system and evaluated using a composite metric - the sum of optimization metrics weighted by importance. Results: The composite metric decreased with fluence-based optimization in 14 of the 15 plans. In the remaining case its overall value, and the PTV and OAR components, were unchanged but the balance of OAR sparing differed. PTV RMS deviation was improved in 13 cases and unchanged in two. The OAR component was reduced in 13 plans. In one case the OAR component increased but the composite metric decreased - a 4 Gy increase in OAR metrics was balanced by a reduction in PTV RMS deviation from 2.8% to 2.6%. Conclusion: Fluence-based trajectory optimization improved plan quality as defined by the composite metric. While dose differences were case specific, fluence-based optimization improved both PTV and OAR dosimetry in 80% of cases.

  18. A hybrid source-driven method to compute fast neutron fluence in reactor pressure vessel - 017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren-Tai, Chiang

    2010-01-01

    A hybrid source-driven method is developed to compute fast neutron fluence with neutron energy greater than 1 MeV in nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV). The method determines neutron flux by solving a steady-state neutron transport equation with hybrid neutron sources composed of peripheral fixed fission neutron sources and interior chain-reacted fission neutron sources. The relative rod-by-rod power distribution of the peripheral assemblies in a nuclear reactor obtained from reactor core depletion calculations and subsequent rod-by-rod power reconstruction is employed as the relative rod-by-rod fixed fission neutron source distribution. All fissionable nuclides other than U-238 (such as U-234, U-235, U-236, Pu-239 etc) are replaced with U-238 to avoid counting the fission contribution twice and to preserve fast neutron attenuation for heavy nuclides in the peripheral assemblies. An example is provided to show the feasibility of the method. Since the interior fuels only have a marginal impact on RPV fluence results due to rapid attenuation of interior fast fission neutrons, a generic set or one of several generic sets of interior fuels can be used as the driver and only the neutron sources in the peripheral assemblies will be changed in subsequent hybrid source-driven fluence calculations. Consequently, this hybrid source-driven method can simplify and reduce cost for fast neutron fluence computations. This newly developed hybrid source-driven method should be a useful and simplified tool for computing fast neutron fluence at selected locations of interest in RPV of contemporary nuclear power reactors. (authors)

  19. Implementing and Integrating a Clinically-Driven Electronic Medical Record (EMR for Radiation Oncology in a Large Medical Enterprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Paxton Kirkpatrick

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose/Objective: While our department is heavily invested in computer-based treatment planning, we historically relied on paper-based charts for management of Radiation Oncology patients. In early 2009, we initiated the process of conversion to an electronic medical record (EMR eliminating the need for paper charts. Key goals included the ability to readily access information wherever and whenever needed, without compromising safety, treatment quality, confidentiality or productivity.Methodology: In February, 2009, we formed a multi-disciplinary team of Radiation Oncology physicians, nurses, therapists, administrators, physicists/dosimetrists, and information technology (IT specialists, along with staff from the Duke Health System IT department. The team identified all existing processes and associated information/reports, established the framework for the EMR system and generated, tested and implemented specific EMR processes.Results: Two broad classes of information were identified: information which must be readily accessed by anyone in the health system versus that used solely within the Radiation Oncology department. Examples of the former are consultation reports, weekly treatment check notes and treatment summaries; the latter includes treatment plans, daily therapy records and quality assurance reports. To manage the former, we utilized the enterprise-wide system , which required an intensive effort to design and implement procedures to export information from Radiation Oncology into that system. To manage "Radiation Oncology" data, we used our existing system (ARIA, Varian Medical Systems. The ability to access both systems simultaneously from a single workstation (WS was essential, requiring new WS and modified software. As of January, 2010, all new treatments were managed solely with an EMR. We find that an EMR makes information more widely accessible and does not compromise patient safety, treatment quality or confidentiality

  20. Features of dynamics of sanitary losses formation in case of large-scale radiation accidents and organization of hospital functioning when admitting the injured persons from the radiation focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avetisov, G.M.; Vorontsov, I.V.; Goncharov, S.F.; Ivanov, V.B.

    1995-01-01

    Specific features of therapeutic-evacuation and sanitary-hygienic arrangements in case of large-scale radiation accidents are considered. The substantiation is given for the necessity of setting up to a field hospital near the focus of such an accident for rendering first medical aid and expert medical care, distribution of the injured and organization of their evacuation to specialized medical establishments in due time. 17 refs.; 1 tab

  1. Radiation damage measurements in room-temperature semiconductor radiation detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Franks, L A; Olsen, R W; Walsh, D S; Vizkelethy, G; Trombka, J I; Doyle, B L; James, R B

    1999-01-01

    The literature of radiation damage measurements on cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), cadmium telluride (CT), and mercuric iodide (HgI sub 2) is reviewed and in the case of CZT supplemented by new alpha particle data. CZT strip detectors exposed to intermediate energy (1.3 MeV) proton fluences exhibit increased interstrip leakage after 10 sup 1 sup 0 p/cm sup 2 and significant bulk leakage after 10 sup 1 sup 2 p/cm sup 2. CZT exposed to 200 MeV protons shows a two-fold loss in energy resolution after a fluence of 5x10 sup 9 p/cm sup 2 in thick (3 mm) planar devices but little effect in 2 mm devices. No energy resolution effects were noted from a moderated fission spectrum of neutrons after fluences up to 10 sup 1 sup 0 n/cm sup 2 , although activation was evident. Exposures of CZT to 5 MeV alpha particles at fluences up to 1.5x10 sup 1 sup 0 alpha/cm sup 2 produced a near linear decrease in peak position with fluence and increases in FWHM beginning at about 7.5x10 sup 9 alpha/cm sup 2. CT detectors show resolution...

  2. Red light-induced shift of the fluence-response curve for first positive curvature of maize [Zea mays] coleoptiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, E.; Schäfer, E.

    1987-01-01

    The fluence-response curve for first positive phototropic curvture of dark-grown maize coleoptiles is shifted to ten-fold higher fluences if the coieoptiles are irradiated with red light 2 h prior to the phototropic induction with blue light. Fluence-response curves for this red-induced shift were obtained with unilateral red irradiations 2 h prior to inductive blue pulses of different fluences. They differ significantly depending on whether the red light was given from the same side as or the opposite side to the respective inductive blue pulse, thus demonstrating that the red light effect is a local response of the coleoptile. The fluence-response curves for an inductive blue pulse in the ascending part were compared with those for an inductive blue pulse in the descending part of the fluence-response curve for blue light induced phototropism. They are quite different in threshold of red light sensitivity and shape for irradiations from both the same and the opposite sides. This offers evidence for the hypothesis that at least two different photosystems are involved in phototropism, and that they are modulated differently by a red light preirradiation. All these fluence-response curves indicate that it is possible to increase the response in the coleoptile, if the red light preirradiation is given opposite to the inductive blue pulse. This is supported by blue light fluence-response curves obtained after a weak unilateral red preirradiation. (author)

  3. Absolute measurement and international intercomparison of 0.1-0.8 MeV monoenergetic neutron fluence rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Hongchang; Lu Hanlin; Rong Chaofan

    1988-01-01

    The methods for absolute measurement of 0.1-18MeV monoenergetic neutron fluence rate are described. Which include proton recoil telescope, semicoducetor telescope, hydrogen filled proportional counter and associated particale method. A long counter used as secondary recent international intercomparison of neutron fluence rate organized by BIPM, and the results were given

  4. Sensitivity analysis of the influence of the medium energy and initial fluence FWHM of electron determining a Bremsstrahlung photon spectrum of a linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juste, B.; Miro, R.; Verdu, G.; Diez, S.; Campayo, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    A correct dose calculation in patient under radiotherapy treatments requires and accurate description of the radiation source. The main goal of the present work is to study the effects of initial electron beam characteristics on Monte Carlo calculated absorbed dose distribution for a 6 MeV linac photon beam. To that, we propose a methodology to determine the initial electron fluence before hitting the accelerator target for an Elektra Precisa medical linear accelerator. The method used for the electron radiation source description is based on a Software for Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis (SUSA) and Monte Carlo simulations using the MCNP5 transport code. This electron spectrum has been validated by means of comparison of its resulting depth dose curve in a water cube with experimental data being the mean difference below the 1%. (Author)

  5. Assessment of radiation damage behaviour in a large collection of empirically optimized datasets highlights the importance of unmeasured complicating effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krojer, Tobias; Delft, Frank von

    2011-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of radiation damage behaviour in a statistically significant number of real-life datasets is presented, in order to gauge the importance of the complications not yet measured or rigorously evaluated in current experiments, and the challenges that remain before radiation damage can be considered a problem solved in practice. The radiation damage behaviour in 43 datasets of 34 different proteins collected over a year was examined, in order to gauge the reliability of decay metrics in practical situations, and to assess how these datasets, optimized only empirically for decay, would have benefited from the precise and automatic prediction of decay now possible with the programs RADDOSE [Murray, Garman & Ravelli (2004 ▶). J. Appl. Cryst.37, 513–522] and BEST [Bourenkov & Popov (2010 ▶). Acta Cryst. D66, 409–419]. The results indicate that in routine practice the diffraction experiment is not yet characterized well enough to support such precise predictions, as these depend fundamentally on three interrelated variables which cannot yet be determined robustly and practically: the flux density distribution of the beam; the exact crystal volume; the sensitivity of the crystal to dose. The former two are not satisfactorily approximated from typical beamline information such as nominal beam size and transmission, or two-dimensional images of the beam and crystal; the discrepancies are particularly marked when using microfocus beams (<20 µm). Empirically monitoring decay with the dataset scaling B factor (Bourenkov & Popov, 2010 ▶) appears more robust but is complicated by anisotropic and/or low-resolution diffraction. These observations serve to delineate the challenges, scientific and logistic, that remain to be addressed if tools for managing radiation damage in practical data collection are to be conveniently robust enough to be useful in real time

  6. Fully implicit solution of large-scale non-equilibrium radiation diffusion with high order time integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Peter N.; Shumaker, Dana E.; Woodward, Carol S.

    2005-01-01

    We present a solution method for fully implicit radiation diffusion problems discretized on meshes having millions of spatial zones. This solution method makes use of high order in time integration techniques, inexact Newton-Krylov nonlinear solvers, and multigrid preconditioners. We explore the advantages and disadvantages of high order time integration methods for the fully implicit formulation on both two- and three-dimensional problems with tabulated opacities and highly nonlinear fusion source terms

  7. Effects of gamma radiation on nymphal development and reproductive capacity of the large milkweed bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus (Dallas) (Hemiptera - Lygaeidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moursy, L.E.

    1985-01-01

    Gamma radiation adversely affected important fitness components of Oncopeltus fasciatus, particularly as expressed by nymphal development, subsequent reproductive capacity, mating competitiveness and longevity. Early treated 5th instar nymphs are about 2X more sensitive to gamma radiation than late treated 5th instar nymphs based upon LD50 values. The extremes in sensitivity were 5.01 kilorads (krad) for early treated males and 13.09 krad for females treated late in the 5th instar. Wing deformities resulted from doses in the same range as those for mortality. Fifty percent of early treated males had wing deformities at a dose of 10.81 krad while a dose of 12.5 and 12.89 krad was necessary for 50% wing deformities in males and females, respectively, when treated late in the 5th instar. Fecundity and fertility were affected at lower dosages of radiation than for mortality. The treatment of both sexes produced the greatest effect. Fecundity was reduced by 50% at 1.22 krad, while 50% reduction in fertility occurred at about half that dose, or 0.66 krad. Somewhat greater doses were required when females alone were treated and mated with untreated males. In this case a 50% reduction occurred with 1.87 and 1.07 krad for fecundity and fertility, respectively. When males alone were treated, ED50 values were 2.24 and 1.58 krad for fecundity and fertility, respectively

  8. ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT): Straw Tubes for Tracking and Particle Identification at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mindur, Bartosz; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three inner detector tracking subsystems and consists of 300000 thin-walled drift tubes (“straw tubes”) that are 4 mm in diameter. The TRT system provides 30 space points with 130 micron resolution for charged tracks with |η| 0.5 GeV/c. The TRT also provides electron identification capability by detecting transition radiation (TR) X-ray photons in a Xe-based working gas mixture. Compared to Run 1, the LHC beams now provide a higher center of mass energy (13 TeV), more bunches with a reduced spacing (25 ns), and more particles in each bunch leading to very challenging, higher occupancies in the TRT. We will present TRT modifications made for Run 2 for in areas: to improve response to the expected much higher rate of hits and to mitigate leaks of the Xe-based active gas mixture. The higher rates required changes to the data acquisition system and introduction of validity gate to reject out-of-time hits. Radiation-induced gain changes in ...

  9. Pulsed laser ablation of Germanium under vacuum and hydrogen environments at various fluences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iqbal, Muhammad Hassan [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, Government College University, Lahore (Pakistan); Bashir, Shazia, E-mail: shaziabashir@gcu.edu.pk [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, Government College University, Lahore (Pakistan); Rafique, Muhammad Shahid [Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore (Pakistan); Dawood, Asadullah; Akram, Mahreen; Mahmood, Khaliq; Hayat, Asma; Ahmad, Riaz; Hussain, Tousif [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, Government College University, Lahore (Pakistan); Mahmood, Arshad [National Institute of Laser and Optronics (NILOP), Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2015-07-30

    Highlights: • Germanium targets were exposed under vacuum and H{sub 2} environment by nanosecond laser pulses. • The effect of laser fluence and ambient environment has been investigated. • The surface morphology is investigated by SEM analysis. • Raman and FTIR Spectroscopy are performed to reveal structural modification. • Electrical conductivity is probed by four probe method. - Abstract: Laser fluence and ambient environment play a significant role for the formation and development of the micro/nano-structures on the laser irradiated targets. Single crystal (1 0 0) Germanium (Ge) has been ablated under two environments of vacuum (10{sup −3} Torr) and hydrogen (100 Torr) at various fluences ranging from 4.5 J cm{sup −2} to 6 J cm{sup −2}. For this purpose KrF Excimer laser with wavelength of 248 nm, pulse duration of 18 ns and repetition rate of 20 Hz has been employed. Surface morphology has been observed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Whereas, structural modification of irradiated targets was explored by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy. Electrical conductivity of the irradiated Ge is measured by four probe method. SEM analysis exhibits the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS), cones and micro-bumps in both ambient environments (vacuum and hydrogen). The formation as well as development of these structures is strongly dependent upon the laser fluence and environmental conditions. The periodicity of LIPSS or ripples varies from 38 μm to 60 μm in case of vacuum whereas in case of hydrogen environment, the periodicity varies from 20 μm to 45 μm. The difference in number of ripples and periodicity as well as in shape and size of cones and bumps in vacuum and hydrogen is explained on the basis of confinement and shielding effect of plasma. FTIR spectroscopy reveals that no new bands are formed for laser ablated Ge under vacuum, whereas C−H stretching vibration band is

  10. Electron fluence correction factors for various materials in clinical electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivares, M.; Blois, F. de; Podgorsak, E.B.; Seuntjens, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    Relative to solid water, electron fluence correction factors at the depth of dose maximum in bone, lung, aluminum, and copper for nominal electron beam energies of 9 MeV and 15 MeV of the Clinac 18 accelerator have been determined experimentally and by Monte Carlo calculation. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were used to measure depth doses in these materials. The measured relative dose at d max in the various materials versus that of solid water, when irradiated with the same number of monitor units, has been used to calculate the ratio of electron fluence for the various materials to that of solid water. The beams of the Clinac 18 were fully characterized using the EGS4/BEAM system. EGSnrc with the relativistic spin option turned on was used to optimize the primary electron energy at the exit window, and to calculate depth doses in the five phantom materials using the optimized phase-space data. Normalizing all depth doses to the dose maximum in solid water stopping power ratio corrected, measured depth doses and calculated depth doses differ by less than ±1% at the depth of dose maximum and by less than 4% elsewhere. Monte Carlo calculated ratios of doses in each material to dose in LiF were used to convert the TLD measurements at the dose maximum into dose at the center of the TLD in the phantom material. Fluence perturbation correction factors for a LiF TLD at the depth of dose maximum deduced from these calculations amount to less than 1% for 0.15 mm thick TLDs in low Z materials and are between 1% and 3% for TLDs in Al and Cu phantoms. Electron fluence ratios of the studied materials relative to solid water vary between 0.83±0.01 and 1.55±0.02 for materials varying in density from 0.27 g/cm3 (lung) to 8.96 g/cm3 (Cu). The difference in electron fluence ratios derived from measurements and calculations ranges from -1.6% to +0.2% at 9 MeV and from -1.9% to +0.2% at 15 MeV and is not significant at the 1σ level. Excluding the data for Cu, electron fluence

  11. Large germinoma in basal ganglia treated by intraarterial chemotherapy with ACNU following osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption and radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyagami, Mitsusuke; Tsubokawa, Takashi; Kobayashi, Makio.

    1988-10-01

    A rare case of large germinoma in the basal ganglia is reported which was effectively treated by intracarotid chemotherapy with ACNU following osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption using 20 % mannitol and radiation therapy. A 19-year-old man displayed slowly progressive right hemiparesis, motor aphasia and predementia on admission. Plain CT demonstrated a tumor which had a slightly high density with intratumoral calcification and a small cyst, and slight to moderate enhancement was observed following intravenous injection of contrast medium, but there was no unilateral ventricular enlargement. Cerebral angiography revealed hypervascular tumor staining with early draining veins. After biopsy, and as a result of intracarotid chemotherapy with ACNU following osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption and radiation therapy, the tumor decreased rapidly to about 20 % of its original mass. After discharge, tumor progression was observed. However, the enlarged tumor mass almost disappeared (except for calcification) on CT with clinical improvement in response to intracarotid chemotherapy with ACNU following 20 % mannitol.

  12. Characteristics and mechanisms of the bystander response in monolayer cell cultures exposed to very low fluences of alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, John B.; Azzam, Edouard I.; Toledo, Sonia M. de; Nagasawa, Hatsumi

    2005-01-01

    When confluent cultures of mammalian cells are irradiated with very low fluences of alpha particles whereby only occasional cells receive any radiation exposure, genetic changes are observed in the non-irradiated ('bystander') cells. Upregulation of the p53 damage-response pathway as well as activation of proteins in the MAPK family occurred in bystander cells; p53 was phosphorylated on the serine 15 residue suggesting that the upregulation of p53 was a consequence of DNA damage. Damage signals were transmitted to bystander cells through gap junctions, as confirmed by the use of genetically manipulated cells including connexin43 knockouts. Expression of connexin43 was markedly enhanced by irradiation. A moderate bystander effect was observed for specific gene mutations and chromosomal aberrations. This effect was markedly enhanced in cells defective in the non-homologous end joining DNA repair pathway. Finally, an upregulation of oxidative metabolism occurred in bystander cells; the increased levels of reactive oxygen species appeared to be derived from flavine-containing oxidase enzymes. We hypothesize that genetic effects observed in non-irradiated bystander cells are a consequence of oxidative base damage; >90% of mutations in bystander cells were point mutations. When bystander cells cannot repair DNA double strand breaks, they become much more sensitive to the induction of chromosomal aberrations and mutations, the latter consisting primarily of deletion mutants. While we propose that the genetic effects occurring in bystander cells are a consequence of oxidative stress, the nature of the signal that initiates this process remains to be determined

  13. Higher operation temperature quadrant photon detectors of 2-11 μm wavelength radiation with large photosensitive areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawluczyk, J.; Sosna, A.; Wojnowski, D.; Koźniewski, A.; Romanis, M.; Gawron, W.; Piotrowski, J.

    2017-10-01

    We report on the quadrant photon HgCdTe detectors optimized for 2-11 μm wavelength spectral range and Peltier or no cooling, and photosensitive area of a quad-cell of 1×1 to 4×4 mm. The devices are fabricated as photoconductors or multiple photovoltaic cells connected in series (PVM). The former are characterized by a relatively uniform photosensitive area. The PVM photovoltaic cells are distributed along the wafer surface, comprising a periodical stripe structure with a period of 20 μm. Within each period, there is an insensitive gap/trench spot of size close to the period, but becomes negligible for the optimal spot size comparable to a quadrant-cell area. The photoconductors produce 1/f noise with about 10 kHz knee frequency, due to bias necessary for their operation. The PVM photodiodes are typically operated at 0 V bias, so they generate no 1/f noise and operation from DC is enabled. At 230 K, upper corner frequency of 16 to 100 MHz is obtained for photoconductor and 60 to 80 MHz for PVM, normalized detectivity D* 6×107 cm×Hz1/2/W to >1.4×108 cm×Hz1/2/W for photoconductor and >1.7×108 cm·Hz1/2/W for PVM, allowing for position control of the radiation beam with submicron accuracy at 16 MHz, 10.6 μm wavelength of pulsed radiation spot of 0.8 mm dia at the close-to-maximal input radiation power density in a range of detector linear operation.

  14. Studies on improvement of tomato productivity in a large-scale greenhouse: Prediction of tomato yield based on integrated solar radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hisaeda, K.; Nishina, H.

    2007-01-01

    As there are currently many large-scale production facilities that have contracts with the large retailing companies, accurate prediction of yield is necessary. The present study developed a method to predict tomato yield accurately using the data on the outside solar radiation. The present study was conducted in a Venlo-type greenhouse (29,568 square m) at Sera Farm Co., Ltd. in Sera-cho in Hiroshima prefecture. The cultivar used for this experiment was plum tomato. The sowing took place on July 18, the planting took place on August 30, and the harvesting started on October 9, 2002. The planting density was 2.5 plants msup(-2). As the results of the analysis of correlation between the weekly tomato yield and the integrated solar radiation for the period from October 7 to July 28 (43 weeks), the highest correlation (r = 0.518) between the weekly tomato yield and the solar radiation integrated from seven to one weeks before the harvesting was observed. Further investigation by the same correlation analysis was conducted for the 25 weeks period from December 8 to May 26, during which time the effect of growing stages and air temperature were considered to be relatively small. The results showed the highest correlation (r = 0.730) between the weekly tomato yield and the solar radiation integrated from eight to one weeks before the harvesting. The tomato yield occasionally needed to be adjusted at Sera Farm. Consequently, the correlation between the three-week moving average of tomato yield and the integrated solar radiation was calculated. The results showed the highest correlation was obtained for the period from eight to one weeks before the harvesting (r = 0.860). This study therefore showed that it was possible to predict the tomato yield (y: kg.msup(-2).weeksup(-1)) using the following equation on the solar radiation integrated from eight to one weeks before the harvesting(x: MJ.msup(-2)): y = 7.50 x 10 sup(-6)x + 0.148 (rsup(2) = 0.740)

  15. Induction and Persistence of Large γH2AX Foci by High Linear Energy Transfer Radiation in DNA-Dependent protein kinase–Deficient Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bracalente, Candelaria; Ibañez, Irene L.; Molinari, Beatriz; Palmieri, Mónica; Kreiner, Andrés; Valda, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the cell response to DNA double-strand breaks induced by low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiations when the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), an essential protein of the nonhomologous end-joining repair pathway, lacks kinase activity. Methods and Materials: CHO10B2, a Chinese hamster ovary cell line, and its derived radiosensitive mutant cell line, irs-20, lacking DNA-PKcs activity, were evaluated after 0 to 3 Gy of γ-rays, plateau and Bragg peak protons, and lithium beams by clonogenic assay, and as a measurement of double-strand breaks, phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX) foci number and size were quantified by immunocytofluorescence. Results: Irs-20 exhibited greater radiosensitivity and a higher amount of γH2AX foci than CHO10B2 at 6 hours after irradiation for all types of radiations. Remarkably, CHO10B2 and irs-20 maintained their difference in radiosensitivity after high-LET radiation. Six hours after low-LET radiations, irs-20 did not reach basal levels of γH2AX at high doses, whereas CHO10B2 recovered basal levels for all doses. After high-LET radiation, only CHO10B2 exhibited a reduction in γH2AX foci, but it never reached basal levels. Persistent foci in irs-20 confirmed a repair deficiency. Interestingly, after 30 minutes of high-LET radiation both cell lines exhibited large foci (size >0.9 μm 2 ) related to the damage nature, whereas at 6 hours irs-20 showed a higher amount of large foci than CHO10B2, with a 7-fold increase at 3 Gy, that could also be associated to radiosensitivity. Conclusions: We demonstrated, for the first time, an association between deficient DNA-PKcs activity and not only high levels of H2AX phosphorylation but also persistence and size increase of γH2AX foci after high-LET irradiation

  16. Induction and Persistence of Large γH2AX Foci by High Linear Energy Transfer Radiation in DNA-Dependent protein kinase–Deficient Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracalente, Candelaria; Ibañez, Irene L. [Departamento de Micro y Nanotecnología, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Molinari, Beatriz [Departamento de Radiobiología, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Palmieri, Mónica [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kreiner, Andrés [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de San Martín, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Valda, Alejandro [Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de San Martín, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); and others

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the cell response to DNA double-strand breaks induced by low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiations when the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), an essential protein of the nonhomologous end-joining repair pathway, lacks kinase activity. Methods and Materials: CHO10B2, a Chinese hamster ovary cell line, and its derived radiosensitive mutant cell line, irs-20, lacking DNA-PKcs activity, were evaluated after 0 to 3 Gy of γ-rays, plateau and Bragg peak protons, and lithium beams by clonogenic assay, and as a measurement of double-strand breaks, phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX) foci number and size were quantified by immunocytofluorescence. Results: Irs-20 exhibited greater radiosensitivity and a higher amount of γH2AX foci than CHO10B2 at 6 hours after irradiation for all types of radiations. Remarkably, CHO10B2 and irs-20 maintained their difference in radiosensitivity after high-LET radiation. Six hours after low-LET radiations, irs-20 did not reach basal levels of γH2AX at high doses, whereas CHO10B2 recovered basal levels for all doses. After high-LET radiation, only CHO10B2 exhibited a reduction in γH2AX foci, but it never reached basal levels. Persistent foci in irs-20 confirmed a repair deficiency. Interestingly, after 30 minutes of high-LET radiation both cell lines exhibited large foci (size >0.9 μm{sup 2}) related to the damage nature, whereas at 6 hours irs-20 showed a higher amount of large foci than CHO10B2, with a 7-fold increase at 3 Gy, that could also be associated to radiosensitivity. Conclusions: We demonstrated, for the first time, an association between deficient DNA-PKcs activity and not only high levels of H2AX phosphorylation but also persistence and size increase of γH2AX foci after high-LET irradiation.

  17. Magnetic collimation and metal foil filtering for electron range and fluence modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phaisangittisakul, N.; D'Souza, W.D.; Ma Lijun

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the use of magnetically collimated electron beams together with metal filters for electron fluence and range modulation. A longitudinal magnetic field collimation method was developed to reduce skin dose and to improve the electron beam penumbra. Thin metal foils were used to adjust the energies of magnetically collimated electrons. The effects for different types of foils such as Al, Be, Cu, Pb, and Ti were studied using Monte Carlo calculations. An empirical pencil beam dose calculation model was developed to calculate electron dose distributions under magnetic collimation and foil modulation. An optimization method was developed to produce conformal dose distributions for simulated targets such as a horseshoe-shaped target. Our results show that it is possible to produce an electron depth dose enhancement peak using similar techniques of producing a spread-out Bragg peak. In conclusion, our study demonstrates new aspects of using magnetic collimation and foil filtration for producing fluence and range modulated electron dose distributions

  18. Study on measurement technique contrast of 14 MeV neutron fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Li; Hu Jun; Wen Dezhi

    2005-10-01

    The stability and repetition of the associated-particle method to measure DT neutron fluence was tested. The neutron activation iron method was contrasted with the associated-particle method, the preparatory experiment was done. The neutron fluence measured with associated-particle method was contrasted with neutron activation Al method, the Al activated foil was measured with 4πβ (PC)-γ coincidence standard device. The contrast result's standard deviation of the two method was less than the expand uncertainty of the associated-particle method. Therein, the uncertainty of the associated-particle method is 1.6%, the uncertainty of the activation Al method is 1.8%. (authors)

  19. Pain during photodynamic therapy is associated with protoporphyrin IX fluorescence and fluence rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiegell, S.R.; Skiveren, J.; Philipsen, P.A.

    2008-01-01

    and protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence, lesion type, lesion preparation and lesion localization. Methods Twenty-six patients with actinic keratoses (AKs) in different localizations and 34 patients with facial acne vulgaris were treated with methyl aminolaevulinate-PDT. Patients with acne were illuminated using......) patients with acne had a pain score of 6 [interquartile range (IQR) 5-7] compared with 8 (IQR 6-10) when using a fluence rate of 68 mW cm(-2) (P = 0.018). After correcting the pain score for PpIX fluorescence no differences in pain scores were found between first and second acne treatment, locations of AK...... lesions or between the two types of lesions. Conclusions Pain during PDT was correlated with the PpIX fluorescence in the treatment area prior to illumination. Pain was reduced using a lower fluence rate during PDT of acne Udgivelsesdato: 2008/4...

  20. Validation of neutron-transport calculations in benchmark facilities for improved damage-fluence predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.L.; Stallmann, F.W.; Maerker, R.E.; Kam, F.B.K.

    1983-01-01

    An accurate determination of damage fluence accumulated by reactor pressure vessels (RPV) as a function of time is essential in order to evaluate the vessel integrity for both pressurized thermal shock (PTS) transients and end-of-life considerations. The desired accuracy for neutron exposure parameters such as displacements per atom or fluence (E > 1 MeV) is of the order of 20 to 30%. However, these types of accuracies can only be obtained realistically by validation of nuclear data and calculational methods in benchmark facilities. The purposes of this paper are to review the needs and requirements for benchmark experiments, to discuss the status of current benchmark experiments, to summarize results and conclusions obtained so far, and to suggest areas where further benchmarking is needed

  1. ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT): Straw tubes for tracking and particle identification at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00220535; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three inner detector tracking subsystems and consists of ∼300,000 thin-walled drift tubes (“straw tubes”) that are 4 mm in diameter. The TRT system provides ∼30 space points with ∼130 micron resolution for charged tracks with |η| 0.5 GeV/c . The TRT also provides electron identification capability by detecting transition radiation (TR) X-ray photons in an Xe-based working gas mixture. Compared to Run 1, the LHC beams now provide a higher centre of mass energy (13 TeV), more bunches with a reduced spacing (25 ns), and more particles in each bunch leading to very challenging, higher occupancies in the TRT. Significant modifications of the TRT detector have been made for LHC Run 2 mainly to improve response to the expected much higher rate of hits and to mitigate leaks of the Xe-based active gas mixture. The higher rates required changes to the data acquisition system and introduction of validity gate to reject out-of-time hits. Man...

  2. Effect of laser fluence on surface, structural and mechanical properties of Zr after irradiation in the ambient environment of oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelani, M.; Bashir, S.; Khaleeq-ur Rehman, M.; Ahamad, R.; Ul-Haq, F.; Yousaf, D.; Akram, M.; Afzal, N.; Umer Chaudhry, M.; Mahmood, K.; Hayat, A.; Ahmad, Sajjad

    2013-01-01

    The laser irradiation effects on surface, structural and mechanical properties of zirconium (Zr) have been investigated. For this purpose, Zr samples were irradiated with Excimer (KrF) laser (λ = 248 nm, τ = 18 ns, repetition rate ∼ 30 Hz). The irradiation was performed under the ambient environment of oxygen gas at filling pressure of 20 torr by varying laser fluences ranging from 3.8 to 5.1 cm -2 . The surface and structural modification of irradiated targets was investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD). In order to explore the mechanical properties of irradiated Zr, the tensile testing and Vickers micro hardness testing techniques were employed. SEM analysis reveals the grain growth on the irradiated Zr surfaces for all fluences. However, the largest sized grains are grown for the lowest fluence of 3.8 J/cm 2 . With increasing fluence from 4.3 to 5.1 J cm -2 , the compactness and density of grains increase whereas their size decreases. XRD analysis reveals the appearance of new phases of ZrO 2 and Zr 3 O. The variation in the peak intensity is observed to be anomalous whereas decreasing trend in the crystallite size and residual stresses has been observed with increasing fluence. Micro hardness analysis reveals the increasing trend in surface hardness with increasing fluence. The tensile testing exhibits the increasing trend of yield stress (YS), decreasing trend of percentage elongation and anomalous behaviour of ultimate tensile strength with increasing fluence. (authors)

  3. Epidermal protection with cryogen spray cooling during high fluence pulsed dye laser irradiation: an ex vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunnell, J W; Nelson, J S; Torres, J H; Anvari, B

    2000-01-01

    Higher laser fluences than currently used in therapy (5-10 J/cm(2)) are expected to result in more effective treatment of port wine stain (PWS) birthmarks. However, higher incident fluences increase the risk of epidermal damage caused by absorption of light by melanin. Cryogen spray cooling offers an effective method to reduce epidermal injury during laser irradiation. The objective of this study was to determine whether high laser incident fluences (15-30 J/cm(2)) could be used while still protecting the epidermis in ex vivo human skin samples. Non-PWS skin from a human cadaver was irradiated with a Candela ScleroPlus Laser (lambda = 585 nm; pulse duration = 1.5 msec) by using various incident fluences (8-30 J/cm(2)) without and with cryogen spray cooling (refrigerant R-134a; spurt durations: 40-250 msec). Assessment of epidermal damage was based on histologic analysis. Relatively short spurt durations (40-100 msec) protected the epidermis for laser incident fluences comparable to current therapeutic levels (8-10 J/cm(2)). However, longer spurt durations (100-250 msec) increased the fluence threshold for epidermal damage by a factor of three (up to 30 J/cm(2)) in these ex vivo samples. Results of this ex vivo study show that epidermal protection from high laser incident fluences can be achieved by increasing the cryogen spurt duration immediately before pulsed laser exposure. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Effects of laser focusing and fluence on the analysis of pellets of plant materials by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustinelli Arantes de Carvalho, Gabriel; Santos, Dario; Nunes, Lidiane Cristina; Gomes, Marcos da Silva; Leme, Flavio de Oliveira; Krug, Francisco José

    2012-01-01

    The effects of laser focusing and fluence on LIBS analysis of pellets of plant leaves was evaluated. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (5 ns, 10 Hz, 1064 nm) was used and the emission signals were collected by lenses into an optical fiber coupled to a spectrometer with Echelle optics and ICCD. Data were acquired from the accumulation of 20 laser pulses at 2.0 μs delay and 5.0 μs integration time gate. The emission signal intensities increased with both laser fluence and spot size. Higher sensitivities for Ca, K, Mg, P, Al, B, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn determinations were observed for fluences in the range from 25 to 60 J cm −2 . Coefficients of variation of site-to-site measurements were generally lower than 10% (n = 30 sites, 20 laser pulses/site) for a fluence of 50 J cm −2 and 750 μm spot size. For most elements, there is an indication that accuracy is improved with higher fluences. - Highlights: ► Laser focusing and fluence affect the quality of LIBS results. ► Improvements on sensitivity and precision were observed for most analytes. ► Matrix effects can be minimized by choosing the most appropriate fluence.