WorldWideScience

Sample records for large coherent structures

  1. Visualisation of isothermal large coherent structures in a swirl burner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valera-Medina, A.; Syred, N.; Griffiths, A. [School of Engineering, Cardiff University, Queen' s Building, The Parade, Cardiff, Wales CF24 3AA (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-15

    Lean premixed combustion using swirl flame stabilisation is widespread amongst gas turbine manufacturers. The use of swirl mixing and flame stabilisation is also prevalent in many other non-premixed systems. Problems that emerge include loss of stabilisation as a function of combustor geometry and thermo-acoustic instabilities. Coherent structures and their relationship with combustion processes have been a concern for decades due to their complex nature. This paper thus adopts an experimental approach to characterise large coherent structures in swirl burners under isothermal conditions so as to reveal the effects of swirl in a number of geometries and cold flow patterns that are relevant in combustion. Aided by techniques such as Hot Wire Anemometry, High Speed Photography and Particle Image Velocimetry, the recognition of several structures was achieved in a 100 kW swirl burner model. Several varied, interacting, structures developed in the field as a consequence of the configurations used. New structures never observed before were identified, the results not only showing the existence of very well defined large structures, but also their dependency on geometrical and flow parameters. The PVC is confirmed to be a semi-helical structure, contrary to previous simulations performed on the system. The appearance of secondary recirculation zones and suppression of the vortical core as a consequence of geometrical constrictions are presented as a mechanism of flow control. The asymmetry of the Central Recirculation Zone in cold flows is observed in all the experiments, with its elongation dependent on Re and swirl number used. (author)

  2. Large Eddy Simulation of Coherent Structure of Impinging Jet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingzhou YU; Lihua CHEN; Hanhui JIN; Jianren FAN

    2005-01-01

    @@ The flow field of a rectangular exit, semi-confined and submerged turbulent jet impinging orthogonally on a flat plate with Reynolds number 8500 was studied by large eddy simulation (LES). A dynamic sub-grid stress model has been used for the small scales of turbulence. The evolvements such as the forming, developing, moving,pairing and merging of the coherent structures of vortex in the whole regions were obtained. The results revealed that the primary vortex structures were generated periodically, which was the key factor to make the secondary vortices generate in the wall jet region. In addition, the eddy intensity of the primary vortices and the secondary vortices induced by the primary vortices along with the time were also analyzed.

  3. Structure Transformation and Coherent Interface in Large Lattice-Mismatched Nanoscale Multilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Y. Xie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscale Al/W multilayers were fabricated by DC magnetron sputtering and characterized by transmission electron microscopy and high-resolution electron microscopy. Despite the large lattice mismatch and significantly different lattice structures between Al and W, a structural transition from face-centered cubic to body-centered cubic in Al layers was observed when the individual layer thickness was reduced from 5 nm to 1 nm, forming coherent Al/W interfaces. For potential mechanisms underlying the observed structure transition and forming of coherent interfaces, it was suggested that the reduction of interfacial energy and high stresses induced by large lattice-mismatch play a crucial role.

  4. A theoretical model for the evolution of two-dimensional large-scale coherent structures in a mixing layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周恒; 马良

    1995-01-01

    By a proper combination of the modified weakly nonlinear theory of hydrodynamic stability and the energy method, the spatial evolution of the large-scale coherent structures in a mixing layer has been calculated. The results are satisfactory.

  5. Emergence of coherent structures and large-scale flows in motile suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saintillan, David; Shelley, Michael J

    2012-03-01

    The emergence of coherent structures, large-scale flows and correlated dynamics in suspensions of motile particles such as swimming micro-organisms or artificial microswimmers is studied using direct particle simulations. A detailed model is proposed for a slender rod-like particle that propels itself in a viscous fluid by exerting a prescribed tangential stress on its surface, and a method is devised for the efficient calculation of hydrodynamic interactions in large-scale suspensions of such particles using slender-body theory and a smooth particle-mesh Ewald algorithm. Simulations are performed with periodic boundary conditions for various system sizes and suspension volume fractions, and demonstrate a transition to large-scale correlated motions in suspensions of rear-actuated swimmers, or Pushers, above a critical volume fraction or system size. This transition, which is not observed in suspensions of head-actuated swimmers, or Pullers, is seen most clearly in particle velocity and passive tracer statistics. These observations are consistent with predictions from our previous mean-field kinetic theory, one of which states that instabilities will arise in uniform isotropic suspensions of Pushers when the product of the linear system size with the suspension volume fraction exceeds a given threshold. We also find that the collective dynamics of Pushers result in giant number fluctuations, local alignment of swimmers and strongly mixing flows. Suspensions of Pullers, which evince no large-scale dynamics, nonetheless display interesting deviations from the random isotropic state.

  6. Conditional sampling technique to test the applicability of the Taylor hypothesis for the large-scale coherent structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, A. K. M. F.

    1980-01-01

    Comparisons of the distributions of large scale structures in turbulent flow with distributions based on time dependent signals from stationary probes and the Taylor hypothesis are presented. The study investigated an area in the near field of a 7.62 cm circular air jet at a Re of 32,000, specifically having coherent structures through small-amplitude controlled excitation and stable vortex pairing in the jet column mode. Hot-wire and X-wire anemometry were employed to establish phase averaged spatial distributions of longitudinal and lateral velocities, coherent Reynolds stress and vorticity, background turbulent intensities, streamlines and pseudo-stream functions. The Taylor hypothesis was used to calculate spatial distributions of the phase-averaged properties, with results indicating that the usage of the local time-average velocity or streamwise velocity produces large distortions.

  7. Conditional sampling technique to test the applicability of the Taylor hypothesis for the large-scale coherent structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, A. K. M. F.

    1980-01-01

    Comparisons of the distributions of large scale structures in turbulent flow with distributions based on time dependent signals from stationary probes and the Taylor hypothesis are presented. The study investigated an area in the near field of a 7.62 cm circular air jet at a Re of 32,000, specifically having coherent structures through small-amplitude controlled excitation and stable vortex pairing in the jet column mode. Hot-wire and X-wire anemometry were employed to establish phase averaged spatial distributions of longitudinal and lateral velocities, coherent Reynolds stress and vorticity, background turbulent intensities, streamlines and pseudo-stream functions. The Taylor hypothesis was used to calculate spatial distributions of the phase-averaged properties, with results indicating that the usage of the local time-average velocity or streamwise velocity produces large distortions.

  8. Study of coherent structures of turbulence with large wall-normal gradients in thermophysical properties using direct numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinink, Shawn K.; Yaras, Metin I.

    2015-06-01

    Forced-convection heat transfer in a heated working fluid at a thermodynamic state near its pseudocritical point is poorly predicted by correlations calibrated with data at subcritical temperatures and pressures. This is suggested to be primarily due to the influence of large wall-normal thermophysical property gradients that develop in proximity of the pseudocritical point on the concentration of coherent turbulence structures near the wall. The physical mechanisms dominating this influence remain poorly understood. In the present study, direct numerical simulation is used to study the development of coherent vortical structures within a turbulent spot under the influence of large wall-normal property gradients. A turbulent spot rather than a fully turbulent boundary layer is used for the study, for the coherent structures of turbulence in a spot tend to be in a more organized state which may allow for more effective identification of cause-and-effect relationships. Large wall-normal gradients in thermophysical properties are created by heating the working fluid which is near the pseudocritical thermodynamic state. It is found that during improved heat transfer, wall-normal gradients in density accelerate the growth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability mechanism in the shear layer enveloping low-speed streaks, causing it to roll up into hairpin vortices at a faster rate. It is suggested that this occurs by the baroclinic vorticity generation mechanism which accelerates the streamwise grouping of vorticity during shear layer roll-up. The increased roll-up frequency leads to reduced streamwise spacing between hairpin vortices in wave packets. The density gradients also promote the sinuous instability mode in low-speed streaks. The resulting oscillations in the streaks in the streamwise-spanwise plane lead to locally reduced spanwise spacing between hairpin vortices forming over adjacent low-speed streaks. The reduction in streamwise and spanwise spacing between

  9. A low-dimensional model predicting geometry-dependent dynamics of large-scale coherent structures in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Kunlun; Brown, Eric

    2015-01-01

    We test the ability of a general low-dimensional model for turbulence to predict geometry-dependent dynamics of large-scale coherent structures, such as convection rolls. The model consists of stochastic ordinary differential equations, which are derived as a function of boundary geometry from the Navier-Stokes equations (Brown and Ahlers 2008). We test the model using Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection experiments in a cubic container. The model predicts a new mode in which the alignment of a convection roll switches between diagonals. We observe this mode with a measured switching rate within 30% of the prediction.

  10. Porous medium convection at large Rayleigh number: Studies of coherent structure, transport, and reduced dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Baole

    Buoyancy-driven convection in fluid-saturated porous media is a key environmental and technological process, with applications ranging from carbon dioxide storage in terrestrial aquifers to the design of compact heat exchangers. Porous medium convection is also a paradigm for forced-dissipative infinite-dimensional dynamical systems, exhibiting spatiotemporally chaotic dynamics if not "true" turbulence. The objective of this dissertation research is to quantitatively characterize the dynamics and heat transport in two-dimensional horizontal and inclined porous medium convection between isothermal plane parallel boundaries at asymptotically large values of the Rayleigh number Ra by investigating the emergent, quasi-coherent flow. This investigation employs a complement of direct numerical simulations (DNS), secondary stability and dynamical systems theory, and variational analysis. The DNS confirm the remarkable tendency for the interior flow to self-organize into closely-spaced columnar plumes at sufficiently large Ra (up to Ra ≃ 105), with more complex spatiotemporal features being confined to boundary layers near the heated and cooled walls. The relatively simple form of the interior flow motivates investigation of unstable steady and time-periodic convective states at large Ra as a function of the domain aspect ratio L. To gain insight into the development of spatiotemporally chaotic convection, the (secondary) stability of these fully nonlinear states to small-amplitude disturbances is investigated using a spatial Floquet analysis. The results indicate that there exist two distinct modes of instability at large Ra: a bulk instability mode and a wall instability mode. The former usually is excited by long-wavelength disturbances and is generally much weaker than the latter. DNS, strategically initialized to investigate the fully nonlinear evolution of the most dangerous secondary instability modes, suggest that the (long time) mean inter-plume spacing in

  11. Objective Eulerian Coherent Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Serra, M

    2015-01-01

    We define objective Eulerian Coherent Structures (OECSs) in two-dimensional, non-autonomous dynamical systems as instantaneously most influential material curves. Specifically, OECSs are stationary curves of the averaged instantaneous material stretching-rate or material shearing-rate functionals. From these objective (frame-invariant) variational principles, we obtain explicit differential equations for hyperbolic, elliptic and parabolic OECSs. As illustration, we compute OECSs in an unsteady ocean velocity data set. In comparison to structures suggested by other common Eulerian diagnostic tools, we find OECSs to be the correct short-term cores of observed trajectory deformation patterns.

  12. Exact coherent structures for the turbulent cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt, Bruno; Zammert, Stefan

    2016-11-01

    The exact coherent structures that are connected with the transition to turbulence in interior flows usually extend across the full height of the domain. Using exact coherent states that are localized in the shear direction together with scaling ideas for the Navier-Stokes equation that combine length and Reynolds number, we show how such large scale structures can be morphed into smaller scale coherent structures. As the Reynolds number increases, more of these states with ever smaller scales appear, all the way down to the Kolmogorov scale. We present the structure and dynamical properties of several families of exact coherent solution in plane Couette flow, with different degrees of spatial localization: Some of them remain localized in the center and help to built the turbulence cascade, others are localized near the walls and contribute to shaping the boundary layer profile.

  13. Nuclear structure with coherent states

    CERN Document Server

    Raduta, Apolodor Aristotel

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the essential features of a large variety of nuclear structure properties, both collective and microscopic in nature. Most of results are given in an analytical form thus giving deep insight into the relevant phenomena. Using coherent states as variational states, which allows a description in the classical phase space, or provides the generating function for a boson basis, is an efficient tool to account, in a realistic fashion, for many complex properties. A detailed comparison with all existing nuclear structure models provides readers with a proper framework and, at the same time, demonstrates the prospects for new developments. The topics addressed are very much of current concern in the field. The book will appeal to practicing researchers and, due to its self-contained account, can also be successfully read and used by new graduate students.

  14. Models as coherent sign structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gazendam, H.W.M.; Jorna, R.J.J.M.; Gazendam, H.W.M.; Cijsouw, R.S.

    2003-01-01

    This chapter explains how models function as the glue that keeps organizations together. In an analysis of models from a semiotic and cognitive point of view, assumptions about evolutionary dynamics and bounded rationality are used. It is concluded that a model is a coherent sign structure,

  15. Detecting coherent structures using braids

    CERN Document Server

    Allshouse, Michael R

    2011-01-01

    The detection of coherent structures is an important problem in fluid dynamics, particularly in geophysical applications. For instance, knowledge of how regions of fluid are isolated from each other allows prediction of the ultimate fate of oil spills. Existing methods detect Lagrangian coherent structures, which are barriers to transport, by examining the stretching field as given by finite-time Lyapunov exponents. These methods are very effective when the velocity field is well-determined, but in many applications only a small number of flow trajectories are known, for example when dealing with oceanic float data. We introduce a topological method for detecting invariant regions based on a small set of trajectories. In the method we regard the two-dimensional trajectory data as a braid in three dimensions, with time being the third coordinate. Invariant regions then correspond to trajectories that travel together and do not entangle other trajectories. We detect these regions by examining the growth of hypo...

  16. Ability of a low-dimensional model to predict geometry-dependent dynamics of large-scale coherent structures in turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Kunlun; Ji, Dandan; Brown, Eric

    2016-02-01

    We test the ability of a general low-dimensional model for turbulence to predict geometry-dependent dynamics of large-scale coherent structures, such as convection rolls. The model consists of stochastic ordinary differential equations, which are derived as a function of boundary geometry from the Navier-Stokes equations [Brown and Ahlers, Phys. Fluids 20, 075101 (2008); Phys. Fluids 20, 105105 (2008)]. We test the model using Rayleigh-Bénard convection experiments in a cubic container. The model predicts a mode in which the alignment of a convection roll stochastically crosses a potential barrier to switch between diagonals. We observe this mode with a measured switching rate within 30% of the prediction.

  17. Coherent structures in compressible free-shear-layer flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aeschliman, D.P.; Baty, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Engineering Sciences Center; Kennedy, C.A.; Chen, J.H. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion and Physical Sciences Center

    1997-08-01

    Large scale coherent structures are intrinsic fluid mechanical characteristics of all free-shear flows, from incompressible to compressible, and laminar to fully turbulent. These quasi-periodic fluid structures, eddies of size comparable to the thickness of the shear layer, dominate the mixing process at the free-shear interface. As a result, large scale coherent structures greatly influence the operation and efficiency of many important commercial and defense technologies. Large scale coherent structures have been studied here in a research program that combines a synergistic blend of experiment, direct numerical simulation, and analysis. This report summarizes the work completed for this Sandia Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project.

  18. Ultrasound Beamforming Methods for Large Coherent Apertures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottenus, Nick

    This dissertation investigates the use of large coherent ultrasound apertures to improve diagnostic image quality for deep clinical targets. The current generation of ultrasound scanners restrict aperture size and geometry based on hardware limitations and field of view requirements at the expense of image quality. This work posits that, without these restrictions, ultrasound could be used for higher quality non-invasive imaging. To support this claim, an experimental device was constructed to acquire in vivo liver images with a synthetic aperture spanning at least 35 degrees at a radius of 10.2 cm with a scan time under one second. Using a 2.5 MHz commercial matrix array with the device, a lateral resolution of 0.45 mm at a depth of 11.6 cm was achieved, surpassing the capabilities of existing commercial systems. This work formed the basis for an in-depth investigation of the clinical promise of large aperture imaging. Ex vivo study of volumetric imaging through the human abdominal wall demonstrated the ability of large apertures to improve target detectability at depth by significantly increasing lateral resolution, even in the presence of tissue-induced aberration and reverberation. For various abdominal wall samples studied, full-width at half-maximum resolution was increased by 1.6 to 4.3 times using a 6.4 cm swept synthetic aperture compared to conventional imaging. Harmonic plane wave imaging was shown to limit the impact of reverberation clutter from the tissue layer and produce images with the highest target detectability, up to a 45.9% improvement in contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) over fundamental imaging. This study was corroborated by simulation of a 10 cm concave matrix array imaging through an abdominal wall based on the Visible Human Project data set. The large aperture data were processed in several ways, including in their entirety as a fully populated large array as well as mimicking the swept synthetic aperture configuration. Image quality

  19. Emergence of non-zonal coherent structures

    CERN Document Server

    Bakas, Nikolaos A

    2015-01-01

    Planetary turbulence is observed to self-organize into large-scale structures such as zonal jets and coherent vortices. One of the simplest models that retains the relevant dynamics of turbulent self-organization is a barotropic flow in a beta-plane channel with turbulence sustained by random stirring. Non-linear integrations of this model show that as the energy input rate of the forcing is increased, the homogeneity of the flow is first broken by the emergence of non-zonal, coherent, westward propagating structures and at larger energy input rates by the emergence of zonal jets. The emergence of both non-zonal coherent structures and zonal jets is studied using a statistical theory, Stochastic Structural Stability Theory (S3T). S3T directly models a second-order approximation to the statistical mean turbulent state and allows the identification of statistical turbulent equilibria and study of their stability. Using S3T, the bifurcation properties of the homogeneous state in barotropic beta-plane turbulence ...

  20. On Attracting Lagrangian Coherent Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Karrasch, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    In this note, we show that in the autonomous, two-dimensional incompressible saddle flow, contrary to common intuition, also attracting Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSs) can show up as ridges of the forward finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) field. This raises the issue of characterization of attracting LCSs from forward time FTLE analysis. First, we extend recent results of Haller & Sapsis (2011) [11] on the relation between forward and backward maximal and minimal stretching rates to the whole finite-time Lyapunov spectrum and to stretching directions by considering the singular value decomposition (SVD) of the deformation gradient. We show two significant advantages of the SVD compared to the usual eigendecomposition of the Cauchy-Green strain tensor: (1) one gains theoretical insight into local deformation under a finite-time dynamical system, and (2) one obtains both complete forward and backward strain information from a single grid advection. Furthermore, we give a short and direct proof of t...

  1. Coherent Structures and Reconnection in Collisionless Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roytershteyn, Vadim; Karimabadi, Homa

    2014-10-01

    The sub-proton range of collisionless turbulence has attracted considerable attention in the last decades due to its role in the dissipation of cascading energy and increased availability of high-quality measurements capable of constraining the relevant models. Coherent structures, such as current sheets, have long been considered important sites for the dissipation of energy. However, a self-consistent treatment of their formation and of the relevant collisionless dissipation mechanisms has only become possible recently. Here we discuss several examples from recent kinetic simulations of turbulence focusing on the role of current sheets and magnetic reconnection. In the 3D fully kinetic simulations with initial conditions relevant to solar wind turbulence, current sheets form over a large range of scales and are shown to be sites of increased energy transfer between fluctuating fields and particles. Moreover, depending on the initial conditions and the type of driving, other types of coherent structures are possible, such as magnetic holes. 2D and 3D global hybrid simulations of the interaction between solar wind and planetary magnetospheres demonstrate inherent connection between collisionless shocks, turbulence, and magnetic reconnection. Specifically, the interaction of foreshock turbulence driven by reflected ions with the shock itself leads to a variety of fascinating phenomena in the magnetosheath, seeding both small-scale turbulence and large-scale global perturbations.

  2. Using Horseshoes to Create Coherent Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Shinbrot, T; Shinbrot, Troy

    1993-01-01

    Abstract: In this letter, we show that coherent structures are related to folds of horseshoes which are present in chaotic systems. We develop techniques that allow us to construct coherent structures by manipulating folds in three prototypical problems: a 1-D chaotic map, a 2-D chaotic map, and a chaotically advected fluid. The ability to construct such structures is of practical importance for the control of chaotic or turbulent extended systems such as fluids, plasmas, and coupled oscillator arrays.

  3. Coherent Structures in Numerically Simulated Plasma Turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed-Hansen, O.; Pécseli, H.L.; Trulsen, J.

    1989-01-01

    Low level electrostatic ion acoustic turbulence generated by the ion-ion beam instability was investigated numerically. The fluctuations in potential were investigated by a conditional statistical analysis revealing propagating coherent structures having the form of negative potential wells which...

  4. Distributed chaos tuned to large scale coherent motions in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bershadskii, A

    2016-01-01

    It is shown, using direct numerical simulations and laboratory experiments data, that distributed chaos is often tuned to large scale coherent motions in anisotropic inhomogeneous turbulence. The examples considered are: fully developed turbulent boundary layer (range of coherence: $14 < y^{+} < 80$), turbulent thermal convection (in a horizontal cylinder), and Cuette-Taylor flow. Two ways of the tuning have been described: one via fundamental frequency (wavenumber) and another via subharmonic (period doubling). For the second way the large scale coherent motions are a natural component of distributed chaos. In all considered cases spontaneous breaking of space translational symmetry is accompanied by reflexional symmetry breaking.

  5. On coherent structure in wall turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, A S

    2013-01-01

    A new theory of coherent structure in wall turbulence is presented. The theory is the first to predict packets of hairpin vortices and other structure in turbulence, and their dynamics, based on an analysis of the Navier-Stokes equations, under an assumption of a turbulent mean profile. The assumption of the turbulent mean acts as a restriction on the class of possible structures. It is shown that the coherent structure is a manifestation of essentially low-dimensional flow dynamics, arising from a critical layer mechanism. Using the decomposition presented in McKeon & Sharma (J. Fluid Mech, 658, 2010), complex coherent structure is recreated from minimal superpositions of response modes predicted by the analysis, which take the form of radially-varying travelling waves. By way of example, simple combinations of these modes are offered that predicts hairpins and modulated hairpin packets. The phase interaction also predicts important skewness and correlation results known in the literature. It is also sho...

  6. Coherent structures and extreme events in rotating multiphase turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Biferale, Luca; Mazzitelli, Irene M; van Hinsberg, Michel A T; Lanotte, Alessandra S; Musacchio, Stefano; Perlekar, Prasad; Toschi, Federico

    2016-01-01

    By using direct numerical simulations (DNS) at unprecedented resolution we study turbulence under rotation in the presence of simultaneous direct and inverse cascades. The accumulation of energy at large scale leads to the formation of vertical coherent regions with high vorticity oriented along the rotation axis. By seeding the flow with millions of inertial particles, we quantify -for the first time- the effects of those coherent vertical structures on the preferential concentration of light and heavy particles. Furthermore, we quantitatively show that extreme fluctuations, leading to deviations from a normal-distributed statistics, result from the entangled interaction of the vertical structures with the turbulent background. Finally, we present the first-ever measurement of the relative importance between Stokes drag, Coriolis force and centripetal forces along the trajectories of inertial particles. We discover that vortical coherent structures lead to unexpected diffusion properties for heavy and light ...

  7. Coherent Structures and Extreme Events in Rotating Multiphase Turbulent Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Biferale

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available By using direct numerical simulations (DNS at unprecedented resolution, we study turbulence under rotation in the presence of simultaneous direct and inverse cascades. The accumulation of energy at large scale leads to the formation of vertical coherent regions with high vorticity oriented along the rotation axis. By seeding the flow with millions of inertial particles, we quantify—for the first time—the effects of those coherent vertical structures on the preferential concentration of light and heavy particles. Furthermore, we quantitatively show that extreme fluctuations, leading to deviations from a normal-distributed statistics, result from the entangled interaction of the vertical structures with the turbulent background. Finally, we present the first-ever measurement of the relative importance between Stokes drag, Coriolis force, and centripetal force along the trajectories of inertial particles. We discover that vortical coherent structures lead to unexpected diffusion properties for heavy and light particles in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the rotation axis.

  8. Coherent Structures and Extreme Events in Rotating Multiphase Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biferale, L.; Bonaccorso, F.; Mazzitelli, I. M.; van Hinsberg, M. A. T.; Lanotte, A. S.; Musacchio, S.; Perlekar, P.; Toschi, F.

    2016-10-01

    By using direct numerical simulations (DNS) at unprecedented resolution, we study turbulence under rotation in the presence of simultaneous direct and inverse cascades. The accumulation of energy at large scale leads to the formation of vertical coherent regions with high vorticity oriented along the rotation axis. By seeding the flow with millions of inertial particles, we quantify—for the first time—the effects of those coherent vertical structures on the preferential concentration of light and heavy particles. Furthermore, we quantitatively show that extreme fluctuations, leading to deviations from a normal-distributed statistics, result from the entangled interaction of the vertical structures with the turbulent background. Finally, we present the first-ever measurement of the relative importance between Stokes drag, Coriolis force, and centripetal force along the trajectories of inertial particles. We discover that vortical coherent structures lead to unexpected diffusion properties for heavy and light particles in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the rotation axis.

  9. Transport and coherent structures in wall turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Tardu, Sedat

    2014-01-01

    Wall bounded turbulent flows are of major importance in industrial and environmental fluid mechanics. The structure of the wall turbulence is intrinsically related to the coherent structures that play a fundamental role in the transport process. The comprehension of their regeneration mechanism is indispensable for the development of efficient strategies in terms of drag control and near wall turbulence management. This book provides an up-to-date overview on the progress made in this specific area in recent years.

  10. Coherent structures in presence of dust charge fluctuations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Kakati; K S Goswami

    2000-05-01

    This paper shows the formation of nonlinear coherent structures in a dusty plasma in presence of dust charge fluctuations. Using the typical plasma parameters the potential of the nonlinear coherent structures is derived.

  11. Lagrangian Coherent Structures: Introduction and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, George

    2008-11-01

    Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS) are distinguished material surfaces that organize the global mixing and transport of fluid particles. While these surfaces define a skeleton that governs all mixing events even in turbulent flows, LCS remain hidden to traditional coherent structure detecting methods based on vorticity, pressure, streamlines, or other frame-dependent quantities. Here we review the mathematical foundations of LCS and discuss how they can be located in an objective (frame-independent) way in complex flows. We also highlight applications to experimental and numerical flow data analysis. Examples include two-dimensional rotating turbulence, hairpin vortices in three-dimensional numerical simulations, passive ocean pollution control and atmospheric clear-air turbulence detection. Some of these examples will be discussed in more detail in later talks within this minisymposium.

  12. Introduction to Focus Issue: Lagrangian Coherent Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Thomas; Dabiri, John

    2010-03-01

    The topic of Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) has been a rapidly growing area of research in nonlinear dynamics for almost a decade. It provides a means to rigorously define and detect transport barriers in dynamical systems with arbitrary time dependence and has a wealth of applications, particularly to fluid flow problems. Here, we give a short introduction to the topic of LCS and review the new work presented in this Focus Issue.

  13. The Effect of Coherence in the Propagation through Periodic Structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertolotti, M.; Hoenders, B.; Mandatori, A.; Sibilia, C.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of the coherence properties of light beams propagating through periodic structures are discussed. In particular, spatial coherence may influence the transmitted field. Some 2D structures which give transmittances strongly influenced by the coherence of the incoming field are discussed.

  14. Coherent structure coloring: identification of coherent structures from sparse flow trajectories using graph theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlueter, Kristy; Dabiri, John

    2016-11-01

    Coherent structure identification is important in many fluid dynamics applications, including transport phenomena in ocean flows and mixing and diffusion in turbulence. However, many of the techniques currently available for measuring such flows, including ocean drifter datasets and particle tracking velocimetry, only result in sparse velocity data. This is often insufficient for the use of current coherent structure detection algorithms based on analysis of the deformation gradient. Here, we present a frame-invariant method for detecting coherent structures from Lagrangian flow trajectories that can be sparse in number. The method, based on principles used in graph coloring algorithms, examines a measure of the kinematic dissimilarity of all pairs of flow trajectories, either measured experimentally, e.g. using particle tracking velocimetry; or numerically, by advecting fluid particles in the Eulerian velocity field. Coherence is assigned to groups of particles whose kinematics remain similar throughout the time interval for which trajectory data is available, regardless of their physical proximity to one another. Through the use of several analytical and experimental validation cases, this algorithm is shown to robustly detect coherent structures using significantly less flow data than is required by existing methods. This research was supported by the Department of Defense (DoD) through the National Defense Science & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) Program.

  15. Coherent structure coloring: identification of coherent structures from sparse data using graph theory

    CERN Document Server

    Schlueter-Kuck, Kristy L

    2016-01-01

    We present a frame-invariant method for detecting coherent structures from Lagrangian flow trajectories that can be sparse in number, as is the case in many fluid mechanics applications of practical interest. The method, based on principles used in graph coloring and spectral graph drawing algorithms, examines a measure of the kinematic dissimilarity of all pairs of fluid trajectories, either measured experimentally, e.g. using particle tracking velocimetry; or numerically, by advecting fluid particles in the Eulerian velocity field. Coherence is assigned to groups of particles whose kinematics remain similar throughout the time interval for which trajectory data is available, regardless of their physical proximity to one another. Through the use of several analytical and experimental validation cases, this algorithm is shown to robustly detect coherent structures using significantly less flow data than is required by existing spectral graph theory methods.

  16. Nano structured materials studied by coherent X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulden, Johannes

    2013-03-15

    Structure determination with X-rays in crystallography is a rapidly evolving field. Crystallographic methods for structure determination are based on the assumptions about the crystallinity of the sample. It is vital to understand the structure of possible defects in the crystal, because they can influence the structure determination. All conventional methods to characterize defects require a modelling through simulated data. No direct methods exist to image the core of defects in crystals. Here a new method is proposed, which will enable to visualize the individual scatterers around and at defects in crystals. The method is based on coherent X-ray scattering. X-rays are perfectly suited since they can penetrate thick samples and buried structures can be investigated Recent developments increased the coherent flux of X-Ray sources such as synchrotrons by orders of magnitude. As a result, the use of the coherent properties of X-rays is emerging as a new aspect of X-ray science. New upcoming and operating X-ray laser sources will accelerate this trend. One new method which has the capacity to recover structural information from the coherently scattered photons is Coherent X-ray Diffraction Imaging (CXDI). The main focus of this thesis is the investigation of the structure and the dynamics of colloidal crystals. Colloidal crystals can be used as a model for atomic crystals in order to understand the growth and defect structure. Despite the large interest in these structures, many details are still unknown.Therefore, it is vital to develop new approaches to measure the core of defects in colloidal crystals. After an introduction into the basics of the field of coherent X-ray scattering, this thesis introduces a novel method, Small Angle Bragg Coherent Diffractive Imaging, (SAB-CDI). This new measurement technique which besides the relevance to colloidal crystals can be applied to a large variety of nano structured materials. To verify the experimental possibilities the

  17. Numerical study of jet noise radiated by turbulent coherent structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastin, F.

    1995-08-01

    a numerical approach of jet mixing noise prediction is presented, based on the assumption that the radiated sound field is essentially due to large-scale coherent turbulent structures. A semi-deterministic turbulence modelling is used to obtain the flow coherent fluctuations. This model is derived from the k-{epsilon} model and validated on the 2-D compressible shear layer case. Three plane jets at Mach 0.5, 1.33 and 2 are calculated. The semi-deterministic modelling yields a realistic unsteady representation of plane jets but not appropriate for axisymmetric jet computations. Lighthill`s analogy is used to estimate the noise radiated by the flow. Three integral formulations of the theory are compared and the most suitable one is expressed in space-time Fourier space. This formulation is associated to a geometrical interpretation of acoustic computations in (k, {omega}) plane. The only contribution of coherent structures cannot account for the high-frequency radiation of a subsonic jet and thus, the initial assumption is not verified in the subsonic range. The interpretation of Lighthill`s analogy in (k, {omega}) plane allows to conclude that the missing high-frequency components are due to the inner structure of the coherent motion. For supersonic jets, full acoustic spectra are obtained, at least in the forward arc where the dominant radiation is emitted. For the fastest jet (M = 2), no Mach waves are observed, which may be explained by a ratio of the structures convection velocity to the jet exit velocity lower in plane than in circular jets. This point is confirmed by instability theory calculations. Large eddy simulations (LES) were performed for subsonic jets. Data obtained in the plane jet case show that this technique allows only a slight improvement of acoustic results. To obtain a satisfactory high-frequency radiation, very fine grids should be considered, and the 2-D approximation could not be justified anymore. (Abstract Truncated)

  18. Coherent structures of electrokinetic instability in microflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Kaushlendra; Gupta, Amit; Bahga, Supreet Singh

    2016-11-01

    Electrokinetic instabilities occur in fluid flow where gradients in electrical properties of fluids, such as conductivity and permittivity, lead to a destabilizing body force. We present an experimental investigation of electrokinetic instability (EKI) in a microchannel flow with orthogonal conductivity gradient and electric field, using time-resolved visualization of a passive fluorescent scalar. This particular EKI has applications in rapid mixing at low Reynolds number in microchannels. Previous studies have shown that such EKI can be characterized by the electric Rayleigh number (Rae) which is the ratio of diffusive and electroviscous time scales. However, these studies were limited to temporal power spectra and time-delay phase maps of fluorescence data at a single spatial location. In the current work, we use dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) of time-resolved snapshots of EKI to investigate the spatio-temporal coherent structures of EKI for a wide range of Rae . Our analysis yields spatial variation of modes in EKI along with their corresponding temporal frequencies. We show that EK instability with orthogonal conductivity-gradient and electric field can be characterized by transverse and longitudinal coherent structures which depend strongly on Rae .

  19. Lagrangian based methods for coherent structure detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allshouse, Michael R., E-mail: mallshouse@chaos.utexas.edu [Center for Nonlinear Dynamics and Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Peacock, Thomas, E-mail: tomp@mit.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    There has been a proliferation in the development of Lagrangian analytical methods for detecting coherent structures in fluid flow transport, yielding a variety of qualitatively different approaches. We present a review of four approaches and demonstrate the utility of these methods via their application to the same sample analytic model, the canonical double-gyre flow, highlighting the pros and cons of each approach. Two of the methods, the geometric and probabilistic approaches, are well established and require velocity field data over the time interval of interest to identify particularly important material lines and surfaces, and influential regions, respectively. The other two approaches, implementing tools from cluster and braid theory, seek coherent structures based on limited trajectory data, attempting to partition the flow transport into distinct regions. All four of these approaches share the common trait that they are objective methods, meaning that their results do not depend on the frame of reference used. For each method, we also present a number of example applications ranging from blood flow and chemical reactions to ocean and atmospheric flows.

  20. Adaptive GOP structure based on motion coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yanzhuo; Wan, Shuai; Chang, Yilin; Yang, Fuzheng; Wang, Xiaoyu

    2009-08-01

    Adaptive Group of Pictures (GOP) is helpful for increasing the efficiency of video encoding by taking account of characteristics of video content. This paper proposes a method for adaptive GOP structure selection for video encoding based on motion coherence, which extracts key frames according to motion acceleration, and assigns coding type for each key and non-key frame correspondingly. Motion deviation is then used instead of motion magnitude in the selection of the number of B frames. Experimental results show that the proposed method for adaptive GOP structure selection achieves performance gain of 0.2-1dB over the fixed GOP, and has the advantage of better transmission resilience. Moreover, this method can be used in real-time video coding due to its low complexity.

  1. Large, Easily Deployable Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agan, W. E.

    1983-01-01

    Study of concepts for large space structures will interest those designing scaffolding, radio towers, rescue equipment, and prefabricated shelters. Double-fold, double-cell module was selected for further design and for zero gravity testing. Concept is viable for deployment by humans outside space vehicle as well as by remotely operated manipulator.

  2. Unsupervised Discovery of Coherent Structures in Spatiotemporal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupe, A.; Kashinath, K.; Prabhat, M.; Crutchfield, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    Coherent structures are ubiquitous in spatiotemporal systems far from equilibrium. These structures provide concise descriptions of the system and its dynamics, and there is often interest in these structures themselves. We present a novel method for automated detection and labeling of coherent structures that can be applied universally to spatiotemporal systems with local dynamics. Adapted from its original development in strictly temporal systems, computational mechanics is a method of inferring a hidden-state model from data which extracts and quantifies structure in the data. Significantly, the structures discovered by computational mechanics are not always readily identifiable from the raw data. Computational mechanics has been successfully applied to identify known structures in cellular automata. Here, we demonstrate the method on two-dimensional DNS hydrodynamic models of vortex shedding. Ultimately, we hope to analyze large-scale climate data for automated detection of extreme weather systems and other (possibly hidden) climatological structures. Current capabilities of the Computational Mechanics in Python (CMPy) software package allows for data parallelization using Berkeley Lab's Cori system, but significant scalability challenges remain to reach more realistic climate simulations. High-resolution simulations produce terabyte-size intermediates that require fully-distributed execution.

  3. Lagrangian Coherent Structures in the Trieste Gulf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besio, G.; Enrile, F.; Magaldi, M. G.; Mantovani, C.; Cosoli, S.; Gerin, R.; Poulain, P. M.

    2013-12-01

    One serious issue in Environmental Science and Engineering concerns the prediction of the fate of contaminants released in a water body. A possible way to tackle this problem consists in forecasting pollutant trajectories from velocity-field data sets obtained by measurements or numerical simulations. A shortcoming of such a traditional approach is the high sensitivity to initial conditions. Another way to understand transport in complex fluid flows comes from a new mathematical tool: Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS). The idea of using Lagrangian Structures rose as a meeting point between non-linear dynamics and fluid mechanics. It provides the means to identify material lines that shape trajectory patterns, dividing the flow field into regions with different dynamical behaviours. The objective of this study is the detection of Lagrangian Coherent Structures in the Gulf of Trieste. LCS are calculated from the 2D surface velocity field measured by the coastal radars of the TOSCA (Tracking Oil Spills & Coastal Awareness network) project. Blobs of simulated particles are subjected to chaotic stirring (transport and stretching) that is in agreement with the detected LCS. In the TOSCA project drifters were deployed, too. Therefore, a simple simulation of some of these drifters was carried out. The trajectory of the simulated drifters diverge from the real one: this result is due to the chaotic transport of passive tracers. However, the separation becomes more evident when velocity fields are less accurate because of lack of measurements, previously filled with nearest neighbourhood interpolation. In the light of such results, the use of LCS could be helpful in understanding the trajectory followed by drifters and passive tracers in general, because they can point out the directions along which transport is likely to develop.

  4. Modulation of energetic coherent motions by large-scale topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wing; Hamed, Ali M.; Troolin, Dan; Chamorro, Leonardo P.

    2016-11-01

    The distinctive characteristics and dynamics of the large-scale coherent motions induced over 2D and 3D large-scale wavy walls were explored experimentally with time-resolved volumetric PIV, and selected wall-normal high-resolution stereo PIV in a refractive-index-matching channel. The 2D wall consists of a sinusoidal wave in the streamwise direction with amplitude to wavelength ratio a/ λx = 0.05, while the 3D wall has an additional wave in the spanwise direction with a/ λy = 0.1. The ?ow was characterized at Re 8000, based on the bulk velocity and the channel half height. The walls are such that the amplitude to boundary layer thickness ratio is a/ δ99 0.1, which resemble geophysical-like topography. Insight on the dynamics of the coherent motions, Reynolds stress and spatial interaction of sweep and ejection events will be discussed in terms of the wall topography modulation.

  5. Lagrangian coherent structures and plasma transport processes

    CERN Document Server

    Falessi, M V; Schep, T J

    2015-01-01

    A dynamical system framework is used to describe transport processes in plasmas embedded in a magnetic field. For periodic systems with one degree of freedom the Poincar\\'e map provides a splitting of the phase space into regions where particles have different kinds of motion: periodic, quasi-periodic or chaotic. The boundaries of these regions are transport barriers; i.e., a trajectory cannot cross such boundaries during the whole evolution of the system. Lagrangian Coherent Structure (LCS) generalize this method to systems with the most general time dependence, splitting the phase space into regions with different qualitative behaviours. This leads to the definition of finite-time transport barriers, i.e. trajectories cannot cross the barrier for a finite amount of time. This methodology can be used to identify fast recirculating regions in the dynamical system and to characterize the transport between them.

  6. Top marine predators track Lagrangian coherent structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tew Kai, Emilie; Rossi, Vincent; Sudre, Joel; Weimerskirch, Henri; Lopez, Cristobal; Hernandez-Garcia, Emilio; Marsac, Francis; Garçon, Veronique

    2009-05-19

    Meso- and submesoscales (fronts, eddies, filaments) in surface ocean flow have a crucial influence on marine ecosystems. Their dynamics partly control the foraging behavior and the displacement of marine top predators (tuna, birds, turtles, and cetaceans). In this work we focus on the role of submesoscale structures in the Mozambique Channel in the distribution of a marine predator, the Great Frigatebird. Using a newly developed dynamic concept, the finite-size Lyapunov exponent (FSLE), we identified Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) present in the surface flow in the channel over a 2-month observation period (August and September 2003). By comparing seabird satellite positions with LCS locations, we demonstrate that frigatebirds track precisely these structures in the Mozambique Channel, providing the first evidence that a top predator is able to track these FSLE ridges to locate food patches. After comparing bird positions during long and short trips and different parts of these trips, we propose several hypotheses to understand how frigatebirds can follow these LCSs. The birds might use visual and/or olfactory cues and/or atmospheric current changes over the structures to move along these biologic corridors. The birds being often associated with tuna schools around foraging areas, a thorough comprehension of their foraging behavior and movement during the breeding season is crucial not only to seabird ecology but also to an appropriate ecosystemic approach to fisheries in the channel.

  7. Coherence in ultrafast laser-induced periodic surface structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Colombier, Jean-Philippe; Li, Chen; Faure, Nicolas; Cheng, Guanghua; Stoian, Razvan

    2015-11-01

    Ultrafast laser irradiation can trigger anisotropically structured nanoscaled gratinglike arrangements of matter, the laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSSs). We demonstrate here that the formation of LIPSS is intrinsically related to the coherence of the laser field. Employing several test materials that allow large optical excursions, we observe the effect of randomizing spatial phase in generating finite domains of ripples. Using three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain methods, we evaluate energy deposition patterns below a material's rough surface and show that modulated pattern, i.e., a spatially ordered electromagnetic solution, results from the coherent superposition of waves. By separating the field scattered from a surface rough topography from the total field, the inhomogeneous energy absorption problem is reduced to a simple interference equation. We further distinguish the contribution of the scattered near field and scattered far field on various types of inhomogeneous energy absorption features. It is found that the inhomogeneous energy absorption which could trigger the low-spatial-frequency LIPSSs (LSFLs) and high-spatial-frequency LIPSSs (HSFLs) of periodicity Λ >λ /Re(n ˜) are due to coherent superposition between the scattered far field (propagation) and the refracted field, while HSFLs of Λ λ ) related to a feedback-driven topography evolution. Those results strongly suggest the electromagnetic interpretation of LIPSSs in interplay with an evolving surface topography.

  8. The emergence of a coherent structure for coherent structures: localized states in nonlinear systems

    OpenAIRE

    Dawes, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Coherent structures emerge from the dynamics of many kinds of dissipative, externally driven, nonlinear systems, and continue to provoke new questions that challenge our physical and mathematical understanding. In one specific sub-class of such problems, where a pattern-forming, or `Turing', instability occurs, rapid progress has been made recently in our understanding of the formation of localized states: patches of regular pattern surrounded by the unpatterned homogeneous background state. ...

  9. Two Phases of Coherent Structure Motions in Turbulent Boundary Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian-Hua; JIANG Nan

    2007-01-01

    Two phases of coherent structure motion are acquired after obtaining conditional phase-averaged waveforms for longitudinal velocity of coherent structures in turbulent boundary layer based on Harr wavelet transfer. The correspondences of the two phases to the two processes (i.e. ejection and sweep) during a burst are determined.

  10. Detection of coherent structures in photospheric turbulent flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chian, Abraham C.-L.; Rempel, Erico L. [National Institute for Space Research (INPE), World Institute for Space Environment Research (WISER), P.O. Box 515, 12227-010 São José dos Campos-SP (Brazil); Aulanier, Guillaume; Schmieder, Brigitte [Observatoire de Paris, LESIA, CNRS, F-92190 Meudon (France); Shadden, Shawn C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Welsch, Brian T. [Space Science Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Yeates, Anthony R., E-mail: abraham.chian@gmail.com, E-mail: rempel@ita.br [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-01

    We study coherent structures in solar photospheric flows in a plage in the vicinity of the active region AR 10930 using the horizontal velocity data derived from Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope magnetograms. Eulerian and Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) are detected by computing the Q-criterion and the finite-time Lyapunov exponents of the velocity field, respectively. Our analysis indicates that, on average, the deformation Eulerian coherent structures dominate over the vortical Eulerian coherent structures in the plage region. We demonstrate the correspondence of the network of high magnetic flux concentration to the attracting Lagrangian coherent structures (aLCSs) in the photospheric velocity based on both observations and numerical simulations. In addition, the computation of aLCS provides a measure of the local rate of contraction/expansion of the flow.

  11. Coherent structures in a supersonic complex nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magstadt, Andrew; Berry, Matthew; Glauser, Mark

    2016-11-01

    The jet flow from a complex supersonic nozzle is studied through experimental measurements. The nozzle's geometry is motivated by future engine designs for high-performance civilian and military aircraft. This rectangular jet has a single plane of symmetry, an additional shear layer (referred to as a wall jet), and an aft deck representative of airframe integration. The core flow operates at a Mach number of Mj , c = 1 . 6 , and the wall jet is choked (Mj , w = 1 . 0). This high Reynolds number jet flow is comprised of intense turbulence levels, an intricate shock structure, shear and boundary layers, and powerful corner vortices. In the present study, stereo PIV measurements are simultaneously sampled with high-speed pressure measurements, which are embedded in the aft deck, and far-field acoustics in the anechoic chamber at Syracuse University. Time-resolved schlieren measurements have indicated the existence of strong flow events at high frequencies, at a Strouhal number of St = 3 . 4 . These appear to result from von Kàrmàn vortex shedding within the nozzle and pervade the entire flow and acoustic domain. Proper orthogonal decomposition is applied on the current data to identify coherent structures in the jet and study the influence of this vortex street. AFOSR Turbulence and Transition Program (Grant No. FA9550-15-1-0435) with program managers Dr. I. Leyva and Dr. R. Ponnappan.

  12. Vibrational structures and long-lasting electronic coherence

    CERN Document Server

    Chin, A W; Rosenbach, R; Caycedo-Soler, F; Huelga, S F; Plenio, M B

    2012-01-01

    Recent observations of beating signals in the excitation energy transfer dynamics of photosynthetic complexes have been interpreted as evidence for sustained coherences that are sufficiently long-lived for energy transport and coherence to coexist. The possibility that coherence may be exploited in biological processes has opened up new avenues of exploration at the interface of physics and biology. The microscopic origin of these long-lived coherences, however, remains to be uncovered. Here we present such a mechanism and verify it by numerically exact simulations of system-environment dynamics. Crucially, the non-trivial spectral structures of the environmental fluctuations and particularly discrete vibrational modes can lead to the generation and sustenance of both oscillatory energy transport and electronic coherence on timescales that are comparable to excitation energy transport. This suggests that the non-trivial structure of protein environments plays a more significant role for coherence in biologica...

  13. Coherent perfect absorption in photonic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Baldacci, Lorenzo; Tredicucci, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The ability to drive a system with an external input is a fundamental aspect of light-matter interaction. The coherent perfect absorption (CPA) phenomenon extends to the general multibeam interference phenomenology the well known critical coupling concepts. This interferometric control of absorption can be employed to reach full delivery of optical energy to nanoscale systems such as plasmonic nanoparticles, and multi-port interference can be used to enhance the absorption of a nanoscale device when it is embedded in a strongly scattering system, with potential applications to nanoscale sensing. Here we review the two-port CPA in reference to photonic structures which can resonantly couple to the external fields. A revised two-port theory of CPA is illustrated, which relies on the Scattering Matrix formalism and is valid for all linear two-port systems with reciprocity. Through a semiclassical approach, treating two-port critical coupling conditions in a non-perturbative regime, it is demonstrated that the st...

  14. Coherent structures in transitional pipe flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellström, Leo H. O.; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram; Smits, Alexander J.

    2016-06-01

    Transition to turbulence in pipe flow is investigated experimentally using a temporally resolved dual-plane particle image velocimetry approach, at a Reynolds number of 3440. The flow is analyzed using proper orthogonal decomposition and it is shown that the flow can be divided into two regions: a pseudolaminar region governed by the presence of azimuthally steady traveling waves, and turbulent slugs. The evolution of the structures within the slugs is identified by using the temporally resolved data along with the dual-plane velocity field. These structures are shown to be remarkably similar to the large-scale motions found in fully turbulent flows, with a streamwise and spatiotemporal extent about four pipe radii. The transition between structures is characterized by the detachment and decay of an old structure and the initiation of a new structure at the wall.

  15. Investigating Coherent Structures in the Standard Turbulence Models using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliassen, Lene; Andersen, Søren

    2016-09-01

    The wind turbine design standards recommend two different methods to generate turbulent wind for design load analysis, the Kaimal spectra combined with an exponential coherence function and the Mann turbulence model. The two turbulence models can give very different estimates of fatigue life, especially for offshore floating wind turbines. In this study the spatial distributions of the two turbulence models are investigated using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition, which is used to characterize large coherent structures. The main focus has been on the structures that contain the most energy, which are the lowest POD modes. The Mann turbulence model generates coherent structures that stretches in the horizontal direction for the longitudinal component, while the structures found in the Kaimal model are more random in their shape. These differences in the coherent structures at lower frequencies for the two turbulence models can be the reason for differences in fatigue life estimates for wind turbines.

  16. Investigating Coherent Structures in the Standard Turbulence Models using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eliassen, Lene; Andersen, Søren Juhl

    2016-01-01

    The wind turbine design standards recommend two different methods to generate turbulent wind for design load analysis, the Kaimal spectra combined with an exponential coherence function and the Mann turbulence model. The two turbulence models can give very different estimates of fatigue life......, especially for offshore floating wind turbines. In this study the spatial distributions of the two turbulence models are investigated using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition, which is used to characterize large coherent structures. The main focus has been on the structures that contain the most energy, which...... are the lowest POD modes. The Mann turbulence model generates coherent structures that stretches in the horizontal direction for the longitudinal component, while the structures found in the Kaimal model are more random in their shape. These differences in the coherent structures at lower frequencies for the two...

  17. Special Properties of Coherence Scanning Interferometers for large Measurement Volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, W, E-mail: W.bauer@polytec.de [Polytec GmbH, Polytec Platz 1-7, 76337 Waldbronn (Germany)

    2011-08-19

    In contrast to many other optical methods the uncertainty of Coherence Scanning Interferometer (CSI) in vertical direction is independent from the field of view. Therefore CSIs are ideal instruments for measuring 3D-profiles of larger areas (36x28mm{sup 2}, e.g.) with high precision. This is of advantage for the determination of form parameters like flatness, parallelism and steps heights within a short time. In addition, using a telecentric beam path allows measurements of deep lying surfaces (<70mm) and the determination of form parameters with large step-heights. The lateral and spatial resolution, however, are reduced. In this presentation different metrological characteristics together with their potential errors are analyzed for large-scale measuring CSIs. Therefore these instruments are ideal tools in quality control for good/bad selections, e.g. The consequences for the practical use in industry and for standardization are discussed by examples of workpieces of automotive suppliers or from the steel industry.

  18. Visual coherence for large-scale line-plot visualizations

    KAUST Repository

    Muigg, Philipp

    2011-06-01

    Displaying a large number of lines within a limited amount of screen space is a task that is common to many different classes of visualization techniques such as time-series visualizations, parallel coordinates, link-node diagrams, and phase-space diagrams. This paper addresses the challenging problems of cluttering and overdraw inherent to such visualizations. We generate a 2x2 tensor field during line rasterization that encodes the distribution of line orientations through each image pixel. Anisotropic diffusion of a noise texture is then used to generate a dense, coherent visualization of line orientation. In order to represent features of different scales, we employ a multi-resolution representation of the tensor field. The resulting technique can easily be applied to a wide variety of line-based visualizations. We demonstrate this for parallel coordinates, a time-series visualization, and a phase-space diagram. Furthermore, we demonstrate how to integrate a focus+context approach by incorporating a second tensor field. Our approach achieves interactive rendering performance for large data sets containing millions of data items, due to its image-based nature and ease of implementation on GPUs. Simulation results from computational fluid dynamics are used to evaluate the performance and usefulness of the proposed method. © 2011 The Author(s).

  19. D-branes and coherent topological charge structure in QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, Hank

    2006-12-01

    Monte Carlo studies of pure glue SU(3) gauge theory using the overlap-based topological charge operator have revealed a laminar structure in the QCD vacuum consisting of extended, thin, co- herent, locally 3-dimensional sheets of topological charge embedded in 4D space, with opposite sign sheets interleaved. Studies of localization properties of Dirac eigenmodes have also shown evidence for the delocalization of low-lying modes on effectively 3-dimensional surfaces. In this talk, I review some theoretical ideas which suggest the possibility of 3-dimensionally coherent topological charge structure in 4-dimensional gauge theory and provide a possible interpretation of the observed structure. I begin with Luscher's "Wilson bag" integral over the 3-index Chern- Simons tensor. The analogy with a Wilson loop as a charged world line in 2-dimensional CP N-1 sigma models suggests that the Wilson bag surface represents the world volume of a physical membrane. The large-N chiral Lagrangian arguments of Witten also indicate the existence of multiple "k-vacuum" states with discontinuous transitions between k-vacua at θ = odd multi- ples of π. The domain walls between these vacua have the properties of a Wilson bag surface. Finally, I review the AdS/CFT duality view of θ dependence in QCD. The dual realtionship be- tween topological charge in gauge theory and Ramond-Ramond charge in type IIA string theory suggests that the coherent topological charge sheets observed on the lattice are the holographic image of wrapped D6 branes.

  20. D-branes and coherent topological charge structure in QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Thacker, H B

    2006-01-01

    Monte Carlo studies of pure glue SU(3) gauge theory using the overlap-based topological charge operator have revealed a laminar structure in the QCD vacuum consisting of extended, thin, coherent, locally 3-dimensional sheets of topological charge embedded in 4D space, with opposite sign sheets interleaved. Studies of localization properties of Dirac eigenmodes have also shown evidence for the delocalization of low-lying modes on effectively 3-dimensional surfaces. In this talk, I review some theoretical ideas which suggest the possibility of 3-dimensionally coherent topological charge structure in 4-dimensional gauge theory and provide a possible interpretation of the observed structure. I begin with Luscher's ``Wilson bag'' integral over the 3-index Chern-Simons tensor. The analogy with a Wilson loop as a charged world line in 2-dimensional $CP^{N-1}$ sigma models suggests that the Wilson bag surface represents the world volume of a physical membrane. The large-N chiral Lagrangian arguments of Witten also in...

  1. COHERENT STRUCTURES IN COUNTERCURRENT AXISYMMETRIC SHEAR FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢锡麟; 麻伟巍; 周慧良

    2003-01-01

    The dynamical behaviors of coherent structures in countercurrent axisymmetric shear flows are experimentally studied. The forward velocity U1 and the velocity ratio R = (U1 - U2)/(U1 +U2), where U2 denotes the suction velocity, are considered as the control parameters. Two kinds of vortex structures, i.e., axisymmetric and helical structures, were discovered with respect to different regimes in the R versus U1 diagram. In the case of U1 ranging from 3 to 20 m/s and R from 1 to 3, the axisymmetric structures play an important role. Based on the dynamical behaviors of axisymmetric structures, a critical forward velocity Ucr1 = 6.8 m/s was defined, subsequently, the subcritical velocity regime: U1 > Ucr1 and the supercritical velocity regime: U1 < Ucr1. In the subcritical velocity regime,the flow system contains shear layer self-excited oscillations in a certain range of the velocity ratio with respect to any forward velocity. In the supercritical velocity regime, the effect of the velocity ratio could be explained by the relative movement and the spatial evolution of the axisymmetric structure undergoes the following stages: (1) Kelvin-Helmholtz instability leading to vortex rolling up, (2) first time vortex agglomeration, (3) jet column self-excited oscillation, (4) shear layer self-excited oscillation,(5) "ordered tearing", (6) turbulence in the case of U1 < 4 m/s (the "ordered tearing" does not exist when U1 > 4m/s), correspondingly, the spatial evolution of the temporal asymptotic behavior of a dynamical system can be described as follows: (1) Hopf bifurcation, (2) subharmonic bifurcation, (3)reversed superharmonic bifurcation, (4) superharmonic bifurcation, (5) chaos ("weak turbulence") in the case of U1 < 4 m/s (superharmonic bifurcation does not exist when U1 > 4 m/s). The proposed new terms, superharmonic and reversed superharmonic bifurcations, are characterized of the frequency doubling rather than the period doubling. A kind of unfamiliar

  2. Large area full-field optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shoude; Sherif, Sherif; Flueraru, Costel

    2006-09-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a fundamentally new type of optical imaging technology. OCT performs high resolution, cross-sectional tomographic imaging of the internal structure in materials and biological systems. The biomedical applications of the OCT imaging systems have been developed for diagnostics of ophthalmology, dermatology, dentistry and cardiology. Most of existing OCT systems use point-scanning based technology, however, the 3-axis scanning makes the system slow and cumbersome. A few OCT systems working directly on 2D full-field images were reported, however, they are designed to work in a relatively small area, around couple of hundred microns square. In this paper, we present a design and implementation of a full-field OCT imaging system for acquiring tomography and with a working area around 15mm by 15 mm. The problems rising from full-field OCT are addressed and analyzed. The algorithms to extract the tomography are proposed. Two applications of multilayer information retrieval and 3D object imaging using full-field OCT are described.

  3. Coherent structure and Intermittent Turbulence in the Solar Wind Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondhiya, Deepak Kumar; Gwal, Ashok Kumar; Kasde, Satish Kumar

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the coherent structures and intermittent turbulence in the solar wind plasma using measurements from the Wind spacecraft. Previously established novel wavelet and higher order statistics are used in this work. We analyze the wavelet power spectrum of various solar wind plasma parameters. We construct a statistical significance level in the wavelet power spectrum to quantify the interference effects arising from filling missing data in the time series, allowing extraction of significant power from the measured data. We analyze each wavelet power spectra for transient coherency, and global periodicities resulting from the superposition of repeating coherent structures. Furthermore, these coherent structures are preferentially found in plasma unstable to the mirror and firehose instabilities. These results offer a new understanding of various processes in a turbulent regime. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for current theories of solar wind generation and describe future work for determining the relationship between the coherent structures in our ionic composition data and the structure of the coronal magnetic field. Keywords: Wavelet Power Spectrum, Coherent structure and Solar wind plasma

  4. Energy-band structure and intrinsic coherent properties in two weakly linked Bose-Einstein condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei-Dong; Zhang, Yunbo; Liang, J.-Q.

    2003-06-01

    The energy-band structure and energy splitting due to quantum tunneling in two weakly linked Bose-Einstein condensates were calculated by using the instanton method. The intrinsic coherent properties of Bose-Josephson junction (BJJ) were investigated in terms of energy splitting. For EC/EJ≪1, the energy splitting is small and the system is globally phase coherent. In the opposite limit, EC/EJ≫1, the energy splitting is large and the system becomes phase dissipated. Our results suggest that one should investigate the coherence phenomena of BJJ in proper condition such as EC/EJ˜1.

  5. Coherent quantum transport features in carbon superlattice structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, R.; Henley, S. J.; Silva, S. R. P.; Bhattacharyya, S.

    2016-10-01

    Whilst resonant transmission is well understood and can be fully harnessed for crystalline superlattices, a complete picture has not yet emerged for disordered superlattices. It has proven difficult to tune resonant transmission in disordered diamond-like carbon (DLC) superlattices as conventional models are not equipped to incorporate significant structural disorder. In this work, we present concurrent experimental and theoretical analysis which addresses resonant transmission in DLC superlattices. Devices were fabricated by growing alternate layers of DLC with different percentages of sp3 hybridized carbon.Coherent quantum transport effects were demonstrated in these structurally disordered DLC superlattices through distinct current modulation with negative differential resistance (NDR) in the current-voltage (I-V) measurements. A model was developed using tight-binding calculations assuming a random variation of the hopping integral to simulate structural (bond-length) disorder. Calculations of the I-V characteristics compliment the interpretation of the measurements and illustrate that while DLC superlattice structures are unlike their classical counterparts, the near-field structural order will help with the confinement of quantised states. The present model provides an empirical guide for tailoring the properties of future devices, giving rise to much hope that carbon electronics operating at high frequencies over large areas can now be developed.

  6. Ergodic Theory, Open Dynamics, and Coherent Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Bose, Christopher; Froyland, Gary

    2014-01-01

    This book is comprised of selected research articles developed from a workshop on Ergodic Theory, Probabilistic Methods and Applications, held in April 2012 at the Banff International Research Station. It contains contributions from world leading experts in ergodic theory, dynamical systems, numerical analysis, fluid dynamics, and networks. The volume will serve as a valuable reference for mathematicians, physicists, engineers, physical oceanographers, atmospheric scientists, biologists, and climate scientists, who currently use, or wish to learn how to use, probabilistic techniques to cope with dynamical models that display open, coherent, or non-equilibrium behavior.

  7. A resistance formula for coherent multi-barrier structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Zhi-Chen; Yang Jian-Hong

    2007-01-01

    Using the Landauer formula and the quantum S-matrix scattering theory, we derive a resistance formula for multi-barrier structure under phase coherent transmission condition. This formula shows that when the transport is coherent, the potential wells of the structure are just like conductors contributing to the overall resistance. And because the resistance formula is derived based on the scattering theory, the barrier resistance will change with the number of scattering centres (i.e. the number of barriers) in the structure.

  8. TURBULENT COHERENT STRUCTURES IN CHANNELS WITH SAND WAVES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Sand wave bed is one of the typical shape of complicated boundaries in hydraulics and river dynamics, and sand wave motion is the main form of the bed load motion in-rivers, thence the study of turbulent structures over sand waves is of importance both in theory and practice. In this paper turbulent coherent structures over single-and multi-sand waves were studied experimentally, the formulae for the separation length and vortex shedding period of the turbulent flow over single-sand wave were suggested, and the characteristics of turbulent coherent structures over multi-sand waves were also given.

  9. Coherent vortex structures in fluids and plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Tur, Anatoli

    2017-01-01

    This monograph introduces readers to the hydrodynamics of vortex formation, and reviews the last decade of active research in the field, offering a unique focus on research topics at the crossroads of traditional fluids and plasmas. Vortices are responsible for the process of macroscopic transport of momentum, energy and mass, and are formed as the result of spontaneous self-organization. Playing an important role in nature and technology, localized, coherent vortices are regularly observed in shear flows, submerged jets, afterbody flows and in atmospheric boundary layers, sometimes taking on the form of vortex streets. In addition, the book addresses a number of open issues, including but not limited to: which singularities are permitted in a 2D Euler equation besides point vortices? Which other, even more complex, localized vortices could be contained in the Euler equation? How do point vortices interact with potential waves?

  10. Formation of coherent structures in 3D laminar mixing flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speetjens, Michel; Clercx, Herman

    2009-11-01

    Mixing under laminar flow conditions is key to a wide variety of industrial systems of size extending from microns to meters. Examples range from the traditional (and still very relevant) mixing of viscous fluids via compact processing equipment down to emerging micro-fluidics applications. Profound insight into laminar mixing mechanisms is imperative for further advancement of mixing technology (particularly for complex micro-fluidics systems) yet remains limited to date. The present study concentrates on a fundamental transport phenomenon of potential relevance to laminar mixing: the formation of coherent structures in the web of 3D fluid trajectories due to fluid inertia. Such coherent structures geometrically determine the transport properties of the flow and better understanding of their formation and characteristics may offer ways to control and manipulate the mixing properties of laminar flows. The formation of coherent structures and its impact upon 3D transport properties is demonstrated by way of examples.

  11. Quantum Signature of Cosmological Large Scale Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Capozziello, S; De Siena, S; Illuminati, F; Capozziello, Salvatore; Martino, Salvatore De; Siena, Silvio De; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    1998-01-01

    We demonstrate that to all large scale cosmological structures where gravitation is the only overall relevant interaction assembling the system (e.g. galaxies), there is associated a characteristic unit of action per particle whose order of magnitude coincides with the Planck action constant $h$. This result extends the class of physical systems for which quantum coherence can act on macroscopic scales (as e.g. in superconductivity) and agrees with the absence of screening mechanisms for the gravitational forces, as predicted by some renormalizable quantum field theories of gravity. It also seems to support those lines of thought invoking that large scale structures in the Universe should be connected to quantum primordial perturbations as requested by inflation, that the Newton constant should vary with time and distance and, finally, that gravity should be considered as an effective interaction induced by quantization.

  12. Special Properties of Coherence Scanning Interferometers for large Measurement Volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, W.

    2011-08-01

    In contrast to many other optical methods the uncertainty of Coherence Scanning Interferometer (CSI) in vertical direction is independent from the field of view. Therefore CSIs are ideal instruments for measuring 3D-profiles of larger areas (36×28mm2, e.g.) with high precision. This is of advantage for the determination of form parameters like flatness, parallelism and steps heights within a short time. In addition, using a telecentric beam path allows measurements of deep lying surfaces (automotive suppliers or from the steel industry.

  13. Laser fields in dynamically ionized plasma structures for coherent acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Luu-Thanh, Ph.; Pukhov, A.; Kostyukov, I.

    2015-01-01

    With the emergence of the CAN (Coherent Amplification Network) laser technology, a new scheme for direct particle acceleration in periodic plasma structures has been proposed. By using our full electromagnetic relativistic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation code equipped with ionisation module, we simulate the laser fields dynamics in the periodic structures of different materials. We study how the dynamic ionization influences the field structure.

  14. Detection of and compensation for blocked elements using large coherent apertures: ex vivo studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovljevic, Marko; Bottenus, Nick; Kuo, Lily; Kumar, Shalki; Dahl, Jeremy; Trahey, Gregg

    2016-04-01

    When imaging with ultrasound through the chest wall, it is not uncommon for parts of the array to get blocked by ribs, which can limit the acoustic window and significantly impede visualization of the structures of interest. With the development of large-aperture, high-element-count, 2-D arrays and their potential use in transthoracic imaging, detecting and compensating for the blocked elements is becoming increasingly important. We synthesized large coherent 2-D apertures and used them to image a point target through excised samples of canine chest wall. Blocked elements are detected based on low amplitude of their signals. As a part of compensation, blocked elements are turned off on transmit (Tx) and receive (Rx), and point-target images are created using: coherent summation of the remaining channels, compounding of intercostal apertures, and adaptive weighting of the available Tx/Rx channel-pairs to recover the desired k-space response. The adaptive compensation method also includes a phase aberration correction to ensure that the non-blocked Tx/Rx channel pairs are summed coherently. To evaluate the methods, we compare the point-spread functions (PSFs) and near-field clutter levels for the transcostal and control acquisitions. Specifically, applying k-space compensation to the sparse aperture data created from the control acquisition reduces sidelobes from -6.6 dB to -12 dB. When applied to the transcostal data in combination with phase-aberration correction, the same method reduces sidelobes only by 3 dB, likely due to significant tissue induced acoustic noise. For the transcostal acquisition, turning off blocked elements and applying uniform weighting results in maximum clutter reduction of 5 dB on average, while the PSF stays intact. Compounding reduces clutter by about 3 dB while the k-space compensation increases clutter magnitude to the non-compensated levels.

  15. Building large structures in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagler, T.

    1976-01-01

    The building of large structures in space would be required for the establishment of a variety of systems needed for different forms of space utilization. The problems involved in the building of such structures in space and the approaches which can be used to solve these problems are illustrated with the aid of an example involving a concept for packaging, transporting, and assembling two representative large space structures. The structure of a radio-astronomy telescope 200 m in diam was felt to be representative of the many medium-size structures of the Shuttle era. A typical very large structure is represented by the supporting structure for the transmission system of a 5000-Mw space solar power station.

  16. Visualization of Coherent Structures in Acoustically Forced,Gas-Particle Turbulent Round Jet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    容易; 张会强; 王希麟; 陈昌麒

    2004-01-01

    To show the effects of the particles and forced disturbances on the instantaneous large-scale vortex structures in a gas-particle round jet, coherent structures in gas-particle turbulent round jets were investigated experimentally by flow visualization. The 45-μm and 350-μm diameter glass beads were used as the particles in the experiments. An acoustic speaker was used to introduce velocity perturbations at the jet exit. The Strouhal number based on the nozzle diameter, exit velocity, and forcing frequency was varied from 0.1 to 0.9. The Reynolds number was 9400. The coherent structures were visualized in unforced and forced single-phase jet flows and unforced and forced particle-laden jet flows with different diameter glass beads. The experimental results show that the particles have significant effects on the gas phase coherent structures. The coherent structures are controlled by the large 350-μm diameter particles, while the structures are mainly dominated by the forced disturbances in the flows with 45-μm diameter particles.

  17. On the Axiomatic Theory of Multistate Coherent Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    ONR Contract N00014-76-C-0839. * S On leave from the Institute de Matematica e Estatistica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brasil. 01 1882 017 ON...THE AXIOMATIC THEORY OF MULTISTATE COHERENT STRUCTURES Wagner de Souza Borges and Fl~vio Wagner Rodrigues Instituto de Matematica e Estatistica

  18. Do Finite-Size Lyapunov Exponents detect coherent structures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karrasch, Daniel; Haller, George

    2013-12-01

    Ridges of the Finite-Size Lyapunov Exponent (FSLE) field have been used as indicators of hyperbolic Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSs). A rigorous mathematical link between the FSLE and LCSs, however, has been missing. Here, we prove that an FSLE ridge satisfying certain conditions does signal a nearby ridge of some Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) field, which in turn indicates a hyperbolic LCS under further conditions. Other FSLE ridges violating our conditions, however, are seen to be false positives for LCSs. We also find further limitations of the FSLE in Lagrangian coherence detection, including ill-posedness, artificial jump-discontinuities, and sensitivity with respect to the computational time step.

  19. Coherent flow structures at earth's surface

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Venditti, J.G; Best, J.L; Church, M; Hardy, R.J

    2013-01-01

    This book reviews the recent progress in the study of the turbulent flows that sculpt the Earth's surface, focusing in particular on the organized structures that have been identified in recent years...

  20. Coherent structures and the saturation of a nonlinear dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Rempel, Erico L; Brandenburg, Axel; Muñoz, Pablo R

    2012-01-01

    Eulerian and Lagrangian tools are used to detect coherent structures in the velocity and magnetic fields of a mean--field dynamo, produced by direct numerical simulations of the three--dimensional compressible magnetohydrodynamic equations with an isotropic helical forcing and moderate Reynolds number. Two distinct stages of the dynamo are studied, the kinematic stage, where a seed magnetic field undergoes exponential growth, and the saturated regime. It is shown that the Lagrangian analysis detects structures with greater detail, besides providing information on the chaotic mixing properties of the flow and the magnetic fields. The traditional way of detecting Lagrangian coherent structures using finite--time Lyapunov exponents is compared with a recently developed method called function M. The latter is shown to produce clearer pictures which readily permit the identification of hyperbolic regions in the magnetic field, where chaotic transport/dispersion of magnetic field lines is highly enhanced.

  1. Lagrangian coherent structures and inertial particle dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Sudharsan, M; Riley, James J

    2015-01-01

    In this work we investigate the dynamics of inertial particles using finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLE). In particular, we characterize the attractor and repeller structures underlying preferential concentration of inertial particles in terms of FTLE fields of the underlying carrier fluid. Inertial particles that are heavier than the ambient fluid (aerosols) attract onto ridges of the negative-time fluid FTLE. This negative-time FTLE ridge becomes a repeller for particles that are lighter than the carrier fluid (bubbles). We also examine the inertial FTLE (iFTLE) determined by the trajectories of inertial particles evolved using the Maxey-Riley equations with non-zero Stokes number and density ratio. Finally, we explore the low-pass filtering effect of Stokes number. These ideas are demonstrated on two-dimensional numerical simulations of the unsteady double gyre flow.

  2. Quantum noise in large-scale coherent nonlinear photonic circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Santori, Charles; Beausoleil, Raymond G; Tezak, Nikolas; Hamerly, Ryan; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    A semiclassical simulation approach is presented for studying quantum noise in large-scale photonic circuits incorporating an ideal Kerr nonlinearity. A netlist-based circuit solver is used to generate matrices defining a set of stochastic differential equations, in which the resonator field variables represent random samplings of the Wigner quasi-probability distributions. Although the semiclassical approach involves making a large-photon-number approximation, tests on one- and two-resonator circuits indicate satisfactory agreement between the semiclassical and full-quantum simulation results in the parameter regime of interest. The semiclassical model is used to simulate random errors in a large-scale circuit that contains 88 resonators and hundreds of components in total, and functions as a 4-bit ripple counter. The error rate as a function of on-state photon number is examined, and it is observed that the quantum fluctuation amplitudes do not increase as signals propagate through the circuit, an important...

  3. Observation of transverse coherent backscattering in disordered photonic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Brake, Sebastian; Leykam, Daniel; Desyatnikov, Anton; Denz, Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    We report on the experimental observation of weak localization in an optically induced disordered (2+1)-dimensional photonic structure. Our flexible method of optical induction is applied with a nondiffracting random intensity distribution. We focus on the analysis of a statistical output spectrum for many probe events with variance of the incoming beam's transverse spatial frequency. For particular spatial frequencies we find considerable signatures of transverse coherent backscattering.

  4. Coherent Turbulent Flow Structures in a Gravel-Bed River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, W.; Macmahan, J. H.; Reniers, A. J.; Thornton, E. B.; Brown, J.; Swick, W. A.

    2010-12-01

    The characteristics of coherent turbulent flow structures were examined during multi-day deployments with three different sensors in a gravel-bed river reach section of the Kootenai River, ID in August 2010. In-situ river velocities were measured using a custom 2 MHz Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) head, an Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV), and a lagged array of six electromagnetic current meters (ECM) mounted on a GPS-equipped portable aluminum frame. The frame was deployed in the river which varied from 0.6 to 1m water depths and 0.5 to 1.5 m/s velocities. It was also deployed in a small channel, near riffle pools, and on the lee of river obstructions. The ECM array was horizontally mounted on a 4m length pole attached to the frame, oriented in the stream-wise direction, with a sampling frequency of 16 Hz. The lagged spacing of the six ECMs was set to resolve coherent motions from up to 8m in length. The ADCP was fitted with a custom head to measure the along beam velocities in all three axes, with a sampling frequency of 1 Hz, 35cm bins, with a maximum range of 10m. The upstream beam is used to describe the coherent structures in the stream-wise velocity. An iterative maximum likelihood estimator is used to evaluate the streamwise wavenumber-frequency spectrum. The coherent structures measured by the ECM array and ADCP are compared to validate the results by the new ADCP head. Turbulent measurements from the 32 Hz sampled ADV are compared to the ADCP and ECM. Our unique approach provides spatial measurements in river reaches (depths) previously not examined. The flow structure as a function of river feature, bed roughness, and flow velocity are described in the stream-wise and lateral directions. This effort was supported by the Office of Naval Research Coastal Geosciences Program.

  5. Large floating structures technological advances

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, BT

    2015-01-01

    This book surveys key projects that have seen the construction of large floating structures or have attained detailed conceptual designs. This compilation of key floating structures in a single volume captures the innovative features that mark the technological advances made in this field of engineering, and will provide a useful reference for ideas, analysis, design, and construction of these unique and emerging urban projects to offshore and marine engineers, urban planners, architects and students.

  6. Comparing High-latitude Ionospheric and Thermospheric Lagrangian Coherent Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, N.; Ramirez, U.; Flores, F.; Okic, D.; Datta-Barua, S.

    2015-12-01

    Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSs) are invisible boundaries in time varying flow fields that may be subject to mixing and turbulence. The LCS is defined by the local maxima of the finite time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE), a scalar field quantifying the degree of stretching of fluid elements over the flow domain. Although the thermosphere is dominated by neutral wind processes and the ionosphere is governed by plasma electrodynamics, we can compare the LCS in the two modeled flow fields to yield insight into transport and interaction processes in the high-latitude IT system. For obtaining thermospheric LCS, we use the Horizontal Wind Model 2014 (HWM14) [1] at a single altitude to generate the two-dimensional velocity field. The FTLE computation is applied to study the flow field of the neutral wind, and to visualize the forward-time Lagrangian Coherent Structures in the flow domain. The time-varying structures indicate a possible thermospheric LCS ridge in the auroral oval area. The results of a two-day run during a geomagnetically quiet period show that the structures are diurnally quasi-periodic, thus that solar radiation influences the neutral wind flow field. To find the LCS in the high-latitude ionospheric drifts, the Weimer 2001 [2] polar electric potential model and the International Geomagnetic Reference Field 11 [3] are used to compute the ExB drift flow field in ionosphere. As with the neutral winds, the Lagrangian Coherent Structures are obtained by applying the FTLE computation. The relationship between the thermospheric and ionospheric LCS is analyzed by comparing overlapping FTLE maps. Both a publicly available FTLE solver [4] and a custom-built FTLE computation are used and compared for validation [5]. Comparing the modeled IT LCSs on a quiet day with the modeled IT LCSs on a storm day indicates important factors on the structure and time evolution of the LCS.

  7. Diffusive Lorenz dynamics: Coherent structures and spatiotemporal chaos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YuehongQIAN; HudongCHEN; Da-HsuanFENG

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we are interested in collective behaviors of many interacting Lorenz strange attractors. With an intermediate diffusion coupling between the attractors,a new remarkable synchronization of well organized structures merges as a result of two competing mechanisms: temporal chaos and spatial diffusive stabilization. A window of the coupling parameter for coherent structures is found numerically. Different from all existing scenarios of routes to chaos (period doubling, intermittency and strange attractors), an algorithmetic increase of wavenumbers before an abrupt change to chaos (compared to the periodic doubling geometrical) is unexpectedly discovered. Meta-stable states are also observed in simulations.

  8. Analytical study of four-wave mixing with large atomic coherence

    CERN Document Server

    Korsunsky, E A; Marangos, J P; Bergmann, K

    2002-01-01

    Four-wave mixing in resonant atomic vapors based on maximum coherence induced by Stark-chirped rapid adiabatic passage (SCRAP) is investigated theoretically. We show the advantages of a coupling scheme involving maximum coherence and demonstrate how a large atomic coherence between a ground and an highly excited state can be prepared by SCRAP. Full analytic solutions of the field propagation problem taking into account pump field depletion are derived. The solutions are obtained with the help of an Hamiltonian approach which in the adiabatic limit permits to reduce the full set of Maxwell-Bloch equations to simple canonical equations of Hamiltonian mechanics for the field variables. It is found that the conversion efficiency reached is largely enhanced if the phase mismatch induced by linear refraction is compensated. A detailed analysis of the phase matching conditions shows, however, that the phase mismatch contribution from the Kerr effect cannot be compensated simultaneously with linear refraction contrib...

  9. Structure functions at large x

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Z

    2002-01-01

    Structure function data together with other measurements from fixed-target deep inelastic scattering and hadron-hadron collider experiments which contribute to our knowledge of the parton density functions are reviewed. The inclusive cross-section measurements of neutral and charged current interactions at HERA are presented and their impact on the parton density functions is discussed. Future prospects for an improved knowledge of the parton density functions at large x are briefly mentioned.

  10. Compressible coherent structures at ion scales in the slow solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Denise; Alexandrova, Olga; Mangeney, Andre; Maksimovic, Milan; Lacombe, Catherine

    2016-04-01

    We present a study of magnetic field fluctuations close to the ion scales in a slow solar wind stream. The nature of these fluctuations is found to be characterized by coherent structures. Although previous studies have shown that coherent current sheets can be considered as the principal cause of intermittency at the solar wind ion scales, here we show for the first time that, in the case of the slow solar wind, a large variety of coherent structures participates to intermittency at proton scales, and current sheets are not the most common ones. Precisely, we find here compressible (δB∥ ≫ δB⊥), linearly polarized structures in form of magnetic holes, solitons and shock waves. Examples of Alfvénic structures (δB⊥ > δB∥) are identified as current sheets and vortex-like structures. Some of these vortices have δB⊥≫ δB∥, but the majority of them are characterized by δB⊥ ≳ δB∥. Thanks to multi-point measurements by Cluster spacecraft, we could determine the normal of the coherent structures and their propagation velocity and spatial scale along this normal. Independently of the nature of the structures, the normal is always perpendicular to the local magnetic field, meaning that k⊥ ≫ k∥. The spatial scales of the studied structures are found to be 2 to 5 times the proton gyroradius or proton inertial length. Most of them are simply convected by the wind, but 25% propagate in the plasma frame. Possible interpretations of the observed structures and the connection with the plasma heating are discussed.

  11. Detection of Coherent Structures in Extreme-Scale Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, C; Iverson, J; Kirk, R; Karypis, G

    2012-03-24

    The analysis of coherent structures is a common problem in many scientific domains ranging from astrophysics to combustion, fusion, and materials science. The data from three-dimensional simulations are analyzed to detect the structures, extract statistics on them, and track them over time to gain insights into the phenomenon being modeled. This analysis is typically done off-line, using data that have been written out by the simulations. However, the move towards extreme scale architectures, with multi-core processors and graphical processing units, will affect how such analysis is done as it is unlikely that the systems will support the I/O bandwidth required for off-line analysis. Moving the analysis in-situ is a solution only if we know a priori what analysis will be done, as well as the algorithms used and their parameter settings. Even then, we need to ensure that this will not substantially increase the memory requirements or the data movement as the former will be limited and the latter will be expensive. In the Exa-DM project, a collaboration between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and University of Minnesota, we are exploring ways in which we can address the conflicting demands of coherent structure analysis of simulation data and the architecture of modern parallel systems, while enabling scientific discovery at the exascale. In this paper, we describe our work in two areas: the in situ implementation of an existing algorithm for coherent structure analysis and the use of graph-based techniques to efficiently compress the data.

  12. Models of large scale structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenk, C.S. (Physics Dept., Univ. of Durham (UK))

    1991-01-01

    The ingredients required to construct models of the cosmic large scale structure are discussed. Input from particle physics leads to a considerable simplification by offering concrete proposals for the geometry of the universe, the nature of the dark matter and the primordial fluctuations that seed the growth of structure. The remaining ingredient is the physical interaction that governs dynamical evolution. Empirical evidence provided by an analysis of a redshift survey of IRAS galaxies suggests that gravity is the main agent shaping the large-scale structure. In addition, this survey implies large values of the mean cosmic density, {Omega}> or approx.0.5, and is consistent with a flat geometry if IRAS galaxies are somewhat more clustered than the underlying mass. Together with current limits on the density of baryons from Big Bang nucleosynthesis, this lends support to the idea of a universe dominated by non-baryonic dark matter. Results from cosmological N-body simulations evolved from a variety of initial conditions are reviewed. In particular, neutrino dominated and cold dark matter dominated universes are discussed in detail. Finally, it is shown that apparent periodicities in the redshift distributions in pencil-beam surveys arise frequently from distributions which have no intrinsic periodicity but are clustered on small scales. (orig.).

  13. Extraction of coherent structures in a rotating turbulent flow experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ruppert-Felsot, J E; Sharon, E; Swinney, H L; Ruppert-Felsot, Jori E.; Praud, Olivier; Sharon, Eran; Swinney, Harry L.

    2004-01-01

    The discrete wavelet packet transform (DWPT) and discrete wavelet transform (DWT) are used to extract and study the dynamics of coherent structures in a turbulent rotating fluid. Three-dimensional (3D) turbulence is generated by strong pumping through tubes at the bottom of a rotating tank (48.4 cm high, 39.4 cm diameter). This flow evolves toward two-dimensional (2D) turbulence with increasing height in the tank. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements on the quasi-2D flow reveal many long-lived coherent vortices with a wide range of sizes. The vorticity fields exhibit vortex birth, merger, scattering, and destruction. We separate the flow into a low-entropy ``coherent'' and a high-entropy ``incoherent'' component by thresholding the coefficients of the DWPT and DWT of the vorticity fields. Similar thresholdings using the Fourier transform and JPEG compression together with the Okubo-Weiss criterion are also tested for comparison. We find that the DWPT and DWT yield similar results and are much more ef...

  14. Coherent structures and anomalous transport in reversed field pinch plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, V.; Drake, J. R.; Spada, E.; Spolaore, M.; Vianello, N.; Bergsåker, H.; Cavazzana, R.; Cecconello, M.; Martines, E.; Serianni, G.

    2006-02-01

    The results leading to the identification of coherent structures emerging from the background turbulence in the edge region of the reversed field pinch experiments EXTRAP-T2R and RFX are reviewed. These structures have traits of vortices in velocity field and blobs in density, and the reconstruction of their spatial structure and of their time evolution is discussed focusing on the analysis tools applied. The role of these structures in the particle anomalous transport is addressed, showing that their collisions can contribute up to 50% the total particle losses.This process is shown to be responsible for bursts in particle flux and it is found to set a characteristic collision time, which is in agreement with the statistical properties of laminar times for particle flux bursts.

  15. The mechanism for the generation of coherent structures in the wall region of a turbulent boundary layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周恒; 熊忠民

    1995-01-01

    By using the idea of resonant triad of the theory of hydrodynamic stability, a theoretical model was proposed for the generation of the coherent structures in the wall region of a turbulent boundary layer. The obtained structural configuration, the spanwise length scale and the convective speed of the coherent structures are in agreement with those obtained by numerical simulations. To further characterize these structures, the probability density distribution of the non-dimensional circulation difference of the largely unsymmetric streamwise vortex pairs has been calculated. Its comparison with those obtained by the numerical simulations is in general satisfactory.

  16. Attraction-Based Computation of Hyperbolic Lagrangian Coherent Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Karrasch, Daniel; Haller, George

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances enable the simultaneous computation of both attracting and repelling families of Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS) at the same initial or final time of interest. Obtaining LCS positions at intermediate times, however, has been problematic, because either the repelling or the attracting family is unstable with respect to numerical advection in a given time direction. Here we develop a new approach to compute arbitrary positions of hyperbolic LCS in a numerically robust fashion. Our approach only involves the advection of attracting material surfaces, thereby providing accurate LCS tracking at low computational cost. We illustrate the advantages of this approach on a simple model and on a turbulent velocity data set.

  17. Coherent structures in wave boundary layers. Part 1. Oscillatory motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Stefan; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    This work concerns oscillatory boundary layers over smooth beds. It comprises combined visual and quantitative techniques including bed shear stress measurements. The experiments were carried out in an oscillating water tunnel. The experiments reveal two significant coherent flow structures: (i......) Vortex tubes, essentially two-dimensional vortices close to the bed extending across the width of the boundary-layer flow, caused by an inflectional-point shear layer instability. The imprint of these vortices in the bed shear stress is a series of small, insignificant kinks and dips. (ii) Turbulent...

  18. Long-range correlations and coherent structures in magnetohydrodynamic equilibria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichman, Peter B

    2012-12-01

    The equilibrium theory of the 2D magnetohydrodynamic equations is derived, accounting for the full infinite hierarchies of conserved integrals. An exact description in terms of two coupled elastic membranes emerges, producing long-ranged correlations between the magnetic and velocity fields. This is quite different from the results of previous variational treatments, which relied on a local product ansatz for the thermodynamic Gibbs distribution. The equilibria display the same type of coherent structures, such as compact eddies and zonal jets, previously found in pure fluid equilibria. Possible consequences of this for recent simulations of the solar tachocline are discussed.

  19. Determining the Spectral Signature of Spatial Coherent Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Pastur, L R; Fraigneau, Y; Podvin, B

    2005-01-01

    We applied to an open flow a proper orthogonal decomposition (pod) technique, on 2D snapshots of the instantaneous velocity field, to reveal the spatial coherent structures responsible of the self-sustained oscillations observed in the spectral distribution of time series. We applied the technique to 2D planes out of 3D direct numerical simulations on an open cavity flow. The process can easily be implemented on usual personal computers, and might bring deep insights on the relation between spatial events and temporal signature in (both numerical or experimental) open flows.

  20. Neuronal bases of structural coherence in contemporary dance observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachrach, Asaf; Jola, Corinne; Pallier, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The neuronal processes underlying dance observation have been the focus of an increasing number of brain imaging studies over the past decade. However, the existing literature mainly dealt with effects of motor and visual expertise, whereas the neural and cognitive mechanisms that underlie the interpretation of dance choreographies remained unexplored. Hence, much attention has been given to the action observation network (AON) whereas the role of other potentially relevant neuro-cognitive mechanisms such as mentalizing (theory of mind) or language (narrative comprehension) in dance understanding is yet to be elucidated. We report the results of an fMRI study where the structural coherence of short contemporary dance choreographies was manipulated parametrically using the same taped movement material. Our participants were all trained dancers. The whole-brain analysis argues that the interpretation of structurally coherent dance phrases involves a subpart (superior parietal) of the AON as well as mentalizing regions in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. An ROI analysis based on a similar study using linguistic materials (Pallier et al., 2011) suggests that structural processing in language and dance might share certain neural mechanisms.

  1. POD of vorticity fields: A method for spatial characterization of coherent structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurka, Roi [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London (Canada)]. E-mail: rgurka@eng.uwo.ca; Liberzon, Alexander [Institute of Environmental Engineering, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)]. E-mail: liberzon@ihw.baug.ethz.ch; Hetsroni, Gad [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel)]. E-mail: hetsroni@tx.technion.ac.il

    2006-06-15

    We present a method to identify large scale coherent structures, in turbulent flows, and characterize them. The method is based on the linear combination of the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) modes of vorticity. Spanwise vorticity is derived from the two-dimensional and two-component velocity fields measured by means of particle image velocimetry (PIV) in the streamwise-wall normal plane of a fully developed turbulent boundary layer in a flume. The identification method makes use of the whole data set simultaneously, through the two-point correlation tensor, providing a statistical description of the dominant coherent motions in a turbulent boundary layer. The identified pattern resembles an elongated, quasi-streamwise, vortical structure with streamwise length equal to the water height in the flume and inclined upwards in the streamwise-wall normal plane at angle of approximately 8{sup o}.

  2. A note on the relationship between turbulent coherent structures and phase correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yanfei; Belušić, Danijel; Smith-Miles, Kate

    2014-06-01

    Various definitions of coherent structures exist in turbulence research, but a common assumption is that coherent structures have correlated spectral phases. As a result, randomization of phases is believed, generally, to remove coherent structures from the measured data. Here, we reexamine these assumptions using atmospheric turbulence measurements. Small-scale coherent structures are detected in the usual way using the wavelet transform. A considerable percentage of the detected structures are not phase correlated, although some of them are clearly organized in space and time. At larger scales, structures have even higher degree of spatiotemporal coherence but are also associated with weak phase correlation. A series of specific examples are shown to demonstrate this. These results warn about the vague terminology and assumptions around coherent structures, particularly for complex real-world turbulence.

  3. A note on the relationship between turbulent coherent structures and phase correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yanfei; Belušić, Danijel, E-mail: danijel.belusic@monash.edu; Smith-Miles, Kate [School of Mathematical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2014-06-15

    Various definitions of coherent structures exist in turbulence research, but a common assumption is that coherent structures have correlated spectral phases. As a result, randomization of phases is believed, generally, to remove coherent structures from the measured data. Here, we reexamine these assumptions using atmospheric turbulence measurements. Small-scale coherent structures are detected in the usual way using the wavelet transform. A considerable percentage of the detected structures are not phase correlated, although some of them are clearly organized in space and time. At larger scales, structures have even higher degree of spatiotemporal coherence but are also associated with weak phase correlation. A series of specific examples are shown to demonstrate this. These results warn about the vague terminology and assumptions around coherent structures, particularly for complex real-world turbulence.

  4. A variational formulation for translation and assimilation of coherent structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Plu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The assimilation of observations from teledetected images in geophysical models requires one to develop algorithms that would account for the existence of coherent structures. In the context of variational data assimilation, a method is proposed to allow the background to be translated so as to fit structure positions deduced from images. Translation occurs as a first step before assimilating all the observations using a classical assimilation procedure with specific covariances for the translated background. A simple validation is proposed using a dynamical system based on the one-dimensional complex Ginzburg–Landau equation in a regime prone to phase and amplitude errors. Assimilation of observations after background translation leads to better scores and a better representation of extremas than the method without translation.

  5. Coherent structures in the boundary plasma of EAST Tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Ning

    filaments in the SOL or slightly inside the separatrix. It is observed that the topological configuration of density and potential in the ELM filaments deviate from each other. Furthermore, isolated electromagnetic filaments have been clearly identified during the type-I-like ELMs. They propagate radially......In recent years, with the application of fast camera in fusion plasma, as well as other diagnostic of spatial-temporal resolution such as Langmuir probe, it has become generally clear that the turbulence transport is mostly dominant by cross-field propagation of coherent structures, namely blobs...... turbulence-simulation code based on the interchange instability as the main drive for the turbulence and structure motion in the scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma, with the input parameters from the EAST experiments. The simulations successfully reproduce the statistical characteristics of the SOL turbulence...

  6. Experimental Studies of Two-Phase Round Turbulent Jet Coherent Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Coherent structures of a two-phase round turbulent jet have been studied experimentally. The flow profiles at different Reynold's numbers and various positions from the jet exit are visualized using a sheet laser source. The jets include two types,an air jet laden with incense smoke and an air jet laden with two kinds of solid particles, glass beads and catalytic cracking beads. The developments of both the large eddy structures of the round turbulent jet and the local particle dispersion in the vortex structures were recorded with a high-speed movie camera. Free and excited jet conditions were tested. Analysis of the video pictures suggests a critical intrinsic frequency exists in the helical coherent structures of the air phase. In the spectral space the clockwise and counter-clockwise helical structures occupy different positions. Large scale structures exsit in the two-phase jet. The patterns are similar to those of the air jet with the Stokes numbers in the range of 1-8.32.

  7. Modeling of individual coherent structures in wall region of a turbulent boundary layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周恒; 陆昌根; 罗纪生

    1999-01-01

    Models for individual coherent structures in the wall region of a turbulent boundary layer are proposed. Method of numerical simulations is used to follow the evolution of the structures. It is found that the proposed model does bear many features of coherent structures found in experiments.

  8. Surface structure of coherently strained ceria ultrathin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yezhou; Stone, Kevin H.; Guan, Zixuan; Monti, Matteo; Cao, Chuntian; El Gabaly, Farid; Chueh, William C.; Toney, Michael F.

    2016-11-01

    Cerium oxide, or ceria, is an important material for solid oxide fuel cells and water splitting devices. Although the ceria surface is active in catalytic and electrochemical reactions, how its catalytic properties are affected by the surface structure under operating conditions is far from understood. We investigate the structure of the coherently strained Ce O2 ultrathin films on yttria-stabilized zirconia (001) single crystals by specular synchrotron x-ray diffraction (XRD) under oxidizing conditions as a first step to study the surface structure in situ. An excellent agreement between the experiment data and the model is achieved by using a "stacks and islands" model that has a two-component roughness. One component is due to the tiny clusters of nanometer scale in lateral dimensions on each terrace, while the other component is due to slightly different Ce O2 thickness that span over hundreds of nanometers on neighboring terraces. We attribute the nonuniform thickness to step depairing during the thin film deposition that is supported by the surface morphology results on the microscopic level. Importantly, our model also shows that the polarity of the ceria surface is removed by a half monolayer surface coverage of oxygen. The successful resolution of the ceria surface structure using in situ specular synchrotron XRD paves the way to study the structural evolution of ceria as a fuel cell electrode under catalytically relevant temperatures and gas pressures.

  9. Effects of light wavelength and coherence in structured light sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Kevin; Ramamurthy, Rajesh; Zhai, Zirong; Han, Jie; Yang, Dongmin

    2016-05-01

    Structured light methods are used by many commercial products on the market today. Many such systems using white light projectors while many line gages use standard red laser diodes. However, in recent years there has been much claimed about using blue light, polarized light and partially coherent systems to obtain better performance. Unlike interferometers, moving from red to blue light for a system using only geometric shape information does not gain an automatic advantage from the shorter wavelength. The sensitivity metric does not have a wavelength component to it. But there are other factors that can improve gage performance. The ability to measure some feature is also a function of other parameters such as signal to noise ratio, reflectivity variations, and depth-of-field over which a clear pattern can be seen. This paper will explore the theoretical and experimental data relating to what works and what can be expected from variations on the old methods.

  10. Computing Lagrangian coherent structures from their variational theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farazmand, Mohammad; Haller, George

    2012-03-01

    Using the recently developed variational theory of hyperbolic Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs), we introduce a computational approach that renders attracting and repelling LCSs as smooth, parametrized curves in two-dimensional flows. The curves are obtained as trajectories of an autonomous ordinary differential equation for the tensor lines of the Cauchy-Green strain tensor. This approach eliminates false positives and negatives in LCS detection by separating true exponential stretching from shear in a frame-independent fashion. Having an explicitly parametrized form for hyperbolic LCSs also allows for their further in-depth analysis and accurate advection as material lines. We illustrate these results on a kinematic model flow and on a direct numerical simulation of two-dimensional turbulence.

  11. Coherent vortical structures in two-dimensional plasma turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, H.L.; Coutsias, E.A.; Huld, T.;

    1992-01-01

    A laboratory experiment was carried out in order to study the nonlinear saturated stage of the cross-field electrostatic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in a strongly magnetized plasma. The presence of large vortex-like structures in a background of wide-band turbulent fluctuations was demonstrated...... simulations. The importance of the large scale structures for the turbulent plasma transport across magnetic field lines was analyzed in detail....

  12. Coherent thermoelectric transport in single, double, and U-bend structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pye, A. J.; Faux, D. A.; Kearney, M. J. [Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-14

    Coherent, i.e., ballistic, thermoelectric transport in electron waveguide structures containing right-angle bends in single, double, and U-bend configurations is investigated. A theory based on Green's functions is used to derive the transmission function (and from that the transport coefficients) and allows for the inclusion of realistic models of spatially distributed imperfections. The results for the single and double-bend structures are presented in more detail than elsewhere in the literature. In the U-bend structure, sharp resonances in the stop-band region of the transmission function lead to large-magnitude peaks in the thermopower and consequently a large thermoelectric figure of merit (of order ten in some instances). These properties are still readily apparent even in the presence of moderate edge roughness or Anderson disorder.

  13. Coherent structures in two-dimensional plasma turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huld, T.; Nielsen, A.H.; Pécseli, H.L.;

    1991-01-01

    -band turbulent fluctuations is demonstrated by a conditional sampling technique. Depending on plasma parameters, the dominant structures can appear as monopole or multipole vortices, dipole vortices in particular. The importance of large structures for the turbulent plasma diffusion is discussed. A statistical...... analysis of the randomly varying plasma flux is presented....

  14. Self-organization and coherent structures in plasmas and fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, A.H.; Juul Rasmussen, J.; Schmidt, M.R.

    1996-01-01

    momentum the development into propagating dipolar structures is observed. This development is discussed by employing self-organization principles. The detailed structures of the evolving dipoles depends on the initial condition. It seems that there are no unique dipolar solutions, but a large class...

  15. Beyond coherence: Recovering structured time-frequency representations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Lasse; Gribonval, Rémi; Nielsen, Morten

    2008-01-01

    pursuit and (orthogonal) matching pursuit algorithms to recover a structured representation of an admissible signal. The sufficient conditions take into account the structure of the wavelet/Wilson dictionary and allow very large (even infinite) support sets to be recovered even though the dictionary...

  16. Reflection and transmission calculations in a multilayer structure with coherent, incoherent, and partially coherent interference, using the transmission line method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathopoulos, N A; Savaidis, S P; Botsialas, A; Ioannidis, Z C; Georgiadou, D G; Vasilopoulou, M; Pagiatakis, G

    2015-02-20

    A generalized transmission line method (TLM) that provides reflection and transmission calculations for a multilayer dielectric structure with coherent, partial coherent, and incoherent layers is presented. The method is deployed on two different application fields. The first application of the method concerns the thickness measurement of the individual layers of an organic light-emitting diode. By using a fitting approach between experimental spectral reflectance measurements and the corresponding TLM calculations, it is shown that the thickness of the films can be estimated. The second application of the TLM concerns the calculation of the external quantum efficiency of an organic photovoltaic with partially coherent rough interfaces between the layers. Numerical results regarding the short circuit photocurrent for different layer thicknesses and rough interfaces are provided and the performance impact of the rough interface is discussed in detail.

  17. Compressive Coherent Structures at Ion Scales in the Slow Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Perrone, D; Mangeney, A; Maksimovic, M; Lacombe, C; Rokoto, V; Kasper, J C; Jovanovic, D

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of magnetic field fluctuations, in a slow solar wind stream, close to ion scales, where an increase of the level of magnetic compressibility is observed. Here, the nature of these compressive fluctuations is found to be characterized by coherent structures. Although previous studies have shown that current sheets can be considered as the principal cause of intermittency at ion scales, here we show for the first time that, in the case of the slow solar wind, a large variety of coherent structures contributes to intermittency at proton scales, and current sheets are not the most common. Specifically, we find compressive ($\\delta b_{\\|} \\gg \\delta b_{\\perp}$), linearly polarized structures in the form of magnetic holes, solitons and shock waves. Examples of Alfv\\'enic structures ($\\delta b_{\\perp} > \\delta b_{\\|}$) are identified as current sheets and vortex-like structures. Some of these vortices have $ \\delta b_{\\perp} \\gg \\delta b_{\\|}$, as in the case of Alfv\\'en vortices, but the majority...

  18. The chlamydiales pangenome revisited: structural stability and functional coherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psomopoulos, Fotis E; Siarkou, Victoria I; Papanikolaou, Nikolas; Iliopoulos, Ioannis; Tsaftaris, Athanasios S; Promponas, Vasilis J; Ouzounis, Christos A

    2012-05-16

    The entire publicly available set of 37 genome sequences from the bacterial order Chlamydiales has been subjected to comparative analysis in order to reveal the salient features of this pangenome and its evolutionary history. Over 2,000 protein families are detected across multiple species, with a distribution consistent to other studied pangenomes. Of these, there are 180 protein families with multiple members, 312 families with exactly 37 members corresponding to core genes, 428 families with peripheral genes with varying taxonomic distribution and finally 1,125 smaller families. The fact that, even for smaller genomes of Chlamydiales, core genes represent over a quarter of the average protein complement, signifies a certain degree of structural stability, given the wide range of phylogenetic relationships within the group. In addition, the propagation of a corpus of manually curated annotations within the discovered core families reveals key functional properties, reflecting a coherent repertoire of cellular capabilities for Chlamydiales. We further investigate over 2,000 genes without homologs in the pangenome and discover two new protein sequence domains. Our results, supported by the genome-based phylogeny for this group, are fully consistent with previous analyses and current knowledge, and point to future research directions towards a better understanding of the structural and functional properties of Chlamydiales.

  19. Reaction enhancement of initially distant scalars by Lagrangian coherent structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, Kenneth R., E-mail: kenneth.pratt@colorado.edu; Crimaldi, John P., E-mail: john.crimaldi@colorado.edu [Department of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0428 (United States); Meiss, James D., E-mail: james.meiss@colorado.edu [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0526 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Turbulent fluid flows have long been recognized as a superior means of diluting initial concentrations of scalars due to rapid stirring. Conversely, experiments have shown that the structures responsible for this rapid dilution can also aggregate initially distant reactive scalars and thereby greatly enhance reaction rates. Indeed, chaotic flows not only enhance dilution by shearing and stretching but also organize initially distant scalars along transiently attracting regions in the flow. To show the robustness of this phenomenon, a hierarchical set of three numerical flows is used: the periodic wake downstream of a stationary cylinder, a chaotic double gyre flow, and a chaotic, aperiodic flow consisting of interacting Taylor vortices. We demonstrate that Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS), as identified by ridges in finite time Lyapunov exponents, are directly responsible for this coalescence of reactive scalar filaments. When highly concentrated filaments coalesce, reaction rates can be orders of magnitude greater than would be predicted in a well-mixed system. This is further supported by an idealized, analytical model that was developed to quantify the competing effects of scalar dilution and coalescence. Chaotic flows, known for their ability to efficiently dilute scalars, therefore have the competing effect of organizing initially distant scalars along the LCS at timescales shorter than that required for dilution, resulting in reaction enhancement.

  20. Large-eddy simulation of spectral coherence in a wind turbine wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, A.; Crespo, A.; Migoya, E.; Garcia, J.

    2008-01-01

    This work is mainly dedicated to the study of the characteristics of spectral coherence of turbulence fluctuations in wind turbine wakes. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code has been implemented using a large-eddy simulation (LES) approach, which is thought to be conceptually more suitable for studying the turbulence evolution in a wind turbine wake. Comparisons with experimental data from the Nørrekær Enge II Windfarm, in Denmark, and with an analytical model proposed by Panofsky and Dutton have been performed, and the results are found to be in reasonable agreement with both.

  1. Inverse energy cascade and emergence of large coherent vortices in turbulence driven by Faraday waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francois, N; Xia, H; Punzmann, H; Shats, M

    2013-05-10

    We report the generation of large coherent vortices via inverse energy cascade in Faraday wave driven turbulence. The motion of floaters in the Faraday waves is three dimensional, but its horizontal velocity fluctuations show unexpected similarity with two-dimensional turbulence. The inverse cascade is detected by measuring frequency spectra of the Lagrangian velocity, and it is confirmed by computing the third moment of the horizontal velocity fluctuations. This is observed in deep water in a broad range of wavelengths and vertical accelerations. The results broaden the scope of recent findings on Faraday waves in thin layers [A. von Kameke et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 074502 (2011)].

  2. Structuring very large domain models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Störrle, Harald

    2010-01-01

    View/Viewpoint approaches like IEEE 1471-2000, or Kruchten's 4+1-view model are used to structure software architectures at a high level of granularity. While research has focused on architectural languages and with consistency between multiple views, practical questions such as the structuring a...

  3. Coherent structures in fully-developed pipe turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Willis, A P; Cossu, C

    2009-01-01

    A turbulent mean profile for pipe flow is prescribed which closely matches experimental observations. The nature of perturbations superimposed upon this profile is then considered. Optimal growth calculations predict two distinct classes of structures, clearly associated with near-wall and large-scale structures. Quantitative correspondence of the spanwise wavelength of wall-structures with experimental observations is very good. The response to harmonic forcing is also considered, and the linear growth tested with direct numerical simulation of forced turbulence. Despite the very simple eddy viscosity assumption, this linear approach predicts well the surprisingly large growth of outer-scale modes in the bulk flow. Un profil moyen turbulent est prescrit dans une conduite cylindrique, en adequation avec les observations experimentales. Nous considerons ensuite la nature des perturbations a cet ecoulement synthetique. Le calcul des croissances optimales predit deux types de structures, associees respectivement...

  4. Turbulent Structures and Coherence in the Atmospheric Surface Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Träumner, K.; Damian, Th.; Stawiarski, Ch.; Wieser, A.

    2015-01-01

    Organized structures in turbulent flow fields are a well-known and still fascinating phenomenon. Although these so-called coherent structures are obvious from visual inspection, quantitative assessment is a challenge and many aspects e.g., formation mechanisms and contribution to turbulent fluxes, are discussed controversially. During the "High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for Advancing Climate Prediction" Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) from April to May 2013, an advanced dual Doppler lidar technique was used to image the horizontal wind field near the surface for approximately 300 h. A visual inspection method, as well as a two-dimensional integral length scale analysis, were performed to characterize the observations qualitatively and quantitatively. During situations with forcing due to shear, the wind fields showed characteristic patterns in the form of clearly bordered, elongated areas of enhanced or reduced wind speed, which can be associated with near-surface streaks. During calm situations with strong buoyancy forcing, open cell patterns in the horizontal divergence field were observed. The measurement technique used enables the calculation of integral length scales of both horizontal wind components in the streamwise and cross-stream directions. The individual length scales varied considerably during the observation period but were on average shorter during situations with compared to strongly stable situations. During unstable situations, which were dominated by wind fields with structures, the streamwise length scales increased with increasing wind speed, whereas the cross-stream length scales decreased. Consequently, the anisotropy increased from 1 for calm situations to values of 2-3 for wind speeds of 8-10. During neutral to stable situations, the eddies were on average quite isotropic in the horizontal plane.

  5. Symmetry Broken Exact Coherent Structures in Plane Couette Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalaswamy, Varchas; Borrero-Echeverry, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Invariant solutions of the fully resolved Navier-Stokes equation, known as exact coherent structures (ECS) are an exciting and potentially revolutionary method for understanding turbulent dynamics. The geometry of plane Couette flow leads to the existence of ECS with a high degree of symmetry. However, turbulent flows do not display a high degree of symmetry, so it is unclear whether these symmetric ECS can truly capture the turbulent dynamics. We report the discovery of four new periodic orbits - P85 and P60 which are fully symmetric, and P32 and P8, which have partially broken symmetry. Projections of these periodic orbits in the dissipation-energy input plane reveal that P32, P60 and P85 lie in the turbulent region of the state space, whereas P8 lies very far away from this region. Parametric continuation in the spanwise periodic cell length Lz suggests that P8 undergoes two bifurcations, which are verified by analysis of various properties of P8 in the dissipation-energy input plane, and by observations of changes in the stability of eigenvectors that are consistent with bifurcations.

  6. Using Lagrangian Coherent Structures to understand coastal water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, L. A.; Olascoaga, M. J.; Reniers, A.; Feng, Z.; Beron-Vera, F. J.; MacMahan, J. H.

    2012-09-01

    The accumulation of pollutants near the shoreline can result in low quality coastal water with negative effects on human health. To understand the role of mixing by tidal flows in coastal water quality we study the nearshore Lagrangian circulation. Specifically, we reveal Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSs), i.e., distinguished material curves which shape global mixing patterns and thus act as skeletons of the Lagrangian circulation. This is done using the recently developed geodesic theory of transport barriers. Particular focus is placed on Hobie Beach, a recreational subtropical marine beach located in Virginia Key, Miami, Florida. According to studies of water quality, Hobie Beach is characterized by high microbial levels. Possible sources of pollution in Hobie Beach include human bather shedding, dog fecal matter, runoff, and sand efflux at high tides. Consistent with the patterns formed by satellite-tracked drifter trajectories, the LCSs extracted from simulated currents reveal a Lagrangian circulation favoring the retention near the shoreline of pollutants released along the shoreline, which can help explain the low quality water registered at Hobie Beach.

  7. The NIF Shear Experiment: Emergent Coherent Structures and Initial Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flippo, K. A.; Doss, F. W.; Merritt, E. C.; di Stefano, C. A.; Devolder, B. G.; Kurien, S.; Kot, L.; Loomis, E. N.; Murphy, T. J.; Perry, T. S.; Kline, J. L.; Huntington, C. M.; Nagel, S. R.; MacLaren, S. A.; Schmidt, D. W.

    2016-10-01

    The NIF Shear experiments are designed to stress turbulence models at high Atwood numbers, high convective Mach number, and in a highly compressible regime. The NIF laser system is used to drive two hohlraums on either end of the experiment, which convert the laser drive into a bath of soft x-rays, 250eV in temperature. The counter-propagating shocks and flow, pressure balance the shear layer, such that it can grow due to the KH instability in the center of the experiment for 20 ns. These experiments are the first High Energy Density (HED) hydro-instability studies to show emergent coherent Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) structures arising from random broadband seeds, and the first to control the phenomenological evolution of the tracer layer by controlling the initial surface roughness conditions. The change in initial conditions forces the system evolution on a different path that does not appear to reach a universal nor self-similar state by the end of the experiment. The experiment was modeled using the multi-physics hydrodynamic code RAGE with the BHR turbulence model. The initial scale-length of the model is modified to match the data. When the model is turned off, the pure hydrodynamics do not capture the behavior of the mixing layer and cannot match the data.

  8. Compressive Coherent Structures at Ion Scales in the Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, D.; Alexandrova, O.; Mangeney, A.; Maksimovic, M.; Lacombe, C.; Rakoto, V.; Kasper, J. C.; Jovanovic, D.

    2016-08-01

    We present a study of magnetic field fluctuations in a slow solar wind stream, close to ion scales, where an increase of the level of magnetic compressibility is observed. Here, the nature of these compressive fluctuations is found to be characterized by coherent structures. Although previous studies have shown that current sheets can be considered the principal cause of intermittency at ion scales, here we show for the first time that, in the case of the slow solar wind, a large variety of coherent structures contributes to intermittency at proton scales, and current sheets are not the most common. Specifically, we find compressive (δ {b}\\parallel \\gg δ {b}\\perp ), linearly polarized structures in the form of magnetic holes, solitons, and shock waves. Examples of Alfvénic structures (δ {b}\\perp \\gt δ {b}\\parallel ) are identified as current sheets and vortex-like structures. Some of these vortices have δ {b}\\perp \\gg δ {b}\\parallel , as in the case of Alfvén vortices, but the majority of them are characterized by δ {b}\\perp ≳ δ {b}\\parallel . Thanks to multi-point measurements by the Cluster spacecraft, for about 100 structures we could determine the normal, the propagation velocity, and the spatial scale along this normal. Independently of the nature of the structures, the normal is always perpendicular to the local magnetic field, meaning that k ⊥ ≫ k ∥. The spatial scales of the studied structures are found to be between two and eight times the proton gyroradius. Most of them are simply convected by the wind, but 25% propagate in the plasma frame. Possible interpretations of the observed structures and the connection with plasma heating are discussed.

  9. Identification of Lagrangian coherent structures in the turbulent boundary layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Using Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponents (FTLE) method, Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) in a fully developed flat-plate turbulent boundary layer are successfully identified from a two-dimensional (2D) velocity field obtained by time-resolved 2D PIV measurement. The typical LCSs in the turbulent boundary layer are hairpin-like structures, which are characterized as legs of quasi-streamwise vor- tices extending deep into the near wall region with an inclination angle θ to the wall, and heads of the transverse vortex tube located in the outer region. Statistical analysis on the characteristic shape of typical LCS reveals that the probability density distribution of θ accords well with t-distribution in the near wall region, but presents a bimodal distribution with two peaks in the outer region, corresponding to the hairpin head and the hairpin neck, respectively. Spatial correlation analysis of FTLE field is im- plemented to get the ensemble-averaged inclination angle θ R of typical LCS. θ R first increases and then decreases along the wall-normal direction, similar to that of the mean value of θ. Moreover, the most probable value of θ saturates at y+=100 with the maximum value of about 24°, suggesting that the most likely position where hairpins transit from the neck to the head is located around y+=100. The ensem- ble-averaged convection velocity Uc of typical LCS is finally calculated from temporal-spatial correla- tion analysis of FTLE field. It is found that the wall-normal profile of the convection velocity Uc(y) ac- cords well with the local mean velocity profile U(y) beyond the buffer layer, evidencing that the down- stream convection of hairpins determines the transportation properties of the turbulent boundary layer in the log-region and beyond.

  10. Identification of Lagrangian coherent structures in the turbulent boundary layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Chong; WANG JinJun; ZHANG Cao

    2009-01-01

    Using Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponents (FTLE) method, Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) in a fully developed flat-plate turbulent boundary layer are successfully identified from a two-dimensional (2D) velocity field obtained by time-resolved 2D PIV measurement. The typical LCSs in the turbulent boundary layer are hairpin-like structures, which are characterized as legs of quasi-streamwise vor-tices extending deep into the near wall region with an inclination angle θto the wall, and heads of the transverse vortex tube located in the outer region. Statistical analysis on the characteristic shape of typical LCS reveals that the probability density distribution of # accords well with t-distribution in the near wall region, but presents a bimodal distribution with two peaks in the outer region, corresponding to the hairpin head and the hairpin neck, respectively. Spatial correlation analysis of FTLE field is im-plemented to get the ensemble-averaged inclination angle θR of typical LCS. θR first increases and then decreases along the wall-normal direction, similar to that of the mean value of θ. Moreover, the most probable value of 8 saturates at Y+=100 with the maximum value of about 24°, suggesting that the most likely position where hairpins transit from the neck to the head is located around Y+=100. The ensem-ble-averaged convection velocity Uc of typical LCS is finally calculated from temporal-spatial correla-tion analysis of FTLE field. It is found that the wall-normal profile of the convection velocity Uc(Y) ac-cords well with the local mean velocity profile U(y) beyond the buffer layer, evidencing that the down-stream convection of hairpins determines the transportation properties of the turbulent boundary layer in the log-region and beyond.

  11. Relating indices of knowledge structure coherence and accuracy to skill-based performance: Is there utility in using a combination of indices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuelke, Matthew J; Day, Eric Anthony; McEntire, Lauren E; Boatman, Jazmine Espejo; Wang, Xiaoqian; Kowollik, Vanessa; Boatman, Paul R

    2009-07-01

    The authors examined the relative criterion-related validity of knowledge structure coherence and two accuracy-based indices (closeness and correlation) as well as the utility of using a combination of knowledge structure indices in the prediction of skill acquisition and transfer. Findings from an aggregation of 5 independent samples (N = 958) whose participants underwent training on a complex computer simulation indicated that coherence and the accuracy-based indices yielded comparable zero-order predictive validities. Support for the incremental validity of using a combination of indices was mixed; the most, albeit small, gain came in pairing coherence and closeness when predicting transfer. After controlling for baseline skill, general mental ability, and declarative knowledge, only coherence explained a statistically significant amount of unique variance in transfer. Overall, the results suggested that the different indices largely overlap in their representation of knowledge organization, but that coherence better reflects adaptable aspects of knowledge organization important to skill transfer.

  12. Model of coherent transport in metal-insulator-midband gap semiconductor-insulator-semiconductor structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, I. I.; Danilyuk, A. L.

    1997-08-01

    A kinetic model of coherent transport with self-organized carrier transfer via midband gap semiconductor states in metal-insulator-midband gap semiconductor-insulator-semiconductor structure at room temperature is proposed. The coherent transport at room temperature can be a result of continuous oscillations of charge carriers at midband gap semiconductor states.

  13. Shannon Entropy-Based Wavelet Transform Method for Autonomous Coherent Structure Identification in Fluid Flow Field Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartik V. Bulusu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The coherent secondary flow structures (i.e., swirling motions in a curved artery model possess a variety of spatio-temporal morphologies and can be encoded over an infinitely-wide range of wavelet scales. Wavelet analysis was applied to the following vorticity fields: (i a numerically-generated system of Oseen-type vortices for which the theoretical solution is known, used for bench marking and evaluation of the technique; and (ii experimental two-dimensional, particle image velocimetry data. The mother wavelet, a two-dimensional Ricker wavelet, can be dilated to infinitely large or infinitesimally small scales. We approached the problem of coherent structure detection by means of continuous wavelet transform (CWT and decomposition (or Shannon entropy. The main conclusion of this study is that the encoding of coherent secondary flow structures can be achieved by an optimal number of binary digits (or bits corresponding to an optimal wavelet scale. The optimal wavelet-scale search was driven by a decomposition entropy-based algorithmic approach and led to a threshold-free coherent structure detection method. The method presented in this paper was successfully utilized in the detection of secondary flow structures in three clinically-relevant blood flow scenarios involving the curved artery model under a carotid artery-inspired, pulsatile inflow condition. These scenarios were: (i a clean curved artery; (ii stent-implanted curved artery; and (iii an idealized Type IV stent fracture within the curved artery.

  14. Atomistic structure of the coherent Ni/Ni[sub 3]Al interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farkas, D. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Campos, M.F. de; Souze, R.M. de; Goldenstein, H. (Escola Politecnica USP, Sao Paulo (Brazil). Dept. de Metalurgia)

    1994-02-01

    Most Ni-based superalloys are strengthened by the presence of coherent precipitates of an ordered fcc bases phase, known as [gamma][prime]. This phase is basically Ni[sub 3]Al. The precipitates are coherent up to a certain size and they present a cubic shape with faces oriented in the (100) planes of both matrix and precipitate. The detailed atomistic structure of this interface has not been studied. Interest in the use of ordered intermetallic compounds as possible structural materials has resulted in a large amount of work in Ni[sub 3]Al and in particular, the development of interatomic potentials for the Ni-Al system using the embedded atom technique. These potentials have been employed in the simulation of a variety of defects in Ni[sub 3]Al, including dislocation cores, grain boundaries and free surfaces. However, there is no simulation of the Ni/Ni[sub 3]Al interface structure using the embedded atom method. The objective of the present work is to carry out such a simulation. Besides the practical importance of the interface in superalloys, it is the simplest type of interface that can be modeled and it is a good starting point for interface work using the embedded atom technique.

  15. Lagrangian coherent structures during combustion instability in a premixed-flame backward-step combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampath, Ramgopal; Mathur, Manikandan; Chakravarthy, Satyanarayanan R.

    2016-12-01

    This paper quantitatively examines the occurrence of large-scale coherent structures in the flow field during combustion instability in comparison with the flow-combustion-acoustic system when it is stable. For this purpose, the features in the recirculation zone of the confined flow past a backward-facing step are studied in terms of Lagrangian coherent structures. The experiments are conducted at a Reynolds number of 18600 and an equivalence ratio of 0.9 of the premixed fuel-air mixture for two combustor lengths, the long duct corresponding to instability and the short one to the stable case. Simultaneous measurements of the velocity field using time-resolved particle image velocimetry and the C H* chemiluminescence of the flame along with pressure time traces are obtained. The extracted ridges of the finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields delineate dynamically distinct regions of the flow field. The presence of large-scale vortical structures and their modulation over different time instants are well captured by the FTLE ridges for the long combustor where high-amplitude acoustic oscillations are self-excited. In contrast, small-scale vortices signifying Kelvin-Helmholtz instability are observed in the short duct case. Saddle-type flow features are found to separate the distinct flow structures for both combustor lengths. The FTLE ridges are found to align with the flame boundaries in the upstream regions, whereas farther downstream, the alignment is weaker due to dilatation of the flow by the flame's heat release. Specifically, the FTLE ridges encompass the flame curl-up for both the combustor lengths, and thus act as the surrogate flame boundaries. The flame is found to propagate upstream from an earlier vortex roll-up to a newer one along the backward-time FTLE ridge connecting the two structures.

  16. Editorial . Quantum fluctuations and coherence in optical and atomic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschner, Jürgen; Gatti, Alessandra; Maître, Agnès; Morigi, Giovanna

    2003-03-01

    From simple interference fringes, over molecular wave packets, to nonlinear optical patterns - the fundamental interaction between light and matter leads to the formation of structures in many areas of atomic and optical physics. Sophisticated technology in experimental quantum optics, as well as modern computational tools available to theorists, have led to spectacular achievements in the investigation of quantum structures. This special issue is dedicated to recent developments in this area. It presents a selection of examples where quantum dynamics, fluctuations, and coherence generate structures in time or in space or where such structures are observed experimentally. The examples range from coherence phenomena in condensed matter, over atoms in optical structures, entanglement in light and matter, to quantum patterns in nonlinear optics and quantum imaging. The combination of such seemingly diverse subjects formed the basis of a successful European TMR network, "Quantum Structures" (visit http://cnqo.phys.strath.ac.uk/~gianluca/QSTRUCT/). This special issue partly re.ects the results and collaborations of the network, going however well beyond its scope by including contributions from a global community and from many related topics which were not addressed directly in the network. The aim of this issue is to present side by side these di.erent topics, all of which are loosely summarized under quantum structures, to highlight their common aspects, their di.erences, and the progress which resulted from the mutual exchange of results, methods, and knowledge. To guide the reader, we have organized the articles into subsections which follow a rough division into structures in material systems and structures in optical .elds. Nevertheless, in the following introduction we point out connections between the contributions which go beyond these usual criteria, thus highlighting the truly interdisciplinary nature of quantum structures. Much of the progress in atom optics

  17. Coherent structures in a zero-pressure-gradient and a strongly decelerated boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simens, Mark P.; Gungor, Ayse G.; Maciel, Yvan

    2016-04-01

    Coherent structures in a strongly decelerated large-velocity-defect turbulent boundary layer (TBL) and a zero pressure gradient (ZPG) boundary layer are analysed by direct numerical simulation (DNS). The characteristics of the one-point velocity stastistics are also considered. The adverse pressure gradient (APG) TBL simulation is a new one carried out by the present authors. The APG TBL begins as a zero pressure gradient boundary layer, decelerates under a strong adverse pressure gradient, and separates near the end of the domain in the form of a very thin separation bubble. The one-point velocity statistics in the outer region of this large-defect boundary layer are compared to those of two other large-velocity-defect APG TBLs (one in dynamic equilibrium, the other in disequilibrium) and a mixing layer. In the upper half of the large-defect boundary layers, the velocity statistics are similar to those of the mixing layer. The dominant peaks of turbulence production and Reynolds stresses are located in the middle of the boundary layers. Three-dimensional spatial correlations of (u, u) and (u, v) show that coherence is lost in the streamwise and spanwise directions as the velocity defect increases. Near-wall streaks tend to disappear in the large-defect zone of the flow to be replaced by more disorganized u motions. Near-wall sweeps and ejections are also less numerous. In the outer region, the u structures tend to be shorter, less streaky, and more inclined with respect to the wall than in the ZPG TBL. The sweeps and ejections are generally bigger with respect to the boundary layer thickness in the large-defect boundary layer, even if the biggest structures are found in the ZPG TBL. Large sweeps and ejections that reach the wall region (wall-attached) are less streamwise elongated and they occupy less space than in the ZPG boundary layer. The distinction between wall-attached and wall-detached structures is not as pronounced in the large-defect TBL.

  18. Characteristics of very large aspect angle E-region coherent echoes at 933 MHz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Jackel

    Full Text Available The EISCAT UHF radar system was used to study the characteristics of E-region coherent backscatter at very large magnetic aspect angles (5–11°. Data taken using 60 μs pulses during elevation scans through horizontally uniform backscatter permitted the use of inversion techniques to determine height profiles of the scattering layer. The layer was always singly peaked, with a mean height of 104 km, and mean thickness (full width at half maximum of 10 km, both independent of aspect angle. Aspect sensitivities were also estimated, with the Sodankylä-Tromsø link observing 5 dB/degree at aspect angles near 5°, decreasing to 3 dB/degree at 10° aspect angle. Observed coherent phase velocities from all three stations were found to be roughly consistent with LOS measurements of a common E-region phase velocity vector. The E-region phase velocity had the same orientation as the F-region ion drift velocity, but was approximately 50% smaller in magnitude. Spectra were narrow with skewness of about +1 (for negative velocities, increasing slightly with aspect angle.

  19. Using co-occurrence to evaluate belief coherence in a large non clinical sample.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Pechey

    Full Text Available Much of the recent neuropsychological literature on false beliefs (delusions has tended to focus on individual or single beliefs, with few studies actually investigating the relationship or co-occurrence between different types of co-existing beliefs. Quine and Ullian proposed the hypothesis that our beliefs form an interconnected web in which the beliefs that make up that system must somehow "cohere" with one another and avoid cognitive dissonance. As such beliefs are unlikely to be encapsulated (i.e., exist in isolation from other beliefs. The aim of this preliminary study was to empirically evaluate the probability of belief co-occurrence as one indicator of coherence in a large sample of subjects involving three different thematic sets of beliefs (delusion-like, paranormal & religious, and societal/cultural. Results showed that the degree of belief co-endorsement between beliefs within thematic groupings was greater than random occurrence, lending support to Quine and Ullian's coherentist account. Some associations, however, were relatively weak, providing for well-established examples of cognitive dissonance.

  20. Coherent and Incoherent Structural Dynamics in Laser-Excited Antimony

    CERN Document Server

    Waldecker, Lutz; Bertoni, Roman; Vasileiadis, Thomas; Garcia, Martin E; Zijlstra, Eeuwe S; Ernstorfer, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the excitation of phonons in photoexcited antimony and demonstrate that the entire electron-lattice interactions, in particular coherent and incoherent electron-phonon coupling, can be probed simultaneously. Using femtosecond electron diffraction (FED) with high temporal resolution, we observe the coherent excitation of the fully symmetric \\Ag\\ optical phonon mode via the shift of the minimum of the atomic potential energy surface. Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to quantify the change in lattice potential and the associated real-space amplitude of the coherent atomic oscillations. In addition, our experimental configuration allows observing the energy transfer from electrons to phonons via incoherent electron-lattice scattering events. Applying a modified two-temperature model, the electron-phonon coupling is determined from the data as a function of electronic temperature.

  1. Dynamics of the Coherent Structures in a Supersonic Rectangular Jet of Aspect Ratio 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanath, Kamal; Corrigan, Andrew; Johnson, Ryan; Kailasanath, Kazhikathra; Gutmark, Ephraim; University of Cincinnati Team; LaboratoriesComputational Physics; Fluid Dynamics Team

    2016-11-01

    Asymmetric exhaust nozzle configurations, in particular rectangular, are likely to become more important in the future for both civilian and military aircraft. Various nozzle geometry features including the presence of sharp corners impact the evolution of the cross-sectional shape of the jet and its mixing features. Asymmetric nozzles potentially offer a passive way of affecting mixing for low aspect ratio jets through both large-scale entrainment due to coherent structures and fine scale mixing at the corners. Data is presented that show the dynamic evolution of the coherent structures for an ideally expanded rectangular nozzle of aspect ratio 2. The sense of the vortex pairs setup through the self-induction at the corners and stretching of the azimuthal vortex ring into streamwise vortices results in diagonal elongation of the time-averaged jet cross-section and contraction at the sides. The phase averaged velocity contours further clearly show the effect of mixing at the sharp corners and the deformation of the rectangular exit cross-section as it propagates downstream. It is observed that the dominant vortex pairs in this case work against axis-switching.

  2. XCAN project : coherent beam combining of large number fibers in femtosecond regime (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antier, Marie; Le Dortz, Jeremy; Bourderionnet, Jerome; Larat, Christian; Lallier, Eric; Daniault, Louis; Fsaifes, Ihsan; Heilmann, Anke; Bellanger, Severine; Simon-Boisson, Christophe; Chanteloup, Jean-Christophe; Brignon, Arnaud

    2016-10-01

    The XCAN project, which is a three years project and began in 2015, carried out by Thales and the Ecole Polytechnique aims at developing a laser system based on the coherent combination of laser beams produced through a network of amplifying optical fibers. This technique provides an attractive mean of reaching simultaneously the high peak and high average powers required for various industrial, scientific and defense applications. The architecture has to be compatible with very large number of fibers (1000-10000). The goal of XCAN is to overcome all the key scientific and technological barriers to the design and development of an experimental laser demonstrator. The coherent addition of multiple individual phased beams is aimed to provide tens of Gigawatt peak power at 50 kHz repetition rate. Coherent beam combining (CBC) of fiber amplifiers involves a master oscillator which is split into N fiber channels and then amplified through series of polarization maintaining fiber pre-amplifiers and amplifiers. In the so-called tiled aperture configuration, the N fibers are arranged in an array and collimated in the near field of the laser output. The N beamlets then interfere constructively in the far field, and give a bright central lobe. CBC techniques with active phase locking involve phase mismatch detection, calculation of the correction and phase compensation of each amplifier by means of phase modulators. Interferometric phase measurement has proven to be particularly well suited to phase-lock a very large number of fibers in continuous regime. A small fraction of the N beamlets is imaged onto a camera. The beamlets interfere separately with a reference beam. The phase mismatch of each beam is then calculated from the interferences' position. In this presentation, we demonstrate the phase locking of 19 fibers in femtosecond pulse regime with this technique. In our first experiment, a master oscillator generates pulses of 300 fs (chirped at 200 ps). The beam is

  3. Detecting Multi-Scale Coherent Eddy Structures and Intermittency in Turbulent Boundary Layer by Wavelet Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Nan; ZHANG Jin

    2005-01-01

    @@ Multi-scale decomposition by wavelet transform has been performed to velocity time sequences obtained by fine measurements of turbulent boundary layer flow. A conditional sampling technique for detecting multi-scale coherent eddy structures in turbulent field is proposed by using multi-scale instantaneous intensity factor and flatness factor of wavelet coefficients. Although the number of coherent eddy structures in the turbulent boundary layer is very small, their energy percentage with respect to the turbulence kinetic energy is high. Especially in buffer layer, the energy percentages of coherent structures are significantly higher than those in the logarithmic layer, indicating that the buffer layer is the most active region in the turbulent boundary layer. These multi-scale coherent eddy structures share some common dynamical characteristics and are responsible for the anomalous scaling law in the turbulent boundary layer.

  4. Characterization of Power Absorption Response of Periodic 3D Structures to Partially Coherent Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Tihon, Denis; Thomas, Christopher N; Craeye, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    In many applications of absorbing structures it is important to understand their spatial response to incident fields, for example in thermal solar panels, bolometric imaging and controlling radiative heat transfer. In practice, the illuminating field often originates from thermal sources and is only spatially partially coherent when reaching the absorbing device. In this paper, we present a method to fully characterize the way a structure can absorb such partially coherent fields. The method is presented for any 3D material and accounts for the partial coherence and partial polarization of the incident light. This characterization can be achieved numerically using simulation results or experimentally using the Energy Absorption Interferometry (EAI) that has been described previously in the literature. The absorbing structure is characterized through a set of absorbing functions, onto which any partially coherent field can be projected. This set is compact for any structure of finite extent and the absorbing f...

  5. CFRP lightweight structures for extremely large telescopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Niels Christian; Nørgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik; Schroll, J.

    2008-01-01

    Telescope structures are traditionally built out of steel. To improve the possibility of realizing the ambitious extremely large telescopes, materials with a higher specific stiffness and a lower coefficient of thermal expansion are needed. An important possibility is Carbon Fibre Reinforced...... Plastic (CFRP). The advantages of using CFRP for the secondary mirror support structure of the European overwhelmingly large telescope are discussed....

  6. Measuring the coherence of healthy and aphasic discourse production in Chinese using Rhetorical Structure Theory (RST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Pak Hin Kong

    2014-04-01

    Our results seemed to suggest that speakers with anomic aphasia had reduced proportion of essential information content, lower degree of elaboration, simplified discourse structure, and more structural disruptions than their healthy counterparts. We argue that the above characteristics have contributed to the reduced overall coherence in their oral discourse. The use of RST to quantify discourse coherence provided more objective measurement on macro-linguistic characteristics in aphasia and, therefore, warrants further investigation.

  7. Chronic stress disrupts neural coherence between cortico-limbic structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Filipe Oliveira

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Chronic stress impairs cognitive function, namely on tasks that rely on the integrity of cortico-limbic networks. To unravel the functional impact of progressive stress in cortico-limbic networks we measured neural activity and spectral coherences between the ventral hippocampus (vHIP and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC in rats subjected to short term (STS and chronic unpredictable stress (CUS. CUS exposure consistently disrupted the spectral coherence between both areas for a wide range of frequencies, whereas STS exposure failed to trigger such effect. The chronic stress-induced coherence decrease correlated inversely with the vHIP power spectrum, but not with the mPFC power spectrum, which supports the view that hippocampal dysfunction is the primary event after stress exposure. Importantly, we additionally show that the variations in vHIP-to-mPFC coherence and power spectrum in the vHIP correlated with stress-induced behavioral deficits in a spatial reference memory task. Altogether, these findings result in an innovative readout to measure, and follow, the functional events that underlie the stress-induced reference memory impairments.

  8. Lagrangian Coherent Structures in a Non-Euclidean Global Thermosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, N.; Ramirez, U.; Flores, F.; Datta-Barua, S.

    2016-12-01

    Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSs) are manifolds of maximum divergence or convergence in 2D or 3D time-varying flow fields. The study of LCSs has been used to predict material transport in numerous geophysical flows. The most commonly used computational method for finding LCSs is to compute the finite time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE), a scalar field measuring the ratio of stretching after a given interval of time among neighboring particles, relative to their initial separation. LCS ridges are located at the local maxima of the FTLE. The LCS must be objective (frame-invariant for different observers), and the technique for computing the FTLE that determines the LCS typically assumes a Euclidean domain. Previous work showed that LCSs are likely to exist globally at high latitudes using the Euclidean norm. Here we refine that calculation by deriving the FTLE calculation for the Riemannian manifold of a spherical surface, and applying it to the thermospheric layer of the atmosphere globally. The thermosphere is treated as a closed spherical 2D domain on which the fluid flows, assuming negligible vertical flow. The domain is discretized in longitude and latitude, and the Horizontal Wind Model 2014 (HWM14) is used to generate the 2D velocity field at each grid point, each of which is a ground speed in the local east-north-up (ENU) frame. To make the LCS objective, the ground speed in each local ENU frame is converted to angular velocity in the earth-centered earth-fixed (ECEF) coordinates. Using bilinear interpolation and including the rotational velocity of Earth to transform to an inertial frame, we trace the trajectory of each particle to compute the final positions after the integration time. Replacing the Euclidean distance between particles with the great circle distance gives the FTLE scalar field from which the LCSs can be identified. We find and illustrate objective LCSs in the neutral wind flow field at high latitudes by applying this algorithm for the

  9. Identifying coherent structures and vortex clusters in Taylor-Couette turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spandan, Vamsi; Ostilla-Monico, Rodolfo; Lohse, Detlef; Verzicco, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The nature of the underlying structures in Taylor-Couette (TC) flow, the flow between two co-axial and independently rotating cylinders is investigated by two methods. First, the quadrant analysis technique for identifying structures with intense radial-azimuthal stresses (also referred to as ‘Q’s) of Lozano-Durán et al., (J. Fluid Mech. 694, 100-130) is used to identify the main structures responsible for the transport of angular velocity. Second, the vortex clusters are identified based on the analysis by del Álamo et al., (J. Fluid. Mech., 561, 329-358). In order to test these criteria, two different radius ratios η = ri/ro are considered, where ri and ro are the radii of inner and outer cylinder, respectively: (i) η = 0.5 and (ii) η = 0.909, which correspond to high and low curvature geometries, respectively and have different underlying structures. The Taylor rolls, i.e. the large-scale coherent structures, are effectively captured as ‘Q’s for the low curvature setup and it is observed that curvature plays a dominant role in influencing the size and volumes of these ‘Q’s. On the other hand, the vortex clusters are smaller in size when compared to the ‘Q’ structures. These vortex clusters are found to be taller in the case of η = 0.909, while the distribution of the lengths of these clusters is almost homogenous for both radius ratios.

  10. Characteristics of very large aspect angle E-region coherent echoes at 933 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackel, B. J.; Moorcroft, D. R.; Schlegel, K.

    1997-01-01

    The EISCAT UHF radar system was used to study the characteristics of E-region coherent backscatter at very large magnetic aspect angles (5-11°). Data taken using 60 s pulses during elevation scans through horizontally uniform backscatter permitted the use of inversion techniques to determine height profiles of the scattering layer. The layer was always singly peaked, with a mean height of 104 km, and mean thickness (full width at half maximum) of 10 km, both independent of aspect angle. Aspect sensitivities were also estimated, with the Sodankylä-Tromsø link observing 5 dB/degree at aspect angles near 5°, decreasing to 3 dB/degree at 10° aspect angle. Observed coherent phase velocities from all three stations were found to be roughly consistent with LOS measurements of a common E-region phase velocity vector. The E-region phase velocity had the same orientation as the F-region ion drift velocity, but was approximately 50% smaller in magnitude. Spectra were narrow with skewness of about +1 (for negative velocities), increasing slightly with aspect angle. Acknowledgements. The authors are grateful to Prof. D. J. Southwood (Imperial College, London), J. C. Samson (University of Alberta, Edmonton), L. J. Lanzerotti (AT&T Bell Laboratories), A. Wolfe (New York City Technical College) and to Dr. M. Vellante (University of LÁquila) for helpful discussions. They also thank Dr. A. Meloni (Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica, Roma) who made available geomagnetic field observations from LÁquila Geomagnetic Observatory. This research activity at LÁquila is supported by MURST (40% and 60% contracts) and by GIFCO/CNR. Topical Editor K.-H. Glaßmeier thanks C. Waters and S. Fujita for their help in evaluating this paper.-> Correspondence to :P. Francia->

  11. Coherent Structures in Plasmas Relevant to Electric Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-24

    with volume number and part number, if applicable. On classified documents, enter the title classification in parentheses. 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...CLASSIFICATION. Enter security classification in accordance with security classification regulations, e.g. U, C, S, etc. If this form contains classified ...dispersion analysis confirms this strong coherence, with a resonant frequency at 250 kHz and a wavenumber (1/) of 200 m-1. A spectral power density

  12. The role of coherent structures in the generation of noise for subsonic jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, G. L.; Whitaker, K. W.

    1982-01-01

    Acoustic measurements were made in the 'near' (r/D 60, x/D 60) field for high Reynolds number (184,000 to 262,000) axisymmetric cold air jets exhausting at atmospheric pressure. These measurements were in conjunction with an investigation which characterized the large scale coherent structure in the flow field of Mach number 0.6 to 0.8 jets. Natural jets as well as artificially excited jets were studied. Directivity plots were made for both natural jets and jets excited at various frequencies. Overall noise radiated by the jets reached a maximum value around 30 deg from the jet axis. However, individual frequencies emitted maximum sound pressure level at different angles from the jet axis. As the angle from the jet axis increased, the spectra of the noise shifted to higher frequencies.

  13. Remote sensing observations of the coherent and non-coherent ring structures in the vicinity of Lesser Antilles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Cruz Gómez

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The North Brazil Current Rings (NBCR penetration into the Caribbean Sea is being investigated by employing a merged altimeter-derived sea height anomaly (TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason-1 and ERS-1, 2, the ocean surface color data (SeaWiFS and Global Drifter Program information. Four strategies are being applied to process the data: (1 calculations of the Okubo-Weiss parameter for NBCR identification, (2 longitude-time plots (also known as Hovmöller diagrams, (3 two-dimensional Radon transforms and (4 two-dimensional Fourier transforms.

    A twofold NBCR structure has been detected in the region under investigation. The results have shown that NBC rings mainly propagate into the Caribbean Sea along two principal pathways (near 12° N and 17° N in the ring translation corridor. Thus, rings following the southern pathway in the fall-winter period can enter through very shallow southern straits as non-coherent structures. A different behavior is observed near the northern pathway (~17° N, where NBC rings are thought to have a coherent structure during their squeezing into the eastern Caribbean, i.e. conserving the principal characteristics of the incident rings. We attribute this difference in the rings' behavior to the vertical scales of the rings and to the bottom topography features in the vicinity of the Lesser Antilles.

  14. Large-volume optical coherence tomography with real-time correction of geometric distortion artifacts

    CERN Document Server

    Van der Jeught, Sam; Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh; Dirckx, Joris J J

    2012-01-01

    Large-volume optical coherence tomography (OCT)-setups employ scanning mirrors and suffer from non-linear geometric distortion artifacts in which the degree of distortion is determined by the maximum angles over which the mirrors rotate. In this chapter, we describe a straightforward approach to correct for these distortion artifacts, creating an alternative to previously reported ray-tracing schemes that are unable to apply these corrections in real-time. By implementing the proposed 3D recalibration algorithm on the graphics card of a standard computer, this feature can be applied in real-time. We validate the accuracy of the technique using OCT measurements of a highly curved object within a large imaging volume of 12.35 x 10.13 x 2.36 mm^3. The resulting 3D object shape measurements are compared against high-resolution and aberration-free optical profilometry measurements. Maintaining an optical resolution of <10 micron within the sample, both axially and transversally, we realized a real-time, high-re...

  15. Large-scale structure of time evolving citation networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leicht, E. A.; Clarkson, G.; Shedden, K.; Newman, M. E. J.

    2007-09-01

    In this paper we examine a number of methods for probing and understanding the large-scale structure of networks that evolve over time. We focus in particular on citation networks, networks of references between documents such as papers, patents, or court cases. We describe three different methods of analysis, one based on an expectation-maximization algorithm, one based on modularity optimization, and one based on eigenvector centrality. Using the network of citations between opinions of the United States Supreme Court as an example, we demonstrate how each of these methods can reveal significant structural divisions in the network and how, ultimately, the combination of all three can help us develop a coherent overall picture of the network's shape.

  16. Structural examination of easel paintings with optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targowski, Piotr; Iwanicka, Magdalena; Tymińska-Widmer, Ludmiła; Sylwestrzak, Marcin; Kwiatkowska, Ewa A

    2010-06-15

    Identification of the order, thickness, composition, and possibly the origin of the paint layers forming the structure of a painting, that is, its stratigraphy, is important in confirming its attribution and history as well as planning conservation treatments. The most common method of examination is analysis of a sample collected from the art object, both visually with a microscope and instrumentally through a variety of sophisticated, modern analytical tools. Because of its invasiveness, however, sampling is less than ideally compatible with conservation ethics; it is severely restricted with respect to the amount of material extirpated from the artwork. Sampling is also rather limited in that it provides only very local information. There is, therefore, a great need for a noninvasive method with sufficient in-depth resolution for resolving the stratigraphy of works of art. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive, noncontact method of optical sectioning of partially transparent objects, with micrometer-level axial resolution. The method utilizes near-infrared light of low intensity (a few milliwatts) to obtain cross-sectional images of various objects; it has been mostly used in medical diagnostics. Through the serial collection of many such images, volume information may be extracted. The application of OCT to the examination of art objects has been in development since 2003. In this Account, we present a short introduction to the technique, briefly discuss the apparatus we use, and provide a paradigm for reading OCT tomograms. Unlike the majority of papers published previously, this Account focuses on one, very specific, use of OCT. We then consider two examples of successful, practical application of the technique. At the request of a conservation studio, the characteristics of inscriptions on two oil paintings, originating from the 18th and 19th centuries, were analyzed. In the first case, it was possible to resolve some questions concerning the

  17. Coherent vortex structures and 3D enstrophy cascade

    CERN Document Server

    Dascaliuc, R

    2011-01-01

    Existence of 2D enstrophy cascade in a suitable mathematical setting, and under suitable conditions compatible with 2D turbulence phenomenology, is known both in the Fourier and in the physical scales. The goal of this paper is to show that the same geometric condition preventing the formation of singularities - 1/2-H\\"older coherence of the vorticity direction - coupled with a suitable condition on a modified Kraichnan scale, and under a certain modulation assumption on evolution of the vorticity, leads to existence of 3D enstrophy cascade in physical scales of the flow.

  18. Emergence of the Coherent Structure of Liquid Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Bono

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We examine in some detail the interaction of water molecules with the radiative electromagnetic field and find the existence of phase transitions from the vapor phase to a condensed phase where all molecules oscillate in unison, in tune with a self-trapped electromagnetic field within extended mesoscopic space regions (Coherence Domains. The properties of such a condensed phase are examined and found to be compatible with the phenomenological properties of liquid water. In particular, the observed value of critical density is calculated with good accuracy.

  19. Optimization of Large-Scale Structural Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, F. M.

    solutions to small problems with one or two variables to the optimization of large structures such as bridges, ships and offshore structures. The methods used for salving these problems have evolved from being classical differential calculus and calculus of variation to very advanced numerical techniques...

  20. Inflation, large scale structure and particle physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S F King

    2004-02-01

    We review experimental and theoretical developments in inflation and its application to structure formation, including the curvation idea. We then discuss a particle physics model of supersymmetric hybrid inflation at the intermediate scale in which the Higgs scalar field is responsible for large scale structure, show how such a theory is completely natural in the framework extra dimensions with an intermediate string scale.

  1. Coherent structures and flow topology of transitional separated-reattached flow over two and three dimensional geometrical shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabil, Hayder Azeez; Li, Xin Kai; Abdalla, Ibrahim Elrayah

    2017-09-01

    Large-scale organized motions (commonly referred to coherent structures) and flow topology of a transitional separated-reattached flow have been visualised and investigated using flow visualisation techniques. Two geometrical shapes including two-dimensional flat plate with rectangular leading edge and three-dimensional square cylinder are chosen to shed a light on the flow topology and present coherent structures of the flow over these shapes. For both geometries and in the early stage of the transition, two-dimensional Kelvin-Helmholtz rolls are formed downstream of the leading edge. They are observed to be twisting around the square cylinder while they stay flat in the case of the two-dimensional flat plate. For both geometrical shapes, the two-dimensional Kelvin-Helmholtz rolls move downstream of the leading edge and they are subjected to distortion to form three-dimensional hairpin structures. The flow topology in the flat plate is different from that in the square cylinder. For the flat plate, there is a merging process by a pairing of the Kelvin-Helmholtz rolls to form a large structure that breaks down directly into many hairpin structures. For the squire cylinder case, the Kelvin-Helmholtz roll evolves topologically to form a hairpin structure. In the squire cylinder case, the reattachment length is much shorter and a forming of the three-dimensional structures is closer to the leading edge than that in the flat plate case.

  2. Structure and dynamics of multicellular assemblies measured by coherent light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunel, Benjamin; Blanch, Carles; Gourrier, Aurélien; Petrolli, Vanni; Delon, Antoine; Joanny, Jean-François; Carminati, Rémi; Pierrat, Romain; Cappello, Giovanni

    2017-07-01

    Determining the structure and the internal dynamics of tissues is essential to understand their functional organization. Microscopy allows for monitoring positions and trajectories of every single cell. Those data are useful to extract statistical observables, such as intercellular distance, tissue symmetry and anisotropy, and cell motility. However, this procedure requires a large and supervised computational effort. In addition, due to the large cross-section of cells, the light scattering limits the use of microscopy to relatively thin samples. As an alternative approach, we propose to take advantage of light scattering and to analyze the dynamical diffraction pattern produced by a living tissue illuminated with coherent light. In this article, we illustrate with a few examples that supra-cellular structures produce an exploitable diffraction signal. From the diffraction signal, we deduce the mean distance between cells, the anisotropy of the supra-cellular organization and, from its fluctuations, the mean speed of moving cells. This easy to implement technique considerably reduces analysis time, allowing real time monitoring.

  3. Volumetric mosaicing for optical coherence tomography for large area bladder wall visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurie, Kristen L.; Ellerbee, Audrey K.

    2014-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has shown potential as a complementary imaging modality to white light cystoscopy (WLC) because it can visualize sub-surface details of the bladder wall, enabling it to stage early cancers and visualize tumors undetectable to WLC. However, the inherently small field of view (FOV) of OCT compared with the area of the bladder wall restricts its clinical utility. A large OCT FOV could improve surgical planning by enabling complete visualization of tumor margins or could aid in early cancer detection by tracking the appearance of the bladder wall over time. To overcome the limited FOV of OCT, we developed a method to create mosaics of OCT volume data using a modified version of the N-dimensional scale invariant feature transform (N-SIFT) algorithm: white-light-enhanced N-SIFT (WhiLE-NS). WhiLE-NS adds a pre-processing step to N-SIFT that uses white light images co-registered with OCT volumes to select small, highly overlapped volumes on which to run N-SIFT. This pre-processing step adds minimal computational time and enables a 200- fold decrease in the amount of time required to register two volumes compared with N-SIFT alone. Quantitatively, WhiLE-NS achieves nearly sub-pixel registration accuracy, and qualitatively, we demonstrate that the algorithm can generate large FOV mosaics of ex vivo bladder tissue. The realization of this algorithm is a critical step to enabling OCT to contribute meaningfully to bladder surveillance and surgical guidance.

  4. Fractal patterns on the onset of coherent structures in a coupled map lattice

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Ambika; Kamala Menon

    2002-07-01

    We report the formation of Cantor set-like fractals during the development of coherent structures in a coupled map lattice (CML). The dependence of these structures on the size of the lattice as well as the first three dimensions of the associated fractal patterns are analyzed numerically.

  5. Effect of pressure fluctuations on Richtmyer-Meshkov coherent structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmick, Aklant K.; Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the formation and evolution of Richtmyer Meshkov bubbles after the passage of a shock wave across a two fluid interface in the presence of pressure fluctuations. The fluids are ideal and incompressible and the pressure fluctuations are scale invariant in space and time, and are modeled by a power law time dependent acceleration field with exponent -2. Solutions indicate sensitivity to pressure fluctuations. In the linear regime, the growth of curvature and bubble velocity is linear. The growth rate is dominated by the initial velocity for weak pressure fluctuations, and by the acceleration term for strong pressure fluctuations. In the non-linear regime, the bubble curvature is constant and the solutions form a one parameter family (parametrized by the bubble curvature). The solutions are shown to be convergent and asymptotically stable. The physical solution (stable fastest growing) is a flat bubble for small pressure fluctuations and a curved bubble for large pressure fluctuations. The velocity field (in the frame of references accounting for the background motion) involves intense motion of the fluids in a vicinity of the interface, effectively no motion of the fluids away from the interfaces, and formation of vortical structures at the interface. The work is supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  6. Ultrafast modulation of electronic structure by coherent phonon excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisshaupt, J.; Rouzée, A.; Woerner, M.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Elsaesser, T.; Shirley, E. L.; Borgschulte, A.

    2017-02-01

    Femtosecond x-ray absorption spectroscopy with a laser-driven high-harmonic source is used to map ultrafast changes of x-ray absorption by femtometer-scale coherent phonon displacements. In LiBH4, displacements along an Ag phonon mode at 10 THz are induced by impulsive Raman excitation and give rise to oscillatory changes of x-ray absorption at the Li K edge. Electron density maps from femtosecond x-ray diffraction data show that the electric field of the pump pulse induces a charge transfer from the BH4- to neighboring Li+ ions, resulting in a differential Coulomb force that drives lattice vibrations in this virtual transition state.

  7. Investigation of planar barrier discharges for coherent nonlinear structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun-Kaymak, I. U.

    2017-02-01

    Nonlinear pattern formations are ubiquitous in nature. One of the analogous configurations in laboratory experiments to such nonlinear systems is the current filament formations observed in glow plasmas. These filaments can generate oscillatory fluctuations in glow, which are also observed in voltage and current measurements. Specifically, semiconductor-gas discharges are known to breed these types of current filaments naturally. The plasma discharge is initiated by applying a DC high voltage to electrodes while they are immersed in nitrogen gas at partial atmospheric pressure. Observed discharge behaves oscillatory in time. Harmonic frequency generation and coherency levels among these modes are investigated. Parametric scans are performed to study the transition to chaotic behavior. Observed results are discussed in detail.

  8. Isotopological Relaxation, Coherent Structures, and Gaussian Turbulence in Two-Dimensional Magnetohydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Isichenko, M B

    1994-01-01

    The long-time relaxation of ideal two dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence subject to the conservation of two infinite families of constants of motion---the magnetic and the "cross" topology invariants--is examined. The analysis of the Gibbs ensemble, where all integrals of motion are respected, predicts the initial state to evolve into an equilibrium, stable coherent structure (the most probable state) and decaying Gaussian turbulence (fluctuations) with a vanishing, but always positive temperature. The non-dissipative turbulence decay is accompanied by decrease in both the amplitude and the length scale of the fluctuations, so that the fluctuation energy remains finite. The coherent structure represents a set of singular magnetic islands with plasma flow whose magnetic topology is identical to that of the initial state, while the energy and the cross topology invariants are shared between the coherent structure and the Gaussian turbulence. These conservation laws suggest the variational principle of i...

  9. Large-scale structure of the Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shandarin, S.F.; Doroshkevich, A.G.; Zel' dovich, Ya.B. (Inst. Prikladnoj Matematiki, Moscow, USSR)

    1983-01-01

    A review of theory of the large-scale structure of the Universe is given, including formation of clusters and superclusters of galaxies as well as large voids. Particular attention is paid to the theory of neutrino dominated Universe - the cosmological model where neutrinos with the rest mass of several tens eV dominate the mean density. Evolution of small perturbations is discussed, estimates of microwave backgorund radiation fluctuations is given for different angular scales. Adiabatic theory of the Universe structure formation, known as ''cake'' scenario and their successive fragmentation is given. This scenario is based on approximate nonlinear theory of gravitation instability. Results of numerical experiments, modeling the processes of large-scale structure formation are discussed.

  10. Coherent Laser Radar Metrology System for Large Scale Optical Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A new type of laser radar metrology inspection system is proposed that incorporates a novel, dual laser coherent detection scheme capable of eliminating both...

  11. Coherent Laser Radar Metrology System for Large Scale Optical Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A new type of laser radar metrology inspection system is proposed that incorporates a novel, dual laser coherent detection scheme capable of eliminating both...

  12. Statistical characteristics of Large Scale Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Demianski; Doroshkevich

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the mass functions of different elements of the Large Scale Structure -- walls, pancakes, filaments and clouds -- and the impact of transverse motions -- expansion and/or compression -- on their statistical characteristics. Using the Zel'dovich theory of gravitational instability we show that the mass functions of all structure elements are approximately the same and the mass of all elements is found to be concentrated near the corresponding mean mass. At high redshifts, both t...

  13. Large-scale wind turbine structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spera, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to show how structural technology was applied in the design of modern wind turbines, which were recently brought to an advanced stage of development as sources of renewable power. Wind turbine structures present many difficult problems because they are relatively slender and flexible; subject to vibration and aeroelastic instabilities; acted upon by loads which are often nondeterministic; operated continuously with little maintenance in all weather; and dominated by life-cycle cost considerations. Progress in horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT) development was paced by progress in the understanding of structural loads, modeling of structural dynamic response, and designing of innovative structural response. During the past 15 years a series of large HAWTs was developed. This has culminated in the recent completion of the world's largest operating wind turbine, the 3.2 MW Mod-5B power plane installed on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. Some of the applications of structures technology to wind turbine will be illustrated by referring to the Mod-5B design. First, a video overview will be presented to provide familiarization with the Mod-5B project and the important components of the wind turbine system. Next, the structural requirements for large-scale wind turbines will be discussed, emphasizing the difficult fatigue-life requirements. Finally, the procedures used to design the structure will be presented, including the use of the fracture mechanics approach for determining allowable fatigue stresses.

  14. NONH:A New Cache—Based Coherence Protocol for Linked List Structure DSM System and Its Performance Evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    房至一; 鞠九滨

    1996-01-01

    The management of memory coherence is an important problem in distributed shared memory(DSM)system.In a cache-based coherence DSM system using linked list structure,the key to maintaining the coherence and improving system performance is how to manage the owner in the linked list.This paper presents the design of a new management protocol-NONH(New-Owner New-Head)and its performance evaluation.The analysis results show that this protocol can improve the scalability and performence of a coherent DSM system using linked list.It is also suitable for managing the cache coherency in tree-like hierarchical architecture.

  15. Camera Systems Rapidly Scan Large Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Needing a method to quickly scan large structures like an aircraft wing, Langley Research Center developed the line scanning thermography (LST) system. LST works in tandem with a moving infrared camera to capture how a material responds to changes in temperature. Princeton Junction, New Jersey-based MISTRAS Group Inc. now licenses the technology and uses it in power stations and industrial plants.

  16. The large-scale structure of vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Albareti, F D; Maroto, A L

    2014-01-01

    The vacuum state in quantum field theory is known to exhibit an important number of fundamental physical features. In this work we explore the possibility that this state could also present a non-trivial space-time structure on large scales. In particular, we will show that by imposing the renormalized vacuum energy-momentum tensor to be conserved and compatible with cosmological observations, the vacuum energy of sufficiently heavy fields behaves at late times as non-relativistic matter rather than as a cosmological constant. In this limit, the vacuum state supports perturbations whose speed of sound is negligible and accordingly allows the growth of structures in the vacuum energy itself. This large-scale structure of vacuum could seed the formation of galaxies and clusters very much in the same way as cold dark matter does.

  17. Rich Localized Coherent Structures of the (2+1)-Dimensional Broer-Kaup-Kupershmidt Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hua-Mei

    2003-01-01

    Using a Backlund transformation and the variable separation approach, we find there exist abundant localized coherent structures for the (2 + 1)-dimensional Broer-Kaup-Kupershmidt (BKK) system. The abundance of the localized structures for the model is introduced by the entrance of an arbitrary function of the seed solution. For some specialselections of the arbitrary function, it is shown that the localized structures of the BKK equation may be dromions, lumps, ring solitons, peakons, or fractal solitons etc.

  18. GPU-accelerated computing for Lagrangian coherent structures of multi-body gravitational regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mingpei; Xu, Ming; Fu, Xiaoyu

    2017-04-01

    Based on a well-established theoretical foundation, Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSs) have elicited widespread research on the intrinsic structures of dynamical systems in many fields, including the field of astrodynamics. Although the application of LCSs in dynamical problems seems straightforward theoretically, its associated computational cost is prohibitive. We propose a block decomposition algorithm developed on Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) platform for the computation of the LCSs of multi-body gravitational regimes. In order to take advantage of GPU's outstanding computing properties, such as Shared Memory, Constant Memory, and Zero-Copy, the algorithm utilizes a block decomposition strategy to facilitate computation of finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields of arbitrary size and timespan. Simulation results demonstrate that this GPU-based algorithm can satisfy double-precision accuracy requirements and greatly decrease the time needed to calculate final results, increasing speed by approximately 13 times. Additionally, this algorithm can be generalized to various large-scale computing problems, such as particle filters, constellation design, and Monte-Carlo simulation.

  19. Controlling the development of coherent structures in high speed jets and the resultant near field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speth, Rachelle

    This work uses Large-Eddy Simulations to examine the effect of actuator parameters and jet exit properties on the evolution of coherent structures and their impact on the near-acoustic field without and with control. For the controlled cases, Localized Arc Filament Plasma Actuators (LAFPAs) are considered, and modeled with a simple heating approach that successfully reproduces the main observations and trends of experiments. A parametric study is first conducted, using the flapping mode (m = +/-1), to investigate the sensitivity of the results to various actuator parameters including: actuator model temperature, actuator duty cycle, and excitation frequency. It is shown by considering a Mach 1.3 jet at Reynolds number of 1 x 106 that the response of the jet is relatively insensitive to actuator model temperature within the limits of the experimentally measured temperature values. Furthermore, duty cycles in the range of 20%--90% were observed to be effective in reproducing the characteristic coherent structures of the flapping mode. Next, jet flow parameters were explored to determine the control authority under different operating conditions. To begin, the effect of the laminar nozzle exit boundary layer thickness was examined by varying its value from essentially uniform flow to 25% of the diameter. In the absence of control, the distance between the nozzle lip and the initial appearance of breakdown is proportional to the boundary-layer thickness, which is consistent with theory and previous results obtained by other researchers at Mach 0.9. The second flow parameter studied was the effect of Reynolds number on a Mach 1.3 jet controlled by the flapping mode at an excitation Strouhal number of 0.3. The higher Reynolds number (Re=1,100,000) jet exhibited reduced control authority compared to the Re=100,000 jet. Like the effect of increasing the nozzle exit boundary layer thickness, increasing the Reynolds number cause a reduction in spreading on the flapping plane

  20. Dipolar interactions and structural coherence in iron nanoparticle arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrell, Dorothy; Cheng Yuhang; Ding Yi; Yamamuro, Saeki; Sanchez-Hanke, Cecilia; Kao, C.-C.; Majetich, Sara A. E-mail: sara@cmu.edu

    2004-11-01

    Self-assembled arrays of iron nanoparticles are characterized structurally by transmission electron microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering, and magnetically by low-temperature hysteresis loops and magnetic relaxation. The differences in the magnetic properties are related to the strength of magnetic dipolar interactions and to the degree of structural ordering in the arrays.

  1. Direct numerical simulation of three-dimensional coherent structure in plane mixing layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The three-dimensional temporally evolving plane mixing layer is sinulated by directly solying the Navier-Stokes equations using pseudo-spectral method. The process of loss of stability, and the formation paring, and development of vortex are presented. The simulated result shows that the evolving characteristics of coherent structure are important mechanism of growing and entrainment of mixing layer.

  2. Electronic structure of atomically coherent square semiconductor superlattices with dimensionality below two

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalesaki, E.; Evers, W.H.; Vanmaekelbergh, D.; Delerue, C.

    2013-01-01

    The electronic structure of recently synthesized square superlattices with atomic coherence composed of PbSe, CdSe, or CdTe nanocrystals (NCs) attached along {100} facets is investigated using tight-binding calculations. In experimental realizations of these systems [W. H. Evers et al., Nano Lett. 1

  3. Electron vortex magnetic holes: a nonlinear coherent plasma structure

    CERN Document Server

    Haynes, Christopher T; Camporeale, Enrico; Sundberg, Torbjorn

    2014-01-01

    We report the properties of a novel type of sub-proton scale magnetic hole found in two dimensional PIC simulations of decaying turbulence with a guide field. The simulations were performed with a realistic value for ion to electron mass ratio. These structures, electron vortex magnetic holes (EVMHs), have circular cross-section. The magnetic field depression is associated with a diamagnetic azimuthal current provided by a population of trapped electrons in petal-like orbits. The trapped electron population provides a mean azimuthal velocity and since trapping preferentially selects high pitch angles, a perpendicular temperature anisotropy. The structures arise out of initial perturbations in the course of the turbulent evolution of the plasma, and are stable over at least 100 electron gyroperiods. We have verified the model for the EVMH by carrying out test particle and PIC simulations of isolated structures in a uniform plasma. It is found that (quasi-)stable structures can be formed provided that there is ...

  4. Electron vortex magnetic holes: A nonlinear coherent plasma structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Christopher T.; Burgess, David; Camporeale, Enrico; Sundberg, Torbjorn

    2015-01-01

    We report the properties of a novel type of sub-proton scale magnetic hole found in two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying turbulence with a guide field. The simulations were performed with a realistic value for ion to electron mass ratio. These structures, electron vortex magnetic holes (EVMHs), have circular cross-section. The magnetic field depression is associated with a diamagnetic azimuthal current provided by a population of trapped electrons in petal-like orbits. The trapped electron population provides a mean azimuthal velocity and since trapping preferentially selects high pitch angles, a perpendicular temperature anisotropy. The structures arise out of initial perturbations in the course of the turbulent evolution of the plasma, and are stable over at least 100 electron gyroperiods. We have verified the model for the EVMH by carrying out test particle and PIC simulations of isolated structures in a uniform plasma. It is found that (quasi-)stable structures can be formed provided that there is some initial perpendicular temperature anisotropy at the structure location. The properties of these structures (scale size, trapped population, etc.) are able to explain the observed properties of magnetic holes in the terrestrial plasma sheet. EVMHs may also contribute to turbulence properties, such as intermittency, at short scale lengths in other astrophysical plasmas.

  5. Electron vortex magnetic holes: A nonlinear coherent plasma structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haynes, Christopher T., E-mail: c.t.haynes@qmul.ac.uk; Burgess, David; Sundberg, Torbjorn [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Camporeale, Enrico [Multiscale Dynamics, Centrum Wiskunde and Informatica (CWI), Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-01-15

    We report the properties of a novel type of sub-proton scale magnetic hole found in two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying turbulence with a guide field. The simulations were performed with a realistic value for ion to electron mass ratio. These structures, electron vortex magnetic holes (EVMHs), have circular cross-section. The magnetic field depression is associated with a diamagnetic azimuthal current provided by a population of trapped electrons in petal-like orbits. The trapped electron population provides a mean azimuthal velocity and since trapping preferentially selects high pitch angles, a perpendicular temperature anisotropy. The structures arise out of initial perturbations in the course of the turbulent evolution of the plasma, and are stable over at least 100 electron gyroperiods. We have verified the model for the EVMH by carrying out test particle and PIC simulations of isolated structures in a uniform plasma. It is found that (quasi-)stable structures can be formed provided that there is some initial perpendicular temperature anisotropy at the structure location. The properties of these structures (scale size, trapped population, etc.) are able to explain the observed properties of magnetic holes in the terrestrial plasma sheet. EVMHs may also contribute to turbulence properties, such as intermittency, at short scale lengths in other astrophysical plasmas.

  6. Large-scale structure of the universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shandarin, S.F.; Doroshkevich, A.G.; Zel' dovich, Y.B.

    1983-01-01

    A survey is given of theories for the origin of large-scale structure in the universe: clusters and superclusters of galaxies, and vast black regions practically devoid of galaxies. Special attention is paid to the theory of a neutrino-dominated universe: a cosmology in which electron neutrinos with a rest mass of a few tens of electron volts would contribute the bulk of the mean density. The evolution of small perturbations is discussed, and estimates are made for the temperature anisotropy of the microwave background radiation on various angular scales. The nonlinear stage in the evolution of smooth irrotational perturbations in a low-pressure medium is described in detail. Numerical experiments simulating large-scale structure formation processes are discussed, as well as their interpretation in the context of catastrophe theory.

  7. Transforming squeezed light into large-amplitude coherent-state superposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Ersbak Bang; Mølmer, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    A quantum superposition of two coherent states of light with small amplitude can be obtained by subtracting a photon from a squeezed vacuum state. In experiments this preparation can be made conditioned on the detection of a photon in the field from a squeezed light source. We propose and analyze...

  8. Large-amplitude chirped coherent phonons in tellurium mediated by ultrafast photoexcited carrier diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaraju, N.; Kumar, Sunil; Anija, M.; Sood, A. K.

    2010-11-01

    We report femtosecond time-resolved reflectivity measurements of coherent phonons in tellurium performed over a wide range of temperatures (3-296 K) and pump-laser intensities. A totally symmetric A1 coherent phonon at 3.6 THz responsible for the oscillations in the reflectivity data is observed to be strongly positively chirped (i.e., phonon time period decreases at longer pump-probe delay times) with increasing photoexcited carrier density, more so at lower temperatures. We show that the temperature dependence of the coherent phonon frequency is anomalous (i.e, increasing with increasing temperature) at high photoexcited carrier density due to electron-phonon interaction. At the highest photoexcited carrier density of ˜1.4×1021cm-3 and the sample temperature of 3 K, the lattice displacement of the coherent phonon mode is estimated to be as high as ˜0.24Å . Numerical simulations based on coupled effects of optical absorption and carrier diffusion reveal that the diffusion of carriers dominates the nonoscillatory electronic part of the time-resolved reflectivity. Finally, using the pump-probe experiments at low carrier density of 6×1018cm-3 , we separate the phonon anharmonicity to obtain the electron-phonon coupling contribution to the phonon frequency and linewidth.

  9. Wavelet diagnostics for detection of coherent structures in instantaneous turbulent flow imagery: A review

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Roddam Narasimha

    2007-02-01

    A review of work over the last decade shows that 2D wavelet techniques applied on flow imagery can provide powerful insights into the nature and lifecycle of coherent structures (the latter through wavelet movies) in turbulent shear flows. The advantage of wavelet techniques in often being able to infer the nature of coherent motion from a single image is emphasized. The techniques are first calibrated by using them on well-known results in the turbulent mixing layer. They are then applied to jets and plumes, and it is shown how off-source heating in such flows can disrupt the coherent structures in the unheated flow. A suitably reduced version of the present method, using discrete wavelet transforms on signals from a finite array of sensors, could be a useful diagnostic tool in near-real-time detection of coherent structures or patterns for the purpose of selecting appropriate control signals to the actuators in a flow-control system.

  10. Watching coherent molecular structural dynamics during photoreaction: beyond kinetic description

    CERN Document Server

    Lemke, Henrik T; Hartsock, Robert; van Driel, Tim Brandt; Chollet, Matthieu; Glownia, J M; Song, Sanghoon; Zhu, Diling; Pace, Elisabetta; Nielsen, Martin M; Benfatto, Maurizio; Gaffney, Kelly J; Collet, Eric; Cammarata, Marco

    2015-01-01

    A deep understanding of molecular photo-transformations occurring is challenging because of the complex interaction between electronic and nuclear structure. The initially excited electronic energy dissipates into electronic and structural reconfigurations often in less than a billionth of a second. Molecular dynamics induced by photoexcitation have been very successfully studied with femtosecond optical spectroscopies, but electronic and nuclear dynamics are often very difficult to disentangle. X-ray based spectroscopies can reduce the ambiguity between theoretical models and experimental data, but it is only with the recent development of bright ultrafast X-ray sources, that key information during transient molecular processes can be obtained on their intrinsic timescale. We use Free Electron Laser (FEL) based time-resolved X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) measurements around the Iron K-edge of a spin crossover prototypical compound. We reveal its transformation from the ligand-located electroni...

  11. Coherent structure diffusivity in the edge region of Reversed Field Pinch experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spolaore, M.; Antoni, V.; Spada, E.; Bergsåker, H.; Cavazzana, R.; Drake, J. R.; Martines, E.; Regnoli, G.; Serianni, G.; Vianello, N.

    2005-01-01

    Coherent structures emerging from the background turbulence have been detected by electrostatic measurements in the edge region of two Reversed Field Pinch experiments, RFX (Padua) and Extrap-T2R (Stockholm). Measurements have been performed by arrays of Langmuir probes which allowed simultaneous measurements of temperature, potential and density to be carried out. These structures have been interpreted as a dynamic balance of dipolar and monopolar vortices, whose relative population are found to depend on the local mean E × B flow shear. The contribution to the anomalous transport of these structures has been investigated and it has been found that the corresponding diffusion coeffcient accounts up to 50% of the total diffusivity. The experimental findings indicate that the diffusion coeffcient associated to the coherent structures depends on the relative population of the two types of vortices and is minimum when the two populations are equal. An interpretative model is proposed to explain this feature.

  12. Coherent Structures near Narrow Gaps in Channel Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guellouz, M. S.; Tavoularis, S.

    1996-11-01

    Flow visualization and hot-wire anemometry were used to investigate the velocity field in axial flow within a rectangular channel containing a single cylindrical rod, parallel to the channel's axis and positioned at different distances from the wall. The formation of a street of three-dimensional, quasi-periodic, counter-rotating vortices in the vicinity of the gap has been observed, even for relatively large gaps. The Strouhal number, convection speed and streamwise spacing of these vortices have been determined as functions of the gap size and the flow parameters. A useful feature of these vortices is the large-scale transport of fluid across the gap, which enhances momentum, heat and mass transfer.

  13. Electron vortex magnetic holes: A nonlinear coherent plasma structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haynes, C.T.; Burgess, D.; Camporeale, E.; Sundberg, T.

    2015-01-01

    We report the properties of a novel type of sub-proton scale magnetic hole found in two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying turbulence with a guide field. The simulations were performed with a realistic value for ion to electron mass ratio. These structures, electron vortex magnetic

  14. Flow coherent structures and frequency signature: application of the dynamic modes decomposition to open cavity flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lusseyran, F; Gueniat, F; Basley, J; Douay, C L; Pastur, L R; Faure, T M [LIMSI-CNRS BP 133, F-91403 Orsay Cedex (France); Schmid, P J [LadHyX, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2011-12-22

    The dynamic dimension of an impinging flow may be significantly reduced by its boundary conditions and self-sustained oscillations they induce. The spectral signature is associated with remarkable spatial coherent structures. Dynamic modes decomposition (DMD) makes it possible to directly extract the dynamical properties of a non-linearly saturated flow. We apply DMD to highlight the spectral contribution of the longitudinal and transverse structures of an experimental open-cavity flow.

  15. Comparison of cost and complexity for various 16-QAM transmitter structures in coherent optical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bermani, Ali; Noé, Reinhold

    2016-02-01

    This article present several possible implementations for an optical square 16-QAM transmitter structures. Two efficient carrier phase estimation techniques with feed-forward structure have been tested in a real-time transmission and compared with each other to present the influence of phase noise; Blind Phase Search (BPS) and QPSK partitioning. 2.5 Gbit/s synchronous coherent 16-QAM data is transmitted and received in a real-time heterodyne setup with BER below FEC (7% overhead) threshold.

  16. Large-scale magnetic structure formation in three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malapaka, Shiva Kumar; Müller, Wolf-Christian [Max-Planck Institute for Plasmaphysics, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748, Garching bei Muenchen (Germany)

    2013-11-20

    The inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D-MHD) turbulence is believed to be one of the processes responsible for large-scale magnetic structure formation in astrophysical systems. In this work, we present an exhaustive set of high-resolution direct numerical simulations of both forced and decaying 3D-MHD turbulence, to understand this structure formation process. It is first shown that an inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in small-scale driven turbulence does not necessarily generate coherent large-scale magnetic structures. The observed large-scale magnetic field, in this case, is severely perturbed by magnetic fluctuations generated by the small-scale forcing. In the decaying case, coherent large-scale structures form similarly to those observed astronomically. Based on the numerical results, the formation of large-scale magnetic structures in some astrophysical systems is suggested to be the consequence of an initial forcing that imparts the necessary turbulent energy into the system, which, after the forcing shuts off, decays to form the large-scale structures. This idea is supported by representative examples, e.g., clusters of galaxies.

  17. Quantitative visualization of coherent flow structures in alluvial channels using multibeam echo-sounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, D. R.; Simmons, S.; Best, J.

    2010-12-01

    Multibeam Echo-Sounder systems have developed rapidly over recent decades and are routinely deployed to provide high-resolution bathymetric details in range of aquatic environments. Modern data handling and storage technologies now facilitate the logging of the raw acoustic back-scatter information that was previously discarded by these systems. This paper describes methodologies that exploit this logging capability to quantify the concentration and dynamics of suspended sediment within the water column and presents a novel method that also allows for quantification of 2D flow velocities. This development provides a multi-purpose tool for the holistic surveying of the process linkages between flow, sediment transport and bed morphology. The application of this new technique is illustrated with reference to flow over alluvial sand dunes, which allows, for the first time in a field study, quantitative visualization of larg-scale, whole flow field, turbulent coherent flow structures, associated with the dune leeside, that are responsible for suspending bed sediment. This methodology holds great potential for use in a wide range of aqueous geophysical flows. CFS captured by MBES in the lee of an alluvial dune. Contours of suspended sediment concentration and superimposed 2D flow velocity vectors

  18. NONLINEAR OPTICS: Coherent laser spectroscopy of matter utilizing waveguide structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaus, A. I.; Yashkir, Yu N.

    1990-07-01

    Some features of CARS spectroscopy in waveguide structures are investigated theoretically taking into account stimulated Raman amplification of a weak pump wave in the field of a strong wave and allowing for the phase matching. A four-photon intermode coupling which occurs under amplification conditions results in energy diffusion between different modes. General expressions for the intensities of the pump waves undergoing stimulated amplification and for the anti-Stokes signal are derived and analyzed.

  19. Imaging of sub-wavelength structures radiating coherently near microspheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maslov, Alexey V., E-mail: avmaslov@yandex.ru [University of Nizhny Novgorod, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Astratov, Vasily N., E-mail: astratov@uncc.edu [Department of Physics and Optical Science, Center for Optoelectronics and Optical Communications, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, North Carolina 28223-0001 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Using a two-dimensional model, we show that the optical images of a sub-wavelength object depend strongly on the excitation of its electromagnetic modes. There exist modes that enable the resolution of the object features smaller than the classical diffraction limit, in particular, due to the destructive interference. We propose to use such modes for super-resolution of resonant structures such as coupled cavities, metal dimers, or bowties. A dielectric microsphere in contact with the object forms its magnified image in a wide range of the virtual image plane positions. It is also suggested that the resonances may significantly affect the resolution quantification in recent experimental studies.

  20. Large-aperture ground glass surface profile measurement using coherence scanning interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Eundeok; Kim, Yunseok; Park, Sanguk; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2017-01-23

    We present a coherence scanning interferometer configured to deal with rough glass surfaces exhibiting very low reflectance due to severe sub-surface light scattering. A compound light source is prepared by combining a superluminescent light-emitting diode with an ytterbium-doped fiber amplifier. The light source is attuned to offer a short temporal coherence length of 15 μm but with high spatial coherence to secure an adequate correlogram contrast by delivering strongly unbalanced optical power to the low reflectance target. In addition, the infrared spectral range of the light source is shifted close to the visible side at a 1,038 nm center wavelength, so a digital camera of multi-mega pixels available for industrial machine vision can be used to improve the correlogram contrast further with better lateral image resolutions. Experimental results obtained from a ground Zerodur mirror of 200 mm aperture size and 0.9 μm rms roughness are discussed to validate the proposed interferometer system.

  1. Tangible 3D modeling of coherent and themed structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther, Jeppe Ullè; Bærentzen, J. Andreas; Aanæs, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    , allows the user to tangibly build structures of greater details than the blocks provide in and of themselves. We show a number of shapes that have been modeled by users and are indicative of the expressive power of the system. Furthermore, we demonstrate the scalability of the tangible interface which......We present CubeBuilder, a system for interactive, tangible 3D shape modeling. CubeBuilder allows the user to create a digital 3D model by placing physical, non-interlocking cubic blocks. These blocks may be placed in a completely arbitrary fashion and combined with other objects. In effect......, this turns the task of 3D modeling into a playful activity that hardly requires any learning on the part of the user. The blocks are registered using a depth camera and entered into the cube graph where each block is a node and adjacent blocks are connected by edges. From the cube graph, we transform...

  2. A field study of coherent flow structures over low angle dunes: Fraser Estuary, British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, R. W.; Hendershot, M. L.; Venditti, J. G.; Kostaschuk, R. A.; Allison, M. A.; Church, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    Aqueous dunes are present in nearly all sand bedded alluvial channels and can significantly influence flow resistance and sediment transport and deposition. The geometry of these bedforms can take on a high angle asymmetrical or low angle symmetrical shape. While advances have been made in understanding the mean and turbulent flow over high angle dunes, far less progress has been made in detailing flow over low angle dunes, commonly observed in large rivers, due to difficulties measuring near the bed and quantifying the turbulence over these bedforms. This field study documents the flow over low angle dunes in the Fraser Estuary, British Columbia, using an acoustic Doppler profiler (aDcp) to measure 3-D flow characteristics and a multi-beam echo sounder (MBES) to provide high-resolution bed topography. Measurements were made over a dune field (~1 km long and ~0.5 wide) through two semi-diurnal tidal cycles during the 2010 freshet. We examine the coupling between the bedform morphology and the generation of coherent flow structures. Bedforms in the dune field range from low-angle symmetric to higher angle asymmetric and vary over tidal cycles; however, none display the classic angle of repose geometry. Mean flow velocity increases on falling tide while it decreases the rising tide. At lower tides, large scale motions caused by topographic forcing emerge on stoss slopes and rise up over the crest producing variations in suspended sediment over the bedforms. Our analysis is intended to contribute insight into what controls the occurrence of low angle bedforms in rivers.

  3. Internal structure of an intact Convallaria majalis pollen grain observed with X-ray Fresnel coherent diffractive imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mancuso, Adrian P; Groves, Matthew R; Polozhentsev, Oleg E; Williams, Garth J; McNulty, Ian; Antony, Claude; Santarella-Mellwig, Rachel; Soldatov, Aleksander V; Lamzin, Victor; Peele, Andrew G; Nugent, Keith A; Vartanyants, Ivan A

    2012-01-01

    We have applied Fresnel Coherent Diffractive Imaging (FCDI) to image an intact pollen grain from Convallaria majalis. This approach allows us to resolve internal structures without the requirement to chemically treat or slice the sample into thin sections. Coherent X-ray diffraction data from this p

  4. Offloading techniques for large deployable space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaggio, Levino; Golob, Alex

    1992-01-01

    The validation and verification of large deployable space structures are continual challenges which face the integration and test engineer today. Spar Aerospace Limited has worked on various programs in which such structure validation was required and faces similar tasks in the future. This testing is reported and the different offloading and deployment methods which were used, as well as the proposed methods which will be used on future programs, are described. Past programs discussed include the Olympus solar array ambient and thermal vacuum deployments, and the Anik-E array and reflector deployments. The proposed MSAT reflector and boom ambient deployment tests, as well as the proposed RADARSAT Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) ambient and thermal vacuum deployment tests will also be presented. A series of tests relating to various component parts of the offloading equipment systems was required. These tests included the characterization and understanding of linear bearings and large (180 in-lbf) constant force spring motors in a thermal vacuum environment, and the results from these tests are presented.

  5. Structural concepts for large solar concentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedgepeth, John M.; Miller, Richard K.

    1987-01-01

    The Sunflower large solar concentrator, developed in the early 1970's, is a salient example of a high-efficiency concentrator. The newly emphasized needs for solar dynamic power on the Space Station and for large, lightweight thermal sources are outlined. Existing concepts for high efficiency reflector surfaces are examined with attention to accuracy needs for concentration rates of 1000 to 3000. Concepts using stiff reflector panels are deemed most likely to exhibit the long-term consistent accuracy necessary for low-orbit operation, particularly for the higher concentration ratios. Quantitative results are shown of the effects of surface errors for various concentration and focal-length diameter ratios. Cost effectiveness is discussed. Principal sources of high cost include the need for various dished panels for paraboloidal reflectors and the expense of ground testing and adjustment. A new configuration is presented addressing both problems, i.e., a deployable Pactruss backup structure with identical panels installed on the structure after deployment in space. Analytical results show that with reasonable pointing errors, this new concept is capable of concentration ratios greater than 2000.

  6. Lagrangian coherent structures in low Reynolds number swimming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Megan M; Eldredge, Jeff D [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Peng Jifeng; Dabiri, John O [Department of Bioengineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2009-05-20

    This work explores the utility of the finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) field for revealing flow structures in low Reynolds number biological locomotion. Previous studies of high Reynolds number unsteady flows have demonstrated that ridges of the FTLE field coincide with transport barriers within the flow, which are not shown by a more classical quantity such as vorticity. In low Reynolds number locomotion (O(1)-O(100)), in which viscous diffusion rapidly smears the vorticity in the wake, the FTLE field has the potential to add new insight to locomotion mechanics. The target of study is an articulated two-dimensional model for jellyfish-like locomotion, with swimming Reynolds number of order 1. The self-propulsion of the model is numerically simulated with a viscous vortex particle method, using kinematics adapted from previous experimental measurements on a live medusan swimmer. The roles of the ridges of the computed forward- and backward-time FTLE fields are clarified by tracking clusters of particles both backward and forward in time. It is shown that a series of ridges in front of the jellyfish in the forward-time FTLE field transport slender fingers of fluid toward the lip of the bell orifice, which are pulled once per contraction cycle into the wake of the jellyfish, where the fluid remains partitioned. A strong ridge in the backward-time FTLE field reveals a persistent barrier between fluid inside and outside the subumbrellar cavity. The system is also analyzed in a body-fixed frame subject to a steady free stream, and the FTLE field is used to highlight differences in these frames of reference.

  7. On the coherence length of large-scale peculiar velocities and gravitational clustering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashlinsky, A. (National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA (USA); Queen Mary College, London (England))

    1989-08-01

    If the large-scale structure in the universe is formed by gravitational clustering of less than 0 density fluctuations, the correlation function of massive objects/clusters of the clustering hierarchy would be increased over the underlying mass autocorrelation function. This means that if light traces mass, the peculiar gravitational field on the average would be stronger when measured by galaxies associated with such clusters. This in turn would lead to larger rms peculiar velocities deduced from the motions of such samples. Ellipticals are known to populate preferentially dense regions/(rich) clusters, and it is, therefore, suggested that this mechanism is responsible for the large peculiar motions observed recently by the Seven Samurai in a sample of elliptical galaxies. On the assumption that light traces mass, these and the cluster-cluster correlation function results are consistent with gravitational clustering of n of about -1 fluctuations in Omega of about 0.2 universe. It is further shown that according to the gravitational clustering theory, galaxies selected preferentially from poor groups should exhibit small rms peculiar velocities. 21 refs.

  8. Cooperative Autonomous Observation of Coherent Atmospheric Structures using Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravela, S.

    2014-12-01

    Mapping the structure of localized atmospheric phenomena, from sea breeze and shallow cumuli to thunderstorms and hurricanes, is of scientific interest. Low-cost small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS) open the possibility for autonomous "instruments" to map important small-scale phenomena (kilometers, hours) and serve as a testbed for for much larger scales. Localized phenomena viewed as coherent structures interacting with their large-scale environment are difficult to map. As simple simulations show, naive Eulerian or Lagrangian strategies can fail in mapping localized phenomena. Model-based techniques are needed. Meteorological targeting, where supplementary UAS measurements additionally constrain numerical models is promising, but may require many primary measurements to be successful. We propose a new, data-driven, field-operable, cooperative autonomous observing system (CAOS) framework. A remote observer (on a UAS) tracks tracers to identify an apparent motion model over short timescales. Motion-based predictions seed MCMC flight plans for other UAS to gather in-situ data, which is fused with the remote measurements to produce maps. The tracking and mapping cycles repeat, and maps can be assimilated into numerical models for longer term forecasting. CAOS has been applied to study small scale emissions. At Popocatepetl, in collaboration with CENAPRED and IPN, it is being applied map the plume using remote IR/UV UAS and in-situ SO2 sensing, with additional plans for water vapor, the electric field and ash. The combination of sUAS with autonomy appears to be highly promising methodology for environmental mapping. For more information, please visit http://caos.mit.edu

  9. Holography and coherent diffraction with low-energy electrons: A route towards structural biology at the single molecule level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Longchamp, Jean-Nicolas; Escher, Conrad; Fink, Hans-Werner, E-mail: hwfink@physik.uzh.ch

    2015-12-15

    The current state of the art in structural biology is led by NMR, X-ray crystallography and TEM investigations. These powerful tools however all rely on averaging over a large ensemble of molecules. Here, we present an alternative concept aiming at structural analysis at the single molecule level. We show that by combining electron holography and coherent diffraction imaging estimations concerning the phase of the scattered wave become needless as the phase information is extracted from the data directly and unambiguously. Performed with low-energy electrons the resolution of this lens-less microscope is just limited by the De Broglie wavelength of the electron wave and the numerical aperture, given by detector geometry. In imaging freestanding graphene, a resolution of 2 Å has been achieved revealing the 660.000 unit cells of the graphene sheet from a single data set. Once applied to individual biomolecules the method shall ultimately allow for non-destructive imaging and imports the potential to distinguish between different conformations of proteins with atomic resolution. - Highlights: • Structural biology of single proteins. • Radiation damage-free imaging of individual biomolecules. • Holography. • Low-energy electrons. • Coherent diffraction and phase retrieval.

  10. Large Gaseous Detector of Ionizing Eradiation in Search for Coherent Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Kopylov, A. V.; Orekhov, I. V.; Petukhov, V. V.; A. E. Solomatin

    2013-01-01

    We propose to search for coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering (CNNS)by means of a triple-sectioned low background proportional counter. As a working medium we plan to use argon and xenon at about 1 MPa. We have shown using bench-scale assembly, that pulse-shape discrimination enables to effectively suppress noise pulses from electromagnetic disturbances and microphonic effect in the energy region where one expects signal from CNNS (from 20 eV to 100 eV) with a factor of about $10^3$. The calc...

  11. Large Gaseous Detector of Ionizing Eradiation in Search for Coherent Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Kopylov, A V; Petukhov, V V; Solomatin, A E

    2013-01-01

    We propose to search for coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering (CNNS)by means of a triple-sectioned low background proportional counter. As a working medium we plan to use argon and xenon at about 1 MPa. We have shown using bench-scale assembly, that pulse-shape discrimination enables to effectively suppress noise pulses from electromagnetic disturbances and microphonic effect in the energy region where one expects signal from CNNS (from 20 eV to 100 eV) with a factor of about $10^3$. The calculation has been done of the background from neutrons, generated by muons of cosmic rays. The experimental setup has been proposed.

  12. In situ scanning tunnelling microscopy of redox molecules. Coherent electron transfer at large bias voltages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2003-01-01

    Theories of in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) of molecules with redox levels near the substrate and tip Fermi levels point to 'spectroscopic' current-overpotential features. Prominent features require a narrow 'probing tip', i.e. a small bias voltage, eV(bias), compared...... and tip Fermi levels. STM here involves coherent two-step interfacial electron transfer between the redox level and the enclosing substrate and tip. We have also extended previous experimental in situ STM studies of the blue copper protein Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin, adsorbed on Au(111), to cover...

  13. Meta-Structures: The Search of Coherence in Collective Behaviours (without Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliano Pessa

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This contribution shortly outlines and reviews a theoretical and computational approach for a theory of change concerning systems where it is not possible to apply the laws of motion ab initio. The concept of meta-structure relates to the emergence of forms of spatiotemporal coherences in collective behaviours intended as coherent sequences of multiple structures. The essential difference compared with traditional methods is the role of the cognitive design by the observer when identifying multiple mesoscopic variables. The goal is both to study the "change without physics" of the dynamics of change and to design non-catastrophic interventions having the purpose to induce, change, keep or restore collective behaviours by influencing -at the mesoscopic level -and not prescribing explicit rules and changes.

  14. RESEARCH ON COHERENT STRUCTURES IN A MIXING LAYER OF THE FENE-P POLYMER SOLUTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵雪明; 林建忠; 余钊圣

    2001-01-01

    The evolution of the coherent structures in a two-dimensional time-developing mixing layer of the FENE-P fluids is examined numerically. By the means of an appropriate filtering for the polymer stress, some characteristics of the coherent structures at high b were obtained, which Azaiez and Homsy did not address. The results indicate that adding polymer to the Newtonian fluids will cause stronger vorticity diffusion, accompanied with weaker fundamental and subharmonical perturbations and slower rotational motion of neighboring vortices during pairing. This effect decreases with the Weissenberg number, but increases with b. In addition, the time when the consecutive rollers are completely coalesced into one delays in the viscoelastic mixing layer compared with the Newtonian one of the same total viscosity.

  15. Large-scale Magnetic Structure Formation in 3D-MHD Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Malapaka, Shiva Kumar

    2013-01-01

    The inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in 3D-MHD turbulence is believed to be one of the processes responsible for large scale magnetic structure formation in astrophysical systems. In this work we present an exhaustive set of high resolution direct numerical simulations (DNS) of both forced and decaying 3D-MHD turbulence, to understand this structure formation process. It is first shown that an inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in small-scale driven turbulence does not necessarily generate coherent large-scale magnetic structures. The observed large-scale magnetic field, in this case, is severely perturbed by magnetic fluctuations generated by the small-scale forcing. In the decaying case, coherent large-scale structure form similar to those observed astronomically. Based on the numerical results the formation of large-scale magnetic structures in some astrophysical systems, is suggested to be the consequence of an initial forcing which imparts the necessary turbulent energy into the system, which, afte...

  16. Tomographic PIV investigation on coherent vortex structures over shark-skin-inspired drag-reducing riblets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shao-Qiong; Li, Shan; Tian, Hai-Ping; Wang, Qing-Yi; Jiang, Nan

    2016-04-01

    Nature has shown us that the microstructure of the skin of fast-swimming sharks in the ocean can reduce the skin friction drag due to the well-known shark-skin effect. In the present study, the effect of shark-skin-inspired riblets on coherent vortex structures in a turbulent boundary layer (TBL) is investigated. This is done by means of tomographic particle image velocimetry (TPIV) measurements in channel flows over an acrylic plate of drag-reducing riblets at a friction Reynolds number of 190. The turbulent flows over drag-reducing riblets are verified by a planar time-resolved particle image velocimetry (TRPIV) system initially, and then the TPIV measurements are performed. Two-dimensional (2D) experimental results with a drag-reduction rate of around 4.81 % are clearly visible over triangle riblets with a peak-to-peak spacing s+ of 14, indicating from the drag-reducing performance that the buffer layer within the TBL has thickened; the logarithmic law region has shifted upward and the Reynolds shear stress decreased. A comparison of the spatial topological distributions of the spanwise vorticity of coherent vortex structures extracted at different wall-normal heights through the improved quadrant splitting method shows that riblets weaken the amplitudes of the spanwise vorticity when ejection (Q2) and sweep (Q4) events occur at the near wall, having the greatest effect on Q4 events in particular. The so-called quadrupole statistical model for coherent structures in the whole TBL is verified. Meanwhile, their spatial conditional-averaged topological shapes and the spatial scales of quadrupole coherent vortex structures as a whole in the overlying turbulent flow over riblets are changed, suggesting that the riblets dampen the momentum and energy exchange between the regions of near-wall and outer portion of the TBL by depressing the bursting events (Q2 and Q4), thereby reducing the skin friction drag.

  17. On coherent structures in a three-dimensional transitional plane jet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation of coherent structures in the three-dimensional transitional jet with a moderate Reynolds number of 5000 was conducted. The finite volume method was used to discretize the governing equations in space and the low-storage, three-order Runge-Kutta scheme was used for time integration. The comparisons between the statistical results of the flow field and the related experimental data were performed to validate the reliability of the present numerical schemes. The emphasis was placed on the study of the spatial evolution of the three-dimensional coherent vortex structures as well as their interactions. It is found that the evolution of the spanwise vortex structures in three-dimensional space is similar to that in two-dimensional jet. The spanwise vortex structures are subject to three-dimensional instability and induce the formation of the streamwise and lateral vortex structures. Going with the breakup and mixing of the spanwise vortex structures, the streamwise and transverse vortex tubes also fall to pieces and the mixing arranged small-scale structures are formed in the flow field. Finally, the arrangement relationship among the spanwise, the streamwise and the lateral vortex structures was analyzed and their interactions were also discussed.

  18. The Large Scale Structure: Polarization Aspects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. F. Pizzo

    2011-12-01

    Polarized radio emission is detected at various scales in the Universe. In this document, I will briefly review our knowledge on polarized radio sources in galaxy clusters and at their outskirts, emphasizing the crucial information provided by the polarized signal on the origin and evolution of such sources. Successively, I will focus on Abell 2255, which is known in the literature as the first cluster for which filamentary polarized emission associated with the radio halo has been detected. By using RM synthesis on our multi-wavelength WSRT observations, we studied the 3-dimensional geometry of the cluster, unveiling the nature of the polarized filaments at the borders of the central radio halo. Our analysis points out that these structures are relics lying at large distance from the cluster center.

  19. Grid sensitivity capability for large scale structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagendra, Gopal K.; Wallerstein, David V.

    1989-01-01

    The considerations and the resultant approach used to implement design sensitivity capability for grids into a large scale, general purpose finite element system (MSC/NASTRAN) are presented. The design variables are grid perturbations with a rather general linking capability. Moreover, shape and sizing variables may be linked together. The design is general enough to facilitate geometric modeling techniques for generating design variable linking schemes in an easy and straightforward manner. Test cases have been run and validated by comparison with the overall finite difference method. The linking of a design sensitivity capability for shape variables in MSC/NASTRAN with an optimizer would give designers a powerful, automated tool to carry out practical optimization design of real life, complicated structures.

  20. Galaxy Formation and Large Scale Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, R

    1999-01-01

    Galaxies represent the visible fabric of the Universe and there has been considerable progress recently in both observational and theoretical studies. The underlying goal is to understand the present-day diversity of galaxy forms, masses and luminosities in the context of theories for the growth of structure. Popular models predict the bulk of the galaxy population assembled recently, in apparent agreement with optical and near-infrared observations. However, detailed conclusions rely crucially on the choice of the cosmological parameters. Although the star formation history has been sketched to early times, uncertainties remain, particularly in connecting to the underlying mass assembly rate. I discuss the expected progress in determining the cosmological parameters and address the question of which observations would most accurately check contemporary models for the origin of the Hubble sequence. The new generation of ground-based and future space-based large telescopes, equipped with instrumentation approp...

  1. Coherent Optical Memory with High Storage Efficiency and Large Fractional Delay

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yi-Hsin; Wang, I-Chung; Du, Shengwang; Chen, Yong-Fan; Chen, Ying-Cheng; Yu, Ite A

    2012-01-01

    A high-storage efficiency and long-live quantum memory for photons is an essential component in long-distance quantum communication and optical quantum computation. Here, we report a 78% storage efficiency of light pulses in a cold atomic medium based on the effect of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). At 50% storage efficiency, we obtain a fractional delay of 74, which is the best up-to-date record. The classical fidelity of the recalled pulse is better than 90% and nearly independent of the storage time, as confirmed by the direct measurement of phase evolution of the output light pulse with a beat-note interferometer. Such excellent phase coherence between the stored and recalled light pulses suggests that the current result can be readily applied to single photon wave packets. Our work significantly advances the technology of EIT-based optical memory and may find practical applications in long-distance quantum communication and optical quantum computation.

  2. Identifying coordinative structure using principal component analysis based on coherence derived from linear systems analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinguang; O'Dwyer, Nicholas; Halaki, Mark; Smith, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Principal component analysis is a powerful and popular technique for capturing redundancy in muscle activity and kinematic patterns. A primary limitation of the correlations or covariances between signals on which this analysis is based is that they do not account for dynamic relations between signals, yet such relations-such as that between neural drive and muscle tension-are widespread in the sensorimotor system. Low correlations may thus be obtained and signals may appear independent despite a dynamic linear relation between them. To address this limitation, linear systems analysis can be used to calculate the matrix of overall coherences between signals, which measures the strength of the relation between signals taking dynamic relations into account. Using ankle, knee, and hip sagittal-plane angles from 6 healthy subjects during ~50% of total variance in the data set, while with overall coherence matrices the first component accounted for > 95% of total variance. The results demonstrate that the dimensionality of the coordinative structure can be overestimated using conventional correlation, whereas a more parsimonious structure is identified with overall coherence.

  3. The Role of Large-Coherent-Eddy Transport in the Atmospheric Surface Layer Based on CASES-99 Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jielun; Lenschow, Donald H.; LeMone, Margaret A.; Mahrt, Larry

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of momentum and heat fluxes from the Cooperative Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Study 1999 (CASES-99) field experiment is extended throughout the diurnal cycle following the investigation of nighttime turbulence by Sun et al. (J Atmos Sci 69:338-351, 2012). Based on the observations, limitations of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) are examined in detail. The analysis suggests that strong turbulent mixing is dominated by relatively large coherent eddies that are not related to local vertical gradients as assumed in MOST. The HOckey-Stick Transition (HOST) hypothesis is developed to explain the generation of observed large coherent eddies over a finite depth and the contribution of these eddies to vertical variations of turbulence intensity and atmospheric stratification throughout the diurnal cycle. The HOST hypothesis emphasizes the connection between dominant turbulent eddies and turbulence generation scales, and the coupling between the turbulence kinetic energy and the turbulence potential energy within the turbulence generation layer in determining turbulence intensity. For turbulence generation directly influenced by the surface, the HOST hypothesis recognizes the role of the surface both in the vertical variation of momentum and heat fluxes and its boundary effect on the size of the dominant turbulence eddies.

  4. A LINEAR THEORY FOR DISTURBANCE OF COHERENT STRUCTURE AND MECHANISM OF SAND WAVES IN OPEN-CHANNEL FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuchuan BAI; Andreas MALCHEREK; Changbo JIANG

    2001-01-01

    The formation of sand wave is such a process in which the roughness and discontinuity of the original bed surface cause the disturbance of the bottom laminar flow in an open channel,and the development of the disturbance in turn leads to instability of the flow and the appearance of the coherent structure. The evolution and development of the coherent structure further promote the undulations of bed surface and sand waves rise finally. The sand wave is explained as a result of action that the bed sediment particles are disturbed by the coherent structure. This study shows that the sand wave formation is the result of disturbance action of neutral coherent structure, and the sand wave shape obtained in computations is identical to the practical one.

  5. Structure-function Investigation of Operando Nanostructured Materials Using Coherent X-ray Diffractive Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulvestad, Andrew

    Nanostructured devices promise to help solve grand challenges of our time, including renewable energy generation, storage, and mitigating climate change. Their power lies in the particular influence of the surface on the total free energy when dimensions approach the nanoscale and it is well known that different sizes, shapes, and defects can drastically alter material properties. However, this strength represents a considerable challenge for imaging techniques that can be limited in terms of sample environments, average over large ensembles of particles, and/or lack adequate spatiotemporal resolution for studying the relevant physical processes. The focus of this thesis is the development of in situ coherent X-ray diffractive imaging (CXDI) and its application in imaging strain evolution in battery cathode nanoparticles. Using in situ CXDI, the compressive/tensile strain field in the pristine state is revealed, and found to be linked to a particular concentration of strain inducing Jahn-Teller ions. The evolution of strain during the first charge/discharge cycle shows that the cathode nanoparticle exhibits phase separation. Using the 3D strain field, the strain field energy is calculated and shows interesting hysteresis between charge and discharge. Strain evolution during a disconnection event, in which the cathode nanoparticle is no longer able to exchange electrons and ions with its environment, reveals the formation of a poorly conducting interphase layer. Finally, strain fields were used to study dislocation dynamics in battery nanoparticles. Using the full 3D information, the dislocation line structure is mapped and shown to move in response to charge transfer. The dislocation is used as a way to probe the local material properties and it is discovered that the material enters an ``auxetic", or negative Poisson's ratio, regime.

  6. Coherent Structure Dynamics and Turbulent Effects of Horizontal Axis Marine Energy Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajardo, D. I.; Escauriaza, C. R.; Ingram, D.

    2016-12-01

    Harnessing the energy available in the oceans constitutes one of the most promising alternatives for generating clean electricity. There are vast amounts of energy present both in waves and tidal currents so it is anticipated that marine energy will have a major role in non-conventional renewable energy generation in the near to mid future. Nevertheless, before marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices can be installed in large numbers a better understanding of the physical, social and environmental implications of their operation is needed. This includes understanding the: hydrodynamic processes, interaction with bathymetry, and the local flow characteristics. This study is focused on the effects horizontal axis MHK devices have on flow turbulence and coherent structures. This is especially relevant considering that sites with favourable conditions for MHK devices are tidal channels where a delicate balance exists between the strong tidal currents and the ecosystems. Understanding how MHK devices influence flow conditions, turbulence and energy flux is essential for predicting and assessing the environmental implications of deploying MHK technologies. We couple a Blade Element Momentum Actuator Disk (BEM-AD) model to a Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) flow solver in order to study flow conditions for different configurations of horizontal axis MHK turbines. In this study, we contribute to the understanding of the hydrodynamic behaviour of MHK technologies, and give insights into the effects devices will have on their environment, with emphasis in ambient turbulence and flow characteristics, while keeping in mind that these effects can alter electricity quality and device performance. Work supported by CONICYT grant 80160084, Fondecyt grant 1130940, Chile's Marine Energy Research & Innovation Center (MERIC) CORFO project 14CEI2-28228, and the collaboration between the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile and the University of Edinburgh, UK, partially supported by the RC

  7. Harbingers and latecomers - The order of appearance of exact coherent structures in plane Poiseuille flow

    CERN Document Server

    Zammert, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The transition to turbulence in plane Poiseuille flow (PPF) is connected with the presence of exact coherent structures. In contrast to other shear flows, PPF has a number of different coherent states that are relevant for the transition. We here discuss the different states, compare the critical Reynolds numbers and optimal wavelengths for their appearance, and explore the differences between flows operating at constant mass flux or at constant pressure drop. The Reynolds numbers quoted here are based on the mean flow velocity and refer to constant mass flux, the ones for constant pressure drop are always higher. The Tollmien-Schlichting waves bifurcate subcritically from the laminar profile at $Re=5772$ and reach down to $Re=2609$ (at a different optimal wave length). Their localized counter part bifurcates at the even lower value $Re=2334$. Three dimensional exact solutions appear at much lower Reynolds numbers. We describe one exact solutions that is spanwise localized and has a critical Reynolds number o...

  8. Trapping, anomalous transport and quasi-coherent structures in magnetically confined plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Vlad, Madalina

    2009-01-01

    Strong electrostatic turbulence in magnetically confined plasmas is characterized by trapping or eddying of particle trajectories produced by the $E\\times B$ stochastic drift. Trapping is shown to produce strong effects on test particles and on test modes. It determines non-standard statistics of trajectories: non-Gaussian distribution, memory effects and coherence. Trapped trajectories form quasi-coherent structure. Trajectory trapping has strong nonlinear effects on the test modes on turbulent plasmas. We determine the growth rate of drift modes as function of the statistical characteristics of the background turbulence. We show that trapping provides the physical mechanism for the inverse cascade observed in drift turbulence and for the zonal flow generation.

  9. Computational analysis of an aortic valve jet with Lagrangian coherent structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadden, Shawn C.; Astorino, Matteo; Gerbeau, Jean-Frédéric

    2010-03-01

    Important progress has been achieved in recent years in simulating the fluid-structure interaction around cardiac valves. An important step in making these computational tools useful to clinical practice is the development of postprocessing techniques to extract clinically relevant information from these simulations. This work focuses on flow through the aortic valve and illustrates how the computation of Lagrangian coherent structures can be used to improve insight into the transport mechanics of the flow downstream of the valve, toward the goal of aiding clinical decision making and the understanding of pathophysiology.

  10. Coherent interaction of a metallic structure with a single quantum emitter: from super absorption to cloaking

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xue-Wen; Agio, Mario

    2012-01-01

    We provide a general theoretical platform based on quantized radiation in absorptive and inhomogeneous media for investigating the coherent interaction of light with metallic structures in the immediate vicinity of quantum emitters. In the case of a very small metallic cluster, we demonstrate extreme regimes where a single emitter can either counteract or enhance particle absorption by three orders of magnitude. For larger structures, we show that an emitter can eliminate both scattering and absorption and cloak a plasmonic antenna. We provide physical interpretations of our results and discuss their applications in active metamaterials and quantum plasmonics.

  11. Coherent soliton structures of the (2+1)-dimensional long-wave-short-wave resonance interaction equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄文华; 张解放; 盛正卯

    2002-01-01

    The variable separation approach is used to find exact solutions of the (2+1)-dimensional long-wave-short-waveresonance interaction equation. The abundance of the coherent soliton structures of this model is introduced by theentrance of an arbitrary function of the seed solutions. For some special selections of the arbitrary function, it is shownthat the coherent soliton structures may be dromions, solitoffs, etc.

  12. Structural colouration of mammalian skin: convergent evolution of coherently scattering dermal collagen arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prum, Richard O; Torres, Rodolfo H

    2004-05-01

    For more than a century, the blue structural colours of mammalian skin have been hypothesized to be produced by incoherent, Rayleigh or Tyndall scattering. We investigated the colour, anatomy, nanostructure and biophysics of structurally coloured skin from two species of primates - mandrill (Mandrillus sphinx) and vervet monkey (Cercopithecus aethiops) - and two species of marsupials - mouse opossum (Marmosa mexicana) and wooly opossum (Caluromys derbianus). We used two-dimensional (2-D) Fourier analysis of transmission electron micrographs (TEMs) of the collagen arrays in the primate tissues to test whether these structural colours are produced by incoherent or coherent scattering (i.e. constructive interference). The structural colours in Mandrillus rump and facial skin and Cercopithecus scrotum are produced by coherent scattering by quasi-ordered arrays of parallel dermal collagen fibres. The 2-D Fourier power spectra of the collagen arrays from Mandrillus and Cercopithecus reveal ring-shaped distributions of Fourier power at intermediate spatial frequencies, demonstrating a substantial nanostructure of the appropriate spatial frequency to produce the observed blue hues by coherent scattering alone. The Fourier power spectra and the observed reflectance spectra falsify assumptions and predictions of the incoherent, Rayleigh scattering hypothesis. Samples of blue Marmosa and Caluromys scrotum conform generally to the anatomy seen in Mandrillus and Cercopithecus but were not sufficiently well preserved to conduct numerical analyses. Colour-producing collagen arrays in mammals have evolved multiple times independently within the two clades of mammals known to have trichromatic colour vision. Mammalian colour-producing collagen arrays are anatomically and mechanistically identical to structures that have evolved convergently in the dermis of many lineages of birds, the tapetum of some mammals and the cornea of some fishes. These collagen arrays constitute quasi

  13. Gravitational redshifts from large-scale structure

    CERN Document Server

    Croft, Rupert A C

    2013-01-01

    The recent measurement of the gravitational redshifts of galaxies in galaxy clusters by Wojtak et al. has opened a new observational window on dark matter and modified gravity. By stacking clusters this determination effectively used the line of sight distortion of the cross-correlation function of massive galaxies and lower mass galaxies to estimate the gravitational redshift profile of clusters out to 4 Mpc/h. Here we use a halo model of clustering to predict the distortion due to gravitational redshifts of the cross-correlation function on scales from 1 - 100 Mpc/h. We compare our predictions to simulations and use the simulations to make mock catalogues relevant to current and future galaxy redshift surveys. Without formulating an optimal estimator, we find that the full BOSS survey should be able to detect gravitational redshifts from large-scale structure at the ~4 sigma level. Upcoming redshift surveys will greatly increase the number of galaxies useable in such studies and the BigBOSS and Euclid exper...

  14. Using Large-Eddy Simulations to Define Spectral and Coherence Characteristics of the Hurricane Boundary Layer for Wind-Energy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsnop, Rochelle P.; Bryan, George H.; Lundquist, Julie K.; Zhang, Jun A.

    2017-06-01

    Offshore wind-energy development is planned for regions where hurricanes commonly occur, such as the USA Atlantic Coast. Even the most robust wind-turbine design (IEC Class I) may be unable to withstand a Category-2 hurricane (hub-height wind speeds >50 m s^{-1} ). Characteristics of the hurricane boundary layer that affect the structural integrity of turbines, especially in major hurricanes, are poorly understood, primarily due to a lack of adequate observations that span typical turbine heights (hurricane at high spatial (10 m) and temporal (0.1 s) resolution. By comparison with unique flight-level observations from a field project, we find that a relatively simple configuration of the Cloud Model I model accurately represents the properties of Hurricane Isabel (2003) in terms of mean wind speeds, wind-speed variances, and power spectra. Comparisons of power spectra and coherence curves derived from our hurricane simulations to those used in current turbine design standards suggest that adjustments to these standards may be needed to capture characteristics of turbulence seen within the simulated hurricane boundary layer. To enable improved design standards for wind turbines to withstand hurricanes, we suggest modifications to account for shifts in peak power to higher frequencies and greater spectral coherence at large separations.

  15. A new computational method to split large biochemical networks into coherent subnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verwoerd Wynand S

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compared to more general networks, biochemical networks have some special features: while generally sparse, there are a small number of highly connected metabolite nodes; and metabolite nodes can also be divided into two classes: internal nodes with associated mass balance constraints and external ones without. Based on these features, reclassifying selected internal nodes (separators to external ones can be used to divide a large complex metabolic network into simpler subnetworks. Selection of separators based on node connectivity is commonly used but affords little detailed control and tends to produce excessive fragmentation. The method proposed here (Netsplitter allows the user to control separator selection. It combines local connection degree partitioning with global connectivity derived from random walks on the network, to produce a more even distribution of subnetwork sizes. Partitioning is performed progressively and the interactive visual matrix presentation used allows the user considerable control over the process, while incorporating special strategies to maintain the network integrity and minimise the information loss due to partitioning. Results Partitioning of a genome scale network of 1348 metabolites and 1468 reactions for Arabidopsis thaliana encapsulates 66% of the network into 10 medium sized subnets. Applied to the flavonoid subnetwork extracted in this way, it is shown that Netsplitter separates this naturally into four subnets with recognisable functionality, namely synthesis of lignin precursors, flavonoids, coumarin and benzenoids. A quantitative quality measure called efficacy is constructed and shows that the new method gives improved partitioning for several metabolic networks, including bacterial, plant and mammal species. Conclusions For the examples studied the Netsplitter method is a considerable improvement on the performance of connection degree partitioning, giving a better balance of

  16. Coherent two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy: quantitative analysis of protein secondary structure in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiz, Carlos R; Peng, Chunte Sam; Reppert, Mike E; Jones, Kevin C; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2012-04-21

    We present a method to quantitatively determine the secondary structure composition of globular proteins using coherent two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectroscopy of backbone amide I vibrations (1550-1720 cm(-1)). Sixteen proteins with known crystal structures were used to construct a library of 2DIR spectra, and the fraction of residues in α-helix, β-sheet, and unassigned conformations was determined by singular value decomposition (SVD) of the measured two-dimensional spectra. The method was benchmarked by removing each individual protein from the set and comparing the composition extracted from 2DIR against the composition determined from the crystal structures. To highlight the increased structural content extracted from 2DIR spectra a similar analysis was also carried out using conventional infrared absorption of the proteins in the library.

  17. Hierarchical fringe tracker to co-phase and coherence very large optical interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Romain G.; Boskri, Abdelkarim; Bresson, Yves; Agabi, Karim; Folcher, Jean-Pierre; Elhalkouj, Thami; Lagarde, Stephane; Benkhaldoum, Zouhair

    2016-08-01

    The full scientific potential of the VLTI with its second generation instruments MATISSE and GRAVITY require fringe tracking up to magnitudes K>14 with the UTs and K>10 with the ATs. The GRAVITY fringe tracker (FT) will be limited to K 10.5 with UTs and K 7.5 with ATs, for fundamental conceptual reasons: the flux of each telescope is distributed among 3 cophasing pairs and then among 5 spectral channels for coherencing. To overcome this limit we propose a new FT concept, called Hierarchical Fringe Tracker (HFT) that cophase pairs of apertures with all the flux from two apertures and only one spectral channel. When the pair is cophased, most of the flux is transmitted as if it was produced by an unique single mode beam and then used to cophase pairs of pairs and then pairs of groups. At the deeper level, the flux is used in an optimized dispersed fringe device for coherencing. On the VLTI such a system allows a gain of about 3 magnitudes over the GRAVITY FT. On interferometers with more apertures such as CHARA (6 telescopes) or a future Planet Formation Imager (12 to 20 telescopes), the HFT would be even more decisive, as its performance does not decrease with the number of apertures. It would allow building a PFI reaching a coherent magnitude H 10 with 16 apertures with diameters smaller than 2 m. We present the HFT concept, the first steps of its feasibility demonstration from computer simulations and the optical design of a 4 telescopes HFT prototype.

  18. A new methodology for the quantitative visualization of coherent flow structures in alluvial channels using multibeam echo-sounding (MBES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Jim; Simmons, Stephen; Parsons, Daniel; Oberg, Kevin; Czuba, Jonathan; Malzone, Chris

    2010-03-01

    In order to investigate the interactions between turbulence and suspended sediment transport in natural aqueous environments, we ideally require a technique that allows simultaneous measurement of fluid velocity and sediment concentration for the whole flow field. Here, we report on development of a methodology using the water column acoustic backscatter signal from a multibeam echo sounder to simultaneously quantify flow velocities and sediment concentrations. The application of this new technique is illustrated with reference to flow over the leeside of an alluvial sand dune, which allows, for the first time in a field study, quantitative visualization of large-scale, whole flow field, turbulent coherent flow structures associated with the dune leeside that are responsible for suspending bed sediment. This methodology holds great potential for use in a wide range of aqueous geophysical flows.

  19. Integrated structural and functional optical imaging combining spectral-domain optical coherence and multiphoton microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Vinegoni, C; Luo, W; Marks, D L; Ralston, T; Tan, W

    2005-01-01

    An integrated microscope that combines different optical techniques for simultaneous imaging is demonstrated. The microscope enables spectral-domain optical coherence microscopy based on optical backscatter, and multi-photon microscopy for the detection of two-photon fluorescence and second harmonic generation signals. The unique configuration of this integrated microscope allows for the simultaneous acquisition of both anatomical (structural) and functional imaging information with particular emphasis for applications in the fields of tissue engineering and cell biology. In addition, the contemporary analysis of the spectroscopic features can enhance contrast by differentiating among different tissue components.

  20. INTERACTIVE STUDY BETWEEN IDENTICAL COHERENT STRUCTURES IN THE WALL REGION OF A TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A theoretical model for identical coherent structures in the wall region of a turbulent boundary layer was proposed, using the idea of general resonant triad of the hydrodynamic stability. The evolution of the structures in the wall region of a turbulent boundary layer was studied by combining the compact finite differences of high numerical accuracy and the Fourier spectral hybrid method for solving the three dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. In this method, the third order mixed explicit-implicit scheme was applied for the time integration. The fifth-order upwind compact finite difference schemes for the nonlinear convection terms in the physical space, and the sixth-order center compact schemes for the derivatives in spectral space were introduced, respectively. The fourth-order compact schemes satisfied by the velocities and pressure in spectral space was derived. As an application, the method was implemented to the wall region of a turbulent boundary to study the evolution of identical coherent structures. It is found that the numerical results are satisfactory.

  1. Coherent Terahertz Radiation from Multiple Electron Beams Excitation within a Plasmonic Crystal-like structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaxin; Zhou, Yucong; Gang, Yin; Jiang, Guili; Yang, Ziqiang

    2017-01-01

    Coherent terahertz radiation from multiple electron beams excitation within a plasmonic crystal-like structure (a three-dimensional holes array) which is composed of multiple stacked layers with 3 × 3 subwavelength holes array has been proposed in this paper. It has been found that in the structure the electromagnetic fields in each hole can be coupled with one another to construct a composite mode with strong field intensity. Therefore, the multiple electron beams injection can excite and efficiently interact with such mode. Meanwhile, the coupling among the electron beams is taken place during the interaction so that a very strong coherent terahertz radiation with high electron conversion efficiency can be generated. Furthermore, due to the coupling, the starting current density of this mechanism is much lower than that of traditional electron beam-driven terahertz sources. This multi-beam radiation system may provide a favorable way to combine photonics structure with electronics excitation to generate middle, high power terahertz radiation.

  2. Investigation of coherent structures in a superheated jet using decomposition methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Avick; Gopalakrishnan, Shivasubramanian; Balasubramanian, Sridhar

    2016-11-01

    A superheated turbulent jet, commonly encountered in many engineering flows, is complex two phase mixture of liquid and vapor. The superposition of temporally and spatially evolving coherent vortical motions, known as coherent structures (CS), govern the dynamics of such a jet. Both POD and DMD are employed to analyze such vortical motions. PIV data is used in conjunction with the decomposition methods to analyze the CS in the flow. The experiments were conducted using water emanating into a tank containing homogeneous fluid at ambient condition. Three inlet pressure were employed in the study, all at a fixed inlet temperature. 90% of the total kinetic energy in the mean flow is contained within the first five modes. The scatterplot for any two POD coefficients predominantly showed a circular distribution, representing a strong connection between the two modes. We speculate that the velocity and vorticity contours of spatial POD basis functions show presence of K-H instability in the flow. From DMD, eigenvalues away from the origin is observed for all the cases indicating the presence of a non-oscillatory structure. Spatial structures are also obtained from DMD. The authors are grateful to Confederation of Indian Industry and General Electric India Pvt. Ltd. for partial funding of this project.

  3. Spatial structure and coherence properties of Brillouin scatter from CO2 laser-target interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchel, G. R.; Grek, B.; Johnston, T. W.; Pépin, H.; Church, P.; Martin, F.

    1982-05-01

    The spatial structure and coherence properties of 10.6-μm light scattered from CO2 laser-target interactions in oblique incidence show many unexpected features. It is found that the Brillouin backscatter is neither a phase conjugate nor a ray retrace of the incident beam. Rather, it shows a preference for scattering directions other than those exactly antiparallel to the incident beam, apparently related to the angular distribution of the scattering source and also of the plasma corona that serves as the Brillouin amplifying medium. As well, the backscatter phasefront is strongly perturbed with respect to the incident phasefront. This is an indication of turbulence in the corona and/or memory of the structure in the source that is then amplified. Small-scale structures seen in the reimaged backscatter are due to phase perturbation and cannot be simply interpreted as geometric images of a (filamented) source. The phasefront of light that is scattered obliquely from the plasma is much more coherent.

  4. Large-Scale Curriculum Reform in Finland--Exploring the Interrelation between Implementation Strategy, the Function of the Reform, and Curriculum Coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietarinen, Janne; Pyhältö, Kirsi; Soini, Tiina

    2017-01-01

    The study aims to gain a better understanding of the national large-scale curriculum process in terms of the used implementation strategies, the function of the reform, and the curriculum coherence perceived by the stakeholders accountable in constructing the national core curriculum in Finland. A large body of school reform literature has shown…

  5. Large-Scale Curriculum Reform in Finland--Exploring the Interrelation between Implementation Strategy, the Function of the Reform, and Curriculum Coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietarinen, Janne; Pyhältö, Kirsi; Soini, Tiina

    2017-01-01

    The study aims to gain a better understanding of the national large-scale curriculum process in terms of the used implementation strategies, the function of the reform, and the curriculum coherence perceived by the stakeholders accountable in constructing the national core curriculum in Finland. A large body of school reform literature has shown…

  6. A Census of Large-Scale ($\\ge$ 10 pc), Velocity-Coherent, Dense Filaments in the Northern Galactic Plane: Automated Identification Using Minimum Spanning Tree

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ke; Burkert, Andreas; Walmsley, C Malcolm; Beuther, Henrik; Henning, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale gaseous filaments with length up to the order of 100 pc are on the upper end of the filamentary hierarchy of the Galactic interstellar medium. Their association with respect to the Galactic structure and their role in Galactic star formation are of great interest from both observational and theoretical point of view. Previous "by-eye" searches, combined together, have started to uncover the Galactic distribution of large filaments, yet inherent bias and small sample size limit conclusive statistical results to be drawn. Here, we present (1) a new, automated method to identify large-scale velocity-coherent dense filaments, and (2) the first statistics and the Galactic distribution of these filaments. We use a customized minimum spanning tree algorithm to identify filaments by connecting voxels in the position-position-velocity space, using the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey spectroscopic catalog. In the range of $7.^{\\circ}5 \\le l \\le 194^{\\circ}$, we have identified 54 large-scale filaments and der...

  7. Non-Destructive Analysis of the Internal Anatomical Structures of Mosquito Specimens Using Optical Coherence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naresh Kumar Ravichandran

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The study of mosquitoes and analysis of their behavior are of crucial importance in the on-going efforts to control the alarming increase in mosquito-borne diseases. Furthermore, a non-destructive and real-time imaging technique to study the anatomical features of mosquito specimens can greatly aid the study of mosquitoes. In this study, we demonstrate the three-dimensional imaging capabilities of optical coherence tomography (OCT for structural analysis of Anopheles sinensis mosquitoes. The anatomical features of An. sinensis head, thorax, and abdominal regions, along with the morphology of internal structures, such as foregut, midgut, and hindgut, were studied using OCT imaging. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional OCT images, used in conjunction with histological images, proved useful for anatomical analysis of mosquito specimens. By presenting this work as an initial study, we demonstrate the applicability of OCT for future mosquito-related entomological research, and also in identifying changes in mosquito anatomical structure.

  8. Ordering of small particles in one-dimensional coherent structures by time-periodic flows

    CERN Document Server

    Pushkin, Dmitri; Shevtsova, Valentina

    2011-01-01

    Small particles transported by a fluid medium do not necessarily have to follow the flow. We show that for a wide class of time-periodic incompressible flows inertial particles have a tendency to spontaneously align in one-dimensional dynamic coherent structures. This effect may take place for particles so small that often they would be expected to behave as passive tracers and be used in PIV measurement technique. We link the particle tendency to form one-dimensional structures to the nonlinear phenomenon of phase locking. We propose that this general mechanism is, in particular, responsible for the enigmatic formation of the `particle accumulation structures' discovered experimentally in thermocapillary flows more than a decade ago and unexplained until now.

  9. Non-Destructive Analysis of the Internal Anatomical Structures of Mosquito Specimens Using Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravichandran, Naresh Kumar; Wijesinghe, Ruchire Eranga; Lee, Seung-Yeol; Choi, Kwang Shik; Jeon, Mansik; Jung, Hee-Young; Kim, Jeehyun

    2017-08-17

    The study of mosquitoes and analysis of their behavior are of crucial importance in the on-going efforts to control the alarming increase in mosquito-borne diseases. Furthermore, a non-destructive and real-time imaging technique to study the anatomical features of mosquito specimens can greatly aid the study of mosquitoes. In this study, we demonstrate the three-dimensional imaging capabilities of optical coherence tomography (OCT) for structural analysis of Anopheles sinensis mosquitoes. The anatomical features of An. sinensis head, thorax, and abdominal regions, along with the morphology of internal structures, such as foregut, midgut, and hindgut, were studied using OCT imaging. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional OCT images, used in conjunction with histological images, proved useful for anatomical analysis of mosquito specimens. By presenting this work as an initial study, we demonstrate the applicability of OCT for future mosquito-related entomological research, and also in identifying changes in mosquito anatomical structure.

  10. Nanosensitive optical coherence tomography for the study of changes in static and dynamic structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandrov, S; Subhash, H; Leahy, M [National University of Ireland, Galway, Galway (Ireland)

    2014-07-31

    We briefly discuss the principle of image formation in Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (OCT). The theory of a new approach to improve dramatically the sensitivity of conventional OCT is described. The approach is based on spectral encoding of spatial frequency. Information about the spatial structure is directly translated from the Fourier domain to the image domain as different wavelengths, without compromising the accuracy. Axial spatial period profiles of the structure are reconstructed for any volume of interest within the 3D OCT image with nanoscale sensitivity. An example of application of the nanoscale OCT to probe the internal structure of medico-biological objects, the anterior chamber of an ex vivo rat eye, is demonstrated. (laser biophotonics)

  11. Formation and interaction of multiple coherent phase space structures in plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakad, Amar; Kakad, Bharati; Omura, Yoshiharu

    2017-06-01

    The head-on collision of multiple counter-propagating coherent phase space structures associated with the ion acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) in plasmas composed of hot electrons and cold ions is studied here by using one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulation. The chains of counter-propagating IASWs are generated in the plasma by injecting the Gaussian perturbations in the equilibrium electron and ion densities. The head-on collisions of the counter-propagating electron and ion phase space structures associated with IASWs are allowed by considering the periodic boundary condition in the simulation. Our simulation shows that the phase space structures are less significantly affected by their collision with each other. They emerge out from each other by retaining their characteristics, so that they follow soliton type behavior. We also find that the electrons trapped within these IASW potentials are accelerated, while the ions are decelerated during the course of their collisions.

  12. Large-core photonic microcells for coherent optics and laser metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, N. V.; Grogan, M. D. W.; Wang, Y. Y.; Murphy, D. F.; Birks, T. A.; Benabid, F.

    2011-03-01

    A photonic microcell (PMC) is a length of gas-filled hollow core-photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) which is hermetically sealed at both ends by splicing to standard single mode fiber. We describe advances in the fabrication technique of PMCs which enable large core Kagome-lattice HC-PCFs to be integrated into PMC form. The modified fabrication technique uses fiber-tapering to accommodate the large dimensions of the fiber and enables low loss splices with single mode fiber by reducing mode field mismatch. Splice losses as low as 0.6 dB are achieved between 1-cell defect Kagome HC-PCF and single mode fiber. Relative to the previously reported PMCs, which were based on photonic bandgap HC-PCF, the present Kagome HC-PCF based PMC provides broad optical transmission, surface mode-free guidance and larger core at the cost of slightly increased fiber attenuation (~0.2 dB/m). Therefore, the integration of this fiber into PMC form opens up new applications for PMC-based devices. The advantage of the large core dimensions and surface mode free guidance for quantum optics in gas-filled HC-PCF are demonstrated by generation of narrow sub-Doppler features in an acetylenefilled large core PMC.

  13. Holographic Analysis of Large Vehicle Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-01

    47 5.35 Driver’s Door, Engine Speed 3000 RPM, t=14ms 48 v Figure No. Figure Title Page No. 6.1 Graphic Illustration of the Relative Phase Shift Between...global dynamic information over large sections of the vibrating vehicle surface. This information provides a means for improving vehicle desing and...sensitivity which is important for large amplitude measurements. The resulting CW fringe pattern for the beam displacement is graphically illustrated in Figure

  14. UHPFRC in large span shell structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Maten, R.N.; Grunewald, S.; Walraven, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-High Performance Fibre-Reinforced Concrete (UHPFRC) is an innovative concrete type with a high compressive strength and a far more durable character compared to conventional concrete. UHPFRC can be applied in structures with aesthetic appearance and high material efficiency. Shell structures a

  15. Emergence of Coherent Localized Structures in Shear Deformations of Temperature Dependent Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsaounis, Theodoros; Olivier, Julien; Tzavaras, Athanasios E.

    2016-12-01

    Shear localization occurs in various instances of material instability in solid mechanics and is typically associated with Hadamard-instability for an underlying model. While Hadamard instability indicates the catastrophic growth of oscillations around a mean state, it does not by itself explain the formation of coherent structures typically observed in localization. The latter is a nonlinear effect and its analysis is the main objective of this article. We consider a model that captures the main mechanisms observed in high strain-rate deformation of metals, and describes shear motions of temperature dependent non-Newtonian fluids. For a special dependence of the viscosity on the temperature, we carry out a linearized stability analysis around a base state of uniform shearing solutions, and quantitatively assess the effects of the various mechanisms affecting the problem: thermal softening, momentum diffusion and thermal diffusion. Then, we turn to the nonlinear model, and construct localized states—in the form of similarity solutions—that emerge as coherent structures in the localization process. This justifies a scenario for localization that is proposed on the basis of asymptotic analysis in uc(Katsaounis) and uc(Tzavaras) (SIAM J Appl Math 69:1618-1643, 2009).

  16. Emergence of coherent localized structures in shear deformations of temperature dependent fluids

    KAUST Repository

    Katsaounis, Theodoros

    2016-11-25

    Shear localization occurs in various instances of material instability in solid mechanics and is typically associated with Hadamard-instability for an underlying model. While Hadamard instability indicates the catastrophic growth of oscillations around a mean state, it does not by itself explain the formation of coherent structures typically observed in localization. The latter is a nonlinear effect and its analysis is the main objective of this article. We consider a model that captures the main mechanisms observed in high strain-rate deformation of metals, and describes shear motions of temperature dependent non-Newtonian fluids. For a special dependence of the viscosity on the temperature, we carry out a linearized stability analysis around a base state of uniform shearing solutions, and quantitatively assess the effects of the various mechanisms affecting the problem: thermal softening, momentum diffusion and thermal diffusion. Then, we turn to the nonlinear model, and construct localized states - in the form of similarity solutions - that emerge as coherent structures in the localization process. This justifies a scenario for localization that is proposed on the basis of asymptotic analysis in \\\\cite{KT}.

  17. Coherent nanocavity structures for enhancement in internal quantum efficiency of III-nitride multiple quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, T.; Liu, B.; Smith, R.; Athanasiou, M.; Gong, Y.; Wang, T., E-mail: t.wang@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-21

    A “coherent” nanocavity structure has been designed on two-dimensional well-ordered InGaN/GaN nanodisk arrays with an emission wavelength in the green spectral region, leading to a massive enhancement in resonance mode in the green spectra region. By means of a cost-effective nanosphere lithography technique, we have fabricated such a structure on an InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well epiwafer and have observed the “coherent” nanocavity effect, which leads to an enhanced spontaneous emission (SE) rate. The enhanced SE rate has been confirmed by time resolved photoluminescence measurements. Due to the coherent nanocavity effect, we have achieved a massive improvement in internal quantum efficiency with a factor of 88, compared with the as-grown sample, which could be significant to bridge the “green gap” in solid-state lighting.

  18. Coherent structural trapping through wave packet dispersion during photoinduced spin state switching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemke, Henrik T.; Kjær, Kasper Skov; Hartsock, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The description of ultrafast nonadiabatic chemical dynamics during molecular photo-transformations remains challenging because electronic and nuclear configurations impact each other and cannot be treated independently. Here we gain experimental insights, beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation......, into the light-induced spin-state trapping dynamics of the prototypical [Fe(bpy)3]2+ compound by time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy at sub-30-femtosecond resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio. The electronic decay from the initial optically excited electronic state towards the high spin state...... is distinguished from the structural trapping dynamics, which launches a coherent oscillating wave packet (265 fs period), clearly identified as molecular breathing. Throughout the structural trapping, the dispersion of the wave packet along the reaction coordinate reveals details of intramolecular vibronic...

  19. Oceanic three-dimensional Lagrangian Coherent Structures: A study in the Benguela upwelling region

    CERN Document Server

    Bettencourt, João H; Hernández-García, Emilio

    2011-01-01

    We study three dimensional oceanic Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSs) in the Benguela region, as obtained from an output from the ROMS model. To this end we first compute Finite-Size Lyapunov exponent (FSLE) fields in the region volume, characterizing mesoscale stirring and mixing there. Average FSLE values show a general decreasing trend with depth, but there is a local maximum at about 100m depth. LCSs are extracted as ridges of the calculated FSLE fields. They present a "curtain-like" geometry in which the strongest attracting and repelling structures appear as quasivertical surfaces. LCSs around a particular cyclonic eddy, pinched off from the upwelling front are also calculated. The LCSs are confirmed to provide pathways and barriers to transport in and out of the eddy.

  20. Coherent structures of a self-similar adverse pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekimoto, Atsushi; Kitsios, Vassili; Atkinson, Callum; Jiménez, Javier; Soria, Julio

    2016-11-01

    The turbulence statistics and structures are studied in direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a self-similar adverse pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer (APG-TBL). The self-similar APG-TBL at the verged of separation is achieved by a modification of the far-field boundary condition to produce the desired pressure gradient. The turbulence statistics in the self-similar region collapse by using the scaling of the external velocity and the displacement thickness. The coherent structures of the APG-TBL are investigated and compared to those of zero-pressure gradient case and homogeneous shear flow. The support of the ARC, NCI and Pawsey SCC funded by the Australian and Western Australian governments as well as the support of PRACE funded by the European Union are gratefully acknowledged.

  1. THREE-DIMENSIONAL PAIRING OF COHERENT STRUCTURES IN A PLANE MIXING LAYER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) pairing process of coherent structures in a plane mixing layer was simulated numerically with the pseudo-spectral method. The behaviors of spanwise cup-shaped vortices, streamwise rib-shaped vortices and quadrupoles were obtained in terms of their iso-surfaces. The results show that three-dimensional structures are strongly influenced by the initial ampiitude of the 3D disturbance, and that in most cases the local pairing finishes in a roughly two-dimensional manner. In pairing region, the streamwise vortices are chaotic after pairing due to the breakdown of the engulfed ribs and especially the subsequent breakdown of the quadrupoles. The surviving ribs extend to the top (or bottom) of the paired vortices under the stretch of them. In addition, it is revealed that three dimensional vortices pairing can enhance the mixing of fluid. Finally, some patterns of numerical flow visualization are presented by computing the passive scalar.

  2. Midfrequency band dynamics of large space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppolino, Robert N.; Adams, Douglas S.; Levine, Marie B.

    2004-09-01

    High and low intensity dynamic environments experienced by a spacecraft during launch and on-orbit operations, respectively, induce structural loads and motions, which are difficult to reliably predict. Structural dynamics in low- and mid-frequency bands are sensitive to component interface uncertainty and non-linearity as evidenced in laboratory testing and flight operations. Analytical tools for prediction of linear system response are not necessarily adequate for reliable prediction of mid-frequency band dynamics and analysis of measured laboratory and flight data. A new MATLAB toolbox, designed to address the key challenges of mid-frequency band dynamics, is introduced in this paper. Finite-element models of major subassemblies are defined following rational frequency-wavelength guidelines. For computational efficiency, these subassemblies are described as linear, component mode models. The complete structural system model is composed of component mode subassemblies and linear or non-linear joint descriptions. Computation and display of structural dynamic responses are accomplished employing well-established, stable numerical methods, modern signal processing procedures and descriptive graphical tools. Parametric sensitivity and Monte-Carlo based system identification tools are used to reconcile models with experimental data and investigate the effects of uncertainties. Models and dynamic responses are exported for employment in applications, such as detailed structural integrity and mechanical-optical-control performance analyses.

  3. Large-Scale Structure of Magnetospheric Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T. E.; Delcourt, D. C.

    1995-01-01

    Recent investigations of magnetospheric plasma structure are summarized under the broad categories of empirical models, transport across boundaries, formation, and dynamics of the plasma sheet. This report reviews work in these areas during the period 1991 to 1993. Fully three-dimensional empirical models and simulations have become important contributors to our understanding of the magnetospheric system. Some new structural concepts have appeared in the literature: the 'entry boundary' and 'geo-pause', the plasma sheet 'region 1 vortices', the 'low-energy layer', the 'adia-baticity boundary' or 'wall region', and a region in the tail to which we refer as the 'injection port'. Traditional structural concepts have also been the subject of recent study, notably the plasmapause, the magnetopause, and the plasma sheet. Significant progress has been made in understanding the nature of plasma sheet formation and dynamics, but the acceleration of electrons to high energy remains somewhat mysterious.

  4. Scaling laws of diffusion and time intermittency generated by coherent structures in atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradisi, P.; Cesari, R.; Donateo, A.; Contini, D.; Allegrini, P.

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the time intermittency of turbulent transport associated with the birth-death of self-organized coherent structures in the atmospheric boundary layer. We apply a threshold analysis on the increments of turbulent fluctuations to extract sequences of rapid acceleration events, which is a marker of the transition between self-organized structures. The inter-event time distributions show a power-law decay ψ(τ) ~ 1/τμ, with a strong dependence of the power-law index μ on the threshold. A recently developed method based on the application of event-driven walking rules to generate different diffusion processes is applied to the experimental event sequences. At variance with the power-law index μ estimated from the inter-event time distributions, the diffusion scaling H, defined by ⟨ X2⟩ ~ t2H, is independent from the threshold. From the analysis of the diffusion scaling it can also be inferred the presence of different kind of events, i.e. genuinely transition events and spurious events, which all contribute to the diffusion process but over different time scales. The great advantage of event-driven diffusion lies in the ability of separating different regimes of the scaling H. In fact, the greatest H, corresponding to the most anomalous diffusion process, emerges in the long time range, whereas the smallest H can be seen in the short time range if the time resolution of the data is sufficiently accurate. The estimated diffusion scaling is also robust under the change of the definition of turbulent fluctuations and, under the assumption of statistically independent events, it corresponds to a self-similar point process with a well-defined power-law index μD ~ 2.1, where D denotes that μD is derived from the diffusion scaling. We argue that this renewal point process can be associated to birth and death of coherent structures and to turbulent transport near the ground, where the contribution of turbulent coherent structures becomes dominant.

  5. Management Structures and Large-Scale Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welty, Gordon; Lundin, Edward

    The structure of an organization plays a vital role in the evaluation of the organization. Social science researchers often assume that controls inherent in the physical sciences are as applicable to human subjects. Evaluation of Head Start is an example of the social relation of investigator to subject matter and of the variables introduced by…

  6. Identification of Large Space Structures on Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-01

    problem is thus the inverse of the analysis problem for dynamical systems with which the structural engineers are quite familiar . However, whereas the...Belgrade, Yugoslavia. Gagliardt, R. M., "Input Selection for Parameter Identification in Discrete Systems", IEEE Trama . Auto. Cont., Vol. AC-12, Pp

  7. Modeling and Control of Large Flexible Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-31

    systems with hybrid (lumped and distributed) structure. * -3.Development of stabilizing control strategies for nonlinear distributed models, including...process, but much more needs to be done. el .It ;,, "..- ,. ,-,,o’,, .4. : ") Part I: :i: ’i" ’" Wierner-Hopf Methods for Design of Stabilizing ... Control Systems :: Z’" ..-- -~ . . . . .. . . . . . . ... . . . . .......- ~ .. . . S 5 * * .5 .. ** .*% - * 5*55 * . . . . % % ’ * . ’ % , . :.:. -A

  8. Automatic Fastening Large Structures: a New Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumley, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    The external tank (ET) intertank structure for the space shuttle, a 27.5 ft diameter 22.5 ft long externally stiffened mechanically fastened skin-stringer-frame structure, was a labor intensitive manual structure built on a modified Saturn tooling position. A new approach was developed based on half-section subassemblies. The heart of this manufacturing approach will be 33 ft high vertical automatic riveting system with a 28 ft rotary positioner coming on-line in mid 1985. The Automatic Riveting System incorporates many of the latest automatic riveting technologies. Key features include: vertical columns with two sets of independently operating CNC drill-riveting heads; capability of drill, insert and upset any one piece fastener up to 3/8 inch diameter including slugs without displacing the workpiece offset bucking ram with programmable rotation and deep retraction; vision system for automatic parts program re-synchronization and part edge margin control; and an automatic rivet selection/handling system.

  9. Investigation of horizontal structures at mesospheric altitudes using coherent radar imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, S.; Stober, G.; Schult, C.; Zecha, M.; Latteck, R.

    2013-07-01

    The Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY) in Northern Norway (69.30°N, 16.04°E) was used to perform interferometric observations of Polar Mesosperic Summer Echoes (PMSE) in June 2012. Coherent Radar Imaging (CRI) using Capon's method was applied allowing a high spatial resolution. The algorithm was validated by simulation and trajectories of meteor head echoes. Both data sets show a good correspondence with the algorithm. Using this algorithm, the aspect sensitivity of PMSE was analysed in a case study, making use of the capability of CRI to resolve the pattern within the beam volume. No correction of the beam pattern was made yet. It was found in this case study, that no large variations in the scattering width and the scattering center occured apart from a very short period of time at the upper edge of the PMSE.

  10. Scaling between superconducting critical temperature and structural coherence length in YBa2Cu3O6.9 films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauzzi, A.; Jönsson-Åkerman, B. Johan; Clerc-Dubois, A.; Pavuna, D.

    2000-09-01

    Measurements of critical temperature Tc in superconducting YBa2Cu3O6.9 films with reduced long-range structural order show the validity of the empirical scaling relation ΔTc propto rc-2 between disorder-induced reduction of Tc and structural coherence length rc in the ab-plane. This result is quantitatively explained by the disorder-induced confinement of the charge carriers within each ordered domain of size rc. Our analysis of the data based on this picture enables us to precisely determine the Ginzburg-Landau superconducting coherence length in the ab-plane, ξab = 1.41 ± 0.04 nm.

  11. Experimental measurements of large-scale temperature fluctuation structures in a heated incompressible turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Nader; White, Bruce R.

    1993-03-01

    Hot-wire anemometry measurements over a heated flat plate are made for three different temperature difference cases of 10, 15, and 20 C. Space-time correlations of temperature fluctuations T-prime are determined from which mean convection velocities, mean inclination angles, extent in space, and coherence characteristics of T-prime large-scale structure are calculated. The T-prime mean convection velocity is found as a function of y(+). The T-prime structure inclination angle is 30 deg. The T-prime structure is limited to the viscous defect length in the normal and spanwise directions. However, in the streamwise direction, the structure is mildly dependent on the temperature difference.

  12. Curvature constraints from Large Scale Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Di Dio, Enea; Raccanelli, Alvise; Durrer, Ruth; Kamionkowski, Marc; Lesgourgues, Julien

    2016-01-01

    We modified the CLASS code in order to include relativistic galaxy number counts in spatially curved geometries; we present the formalism and study the effect of relativistic corrections on spatial curvature. The new version of the code is now publicly available. Using a Fisher matrix analysis, we investigate how measurements of the spatial curvature parameter $\\Omega_K$ with future galaxy surveys are affected by relativistic effects, which influence observations of the large scale galaxy distribution. These effects include contributions from cosmic magnification, Doppler terms and terms involving the gravitational potential. As an application, we consider angle and redshift dependent power spectra, which are especially well suited for model independent cosmological constraints. We compute our results for a representative deep, wide and spectroscopic survey, and our results show the impact of relativistic corrections on the spatial curvature parameter estimation. We show that constraints on the curvature para...

  13. Neutrino footprint in Large Scale Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Jimenez, Raul; Verde, Licia

    2016-01-01

    Recent constrains on the sum of neutrino masses inferred by analyzing cosmological data, show that detecting a non-zero neutrino mass is within reach of forthcoming cosmological surveys, implying a direct determination of the absolute neutrino mass scale. The measurement relies on constraining the shape of the matter power spectrum below the neutrino free streaming scale: massive neutrinos erase power at these scales. Detection of a lack of small-scale power, however, could also be due to a host of other effects. It is therefore of paramount importance to validate neutrinos as the source of power suppression at small scales. We show that, independent on hierarchy, neutrinos always show a footprint on large, linear scales; the exact location and properties can be related to the measured power suppression (an astrophysical measurement) and atmospheric neutrinos mass splitting (a neutrino oscillation experiment measurement). This feature can not be easily mimicked by systematic uncertainties or modifications in ...

  14. AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON THE COHERENT STRUCTURES AND CHAOTIC PHENOMENA IN THE AXISYMMETRIC COUNTERCURRENT SHEAR FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    麻伟巍; 谢锡麟; 周慧良

    2001-01-01

    The coherent structures and the chaotic phenomena in the transition of the axisymmetric countercurrent mixing shear flow were investigated experimentally. Two kinds of self-excited oscillation modes could exist in the axisymmetric countercurrent mixing shear flow. One is the shear layer self-excited oscillation mode corresponding to the high Reynolds number regime and the other is the jet column self-excited oscillation mode corresponding to the low Reynolds number regime in the case of the velocity ratio ranging from 1 to 1.5. Analyzing the auto-power spec trum, self-correlation-function and three dimensional reconstructed phase trajectory,the route to chaos through three Hopf bifurcations intercepted by an intermittence of the dynamical system corresponding to the axisymmetric countercurrent mixing shear flow was discovered when the velocity ratio is equal to 1.32.

  15. Characteristic Functions Describing the Power Absorption Response of Periodic Structures to Partially Coherent Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Craeye, Christophe; Thomas, Christopher N

    2014-01-01

    Many new types of sensing or imaging surfaces are based on periodic thin films. It is explained how the response of those surfaces to partially coherent fields can be fully characterized by a set of functions in the wavenumber spectrum domain. The theory is developed here for the case of 2D absorbers with TE illumination and arbitrary material properties in the plane of the problem, except for the resistivity which is assumed isotropic. Sum and difference coordinates in both spatial and spectral domains are conveniently used to represent the characteristic functions, which are specialized here to the case of periodic structures. Those functions can be either computed or obtained experimentally. Simulations rely on solvers based on periodic-boundary conditions, while experiments correspond to Energy Absorption Interferometry (EAI), already described in the literature. We derive rules for the convergence of the representation versus the number of characteristic functions used, as well as for the sampling to be ...

  16. Hyperbolic Lagrangian coherent structures align with contours of path-averaged scalars

    CERN Document Server

    Farazmand, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    We prove that, in area-preserving two-dimensional flows, hyperbolic Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS) align with the contours of path-averaged scalars, i.e. the time average of scalar fields along the trajectories of the dynamical system. The alignment is a consequence of the fact that the length of a repelling (respectively, attracting) LCS shrinks rapidly under advection in forward (respectively, backward) time. As a result, the points along a hyperbolic LCS sample similar values of the scalar field, leading to almost uniform distribution of the path-averaged scalar along the LCS. Our results illuminate the relation between the variational theory of hyperbolic LCSs and a significant subset of mixing diagnostics which are obtained as path-averaged scalars. We illustrate the theoretical results on a direct numerical simulation of two-dimensional Navier--Stokes equations. Furthermore, our results provide partial explanation for a recent observation that hyperbolic LCSs separate dynamically distinct regions ...

  17. Stratified shear flow in an inclined duct: coherent structures and mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefauve, Adrien; Partridge, Jamie; Dalziel, Stuart; Linden, Paul

    2016-11-01

    We present laboratory experiments on the exchange flow in an inclined square duct connecting two reservoirs at different densities. This system generates and maintains a stratified shear flow, which can be laminar, wavy or turbulent depending on the density difference and inclination angle. It is believed that the mean dissipation is set by the angle, and that high buoyancy Reynolds numbers (i.e. turbulent intensity) can be maintained, making this system suited for the study of continuously forced stratified turbulence. The talk will focus on the analysis of time-resolved, near-instantaneous 3D velocity and density data obtained by stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV) and laser induced fluorescence (LIF). This data allow for the visualisation of 3D coherent structures as well as turbulent mixing properties, which are key in understanding the dynamics of stratified turbulence. Supported by EPSRC Programme Grant EP/K034529/1 entitled "Mathematical Underpinnings of Stratified Turbulence".

  18. Complexity of localised coherent structures in a boundary-layer flow

    CERN Document Server

    Khapko, Taras; Kreilos, Tobias; Schlatter, Philipp; Eckhardt, Bruno; Henningson, Dan S

    2013-01-01

    We study numerically transitional coherent structures in a boundary-layer flow with homogeneous suction at the wall (the so-called asymptotic suction boundary layer ASBL). The dynamics restricted to the laminar-turbulent separatrix is investigated in a spanwisely extended domain that allows for robust localisation of all edge states. We work at fixed Reynolds number and study the edge states as a function of the streamwise period. We demonstrate the complex spatio-temporal dynamics of these localised states, which exhibits multistability and undergoes complex bifurcations leading from periodic to chaotic regimes. It is argued that in all regimes the dynamics restricted to the edge is essentially low-dimensional and non-extensive.

  19. Coherent Structures in Transition of a Flat-Plate Boundary Layer at Ma=0.7

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Ying; LI Xin-Liang; FU De-Xun; MA Yan-Wen

    2007-01-01

    @@ Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a spatially evolving flat-plate boundary layer transition process at free stream Mach number 0.7 is performed. Tollmien-Schlichting (T-S) waves are added on the inlet boundary as the disturbances before transition. Typical coherent structures in the transition process are investigated based on the second invariant of velocity gradient tensor. The instantaneous shear stress and the mean velocity profile in the transition region are studied. In our view, the fact that the peak value of shear stress in the stress concentration area increases and exceeds a threshold value during the later stage of the transition process plays an important role in the laminar breakdown process.

  20. An Evaluation Framework for Large-Scale Network Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Myrup; Knudsen, Thomas Phillip; Madsen, Ole Brun

    2004-01-01

    An evaluation framework for large-scale network structures is presented, which facilitates evaluations and comparisons of different physical network structures. A number of quantitative and qualitative parameters are presented, and their importance to networks discussed. Choosing a network...

  1. Neutrino footprint in large scale structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garay, Carlos Peña; Verde, Licia; Jimenez, Raul

    2017-03-01

    Recent constrains on the sum of neutrino masses inferred by analyzing cosmological data, show that detecting a non-zero neutrino mass is within reach of forthcoming cosmological surveys. Such a measurement will imply a direct determination of the absolute neutrino mass scale. Physically, the measurement relies on constraining the shape of the matter power spectrum below the neutrino free streaming scale: massive neutrinos erase power at these scales. However, detection of a lack of small-scale power from cosmological data could also be due to a host of other effects. It is therefore of paramount importance to validate neutrinos as the source of power suppression at small scales. We show that, independent on hierarchy, neutrinos always show a footprint on large, linear scales; the exact location and properties are fully specified by the measured power suppression (an astrophysical measurement) and atmospheric neutrinos mass splitting (a neutrino oscillation experiment measurement). This feature cannot be easily mimicked by systematic uncertainties in the cosmological data analysis or modifications in the cosmological model. Therefore the measurement of such a feature, up to 1% relative change in the power spectrum for extreme differences in the mass eigenstates mass ratios, is a smoking gun for confirming the determination of the absolute neutrino mass scale from cosmological observations. It also demonstrates the synergy between astrophysics and particle physics experiments.

  2. Numerical Simulation of Large Diameter Cylindrical Structure Slamming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jing; WANG De-yu

    2008-01-01

    The water entry of large diameter cylindrical structure is studied by applying numerical simulation method. The processes of different diameter cylindrical structures impacting water with various constant velocities are calculated numerically. Thereafter, analyzed are the distribution of slamming pressure on structure during slamming course and the influence of slamming velocity and cylindrical diameter on slamming process. Furthermore, presented herein is an equation being used to forecast the peak slamming force on a large diameter cylindrical structure.

  3. Characterization of multiscroll attractors using Lyapunov exponents and Lagrangian coherent structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazanaro, Filipe I; Soriano, Diogo C; Suyama, Ricardo; Attux, Romis; Madrid, Marconi K; de Oliveira, José Raimundo

    2013-06-01

    The present work aims to apply a recently proposed method for estimating Lyapunov exponents to characterize-with the aid of the metric entropy and the fractal dimension-the degree of information and the topological structure associated with multiscroll attractors. In particular, the employed methodology offers the possibility of obtaining the whole Lyapunov spectrum directly from the state equations without employing any linearization procedure or time series-based analysis. As a main result, the predictability and the complexity associated with the phase trajectory were quantified as the number of scrolls are progressively increased for a particular piecewise linear model. In general, it is shown here that the trajectory tends to increase its complexity and unpredictability following an exponential behaviour with the addition of scrolls towards to an upper bound limit, except for some degenerated situations where a non-uniform grid of scrolls is attained. Moreover, the approach employed here also provides an easy way for estimating the finite time Lyapunov exponents of the dynamics and, consequently, the Lagrangian coherent structures for the vector field. These structures are particularly important to understand the stretching/folding behaviour underlying the chaotic multiscroll structure and can provide a better insight of phase space partition and exploration as new scrolls are progressively added to the attractor.

  4. Impact of oceanic submesoscale coherent structures on marine top predators: new tools and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tew-Kai, E.; Sudre, J.; Gremillet, D.; Yahia, H.; Rossi, V.; Hernandez-Garcia, E.; López, C.; Marsac, F.; Weimerskirch, H.; Garçon, V.

    2011-12-01

    In recent years it appears that meso- and submesoscale features (fronts, eddies, filaments) in surface ocean flow have a crucial influence on marine ecosystems. Their dynamics partly control the foraging behaviour and the movements of marine top. One of the challenges in ecology is to define critical habitats and understand the rules of habitat selection. Recently new tools for detection of coherent structures at submesoscale open the way for new studies never investigated before in marine ecology. Through two examples we highlight novel research on the importance of submesoscale structures for the spatial distribution of marine top predators. We studied two seabird populations with contrasting characteristics: Frigatebirds in the Mozambique Channel, and Cape gannets in the Benguela upwelling off southern Africa. Frigatebirds are mainly offshore birds while Cape gannets do not venture beyond the continental shelf. For these two studies, we used products derived from remote sensing data, to describe submesoscale coherent structures (Mozambique Channel resulting from an intense mesoscale activity. By comparing seabird satellite positions with LCSs locations, we demonstrate that frigatebirds track precisely these structures in the Mozambique Channel, providing the first evidence that a top predator is able to track these FSLE ridges to locate food patches. Although many questions remain unanswered, this work remains a pioneering on this topic. Despite the interest of FSLE, they are limited to offshore areas due to altimetry products limitation on continental shelves. However, many seabirds operate in coastal areas undergoing stronger anthropogenic pressures, such as Cape gannets off South Africa. The Benguela system is characterized by an upwelling inhabited by numerous fronts and filaments that very likely have a strong impact on seabird spatial distribution, and it was not possible to implement FSLE in this area. Thus, we used a newly developed method based on the

  5. Electron beam excitation of coherent sub-terahertz radiation in periodic structures manufactured by 3D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, A. R.; MacLachlan, A. J.; Robertson, C. W.; Zhang, L.; Konoplev, I. V.; Cross, A. W.; Phelps, A. D. R.

    2017-07-01

    For the creation of novel coherent sub-THz sources excited by electron beams there is a requirement to manufacture intricate periodic structures to produce and radiate electromagnetic fields. The specification and the measured performance is reported of a periodic structure constructed by additive manufacturing and used successfully in an electron beam driven sub-THz radiation source. Additive manufacturing, or ;3D printing;, is promising to be quick and cost-effective for prototyping these periodic structures.

  6. Holography and coherent diffraction with low-energy electrons: A route towards structural biology at the single molecule level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Longchamp, Jean-Nicolas; Escher, Conrad; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2015-12-01

    The current state of the art in structural biology is led by NMR, X-ray crystallography and TEM investigations. These powerful tools however all rely on averaging over a large ensemble of molecules. Here, we present an alternative concept aiming at structural analysis at the single molecule level. We show that by combining electron holography and coherent diffraction imaging estimations concerning the phase of the scattered wave become needless as the phase information is extracted from the data directly and unambiguously. Performed with low-energy electrons the resolution of this lens-less microscope is just limited by the De Broglie wavelength of the electron wave and the numerical aperture, given by detector geometry. In imaging freestanding graphene, a resolution of 2Å has been achieved revealing the 660.000 unit cells of the graphene sheet from a single data set. Once applied to individual biomolecules the method shall ultimately allow for non-destructive imaging and imports the potential to distinguish between different conformations of proteins with atomic resolution.

  7. Holography and Coherent Diffraction with Low-Energy Electrons: A Route towards Structural Biology at the Single Molecule Level

    CERN Document Server

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Escher, Conrad; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2014-01-01

    The current state of the art in structural biology is led by NMR, X-ray crystallography and TEM investigations. These powerful tools however all rely on averaging over a large ensemble of molecules. Here, we present an alternative concept aiming at structural analysis at the single molecule level. We show that by combining electron holography and coherent diffraction imaging estimations concerning the phase of the scattered wave become needless as the phase information is extracted from the data directly and unambiguously. Performed with low-energy electrons the resolution of this lens-less microscope is just limited by the De Broglie wavelength of the electron wave and the numerical aperture, given by detector geometry. In imaging freestanding graphene, a resolution of 2 Angstrom has been achieved revealing the 660.000 unit cells of the graphene sheet from one data set at once. Applied to individual biomolecules the method allows for non-destructive imaging and imports the potential to distinguish between di...

  8. Turbulent coherent-structure dynamics in a natural surface storage zone: Mechanisms of mass and momentum transport in rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escauriaza, Cristian; Sandoval, Jorge; Mignot, Emmanuel; Mao, Luca

    2016-11-01

    Turbulent flows developed in surface storage zones (SSZ) in rivers control many physical and biogeochemical processes of contaminants in the water. These regions are characterized by low velocities and long residence times, which favor particle deposition, nutrient uptake, and flow interactions with reactive sediments. The dynamics of the flow in SSZ is driven by a shear layer that induces multiple vortical structures with a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. In this work we study the flow in a lateral SSZ of the Lluta River, a high-altitude Andean stream (4,000 masl), with a Re=45,800. We describe the large-scale turbulent coherent structures using field measurements and 3D numerical simulations. We measure the bed topography, instantaneous 3D velocities at selected points, the mean 2D free-surface velocity field, and arsenic concentration in the sediment. Numerical simulations of the flow are also performed using a DES turbulence model. We focus on the mass and momentum transport processes, analyzing the statistics of mass exchange and residence times in the SSZ. With this information we provide new insights on the flow and transport processes between the main channel and the recirculating region in natural conditions. Supported by Fondecyt 1130940.

  9. Spatial-temporal analysis of coherent offshore wind field structures measured by scanning Doppler-lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valldecabres, L.; Friedrichs, W.; von Bremen, L.; Kühn, M.

    2016-09-01

    An analysis of the spatial and temporal power fluctuations of a simplified wind farm model is conducted on four offshore wind fields data sets, two from lidar measurements and two from LES under unstable and neutral atmospheric conditions. The integral length scales of the horizontal wind speed computed in the streamwise and the cross-stream direction revealed the elongation of the structures in the direction of the mean flow. To analyse the effect of the structures on the power output of a wind turbine, the aggregated equivalent power of two wind turbines with different turbine spacing in the streamwise and cross-stream direction is analysed at different time scales under 10 minutes. The fact of considering the summation of the power of two wind turbines smooths out the fluctuations of the power output of a single wind turbine. This effect, which is stronger with increasing spacing between turbines, can be seen in the aggregation of the power of two wind turbines in the streamwise direction. Due to the anti-correlation of the coherent structures in the cross-stream direction, this smoothing effect is stronger when the aggregated power is computed with two wind turbines aligned orthogonally to the mean flow direction.

  10. Identification of iridocorneal angle structures assessed by Fourier domain optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Vigo, J I; Fernández-Vigo, C; Martínez de la Casa, J M; Sáenz-Francés, F; Santos-Bueso, E; García Feijóo, J; Fernández-Vigo, J A

    2016-02-01

    To study the structures of the iridocorneal angle using anterior segment optical coherence tomography (OCT) defining their tomographic characteristics and quantifying their identification frequency. A cross-sectional study was performed on 267 right eyes of 267 consecutive healthy patients. Fourier domain OCT RTVue (Optovue Inc, CA, EE. UU.) was used to examine the iridocorneal angle in the nasal and temporal sectors. The structures evaluated were: Sclerocorneal limbus, sclerocorneal transition, Schwalbe's line, trabecular meshwork, Schlemm's canal, scleral spur, and angular recess. Within and between agreements to identify structures were calculated using Cohen's kappa coefficient. The mean age was 41.3 ± 14.3 years (range 20-80), with 57% being women. The sclerocorneal limbus, sclerocorneal transition, and Schwalbe's line were identified by 98.7, 97 and 93.4% of the images, respectively, with the trabecular meshwork and Schlemm's canal being identified in 91% of cases. The scleral spur could be identified in 85.4%, and the angular recess in 74.5%. There was no difference in the identification between the temporal and nasal sectors. Within and between agreement was k=0.92 and k=0.88, respectively, in the identification of the structures of the total images studied. Fourier domain OCT is a reliable technique for the identification of the structures of the iridocorneal angle, among which can be highlighted are, the trabecular meshwork, Schlemm's canal, scleral spur, and Schwalbe's line. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Optical theory of partially coherent thin-film energy-absorbing structures for power detectors and imaging arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withington, Stafford; Thomas, Christopher N

    2009-06-01

    Free-space power detectors often have energy absorbing structures comprising multilayer systems of patterned thin films. We show that for any system of interacting resistive films, the expectation value of the absorbed power is given by the contraction of two tensor fields: one describes the spatial state of coherence of the incoming radiation, the other the state of coherence to which the detector is sensitive. Equivalently, the natural modes of the optical field scatter power into the natural modes of the detector. We describe a procedure for determining the amplitude, phase, and polarization patterns of a detector's optical modes and their relative responsivities. The procedure gives the state of coherence of the currents flowing in the system and leads to important conceptual insights into the way the pixels of an imaging array interact and extract information from an optical field.

  12. Coherence and Sense of Coherence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dau, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    of coherence is both related to conditional matters as learning environments, structure, clarity and linkage but also preconditioned matters and prerequisites among participants related to experiences and convenience. It is stressed that this calls for continuous assessment and reflections upon these terms...... and conditions if the student shall be able acquire the necessary competencies....

  13. Integrated structural control design of large space structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, J.J.; Lauffer, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Active control of structures has been under intensive development for the last ten years. Reference 2 reviews much of the identification and control technology for structural control developed during this time. The technology was initially focused on space structure and weapon applications; however, recently the technology is also being directed toward applications in manufacturing and transportation. Much of this technology focused on multiple-input/multiple-output (MIMO) identification and control methodology because many of the applications require a coordinated control involving multiple disturbances and control objectives where multiple actuators and sensors are necessary for high performance. There have been many optimal robust control methods developed for the design of MIMO robust control laws; however, there appears to be a significant gap between the theoretical development and experimental evaluation of control and identification methods to address structural control applications. Many methods have been developed for MIMO identification and control of structures, such as the Eigensystem Realization Algorithm (ERA), Q-Markov Covariance Equivalent Realization (Q-Markov COVER) for identification; and, Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG), Frequency Weighted LQG and H-/ii-synthesis methods for control. Upon implementation, many of the identification and control methods have shown limitations such as the excitation of unmodelled dynamics and sensitivity to system parameter variations. As a result, research on methods which address these problems have been conducted.

  14. Choroidal structure determined by binarizing optical coherence tomography images in eyes with reticular pseudodrusen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Naonori; Kojima, Masashi; Yamashita, Mariko; Nishi, Tomo; Ogata, Nahoko

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To compare the choroidal structure beneath the macular area in eyes with reticular pseudodrusen (RPD) and age-matched controls. Methods This study was performed at Nara Medical University Hospital, Japan. Twenty eyes of 14 patients (82.3±4.2 years, mean ± standard deviation) with RPD and 35 eyes of 20 age-matched controls (81.5±6.0 years) were studied. The choroidal structure was determined by binarizing the images obtained by enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography in all patients and controls. The total, luminal, and stromal choroidal areas were quantified by the binarization method. Results The total choroidal area of the eyes with RPD was significantly smaller than that of control eyes (P=0.001, unpaired t-test). Both the luminal and stromal areas in eyes with RPD were significantly smaller than that of control eyes (P=0.001, paired t-test), but there was no significant difference in the luminal/stromal ratio between eyes with RPD and control eyes. Conclusion The total, luminal, and stromal choroidal areas in eyes with RPD were smaller than those of the control eyes. The reduction of the choroidal luminal and stromal areas may be due to a loss of the oxygen demand of the choroid due to RPE dysfunction. PMID:28490860

  15. Choroidal structure determined by binarizing optical coherence tomography images in eyes with reticular pseudodrusen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Naonori; Kojima, Masashi; Yamashita, Mariko; Nishi, Tomo; Ogata, Nahoko

    2017-01-01

    To compare the choroidal structure beneath the macular area in eyes with reticular pseudodrusen (RPD) and age-matched controls. This study was performed at Nara Medical University Hospital, Japan. Twenty eyes of 14 patients (82.3±4.2 years, mean ± standard deviation) with RPD and 35 eyes of 20 age-matched controls (81.5±6.0 years) were studied. The choroidal structure was determined by binarizing the images obtained by enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography in all patients and controls. The total, luminal, and stromal choroidal areas were quantified by the binarization method. The total choroidal area of the eyes with RPD was significantly smaller than that of control eyes (P=0.001, unpaired t-test). Both the luminal and stromal areas in eyes with RPD were significantly smaller than that of control eyes (P=0.001, paired t-test), but there was no significant difference in the luminal/stromal ratio between eyes with RPD and control eyes. The total, luminal, and stromal choroidal areas in eyes with RPD were smaller than those of the control eyes. The reduction of the choroidal luminal and stromal areas may be due to a loss of the oxygen demand of the choroid due to RPE dysfunction.

  16. Choroidal Structure in Children with Anisohypermetropic Amblyopia Determined by Binarization of Optical Coherence Tomographic Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Tomo; Ueda, Tetsuo; Mizusawa, Yuutaro; Shinomiya, Kayo; Semba, Kentaro; Mitamura, Yoshinori; Sonoda, Shozo; Uchino, Eisuke; Sakamoto, Taiji; Ogata, Nahoko

    2016-01-01

    To compare the choroidal structure of the subfoveal area in the eyes of children with anisohypermetropic amblyopia to that of the fellow eyes and to age-matched controls using a binarization method of the images obtained by enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT). This study was performed at Nara Medical University Hospital, Tokushima University Hospital, and Kagoshima University Hospital, Japan. Forty amblyopic eyes with anisohypermetropic amblyopia and their fellow eyes (5.9 ± 2.1 years, mean ± standard deviation), and 103 age-matched controls (6.7 ± 2.4 years) were studied. The control eyes were divided into myopic, emmetropic, and hyperopic eyes. The total choroidal area, luminal area and stromal area of the subfoveal choroid were measured by the binarization method. The luminal/stromal ratio and the axial length of the amblyopic eyes were compared to that of the control eyes. The total choroidal area in the amblyopic eyes was significantly larger than that of the fellow eyes (P = 0.005). The luminal/stromal ratio was significantly larger in the amblyopic eyes than that of the fellow eyes (Pcontrol hyperopic eyes (Pcontrol eyes (r = -0.30, P = 0.001), but no significant correlation was found in the amblyopic eyes. The choroidal structure of the amblyopic eyes was different from that of the fellow and the control hyperopic eyes. The choroidal changes are related to amblyopia.

  17. The Chlamydiales Pangenome Revisited: Structural Stability and Functional Coherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fotis E. Psomopoulos

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The entire publicly available set of 37 genome sequences from the bacterial order Chlamydiales has been subjected to comparative analysis in order to reveal the salient features of this pangenome and its evolutionary history. Over 2,000 protein families are detected across multiple species, with a distribution consistent to other studied pangenomes. Of these, there are 180 protein families with multiple members, 312 families with exactly 37 members corresponding to core genes, 428 families with peripheral genes with varying taxonomic distribution and finally 1,125 smaller families. The fact that, even for smaller genomes of Chlamydiales, core genes represent over a quarter of the average protein complement, signifies a certain degree of structural stability, given the wide range of phylogenetic relationships within the group. In addition, the propagation of a corpus of manually curated annotations within the discovered core families reveals key functional properties, reflecting a coherent repertoire of cellular capabilities for Chlamydiales. We further investigate over 2,000 genes without homologs in the pangenome and discover two new protein sequence domains. Our results, supported by the genome-based phylogeny for this group, are fully consistent with previous analyses and current knowledge, and point to future research directions towards a better understanding of the structural and functional properties of Chlamydiales.

  18. Coherent structural trapping through wave packet dispersion during photoinduced spin state switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, Henrik T.; Kjær, Kasper S.; Hartsock, Robert; van Driel, Tim B.; Chollet, Matthieu; Glownia, James M.; Song, Sanghoon; Zhu, Diling; Pace, Elisabetta; Matar, Samir F.; Nielsen, Martin M.; Benfatto, Maurizio; Gaffney, Kelly J.; Collet, Eric; Cammarata, Marco

    2017-05-01

    The description of ultrafast nonadiabatic chemical dynamics during molecular photo-transformations remains challenging because electronic and nuclear configurations impact each other and cannot be treated independently. Here we gain experimental insights, beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, into the light-induced spin-state trapping dynamics of the prototypical [Fe(bpy)3]2+ compound by time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy at sub-30-femtosecond resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio. The electronic decay from the initial optically excited electronic state towards the high spin state is distinguished from the structural trapping dynamics, which launches a coherent oscillating wave packet (265 fs period), clearly identified as molecular breathing. Throughout the structural trapping, the dispersion of the wave packet along the reaction coordinate reveals details of intramolecular vibronic coupling before a slower vibrational energy dissipation to the solution environment. These findings illustrate how modern time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy can provide key information to unravel dynamic details of photo-functional molecules.

  19. Optical Coherence Tomography Observation of Gonio Structures during Microhook Ab Interno Trabeculotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Tanito

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Intraoperative observation of ocular structures using microscope-integrated optical coherence tomography (iOCT has been adopted recently. I report my initial feasibility assessment of iOCT for the incised trabecular meshwork observation during microhook ab interno trabeculotomy. Case Series. Both the nasal and temporal sides or either side of the trabecular meshwork/inner wall of Schlemm’s canal was incised more than 3 clock hours. After then, under observation using a Swan-Jacob gonioprism lens with the real-time 5-line scan mode, OCT images of the area were successfully acquired in 10 (83% of 12 sides in nine eyes. Based on the appearance of the acquired images of the 10 sides, the trabeculotomy cleft could be classified into three incisional patterns, that is, six (60% anterior-opening patterns (posterior-based flap, three (30% middle-opening patterns (posterior- and anterior-based flaps, and one (10% posterior-opening pattern (anterior-based flap, according to the predominant locations of the trabecular meshwork flaps. Conclusion. Intraoperative observation of the gonio structures including the trabeculotomy cleft was feasible using the RESCAN 700 in combination with a gonioprism.

  20. Structure and coherence of reasoning ability in Down Syndrome adults and typically developing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsopoulo, D; Christou, C; Koutselini, M; Raftopoulos, A; Karefillidou, C

    2002-01-01

    The present study investigates the ability of Down Syndrome (DS) adults to reason: (a) deductively with transitivity (linear and reverse relations) and categorical syllogisms (all-some relations); (b) inductively with classical verbal analogies and non-verbal analogical reasoning (Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices); and (c) to retain information in short-term memory. The results have shown that: (i) The Down Syndrome adults did not differ from typically developing children, matched on expressive and verbal ability, in transitivity and non-verbal analogical thinking; (ii) they differed in categorical reasoning, classical verbal analogies and short-term memory. Application of a structural model demonstrated that, despite differences in slope means in the three measures, the structure of functioning within-and-across all domains of cognition tests and its growth pattern, equally reliable and coherent, goes in parallel for the Down Syndrome adults and the typically developing children. The results are discussed within the context of the two-group developmental and difference approach.

  1. Four-dimensional structural and Doppler optical coherence tomography imaging on graphics processing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylwestrzak, Marcin; Szlag, Daniel; Szkulmowski, Maciej; Gorczynska, Iwona; Bukowska, Danuta; Wojtkowski, Maciej; Targowski, Piotr

    2012-10-01

    The authors present the application of graphics processing unit (GPU) programming for real-time three-dimensional (3-D) Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FdOCT) imaging with implementation of flow visualization algorithms. One of the limitations of FdOCT is data processing time, which is generally longer than data acquisition time. Utilizing additional algorithms, such as Doppler analysis, further increases computation time. The general purpose computing on GPU (GPGPU) has been used successfully for structural OCT imaging, but real-time 3-D imaging of flows has so far not been presented. We have developed software for structural and Doppler OCT processing capable of visualization of two-dimensional (2-D) data (2000 A-scans, 2048 pixels per spectrum) with an image refresh rate higher than 120 Hz. The 3-D imaging of 100×100 A-scans data is performed at a rate of about 9 volumes per second. We describe the software architecture, organization of threads, and optimization. Screen shots recorded during real-time imaging of a flow phantom and the human eye are presented.

  2. Identification and control of large-scale structures in highly turbulent shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schadow, K. C.; Wilson, K. J.; Gutmark, E.

    Unforced and forced subsonic jets were studied using hot-wire anemometry. It is found that highly coherent flow structure can be generated in the initial region of ducted flow by applying forcing to the flow innstability frequencies. Flow visualization experiments in water showed that the coherent structures had relatively high azimuthal coherence and were periodic in time and space. The convection velocity of the structures was about 60 percent of the mean flow velocity. Mixing of the shear layer with the surrounding recirculation zone and the inside core was enhanced by the forcing and reduced their size accordingly. Photographs from the flow visualization tests are provided.

  3. Coherence and Sense of Coherence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dau, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Constraints in the implementation of models of blended learning can be explained by several causes, but in this paper, it is illustrated that lack of sense of coherence is a major factor of these constraints along with the referential whole of the perceived learning environments. The question...... of coherence is both related to conditional matters as learning environments, structure, clarity and linkage but also preconditioned matters and prerequisites among participants related to experiences and convenience. It is stressed that this calls for continuous assessment and reflections upon these terms...... and conditions if the student shall be able acquire the necessary competencies....

  4. Probabilistic cartography of the large-scale structure

    CERN Document Server

    Leclercq, Florent; Lavaux, Guilhem; Wandelt, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    The BORG algorithm is an inference engine that derives the initial conditions given a cosmological model and galaxy survey data, and produces physical reconstructions of the underlying large-scale structure by assimilating the data into the model. We present the application of BORG to real galaxy catalogs and describe the primordial and late-time large-scale structure in the considered volumes. We then show how these results can be used for building various probabilistic maps of the large-scale structure, with rigorous propagation of uncertainties. In particular, we study dynamic cosmic web elements and secondary effects in the cosmic microwave background.

  5. Real-time prediction of atmospheric Lagrangian coherent structures based on forecast data: An application and error analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    BozorgMagham, Amir E.; Ross, Shane D.; Schmale, David G.

    2013-09-01

    The language of Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) provides a new means for studying transport and mixing of passive particles advected by an atmospheric flow field. Recent observations suggest that LCSs govern the large-scale atmospheric motion of airborne microorganisms, paving the way for more efficient models and management strategies for the spread of infectious diseases affecting plants, domestic animals, and humans. In addition, having reliable predictions of the timing of hyperbolic LCSs may contribute to improved aerobiological sampling of microorganisms with unmanned aerial vehicles and LCS-based early warning systems. Chaotic atmospheric dynamics lead to unavoidable forecasting errors in the wind velocity field, which compounds errors in LCS forecasting. In this study, we reveal the cumulative effects of errors of (short-term) wind field forecasts on the finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields and the associated LCSs when realistic forecast plans impose certain limits on the forecasting parameters. Objectives of this paper are to (a) quantify the accuracy of prediction of FTLE-LCS features and (b) determine the sensitivity of such predictions to forecasting parameters. Results indicate that forecasts of attracting LCSs exhibit less divergence from the archive-based LCSs than the repelling features. This result is important since attracting LCSs are the backbone of long-lived features in moving fluids. We also show under what circumstances one can trust the forecast results if one merely wants to know if an LCS passed over a region and does not need to precisely know the passage time.

  6. Structure of Wall-Eddies at Very Large Reynolds Number--A Large-Scale PIV Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommema, S. E.; Adrian, R. J.

    2000-11-01

    The results of an experiment performed in the first 5 m of the neutral atmospheric boundary layer are presented. Large-scale PIV measurements (up to 2 m × 2 m field-of-view) were obtained in the streamwise / wall-normal plane of a very-large Reynolds number (Re_θ > 10^6, based on momentum thickness and freestream velocity), flat-plate, zero-pressure-gradient boundary layer. Measurements were obtained at the SLTEST facility in the U.S. Army's Dugway Proving Grounds. Coherent packets of ramp-like structures with downstream inclination are observed and show a remarkable resemblance to those observed in typical laboratory-scale experiments at far lower Reynolds number. The results are interpreted in terms of a vortex packet paradigm(Adrian, R.J., C.D. Meinhart, and C.D. Tomkins, Vortex organization in the outer region of the turbulent boundary layer, to appear in J. Fluid Mech., 2000.) and begin to extend the model to high Reynolds numbers of technological importance. Additional results obtained during periods of non-neutral atmospheric stability are contrasted with those of the canonical neutral boundary layer. Sample smoke visualization images (3 m × 15 m field-of-view) are available online from the author.

  7. A Data Structure to Handle Large Sets of Equal Terms

    OpenAIRE

    Le Charlier, Baudouin; Atindehou, Mêton Mêton; SCSS 2016. 7th International Symposium on Symbolic Computation in Software Science

    2016-01-01

    We present a data structure to represent and manipulate large sets of (equal) terms (or expressions). Our initial and main motivation for this data structure is the simplification of expressions with respect to a formal theory, typically, an equational one. However, it happens that the data structure is also efficient to compute the congruence closure of a relation over a set of terms. We provide an abstract definition of the data structure, including a precise semantics, and we explain how t...

  8. Identification of Coherent Structures of Turbulence at the Atmospheric Surface Layer%大气边界层湍流相干结构的识别

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李昕; M.H.Al-Jiboori; 等

    2002-01-01

    A parameter-free method based on orthonormal wavelet transforms is recommended for calculating the principal time scale of coherent structures in atmospheric boundary-layer measurements. First, the atmospheric turbulent signal is decomposed into the small scate vortex that has approximate isotropy and the large scale vortex with the digital filter. Then, the large scale vortex is used to detect colterent structures with this method. The principal time scale and profile of coherent structures for velocity components (u, v, w)above rice fields are obtained. In order to testify the validity of this method, the correlation of coherent structures and non-coherent structures are also calculated.%首先利用数字滤波方法对淮河流域试验的大气边界层湍流观测资料进行三项分解,将大气边界层湍流的风速信号分解为近似各项同性的小尺度涡和各向异性的大尺度涡.然后再将大尺度涡信号进行离散正交小波分解,寻找相干结构的主要特征尺度.对于大气边界层湍流垂直脉动风速来说,其相干结构的主要特征尺度为16 s;对径向与纬向脉动风速来说,其相干结构的主要特征尺度为32~64 s.在此基础上,利用小波的反变换提取出相干结构的信号与非相干结构的信号,并计算两者间的相关系数,最大仅有0.02.此外,对原始大气湍流观测信号不进行数字滤波,直接利用本文中子波分析法提取湍流相干结构所得结果作比较研究;并探讨了采用对称或似对称离散正交小波对此研究的影响.

  9. Structural coherence and temporal stability of psychopathic personality features during emerging adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawes, Samuel W; Mulvey, Edward P; Schubert, Carol A; Pardini, Dustin A

    2014-08-01

    Psychopathy is a complex personality disorder characterized by affective, interpersonal, and behavioral dimensions. Although features of psychopathy have been extended downwardly to earlier developmental periods, there is a discerning lack of studies that have focused on critically important issues such as longitudinal invariance and stability/change in these features across time. The current study examines these issues using a large sample of male adolescent offenders (N = 1,170) assessed across 7 annual time points during the transition into emerging adulthood (ages ∼17 to 24 years). Findings demonstrated that features of psychopathy remained longitudinally invariant across this developmental period, and showed temporally consistent and theoretically coherent associations with other measures of personality, psychopathology, and criminal behaviors. Results also demonstrated that mean levels of psychopathic personality features tended to decrease into emerging adulthood and showed relatively modest rank-order stability across assessments with 7-year lags. These findings suggest that reductions in maladaptive personality features seem to parallel the well-documented decreases in offending that occur during the early 20s.

  10. Coherent late-Holocene climate-driven shifts in the structure of three Rocky Mountain lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Jeffery R.; Saros, Jasmine E.; Pederson, Gregory T.

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale atmospheric pressure centers, such as the Aleutian and Icelandic Low, have a demonstrated relationship with physical lake characteristics in contemporary monitoring studies, but the responses to these phenomena are rarely observed in lake records. We observe coherent changes in the stratification patterns of three deep (>30 m) lakes inferred from fossil diatom assemblages as a response to shifts in the location and intensity of the Aleutian Low and compare these changes with similar long-term changes observed in the δ18O record from the Yukon. Specifically, these records indicate that between 3.2 and 1.4 ka, the Aleutian Low shifted westward, resulting in an increased frequency of storm tracks across the Pacific Northwest during winter and spring. This change in atmospheric circulation ultimately produced deeper mixing in the upper waters of these three lake systems. Enhanced stratification between 4.5 and 3.3 ka and from 1.3 ka to present suggests a strengthened Aleutian Low and more meridional circulation.

  11. Kinematic Morphology of Large-scale Structure: Evolution from Potential to Rotational Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xin; Aragon-Calvo, Miguel A; Neyrinck, Mark C; Eyink, Gregory L

    2013-01-01

    As an alternative way of describing the cosmological velocity field, we discuss the evolution of rotational invariants constructed from the velocity gradient tensor. Compared with the traditional divergence-vorticity decomposition, these invariants, defined as coefficients of characteristic equation of the velocity gradient tensor, enable a complete classification of all possible flow patterns in the dark-matter comoving frame, including both potential and vortical flows. Before shell-crossing, different categories of potential flow are highly associated with cosmic web structure, because of the coherent evolution of density and velocity. This correspondence is even preserved at some level when vorticity is generated after shell-crossing. The evolution from the potential to vortical flow can be traced continuously by these invariants. With the help of this tool, we show that the vorticity is generated in a particular way that is highly correlated with the large-scale structure. This includes a distinct spatia...

  12. Choroidal structure determined by binarizing optical coherence tomography images in eyes with reticular pseudodrusen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masuda N

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Naonori Masuda, Masashi Kojima, Mariko Yamashita, Tomo Nishi, Nahoko Ogata Department of Ophthalmology, Nara Medical University, Nara, Japan Purpose: To compare the choroidal structure beneath the macular area in eyes with reticular pseudodrusen (RPD and age-matched controls.Methods: This study was performed at Nara Medical University Hospital, Japan. Twenty eyes of 14 patients (82.3±4.2 years, mean ± standard deviation with RPD and 35 eyes of 20 age-matched controls (81.5±6.0 years were studied. The choroidal structure was determined by binarizing the images obtained by enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography in all patients and controls. The total, luminal, and stromal choroidal areas were quantified by the binarization method.Results: The total choroidal area of the eyes with RPD was significantly smaller than that of control eyes (P=0.001, unpaired t-test. Both the luminal and stromal areas in eyes with RPD were significantly smaller than that of control eyes (P=0.001, paired t-test, but there was no significant difference in the luminal/stromal ratio between eyes with RPD and control eyes.Conclusion: The total, luminal, and stromal choroidal areas in eyes with RPD were smaller than those of the control eyes. The reduction of the choroidal luminal and stromal areas may be due to a loss of the oxygen demand of the choroid due to RPE dysfunction. Keywords: reticular pseudodrusen, age-related macular degeneration, choroidal structure, binarization method

  13. A standard model eye with micro scale multilayer structure for ophthalmic optical coherence tomography equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhenggang; Ding, Zengqian; Hu, Zhixiong; Wen, Tao; Qiao, Wen; Liu, Wenli

    2016-10-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been widely applied in diagnosis of eye diseases during the last 20 years. Differing from traditional two-dimension imaging technologies, OCT could also provide cross-sectional information of target tissues simultaneously and precisely. As well known, axial resolution is one of the most critical parameters impacting the OCT image quality, which determines whether an accurate diagnosis could be obtained. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the axial resolution of an OCT equipment. Phantoms always play an important role in the standardization and validation process. Here, a standard model eye with micro-scale multilayer structure was custom designed and manufactured. Mimicking a real human eye, analyzing the physical characteristic of layer structures of retina and cornea in-depth, appropriate materials were selected by testing the scattering coefficient of PDMS phantoms with difference concentration of TiO2 or BaSO4 particles. An artificial retina and cornea with multilayer-films which have a thickness of 10 to 60 micrometers for each layer were fabricated using spin coating technology. Considering key parameters of the standard model eye need to be traceable as well as accurate, the optical refractive index and layer structure thicknesses of phantoms were verified by utilizing Thickness Monitoring System. Consequently, a standard OCT model eye was obtained after the retinal or corneal phantom was embedded into a water-filled model eye which has been fabricated by 3D printing technology to simulate ocular dispersion and emmetropic refraction. The eye model was manufactured with a transparent resin to simulate realistic ophthalmic testing environment, and most key optical elements including cornea, lens and vitreous body were realized. By investigating with a research and a clinical OCT system respectively, the OCT model eye was demonstrated with similar physical properties as natural eye, and the multilayer film measurement

  14. Coherent Operations, Entanglement, and Progress Toward Quantum Search in a Large 2D Array of Neutral Atom Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-18

    tune the Ti:S to another wavelength in the future, for example to set the traps to a magic wavelength (Carr and Saffman [71]). We use a Coherent Verdi ...gives sufficient on/off contrast. The light is then fiber coupled for delivery of 2.5 W to the trap array optics. 108 Verdi V18 532 nm 18 W MSquared...Ti:Sappire laser system consisting of a Coherent Verdi V18 pump and MSquared SolsTiS. The two AOMs in series are used to get sufficient shutoff suppression

  15. The investigation of coherent structures in the wall region of a supersonic turbulent boundary layer based on DNS database

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Through temporal mode direct numerical simulation, flow field database of a fully developed turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate with Mach number 4.5 and Reynolds number Reθ =1094 has been obtained. Commonly used detection meth- ods in experiments are applied to detecting coherent structures in the flow field, and it is found that coherent structures do exist in the wall region of a supersonic turbulent boundary layer. The detected results show that a low-speed streak is de- tected by using the Mu-level method, the rising parts of this streak are detected by using the second quadrant method, and the crossing regions from a low-speed streak to the high-speed one are detected by using the VITA method respectively. Notwithstanding that different regions are detected by different methods, they are all accompanied by quasi-stream-wise vortex structures.

  16. The investigation of coherent structures in the wall region of a supersonic turbulent boundary layer based on DNS database

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG ZhangFeng; ZHOU Heng; LUO JiSheng

    2007-01-01

    Through temporal mode direct numerical simulation, flow field database of a fully developed turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate with Mach number 4.5 and Reynolds number Reθ=1094 has been obtained. Commonly used detection methods in experiments are applied to detecting coherent structures in the flow field,and it is found that coherent structures do exist in the wall region of a supersonic turbulent boundary layer. The detected results show that a low-speed streak is detected by using the Mu-level method, the rising parts of this streak are detected by using the second quadrant method, and the crossing regions from a low-speed streak to the high-speed one are detected by using the VITA method respectively.Notwithstanding that different regions are detected by different methods, they are all accompanied by quasi-stream-wise vortex structures.

  17. Convected transient analysis for large space structures maneuver and deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housner, J.

    1984-01-01

    Convected-transient analysis techniques in the finite-element method are used to investigate the deployment and maneuver of large spacecraft structures with multiple-member flexible trusses and frames. Numerical results are presented for several sample problems.

  18. Time line cell tracking for the approximation of lagrangian coherent structures with subgrid accuracy

    KAUST Repository

    Kuhn, Alexander

    2013-12-05

    Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) have become a widespread and powerful method to describe dynamic motion patterns in time-dependent flow fields. The standard way to extract LCS is to compute height ridges in the finite-time Lyapunov exponent field. In this work, we present an alternative method to approximate Lagrangian features for 2D unsteady flow fields that achieve subgrid accuracy without additional particle sampling. We obtain this by a geometric reconstruction of the flow map using additional material constraints for the available samples. In comparison to the standard method, this allows for a more accurate global approximation of LCS on sparse grids and for long integration intervals. The proposed algorithm works directly on a set of given particle trajectories and without additional flow map derivatives. We demonstrate its application for a set of computational fluid dynamic examples, as well as trajectories acquired by Lagrangian methods, and discuss its benefits and limitations. © 2013 The Authors Computer Graphics Forum © 2013 The Eurographics Association and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Dynamically dominant exact coherent structures in turbulent Taylor-Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krygier, Michael; Grigoriev, Roman

    2016-11-01

    Unstable Exact Coherent Structures (ECS), which are solutions to the Navier-Stokes equation, provide a connection between turbulence and dynamical systems and offer a method for exploiting the low dimensionality of weakly turbulent flows. We investigate ECS in an intermittent Taylor-Couette flow (TCF) found in a small-aspect-ratio geometry with counter-rotating cylinders (η = 0 . 5 , Γ = 1 , Rei = - 1200 , Reo = 1200). The presence of end-caps breaks the axial translational symmetry of TCF, but continuous rotational symmetry remains, which suggest that typical ECS should be the relative versions of equilibria and time-periodic orbits. Indeed, previous studies (Meseguer et al., 2009 and Deguchi, Meseguer & Mellibovsky, 2014) found several unstable traveling wave solutions (relative equilibria). We have shown that the dynamically dominant ECS for weakly turbulent TCF in the small-aspect-ratio geometry are relative periodic orbits (not relative equilibria), as evidenced by the frequent visits of their neighborhoods by the turbulent flow. This work is supported by a Grant from the Army Research Office (Contract # W911NF-15-1-0471).

  20. Trajectory exploration within asynchronous binary asteroid systems using refined Lagrangian coherent structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Haibin; Wu, Xiaoyu; Cui, Pingyuan

    2017-02-01

    Ground observations have found that asynchronous systems constitute most of the population of the near-Earth binary asteroids. This paper concerns the trajectory of a particle in the asynchronous system which is systematically described using periodic ellipsoidal and spherical body models. Due to the non-autonomous characteristics of the asynchronous system, Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) are employed to identify the various dynamical behaviors. To enhance the accuracy of LCS, a robust LCS finding algorithm is developed incorporating hierarchical grid refinement, one-dimensional search and variational theory verification. In this way, the intricate dynamical transport boundaries are detected efficiently. These boundaries indicate that a total of 15 types of trajectories exist near asynchronous binary asteroids. According to their Kepler energy variations, these trajectories can be grouped into four basic categories, i.e., transitory, escape, impact and flyby trajectories. Furthermore, the influence of the ellipsoid's spin period on the dynamical behavior is discussed in the context of the change of dynamical regions. We found that the transitory and impact motions occur easily in the synchronous-like binary systems, in which the rotation period of the ellipsoid is nearly equal to that of the mutual orbit. Meanwhile, the results confirm a positive correlation between the spinning rate of the ellipsoid and the probability of the escape and flyby trajectories. The LCS also reveal a marked increase in trajectory diversity after a larger initial energy is selected.

  1. Coherence and spectral weight transfer in the dynamic structure factor of cold lattice bosons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleski, T. A.; Kopeć, T. K.

    2017-01-01

    Ultracold atoms have been used to create novel correlated quantum phases allowing to address many solid-state physics problems using the quasi-particle concept, which is the foundation of our understanding of many-body quantum systems. For bosons, the simplest kinds of excited states involve two particles and they are connected to the dynamic structure factor S (k , ω) , measured using Bragg spectroscopy, similarly to the angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) in solid state physics - a major tool in the study of high-Tc cuprates. Calculation of S (k , ω) requires a significant numerical effort to determine multidimensional convolutions of momentum and frequency dependent constituents functions, which we achieve using parallelized fast Fourier transform. As a result, we are able to show that spectral weight transfer between low and high energies is an intrinsic property of the strongly correlated Bose system in close analogy to the doped Mott-Hubbard electronic insulator. Furthermore, the appearance of sharp coherence peaks in the superfluid phase of the cold bosons closely resembles the formation of sharply defined quasiparticle excitations below Tc in cuprates suggesting an intimate connection between the intrinsic nature of these seemingly different systems.

  2. The application of optical coherence tomography to image subsurface tissue structure of Antarctic krill Euphausia superba.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Bellini

    Full Text Available Many small open ocean animals, such as Antarctic krill, are an important part of marine ecosystems. To discover what will happen to animals such as krill in a changing ocean, experiments are run in aquaria where conditions can be controlled to simulate water characteristics predicted to occur in the future. The response of individual animals to changing water conditions can be hard to observe, and with current observation techniques it is very difficult to follow the progress of an individual animal through its life. Optical coherence tomography (OCT is an optical imaging technique that allows images at high resolution to be obtained from depths up to a few millimeters inside biological specimens. It is compatible with in vivo imaging and can be used repeatedly on the same specimens. In this work, we show how OCT may be applied to post mortem krill samples and how important physiological data such as shell thickness and estimates of organ volume can be obtained. Using OCT we find an average value for the thickness of krill exoskeleton to be (30±4 µm along a 1 cm length of the animal body. We also show that the technique may be used to provide detailed imagery of the internal structure of a pleopod joint and provide an estimate for the heart volume of (0.73±0.03 mm3.

  3. Magnetomotive optical coherence elastography for relating lung structure and function in cystic fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhetri, Raghav K.; Carpenter, Jerome; Superfine, Richard; Randell, Scott H.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2010-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic defect in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein and is the most common life-limiting genetic condition affecting the Caucasian population. It is an autosomal recessive, monogenic inherited disorder characterized by failure of airway host defense against bacterial infection, which results in bronchiectasis, the breakdown of airway wall extracellular matrix (ECM). In this study, we show that the in vitro models consisting of human tracheo-bronchial-epithelial (hBE) cells grown on porous supports with embedded magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) at an air-liquid interface are suitable for long term, non-invasive assessment of ECM remodeling using magnetomotive optical coherence elastography (MMOCE). The morphology of ex vivo CF and normal lung tissues using OCT and correlative study with histology is also examined. We also demonstrate a quantitative measure of normal and CF airway elasticity using MMOCE. The improved understanding of pathologic changes in CF lung structure and function and the novel method of longitudinal in vitro ECM assessment demonstrated in this study may lead to new in vivo imaging and elastography methods to monitor disease progression and treatment in cystic fibrosis.

  4. Tracing the early development of harmful algal blooms with the aid of Lagrangian coherent structures

    CERN Document Server

    Olascoaga, M J; Brand, L E; Koçak, H

    2007-01-01

    Several theories have been proposed to explain the development of harmful algal blooms (HABs) produced by the toxic dinoflagellate \\emph{Karenia brevis} on the West Florida Shelf. However, because the early stages of HAB development are usually not detected, these theories have been so far very difficult to verify. In this paper we employ simulated \\emph{Lagrangian coherent structures} (LCSs) to trace the early location of a HAB in late 2004 before it was transported to an area where it could be detected by satellite imagery, and then we make use of a population dynamics model to infer the factors that may have led to its development. The LCSs, which are computed based on a surface flow description provided by an ocean circulation model, delineate past and future histories of boundaries of passively advected fluid domains. The population dynamics model determines nitrogen in two components, nutrients and phytoplankton, which are assumed to be passively advected by the simulated surface currents. Two nearshore...

  5. Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponents and Lagrangian Coherent Structures in Uncertain Unsteady Flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hanqi; He, Wenbin; Peterka, Tom; Shen, Han-Wei; Collis, Scott; Helmus, Jonathan

    2016-02-29

    The objective of this paper is to understand transport behavior in uncertain time-varying flow fields by redefining the finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) and Lagrangian coherent structure (LCS) as stochastic counterparts of their traditional deterministic definitions. Three new concepts are introduced: the distribution of the FTLE (D-FTLE), the FTLE of distributions (FTLE-D), and uncertain LCS (U-LCS). The D-FTLE is the probability density function of FTLE values for every spatiotemporal location, which can be visualized with different statistical measurements. The FTLE-D extends the deterministic FTLE by measuring the divergence of particle distributions. It gives a statistical overview of how transport behaviors vary in neighborhood locations. The U-LCS, the probabilities of finding LCSs over the domain, can be extracted with stochastic ridge finding and density estimation algorithms. We show that our approach produces better results than existing variance-based methods do. Our experiments also show that the combination of D-FTLE, FTLE-D, and U-LCS can help users understand transport behaviors and find separatrices in ensemble simulations of atmospheric processes.

  6. Experimental Observation of Exact Coherent Structures in a Weakly Turbulent Quasi-Two-Dimensional Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri, Balachandra; Tithof, Jeffrey; Pallantla, Ravi Kumar; Grigoriev, Roman; Schatz, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The dynamical systems approach to fluid turbulence relies on understanding the role of unstable, non-chaotic solutions - such as equilibria, traveling waves, and periodic orbits - of the Navier-Stokes equations. These solutions, called Exact Coherent Structures, exist in the same parameter regime as turbulence, but being unstable, are observed in experiments only as short transients. In this talk, we present experimental evidence for the existence and dynamical relevance of unstable equilibria in a weakly turbulent quasi-two-dimensional (Q2D) Kolmogorov flow. In the experiment, this Q2D flow is generated in an electromagnetically driven shallow layer of electrolyte. The numerical simulations, however, use a strictly 2D model which incorporates the effects of the finite thickness of the fluid layer in the experiment. During its evolution, there are instances when the dynamics of a weakly turbulent flow slow down, rather dramatically. Using experimental flow fields from such instances, and by means of a Newton-Solver, we numerically compute several unstable equilibria. Additionally, using numerical simulations, we show that the dynamics of a turbulent flow in the neighbourhood of an equilibrium are accurately described by the unstable manifold of the equilibrium. This work is supported in part by the National Science Foundation under grants CBET-0900018, and CMMI-1234436.

  7. Development of large-scale structure in the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Ostriker, J P

    1991-01-01

    This volume grew out of the 1988 Fermi lectures given by Professor Ostriker, and is concerned with cosmological models that take into account the large scale structure of the universe. He starts with homogeneous isotropic models of the universe and then, by considering perturbations, he leads us to modern cosmological theories of the large scale, such as superconducting strings. This will be an excellent companion for all those interested in the cosmology and the large scale nature of the universe.

  8. Development of cross-correlation spectrometry and the coherent structures of maser sources

    CERN Document Server

    Takefuji, Kazuhiro; Sekido, Mamoru

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a new method of data processing for radio telescope observation data to measure time-dependent temporal coherence, and we named it cross-correlation spectrometry (XCS). XCS is an autocorrelation procedure that expands time lags over the integration time and is applied to data obtained from a single-dish observation. The temporal coherence property of received signals is enhanced by XCS. We tested the XCS technique using the data of strong H2O masers in W3 (H2O), W49N and W75N. We obtained the temporal coherent lengths of the maser emission to be 17.95 $\\pm$ 0.33 {\\mu}s, 26.89 $\\pm$ 0.49 {\\mu}s and 15.95 $\\pm$ 0.46 {\\mu}s for W3 (H2O), W49N and W75N, respectively. These results may indicate the existence of a coherent astrophysical maser.

  9. Development of cross-correlation spectrometry and the coherent structures of maser sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takefuji, Kazuhiro; Imai, Hiroshi; Sekido, Mamoru

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a new method of data processing for radio telescope observation data to measure time-dependent temporal coherence, and we have named it "cross-correlation spectrometry" (XCS). XCS is an autocorrelation procedure that expands time lags over the integration time and is applied to data obtained from a single-dish observation. The temporal coherence property of received signals is enhanced by XCS. We tested the XCS technique using the data of strong H2O masers in W 3 (H2O), W 49 N, and W 75 N. We obtained the temporal coherent lengths of the maser emission to be 17.95 ± 0.33 μs, 26.89 ± 0.49 μs, and 15.95 ± 0.46 μs for W 3 (H2O), W 49 N, and W 75 N, respectively. These results may indicate the existence of a coherent astrophysical maser.

  10. Dynamics and structure analysis of coherent turbulent structures at the boundary of toroidally confined plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchert, Golo

    2013-12-13

    The safe and reliable satisfaction of the world's increasing energy demand at affordable costs is one of the major challenges of our century. Nuclear fusion power plants following the magnetic confinement approach may play an essential role in solving this issue. The energy loss of the fusion plasma due to plasma turbulence reduces the efficiency and poses a threat to the first wall of a fusion reactor. Close to the wall, in the scrape-off layer, this transport is dominated by blobs or filaments: Localized structures of increased pressure, which transport energy and particles towards the wall by propagating radially outwards. Their contribution to the transport depends on their size, propagation velocity and generation rate. An analytical model for the evolution of blobs predicts their velocity and size, but not the generation rate. Experiments indicate that edge turbulence in the vicinity of the last closed flux surface (the boundary between the confined plasma and the scrape-off layer) is involved in the blob generation process and should influence the generation rate. The present thesis aims at answering two main questions: How well do the blob properties predicted from the simple model compare to experimental observations in more complex magnetic field configurations of actual fusion experiments and does the edge turbulence influence the blob properties during the generation process. A fast camera was used to measure blob properties in two devices, TJ-K and ASDEX Upgrade. In TJ-K, blob sizes and velocities were determined together with the generation rate. An overall agreement with the predictions from the simple model is found. For the first time a clear influence of the edge dynamics on the analyzed blob properties is demonstrated. These measurements include the first systematic comparison of the structure-size scaling inside and outside of the last closed flux surface. Furthermore, measurements with a multi-probe array are used to reconstruct the blob

  11. Resistive MHD reconstruction of two-dimensional coherent structures in space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.-L. Teh

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a reconstruction technique to solve the steady resistive MHD equations in two dimensions with initial inputs of field and plasma data from a single spacecraft as it passes through a coherent structure in space. At least two components of directly measured electric fields (the spacecraft spin-plane components are required for the reconstruction, to produce two-dimensional (2-D field and plasma maps of the cross section of the structure. For convenience, the resistivity tensor η is assumed diagonal in the reconstruction coordinates, which allows its values to be estimated from Ohm's law, E+v×B=η·j. In the present paper, all three components of the electric field are used. We benchmark our numerical code by use of an exact, axi-symmetric solution of the resistive MHD equations and then apply it to synthetic data from a 3-D, resistive, MHD numerical simulation of reconnection in the geomagnetic tail, in a phase of the event where time dependence and deviations from 2-D are both weak. The resistivity used in the simulation is time-independent and localized around the reconnection site in an ellipsoidal region. For the magnetic field, plasma density, and pressure, we find very good agreement between the reconstruction results and the simulation, but the electric field and plasma velocity are not predicted with the same high accuracy.

  12. The roll-up and merging of coherent structures in shallow mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, M. Y.; Ghidaoui, M. S.; Kolyshkin, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    The current study seeks a fundamental explanation to the development of two-dimensional coherent structures (2DCSs) in shallow mixing layers. A nonlinear numerical model based on the depth-averaged shallow water equations is used to investigate the temporal evolution of shallow mixing layers, where the mapping from temporal to spatial results is made using the velocity at the center of the mixing layers. The flow is periodic in the streamwise direction. Transmissive boundary conditions are used in the cross-stream boundaries to prevent reflections. Numerical results are compared to linear stability analysis, mean-field theory, and secondary stability analysis. Results suggest that the onset and development of 2DCS in shallow mixing layers are the result of a sequence of instabilities governed by linear theory, mean-field theory, and secondary stability theory. The linear instability of the shearing velocity gradient gives the onset of 2DCS. When the perturbations reach a certain amplitude, the flow field of the perturbations changes from a wavy shape to a vortical (2DCS) structure because of nonlinearity. The development of the vertical 2DCS does not appear to follow weakly nonlinear theory; instead, it follows mean-field theory. After the formation of 2DCS, separate 2DCSs merge to form larger 2DCS. In this way, 2DCSs grow and shallow mixing layers develop and grow in scale. The merging of 2DCS in shallow mixing layers is shown to be caused by the secondary instability of the 2DCS. Eventually 2DCSs are dissipated by bed friction. The sequence of instabilities can cause the upscaling of the turbulent kinetic energy in shallow mixing layers.

  13. Structuring and assessing large and complex decision problems using MCDA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Michael Bruhn

    This paper presents an approach for the structuring and assessing of large and complex decision problems using multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA). The MCDA problem is structured in a decision tree and assessed using the REMBRANDT technique featuring a procedure for limiting the number of pair...

  14. Primordial non-Gaussianity from the large scale structure

    CERN Document Server

    Desjacques, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Primordial non-Gaussianity is a potentially powerful discriminant of the physical mechanisms that generated the cosmological fluctuations observed today. Any detection of non-Gaussianity would have profound implications for our understanding of cosmic structure formation. In this paper, we review past and current efforts in the search for primordial non-Gaussianity in the large scale structure of the Universe.

  15. The fractal octahedron network of the large scale structure

    CERN Document Server

    Battaner, E

    1998-01-01

    In a previous article, we have proposed that the large scale structure network generated by large scale magnetic fields could consist of a network of octahedra only contacting at their vertexes. Assuming such a network could arise at different scales producing a fractal geometry, we study here its properties, and in particular how a sub-octahedron network can be inserted within an octahedron of the large network. We deduce that the scale of the fractal structure would range from $\\approx$100 Mpc, i.e. the scale of the deepest surveys, down to about 10 Mpc, as other smaller scale magnetic fields were probably destroyed in the radiation dominated Universe.

  16. A chemical-structural model for coherent martensite/parent interface in Mn-based antiferromagnetic shape memory alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, S; Wan, J F; Zuo, X W; Chen, N L; Zhang, J H; Rong, Y H

    2016-11-21

    The martensite/parent coherent interface of Mn-based shape memory alloys (SMAs) is a significant part in the research of their martensitic transformation, reversible shape memory effect and magnetic shape memory effect. In the present work, a chemical-structural model was proposed to calculate the martensite/parent coherent interfacial energy of Mn-X (X = Cu, Fe) alloys. In this model, the coherent heterophase interfacial energy consists of chemical and structural parts. Resulting from the formation process of the heterophase interface, the chemical interfacial energy is expressed as the incremental value of bond energy, while the structural part is obtained by calculating the interfacial strain energy. The results show that the structural interfacial energy plays the chief role in the total interfacial energy, and the total interfacial energy decreases as the temperature rises when the alloy composition is fixed. In addition, the preferred orientation has noteworthy influence on the total interfacial energy. Using the proposed model, interfacial energy, interfacial entropy, interfacial enthalpy and interfacial heat capacity are found to be correlated with temperature and interface preferred orientation. Furthermore, the influences of alloy composition, modulus softening, and the index of the habit plane on the results were discussed.

  17. 3D versus 1D quantum confinement in coherently strained CdS/ZnS quantum structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woggon, U.; Gindele, F.; Petri, W.

    1998-01-01

    Monolayer fluctuations in ultrathin, coherently strained CdS/ZnS quantum structures result in a very strong localization of excitons. The deepest localized excitons can be considered as individual, decoupled and three-dimensionally confined. Consequently, fingerprints of zero-dimensionality are f......Monolayer fluctuations in ultrathin, coherently strained CdS/ZnS quantum structures result in a very strong localization of excitons. The deepest localized excitons can be considered as individual, decoupled and three-dimensionally confined. Consequently, fingerprints of zero......-dimensionality are found in the optical spectra like single, ultranarrow luminescence lines in micro-photoluminescence and spectrally broad optical gain in the deep blue spectral range. The exchange splitting is proven and a strong enhancement over the bulk value is observed....

  18. Phase-averaged waveforms of Reynolds stress in wall turbulence during the burst events of coherent structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Nan; LIU Wei; LIU JianHua; TIAN Yan

    2008-01-01

    The time sequence signals of instantaneous longitudinal and normal velocity components at different vertical locations in the turbulent boundary layer over a smooth flat plate have been finely measured by constant temperature anemometry of model IFA-300 and X-shaped hot-wire sensor probe in a wind tunnel. The longitudinal and normal velocity components have been decomposed into multi-scales by wavelet transform. The upward eject and downward sweep motions in a burst process of coherent structure have been detected by the maximum energy criterion of identifying burst event in wall turbulence through wavelet analysis. The relationships of phase-averaged waveforms among longitudinal velocity component, normal velocity component and Reynolds stress component have been studied through a correlation function method. The dynamics course of coherent structures and their effects on statistical characteristics of turbulent flows are analyzed.

  19. Coherent structure in the turbulent wake behind a circular cylinder 3. Flow visualization and hot wire measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, Ryuichiro; Oshima, Shuzo; Okubo, Masaaki; Kotani, Juzo

    1988-07-01

    In the previous papers the authors have reported that the two-dimensional Kármán vortices behind a circular cylinder are deformed until they form chains of spoon-shaped vortex couples whose spanwise scale is about 8 d, which is a new type of coherent structure. In this report experimental evidence of this structure is presented. Formation process of the structure and the turbulence in it were investigated for the wake behind a circular cylinder with Re = 2100 and 4200 by means of the flow visualization technique, simultaneous hot wire measurements, spanwise correlation measurements, construction of instantaneous velocity field by the conditional sampling method, etc.

  20. Morphometric analysis of aqueous humor outflow structures with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Andrew W; Kagemann, Larry; Wollstein, Gadi; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Folz, Steven; Overby, Darryl R; Sigal, Ian A; Wang, Bo; Schuman, Joel S

    2012-08-07

    To describe morphometric details of the human aqueous humor (AH) outflow microvasculature visualized with 360-degree virtual castings during active AH outflow in cadaver eyes and to compare these structures with corrosion casting studies. The conventional AH outflow pathways of donor eyes (n = 7) and eyes in vivo (n = 3) were imaged with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and wide-bandwidth superluminescent diode array during active AH outflow. Digital image contrast was adjusted to isolate AH microvasculature, and images were viewed in a 3D viewer. Additional eyes (n = 3) were perfused with mock AH containing fluorescent tracer microspheres to compare microvasculature patterns. Observations revealed components of the conventional outflow pathway from Schlemm's canal (SC) to the superficial intrascleral venous plexus (ISVP). The superficial ISVP in both our study and corrosion casts were composed of interconnected venules (10-50 μm) forming a hexagonal meshwork. Larger radial arcades (50-100 μm) drained the region nearest SC and converged with larger tortuous vessels (>100 μm). A 360-degree virtual casting closely approximated corrosion casting studies. Tracer studies corroborated our findings. Tracer decorated several larger vessels (50-100 μm) extending posteriorly from the limbus in both raw and contrast-enhanced fluorescence images. Smaller tracer-labeled vessels (30-40 μm) were seen branching between larger vessels and exhibited a similar hexagonal network pattern. SD-OCT is capable of detailed morphometric analysis of the conventional outflow pathway in vivo or ex vivo with details comparable to corrosion casting techniques.

  1. Coherent Flow Structures and Suspension Events over Low-angle Dunes: Fraser River, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, R. W.; Venditti, J. G.; Kostaschuk, R. A.; Hendershot, M. L.; Allison, M. A.; Church, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Increasing observations show that dunes with low-angle lee-sides (MBES) while an acoustic Doppler current profiler (aDcp) simultaneously provided flow and suspended sediment measurements over a range of flows through tidal cycles. At high tide, river flow nearly ceases and a salt wedge enters the channel, forcing plumes of salt water towards the surface into the downstream moving fresh water above as the wedge moves upstream over the dunes. The salt wedge persists in the channel causing stratification in water column and one-sided instabilities along the saline-fresh water interface until the late in the falling tide. At low tide, mean velocities peak and force the saline water out of the channel. Flow over the low-angle dunes displays topographically induced flow patterns similar to previously observed over high-angle dunes, but permanent flow separation is notably absent. Sediment-laden kolks emerge as important suspended sediment transport agents during low tide but become more coherent, yet less frequent, structures as the tide begins to rise. Kolks appear to form downstream of dune crests along the shear layer that is likely formed by intermittent flow separation. Kolks also form at the reattachment point and grow over the stoss slope of the dunes. This is consistent with the generation of hairpin vortices formed near the bed that lift into the flow and grow to the surface through an 'autogeneration' mechanism. Persistent downwelling and periodic sweeps at dune crests provide a mechanism for sediment erosion and entrainment while periodic ejection motions or kolks in a zone of persistent upwelling at the lower stoss provide a mechanism sediment suspension. Kolks are estimated to move ~70% of the total sediment in the flow above dunes when they are present in the water column.

  2. Noninvasive, in vivo assessment of mouse retinal structure using optical coherence tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Dominik Fischer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Optical coherence tomography (OCT is a novel method of retinal in vivo imaging. In this study, we assessed the potential of OCT to yield histology-analogue sections in mouse models of retinal degeneration. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We achieved to adapt a commercial 3(rd generation OCT system to obtain and quantify high-resolution morphological sections of the mouse retina which so far required in vitro histology. OCT and histology were compared in models with developmental defects, light damage, and inherited retinal degenerations. In conditional knockout mice deficient in retinal retinoblastoma protein Rb, the gradient of Cre expression from center to periphery, leading to a gradual reduction of retinal thickness, was clearly visible and well topographically quantifiable. In Nrl knockout mice, the layer involvement in the formation of rosette-like structures was similarly clear as in histology. OCT examination of focal light damage, well demarcated by the autofluorescence pattern, revealed a practically complete loss of photoreceptors with preservation of inner retinal layers, but also more subtle changes like edema formation. In Crb1 knockout mice (a model for Leber's congenital amaurosis, retinal vessels slipping through the outer nuclear layer towards the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE due to the lack of adhesion in the subapical region of the photoreceptor inner segments could be well identified. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We found that with the OCT we were able to detect and analyze a wide range of mouse retinal pathology, and the results compared well to histological sections. In addition, the technique allows to follow individual animals over time, thereby reducing the numbers of study animals needed, and to assess dynamic processes like edema formation. The results clearly indicate that OCT has the potential to revolutionize the future design of respective short- and long-term studies, as well as the preclinical

  3. Synchronization in area-preserving maps: Effects of mixed phase space and coherent structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahata, Sasibhusan; Das, Swetamber; Gupte, Neelima

    2016-06-01

    The problem of synchronization of coupled Hamiltonian systems presents interesting features due to the mixed nature (regular and chaotic) of the phase space. We study these features by examining the synchronization of unidirectionally coupled area-preserving maps coupled by the Pecora-Caroll method. The master stability function approach is used to study the stability of the synchronous state and to identify the percentage of synchronizing initial conditions. The transient to synchronization shows intermittency with an associated power law. The mixed nature of the phase space of the studied map has notable effects on the synchronization times as is seen in the case of the standard map. Using finite-time Lyapunov exponent analysis, we show that the synchronization of the maps occurs in the neighborhood of invariant curves in the phase space. The phase differences of the coevolving trajectories show intermittency effects, due to the existence of stable periodic orbits contributing locally stable directions in the synchronizing neighborhoods. Furthermore, the value of the nonlinearity parameter, as well as the location of the initial conditions play an important role in the distribution of synchronization times. We examine drive response combinations which are chaotic-chaotic, chaotic-regular, regular-chaotic, and regular-regular. A range of scaling behavior is seen for these cases, including situations where the distributions show a power-law tail, indicating long synchronization times for at least some of the synchronizing trajectories. The introduction of coherent structures in the system changes the situation drastically. The distribution of synchronization times crosses over to exponential behavior, indicating shorter synchronization times, and the number of initial conditions which synchronize increases significantly, indicating an enhancement in the basin of synchronization. We discuss the implications of our results.

  4. Structure-function relationships using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography: comparison with scanning laser polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aptel, Florent; Sayous, Romain; Fortoul, Vincent; Beccat, Sylvain; Denis, Philippe

    2010-12-01

    To evaluate and compare the regional relationships between visual field sensitivity and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness as measured by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) and scanning laser polarimetry. Prospective cross-sectional study. One hundred and twenty eyes of 120 patients (40 with healthy eyes, 40 with suspected glaucoma, and 40 with glaucoma) were tested on Cirrus-OCT, GDx VCC, and standard automated perimetry. Raw data on RNFL thickness were extracted for 256 peripapillary sectors of 1.40625 degrees each for the OCT measurement ellipse and 64 peripapillary sectors of 5.625 degrees each for the GDx VCC measurement ellipse. Correlations between peripapillary RNFL thickness in 6 sectors and visual field sensitivity in the 6 corresponding areas were evaluated using linear and logarithmic regression analysis. Receiver operating curve areas were calculated for each instrument. With spectral-domain OCT, the correlations (r(2)) between RNFL thickness and visual field sensitivity ranged from 0.082 (nasal RNFL and corresponding visual field area, linear regression) to 0.726 (supratemporal RNFL and corresponding visual field area, logarithmic regression). By comparison, with GDx-VCC, the correlations ranged from 0.062 (temporal RNFL and corresponding visual field area, linear regression) to 0.362 (supratemporal RNFL and corresponding visual field area, logarithmic regression). In pairwise comparisons, these structure-function correlations were generally stronger with spectral-domain OCT than with GDx VCC and with logarithmic regression than with linear regression. The largest areas under the receiver operating curve were seen for OCT superior thickness (0.963 ± 0.022; P polarimetry, and was better expressed logarithmically than linearly. Measurements with these 2 instruments should not be considered to be interchangeable. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Simultaneous 3D turbulent large-scale structures in a flood flow by multi-channels measuring systems

    OpenAIRE

    Hino, Mikio; Meng, Yang; Murayama, Nobuyoshi; 日野 幹雄; Meng, Y.; 村山 宣義

    1992-01-01

    Field measurements on turbulent large-scale structure of a flood flow in the Hinuma river at a high Reynolds number of the order of 10 (exp 6) were conducted with 16-channels electromagnetic velocimeters. The turbulent velocity components (u, v) at eight points in a plane perpendicular to the mean flow have been sampled and recorded simultaneously by a A/D converter. The quasi-instantaneous 3D images of coherent structures in the flood flow were reconstructed from these data by using a new me...

  6. On the nonlinear trapping nature of undamped, coherent structures in collisionless plasmas and its impact on stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schamel, Hans; Mandal, Debraj; Sharma, Devendra

    2017-03-01

    An outstanding notion for collisionless plasmas is the essential nonlinear character of their coherent structures, which in the stationary, weak amplitude limit are described by a continuum of cnoidal electron and ion hole modes governed by a multiparametric nonlinear dispersion relation. The well-known discrete structure of undamped linear plasma modes is seamlessly embedded in this nonlinear continuum as the microscopic texture of plasma begins to reveal itself in the high temperature collisionless plasma limit. This transforms the linear-threshold-based operating mechanism of plasma turbulence into a fundamental nonlinear, multifaceted one. Based on a comprehensive three-level description of increasing profundity, a proof of this novel dictum is presented, which makes use of the joint properties of such structures, their coherency and stationarity, and uses in succession a fluid, linear Vlasov and a full Vlasov description. It unifies discrete and continuum limits by resolving the inevitable resonant region and shows that coherent electrostatic equilibria are generally controlled by kinetic particle trapping and are hence fundamentally nonlinear. By forging a link between damped and growing wave solutions, these modes render plasma stability complex and difficult to evaluate due to the entangled pattern of the stability boundary in function and parameter space, respectively. A direct consequence is the existence of negative energy modes of arbitrarily small amplitudes in the subcritical region of the two-stream instability as well as the failure of linear Landau (Vlasov, van Kampen) theory, whenever resonant particles are involved, in addressing the onset of instability in a current-carrying plasma. Responsible for this subtle phase space behavior is hence the thresholdless omnipresence of the trapping nonlinearity originating from coherency. A high resolution, exact-mass-ratio, multispecies, and collisionless plasma simulation is employed to illustrate

  7. Identification of Antioxidant Compounds Structure Large-Leafed Mangrove Fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabri Sudirman

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidants are compounds that can inhibit or prevent the oxidation of the easily oxidized substrate.One of the plants as a potential source of bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity is large-leafedmangrove (Bruguiera gymnorrhiza. This plant is commonly found in the Pacific region of Southeast Asia,Ryukyu Islands, Micronesia and Polynesia (Samoa to subtropical regions of Australia and has been usedby the society. This study aimed to determine the bioactive compounds structure of large-leafed mangrovehas the highest antioxidant activity. The compound structure prediction was done by Nuclear MagneticResonance (NMR. The compound structure in the selected antioxidant fractions are flavonol, glikosilfalvonand flavon. Those three compounds are flavonoid compound which has a great role as the one that hasantioxidant activity in large-leafed mangrove fruit.

  8. Turbulent large-scale structure effects on wake meandering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Y.-A.; Masson, C.; Aubrun, S.

    2015-06-01

    This work studies effects of large-scale turbulent structures on wake meandering using Large Eddy Simulations (LES) over an actuator disk. Other potential source of wake meandering such as the instablility mechanisms associated with tip vortices are not treated in this study. A crucial element of the efficient, pragmatic and successful simulations of large-scale turbulent structures in Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) is the generation of the stochastic turbulent atmospheric flow. This is an essential capability since one source of wake meandering is these large - larger than the turbine diameter - turbulent structures. The unsteady wind turbine wake in ABL is simulated using a combination of LES and actuator disk approaches. In order to dedicate the large majority of the available computing power in the wake, the ABL ground region of the flow is not part of the computational domain. Instead, mixed Dirichlet/Neumann boundary conditions are applied at all the computational surfaces except at the outlet. Prescribed values for Dirichlet contribution of these boundary conditions are provided by a stochastic turbulent wind generator. This allows to simulate large-scale turbulent structures - larger than the computational domain - leading to an efficient simulation technique of wake meandering. Since the stochastic wind generator includes shear, the turbulence production is included in the analysis without the necessity of resolving the flow near the ground. The classical Smagorinsky sub-grid model is used. The resulting numerical methodology has been implemented in OpenFOAM. Comparisons with experimental measurements in porous-disk wakes have been undertaken, and the agreements are good. While temporal resolution in experimental measurements is high, the spatial resolution is often too low. LES numerical results provide a more complete spatial description of the flow. They tend to demonstrate that inflow low frequency content - or large- scale turbulent structures - is

  9. Mean, coherent and stochastic flow structure interactions in the near-wake of an oscillatory foil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siala, Firas; Liburdy, James

    2016-11-01

    Particle image velocimetry measurements are conducted to investigate the transport mechanism of flow kinetic energy in the near-wake of an oscillating foil at a reduced frequency of 0.18-0.2. Velocity triple decomposition is used to decompose the flow into mean, coherent and stochastic fields, and the kinetic energy evolution equations are utilized to study the energy exchange between the three components of the flow fields. The results show that the leading edge vortex (LEV) is responsible in extracting the majority of the free stream kinetic energy via the coherent shear strain. Furthermore, a scale-based model that characterizes the energy content of the LEV is developed. It is shown that coherent kinetic energy produced by the mean rate of strain scales remarkably well with the LEV energy content estimated by the model.

  10. Modeling the Link between Left Ventricular Flow and Thromboembolic Risk Using Lagrangian Coherent Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen May-Newman

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A thrombus is a blood clot that forms on a surface, and can grow and detach, presenting a high risk for stroke and pulmonary embolism. This risk increases with blood-contacting medical devices, due to the immunological response to foreign surfaces and altered flow patterns that activate the blood and promote thromboembolism (TE. Abnormal blood transport, including vortex behavior and regional stasis, can be assessed from Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS. LCS are flow structures that bound transport within a flow field and divide the flow into regions with maximally attracting/repelling surfaces that maximize local shear. LCS can be identified from finite time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE fields, which are computed from velocity field data. In this study, the goal was to use FTLE analysis to evaluate LCS in the left ventricle (LV using velocity data obtained from flow visualization of a mock circulatory loop. A model of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM was used to investigate the effect of left ventricular assist device (LVAD support on diastolic filling and transport in the LV. A small thrombus in the left ventricular outflow tract was also considered using data from a corresponding LV model. The DCM LV exhibited a direct flow of 0.8 L/cardiac cycle, which was tripled during LVAD support Delayed ejection flow was doubled, further illustrating the impact of LVAD support on blood transport. An examination of the attracting LCS ridges during diastolic filling showed that the increase is due primarily to augmentation of A wave inflow, which is associated with increased vortex circulation, kinetic energy and Forward FTLE. The introduction of a small thrombus in the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT of the LV had a minimal effect on diastolic inflow, but obstructed systolic outflow leading to decreased transport compared with the unobstructed LVOT geometry. Localized FTLE in the LVOT increased dramatically with the small thrombus model, which reflects

  11. Spin-Relaxation without Coherence Loss: Fine-Structure Splitting of Localized Excitons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langbein, W.; Zimmermann, R.; Runge, E.

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the polarization dynamics of the secondary emission from a disordered quantum well after resonant excitation. Using the speckle analysis technique we determine the coherence degree of the emission, and find that the polarization-relaxed emission has a coherence degree comparable...... to the one of the emission co-polarized to the excitation. This is explained by the finestructure splitting between the two optically active states of anisotropically localized excitons. The eigenstates are linearly polarized with distributed orientations. The time evolution of the involved eigenstate...

  12. Bayesian large-scale structure inference and cosmic web analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Leclercq, Florent

    2015-01-01

    Surveys of the cosmic large-scale structure carry opportunities for building and testing cosmological theories about the origin and evolution of the Universe. This endeavor requires appropriate data assimilation tools, for establishing the contact between survey catalogs and models of structure formation. In this thesis, we present an innovative statistical approach for the ab initio simultaneous analysis of the formation history and morphology of the cosmic web: the BORG algorithm infers the primordial density fluctuations and produces physical reconstructions of the dark matter distribution that underlies observed galaxies, by assimilating the survey data into a cosmological structure formation model. The method, based on Bayesian probability theory, provides accurate means of uncertainty quantification. We demonstrate the application of BORG to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data and describe the primordial and late-time large-scale structure in the observed volume. We show how the approach has led to the fi...

  13. Modal identification experiment design for large space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoung M.; Doiron, Harold H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes an on-orbit modal identification experiment design for large space structures. Space Station Freedom (SSF) systems design definition and structural dynamic models were used as representative large space structures for optimizing experiment design. Important structural modes of study models were selected to provide a guide for experiment design and used to assess the design performance. A pulsed random excitation technique using propulsion jets was developed to identify closely-spaced modes. A measuremenat location selection approach was developed to estimate accurate mode shapes as well as frequencies and damping factors. The data acquisition system and operational scenarios were designed to have minimal impacts on the SSF. A comprehensive simulation was conducted to assess the overall performance of the experiment design.

  14. Communities, modules and large-scale structure in networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, M. E. J.

    2012-01-01

    Networks, also called graphs by mathematicians, provide a useful abstraction of the structure of many complex systems, ranging from social systems and computer networks to biological networks and the state spaces of physical systems. In the past decade there have been significant advances in experiments to determine the topological structure of networked systems, but there remain substantial challenges in extracting scientific understanding from the large quantities of data produced by the experiments. A variety of basic measures and metrics are available that can tell us about small-scale structure in networks, such as correlations, connections and recurrent patterns, but it is considerably more difficult to quantify structure on medium and large scales, to understand the `big picture'. Important progress has been made, however, within the past few years, a selection of which is reviewed here.

  15. High enhancement factor of Au nano triangular prism structure for surface enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zuyin; Song, Guofeng

    2017-02-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy (CARS) is a well-known detecting tool in biosensing and nonlinear spectroscopy. It can provide a non-invasive alternative without the need for exogenous labels, while the enhancement factor for surface plasmon resonances (SPR) are extensively used to increase the local field close to the oscillators and which can obtain high enhancement. In this work, we investigate the enhancement factor of our structure for surface-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering. The absorption spectrum of the structure has been studied, a wide range of absorption has been realized. The enhancement can be as high as 10{16} over standard CARS. Our design is very useful for improving the enhancement factor of surface-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering. Project supported by the National Key Research Program of China (No. 2011ZX01015-001) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Nos. 2011CBA00608, 2012CB619203, 2015CB351902, 2015CB932402).

  16. Magnetic fields and the large-scale structure

    CERN Document Server

    Battaner, E

    1999-01-01

    The large-scale structure of the Universe has been observed to be characterized by long filaments, forming polyhedra, with a remarkable 100-200 Mpc periodicity, suggesting a regular network. The introduction of magnetic fields into the physics of the evolution of structure formation provides some clues to understanding this unexpected lattice structure. A relativistic treatment of the evolution of pre-recombination inhomogeneities, including magnetic fields, is presented to show that equivalent-to-present field strengths of the order of $10^{-8}$ G could have played an important role. Primordial magnetic tubes generated at inflation, at scales larger than the horizon before recombination, could have produced filamentary density structures, with comoving lengths larger than about 10 Mpc. Structures shorter than this would have been destroyed by diffusion due to the small pre-recombination conductivity. If filaments constitute a lattice, the primordial magnetic field structures that produced the post-recombinat...

  17. Implementation of efficient sensitivity analysis for optimization of large structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umaretiya, J. R.; Kamil, H.

    1990-01-01

    The paper presents the theoretical bases and implementation techniques of sensitivity analyses for efficient structural optimization of large structures, based on finite element static and dynamic analysis methods. The sensitivity analyses have been implemented in conjunction with two methods for optimization, namely, the Mathematical Programming and Optimality Criteria methods. The paper discusses the implementation of the sensitivity analysis method into our in-house software package, AutoDesign.

  18. Structural materials for large superconducting magnets for tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, C.J.

    1976-12-01

    The selection of structural materials for large superconducting magnets for tokamak-type fusion reactors is considered. The important criteria are working stress, radiation resistance, electromagnetic interaction, and general feasibility. The most advantageous materials appear to be face-centered-cubic alloys in the Fe-Ni-Cr system, but high-modulus composites may be necessary where severe pulsed magnetic fields are present. Special-purpose structural materials are considered briefly.

  19. Stability constraints on large-scale structural brain networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard T. Gray

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Stability is an important dynamical property of complex systems and underpins a broad range of coherent self-organized behaviour. Based on evidence that some neurological disorders correspond to linear instabilities,we hypothesize that stability constrains the brain’s electrical activity and influences its structure and physiology. Using a physiologically based model of brain electrical activity, we investigated the stability and dispersion solutions of networks of neuronal populations with propagation time delays and dendritic time constants. We find that stability is determined by the spectrum of the network’s matrix of connection strengths and is independent of the temporal damping rate of axonal propagation with stability restricting the spectrum to a region in the complex plane. Time delays and dendritic time constants modify the shape of this region but it always contains the unit disk. Instabilities resulting from changes in connection strength initially have frequencies less than a critical frequency. For physiologically plausible parameter values based on the corticothalamic system, this critical frequency is approximately $10$ Hz. For excitatory networks and networks with randomlydistributed excitatory and inhibitory connections, time delays and nonzero dendritic time constants have no impact on network stability but do effect dispersion frequencies. Random networks with both excitatory and inhibitory connections can have multiple marginally stable modes at low delta frequencies.

  20. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): The large scale structure of galaxies and comparison to mock universes

    CERN Document Server

    Alpaslan, Mehmet; Driver, Simon; Norberg, Peder; Baldry, Ivan; Bauer, Amanda E; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brown, Michael; Cluver, Michelle; Colless, Matthew; Foster, Caroline; Hopkins, Andrew; Van Kampen, Eelco; Kelvin, Lee; Lara-Lopez, Maritza A; Liske, Jochen; Lopez-Sanchez, Angel R; Loveday, Jon; McNaught-Roberts, Tamsyn; Merson, Alexander; Pimbblet, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    From a volume limited sample of 45,542 galaxies and 6,000 groups with $z \\leq 0.213$ we use an adapted minimal spanning tree algorithm to identify and classify large scale structures within the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. Using galaxy groups, we identify 643 filaments across the three equatorial GAMA fields that span up to 200 $h^{-1}$ Mpc in length, each with an average of 8 groups within them. By analysing galaxies not belonging to groups we identify a secondary population of smaller coherent structures composed entirely of galaxies, dubbed `tendrils' that appear to link filaments together, or penetrate into voids, generally measuring around 10 $h^{-1}$ Mpc in length and containing on average 6 galaxies. Finally we are also able to identify a population of isolated void galaxies. By running this algorithm on GAMA mock galaxy catalogues we compare the characteristics of large scale structure between observed and mock data; finding that mock filaments reproduce observed ones extremely well. This p...

  1. Identification of Large-Scale Structure Fluctuations in IC Engines using POD-Based Conditional Averaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buhl Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cycle-to-Cycle Variations (CCV in IC engines is a well-known phenomenon and the definition and quantification is well-established for global quantities such as the mean pressure. On the other hand, the definition of CCV for local quantities, e.g. the velocity or the mixture distribution, is less straightforward. This paper proposes a new method to identify and calculate cyclic variations of the flow field in IC engines emphasizing the different contributions from large-scale energetic (coherent structures, identified by a combination of Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD and conditional averaging, and small-scale fluctuations. Suitable subsets required for the conditional averaging are derived from combinations of the the POD coefficients of the second and third mode. Within each subset, the velocity is averaged and these averages are compared to the ensemble-averaged velocity field, which is based on all cycles. The resulting difference of the subset-average and the global-average is identified as a cyclic fluctuation of the coherent structures. Then, within each subset, remaining fluctuations are obtained from the difference between the instantaneous fields and the corresponding subset average. The proposed methodology is tested for two data sets obtained from scale resolving engine simulations. For the first test case, the numerical database consists of 208 independent samples of a simplified engine geometry. For the second case, 120 cycles for the well-established Transparent Combustion Chamber (TCC benchmark engine are considered. For both applications, the suitability of the method to identify the two contributions to CCV is discussed and the results are directly linked to the observed flow field structures.

  2. Effective constitutive relations for large repetitive frame-like structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfeh, A. H.; Hefzy, M. S.

    1981-01-01

    Effective mechanical properties for large repetitive framelike structures are derived using combinations of strength of material and orthogonal transformation techniques. Symmetry considerations are used in order to identify independent property constants. The actual values of these constants are constructed according to a building block format which is carried out in the three consecutive steps: (1) all basic planar lattices are identified; (2) effective continuum properties are derived for each of these planar basic grids using matrix structural analysis methods; and (3) orthogonal transformations are used to determine the contribution of each basic set to the overall effective continuum properties of the structure.

  3. An Evaluation Framework for Large-Scale Network Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Myrup; Knudsen, Thomas Phillip; Madsen, Ole Brun

    2004-01-01

    structure is a matter of trade-offs between different desired properties, and given a specific case with specific known or expected demands and constraints, the parameters presented will be weighted differently. The decision of such a weighting is supported by a discussion of each parameter. The paper......An evaluation framework for large-scale network structures is presented, which facilitates evaluations and comparisons of different physical network structures. A number of quantitative and qualitative parameters are presented, and their importance to networks discussed. Choosing a network...

  4. Semi-Active Friction Damping of Large Space Truss Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Gaul

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The present approach for vibration suppression of flexible structures is based on friction damping in semi-active joints. At optimal locations conventional rigid connections of a large truss structure are replaced by semi-active friction joints. Two different concepts for the control of the normal forces in the friction interfaces are implemented. In the first approach each semi-active joint has its own local feedback controller, whereas the second concept uses a global, clipped-optimal controller. Simulation results of a 10-bay truss structure show the potential of the proposed semi-active concept.

  5. Topological Properties of Spatial Coherence Function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Ji-Rong; ZHU Tao; DUAN Yi-Shi

    2008-01-01

    The topological properties of the spatial coherence function are investigated rigorously.The phase singular structures(coherence vortices)of coherence function can be naturally deduced from the topological current,which is an abstract mathematical object studied previously.We find that coherence vortices are characterized by the Hopf index and Brouwer degree in topology.The coherence flux quantization and the linking of the closed coherence vortices are also studied from the topological properties of the spatial coherence function.

  6. Supermassive black holes, large scale structure and holography

    CERN Document Server

    Mongan, T R

    2013-01-01

    A holographic analysis of large scale structure in the universe estimates the mass of supermassive black holes at the center of large scale structures with matter density varying inversely as the square of the distance from their center. The estimate is consistent with two important test cases involving observations of the supermassive black hole with mass 3.6\\times10^{-6} times the galactic mass in Sagittarius A^{*} near the center of our Milky Way and the 2\\times10^{9} solar mass black hole in the quasar ULAS J112001.48+064124.3 at redshift z=7.085. It is also consistent with upper bounds on central black hole masses in globular clusters M15, M19 and M22 developed using the Jansky Very Large Array in New Mexico.

  7. Distant galaxy clusters in the XMM Large Scale Structure survey

    CERN Document Server

    Willis, J P; Bremer, M N; Pierre, M; Adami, C; Ilbert, O; Maughan, B; Maurogordato, S; Pacaud, F; Valtchanov, I; Chiappetti, L; Thanjavur, K; Gwyn, S; Stanway, E R; Winkworth, C

    2012-01-01

    (Abridged) Distant galaxy clusters provide important tests of the growth of large scale structure in addition to highlighting the process of galaxy evolution in a consistently defined environment at large look back time. We present a sample of 22 distant (z>0.8) galaxy clusters and cluster candidates selected from the 9 deg2 footprint of the overlapping X-ray Multi Mirror (XMM) Large Scale Structure (LSS), CFHTLS Wide and Spitzer SWIRE surveys. Clusters are selected as extended X-ray sources with an accompanying overdensity of galaxies displaying optical to mid-infrared photometry consistent with z>0.8. Nine clusters have confirmed spectroscopic redshifts in the interval 0.80.8 clusters.

  8. Active disturbance rejection in large flexible space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlos, Alexander G.; Sunkel, John W.

    1990-01-01

    The design of an active control law for the rejection of persistent disturbances, in large space structures is presented. The control system design approach is based on a deterministic model of the disturbances and it optimizes the magnitude of the disturbance that the structure can tolerate without violating certain predetermined constraints. In addition to closed-loop stability, the explicit treatment of state, control, and control rate constraints, such as structural displacement and control actuator effort, guarantees that the final design will exhibit desired performance characteristics. The technique is applied to a simple two-bay truss structure, and its response is compared with that obtained using a linear-quadratic-Gaussian/loop-transfer-recovery (LQG/LTR) compensator. Preliminary results indicate that the proposed control system can reject persistent disturbances of greater magnitude by utilizing most of the available control, while limiting the structural displacements to within desired tolerances.

  9. Method for large-range structured light system calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yatong; Bell, Tyler; Li, Beiwen; Xu, Jing; Zhang, Song

    2016-11-20

    Structured light system calibration often requires the usage of a calibration target with a similar size as the field of view (FOV), which brings challenges to a large-range structured light system calibration since fabricating large calibration targets is difficult and expensive. This paper presents a large-range system calibration method that does not need a large calibration target. The proposed method includes two stages: (1) accurately calibrate intrinsics (i.e., focal lengths and principle points) at a near range where both the camera and projector are out of focus, and (2) calibrate the extrinsic parameters (translation and rotation) from camera to projector with the assistance of a low-accuracy, large-range three-dimensional (3D) sensor (e.g., Microsoft Kinect). We have developed a large-scale 3D shape measurement system with a FOV of 1120  mm×1900  mm×1000  mm. Experiments demonstrate our system can achieve measurement accuracy as high as 0.07 mm with a standard deviation of 0.80 mm by measuring a 304.8 mm diameter sphere. As a comparison, Kinect V2 only achieved mean error of 0.80 mm with a standard deviation of 3.41 mm for the FOV of measurement.

  10. Identifying Coherent Structures in a 3-Stream Supersonic Jet Flow using Time-Resolved Schlieren Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenney, Andrew; Coleman, Thomas; Berry, Matthew; Magstadt, Andy; Gogineni, Sivaram; Kiel, Barry

    2015-11-01

    Shock cells and large scale structures present in a three-stream non-axisymmetric jet are studied both qualitatively and quantitatively. Large Eddy Simulation is utilized first to gain an understanding of the underlying physics of the flow and direct the focus of the physical experiment. The flow in the experiment is visualized using long exposure Schlieren photography, with time resolved Schlieren photography also a possibility. Velocity derivative diagnostics are calculated from the grey-scale Schlieren images are analyzed using continuous wavelet transforms. Pressure signals are also captured in the near-field of the jet to correlate with the velocity derivative diagnostics and assist in unraveling this complex flow. We acknowledge the support of AFRL through an SBIR grant.

  11. Cosmic Structure as the Quantum Interference of a Coherent Dark Wave

    CERN Document Server

    Schive, Hsi-Yu; Broadhurst, Tom

    2014-01-01

    The conventional cold, particle interpretation of dark matter (CDM) still lacks laboratory support and struggles with the basic properties of common dwarf galaxies, which have surprisingly uniform central masses and shallow density profiles. In contrast, galaxies predicted by CDM extend to much lower masses, with steeper, singular profiles. This tension motivates cold, wavelike dark matter ($\\psi$DM) composed of a non-relativistic Bose-Einstein condensate, so the uncertainty principle counters gravity below a Jeans scale. Here we achieve the first cosmological simulations of this quantum state at unprecedentedly high resolution capable of resolving dwarf galaxies, with only one free parameter, $\\bf{m_B}$, the boson mass. We demonstrate the large scale structure of this $\\psi$DM simulation is indistinguishable from CDM, as desired, but differs radically inside galaxies. Connected filaments and collapsed haloes form a large interference network, with gravitationally self-bound solitonic cores inside every galax...

  12. Measurement of local relative displacements in large structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tesauro, Angelo; Eder, Martin Alexander; Nielsen, Magda

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel measurement technique to measure local relative displacements between parts of large-scale structures. The measured deformations can be of significant importance for fracture analyses in many different types of structures in general, and for adhesive connections...... in particular. The measurement of small local relative displacements in structures subjected to large global deformations is complex and hardly feasible with conventional measurement methods. Therefore, a Small Displacement Measurement System (SDMS) has been devised. The SDMS is based on stereo photogrammetry...... and capable of measuring 3D local displacements with a high degree of accuracy. In this article, the technique is used to measure local deformations in the vicinity of the adhesive trailing edge joint of a wind turbine rotor blade. The SDMS results correspond well with another independent measurement method....

  13. Clusters and Large-Scale Structure: the Synchrotron Keys

    CERN Document Server

    Rudnick, L; Andernach, H; Battaglia, N; Brown, S; Brunetti, Gf; Burns, J; Clarke, T; Dolag, K; Farnsworth, D; Giovannini, G; Hallman, E; Johnston-Hollit, M; Jones, T W; Kang, H; Kassim, N; Kravtsov, A; Lazio, J; Lonsdale, C; McNamara, B; Myers, S; Owen, F; Pfrommer, C; Ryu, D; Sarazin, C; Subrahmanyan, R; Taylor, G; Taylor, R

    2009-01-01

    For over four decades, synchrotron-radiating sources have played a series of pathfinding roles in the study of galaxy clusters and large scale structure. Such sources are uniquely sensitive to the turbulence and shock structures of large-scale environments, and their cosmic rays and magnetic fields often play important dynamic and thermodynamic roles. They provide essential complements to studies at other wavebands. Over the next decade, they will fill essential gaps in both cluster astrophysics and the cosmological growth of structure in the universe, especially where the signatures of shocks and turbulence, or even the underlying thermal plasma itself, are otherwise undetectable. Simultaneously, synchrotron studies offer a unique tool for exploring the fundamental question of the origins of cosmic magnetic fields. This work will be based on the new generation of m/cm-wave radio telescopes now in construction, as well as major advances in the sophistication of 3-D MHD simulations.

  14. Vacuum impregnation with epoxy of large superconducting magnet structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, M.A.; Coyle, D.E.; Miller, P.B.; Wenzel, W.F.

    1978-06-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) has been developing a new generation of superconducting magnets which have the helium cooling system as an integral part of the magnet structure. The LBL technique calls for large sections of the magnet structure to be vacuum impregnated with epoxy. The epoxy was chosen for its impregnation properties. Epoxies which have good impregnation characteristics are often subject to cracking when they are cooled to cryogenic temperatures. The cracking of such an epoxy can be controlled by: (1) minimizing the amount of epoxy in the structure; (2) reducing the size of unfilled epoxy spaces; and (3) keeping the epoxy in compression. The technique for using the epoxy is often more important than the formulation of the epoxy. The LBL vacuum impregnation and curing technique is described. Experimental measurements on small samples of coil sections are presented. Practical experience with large vacuum impregnation superconducting coils (up to two meters in dia) is also discussed.

  15. Competition between magnetic field dependent band structure and coherent backscattering in multiwall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojetz, B.; Roche, S.; Miko, C.; Triozon, F.; Forró, L.; Strunk, C.

    2007-03-01

    Magnetotransport measurements in large diameter multiwall carbon nanotubes (20 40 nm) demonstrate the competition of a magnetic-field dependent bandstructure and Altshuler Aronov Spivak oscillations. By means of an efficient capacitive coupling to a backgate electrode, the magnetoconductance oscillations are explored as a function of Fermi level shift. Changing the magnetic field orientation with respect to the tube axis and by ensemble averaging, allows the contributions of different Aharonov Bohm phases to be identified. The results are in qualitative agreement with numerical calculations of the band structure and the conductance.

  16. Coherent Structure in Solar Wind C$^{6+}$/C$^{4+}$ Ionic Composition Data During the Quiet-Sun Conditions of 2008

    CERN Document Server

    Edmondson, J K; Lepri, S T; Zurbuchen, T H

    2013-01-01

    This analysis offers evidence of characteristic scale sizes in solar wind charge state data measured in-situ for thirteen quiet-sun Carrington rotations in 2008. Using a previously established novel methodology, we analyze the wavelet power spectrum of the charge state ratio C$^{6+}$/C$^{4+}$ measured in-situ by ACE/SWICS for 2-hour and 12-minute cadence. We construct a statistical significance level in the wavelet power spectrum to quantify the interference effects arising from filling missing data in the time series (Edmondson et al. 2013), allowing extraction of significant power from the measured data to a resolution of 24 mins. We analyze each wavelet power spectra for transient coherency, and global periodicities resulting from the superposition of repeating coherent structures. From the significant wavelet power spectra, we find evidence for a general upper-limit on individual transient coherency of $\\sim$10 days. We find evidence for a set of global periodicities between 4-5 hours and 35-45 days. We f...

  17. Modeling and analysis of a large deployable antenna structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Zhengrong; Deng, Zongquan; Qi, Xiaozhi; Li, Bing

    2014-02-01

    One kind of large deployable antenna (LDA) structure is proposed by combining a number of basic deployable units in this paper. In order to avoid vibration caused by fast deployment speed of the mechanism, a braking system is used to control the spring-actuated system. Comparisons between the LDA structure and a similar structure used by the large deployable reflector (LDR) indicate that the former has potential for use in antennas with up to 30 m aperture due to its lighter weight. The LDA structure is designed to form a spherical surface found by the least square fitting method so that it can be symmetrical. In this case, the positions of the terminal points in the structure are determined by two principles. A method to calculate the cable network stretched on the LDA structure is developed, which combines the original force density method and the parabolic surface constraint. Genetic algorithm is applied to ensure that each cable reaches a desired tension, which avoids the non-convergence issue effectively. We find that the pattern for the front and rear cable net must be the same when finding the shape of the rear cable net, otherwise anticlastic surface would generate.

  18. Characterization of large structural genetic mosaicism in human autosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machiela, Mitchell J; Zhou, Weiyin; Sampson, Joshua N; Dean, Michael C; Jacobs, Kevin B; Black, Amanda; Brinton, Louise A; Chang, I-Shou; Chen, Chu; Chen, Constance; Chen, Kexin; Cook, Linda S; Crous Bou, Marta; De Vivo, Immaculata; Doherty, Jennifer; Friedenreich, Christine M; Gaudet, Mia M; Haiman, Christopher A; Hankinson, Susan E; Hartge, Patricia; Henderson, Brian E; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hosgood, H Dean; Hsiung, Chao A; Hu, Wei; Hunter, David J; Jessop, Lea; Kim, Hee Nam; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young Tae; Klein, Robert; Kraft, Peter; Lan, Qing; Lin, Dongxin; Liu, Jianjun; Le Marchand, Loic; Liang, Xiaolin; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Lingeng; Magliocco, Anthony M; Matsuo, Keitaro; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Park, Jae Yong; Pooler, Loreall; Prescott, Jennifer; Rastogi, Radhai; Risch, Harvey A; Schumacher, Fredrick; Seow, Adeline; Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Shen, Hongbing; Sheng, Xin; Shin, Min-Ho; Shu, Xiao-Ou; VanDen Berg, David; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wong, Maria Pik; Wu, Chen; Wu, Tangchun; Wu, Yi-Long; Xia, Lucy; Yang, Hannah P; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Baosen; Abnet, Christian C; Albanes, Demetrius; Aldrich, Melinda C; Amos, Christopher; Amundadottir, Laufey T; Berndt, Sonja I; Blot, William J; Bock, Cathryn H; Bracci, Paige M; Burdett, Laurie; Buring, Julie E; Butler, Mary A; Carreón, Tania; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Chung, Charles C; Cook, Michael B; Cullen, Michael; Davis, Faith G; Ding, Ti; Duell, Eric J; Epstein, Caroline G; Fan, Jin-Hu; Figueroa, Jonine D; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Freedman, Neal D; Fuchs, Charles S; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M; Patiño-Garcia, Ana; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaziano, J Michael; Giles, Graham G; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Giovannucci, Edward L; Goldin, Lynn; Goldstein, Alisa M; Greene, Mark H; Hallmans, Goran; Harris, Curtis C; Henriksson, Roger; Holly, Elizabeth A; Hoover, Robert N; Hu, Nan; Hutchinson, Amy; Jenab, Mazda; Johansen, Christoffer; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kolonel, Laurence N; Kooperberg, Charles; Krogh, Vittorio; Kurtz, Robert C; LaCroix, Andrea; Landgren, Annelie; Landi, Maria Teresa; Li, Donghui; Liao, Linda M; Malats, Nuria; McGlynn, Katherine A; McNeill, Lorna H; McWilliams, Robert R; Melin, Beatrice S; Mirabello, Lisa; Peplonska, Beata; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Purdue, Mark; Qiao, You-Lin; Rabe, Kari G; Rajaraman, Preetha; Real, Francisco X; Riboli, Elio; Rodríguez-Santiago, Benjamín; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ruder, Avima M; Savage, Sharon A; Schwartz, Ann G; Schwartz, Kendra L; Sesso, Howard D; Severi, Gianluca; Silverman, Debra T; Spitz, Margaret R; Stevens, Victoria L; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Stram, Daniel; Tang, Ze-Zhong; Taylor, Philip R; Teras, Lauren R; Tobias, Geoffrey S; Viswanathan, Kala; Wacholder, Sholom; Wang, Zhaoming; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Wheeler, William; White, Emily; Wiencke, John K; Wolpin, Brian M; Wu, Xifeng; Wunder, Jay S; Yu, Kai; Zanetti, Krista A; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Ziegler, Regina G; de Andrade, Mariza; Barnes, Kathleen C; Beaty, Terri H; Bierut, Laura J; Desch, Karl C; Doheny, Kimberly F; Feenstra, Bjarke; Ginsburg, David; Heit, John A; Kang, Jae H; Laurie, Cecilia A; Li, Jun Z; Lowe, William L; Marazita, Mary L; Melbye, Mads; Mirel, Daniel B; Murray, Jeffrey C; Nelson, Sarah C; Pasquale, Louis R; Rice, Kenneth; Wiggs, Janey L; Wise, Anastasia; Tucker, Margaret; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A; Laurie, Cathy C; Caporaso, Neil E; Yeager, Meredith; Chanock, Stephen J

    2015-03-05

    Analyses of genome-wide association study (GWAS) data have revealed that detectable genetic mosaicism involving large (>2 Mb) structural autosomal alterations occurs in a fraction of individuals. We present results for a set of 24,849 genotyped individuals (total GWAS set II [TGSII]) in whom 341 large autosomal abnormalities were observed in 168 (0.68%) individuals. Merging data from the new TGSII set with data from two prior reports (the Gene-Environment Association Studies and the total GWAS set I) generated a large dataset of 127,179 individuals; we then conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the patterns of detectable autosomal mosaicism (n = 1,315 events in 925 [0.73%] individuals). Restricting to events >2 Mb in size, we observed an increase in event frequency as event size decreased. The combined results underscore that the rate of detectable mosaicism increases with age (p value = 5.5 × 10(-31)) and is higher in men (p value = 0.002) but lower in participants of African ancestry (p value = 0.003). In a subset of 47 individuals from whom serial samples were collected up to 6 years apart, complex changes were noted over time and showed an overall increase in the proportion of mosaic cells as age increased. Our large combined sample allowed for a unique ability to characterize detectable genetic mosaicism involving large structural events and strengthens the emerging evidence of non-random erosion of the genome in the aging population.

  19. U-shaped Vortex Structures in Large Scale Cloud Cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yantao; Peng, Xiaoxing; Xu, Lianghao; Hong, Fangwen

    2015-12-01

    The control of cloud cavitation, especially large scale cloud cavitation(LSCC), is always a hot issue in the field of cavitation research. However, there has been little knowledge on the evolution of cloud cavitation since it is associated with turbulence and vortex flow. In this article, the structure of cloud cavitation shed by sheet cavitation around different hydrofoils and a wedge were observed in detail with high speed camera (HSC). It was found that the U-shaped vortex structures always existed in the development process of LSCC. The results indicated that LSCC evolution was related to this kind of vortex structures, and it may be a universal character for LSCC. Then vortex strength of U-shaped vortex structures in a cycle was analyzed with numerical results.

  20. Life cycle detection of prestress in large prestressed reinforcement structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Xiu-mei; DU Yan-liang; SUN Bao-chen

    2005-01-01

    To monitor the stress state of prestressed reinforcement in large reinforcement prestressed structure, two sensing structures, namely the direct spiral-winding structure and sawtooth modulated structure, were designed based on the ordinary communication optical fiber. The sensing theories were analyzed, and the experimental studies were also carried out. The quasi-distributed sensing system based on optical time domain reflective technology was established. The detection wavelength and spatial resolution were analyzed, and the estimation formula of maximal number of sensing point was also given. The results show that the system can realize the quasi-distributed test of measurand with single fiber, which helps to simplify the in-out wires. Moreover it can take on the important task of long-term and continuous monitoring of prestress, which helps to realize the life cycle detection of prestress, and play an important role in the estimating of bridge health state.

  1. Swirling around filaments: are large-scale structure vortices spinning up dark haloes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laigle, C.; Pichon, C.; Codis, S.; Dubois, Y.; Le Borgne, D.; Pogosyan, D.; Devriendt, J.; Peirani, S.; Prunet, S.; Rouberol, S.; Slyz, A.; Sousbie, T.

    2015-01-01

    The kinematic analysis of dark matter and hydrodynamical simulations suggests that the vorticity in large-scale structure is mostly confined to, and predominantly aligned with, their filaments, with an excess of probability of 20 per cent to have the angle between vorticity and filaments direction lower than 60° relative to random orientations. The cross-sections of these filaments are typically partitioned into four quadrants with opposite vorticity sign, arising from multiple flows, originating from neighbouring walls. The spins of haloes embedded within these filaments are consistently aligned with this vorticity for any halo mass, with a stronger alignment for the most massive structures up to an excess of probability of 165 per cent. The global geometry of the flow within the cosmic web is therefore qualitatively consistent with a spin acquisition for smaller haloes induced by this large-scale coherence, as argued in Codis et al. In effect, secondary anisotropic infall (originating from the vortex-rich filament within which these lower-mass haloes form) dominates the angular momentum budget of these haloes. The transition mass from alignment to orthogonality is related to the size of a given multi-flow region with a given polarity. This transition may be reconciled with the standard tidal torque theory if the latter is augmented so as to account for the larger scale anisotropic environment of walls and filaments.

  2. A telerobotic system for automated assembly of large space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Marvin D.; Will, Ralph W.; Wise, Marion A.

    1990-01-01

    Future space missions such as polar platforms and antennas are anticipated to require large truss structures as their primary support system. During the past several years considerable research has been conducted to develop hardware and construction techniques suitable for astronaut assembly of truss structures in space. A research program has recently been initiated to develop the technology and to demonstrate the potential for automated in-space assembly of large erectable structures. The initial effort will be focused on automated assembly of a tetrahedral truss composed of 2-meter members. The facility is designed as a ground based system to permit evaluation of assembly concepts and was not designed for space qualification. The system is intended to be used as a tool from which more sophisticated procedures and operations can be developed. The facility description includes a truss structure, motionbases and a robot arm equipped with an end effector. Other considerations and requirements of the structural assembly describe computer control systems to monitor and control the operations of the assembly facility.

  3. Absolute Measurement Fiber-optic Sensors in Large Structural Monitoring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The security of civil engineering is an important task due to the economic, social and environmental significance. Compared with conventional sensors, the optical fiber sensors have their unique characteristics.Being durable, stable and insensitive to external perturbations,they are particular interesting for the long-term monitoring of civil structures.Focus is on absolute measurement optical fiber sensors, which are emerging from the monitoring large structural, including SOFO system, F-P optical fiber sensors, and fiber Bragg grating sensors. The principle, characteristic and application of these three kinds of optical fiber sensors are described together with their future prospects.

  4. COMPUTERIZED KINEMATIC AND DYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF LARGE DEPLOYABLE STRUCTURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡其彪; 关富玲; 侯鹏飞

    2001-01-01

    As Huston's form of Kane's equation cannot be easily applied to large deployable structures, what is needed is further development of Kane's equation as described in this paper. Fully-Cartesian-coordinate (FCC) method uses Cartesian coordinates of points and Cartesian components of unitary vectors as generalized coordinates to describe three-dimension mechanisms. This FCC method avoids the need to consider angular coordinates and the resulting solution is just the space position of the structures. The FCC form of Kane's equation derived in this study is suitable for solution by computer method and is a good base for further simulation research. A numerical example showed that it is effective.

  5. Simple Method for Large-Scale Fabrication of Plasmonic Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Makarov, Sergey V; Mukhin, Ivan S; Shishkin, Ivan I; Mozharov, Alexey M; Krasnok, Alexander E; Belov, Pavel A

    2015-01-01

    A novel method for single-step, lithography-free, and large-scale laser writing of nanoparticle-based plasmonic structures has been developed. Changing energy of femtosecond laser pulses and thickness of irradiated gold film it is possible to vary diameter of the gold nanoparticles, while the distance between them can be varied by laser scanning parameters. This method has an advantage over the most previously demonstrated methods in its simplicity and versatility, while the quality of the structures is good enough for many applications. In particular, resonant light absorbtion/scattering and surface-enhanced Raman scattering have been demonstrated on the fabricated nanostructures.

  6. Short Large-Amplitude Magnetic Structures (SLAMS) at Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinson, G. A.; Wilson, L. B.; Sibeck, D. G.; Shane, N.; Zhang, T. L.; Moore, T. E.; Coates, A. J.; Barabash, S.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first observation of magnetic fluctuations consistent with Short Large-Amplitude Magnetic Structures (SLAMS) in the foreshock of the planet Venus. Three monolithic magnetic field spikes were observed by the Venus Express on the 11th of April 2009. The structures were approx.1.5->11s in duration, had magnetic compression ratios between approx.3->6, and exhibited elliptical polarization. These characteristics are consistent with the SLAMS observed at Earth, Jupiter, and Comet Giacobini-Zinner, and thus we hypothesize that it is possible SLAMS may be found at any celestial body with a foreshock.

  7. Rapid production of large-area deep sub-wavelength hybrid structures by femtosecond laser light-field tailoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lei; Chen, Qi-Dai, E-mail: chenqd@jlu.edu.cn, E-mail: hbsun@jlu.edu.cn; Yang, Rui; Xu, Bin-Bin; Wang, Hai-Yu [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China); Yang, Hai; Huo, Cheng-Song; Tu, Hai-Ling [General Research Institute for Nonferrous Metals, Beijing 100088 (China); Sun, Hong-Bo, E-mail: chenqd@jlu.edu.cn, E-mail: hbsun@jlu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China); College of Physics, Jilin University, 119 Jiefang Road, Changchun 130023 (China)

    2014-01-20

    The goal of creation of large-area deep sub-wavelength nanostructures by femtosecond laser irradiation onto various materials is being hindered by the limited coherence length. Here, we report solution of the problem by light field tailoring of the incident beam with a phase mask, which serves generation of wavelets. Direct interference between the wavelets, here the first-order diffracted beams, and interference between a wavelet and its induced waves such as surface plasmon polariton are responsible for creation of microgratings and superimposed nanogratings, respectively. The principle of wavelets interference enables extension of uniformly induced hybrid structures containing deep sub-wavelength nanofeatures to macro-dimension.

  8. Large-scale structure non-Gaussianities with modal methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmittfull, Marcel

    2016-10-01

    Relying on a separable modal expansion of the bispectrum, the implementation of a fast estimator for the full bispectrum of a 3d particle distribution is presented. The computational cost of accurate bispectrum estimation is negligible relative to simulation evolution, so the bispectrum can be used as a standard diagnostic whenever the power spectrum is evaluated. As an application, the time evolution of gravitational and primordial dark matter bispectra was measured in a large suite of N-body simulations. The bispectrum shape changes characteristically when the cosmic web becomes dominated by filaments and halos, therefore providing a quantitative probe of 3d structure formation. Our measured bispectra are determined by ~ 50 coefficients, which can be used as fitting formulae in the nonlinear regime and for non-Gaussian initial conditions. We also compare the measured bispectra with predictions from the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS).

  9. Structure Function Sum rules for Systems with Large Scattering Lengths

    CERN Document Server

    Goldberger, Walter D

    2010-01-01

    We use a dispersion relation in conjunction with the operator product expansion (OPE) to derive model independent sum rules for the dynamic structure functions of systems with large scattering lengths. We present an explicit sum rule for the structure functions that control the density and spin response of the many-body ground state. Our methods are general, and apply to either fermions or bosons which interact through two-body contact interactions with large scattering lengths. By employing a Borel transform of the OPE, the relevant integrals are weighted towards infrared frequencies, thus allowing for greater overlap low energy data. Similar sum rules can be derived for other response functions. The sum rules can be used to extract the contact parameter introduced by Tan, including universality violating corrections at finite scattering lengths.

  10. Behaviour of Large Cylindrical Offshore Structures Subjected to Wave Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begüm Yurdanur DAĞLI

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Spar-type and monopole substructures consisting of a large-diameter, single vertical cylinders have been used as wind turbine towers, oil storage platforms, tankers and wave energy converters at deepwater region in the sea. These towers and platforms are exposed to environmental forces such as wind, wave and current. Wave force is the most effective force in the total environmental force. The body disturbs the incident wave and Diffraction Theory is used for computing the pressure distribution for designing the structure. Therefore, this study aims to present the effect of structural design of towers on dynamic behavior due to wave actions. Two different cases of structural models are selected to employ bidirectional fluid structure interaction (FSI analysis. Diffraction Theory is utilized to investigate wave forces. Solid and fluid domains are modeled in Abaqus finite elements program. Behaviors of various types of offshore structures are evaluated and compared according to the significant stresses and displacements. The hydrodynamic pressure on the cylindrical structure surface and the diffraction forces acting on structures are presented. Mode shapes, first three natural frequencies are comparatively given.

  11. One-dimensional adhesion model for large scale structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayyunnapara Thomas Joseph

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We discuss initial value problems and initial boundary value problems for some systems of partial differential equations appearing in the modelling for the large scale structure formation in the universe. We restrict the initial data to be bounded measurable and locally bounded variation function and use Volpert product to justify the product which appear in the equation. For more general initial data in the class of generalized functions of Colombeau, we construct the solution in the sense of association.

  12. Macromolecular structures probed by combining single-shot free-electron laser diffraction with synchrotron coherent X-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher-Jones, Marcus; Bessho, Yoshitaka; Kim, Sunam; Park, Jaehyun; Kim, Sangsoo; Nam, Daewoong; Kim, Chan; Kim, Yoonhee; Noh, Do Young; Miyashita, Osamu; Tama, Florence; Joti, Yasumasa; Kameshima, Takashi; Hatsui, Takaki; Tono, Kensuke; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Yabashi, Makina; Hasnain, S Samar; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Song, Changyong

    2014-05-02

    Nanostructures formed from biological macromolecular complexes utilizing the self-assembly properties of smaller building blocks such as DNA and RNA hold promise for many applications, including sensing and drug delivery. New tools are required for their structural characterization. Intense, femtosecond X-ray pulses from X-ray free-electron lasers enable single-shot imaging allowing for instantaneous views of nanostructures at ambient temperatures. When combined judiciously with synchrotron X-rays of a complimentary nature, suitable for observing steady-state features, it is possible to perform ab initio structural investigation. Here we demonstrate a successful combination of femtosecond X-ray single-shot diffraction with an X-ray free-electron laser and coherent diffraction imaging with synchrotron X-rays to provide an insight into the nanostructure formation of a biological macromolecular complex: RNA interference microsponges. This newly introduced multimodal analysis with coherent X-rays can be applied to unveil nano-scale structural motifs from functional nanomaterials or biological nanocomplexes, without requiring a priori knowledge.

  13. Electronic-structure calculations of large cadmium chalcogenide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenzel, Johannes [Lehrstuhl fuer Theoretische Chemie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (Germany); Joswig, Jan-Ole [Physikalische Chemie, Technische Universitaet Dresden (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    In this paper, we will review our studies of large cadmium chalcogenide nanoparticles and present some new results on cadmium telluride systems. All calculations have been performed using density-functional based methods. The studies deal with the structural properties of saturated and unsaturated nanoparticles where the surfactants generally are hydrogen atoms or thiol groups. We have focused on the investigation of the density of states, the Mulliken charges, the eigenvalue spectra, and the spatial distributions of the frontier orbitals. Optical excitation spectra of pure CdS and CdSe/CdS core-shell systems have been calculated using a linear-response formalism. The reviewed studies are compared to the state of the art of modeling large cadmium chalcogenide particles. Optical excitations in large saturated cadmium chalcogenide nanoparticles with several thousand atoms. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Constraining cosmological ultra-large scale structure using numerical relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Braden, Jonathan; Peiris, Hiranya V; Aguirre, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic inflation, a period of accelerated expansion in the early universe, can give rise to large amplitude ultra-large scale inhomogeneities on distance scales comparable to or larger than the observable universe. The cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy on the largest angular scales is sensitive to such inhomogeneities and can be used to constrain the presence of ultra-large scale structure (ULSS). We numerically evolve nonlinear inhomogeneities present at the beginning of inflation in full General Relativity to assess the CMB quadrupole constraint on the amplitude of the initial fluctuations and the size of the observable universe relative to a length scale characterizing the ULSS. To obtain a statistically significant number of simulations, we adopt a toy model in which inhomogeneities are injected along a preferred direction. We compute the likelihood function for the CMB quadrupole including both ULSS and the standard quantum fluctuations produced during inflation. We compute the posterior given...

  15. Fluid and Structural Analysis of Large Butterfly Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xueguan; Wang, Lin; Park, Youngchul

    2008-10-01

    A butterfly valve of large diameter is commonly used as control equipments in applications where the inlet velocity is fast and the pressure is relatively high. Because of the size of the valve is too large, therefore it's too difficult to conduct the experiment in a laboratory. In this paper, the numerical simulation using commercial package-CFX and ANSYS was conducted. In order to do fluid analysis and structural analysis perfectly, large valve models are generated in three dimensions without much simplification, the result of fluid analysis is also fully coupled to the structural domain by the fluid-structural interface to provide an exacter initial condition. In addition to describe the flow patterns and to measure the performance coefficients when the valves with various open angles were used, the verification of the safety performance whether the valve could work normally at those conditions or not was conducted. Fortunately, the result shows this type valve is safe in a given inlet velocity of 3m/s, and it's not necessary to be strengthened anywhere, and if need be, the shape of valve disc can be optimized to reduce the weight of disc, and also to make the flow coefficient be closer to the suggested level.

  16. Searching for Large Scale Structure in Deep Radio Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Baleisis, A; Loan, A J; Wall, J V; Baleisis, Audra; Lahav, Ofer; Loan, Andrew J.; Wall, Jasper V.

    1997-01-01

    (Abridged Abstract) We calculate the expected amplitude of the dipole and higher spherical harmonics in the angular distribution of radio galaxies. The median redshift of radio sources in existing catalogues is z=1, which allows us to study large scale structure on scales between those accessible to present optical and infrared surveys, and that of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). The dipole is due to 2 effects which turn out to be of comparable magnitude: (i) our motion with respect to the CMB, and (ii) large scale structure, parameterised here by a family of Cold Dark Matter power-spectra. We make specific predictions for the Green Bank (87GB) and Parkes-MIT-NRAO (PMN) catalogues. For these relatively sparse catalogues both the motion and large scale structure dipole effects are expected to be smaller than the Poisson shot-noise. However, we detect dipole and higher harmonics in the combined 87GB-PMN catalogue which are far larger than expected. We attribute this to a 2 % flux mismatch between the two...

  17. Large scale structure around a z=2.1 cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Hung, Chao-Ling; Chiang, Yi-Kuan; Capak, Peter; Cowley, Michael J; Darvish, Behnam; Kacprzak, Glenn G; Kovac, K; Lilly, Simon J; Nanayakkara, Themiya; Spitler, Lee R; Tran, Kim-Vy H; Yuan, Tiantian

    2016-01-01

    The most prodigious starburst galaxies are absent in massive galaxy clusters today, but their connection with large scale environments is less clear at $z\\gtrsim2$. We present a search of large scale structure around a galaxy cluster core at $z=2.095$ using a set of spectroscopically confirmed galaxies. We find that both color-selected star-forming galaxies (SFGs) and dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) show significant overdensities around the $z=2.095$ cluster. A total of 8 DSFGs (including 3 X-ray luminous active galactic nuclei, AGNs) and 34 SFGs are found within a 10 arcmin radius (corresponds to $\\sim$15 cMpc at $z\\sim2.1$) from the cluster center and within a redshift range of $\\Delta z=0.02$, which leads to galaxy overdensities of $\\delta_{\\rm DSFG}\\sim12.3$ and $\\delta_{\\rm SFG}\\sim2.8$. The cluster core and the extended DSFG- and SFG-rich structure together demonstrate an active cluster formation phase, in which the cluster is accreting a significant amount of material from large scale structure whi...

  18. Elastic deformations disrupt structural superlubricity in large contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Tristan A.; Pastewka, Lars; Robbins, Mark O.

    Force microscopy experiments observe ultra-low friction between solids with incommensurate lattice structures. This phenomenon is referred to as superlubricity and is due to a cancellation of lateral forces because surfaces sample all relative local configurations with equal probability. We use simulations to show that elasticity disrupts superlubricity in sufficiently large circular contacts. The simulations include atomic-scale geometry and reach micron-scales. For rigid solids, cancellation is complete except at the contact boundary. The static friction force per contact area, τ, falls as a power of contact radius, τ ~a - 3 / 2 . Elastic deformations limit this cancellation when the contact radius a is larger than a characteristic length scale set by the core width of interfacial dislocations, bcore. For a >bcore sliding of moderately incommensurate contacts is dominated by dislocation motion and, at large a, τ approaches a constant value near the Peierls stress needed to move edge dislocations. Surprisingly, the stress in commensurate contacts drops to nearly the same value at large a. We conclude that true structural lubricity does not occur in large contacts, although the constant shear stress drops rapidly with bcore. NSF IGERT, DAAD.

  19. Simulation and experiment for large scale space structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongbo; Zhou, Jian; Zha, Zuoliang

    2013-04-01

    The future space structures are relatively large, flimsy, and lightweight. As a result, they are more easily affected or distortion by space environments compared to other space structures. This study examines the structural integrity of a large scale space structure. A new design of transient temperature field analysis method of the developable reflector on orbit environment is presented, which simulates physical characteristic of developable antenna reflector with a high precision. The different kinds of analysis denote that different thermal elastic characteristics of different materials. The three-dimension multi-physics coupling transient thermal distortion equations for the antenna are founded based on the Galerkins method. For a reflector on geosynchronous orbit, the transient temperature field results from this method are compared with these from NASA. It follows from the analysis that the precision of this method is high. An experimental system is established to verify the control mechanism with IEBIS and thermal sensor technique. The shape control experiments are finished by measuring and analyzing developable tube. Results reveal that the temperature levels of the developable antenna reflector alternate greatly in the orbital period, which is about ±120° when considering solar flux ,earth radiating flux and albedo scattering flux.

  20. Structure and energetics of the coherent interface between the {theta}' precipitate phase and aluminium in Al-Cu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourgeois, Laure, E-mail: laure.bourgeois@monash.edu [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); ARC Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Dwyer, Christian [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); ARC Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Weyland, Matthew [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Nie Jianfeng; Muddle, Barrington C. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2011-10-15

    The {theta}' phase is a well-known intermediate phase that forms as part of the classic decomposition sequence of an aluminium-copper solid solution. It is also the archetypal precipitate phase of high-strength aluminium alloys. Here we use atomic-resolution electron microscopy imaging to reveal that the coherent interface of {theta}' with aluminium can adopt a structure that differs from that previously assumed based on the bulk crystal structures. These observations, combined with first-principles energetics calculations for realistic models of embedded {theta}' precipitates, show that this new interfacial structure constitutes an intermediate state in the atomistics of precipitate thickening. These findings will require revision of theoretical models of {theta}' precipitate growth and nucleation.

  1. Decentralized control of large flexible structures by joint decoupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Tzu-Jeng; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method to design decentralized controllers for large complex flexible structures by using the idea of joint decoupling. Decoupling of joint degrees of freedom from the interior degrees of freedom is achieved by setting the joint actuator commands to cancel the internal forces exerting on the joint degrees of freedom. By doing so, the interactions between substructures are eliminated. The global structure control design problem is then decomposed into several substructure control design problems. Control commands for interior actuators are set to be localized state feedback using decentralized observers for state estimation. The proposed decentralized controllers can operate successfully at the individual substructure level as well as at the global structure level. Not only control design but also control implementation is decentralized. A two-component mass-spring-damper system is used as an example to demonstrate the proposed method.

  2. High pressure sheet metal forming of large scale body structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trompeter, M.; Krux, R.; Homberg, W.; Kleiner, M. [Dortmund Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Forming Technology and Lightweight Construction

    2005-07-01

    An important trend in the automotive industry is the weight reduction of car bodies by lightweight construction. One approach to realise lightweight structures is the use of load optimised sheet metal parts (e.g. tailored blanks), especially for crash relevant car body structures. To form such parts which are mostly complex and primarily made of high strength steels, the use of working media based forming processes is favorable. The paper presents the manufacturing of a large scale structural component made of tailor rolled blanks (TRB) by high pressure sheet metal forming (HBU). The paper focuses mainly on the tooling system, which is integrated into a specific 100 MN hydroform press at the IUL. The HBU tool basically consists of a multipoint blankholder, a specially designed flange draw-in sensor, which is necessary to determine the material flow, and a sealing system. Furthermore, the paper presents a strategy for an effective closed loop flange draw-in control. (orig.)

  3. Large-scale structures in turbulent Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Hoon; Lee, Jae Hwa

    2016-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation of fully developed turbulent Couette flow is performed with a large computational domain in the streamwise and spanwise directions (40 πh and 6 πh) to investigate streamwise-scale growth mechanism of the streamwise velocity fluctuating structures in the core region, where h is the channel half height. It is shown that long streamwise-scale structures (> 3 h) are highly energetic and they contribute to more than 80% of the turbulent kinetic energy and Reynolds shear stress, compared to previous studies in canonical Poiseuille flows. Instantaneous and statistical analysis show that negative-u' structures on the bottom wall in the Couette flow continuously grow in the streamwise direction due to mean shear, and they penetrate to the opposite moving wall. The geometric center of the log layer is observed in the centerline with a dominant outer peak in streamwise spectrum, and the maximum streamwise extent for structure is found in the centerline, similar to previous observation in turbulent Poiseuille flows at high Reynolds number. Further inspection of time-evolving instantaneous fields clearly exhibits that adjacent long structures combine to form a longer structure in the centerline. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF-2014R1A1A2057031).

  4. Structure, transport, and vertical coherence of the Gulf Stream from the Straits of Florida to the Southeast Newfoundland Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinen, Christopher S.; Luther, Douglas S.

    2016-06-01

    Data from three independent and extensive field programs in the Straits of Florida, the Mid-Atlantic Bight, and near the Southeast Newfoundland Ridge are reanalyzed and compared with results from other historical studies to highlight the downstream evolution of several characteristics of the Gulf Stream's mean flow and variability. The three locations represent distinct dynamical regimes: a tightly confined jet in a channel; a freely meandering jet; and a topographically controlled jet on a boundary. Despite these differing dynamical regimes, the Gulf Stream in these areas exhibits many similarities. There are also anticipated and important differences, such as the loss of the warm core of the current by 42°N and the decrease in the cross-frontal gradient of potential vorticity as the current flows northward. As the Gulf Stream evolves it undergoes major changes in transport, both in magnitude and structure. The rate of inflow up to 60°W and outflow thereafter are generally uniform, but do exhibit some remarkable short-scale variations. As the Gulf Stream flows northward the vertical coherence of the flow changes, with the Florida Current and North Atlantic Current segments of the Gulf Stream exhibiting distinct upper and deep flows that are incoherent, while in the Mid-Atlantic Bight the Gulf Stream exhibits flows in three layers each of which tends to be incoherent with the other layers at most periods. These coherence characteristics are exhibited in both Eulerian and stream coordinates. The observed lack of vertical coherence indicates that great caution must be exercised in interpreting proxies for Gulf Stream structure and flow from vertically-limited or remote observations.

  5. Spatially coherent surface resonance states derived from magnetic resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Zeyong; Cao, Yang; Wu, Chao; Ren, Jinzhi; Hang, Zhihong; Chen, Hong; Zhang, Daozhong; Chan, C T

    2010-01-01

    A thin metamaterial slab comprising a dielectric spacer sandwiched between a metallic grating and a ground plane is shown to possess spatially coherent surface resonance states that span a large frequency range and can be tuned by structural and material parameters. They give rise to nearly perfect angle-selective absorption and thus exhibit directional thermal emissivity. Direct numerical simulations show that the metamaterial slab supports spatially coherent thermal emission in a wide frequency range that is robust against structural disorder.

  6. Coherent Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering for in situ detection of nanoparticles and large molecules in gas and plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerakis, A.; Shneider, M. N.; Stratton, B. C.; Santra, B.; Car, R.; Raitses, Y.

    2016-09-01

    Laser-based diagnostics methods, such as Spontaneous and Coherent Rayleigh and Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering (SRBS and CRBS), can be used for in-situ detection and characterization of nanoparticle shape and size as well as their concentration in an inert gas atmosphere. We recently developed and tested this advanced diagnostic at PPPL. It was shown that the signal intensity of the CRBS signal depends on the gas-nanoparticle mixture composition, density and the polarizabilities of the mixture components. The measured results agree well with theoretical predictions of Refs. In this work, we report the application of this diagnostic to monitor nucleation and growth of nanoparticles in a carbon arc discharge. In support of these measurements, A time-dependent density functional theory was used to compute the frequency-dependent polarizabilities of various nanostructures in order to predict the corresponding Rayleigh scattering intensities as well as light depolarization. Preliminary results of measurements demonstrate that CRBS is capable to detect nanoparticles in volume. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  7. Ceres' internal structure as inferred from its large craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi, Simone; Raymond, Carol; Fu, Roger; Ermakov, Anton I.; O'Brien, David P.; De Sanctis, Cristina; Ammannito, Eleonora; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-10-01

    The Dawn spacecraft has gathered important data about the surface composition, internal structure, and geomorphology of Ceres, revealing a cratered landscape. Digital terrain models and global mosaics have been used to derive a global catalog of impact craters larger than 10 km in diameter. A surface dichotomy appears evident: a large fraction of the northern hemisphere is heavily cratered as the result of several billion of years of collisions, while portions of the equatorial region and southern hemisphere are much less cratered. The latter are associated with the presence of the two largest (~270-280 km) impact craters, Kerwan and Yalode. The global crater count shows a severe depletion for diameters larger than 100-150 km with respect to collisional models and other large asteroids, like Vesta. This is a strong indication that a significant population of large cerean craters has been obliterated over geological time-scales. This observation is supported by the overall topographic power spectrum of Ceres, which shows that long wavelengths in topography are suppressed (that is, flatter surface) compared to short wavelengths.Viscous relaxation of topography may be a natural culprit for the observed paucity of large craters. Relaxation accommodated by the creep of water ice is expected to result in much more rapid and complete decay of topography than inferred. In contrast, we favor a strong crust composed of a mixture of silicates and salt species (depression, known as Vendimia Planitia. The overall topography of Vendimia Planitia is compatible with a partially relaxed mega impact structure. The presence of such a large scale depression bears implications for the rheology of the deeper interior, potentially implying a transition to higher viscosity/higher density materials at a depth of ~200 km. This is compatible with the presence of a central mass concentration, as inferred from gravity measurements.

  8. Characterization of Large Structural Genetic Mosaicism in Human Autosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machiela, Mitchell J.; Zhou, Weiyin; Sampson, Joshua N.; Dean, Michael C.; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Black, Amanda; Brinton, Louise A.; Chang, I-Shou; Chen, Chu; Chen, Constance; Chen, Kexin; Cook, Linda S.; Crous Bou, Marta; De Vivo, Immaculata; Doherty, Jennifer; Friedenreich, Christine M.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hartge, Patricia; Henderson, Brian E.; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hosgood, H. Dean; Hsiung, Chao A.; Hu, Wei; Hunter, David J.; Jessop, Lea; Kim, Hee Nam; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young Tae; Klein, Robert; Kraft, Peter; Lan, Qing; Lin, Dongxin; Liu, Jianjun; Le Marchand, Loic; Liang, Xiaolin; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Lingeng; Magliocco, Anthony M.; Matsuo, Keitaro; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Park, Jae Yong; Pooler, Loreall; Prescott, Jennifer; Rastogi, Radhai; Risch, Harvey A.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Seow, Adeline; Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Shen, Hongbing; Sheng, Xin; Shin, Min-Ho; Shu, Xiao-Ou; VanDen Berg, David; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wong, Maria Pik; Wu, Chen; Wu, Tangchun; Wu, Yi-Long; Xia, Lucy; Yang, Hannah P.; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Baosen; Abnet, Christian C.; Albanes, Demetrius; Aldrich, Melinda C.; Amos, Christopher; Amundadottir, Laufey T.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Blot, William J.; Bock, Cathryn H.; Bracci, Paige M.; Burdett, Laurie; Buring, Julie E.; Butler, Mary A.; Carreón, Tania; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Chung, Charles C.; Cook, Michael B.; Cullen, Michael; Davis, Faith G.; Ding, Ti; Duell, Eric J.; Epstein, Caroline G.; Fan, Jin-Hu; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Freedman, Neal D.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M.; Patiño-Garcia, Ana; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giles, Graham G.; Gillanders, Elizabeth M.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Goldin, Lynn; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Greene, Mark H.; Hallmans, Goran; Harris, Curtis C.; Henriksson, Roger; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Hoover, Robert N.; Hu, Nan; Hutchinson, Amy; Jenab, Mazda; Johansen, Christoffer; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kooperberg, Charles; Krogh, Vittorio; Kurtz, Robert C.; LaCroix, Andrea; Landgren, Annelie; Landi, Maria Teresa; Li, Donghui; Liao, Linda M.; Malats, Nuria; McGlynn, Katherine A.; McNeill, Lorna H.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Melin, Beatrice S.; Mirabello, Lisa; Peplonska, Beata; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M.; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Purdue, Mark; Qiao, You-Lin; Rabe, Kari G.; Rajaraman, Preetha; Real, Francisco X.; Riboli, Elio; Rodríguez-Santiago, Benjamín; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ruder, Avima M.; Savage, Sharon A.; Schwartz, Ann G.; Schwartz, Kendra L.; Sesso, Howard D.; Severi, Gianluca; Silverman, Debra T.; Spitz, Margaret R.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Stram, Daniel; Tang, Ze-Zhong; Taylor, Philip R.; Teras, Lauren R.; Tobias, Geoffrey S.; Viswanathan, Kala; Wacholder, Sholom; Wang, Zhaoming; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Wheeler, William; White, Emily; Wiencke, John K.; Wolpin, Brian M.; Wu, Xifeng; Wunder, Jay S.; Yu, Kai; Zanetti, Krista A.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Ziegler, Regina G.; de Andrade, Mariza; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Beaty, Terri H.; Bierut, Laura J.; Desch, Karl C.; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Feenstra, Bjarke; Ginsburg, David; Heit, John A.; Kang, Jae H.; Laurie, Cecilia A.; Li, Jun Z.; Lowe, William L.; Marazita, Mary L.; Melbye, Mads; Mirel, Daniel B.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Nelson, Sarah C.; Pasquale, Louis R.; Rice, Kenneth; Wiggs, Janey L.; Wise, Anastasia; Tucker, Margaret; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A.; Laurie, Cathy C.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Yeager, Meredith; Chanock, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Analyses of genome-wide association study (GWAS) data have revealed that detectable genetic mosaicism involving large (>2 Mb) structural autosomal alterations occurs in a fraction of individuals. We present results for a set of 24,849 genotyped individuals (total GWAS set II [TGSII]) in whom 341 large autosomal abnormalities were observed in 168 (0.68%) individuals. Merging data from the new TGSII set with data from two prior reports (the Gene-Environment Association Studies and the total GWAS set I) generated a large dataset of 127,179 individuals; we then conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the patterns of detectable autosomal mosaicism (n = 1,315 events in 925 [0.73%] individuals). Restricting to events >2 Mb in size, we observed an increase in event frequency as event size decreased. The combined results underscore that the rate of detectable mosaicism increases with age (p value = 5.5 × 10−31) and is higher in men (p value = 0.002) but lower in participants of African ancestry (p value = 0.003). In a subset of 47 individuals from whom serial samples were collected up to 6 years apart, complex changes were noted over time and showed an overall increase in the proportion of mosaic cells as age increased. Our large combined sample allowed for a unique ability to characterize detectable genetic mosaicism involving large structural events and strengthens the emerging evidence of non-random erosion of the genome in the aging population. PMID:25748358

  9. Effect of velocity ratio on coherent-structure dynamics in turbulent free shear layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanarayanan, Saikishan; Narasimha, Roddam

    2014-11-01

    The relevance of the vortex-gas model to the large scale dynamics of temporally evolving turbulent free shear layers has been established by extensive simulations (Phys. Rev. E 89, 013009 (2014)). The effects of velocity ratio (r =U2 /U1) on shear layer dynamics are revealed by spatially evolving vortex-gas shear-layer simulations using a computational model based on Basu et al. (Appl. Math. Modelling 19, (1995)), but with a crucial improvement that ensures conservation of global circulation. The simulations show that the initial conditions and downstream boundaries can significantly affect the flow over substantial part of the domain, but the equilibrium spread rate is a universal function of r, and is within the experimental scatter. The spread in the r = 0 limit is higher than Galilean-transformed temporal value. The present 2D simulations at r = 0 show continuous growth of structures, while merger-dominated evolution is observed for r = 0 . 23 (and higher). These two mechanisms were observed across the same two values of r in the experiments of D'Ovidio & Coats (J. Fluid Mech. 737, 2013), but the continuous growth was instead attributed to mixing-transition and 3D. The 2D mechanisms responsible for the observed continuous growth of structures are analyzed in detail. Supported in part by RN/Intel/4288 and RN/DRDO/4124.

  10. Coherent structures and enstrophy dynamics in highly stratified flow past a sphere at Re = 3700

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chongsiripinyo, Karu; Pal, Anikesh; Sarkar, Sutanu

    2016-11-01

    Vortex dynamics of flow past a sphere in a linearly stratified environment is investigated. Simulations are carried out for a flow with Reynolds number of 3700 and for several Froude numbers (Fr) ranging as low as 0.025. Isosurface of Q criterion is used to identify vortical structures whose cross-section and orientation are found to be affected by buoyancy. At low Fr = 0 . 025 , pancake eddies and surfboard-like inclined structures emerge in the near wake and have a regular streamwise spacing that is associated with the frequency of vortex shedding from the sphere. Similar to turbulent kinetic energy, the enstrophy in the near wake decreases with decreasing Fr (increasing stratification) until a minimum at Fr = 0 . 5 but the trend reverses in the low- Fr regime. Vortex stretching by fluctuating and mean strain are both responsible for enhancing vorticity with relatively small contribution from the baroclinic term. Decreasing Fr to O (1) values tends to suppress vortex stretching. Upon further reduction of Fr below 0.25, the vortex stretching term takes large values near the sphere.

  11. Temporal structure of attosecond pulses from laser-driven coherent synchrotron emission

    CERN Document Server

    Cousens, S; Dromey, B; Zepf, M

    2016-01-01

    The microscopic dynamics of laser-driven coherent synchrotron emission transmitted through thin foils are investigated using particle-in-cell simulations. For normal incidence interactions, we identify the formation of two distinct electron nanobunches from which emission takes place each half-cycle of the driving laser pulse. These emissions are separated temporally by 130 attoseconds and are dominant in different frequency ranges, which is a direct consequence of the distinct characteristics of each electron nanobunch. This may be exploited through spectral filtering to isolate these emissions, generating electromagnetic pulses of duration ~70 as.

  12. LOCALIZED COHERENT STRUCTURES OF THE (2+1)-DIMENSIONAL HIGHER ORDER BROER-KAUP EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张解放; 刘宇陆

    2002-01-01

    By using the extended homogeneous balance method, the localized coherentstructures are studied. A nonlinear transformation was first established, and then thelinearization form was obtained based on the extended homogeneous balance method for thehigher order ( 2 + 1 ) -dimensional Broer-Kaup equations. Starting from this linearizationform equation, a variable separation solution with the entrance of some arbitrary functionsand some arbitrary parameters was constructed. The quite rich localized coherent structureswere revealed. This method, which can be generalized to other (2 + 1 )-dimensionalnonlinear evolution equation, is simple and powerful.

  13. Roles of a coherent scalar field on the evolution of cosmic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, J

    1997-01-01

    A coherently oscillating scalar field, an axion as an example, is known to behave as a cold dark matter. The arguments were usually made in the Newtonian context. Ratra proved the case in relativistic context using the synchronous gauge. In this paper we present another proof based on a more suitable gauge choice, the uniform-curvature gauge, which fits the problem. By a proper time averaging the perturbed oscillating scalar field behaves as a cold dark matter on the relevant scales including the superhorizon scale.

  14. Coherent Structure Patterns Affect Energy Balance Closure: Evidence from Virtual Measurements for a Field Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S.; De Roo, F.; Heinze, R.; Eder, F.; Huq, S.; Schmidt, M.; Kalthoff, N.; Mauder, M.

    2015-12-01

    The energy balance closure problem is a well-known issue of eddy-covariance measurements. However, the underlying mechanisms are still under debate. Recent evidence suggests that organized low-frequency motion contributes significantly to the energy balance residual, because the associated transport cannot be captured by a point measurement. In this study, we carry out virtual measurements using a PArallelized Large-Eddy Simulation Model (PALM). In order to represent specific measurement days of the field campaign "High definition clouds and precipitation for advancing climate prediction" (HD(CP)²), which was part of the project "High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for Advancing Climate Prediction"(HOPE) in 2013, the simulations were driven by synoptic-scale COSMO-DE reanalysis data. Planet boundary layer height, the vertical profiles of variance and skewness of vertical wind were analyzed and a comparison with Doppler-lidar observations shows good agreement. Furthermore, simulated energy imbalances were compared with real-world imbalances from two eddy-covariance stations in the model domain. Particularly poor energy balance closure was found for a day with cellular organized structures in the surface layer, while the energy balance closure was better on other days with roll-like structures. This finding might be one explanation why the energy balance closure generally tends to improve with increasing friction velocity, since roll-like structures are typically associated with higher wind speeds. In order to gain insight into the partitioning of the energy balance residual between the sensible and latent heat fluxes, we further employed a control volume method within the numerical simulation. Hence, advection and storage terms were identified as the most important causes for the lack of energy balance closure by the eddy-covariance method. The results of the virtual measurements indicate that the "missing" part of the surface energy mainly comes from the

  15. Nonisothermal turbulent boundary-layer adverse pressure gradient large scale thermal structure measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Nader; White, Bruce R.; Lei, Ting-Kwo

    1994-01-01

    Hot-wire anemometry measurements in an incompressible turbulent boundary-layer flow over a heated flat plate under equilibrium adverse-pressure-gradient conditions (beta = 1.8) were made for two different temperature difference cases (10 and 15 C) between the wall and the freestream. Space-time correlations of temperature fluctuations (T') were obtained with a pair of subminiature temperature fluctuation probes. The mean convection velocities, the mean inclination angles, and coherence characteristics of the T' large-scale structure were determined. The present temperature structures measurements for a nonisothermal boundary layer are compared to the zero-pressure-gradient case with identical temperature differences previously reported, in which the mean convection velocity of the T' structure was a function of position y(sup +) and independent of the limited temperature-difference cases tested. The three major findings of the present study, as compared to the zero-pressure-gradient case, are (1) the mean convection speed of the T' structure under beta = 1.8 pressure-gradient conditions was found to be substantially lower in the logarithmic core region than the zero-pressure-gradient case. Additionally, the mean convection speed is felt by the authors to be a function of pressure-gradient parameter beta; (2) the mean inclination angle of the T' structure to the wall under the adverse-pressure-gradient flow was 32 deg, which compares favorably to the 30-deg value of the zero-pressure-gradient case; and (3) the limited data suggests that the mean convection velocity of the T' structure is a function of y(sup +) and independent of the limited temperature-difference cases tested.

  16. Reliability-Based Optimal Design for Very Large Floating Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Shu-hua(张淑华); FUJIKUBO Masahiko

    2003-01-01

    Costs and losses induced by possible future extreme environmental conditions and difficulties in repairing post-yielding damage strongly suggest the need for proper consideration in design rather than just life loss prevention. This can be addressed through the development of design methodology that balances the initial cost of the very large floating structure (VLFS) against the expected potential losses resulting from future extreme wave-induced structural damage. Here, the development of a methodology for determining optimal, cost-effective design will be presented and applied to a VLFS located in the Tokyo bay. Optimal design criteria are determined based on the total expected life-cycle cost and acceptable damage probability and curvature of the structure, and a set of sizes of the structure are obtained. The methodology and applications require expressions of the initial cost and the expected life-cycle damage cost as functions of the optimal design variables. This study includes the methodology, total life-cycle cost function, structural damage modeling, and reliability analysis.

  17. RScan: fast searching structural similarities for structured RNAs in large databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Guo-Ping

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many RNAs have evolutionarily conserved secondary structures instead of primary sequences. Recently, there are an increasing number of methods being developed with focus on the structural alignments for finding conserved secondary structures as well as common structural motifs in pair-wise or multiple sequences. A challenging task is to search similar structures quickly for structured RNA sequences in large genomic databases since existing methods are too slow to be used in large databases. Results An implementation of a fast structural alignment algorithm, RScan, is proposed to fulfill the task. RScan is developed by levering the advantages of both hashing algorithms and local alignment algorithms. In our experiment, on the average, the times for searching a tRNA and an rRNA in the randomized A. pernix genome are only 256 seconds and 832 seconds respectively by using RScan, but need 3,178 seconds and 8,951 seconds respectively by using an existing method RSEARCH. Remarkably, RScan can handle large database queries, taking less than 4 minutes for searching similar structures for a microRNA precursor in human chromosome 21. Conclusion These results indicate that RScan is a preferable choice for real-life application of searching structural similarities for structured RNAs in large databases. RScan software is freely available at http://bioinfo.au.tsinghua.edu.cn/member/cxue/rscan/RScan.htm.

  18. What is a large-scale dynamo?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, G.; Pongkitiwanichakul, P.; Cattaneo, F.; Tobias, S. M.

    2017-01-01

    We consider kinematic dynamo action in a sheared helical flow at moderate to high values of the magnetic Reynolds number (Rm). We find exponentially growing solutions which, for large enough shear, take the form of a coherent part embedded in incoherent fluctuations. We argue that at large Rm large-scale dynamo action should be identified by the presence of structures coherent in time, rather than those at large spatial scales. We further argue that although the growth rate is determined by small-scale processes, the period of the coherent structures is set by mean-field considerations.

  19. Nonlinear evolution of large-scale structure in the universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenk, C.S.; White, S.D.M.; Davis, M.

    1983-08-15

    Using N-body simulations we study the nonlinear development of primordial density perturbation in an Einstein--de Sitter universe. We compare the evolution of an initial distribution without small-scale density fluctuations to evolution from a random Poisson distribution. These initial conditions mimic the assumptions of the adiabatic and isothermal theories of galaxy formation. The large-scale structures which form in the two cases are markedly dissimilar. In particular, the correlation function xi(r) and the visual appearance of our adiabatic (or ''pancake'') models match better the observed distribution of galaxies. This distribution is characterized by large-scale filamentary structure. Because the pancake models do not evolve in a self-similar fashion, the slope of xi(r) steepens with time; as a result there is a unique epoch at which these models fit the galaxy observations. We find the ratio of cutoff length to correlation length at this time to be lambda/sub min//r/sub 0/ = 5.1; its expected value in a neutrino dominated universe is 4(..cap omega..h)/sup -1/ (H/sub 0/ = 100h km s/sup -1/ Mpc/sup -1/). At early epochs these models predict a negligible amplitude for xi(r) and could explain the lack of measurable clustering in the Ly..cap alpha.. absorption lines of high-redshift quasars. However, large-scale structure in our models collapses after z = 2. If this collapse precedes galaxy formation as in the usual pancake theory, galaxies formed uncomfortably recently. The extent of this problem may depend on the cosmological model used; the present series of experiments should be extended in the future to include models with ..cap omega..<1.

  20. Shear deformation plate continua of large double layered space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefzy, Mohamed Samir; Nayfeh, Adnan H.

    1986-01-01

    A simple method is presented to model large rigid-jointed lattice structures as continuous elastic media with couple stresses using energy equivalence. In the analysis, the transition from the discrete system to the continuous media is achieved by expanding the displacements and the rotations of the nodal points in a Taylor series about a suitable chosen origin. The strain energy of the continuous media with couple stresses is then specialized to obtain shear deformation plate continua. Equivalent continua for single layered grids, double layered grids, and three-dimensional lattices are then obtained.

  1. Cosmological parameters from large scale structure - geometric versus shape information

    CERN Document Server

    Hamann, Jan; Lesgourgues, Julien; Rampf, Cornelius; Wong, Yvonne Y Y

    2010-01-01

    The matter power spectrum as derived from large scale structure (LSS) surveys contains two important and distinct pieces of information: an overall smooth shape and the imprint of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO). We investigate the separate impact of these two types of information on cosmological parameter estimation, and show that for the simplest cosmological models, the broad-band shape information currently contained in the SDSS DR7 halo power spectrum (HPS) is by far superseded by geometric information derived from the baryonic features. An immediate corollary is that contrary to popular beliefs, the upper limit on the neutrino mass m_\

  2. Structure and function of large-scale brain systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziol, Leonard F; Barker, Lauren A; Joyce, Arthur W; Hrin, Skip

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces the functional neuroanatomy of large-scale brain systems. Both the structure and functions of these brain networks are presented. All human behavior is the result of interactions within and between these brain systems. This system of brain function completely changes our understanding of how cognition and behavior are organized within the brain, replacing the traditional lesion model. Understanding behavior within the context of brain network interactions has profound implications for modifying abstract constructs such as attention, learning, and memory. These constructs also must be understood within the framework of a paradigm shift, which emphasizes ongoing interactions within a dynamically changing environment.

  3. Clusters as cornerstones of large-scale structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlöber, S.; Retzlaff, J.; Turchaninov, V.

    1997-04-01

    Galaxy clusters are one of the best tracers of large-scale structure in the Universe on scales well above 100 Mpc. The authors investigate here the clustering properties of a redshift sample of Abell/ACO clusters and compare the observational sample with mock samples constructed from N-body simulations on the basis of four different cosmological models. The authors discuss the power spectrum, the Minkowski functionals and the void statistics of these samples and conclude, that the SCDM and TCDM models are ruled out whereas the ACDM and BSI models are in agreement with the observational data.

  4. The large-scale structure of the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springel, Volker; Frenk, Carlos S.; White, Simon D. M.

    2006-04-01

    Research over the past 25 years has led to the view that the rich tapestry of present-day cosmic structure arose during the first instants of creation, where weak ripples were imposed on the otherwise uniform and rapidly expanding primordial soup. Over 14 billion years of evolution, these ripples have been amplified to enormous proportions by gravitational forces, producing ever-growing concentrations of dark matter in which ordinary gases cool, condense and fragment to make galaxies. This process can be faithfully mimicked in large computer simulations, and tested by observations that probe the history of the Universe starting from just 400,000 years after the Big Bang.

  5. The large-scale structure of the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Springel, V; White, S D M; Frenk, Carlos S.; Springel, Volker; White, Simon D. M.

    2006-01-01

    Research over the past 25 years has led to the view that the rich tapestry of present-day cosmic structure arose during the first instants of creation, where weak ripples were imposed on the otherwise uniform and rapidly expanding primordial soup. Over 14 billion years of evolution, these ripples have been amplified to enormous proportions by gravitational forces, producing ever-growing concentrations of dark matter in which ordinary gases cool, condense and fragment to make galaxies. This process can be faithfully mimicked in large computer simulations, and tested by a variety of observations that probe the history of the Universe starting from just 400,000 yr after the Big Bang.

  6. Laser Welding of Large Scale Stainless Steel Aircraft Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitemeyer, D.; Schultz, V.; Syassen, F.; Seefeld, T.; Vollertsen, F.

    In this paper a welding process for large scale stainless steel structures is presented. The process was developed according to the requirements of an aircraft application. Therefore, stringers are welded on a skin sheet in a t-joint configuration. The 0.6 mm thickness parts are welded with a thin disc laser, seam length up to 1920 mm are demonstrated. The welding process causes angular distortions of the skin sheet which are compensated by a subsequent laser straightening process. Based on a model straightening process parameters matching the induced welding distortion are predicted. The process combination is successfully applied to stringer stiffened specimens.

  7. Large-scale shielding structures in low earth orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panov, D. V.; Silnikov, M. V.; Mikhaylin, A. I.; Rubzov, I. S.; Nosikov, V. B.; Minenko, E. Yu.; Murtazin, D. A.

    2015-04-01

    The problems involved in the design-engineering digital simulation of large-size transformable-screen constructions for protecting spacecraft and equipment from space debris and meteoroids were considered. The engineering principles used to improve the design and efficiency of protective screens are presented. The use of embedded matrix transducers located all over the composite material used for armor tiles is proposed for the construction of protective clad screens; this approach enables efficient detection of damaged areas of the protective screen, the assessment of the level of damage, and the prediction of damage to spacecraft and equipment structures.

  8. The dynamics and control of large flexible space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainum, P. M.; Krishna, R.; Kumar, V. K.; Reddy, A. S. S. R.

    1981-01-01

    The dynamics and attitude and shape control of very large, inherently flexible spacecraft systems were investigated. Increasingly more complex examples were examined, beginning with a uniform free-free beam, next a free-free uniform plate/platform and finally by considering a thin shallow spherical shell structure in orbit. The effects devices were modeled. For given sets of assumed actuator locations, the controllability of these systems was first established. Control laws for each of the actuators were developed based on decoupling techniques (including distributed modal control) pole placement algorithms and a application of the linear regulator problem for optical control theory.

  9. Coherent x-ray diffraction imaging of photo-induced structural changes in BiFeO3 nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Marcus C.; Parsons, Aaron; Wagner, Ulrich; Rau, Christoph

    2016-09-01

    Multiferroic materials that exhibit coupling between ferroelectric and magnetic properties are of considerable utility for technological applications and are also interesting from a fundamental standpoint. When reduced to the nanoscale, multiferroic materials often display additional functionality that is dominated by interfacial and confinement effects. Bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3) is one such material with room temperature anti-ferromagnetic and ferroelectric ordering. Optical excitation of BiFeO3 crystals results in an elastic structural deformation of the lattice with a fast response on the pico-second time scale. Here we report on dynamic measurements to investigate the structural properties of BiFeO3 nanoscale crystals using laser excitation and three-dimensional Bragg coherent x-ray diffraction imaging. Tensile strain beyond 8 × {10}-2 was observed predominantly at the surface of the nanoscale crystal as evidenced in the reconstructed phase information and was correlated to photo-induced lattice deformation.

  10. Optical coherence tomography reveals in vivo cortical structures of adult rats in response to cerebral ischemia injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yi-rong; Guo, Zhou-yi; Shu, So-yun; Bao, Xin-min

    2008-12-01

    Optical coherence tomography(OCT) is a high resolution imaging technique which uses light to directly image living tissue. we investigate the potential use of OCT for structural imaging of the ischemia injury mammalian cerebral cortex. And we examine models of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in rats in vivo using OCT. In particular, we show that OCT can perform in vivo detection of cortex and differentiate normal and abnormal cortical anatomy. This OCT system in this study provided an axial resolution of 10~15μ m, the transverse resolution of the system is about 25 μm. OCT can provide cross-sectional images of cortical of adult rats in response to cerebral ischemia injury.We conclude that OCT represents an exciting new approach to visualize, in real-time, pathological changes in the cerebral cortex structures and may offer a new tool for Possible neuroscience clinical applications.

  11. The gamma ray background from large scale structure formation

    CERN Document Server

    Gabici, S; Gabici, Stefano; Blasi, Pasquale

    2003-01-01

    Hierarchical clustering of dark matter halos is thought to describe well the large scale structure of the universe. The baryonic component of the halos is shock heated to the virial temperature while a small fraction of the energy flux through the shocks may be energized through the first order Fermi process to relativistic energy per particle. It has been proposed that the electrons accelerated in this way may upscatter the photons of the universal microwave background to gamma ray energies and indeed generate a diffuse background of gamma rays that compares well to the observations. In this paper we calculate the spectra of the particles accelerated at the merger shocks and re-evaluate the contribution of structure formation to the extragalactic diffuse gamma ray background (EDGRB), concluding that this contribution adds up to at most 10% of the observed EDGRB.

  12. Mass Efficiencies for Common Large-Scale Precision Space Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R. Brett; Agnes, Gregory S.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a mass-based trade study for large-scale deployable triangular trusses, where the longerons can be monocoque tubes, isogrid tubes, or coilable longeron trusses. Such structures are typically used to support heavy reflectors, solar panels, or other instruments, and are subject to thermal gradients that can vary a great deal based on orbital altitude, location in orbit, and self-shadowing. While multi layer insulation (MLI) blankets are commonly used to minimize the magnitude of these thermal disturbances, they subject the truss to a nonstructural mass penalty. This paper investigates the impact of these add-on thermal protection layers on selecting the lightest precision structure for a given loading scenario.

  13. Optimal control of large space structures via generalized inverse matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Charles C.; Fang, Xiaowen

    1987-01-01

    Independent Modal Space Control (IMSC) is a control scheme that decouples the space structure into n independent second-order subsystems according to n controlled modes and controls each mode independently. It is well-known that the IMSC eliminates control and observation spillover caused when the conventional coupled modal control scheme is employed. The independent control of each mode requires that the number of actuators be equal to the number of modelled modes, which is very high for a faithful modeling of large space structures. A control scheme is proposed that allows one to use a reduced number of actuators to control all modeled modes suboptimally. In particular, the method of generalized inverse matrices is employed to implement the actuators such that the eigenvalues of the closed-loop system are as closed as possible to those specified by the optimal IMSC. Computer simulation of the proposed control scheme on a simply supported beam is given.

  14. Large-eddy simulation of turbulent flow and structures in a square duct roughened with perpendicular and V-shaped ribs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xingjun; Yang, Zixuan; Wang, Bing-Chen; Tachie, Mark F.; Bergstrom, Donald J.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, highly disturbed turbulent flows confined within a square duct with uniformly spaced V-shaped ribs mounted on one wall are investigated using large-eddy simulation (LES). Two V-shaped (6 0° and 4 5°) rib cases are studied in comparison with the perpendicular (9 0°) rib case. The LES results are validated against a set of water-channel measurement data newly acquired by the authors. The effects of different shaped ribs on turbulent flow are systematically studied in terms of the mean velocity field, turbulence statistics, and coherent structures. The results show that strong secondary flows in the pattern of a pair of large symmetrical streamwise-elongated vortices exist in all three rib cases. The impacts of rib geometry on turbulent coherent structures are investigated using vortex identifiers, temporal autocorrections, spatial two-point autocorrelations, and velocity spectra.

  15. Large-scale Filamentary Structures around the Virgo Cluster Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suk; Rey, Soo-Chang; Bureau, Martin; Yoon, Hyein; Chung, Aeree; Jerjen, Helmut; Lisker, Thorsten; Jeong, Hyunjin; Sung, Eon-Chang; Lee, Youngdae; Lee, Woong; Chung, Jiwon

    2016-12-01

    We revisit the filamentary structures of galaxies around the Virgo cluster, exploiting a larger data set, based on the HyperLeda database, than previous studies. In particular, this includes a large number of low-luminosity galaxies, resulting in better sampled individual structures. We confirm seven known structures in the distance range 4 h -1 Mpc fundamental axis of the Virgo cluster is smoothly connected to two of these filaments (Leo II A and B). Behind the Virgo cluster (16 h -1 Mpc < SGY < 27 h -1 Mpc), we also identify a new filament elongated toward the NGC 5353/4 group (“NGC 5353/4 filament”) and confirm a sheet that includes galaxies from the W and M clouds of the Virgo cluster (“W-M sheet”). In the Hubble diagram, the NGC 5353/4 filament galaxies show infall toward the NGC 5353/4 group, whereas the W-M sheet galaxies do not show hints of gravitational influence from the Virgo cluster. The filamentary structures identified can now be used to better understand the generic role of filaments in the build-up of galaxy clusters at z ≈ 0.

  16. Large Scale Structure in the SDSS Galaxy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Doroshkevich, A G; Tucker, D L

    2004-01-01

    The Large Scale Structure (LSS) in the galaxy distribution is investigated using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Early Data Release (SDSS EDR). Using the Minimal Spanning Tree technique we have extracted sets of filaments, of wall-like structures, of galaxy groups, and of rich clusters from this unique sample. The physical properties of these structures were then measured and compared with the expectations from Zel'dovich' theory. The measured characteristics of galaxy walls were found to be consistent with those for a spatially flat $\\Lambda$CDM cosmological model with $\\Omega_m\\approx$ 0.3 and $\\Omega_\\Lambda \\approx$ 0.7, and for Gaussian initial perturbations with a Harrison -- Zel'dovich power spectrum. Furthermore, we found that the mass functions of groups and of unrelaxed structure elements generally fit well with the expectations from Zel'dovich' theory, although there was some discrepancy for lower mass groups which may be due to incompleteness in the selected sample of groups. We also note that both g...

  17. Large Scale Structure in the SDSS DR1 Galaxy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Doroshkevich, A G; Allam, S S; Way, M J

    2003-01-01

    The Large Scale Structure in the galaxy distribution is investigated using The First Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using the Minimal Spanning Tree technique we have extracted sets of filaments, of wall--like structures, of galaxy groups, and of rich clusters from this unique sample. The physical properties of these structures were then measured and compared with the statistical expectations based on the Zel'dovich' theory. The measured characteristics of galaxy walls were found to be consistent with those for a spatially flat $\\Lambda$CDM cosmological model with $\\Omega_m\\approx$ 0.3 and $\\Omega_\\Lambda \\approx$ 0.7, and for Gaussian initial perturbations with a Harrison -- Zel'dovich power spectrum. Furthermore, we found that the mass functions of groups and of unrelaxed structure elements generally fit well with the expectations from Zel'dovich' theory. We also note that both groups and rich clusters tend to prefer the environments of walls, which tend to be of higher density, rather than th...

  18. Natural snowfall reveals large-scale flow structures in the wake of a 2.5-MW wind turbine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jiarong; Toloui, Mostafa; Chamorro, Leonardo P; Guala, Michele; Howard, Kevin; Riley, Sean; Tucker, James; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2014-06-24

    To improve power production and structural reliability of wind turbines, there is a pressing need to understand how turbines interact with the atmospheric boundary layer. However, experimental techniques capable of quantifying or even qualitatively visualizing the large-scale turbulent flow structures around full-scale turbines do not exist today. Here we use snowflakes from a winter snowstorm as flow tracers to obtain velocity fields downwind of a 2.5-MW wind turbine in a sampling area of ~36 × 36 m(2). The spatial and temporal resolutions of the measurements are sufficiently high to quantify the evolution of blade-generated coherent motions, such as the tip and trailing sheet vortices, identify their instability mechanisms and correlate them with turbine operation, control and performance. Our experiment provides an unprecedented in situ characterization of flow structures around utility-scale turbines, and yields significant insights into the Reynolds number similarity issues presented in wind energy applications.

  19. From Systematic Errors to Cosmology Using Large-Scale Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunterer, Dragan

    We propose to carry out a two-pronged program to significantly improve links between galaxy surveys and constraints on primordial cosmology and fundamental physics. We will first develop the methodology to self-calibrate the survey, that is, determine the large-angle calibration systematics internally from the survey. We will use this information to correct biases that propagate from the largest to smaller angular scales. Our approach for tackling the systematics is very complementary to existing ones, in particular in the sense that it does not assume knowledge of specific systematic maps or templates. It is timely to undertake these analyses, since none of the currently known methods addresses the multiplicative effects of large-angle calibration errors that contaminate the small-scale signal and present one of the most significant sources of error in the large-scale structure. The second part of the proposal is to precisely quantify the statistical and systematic errors in the reconstruction of the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) contribution to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky map using information from galaxy surveys. Unlike the ISW contributions to CMB power, the ISW map reconstruction has not been studied in detail to date. We will create a nimble plug-and-play pipeline to ascertain how reliably a map from an arbitrary LSS survey can be used to separate the late-time and early-time contributions to CMB anisotropy at large angular scales. We will pay particular attention to partial sky coverage, incomplete redshift information, finite redshift range, and imperfect knowledge of the selection function for the galaxy survey. Our work should serve as the departure point for a variety of implications in cosmology, including the physical origin of the large-angle CMB "anomalies".

  20. Effect of concentration of Er3+ ions on ultra-large index of refraction via atomic coherence in Er3+: YAG crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张惠芳; 戴振文; 张冰; 吴金辉; 高锦岳

    2003-01-01

    A four-level system is proposed to produce large index of refraction accompanied by vanishing absorption in the Er3+-doped yttrium aluminium garnet(YAG)crystal.It is found that the high index of refraction with zero absorption can be provided by adjusting the incoherent pumping,the coherent field,as well as the concentration of Er3+ ions in the crystal.Furthermore,the value of the incoherent pump to achieve the high index of refraction with zero absorption is greatly changed with increasing the concentration of Er3+ ions in the crystal.This indicates that the effect of concentration on the high index of refraction with zero absorption cannot be neglected.

  1. Coherent scatter-controlled phase-change grating structures in silicon using femtosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-Edfuf, Yasser; Garcia-Lechuga, Mario; Puerto, Daniel; Florian, Camilo; Garcia-Leis, Adianez; Sanchez-Cortes, Santiago; Solis, Javier; Siegel, Jan

    2017-07-04

    Periodic structures of alternating amorphous-crystalline fringes have been fabricated in silicon using repetitive femtosecond laser exposure (800 nm wavelength and 120 fs duration). The method is based on the interference of the incident laser light with far- and near-field scattered light, leading to local melting at the interference maxima, as demonstrated by femtosecond microscopy. Exploiting this strategy, lines of highly regular amorphous fringes can be written. The fringes have been characterized in detail using optical microscopy combined modelling, which enables a determination of the three-dimensional shape of individual fringes. 2D micro-Raman spectroscopy reveals that the space between amorphous fringes remains crystalline. We demonstrate that the fringe period can be tuned over a range of 410 nm - 13 µm by changing the angle of incidence and inverting the beam scan direction. Fine control over the lateral dimensions, thickness, surface depression and optical contrast of the fringes is obtained via adjustment of pulse number, fluence and spot size. Large-area, highly homogeneous gratings composed of amorphous fringes with micrometer width and millimeter length can readily be fabricated. The here presented fabrication technique is expected to have applications in the fields of optics, nanoelectronics, and mechatronics and should be applicable to other materials.

  2. Coherent Structures in Turbulent Flow over Two-Dimensional River Dunes

    CERN Document Server

    Omidyeganeh, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    We performed large-eddy simulations of the flow over a typical two-dimensional dune geometry at laboratory scale (the Reynolds number based on the average channel height and mean velocity is 18,900) using the Lagrangian dynamic eddy-viscosity subgrid-scale model. The flow separates at the dune crest and reattaches downstream on the bed (at x=5.7h). A favorable pressure gradient accelerates the flow over the stoss-side (the upward-sloping region for x > 8h) and an unfavorable gradient for x < 8h decelerates the flow over the lee-side of the dune. Due to the separation of the flow, a shear layer is generated after the crest that expands in the wake region towards the next dune. The outer-layer turbulence structures are visualized through isosurfaces of pressure fluctuations colored by distance to the surface. Spanwise vortices are generated in the shear layer separating from the crest due to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. They are convected downstream and either interact with the wall or rise to the surfa...

  3. Dimensional metrology of lab-on-a-chip internal structures: a comparison of optical coherence tomography with confocal fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, D R; Halter, M; Hwang, J

    2015-07-01

    The characterization of internal structures in a polymeric microfluidic device, especially of a final product, will require a different set of optical metrology tools than those traditionally used for microelectronic devices. We demonstrate that optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging is a promising technique to characterize the internal structures of poly(methyl methacrylate) devices where the subsurface structures often cannot be imaged by conventional wide field optical microscopy. The structural details of channels in the devices were imaged with OCT and analyzed with an in-house written ImageJ macro in an effort to identify the structural details of the channel. The dimensional values obtained with OCT were compared with laser-scanning confocal microscopy images of channels filled with a fluorophore solution. Attempts were also made using confocal reflectance and interferometry microscopy to measure the channel dimensions, but artefacts present in the images precluded quantitative analysis. OCT provided the most accurate estimates for the channel height based on an analysis of optical micrographs obtained after destructively slicing the channel with a microtome. OCT may be a promising technique for the future of three-dimensional metrology of critical internal structures in lab-on-a-chip devices because scans can be performed rapidly and noninvasively prior to their use.

  4. Stability and coherent structures of the asymptotic suction boundary layer over a heated plate

    CERN Document Server

    Zammert, Stefan; Eckhardt, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    The asymptotic suction boundary layer (ASBL) is a parallel shear flow that becomes turbulent in a bypass transition in parameter regions where the laminar profile is stable. We here add a temperature gradient perpendicular to the plate and explore the interaction between convection and shear in determining the transition. We find that the laminar state becomes unstable in a subcritical bifurcation and that the critical Rayleigh number and wave number depend strongly on the Prandtl number. We also track several secondary bifurcations and identify states that are localized in two directions, showing different symmetries. In the subcritical regime, transient turbulent states which are connected to exact coherent states and follow the same transition scenario as found in linearly stable shear flows are identified and analyzed. The study extends the bypass transition scenario from shear flows to thermal boundary layers and shows the intricate interactions between thermal and shear forces in determining critical po...

  5. Experimental Study on Coherence of Thermal Radiation of Thin Film Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Xin-Gang; HAN Mao-Hua

    2006-01-01

    @@ The spectral, angular and polarization characteristics of thermal radiation from plane-parallel Si films are studied experimentally. Pronounced spectral and angular peaks demonstrate the presence of thermal radiation coherence.Two kinds of multilayer films are designed to obtain favourable radiant properties. The ZrO2-Ge-ZnS film has a broad anti-reflection band in the wavelength range from 3.5μm to 8μm. The spectral and angular emissivities of the MgF2-ZnS-Ge-Al film are tremendously enhanced compared with those of an uncoated aluminium film.This can be helpful to the design of elements that generate controlled thermal radiation.

  6. Argentine Population Genetic Structure: Large Variance in Amerindian Contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldin, Michael F.; Tian, Chao; Shigeta, Russell; Scherbarth, Hugo R.; Silva, Gabriel; Belmont, John W.; Kittles, Rick; Gamron, Susana; Allevi, Alberto; Palatnik, Simon A.; Alvarellos, Alejandro; Paira, Sergio; Caprarulo, Cesar; Guillerón, Carolina; Catoggio, Luis J.; Prigione, Cristina; Berbotto, Guillermo A.; García, Mercedes A.; Perandones, Carlos E.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta E.

    2011-01-01

    Argentine population genetic structure was examined using a set of 78 ancestry informative markers (AIMs) to assess the contributions of European, Amerindian, and African ancestry in 94 individuals members of this population. Using the Bayesian clustering algorithm STRUCTURE, the mean European contribution was 78%, the Amerindian contribution was 19.4%, and the African contribution was 2.5%. Similar results were found using weighted least mean square method: European, 80.2%; Amerindian, 18.1%; and African, 1.7%. Consistent with previous studies the current results showed very few individuals (four of 94) with greater than 10% African admixture. Notably, when individual admixture was examined, the Amerindian and European admixture showed a very large variance and individual Amerindian contribution ranged from 1.5 to 84.5% in the 94 individual Argentine subjects. These results indicate that admixture must be considered when clinical epidemiology or case control genetic analyses are studied in this population. Moreover, the current study provides a set of informative SNPs that can be used to ascertain or control for this potentially hidden stratification. In addition, the large variance in admixture proportions in individual Argentine subjects shown by this study suggests that this population is appropriate for future admixture mapping studies. PMID:17177183

  7. Study on diagnosis of micro-biomechanical structure using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Souichi; Hashimoto, Youhei; Saito, Takashi; Hiro, Takafumi; Matsuzaki, Masunori

    2007-02-01

    Acute coronary syndromes, e.g. myocardial infarctions, are caused by the rupture of unstable plaques on coronary arteries. The stability of plaque, which depends on biomechanical properties of fibrous cap, should be diagnosed crucially. Recently, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has been developed as a cross-sectional imaging method of microstructural biological tissue with high resolution 1~10 μm. Multi-functional OCT system has been promising, e.g. an estimator of biomechanical characteristics. It has been, however, difficult to estimate biomechanical characteristics, because OCT images have just speckle patterns by back-scattering light from tissue. In this study, presented is Optical Coherence Straingraphy (OCS) on the basis of OCT system, which can diagnose tissue strain distribution. This is basically composed of Recursive Cross-correlation technique (RC), which can provide a displacement vector distribution with high resolution. Furthermore, Adjacent Cross-correlation Multiplication (ACM) is introduced as a speckle noise reduction method. Multiplying adjacent correlation maps can eliminate anomalies from speckle noise, and then can enhance S/N in the determination of maximum correlation coefficient. Error propagation also can be further prevented by introducing to the recursive algorithm (RC). In addition, the spatial vector interpolation by local least square method is introduced to remove erroneous vectors and smooth the vector distribution. This was numerically applied to compressed elastic heterogeneous tissue samples to carry out the accuracy verifications. Consequently, it was quantitatively confirmed that its accuracy of displacement vectors and strain matrix components could be enhanced, comparing with the conventional method. Therefore, the proposed method was validated by the identification of different elastic objects with having nearly high resolution for that defined by optical system.

  8. Probing large-scale structure with radio observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Shea D.

    This thesis focuses on detecting magnetized relativistic plasma in the intergalactic medium (IGM) of filamentary large-scale structure (LSS) by observing synchrotron emission emitted by structure formation shocks. Little is known about the IGM beyond the largest clusters of galaxies, and synchrotron emission holds enormous promise as a means of probing magnetic fields and relativistic particle populations in these low density regions. I'll first report on observations taken at the Very Large Array and the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope of the diffuse radio source 0809+39. I use these observations to demonstrate that 0809+39 is likely the first "radio relic" discovered that is not associated with a rich |"X-ray emitting cluster of galaxies. I then demonstrate that an unconventional reprocessing of the NVSS polarization survey can reveal structures on scales from 15' to hundreds of degrees, far larger than the nominal shortest-baseline scale. This yields hundreds of new diffuse sources as well as the identification of a new nearby galactic loop . These observations also highlight the major obstacle that diffuse galactic foreground emission poses for any search for large-scale, low surface- brightness extragalactic emission. I therefore explore the cross-correlation of diffuse radio emission with optical tracers of LSS as a means of statistically detecting the presence of magnetic fields in the low-density regions of the cosmic web. This initial study with the Bonn 1.4 GHz radio survey yields an upper limit of 0.2 mG for large-scale filament magnetic fields. Finally, I report on new Green Bank Telescope and Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope observations of the famous Coma cluster of galaxies. Major findings include an extension to the Coma cluster radio relic source 1253+275 which makes its total extent ~2 Mpc, as well as a sharp edge, or "front", on the Western side of the radio halo which shows a strong correlation with merger activity associated with an

  9. On the evolution and form of coherent flow structures over a gravel bed: Insights from whole flow field visualization and measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, R. J.; Best, J. L.; Parsons, D. R.; Marjoribanks, T. I.

    2016-08-01

    The microtopography of a gravel bed river has been shown to generate turbulent flow structures that originate from shear flow generated in the near-bed region. Although field and laboratory measurements have shown that such flows contain a range of coherent flow structures (CFS), the origin, evolution, and characteristics of the turbulent structures are poorly understood. Here we apply a combined experimental methodology using planar laser-induced fluorescence and particle imaging velocimetry (LIF-PIV) to measure simultaneously the geometric, kinematic, and dynamic characteristics of these CFS. The flow structures were analyzed by applying standard Reynolds decomposition and Lagrangian vortex detection methods to understand their evolution, propagation, and growth in the boundary layer and characterize their internal dynamical complexity. The LIF results identify large, individual, fluid packets that are initiated at the bed through shear that generate a bursting mechanism. When these large individual fluid packets are analyzed through direct flow measurement, they are found to contain several smaller scales of fluid motion within the one larger individual fluid parcel. Flow measurements demonstrate that near-bed shear controls the initiation and evolution of these CFS through merging with vortex chains that originate at the bed. The vortex chains show both the coalescence in the formation of the larger structures and also the shedding of vortices from the edges of these packets, which may influence the life span and mixing of CFS in open channels. The life span and geometric characteristics of such CFS are critical in influencing the duration and intensity of near-bed stresses that are responsible for the entrainment of sediment.

  10. In-space construction and dynamics of large space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The types of equipment and structures that will be required to construct very large spacecraft in space are discussed. One of the basic issues that must be resolved is the appropriate mix of humans and machines in the construction process. While the use of robots offers the potential for reducing the number of extra-vehicular activity (EVA) hours required for particular construction operations, the availability of humans greatly increases the reliability of complex construction tasks. A hybrid system is described which makes the best use of man and machine to provide a highly reliable and versatile construction approach. Such a system will provide an efficient method for constructing large spacecraft until fully automated, robotic devices can be perfected. Details are given on an extensive ground test program which was designed to evaluate and demonstrate large spacecraft construction. A discussion is presented on the use of the Space Station Freedom, or an appropriate derivative, as a construction facility. Finally, a construction scenario and assembly timelines are presented for constructing a 20-meter-diameter high precision reflector.

  11. The effective field theory of cosmological large scale structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrasco, John Joseph M. [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Hertzberg, Mark P. [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Senatore, Leonardo [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2012-09-20

    Large scale structure surveys will likely become the next leading cosmological probe. In our universe, matter perturbations are large on short distances and small at long scales, i.e. strongly coupled in the UV and weakly coupled in the IR. To make precise analytical predictions on large scales, we develop an effective field theory formulated in terms of an IR effective fluid characterized by several parameters, such as speed of sound and viscosity. These parameters, determined by the UV physics described by the Boltzmann equation, are measured from N-body simulations. We find that the speed of sound of the effective fluid is c2s ≈ 10–6c2 and that the viscosity contributions are of the same order. The fluid describes all the relevant physics at long scales k and permits a manifestly convergent perturbative expansion in the size of the matter perturbations δ(k) for all the observables. As an example, we calculate the correction to the power spectrum at order δ(k)4. As a result, the predictions of the effective field theory are found to be in much better agreement with observation than standard cosmological perturbation theory, already reaching percent precision at this order up to a relatively short scale k ≃ 0.24h Mpc–1.

  12. Solving Large Scale Structure in Ten Easy Steps with COLA

    CERN Document Server

    Tassev, Svetlin; Eisenstein, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    We present the COmoving Lagrangian Acceleration (COLA) method: an N-body method for solving for Large Scale Structure (LSS) in a frame that is comoving with observers following trajectories calculated in Lagrangian Perturbation Theory (LPT). Unlike standard N-body methods, the COLA method can straightforwardly trade accuracy at small-scales in order to gain computational speed without sacrificing accuracy at large scales. This is especially useful for cheaply generating large ensembles of accurate mock halo catalogs required to study galaxy clustering and weak lensing, as those catalogs are essential for performing detailed error analysis for ongoing and future surveys of LSS. As an illustration, we ran a COLA-based N-body code on a box of size 100Mpc/h with particles of mass ~5*10^9Msolar/h. Running the code with only 10 timesteps was sufficient to obtain an accurate description of halo statistics down to halo masses of at least 10^11Msolar/h. This is only at a modest speed penalty when compared to mocks obt...

  13. Large-scale structure and the intrinsic alignment of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Blazek, Jonathan; Mandelbaum, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Coherent alignments of galaxy shapes, often called "intrinsic alignments" (IA), are the most significant source of astrophysical uncertainty in weak lensing measurements. We develop the tidal alignment model of IA and demonstrate its success in describing observational data. We also describe a technique to separate IA from galaxy-galaxy lensing measurements. Applying this technique to luminous red galaxy lenses in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we constrain potential IA contamination from associated sources to be below a few percent.

  14. Credibility and Security of Weighing System for Large Structure Object

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The weighing system designed for large structure object is mainly composed of three parts. The part of hydraulic system is made up of hydraulic cylinders, high pressure hydraulic hoses and electric pumps; the part of computer controlling system comprises pressure sensors, displacement sensors, data acquisitions, RS 485 network and the computer controlling model; the part of loading system is composed of the fulcrum structure and the concrete girder. The measurement principle and composition of the weighing system are discussed in this paper. Credibility and security of the weighing system are fully considered during the design phase. The hydraulic system is controlled by pilot operated check valves in case of the sudden loss of system pressure. The states of all gauges and RS485 network are monitored by computer controlling system functioning in different modules. When the system is running incorrectly, it will be switched to manual mode and givealarm. The finite element method is employed to analyze fulcrum structure so that the system has enough intensity to be lifted. Hence the reliability of the whole system is enhanced.

  15. Large-scale filamentary structures around the Virgo cluster revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Suk; Bureau, Martin; Yoon, Hyein; Chung, Aeree; Jerjen, Helmut; Lisker, Thorsten; Jeong, Hyunjin; Sung, Eon-Chang; Lee, Youngdae; Lee, Woong; Chung, Jiwon

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the filamentary structures of galaxies around the Virgo cluster, exploiting a larger dataset based on the HyperLeda database than previous studies. In particular, this includes a large number of low-luminosity galaxies, resulting in better sampled individual structures. We confirm seven known structures in the distance range 4~$h^{-1}$~Mpc~$<$ SGY~$<$ 16~$h^{-1}$ Mpc, now identified as filaments, where SGY is the axis of the supergalactic coordinate system roughly along the line of sight. The Hubble diagram of the filament galaxies suggests they are infalling toward the main-body of the Virgo cluster. We propose that the collinear distribution of giant elliptical galaxies along the fundamental axis of the Virgo cluster is smoothly connected to two of these filaments (Leo~II~A and B). Behind the Virgo cluster (16~$h^{-1}$~Mpc~$<$ SGY~$<$ 27~$h^{-1}$~Mpc), we also identify a new filament elongated toward the NGC 5353/4 group ("NGC 5353/4 filament") and confirm a sheet that includes galaxi...

  16. Structure of Supergiant Shells in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Book, Laura G; Gruendl, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    Nine supergiant shells (SGSs) have been identified in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) based on H-alpha images, and twenty-three SGSs have been reported based on HI 21-cm line observations, but these sets do not always identify the same structures. We have examined the physical structure of the optically identified SGSs using HI channel maps and P-V diagrams to analyze the gas kinematics. There is good evidence for seven of the nine optically identified SGSs to be true shells. Of these seven H-alpha SGSs, four are the ionized inner walls of HI SGSs, while three are an ionized portion of a larger and more complex HI structure. All of the H-alpha SGSs are identified as such because they have OB associations along the periphery or in the center, with younger OB associations more often found along the periphery. After roughly 12 Myrs, if no new OB associations have been formed a SGS will cease to be identifiable at visible wavelengths. Thus, the presence and location of ionizing sources is the main distinction be...

  17. Structure of Sn1−xGex random alloys as obtained from the coherent potential approximation

    KAUST Repository

    Pulikkotil, J. J.

    2011-08-09

    The structure of the Sn1−xGex random alloys is studied using density functional theory and the coherent potential approximation. We report on the deviation of the Sn1−xGex alloys from Vegard’s law, addressing their full compositional range. The findings are compared to the related Si1−xGex alloys and to experimental results. Interestingly, the deviation from Vegard’s law is quantitatively and qualitatively different between the Sn1−xGex and Si1−xGex alloys. An almost linear dependence of the bulk modulus as a function of composition is found for Si1−xGex, whereas for Sn1−xGex the dependence is strongly nonlinear.

  18. Comparison of solar surface flows inferred from time--distance helioseismology and coherent structure tracking using HMI/SDO observations

    CERN Document Server

    Svanda, M; Rieutord, M; Burston, R; Gizon, L

    2013-01-01

    We compare measurements of horizontal flows on the surface of the Sun using helioseismic time--distance inversions and coherent structure tracking of solar granules. Tracking provides 2D horizontal flows on the solar surface, whereas the time--distance inversions estimate the full 3-D velocity flows in the shallow near-surface layers. Both techniques use HMI observations as an input. We find good correlations between the various measurements resulting from the two techniques. Further, we find a good agreement between these measurements and the time-averaged Doppler line-of-sight velocity, and also perform sanity checks on the vertical flow that resulted from the 3-D time--distance inversion.

  19. Extraction of optical scattering parameters and attenuation compensation in optical coherence tomography images of multi-layered tissue structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Lars; Frosz, Michael Henoch; Tycho, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    A recently developed analytical optical coherence tomography (OCT) model [Thrane et al., J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 17, 484 (2000)] allows the extraction of optical scattering parameters from OCT images, thereby permitting attenuation compensation in those images. By expanding this theoretical model, we...... have developed a new method for extracting optical scattering parameters from multilayered tissue structures in vivo. To verify this, we used a Monte Carlo (MC) OCT model as a numerical phantom to simulate the OCT signal for het-erogeneous multilayered tissue. Excellent agreement between the extracted...... values of the optical scattering properties of the different layers and the corresponding input reference values of the MC simulation was obtained, which demonstrates the feasibility of the method for in vivo applications. This is to our knowledge the first time such verification has been obtained...

  20. Collapse of the G d3 + ESR fine structure throughout the coherent temperature of the Gd-doped Kondo Semiconductor CeF e4P12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venegas, P. A.; Garcia, F. A.; Garcia, D. J.; Cabrera, G. G.; Avila, M. A.; Rettori, C.

    2016-12-01

    Recent experiments on G d3 + electron-spin resonance (ESR) in the filled skutterudite C e1 -xG dxF e4P12(x ≈0.001 ) , at temperatures where the host resistivity manifests a smooth insulator-metal crossover, provide evidence of the underlying Kondo physics associated with this system. At low temperatures (below T ≈160 K), C e1 -xG dxF e4P12 behaves as a Kondo insulator with a relatively large hybridization gap, and the G d3 + ESR spectra display a fine structure with Lorentzian line shape, typical of insulating media. In this work, based on previous experiments performed by the same group, we argue that the electronic gap may be attributed to the large hybridization present in the coherent regime of a Kondo lattice. Moreover, mean-field calculations suggest that the electron-phonon interaction is fundamental at explaining such hybridization. The resulting electronic structure is strongly temperature dependent, and at T*≈160 K the system undergoes an insulator-to-metal transition induced by the withdrawal of 4 f electrons from the Fermi volume, the system becoming metallic and nonmagnetic. The G d3 + ESR fine structure coalesces into a single Dysonian resonance, as in metals. Our simulations suggest that exchange narrowing via the usual Korringa mechanism is not enough to describe the thermal behavior of the G d3 + ESR spectra in the entire temperature region (4.2-300 K). We propose that the temperature activated fluctuating valence of the Ce ions is the key ingredient that fully describes this unique temperature dependence of the G d3 + ESR fine structure.

  1. The XMM/Megacam-VST/VIRMOS Large Scale Structure Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Pierre, M

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the XMM-LSS Survey is to map the large scale structure of the universe, as highlighted by clusters and groups of galaxies, out to a redshift of about 1, over a single 8x8 sq.deg. area. For the first time, this will reveal the topology of the distribution of the deep potential wells and provide statistical measurements at truly cosmological distances. In addition, clusters identified via their X-ray properties will form the basis for the first uniformly-selected, multi-wavelength survey of the evolution of clusters and individual cluster galaxies as a function of redshift. The survey will also address the very important question of the QSO distribution within the cosmic web.

  2. Testing Inflation with Large Scale Structure: Connecting Hopes with Reality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, Marcello [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Baldauf, T. [Inst. of Advanced Studies, Princeton, NJ (United States); Bond, J. Richard [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Canadian Inst. for Advanced Research, Toronto, ON (Canada); Dalal, N. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Putter, R. D. [Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (United States); California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Dore, O. [Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (United States); California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Green, Daniel [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Canadian Inst. for Advanced Research, Toronto, ON (Canada); Hirata, Chris [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Huang, Zhiqi [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Huterer, Dragan [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Jeong, Donghui [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Johnson, Matthew C. [York Univ., Toronto, ON (Canada); Perimeter Inst., Waterloo, ON (Canada); Krause, Elisabeth [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Loverde, Marilena [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Meyers, Joel [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Meeburg, Daniel [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Senatore, Leonardo [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Shandera, Sarah [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Silverstein, Eva [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Slosar, Anze [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Smith, Kendrick [Perimeter Inst., Waterloo, Toronto, ON (Canada); Zaldarriaga, Matias [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Assassi, Valentin [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom); Braden, Jonathan [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Hajian, Amir [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Kobayashi, Takeshi [Perimeter Inst., Waterloo, Toronto, ON (Canada); Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Stein, George [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Engelen, Alexander van [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2014-12-15

    The statistics of primordial curvature fluctuations are our window into the period of inflation, where these fluctuations were generated. To date, the cosmic microwave background has been the dominant source of information about these perturbations. Large-scale structure is, however, from where drastic improvements should originate. In this paper, we explain the theoretical motivations for pursuing such measurements and the challenges that lie ahead. In particular, we discuss and identify theoretical targets regarding the measurement of primordial non-Gaussianity. We argue that when quantified in terms of the local (equilateral) template amplitude f$loc\\atop{NL}$ (f$eq\\atop{NL}$), natural target levels of sensitivity are Δf$loc, eq\\atop{NL}$ ≃ 1. We highlight that such levels are within reach of future surveys by measuring 2-, 3- and 4-point statistics of the galaxy spatial distribution. This paper summarizes a workshop held at CITA (University of Toronto) on October 23-24, 2014.

  3. Statistics of Caustics in Large-Scale Structure Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldbrugge, Job L.; Hidding, Johan; van de Weygaert, Rien

    2016-10-01

    The cosmic web is a complex spatial pattern of walls, filaments, cluster nodes and underdense void regions. It emerged through gravitational amplification from the Gaussian primordial density field. Here we infer analytical expressions for the spatial statistics of caustics in the evolving large-scale mass distribution. In our analysis, following the quasi-linear Zel'dovich formalism and confined to the 1D and 2D situation, we compute number density and correlation properties of caustics in cosmic density fields that evolve from Gaussian primordial conditions. The analysis can be straightforwardly extended to the 3D situation. We moreover, are currently extending the approach to the non-linear regime of structure formation by including higher order Lagrangian approximations and Lagrangian effective field theory.

  4. Approximation of the optimal compensator for a large space structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, M. K.

    1983-01-01

    This paper considers the approximation of the optimal compensator for a Large Space Structure. The compensator is based upon a solution to the Linear Stochastic Quadratic Regulator problem. Colocation of sensors and actuators is assumed. A small gain analytical solution for the optimal compensator is obtained for a single input/single output system, i.e., certain terms in the compensator can be neglected for sufficiently small gain. The compensator is calculated in terms of the kernel to a Volterra integral operator using a Neumann series. The calculation of the compensator is based upon the C sub 0 semigroup for the infinite dimensional system. A finite dimensional approximation of the compensator is, therefore, obtained through analysis of the infinite dimensional compensator which is a compact operator.

  5. Interloper bias in future large-scale structure surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Pullen, Anthony R; Dore, Olivier; Raccanelli, Alvise

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation spectroscopic surveys will map the large-scale structure of the observable universe, using emission line galaxies as tracers. While each survey will map the sky with a specific emission line, interloping emission lines can masquerade as the survey's intended emission line at different redshifts. Interloping lines from galaxies that are not removed can contaminate the power spectrum measurement, mixing correlations from various redshifts and diluting the true signal. We assess the potential for power spectrum contamination, finding that an interloper fraction worse than 0.2% could bias power spectrum measurements for future surveys by more than 10% of statistical errors, while also biasing inferences based on the power spectrum. We also construct a formalism for predicting biases for cosmological parameter measurements, and we demonstrate that a 0.3% interloper fraction could bias measurements of the growth rate by more than 10% of the error, which can affect constraints from upcoming surveys o...

  6. Statistics of Caustics in Large-Scale Structure Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Feldbrugge, Job; van de Weygaert, Rien

    2014-01-01

    The cosmic web is a complex spatial pattern of walls, filaments, cluster nodes and underdense void regions. It emerged through gravitational amplification from the Gaussian primordial density field. Here we infer analytical expressions for the spatial statistics of caustics in the evolving large-scale mass distribution. In our analysis, following the quasi-linear Zeldovich formalism and confined to the 1D and 2D situation, we compute number density and correlation properties of caustics in cosmic density fields that evolve from Gaussian primordial conditions. The analysis can be straightforwardly extended to the 3D situation. We moreover, are currently extending the approach to the non-linear regime of structure formation by including higher order Lagrangian approximations and Lagrangian effective field theory.

  7. Solar wind stream structure at large heliocentric distances Pioneer observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazis, P. R.

    1987-01-01

    Time profiles and histograms of plasma data from Pioneers 10 and 11 are examined for the period between 1975 and 1983. During this time, Pioneer 10 traveled between a heliocentric distance of 8.7 and 30.4 AU. The velocity structure of the solar wind at these heliocentric distances is found to have one of two distinct forms: approximately 70 percent of the time the solar wind has a nearly flat velocity profile. Occasionally, this flat velocity profile is accompanied by quasi-periodic variations in density and in thermal speed consistent with the concept that the 'corotating interaction regions' which are produced by the interaction of high- and low-speed streams at intermediate heliocentric distances are replaced by 'pressure regions' in the outer heliosphere. The remaining 30 percent of the time the solar wind is marked by large (50-200 km/s) long-term (30-120 days) shifts in the average solar wind velocity.

  8. Approximation of the optimal compensator for a large space structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, M. K.

    1983-01-01

    This paper considers the approximation of the optimal compensator for a Large Space Structure. The compensator is based upon a solution to the Linear Stochastic Quadratic Regulator problem. Colocation of sensors and actuators is assumed. A small gain analytical solution for the optimal compensator is obtained for a single input/single output system, i.e., certain terms in the compensator can be neglected for sufficiently small gain. The compensator is calculated in terms of the kernel to a Volterra integral operator using a Neumann series. The calculation of the compensator is based upon the C sub 0 semigroup for the infinite dimensional system. A finite dimensional approximation of the compensator is, therefore, obtained through analysis of the infinite dimensional compensator which is a compact operator.

  9. Near optimal bispectrum estimators for large-scale structure

    CERN Document Server

    Schmittfull, Marcel; Seljak, Uroš

    2014-01-01

    Clustering of large-scale structure provides significant cosmological information through the power spectrum of density perturbations. Additional information can be gained from higher-order statistics like the bispectrum, especially to break the degeneracy between the linear halo bias $b_1$ and the amplitude of fluctuations $\\sigma_8$. We propose new simple, computationally inexpensive bispectrum statistics that are near optimal for the specific applications like bias determination. Corresponding to the Legendre decomposition of nonlinear halo bias and gravitational coupling at second order, these statistics are given by the cross-spectra of the density with three quadratic fields: the squared density, a tidal term, and a shift term. For halos and galaxies the first two have associated nonlinear bias terms $b_2$ and $b_{s^2}$, respectively, while the shift term has none in the absence of velocity bias (valid in the $k \\rightarrow 0$ limit). Thus the linear bias $b_1$ is best determined by the shift cross-spec...

  10. In-situ biofilm characterization in membrane systems using Optical Coherence Tomography: formation, structure, detachment and impact of flux change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreszer, C; Wexler, A D; Drusová, S; Overdijk, T; Zwijnenburg, A; Flemming, H-C; Kruithof, J C; Vrouwenvelder, J S

    2014-12-15

    Biofouling causes performance loss in spiral wound nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membrane operation for process and drinking water production. The development of biofilm formation, structure and detachment was studied in-situ, non-destructively with Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) in direct relation with the hydraulic biofilm resistance and membrane performance parameters: transmembrane pressure drop (TMP) and feed-channel pressure drop (FCP). The objective was to evaluate the suitability of OCT for biofouling studies, applying a membrane biofouling test cell operated at constant crossflow velocity (0.1 m s(-1)) and permeate flux (20 L m(-2)h(-1)). In time, the biofilm thickness on the membrane increased continuously causing a decline in membrane performance. Local biofilm detachment was observed at the biofilm-membrane interface. A mature biofilm was subjected to permeate flux variation (20 to 60 to 20 L m(-2)h(-1)). An increase in permeate flux caused a decrease in biofilm thickness and an increase in biofilm resistance, indicating biofilm compaction. Restoring the original permeate flux did not completely restore the original biofilm parameters: After elevated flux operation the biofilm thickness was reduced to 75% and the hydraulic resistance increased to 116% of the original values. Therefore, after a temporarily permeate flux increase the impact of the biofilm on membrane performance was stronger. OCT imaging of the biofilm with increased permeate flux revealed that the biofilm became compacted, lost internal voids, and became more dense. Therefore, membrane performance losses were not only related to biofilm thickness but also to the internal biofilm structure, e.g. caused by changes in pressure. Optical Coherence Tomography proved to be a suitable tool for quantitative in-situ biofilm thickness and morphology studies which can be carried out non-destructively and in real-time in transparent membrane biofouling monitors.

  11. In-situ biofilm characterization in membrane systems using Optical Coherence Tomography: Formation, structure, detachment and impact of flux change

    KAUST Repository

    Dreszer, C.

    2014-12-01

    Biofouling causes performance loss in spiral wound nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membrane operation for process and drinking water production. The development of biofilm formation, structure and detachment was studied in-situ, non-destructively with Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) in direct relation with the hydraulic biofilm resistance and membrane performance parameters: transmembrane pressure drop (TMP) and feed-channel pressure drop (FCP). The objective was to evaluate the suitability of OCT for biofouling studies, applying a membrane biofouling test cell operated at constant crossflow velocity (0.1 m s-1) and permeate flux (20 L m-2h-1).In time, the biofilm thickness on the membrane increased continuously causing a decline in membrane performance. Local biofilm detachment was observed at the biofilm-membrane interface. A mature biofilm was subjected to permeate flux variation (20 to 60 to 20 L m-2h-1). An increase in permeate flux caused a decrease in biofilm thickness and an increase in biofilm resistance, indicating biofilm compaction. Restoring the original permeate flux did not completely restore the original biofilm parameters: After elevated flux operation the biofilm thickness was reduced to 75% and the hydraulic resistance increased to 116% of the original values. Therefore, after a temporarily permeate flux increase the impact of the biofilm on membrane performance was stronger. OCT imaging of the biofilm with increased permeate flux revealed that the biofilm became compacted, lost internal voids, and became more dense. Therefore, membrane performance losses were not only related to biofilm thickness but also to the internal biofilm structure, e.g. caused by changes in pressure.Optical Coherence Tomography proved to be a suitable tool for quantitative in-situ biofilm thickness and morphology studies which can be carried out non-destructively and in real-time in transparent membrane biofouling monitors.

  12. On soft limits of large-scale structure correlation functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagunski, Laura

    2016-08-15

    Large-scale structure surveys have the potential to become the leading probe for precision cosmology in the next decade. To extract valuable information on the cosmological evolution of the Universe from the observational data, it is of major importance to derive accurate theoretical predictions for the statistical large-scale structure observables, such as the power spectrum and the bispectrum of (dark) matter density perturbations. Hence, one of the greatest challenges of modern cosmology is to theoretically understand the non-linear dynamics of large-scale structure formation in the Universe from first principles. While analytic approaches to describe the large-scale structure formation are usually based on the framework of non-relativistic cosmological perturbation theory, we pursue another road in this thesis and develop methods to derive generic, non-perturbative statements about large-scale structure correlation functions. We study unequal- and equal-time correlation functions of density and velocity perturbations in the limit where one of their wavenumbers becomes small, that is, in the soft limit. In the soft limit, it is possible to link (N+1)-point and N-point correlation functions to non-perturbative 'consistency conditions'. These provide in turn a powerful tool to test fundamental aspects of the underlying theory at hand. In this work, we first rederive the (resummed) consistency conditions at unequal times by using the so-called eikonal approximation. The main appeal of the unequal-time consistency conditions is that they are solely based on symmetry arguments and thus are universal. Proceeding from this, we direct our attention to consistency conditions at equal times, which, on the other hand, depend on the interplay between soft and hard modes. We explore the existence and validity of equal-time consistency conditions within and beyond perturbation theory. For this purpose, we investigate the predictions for the soft limit of the

  13. Simulating the Large-Scale Structure of HI Intensity Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Seehars, Sebastian; Witzemann, Amadeus; Refregier, Alexandre; Amara, Adam; Akeret, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Intensity mapping of neutral hydrogen (HI) is a promising observational probe of cosmology and large-scale structure. We present wide field simulations of HI intensity maps based on N-body simulations, the halo model, and a phenomenological prescription for assigning HI mass to halos. The simulations span a redshift range of 0.35 < z < 0.9 in redshift bins of width $\\Delta z \\approx 0.05$ and cover a quarter of the sky at an angular resolution of about 7'. We use the simulated intensity maps to study the impact of non-linear effects on the angular clustering of HI. We apply and compare several estimators for the angular power spectrum and its covariance. We verify that they agree with analytic predictions on large scales and study the validity of approximations based on Gaussian random fields, particularly in the context of the covariance. We discuss how our results and the simulated maps can be useful for planning and interpreting future HI intensity mapping surveys.

  14. Simulating the large-scale structure of HI intensity maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seehars, Sebastian; Paranjape, Aseem; Witzemann, Amadeus; Refregier, Alexandre; Amara, Adam; Akeret, Joel

    2016-03-01

    Intensity mapping of neutral hydrogen (HI) is a promising observational probe of cosmology and large-scale structure. We present wide field simulations of HI intensity maps based on N-body simulations of a 2.6 Gpc / h box with 20483 particles (particle mass 1.6 × 1011 Msolar / h). Using a conditional mass function to populate the simulated dark matter density field with halos below the mass resolution of the simulation (108 Msolar / h assign HI to those halos according to a phenomenological halo to HI mass relation. The simulations span a redshift range of 0.35 lesssim z lesssim 0.9 in redshift bins of width Δ z ≈ 0.05 and cover a quarter of the sky at an angular resolution of about 7'. We use the simulated intensity maps to study the impact of non-linear effects and redshift space distortions on the angular clustering of HI. Focusing on the autocorrelations of the maps, we apply and compare several estimators for the angular power spectrum and its covariance. We verify that these estimators agree with analytic predictions on large scales and study the validity of approximations based on Gaussian random fields, particularly in the context of the covariance. We discuss how our results and the simulated maps can be useful for planning and interpreting future HI intensity mapping surveys.

  15. Using Large Scale Structure to test Multifield Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, Simone

    2014-01-01

    Primordial non-Gaussianity of local type is known to produce a scale-dependent contribution to the galaxy bias. Several classes of multi-field inflationary models predict non-Gaussian bias which is stochastic, in the sense that dark matter and halos don't trace each other perfectly on large scales. In this work, we forecast the ability of next-generation Large Scale Structure surveys to constrain common types of primordial non-Gaussianity like $f_{NL}$, $g_{NL}$ and $\\tau_{NL}$ using halo bias, including stochastic contributions. We provide fitting functions for statistical errors on these parameters which can be used for rapid forecasting or survey optimization. A next-generation survey with volume $V = 25 h^{-3}$Mpc$^3$, median redshift $z = 0.7$ and mean bias $b_g = 2.5$, can achieve $\\sigma(f_{NL}) = 6$, $\\sigma(g_{NL}) = 10^5$ and $\\sigma(\\tau_{NL}) = 10^3$ if no mass information is available. If halo masses are available, we show that optimally weighting the halo field in order to reduce sample variance...

  16. The fine structure of endothelium of large arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BUCK, R C

    1958-03-25

    Endothelium of large arteries from several species was studied in thin sections with the electron microscope. Before sacrifice, some animals received an intravenous injection of colloidal thorium dioxide which was visualized in the sections. Surface replicas were prepared by carbon evaporation on either frozen-dried endothelium or on endothelium dried by sublimation of naphthalene with which the tissue had been impregnated. Cell boundaries, stained with silver, were observed in sections and also from the surface by stripping off the inner part of the endothelium. In addition to the usual cytoplasmic organelles, the endothelial cells showed certain characteristic features, namely, large invaginated pockets communicating with the arterial lumen, numerous much smaller vesicular structures immediately under the plasma membrane and apparently also communicating with the lumen, and inclusions, into which injected thorium particles were incorporated. Intercellular boundaries appeared as regular double membranes in thin sections, and they were outlined by a double row of silver granules after silver staining. No evidence was obtained of permeation of intracellular spaces by colloidal thorium.

  17. Large Scale Structure in the Epoch of Reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koekemoer, Anton; Mould, Jeremy; Cooke, Jeffrey; Wyithe, Stuart; Lidman, Christopher; Trenti, Michele; Abbott, Tim; Kunder, Andrea; Barone-Nugent, Robert; Tescari, Edoardo; Katsianis, Antonios

    2014-02-01

    We propose to capitalize on the high red sensitivity and large field of view of DECam to detect the brightest and rarest galaxies at z=6-7. Our 2012 results show the signature of large scale structure with wavenumber of order 0.1 inverse Mpc in line with expectations of primordial non-gaussianity. But the signal to noise in one deep field from two nights' data is insufficient for a robust conclusion. Ten nights' data will do the job. These data will also constrain the galaxy contribution to reionization by enabling a tighter constraint on the full galaxy luminosity function, including the faint end. The observations will be executed with a cadence and depth that will enable the detection of super-luminous supernovae at z=6-7. Super-luminous supernovae are a recently observed class of supernovae that are 10-100x more luminous than typical supernovae. This class includes pair- instability supernovae that are a rare, third type of supernova explosion in which only 3 events are known. The proposed observations will greatly extend the current reach of supernovae research, examining their occurrence rate and properties near the epoch of reionization.

  18. Optical coherence tomography using images of hair structure and dyes penetrating into the hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsugita, Tetsuya; Iwai, Toshiaki

    2014-11-01

    Hair dyes are commonly evaluated by the appearance of the hair after dyeing. However, this approach cannot simultaneously assess how deep the dye has penetrated into hair. For simultaneous assessment of the appearance and the interior of hair, we developed a visible-range red, green, and blue (RGB) (three primary colors)-optical coherence tomography (OCT) using an RGB LED light source. We then evaluated a phantom model based on the assumption that the sample's absorbability in the vertical direction affects the tomographic imaging. Consistent with theory, our device showed higher resolution than conventional OCT with far-red light. In the experiment on the phantom model, we confirmed that the tomographic imaging is affected by absorbability unique to the sample. Furthermore, we verified that permeability can be estimated from this tomographic image. We also identified for the first time the relationship between penetration of the dye into hair and characteristics of wavelength by tomographic imaging of dyed hair. We successfully simultaneously assessed the appearance of dyed hair and inward penetration of the dye without preparing hair sections. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. CORRELATION OF MICROVASCULAR STRUCTURES ON OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY ANGIOGRAPHY WITH VISUAL ACUITY IN RETINAL VEIN OCCLUSION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Joon-Won; Yoo, Romi; Jo, Youn Hye; Kim, Hyung Chan

    2017-09-01

    To analyze the correlation of superficial and deep capillary plexuses using optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography with visual acuity in eyes with retinal vein occlusion (RVO). We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 33 patients with retinal vein occlusion (RVO; branch retinal vein occlusion in 21 patients, central retinal vein occlusion in 12 patients) and included 33 healthy subjects as a control group, who were evaluated by OCT angiography. The OCT angiography was performed on a 3 mm × 3-mm region centered on the fovea and parafoveal area. The foveal avascular zone (FAZ), and foveal and parafoveal vascular density (VD) in superficial and deep vascular plexuses were analyzed using OCT angiography. The area of superficial and deep FAZ in eyes with RVO were larger than those in fellow eyes and control eyes (P = 0.034, P = 0.018). The superficial and deep parafoveal VDs in eyes with RVO were significantly lower than those in fellow eyes and control eyes (P = 0.001, Pretinal vein occlusion (85.7%) showed a high concordance rate with respect to the location of branch retinal vein occlusion and the lowest parafoveal VD area. The multivariate analysis showed that the deep parafoveal VD was associated with best-corrected visual acuity. The OCT angiography allows to detect FAZ enlargement, increased parafoveal capillary nonperfusion, and decreased parafoveal VD in eyes with RVO. The area of superficial FAZ and the parafoveal VD are correlated with best-corrected visual acuity in eyes with RVO.

  20. Probing Large-scale Coherence between Spitzer IR and Chandra X-Ray Source-subtracted Cosmic Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelluti, N.; Arendt, R.; Kashlinsky, A.; Li, Y.; Hasinger, G.; Helgason, K.; Urry, M.; Natarajan, P.; Finoguenov, A.

    2017-09-01

    We present new measurements of the large-scale clustering component of the cross-power spectra of the source-subtracted Spitzer-IRAC cosmic infrared background and Chandra-ACIS cosmic X-ray background surface brightness fluctuations Our investigation uses data from the Chandra Deep Field South, Hubble Deep Field North, Extended Groth Strip/AEGIS field, and UDS/SXDF surveys, comprising 1160 Spitzer hours and ∼12 Ms of Chandra data collected over a total area of 0.3 deg2. We report the first (>5σ) detection of a cross-power signal on large angular scales >20″ between [0.5–2] keV and the 3.6 and 4.5 μm bands, at ∼5σ and 6.3σ significance, respectively. The correlation with harder X-ray bands is marginally significant. Comparing the new observations with existing models for the contribution of the known unmasked source population at z < 7, we find an excess of about an order of magnitude at 5σ confidence. We discuss possible interpretations for the origin of this excess in terms of the contribution from accreting early black holes (BHs), including both direct collapse BHs and primordial BHs, as well as from scattering in the interstellar medium and intra-halo light.

  1. Large scale structures in liquid crystal/clay colloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duijneveldt, Jeroen S van [School of Chemistry, Cantock' s Close, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); Klein, Susanne [HP Laboratories, Filton Road, Stoke Gifford, Bristol BS34 8QZ (United Kingdom); Leach, Edward [HP Laboratories, Filton Road, Stoke Gifford, Bristol BS34 8QZ (United Kingdom); Pizzey, Claire [School of Chemistry, Cantock' s Close, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); Richardson, Robert M [H H Wills Physics Laboratory, Tyndall Avenue, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom)

    2005-04-20

    Suspensions of three different clays in K15, a thermotropic liquid crystal, have been studied by optical microscopy and small angle x-ray scattering. The three clays were claytone AF, a surface treated natural montmorillonite, laponite RD, a synthetic hectorite, and mined sepiolite. The claytone and laponite were sterically stabilized whereas sepiolite formed a relatively stable suspension in K15 without any surface treatment. Micrographs of the different suspensions revealed that all three suspensions contained large scale structures. The nature of these aggregates was investigated using small angle x-ray scattering. For the clays with sheet-like particles, claytone and laponite, the flocs contain a mixture of stacked and single platelets. The basal spacing in the stacks was independent of particle concentration in the suspension and the phase of the solvent. The number of platelets in the stack and their percentage in the suspension varied with concentration and the aspect ratio of the platelets. The lath shaped sepiolite did not show any tendency to organize into ordered structures. Here the aggregates are networks of randomly oriented single rods.

  2. Large amplitude nonlinear structures in the nighttime polar mesosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharaj, Shimul K.; Bharuthram, Ramashwar; Singh Lakhina, Gurbax; Muralikrishna, Polinaya; Singh, Satyavir

    2016-07-01

    The existence of large amplitude potential structures will be investigated for a plasma composed of negative ions, positive ions, electrons and an additional fourth component of charged (usually positive) nano-sized ions in an attempt to model the plasma composition in the nighttime polar mesosphere (˜80 - 90 km altitude) [1]. The fourth ionic component becomes positively charged if there is a high enough concentration of negative ions which are sufficiently heavy. The positive charge on the fourth component can be explained by the capture of currents, and is not a result of photo-emission and secondary electron emission processes. Consequently, if the negative ions are much lighter, then the fourth ion component will become negatively charged. The charged ion species will be treated as inertial species which are cold or adiabatic, whilst the electrons will be considered to be Boltzmann-distributed (isothermal). Taking into consideration not only the dynamics of the heaviest species (dust-acoustic) but also the lighter ions (ion-acoustic), the theoretical study will use the Sagdeev pseudo-potential formalism to explore the existence of arbitrary amplitude solitons and double layer potential structures. [1] Observations of positively charged nanoparticles in the nighttime polar mesosphere, M. Rapp, J. Hedin, I. Strelnikova, M. Friederich, J. Gumbel, and F.˜J. Lübken, Geophys. Res. Letters. 32, L23821, doi:10.1029/2005GL024676 (2005).

  3. Structure of the Large Magellanic Cloud using red clump stars

    CERN Document Server

    Subramanian, Smitha

    2010-01-01

    The structural parameters of the disk of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) are estimated.We used the red clump stars from the VI photometric data of the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE III) survey and from the Magellanic Cloud Photometric Survey (MCPS) for the estimation of inclination and position angle of line of nodes of the LMC disk. The dereddened peak I magnitude of the red clump stars in each subregion is used to obtain the relative distances and hence the z coordinate. The RA and Dec of each sub-region is converted into x & y cartesian coordinates. A weighted least square plane fitting method is applied to this x,y,z data to estimate the structural parameters of the LMC disk. We find an inclination of i =23.0 plus or minus 0.8 and PAlon = 163.7 plus or minus 1.5 for the LMC disk using the OGLE III data and an inclination of i=37.4 plus or minus 2.3 and PAlon= 141.2 plus or minus 3.7 for the LMC disk using the MCPS data. Extra-planar features which are in front as well as behind the f...

  4. K-mouflage Cosmology: Formation of Large-Scale Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Brax, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    We study structure formation in K-mouflage cosmology whose main feature is the absence of screening effect on quasi-linear scales. We show that the growth of structure at the linear level is both affected by a new time dependent Newton constant and a friction term which depend on the background evolution. These combine with the modified background evolution to change the growth rate by up to ten percent since $z\\sim 2$. At the one loop level, we find that the non-linearities of the K-mouflage models are mostly due to the matter dynamics and that the scalar perturbations can be treated at tree level. We also study the spherical collapse in K-mouflage models and show that the critical density contrast deviates from its $\\Lambda$-CDM value and that, as a result, the halo mass function is modified for large masses by an order one factor. Finally we consider the deviation of the matter spectrum from $\\Lambda$-CDM on non-linear scales where a halo model is utilised. We find that the discrepancy peaks around $1\\ h{\\...

  5. Large-scale structure and matter in the Universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, J A

    2003-11-15

    This paper summarizes the physical mechanisms that encode the type and quantity of cosmological matter in the properties of large-scale structure, and reviews the application of such tests to current datasets. The key lengths of the horizon size at matter-radiation equality and at last scattering determine the total matter density and its ratio to the relativistic density; acoustic oscillations can diagnose whether the matter is collisionless, and small-scale structure or its absence can limit the mass of any dark-matter relic particle. The most stringent constraints come from combining data on present-day galaxy clustering with data on CMB anisotropies. Such an analysis breaks the degeneracies inherent in either dataset alone, and proves that the Universe is very close to flat. The matter content is accurately consistent with pure cold dark matter, with ca. 25% of the critical density, and fluctuations that are scalar only, adiabatic and scale invariant. It is demonstrated that these conclusions cannot be evaded by adjusting either the equation of state of the vacuum, or the total relativistic density.

  6. Analysis of the large-scale structure of the Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doroshkevich, A.G.; Kotok, E.V.; Shandarin, S.F.; Sigov, Yu.S. (AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. of Applied Mathematics)

    1983-02-01

    A method of calculation of the large-scale structure of the Universe based on the adiabatic theory (A-theory) of its formation is proposed. The initial spectrum of perturbation is related to some observable parameters of the structure, which are objectively defined as a set of regions enclosed by the border of constant density rho=rhosub(c) (rhosub(c) is a free parameter of the theory). The parameters are: (1) W is the fraction of matter within the regions of high density rho > rhosub(c); (2) L is the mean size of a region defined as the diameter of the circle circumscribed around the region; (3) D is a mean separation of dense regions taken along a straight line and (4) n is a mean number of dense regions in a unit area. Equations relate these parameters to the fundamental length which is associated with the initial spectrum. The conclusions of the theory are checked by several numerical models and are applied to observational parameters.

  7. Large Area Nondestructive Evaluation of a Fatigue Loaded Composite Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Burke, Eric R.; Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2016-01-01

    Large area nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspections are required for fatigue testing of composite structures to track damage initiation and growth. Of particular interest is the progression of damage leading to ultimate failure to validate damage progression models. In this work, passive thermography and acoustic emission NDE were used to track damage growth up to failure of a composite three-stringer panel. Fourteen acoustic emission sensors were placed on the composite panel. The signals from the array were acquired simultaneously and allowed for acoustic emission location. In addition, real time thermal data of the composite structure were acquired during loading. Details are presented on the mapping of the acoustic emission locations directly onto the thermal imagery to confirm areas of damage growth leading to ultimate failure. This required synchronizing the acoustic emission and thermal data with the applied loading. In addition, processing of the thermal imagery which included contrast enhancement, removal of optical barrel distortion and correction of angular rotation before mapping the acoustic event locations are discussed.

  8. Alignment between galaxies and large-scale structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. Faltenbacher; Cheng Li; Simon D. M. White; Yi-Peng Jing; Shu-De Mao; Jie Wang

    2009-01-01

    Based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR6 (SDSS) and the Millennium Simulation (MS), we investigate the alignment between galaxies and large-scale struc-ture. For this purpose, we develop two new statistical tools, namely the alignment cor-relation function and the cos(20)-statistic. The former is a two-dimensional extension of the traditional two-point correlation function and the latter is related to the ellipticity correlation function used for cosmic shear measurements. Both are based on the cross correlation between a sample of galaxies with orientations and a reference sample which represents the large-scale structure. We apply the new statistics to the SDSS galaxy cat-alog. The alignment correlation function reveals an overabundance of reference galaxies along the major axes of red, luminous (L L*) galaxies out to projected separations of 60 h-1Mpc. The signal increases with central galaxy luminosity. No alignment signal is detected for blue galaxies. The cos(2θ)-statistic yields very similar results. Starting from a MS semi-analytic galaxy catalog, we assign an orientation to each red, luminous and central galaxy, based on that of the central region of the host halo (with size similar to that of the stellar galaxy). As an alternative, we use the orientation of the host halo itself. We find a mean projected misalignment between a halo and its central region of ~ 25°. The misalignment decreases slightly with increasing luminosity of the central galaxy. Using the orientations and luminosities of the semi-analytic galaxies, we repeat our alignment analysis on mock surveys of the MS. Agreement with the SDSS results is good if the central orientations are used. Predictions using the halo orientations as proxies for cen-tral galaxy orientations overestimate the observed alignment by more than a factor of 2. Finally, the large volume of the MS allows us to generate a two-dimensional map of the alignment correlation function, which shows the reference galaxy

  9. Long-range and wide field of view optical coherence tomography for in vivo 3D imaging of large volume object based on akinetic programmable swept source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shaozhen; Xu, Jingjiang; Wang, Ruikang K

    2016-11-01

    Current optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging suffers from short ranging distance and narrow imaging field of view (FOV). There is growing interest in searching for solutions to these limitations in order to expand further in vivo OCT applications. This paper describes a solution where we utilize an akinetic swept source for OCT implementation to enable ~10 cm ranging distance, associated with the use of a wide-angle camera lens in the sample arm to provide a FOV of ~20 x 20 cm(2). The akinetic swept source operates at 1300 nm central wavelength with a bandwidth of 100 nm. We propose an adaptive calibration procedure to the programmable akinetic light source so that the sensitivity of the OCT system over ~10 cm ranging distance is substantially improved for imaging of large volume samples. We demonstrate the proposed swept source OCT system for in vivo imaging of entire human hands and faces with an unprecedented FOV (up to 400 cm(2)). The capability of large-volume OCT imaging with ultra-long ranging and ultra-wide FOV is expected to bring new opportunities for in vivo biomedical applications.

  10. Real-time display with large field of view on fourier domain optical coherence tomography at 1310 nm wavelength for dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qing; Hou, Jue; Fu, Ling

    2012-06-01

    A Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) system with 1310 nm light was demonstrated to study inflammatory human skin and the skin coated with a moisturizer in vivo. By using a graphics processing unit (GPU), the display rate could reach 20 frames/s with 1000 A-scans contained in one image. The field of view (FOV) of the cross-sectional image is 7 mm in the lateral direction and the penetration depth is ˜1 mm in skin. The result shows that, in inflammatory skin, the epidermis became thicker and had a decreased scattering; furthermore, the region of the severe lesion present an uneven thickness of the epidermis compared with the peripheral area. For the result of a finger tip coated with the moisturizer, the antireflection effect was significant and the stratum corneum became more transparent. In this letter, we demonstrated that real-time display with a large FOV could enable screening of a large tissue area; thereby increasing the dermatologic diagnostic potential of the method by permitting a comparison of the lesion and the normal peripheral region.

  11. High-power coherent GaAs-based monolithic semiconductor lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botez, Dan

    2001-11-01

    Stable-beam operation to high coherent powers from large aperture devices can only be obtained from active-photonic- lattice (APL) structures of large built-in index step. Resonant phase-locked arrays of antiguides, so called ROW array, have provided 1.6W CW coherent power from 200micrometers - wide apertures. Two-dimensional surface-emitting APLs combining ROW arrays and DFB-DBR structures with central (pi) phase-shift are capable of providing coherent powers in the multi-watt range. ARROW-type devices, simpler APL structures, hold the potential for emitting 1W single-mode CW power reliability in stable beam patterns.

  12. Observation and analysis of emergent coherent structures in a high-energy-density shock-driven planar mixing layer experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doss, F. W.; Flippo, K. A.; Merritt, E. C.

    2016-08-01

    Coherent emergent structures have been observed in a high-energy-density supersonic mixing layer experiment. A millimeter-scale shock tube uses lasers to drive Mbar shocks into the tube volume. The shocks are driven into initially solid foam (60 mg /cm3 ) hemicylinders separated by an Al or Ti metal tracer strip; the components are vaporized by the drive. Before the experiment disassembles, the shocks cross at the tube center, creating a very fast (Δ U > 200 km/s) shear-unstable zone. After several nanoseconds, an expanding mixing layer is measured, and after 10+ ns we observe the appearance of streamwise-periodic, spanwise-aligned rollers associated with the primary Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of mixing layers. We additionally image roller pairing and spanwise-periodic streamwise-aligned filaments associated with secondary instabilities. New closures are derived to connect length scales of these structures to estimates of fluctuating velocity data otherwise unobtainable in the high-energy-density environment. This analysis indicates shear-induced specific turbulent energies 103-104 times higher than the nearest conventional experiments. Because of difficulties in continuously driving systems under these conditions and the harshness of the experimental environment limiting the usable diagnostics, clear evidence of these developing structures has never before been observed in this regime.

  13. Drawing the Line between Constituent Structure and Coherence Relations in Visual Narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Neil; Bender, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Theories of visual narrative understanding have often focused on the changes in meaning across a sequence, like shifts in characters, spatial location, and causation, as cues for breaks in the structure of a discourse. In contrast, the theory of visual narrative grammar posits that hierarchic "grammatical" structures operate at the…

  14. Polyglutamine aggregate structure in vitro and in vivo; new avenues for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas M Perney

    Full Text Available Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS microscopy is applied for the first time for the evaluation of the protein secondary structure of polyglutamine (polyQ aggregates in vivo. Our approach demonstrates the potential for translating information about protein structure that has been obtained in vitro by X-ray diffraction into a microscopy technique that allows the same protein structure to be detected in vivo. For these studies, fibres of polyQ containing peptides (D(2Q(15K(2 were assembled in vitro and examined by electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction methods; the fibril structure was shown to be cross β-sheet. The same polyQ fibres were evaluated by Raman spectroscopy and this further confirmed the β-sheet structure, but indicated that the structure is highly rigid, as indicated by the strong Amide I signal at 1659 cm(-1. CARS spectra were simulated using the Raman spectrum taking into account potential non-resonant contributions, providing evidence that the Amide I signal remains strong, but slightly shifted to lower wavenumbers. Combined CARS (1657 cm(-1 and multi-photon fluorescence microscopy of chimeric fusions of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP with polyQ (Q40 expressed in the body wall muscle cells of Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes (1 day old adult hermaphrodites revealed diffuse and foci patterns of Q40-YFP that were both fluorescent and exhibited stronger CARS (1657 cm(-1 signals than in surrounding tissues at the resonance for the cross β-sheet polyQ in vitro.

  15. Inflationary tensor fossils in large-scale structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimastrogiovanni, Emanuela [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Fasiello, Matteo [Department of Physics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Jeong, Donghui [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kamionkowski, Marc, E-mail: ema@physics.umn.edu, E-mail: mrf65@case.edu, E-mail: duj13@psu.edu, E-mail: kamion@jhu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 3400 N. Charles St., Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Inflation models make specific predictions for a tensor-scalar-scalar three-point correlation, or bispectrum, between one gravitational-wave (tensor) mode and two density-perturbation (scalar) modes. This tensor-scalar-scalar correlation leads to a local power quadrupole, an apparent departure from statistical isotropy in our Universe, as well as characteristic four-point correlations in the current mass distribution in the Universe. So far, the predictions for these observables have been worked out only for single-clock models in which certain consistency conditions between the tensor-scalar-scalar correlation and tensor and scalar power spectra are satisfied. Here we review the requirements on inflation models for these consistency conditions to be satisfied. We then consider several examples of inflation models, such as non-attractor and solid-inflation models, in which these conditions are put to the test. In solid inflation the simplest consistency conditions are already violated whilst in the non-attractor model we find that, contrary to the standard scenario, the tensor-scalar-scalar correlator probes directly relevant model-dependent information. We work out the predictions for observables in these models. For non-attractor inflation we find an apparent local quadrupolar departure from statistical isotropy in large-scale structure but that this power quadrupole decreases very rapidly at smaller scales. The consistency of the CMB quadrupole with statistical isotropy then constrains the distance scale that corresponds to the transition from the non-attractor to attractor phase of inflation to be larger than the currently observable horizon. Solid inflation predicts clustering fossils signatures in the current galaxy distribution that may be large enough to be detectable with forthcoming, and possibly even current, galaxy surveys.

  16. Near optimal bispectrum estimators for large-scale structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmittfull, Marcel; Baldauf, Tobias; Seljak, Uroš

    2015-02-01

    Clustering of large-scale structure provides significant cosmological information through the power spectrum of density perturbations. Additional information can be gained from higher-order statistics like the bispectrum, especially to break the degeneracy between the linear halo bias b1 and the amplitude of fluctuations σ8. We propose new simple, computationally inexpensive bispectrum statistics that are near optimal for the specific applications like bias determination. Corresponding to the Legendre decomposition of nonlinear halo bias and gravitational coupling at second order, these statistics are given by the cross-spectra of the density with three quadratic fields: the squared density, a tidal term, and a shift term. For halos and galaxies the first two have associated nonlinear bias terms b2 and bs2 , respectively, while the shift term has none in the absence of velocity bias (valid in the k →0 limit). Thus the linear bias b1 is best determined by the shift cross-spectrum, while the squared density and tidal cross-spectra mostly tighten constraints on b2 and bs2 once b1 is known. Since the form of the cross-spectra is derived from optimal maximum-likelihood estimation, they contain the full bispectrum information on bias parameters. Perturbative analytical predictions for their expectation values and covariances agree with simulations on large scales, k ≲0.09 h /Mpc at z =0.55 with Gaussian R =20 h-1 Mpc smoothing, for matter-matter-matter, and matter-matter-halo combinations. For halo-halo-halo cross-spectra the model also needs to include corrections to the Poisson stochasticity.

  17. Relation of microchannel structure identified by optical coherence tomography to plaque vulnerability in patients with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitabata, Hironori; Tanaka, Atsushi; Kubo, Takashi; Takarada, Shigeho; Kashiwagi, Manabu; Tsujioka, Hiroto; Ikejima, Hideyuki; Kuroi, Akio; Kataiwa, Hideaki; Ishibashi, Kohei; Komukai, Kenichi; Tanimoto, Takashi; Ino, Yasushi; Hirata, Kumiko; Nakamura, Nobuo; Mizukoshi, Masato; Imanishi, Toshio; Akasaka, Takashi

    2010-06-15

    Increased neovascularization in atherosclerotic plaques is associated with plaque vulnerability. The high resolution of optical coherence tomography (OCT) might provide a chance to directly visualize plaque neovascularization in vivo. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relation between microchannels in culprit plaques identified by OCT and plaque vulnerability in patients with coronary artery disease. A total of 63 consecutive patients with coronary artery disease who had undergone both OCT and intravascular ultrasound before any interventions to examine culprit lesion morphologies were enrolled. Microchannel was defined as a no-signal tubuloluminal structure on the cross-sectional optical coherence tomographic image. Microchannels were found in 24 (38%) of the 63 patients. The patients were divided into 2 groups according to the presence or absence of microchannels. The frequency of plaque rupture tended to be greater in the microchannel group (50% vs 28%, p = 0.11). The thickness of the fibrous cap (median 60 vs 100 microm, p = 0.001) was significantly less in the patients with microchannels, and significant differences were found in the frequency of thin-cap fibroatheroma (54% vs 21%, p = 0.012) and positive remodeling (67% vs 36%, p = 0.02) between the 2 groups. The high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels in the microchannel group was significantly greater than those in the no-microchannel group (median 0.27 vs 0.13 mg/dl, p = 0.015). Moreover, increased microchannel counts were associated with greater high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels (p = 0.01). In conclusion, a significant relation was found between the presence of microchannels in plaques identified by OCT and plaque vulnerability in patients with coronary artery disease.

  18. Shape-dependent global deformation modes of large protein structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloshevsky, Gennady V.; Hassanein, Ahmed; Jordan, Peter C.

    2010-05-01

    Conformational changes are central to the functioning of pore-forming proteins that open and close their molecular gates in response to external stimuli such as pH, ionic strength, membrane voltage or ligand binding. Normal mode analysis (NMA) is used to identify and characterize the slowest motions in the gA, KcsA, ClC-ec1, LacY and LeuT Aa proteins at the onset of gating. Global deformation modes of the essentially cylindrical gA, KcsA, LacY and LeuT Aa biomolecules are reminiscent of global twisting, transverse and longitudinal motions in a homogeneous elastic rod. The ClC-ec1 protein executes a splaying motion in the plane perpendicular to the lipid bilayer. These global collective deformations are determined by protein shape. New methods, all-atom Monte Carlo Normal Mode Following and its simplification using a rotation-translation of protein blocks (RTB), are described and applied to gain insight into the nature of gating transitions in gA and KcsA. These studies demonstrate the severe limitations of standard NMA in characterizing the structural rearrangements associated with gating transitions. Comparison of all-atom and RTB transition pathways in gA clearly illustrates the impact of the rigid protein block approximation and the need to include all degrees of freedom and their relaxation in computational studies of protein gating. The effects of atomic level structure, pH, hydrogen bonding and charged residues on the large-scale conformational changes associated with gating transitions are discussed.

  19. Investigating protein structure and folding with coherent two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiz, Carlos; Peng, Chunte; Reppert, Michael; Jones, Kevin; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2012-02-01

    We present a new technique to quantitatively determine the secondary structure composition of proteins in solution based on ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectroscopy. The percentage of residues in alpha-helix, beta-sheet, and unstructured conformations is extracted from a principal component analysis of the measured amide-I 2DIR spectra. We benchmark the method against a library of commercially-available proteins by comparing the predicted structure compositions with the x-ray crystal structures. The new technique offers sub-picosecond time resolution, and can be used to study systems that are difficult to study with conventional methods such as gels, intrinsically disordered peptides, fibers, and aggregates. We use the technique to investigate the structural changes and timescales associated with folding and denaturing of small proteins via equilibrium and transient temperature-jump 2DIR spectroscopy.

  20. Substrate stiffness-modulated registry phase correlations in cardiomyocytes map structural order to coherent beating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasbiswas, K.; Majkut, S.; Discher, D. E.; Safran, Samuel A.

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments show that both striation, an indication of the structural registry in muscle fibres, as well as the contractile strains produced by beating cardiac muscle cells can be optimized by substrate stiffness. Here we show theoretically how the substrate rigidity dependence of the registry data can be mapped onto that of the strain measurements. We express the elasticity-mediated structural registry as a phase-order parameter using a statistical physics approach that takes the noise and disorder inherent in biological systems into account. By assuming that structurally registered myofibrils also tend to beat in phase, we explain the observed dependence of both striation and strain measurements of cardiomyocytes on substrate stiffness in a unified manner. The agreement of our ideas with experiment suggests that the correlated beating of heart cells may be limited by the structural order of the myofibrils, which in turn is regulated by their elastic environment.