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Sample records for lansce facility target

  1. LANSCE target system performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.J.; Gilmore, J.S.; Robinson, H.; Legate, G.L.; Bridge, A.; Sanchez, R.J.; Brewton, R.J.; Woods, R.; Hughes, H.G. III

    1989-01-01

    We measured neutron beam fluxes at LANSCE using gold foil activation techniques. We did an extensive computer simulation of the as-built LANSCE Target/Moderator/Reflector/Shield geometry. We used this mockup in a Monte Carlo calculation to predict LANSCE neutronic performance for comparison with measured results. For neutron beam fluxes at 1 eV, the ratio of measured data to calculated varies from ∼0.6-0.9. The computed 1 eV neutron leakage at the moderator surface is 3.9 x 10 10 n/eV-sr-s-μA for LANSCE high-intensity water moderators. The corresponding values for the LANSCE high-resolution water moderator and the liquid hydrogen moderator are 3.3 and 2.9 x 10 10 , respectively. LANSCE predicted moderator intensities (per proton) for a tungsten target are essentially the same as ISIS predicted moderator intensities for a depleted uranium target. The calculated LANSCE steady state unperturbed thermal (E 13 n/cm 2 -s. The unique LANSCE split-target/flux-trap-moderator system is performing exceedingly well. The system has operated without a target or moderator change for over three years at nominal proton currents of ∼25 μA of 800-MeV protons. (author)

  2. Overview of progress on the improvement projects for the LANSCE accelerator and target facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macek, R.J.; Browne, J.; Brun, T.; Donahue, J.B.; Fitzgerald, D.H.; Hoffman, E.; Pynn, R.; Schriber, S.; Weinacht, D.

    1997-01-01

    Three projects have been initiated since 1994 to improve the performance of the accelerator and target facilities for the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The LANSCE Reliability Improvement Project (LRIP) was separated into two phases. Phase 1, completed in 1995, targeted near-term improvements to beam reliability and availability that could be completed in one-year's time. Phase 2, now underway and scheduled for completion in May 1998, consists of two projects: (a) implementation of direct H-injection for the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) and (b) an upgrade of the target/moderator system for the short pulse spallation neutron (SPSS) source. The latter will reduce the target change-out time from about 10 months to about three weeks. The third project, the SPSS Enhancement Project, is aimed at increasing the PSR output beam current to 200 microA at 30 Hz and providing up to seven new neutron scattering instruments

  3. Lessons from shielding retrofits at the LAMPF/LANSCE/PSR accelerator, beam lines and target facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macek, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    The experience in the past 7 years to improve the shielding and radiation control systems at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) and the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) provides important lessons for the design of radiation control systems at future, high beam power proton accelerator facilities. Major issues confronted and insight gained in developing shielding criteria and in the use of radiation interlocks are discussed. For accelerators and beam lines requiring hands-on-maintenance, our experience suggests that shielding criteria based on accident scenarios will be more demanding than criteria based on routinely encountered beam losses. Specification and analysis of the appropriate design basis accident become all important. Mitigation by active protection systems of the consequences of potential, but severe, prompt radiation accidents has been advocated as an alternate choice to shielding retrofits for risk management at both facilities. Acceptance of active protection systems has proven elusive primarily because of the difficulty in providing convincing proof that failure of active systems (to mitigate the accident) is incredible. Results from extensive shielding assessment studies are presented including data from experimental beam spill tests, comparisons with model estimates, and evidence bearing on the limitations of line-of-sight attenuation models in complex geometries. The scope and significant characteristics of major shielding retrofit projects at the LAMPF site are illustrated by the project to improve the shielding beneath a road over a multiuse, high-intensity beam line (Line D)

  4. Overview of the Neutron experimental facilities at LANSCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mocko, Michal [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-30

    This presentation gives an overview of the neutron experimental facilities at LANSCE. The layout is mentioned in detail, with a map of the south-side experimental facilities, information on Target-4 and the Lujan Center. Then it goes into detail about neutron sources, specifically continuous versus pulsed. Target 4 is then discussed. In conclusion, we have introduced the south-side experimental facilities in operation at LANSCE. 1L target and Target 4 provide complementary neutron energy spectra. Two spallation neutron sources taken together cover more than 11 orders of magnitude in neutron energy.

  5. Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Nuclear Science Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Ronald Owen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wender, Steve [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-06-19

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) facilities for Nuclear Science consist of a high-energy "white" neutron source (Target 4) with 6 flight paths, three low-energy nuclear science flight paths at the Lujan Center, and a proton reaction area. The neutron beams produced at the Target 4 complement those produced at the Lujan Center because they are of much higher energy and have shorter pulse widths. The neutron sources are driven by the 800-MeV proton beam of the LANSCE linear accelerator. With these facilities, LANSCE is able to deliver neutrons with energies ranging from a milli-electron volt to several hundreds of MeV, as well as proton beams with a wide range of energy, time and intensity characteristics. The facilities, instruments and research programs are described briefly.

  6. Recent operational experiments at the LANSCE facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rybarcyk, Lawrence J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-09-15

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) consists of a pulsed 800-MeV room-temperature linear accelerator and an 800-MeV accumulator ring. It simultaneously provides H{sup +} and H{sup -} beams to several user facilities that have their own distinctive requirements, e.g. intensity, chopping pattern, duty factor, etc.. This multibeam operation presents challenges both from the standpoint of meeting the individual requirements but also achieving good overall performance for the integrated operation. Various aspects of more recent operations including the some of these challenges will be discussed.

  7. LANSCE (Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center) target system performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.J.; Gilmore, J.S.; Robinson, H.; Legate, G.L.; Bridge, A.; Sanchez, R.J.; Brewton, R.J.; Woods, R.; Hughes, H.G. III

    1989-01-01

    The authors measured neutron beam fluxes at LANSCE using gold foil activation techniques. They did an extensive computer simulation of the as-built LANSCE Target/Moderator/Reflector/Shield geometry. They used this mockup in a Monte Carlo calculation to predict LANSCE neutronic performance for comparison with measured results. For neutron beam fluxes at 1 eV, the ratio of measured data to calculated varies from ∼0.6-0.9. The computed 1 eV neutron leakage at the moderator surface is 3.9 x 10 10 n/eV-sr-s-μA for LANSCE high-intensity water moderators. The corresponding values for the LANSCE high-resolution water moderator and the liquid hydrogen moderator are 3.3 and 2.9 x 10 10 , respectively. LANSCE predicted moderator intensities (per proton) for a tungsten target are essentially the same as ISIS predicted moderator intensities for a depleted uranium target. The calculated LANSCE steady state unperturbed thermal (E 13 n/cm 2 -s. The unique LANSCE split-target/flux-trap-moderator system is performing exceedingly well. The system has operated without a target or moderator change for over three years at nominal proton currents of 25 μA of 800-MeV protons. 17 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  8. Preconceptual design of a Long-Pulse Spallation Source (LPSS) at the LANSCE Facility: Target system, facility, and material handling considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, W.F.

    1995-12-01

    This report provides a summary of a preconceptual design study for the proposed Long-Pulse Spallation. Source (LPSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The LPSS will use a 0.8-MW proton beam to produce neutrons from a tungsten target. This study focuses on the design of the target station and changes to the existing building that would be made to accommodate the LPSS. The LPSS will provide fifteen flight paths to neutron scattering instruments. In addition, options for generating ultracold neutrons, pions, and muons will be available. Flight-energy, forward-scattered neutrons on the downstream side of the target will also be available for autoradiography studies. A Target Test Bed (TTB) is also proposed for full-beam tests of component materials and advanced spallation neutron sources. The design allows for separation of the experiment hall from the beam line, target, and flight paths. The target and moderator systems and the systems/components to be tested in the TTB will be emplaced and removed separately by remotely operated, shielded equipment. Irradiated materials will be transported to a hot cell adjacent to the target chamber for testing by remotely operated instruments. These tests will provide information about how materials properties are affected by proton and neutron beams

  9. The LANSCE (Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center) target data collection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kernodle, A.K.

    1989-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) Target Data Collection System is the result of an effort to provide a base of information from which to draw conclusions on the performance and operational condition of the overall LANSCE target system. During the conceptualization of the system, several goals were defined. A survey was made of both custom-made and off-the-shelf hardware and software that were capable of meeting these goals. The first stage of the system was successfully implemented for the LANSCE run cycle 52. From the operational experience gained thus far, it appears that the LANSCE Target Data Collection System will meet all of the previously defined requirements

  10. Wire Scanner Beam Profile Measurements for the LANSCE Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilpatrick, John D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gruchalla, Michael E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Derwin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pillai, Chandra [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sedillo, James Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Brian G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-15

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is replacing beam profile measurement systems, commonly known as Wire Scanners (WS). Using the principal of secondary electron emission, the WS measurement system moves a wire or fiber across an impinging particle beam, sampling a projected transverse-beam distribution. Because existing WS actuators and electronic components are either no longer manufactured or home-built with antiquated parts, a new WS beam profile measurement is being designed, fabricated, and tested. The goals for these new WS's include using off-the-shelf components while eliminating antiquated components, providing quick operation while allowing for easy maintainability, and tolerating external radioactivation. The WS measurement system consists of beam line actuators, a cable plant, an electronics processor chassis, and software located both in the electronics chassis (National Instruments LabVIEW) and in the Central Control Room (EPICS-based client software). This WS measurement system will measure Hand H{sup +} LANSCE-facility beams and will also measure less common beams. This paper describes these WS measurement systems.

  11. Wire Scanner Beam Profile Measurements for the LANSCE Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilpatrick, John D.; Gruchalla, Michael E.; Martinez, Derwin; Pillai, Chandra; Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio; Sedillo, James Daniel; Smith, Brian G.

    2012-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is replacing beam profile measurement systems, commonly known as Wire Scanners (WS). Using the principal of secondary electron emission, the WS measurement system moves a wire or fiber across an impinging particle beam, sampling a projected transverse-beam distribution. Because existing WS actuators and electronic components are either no longer manufactured or home-built with antiquated parts, a new WS beam profile measurement is being designed, fabricated, and tested. The goals for these new WS's include using off-the-shelf components while eliminating antiquated components, providing quick operation while allowing for easy maintainability, and tolerating external radioactivation. The WS measurement system consists of beam line actuators, a cable plant, an electronics processor chassis, and software located both in the electronics chassis (National Instruments LabVIEW) and in the Central Control Room (EPICS-based client software). This WS measurement system will measure Hand H + LANSCE-facility beams and will also measure less common beams. This paper describes these WS measurement systems.

  12. Radioactive targets for nuclear astrophysics research at LANSCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, P.E.; O'Brien, H.A.; Gursky, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    During the past few years we have made measurements of (n,p) and (n,α) cross sections on several radioactive nuclei of importance to nuclear astrophysics. The measurements were made at the Manuel Lujan, Jr., Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) from thermal neutron energy to approximately 100 keV. Successful measurements have been completed on the radioisotopes 7 Be, 22 Na and 36 Cl while preliminary data have been taken on targets of 54 Mn and 55 Fe. Similar measurements have also been made on the stable isotopes 14 N, 17 O and 35 Cl. We are currently assembling a 4π barium fluoride (BaF 2 ) detector which will allow us to expand our program to (n,γ) measurements. The (n,γ) (and in some cases future (n,p)) measurements will require targets with higher specific activity and greater chemical purity than we have so far been able to use. We discuss the fabrication techniques used for the samples produced so far, the requirements the future (n,γ) targets must meet and our current plans for producing them, and the physics motivations for the measurements

  13. Determination of proton and neutron spectra in the LANSCE spallation irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, M.R.; Maloy, S.A.; Sommer, W.F.; Fowler, M.M.; Dry, D.; Ferguson, P.D.; Mueller, G.; Corzine, R.K.

    1999-01-01

    Materials samples were recently irradiated in the Los Alamos Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) to provide data for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project on the effect of irradiation on the mechanical and physical properties of materials. The targets were configured to expose samples to a variety of radiation environments including, high-energy protons, mixed protons and high-energy neutrons, and low-energy neutrons. The samples were irradiated for approximately six months during a ten month period using an 800 MeV proton beam with a circular Gaussian shape of approximately 2σ = 3.0 cm. At the end of this period, the samples were extracted and tested. Activation foils were also extracted that had been placed in proximity to the materials samples. These were used to quantify the fluences in various locations

  14. Using the LANSCE irradiation facility to predict the number of fatal soft errors in one of the world's fastest supercomputers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalak, S.E.; Harris, K.W.; Hengartner, N.W.; Takala, B.E.; Wender, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is home to the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). LANSCE is a unique facility because its neutron spectrum closely mimics the neutron spectrum at terrestrial and aircraft altitudes, but is many times more intense. Thus, LANSCE provides an ideal setting for accelerated testing of semiconductor and other devices that are susceptible to cosmic ray induced neutrons. Many industrial companies use LANSCE to estimate device susceptibility to cosmic ray induced neutrons, and it has also been used to test parts from one of LANL's supercomputers, the ASC (Advanced Simulation and Computing Program) Q. This paper discusses our use of the LANSCE facility to study components in Q including a comparison with failure data from Q

  15. Wire Scanner Beam Profile Measurements: LANSCE Facility Beam Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilpatrick, John D.; Batygin, Yuri K.; Gonzales, Fermin; Gruchalla, Michael E.; Kutac, Vincent G.; Martinez, Derwin; Sedillo, James Daniel; Pillai, Chandra; Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio; Smith, Brian G.

    2012-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is replacing Wire Scanner (WS) beam profile measurement systems. Three beam development tests have taken place to test the new wire scanners under beam conditions. These beam development tests have integrated the WS actuator, cable plant, electronics processors and associated software and have used H - beams of different beam energy and current conditions. In addition, the WS measurement-system beam tests verified actuator control systems for minimum profile bin repeatability and speed, checked for actuator backlash and positional stability, tested the replacement of simple broadband potentiometers with narrow band resolvers, and tested resolver use with National Instruments Compact Reconfigurable Input and Output (cRIO) Virtual Instrumentation. These beam tests also have verified how trans-impedance amplifiers react with various types of beam line background noise and how noise currents were not generated. This paper will describe these beam development tests and show some resulting data.

  16. Wire Scanner Beam Profile Measurements: LANSCE Facility Beam Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilpatrick, John D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batygin, Yuri K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gonzales, Fermin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gruchalla, Michael E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kutac, Vincent G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Derwin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sedillo, James Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pillai, Chandra [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Brian G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-15

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is replacing Wire Scanner (WS) beam profile measurement systems. Three beam development tests have taken place to test the new wire scanners under beam conditions. These beam development tests have integrated the WS actuator, cable plant, electronics processors and associated software and have used H{sup -} beams of different beam energy and current conditions. In addition, the WS measurement-system beam tests verified actuator control systems for minimum profile bin repeatability and speed, checked for actuator backlash and positional stability, tested the replacement of simple broadband potentiometers with narrow band resolvers, and tested resolver use with National Instruments Compact Reconfigurable Input and Output (cRIO) Virtual Instrumentation. These beam tests also have verified how trans-impedance amplifiers react with various types of beam line background noise and how noise currents were not generated. This paper will describe these beam development tests and show some resulting data.

  17. Design of the Next Generation Target at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, LANSCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferres, Laurent [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); National Graduate School of Engineering and Research Center (ENSICAEN), Caen (France)

    2016-08-03

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) supports scientific research in many diverse fields such as biology, chemistry, and nuclear science. The Laboratory was established in 1943 during the Second World War to develop nuclear weapons. Today, LANL is one of the largest laboratories dedicated to nuclear defense and operates an 800 MeV proton linear accelerator for basic and applied research including: production of high- and low-energy neutrons beams, isotope production for medical applications and proton radiography. This accelerator is located at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The work performed involved the redesign of the target for the low-energy neutron source at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, which is one of the facilities built around the accelerator. The redesign of the target involves modeling various arrangements of the moderator-reflector-shield for the next generation neutron production target. This is done using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX), and ROOT analysis framework, a C++ based-software, to analyze the results.

  18. LANSCE Activity Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amy Robinson; Audrey Archuleta; Barbara Maes; Dan Strottman; Earl Hoffman; Garth Tietjen; Gene Farnum; Geoff Greene; Joyce Roberts; Ken Johnson; Paul Lewis; Roger Pynn; Stan Schriber; Steve Sterbenz; Steve Wender; Sue Harper

    1999-02-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Activity Report describes scientific and technological progress and achievements in LANSCE Division during the period of 1995 to 1998. This report includes a message from the Division Director, an overview of LANSCE, sponsor overviews, research highlights, advanced projects and facility upgrades achievements, experimental and user program accomplishments, news and events, and a list of publications. The research highlights cover the areas of condensed-matter science and engineering, accelerator science, nuclear science, and radiography. This report also contains a compact disk that includes an overview, the Activity Report itself, LANSCE operations progress reports for 1996 and 1997, experiment reports from LANSCE users, as well as a search capability.

  19. The Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) experiment reports 1993 run cycle. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrer, R.; Longshore, A. [comps.

    1995-06-01

    This year the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) ran an informal user program because the US Department of Energy planned to close LANSCE in FY1994. As a result, an advisory committee recommended that LANSCE scientists and their collaborators complete work in progress. At LANSCE, neutrons are produced by spallation when a pulsed, 800-MeV proton beam impinges on a tungsten target. The proton pulses are provided by the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator and a associated Proton Storage Ring (PSR), which can Iter the intensity, time structure, and repetition rate of the pulses. The LAMPF protons of Line D are shared between the LANSCE target and the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility, which results in LANSCE spectrometers being available to external users for unclassified research about 80% of each annual LAMPF run cycle. Measurements of interest to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) may also be performed and may occupy up to an additional 20% of the available beam time. These experiments are reviewed by an internal program advisory committee. This year, a total of 127 proposals were submitted. The proposed experiments involved 229 scientists, 57 of whom visited LANSCE to participate in measurements. In addition, 3 (nuclear physics) participating research teams, comprising 44 scientists, carried out experiments at LANSCE. Instrument beam time was again oversubscribed, with 552 total days requested an 473 available for allocation.

  20. The Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) experiment reports 1993 run cycle. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrer, R.; Longshore, A.

    1995-06-01

    This year the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) ran an informal user program because the US Department of Energy planned to close LANSCE in FY1994. As a result, an advisory committee recommended that LANSCE scientists and their collaborators complete work in progress. At LANSCE, neutrons are produced by spallation when a pulsed, 800-MeV proton beam impinges on a tungsten target. The proton pulses are provided by the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator and a associated Proton Storage Ring (PSR), which can Iter the intensity, time structure, and repetition rate of the pulses. The LAMPF protons of Line D are shared between the LANSCE target and the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility, which results in LANSCE spectrometers being available to external users for unclassified research about 80% of each annual LAMPF run cycle. Measurements of interest to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) may also be performed and may occupy up to an additional 20% of the available beam time. These experiments are reviewed by an internal program advisory committee. This year, a total of 127 proposals were submitted. The proposed experiments involved 229 scientists, 57 of whom visited LANSCE to participate in measurements. In addition, 3 (nuclear physics) participating research teams, comprising 44 scientists, carried out experiments at LANSCE. Instrument beam time was again oversubscribed, with 552 total days requested an 473 available for allocation

  1. The status of the LANSCE refurbishment project (LANSCE-R)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, John Leonard; Jones, Kevin; Streve, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator is an 800-MeV proton linac that drives user facilities for isotope production, proton radiography, ultra-cold neutrons, weapons neutron research and various sciences using neutron scattering. The LANSCE Refurbishment Project (LANSCE-R) is an ambitious project to refurbish key elements of the LANSCE accelerator that are becoming obsolete or nearing end-of-life. The conceptual design phase for the project is funded and underway. The 5 year, $170M (US) project will enable future decades of reliable, high-performance operation. It will replace a substantial fraction of the radio-frequency power systems (gridded tubes and klystrons) with modern systems, completely refurbish the original accelerator control and timing systems, replace obsolete diagnostic devices, and modernize other ancillary systems. An overview of the LANSCE-R project will be presented. The functional and operating requirements will be discussed, the proposed technical solutions presented, and the plan for successful project execution while meeting annual customer expectations for beam delivery will be reviewed.

  2. Scheduling at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallegos, F.R.

    1999-01-01

    The centerpieces of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) are a half-mile long 800-MeV proton linear accelerator and proton storage ring. The accelerator, storage ring, and target stations provide the protons and spallation neutrons that are used in the numerous basic research and applications experimental programs supported by the US Department of Energy. Experimental users, facility maintenance personnel, and operations personnel must work together to achieve the most program benefit within defined budget and resource constraints. In order to satisfy the experimental users programs, operations must provide reliable and high quality beam delivery. Effective and efficient scheduling is a critical component to achieve this goal. This paper will detail how operations scheduling is presently executed at the LANSCE accelerator facility

  3. LANSCE Activity Report 1995-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amy Robinson; Audrey Archuleta; Barbara Maes; Dan Strottman; Earl Hoffman; Garth Tietjen; Gene Farnum; Geoff Greene; Joyce Roberts; Ken Johnson; Paul Lewis; Roger Pynn; Stan Schriber; Steve Sterbenz; Steve Wender; Sue Harper

    1999-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Activity Report describes scientific and technological progress and achievements in LANSCE Division during the period of 1995 to 1998. This report includes a message from the Division Director, an overview of LANSCE, sponsor overviews, research highlights, advanced projects and facility upgrades achievements, experimental and user program accomplishments, news and events, and a list of publications. The research highlights cover the areas of condensed-matter science and engineering, accelerator science, nuclear science, and radiography. This report also contains a compact disk that includes an overview, the Activity Report itself, LANSCE operations progress reports for 1996 and 1997, experiment reports from LANSCE users, as well as a search capability

  4. Target Assembly Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Target Assembly Facility integrates new armor concepts into actual armored vehicles. Featuring the capability ofmachining and cutting radioactive materials, it...

  5. The Manuel Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, LANSCE experiment reports: 1990 Run Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiStravolo, M.A. (comp.)

    1991-10-01

    This year was the third in which LANSCE ran a formal user program. A call for proposals was issued before the scheduled run cycles, and experiment proposals were submitted by scientists from universities, industry, and other research facilities around the world. An external program advisory committee, which LANSCE shares with the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS), Argonne National Laboratory examined the proposals and made recommendations. At LANSCE, neutrons are produced by spallation when a pulsed, 800-MeV proton beam impinges on a tungsten target. The proton pulses are provided by the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator and an associated Proton Storage Ring (PSR), which can alter the intensity, time structure, and repetition rate of the pulses. The LAMPF protons of Line D are shared between the LANSCE target and the Weapons Neutron Research facility, which results in LANSCE spectrometers being available to external users for unclassified research about 80% of each six-month LAMPF run cycle. Measurements of interest to the Los Alamos National Laboratory may also be performed and may occupy up to an additional 20% of the available beam time. These experiments are reviewed by an internal program advisory committee. One hundred thirty-four proposals were submitted for unclassified research and twelve proposals for research of a programmatic nature to the Laboratory. Our definition of beam availability is when the proton current from the PSR exceeds 50% of the planned value. The PSR ran at 65{mu}A current (average) at 20 Hz for most of 1990. All of the scheduled experiments were performed and experiments in support of the LANSCE research program were accomplished during the discretionary periods.

  6. The Manuel Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) experiment reports 1992 run cycle. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiStravolo, M.A. [comp.

    1993-09-01

    This year was the fifth in which LANSCE ran a formal user program. A call for proposals was issued before the scheduled run cycles, and experiment proposals were submitted by scientists from universities, industry, and other research facilities around the world. An external program advisory committee, which LANSCE shares with the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS), Argonne National Laboratory, examined the proposals and made recommendations. At LANSCE, neutrons are produced by spallation when a pulsed, 800-MeV proton beam impinges on a tungsten target. The proton pulses are provided by the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator and an associated Proton Storage Ring (PSR), which can alter the intensity, time structure, and repetition rate of the pulses. The LAMPF protons of Line D are shared between the LANSCE target and the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility, which results in LANSCE spectrometers being available to external users for unclassified research about 80% of each annual LAMPF run cycle. Measurements of interest to the Los Alamos National Laboratory may also be performed and may occupy up to an additional 20% of the available beam time. These experiments are reviewed by an internal program advisory committee. One hundred sixty-seven proposals were submitted for unclassified research and twelve proposals for research of a programmatic interest to the Laboratory; six experiments in support of the LANSCE research program were accomplished during the discretionary periods. Oversubscription for instrument beam time by a factor of three was evident with 839 total days requested and only 371 available for allocation.

  7. The Manuel Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) experiment reports 1992 run cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiStravolo, M.A.

    1993-09-01

    This year was the fifth in which LANSCE ran a formal user program. A call for proposals was issued before the scheduled run cycles, and experiment proposals were submitted by scientists from universities, industry, and other research facilities around the world. An external program advisory committee, which LANSCE shares with the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS), Argonne National Laboratory, examined the proposals and made recommendations. At LANSCE, neutrons are produced by spallation when a pulsed, 800-MeV proton beam impinges on a tungsten target. The proton pulses are provided by the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator and an associated Proton Storage Ring (PSR), which can alter the intensity, time structure, and repetition rate of the pulses. The LAMPF protons of Line D are shared between the LANSCE target and the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility, which results in LANSCE spectrometers being available to external users for unclassified research about 80% of each annual LAMPF run cycle. Measurements of interest to the Los Alamos National Laboratory may also be performed and may occupy up to an additional 20% of the available beam time. These experiments are reviewed by an internal program advisory committee. One hundred sixty-seven proposals were submitted for unclassified research and twelve proposals for research of a programmatic interest to the Laboratory; six experiments in support of the LANSCE research program were accomplished during the discretionary periods. Oversubscription for instrument beam time by a factor of three was evident with 839 total days requested and only 371 available for allocation

  8. The Manuel Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, LANSCE experiment reports: 1990 Run Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiStravolo, M.A.

    1991-10-01

    This year was the third in which LANSCE ran a formal user program. A call for proposals was issued before the scheduled run cycles, and experiment proposals were submitted by scientists from universities, industry, and other research facilities around the world. An external program advisory committee, which LANSCE shares with the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS), Argonne National Laboratory examined the proposals and made recommendations. At LANSCE, neutrons are produced by spallation when a pulsed, 800-MeV proton beam impinges on a tungsten target. The proton pulses are provided by the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator and an associated Proton Storage Ring (PSR), which can alter the intensity, time structure, and repetition rate of the pulses. The LAMPF protons of Line D are shared between the LANSCE target and the Weapons Neutron Research facility, which results in LANSCE spectrometers being available to external users for unclassified research about 80% of each six-month LAMPF run cycle. Measurements of interest to the Los Alamos National Laboratory may also be performed and may occupy up to an additional 20% of the available beam time. These experiments are reviewed by an internal program advisory committee. One hundred thirty-four proposals were submitted for unclassified research and twelve proposals for research of a programmatic nature to the Laboratory. Our definition of beam availability is when the proton current from the PSR exceeds 50% of the planned value. The PSR ran at 65μA current (average) at 20 Hz for most of 1990. All of the scheduled experiments were performed and experiments in support of the LANSCE research program were accomplished during the discretionary periods

  9. Shiva target irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manes, K.R.; Ahlstrom, H.G.; Coleman, L.W.; Storm, E.K.; Glaze, J.A.; Hurley, C.A.; Rienecker, F.; O'Neal, W.C.

    1977-01-01

    The first laser/plasma studies performed with the Shiva laser system will be two sided irradiations extending the data obtained by other LLL lasers to higher powers. The twenty approximately 1 TW laser pulses will reach the target simultaneously from above and below in nested pentagonal clusters. The upper and lower clusters of ten beams each are radially polarized so that they strike the target in p-polarization and maximize absorption. This geometry introduces laser system isolation problems which will be briefly discussed. The layout and types of target diagnostics will be described and a brief status report on the facility given

  10. Nuclear science research at the WNR and LANSCE neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisowski, P.W.

    1994-01-01

    The Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) Facility and the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) use 800 MeV proton beam from the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) to generate intense bursts of neutrons. Experiments using time-of-flight (TOF) energy determination can cover an energy range from thermal to about 2 MeV at LANSCE and 0.1 to 800 MeV at WNR. At present, three flight paths at LANSCE and six flight paths at WNR are used in basic and applied nuclear science research. In this paper we present a status report on WNR and LANSCE, discuss plans for the future, and describe three experiments recently completed or underway that use the unique features of these sources

  11. Target station design for a 1 MW pulsed spallation neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.J.; Baker, G.D.; Brewton, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    Target stations are vital components of the 1 MW, next generation spallation neutron source proposed for LANSCE. By and large, target stations design determines the overall performance of the facility. Many traditional concepts will probably have to be rethought, and many new concepts will have to be put forward to meet the 1 MW challenge. This article gives a brief overview of the proposed neutron spallation source from the target station viewpoint, as well as the general philosophy adopted for the design of the LANSCE-II target stations. Some of the saliant concepts and features envisioned for LANSCE-II are briefly described

  12. LANSCE beam current limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallegos, F.R.

    1996-01-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated beam. Active instrumentation, such as the Beam Current Limiter, is a component of the RSS. The current limiter is designed to limit the average current in a beam line below a specific level, thus minimizing the maximum current available for a beam spill accident. The beam current limiter is a self-contained, electrically isolated toroidal beam transformer which continuously monitors beam current. It is designed as fail-safe instrumentation. The design philosophy, hardware design, operation, and limitations of the device are described

  13. Neutron Imaging Developments at LANSCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Ron; Hunter, James; Schirato, Richard; Vogel, Sven; Swift, Alicia; Ickes, Tim; Ward, Bill; Losko, Adrian; Tremsin, Anton

    2015-10-01

    Neutron imaging is complementary to x-ray imaging because of its sensitivity to light elements and greater penetration of high-Z materials. Energy-resolved neutron imaging can provide contrast enhancements for elements and isotopes due to the variations with energy in scattering cross sections due to nuclear resonances. These cross section differences exist due to compound nuclear resonances that are characteristic of each element and isotope, as well as broader resonances at higher energies. In addition, multi-probe imaging, such as combined photon and neutron imaging, is a powerful tool for discerning properties and features in materials that cannot be observed with a single probe. Recently, we have demonstrated neutron imaging, both radiography and computed tomography, using the moderated (Lujan Center) and high-energy (WNR facility) neutron sources at LANSCE. Flat panel x-ray detectors with suitable scintillator-converter screens provide good sensitivity for both low and high neutron energies. Micro-Channel-Plate detectors and iCCD scintillator camera systems that provide the fast time gating needed for energy-resolved imaging have been demonstrated as well. Examples of recent work will be shown including fluid flow in plants and imaging through dense thick objects. This work is funded by the US Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, and performed by Los Alamos National Security LLC under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  14. LANSCE '90: the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pynn, Roger

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes progress that has been made at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) during the past two years. Presently, LANSCE provides a higher peak neutron flux than any other pulsed spallation neutron source. There are seven spectrometers for neutron scattering experiments that are operated for a national user program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy. Two more spectrometers are under construction. Plans have been made to raise the number of beam holes available for instrumentation and to improve the efficiency of the target/moderator system. (author)

  15. LANSCE '90: The Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pynn, R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes progress that has been made at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) during the past two years. Presently, LANSCE provides a higher peak neutron flux than any other pulsed spallation neutron source. There are seven spectrometers for neutron scattering experiments that are operated for a national user program sponsored by the US Department of Energy. Two more spectrometers are under construction. Plans have been made to raise the number of beam holes available for instrumentation and to improve the efficiency of the target/moderator system. 9 refs., 4 figs

  16. Facility target insert shielding assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mocko, Michal [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-06

    Main objective of this report is to assess the basic shielding requirements for the vertical target insert and retrieval port. We used the baseline design for the vertical target insert in our calculations. The insert sits in the 12”-diameter cylindrical shaft extending from the service alley in the top floor of the facility all the way down to the target location. The target retrieval mechanism is a long rod with the target assembly attached and running the entire length of the vertical shaft. The insert also houses the helium cooling supply and return lines each with 2” diameter. In the present study we focused on calculating the neutron and photon dose rate fields on top of the target insert/retrieval mechanism in the service alley. Additionally, we studied a few prototypical configurations of the shielding layers in the vertical insert as well as on the top.

  17. LANSCE wire scanning diagnostics device mechanical design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is one of the major experimental science facilities at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The core of LANSCE's work lies in the operation of a powerful linear accelerator, which accelerates protons up to 84% the speed oflight. These protons are used for a variety of purposes, including materials testing, weapons research and isotopes production. To assist in guiding the proton beam, a series of over one hundred wire scanners are used to measure the beam profile at various locations along the half-mile length of the particle accelerator. A wire scanner is an electro-mechanical device that moves a set of wires through a particle beam and measures the secondary emissions from the resulting beam-wire interaction to obtain beam intensity information. When supplemented with data from a position sensor, this information is used to determine the cross-sectional profile of the beam. This measurement allows beam operators to adjust parameters such as acceleration, beam steering, and focus to ensure that the beam reaches its destination as effectively as possible. Some of the current wire scanners are nearly forty years old and are becoming obsolete. The problem with current wire scanners comes in the difficulty of maintenance and reliability. The designs of these wire scanners vary making it difficult to keep spare parts that would work on all designs. Also many of the components are custom built or out-dated technology and are no longer in production.

  18. Lansce Wire Scanning Diagnostics Device Mechanical Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio; Batygin, Yuri K.; Gilpatrick, John D.; Gruchalla, Michael E.; Maestas, Alfred J.; Pillai, Chandra; Raybun, Joseph L.; Sattler, F.D.; Sedillo, James Daniel; Smith, Brian G.

    2011-01-01

    The Accelerator Operations and Technology Division at Los Alamos National Laboratory operates a linear particle accelerator which utilizes 110 wire scanning diagnostics devices to gain position and intensity information of the proton beam. In the upcoming LANSCE improvements, 51 of these wire scanners are to be replaced with a new design, up-to-date technology and off-the-shelf components. This document outlines the requirements for the mechanical design of the LANSCE wire scanner and presents the recently developed linac wire scanner prototype. Additionally, this document presents the design modifications that have been implemented into the fabrication and assembly of this first linac wire scanner prototype. Also, this document will present the design for the second, third, and fourth wire scanner prototypes being developed. Prototypes 2 and 3 belong to a different section of the particle accelerator and therefore have slightly different design specifications. Prototype 4 is a modification of a previously used wire scanner in our facility. Lastly, the paper concludes with a plan for future work on the wire scanner development.

  19. Lansce Wire Scanning Diagnostics Device Mechanical Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batygin, Yuri K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gilpatrick, John D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gruchalla, Michael E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Maestas, Alfred J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pillai, Chandra [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Raybun, Joseph L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sattler, F. D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sedillo, James Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Brian G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01

    The Accelerator Operations & Technology Division at Los Alamos National Laboratory operates a linear particle accelerator which utilizes 110 wire scanning diagnostics devices to gain position and intensity information of the proton beam. In the upcoming LANSCE improvements, 51 of these wire scanners are to be replaced with a new design, up-to-date technology and off-the-shelf components. This document outlines the requirements for the mechanical design of the LANSCE wire scanner and presents the recently developed linac wire scanner prototype. Additionally, this document presents the design modifications that have been implemented into the fabrication and assembly of this first linac wire scanner prototype. Also, this document will present the design for the second, third, and fourth wire scanner prototypes being developed. Prototypes 2 and 3 belong to a different section of the particle accelerator and therefore have slightly different design specifications. Prototype 4 is a modification of a previously used wire scanner in our facility. Lastly, the paper concludes with a plan for future work on the wire scanner development.

  20. LANSCE wire scanning diagnostics device mechanical design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is one of the major experimental science facilities at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The core of LANSCE's work lies in the operation of a powerful linear accelerator, which accelerates protons up to 84% the speed oflight. These protons are used for a variety of purposes, including materials testing, weapons research and isotopes production. To assist in guiding the proton beam, a series of over one hundred wire scanners are used to measure the beam profile at various locations along the half-mile length of the particle accelerator. A wire scanner is an electro-mechanical device that moves a set of wires through a particle beam and measures the secondary emissions from the resulting beam-wire interaction to obtain beam intensity information. When supplemented with data from a position sensor, this information is used to determine the cross-sectional profile of the beam. This measurement allows beam operators to adjust parameters such as acceleration, beam steering, and focus to ensure that the beam reaches its destination as effectively as possible. Some of the current wire scanners are nearly forty years old and are becoming obsolete. The problem with current wire scanners comes in the difficulty of maintenance and reliability. The designs of these wire scanners vary making it difficult to keep spare parts that would work on all designs. Also many of the components are custom built or out-dated technology and are no longer in production.

  1. National Ignition Facility Target Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wavrik, R W; Cox, J R; Fleming, P J

    2000-01-01

    On June 11, 1999 the Department of Energy dedicated the single largest piece of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. The ten (10) meter diameter aluminum target high vacuum chamber will serve as the working end of the largest laser in the world. The output of 192 laser beams will converge at the precise center of the chamber. The laser beams will enter the chamber in two by two arrays to illuminate 10 millimeter long gold cylinders called hohlraums enclosing 2 millimeter capsule containing deuterium, tritium and isotopes of hydrogen. The two isotopes will fuse, thereby creating temperatures and pressures resembling those found only inside stars and in detonated nuclear weapons, but on a minute scale. The NIF Project will serve as an essential facility to insure safety and reliability of our nation's nuclear arsenal as well as demonstrating inertial fusion's contribution to creating electrical power. The paper will discuss the requirements that had to be addressed during the design, fabrication and testing of the target chamber. A team from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and LLNL with input from industry performed the configuration and basic design of the target chamber. The method of fabrication and construction of the aluminum target chamber was devised by Pitt-Des Moines, Inc. (PDM). PDM also participated in the design of the chamber in areas such as the Target Chamber Realignment and Adjustment System, which would allow realignment of the sphere laser beams in the event of earth settlement or movement from a seismic event. During the fabrication of the target chamber the sphericity tolerances had to be addressed for the individual plates. Procedures were developed for forming, edge preparation and welding of individual plates. Construction plans were developed to allow the field construction of the target chamber to occur parallel to other NIF construction activities. This was

  2. Cryogenic polarized target facility: status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, C.; Nash, H.K.; Roberson, N.; Schneider, M.; Seagondollar, W.; Soderstrum, J.

    1985-01-01

    The TUNL cryogenically polarized target facility consists of a 3 He- 4 He dilution refrigerator and a superconducting magnet, together capable of maintaining samples at between 10 and 20 mK in magnetic fields up to 7 Tesla. At these temperatures and magnetic fields brute-force nuclear orientation occurs. Polarizations from 20 to 60% are attainable in about twenty nonzero spin nuclei. Most are metals, ranging in mass from 6 Li to 209 Bi, but the nuclei 1 H and 3 He are also polarizable via this method. The main effort is directed towards a better determination of the effective spin-spin force in nuclei. These experiments are briefly described and the beam stabilization system, cryostat and polarized 3 He targets are discussed

  3. Systems engineering aspects to installation of the phased multi-year LANSCE-refurbishment project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pieck, Martin; Erickson, John E.; Gulley, Mark S.; Jones, Kevin W.; Rybarcyk, Larry J.

    2009-01-01

    The LANSCE Refurbishment Project (LANSCE-R) is a phased, multiyear project. The project is scheduled to start refurbishment in the 2nd quarter of fiscal year 2011. Closeout will occur during the 4th quarter of FY2016. During the LANSCE-R project, installation of project components must be scheduled during six annual 6-month maintenance-outages and not conflict with annual LANSCE operational commitments to its user facilities. The project and operations schedules must be synchronized carefully. Therefore, the scheduled maintenance outages, functional testing (with beam off, by primarily project personnel) and commissioning (with beam on, by primarily Accelerator Operation Technology (AOT) personnel) must be managed to accommodate operation. Active and effective coordination and communication between the project and AOT personnel must be encouraged to identify, as early as possible, any operational issues. This paper will report on the systems engineering approach to the integration and control of engineering activities.

  4. Fission cross section measurements of actinides at LANSCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tovesson, Fredrik [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Laptev, Alexander B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Tony S [INL

    2010-01-01

    Fission cross sections of a range of actinides have been measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in support of nuclear energy applications. By combining measurement at two LANSCE facilities, Lujan Center and the Weapons Neutron Research center (WNR), differential cross sections can be measured from sub-thermal energies up to 200 MeV. Incident neutron energies are determined using the time-of-flight method, and parallel-plate ionization chambers are used to measure fission cross sections relative to the {sup 235}U standard. Recent measurements include the {sup 233,238}U, {sup 239,242}Pu and {sup 243}Am neutron-induced fission cross sections. In this paper preliminary results for cross section data of {sup 243}Am and {sup 233}U will be presented.

  5. Operational status of the Los Alamos neutron science center (LANSCE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Kevin W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Erickson, John L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schoenberg, Kurt F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator and beam delivery complex generates the proton beams that serve three neutron production sources; the thermal and cold source for the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) high-energy neutron source, and a pulsed Ultra-Cold Neutron Source. These three sources are the foundation of strong and productive multi-disciplinary research programs that serve a diverse and robust user community. The facility also provides multiplexed beams for the production of medical radioisotopes and proton radiography of dynamic events. The recent operating history of these sources will be reviewed and plans for performance improvement will be discussed, together with the underlying drivers for the proposed LANSCE Refurbishment project. The details of this latter project are presented in a separate contribution.

  6. Target system neutronics study for NXGENS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, C.; Muhrer, G.

    2007-01-01

    The Materials Test Station (MTS) [E. Pitcher, G. Muhrer, H. Trellue, Neutronics Assessment of the LANSCE Materials Test Station as an Irradiation Facility for the JIMO Space Reactor, LA-CP-04-0903.], a spallation target station, planned for construction at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), will provide the opportunity to test the prototype of a long-pulse spallation source neutron scattering instrument (NXGENS). In this paper, we present the target-moderator neutronics optimization study that was performed in support of NXGENS

  7. LANSCE radiation security system (RSS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallegos, F.R.

    1996-01-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) is an engineered safety system which automatically terminates transmission of accelerated ion beams in response to pre-defined abnormal conditions. It is one of the four major mechanisms used to protect people from radiation hazards induced by accelerated pulsed ion beams at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The others are shielding, administrative policies and procedures, and qualified, trained personnel. Prompt radiation hazards at the half-mile long LANSCE accelerator exist due to average beam intensities ranging from 1 milli-amp for H + beam to 100 micro-amps for the high intensity H - beam. Experimental programs are supplied with variable energy (maximum 800 MeV), pulse-width (maximum 1 msec), and pulse frequency (maximum 120 Hz) ion beams. The RSS includes personnel access control systems, beam spill monitoring systems, and beam current level limiting systems. It is a stand-alone system with redundant logic chains. A fault of the RSS will cause the insertion of fusible beam plugs in the accelerator low energy beam transport. The design philosophy, description, and operation of the RSS are described in this paper

  8. LANSCE Beam Current Limiter (XL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallegos, F.R.; Hall, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is an engineered safety system that provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated proton beams. The Beam Current Limiter (XL), as an active component of the RSS, limits the maximum average current in a beamline, thus the current available for a beam spill accident. Exceeding the pre-set limit initiates action by the RSS to mitigate the hazard (insertion of beam stoppers in the low energy beam transport). The beam limiter is an electrically isolated, toroidal transformer and associated electronics. The device was designed to continuously monitor beamline currents independent of any external timing. Fail-safe operation was a prime consideration in its development. Fail-safe operation is defined as functioning as intended (due to redundant circuitry), functioning with a more sensitive fault threshold, or generating a fault condition. This report describes the design philosophy, hardware, implementation, operation, and limitations of the device

  9. Acquisition and Initial Analysis of H+- and H--Beam Centroid Jitter at LANSCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilpatrick, J. D.; Bitteker, L.; Gulley, M. S.; Kerstiens, D.; Oothoudt, M.; Pillai, C.; Power, J.; Shelley, F.

    2006-11-01

    During the 2005 Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) beam runs, beam current and centroid-jitter data were observed, acquired, analyzed, and documented for both the LANSCE H+ and H- beams. These data were acquired using three beam position monitors (BPMs) from the 100-MeV Isotope Production Facility (IPF) beam line and three BPMs from the Switchyard transport line at the end of the LANSCE 800-MeV linac. The two types of data acquired, intermacropulse and intramacropulse, were analyzed for statistical and frequency characteristics as well as various other correlations including comparing their phase-space like characteristics in a coordinate system of transverse angle versus transverse position. This paper will briefly describe the measurements required to acquire these data, the initial analysis of these jitter data, and some interesting dilemmas these data presented.

  10. Development of a gamma ray spectroscopy capability at LANSCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, R.O.; Strottman, D.D.; Sterbenz, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal of this project was to explore an upgrade to the GEANIE high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) to help build additional experimental capabilities. The improvements identified have significantly added to the capabilities of GEANIE and made the facility more attractive for studies supporting the core national security mission as well as for use by outside collaborators. These benefits apply to both basic and applied studies

  11. The Manuel Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center LANSCE experiment reports 1989 run cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyer, D.K.; DiStravolo, M.A.

    1990-10-01

    This report contains a listing and description of experiments carried on at the LANSCE neutron scattering facility in the following areas: High Density Powder Diffraction; Neutron Powder Diffractometer, (NPD); Single Crystal Diffractometer, (SCD); Low-Q Diffractometer, (LQD); Surface Profile Analysis Reflectometer, (SPEAR); Filter Difference Spectrometer, (FDS); and Constant-Q Spectrometer

  12. The Manuel Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center LANSCE experiment reports 1989 run cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyer, D.K.; DiStravolo, M.A. (comps.)

    1990-10-01

    This report contains a listing and description of experiments carried on at the LANSCE neutron scattering facility in the following areas: High Density Powder Diffraction; Neutron Powder Diffractometer, (NPD); Single Crystal Diffractometer, (SCD); Low-Q Diffractometer, (LQD); Surface Profile Analysis Reflectometer, (SPEAR); Filter Difference Spectrometer, (FDS); and Constant-Q Spectrometer.

  13. The Manuel Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) experiment reports, 1991 run cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiStravolo, M.A.

    1992-12-01

    This report briefly discusses experiments conducted at the Lansce neutron source facility. The experiments were conducted on the following instruments: high intensity powder diffractometer; neutron powder diffractometer; single crystal diffractometer; low-q diffractometer; surface profile analysis reflectometer; filter difference spectrometer; experiment reports, and pharos

  14. Opportunities for research program development at LANSCE (Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, C.D.

    1989-01-01

    The availability of intense neutron beams from facilities associated with the Proton Storage Ring and LANSCE has stimulated the development of neutron research well beyond the mainstream of neutron scattering. A description of this extended program is given along with prospects for further growth. 23 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs

  15. Los Alamos pulsed spallation neutron source target systems - present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.J.; Daemen, L.L.; Pitcher, E.J.; Brun, T.O.; Hjelm, R.P. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    For the past 16 yr, spallation target-system designers have devoted much time and effort to the design and optimization of pulsed spallation neutron sources. Many concepts have been proposed, but, in practice, only one has been implemented horizontal beam insertion with moderators in wing geometry i.e., until we introduced the innovative split-target/flux-trap-moderator design with a composite reflector shield at the Manuel Lujan, Jr., Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE). The LANSCE target system design is now considered a classic by spallation target system designers worldwide. LANSCE, a state-of-the-art pulsed spallation neutron source for materials science and nuclear physics research, uses 800-MeV protons from the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. These protons are fed into the proton storage ring to be compressed to 250-ns pulses before being delivered to LANSCE at 20 Hz. LANSCE produces the highest peak neutron flux of any pulsed spallation neutron source in the world

  16. Target Visualization at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potter, Daniel Abraham [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    As the National Ignition Facility continues its campaign to achieve ignition, new methods and tools will be required to measure the quality of the targets used to achieve this goal. Techniques have been developed to measure target surface features using a phase-shifting diffraction interferometer and Leica Microsystems confocal microscope. Using these techniques we are able to produce a detailed view of the shell surface, which in turn allows us to refine target manufacturing and cleaning processes. However, the volume of data produced limits the methods by which this data can be effectively viewed by a user. This paper introduces an image-based visualization system for data exploration of target shells at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It aims to combine multiple image sets into a single visualization to provide a method of navigating the data in ways that are not possible with existing tools.

  17. Redesign of the Target-Moderator-Reflector-Shield Assembly for Optimization of the Neutron Flux in the 0.001 - 1 MeV at LANSCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowicki, Suzanne Florence; Mocko, Michal; Wender, Stephen Arthur; Ferres, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    These are the slides for a presentation at the 2016 Postdoc Summer Seminar Series at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The conclusions of the research presented are the following: we can provide a significant gain in intensity in the upper tier; lower and upper tier are coupled: translating the target in the FOV of the upper tier decreases the intensity in the lower tier; it is possible to balance the production between the upper and lower tier if we keep some of the material between the tiers.

  18. Progress Towards an Indirect Neutron Capture Capability at LANSCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, Paul E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ullmann, John Leonard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Couture, Aaron Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mosby, Shea Morgan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-20

    There are many neutron-capture cross sections of importance to radiochemical diagnostics and nuclear forensics which are beyond the reach of direct measurements. Hence, we have been developing an apparatus on flight path (FP) 13 at target 1 at LANSCE for tightly constraining these cross sections via determination of the underlying physical quantities. FP-13 was initially a cold-neutron beam line for materials science and therefore required substantial modification for use for nuclear physics. In FY17, we made several improvements to FP-13, demonstrated improved performance due to these changes via measurements on a variety of samples, identified a few more needed improvements, and reconfigured the beam line to implement the most important of these. New measurements to assess the impact of the most recent improvement will commence when beam is restored to LANSCE. Although FP-13 has not yet reached the performance required for small radioactive samples, measurements on a gold sample have led to an important science result which we are preparing for publication.

  19. A fixed target facility at the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loken, S.; Morfin, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    The question of whether a facility for fixed target physics should be provided at the SSC must be answered before the final technical design of the SSC can be completed, particularly if the eventual form of extraction would influence the magnet design. To this end, an enthusiastic group of experimentalists, theoreticians and accelerator specialists have studied this point. The accelerator physics issues were addressed by a group whose report is contained in these proceedings. The physics addressable by fixed target was considered by many of the Physics area working groups and in particular by the Structure Function Group. This report is the summary of the working group which considered various SSC fixed target experiments and determined which types of beams and detectors would be required

  20. Fixed target facility at the SSC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loken, S.C.; Morfin, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    The question of whether a facility for fixed target physics should be provided at the SSC must be answered before the final technical design of the SSC can be completed, particularly if the eventual form of extraction would influence the magnet design. To this end, an enthusiastic group of experimentalists, theoreticians and accelerator specialists have studied this point. The accelerator physics issues were addressed by a group led by E. Colton whose report is contained in these proceedings. The physics addressable by fixed target was considered by many of the Physics area working groups and in particular by the Structure Function Group. This report is the summary of the working group which considered various SSC fixed target experiments and determined which types of beams and detectors would be required. 13 references, 5 figures.

  1. Fixed target facility at the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loken, S.C.; Morfin, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    The question of whether a facility for fixed target physics should be provided at the SSC must be answered before the final technical design of the SSC can be completed, particularly if the eventual form of extraction would influence the magnet design. To this end, an enthusiastic group of experimentalists, theoreticians and accelerator specialists have studied this point. The accelerator physics issues were addressed by a group led by E. Colton whose report is contained in these proceedings. The physics addressable by fixed target was considered by many of the Physics area working groups and in particular by the Structure Function Group. This report is the summary of the working group which considered various SSC fixed target experiments and determined which types of beams and detectors would be required. 13 references, 5 figures

  2. Assessment of Laser-Driven Pulsed Neutron Sources for Poolside Neutron-based Advanced NDE – A Pathway to LANSCE-like Characterization at INL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, Markus [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany); Vogel, Sven C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bourke, Mark Andrew M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fernandez, Juan Carlos [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mocko, Michael Jeffrey [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Glenzer, Siegfried [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Leemans, Wim [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Siders, Craig [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Haefner, Constantin [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-04-19

    A variety of opportunities for characterization of fresh nuclear fuels using thermal (~25meV) and epithermal (~10eV) neutrons have been documented at Los Alamos National Laboratory. They include spatially resolved non-destructive characterization of features, isotopic enrichment, chemical heterogeneity and stoichiometry. The LANSCE spallation neutron source is well suited in neutron fluence and temporal characteristics for studies of fuels. However, recent advances in high power short pulse lasers suggest that compact neutron sources might, over the next decade, become viable at a price point that would permit their consideration for poolside characterization on site at irradiation facilities. In a laser-driven neutron source the laser is used to accelerate deuterium ions into a beryllium target where neutrons are produced. At this time, the technology is new and their total neutron production is approximately four orders of magnitude less than a facility like LANSCE. However, recent measurements on a sub-optimized system demonstrated >1010 neutrons in sub-nanosecond pulses in predominantly forward direction. The compactness of the target system compared to a spallation target may allow exchanging the target during a measurement to e.g. characterize a highly radioactive sample with thermal, epithermal, and fast neutrons as well as hard X-rays, thus avoiding sample handling. At this time several groups are working on laser-driven neutron production and are advancing concepts for lasers, laser targets, and optimized neutron target/moderator systems. Advances in performance sufficient to enable poolside fuels characterization with LANSCE-like fluence on sample within a decade may be possible. This report describes the underlying physics and state-of-the-art of the laser-driven neutron production process from the perspective of the DOE/NE mission. It also discusses the development and understanding that will be necessary to provide customized capability for

  3. Electron beam facility for divertor target experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisimov, A.; Gagen-Torn, V.; Giniyatulin, R.N.

    1994-01-01

    To test different concepts of divertor targets and bumpers an electron beam facility was assembled in Efremov Institute. It consists of a vacuum chamber (3m 3 ), vacuum pump, electron beam gun, manipulator to place and remove the samples, water loop and liquid metal loop. The following diagnostics of mock-ups is stipulated: (1) temperature distribution on the mock-up working surface (scanning pyrometer and infra-red imager); (2) temperature distribution over mocked-up thickness in 3 typical cross-sections (thermo-couples); (3) cracking dynamics during thermal cycling (acoustic-emission method), (4) defects in the mock-up before and after tests (ultra-sonic diagnostics, electron and optical microscopes). Carbon-based and beryllium mock-ups are made for experimental feasibility study of water and liquid-metal-cooled divertor/bumper concepts

  4. SNS Target Test Facility for remote handling design and verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spampinato, P.T.; Graves, V.B.; Schrock, S.L.

    1998-01-01

    The Target Test Facility will be a full-scale prototype of the Spallation Neutron Source Target Station. It will be used to demonstrate remote handling operations on various components of the mercury flow loop and for thermal/hydraulic testing. This paper describes the remote handling aspects of the Target Test Facility. Since the facility will contain approximately 1 cubic meter of mercury for the thermal/hydraulic tests, an enclosure will also be constructed that matches the actual Target Test Cell

  5. Radiation damage calculations for the LANSCE degrader

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, P.D.; Sommer, W.F.; Dudziak, D.J.; Wechsler, M.S.; Barnett, M.H.; Corzine, R.K.

    1998-01-01

    The A-6 water degrader at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) linear proton accelerator has an outer shell of Inconel 718. The degrader was irradiated by 800-MeV protons during 1988--1993 to an exposure of 5.3 ampere-hours (A h). As described in Ref. 1, material from the Inconel is currently being cut into specimens for microhardness, three-point bending, ball punch, microscopy, and corrosion tests. This paper is devoted to calculations of radiation damage, particularly displacement and He production, sustained by the degrader Inconel

  6. The LANSCE RICE control system upgrade.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oothoudt, Michael; Schaller, S. (Stuart); Bjorklund, E. A. (Eric A.); Burns, M. J. (Mary J.); Carr, G. (Gary); Carr, G. (Gary); Faucett, John Allen,; Hayden, D. J. (David J.); Lusk, M. D. (Matthew D.); Merl, R. B. (Robert B.); Potter, J. M. (Jerry M.); Reynolds, J. A. (Jerome A.); Romero, D. B. (Dolores B.); Shelley, F. E. (Fred E.)

    2003-01-01

    The LANSCE (Los Alamos Neutron Science Center) control system upgrade program continues with the impending replacement of the RICE (Remote Instrumentation and Control Equipment) subsystem. The RICE subsystem upgrade is a challenge because of its technology (late 1960s), number of channels (>10,000), and unique characteristics (all-modules data takes, timed/flavored data takes). The plan is to replace at least the non-timed data and the command portions of the subsystem with Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs). We discuss motivations, technological challenges, proof-of-principle, and planning. The boundary condition, as usual, is that we must implement these major changes on a running accelerator.

  7. The LANSCE RICE control system upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oothoudt, Michael; Schaller, S.; Bjorklund, E.A.; Burns, M.J.; Carr, G.; Faucett, John Allen; Hayden, D.J.; Lusk, M.D.; Merl, R.B.; Potter, J.M.; Reynolds, J.A.; Romero, D.B.; Shelley, F.E.

    2003-01-01

    The LANSCE (Los Alamos Neutron Science Center) control system upgrade program continues with the impending replacement of the RICE (Remote Instrumentation and Control Equipment) subsystem. The RICE subsystem upgrade is a challenge because of its technology (late 1960s), number of channels (>10,000), and unique characteristics (all-modules data takes, timed/flavored data takes). The plan is to replace at least the non-timed data and the command portions of the subsystem with Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs). We discuss motivations, technological challenges, proof-of-principle, and planning. The boundary condition, as usual, is that we must implement these major changes on a running accelerator.

  8. CACAO facility. Radioactive targets at Orsay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacri, C.O.; Petitbon-Thevenet, V.; Mottier, J.; Lefort, H.; Durnez, A.; Fortuna, F.

    2014-01-01

    CACAO, Chimie des Actinides et Cibles radioActives a Orsay (actinide chemistry and radioactive targets at Orsay), is a new laboratory dedicated to the fabrication and characterization of radioactive targets. It is supported by the radiochemistry group and the stable target service of the IPNO. The recurring needs of physicists working in the nuclear fuel cycle physics and the growing difficulties to obtain radioactive targets elsewhere were the main motivating factors behind the construction of this new laboratory. The first targets of 235,238 U and 232 Th have already been prepared although the full operating licenses still need to be obtained. In this paper, the installation and the equipment of CACAO will be described. An extensive study of a U test target fabricated by the CACAO laboratory has been performed and results are reported here. The different techniques used to characterize the deposit are presented and the outcome is discussed. (author)

  9. The BLAIRR Irradiation Facility Hybrid Spallation Target Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simos N.; Hanson A.; Brown, D.; Elbakhshawn, M.

    2016-04-11

    BLAIRR STUDY STATUS OVERVIEW Beamline Complex Evaluation/Assessment and Adaptation to the Goals Facility Radiological Constraints ? Large scale analyses of conventional facility and integrated shield (concrete, soil)Target Optimization and Design: Beam-target interaction optimization Hadronic interaction and energy deposition limitations Single phase and Hybrid target concepts Irradiation Damage Thermo-mechanical considerations Spallation neutron fluence optimization for (a) fast neutron irradiation damage (b) moderator/reflector studies, (c) NTOF potential and optimization (d) mono-energetic neutron beam

  10. The target vacuum storage facility at iThemba LABS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neveling, R.; Kheswa, N. Y.; Papka, P.

    2018-05-01

    A number of nuclear physics experiments at iThemba LABS require target foils that consist of specific isotopes of elements which are reactive in air. Not only is it important to prepare these targets in a suitable environment to prevent oxidation, but consideration should also be given to the long term storage and handling facilities of such targets. The target vacuum storage facility at iThemba LABS, as well as additional hardware necessary to transport and install the target foils in the experimental chamber, will be discussed.

  11. Design of the target area for the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.J.; Karpenko, V.P.; Adams, C.H.

    1997-01-01

    The preliminary design of the target area for the National Ignition Facility has been completed. The target area is required to meet a challenging set of engineering system design requirements and user needs. The target area must provide the appropriate conditions before, during, and after each shot. The repeated introduction of large amounts of laser energy into the chamber and subsequent target emissions represent new design challenges for ICF facility design. Prior to each shot, the target area must provide the required target illumination, target chamber vacuum, diagnostics, and optically stable structures. During the shot, the impact of the target emissions on the target chamber, diagnostics, and optical elements is minimized and the workers and public are protected from excessive prompt radiation doses. After the shot, residual radioactivation is managed to allow the required accessibility. Diagnostic data is retrieved, operations and maintenance activities are conducted, and the facility is ready for the next shot. The target area subsystems include the target chamber, target positioner, structural systems, target diagnostics, environmental systems, and the final optics assembly. The engineering design of the major elements of the target area requires a unique combination of precision engineering, structural analysis, opto-mechanical design, random vibration suppression, thermal stability, materials engineering, robotics, and optical cleanliness. The facility has been designed to conduct both x- ray driven targets and to be converted at a later date for direct drive experiments. The NIF has been configured to provide a wide range of experimental environments for the anticipated user groups of the facility. The design status of the major elements of the target area is described

  12. LANSCE personnel access control system (PACS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturrock, J.C.; Gallegos, F.R.; Hall, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated beam. The Personnel Access Control System (PACS) is a component of the RSS that is designed to prevent personnel access to areas where prompt radiation is a hazard. PACS was designed to replace several older personnel safety systems (PSS) with a single modem unified design. Lessons learned from the operation over the last 20 years were incorporated into a redundant sensor, single-point failure safe, fault tolerant, and tamper-resistant system that prevents access to the beam areas by controlling the access keys and beam stoppers. PACS uses a layered philosophy to the physical and electronic design. The most critical assemblies are battery backed up, relay logic circuits; less critical devices use Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) for timing functions and communications. Outside reviewers have reviewed the operational safety of the design. The design philosophy, lessons learned, hardware design, software design, operation, and limitations of the device are described

  13. The LANSCE Low Momentum Beam Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Merl, R

    2004-01-01

    A diagnostic has been developed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) for the purpose of identifying low momentum beam tails in the linear accelerator. These tails must be eliminated in order to maintain the transverse and longitudinal beam size. Instead of the currently used phosphor camera system, this instrument consists of a Multi Wire Proportional Chamber (MWPC) front end coupled to an EPICS compliant VME-based electronics package. Low momentum tails are detected with a resolution of 5 mm in the MWPC at a high dispersion point near a bending magnet. While phosphor is typically not sensitive in the nano amp range, the MWPC is sensitive down to about a pico amp. The electronics package processes the signals from each of the MWPC wires to generate an array of beam currents at each of the lower energies. The electronics has an analog front end with a high-speed analog to digital converter for each wire. Data from multiple wires are processed with an embedded digital signal processor and results p...

  14. Fission neutron output measurements at LANSCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, Ronald Owen; Haight, Robert C.; Devlin, Matthew J.; Fotiadis, Nikolaos; Laptev, Alexander; O'Donnell, John M.; Taddeucci, Terry N.; Tovesson, Fredrik; Ullmann, J.L.; Wender, Stephen A.; Bredeweg, T.A.; Jandel, M.; Vieira, D.J.; Wu, Ching-Yen; Becker, J.A.; Stoyer, M.A.; Henderson, R.; Sutton, M.; Belier, Gilbert; Chatillon, A.; Granier, Thierry; Laurent, Benoit; Taieb, Julien

    2010-01-01

    Accurate data for both physical properties and fission properties of materials are necessary to properly model dynamic fissioning systems. To address the need for accurate data on fission neutron energy spectra, especially at outgoing neutron energies below about 200 keV and at energies above 8 MeV, ongoing work at LANSCE involving collaborators from LANL, LLNL and CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel is extending the energy range, efficiency and accuracy beyond previous measurements. Initial work in the outgoing neutron energy range from 1 to 7 MeV is consistent with current evaluations and provides a foundation for extended measurements. As part of these efforts, a new fission fragment detector that reduces backgrounds and improves timing has been designed fabricated and tested, and new neutron detectors are being assessed for optimal characteristics. Simulations of experimental designs are in progress to ensure that accuracy goals are met. Results of these measurements will be incorporated into evaluations and data libraries as they become available.

  15. Enhanced H- ion source testing capabilities at LANSCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingalls, W.B.; Hardy, M.W.; Prichard, B.A.; Sander, O.R.; Stelzer, J.E.; Stevens, R.R.; Leung, K.N.; Williams, M.D.

    1998-01-01

    As part of the on-going beam-current upgrade in the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), the current available from the H - injector will be increased from the present 16 to 18 mA to as much as 40 mA. A collaboration between the Ion Beam Technology Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the Ion Sources and Injectors section of LANSCE-2 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been formed to develop and evaluate a new ion source. A new Ion Source Test Stand (ISTS) has been constructed at LANSCE to evaluate candidate ion sources. The ISTS has been constructed to duplicate as closely as possible the beam transport and ancillary systems presently in use in the LANSCE H - injector, while incorporating additional beam diagnostics for source testing. The construction and commissioning of the ISTS will be described, preliminary results for the proof-of-principle ion source developed by the Berkeley group will be presented, and future plans for the extension of the test stand will be presented

  16. Tritium and ignition target management at the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draggoo, Vaughn

    2013-06-01

    Isotopic mixtures of hydrogen constitute the basic fuel for fusion targets of the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A typical NIF fusion target shot requires approximately 0.5 mmoles of hydrogen gas and as much as 750 GBq (20 Ci) of 3H. Isotopic mix ratios are specified according to the experimental shot/test plan and the associated test objectives. The hydrogen isotopic concentrations, absolute amounts, gas purity, configuration of the target, and the physical configuration of the NIF facility are all parameters and conditions that must be managed to ensure the quality and safety of operations. An essential and key step in the preparation of an ignition target is the formation of a ~60 μm thick hydrogen "ice" layer on the inner surface of the target capsule. The Cryogenic Target Positioning System (Cryo-Tarpos) provides gas handling, cyro-cooling, x-ray imaging systems, and related instrumentation to control the volumes and temperatures of the multiphase (solid, liquid, and gas) hydrogen as the gas is condensed to liquid, admitted to the capsule, and frozen as a single spherical crystal of hydrogen in the capsule. The hydrogen fuel gas is prepared in discrete 1.7 cc aliquots in the LLNL Tritium Facility for each ignition shot. Post-shot hydrogen gas is recovered in the NIF Tritium Processing System (TPS). Gas handling systems, instrumentation and analytic equipment, material accounting information systems, and the shot planning systems must work together to ensure that operational and safety requirements are met.

  17. Recent developments in the target facilities at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, J.P.; Thomas, G.E.

    1989-01-01

    A description is given of recent developments in the target facility at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Highlights include equipment upgrades which enable us to provide enhanced capabilities for support of the Argonne Heavy-Ion ATLAS Accelerator Project. Also, future plans and additional equipment acquisitions will be discussed. (orig.)

  18. Recent developments in the target facilities at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, J.P.; Thomas, G.E.

    1988-01-01

    A description is given of recent developments in the target facility at Argonne National Laboratory. Highlights include equipment upgrades which enables us to provide enhanced capabilities for support of the Argonne Heavy-Ion ATLAS Accelerator Project. Also future plans and additional equipment acquisitions will be discussed. 3 refs., 3 tabs

  19. Design of ignition targets for the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haan, S.W.; Dittrich, T.R.; Marinak, M.M.; Hinkel, D.E.

    1999-01-01

    This is a brief update on the work being done to design ignition targets for the National Ignition Facility. Updates are presented on three areas of current activity : improvements in modeling, work on a variety of targets spanning the parameter space of possible ignition targets ; and the setting of specifications for target fabrication and diagnostics. Highlights of recent activity include : a simulation of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth on an imploding capsule, done in 3D on a 72degree by 72degree wedge, with enough zones to resolve modes out to 100 ; and designs of targets at 250eV and 350eV, as well as the baseline 300 eV ; and variation of the central DT gas density, which influences both the Rayleigh-Taylor growth and the smoothness of the DT ice layer

  20. The Ignition Target for the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atherton, L J; Moses, E I; Carlisle, K; Kilkenny, J

    2007-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192 beam Nd-glass laser facility presently under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for performing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high energy density (HED) science. When completed in 2009, NIF will be able to produce 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of ultraviolet light for target experiments that will create conditions of extreme temperatures (>10 8 K), pressures (10-GBar) and matter densities (> 100 g/cm 3 ). A detailed program called the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) has been developed to enable ignition experiments in 2010, with the goal of producing fusion ignition and burn of a deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel mixture in millimeter-scale target capsules. The first of the target experiments leading up to these ignition shots will begin in 2008. Targets for the National Ignition Campaign are both complex and precise, and are extraordinarily demanding in materials fabrication, machining, assembly, cryogenics and characterization. An overview of the campaign for ignition will be presented, along with technologies for target fabrication, assembly and metrology and advances in growth and x-ray imaging of DT ice layers. The sum of these efforts represents a quantum leap in target precision, characterization, manufacturing rate and flexibility over current state-of-the-art

  1. Present status of the conceptual design of IFMIF target facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsuta, H.; Kato, Y.; Konishi, S.; Miyauchi, Y.; Smith, D.; Hua, T.; Green, L.; Benamati, G.; Cevolani, S.; Roehrig, H.; Schutz, W.

    1998-01-01

    The conceptual design activity (CDA) for the international fusion materials irradiation facility (IFMIF) has been conducted. For the IFMIF target facility, the conceptual designs of the following two main components have been performed. The design concept of IFMIF utilizes a high energy deuteron beam of 30-40 MeV and total current of 250 mA, impinging on a flowing lithium jet to produce high energy neutrons for irradiation of candidate fusion materials. (1) The target assembly: The kinetic energy of the deuteron beam is deposited on a Li-jet target and neutrons are produced through the d-Li stripping reaction in this target. The assembly is designed to get a stable lithium jet and to prevent the onset of lithium boiling. For 40-MeV deuteron beam (total current of 250 mA) and a beam footprint of 5 x 20 cm 2 lithium jet dimensions are designed to be 2.5 cm thick and 26 cm wide. The lithium jet parameters are given. (2) Lithium loop: The loop circulates the lithium to and from the target assembly and removes the heat deposited by the deuteron beam containing systems for maintaining the-high purity of the lithium required for radiological safety and to minimize corrosion. The maximum lithium flow rate is 130 l/s and the total lithium inventory is about 21 m 3 . The IFMIF policy requires that the lithium loop system be designed to guarantee no combustion of lithium in the event of a lithium leak. This can be achieved by use of multiple confinement of the lithium carrying components. The radioactive waste generated by the target facilities is estimated. (orig.)

  2. Hydrodynamic instabilities in beryllium targets for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, S. A., E-mail: austinyi@lanl.gov; Simakov, A. N.; Wilson, D. C.; Olson, R. E.; Kline, J. L.; Batha, S. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Clark, D. S.; Hammel, B. A.; Milovich, J. L.; Salmonson, J. D.; Kozioziemski, B. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Beryllium ablators offer higher ablation velocity, rate, and pressure than their carbon-based counterparts, with the potential to increase the probability of achieving ignition at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)]. We present here a detailed hydrodynamic stability analysis of low (NIF Revision 6.1) and high adiabat NIF beryllium target designs. Our targets are optimized to fully utilize the advantages of beryllium in order to suppress the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities. This results in an implosion that resists breakup of the capsule, and simultaneously minimizes the amount of ablator material mixed into the fuel. We quantify the improvement in stability of beryllium targets relative to plastic ones, and show that a low adiabat beryllium capsule can be at least as stable at the ablation front as a high adiabat plastic target.

  3. LANSCE steady state unperturbed thermal neutron fluxes at 100 μA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.J.

    1989-01-01

    The ''maximum'' unperturbed, steady state thermal neutron flux for LANSCE is calculated to be 2 /times/ 10 13 n/cm 2 -s for 100 μA of 800-MeV protons. This LANSCE neutron flux is a comparable entity to a steady state reactor thermal neutron flux. LANSCE perturbed steady state thermal neutron fluxes have also been calculated. Because LANSCE is a pulsed neutron source, much higher ''peak'' (in time) neutron fluxes can be generated than at a steady state reactor source. 5 refs., 5 figs

  4. A multiple sampling ionization chamber for the External Target Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, X.H.; Tang, S.W.; Ma, P.; Lu, C.G.; Yang, H.R.; Wang, S.T.; Yu, Y.H.; Yue, K.; Fang, F.; Yan, D.; Zhou, Y.; Wang, Z.M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.Y.; Duan, L.M.; Sun, B.H.

    2015-01-01

    A multiple sampling ionization chamber used as a particle identification device for high energy heavy ions has been developed for the External Target Facility. The performance of this detector was tested with a 239 Pu α source and RI beams. A Z resolution (FWHM) of 0.4–0.6 was achieved for nuclear fragments of 18 O at 400 AMeV

  5. Reference moderator calculated performance for the LANSCE upgrade project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, P.D.; Russell, G.J.; Pitcher, E.J.

    1995-01-01

    The authors have calculated the performance of five moderators of interest to the LANSCE upgrade project. Coupled and decoupled light water and liquid hydrogen moderators in flux-trap geometry surrounded by a neutronically infinite heavy-water cooled beryllium reflector have been studied. Time and energy spectra, as well as semi-empirical fits to the data, are presented. The data has been made available to aid the instrument design and moderator selection process

  6. Option study of an orthogonal X-ray radiography axis for pRad at LANSCE area C, Los Alamos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, Bryan Velten; Johnson, David L.; Leckbee, Joshua J.; Jones, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We report on an option study of two potential x-ray systems for orthogonal radiography at Area C in the LANSCE facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The systems assessed are expected to be near equivalent systems to the presently existing Cygnus capability at the Nevada Test Site. Nominal dose and radiographic resolution of 4 rad (measured at one meter) and 1 mm spot are desired. Both a system study and qualitative design are presented as well as estimated cost and schedule. Each x-ray system analyzed is designed to drive a rod-pinch electron beam diode capable of producing the nominal dose and spot.

  7. RAMI analysis and modeling for the LANSCE accelerator systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macek, R.J.; Wilkinson, C.A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Reliability, availability, maintainability, and inspectability (RAMI) have become important issues for the high-power machines being planned for applications such as accelerator transmutation of nuclear waste (ATW), accelerator production of tritium (APT) and the next generation spallation neutron source. Beam reliability and beam availability are vitally important specifications to the present users of accelerator-driven spallation neutron sources, synchrotron light sources and medical accelerators. At Los Alamos, improved beam availability is a key goal in the planned LANSCE improvement program. Clearly, the capability to adequately model and predict the reliability and availability of complex accelerator systems will be of great value in assessing and optimizing RAMI measures in accelerator design and improvement programs. To date, no major accelerator project has developed comprehensive reliability models although the Advance Photon Source at ANL has started work on reliability analysis for selected subsystems. In this paper the authors discuss their experience in developing RAMI analysis and modeling for the LANSCE Accelerator Systems. Progress has been made in developing suitable measures and functions to characterize user risk, in logging of needed data on failure rates and repair/down times, and in developing a first-pass RAMI model for selected subsystems. Plans have been made for a more complete RAMI model. In addition, the authors discuss their experience in the use of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methodology for estimation of the reliability of active, instrumentation-based, radiation safety systems at LANSCE.

  8. Target diagnostic system for the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeper, R.J.; Chandler, G.A.; Cooper, G.W.; Derzon, M.S.

    1996-01-01

    A review of recent progress on the design of a diagnostic system proposed for ignition target experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be presented. This diagnostic package contains an extensive suite of optical, x-ray, gamma-ray, and neutron diagnostics that enable measurements of the performance of both direct and indirect driven NIF targets. The philosophy used in designing all of the diagnostics in the set has emphasized redundant and independent measurement of fundamental physical quantities relevant to the operation of the NIF target. A unique feature of these diagnostics is that they are being designed to be capable of operating, in the high radiation, EMP, and debris backgrounds expected on the NIF facility. The diagnostic system proposed can be categorized into three broad areas: laser characterization, hohlraum characterization, and capsule performance diagnostics. The operating principles of a representative instrument from each class of diagnostic employed in this package will be summarized and illustrated with data obtained in recent prototype diagnostic tests

  9. Corrosion measurements on apt prototypic materials in the Lansce high-power proton beam and applicability to other systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lillard, R.S.; Gac, F.D.; James, M.R.; Maloy, S.A.; Paciotti, M.A.; Waters, L.S.; Willcutt, G.J.; Chandler, G.T.; Ferguson, P.D.

    2003-01-01

    The corrosion rates of several corrosion resistant materials behave in a similar manner even under the intense radiation of the LANSCE high-power beam. A second observation was made, showing that the corrosion rates saturated under high instantaneous radiation intensity in corrosion experiments conducted for the accelerator production of tritium (APT) programme. The LANSCE H + beam is not prototypic of the proposed APT production plant in several respects. The instantaneous proton flux in the APT production plant beam is about 10 times that of the LANSCE beam. The small transverse APT beam spot is rastered to spread the power density over the area of the target, and as the beam rasters, it creates a pulsed character to the beam at a specific location. In order to develop correlations that would enable extrapolation of the corrosion data to the proposed APT production plant, the experimental programme included measurements over a range of average beam currents, measurements at high and low instantaneous beam current, and measurements at various combinations of pulse width and repetition rate. The correlations that were developed are based on an approximately linear dependence of corrosion rate on average beam current (average radiation intensity) and the saturation effect observed at high instantaneous radiation intensity. For a given transverse beam profile and for the same average beam current, the correlations predict the highest corrosion rate in a do beam and the lowest corrosion rate in the lowest duty cycle beams. In the case of the APT extrapolation, the predicted corrosion rates were a factor of 5 lower than for a do beam depositing the same average power density. The measured corrosion rates and the formulated extrapolations are applicable to water-cooled targets and components in proton beams. (authors)

  10. Actinide neutron-induced fission cross section measurements at LANSCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tovesson, Fredrik K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Laptev, Alexander B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Tony S [INL

    2010-01-01

    Fission cross sections of a range of actinides have been measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in support of nuclear energy applications in a wide energy range from sub-thermal energies up to 200 MeV. A parallel-plate ionization chamber are used to measure fission cross sections ratios relative to the {sup 235}U standard while incident neutron energies are determined using the time-of-flight method. Recent measurements include the {sup 233,238}U, {sup 239-242}Pu and {sup 243}Am neutron-induced fission cross sections. Obtained data are presented in comparison with ex isting evaluations and previous data.

  11. First results from PHAROS, the new chopper spectrometer at LANSCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivier, B.J.; Sandoval, J.P.; Lysaght, P.; Nutter, M.; Robinson, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    In this article we present the first experimental measurements obtained on PHAROS during the 1992 run cycle at LANSCE. These are data on the phasing of the choppers relative to the accelerator system along with the consequent neutronic resolution, data on the real-space position resolution of the main detectors, a white-beam nickel powder calibration, and our first inelastic scattering measurement made on TiH 2 with an incident energy of 300 MeV. The characteristic features of the new chopper spectrometer PHAROS, designed for low-angle inelastic neutron scattering and neutron Brillouin scattering, are described elsewhere in these proceedings

  12. HELIOS: A high intensity chopper spectrometer at LANSCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, T.E.; Broholm, C.; Fultz, B.

    1998-01-01

    A proposal to construct a high intensity chopper spectrometer at LANSCE as part of the SPSS upgrade project is discussed. HELIOS will be optimized for science requiring high sensitivity neutron spectroscopy. This includes studies of phonon density of states in small polycrystalline samples, magnetic excitations in quantum magnets and highly correlated electron systems, as well as parametric studies (as a function of pressure, temperature, or magnetic field) of S(Q,ω). By employing a compact design together with the use of supermirror guide in the incident flight path the neutron flux at HELIOS will be significantly higher than any other comparable instrument now operating

  13. Internal strain measurement using pulsed neutron diffraction at LANSCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstone, J.A.; Bourke, M.A.M.; Shi, N.

    1994-01-01

    The presence of residual stress in engineering components can effect their mechanical properties and structural integrity. Neutron diffraction in the only technique that can make nondestructive measurements in the interior of components. By recording the change in crystalline lattice spacings, elastic strains can be measured for individual lattice reflections. Using a pulsed neutron source, all lattice reflections are recorded in each measurement, which allows for easy examination of heterogeneous materials such as metal matrix composites. Measurements made at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) demonstrate the potential at pulsed sources for in-situ stress measurements at ambient and elevated temperatures

  14. Engineering strain measurements using the NPD at LANSCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourke, M.A.M.; Goldstone, J.A.; Lovell, K.J.

    1991-01-01

    The presence of residual stress in engineering components can affect their mechanical properties and structural integrity. Neutron diffraction is the only measuring technique which can provide spatially resolved non-destructive strain measurements in the interior of a component. By recording the change in the interplanar spacings elastic strains can be measured for individual lattice reflections. Also on a pulsed source, where all lattice reflections are recorded, profile refinement is an option which allows the strain to be obtained from changes in the lattice parameter. Measurements made at LANSCE demonstrate the potential for stress measurements on a pulsed source and indicate the advantages and disadvantages over measurements made on a reactor. (author)

  15. HELIOS: A high intensity chopper spectrometer at LANSCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, T.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Broholm, C. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Fultz, B. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science] [and others

    1998-12-31

    A proposal to construct a high intensity chopper spectrometer at LANSCE as part of the SPSS upgrade project is discussed. HELIOS will be optimized for science requiring high sensitivity neutron spectroscopy. This includes studies of phonon density of states in small polycrystalline samples, magnetic excitations in quantum magnets and highly correlated electron systems, as well as parametric studies (as a function of pressure, temperature, or magnetic field) of S(Q,{omega}). By employing a compact design together with the use of supermirror guide in the incident flight path the neutron flux at HELIOS will be significantly higher than any other comparable instrument now operating.

  16. Improved liquid-lithium target for the FMIT facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miles, R.R.; Greenwell, R.K.; Hassberger, J.A.; Ingham, J.G.

    1982-11-01

    An improved target for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Testing Facility was designed. The purpose of the target is to produce a high neutron flux (10 19 n/m 2 sec) for testing of candidate first wall materials for fusion reactors. The neutrons are produced through a Li(d,n) stripping reaction between accelerated deuterons (35 MeV, 0.1A) and a thin jet of flowing liquid lithium. The target consists of a high speed (approx. 17 m/s), free surface wall jet which is exposed to the high (10 -4 Pa) accelerator vacuum. The energy deposited by the deuteron beam in the lithium is sufficient to heat the jet internally to a maximum temperature of roughly 740 0 C, 430 0 C greater than the saturation temperature at the jet free surface. For this reason, the jet flows along a curved wall which provides the pressurization required to prevent sperheat internal to the jet. Supporting hardware for the jet and a drain line which controls the jet beyond the beam intercept region

  17. Target designs for energetics experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meezan, N B; Glenzer, S H; Suter, L J

    2008-01-01

    The goal of the first hohlraum energetics experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller et al, Optical Eng. 43, 2841 (2004)] is to select the hohlraum design for the first ignition experiments. Sub-scale hohlraums heated by 96 of the 192 laser beams on the NIF are used to emulate the laser-plasma interaction behavior of ignition hohlraums. These 'plasma emulator' targets are 70% scale versions of the 1.05 MJ, 300 eV ignition hohlraum and have the same energy-density as the full-scale ignition designs. Radiation-hydrodynamics simulations show that the sub-scale target is a good emulator of plasma conditions inside the ignition hohlraum, reproducing density n e within 10% and temperature T e within 15% along a laser beam path. Linear backscatter gain analysis shows the backscatter risk to be comparable to that of the ignition target. A successful energetics campaign will allow the National Ignition Campaign to focus its efforts on optimizing ignition hohlraums with efficient laser coupling

  18. National Ignition Facility Cryogenic Target Systems Interim Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, B

    2002-01-01

    Restricted availability of funding has had an adverse impact, unforeseen at the time of the original decision to projectize the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Cryogenic Target Handling Systems (NCTS) Program, on the planning and initiation of these efforts. The purpose of this document is to provide an interim project management plan describing the organizational structure and management processes currently in place for NCTS. Preparation of a Program Execution Plan (PEP) for NCTS has been initiated, and a current draft is provided as Attachment 1 to this document. The National Ignition Facility is a multi-megajoule laser facility being constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) in the Department of Energy (DOE). Its primary mission is to support the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) by performing experiments studying weapons physics, including fusion ignition. NIF also supports the missions of weapons effects, inertial fusion energy, and basic science in high-energy-density physics. NIF will be operated by LLNL under contract to the University of California (UC) as a national user facility. NIF is a low-hazard, radiological facility, and its operation will meet all applicable federal, state, and local Environmental Safety and Health (ES and H) requirements. The NCTS Interim Management Plan provides a summary of primary design criteria and functional requirements, current organizational structure, tracking and reporting procedures, and current planning estimates of project scope, cost, and schedule. The NIF Director controls the NIF Cryogenic Target Systems Interim Management Plan. Overall scope content and execution schedules for the High Energy Density Physics Campaign (SSP Campaign 10) are currently undergoing rebaselining and will be brought into alignment with resources expected to be available throughout the NNSA Future Years National Security Plan (FYNSP). The revised schedule for

  19. The first target experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landen, O.L.; Glenzer, S.H.; Froula, D.H.; Dewald, E.L.; Suter, L.J.; Schneider, M.B.; Hinkel, D.E.; Fernandez, J.C.; Kline, J.L.; Goldman, S.R.; Braun, D.G.; Celliers, P.M.; Moon, S.J.; Robey, H.S.; Lanier, N.E.; Glendinning, S.G.; Blue, B.E.; Wilde, B.H.; Jones, O.S.; Schein, J.; Divol, L.; Kalantar, D.H.; Campbell, K.M.; Holder, J.P.; McDonald, J.W.; Niemann, C.; Mackinnon, A.J.; Collins, G.W.; Bradley, D.K.; Eggert, J.H.; Hicks, D.G.; Gregori, G.; Kirkwood, R.K.; Young, B.K.; Foster, J.M.; Hansen, J.F.; Perry, T.S.; Munro, D.H.; Baldis, H.A.; Grim, G.P.; Heeter, R.F.; Hegelich, M.B.; Montgomery, D.S.; Rochau, G.A.; Olson, R.E.; Turner, R.E.; Workman, J.B.; Berger, R.L.; Cohen, B.I.; Kruer, W.L.; Langdon, A.B.; Langer, S.H.; Meezan, N.B.; Rose, H.A.; Still, C.H.; Williams, E.A.; Dodd, E.A.; Edwards, M.J.; Monteil, M.C.; Stevenson, R.M.; Thomas, B.R.; Coker, R.F.; Magelssen, G.R.; Rosen, P.A.; Stry, P.E.; Woods, D.; Weber, S.V.; Young, P.E.; Alvarez, S.; Armstrong, G.; Bahr, R.; Bourgade, G.L.; Bower, D.; Celeste, J.; Chrisp, M.; Compton, S.; Cox, J.; Constantin, C.; Costa, R.; Duncan, J.; Ellis, A.; Emig, J.; Gautier, C.; Greenwood, A.; Griffith, R.; Holdner, F.; Holtmeier, G.; Hargrove, D.; James, T.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kimbrough, J.; Landon, M.; Lee, F.D.; Malone, R.; May, M.; Montelongo, S.; Moody, J.; Ng, E.; Nikitin, A.; Pellinen, D.; Piston, K.; Poole, M.; Rekow, V.; Rhodes, M.; Shepherd, R.; Shiromizu, S.; Voloshin, D.; Warrick, A.; Watts, P.; Weber, F.; Young, P.; Arnold, P.

    2007-01-01

    A first set of shock timing, laser-plasma interaction, hohlraum energetics and hydrodynamic experiments have been performed using the first 4 beams of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), in support of indirect drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and High Energy Density Physics (HEDP). In parallel, a robust set of optical and X-ray spectrometers, interferometer, calorimeters and imagers have been activated. The experiments have been undertaken with laser powers and energies of up to 8 TW and 17 kJ in flattop and shaped 1-9 ns pulses focused with various beam smoothing options. The experiments have demonstrated excellent agreement between measured and predicted laser-target coupling in foils and hohlraums, even when extended to a longer pulse regime unattainable at previous laser facilities, validated the predicted effects of beam smoothing on intense laser beam propagation in long scale-length plasmas and begun to test 3-dimensional codes by extending the study of laser driven hydrodynamic jets to 3-dimensional geometries. (authors)

  20. The first target experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landen, O.L.; Glenzer, S.H.; Froula, D.H.; Dewald, E.L.; Suter, L.J.; Schneider, M.B.; Hinkel, D.E.; Fernandez, J.C.; Kline, J.L.; Goldman, S.R.; Braun, D.G.; Celliers, P.M.; Moon, S.J.; Robey, H.S.; Lanier, N.E.; Glendinning, S.G.; Blue, B.E.; Wilde, B.H.; Jones, O.S.; Schein, J.; Divol, L.; Kalantar, D.H.; Campbell, K.M.; Holder, J.P.; McDonald, J.W.; Niemann, C.; Mackinnon, A.J.; Collins, G.W.; Bradley, D.K.; Eggert, J.H.; Hicks, D.G.; Gregori, G.; Kirkwood, R.K.; Young, B.K.; Foster, J.M.; Hansen, J.F.; Perry, T.S.; Munro, D.H.; Baldis, H.A.; Grim, G.P.; Heeter, R.F.; Hegelich, M.B.; Montgomery, D.S.; Rochau, G.A.; Olson, R.E.; Turner, R.E.; Workman, J.B.; Berger, R.L.; Cohen, B.I.; Kruer, W.L.; Langdon, A.B.; Langer, S.H.; Meezan, N.B.; Rose, H.A.; Still, C.H.; Williams, E.A.; Dodd, E.A.; Edwards, M.J.; Monteil, M.C.; Stevenson, R.M.; Thomas, B.R.; Coker, R.F.; Magelssen, G.R.; Rosen, P.A.; Stry, P.E.; Woods, D.; Weber, S.V.; Young, P.E.; Alvarez, S.; Armstrong, G.; Bahr, R.; Bourgade, G.L.; Bower, D.; Celeste, J.; Chrisp, M.; Compton, S.; Cox, J.; Constantin, C.; Costa, R.; Duncan, J.; Ellis, A.; Emig, J.; Gautier, C.; Greenwood, A.; Griffith, R.; Holdner, F.; Holtmeier, G.; Hargrove, D.; James, T.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kimbrough, J.; Landon, M.; Lee, F.D.; Malone, R.; May, M.; Montelongo, S.; Moody, J.; Ng, E.; Nikitin, A.; Pellinen, D.; Piston, K.; Poole, M.; Rekow, V.; Rhodes, M.; Shepherd, R.; Shiromizu, S.; Voloshin, D.; Warrick, A.; Watts, P.; Weber, F.; Young, P.; Arnold, P

    2007-08-15

    A first set of shock timing, laser-plasma interaction, hohlraum energetics and hydrodynamic experiments have been performed using the first 4 beams of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), in support of indirect drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and High Energy Density Physics (HEDP). In parallel, a robust set of optical and X-ray spectrometers, interferometer, calorimeters and imagers have been activated. The experiments have been undertaken with laser powers and energies of up to 8 TW and 17 kJ in flattop and shaped 1-9 ns pulses focused with various beam smoothing options. The experiments have demonstrated excellent agreement between measured and predicted laser-target coupling in foils and hohlraums, even when extended to a longer pulse regime unattainable at previous laser facilities, validated the predicted effects of beam smoothing on intense laser beam propagation in long scale-length plasmas and begun to test 3-dimensional codes by extending the study of laser driven hydrodynamic jets to 3-dimensional geometries. (authors)

  1. Fission neutron spectra measurements at LANSCE - Status and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haight, R. C.; Noda, S.; Nelson, R. O.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Devlin, M.; Chatillon, A.; Granier, T.; Taiebb, J.; Laurent, B.; Belier, G.; Becker, J. A.; Wu, C. Y.

    2010-01-01

    A program to measure fission neutron spectra from neutron-induced fission of actinides is underway at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in a collaboration among the CEA laboratory at Bruyeres-le-Chatel, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The spallation source of fast neutrons at LANSCE is used to provide incident neutron energies from less than 1 MeV to 100 MeV or higher. The fission events take place in a gas-ionization fission chamber, and the time of flight from the neutron source to that chamber gives the energy of the incident neutron. Outgoing neutrons are detected by an array of organic liquid scintillator neutron detectors, and their energies are deduced from the time of flight from the fission chamber to the neutron detector. Measurements have been made of the fission neutrons from fission of 235 U, 238 U, 237 Np and 239 Pu. The range of outgoing energies measured so far is from 0.7 MeV to approximately 8 MeV. These partial spectra and average fission neutron energies are compared with evaluated data and with models of fission neutron emission. Results to date are summarized in this presentation. Future plans are to make significant improvements in the fission chambers, neutron detectors, signal processing, data acquisition and the experimental environment to provide high fidelity data including measurements of fission neutrons below 0.7 MeV and improvements in the data above 8 MeV. (authors)

  2. Neutron-Induced Charged Particle Studies at LANSCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Young; Haight, Robert C.

    2014-09-01

    Direct measurements on neutron-induced charged particle reactions are of interest for nuclear astrophysics and applied nuclear energy. LANSCE (Los Alamos Neutron Science Center) produces neutrons in energy of thermal to several hundreds MeV. There has been an effort at LANSCE to upgrade neutron-induced charged particle detection technique, which follows on (n,z) measurements made previously here and will have improved capabilities including larger solid angles, higher efficiency, and better signal to background ratios. For studying cross sections of low-energy neutron induced alpha reactions, Frisch-gridded ionization chamber is designed with segmented anodes for improving signal-to-noise ratio near reaction thresholds. Since double-differential cross sections on (n,p) and (n,a) reactions up to tens of MeV provide important information on deducing nuclear level density, the ionization chamber will be coupled with silicon strip detectors (DSSD) in order to stop energetic charged particles. In this paper, we will present the status of this development including the progress on detector design, calibrations and Monte Carlo simulations. This work is funded by the US Department of Energy - Los Alamos National Security, LLC under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  3. Visualization of target inspection data at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potter, Daniel, E-mail: potter15@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States); Antipa, Nick, E-mail: antipa1@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Target surfaces are measured using a phase-shifting diffraction interferometer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Datasets are several gigabytes that consist of tens to hundreds of files. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Software tools that provide a high-level overview of the entire dataset. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single datasets loaded into the visualization session can be individually rotated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multiple datasets with common features are found then datasets can be aligned. - Abstract: As the National Ignition Facility continues its campaign to achieve ignition, new methods and tools will be required to measure the quality of the target capsules used to achieve this goal. Techniques have been developed to measure capsule surface features using a phase-shifting diffraction interferometer and Leica Microsystems confocal microscope. These instruments produce multi-gigabyte datasets which consist of tens to hundreds of files. Existing software can handle viewing a small subset of an entire dataset, but none can view a dataset in its entirety. Additionally, without an established mode of transport that keeps the target capsules properly aligned throughout the assembly process, a means of aligning the two dataset coordinate systems is needed. The goal of this project is to develop web based software utilizing WebGL which will provide high level overview visualization of an entire dataset, with the capability to retrieve finer details on demand, in addition to facilitating alignment of multiple datasets with one another based on common features that have been visually identified by users of the system.

  4. Engineering strain measurements using the NPD at LANSCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourke, M.A.M.; Goldstone, J.A.; Lovell, K.J.

    1990-01-01

    The presence of residual stress in engineering components can affect their mechanical properties and structural integrity. Neutron diffraction is the only measuring technique which can provide spatially resolved non-destructive strain measurements in the interior of a component. By recording the change in the interplanar spacings elastic strains can be measured for individual lattice reflections. Also on a pulsed source, where all lattice reflections are recorded, profile refinement is an option which alloys the strain to be obtained from changes in the lattice parameter. Measurements made at LANSCE demonstrate the potential for stress measurements on a pulsed source and indicate the advantages and disadvantages over measurements made on a reactor. 5 refs., 5 figs

  5. Residual stress measurement using the pulsed neutron source at LANSCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourke, M.A.M.; Goldstone, J.A.; Holden, T.M.

    1991-01-01

    The presence of residual stress in engineering components can effect their mechanical properties and structural integrity. Neutron diffraction is the only measuring technique which can make spatially resolved non-destructive strain measurements in the interior of components. By recording the change in the crystalline interplanar spacing, elastic strains can be measured for individual lattice reflections. Using a pulsed neutron source, all the lattice reflections are recorded in each measurement which allows anisotropic effects to be studied. Measurements made at the Manuel Lujan Jr Neutron Scattering Centre (LANSCE) demonstrate the potential for stress measurements on a pulsed source and indicate the advantages and disadvantages over measurements made on a reactor. 15 refs., 7 figs

  6. Fission neutron spectra measurements at LANSCE - status and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haight, Robert C.; Noda, Shusaku; Nelson, Ronald O.; O' Donnell, John M.; Devlin, Matt; Chatillon, Audrey; Granier, Thierry; Taieb, Julien; Laurent, Benoit; Belier, Gilbert; Becker, John A.; Wu, Ching-Yen

    2009-01-01

    A program to measure fission neutron spectra from neutron-induced fission of actinides is underway at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in a collaboration among the CEA laboratory at Bruyeres-le-Chatel, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The spallation source of fast neutrons at LANSCE is used to provide incident neutron energies from less than 1 MeV to 100 MeV or higher. The fission events take place in a gas-ionization fission chamber, and the time of flight from the neutron source to that chamber gives the energy of the incident neutron. Outgoing neutrons are detected by an array of organic liquid scintillator neutron detectors, and their energies are deduced from the time of flight from the fission chamber to the neutron detector. Measurements have been made of the fission neutrons from fission of 235 U, 238 U, 237 Np and 239 Pu. The range of outgoing energies measured so far is from 1 MeV to approximately 8 MeV. These partial spectra and average fission neutron energies are compared with evaluated data and with models of fission neutron emission. Results to date will be presented and a discussion of uncertainties will be given in this presentation. Future plans are to make significant improvements in the fission chambers, neutron detectors, signal processing, data acquisition and the experimental environment to provide high fidelity data including mea urements of fission neutrons below 1 MeV and improvements in the data above 8 MeV.

  7. Mechanical Design and Fabrication of a New RF Power Amplifier for LANSCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zukun

    2011-01-01

    A Full-scale prototype of a new 201.25 MHz RF Final Power Amplifier (FPA) for Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has been designed, fabricated, assembled and installed in the test facility. This prototype was successfully tested and met the physics and electronics design criteria. The team faced design and manufacturing challenges, having a goal to produce 2 MW peak power at 13% duty factor, at the elevation of over 2 km in Los Alamos. The mechanical design of the final power amplifier was built around a Thales TH628 Diacrode R , a state-of-art tetrode power tube. The main structure includes Input circuit, Output circuit, Grid decoupling circuit, Output coupler, Tuning pistons, and a cooling system. Many types of material were utilized to make this new RF amplifier. The fabrication processes of the key components were completed in the Prototype Fabrication Division shop at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The critical plating procedures were achieved by private industry. The FPA mass is nearly 600 kg and installed in a beam structural support stand. In this paper, we summarize the FPA design basis and fabrication, plating, and assembly process steps with necessary lifting and handling fixtures. In addition, to ensure the quality of the FPA support structure a finite element analysis with seismic design forces has also been carried out.

  8. Mechanical Design and Fabrication of a New RF Power Amplifier for LANSCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zukun [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01

    A Full-scale prototype of a new 201.25 MHz RF Final Power Amplifier (FPA) for Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has been designed, fabricated, assembled and installed in the test facility. This prototype was successfully tested and met the physics and electronics design criteria. The team faced design and manufacturing challenges, having a goal to produce 2 MW peak power at 13% duty factor, at the elevation of over 2 km in Los Alamos. The mechanical design of the final power amplifier was built around a Thales TH628 Diacrode{sup R}, a state-of-art tetrode power tube. The main structure includes Input circuit, Output circuit, Grid decoupling circuit, Output coupler, Tuning pistons, and a cooling system. Many types of material were utilized to make this new RF amplifier. The fabrication processes of the key components were completed in the Prototype Fabrication Division shop at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The critical plating procedures were achieved by private industry. The FPA mass is nearly 600 kg and installed in a beam structural support stand. In this paper, we summarize the FPA design basis and fabrication, plating, and assembly process steps with necessary lifting and handling fixtures. In addition, to ensure the quality of the FPA support structure a finite element analysis with seismic design forces has also been carried out.

  9. Conceptual design of a 6-10 MJ driver for a high gain target development facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    Commercial application of inertial confinement fusion would require low yield (≅200-500 MJ), high gain (≥80) fusion targets. It is thought that the development off such targets would reqiure a 5-10 year research program utilizing one or more dedicated nuclear facilities with drivers capable of delivering on-target pulses of 6-10 MJ at the rate of several shots per day. The ''Target Development Facility'' (TDF) is the light ion driven version of such a facility. A TDF driver concept based upon reasonable extrapolation from present-day technology is described in this paper

  10. Neutron targets of Moscow meson facility status, problems, prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidorkin, S.; Koptelov, E.; Perekrestenko, A.; Stavissky, Y.; Trushkin, V.; Sobolevsky, N. [Institute for Nuclear Research RAS, 60-th October Anniversary Prospect, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2001-03-01

    The status, problems and possible perspectives of target complexes of the Moscow meson factory is described in the report. The results of test proton beam session to neutron source are analysed. Some technical features of targets and expected modes in the nearest sessions are stated. (author)

  11. Monte Carlo simulation of the spear reflectometer at LANSCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.S.

    1995-01-01

    The Monte Carlo instrument simulation code, MCLIB, contains elements to represent several components found in neutron spectrometers including slits, choppers, detectors, sources and various samples. Using these elements to represent the components of a neutron scattering instrument, one can simulate, for example, an inelastic spectrometer, a small angle scattering machine, or a reflectometer. In order to benchmark the code, we chose to compare simulated data from the MCLIB code with an actual experiment performed on the SPEAR reflectometer at LANSCE. This was done by first fitting an actual SPEAR data set to obtain the model scattering-length-density profile, Β(z), for the sample and the substrate. Then these parameters were used as input values for the sample scattering function. A simplified model of SPEAR was chosen which contained all of the essential components of the instrument. A code containing the MCLIB subroutines was then written to simulate this simplified instrument. The resulting data was then fit and compared to the actual data set in terms of the statistics, resolution and accuracy

  12. The LANSCE 805 MHZ RF System History and Status

    CERN Document Server

    Lynch, Michael; Tallerico, Paul J

    2005-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) linear accelerator runs at 201.25 MHz for acceleration to 100 MeV. The remainder of the acceleration to 800 MeV is at 805 MHz. This is done with 44 accelerator cavity stages driven by 805 MHz klystrons. Each klystron has a peak power capability of 1.25 MeV. Originally, 97 klystrons were purchased, which was 70 from Varian/CPI and 27 from Litton. The 44 RF systems are laid out in sectors with either 6 or 7 klystrons per sector. The klystrons in each sector are powered from a common HV sytem. The current arrangement uses the Varian/CPI klystrons in 6 of the 7 sectors and Litton klystrons in the remaining sector. With that arrangement there are 38 CPI klystrons installed and 1 spare klystron per sector and 6 Litton klystrons installed in the final sector with 2 spares. The current average life of all of the operating and spare klystrons (52 total) is >112,000 filament hours and >93,000 HV hours. That is three times the typical klystron lifetime today f...

  13. Conceptual design of a 10-MJ driver for a high gain target development facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    Commercial application of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) will require inexpensive, high gain (>80) fusion targets. It is thought that the development of such targets will require a 5 to 10 year search effort utilizing a dedicated nuclear research facility with a driver capable of providing a 10 MJ, 300 to 1000 TW pulse of on-target energy. The Terget Development Facility (TDF) is a light ion driven concept for such a facility. A TDF driver based upon extrapolations from present-day pulsed power technology is described in the present paper

  14. The Scottish Structural Proteomics Facility: targets, methods and outputs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oke, Muse; Carter, Lester G; Johnson, Kenneth A

    2010-01-01

    The Scottish Structural Proteomics Facility was funded to develop a laboratory scale approach to high throughput structure determination. The effort was successful in that over 40 structures were determined. These structures and the methods harnessed to obtain them are reported here. This report...... reflects on the value of automation but also on the continued requirement for a high degree of scientific and technical expertise. The efficiency of the process poses challenges to the current paradigm of structural analysis and publication. In the 5 year period we published ten peer-reviewed papers...

  15. X-ray emission from National Ignition Facility indirect drive targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, A.T.; Managan, R.A.; Tobin, M.T.; Peterson, P.F.

    1996-01-01

    We have performed a series of 1-D numerical simulations of the x-ray emission from National Ignition Facility (NIF) targets. Results are presented in terms of total x-ray energy, pulse length, and spectrum. Scaling of x-ray emissions is presented for variations in both target yield and hohlraum thickness. Experiments conducted on the Nova facility provide some validation of the computational tools and methods

  16. SATIF-2 shielding aspects of accelerators, targets and irradiation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    Particle accelerators have evolved over the last 50 years from simple devices to powerful machines, and will continue to have an important impact on research, technology and lifestyle. Today they cover a wide range of applications, from television and computer displays in households to the investigation of the origin and structure of matter. It has become common practice to use them for material science and medical applications. In recent years, requirements from new technological and research applications have emerged, such as increased particle beams intensities, higher flexibility, etc., giving rise to new radiation shielding aspects and problems. These proceedings review recent progress in radiation shielding of accelerator facilities, and evaluate advancements with respect to international co-operation in this field

  17. Target Diagnostic Control System Implementation for the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelton, R.T.; Kamperschroer, J.H.; Lagin, L.J.; Nelson, J.R.; O'Brien, D.W.

    2010-01-01

    The extreme physics of targets shocked by NIF's 192-beam laser are observed by a diverse suite of diagnostics. Many diagnostics are being developed by collaborators at other sites, but ad hoc controls could lead to unreliable and costly operations. A Diagnostic Control System (DCS) framework for both hardware and software facilitates development and eases integration. Each complex diagnostic typically uses an ensemble of electronic instruments attached to sensors, digitizers, cameras, and other devices. In the DCS architecture each instrument is interfaced to a low-cost Windows XP processor and Java application. Each instrument is aggregated with others as needed in the supervisory system to form an integrated diagnostic. The Java framework provides data management, control services and operator GUI generation. DCS instruments are reusable by replication with reconfiguration for specific diagnostics in XML. Advantages include minimal application code, easy testing, and high reliability. Collaborators save costs by assembling diagnostics with existing DCS instruments. This talk discusses target diagnostic instrumentation used on NIF and presents the DCS architecture and framework.

  18. The Super Fixed Target beauty facility at the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, Kwong

    1991-01-01

    The rationale for pursuing beauty physics at the SSC in a fixed target configuration is described. The increased beauty production cross section at the SSC, combined with high interaction rate capability of the proposed detector, results in 10 10-11 produced BB events per year. The long decay length of the B hadrons (≅ 10 cm) allows direct observation of B decays in the high resolution silicon microstrip vertex detector. To optimize the operation of the proposed beauty spectrometer and the SSC, parasitic extraction of attendant or artificially generated large amplitude protons using crystal channeling is proposed and explored. The large sample of fully reconstructed B events allows detailed studies of various CP violating decays with requisite statistics to confront the standard model. The CP physics potential of the proposed experiment is evaluated and compared with alternative approaches, such as symmetric e + e - B Factories and specialized hadron colliders

  19. Facilities for preparing actinide or fission product-based targets

    CERN Document Server

    Sors, M

    1999-01-01

    Research and development work is currently in progress in France on the feasibility of transmutation of very long-lived radionuclides such as americium, blended with an inert medium such as magnesium oxide and pelletized for irradiation in a fast neutron reactor. The process is primarily designed to produce ceramics for nuclear reactors, but could also be used to produce targets for accelerators. The Actinide Development Laboratory is part of the ATALANTE complex at Marcoule, where the CEA investigates reprocessing, liquid and solid waste treatment and vitrification processes. The laboratory produces radioactive sources; after use, their constituents are recycled, notably through R and D programs requiring such materials. Recovered americium is purified, characterized and transformed for an experiment known as ECRIX, designed to demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating americium-based ceramics and to determine the reactor transmutation coefficients.

  20. The LEU target development and conversion program for the MAPLE reactors and new processing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkoske, G.R.

    2003-01-01

    The availability of isotope grade, Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU), from the United States for use in the manufacture of targets for molybdenum-99 production in AECL's NRU research reactor has been a key factor to enable MDS Nordion to develop a reliable, secure supply of medical isotopes for the international nuclear medicine community. The molybdenum extraction process from HEU targets is a proven and established method that has reliably produced medical isotopes for several decades. The HEU process provides predictable, consistent yields for our high-volume, molybdenum-99 production. Other medical isotopes such as I-131 and Xe-133, which play an important role in nuclear medicine applications, are also produced from irradiated HEU targets as a by-product of the molybdenum-99 process. To ensure a continued reliable and timely supply of medical isotopes, MDS Nordion is completing the commissioning of two MAPLE reactors and an associated isotope processing facility (the New Processing Facility). The new MAPLE facilities, which will be dedicated exclusively to medical isotope production, will provide an essential contribution to a secure, robust global healthcare system. Design and construction of these facilities has been based on a life cycle management philosophy for the isotope production process. This includes target irradiation, isotope extraction and waste management. The MAPLE reactors will operate with Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel, a significant contribution to the objectives of the RERTR program. The design of the isotope production process in the MAPLE facilities is based on an established process - extraction of isotopes from HEU target material. This is a proven technology that has been demonstrated over more than three decades of operation. However, in support of the RERTR program and in compliance with U.S. legislation, MDS Nordion has undertaken a LEU Target Development and Conversion Program for the MAPLE facilities. This paper will provide an

  1. The target laboratory of the Pelletron Accelerator's facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueta, Nobuko; Pereira Engel, Wanda Gabriel [Nuclear Physics Department - University of Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2013-05-06

    A short report on the activities developed in the Target Laboratory, since 1970, will be presented. Basic target laboratory facilities were provided to produce the necessary nuclear targets as well as the ion beam stripper foils. Vacuum evaporation units, a roller, a press and an analytical balance were installed in the Oscar Sala building. A brief historical report will be presented in commemoration of the 40{sup th} year of the Pelletron Accelerator.

  2. Time gating for energy selection and scatter rejection: High-energy pulsed neutron imaging at LANSCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Alicia; Schirato, Richard; McKigney, Edward; Hunter, James; Temple, Brian

    2015-09-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is a linear accelerator in Los Alamos, New Mexico that accelerates a proton beam to 800 MeV, which then produces spallation neutron beams. Flight path FP15R uses a tungsten target to generate neutrons of energy ranging from several hundred keV to ~600 MeV. The beam structure has micropulses of sub-ns width and period of 1.784 ns, and macropulses of 625 μs width and frequency of either 50 Hz or 100 Hz. This corresponds to 347 micropulses per macropulse, or 1.74 x 104 micropulses per second when operating at 50 Hz. Using a very fast, cooled ICCD camera (Princeton Instruments PI-Max 4), gated images of various objects were obtained on FP15R in January 2015. Objects imaged included blocks of lead and borated polyethylene; a tungsten sphere; and a tungsten, polyethylene, and steel cylinder. Images were obtained in 36 min or less, with some in as little as 6 min. This is novel because the gate widths (some as narrow as 10 ns) were selected to reject scatter and other signal not of interest (e.g. the gamma flash that precedes the neutron pulse), which has not been demonstrated at energies above 14 MeV. This proof-of-principle experiment shows that time gating is possible above 14MeV and is useful for selecting neutron energy and reducing scatter, thus forming clearer images. Future work (simulation and experimental) is being undertaken to improve camera shielding and system design and to precisely determine optical properties of the imaging system.

  3. New target solution for a muon collider or a muon-decay neutrino beam facility: The granular waterfall target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Jie Cai

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A new target solution, the granular waterfall target, is proposed here for a muon collider or a muon-decay neutrino beam facility, especially for the moment which adopts a 15 MW continuous-wave (cw superconducting linac. Compared to the mercury jet target, the granular waterfall target works by a much simpler mechanism which can operate with a much more powerful beam, which are indicated by the detailed investigations into the heat depositions and the evaluations of the temperature increases for different target concepts. By varying proton beam kinetic energy and the geometrical parameters of the waterfall target, an overall understanding of the figure of merit concerning muon production for this target concept as the target solutions of the long-baseline neutrino factory and the medium-baseline moment is obtained. With 8 GeV beam energy and the optimal geometrical parameters, the influence on muon yield by adopting different beam-target interaction parameters is explored. Studies and discussions of the design details concerning beam dumping are also presented.

  4. Spallation Neutron Source Accelerator Facility Target Safety and Non-safety Control Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battle, Ronald E.; DeVan, B.; Munro, John K. Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a proton accelerator facility that generates neutrons for scientific researchers by spallation of neutrons from a mercury target. The SNS became operational on April 28, 2006, with first beam on target at approximately 200 W. The SNS accelerator, target, and conventional facilities controls are integrated by standardized hardware and software throughout the facility and were designed and fabricated to SNS conventions to ensure compatibility of systems with Experimental Physics Integrated Control System (EPICS). ControlLogix Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) interface to instruments and actuators, and EPICS performs the high-level integration of the PLCs such that all operator control can be accomplished from the Central Control room using EPICS graphical screens that pass process variables to and from the PLCs. Three active safety systems were designed to industry standards ISA S84.01 and IEEE 603 to meet the desired reliability for these safety systems. The safety systems protect facility workers and the environment from mercury vapor, mercury radiation, and proton beam radiation. The facility operators operated many of the systems prior to beam on target and developed the operating procedures. The safety and non-safety control systems were tested extensively prior to beam on target. This testing was crucial to identify wiring and software errors and failed components, the result of which was few problems during operation with beam on target. The SNS has continued beam on target since April to increase beam power, check out the scientific instruments, and continue testing the operation of facility subsystems

  5. A conversion development program to LEU targets for medical isotope production in the MAPLE Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkoske, G.R.

    2000-01-01

    Historically, the production of molybdenum-99 in the NRU research reactors at Chalk River, Canada has been extracted from reactor targets employing highly enriched uranium (HEU). The molybdenum extraction process from the HEU targets provided predictable, consistent yields for our high-volume molybdenum production process. A reliable supply of HEU for the NRU research reactor targets has enabled MDS Nordion to develop a secure chain of medical isotope supply for the international nuclear medicine community. Each link of the isotope supply chain, from isotope production to patient application, has been established on a proven method of HEU target irradiation and processing. To ensure a continued reliable and timely supply of medical isotopes, the design of the MAPLE facilities was based on our established process - extraction of isotopes from HEU target material. However, in concert with the global trend to utilize low enriched uranium (LEU) in research reactors, MDS Nordion has launched a program to convert the MAPLE facilities to LEU targets. An initial feasibility study was initiated to identify the technical issues to convert the MAPLE targets from HEU to LEU. This paper will present the results of the feasibility study. It will also describe future challenges and opportunities in converting the MAPLE facilities to LEU targets for large scale, commercial medical isotope production. (author)

  6. Reliability analysis of minimum energy on target for laser facilities with more beam lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Guangyu

    2008-01-01

    Shot reliability performance measures of laser facilities with more beam lines pertain to three categories: minimum-energy-on-target, power balance, and shot diagnostics. Accounting for symmetry of NIF beam line design and similarity of subset reliability in a same partition, a fault tree of meeting minimum-energy-on-target for the large laser facility shot of type K and a simplified method are presented, which are used to analyze hypothetic reliability of partition subsets in order to get trends of influences increasing number of beam lines and diverse shot types of large laser facilities on their shot reliability. Finally, it finds that improving component reliability is more crucial for laser facilities with more beam lines in comparison with those with beam lines and functional diversity from design flexibility is greatly helpful for improving shot reliability. (authors)

  7. Facility factors dominate the ability to achieve target haemoglobin levels in haemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kevin E; Lafayette, Richard A; Whittemore, Alice S; Hlatky, Mark A; Moran, John

    2008-09-01

    Our objective was to determine whether patient factors, processes of care and measures of erythropoietin (EPO) responsiveness were associated with successful anemia management at the individual patient level. We retrospectively reviewed laboratory and demographic data from 1499 patients receiving hemodialysis in 15 units operated by the same dialysis provider. We performed univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis to determine predictors of an average 3-month hemoglobin level below or above the target interval of 11.0-12.5 g/dL. To explain the effect of facility on anemia performance, we calculated correlations between measures of EPO responsiveness and the probability of achieving the target interval by facility. Patients above the target hemoglobin range demonstrated an association with parathyroid hormone (PTH) (OR = 0.96 per 100 pg/mL increase), female gender (OR = 0.68), EPO protocol use (OR = 0.94 per 10% increase in use) and facility (range of OR = 0.26-2.59 for 15 participating sites). Patients below the target hemoglobin range demonstrated an association with CRP (OR = 1.10 per mg/L increase), PTH (OR = 1.07 per 100 pg/mL increase), iron deficiency (OR = 1.07 per 10% increase), EPO protocol use (OR = 0.89 per 10% increase in use), iron protocol use (OR = 0.93 per 10% increase in use) and facility (range of OR = 0.58-3.41 over 15 units). EPO index (r = 0.71), EPO dose (r = 0.73), hemoglobin (r = -0.60) and EPO per unit weight (r = 0.76) were significantly correlated with the probability of achieving the target hemoglobin by facility. The facility significantly influences the outcome of anemia management in patients with ESRD. In part, this is due to the patients' EPO responsiveness, which may be influenced by facility care patterns.

  8. The accomplishments of lithium target and test facility validation activities in the IFMIF/EVEDA phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbeiter, Frederik; Baluc, Nadine; Favuzza, Paolo; Gröschel, Friedrich; Heidinger, Roland; Ibarra, Angel; Knaster, Juan; Kanemura, Takuji; Kondo, Hiroo; Massaut, Vincent; Saverio Nitti, Francesco; Miccichè, Gioacchino; O'hira, Shigeru; Rapisarda, David; Sugimoto, Masayoshi; Wakai, Eiichi; Yokomine, Takehiko

    2018-01-01

    As part of the engineering validation and engineering design activities (EVEDA) phase for the international fusion materials irradiation facility IFMIF, major elements of a lithium target facility and the test facility were designed, prototyped and validated. For the lithium target facility, the EVEDA lithium test loop was built at JAEA and used to test the stability (waves and long term) of the lithium flow in the target, work out the startup procedures, and test lithium purification and analysis. It was confirmed by experiments in the Lifus 6 plant at ENEA that lithium corrosion on ferritic martensitic steels is acceptably low. Furthermore, complex remote handling procedures for the remote maintenance of the target in the test cell environment were successfully practiced. For the test facility, two variants of a high flux test module were prototyped and tested in helium loops, demonstrating their good capabilities of maintaining the material specimens at the desired temperature with a low temperature spread. Irradiation tests were performed for heated specimen capsules and irradiation instrumentation in the BR2 reactor at SCK-CEN. The small specimen test technique, essential for obtaining material test results with limited irradiation volume, was advanced by evaluating specimen shape and test technique influences.

  9. The Cryogenic Studying and Filling Facilities for the Laser Megajoule Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachelet, F.; Vincent-Viry, O.; Collier, R.; Fleury, E.; Jeannot, L.; Legaie, O.; Pascal, G. [CEA Valduc, DAM, 21 - Is-sur-Tille (France); Perin, J. P.; Viargues, F. [CEA Grenoble, DSM INAC SBT, 38 (France)

    2009-04-15

    As part of the French Inertial Confinement Fusion program, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique has developed cryogenic target assemblies (CTAs) for the Laser Megajoule (LMJ) and a program in two stages for the permeation filling of these CTAs: (a) the permeation filling studies with the Study Filling Station cryostats and (b) the design and manufacturing of the whole operational chain of CTA filling facilities. This paper deals with the description of both the cryogenic studying and the filling facilities for the LMJ targets. (authors)

  10. A pulsed supersonic gas jet target for precision spectroscopy at the HITRAP facility at GSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiedemann, D.; Stiebing, K. E.; Winters, D. F. A.; Quint, W.; Varentsov, V.; Warczak, A.; Malarz, A.; Stöhlker, Th.

    2014-11-01

    A pulsed supersonic gas jet target for experiments at the HITRAP facility at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt has been designed and built as a multi-purpose installation for key experiments on fundamental atomic physics in strong fields. This setup is currently installed at the Institut für Kernphysik of Goethe-University, Frankfurt am Main (IKF), in order to explore its operation prior to its installation at the HITRAP facility. Design and performance of the target are described. The measured target densities of 5.9×1012 atoms/cm3 for helium and 8.1×1012 atoms/cm³ for argon at the stagnation pressure of 30 bar match the required values. The target-beam diameter of 0.9 mm and the pulsed operation mode (jet built-up-time ≤15 ms) are well suited for the use at HITRAP.

  11. A flexible testing facility for high-power targets T-MIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusco, Y.; Samec, K.; Behzad, M.; Kadi, Y.

    2015-01-01

    A dedicated material test irradiation facility is being proposed. The testing station will allow critical issues concerning materials under irradiation to be addressed, such as the impact of proton beam irradiation, neutron irradiation, liquid metal corrosion and temperature. The material samples to be investigated in such a facility will be subjected to tensile stress, either constant or cyclical. The facility may also be used for sensor development under irradiation and isotope production. The goal of the current work is to propose a facility that is sufficiently versatile and compact so that it may be transported and used in different laboratories. The power is limited to 100 kW. The general aspect of the proposed irradiation facility is a cube, 2 metres deep and comprising within it all the necessary systems. The interface to the laboratory is limited to the coolant connections, the secondary circuit, the electric energy supply and the signals from the instrumentation. The liquid metal target placed in the centre of the facility contains the samples which are subjected to a proton beam, creating irradiation damage directly through protons or indirectly through neutrons created by spallation of the surrounding liquid metal by the incoming protons. The design of the target is based upon the EURISOL target. The same beam window design is used, albeit stretched horizontally to adopt an elliptical section which is compatible with the shape of the beam used to irradiate the samples. The liquid metal in the target is re-circulated by an electromagnetic pump that drives the liquid metal through a heat exchanger located at the top of the facility, the position of which was chosen to encourage natural circulation. The heat exchanger is made up of two separate parts which allow the primary and secondary circuit to separate cleanly

  12. Target experimental area and systems of the Us national ignition facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobin, M.; Van Wonterghem, B.; MacGowan, B.J.; Hibbard, W.; Kalantar, D.; Lee, F.D.; Pittenger, L.; Wong, K.

    2000-01-01

    One of the major goals of the US National Ignition Facility is the demonstration of laser driven fusion ignition and burn of targets by inertial confinement and provide capability for a wide variety of high energy density physics experiments. The NIF target area houses the optical systems required to focus the 192 beamlets to a target precisely positioned at the center of the 10 meter diameter, 10-cm thick aluminum target chamber. The chamber serves as mounting surface for the 48 final optics assemblies, the target alignment and positioning equipment, and the target diagnostics. The internal surfaces of the chamber are protected by louvered steel beam dumps. The target area also provides the necessary shielding against target emission and environmental protection equipment. Despite its complexity, the design provides the flexibility to accommodate the needs of the various NIF user groups, such as direct and indirect drive irradiation geometries, modular final optics design, capability to handle cryogenic targets, and easily re-configurable diagnostic instruments. Efficient target area operations are ensured by using line-replaceable designs for systems requiring frequent inspection, maintenance and reconfiguration, such as the final optics, debris shields, phase plates and the diagnostic instruments. A precision diagnostic instrument manipulator (DIMS) allows fast removal and precise repositioning of diagnostic instruments. In addition we will describe several activities to enhance the target chamber availability, such as the target debris mitigation, the use of standard experimental configurations and the development of smart shot operations planning tools. (authors)

  13. Target experimental area and systems of the U.S. National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobin, M; Van Wonterghem, B; MacGowan, B J; Hibbard, W; Kalantar, D; Lee, F D; Pittenger, L; Wong, K

    1999-01-01

    One of the major goals of the US National Ignition Facility is the demonstration of laser driven fusion ignition and burn of targets by inertial confinement and provide capability for a wide variety of high energy density physics experiments. The NIF target area houses the optical systems required to focus the 192 beamlets to a target precisely positioned at the center of the 10 meter diameter, 10-cm thick aluminum target chamber. The chamber serves as mounting surface for the 48 final optics assemblies, the target alignment and positioning equipment, and the target diagnostics. The internal surfaces of the chamber are protected by louvered steel beam dumps. The target area also provides the necessary shielding against target emission and environmental protection equipment. Despite its complexity, the design provides the flexibility to accommodate the needs of the various NIF user groups, such as direct and indirect drive irradiation geometries, modular final optics design, capability to handle cryogenic targets, and easily re-configurable diagnostic instruments. Efficient target area operations are ensured by using line-replaceable designs for systems requiring frequent inspection, maintenance and reconfiguration, such as the final optics, debris shields, phase plates and the diagnostic instruments. A precision diagnostic instrument manipulator (DIMS) allows fast removal and precise repositioning of diagnostic instruments. In addition the authors describe several activities to enhance the target chamber availability, such as the target debris mitigation, the use of standard experimental configurations and the development of smart shot operations planning tools

  14. Design Optimisation of a High Intensity Beam Facility and Feasibility Experiment of a Solid Fragmented Target

    CERN Document Server

    Charitonidis, Nikolaos; Rivkin, Leonid

    2014-06-13

    The present PhD thesis describes the design, execution and results of the HRMT-10 experiment performed at the HiRadMat facility of the CERN/SPS complex. The first part of the thesis covers the design optimization studies of the HiRadMat facility, focusing in particular on the radiation protection issues. A detailed Monte-Carlo model of the facility has been developed and validated through comparison with measurements. A very satisfactory agreement between the simulation and the experimental data is observed. In the second part of this thesis, a novel feasibility experiment of a fragmented solid target for a future Neutrino Factory or a Super Beam facility, able to support high beam powers ( 1 MW) is presented in detail. A solid granular target has been proposed as an interesting alternative to an open Hg jet target, presently considered as the baseline for such facilities, but posing considerable technical challenges. The HRMT-10 experiment seeks to address the lack of experimental data of the feasibility of...

  15. High-energy, twelve-channel laser facility (DEFIN) for spherical irradiation of thermonuclear targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basov, N.G.; Danilov, A.E.; Krokhin, O.N.; Kruglov, B.V.; Mikhailov, Yu.A.; Sklizkov, G.V.; Fedotov, S.I.; Fedorov, A.N.

    This paper describes a high-energy, twelve-channel laser facility (DELFIN) intended for high-temperature heating of thermonuclear targets with spherical symmetry. The facility includes a neodymium-glass laser with the ultimate radiation energy of 10 kJ, a pulse length of approximately 10 -10 to 10 -9 s, beam divergence of 5 x 10 -4 radians, a vacuum chamber in which laser radiation interacts with the plasma, and a system of diagnostic instrumentation for the observation of laser beam and plasma parameters. Described are the optical scheme and construction details of the laser facility. Presented is an analysis of focusing schemes for target irradiation and described is the focusing scheme of the DELFIN facility, which is capable of attaining a high degree of spherical symmetry in irradiating targets with maximum beam intensity at the target surface of approximately 10 15 W/cm 2 . This paper examines the most important problems connected with the physical investigations of thermonuclear laser plasma and the basic diagnostic problems involved in their solution

  16. Hot target assembly at 14 UD Pelletron Accelerator Facility, BARC- TIFR, Mumbai

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, S.C.; Ramjilal; Ninawe, N.G.; Bhagwat, P.V.; Ahmeabadhai, P.; Kain, V.

    2005-01-01

    BARC-TIFR 14 UD Pelletron Accelerator Facility at Mumbai is operational since 1989 with progressively increased efficiency. The accelerator has been serving as major facility for heavy ion based research in India. There is an increased demand for high current proton beam, especially on heated targets for reactor physics based experiments. A proton beam setup is commissioned in the tower area of the existing facility itself, which provide proton beam of energy 2 MeV to 26 MeV with maximum 3 μA current. This setup is being used to produce radioisotopes and tracer packets. Proton beam of few MeV in μA current range is also needed to study radiation effects on metals at higher temperature, for use in reactors. For this purpose a hot target assembly has been designed and is being currently used at the Pelletron Accelerator

  17. Preparation of thin arsenic and radioarsenic targets for neutron capture studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fassbender, M.; Bach, H.; Bond, E.; Nortier, F.M.; Vieira, D.

    2009-01-01

    A simple method for the electrodeposition of elemental arsenic (As) on a metal backing from aqueous solutions has been developed. The method was successfully applied to stable As ( 75 As). Thin (2.5 mg cm -2 ) coherent, smooth layers of the metalloid on Ti foils (2.5 μm thickness) were obtained. Electrodeposits served as targets for 75 As(n,γ) 76 As neutron capture experiments at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Respective 73 As(n,γ) 74 As experiments are planned for the near future, and 73 As targets will be prepared in a similar fashion utilizing the new electrodeposition method. The preparation of an 73 As (half-life 80.3 days) plating bath solution from proton irradiated germanium has been demonstrated. Germanium target irradiation was performed at the Los Alamos Isotope Production Facility (IPF). (author)

  18. Design and Certification of Targets for Drop Tests at the NTRC Packaging Research Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, S.B.

    2003-01-01

    This report provides documentation of the design and certification of drop pad (targets) at the National Transportation Research Center (NTRC) Packaging Research Facility(PRF). Based on the evaluation performed, it has been demonstrated that the small (interior) drop pad (target) meets the regulatory definition of a flat, essentially unyielding, horizontal surface for packages weighing up to 3,150 lb (1,432 kg). The large (exterior) drop pad (target) meets the regulatory definition of a flat, essentially unyielding, horizontal surface for packages weighing up to 28,184 lb (12,811 kg)

  19. Selection of targets and ion sources for RIB generation at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alton, G.D.

    1995-01-01

    In this report, the authors describe the performance characteristics for a selected number of target ion sources that will be employed for initial use at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) as well as prototype ion sources that show promise for future use for RIB applications. A brief review of present efforts to select target materials and to design composite target matrix/heat-sink systems that simultaneously incorporate the short diffusion lengths, high permeabilities, and controllable temperatures required to effect fast and efficient diffusion release of the short-lived species is also given

  20. Inertial confinement fusion target insertion concepts for the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laughon, G.J.; Schultz, K.R.

    1996-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be used to demonstrate fusion ignition in a laboratory environment in order to support development of inertial fusion as a potential fusion energy source for civilian use. However, target insertion must first be addressed before inertial fusion can become a practical energy source. Since target insertion systems currently utilized are not suitable for multiple shots in quick succession, insertion concepts involving free-falling and artificially accelerated targets are developed and evaluated against a set of predetermined guidelines. It is shown that a system involving a fast retraction positioner would be suitable. 5 refs., 4 figs

  1. Lessons learned enhancing EPICS CA for LANSCE timed and flavored data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Jeffrey O.

    2009-01-01

    A previous paper described an upgrade to EPICS enabling client side tools at LANSCE to receive subscription updates filtered selectively to match a logical configuration of LANSCE beam gates, as configured by the control room. The upgrade required fundamental changes in the EPICS core components. First, the event queue in the EPICS server was upgraded to buffer record (function block) and device specific parameters accessed generically via software interfaces for introspection of 3rd party data. In contrast, event queues in previous versions of EPICS were strictly limited to buffering only value, timestamp, and alarm status tuples. Second, the Channel Access server is being upgraded to filter subscription updates. In this follow on paper some necessary design changes mid-project and the lessons learned during the software development will be described.

  2. A New Approach to Measuring the Neutron Decay Correlations with Cold Neutrons at LANSCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilburn, W.S.; Bowman, J.D.; Greene, G.L.; Jones, G.L.; Kapustinsky, J.S.; Penttila, S.I.

    1999-01-01

    Precision measurements of the neutron beta-decay correlations A, B, a, and b provide important tests of the standard model of electroweak interactions: a test of the unitarity of the first row of the CKM matrix, a search for new weak interactions, a test of the theory of nuclear beta decays, and a test of the conserved-vector-current hypothesis. The authors are designing an experiment at the LANSCE short-pulse spallation source to measure all four correlations to an order of magnitude better accuracy than the existing measurements. The accuracy of the previous measurements was limited by systematics. The design of the proposed experiment makes use of the pulsed nature of the LANSCE source to reduce systematic errors associated with the measurement of the neutron polarization as well as other systematic errors. In addition, the authors are developing silicon strip detectors for detecting both the proton and electron from the neutron decay

  3. The LEU target development and conversion program for the MAPLE reactors and new processing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkoske, G.R.

    2002-01-01

    Historically, the production of molybdenum-99 in the NRU research reactors at Chalk River, Canada has been extracted from reactor targets employing highly enriched uranium (HEU). A reliable supply of HEU metal from the United States used in the manufacture of targets for the NRU research reactor has been a key factor to enable MDS Nordion to develop a secure supply of medical isotopes for the international nuclear medicine community. The molybdenum extraction process from HEU targets provides predictable, consistent yields for our high-volume molybdenum production process. Each link of the isotope supply chain, from isotope production to ultimate use by the physician, has been established using this proven and established method of HEU target irradiation and processing to extract molybdenum-99. To ensure a continued reliable and timely supply of medical isotopes, MDS Nordion is completing the construction of two MAPLE reactors and a New Processing Facility. The design of the MAPLE facilities was based on an established process developed by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL) - extraction of isotopes from HEU target material. However, in concert with the global trend to utilize low enriched uranium (LEU) in research reactors, MDS Nordion has launched a three phase LEU Target Development and Conversion Program for the MAPLE facilities. Phase 1, the Initial Feasibility Study, which identified the technical issues to convert the MAPLE reactor targets from HEU to LEU for large scale commercial production was reported on at the RERTR- 2000 conference. The second phase of the LEU Target Development and Conversion Program was developed with extensive consultation and involvement of experts knowledgeable in target development, process system design, enriched uranium conversion chemistry and commercial scale reactor operations and molybdenum production. This paper will provide an overview of the Phase 2 Conversion Development Program, report on progress to date, and further

  4. Beam reliability and equipment downtime tracking how Lansce closes the loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callaway, N.T.; Ryder, R.D.

    2003-01-01

    LANSCE uses a semi-automated accounting system to track how well we meet our stated beam delivery goals. When an equipment failure prevents delivery of the desired beam to our customers, the first order cause is identified and an accurate measurement of the downtime is recorded. For equipment downtimes of significant duration, we investigate the causes and make recommendations that will hopefully eliminate or mitigate the impact of similar downtimes in the future. (authors)

  5. Recent operating experience with the H- ion injector at LAMPF/LANSCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingalls, W.B.; Stelzer, J.E.; Williams, H.E. III.

    1996-01-01

    A cusp-field cesium conversion ion source has provided H - beams at LAMPF/LANSCE since 1984. three interchangeable sources are now used during beam production cycles to minimize down time during scheduled source change-outs. Ion source change-outs are scheduled to prevent unscheduled loss of beam time due to finite filament lifetime. Ion source operating parameters and filament lifetime data are presented

  6. Facility Targeting, Protection and Mission Decision Making Using the VISAC Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Robert H.; Sulfredge, C. David

    2011-01-01

    The Visual Interactive Site Analysis Code (VISAC) has been used by DTRA and several other agencies to aid in targeting facilities and to predict the associated collateral effects for the go, no go mission decision making process. VISAC integrates the three concepts of target geometric modeling, damage assessment capabilities, and an event/fault tree methodology for evaluating accident/incident consequences. It can analyze a variety of accidents/incidents at nuclear or industrial facilities, ranging from simple component sabotage to an attack with military or terrorist weapons. For nuclear facilities, VISAC predicts the facility damage, estimated downtime, amount and timing of any radionuclides released. Used in conjunction with DTRA's HPAC code, VISAC also can analyze transport and dispersion of the radionuclides, levels of contamination of the surrounding area, and the population at risk. VISAC has also been used by the NRC to aid in the development of protective measures for nuclear facilities that may be subjected to attacks by car/truck bombs.

  7. Development of a RAMI model for LANSCE and high power APT accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallerico, P.J.

    1994-01-01

    Assessment of the reliability, availability, maintainability and inspectability (RAMI) of all high power, high cost systems is important to justify and improve the cost effectiveness of these systems. For the very large (over 100 MW) accelerator systems associated with APT, a RAMI model is very valuable in guiding the design and allocation of resources. A RAMI model of an existing machine is also valuable, since machine improvement funds must be allocated to increase the availability by the largest amount. The authors have developed a RAMI model using the critical subsystems of the LANSCE accelerator and beam delivery complex as an example and to evaluate the effectiveness for estimating reliability and beam availability. LAMPF and LANSCE together provide most of the features required for the accelerator and beam delivery part of a high-power APT machine, but LANSCE is pulsed, rather than CW. This complex is capable of a 1-MW average power H - beam, and it is the most powerful proton accelerator in the US built to date

  8. Low stored energy 100 kV regulator for ion sources at LANSCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, E.G.; Haffner, R.L.; Ingalls, W.B.; Meyer, B.J.; Stelzer, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    To minimize accelerating column damage caused by uncontrolled energy release during arc-downs, it is desirable to minimize the available stored electrical energy. For the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) H - ion sources, the stored energy includes, in addition to the charge in the power supply output capacitance, the charge on the electronics racks. They are supported and insulated from ground by PVC pipe and have a capacitance to ground of approximately 900 pf. In 1988 (LANSCE) personnel designed a high-voltage current source using a low-stored-energy power supply and planar triode with the goal of eliminating uncontrolled release of charge stored in the power supply. Construction and testing were performed intermittently as resources permitted until 1993. When work on the Short Pulse Spallation Source (SPSS) started on the LANSCE Ion Source Test Stand (ISTS) it was recognized that a higher current power supply would be needed and work resumed on the regulator circuitry. A 120 kV power supply having low output capacitance, and a planar triode have been used to supply 40 mA, 120 Hz, 12% duty-factor current for the ISTS beam. The triode's cathode current is controlled by circuitry operating both at power-supply voltage level and at ground level via a fiber optic link. Voltage droop is approximately 600 V during the 1 ms beam pulse. The authors present the status of the regulator and its special challenges

  9. Target irradiation facility and targetry development at 160 MeV proton beam of Moscow linac

    CERN Document Server

    Zhuikov, B L; Konyakhin, N A; Vincent, J

    1999-01-01

    A facility has been built and successfully operated with the 160 MeV proton beam of Moscow Meson factory LINAC, Institute for Nuclear Research (INR) of Russian Academy of Science, Troitsk. The facility was created for various isotope production goals as well as for fundamental nuclear investigations at high intensity beam (100 mu A and more). An important part of the facility targetry system is a high-intensity beam monitoring collimator device. Measurements of the temperature distribution between collimator sectors, cooling water flow and temperature, and the beam current, provide an opportunity to compute beam losses and beam position. The target holder design allows easy insertion by manipulator and simultaneous bombardment of several different targets of various types and forms, and variation of proton energy on each target over a wide range below 160 MeV. The main target utilized for commercial sup 8 sup 2 Sr isotope production is metallic rubidium in a stainless-steel container. A regular wet chemistry ...

  10. Parametric studies of target/moderator configurations for the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.J.; Seeger, P.A.; Fluharty, R.G.

    1977-03-01

    Parametric studies, using continuous-energy Monte Carlo codes, were done to optimize the neutronics of the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) target and three possible target/moderator configurations: slab target/slab moderators, cylindrical target/cylindrical moderator, and cylindrical target/double-wing moderators. The energy range was 0.5 eV to 800 MeV. A general figure-of-merit (FOM) approach was used. The WNR facility performance can be doubled or tripled by optimizing the target and target/moderator configurations; this approach is more efficient than increasing the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator power by an equivalent factor. A bare target should be used for neutron energies above approximately 100 keV. The FOM for the slab target/slab moderator configuration is the best by a factor of at least 2 to 3 below approximately 1 keV. The total neutron leakage from 0.5 eV to 100 keV through a 100- by 100-mm area centered at the peak leakage is largest for the slab moderator, exceeding that of the cylindrical moderator and double-wing moderator by factors of 1.7 and 3.4, respectively. The neutron leakage at 1 eV from one 300- by 150-mm surface of a slab moderator is 1.5 times larger than that from one 155- by 150-mm surface of a cylindrical moderator. When compared with the 1-eV leakage from two 100- by 150-mm surfaces of a double-wing moderator, that from the slab moderator is 3.4 times larger. 107 figures, 13 tables

  11. Hospital to Post-Acute Care Facility Transfers: Identifying Targets for Information Exchange Quality Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christine D; Cumbler, Ethan; Honigman, Benjamin; Burke, Robert E; Boxer, Rebecca S; Levy, Cari; Coleman, Eric A; Wald, Heidi L

    2017-01-01

    Information exchange is critical to high-quality care transitions from hospitals to post-acute care (PAC) facilities. We conducted a survey to evaluate the completeness and timeliness of information transfer and communication between a tertiary-care academic hospital and its related PAC facilities. This was a cross-sectional Web-based 36-question survey of 110 PAC clinicians and staff representing 31 PAC facilities conducted between October and December 2013. We received responses from 71 of 110 individuals representing 29 of 31 facilities (65% and 94% response rates). We collapsed 4-point Likert responses into dichotomous variables to reflect completeness (sufficient vs insufficient) and timeliness (timely vs not timely) for information transfer and communication. Among respondents, 32% reported insufficient information about discharge medical conditions and management plan, and 83% reported at least occasionally encountering problems directly related to inadequate information from the hospital. Hospital clinician contact information was the most common insufficient domain. With respect to timeliness, 86% of respondents desired receipt of a discharge summary on or before the day of discharge, but only 58% reported receiving the summary within this time frame. Through free-text responses, several participants expressed the need for paper prescriptions for controlled pain medications to be sent with patients at the time of transfer. Staff and clinicians at PAC facilities perceive substantial deficits in content and timeliness of information exchange between the hospital and facilities. Such deficits are particularly relevant in the context of the increasing prevalence of bundled payments for care across settings as well as forthcoming readmissions penalties for PAC facilities. Targets identified for quality improvement include structuring discharge summary information to include information identified as deficient by respondents, completion of discharge summaries

  12. Design of a deuterium and tritium-ablator shock ignition target for the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, Matthew R.; Perkins, L. John; Sepke, Scott M.

    2012-01-01

    Shock ignition presents a viable path to ignition and high gain on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In this paper, we describe the development of the 1D design of 0.5 MJ class, all-deuterium and tritium (fuel and ablator) shock ignition target that should be reasonably robust to Rayleigh-Taylor fluid instabilities, mistiming, and hot electron preheat. The target assumes “day one” NIF hardware and produces a yield of 31 MJ with reasonable allowances for laser backscatter, absorption efficiency, and polar drive power variation. The energetics of polar drive laser absorption require a beam configuration with half of the NIF quads dedicated to launching the ignitor shock, while the remaining quads drive the target compression. Hydrodynamic scaling of the target suggests that gains of 75 and yields 70 MJ may be possible.

  13. Neutron measurements from beam-target reactions at the ELISE neutral beam test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xufei, X.; Fan, T.; Nocente, M.; Gorini, G.; Bonomo, F.; Franzen, P.; Fröschle, M.; Grosso, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Grünauer, F.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of 2.5 MeV neutron emission from beam-target reactions performed at the ELISE neutral beam test facility are presented in this paper. The measurements are used to study the penetration of a deuterium beam in a copper dump, based on the observation of the time evolution of the neutron counting rate from beam-target reactions with a liquid scintillation detector. A calculation based on a local mixing model of deuterium deposition in the target up to a concentration of 20% at saturation is used to evaluate the expected neutron yield for comparison with data. The results are of relevance to understand neutron emission associated to beam penetration in a solid target, with applications to diagnostic systems for the SPIDER and MITICA Neutral Beam Injection prototypes

  14. The Nike KrF laser facility: Performance and initial target experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obenschain, S. P.; Bodner, S. E.; Colombant, D.; Gerber, K.; Lehmberg, R. H.; McLean, E. A.; Mostovych, A. N.; Pronko, M. S.; Pawley, C. J.; Schmitt, A. J.; Sethian, J. D.; Serlin, V.; Stamper, J. A.; Sullivan, C. A.; Dahlburg, J. P.; Gardner, J. H.; Chan, Y.; Deniz, A. V.; Hardgrove, J.; Lehecka, T.; Klapisch, M.

    1996-05-01

    Krypton-fluoride (KrF) lasers are of interest to laser fusion because they have both the large bandwidth capability (≳THz) desired for rapid beam smoothing and the short laser wavelength (1/4 μm) needed for good laser-target coupling. Nike is a recently completed 56-beam KrF laser and target facility at the Naval Research Laboratory. Because of its bandwidth of 1 THz FWHM (full width at half-maximum), Nike produces more uniform focal distributions than any other high-energy ultraviolet laser. Nike was designed to study the hydrodynamic instability of ablatively accelerated planar targets. First results show that Nike has spatially uniform ablation pressures (Δp/pNike laser in producing uniform illumination, and its performance in correspondingly uniform acceleration of targets.

  15. Implementation of the Polarized HD target at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaden Djalali; David Tedeschi

    2007-01-01

    The original goal of this proposal was to study frozen spin polarized targets (HD target and other technologies) and produce a conceptual design report for the implementation of such a target in the HALL B detector of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). During the first two years of the proposal, we came to the conclusion that the best suited target for JLab was a frozen spin target and helped with the design of such a target. We have not only achieved our original goal but have exceeded it by being involved in the actual building and testing of parts the target. The main reason for this success has been the hiring of a senior research associate, Dr. Oleksandr Dzyubak, who had more than 10 years of experience in the field of frozen spin polarized targets. The current grant has allowed the USC nuclear physics group to strengthen its role in the JLab collaboration and make important contribution to both the detector development and the scientific program

  16. Design of a control system for HIRFL-CSRe internal target facility in Lanzhou

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yanyu; Liu Wufeng; Shao Caojie; Lin Feiyu; Zhang Jianchuan; Xiao Wenjun

    2010-01-01

    It is described in this paper the design of the control system for HIRFL-CSRe internal target facility, in which there are many different kinds of units need to be monitored and controlled. The control system is composed of several subsystems which are designed to control the gas-jet temperature, chamber vacuum, valves and molecular pumps. A human-computer interaction interface is also realized to do the data acquisition, data processing and display. The whole system has been working stably and safely, it fully meets the requirements of physical experiments in the internal target facility. In January of 2010, the first physics experiment of the radioactive electron capture was finished successfully with the aids of this control system. (authors)

  17. Cryogenic polarized-target facility. Progress report, July 1, 1981-June 30, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, C.R.; Haase, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    The goal of this three-year research project is to build a cryogenically polarized target facility for measuring total neutron cross sections for polarized neutrons incident on polarized nuclei. The components of the system have been assembled at TUNL during the current contract period. These include the dilution-refrigerator support assembly, the dilution-refrigerator itself, the dewar, the beam line, the shielding cave for the neutron source, and the neutron-detector shield and rolling-cart assembly. The dilution refrigerator is presently undergoing testing at liquid-nitrogen and liquid-helium temperatures. Experiments with aluminum and copper targets are scheduled for the coming contract period

  18. Spallation target-moderator-reflector studies at the Weapons Neutron Research facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.J.; Gilmore, J.S.; Prael, S.D.; Robinson, H.; Howe, S.D.

    1980-01-01

    Basic neutronics data, initiated by 800-MeV proton spallation reactions, are important to spallation neutron source development and electronuclear fuel production. Angle-dependent and energy-dependent neutron production cross sections, energy-dependent and total neutron yields, thermal and epithermal neutron surface and beam fluxes, and fertile-to-fissile conversion ratios are being measured. The measurements are being done at the Weapons Neutron Research facility on a variety of targets and target-moderator-reflector configurations. The experiments are relevant to the above applications, and provide data to validate computer codes. Preliminary results are presented and compared to calculated predictions. 13 figures

  19. The drift chamber array at the external target facility in HIRFL-CSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. Y.; Wang, S. T.; Duan, L. M.; Sun, Y.; Yan, D.; Tang, S. W.; Yang, H. R.; Lu, C. G.; Ma, P.; Yu, Y. H.; Zhang, X. H.; Yue, K.; Fang, F.; Su, H.

    2018-06-01

    A drift chamber array at the External Target Facility in HIRFL-CSR has been constructed for three-dimensional particle tracking in high-energy radioactive ion beam experiments. The design, readout, track reconstruction program and calibration procedures for the detector are described. The drift chamber array was tested in a 311 AMeV 40Ar beam experiment. The detector performance based on the measurements of the beam test is presented. A spatial resolution of 230 μm is achieved.

  20. Characterization of third-harmonic target plan irradiance on the National Ignition Facility Beamlet demonstration project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wegner, P.J.; Van Wonterghem, B.M.; Dixit, S.N.; Henesian, M.A.; Barker, C.E.; Thompson, C.E.; Seppala, L.G.; Caird, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    The Beamlet laser is a single-aperture prototype for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). We have recently installed and activated a 55 m 3 vacuum vessel and associated diagnostic package at the output of the Beamlet that we are using to characterize target plane irradiance at high power. Measurements obtained both with and without a kinoform diffractive optic are reported. Dependences on critical laser parameters including output power, spatial filtering, and wavefront correction are discussed and compared with simulations

  1. Design of the Next Generation Spallation Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferres, Laurent [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-13

    The purpose of this summary is to detail the studies that enable new nuclear physics experiments currently limited by neutron intensity or energy resolution available at LANSCE. The target is being redesigned so that the Flight Paths (FP) in the upper tier provide a higher intensity in the epithermal and medium energy ranges.

  2. Spallation source neutron target systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.; Brown, R.; Collier, M.; Donahue, J.

    1996-01-01

    This is the final report for a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project sought to design a next-generation spallation source neutron target system for the Manuel Lujan, Jr., Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) at Los Alamos. It has been recognized for some time that new advanced neutron sources are needed in the US if the country is to maintain a competitive position in several important scientific and technological areas. A recent DOE panel concluded that the proposed Advanced Neutron Source (a nuclear reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory) and a high-power pulsed spallation source are both needed in the near future. One of the most technically challenging designs for a spallation source is the target station itself and, more specifically, the target-moderator-reflector arrangement. Los Alamos has demonstrated capabilities in designing, building, and operating high-power spallation-neutron-source target stations. Most of the new design ideas proposed worldwide for target system design for the next generation pulsed spallation source have either been conceived and implemented at LANSCE or proposed by LANSCE target system designers. These concepts include split targets, flux-trap moderators, back scattering and composite moderators, and composite reflectors

  3. Research on interactions of plasma streams with CFC targets in the Rod Plasma Injector facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaloga Dobromil R.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper present results of optical spectroscopy studies of interactions of intense plasma streams with a solid target made of carbon fibre composite (CFC. The experiments were carried out within the Rod Plasma Injector (RPI IBIS facility. The optical measurements were performed first for a freely propagating plasma stream in order to determine the optimal operational parameters of this facility. Optical emission spectra (OES were recorded for different operational modes of the RPI IBIS device, and spectral lines were identified originating from the working gas (deuterium as well as some lines from the electrode material (molybdenum. Subsequently, optical measurements of plasma interacting with the CFC target were performed. In the optical spectra recorded with the irradiated CFC samples, in addition to deuterium and molybdenum lines, many carbon lines, which enabled to estimate erosion of the investigated targets, were recorded. In order to study changes in the irradiated CFC samples, their surfaces were analysed (before and after several plasma discharges by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS techniques. The analysis of the obtained SEM images showed that the plasma irradiation induces noticeable changes in the surface morphology, for example vaporisation of some carbon fibres and formation of microcracks. The obtained EDS images showed that upon the irradiated target surface, some impurity ions are also deposited, particularly molybdenum ions from the applied electrodes.

  4. Theoretical study and experimental detection of cavitation phenomena in Liquid Lithium Target Facility for IFMIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orco, G. Dell; Horiike, H.; Ida, M.; Nakamura, H.

    2006-01-01

    In the IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) testing facility, the required high energy neutrons emission will be produced by reaction of two D + beams with a free surface liquid Lithium jet target flowing along concave back-wall at 20 m/s. The Lithium height in the experimental loop and its relevant static pressure, the high flow velocities and the presence of several devices for the flow control and the pressure reduction increase the risk of cavitation onset in the target system. Special attention has to be taken in the primary pump, in the flow straightener, in the nozzle and their interconnections where the local pressure decreases and/or velocity increases or flow separations could promote the emission of cavitation vapour bubbles. The successive bubble re-implosions, in the higher pressure liquid bulk, could activate material erosion and transportation of activated particulates. These bubbles, if emitted close to the free jet flow, could also procure hydraulic instability and disturbance of the neutron field in the D + beams-Lithium target zone. Therefore, the cavitation risk must be properly foreseen along the whole IFMIF Lithium target circuit and its occurrence at different operating condition should be also monitored by special instrumentation. ENEA, in close cooperation with JAEA, has demonstrated the capability to detect the onset of the cavitation noises in liquid Lithium, by using the ENEA patented accelerometric gauge called CASBA-2000, during hydraulic test campaigns carried-out at Osaka University Lithium facility on a straight mock-up of the IFMIF back plate target. Comparison with the Thoma' cavitation similitude criteria have also determined the critical threshold limit for the estimation of the onset. Theoretical study on the conditions of cavitations generation in the IFMIF Lithium Target Circuit were also launched between ENEA and JAEA aiming at analysing the risk of the cavitation occurrence in the Lithium flow by

  5. Overview on the target fabrication facilities at ELI-NP and ongoing strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghiu, C. C.; Leca, V.; Popa, D.; Cernaianu, M. O.; Stutman, D.

    2016-10-01

    Along with the development of petawatt class laser systems, the interaction between high power lasers and matter flourished an extensive research, with high-interest applications like: laser nuclear physics, proton radiography or cancer therapy. The new ELI-NP (Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics) petawatt laser facility, with 10PW and ~ 1023W/cm2 beam intensity, is one of the innovative projects that will provide novel research of fundamental processes during light-matter interaction. As part of the ELI-NP facility, Targets Laboratory will provide the means for in-house manufacturing and characterization of the required targets (mainly solid ones) for the experiments, in addition to the research activity carried out in order to develop novel target designs with improved performances. A description of the Targets Laboratory with the main pieces of equipment and their specifications are presented. Moreover, in view of the latest progress in the target design, one of the proposed strategies for the forthcoming experiments at ELI-NP is also described, namely: ultra-thin patterned foil of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coated with a carbon-based ultra-low density layer. The carbon foam which behaves as a near-critical density plasma, will allow the controlled-shaping of the laser pulse before the main interaction with the solid foil. Particular emphasis will be directed towards the target's design optimization, by simulation tests and tuning the key-properties (thickness/length, spacing, density foam, depth, periodicity etc.) which are expected to have a crucial effect on the laser-matter interaction process.

  6. The physics basis for ignition using indirect-drive targets on the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindl, John D.; Amendt, Peter; Berger, Richard L.; Glendinning, S. Gail; Glenzer, Siegfried H.; Haan, Steven W.; Kauffman, Robert L.; Landen, Otto L.; Suter, Laurence J.

    2004-01-01

    The 1990 National Academy of Science final report of its review of the Inertial Confinement Fusion Program recommended completion of a series of target physics objectives on the 10-beam Nova laser at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory as the highest-priority prerequisite for proceeding with construction of an ignition-scale laser facility, now called the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These objectives were chosen to demonstrate that there was sufficient understanding of the physics of ignition targets that the laser requirements for laboratory ignition could be accurately specified. This research on Nova, as well as additional research on the Omega laser at the University of Rochester, is the subject of this review. The objectives of the U.S. indirect-drive target physics program have been to experimentally demonstrate and predictively model hohlraum characteristics, as well as capsule performance in targets that have been scaled in key physics variables from NIF targets. To address the hohlraum and hydrodynamic constraints on indirect-drive ignition, the target physics program was divided into the Hohlraum and Laser-Plasma Physics (HLP) program and the Hydrodynamically Equivalent Physics (HEP) program. The HLP program addresses laser-plasma coupling, x-ray generation and transport, and the development of energy-efficient hohlraums that provide the appropriate spectral, temporal, and spatial x-ray drive. The HEP experiments address the issues of hydrodynamic instability and mix, as well as the effects of flux asymmetry on capsules that are scaled as closely as possible to ignition capsules (hydrodynamic equivalence). The HEP program also addresses other capsule physics issues associated with ignition, such as energy gain and energy loss to the fuel during implosion in the absence of alpha-particle deposition. The results from the Nova and Omega experiments approach the NIF requirements for most of the important ignition capsule parameters, including

  7. Targets for ion sources for RIB generation at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alton, G.D.

    1995-01-01

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF), now under construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is based on the use of the well-known on-line isotope separator (ISOL) technique in which radioactive nuclei are produced by fusion type reactions in selectively chosen target materials by high-energy proton, deuteron, or He ion beams from the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC). Among several major challenges posed by generating and accelerating adequate intensities of radioactive ion beams (RIBs), selection of the most appropriate target material for production of the species of interest is, perhaps, the most difficult. In this report, we briefly review present efforts to select target materials and to design composite target matrix/heat-sink systems that simultaneously incorporate the short diffusion lengths, high permeabilities, and controllable temperatures required to effect maximum diffusion release rates of the short-lived species that can be realized at the temperature limits of specific target materials. We also describe the performance characteristics for a selected number of target ion sources that will be employed for initial use at the HRIBF as well as prototype ion sources that show promise for future use for RIB applications

  8. An ion accelerator facility for the preparation of nuclear bombardement targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grime, G.W.; Takacs, J.

    1981-01-01

    As a result of the demand for increasingly complex nuclear bombardment targets in this laboratory, work has started on the construction of a medium-energy accelerator facility capable of preparing targets both by ion implantation and by heavy-ion sputtering. Basic consideration was given in the design to flexibility and simplicity. The ion source chosen was the Harwell sputter ion gun which is capable of producing ions of practically any element at currents up to several hundred μA. This was modified to suit our specific requirement. The acceleration system was constructed to operate at a maximum of 100 kV, and the beam is focussed by a three-cylinder electrostatic lens. The ions are analysed by 50 0 magnet which is capable of a mass dispersion of 7 mm in the target chamber between adjacent mass numbers at mass 100. A slit feedback system is used to stabilise the energy against short-term fluctuations. The system is fitted with two target chambers; one after the magnet and one after the electrostatic lens. The latter is used for applications such as sputtering. Two dimensional scanning is available in both target chambers for ensuring uniformity of implantation over areas larger than the spot size. Using this apparatus, implanted targets of 3 He and 20 Ne have been prepared. In addition high quality films of refractory metals have been sputtered using Ar or Xe beams. (orig.)

  9. Initiated chemical vapor deposited nanoadhesive for bonding National Ignition Facility's targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tom [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-05-19

    Currently, the target fabrication scientists in National Ignition Facility Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is studying the propagation force resulted from laser impulses impacting a target. To best study this, they would like the adhesive used to glue the target substrates to be as thin as possible. The main objective of this research project is to create adhesive glue bonds for NIF’s targets that are ≤ 1 μm thick. Polyglycidylmethacrylate (PGMA) thin films were coated on various substrates using initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD). Film quality studies using white light interferometry reveal that the iCVD PGMA films were smooth. The coated substrates were bonded at 150 °C under vacuum, with low inflow of Nitrogen. Success in bonding most of NIF’s mock targets at thicknesses ≤ 1 μm indicates that our process is feasible in bonding the real targets. Key parameters that are required for successful bonding were concluded from the bonding results. They include inert bonding atmosphere, sufficient contact between the PGMA films, and smooth substrates. Average bond strength of 0.60 MPa was obtained from mechanical shearing tests. The bonding failure mode of the sheared interfaces was observed to be cohesive. Future work on this project will include reattempt to bond silica aerogel to iCVD PGMA coated substrates, stabilize carbon nanotube forests with iCVD PGMA coating, and kinetics study of PGMA thermal crosslinking.

  10. Polyimide capsules may hold high pressure DT fuel without cryogenic support for the National Ignition Facility indirect-drive targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, J.J.; Letts, S.A.

    1997-01-01

    New target designs for the Omega upgrade laser and ignition targets in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) require thick (80 - 100 microm) cryogenic fuel layers. The Omega upgrade target will require cryogenic handling after initial fill because of the high fill pressures and the thin capsule walls. For the NIF indirectly driven targets, a larger capsule size and new materials offer hope that they can be built, filled and stored in a manner similar to the targets used in the Nova facility without requiring cryogenic handling

  11. Engineering validation for lithium target facility of the IFMIF under IFMIF/EVEDA project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Wakai

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF, presently in the Engineering Validation and Engineering Design Activities (EVEDA phase was started from 2007 under the frame of the Broader Approach (BA agreement. In the activities, a prototype Li loop with the world's highest flow rate of 3000L/min was constructed in 2010, and it succeeded in generating a 100mm wide and 25mm thick with a free-surface lithium flow along a concave back plate steadily at a high-speed of 15m/s at 250°C for 1300h. In the demonstration operation it was needed to develop the Li flowing measurement system with precious resolution less than 0.1mm, and a new wave height measuring method which is laser-probe method was developed for measurements of the 3D geometry of the liquid Li target surface. Using the device, the stability of the variation in the Li flowing thickness which is required in the IFMIF specification was ±1mm or less as the liquid Li target, and the result was satisfied with it and the feasibility of the long-term stable liquid Li flow was also verified. The results of the other engineering validation tests such as lithium purification tests of lithium target facility have also been evaluated and summarized.

  12. Shielding Aspects of Accelerators, Targets and Irradiation Facilities - SATIF-11 Workshop Proceedings Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Particle accelerators have evolved over the last decades from simple devices to powerful machines. In recent years, new technological and research applications have helped to define requirements while the number of accelerator facilities in operation, being commissioned, designed or planned has grown significantly. Their parameters, which include the beam energy, currents and intensities, and target composition, can vary widely, giving rise to new radiation shielding issues and challenges. Particle accelerators must be operated in safe ways to protect operators, the public and the environment. As the design and use of these facilities evolve, so must the analytical methods used in the safety analyses. These workshop proceedings review the state of the art in radiation shielding of accelerator facilities and irradiation targets. They also evaluate progress in the development of modelling methods used to assess the effectiveness of such shielding as part of safety analyses. The transport of radiation through shielding materials is a major consideration in the safety design studies of nuclear power plants, and the modelling techniques used may be applied to many other types of scientific and technological facilities. Accelerator and irradiation facilities represent a key capability in R and D, medical and industrial infrastructures, and they can be used in a wide range of scientific, medical and industrial applications. High-energy ion accelerators, for example, are now used not only in fundamental research, such as the search for new super-heavy nuclei, but also for therapy as part of cancer treatment. While the energy of the incident particles on the shielding of these facilities may be much higher than those found in nuclear power plants, much of the physics associated with the behaviour of the secondary particles produced is similar, as are the computer modelling techniques used to quantify key safety design parameters, such as radiation dose and activation levels

  13. The Nike KrF laser facility: Performance and initial target experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obenschain, S.P.; Bodner, S.E.; Colombant, D.; Gerber, K.; Lehmberg, R.H.; McLean, E.A.; Mostovych, A.N.; Pronko, M.S.; Pawley, C.J.; Schmitt, A.J.; Sethian, J.D.; Serlin, V.; Stamper, J.A.; Sullivan, C.A.; Dahlburg, J.P.; Gardner, J.H.; Chan, Y.; Deniz, A.V.; Hardgrove, J.; Lehecka, T.; Klapisch, M.

    1996-01-01

    Krypton-fluoride (KrF) lasers are of interest to laser fusion because they have both the large bandwidth capability (approx-gt THz) desired for rapid beam smoothing and the short laser wavelength (1/4 μm) needed for good laser endash target coupling. Nike is a recently completed 56-beam KrF laser and target facility at the Naval Research Laboratory. Because of its bandwidth of 1 THz FWHM (full width at half-maximum), Nike produces more uniform focal distributions than any other high-energy ultraviolet laser. Nike was designed to study the hydrodynamic instability of ablatively accelerated planar targets. First results show that Nike has spatially uniform ablation pressures (Δp/p<2%). Targets have been accelerated for distances sufficient to study hydrodynamic instability while maintaining good planarity. In this review we present the performance of the Nike laser in producing uniform illumination, and its performance in correspondingly uniform acceleration of targets. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  14. The 235U prompt fission neutron spectrum measured by the Chi-Nu project at LANSCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomez J.A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Chi-Nu experiment aims to accurately measure the prompt fission neutron spectrum for the major actinides. At the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE, fission can be induced with neutrons ranging from 0.7 MeV and above. Using a two arm time-of-flight (TOF technique, the fission neutrons are measured in one of two arrays: a 22-6Li glass array for lower energies, or a 54-liquid scintillator array for outgoing energies of 0.5 MeV and greater. Presented here are the collaboration's preliminary efforts at measuring the 235U PFNS.

  15. Proton-beam window design for a transmutation facility operating with a liquid lead target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, C.; Lypsch, F.; Lizana, P. [Institute for Safety Research and Reactor Technology, Juelich (Germany)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The proton beam target of an accelerator-driven transmutation facility can be designed as a vertical liquid lead column. To prevent lead vapor from entering the accelerator vacuum, a proton-beam window has to separate the area above the lead surface from the accelerator tube. Two radiation-cooled design alternatives have been investigated which should withstand a proton beam of 1.6 GeV and 25 mA. Temperature calculations based on energy deposition calculations with the Monte Carlo code HETC, stability analysis and spallation-induced damage calculations have been performed showing the applicability of both designs.

  16. Bounding Radionuclide Inventory and Accident Consequence Calculation for the 1L Target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelsey, Charles T. IV

    2011-01-01

    A bounding radionuclide inventory for the tungsten of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) IL Target is calculated. Based on the bounding inventory, the dose resulting from the maximum credible incident (MCI) is calculated for the maximally exposed offsite individual (MEOl). The design basis accident involves tungsten target oxidation following a loss of cooling accident. Also calculated for the bounding radionuclide inventory is the ratio to the LANSCE inventory threshold for purposes of inventory control as described in the target inventory control policy. A bounding radionuclide inventory calculation for the lL Target was completed using the MCNPX and CINDER'90 codes. Continuous beam delivery at 200 (micro)A to 2500 mA·h was assumed. The total calculated activity following this irradiation period is 205,000 Ci. The dose to the MEOI from the MCI is 213 mrem for the bounding inventory. The LANSCE inventory control threshold ratio is 132.

  17. A flexible testing facility for high-power targets (Tiara FP7 program)

    CERN Document Server

    Fusco, Y.; Samec, K.; Kadi, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Building on recent experience in the field of applied physics, TIARA Work package n° 9 focuses on target applications for accelerators in Europe. A roadmap for target development has been derived from major achievements in the EU-FP6 and EU-FP7 programs such as the MEGAPIE and EURISOL experiments. The TIARA management board concluded that a worthwhile continuation of such projects would be in the development of a flexible material irradiation facility easily transportable and which could be installed in different laboratories. The power is limited to 100 kW in a very compact arrangement so as to obtain the best neutron economy from a moderate beam power which is more likely to be found in laboratories across Europe. The challenges posed by such a compact design and accompanying calculations are presented in the current work.

  18. Target development for 67Cu, 82Sr radionuclide production at the RIC-80 facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panteleev, V. N.; Barzakh, A. E.; Batist, L. Kh.; Fedorov, D. V.; Ivanov, V. S.; Krotov, S. A.; Molkanov, P. L.; Moroz, F. V.; Orlov, S. Yu.; Volkov, Yu. M.

    2018-01-01

    A high-current cyclotron C-80 capable of producing 40-80 MeV proton beams with a current of up to 200 μA has been constructed and commissioned at PNPI (Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute). One of the main goals of cyclotron C-80 is the production of a wide spectrum of medical radionuclides for diagnostics and therapy. To date, the project development of a radioisotope facility RIC-80 (radioisotopes at cyclotron C-80) has been completed. The feature of the project is the use of a mass-separator combined with the ion-target device for obtaining ion beams of radioisotopes with a high purity of separation that is especially important for medical applications. The first results of a new high-temperature method for extracting 82Sr and 67Cu radioisotopes from irradiated targets have been presented.

  19. Conceptual design of low activation target chamber and components for the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streckert, H.H.; Schultz, K.R.; Sager, G.T.; Kantner, R.D.

    1996-01-01

    The baseline design for the target chamber and chamber components for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) consists of aluminum alloy structural material. Low activation composite chamber and components have important advantages including enhanced environmental and safety characteristics and improved accessibility due to reduced neutron-induced radioactivity. A low activation chamber can be fabricated from carbon fiber reinforced epoxy using thick wall laminate technology similar to submarine bow dome fabrication for the U.S. Navy. A risk assessment analysis indicates that a composite chamber has a reasonably high probability of success, but that an aluminum alloy chamber represents a lower risk. Use of low activation composite materials for several chamber components such as the final optics assemblies, the target positioner and inserter, the diagnostics manipulator tubes, and the optics beam tubes would offer an opportunity to make significant reductions in post-shot radiation dose rate with smaller, less immediate impact on the NIF design. 7 refs., 3 figs

  20. Spallation radiation damage and the radiation damage facility at the LAMPF A-6 target station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wechsler, M.S.; Sommer, W.F. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1984-05-01

    A redesign of the Clinton P. Anderson Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) A-6 Target Station is underway that will permit materials irradiations to be conducted in the proton beam and in the spallation neutron environment under more controlled conditions than has been possible heretofore. The protons of energy near 800 MeV and beam current approaching one mA are able to produce radiation damage rates (displacement production rates) as high as can be achieved in fission reactors, and the damage is uniform over macroscopic dimensions. The spallation neutrons have a degraded fission spectrum energy distribution, with the important admixture of a high energy tail up to 800 MeV. Irradiations in these radiation environments can be used to address important problems in the development of materials for fusion reactors. The redesign of the A-6 Target Station is described and plans for its use are discussed.

  1. THE PRIMARY TARGET FACILITY FOR A NEUTRINO FACTORY BASED ON MUON BEAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HASSENEIN, A.; KAHN, S.A.; KING, B.J.; KIRK, H.G.; LUDEWIG, H.; PALMER, R.B.; PEARSON, C.E.; SAMULYAK, R.; SIMOS, N.; STUMER, I.; THIEBERGER, P.; WEGGEL, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    Neutrino beams from the decay of muons in a storage ring offer the prospect of very high flux, well-understood spectra, and equal numbers of electron and muon neutrinos, as desirable for detailed exploration of neutrino oscillations via long baseline detectors [1]. Such beams require. large numbers of muons, and hence a high performance target station at which a 1-4 MW proton beam of 16-24 GeV impinges on a compact target, all inside a high field solenoid channel to capture as much of the phase volume of soft pions as possible. A first concept was based on a carbon target, as reported in 2000 the Neutrino Factory Study-I [2]. A higher performance option based on a free mercury jet has been studied in 2001 as part of the Neutrino Factory Feasibility Study-II [3,4]. An overview of a mercury jet target facility is presented here, including requirements, design concept and summaries of simulated performance. Further details are presented in related papers at this conference

  2. Selection of RIB targets using ion implantation at the Holifield radioactive ion beam facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alton, G.D.; Dellwo, J.

    1995-01-01

    Among several major challenges posed by generating and accelerating adequate intensities of RIBs, selection of the most appropriate target material is perhaps the most difficult because of the requisite fast and selective thermal release of minute amounts of the short-lived product atoms from the ISOL target in the presence of bulk amounts of target material. Experimental studies are under way at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) which are designed to measure the time evolution of implanted elements diffused from refractory target materials which are candidates for forming radioactive ion beams (RIBs) at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF). The diffusion coefficients are derived by comparing experimental data with numerical solutions to a one-dimensional form of Fick's second law for ion implanted distributions. In this report, we describe the experimental arrangement, experimental procedures, and provide time release data and diffusion coefficients for releasing ion implanted 37 Cl from Zr 5 Si 3 and 75 As, 79 Br, and 78 Se from Zr 5 Ge 3 and estimates of the diffusion coefficients for 35 Cl, 63 Cu, 65 Cu, 69 Ga and 71 Ga diffused from BN; 35 Cl, 63 Cu, 65 Cu, 69 Ga, 75 As, and 78 Se diffused from C; 35 Cl, 68 Cu, 69 Ga, 75 As, and 78 Se diffused from Ta

  3. Thin and thick targets for radioactive ion beam production at SPIRAL1 facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardin, P.; Bajeat, O.; Delahaye, P.; Dubois, M.; Kuchi, V.; Maunoury, L.

    2018-05-01

    The upgrade of the Système de Production d'Ions Radioactifs Accélérés en Ligne (SPIRAL1) facility will deliver its new Radioactive Ion Beams (RIB) by summer 2017. The goal of the upgrade is an improvement of the performances of the installation in terms of isotopes species and ion charge states [1]. Ion beams are produced using the Isotope Separator On Line Method, consisting in an association of a primary beam of stable ions, a hot target and an ion source. The primary beam impinges on the material of the target. Radioactive isotopes are produced by nuclear reactions and propagate up to the source, where they are ionized and accelerated to create a RIB. One advantage of SPIRAL1 driver is the variety of its available primary beams, from carbon to uranium with energies up to 95 MeV/A. Within the SPIRAL1 upgrade, they will be combined with targets made of a large choice of materials, extending in this way the number of possible nuclear reactions (fusion-evaporation, transfer, fragmentation) for producing a wider range of isotopes, up to regions of the nuclide chart still scarcely explored. Depending on the reaction process, on the collision energy and on the primary beam power, thin and thick targets are used. As their functions can be different, their design must cope with specific constraints which will be described. After a presentation of the goals of present and future SPIRAL1 Target Ion Source System, the main target features, studies and designs under progress are presented.

  4. Studies of plasma interactions with tungsten targets in PF-1000U facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladygina Maryna S.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of experimental studies of tungsten samples of 99.95% purity, which were irradiated by intense plasma-ion streams. The behaviour of tungsten, and particularly its structural change induced by high plasma loads, is of great importance for fusion technology. The reported measurements were performed within a modified PF-1000U plasma-focus facility operated at the IFPiLM in Warsaw, Poland. The working gas was pure deuterium. In order to determine the main plasma parameters and to study the behaviour of impurities at different instants of the plasma discharge, the optical emission spectroscopy was used. The dependence of plasma parameters on the initial charging voltage (16, 19 and 21 kV was studied. Detailed optical measurements were performed during interactions of a plasma stream with the tungsten samples placed at the z-axis of the facility, at a distance of 6 cm from the electrode outlets. The recorded spectra showed distinct WI and WII spectral lines. Investigation of a target surface morphology, after its irradiation by intense plasma streams, was performed by means of an optical microscope. The observations revealed that some amounts of the electrodes material (mainly copper were deposited upon the irradiated sample surface. In all the cases, melted zones were observed upon the irradiated target surface, and in experiments performed at the highest charging voltage there were formed some cracks.

  5. Los Alamos contribution to target diagnostics on the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, J.M.; Baker, D.A.; Caldwell, S.E.

    1994-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will have a large suite of sophisticated target diagnostics. This will allow thoroughly diagnosed experiments to be performed both at the ignition and pre-ignition levels. As part of the national effort Los Alamos National Laboratory will design, construct and implement a number of diagnostics for the NIF. This paper describes Los Alamos contributions to the ''phase I diagnostics.'' Phase I represents the most fundamental and basic measurement systems that will form the core for most work on the NIF. The Los Alamos effort falls into four categories: moderate to hard X-ray (time resolved imaging neutron spectroscopy- primarily with neutron time of flight devices; burn diagnostics utilizing gamma ray measurements; testing measurement concepts on the TRIDENT laser system at Los Alamos. Because of the high blast, debris and radiation environment, the design of high resolution X-ray imaging systems present significant challenges. Systems with close target proximity require special protection and methods for such protection is described. The system design specifications based on expected target performance parameters is also described. Diagnosis of nuclear yield and burn will be crucial to the NIF operation. Nuclear reaction diagnosis utilizing both neutron and gamma ray detection is discussed. The Los Alamos TRIDENT laser system will be used extensively for the development of new measurement concepts and diagnostic instrumentation. Some its potential roles in the development of diagnostics for NIF are given

  6. Los Alamos contribution to target diagnostics on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mack, J.M.; Baker, D.A.; Caldwell, S.E. [and others

    1994-07-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will have a large suite of sophisticated target diagnostics. This will allow thoroughly diagnosed experiments to be performed both at the ignition and pre-ignition levels. As part of the national effort Los Alamos National Laboratory will design, construct and implement a number of diagnostics for the NIF. This paper describes Los Alamos contributions to the ``phase I diagnostics.`` Phase I represents the most fundamental and basic measurement systems that will form the core for most work on the NIF. The Los Alamos effort falls into four categories: moderate to hard X-ray (time resolved imaging neutron spectroscopy- primarily with neutron time of flight devices; burn diagnostics utilizing gamma ray measurements; testing measurement concepts on the TRIDENT laser system at Los Alamos. Because of the high blast, debris and radiation environment, the design of high resolution X-ray imaging systems present significant challenges. Systems with close target proximity require special protection and methods for such protection is described. The system design specifications based on expected target performance parameters is also described. Diagnosis of nuclear yield and burn will be crucial to the NIF operation. Nuclear reaction diagnosis utilizing both neutron and gamma ray detection is discussed. The Los Alamos TRIDENT laser system will be used extensively for the development of new measurement concepts and diagnostic instrumentation. Some its potential roles in the development of diagnostics for NIF are given.

  7. Reduced cost design of liquid lithium target for international fusion material irradiation facility (IFMIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hiroo; Ida, Mizuho; Sugimoto, Masayoshi; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Yutani, Toshiaki

    2001-01-01

    The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is being jointly planned to provide an accelerator-based D-Li neutron source to produce intense high energy neutrons (2 MW/m 2 ) up to 200 dpa and a sufficient irradiation volume (500 cm 3 ) for testing the candidate materials and components up to about a full lifetime of their anticipated use in ITER and DEMO. To realize such a condition, 40 MeV deuteron beam with a current of 250 mA is injected into high speed liquid lithium flow with a speed of 20 m/s. Following Conceptual Design Activity (1995-1998), a design study with focus on cost reduction without changing its original mission has been done in 1999. The following major changes to the CAD target design have been considered in the study and included in the new design: i) number of the Li target has been changed from 2 to 1, ii) spare of impurity traps of the Li loop was removed although the spare will be stored in a laboratory for quick exchange, iii) building volume was reduced via design changes in lithium loop length. This paper describes the reduced cost design of the lithium target system and recent status of Key Element Technology activities. (author)

  8. Optimized beryllium target design for indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simakov, Andrei N., E-mail: simakov@lanl.gov; Wilson, Douglas C.; Yi, Sunghwan A.; Kline, John L.; Batha, Steven H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Clark, Daniel S.; Milovich, Jose L.; Salmonson, Jay D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    For indirect drive inertial confinement fusion, Beryllium (Be) ablators offer a number of important advantages as compared with other ablator materials, e.g., plastic and high density carbon. In particular, the low opacity and relatively high density of Be lead to higher rocket efficiencies giving a higher fuel implosion velocity for a given X-ray drive; and to higher ablation velocities providing more ablative stabilization and reducing the effect of hydrodynamic instabilities on the implosion performance. Be ablator advantages provide a larger target design optimization space and can significantly improve the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. D. Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)] ignition margin. Herein, we summarize the Be advantages, briefly review NIF Be target history, and present a modern, optimized, low adiabat, Revision 6 NIF Be target design. This design takes advantage of knowledge gained from recent NIF experiments, including more realistic levels of laser-plasma energy backscatter, degraded hohlraum-capsule coupling, and the presence of cross-beam energy transfer.

  9. Automated alignment of the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) target area at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Randy S.; Awwal, Abdul A. S.; Bliss, Erlan S.; Heebner, John E.; Leach, Richard R.; Orth, Charles D.; Rushford, Michael C.; Lowe-Webb, Roger R.; Wilhelmsen, Karl C.

    2015-09-01

    The Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a petawatt-class, short-pulse laser system designed to provide x-ray backlighting of NIF targets. ARC uses four NIF beamlines to produce eight beamlets to create a sequence of eight images of an imploding fuel capsule using backlighting targets and diagnostic instrumentation. ARC employs a front end that produces two pulses, chirps the pulses out to 2 ns, and then injects the pulses into the two halves of each of four NIF beamlines. These pulses are amplified by NIF pre- and main amplifiers and transported to compressor vessels located in the NIF target area. The pulses are then compressed and pointed into the NIF target chamber where they impinge upon an array of backlighters. The interaction of the ARC laser pulses and the backlighting material produces bursts of high-energy x-rays that illuminate an imploding fuel capsule. The transmitted x-rays are imaged by diagnostic instrumentation to produce a sequence of radiograph images. A key component of the success of ARC is the automatic alignment system that accomplishes the precise alignment of the beamlets to avoid damaging equipment and to ensure that the beamlets are directed onto the tens-of-microns scale backlighters. In this paper, we describe the ARC automatic alignment system, with emphasis on control loops used to align the beampaths. We also provide a detailed discussion of the alignment image processing, because it plays a critical role in providing beam centering and pointing information for the control loops.

  10. Radiation effects on active camera electronics in the target chamber at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayton, M.; Datte, P.; Carpenter, A.; Eckart, M.; Manuel, A.; Khater, H.; Hargrove, D.; Bell, P.

    2017-08-01

    The National Ignition Facility's (NIF) harsh radiation environment can cause electronics to malfunction during high-yield DT shots. Until now there has been little experience fielding electronic-based cameras in the target chamber under these conditions; hence, the performance of electronic components in NIF's radiation environment was unknown. It is possible to purchase radiation tolerant devices, however, they are usually qualified for radiation environments different to NIF, such as space flight or nuclear reactors. This paper presents the results from a series of online experiments that used two different prototype camera systems built from non-radiation hardened components and one commercially available camera that permanently failed at relatively low total integrated dose. The custom design built in Livermore endured a 5 × 1015 neutron shot without upset, while the other custom design upset at 2 × 1014 neutrons. These results agreed with offline testing done with a flash x-ray source and a 14 MeV neutron source, which suggested a methodology for developing and qualifying electronic systems for NIF. Further work will likely lead to the use of embedded electronic systems in the target chamber during high-yield shots.

  11. An update on the LEU target development and conversion program for the MAPLE reactors and new processing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkoske, G.R.; Eng, B.Sc; Eng, P.

    2002-01-01

    Historically, the production of molybdenum-99 in the NRU research reactors at Chalk River, Canada, has been extracted from reactor targets employing highly enriched uranium (HEU). A reliable supply of HEU metal from the United States used in the manufacture of targets for the NRU research reactor has been a key factor to enable MDS Nordion to develop a secure supply of medical isotopes for the international nuclear medicine community. The molybdenum extraction process from HEU targets provides predictable, consistent yields for our high-volume molybdenum production process. Each link of the isotope supply chain, from isotope production to ultimate use by the physician, has been established using this proven and established method of HEU target irradiation and processing to extract molybdenum-99. To ensure a continued reliable and timely supply of medical isotopes, MDS Nordion is completing the construction of two MAPLE reactors and a New Processing Facility. The design of the MAPLE facilities was based on an established process developed by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL)-extraction of isotopes from HEU target material. However, in concert with the global trend to utilize low enriched uranium (LEU) in research reactors, MDS Nordion has launched a three phase LEU Target Development and Conversion Program for the MAPLE facilities. Phase 1, the Initial Feasibility Study, which identified the technical issues to convert the MAPLE reactor targets from HEU to LEU for large scale commercial production was reported on at the RERTR-2000 conference. The second phase of the LEU Target Development and Conversion Program was developed with extensive consultation and involvement of experts knowledgeable in target development, process system design, enriched uranium conversion chemistry and commercial scale reactor operations and molybdenum production. This paper will provide an overview of the Phase 2 Conversion Development Program, report on progress to date, and further

  12. Multi-objective particle swarm and genetic algorithm for the optimization of the LANSCE linac operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang, X.; Rybarcyk, L.J.

    2014-01-01

    Particle swarm optimization (PSO) and genetic algorithm (GA) are both nature-inspired population based optimization methods. Compared to GA, whose long history can trace back to 1975, PSO is a relatively new heuristic search method first proposed in 1995. Due to its fast convergence rate in single objective optimization domain, the PSO method has been extended to optimize multi-objective problems. In this paper, we will introduce the PSO method and its multi-objective extension, the MOPSO, apply it along with the MOGA (mainly the NSGA-II) to simulations of the LANSCE linac and operational set point optimizations. Our tests show that both methods can provide very similar Pareto fronts but the MOPSO converges faster

  13. Multi-objective particle swarm and genetic algorithm for the optimization of the LANSCE linac operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, X., E-mail: xpang@lanl.gov; Rybarcyk, L.J.

    2014-03-21

    Particle swarm optimization (PSO) and genetic algorithm (GA) are both nature-inspired population based optimization methods. Compared to GA, whose long history can trace back to 1975, PSO is a relatively new heuristic search method first proposed in 1995. Due to its fast convergence rate in single objective optimization domain, the PSO method has been extended to optimize multi-objective problems. In this paper, we will introduce the PSO method and its multi-objective extension, the MOPSO, apply it along with the MOGA (mainly the NSGA-II) to simulations of the LANSCE linac and operational set point optimizations. Our tests show that both methods can provide very similar Pareto fronts but the MOPSO converges faster.

  14. MACS, the manipulation and collimation system on the NPD at LANSCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourke, M.A.M.; Goldstone, J.A.; Lovell, K.J.

    1991-01-01

    The practical problems associated with beam collimation and specimen manipulation at a pulsed neutron source are identical to those on a steady state source. However extra constraints result from the limited space available and from the time of flight analysis of the diffracted neutrons. A manipulation and collimation system (MACS) has been designed for the neutron powder diffractometer (NPD) at the Los Alamos spallation neutron source (LANSCE). It provides specimen motion and aperture positioning with accuracies of better than 0.1mm and is constructed as a rigid unit. For flat sided specimens sampling volumes less than 30 mm 3 have been obtained demonstrating the viability of making spatially resolved strain measurements at a pulsed neutron source. 3 figs

  15. The design status of the liquid lithium target facility of IFMIF at the end of the engineering design activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitti, F.S., E-mail: francesco.nitti@enea.it [IFMIF/EVEDA Project Team, Rokkasho Japan (Japan); Ibarra, A. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Ida, M. [IHI Corporation, Tokyo (Japan); Favuzza, P. [ENEA Research Center Firenze (Italy); Furukawa, T. [JAEA Research Center, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki (Japan); Groeschel, F. [KIT Research Center, Karlsruhe (Germany); Heidinger, R. [F4E Research Center, Garching (Germany); Kanemura, T. [JAEA Research Center, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki (Japan); Knaster, J. [IFMIF/EVEDA Project Team, Rokkasho Japan (Japan); Kondo, H. [JAEA Research Center, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki (Japan); Micchiche, G. [ENEA Research Center, Brasimone (Italy); Sugimoto, M. [JAEA Research Center, Rokkasho Japan (Japan); Wakai, E. [JAEA Research Center, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Results of validation and design activity for the Li loop facility of IFMIF. • Demonstration of Li target stability, with surface disturbance <1 mm. • Demonstration of start-up and shut down procedures of Li loop. • Complete design of the heat removal system and C and O purification system. • Conceptual design of N and H isotopes purification systems. - Abstract: The International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is an experimental facility conceived for qualifying and characterizing structural materials for nuclear fusion applications. The Engineering Validation and Engineering Design Activity (EVEDA) is a fundamental step towards the final design. It presented two mandates: the Engineering Validation Activities (EVA), still on-going, and the Engineering Design Activities (EDA) accomplished on schedule in June 2013. Five main facilities are identified in IFMIF, among which the Lithium Target Facility constituted a technological challenge overcome thanks to the success of the main validation challenges impacting the design. The design of the liquid Lithium Target Facility at the end of the EDA phase is here detailed.

  16. The design status of the liquid lithium target facility of IFMIF at the end of the engineering design activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitti, F.S.; Ibarra, A.; Ida, M.; Favuzza, P.; Furukawa, T.; Groeschel, F.; Heidinger, R.; Kanemura, T.; Knaster, J.; Kondo, H.; Micchiche, G.; Sugimoto, M.; Wakai, E.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Results of validation and design activity for the Li loop facility of IFMIF. • Demonstration of Li target stability, with surface disturbance <1 mm. • Demonstration of start-up and shut down procedures of Li loop. • Complete design of the heat removal system and C and O purification system. • Conceptual design of N and H isotopes purification systems. - Abstract: The International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is an experimental facility conceived for qualifying and characterizing structural materials for nuclear fusion applications. The Engineering Validation and Engineering Design Activity (EVEDA) is a fundamental step towards the final design. It presented two mandates: the Engineering Validation Activities (EVA), still on-going, and the Engineering Design Activities (EDA) accomplished on schedule in June 2013. Five main facilities are identified in IFMIF, among which the Lithium Target Facility constituted a technological challenge overcome thanks to the success of the main validation challenges impacting the design. The design of the liquid Lithium Target Facility at the end of the EDA phase is here detailed.

  17. HRP facility for fabrication of ITER vertical target divertor full scale plasma facing units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visca, Eliseo; Roccella, S.; Candura, D.; Palermo, M.; Rossi, P.; Pizzuto, A.; Sanguinetti, G.P.; Mancini, A.; Verdini, L.; Cacciotti, E.; Cerri, V.; Mugnaini, G.; Reale, A.; Giacomi, G.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • R&D activities for the manufacturing of ITER divertor high heat flux plasma-facing components (HHFC). • ENEA and Ansaldo have jointly manufactured several actively cooled monoblock mock-ups and prototypical components. • ENEA and ANSALDO NUCLEARE jointly participate to the European program for the qualification of the manufacturing technology for the ITER divertor IVT. • Successful manufacturing by HRP (Hot Radial Pressing) of first full-scale full-W armored IVT qualification prototype. - Abstract: ENEA and Ansaldo Nucleare S.p.A. (ANN) have being deeply involved in the European development activities for the manufacturing of the ITER Divertor Inner Vertical Target (IVT) plasma-facing components. During normal operation the heat flux deposited on the bottom segment of divertor is 5–10 MW/m 2 but the capability to remove up to 20 MW/m 2 during transient events of 10 s must also be demonstrated. In order to fulfill ITER requirements, ENEA has set up and widely tested a manufacturing process, named Hot Radial Pressing (HRP). The last challenge is now to fabricate full-scale prototypes of the IVT, aimed to be qualified for the next step, i.e. the series production. On the basis of the experience of manufacturing hundreds of small mock-ups, ENEA designed and installed a new suitable HRP facility. The objective of getting a final shaped plasma facing unit (PFU) that satisfies these requirements is an ambitious target because tolerances set by ITER/F4E are very tight. The setting-up of the equipment started with the fabrication of full scale and representative ‘dummies’ in which stainless steel instead of CFC or W was used for monoblocks. The results confirmed that dimensions were compliant with the required tolerances. The paper reports a brief description of the innovative HRP equipment and the dimensional check results after HRP of the first full-scale full-W PFU.

  18. Robustness studies of ignition targets for the National Ignition Facility in two dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Daniel S.; Haan, Steven W.; Salmonson, Jay D.

    2008-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion capsules are critically dependent on the integrity of their hot spots to ignite. At the time of ignition, only a certain fractional perturbation of the nominally spherical hot spot boundary can be tolerated and the capsule still achieve ignition. The degree to which the expected hot spot perturbation in any given capsule design is less than this maximum tolerable perturbation is a measure of the ignition margin or robustness of that design. Moreover, since there will inevitably be uncertainties in the initial character and implosion dynamics of any given capsule, all of which can contribute to the eventual hot spot perturbation, quantifying the robustness of that capsule against a range of parameter variations is an important consideration in the capsule design. Here, the robustness of the 300 eV indirect drive target design for the National Ignition Facility [Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)] is studied in the parameter space of inner ice roughness, implosion velocity, and capsule scale. A suite of 2000 two-dimensional simulations, run with the radiation hydrodynamics code LASNEX, is used as the data base for the study. For each scale, an ignition region in the two remaining variables is identified and the ignition cliff is mapped. In accordance with the theoretical arguments of Levedahl and Lindl [Nucl. Fusion 37, 165 (1997)] and Kishony and Shvarts [Phys. Plasmas 8, 4925 (2001)], the location of this cliff is fitted to a power law of the capsule implosion velocity and scale. It is found that the cliff can be quite well represented in this power law form, and, using this scaling law, an assessment of the overall (one- and two-dimensional) ignition margin of the design can be made. The effect on the ignition margin of an increase or decrease in the density of the target fill gas is also assessed

  19. Laser-Plasma Interactions in Drive Campaign targets on the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinkel, D E; Callahan, D A; Moody, J D; Amendt, P A; Lasinski, B F; MacGowan, B J; Meeker, D; Michel, P A; Ralph, J; Rosen, M D; Ross, J S; Schneider, M B; Storm, E; Strozzi, D J; Williams, E A

    2016-01-01

    The Drive campaign [D A Callahan et al., this conference] on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser [E. I. Moses, R. N. Boyd, B. A. Remington, C. J. Keane, R. Al-Ayat, Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] has the focused goal of understanding and optimizing the hohlraum for ignition. Both the temperature and symmetry of the radiation drive depend on laser and hohlraum characteristics. The drive temperature depends on the coupling of laser energy to the hohlraum, and the symmetry of the drive depends on beam-to-beam interactions that result in energy transfer [P. A. Michel, S. H. Glenzer, L. Divol, et al, Phys. Plasmas 17, 056305 (2010).] within the hohlraum. To this end, hohlraums are being fielded where shape (rugby vs. cylindrical hohlraums), gas fill composition (neopentane at room temperature vs. cryogenic helium), and gas fill density (increase of ∼ 150%) are independently changed. Cylindrical hohlraums with higher gas fill density show improved inner beam propagation, as should rugby hohlraums, because of the larger radius over the capsule (7 mm vs. 5.75 mm in a cylindrical hohlraum). Energy coupling improves in room temperature neopentane targets, as well as in hohlraums at higher gas fill density. In addition cross-beam energy transfer is being addressed directly by using targets that mock up one end of a hohlraum, but allow observation of the laser beam uniformity after energy transfer. Ideas such as splitting quads into “doublets” by re-pointing the right and left half of quads are also being pursued. LPI results of the Drive campaign will be summarized, and analyses of future directions presented. (paper)

  20. HRP facility for fabrication of ITER vertical target divertor full scale plasma facing units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visca, Eliseo, E-mail: eliseo.visca@enea.it [Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Roccella, S. [Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Candura, D.; Palermo, M. [Ansaldo Nucleare S.p.A., Corso Perrone 25, IT-16152 Genova (Italy); Rossi, P.; Pizzuto, A. [Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Sanguinetti, G.P. [Ansaldo Nucleare S.p.A., Corso Perrone 25, IT-16152 Genova (Italy); Mancini, A.; Verdini, L.; Cacciotti, E.; Cerri, V.; Mugnaini, G.; Reale, A.; Giacomi, G. [Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • R&D activities for the manufacturing of ITER divertor high heat flux plasma-facing components (HHFC). • ENEA and Ansaldo have jointly manufactured several actively cooled monoblock mock-ups and prototypical components. • ENEA and ANSALDO NUCLEARE jointly participate to the European program for the qualification of the manufacturing technology for the ITER divertor IVT. • Successful manufacturing by HRP (Hot Radial Pressing) of first full-scale full-W armored IVT qualification prototype. - Abstract: ENEA and Ansaldo Nucleare S.p.A. (ANN) have being deeply involved in the European development activities for the manufacturing of the ITER Divertor Inner Vertical Target (IVT) plasma-facing components. During normal operation the heat flux deposited on the bottom segment of divertor is 5–10 MW/m{sup 2} but the capability to remove up to 20 MW/m{sup 2} during transient events of 10 s must also be demonstrated. In order to fulfill ITER requirements, ENEA has set up and widely tested a manufacturing process, named Hot Radial Pressing (HRP). The last challenge is now to fabricate full-scale prototypes of the IVT, aimed to be qualified for the next step, i.e. the series production. On the basis of the experience of manufacturing hundreds of small mock-ups, ENEA designed and installed a new suitable HRP facility. The objective of getting a final shaped plasma facing unit (PFU) that satisfies these requirements is an ambitious target because tolerances set by ITER/F4E are very tight. The setting-up of the equipment started with the fabrication of full scale and representative ‘dummies’ in which stainless steel instead of CFC or W was used for monoblocks. The results confirmed that dimensions were compliant with the required tolerances. The paper reports a brief description of the innovative HRP equipment and the dimensional check results after HRP of the first full-scale full-W PFU.

  1. Recent US target-physics-related research in heavy-ion inertial fusion: simulations for tamped targets and for disk experiments in accelerator test facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, J.W.K.

    1982-01-01

    Within the last few years, there have also appeared in the Heavy-Ion Fusion literature several studies of targets which have outer tampers. One-dimensional simulations indicate higher target gains with a judicious amount of tamping. But for these targets, a full investigation has not been carried through in regards to conservative criteria for fluid instabilities as well as reasonable imperfections in target fabrication and illumination symmetry which all affect target ignition and burn. Comparisons of these results with the gain survey of Part I would have to be performed with care. These calculations suggest that experiments relating to high temperature disk heating, as well as beam deposition, focusing and transport can be performed within the context of current design proposals for accelerator test-facilities. Since the test-facilities have lower ion kinetic energy and beam pulse power as compared to reactor drivers, we achieve high-beam intensities at the focal spot by using short focal distance and properly designed beam optics

  2. National Ignition Facility subsystem design requirements laser and target area building (LTAB) SSDR 1.2.2.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kempel, P.; Hands, J.

    1996-01-01

    This Subsystem Design Requirements (SSDR) document establishes the performance, design, and verification requirements for the conventional building systems and subsystems of the Laser and Target Area Building (LTAB), including those that house and support the operation of high-energy laser equipment and the operational flow of personnel and materials throughout the facility. This SSDR addresses the following subsystems associated with the LTAB: Building structural systems for the Target Bay, Switchyards, Diagnostic Building, Decontamination Area, Laser Bays, Capacitor Bays and Operations Support Area, and the necessary space associated with building-support equipment; Architectural building features associated with housing the space and with the operational cleanliness of the functional operation of the facilities; Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) systems for maintaining a clean and thermally stable ambient environment within the facilities; Plumbing systems that provide potable water and sanitary facilities for the occupants, plus stormwater drainage for transporting rainwater; Fire Protection systems that guard against fire damage to the facilities and their contents; Material handling systems for transporting personnel and heavy materials within the building areas; Mechanical process piping systems for liquids and gases that provide cooling and other service to experimental laser equipment and components; Electrical power and grounding systems that provide service and standby power to building and experimental equipment, including lighting distribution and communications systems for the facilities; Instrumentation and control systems that ensure the safe operation of conventional facilities systems, such as those listed above. Detailed requirements for building subsystems that are not addressed in this document (such as specific sizes, locations, or capacities) are included in detail-level NIP Project Interface Control Documents (ICDS)

  3. National Ignition Facility subsystem design requirements target positioning subsystem SSDR 1.8.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pittenger, L.

    1996-01-01

    This Subsystem Design Requirement document is a development specification that establishes the performance, design, development and test requirements for the target positioner subsystem (WBS 1.8.2) of the NIF Target Experimental System (WBS 1.8)

  4. LANSCE-R WIRE-SCANNER ANALOG FRONT-END ELECTRONICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruchalla, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    A new AFE is being developed for the new LANSCE-R wire-scanner systems. The new AFE is implemented in a National Instruments Compact RIO (cRIO) module installed a BiRa 4U BiRIO cRIO chassis specifically designed to accommodate the cRIO crate and all the wire-scanner interface, control and motor-drive electronics. A single AFE module provides interface to both X and Y wire sensors using true DC coupled transimpedance amplifiers providing collection of the wire charge signals, real-time wire integrity verification using the normal dataacquisition system, and wire bias of 0V to +/-50V. The AFE system is designed to accommodate comparatively long macropulses (>1ms) with high PRF (>120Hz) without the need to provide timing signals. The basic AFE bandwidth is flat from true DC to 50kHz with a true first-order pole at 50kHz. Numeric integration in the cRIO FPGA provides real-time pulse-to-pulse numeric integration of the AFE signal to compute the total charge collected in each macropulse. This method of charge collection eliminates the need to provide synchronization signals to the wire-scanner AFE while providing the capability to accurately record the charge from long macropulses at high PRF.

  5. The LANL/LLNL Program to Measure Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra at LANSCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haight, Robert; Wu, Ching Yen; Lee, Hye Young; Taddeucci, Terry; Mosby, Shea; O'Donnell, John; Fotiades, Nikolaos; Devlin, Mattew; Ullmann, John; Nelson, Ronald; Wender, Stephen; White, Morgan; Solomon, Clell; Neudecker, Denise; Talou, Patrick; Rising, Michael; Bucher, Brian; Buckner, Matthew; Henderson, Roger

    2015-10-01

    Accurate data on the spectrum of neutrons emitted in neutron-induced fission are needed for applications and for a better understanding of the fission process. At LANSCE we have made important progress in understanding systematic uncertainties and in obtaining data for 235U on the low-energy part of the prompt fission neutron spectra (PFNS), a particularly difficult region because down-scattered neutrons go in this direction. We use a double time-of-flight technique to determine energies of incoming and outgoing neutrons. With data acquisition via waveform digitizers, accidental coincidences between fission chamber and neutron detector are measured to high statistical accuracy and then subtracted from measured events. Monte Carlo simulations with high performance computers have proven to be essential in the design to minimize neutron scattering and in calculating detector response. Results from one of three approaches to analyzing the data will be presented. This work is funded by the US Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration and Office of Nuclear Physics.

  6. New high power 200 MHz RF system for the LANSCE drift tube linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyles, J.; Friedrichs, C.; Lynch, M.

    1998-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) linac provides an 800 MeV direct H + proton beam, and injects H - to the upgraded proton storage ring for charge accumulation for the Short Pulse Spallation Source. Accelerating these interlaced beams requires high average power from the 201.25 MHz drift tube linac (DTL) RF system. Three power amplifiers have operated at up to three Megawatts with 12% duty factor. The total number of electron power tubes in the RF amplifiers and their modulators has been reduced from fifty-two to twenty-four. The plant continues to utilize the original design of a tetrode driving a super power triode. Further increases in the linac duty factor are limited, in part, by the maximum dissipation ratings of the triodes. A description of the system modifications proposed to overcome these limitations includes new power amplifiers using low-level RF modulation for tank field control. The first high power Diacrode reg-sign is being delivered and a new amplifier cavity is being designed. With only eight power tubes, the new system will deliver both peak power and high duty factor, with lower mains power and cooling requirements. The remaining components needed for the new RF system will be discussed

  7. National Ignition Facility subsystem design requirements target diagnostics subsystem SSDR 1.8.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.

    1996-01-01

    This SSDR establishes the performance, design, development and test requirements for the Target Experimental System's Diagnostic, WBS 1.8. 3. This includes the individual diagnostic components, the Target Diagnostic Data Acquisition System (Target DAS), the diagnostic vacuum system, the timing/fiducial system, and the EMI protection system

  8. Lean coding machine. Facilities target productivity and job satisfaction with coding automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Genna

    2010-07-01

    Facilities are turning to coding automation to help manage the volume of electronic documentation, streamlining workflow, boosting productivity, and increasing job satisfaction. As EHR adoption increases, computer-assisted coding may become a necessity, not an option.

  9. Structural integrity of heavy liquid-metal target installed in spallation neutron facility. Part 4: Consideration by fracture mechanics of target container window

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikura, Syuichi; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Kikuchi, Kenji; Haga, Katsuhiro; Kaminaga, Masanori; Hino, Ryutaro

    2004-01-01

    Developments of the neutron scattering facility is carried out under the high-intensity proton accelerator project promoted by JAERI and KEK. To estimate the structural integrity of the heavy liquid-metal (mercury) target used as a spallation neutron source in a MW-class neutron scattering facility, static and dynamic stress (including pressure wave in mercury) behaviors due to the incident of 1MW-pulsed proton beam (Maximum heat density is 461W/cc) were analyzed. In the analyses, two type target containers with semi-cylindrical type and flat-type beam windows were used as analytical models. As a result, it is confirmed that the stress generated by the pressure wave becomes the largest at the center of the beam window, and the flat-type beam window is more advantageous from the structural viewpoint than the semi-cylindrical type beam window. It has been understood that the stress generated in the beam window by the pressure wave can be treated as the secondary stress. Then, it has been understood that the stress and the stress range generated in the target window were bellow the allowable stress level defined by the standard of JIS on the maximum stress and fatigue strength. It has been experimentally confirmed that a cavitation was generated by generating the negative pressure in mercury near the target beam window and a collapse of cavitation damaged to the target container material, as pits. Then, the fracture mechanical analyses were carried out on the pit and a crack on pit tip. Consequently, it was clarified that the crack would not propagate because the inner surface of the beam window was become the compressive stress field due to the steady state thermal stress. Moreover, the evaluation technique of the cavitation which would be needed in the future was summarized. (author)

  10. An expression of interest in a Super Fixed Target Beauty Facility (SFT) at the Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The concept of a Super Fixed Target Beauty Facility (SFT) which uses a relatively low intensity 20 TeV proton beam as a generator of very high momenta B's is an exciting prospect which is very competitive with other B factory ideas. The yields of B's in such a facility are quite high (3 x 10 10 → 10 11 B's per year). At this level of statistics, CP violation measurements will be possible in many modes. In addition, the fixed target configuration, because of the high momenta of the produced B's and the resulting long decay lengths, facilitates the detection and reconstruction of B's and offers unique opportunities for observation of the B decays. The limited solid angle coverage required for the fixed target spectrometer makes the cost of the facility much cheaper than other e + e - or hadron collider options under consideration. The relatively low intensity 20 TeV beam (1 → 2 x 10 8 protons/second) needed for the SFT makes it possible to consider an extraction system which operates concurrently and in a non-interfering manner with the other collider experiments. One possible method for generating such a beam, crystal channeling, is discussed

  11. Conceptual design of the handling and storage system of the spent target vessel for neutron scattering facility 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Junichi; Kaminaga, Masanori; Sasaki, Shinobu; Haga, Katsuhiro; Aso, Tomokazu; Kinoshita, Hidetaka; Hino, Ryutaro

    2002-01-01

    In designing the neutron scattering facility, a spent target vessel should be replaced with remote handling devices in order to protect radioactive exposure, since it would be highly activated through the high energy neutron irradiation caused by the spallation reaction between mercury of the target material and the MW-class proton beam. In the storage of the spent target vessel, it is necessary to consider decay heat of the target vessel and mercury contamination caused by vaporization of the residual mercury in the vessel. A conceptual design has been carried out to establish basic concept and to clarify its specification of main equipments on handling and storage systems for the spent target vessel. This report presents the basic concept and a system plot plan based on latest design works of remote handling devices such as a spent target vessel storage cask and a target vessel exchange trolley, which aim at reasonability and simplification. In addition, storage systems for the spent moderator vessel, the spent proton beam window and the spent reflector vessel are also investigated based on the plot plan. (author)

  12. Computational design of high efficiency release targets for use at ISOL facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Y

    1999-01-01

    This report describes efforts made at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to design high-efficiency-release targets that simultaneously incorporate the short diffusion lengths, high permeabilities, controllable temperatures, and heat-removal properties required for the generation of useful radioactive ion beam (RIB) intensities for nuclear physics and astrophysics research using the isotope separation on-line (ISOL) technique. Short diffusion lengths are achieved either by using thin fibrous target materials or by coating thin layers of selected target material onto low-density carbon fibers such as reticulated-vitreous-carbon fiber (RVCF) or carbon-bonded-carbon fiber (CBCF) to form highly permeable composite target matrices. Computational studies that simulate the generation and removal of primary beam deposited heat from target materials have been conducted to optimize the design of target/heat-sink systems for generating RIBs. The results derived from diffusion release-rate simulation studies for selected t...

  13. National Ignition Facility subsystem design requirements target area auxiliary subsystem SSDR 1.8.6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitz, T.

    1996-01-01

    This Subsystem Design Requirement (SSDR) establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Target Area Auxiliary Subsystems (WBS 1.8.6), which is part of the NIF Target Experimental System (WBS 1.8). This document responds directly to the requirements detailed in NIF Target Experimental System SDR 003 document. Key elements of the Target Area Auxiliary Subsystems include: WBS 1.8.6.1 Local Utility Services; WBS 1.8.6.2 Cable Trays; WBS 1.8.6.3 Personnel, Safety, and Occupational Access; WBS 1.8.6.4 Assembly, Installation, and Maintenance Equipment; WBS 1.8.6.4.1 Target Chamber Service System; WBS 1.8.6.4.2 Target Bay Service Systems

  14. The target of the CNGS facility at CERN, which will enable the production of neutrino

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    The final target system (base table, alignment table with target magazine and BPKG) was installed in the target chamber on 8 March 2006. The pictures show the material in the test set-up in the laboratory, before transportation. On 29 May, CNGS (CERN Neutrinos to Gran Sasso) will send the first neutrino beams from CERN to the Gran Sasso Laboratory in Italy. The neutrinos will journey 730 km through the earth's crust.

  15. Investigation of the radionuclide inventory and the production yields of the target stacks at the PEFP radioisotope production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Sang-Pil; Hong, In-Seok; Cho, Yong-Sub

    2010-01-01

    The Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP) will construct a radioisotope production facility by using the nuclear reaction between the 100-MeV proton beam and the solid target. For investigating the radionuclide inventory and the production yield of the radioisotope production facility, we have optimized the thickness of the prototype target stacks by using a SRIM calculation. The target stacks consist of RbCl encapsulated in inconel alloy, Zn metal, and Ga metal encapsulated in niobium. Typical beam parameters were 300 μA and 95 hours. An inventory of all generated radionuclide activities is mandatory in order to prepare the operation scenario and design the hot cell. The Monte Carlo code MCNPX was used to investigate what radionuclide is generated. The obtained radionuclide inventory indicated that about 100 radionuclides were generated and that the total radioactivity of the irradiated target stacks was 1324.1 Ci at the end of the bombardment. The production yields of Sr-82, Cu-67, and Ge-68 were 3.79 Ci, 2.74 Ci, and 1.23 Ci at the end of the bombardment.

  16. Rationale for a spallation neutron source target system test facility at the 1-MW Long-Pulse Spallation Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, W.F.

    1995-12-01

    The conceptual design study for a 1-MW Long-Pulse Spallation Source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center has shown the feasibility of including a spallation neutron test facility at a relatively low cost. This document presents a rationale for developing such a test bed. Currently, neutron scattering facilities operate at a maximum power of 0.2 MW. Proposed new designs call for power levels as high as 10 MW, and future transmutation activities may require as much as 200 MW. A test bed will allow assessment of target neutronics; thermal hydraulics; remote handling; mechanical structure; corrosion in aqueous, non-aqueous, liquid metal, and molten salt systems; thermal shock on systems and system components; and materials for target systems. Reliable data in these areas are crucial to the safe and reliable operation of new high-power facilities. These tests will provide data useful not only to spallation neutron sources proposed or under development, but also to other projects in accelerator-driven transmutation technologies such as the production of tritium

  17. Use of a spatial scan statistic to identify clusters of births occurring outside Ghanaian health facilities for targeted intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosomprah, Samuel; Dotse-Gborgbortsi, Winfred; Aboagye, Patrick; Matthews, Zoe

    2016-11-01

    To identify and evaluate clusters of births that occurred outside health facilities in Ghana for targeted intervention. A retrospective study was conducted using a convenience sample of live births registered in Ghanaian health facilities from January 1 to December 31, 2014. Data were extracted from the district health information system. A spatial scan statistic was used to investigate clusters of home births through a discrete Poisson probability model. Scanning with a circular spatial window was conducted only for clusters with high rates of such deliveries. The district was used as the geographic unit of analysis. The likelihood P value was estimated using Monte Carlo simulations. Ten statistically significant clusters with a high rate of home birth were identified. The relative risks ranged from 1.43 ("least likely" cluster; P=0.001) to 1.95 ("most likely" cluster; P=0.001). The relative risks of the top five "most likely" clusters ranged from 1.68 to 1.95; these clusters were located in Ashanti, Brong Ahafo, and the Western, Eastern, and Greater regions of Accra. Health facility records, geospatial techniques, and geographic information systems provided locally relevant information to assist policy makers in delivering targeted interventions to small geographic areas. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Laboratory facility for production of cryogenic targets for hot plasma experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadowski, M.; Szydlowski, A.; Jakubowski, L.; Cwiek, E.

    1990-10-01

    Results of preliminary operational tests of the cryogenic stand designed for the production of small droplets of liquid hydrogen or deuterium are presented. Such cryogenic micro-targets are needed for nuclear and thermonuclear experiments. (author)

  19. Development of lithium target system in engineering validation and engineering design activity of the international fusion materials irradiation facility (IFMIF/EVEDA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakai, Eiichi; Kondo, Hiroo; Sugimoto, Masayoshi; Ida, Mizuho; Kanemura, Takuji; Watanabe, Kazuyoshi; Fujishiro, Kouji; Edao, Yuuki; Niitsuma, Shigeto; Kimura, Haruyuki; Fukada, Satoshi; Hiromoto, Tetsushi; Shigeharu, Satoshi; Yagi, Jyuro; Furukawa, Tomohiro; Hirakawa, Yasushi; Suzuki, Akihiro; Terai, Takayuki; Horiike, Hiroshi; Hoashi, Eiji; Suzuki, Sachiko; Yamaoka, Nobuo; Serizawa, Hisashi; Kawahito, Yosuke; Tsuji, Yoshiyuki; Furuya, Kazuyuki; Takeo, Fumio

    2012-01-01

    Engineering validation and engineering design activity (EVEDA) for the international fusion materials irradiation facility (IFMIF) has been conducted since 2007. Research and development of the Lithium target facility is an important part of this activity. We constructed a world largest liquid Lithium test loop with a capacity of 5000 L in 2010 and successfully completed the first stage validation tests (functional tests of components and Lithium flow test (flow velocity 15 m/s at the target). In the present article, recent results of the EVEDA activity for the Lithium target facility and related technologies on liquid Lithium are reviewed. (author)

  20. Large Dog Relinquishment to Two Municipal Facilities in New York City and Washington, D.C.: Identifying Targets for Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Weiss

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available While the overall trend in euthanasia has been decreasing nationally, large dogs are at a higher risk of euthanasia than other sized dogs in most animal shelters in the United States. We hypothesized one way to increase the lives saved with respect to these large dogs is to keep them home when possible. In order to develop solutions to decrease relinquishment, a survey was developed to learn more about the reasons owners relinquish large dogs. The survey was administered to owners relinquishing their dogs at two large municipal facilities, one in New York City and one in Washington, D.C. There were 157 responses between the two facilities. We found both significant similarities and differences between respondents and their dogs from the two cities. We identified opportunities to potentially support future relinquishers and found that targets for interventions are likely different in each community.

  1. On the Fielding of a High Gain, Shock-Ignited Target on the National Ignitiion Facility in the Near Term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, L.J.; Betti, R.; Schurtz, G.P.; Craxton, R.S.; Dunne, A.M.; LaFortune, K.N.; Schmitt, A.J.; McKenty, P.W.; Bailey, D.S.; Lambert, M.A.; Ribeyre, X.; Theobald, W.R.; Strozzi, D.J.; Harding, D.R.; Casner, A.; Atzemi, S.; Erbert, G.V.; Andersen, K.S.; Murakami, M.; Comley, A.J.; Cook, R.C.; Stephens, R.B.

    2010-01-01

    Shock ignition, a new concept for igniting thermonuclear fuel, offers the possibility for a near-term (∼3-4 years) test of high gain inertial confinement fusion on the National Ignition Facility at less than 1MJ drive energy and without the need for new laser hardware. In shock ignition, compressed fusion fuel is separately ignited by a strong spherically converging shock and, because capsule implosion velocities are significantly lower than those required for conventional hotpot ignition, fusion energy gains of ∼60 may be achievable on NIF at laser drive energies around ∼0.5MJ. Because of the simple all-DT target design, its in-flight robustness, the potential need for only 1D SSD beam smoothing, minimal early time LPI preheat, and use of present (indirect drive) laser hardware, this target may be easier to field on NIF than a conventional (polar) direct drive hotspot ignition target. Like fast ignition, shock ignition has the potential for high fusion yields at low drive energy, but requires only a single laser with less demanding timing and spatial focusing requirements. Of course, conventional symmetry and stability constraints still apply. In this paper we present initial target performance simulations, delineate the critical issues and describe the immediate-term R and D program that must be performed in order to test the potential of a high gain shock ignition target on NIF in the near term.

  2. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Studies of a scintillator-bar detector for a neutron wall at an external target facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yu-Hong; Xu, Hua-Gen; Xu, Hu-Shan; Zhan, Wen-Long; Sun, Zhi-Yu; Guo, Zhong-Yan; Hu, Zheng-Guo; Wang, Jian-Song; Chen, Jun-Ling; Zheng, Chuan

    2009-07-01

    To achieve a better time resolution of a scintillator-bar detector for a neutron wall at the external target facility of HIRFL-CSR, we have carried out a detailed study of the photomultiplier, the wrapping material and the coupling media. The timing properties of a scintillator-bar detector have been studied in detail with cosmic rays using a high and low level signal coincidence. A time resolution of 80 ps has been achieved in the center of the scintillator-bar detector.

  3. Neutron dose equivalent next to the target shield of a neutron therapy facility using an LET counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stinchcomb, T.G.; Kuchnir, F.T.

    1981-01-01

    The use of a spherical tissue-equivalent proportional counter for measurements of the lineal energy (y) and derivations of the linear energy transfer (LET) for fast neutrons has the advantage of giving distributions of dose and dose equivalent as functions of either LET or y. A measurement next to the target shielding of the neutron therapy facility at the University of Chicago Hospitals and Clinics (UCHC) is described, and the data processing is outlined. The distributions are presented and compared to those from measurements in the neutron beam. The average quality factors are presented

  4. Basic features of electromagnetic pulse generated in a laser-target chamber at 3-TW laser facility PALS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Marco, M; Pfeifer, M; Krousky, E; Krasa, J; Cikhardt, J; Klir, D; Nassisi, V

    2014-01-01

    We describe the radiofrequency emission taking place when 300 ps laser pulses irradiate various solid targets with an intensity of 10 16 W/cm 2 . The emission of intense electromagnetic pulses was observed outside the laser target chamber by two loop antennas up to 1 GHz. Electromagnetic pulses can be 800 MHz transients, which decay from a peak electromagnetic field of E 0 ≊ 7 kV/m and H 0 ≊ 15 A/m. The occurrence of these electromagnetic pulses is associated with generation of hard x-rays with photon energies extending beyond 1 MeV. This contribution reports the first observation of this effect at the PALS facility.

  5. Target Diagnostic Instrument-Based Controls Framework for the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelton, R; O'Brien, D; Nelson, J; Kamperschroer, J

    2007-01-01

    NIF target diagnostics are being developed to observe and measure the extreme physics of targets irradiated by the 192-beam laser. The response time of target materials can be on the order of 100ps--the time it takes light to travel 3 cm--temperatures more than 100 times hotter than the surface of the sun, and pressures that exceed 109 atmospheres. Optical and x-ray diagnostics were developed and fielded to observe and record the results of the first 4-beam experiments at NIF. Hard and soft x-ray spectra were measured, and time-integrated and gated x-ray images of hydrodynamics experiments were recorded. Optical diagnostics recorded backscatter from the target, and VISAR laser velocimetry measurements were taken of laser-shocked target surfaces. Additional diagnostics are being developed and commissioned to observe and diagnose ignition implosions, including various neutron and activation diagnostics. NIF's diagnostics are being developed at LLNL and with collaborators at other sites. To accommodate the growing number of target diagnostics, an Instrument-Based Controls hardware-software framework has been developed to facilitate development and ease integration into the NIF Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS). Individual WindowsXP PC controllers for each digitizer, power supply and camera (i.e., instruments) execute controls software unique to each instrument model. Each hardware-software controller manages a single instrument, in contrast to the complexity of combining all the controls software needed for a diagnostic into a single controller. Because of this simplification, controllers can be more easily tested on the actual hardware, evaluating all normal and off-normal conditions. Each target diagnostic is then supported by a number of instruments, each with its own hardware-software instrument-based controller. Advantages of the instrument-based control architecture and framework include reusability, testability, and improved reliability of the deployed

  6. Target Diagnostic Instrument-Based Controls Framework for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelton, R; O' Brien, D; Nelson, J; Kamperschroer, J

    2007-05-07

    NIF target diagnostics are being developed to observe and measure the extreme physics of targets irradiated by the 192-beam laser. The response time of target materials can be on the order of 100ps--the time it takes light to travel 3 cm--temperatures more than 100 times hotter than the surface of the sun, and pressures that exceed 109 atmospheres. Optical and x-ray diagnostics were developed and fielded to observe and record the results of the first 4-beam experiments at NIF. Hard and soft x-ray spectra were measured, and time-integrated and gated x-ray images of hydrodynamics experiments were recorded. Optical diagnostics recorded backscatter from the target, and VISAR laser velocimetry measurements were taken of laser-shocked target surfaces. Additional diagnostics are being developed and commissioned to observe and diagnose ignition implosions, including various neutron and activation diagnostics. NIF's diagnostics are being developed at LLNL and with collaborators at other sites. To accommodate the growing number of target diagnostics, an Instrument-Based Controls hardware-software framework has been developed to facilitate development and ease integration into the NIF Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS). Individual WindowsXP PC controllers for each digitizer, power supply and camera (i.e., instruments) execute controls software unique to each instrument model. Each hardware-software controller manages a single instrument, in contrast to the complexity of combining all the controls software needed for a diagnostic into a single controller. Because of this simplification, controllers can be more easily tested on the actual hardware, evaluating all normal and off-normal conditions. Each target diagnostic is then supported by a number of instruments, each with its own hardware-software instrument-based controller. Advantages of the instrument-based control architecture and framework include reusability, testability, and improved reliability of the

  7. Large Dog Relinquishment to Two Municipal Facilities in New York City and Washington, D.C.: Identifying Targets for Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Emily; Slater, Margaret; Garrison, Laurie; Drain, Natasha; Dolan, Emily; Scarlett, Janet M.; Zawistowski, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    Simple Summary While the overall trend in euthanasia has been decreasing nationally, large dogs are at a higher risk of euthanasia than other-sized dogs in most animal shelters in the United States. We hypothesized that one way to increase the lives saved with regard to large dogs in shelters is to keep them home in the first place when possible. Our research is the first to collect data in New York City and Washington, D.C., identifying the process leading to the owner relinquishment of large dogs. We found that targets for interventions to decrease large dog relinquishment are likely different in each community. Abstract While the overall trend in euthanasia has been decreasing nationally, large dogs are at a higher risk of euthanasia than other sized dogs in most animal shelters in the United States. We hypothesized one way to increase the lives saved with respect to these large dogs is to keep them home when possible. In order to develop solutions to decrease relinquishment, a survey was developed to learn more about the reasons owners relinquish large dogs. The survey was administered to owners relinquishing their dogs at two large municipal facilities, one in New York City and one in Washington, D.C. There were 157 responses between the two facilities. We found both significant similarities and differences between respondents and their dogs from the two cities. We identified opportunities to potentially support future relinquishers and found that targets for interventions are likely different in each community. PMID:26480315

  8. Optical spectroscopy of free-propagating plasma and its interaction with tungsten targets in PF-1000 facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Malinowski, K. [The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, IPJ, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Sadowski, M.J. [The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, IPJ, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland)] [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, IPPLM, 01-497 Warsaw (Poland); Kubkowska, M.; Jakubowska, K.; Paduch, M.; Scholz, M. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, IPPLM, 01-497 Warsaw (Poland); Garkusha, I.E.; Ladygina, M.; Tereshin, V.I. [Institute of Plasma Physics, NSC KIPT, 61-108 Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2011-07-01

    The paper reports on optical spectroscopy of pulsed plasma streams during their free propagation within a vacuum chamber and their interaction with tungsten targets. Experiments were performed with the PF-1000 facility and particular attention was paid to improvements in spectroscopic diagnostics techniques. In contrary to preliminary studies, the recent spectroscopic measurements of the free plasma streams were carried out perpendicular to the z-axis and at a larger distance from the electrode outlet. The center of the observation quartz-window was located at z = 30 cm in order to observe first a pure deuterium-plasma stream, and later on some heavy impurities which might reach that distance with a delay induced by differences in their production and time-of-flight. The recorded spectral lines were identified by means of a Kurucz database. It was confirmed that at the pure D{sub 2}-filling the PF-1000 facility emits first the deuterium-plasma stream and one can observe intense deuterium Balmer lines, but at a distance z = 30 cm, after about 2 microseconds there appear many impurity lines originating mainly from the Cu-electrodes, i.e. Cu-lines. The second part of the experiment concerned the spectroscopic measurements of metal plasma 'pillow' produced by the plasma stream impinging upon a solid target made of pure tungsten. The described measurements enabled the most intense spectral lines to be identified. This document is composed of an abstract followed by the slides of the presentation

  9. Management of unconverted light for the National Ignition Facility target chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, A. T.; Bletzer, K.; Burnham, A. K.; Dixit, S.; Genin, F. Y.; Hibbard, W.; Norton, J.; Scott, J. M.; Whitman, P. K.

    1998-01-01

    The NIF target chamber beam dumps must survive high x-ray, laser, ion, and shrapnel exposures without excessive generation of vapors or particulate that will contaminate the final optics debris shields, thereby making the debris shields susceptible to subsequent laser damage. The beam dumps also must be compatible with attaining and maintaining the required target chamber vacuum and must not activate significantly under high neutron fluxes. Finally, they must be developed, fabricated, and maintained for a reasonable cost. The primary challenge for the beam dump is to survive up to 20 J/cm 2 of lpm light and 1 - 2 J/cm 2 of nominally 200 - 350 eV blackbody temperature x rays. Additional threats include target shrapnel, and other contamination issues. Designs which have been evaluated include louvered hot-pressed boron carbide (B 4 C) or stainless steel (SS) panels, in some cases covered with transparent Teflon film, and various combinations of inexpensive low thermal expansion glasses backed by inexpensive absorbing glass. Louvered designs can recondense a significant amount of ablated material that would otherwise escape into the target chamber. Transparent Teflon was evaluated as an alternative way to capture ablated material. The thin Teflon sheet would need to be replaced after each shot since it exhibits both laser damage and considerable x- ray ablation with each shot. Uncontaminated B 4 C, SS, and low thermal expansion glasses have reasonably small x-ray and laser ablation rates, although the glasses begin to fail catastrophically after 100 high fluence shots. Commercially available absorbing glasses require a pre-shield of either Teflon or low thermal expansion glass to prevent serious degradation by the x-ray fluence. Advantages of the hot-pressed B 4 C and SS over glass are their performance against microshrapnel, their relative indifference to contamination, and their ability to be refurbished by aggressive cleaning using CO 2 pellets, glass beads, high

  10. Target area acquisition and control system survivability for the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagans, K.; Stathis, P.; Wiedwald, J.; Campbell, D.

    1994-06-01

    The hardening of instruments to survive NIF target emission environments presents a significant challenge. Neutron flux is predicted to be as much as six orders of magnitude greater than the highest achieved neutron flux on NOVA. Not withstanding the high prompt radiation fields, the specifications for the instruments are demanding; requiring high resolution imaging and sub nanosecond transient measurements. We present an analysis of the sensitivity of the proposed NIF instrumentation design to EMP, X-rays, gamma rays, and neutrons. Major components assessed include fiber optic cable transport, high bandwidth cable and charge coupled detector (CCD) imaging systems

  11. PEGASYS---A proposed internal target facility for the PEP storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Biber, K.

    1988-07-01

    A proposal for an integral gas-jet target and forward spectrometer for the PEP storage ring is described. The beam structure, allowable, luminosity (L = 10 33 cm/sup /minus/2/s/sup /minus/1/ for H 2 , D 2 ) and energy (E/sub e/ ≤ 15 GeV) make the ring ideal for multiparticle coincidence studies in the scaling regime, and where perturbative QCD may be an apt description of some exclusive and semi-inclusive reactions. 14 refs., 7 figs

  12. Target diagnostic control system implementation for the National Ignition Facility (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelton, R. T.; Kamperschroer, J. H.; Lagin, L. J.; Nelson, J. R.; O' Brien, D. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    The extreme physics of targets shocked by NIF's 192-beam laser is observed by a diverse suite of diagnostics. Many diagnostics are being developed by collaborators at other sites, but ad hoc controls could lead to unreliable and costly operations. A diagnostic control system (DCS) framework for both hardware and software facilitates development and eases integration. Each complex diagnostic typically uses an ensemble of electronic instruments attached to sensors, digitizers, cameras, and other devices. In the DCS architecture each instrument is interfaced to a low-cost WINDOWS XP processor and JAVA application. Each instrument is aggregated with others as needed in the supervisory system to form an integrated diagnostic. The JAVA framework provides data management, control services, and operator graphical user interface generation. DCS instruments are reusable by replication with reconfiguration for specific diagnostics in extensible markup language. Advantages include minimal application code, easy testing, and high reliability. Collaborators save costs by assembling diagnostics with existing DCS instruments. This talk discusses target diagnostic instrumentation used on NIF and presents the DCS architecture and framework.

  13. Target diagnostic control system implementation for the National Ignition Facility (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelton, R. T.; Kamperschroer, J. H.; Lagin, L. J.; Nelson, J. R.; O'Brien, D. W.

    2010-01-01

    The extreme physics of targets shocked by NIF's 192-beam laser is observed by a diverse suite of diagnostics. Many diagnostics are being developed by collaborators at other sites, but ad hoc controls could lead to unreliable and costly operations. A diagnostic control system (DCS) framework for both hardware and software facilitates development and eases integration. Each complex diagnostic typically uses an ensemble of electronic instruments attached to sensors, digitizers, cameras, and other devices. In the DCS architecture each instrument is interfaced to a low-cost WINDOWS XP processor and JAVA application. Each instrument is aggregated with others as needed in the supervisory system to form an integrated diagnostic. The JAVA framework provides data management, control services, and operator graphical user interface generation. DCS instruments are reusable by replication with reconfiguration for specific diagnostics in extensible markup language. Advantages include minimal application code, easy testing, and high reliability. Collaborators save costs by assembling diagnostics with existing DCS instruments. This talk discusses target diagnostic instrumentation used on NIF and presents the DCS architecture and framework.

  14. Indirect-drive noncryogenic double-shell ignition targets for the National Ignition Facility: Design and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amendt, Peter; Colvin, J.D.; Tipton, R.E.; Hinkel, D.E.; Edwards, M.J.; Landen, O.L.; Ramshaw, J.D.; Suter, L.J.; Varnum, W.S.; Watt, R.G.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis and design of indirect-drive National Ignition Facility double-shell targets with hohlraum temperatures of 200 eV and 250 eV are presented. The analysis of these targets includes the assessment of two-dimensional radiation asymmetry and nonlinear mix. Two-dimensional integrated hohlraum simulations indicate that the x-ray illumination can be adjusted to provide adequate symmetry control in hohlraums specially designed to have high laser-coupling efficiency [Suter et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 2092 (2000)]. These simulations also reveal the need to diagnose and control localized 10-15 keV x-ray emission from the high-Z hohlraum wall because of strong absorption by the high-Z inner shell. Preliminary estimates of the degree of laser backscatter from an assortment of laser-plasma interactions suggest comparatively benign hohlraum conditions. The application of a variety of nonlinear mix models and phenomenological tools, including buoyancy-drag models, multimode simulations and fall-line optimization, indicates a possibility of achieving ignition, i.e., fusion yields greater than 1 MJ. Planned experiments on the Omega laser will test current understanding of high-energy radiation flux asymmetry and mix-induced yield degradation in double-shell targets

  15. Solid targets and irradiation facilities for production of diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclides at the Debrecen cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarkanyi, F.; Ando, L.; Szucs, Z.; Mahunka, I.; Kovacs, Z.

    2000-01-01

    The MGC-20E (NIIEFA, Leningrad, USSR) variable energy compact cyclotron (k=20) was installed in ATOMKI (Debrecen, Hungary) in 1985. Protons, deuterons, 3 He- and α-particles can be accelerated with currents up to 300 μA for internal irradiation and up to 50 μA for external beams. The establishment of the Cyclotron Laboratory was partly supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The application of the cyclotron is multipurpose: basic nuclear research, application of activation technique for analytical and wear studies, application of intense fast neutron source for agro-biological, bio-medical application and for radiation damage test of electronic components, and finally radioisotope production for medical diagnostics and for other scientific and applied fields. The cyclotron laboratory has six target rooms, a radiochemistry laboratory and a medical unit equipped with PET

  16. Design and construction of a time-of-flight wall detector at External Target Facility of HIRFL-CSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y.; Sun, Z. Y.; Yu, Y. H.; Yan, D.; Tang, S. W.; Sun, Y. Z.; Wang, S. T.; Zhang, X. H.; Yue, K.; Fang, F.; Chen, J. L.; Zhang, Y. J.; Hu, B. T.

    2018-06-01

    A Time-Of-Flight Wall (TOFW) detector has been designed and constructed at the External Target Facility (ETF) of HIRFL-CSR. The detector covers a sensitive area of 1.2 × 1.2 m2 and consists of 30 modules. Each module is composed of a long plastic scintillator bar with two photo-multiplier tubes coupled at both ends for readout. The design and manufacture details are described and the test results are reported. The performance of the TOFW detector has been tested and measured with cosmic rays and a 310 MeV/u 40Ar beam. The results show that the time resolutions of all the TOFW modules are better than 128 ps, satisfying the requirements of the experiments which will be carried out at the ETF.

  17. Use of the target diagnostic control system in the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelton, R; Lagin, L; Nelson, J

    2011-07-25

    The extreme physics of targets shocked by NIF's 192-beam laser are observed by a diverse suite of diagnostics including optical backscatter, time-integrated, time resolved and gated X-ray sensors, laser velocity interferometry, and neutron time of flight. Diagnostics to diagnose fusion ignition implosion and neutron emissions have been developed. A Diagnostic Control System (DCS) for both hardware and software facilitates development and eases integration. Each complex diagnostic typically uses an ensemble of electronic instruments attached to sensors, digitizers, cameras, and other devices. In the DCS architecture each instrument is interfaced to a low-cost Window XP processor and Java application. Instruments are aggregated as needed in the supervisory system to form an integrated diagnostic. The Java framework provides data management, control services and operator GUI generation. During the past several years, over thirty-six diagnostics have been deployed using this architecture in support of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The DCS architecture facilitates the expected additions and upgrades to diagnostics as more experiments are performed. This paper presents the DCS architecture, framework and our experiences in using it during the NIC to operate, upgrade and maintain a large set of diagnostic instruments.

  18. Use of the target diagnostic control system in the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelton, R.; Lagin, L.; Nelson, J.

    2011-01-01

    The extreme physics of targets shocked by NIF's 192-beam laser are observed by a diverse suite of diagnostics including optical backscatter, time-integrated, time resolved and gated X-ray sensors, laser velocity interferometry, and neutron time of flight. Diagnostics to diagnose fusion ignition implosion and neutron emissions have been developed. A Diagnostic Control System (DCS) for both hardware and software facilitates development and eases integration. Each complex diagnostic typically uses an ensemble of electronic instruments attached to sensors, digitizers, cameras, and other devices. In the DCS architecture each instrument is interfaced to a low-cost Window XP processor and Java application. Instruments are aggregated as needed in the supervisory system to form an integrated diagnostic. The Java framework provides data management, control services and operator GUI generation. During the past several years, over thirty-six diagnostics have been deployed using this architecture in support of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The DCS architecture facilitates the expected additions and upgrades to diagnostics as more experiments are performed. This paper presents the DCS architecture, framework and our experiences in using it during the NIC to operate, upgrade and maintain a large set of diagnostic instruments.

  19. Mineralisation of target hydrocarbons in three contaminated soils from former refinery facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towell, Marcie G; Bellarby, Jessica; Paton, Graeme I; Coulon, Frédéric; Pollard, Simon J T; Semple, Kirk T

    2011-02-01

    This study investigated the microbial degradation of (14)C-labelled hexadecane, octacosane, phenanthrene and pyrene and considered how degradation might be optimised in three genuinely hydrocarbon-contaminated soils from former petroleum refinery sites. Hydrocarbon mineralisation by the indigenous microbial community was monitored over 23 d. Hydrocarbon mineralisation enhancement by nutrient amendment (biostimulation), hydrocarbon degrader addition (bioaugmentation) and combined nutrient and degrader amendment, was also explored. The ability of indigenous soil microflora to mineralise (14)C-target hydrocarbons was appreciable; ≥ 16% mineralised in all soils. Generally, addition of nutrients or degraders increased the rates and extents of mineralisation of (14)C-hydrocarbons. However, the addition of nutrients and degraders in combination had a negative effect upon (14)C-octacosane mineralisation and resulted in lower extents of mineralisation in the three soils. In general, the rates and extents of mineralisation will be dependent upon treatment type, nature of the contamination and adaptation of the ingenious microbial community. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Improving the survivability of Nb-encapsulated Ga targets for the production of 68Ge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, H. T.; Claytor, T. N.; Hunter, J. F.; Olivas, E. R.; Kelsey, C. T., IV; Engle, J. W.; Connors, M. A.; Nortier, F. M.; Runde, W. H.; Moddrell, C.; Lenz, J. W.; John, K. D.

    2013-03-01

    At the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Isotope Production Facility (IPF), radioisotopes are produced for medical, scientific, and industrial applications by irradiating various targets with a 100 MeV, 230 μA proton beam. The medical isotope germanium-68 is produced by irradiating Nb capsules containing molten Ga target material. During irradiation, the Nb is subjected to intense radiation damage, corrosive attack by Ga, and mechanical and thermally-induced stresses for an extended period. Maintaining the structural integrity of the Nb target capsules during irradiation is crucial to contain the molten Ga target and the radioisotope product. In the present work, we focus on potential material related factors and assess the effect of the Nb stock material on target durability. We do so by comparing post-irradiation target mortality information to data collected during pre-irradiation ultrasound testing and X-ray imaging. We also explore possible failure mechanisms by using MCNP6 simulations and ANSYS codes to predict the induced atom displacement levels, hydrogen gas built-up, temperature distribution, and mechanical stresses. Our analysis, performed entirely in the context of an aggressive production program that allows for only limited diagnostic interference, suggests that using Nb stock with reasonably large and uniform grains is the most important factor in reducing early target failure at integrated beam current values <18 mAh and random failure at the face of the rear window at <60 mAh. We discuss possible failure mechanisms of failed targets that were fabricated using the same stock material and grain structure and then irradiated to integrated beam current values of up to 60 mAh and more. Based on these observations, we have enacted new specifications for Nb stock material quality, target design, and limits on integrated beam current. These changes have resulted in improved Nb capsule survivability.

  1. Simulation of Targets Feeding Pipe Rupture in Wendelstein 7-X Facility Using RELAP5 and COCOSYS Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliatka, T.; Povilaitis, M.; Kaliatka, A.; Urbonavicius, E.

    2012-10-01

    Wendelstein nuclear fusion device W7-X is a stellarator type experimental device, developed by Max Planck Institute of plasma physics. Rupture of one of the 40 mm inner diameter coolant pipes providing water for the divertor targets during the "baking" regime of the facility operation is considered to be the most severe accident in terms of the plasma vessel pressurization. "Baking" regime is the regime of the facility operation during which plasma vessel structures are heated to the temperature acceptable for the plasma ignition in the vessel. This paper presents the model of W7-X cooling system (pumps, valves, pipes, hydro-accumulators, and heat exchangers), developed using thermal-hydraulic state-of-the-art RELAP5 Mod3.3 code, and model of plasma vessel, developed by employing the lumped-parameter code COCOSYS. Using both models the numerical simulation of processes in W7-X cooling system and plasma vessel has been performed. The results of simulation showed, that the automatic valve closure time 1 s is the most acceptable (no water hammer effect occurs) and selected area of the burst disk is sufficient to prevent pressure in the plasma vessel.

  2. From US NAVY Mate to Division Leader for Operations - Requirements, Development and Career Paths of LANL/LANSCE Accelerator Operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spickermann, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    There are opportunities for advancement within the team. Operators advance by: (1) Becoming fully qualified - following the LANSCE Accelerator Operator Training Manual, Operator trainees go through 5 levels of qualification, from Radiation Security System to Experimental Area Operator. Must obtain Knowledge and Performance checkouts by an OSS or AOSS, and an End-of-Card checkout by the team leader or RSS engineer (level I). Program was inspired by US NAVY qualification program for nuclear reactor operators. Time to complete: 2-2.5 years. (2) Fully qualified operators are eligible to apply for vacant (OSS)/AOSS positions; and (3) Alternatively, experienced operators can sign up for the voluntary Senior Operator Qualification Program. They must demonstrate in-depth knowledge of all areas of the accelerator complex. Time to complete is 2-3 years (Minimum 4 years from fully qualified). Eligible for promotion to level between qualified operator and AOSS.

  3. Calculations of high-power production target and beamdump for the GSI future Super-FRS for a fast extraction scheme at the FAIR Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, N A; Weick, H; Iwase, H

    2005-01-01

    A superconducting fragment separator (Super-FRS) is being designed for the production and separation of radioactive isotopes at the future FAIR (Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research) facility at Darmstadt. This paper discusses various aspects and requirements for the high-power production target that will be used in the Super-FRS experiments. The production target must survive over an extended period of time as it will be used during the course of many experiments. The specific power deposited by the high intensity beam that will be generated at the future FAIR facility will be high enough to destroy the target in most of the cases as a result of a single shot from the new heavy ion synchrotrons SIS100/300. By using an appropriate beam intensity and focal spot parameters, the target would survive after being irradiated once. However, the heat should be dissipated efficiently before the same target area is irradiated again. We have considered a wheel shaped solid carbon target that rotates around its axis so that different areas of the target are irradiated successively. This allows for cooling of the beam heated region by thermal conduction before the same part of the target is irradiated a second time. Another attractive option is to use a liquid jet target at the Super-FRS. First calculations of a possible liquid lithium target are also presented in this paper. One of the advantages of using lithium as a target is that it will survive even if one uses a smaller focal spot, which has half the area of that used for a solid carbon target. This will significantly improve the isotope resolution. A similar problem associated with these experiments will be safe deposition of the beam energy in a beamdump after its interaction with the production target. We also present calculations to study the suitability of a proposed beamdump

  4. Basic and Applied Research at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisowski, P.W.

    2003-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, or LANSCE, is an accelerator-based national user facility for research in basic and applied science. At present LANSCE has two experimental areas primarily using neutrons generated by 800-MeV protons striking tungsten target systems. A third area uses the proton beam for radiography. This paper describes the three LANSCE experimental areas, gives highlights of the past operating period, and discusses plans for the future

  5. A Concept for a Low Pressure Noble Gas Fill Intervention in the IFE Fusion Test Facility (FTF) Target Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentile, C.A.; Blanchard, W.R.; Kozub, T.A.; Aristova, M.; McGahan, C.; Natta, S.; Pagdon, K.; Zelenty, J.

    2010-01-01

    An engineering evaluation has been initiated to investigate conceptual engineering methods for implementing a viable gas shield strategy in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) target chamber. The employment of a low pressure noble gas in the target chamber to thermalize energetic helium ions prior to interaction with the wall could dramatically increase the useful life of the first wall in the FTF reactor1. For the purpose of providing flexibility, two target chamber configurations are addressed: a five meter radius sphere and a ten meter radius sphere. Experimental studies at Nike have indicated that a low pressure, ambient gas resident in the target chamber during laser pulsing does not appear to impair the ability of laser light from illuminating targets2. In addition, current investigations into delivering, maintaining, and processing low pressure gas appear to be viable with slight modification to current pumping and plasma exhaust processing technologies3,4. Employment of a gas fill solution for protecting the dry wall target chamber in the FTF may reduce, or possibly eliminate the need for other attenuating technologies designed for keeping He ions from implanting in first wall structures and components. The gas fill concept appears to provide an effective means of extending the life of the first wall while employing mostly commercial off the shelf (COTS) technologies. Although a gas fill configuration may provide a methodology for attenuating damage inflicted on chamber surfaces, issues associated with target injection need to be further analyzed to ensure that the gas fill concept is viable in the integrated FTF design5. In the proposed system, the ambient noble gas is heated via the energetic helium ions produced by target detonation. The gas is subsequently cooled by the chamber wall to approximately 800oC, removed from the chamber, and processed by the chamber gas processing system (CGPS). In an optimized scenario of the above stated concept, the chamber

  6. Design risk analysis comparison between low-activation composite and aluminum alloy target chamber for the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streckert, H.H.; Schleicher, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    The baseline design for the target chamber for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) consists of an aluminum alloy spherical shell. A low-activation composite chamber (e.g., carbon fiber/epoxy) has important advantages such as enhanced environmental and safety characteristics, improved chamber accessibility due to reduced neutron-induced radioactivity, and elimination of the concrete shield. However, it is critical to determine the design and manufacturing risk for the first application. The replacement of such a critical component requires a detailed development risk assessment. A semiquantitative approach to risk assessment has been applied to this problem based on failure modes, effects, and criticality analysis. This analysis consists of a systematic method for organizing the collective judgment of the designers to identify failure modes, estimate probabilities, judge the severity of the consequence, and illustrate risk in a matrix representation. The results of the analyses indicate that the composite chamber has a reasonably high probability of success in the NIF application. The aluminum alloy chamber, however, represents a lower risk, partially based on a more mature technology. 8 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs

  7. Possible version of the compression degradation of the thermonuclear indirect-irradiation targets at the national ignition facility and a reason for the failure of ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozanov, V. B., E-mail: rozanov@sci.lebedev.ru; Vergunova, G. A., E-mail: verg@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    The main parameters of compression of a target and tendencies at change in the irradiation conditions are determined by analyzing the published results of experiments at the megajoule National Ignition Facility (NIF) on the compression of capsules in indirect-irradiation targets by means of the one-dimensional RADIAN program in the spherical geometry. A possible version of the “failure of ignition” of an indirect-irradiation target under the NIF conditions is attributed to radiation transfer. The application of onedimensional model to analyze the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) experiments allows identifying conditions corresponding to the future ignition regime and distinguishing them from conditions under which ignition does not occur.

  8. First experimental evidence of hydrodynamic tunneling of ultra-relativistic protons in extended solid copper target at the CERN HiRadMat facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, R.; Blanco Sancho, J.; Burkart, F.; Grenier, D.; Wollmann, D.; Tahir, N. A.; Shutov, A.; Piriz, A. R.

    2014-08-01

    A novel experiment has been performed at the CERN HiRadMat test facility to study the impact of the 440 GeV proton beam generated by the Super Proton Synchrotron on extended solid copper cylindrical targets. Substantial hydrodynamic tunneling of the protons in the target material has been observed that leads to significant lengthening of the projectile range, which confirms our previous theoretical predictions [N. A. Tahir et al., Phys. Rev. Spec. Top.-Accel. Beams 15, 051003 (2012)]. Simulation results show very good agreement with the experimental measurements. These results have very important implications on the machine protection design for powerful machines like the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the future High Luminosity LHC, and the proposed huge 80 km circumference Future Circular Collider, which is currently being discussed at CERN. Another very interesting outcome of this work is that one may also study the field of High Energy Density Physics at this test facility.

  9. First experimental evidence of hydrodynamic tunneling of ultra–relativistic protons in extended solid copper target at the CERN HiRadMat facility

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, R; Sancho, J Blanco; Burkart, F; Grenier, D; Wollmann, D; Tahir, N A; Shutov, A; Piriz, A R

    2014-01-01

    A novel experiment has been performed at the CERN HiRadMat test facility to study the impact of the 440 GeV proton beam generated by the Super Proton Synchrotron on extended solid copper cylindrical targets. Substantial hydrodynamic tunneling of the protons in the target material has been observed that leads to significant lengthening of the projectile range, which confirms our previous theoretical predictions [N. A. Tahir et al., Phys. Rev. Spec. Top.-Accel. Beams 15, 051003 (2012)]. Simulation results show very good agreement with the experimental measurements. These results have very important implications on the machine protection design for powerful machines like the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the future High Luminosity LHC, and the proposed huge 80 km circumference Future Circular Collider, which is currently being discussed at CERN. Another very interesting outcome of this work is that one may also study the field of High Energy Density Physics at this test facility.

  10. Framework for the analysis of the low-carbon scenario 2020 to achieve the national carbon Emissions reduction target: Focused on educational facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Choongwan; Kim, Hyunjoong; Hong, Taehoon

    2014-01-01

    Since the increase in greenhouse gas emissions has increased the global warming potential, an international agreement on carbon emissions reduction target (CERT) has been formulated in Kyoto Protocol (1997). This study aimed to develop a framework for the analysis of the low-carbon scenario 2020 to achieve the national CERT. To verify the feasibility of the proposed framework, educational facilities were used for a case study. This study was conducted in six steps: (i) selection of the target school; (ii) establishment of the reference model for the target school; (iii) energy consumption pattern analysis by target school; (iv) establishment of the energy retrofit model for the target school; (v) economic and environmental assessment through the life cycle cost and life cycle CO 2 analysis; and (vi) establishment of the low-carbon scenario in 2020 to achieve the national CERT. This study can help facility managers or policymakers establish the optimal retrofit strategy within the limited budget from a short-term perspective and the low-carbon scenario 2020 to achieve the national CERT from the long-term perspective. The proposed framework could be also applied to any other building type or country in the global environment

  11. Recent US target-physics-related research in heavy-ion inertial fusion: simulations for tamped targets and for disk experiments in accelerator test facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark, J.W.K.

    1982-03-22

    Calculations suggest that experiments relating to disk heating, as well as beam deposition, focusing and transport can be performed within the context of current design proposals for accelerator test-facilities. Since the test-facilities have lower ion kinetic energy and beam pulse power as compared to reactor drivers, we achieve high-beam intensities at the focal spot by using short focal distance and properly designed beam optics. In this regard, the low beam emittance of suggested multi-beam designs are very useful. Possibly even higher focal spot brightness could be obtained by plasma lenses which involve external fields on the beam which is stripped to a higher charge state by passing through a plasma cell. Preliminary results suggest that intensities approx. 10/sup 13/ - 10/sup 14/ W/cm/sup 2/ are achievable. Given these intensities, deposition experiments with heating of disks to greater than a million degrees Kelvin (100 eV) are expected.

  12. Multi probes measurements at the PALS Facility Research Centre during high intense laser pulse interactions with various target materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Marco Massimo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available During the interaction of high intense laser pulse with solid target, a large amount of hot electrons is produced and a giant Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP is generated due to the current flowing into the system target–target holder, as well as due to the escaping charged particles in vacuum. EMP production for different target materials is investigated inside and outside the target chamber, using monopole antenna, super wide-band microstrip antenna and Moebius antenna. The EMP consists in a fast transient magnetic field lasting hundreds of nanosecond with frequencies ranging from MHz to tens of GHz. Measurements of magnetic field and return target current in the range of kA were carried out by an inductive target probe (Cikhardt J. et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85 (2014 103507.

  13. Target laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ephraim, D.C.; Pednekar, A.R.

    1993-01-01

    A target laboratory to make stripper foils for the accelerator and various targets for use in the experiments is set up in the pelletron accelerator facility. The facilities available in the laboratory are: (1) D.C. glow discharge setup, (2) carbon arc set up, and (3) vacuum evaporation set up (resistance heating), electron beam source, rolling mill - all for target preparation. They are described. Centrifugal deposition technique is used for target preparation. (author). 3 figs

  14. Evaluation of the Induced Activity in Air by the External Proton Beam in the Target Room of the Proton Accelerator Facility of Proton Engineering Frontier Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Cheol Woo; Lee, Young Ouk; Cho, Young Sik; Ahn, So Hyun

    2007-01-01

    One of the radiological concerns is the worker's exposure level and the concentration of the radionuclides in the air after shutdown, for the safety analysis on the proton accelerator facility. Although, the primary radiation source is the protons accelerated up to design value, all of the radio-nuclide is produced from the secondary neutron and photon induced reaction in air. Because, the protons don't penetrate the acceleration equipment like the DTL tank wall or BTL wall, secondary neutrons or photons are only in the air in the accelerator tunnel building because of the short range of the proton in the materials. But, for the case of the target rooms, external proton beams are occasionally used in the various experiments. When these external proton beams travel through air from the end of the beam transport line to the target, they interact directly with air and produce activation products from the proton induced reaction. The external proton beam will be used in the target rooms in the accelerator facility of the Proton Accelerator Frontier Project (PEFP). In this study, interaction characteristics of the external proton beam with air and induced activity in air from the direct interaction of the proton beam were evaluated

  15. Final deactivation report on the tritium target facility, Building 7025, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-08-01

    This report includes a history and profile of Bldg. 7025 before and after completion of deactivation. It also discusses turnover items, such as the Postdeactivation Surveillance ampersand Maintenance Plan, remaining hazardous materials, radiological controls, Safeguards and Security, quality assurance, facility operations, and supporting documentation in the EM-60 Turnover package. Other than minimal S ampersand M activities, the building will be unoccupied and the exterior doors locked (access only for the required S ampersand M)

  16. Optical design of the National Ignition Facility main laser and switchyard/target area beam transport systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John L.; English, R. Edward, Jr.; Korniski, Ronald J.; Rodgers, J. Michael

    1999-07-01

    The optical design of the main laser and transport mirror sections of the National Ignition Facility are described. For the main laser the configuration, layout constraints, multiple beam arrangement, pinhole layout and beam paths, clear aperture budget, ray trace models, alignment constraints, lens designs, wavefront performance, and pupil aberrations are discussed. For the transport mirror system the layout, alignment controls and clear aperture budget are described.

  17. Simple model of the indirect compression of targets under conditions close to the national ignition facility at an energy of 1.5 MJ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozanov, V. B., E-mail: rozanov@sci.lebedev.ru; Vergunova, G. A., E-mail: verg@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    The possibility of the analysis and interpretation of the reported experiments with the megajoule National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser on the compression of capsules in indirect-irradiation targets by means of the one-dimensional RADIAN program in the spherical geometry has been studied. The problem of the energy balance in a target and the determination of the laser energy that should be used in the spherical model of the target has been considered. The results of action of pulses differing in energy and time profile (“low-foot” and “high-foot” regimes) have been analyzed. The parameters of the compression of targets with a high-density carbon ablator have been obtained. The results of the simulations are in satisfactory agreement with the measurements and correspond to the range of the observed parameters. The set of compared results can be expanded, in particular, for a more detailed determination of the parameters of a target near the maximum compression of the capsule. The physical foundation of the possibility of using the one-dimensional description is the necessity of the closeness of the last stage of the compression of the capsule to a one-dimensional process. The one-dimensional simulation of the compression of the capsule can be useful in establishing the boundary behind which two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulation should be used.

  18. HIPPO, the high-pressure preferred orientation diffractometer at LANSCE for characterization of bulk materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, K.; Dreele, R.B. von; Wenk, H.R.

    2001-01-01

    United States National Laboratory researchers and University of California faculty, representing a broad range of scientific disciplines, is building a novel time-of-flight (TOF) neutron diffractometer and associated in situ equipment at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (Lujan Center), under the auspices of the United States Department of Energy. The goal with the High-Pressure Preferred Orientation Instrument (HIPPO) is to investigate dynamic processes in heterogeneous bulk materials in a variety of environments. The instrument, which will become available in summer 2001, has the extremely high count-rates necessary to study time-dependent processes in small (1-mm diameter) and large (2-cm diameter) samples, and in a large variety of environmental conditions (10-2000 K cryostats and furnaces, 0-20 GPa pressure vessels, straining cells, goniometers, magnets, etc.). The 3-D arrangement of detectors allows direct measurements of crystal orientation distributions in polycrystalline materials. The analysis of TOF diffraction patterns with versatile Rietveld codes provides simultaneous information on crystal structure, texture, microstructure and phase proportions. While this instrument has many applications in materials science, it is also of great interest for geology and geophysics. Some applications include: kinetics of reactions, structure of silicate glasses and melts, high-pressure investigations of complex systems, evolution of texture and anisotropy during deformation and recrystallization. The Lujan Center aims at creating an instrument with high data through-put and easy access to researchers and students. While the HIPPO instrument will be part of the national user facility operated by the Lujan Center, the scientific program will be guided by the University of California consortium with the goal of satisfying national priorities and establishing an environment of scientific excellence. (author)

  19. HIPPO, the high-pressure preferred orientation diffractometer at LANSCE for characterization of bulk materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, K.; Dreele, R.B. von [Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wenk, H.R. [Department of Geology and Geophysics, Univ. of California, Berkely, CA (United States)

    2001-03-01

    United States National Laboratory researchers and University of California faculty, representing a broad range of scientific disciplines, is building a novel time-of-flight (TOF) neutron diffractometer and associated in situ equipment at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (Lujan Center), under the auspices of the United States Department of Energy. The goal with the High-Pressure Preferred Orientation Instrument (HIPPO) is to investigate dynamic processes in heterogeneous bulk materials in a variety of environments. The instrument, which will become available in summer 2001, has the extremely high count-rates necessary to study time-dependent processes in small (1-mm diameter) and large (2-cm diameter) samples, and in a large variety of environmental conditions (10-2000 K cryostats and furnaces, 0-20 GPa pressure vessels, straining cells, goniometers, magnets, etc.). The 3-D arrangement of detectors allows direct measurements of crystal orientation distributions in polycrystalline materials. The analysis of TOF diffraction patterns with versatile Rietveld codes provides simultaneous information on crystal structure, texture, microstructure and phase proportions. While this instrument has many applications in materials science, it is also of great interest for geology and geophysics. Some applications include: kinetics of reactions, structure of silicate glasses and melts, high-pressure investigations of complex systems, evolution of texture and anisotropy during deformation and recrystallization. The Lujan Center aims at creating an instrument with high data through-put and easy access to researchers and students. While the HIPPO instrument will be part of the national user facility operated by the Lujan Center, the scientific program will be guided by the University of California consortium with the goal of satisfying national priorities and establishing an environment of scientific excellence. (author)

  20. Automated System Calibration and Verification of the Position Measurements for the Los Alamos Isotope Production Facility and the Switchyard Kicker Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, D.; Gilpatrick, J. D.; Martinez, D.; Shurter, R. B.

    2004-11-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory has constructed both an Isotope Production Facility (IPF) and a Switchyard Kicker (XDK) as additions to the H+ and H- accelerator. These additions contain eleven Beam Position Monitors (BPMs) that measure the beam's position throughout the transport. The analog electronics within each processing module determines the beam position using the log-ratio technique. For system reliability, calibrations compensate for various temperature drifts and other imperfections in the processing electronics components. Additionally, verifications are periodically implemented by a PC running a National Instruments LabVIEW virtual instrument (VI) to verify continued system and cable integrity. The VI communicates with the processor cards via a PCI/MXI-3 VXI-crate communication module. Previously, accelerator operators performed BPM system calibrations typically once per day while beam was explicitly turned off. One of this new measurement system's unique achievements is its automated calibration and verification capability. Taking advantage of the pulsed nature of the LANSCE-facility beams, the integrated electronics hardware and VI perform calibration and verification operations between beam pulses without interrupting production beam delivery. The design, construction, and performance results of the automated calibration and verification portion of this position measurement system will be the topic of this paper.

  1. 77 FR 16796 - Lead Requirements for Lead-Based Paint Activities in Target Housing and Child-Occupied Facilities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ... document announces the receipt of Arkansas's rules established pursuant to its new 2011 statutory authority... program accreditation requirements, and work practice standards for lead-based paint activities in target...-based paint program and passed a new statute establishing a State lead-based paint program and changing...

  2. Above scaling short-pulse ion acceleration from flat foil and ``Pizza-top Cone'' targets at the Trident laser facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flippo, Kirk; Hegelich, B. Manuel; Cort Gautier, D.; Johnson, J. Randy; Kline, John L.; Shimada, Tsutomu; Fernández, Juan C.; Gaillard, Sandrine; Rassuchine, Jennifer; Le Galloudec, Nathalie; Cowan, Thomas E.; Malekos, Steve; Korgan, Grant

    2006-10-01

    Ion-driven Fast Ignition (IFI) has certain advantages over electron-driven FI due to a possible large reduction in the amount of energy required. Recent experiments at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Trident facility have yielded ion energies and efficiencies many times in excess of recent published scaling laws, leading to even more potential advantages of IFI. Proton energies in excess of 35 MeV have been observed from targets produced by the University of Nevada, Reno - dubbed ``Pizza-top Cone'' targets - at intensities of only 1x10^19 W/cm^2 with 20 joules in 600 fs. Energies in excess of 24 MeV were observed from simple flat foil targets as well. The observed energies, above any published scaling laws, are attributed to target production, preparation, and shot to shot monitoring of many laser parameters, especially the laser ASE prepulse level and laser pulse duration. The laser parameters are monitored in real-time to keep the laser in optimal condition throughout the run providing high quality, reproducible shots.

  3. Satif-3: Shielding aspects of accelerators, targets, and irradiation facilities. Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan, 12--13 May 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Particle accelerators have evolved over the last 50 years from simple devices to powerful machines, and will continue to have an important impact on research, technology and lifestyle. Today, they cover a wide range of applications, from television and computer displays in households to the investigation of the origin and structure of matter. It has become common practice to use them for material science and medical applications. In recent years, requirements from new technological and research applications have emerged, giving rise to new radiation shielding aspects and problems. These proceedings review recent progress in radiation shielding of accelerator facilities, evaluate advancements and discuss further developments needed with respect to international co-operation in this field

  4. APT target-blanket fabrication development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, D.L.

    1997-06-13

    Concepts for producing tritium in an accelerator were translated into hardware for engineering studies of tritium generation, heat transfer, and effects of proton-neutron flux on materials. Small-scale target- blanket assemblies were fabricated and material samples prepared for these performance tests. Blanket assemblies utilize composite aluminum-lead modules, the two primary materials of the blanket. Several approaches are being investigated to produce large-scale assemblies, developing fabrication and assembly methods for their commercial manufacture. Small-scale target-blanket assemblies, designed and fabricated at the Savannah River Site, were place in Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) for irradiation. They were subjected to neutron flux for nine months during 1996-97. Coincident with this test was the development of production methods for large- scale modules. Increasing module size presented challenges that required new methods to be developed for fabrication and assembly. After development, these methods were demonstrated by fabricating and assembling two production-scale modules.

  5. The experimental plan for cryogenic layered target implosions on the National Ignition Facility - The inertial confinement approach to fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, M. J.; Lindl, J. D.; Spears, B. K.; Weber, S. V.; Atherton, L. J.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Cerjan, C. J.; Clark, D; Collins, G. W.; Fair, J. E.; Fortner, R. J.; Glenzer, S. H.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A. V.; Hatchett, S. P.; Izumi, N.; Jacoby, B.

    2011-01-01

    Ignition requires precisely controlled, high convergence implosions to assemble a dense shell of deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel with ρR>∼1 g/cm 2 surrounding a 10 keV hot spot with ρR ∼ 0.3 g/cm 2 . A working definition of ignition has been a yield of ∼1 MJ. At this yield the α-particle energy deposited in the fuel would have been ∼200 kJ, which is already ∼10 x more than the kinetic energy of a typical implosion. The National Ignition Campaign includes low yield implosions with dudded fuel layers to study and optimize the hydrodynamic assembly of the fuel in a diagnostics rich environment. The fuel is a mixture of tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) with a density equivalent to DT. The fraction of D can be adjusted to control the neutron yield. Yields of ∼10 14-15 14 MeV (primary) neutrons are adequate to diagnose the hot spot as well as the dense fuel properties via down scattering of the primary neutrons. X-ray imaging diagnostics can function in this low yield environment providing additional information about the assembled fuel either by imaging the photons emitted by the hot central plasma, or by active probing of the dense shell by a separate high energy short pulse flash. The planned use of these targets and diagnostics to assess and optimize the assembly of the fuel and how this relates to the predicted performance of DT targets is described. It is found that a good predictor of DT target performance is the THD measurable parameter, Experimental Ignition Threshold Factor, ITFX ∼ Y x dsf 2.3 , where Y is the measured neutron yield between 13 and 15 MeV, and dsf is the down scattered neutron fraction defined as the ratio of neutrons between 10 and 12 MeV and those between 13 and 15 MeV.

  6. A rich revenue from the use of radioactive beams and radioactive targets: recent highlights from the nTOF and ISOLDE facilities (1/2)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    The On-Line Isotope Mass Separator ISOLDE is a facility dedicated to the production of a large variety of radioactive ion beams for a great number of different experiments, e.g. in the field of nuclear and atomic physics, solid-state physics, life sciences and material science. At ISOLDE, radioactive nuclides are produced in thick high-temperature targets via spallation, fission or fragmentation reactions. The targets are placed in the external proton beam of the PSB, which has an energy of 1.0 or 1.4 GeV and an intensity of about 2 microA. The target and ion-source together represent a small chemical factory for converting the nuclear reaction products into a radioactive ion beam. An electric field accelerates the ions, which are mass separated and steered to the experiments. Until now more than 600 isotopes of more than 60 elements (Z=2 to 88) have been produced with half-lives down to milliseconds and intensities up to 1011 ions per second. Through the advent of post-accelerated beams with the REX-ISOLDE c...

  7. Mirror position display equipment for the target chamber mirror mounts of the LASL HELIOS laser fusion facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, F.D.; Remington, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    Equipment has been fabricated which records the absolute positions of sixteen mirror mounts used to direct and focus eight high-energy laser beams for research in laser induced fusion. Each mirror mount is driven by three stepping motors, controlled to produce the motions of Focus, Tilt, and Rotate relative to the target. Stepping of the motors is sensed by incremental optical encoders coupled to the motor drive shafts. Outputs from the encoder tracks are multiplexed to a microprocessor which transmits motor step information via a fiber optical data link to a Mirror Position Display chassis. This unit accumulates the steps, stores the motor positions, displays mirror position data to the operator, and provides the equipment control functions. Standby battery power is included to retain the motor step data in the event of power failure

  8. Laser stand for irradiation of targets by laser pulses from the Iskra-5 facility at a repetition rate of 100 MHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annenkov, V I; Garanin, Sergey G; Eroshenko, V A; Zhidkov, N V; Zubkov, A V; Kalipanov, S V; Kalmykov, N A; Kovalenko, V P; Krotov, V A; Lapin, S G; Martynenko, S P; Pankratov, V I; Faizullin, V S; Khrustalev, V A; Khudikov, N M; Chebotar, V S

    2009-01-01

    A train of a few tens of high-power subnanosecond laser pulses with a repetition period of 10 ns is generated in the Iskra-5 facility. The laser pulse train has an energy of up to 300 J and contains up to 40 pulses (by the 0.15 intensity level), the single pulse duration in the train being ∼0.5 ns. The results of experiments on conversion of a train of laser pulses to a train of X-ray pulses are presented. Upon irradiation of a tungsten target, a train of X-ray pulses is generated with the shape of an envelope in the spectral band from 0.18 to 0.28 keV similar to that of the envelope of the laser pulse train. The duration of a single X-ray pulse in the train is equal to that of a single laser pulse. (lasers)

  9. Optical alignment techniques for line-imaging velocity interferometry and line-imaging self-emulsion of targets at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malone, Robert M.; Frogget, Brent C.; Kaufman, Morris I.; Tunnell, Thomas W.; Guyton, Robert L.; Reinbachs, Imants P.; Watts, Phillip W.

    2007-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires optical diagnostics for measuring shock velocities in shock physics experiments. The Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) measures shock velocities, shock breakout times, and emission of 1- to 5-mm targets at a location remote to the NIF target chamber. Three optical systems using the same vacuum chamber port each have a total track of 69 feet. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts or sliding rails, enabling pointing accuracy of the optical axis to be checked. Counter-propagating laser beams (orange and red) align these diagnostics to a listing of tolerances. The orange alignment laser is introduced at the entrance to the two-level interferometer table and passes forward through the optical systems to the recording streak cameras. The red alignment laser is introduced in front of the recording streak cameras and passes in the reverse direction through all optical elements, out of the interferometer table, eventually reaching the target chamber center. Red laser wavelength is selected to be at the 50 percent reflection point of a special beamsplitter used to separate emission light from the Doppler-shifted interferometer light. Movable aperture cards, placed before and after lens groups, show the spread of alignments spots created by the orange and red alignment lasers. Optical elements include 1- to 15-inch-diameter mirrors, lenses with up to 10.5-inch diameters, beamsplitters, etalons, dove prisms, filters, and pellicles. Alignment of more than 75 optical elements must be verified before each target shot. Archived images from eight alignment cameras prove proper alignment before each shot

  10. First test of the prompt gamma ray timing method with heterogeneous targets at a clinical proton therapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hueso-González, Fernando; Enghardt, Wolfgang; Golnik, Christian; Petzoldt, Johannes; Pausch, Guntram; Fiedler, Fine; Priegnitz, Marlen; Römer, Katja E; Wagner, Andreas; Janssens, Guillaume; Prieels, Damien; Smeets, Julien; Vander Stappen, François

    2015-01-01

    Ion beam therapy promises enhanced tumour coverage compared to conventional radiotherapy, but particle range uncertainties significantly blunt the achievable precision. Experimental tools for range verification in real-time are not yet available in clinical routine. The prompt gamma ray timing method has been recently proposed as an alternative to collimated imaging systems. The detection times of prompt gamma rays encode essential information about the depth-dose profile thanks to the measurable transit time of ions through matter. In a collaboration between OncoRay, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf and IBA, the first test at a clinical proton accelerator (Westdeutsches Protonentherapiezentrum Essen, Germany) with several detectors and phantoms is performed. The robustness of the method against background and stability of the beam bunch time profile is explored, and the bunch time spread is characterized for different proton energies. For a beam spot with a hundred million protons and a single detector, range differences of 5 mm in defined heterogeneous targets are identified by numerical comparison of the spectrum shape. For higher statistics, range shifts down to 2 mm are detectable. A proton bunch monitor, higher detector throughput and quantitative range retrieval are the upcoming steps towards a clinically applicable prototype. In conclusion, the experimental results highlight the prospects of this straightforward verification method at a clinical pencil beam and settle this novel approach as a promising alternative in the field of in vivo dosimetry. (paper)

  11. Pulsed-coil magnet systems for applying uniform 10-30 T fields to centimeter-scale targets on Sandia's Z facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovang, D C; Lamppa, D C; Cuneo, M E; Owen, A C; McKenney, J; Johnson, D W; Radovich, S; Kaye, R J; McBride, R D; Alexander, C S; Awe, T J; Slutz, S A; Sefkow, A B; Haill, T A; Jones, P A; Argo, J W; Dalton, D G; Robertson, G K; Waisman, E M; Sinars, D B; Meissner, J; Milhous, M; Nguyen, D N; Mielke, C H

    2014-12-01

    Sandia has successfully integrated the capability to apply uniform, high magnetic fields (10-30 T) to high energy density experiments on the Z facility. This system uses an 8-mF, 15-kV capacitor bank to drive large-bore (5 cm diameter), high-inductance (1-3 mH) multi-turn, multi-layer electromagnets that slowly magnetize the conductive targets used on Z over several milliseconds (time to peak field of 2-7 ms). This system was commissioned in February 2013 and has been used successfully to magnetize more than 30 experiments up to 10 T that have produced exciting and surprising physics results. These experiments used split-magnet topologies to maintain diagnostic lines of sight to the target. We describe the design, integration, and operation of the pulsed coil system into the challenging and harsh environment of the Z Machine. We also describe our plans and designs for achieving fields up to 20 T with a reduced-gap split-magnet configuration, and up to 30 T with a solid magnet configuration in pursuit of the Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion concept.

  12. Development and testing of a deuterium gas target assembly for neutron production via the H-2(d,n)He-3 reaction at a low-energy accelerator facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feautrier, D.; Smith, D.L.

    1992-03-01

    This report describes the development and testing of a deuterium gas target intended for use at a low-energy accelerator facility to produce neutrons for basic research and various nuclear applications. The principle source reaction is H-2(d,n)He-3. It produces a nearly mono-energetic group of neutrons. However, a lower-energy continuum neutron spectrum is produced by the H-2(d;n,p)H-2 reaction and also by deuterons which strike various components in the target assembly. The present target is designed to achieve the following objectives: (1) minimize unwanted background neutron production from the target assembly, (2) provide a relatively low level of residual long-term activity within the target components, (3) have the capacity to dissipate up to 150 watts of beam power with good target longevity, and (4) possess a relatively modest target mass in order to minimize neutron scattering from the target components. The basic physical principles that have to be considered in designing an accelerator target are discussed and the major engineering features of this particular target design are outlined. The results of initial performance tests on this target are documented and some conclusions concerning the viability of the target design are presented

  13. Facile synthesis of highly biocompatible folic acid-functionalised SiO2 nanoparticles encapsulating rare-earth metal complexes, and their application in targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiuling; Hu, Fan; Shuai, Qi

    2017-11-14

    Mesoporous silica core-shell nanospheres encapsulating a rare-earth metal complex (RC) were first synthesised through a facile W/O (water in oil) inverse microemulsion method. In order to achieve targeted complex delivery, folic acid (FA) was used as the targeting component due to its high affinity for over-expressed folate receptors (FRs) in cancer cells. The RC 2 @SiO 2 -FA nanospheres were characterised via ultraviolet-visible light absorption spectroscopy (UV-vis spectroscopy), dynamic light scattering (DLS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A microwave method was used to synthesise five RC cores based on 4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid, and their crystal structures were further confirmed using X-ray diffraction. The five RC cores have the following chemical formulae: [Er 2 (p-CPA) 6 (H 2 O) 6 ] RC 1 , [Ho 2 (p-CPA) 6 (H 2 O) 6 ] RC 2 , [Sm(p-CPA) 3 (H 2 O)] RC 3 , [Pr(p-CPA) 3 (H 2 O)]·3H 2 O RC 4 and [Ce(p-CPA) 3 (H 2 O) 2 ]·2H 2 O RC 5 . The carboxyl groups showed two kinds of coordination modes, namely μ 2 -η 1 :η 1 and μ 2 -η 1 :η 2 , among RC 1 -RC 5 . The flexible -OCH 2 COO- spacer group, which can undergo rotation of its C-O and C-C bonds, offered great potential for structural diversity. In vivo experiments revealed that the nanospheres exhibited no obvious cytotoxicity on HepG2 cells and 293 T cells, even at concentrations of up to 80 μg mL -1 . Nevertheless, all of the RC cores showed a certain degree of anti-tumour efficacy; in particular, RC 2 showed the strongest cytotoxicity against HepG2 cells. Interestingly, the cytotoxicity of all of the RC 2 @SiO 2 -FA nanospheres was higher than that of lone RC 2 . These types of FA-targeted mesoporous silica nanocarriers can be used for the delivery of anti-tumour RC, and provide a basis for the further study of affordable non-platinum-based complexes.

  14. Basic and Applied Science Research at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisowski, Paul W.

    2005-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, or LANSCE, is an accelerator-based national user facility for research in basic and applied science using four experimental areas. LANSCE has two areas that provide neutrons generated by the 800-MeV proton beam striking tungsten target systems. A third area uses the proton beam for radiography. The fourth area uses 100 MeV protons to produce medical radioisotopes. This paper describes the four LANSCE experimental areas, gives nuclear science highlights of the past operating period, and discusses plans for the future

  15. Time-of-flight small-angle neutron scattering data reduction and analysis at LANSCE with program SMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjelm, R.P. Jr.; Seeger, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    A user-friendly integrated system, SMR, for the display, reduction and analysis of data from time-of-flight small-angle neutron diffractometers is described. Its purpose is to provide facilities for data display and assessment, and to provide these facilities in near real time. This allows the results of each scattering measurement to be available almost immediately, and enables the user to use the results of a measurement as a basis for other measurements in the same time allocation of the instrument. 8 refs., 10 figs

  16. Early-time radiation flux symmetry optimization and its effect on gas-filled hohlraum ignition targets on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milovich, J. L., E-mail: milovich1@llnl.gov; Dewald, E. L.; Pak, A.; Michel, P.; Town, R. P. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Landen, O.; Edwards, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Achieving ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is tied to our ability to control and minimize deviations from sphericity of the capsule implosion. Low-mode asymmetries of the hot spot result from the combined effect of radiation drive asymmetries throughout the laser pulse and initial roughness on the capsule surface. In this paper, we report on simulations and experiments designed to assess, measure, and correct the drive asymmetries produced by the early-time (≈first 2 ns or “picket”) period of the laser pulse. The drive asymmetry during the picket is commonly thought to introduce distortions in the hot-spot shape at ignition time. However, a more subtle effect not previously considered is that it also leads to an asymmetry in shock velocity and timing, thereby increasing the fuel adiabat and reducing the margin for ignition. It is shown via hydrodynamic simulations that minimizing this effect requires that the early-time asymmetry be kept below 7.5% in the second Legendre mode (P{sub 2}), thus keeping the loss of performance margin below ≈10% for a layered implosion. Asymmetries during the picket of the laser pulse are measured using the instantaneous self-emission of a high-Z re-emission sphere in place of an ignition capsule in a hohlraum with large azimuthal diagnostic windows. Three dimensional simulations using the code HYDRA (to capture the effect of non-azimuthal hohlraum features) coupled to a cross-beam energy transfer model [Michel et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056305 (2010)] are used to establish the surrogacy of the re-emit target and to assess the early-time drive symmetry. Calculations using this model exhibit the same sensitivity to variations in the relative input powers between the different cones of NIF beams as measured for the “Rev5” CH target [Haan et al., Phys Plasmas 18, 051001 (2011)] and reported by Dewald et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 235001 (2013)]. The same methodology applied to recently improved implosions

  17. Early-time radiation flux symmetry optimization and its effect on gas-filled hohlraum ignition targets on the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milovich, J. L.; Dewald, E. L.; Pak, A.; Michel, P.; Town, R. P. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Landen, O.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Achieving ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is tied to our ability to control and minimize deviations from sphericity of the capsule implosion. Low-mode asymmetries of the hot spot result from the combined effect of radiation drive asymmetries throughout the laser pulse and initial roughness on the capsule surface. In this paper, we report on simulations and experiments designed to assess, measure, and correct the drive asymmetries produced by the early-time (≈first 2 ns or “picket”) period of the laser pulse. The drive asymmetry during the picket is commonly thought to introduce distortions in the hot-spot shape at ignition time. However, a more subtle effect not previously considered is that it also leads to an asymmetry in shock velocity and timing, thereby increasing the fuel adiabat and reducing the margin for ignition. It is shown via hydrodynamic simulations that minimizing this effect requires that the early-time asymmetry be kept below 7.5% in the second Legendre mode (P_2), thus keeping the loss of performance margin below ≈10% for a layered implosion. Asymmetries during the picket of the laser pulse are measured using the instantaneous self-emission of a high-Z re-emission sphere in place of an ignition capsule in a hohlraum with large azimuthal diagnostic windows. Three dimensional simulations using the code HYDRA (to capture the effect of non-azimuthal hohlraum features) coupled to a cross-beam energy transfer model [Michel et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056305 (2010)] are used to establish the surrogacy of the re-emit target and to assess the early-time drive symmetry. Calculations using this model exhibit the same sensitivity to variations in the relative input powers between the different cones of NIF beams as measured for the “Rev5” CH target [Haan et al., Phys Plasmas 18, 051001 (2011)] and reported by Dewald et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 235001 (2013)]. The same methodology applied to recently improved implosions using

  18. Early-time radiation flux symmetry optimization and its effect on gas-filled hohlraum ignition targets on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovich, J. L.; Dewald, E. L.; Pak, A.; Michel, P.; Town, R. P. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Landen, O.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Achieving ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is tied to our ability to control and minimize deviations from sphericity of the capsule implosion. Low-mode asymmetries of the hot spot result from the combined effect of radiation drive asymmetries throughout the laser pulse and initial roughness on the capsule surface. In this paper, we report on simulations and experiments designed to assess, measure, and correct the drive asymmetries produced by the early-time (≈first 2 ns or "picket") period of the laser pulse. The drive asymmetry during the picket is commonly thought to introduce distortions in the hot-spot shape at ignition time. However, a more subtle effect not previously considered is that it also leads to an asymmetry in shock velocity and timing, thereby increasing the fuel adiabat and reducing the margin for ignition. It is shown via hydrodynamic simulations that minimizing this effect requires that the early-time asymmetry be kept below 7.5% in the second Legendre mode (P2), thus keeping the loss of performance margin below ≈10% for a layered implosion. Asymmetries during the picket of the laser pulse are measured using the instantaneous self-emission of a high-Z re-emission sphere in place of an ignition capsule in a hohlraum with large azimuthal diagnostic windows. Three dimensional simulations using the code HYDRA (to capture the effect of non-azimuthal hohlraum features) coupled to a cross-beam energy transfer model [Michel et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056305 (2010)] are used to establish the surrogacy of the re-emit target and to assess the early-time drive symmetry. Calculations using this model exhibit the same sensitivity to variations in the relative input powers between the different cones of NIF beams as measured for the "Rev5" CH target [Haan et al., Phys Plasmas 18, 051001 (2011)] and reported by Dewald et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 235001 (2013)]. The same methodology applied to recently improved implosions using different

  19. Millimeter-wave Instrumentation Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Millimeter-wave Instrumentation Test Facility conducts basic research in propagation phenomena, remote sensing, and target signatures. The facility has a breadth...

  20. THERMAL NEUTRON FLUX MAPPING ON A TARGET CAPSULE AT RABBIT FACILITY OF RSG-GAS REACTOR FOR USE IN k0-INAA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutisna Sutisna

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Instrumental neutron activation analysis based on the k0 method (k0-INAA requires the availability of the accurate reactor parameter data, in particular a thermal neutron flux that interact with a targets inside the target capsule. This research aims to determine and map the thermal neutron flux inside the capsule and irradiation channels used for the elemental quantification using the k0-AANI. Mapping of the thermal neutron flux (фth on two type of irradiation capsule have been done for RS01 and RS02 facilities of RSG-GAS reactor. Thermal neutron flux determined using Al-0,1%Au alloy through 197Au(n,g 198Au nuclear reaction, while the flux mapping done using statistics R. Thermal neutron flux are calculated using k0-IAEA software provided by IAEA. The results showed the average thermal neutron flux is (5.6±0.3×10+13 n.cm-2.s-1; (5.6±0.4×10+13 n.cm-2.s-1; (5.2±0.4×10+13 n.cm-2.s-1 and (5.3±0.4×10+13 n.cm-2.s-1 for Polyethylene capsule of 1st , 2nd, 3rd and 4th layer respectively. In the case of Aluminum capsule, the thermal neutron flux was lower compared to that on Polyethylene capsule. There were (3.0±0.2×10+13 n.cm-2.s-1; (2.8±0.1×10+13 n.cm-2.s-1; (3.2±0.3×10+13 n.cm-2.s-1 for 1st, 2nd and 3rd layers respectively. For each layer in the capsule, the thermal neutron flux is not uniform and it was no degradation flux in the axial direction, both for polyethylene and aluminum capsules. Contour map of eight layer on polyethylene capsule and six layers on aluminum capsule for RS01 and RS02 irradiation channels had a similar pattern with a small diversity for all type of the irradiation capsule. Keywords: thermal neutron, flux, capsule, NAA   Analisis aktivasi neutron instrumental berbasis metode k0 (k0-AANI memerlukan ketersediaan data parameter reaktor yang akurat, khususnya data fluks neutron termal yang berinteraksi dengan inti sasaran di dalam kapsul target. Penelitian ini bertujuan menentukan dan memetakan fluks neutron termal

  1. A method for measuring the corrosion rate of materials in spallation neutron source target/blanket cooling loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lillard, R.S.; Butt, D.P.

    1999-01-01

    This paper summarizes the ongoing evaluation of the susceptibility of materials in accelerator target/blanket cooling loops to corrosion. To simulate the exposure environment in a target/blanket cooling loop, samples were irradiated by an 800 MeV proton beam at the A6 Target Station of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). To accomplish this, a cooling water loop capable of exposing corrosion samples to an 800 MeV proton beam at currents upwards of 1 mA was constructed. This loop allowed control and evaluation hydrogen water chemistry, water conductivity, and solution pH. Specially designed ceramic sealed samples were used to measure the real-time corrosion rates of materials placed directly in the proton beam using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). EIS was also used to measure real-time corrosion rates of samples that were out of the proton beam and downstream from the in-beam samples. These out-of-beam probes primarily examined the effects of long lived water radiolysis products from proton irradiation on corrosion rates. An overview of the LANSCE corrosion loop, the corrosion probes, and data from an in-beam alloy 718 probe are presented

  2. The impact of targeted subsidies for facility-based delivery on access to care and equity - evidence from a population-based study in rural Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Allegri, Manuela; Ridde, Valéry; Louis, Valérie R; Sarker, Malabika; Tiendrebéogo, Justin; Yé, Maurice; Müller, Olaf; Jahn, Albrecht

    2012-11-01

    We conducted the first population-based impact assessment of a financing policy introduced in Burkina Faso in 2007 on women's access to delivery services. The policy offers an 80 per cent subsidy for facility-based delivery. We collected information on delivery in five repeated cross-sectional surveys carried out from 2006 to 2010 on a representative sample of 1050 households in rural Nouna Health District. Over the 5 years, the proportion of facility-based deliveries increased from 49 to 84 per cent (Ptariff of 900 CFA. Our findings indicate the operational effectiveness of the policy in increasing the use of facility-based delivery services for women. The potential to reduce maternal mortality substantially has not yet been assessed by health outcome measures of neonatal and maternal mortality.

  3. Novel uses of a wide beam saddle field ion source for producing targets used in nuclear physics experiments at the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, J.P.; Thomas, G.E.

    1996-01-01

    The wide beam ion sputter source has several unique characteristics which make it very useful for producing, reducing the thickness or cleaning the surface of targets needed for nuclear physics experiments. A discussion of these techniques as well as the sputter source characteristics will be given. Sputter yields obtained utilizing the source are presented for a variety of materials common to nuclear target production

  4. Measurements and calculations of air activation in the NuMI neutrino production facility at Fermilab with the 120-GeV proton beam on target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakhno, I. L.; Hylen, J.; Kasper, P.; Mokhov, N. V.; Quinn, M.; Striganov, S. I.; Vaziri, K.

    2018-01-01

    Measurements and calculations of the air activation at a high-energy proton accelerator are described. The quantity of radionuclides released outdoors depends on operation scenarios including details of the air exchange inside the facility. To improve the prediction of the air activation levels, the MARS15 Monte Carlo code radionuclide production model was modified to be used for these studies. Measurements were done to benchmark the new model and verify its use in optimization studies for the new DUNE experiment at the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) at Fermilab. The measured production rates for the most important radionuclides – 11C, 13N, 15O and 41Ar – are in a good agreement with those calculated with the improved MARS15 code.

  5. Measurements and calculations of air activation in the NuMI neutrino production facility at Fermilab with the 120-GeV proton beam on target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhno, I. L.; Hylen, J.; Kasper, P.; Mokhov, N. V.; Quinn, M.; Striganov, S. I.; Vaziri, K.

    2018-01-01

    Measurements and calculations of the air activation at a high-energy proton accelerator are described. The quantity of radionuclides released outdoors depends on operation scenarios including details of the air exchange inside the facility. To improve the prediction of the air activation levels, the MARS15 Monte Carlo code radionuclide production model was modified to be used for these studies. Measurements were done to benchmark the new model and verify its use in optimization studies for the new DUNE experiment at the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) at Fermilab. The measured production rates for the most important radionuclides - 11C, 13N, 15O and 41Ar - are in a good agreement with those calculated with the improved MARS15 code.

  6. National Ignition Facility system design requirements conventional facilities SDR001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hands, J.

    1996-01-01

    This System Design Requirements (SDR) document specifies the functions to be performed and the minimum design requirements for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) site infrastructure and conventional facilities. These consist of the physical site and buildings necessary to house the laser, target chamber, target preparation areas, optics support and ancillary functions

  7. Facilities & Leadership

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The facilities web service provides VA facility information. The VA facilities locator is a feature that is available across the enterprise, on any webpage, for the...

  8. Biochemistry Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Biochemistry Facility provides expert services and consultation in biochemical enzyme assays and protein purification. The facility currently features 1) Liquid...

  9. Design of a target and moderator at the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) as a neutron source for fusion reactor materials development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, P.D.; Mueller, G.E.

    1993-01-01

    The LASREF facility is located in the beam stop area at LAMPF. The neutron spectrum is fission-like with the addition of a 3% to 5% component with E > 20 MeV. The present study evaluates the limits on geometry and material selection that will maximize the neutron flux. MCNP and LAHET were used to predict the neutron flux and energy spectrum for a variety of geometries. The problem considers 760 MeV protons incident on tungsten. The resulting neutrons are multiplied in uranium through (n,xn) reactions. Calculations show that a neutron flux greater than 10 19 n/m 2 /s is achievable. The helium to dpa ratio and the transmutation product generation are calculated. These results are compared to expectations for the proposed DEMO fusion reactor and to FFTF

  10. Dance Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Dudley, Ed.; Irey, Charlotte, Ed.

    This booklet represents an effort to assist teachers and administrators in the professional planning of dance facilities and equipment. Three chapters present the history of dance facilities, provide recommended dance facilities and equipment, and offer some adaptations of dance facilities and equipment, for elementary, secondary and college level…

  11. Operational status and future plans for the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Kevin W.; Schoenberg, Kurt F.

    2008-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) continues to be a signature experimental science facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The 800 MeV linear proton accelerator provides multiplexed beams to five unique target stations to produce medical radioisotopes, ultra-cold neutrons, thermal and high energy neutrons for material and nuclear science, and to conduct proton radiography of dynamic events. Recent operating experience will be reviewed and the role of an enhanced LANSCE facility in LANL's new signature facility initiative, Matter and Radiation in Extremes (MaRIE) will be discussed.

  12. Performance of Shiva as a laser fusion irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speck, D.R.; Bliss, E.S.; Glaze, J.A.; Johnson, B.C.; Manes, K.R.; Ozarski, R.G.; Rupert, P.R.; Simmons, W.W.; Swift, C.D.; Thompson, C.E.

    1979-01-01

    Shiva is a 20 beam Nd:Glass Laser and Target Irradiation Facility at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The laser system and integrated target facility evolved during the last year from a large, untested, experimental laser system to a target irradiation facility which has provided significant laser driven inertial confinement fusion data. The operation of the facility is discussed

  13. Estimates of internal dose equivalent to 22 target organs for radionuclides occurring in routine releases from nuclear fuel-cycle facilities. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killough, G.G.; Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Bernard, S.R.; Pleasant, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    This report is the first of a two-volume tabulation of internal radiation dose conversion factors for man for radionuclides of interest in environmental assessments of light-water-reactor fuel cycles. This volume treats 68 radionuclides, all of mass number less than 150. Intake by inhalation and ingestion is considered. In the former case, the ICRP Task Group Lung Model has been used to simulate the behavior of particulate matter in the respiratory tract. Results corresponding to activity median aerodynamic diameters (AMAD) of 0.3, 1.0, and 5.0 μm are given. The GI tract has been represented by a four-segment catenary model with exponential transfer of radioactivity from one segment to the next. Retention of radionuclides in other organs was characterized by linear combinations of decaying exponential functions. Dose equivalent per microcurie intake of each parent nuclide is given for 22 target organs with contributions from specified source organs plus surplus activity in the rest of the body. Cross irradiation due to penetrating radiations has also been considered in the calculations

  14. A step by step selection method for the location and the size of a waste-to-energy facility targeting the maximum output energy and minimization of gate fee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriakis, Efstathios; Psomopoulos, Constantinos; Kokkotis, Panagiotis; Bourtsalas, Athanasios; Themelis, Nikolaos

    2017-06-23

    This study attempts the development of an algorithm in order to present a step by step selection method for the location and the size of a waste-to-energy facility targeting the maximum output energy, also considering the basic obstacle which is in many cases, the gate fee. Various parameters identified and evaluated in order to formulate the proposed decision making method in the form of an algorithm. The principle simulation input is the amount of municipal solid wastes (MSW) available for incineration and along with its net calorific value are the most important factors for the feasibility of the plant. Moreover, the research is focused both on the parameters that could increase the energy production and those that affect the R1 energy efficiency factor. Estimation of the final gate fee is achieved through the economic analysis of the entire project by investigating both expenses and revenues which are expected according to the selected site and outputs of the facility. In this point, a number of commonly revenue methods were included in the algorithm. The developed algorithm has been validated using three case studies in Greece-Athens, Thessaloniki, and Central Greece, where the cities of Larisa and Volos have been selected for the application of the proposed decision making tool. These case studies were selected based on a previous publication made by two of the authors, in which these areas where examined. Results reveal that the development of a «solid» methodological approach in selecting the site and the size of waste-to-energy (WtE) facility can be feasible. However, the maximization of the energy efficiency factor R1 requires high utilization factors while the minimization of the final gate fee requires high R1 and high metals recovery from the bottom ash as well as economic exploitation of recovered raw materials if any.

  15. Waste Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset was developed from the Vermont DEC's list of certified solid waste facilities. It includes facility name, contact information, and the materials...

  16. Health Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, ... psychiatric care centers. When you choose a health facility, you might want to consider How close it ...

  17. Fabrication Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Fabrication Facilities are a direct result of years of testing support. Through years of experience, the three fabrication facilities (Fort Hood, Fort Lewis, and...

  18. The Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstone, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    High in the northcentral mountains of Los Alamos, New Mexico, is the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE), a pulsed-spallation neutron source located at Los Alamos National Laboratory. At LANSCE, neutrons are produced by spallation when a pulsed 800-MeV proton beam impinges on a tungsten target. The proton pulses are provided by a linear accelerator and an associated Proton Storage Ring (PSR), which alters the intensity, time structure, and repetition rate of the pulses. In October 1986, LANSCE was designated a national user facility, with a formal user program initiated in 1988. In July 1989, the LANSCE facility was dedicated as the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center in honor of the long-term Congressman from New Mexico. At present, the PSR operates with a proton pulse width of 0.27 μs at 20 Hz and 80 μA, attaining the highest peak neutron flux in the world and close to its goal of 100 μA, which would yield a peak thermal neutron flux of 10 16 n/cm -2 s -1 . This paper discusses the target/moderator/reflector shield system, the LANSCE instruments, the facility improvement projects, and user programs

  19. Polarized targets and beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, W.

    1985-01-01

    First the experimental situation of the single-pion photoproduction and the photodisintegration of the deuteron is briefly discussed. Then a description of the Bonn polarization facilities is given. The point of main effort is put on the polarized target which plays a vital role in the program. A facility for photon induced double polarization experiments at ELSA will be presented in section 4. Properties of a tensor polarized deuteron target are discussed in section 5. The development in the field of polarized targets, especially on new target materials, enables a new generation of polarized target experiments with (polarized) electrons. Some comments on the use of a polarized target in combination with electron beams will be discussed in section 6. Electron deuteron scattering from a tensor polarized deuteron target is considered and compared with other experimental possibilities. (orig./HSI)

  20. Improving medication information transfer between hospitals, skilled-nursing facilities, and long-term-care pharmacies for hospital discharge transitions of care: A targeted needs assessment using the Intervention Mapping framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerstenetzky, Luiza; Birschbach, Matthew J; Beach, Katherine F; Hager, David R; Kennelty, Korey A

    2018-02-01

    Patients transitioning from the hospital to a skilled nursing home (SNF) are susceptible to medication-related errors resulting from fragmented communication between facilities. Through continuous process improvement efforts at the hospital, a targeted needs assessment was performed to understand the extent of medication-related issues when patients transition from the hospital into a SNF, and the gaps between the hospital's discharge process, and the needs of the SNF and long-term care (LTC) pharmacy. We report on the development of a logic model that will be used to explore methods for minimizing patient care medication delays and errors while further improving handoff communication to SNF and LTC pharmacy staff. Applying the Intervention Mapping (IM) framework, a targeted needs assessment was performed using quantitative and qualitative methods. Using the hospital discharge medication list as reference, medication discrepancies in the SNF and LTC pharmacy lists were identified. SNF and LTC pharmacy staffs were also interviewed regarding the continuity of medication information post-discharge from the hospital. At least one medication discrepancy was discovered in 77.6% (n = 45/58) of SNF and 76.0% (n = 19/25) of LTC pharmacy medication lists. A total of 191 medication discrepancies were identified across all SNF and LTC pharmacy records. Of the 69 SNF staff interviewed, 20.3% (n = 14) reported patient care delays due to omitted documents during the hospital-to-SNF transition. During interviews, communication between the SNF/LTC pharmacy and the discharging hospital was described by facility staff as unidirectional with little opportunity for feedback on patient care concerns. The targeted needs assessment guided by the IM framework has lent to several planned process improvements initiatives to help reduce medication discrepancies during the hospital-to-SNF transition as well as improve communication between healthcare entities. Opening lines of

  1. Simulation study of 3–5 keV x-ray conversion efficiency from Ar K-shell vs. Ag L-shell targets on the National Ignition Facility laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemp, G. E., E-mail: kemp10@llnl.gov; Colvin, J. D.; Fournier, K. B.; May, M. J.; Barrios, M. A.; Patel, M. V.; Scott, H. A.; Marinak, M. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550-9698 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Tailored, high-flux, multi-keV x-ray sources are desirable for studying x-ray interactions with matter for various civilian, space and military applications. For this study, we focus on designing an efficient laser-driven non-local thermodynamic equilibrium 3–5 keV x-ray source from photon-energy-matched Ar K-shell and Ag L-shell targets at sub-critical densities (∼n{sub c}/10) to ensure supersonic, volumetric laser heating with minimal losses to kinetic energy, thermal x rays and laser-plasma instabilities. Using HYDRA, a multi-dimensional, arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian, radiation-hydrodynamics code, we performed a parameter study by varying initial target density and laser parameters for each material using conditions readily achievable on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser. We employ a model, benchmarked against Kr data collected on the NIF, that uses flux-limited Lee-More thermal conductivity and multi-group implicit Monte-Carlo photonics with non-local thermodynamic equilibrium, detailed super-configuration accounting opacities from CRETIN, an atomic-kinetics code. While the highest power laser configurations produced the largest x-ray yields, we report that the peak simulated laser to 3–5 keV x-ray conversion efficiencies of 17.7% and 36.4% for Ar and Ag, respectively, occurred at lower powers between ∼100–150 TW. For identical initial target densities and laser illumination, the Ag L-shell is observed to have ≳10× higher emissivity per ion per deposited laser energy than the Ar K-shell. Although such low-density Ag targets have not yet been demonstrated, simulations of targets fabricated using atomic layer deposition of Ag on silica aerogels (∼20% by atomic fraction) suggest similar performance to atomically pure metal foams and that either fabrication technique may be worth pursuing for an efficient 3–5 keV x-ray source on NIF.

  2. Animal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, T.E.; Angerman, J.M.; Keenan, W.G.; Linsley, J.G.; Poole, C.M.; Sallese, A.; Simkins, R.C.; Tolle, D.

    1981-01-01

    The animal facilities in the Division are described. They consist of kennels, animal rooms, service areas, and technical areas (examining rooms, operating rooms, pathology labs, x-ray rooms, and 60 Co exposure facilities). The computer support facility is also described. The advent of the Conversational Monitor System at Argonne has launched a new effort to set up conversational computing and graphics software for users. The existing LS-11 data acquisition systems have been further enhanced and expanded. The divisional radiation facilities include a number of gamma, neutron, and x-ray radiation sources with accompanying areas for related equipment. There are five 60 Co irradiation facilities; a research reactor, Janus, is a source for fission-spectrum neutrons; two other neutron sources in the Chicago area are also available to the staff for cell biology studies. The electron microscope facilities are also described

  3. Target support for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, K.R.

    1995-08-01

    General Atomics (GA) plays an important industrial support role for the US Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program in the area of target technology. This includes three major activities: target fabrication support, target handling systems development, and target chamber design. The work includes target fabrication for existing ICF experiments, target and target system development for future experiments, and target research and target chamber design for experiments on future machines, such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

  4. Time-of-flight small-angle-neutron-scattering data reduction and analysis at LANSCE (Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center) with program SMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjelm, R.P. Jr.; Seegar, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    A user-friendly, integrated system, SMR, for the display, reduction and analysis of data from time-of-flight small-angle neutron diffractometers is described. Its purpose is to provide facilities for data display and assessment and to provide these facilities in near real time. This allows the results of each scattering measurement to be available almost immediately, and enables the experimenter to use the results of a measurement as a basis for other measurements in the same instrument allocation. 8 refs., 11 figs

  5. Facilities Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullis, Robert V.

    1992-01-01

    A procedure for physical facilities management written 17 years ago is still worth following today. Each of the steps outlined for planning, organizing, directing, controlling, and evaluating must be accomplished if school facilities are to be properly planned and constructed. However, lessons have been learned about energy consumption and proper…

  6. Courtland Target Assembly Facility Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    Draft Environmental Assessment 2-17 tributyl phosphate (TBP)6, diatomaceous earth, talcum powder, cornmeal , water, steel, and plastic. 2.2.2... cornmeal , water, steel, and plastic that would not qualify as hazardous materials. TBP is non-explosive, non-flammable, and stable under normal

  7. Nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2000-01-01

    Here is given the decree (2000-1065) of the 25. of October 2000 reporting the publication of the convention between the Government of the French Republic and the CERN concerning the safety of the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) and the SPS (Proton Supersynchrotron) facilities, signed in Geneva on July 11, 2000. By this convention, the CERN undertakes to ensure the safety of the LHC and SPS facilities and those of the operations of the LEP decommissioning. The French legislation and regulations on basic nuclear facilities (concerning more particularly the protection against ionizing radiations, the protection of the environment and the safety of facilities) and those which could be decided later on apply to the LHC, SPS and auxiliary facilities. (O.M.)

  8. Monitoring production target thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oothoudt, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    Pion and muon production targets at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility consist of rotating graphite wheels. The previous target thickness monitoring Procedure scanned the target across a reduced intensity beam to determine beam center. The fractional loss in current across the centered target gave a measure of target thickness. This procedure, however, required interruption of beam delivery to experiments and frequently indicated a different fractional loss than at normal beam currents. The new monitoring Procedure compares integrated ups and downs toroid current monitor readings. The current monitors are read once per minute and the integral of readings are logged once per eight-hour shift. Changes in the upstream to downstream fractional difference provide a nonintrusive continuous measurement of target thickness under nominal operational conditions. Target scans are now done only when new targets are installed or when unexplained changes in the current monitor data are observed

  9. Mammography Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mammography Facility Database is updated periodically based on information received from the four FDA-approved accreditation bodies: the American College of...

  10. Canyon Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — B Plant, T Plant, U Plant, PUREX, and REDOX (see their links) are the five facilities at Hanford where the original objective was plutonium removal from the uranium...

  11. High heat flux facility GLADIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greuner, H.; Boeswirth, B.; Boscary, J.; McNeely, P.

    2007-01-01

    The new ion beam facility GLADIS started the operation at IPP Garching. The facility is equipped with two individual 1.1 MW power ion sources for testing actively cooled plasma facing components under high heat fluxes. Each ion source generates heat loads between 3 and 55 MW/m 2 with a beam diameter of 70 mm at the target position. These parameters allow effective testing from probes to large components up to 2 m length. The high heat flux allows the target to be installed inclined to the beam and thus increases the heated surface length up to 200 mm for a heat flux of 15 MW/m 2 in the standard operating regime. Thus the facility has the potential capability for testing of full scale ITER divertor targets. Heat load tests on the WENDELSTEIN 7-X pre-series divertor targets have been successfully started. These tests will validate the design and manufacturing for the production of 950 elements

  12. An intervention targeting fundamental values among caregivers at residential facilities: effects of a cluster-randomized controlled trial on residents' self-reported empowerment, person-centered climate and life satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Charlotte; Silén, Marit; Skytt, Bernice; Engström, Maria

    2016-07-07

    In Sweden the national fundamental values for care of older people state that care should ensure that they can live in dignity and with a sense of well-being. Our hypothesis was that a caregiver intervention targeting the national fundamental values would improve perceived empowerment, person-centered climate and life satisfaction among older people living in residential facilities. The study was a cluster-randomized controlled trial with a pre- and one post-test design, conducted in 27 units (17 study units) at 12 residential facilities for older people in five municipalities in central Sweden. The units in each municipality were randomly assigned to intervention or control group. The caregiver intervention was carried out using an interpretative approach with eight guided face-to-face seminars, where self-reflection and dialogue were used. Data were collected using questionnaires. The number of residents was 43 (78 %) in the intervention group and 37 (71 %) in the control group. The Chi-square test and Mann-Whitney U-tests were performed to detect differences between groups and Wilcoxon signed rank tests to explore differences in change over time within groups. Furthermore, generalized estimating equation (GEE) models were used to study effects of the intervention controlling for clustering effects. Primary outcome measures were empowerment, person-centered climate and life satisfaction. In the intervention group, improvements at follow-up were found in residents' self-reported empowerment (n = 42; p = 0.001, Median difference 4.0, 95 % CI 1.5;6.0), person-centered climate (n = 42; p ≤0.001, Median difference 8.0, 95 % CI 4.5;11.4) and life satisfaction regarding the factor quality of everyday activities (n = 40; p = 0.033, Median difference 9.7, 95 % CI 1.0;21.9) while disempowerment decreased (n = 43; p = 0.018, Median difference -1.3, 95 % CI -2.0;0.0). In the control group person-centered climate decreased (n = 37; p

  13. Implementation of an antimicrobial stewardship program targeting residents with urinary tract infections in three community long-term care facilities: a quasi-experimental study using time-series analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doernberg, Sarah B; Dudas, Victoria; Trivedi, Kavita K

    2015-01-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria in the elderly commonly results in antibiotic administration and, in turn, contributes to antimicrobial resistance, adverse drug events, and increased costs. This is a major problem in the long-term care facility (LTCF) setting, where residents frequently transition to and from the acute-care setting, often transporting drug-resistant organisms across the continuum of care. The goal of this study was to assess the feasibility and efficacy of antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) targeting urinary tract infections (UTIs) at community LTCFs. This was a quasi-experimental study targeting antibiotic prescriptions for UTI using time-series analysis with 6-month retrospective pre-intervention and 6-month intervention period at three community LTCFs. The ASP team (infectious diseases (ID) pharmacist and ID physician) performed weekly prospective audit and feedback of consecutive prescriptions for UTI. Loeb clinical consensus criteria were used to assess appropriateness of antibiotics; recommendations were communicated to the primary treating provider by the ID pharmacist. Resident outcomes were recorded at subsequent visits. Generalized estimating equations using segmented regression were used to evaluate the impact of the ASP intervention on rates of antibiotic prescribing and antibiotic resistance. One-hundred and four antibiotic prescriptions for UTI were evaluated during the intervention, and recommendations were made for change in therapy in 40 (38 %), out of which 10 (25 %) were implemented. Only eight (8 %) residents started on antibiotics for UTI met clinical criteria for antibiotic initiation. An immediate 26 % decrease in antibiotic prescriptions for UTI during the ASP was identified with a 6 % reduction continuing through the intervention period (95 % Confidence Interval ([CI)] for the difference: -8 to -3 %). Similarly, a 25 % immediate decrease in all antibiotic prescriptions was noted after introduction of the ASP with a

  14. The National Ignition Facility Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paisner, J.A.; Campbell, E.M.; Hogan, W.J.

    1994-01-01

    The mission of the National Ignition Facility is to achieve ignition and gain in inertial confinement fusion targets in the laboratory. The facility will be used for defense applications such as weapons physics and weapons effects testing, and for civilian applications such as fusion energy development and fundamental studies of matter at high temperatures and densities. This paper reviews the design, schedule, and costs associated with the construction project

  15. The National Ignition Facility Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paisner, J.A.; Campbell, E.M.; Hogan, W.J.

    1994-01-01

    The mission of the National Ignition Facility is to achieve ignition and gain in ICF targets in the laboratory. The facility will be used for defense applications such as weapons physics and weapons effect testing, and for civilian applications such as fusion energy development and fundamental studies of matter at high temperatures and densities. This paper reviews the design, schedule and costs associated with the construction project

  16. Viability of infrared FEL facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwettman, H.A.

    2004-01-01

    Infrared FELs have broken important ground in optical science in the past decade. The rapid development of optical parametric amplifiers and oscillators, and THz sources, however, has changed the competitive landscape and compelled FEL facilities to identify and exploit their unique advantages. The viability of infrared FEL facilities depends on targeting unique world-class science and providing adequate experimental beam time at competitive costs

  17. Progress on the SNS target station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carne, A.

    1983-01-01

    This review gives progress and modifications covering the last eighteen months, under the five broad areas of target, target assembly, control system, bulk shield and remote handling. Finally a discussion of additional facilities to the SNS is presented

  18. Relativistic heavy ion facilities: worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, L.S.

    1986-05-01

    A review of relativistic heavy ion facilities which exist, are in a construction phase, or are on the drawing boards as proposals is presented. These facilities span the energy range from fixed target machines in the 1 to 2 GeV/nucleon regime, up to heavy ion colliders of 100 GeV/nucleon on 100 GeV/nucleon. In addition to specifying the general features of such machines, an outline of the central physics themes to be carried out at these facilities is given, along with a sampling of the detectors which will be used to extract the physics. 22 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs

  19. EURISOL High Power Targets

    CERN Document Server

    Kadi, Y; Lindroos, M; Ridikas, D; Stora, T; Tecchio, L; CERN. Geneva. BE Department

    2009-01-01

    Modern Nuclear Physics requires access to higher yields of rare isotopes, that relies on further development of the In-flight and Isotope Separation On-Line (ISOL) production methods. The limits of the In-Flight method will be applied via the next generation facilities FAIR in Germany, RIKEN in Japan and RIBF in the USA. The ISOL method will be explored at facilities including ISAC-TRIUMF in Canada, SPIRAL-2 in France, SPES in Italy, ISOLDE at CERN and eventually at the very ambitious multi-MW EURISOL facility. ISOL and in-flight facilities are complementary entities. While in-flight facilities excel in the production of very short lived radioisotopes independently of their chemical nature, ISOL facilities provide high Radioisotope Beam (RIB) intensities and excellent beam quality for 70 elements. Both production schemes are opening vast and rich fields of nuclear physics research. In this article we will introduce the targets planned for the EURISOL facility and highlight some of the technical and safety cha...

  20. Support facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, F.S.; Blomquist, J.A.; Fox, C.A.

    1977-01-01

    Computer support is centered on the Remote Access Data Station (RADS), which is equipped with a 1000 lpm printer, 1000 cpm reader, and a 300 cps paper tape reader with 500-foot spools. The RADS is located in a data preparation room with four 029 key punches (two of which interpret), a storage vault for archival magnetic tapes, card files, and a 30 cps interactive terminal principally used for job inquiry and routing. An adjacent room provides work space for users, with a documentation library and a consultant's office, plus file storage for programs and their documentations. The facility has approximately 2,600 square feet of working laboratory space, and includes two fully equipped photographic darkrooms, sectioning and autoradiographic facilities, six microscope cubicles, and five transmission electron microscopes and one Cambridge scanning electron microscope equipped with an x-ray energy dispersive analytical system. Ancillary specimen preparative equipment includes vacuum evaporators, freeze-drying and freeze-etching equipment, ultramicrotomes, and assorted photographic and light microscopic equipment. The extensive physical plant of the animal facilities includes provisions for holding all species of laboratory animals under controlled conditions of temperature, humidity, and lighting. More than forty rooms are available for studies of the smaller species. These have a potential capacity of more than 75,000 mice, or smaller numbers of larger species and those requiring special housing arrangements. There are also six dog kennels to accommodate approximately 750 dogs housed in runs that consist of heated indoor compartments and outdoor exercise areas

  1. Ice targets for use at NTOF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercer, D.J.

    1992-12-01

    This report describes ice targets which were used during an experiment at the Neutron Time of Flight facility (NTOF) at LAMPF. Reasons for using the ice targets are given, and the construction, refrigeration system, and target preparation are detailed. Results of the research using these ice targets will be published at a later date

  2. Emission Facilities - Erosion & Sediment Control Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — An Erosion and Sediment Control Facility is a DEP primary facility type related to the Water Pollution Control program. The following sub-facility types related to...

  3. Active use of urban park facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Michael; Schipperijn, Jasper

    2015-01-01

    groups of the facilities. Facilities that provide the opportunity for games and playing activities are more used for PA than facilities directed at individual training of strength and fitness. The opportunity for socializing and playing while being physically active seems important for many users...... was mentioned as a key factor when designing facilities. Our results provide important knowledge to architects, planners and policy makers when aiming at designing activity-promoting facilities in UGS. Future studies need to further investigate the use of facilities among specific target groups, particularly......Abstract Urban green spaces (UGS), and more specific a higher number of facilities in UGS, have been positively associated with physical activity (PA). However, more detailed studies of which facilities generate high levels of PA, for which type of users, are relevant as existing knowledge...

  4. The National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, W.J.; Moses, E.; Warner, B.; Sorem, M.; Soures, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the largest construction project ever undertaken at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). NIF consists of 192 forty-centimeter-square laser beams and a 10-m-diameter target chamber. NIF is being designed and built by an LLNL-led team from Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, the University of Rochester, and LLNL. Physical construction began in 1997. The Laser and Target Area Building and the Optics Assembly Building were the first major construction activities, and despite several unforeseen obstacles, the buildings are now 92% complete and have been done on time and within cost. Prototype component development and testing has proceeded in parallel. Optics vendors have installed full-scale production lines and have done prototype production runs. The assembly and integration of the beampath infrastructure has been reconsidered and a new approach has been developed. This paper will discuss the status of the NIF project and the plans for completion. (author)

  5. CERN: Fixed target targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1993-03-15

    Full text: While the immediate priority of CERN's research programme is to exploit to the full the world's largest accelerator, the LEP electron-positron collider and its concomitant LEP200 energy upgrade (January, page 1), CERN is also mindful of its long tradition of diversified research. Away from LEP and preparations for the LHC proton-proton collider to be built above LEP in the same 27-kilometre tunnel, CERN is also preparing for a new generation of heavy ion experiments using a new source, providing heavier ions (April 1992, page 8), with first physics expected next year. CERN's smallest accelerator, the LEAR Low Energy Antiproton Ring continues to cover a wide range of research topics, and saw a record number of hours of operation in 1992. The new ISOLDE on-line isotope separator was inaugurated last year (July, page 5) and physics is already underway. The remaining effort concentrates around fixed target experiments at the SPS synchrotron, which formed the main thrust of CERN's research during the late 1970s. With the SPS and LEAR now approaching middle age, their research future was extensively studied last year. Broadly, a vigorous SPS programme looks assured until at least the end of 1995. Decisions for the longer term future of the West Experimental Area of the SPS will have to take into account the heavy demand for test beams from work towards experiments at big colliders, both at CERN and elsewhere. The North Experimental Area is the scene of larger experiments with longer lead times. Several more years of LEAR exploitation are already in the pipeline, but for the longer term, the ambitious Superlear project for a superconducting ring (January 1992, page 7) did not catch on. Neutrino physics has a long tradition at CERN, and this continues with the preparations for two major projects, the Chorus and Nomad experiments (November 1991, page 7), to start next year in the West Area. Delicate neutrino oscillation effects could become visible for the first

  6. Air Quality Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research FacilityFacilities with operating permits for Title V of the Federal Clean Air Act, as well as facilities required to submit an air emissions inventory, and other facilities...

  7. CERN: Fixed target targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Full text: While the immediate priority of CERN's research programme is to exploit to the full the world's largest accelerator, the LEP electron-positron collider and its concomitant LEP200 energy upgrade (January, page 1), CERN is also mindful of its long tradition of diversified research. Away from LEP and preparations for the LHC proton-proton collider to be built above LEP in the same 27-kilometre tunnel, CERN is also preparing for a new generation of heavy ion experiments using a new source, providing heavier ions (April 1992, page 8), with first physics expected next year. CERN's smallest accelerator, the LEAR Low Energy Antiproton Ring continues to cover a wide range of research topics, and saw a record number of hours of operation in 1992. The new ISOLDE on-line isotope separator was inaugurated last year (July, page 5) and physics is already underway. The remaining effort concentrates around fixed target experiments at the SPS synchrotron, which formed the main thrust of CERN's research during the late 1970s. With the SPS and LEAR now approaching middle age, their research future was extensively studied last year. Broadly, a vigorous SPS programme looks assured until at least the end of 1995. Decisions for the longer term future of the West Experimental Area of the SPS will have to take into account the heavy demand for test beams from work towards experiments at big colliders, both at CERN and elsewhere. The North Experimental Area is the scene of larger experiments with longer lead times. Several more years of LEAR exploitation are already in the pipeline, but for the longer term, the ambitious Superlear project for a superconducting ring (January 1992, page 7) did not catch on. Neutrino physics has a long tradition at CERN, and this continues with the preparations for two major projects, the Chorus and Nomad experiments (November 1991, page 7), to start next year in the West Area. Delicate neutrino oscillation effects could become

  8. ORION laser target diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentley, C. D.; Edwards, R. D.; Andrew, J. E.; James, S. F.; Gardner, M. D.; Comley, A. J.; Vaughan, K.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M. S.; Rothman, S. D.; Daykin, S.; Masoero, S. J.; Palmer, J. B.; Meadowcroft, A. L.; Williams, B. M.; Gumbrell, E. T.; Fyrth, J. D.; Brown, C. R. D.; Hill, M. P.; Oades, K.

    2012-01-01

    The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics.

  9. ORION laser target diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, C D; Edwards, R D; Andrew, J E; James, S F; Gardner, M D; Comley, A J; Vaughan, K; Horsfield, C J; Rubery, M S; Rothman, S D; Daykin, S; Masoero, S J; Palmer, J B; Meadowcroft, A L; Williams, B M; Gumbrell, E T; Fyrth, J D; Brown, C R D; Hill, M P; Oades, K; Wright, M J; Hood, B A; Kemshall, P

    2012-10-01

    The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics.

  10. Springfield Processing Plant (SPP) Facility Information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leach, Janice; Torres, Teresa M.

    2012-10-01

    The Springfield Processing Plant is a hypothetical facility. It has been constructed for use in training workshops. Information is provided about the facility and its surroundings, particularly security-related aspects such as target identification, threat data, entry control, and response force data.

  11. Ice targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco, C.; Stark, C.; Tanaka, N.; Hodgkins, D.; Barnhart, J.; Kosty, J.

    1979-12-01

    This report presents a description of ice targets that were constructed for research work at the High Resolution Spectrometer (HRS) and at the Energetic Pion Channel and Spectrometer (EPICS). Reasons for using these ice targets and the instructions for their construction are given. Results of research using ice targets will be published at a later date

  12. Reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hiroaki; Murase, Michio; Yokomizo, Osamu.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a BWR type reactor facility capable of suppressing the amount of steams generated by the mutual effect of a failed reactor core and coolants upon occurrence of an imaginal accident, and not requiring spacial countermeasures for enhancing the pressure resistance of the container vessel. Namely, a means for supplying cooling water at a temperature not lower by 30degC than the saturated temperature corresponding to the inner pressure of the containing vessel upon occurrence of an accident is disposed to a lower dry well below the pressure vessel. As a result, upon occurrence of such an accident that the reactor core should be melted and flown downward of the pressure vessel, when cooling water at a temperature not lower than the saturated temperature, for example, cooling water at 100degC or higher is supplied to the lower dry well, abrupt generation of steams by the mutual effect of the failed reactor core and cooling water is scarcely caused compared with a case of supplying cooling water at a temperature lower than the saturation temperature by 30degC or more. Accordingly, the amount of steams to be generated can be suppressed, and special countermeasure is no more necessary for enhancing the pressure resistance of the container vessel is no more necessary. (I.S.)

  13. Nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2002-01-01

    During September and October 2001, 15 events were recorded on the first grade and 1 on the second grade of the INES scale. The second grade event is in fact a re-classification of an incident that occurred on the second april 2001 at Dampierre power plant. This event happened during core refueling, a shift in the operation sequence led to the wrong positioning of 113 assemblies. A preliminary study of this event shows that this wrong positioning could have led, in other circumstances, to the ignition of nuclear reactions. Even in that case, the analysis made by EDF shows that the consequences on the staff would have been limited. Nevertheless a further study has shown that the existing measuring instruments could not have detected the power increase announcing the beginning of the chain reaction. The investigation has shown that there were deficiencies in the control of the successive operations involved in refueling. EDF has proposed a series of corrective measures to be implemented in all nuclear power plants. The other 15 events are described in the article. During this period 121 inspections have been made in nuclear facilities. (A.C.)

  14. Implementation of an antimicrobial stewardship program targeting residents with urinary tract infections in three community long-term care facilities: a quasi-experimental study using time-series analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Doernberg, Sarah B.; Dudas, Victoria; Trivedi, Kavita K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Asymptomatic bacteriuria in the elderly commonly results in antibiotic administration and, in turn, contributes to antimicrobial resistance, adverse drug events, and increased costs. This is a major problem in the long-term care facility (LTCF) setting, where residents frequently transition to and from the acute-care setting, often transporting drug-resistant organisms across the continuum of care. The goal of this study was to assess the feasibility and efficacy of antimicrobial s...

  15. National Biomedical Tracer Facility: Project definition study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heaton, R.; Peterson, E.; Smith, P.

    1995-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is an ideal institution and New Mexico is an ideal location for siting the National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). The essence of the Los Alamos proposal is the development of two complementary irradiation facilities that combined with our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities and waste handling and disposal facilities provide a low cost alternative to other proposals that seek to satisfy the objectives of the NBTF. We propose the construction of a 30 MeV cyclotron facility at the site of the radiochemical facilities, and the construction of a 100 MeV target station at LAMPF to satisfy the requirements and objectives of the NBTF. We do not require any modifications to our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities or our waste treatment and disposal facilities to accomplish the objectives of the NBTF. The total capital cost for the facility defined by the project definition study is $15.2 M. This cost estimate includes $9.9 M for the cyclotron and associated facility, $2.0 M for the 100 MeV target station at LAMPF, and $3.3 M for design

  16. National Biomedical Tracer Facility: Project definition study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heaton, R.; Peterson, E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Smith, P. [Smith (P.A.) Concepts and Designs (United States)

    1995-05-31

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is an ideal institution and New Mexico is an ideal location for siting the National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). The essence of the Los Alamos proposal is the development of two complementary irradiation facilities that combined with our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities and waste handling and disposal facilities provide a low cost alternative to other proposals that seek to satisfy the objectives of the NBTF. We propose the construction of a 30 MeV cyclotron facility at the site of the radiochemical facilities, and the construction of a 100 MeV target station at LAMPF to satisfy the requirements and objectives of the NBTF. We do not require any modifications to our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities or our waste treatment and disposal facilities to accomplish the objectives of the NBTF. The total capital cost for the facility defined by the project definition study is $15.2 M. This cost estimate includes $9.9 M for the cyclotron and associated facility, $2.0 M for the 100 MeV target station at LAMPF, and $3.3 M for design.

  17. Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemp, E.L.; Trego, A.L.

    1979-01-01

    A Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility is being designed to be constructed at Hanford, Washington, The system is designed to produce about 10 15 n/cm-s in a volume of approx. 10 cc and 10 14 n/cm-s in a volume of 500 cc. The lithium and target systems are being developed and designed by HEDL while the 35-MeV, 100-mA cw accelerator is being designed by LASL. The accelerator components will be fabricated by US industry. The total estimated cost of the FMIT is $105 million. The facility is scheduled to begin operation in September 1984

  18. High pressure neutron powder diffraction at LANSCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Dreele, R.B.

    1994-01-01

    By making use of the recently developed ''Paris-Edinburgh'' high pressure cell, the author has successfully performed neutron powder experiments to 10GPa at ambient temperature. Results for the structural compression of the high Tc 1223-Hg superconductor to 9.2 GPa, the compression and possible hydrogen bond formation in brucite, Mg(OD) 2 , to 9.3 GPa, and the molecular reorientation in nitromethane to 5.5 GPa will be presented

  19. LANSCE: Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kippen, Karen Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    The principle goals of this project is to increase flux and improve resolution for neutron energies above 1 keV for nuclear physics experiments; and preserve current strong performance at thermal energies for material science.

  20. LANSCE: Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kippen, Karen Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-02

    The principle goals of this project is to increase flux and improve resolution for neutron energies above 1 keV for nuclear physics experiments; and preserve current strong performance at thermal energies for material science.

  1. Irradiation Facilities at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gkotse, Blerina; Carbonez, Pierre; Danzeca, Salvatore; Fabich, Adrian; Garcia, Alia, Ruben; Glaser, Maurice; Gorine, Georgi; Jaekel, Martin, Richard; Mateu,Suau, Isidre; Pezzullo, Giuseppe; Pozzi, Fabio; Ravotti, Federico; Silari, Marco; Tali, Maris

    2017-01-01

    CERN provides unique irradiation facilities for applications in many scientific fields. This paper summarizes the facilities currently operating for proton, gamma, mixed-field and electron irradiations, including their main usage, characteristics and information about their operation. The new CERN irradiation facilities database is also presented. This includes not only CERN facilities but also irradiation facilities available worldwide.

  2. Research Facilities | Wind | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Facilities Research Facilities NREL's state-of-the-art wind research facilities at the Research Facilities Photo of five men in hard hards observing the end of a turbine blade while it's being tested. Structural Research Facilities A photo of two people silhouetted against a computer simulation of

  3. JAERI/KEK target material program overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Kenji; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Sasa, Toshinobu

    2001-01-01

    Mercury target was designed for megawatt neutron scattering facility in JAERI/KEK spallation neutron source. The incident proton energy and current are 3 GeV and 333 μA, respectively: the total proton energy is 1 MW in short pulses at a frequency of 25 Hz. Under the guide rule the mercury target was designed: the maximum temperature of target window is 170degC and induced stresses for the type 316 stainless steel are within limits of design guide. In order to demonstrate ADS (Accelerator Driven Systems) transmutation critical and engineering facilities have been designed conceptually. In engineering facility lead-bismuth spallation target station is to be planned. Objective to build the facility is to demonstrate material irradiation. According to neutronics calculation irradiation damage of the target vessel window will be 5 dpa per year. (author)

  4. Automated laser fusion target production concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1977-01-01

    A target production concept is described for the production of multilayered cryogenic spherical inertial confinement fusion targets. The facility is to deliver targets to the reactor chamber at rates up to 10 per second and at costs consistent with economic production of power

  5. North Slope, Alaska ESI: FACILITY (Facility Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains data for oil field facilities for the North Slope of Alaska. Vector points in this data set represent oil field facility locations. This data...

  6. Study and conception of the decay ring of a neutrino facility using the β decays of the helium 6 and neon 18 nuclei produced by an intense beam of protons hitting various targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chance, A.

    2007-09-01

    The study of the neutrino oscillation between its different flavours needs pure and very intense flux of energetic, well collimated neutrinos with a well determined energy spectrum. So, a dedicated machine seems necessary nowadays. Among the different concepts of neutrino facilities, the one which will be studied here, called Beta-Beams, lies on the neutrino production by beta decay of radioactive ions after their acceleration. More precisely, the thesis is focused on the study and the design of the race-track-shaped storage ring of the high energy ions. Its aim is to store the ions until decaying. After a brief description of the neutrino oscillation mechanism and a review of the different experiments, an introduction to the neutrino facility concept and more precisely to the Beta-Beams will be given. Then, the issues linked to the Beta-Beams will be presented. After a description of the beam transport formalism, a first design and the optical properties of the ring will be then given. The effects of the misalignment and of the field errors in the dipoles have been studied. The dynamic aperture optimization is then realized. Handling of the decay losses or the energy collimation scheme will be developed. The off-momentum injection needed in presence of a circulating beam will be explained. Finally, the specific radiofrequency program needed by the beam merging will be presented. (author)

  7. Jupiter Laser Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Jupiter Laser Facility is an institutional user facility in the Physical and Life Sciences Directorate at LLNL. The facility is designed to provide a high degree...

  8. Basic Research Firing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Basic Research Firing Facility is an indoor ballistic test facility that has recently transitioned from a customer-based facility to a dedicated basic research...

  9. Confinement of ignition and yield on the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobin, M.; Karpenko, V.; Foley, D.; Anderson, A.; Burnham, A.; Reitz, T.; Latkowski, J.; Bernat, T.

    1996-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility Target Areas and Experimental Systems has reached mid-Title I design. Performance requirements for the Target Area are reviewed and design changes since the Conceptual Design Report are discussed. Development activities confirm a 5-m radius chamber and the viability of a boron carbide first wall. A scheme for cryogenic target integration with the NIF Target Area is presented

  10. Optimization of the testing volumes with respect to neutron flux levels in the two-target high flux D-Li neutron source for the international fusion materials irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelleher, W.P.; Varsamis, G.L.

    1989-01-01

    An economic and fusion-relevant source of high-energy neutrons is an essential element in the fusion nuclear technology and development program. This source can be generated by directing a high energy deuteron beam onto a flowing liquid lithium target, producing neutrons via the D-Lithium stripping reaction. Previous work on this type of source concentrated on a design employing one deuteron beam of modest amperage. This design was shown to have a relatively small testing volume with high flux gradients and was therefor considered somewhat unattractive from a materials testing standpoint. A design using two lithium targets and two high-amperage beams has recently been proposed. This two beam design has been examined in an effort to maximize the test volume while minimizing the flux gradients and minimizing the effect of radiation damage on one target due to the other. A spatial, energy and angle dependent neutron source modeling the D-Lithium source was developed. Using this source, a 3-dimensional map of uncollided flux within the test volume was calculated. The results showed that the target separation has little effect on the available experimental volume and that a testing volume of ∼35 liters is available with a volume averaged flux above 10 14 n/cm 2 /s. The collided flux within the test volume was then determined by coupling the source model with a Monte Carlo code. The spectral effects of the high-energy tail in the flux were examined and evaluated as to possible effects on materials response. Calculations comparing the radiation damage to materials from the D-Lithium source to that cause by a standard DT fusion first-wall neutron flux spectrum showed that the number of appm and dpa, as well as the ratio appm/dpa and dpa/MW/m 2 are within 30% for the two sources. 8 refs., 8 figs

  11. Aperture area measurement facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NIST has established an absolute aperture area measurement facility for circular and near-circular apertures use in radiometric instruments. The facility consists of...

  12. High Throughput Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Argonne?s high throughput facility provides highly automated and parallel approaches to material and materials chemistry development. The facility allows scientists...

  13. Licensed Healthcare Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The Licensed Healthcare Facilities point layer represents the locations of all healthcare facilities licensed by the State of California, Department of Health...

  14. Facility Registry Service (FRS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Facility Registry Service (FRS) provides an integrated source of comprehensive (air, water, and waste) environmental information about facilities across EPA,...

  15. Using the Nova target chamber for high-yield targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitts, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    The existing 2.2-m-radius Nova aluminum target chamber, coated and lined with boron-seeded carbon shields, is proposed for use with 1000-MJ-yield targets in the next laser facility. The laser beam and diagnostic holes in the target chamber are left open and the desired 10 -2 Torr vacuum is maintained both inside and outside the target chamber; a larger target chamber room is the vacuum barrier to the atmosphere. The hole area available is three times that necessary to maintain a maximum fluence below 12 J/cm 2 on optics placed at a radius of 10 m. Maximum stress in the target chamber wall is 73 MPa, which complies with the intent of the ASME Pressure Vessel Code. However, shock waves passing through the inner carbon shield could cause it to comminute. We propose tests and analyses to ensure that the inner carbon shield survives the environment. 13 refs

  16. Antiproton Target

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Antiproton target used for the AA (antiproton accumulator). The first type of antiproton production target used from 1980 to 1982 comprised a rod of copper 3mm diameter and 120mm long embedded in a graphite cylinder that was itself pressed into a finned aluminium container. This assembly was air-cooled and it was used in conjunction with the Van der Meer magnetic horn. In 1983 Fermilab provided us with lithium lenses to replace the horn with a view to increasing the antiproton yield by about 30%. These lenses needed a much shorter target made of heavy metal - iridium was chosen for this purpose. The 50 mm iridium rod was housed in an extension to the original finned target container so that it could be brought very close to the entrance to the lithium lens. Picture 1 shows this target assembly and Picture 2 shows it mounted together with the lithium lens. These target containers had a short lifetime due to a combination of beam heating and radiation damage. This led to the design of the water-cooled target in...

  17. Dynamic Pressure of Liquid Mercury Target During 800-MeV Proton Thermal Shock Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, S.W.; Andriulli, J.B.; Cates, M.R.; Earl, D.D.; Haines, J.R.; Morrissey, F.X.; Tsai, C.C.; Wender, S.

    2000-01-01

    Described here are efforts to diagnose transient pressures generated by a short-pulse (about 0.5 microseconds) high intensity proton (∼ 2 * 10 14 per pulse) beam. Proton energy is 800-MeV. The tests were performed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center - Weapons Neutron Research (LANSCE-WNR). Such capability is required for understanding target interaction for the Spallation Neutron Source project as described previously at this conference.1-4 The main approach to effect the pressure measurements utilized the deflection of a diaphragm in intimate contact with the mercury. There are a wide variety of diaphragm-deflection methods used in scientific and industrial applications. Many deflection-sensing approaches are typically used, including, for instance, capacitive and optical fiber techniques. It was found, however, that conventional pressure measurement using commercial pressure gages with electrical leads was not possible due to the intense nuclear radiation environment. Earlier work with a fiber optic strain gauge demonstrated the viability of using fiber optics for this environment

  18. Guide to research facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    This Guide provides information on facilities at US Department of Energy (DOE) and other government laboratories that focus on research and development of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. These laboratories have opened these facilities to outside users within the scientific community to encourage cooperation between the laboratories and the private sector. The Guide features two types of facilities: designated user facilities and other research facilities. Designated user facilities are one-of-a-kind DOE facilities that are staffed by personnel with unparalleled expertise and that contain sophisticated equipment. Other research facilities are facilities at DOE and other government laboratories that provide sophisticated equipment, testing areas, or processes that may not be available at private facilities. Each facility listing includes the name and phone number of someone you can call for more information.

  19. High-efficiency target-ion sources for RIB generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alton, G.D.

    1993-01-01

    A brief review is given of high-efficiency ion sources which have been developed or are under development at ISOL facilities which show particular promise for use at existing, future, or radioactive ion beam (RIB) facilities now under construction. Emphasis will be placed on those sources which have demonstrated high ionization efficiency, species versatility, and operational reliability and which have been carefully designed for safe handling in the high level radioactivity radiation fields incumbent at such facilities. Brief discussions will also be made of the fundamental processes which affect the realizable beam intensities in target-ion sources. Among the sources which will be reviewed will be selected examples of state-of-the-art electron-beam plasma-type ion sources, thermal-ionization, surface-ionization, ECR, and selectively chosen ion source concepts which show promise for radioactive ion beam generation. A few advanced, chemically selective target-ion sources will be described, such as sources based on the use of laser-resonance ionization, which, in principle, offer a more satisfactory solution to isobaric contamination problems than conventional electromagnetic techniques. Particular attention will be given to the sources which have been selected for initial or future use at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility now under construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  20. Omega: A 24-beam UV irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, M.C.; Beich, W.; Delettrez, J.

    1985-01-01

    The authors report on the characterization and performance of the 24-beam Omega laser facility under full third harmonic (351-nm) upconversion. This system provides for the first time a multibeam laser facility for the illumination of spherical targets with UV laser light in symmetric irradiation conditions with energies in the kilojoule range. This facility is capable of providing sufficient irradiation uniformity to test concepts of direct drive laser fusion with UV-driven ablation targets. The results of initial studies of ablatively driven DT-fueled glass microballoon targets will be described. The 24-beam Omega Nd:phosphate glass facility is capable of providing at 1054 nm output powers in excess of 10 TW in short ( 10 4 full system shots to date) irradiation facility with beam synchronism of approx. =3 psec, beam placement accuracy on target of 10 μm, and interbeam energy variance of approx. =2%. From measured target plane intensity distributions, overall illumination uniformity with tangentially focused beams is estimated to be approx. =5%. In 1984, a symmetric set of six beams was upconverted to 351-nm radiation using the polarization-mismatch scheme developed by Craxton. Monolithic cells of 20-cm clear aperture containing both frequency and doubler and tripler type II KDP crystals in index-matching propylene carbonate liquid were incorporated to output of six of the Omega beams with a full set of UV beam diagnostics

  1. Design of the FMIT lithium target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassberger, J.A.; Annese, C.E.; Greenwell, R.K.; Ingham, J.G.; Miles, R.R.; Miller, W.C.

    1981-01-01

    Development of the liquid lithium target for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility is described. The target concept, major design goals and design requirements are presented. Progress made in the research and development areas leading to detailed design of the target is discussed. This progress, including experimental and analytic results, demonstrates that the FMIT target design is capable of meeting its major design goals and requirements

  2. Current progress in NIF target concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gobby, P.L.; Foreman, L.R.; Thoma, D.J.; Jacobson, L.A.; Hollis, R.V.; Barrera, J.; Mitchell, M.A.; Salazar, M.A.; Salzer, L.J.

    1996-01-01

    Target concepts for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) require progress in the art and science of target fabrication. Three distinct issues are addressed: beryllium fuel capsules, foam-buffered direct drive, and high-density gas-filled hohlraums. In all cases experiments on the existing Nova laser at LLNL are either in progress or planned for the near future to test the various concepts. Consequently, target fabrication must be able to deliver targets appropriate for each

  3. Communication grounding facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gye Seong

    1998-06-01

    It is about communication grounding facility, which is made up twelve chapters. It includes general grounding with purpose, materials thermal insulating material, construction of grounding, super strength grounding method, grounding facility with grounding way and building of insulating, switched grounding with No. 1A and LCR, grounding facility of transmission line, wireless facility grounding, grounding facility in wireless base station, grounding of power facility, grounding low-tenton interior power wire, communication facility of railroad, install of arrester in apartment and house, install of arrester on introduction and earth conductivity and measurement with introduction and grounding resistance.

  4. Nike Facility Diagnostics and Data Acquisition System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yung; Aglitskiy, Yefim; Karasik, Max; Kehne, David; Obenschain, Steve; Oh, Jaechul; Serlin, Victor; Weaver, Jim

    2013-10-01

    The Nike laser-target facility is a 56-beam krypton fluoride system that can deliver 2 to 3 kJ of laser energy at 248 nm onto targets inside a two meter diameter vacuum chamber. Nike is used to study physics and technology issues related to laser direct-drive ICF fusion, including hydrodynamic and laser-plasma instabilities, material behavior at extreme pressures, and optical and x-ray diagnostics for laser-heated targets. A suite of laser and target diagnostics are fielded on the Nike facility, including high-speed, high-resolution x-ray and visible imaging cameras, spectrometers and photo-detectors. A centrally-controlled, distributed computerized data acquisition system provides robust data management and near real-time analysis feedback capability during target shots. Work supported by DOE/NNSA.

  5. AOV Facility Tool/Facility Safety Specifications -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Develop and maintain authorizing documents that are standards that facilities must follow. These standards are references of FAA regulations and are specific to the...

  6. The National Ignition Facility Project. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paisner, J.A.; Campbell, E.M.; Hogan, W.J.

    1994-01-01

    The mission of the National Ignition Facility is to achieve ignition and gain in inertial confinement fusion targets in the laboratory. The facility will be used for defense applications such as weapons physics and weapons effects testing, and for civilian applications such as fusion energy development and fundamental studies of matter at high temperatures and densities. This paper reviews the design, schedule, and costs associated with the construction project

  7. Targeted Learning

    CERN Document Server

    van der Laan, Mark J

    2011-01-01

    The statistics profession is at a unique point in history. The need for valid statistical tools is greater than ever; data sets are massive, often measuring hundreds of thousands of measurements for a single subject. The field is ready to move towards clear objective benchmarks under which tools can be evaluated. Targeted learning allows (1) the full generalization and utilization of cross-validation as an estimator selection tool so that the subjective choices made by humans are now made by the machine, and (2) targeting the fitting of the probability distribution of the data toward the targe

  8. Target preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinn, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    A few of the more interesting of the 210 targets prepared in the Laboratory last year are listed. In addition the author continues to use powdered silver mixed with /sup 9,10/BeO to produce sources for accelerator radio dating of Alaskan and South Polar snow. Currently, he is trying to increase production by multiple sample processing. Also the author routinely makes 3 μg/cm 2 cracked slacked carbon stripper foils and is continuing research with some degree of success in making enriched 28 Si targets starting with the oxide

  9. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) as a User Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Christopher; NIF Team

    2013-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) has made significant progress towards operation as a user facility. Through June 2013, NIF conducted over 1200 experiments in support of ICF, HED science, and development of facility capabilities. The NIF laser has met or achieved all specifications and a wide variety of diagnostic and target fabrication capabilities are in place. A NIF User Group and associated Executive Board have been formed. Two User Group meetings have been conducted since formation of the User Group. NIF experiments in fundamental science have provided important new results. NIF ramp compression experiments have been conducted using diamond and iron, with EOS results obtained at pressures up to approximately 50 Mbar and 8 Mbar, respectively. Initial experiments in supernova hydrodynamics, the fundamental physics of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, and equation of state in the Gbar pressure regime have also been conducted. This presentation will discuss the fundamental science program at NIF, including the proposal solicitation and scientific review processes and other aspects of user facility operation. This work was performed under the auspices of the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, (LLNS) under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. n_TOF facility past and future

    CERN Document Server

    Vlachoudis, V

    2010-01-01

    The neutron Time of Flight (n_TOF) facility at CERN is a source of high flux of neutrons obtained by the spallation process of 20 GeV/c protons onto a solid lead target and the remarkable beam intensity of the Proton Synchrotron (PS). From November 2008 the n_TOF facility resumed operation after a halt of 4 years due to radio-protection issues. It features a new lead spallation target with a more robust design, more efficient cooling, separate moderator circuit, target area ventilation and most important without any loss of the unique neutron performances of the previous target. Moreover the separate moderator circuit will permit in the future the use of borated or heavy water instead of normal water to reduce the 2.2 MeV gamma background for the neutron capture measurements. The facility has been commissioned in Nov 2008, with performances similar of the previous target and predicted by Monte Carlo simulations. The facility will resume operation for physics from May 2009 with 4 experimental proposals already...

  11. Lesotho - Health Facility Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — The main objective of the 2011 Health Facility Survey (HFS) was to establish a baseline for informing the Health Project performance indicators on health facilities,...

  12. Armament Technology Facility (ATF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Armament Technology Facility is a 52,000 square foot, secure and environmentally-safe, integrated small arms and cannon caliber design and evaluation facility....

  13. Projectile Demilitarization Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Projectile Wash Out Facility is US Army Ammunition Peculiar Equipment (APE 1300). It is a pilot scale wash out facility that uses high pressure water and steam...

  14. Rocketball Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This test facility offers the capability to emulate and measure guided missile radar cross-section without requiring flight tests of tactical missiles. This facility...

  15. Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Individual permits for municipal, industrial, and semi-public wastewater treatment facilities in Iowa for the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES)...

  16. Materiel Evaluation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — CRREL's Materiel Evaluation Facility (MEF) is a large cold-room facility that can be set up at temperatures ranging from −20°F to 120°F with a temperature change...

  17. Environmental Toxicology Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Fully-equipped facilities for environmental toxicology researchThe Environmental Toxicology Research Facility (ETRF) located in Vicksburg, MS provides over 8,200 ft...

  18. Dialysis Facility Compare

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Dialysis Facility Compare helps you find detailed information about Medicare-certified dialysis facilities. You can compare the services and the quality of care that...

  19. Energetics Conditioning Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energetics Conditioning Facility is used for long term and short term aging studies of energetic materials. The facility has 10 conditioning chambers of which 2...

  20. Explosive Components Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The 98,000 square foot Explosive Components Facility (ECF) is a state-of-the-art facility that provides a full-range of chemical, material, and performance analysis...

  1. Facilities for US Radioastronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaddeus, Patrick

    1982-01-01

    Discusses major developments in radioastronomy since 1945. Topics include proposed facilities, very-long-baseline interferometric array, millimeter-wave telescope, submillimeter-wave telescope, and funding for radioastronomy facilities and projects. (JN)

  2. Neighbourhood facilities for sustainability

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gibberd, Jeremy T

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available . In this paper these are referred to as ‘Neighbourhood Facilities for Sustainability’. Neighbourhood Facilities for Sustainability (NFS) are initiatives undertaken by individuals and communities to build local sustainable systems which not only improve...

  3. Cold Vacuum Drying Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located near the K-Basins (see K-Basins link) in Hanford's 100 Area is a facility called the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF).Between 2000 and 2004, workers at the...

  4. Ouellette Thermal Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Thermal Test Facility is a joint Army/Navy state-of-the-art facility (8,100 ft2) that was designed to:Evaluate and characterize the effect of flame and thermal...

  5. Integrated Disposal Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located near the center of the 586-square-mile Hanford Site is the Integrated Disposal Facility, also known as the IDF.This facility is a landfill similar in concept...

  6. Facility design: introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unger, W.E.

    1980-01-01

    The design of shielded chemical processing facilities for handling plutonium is discussed. The TRU facility is considered in particular; its features for minimizing the escape of process materials are listed. 20 figures

  7. New irradiation facilities at the Australian national medical cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parcell, S.K.; Arnott, D.W.; Conard, E.M.

    1999-01-01

    Two new irradiation facilities have been developed at the National Medical Cyclotron for radionuclide production. The first relocates PET irradiations from the cyclotron vault to a dedicated PET beam room, to improve accessibility and reduce radiation exposures associated with target maintenance. This new facility consists of a beam line to transport 16-30 MeV proton beams from the cyclotron to 1 of 8 PET targets mounted on a target rack. The target rack has increased the number of targets available for production and experimentation. The second is a completely independent solid target irradiation facility for SPECT. This facility consists of a beam line to transport 26-30 MeV proton beams from the cyclotron to a dedicated beam room containing one solid target station. A new pneumatic target transfer system was also developed to transport the solid target to and from the existing chemistry hot cells. The beam line and target components are operated under the control of a dedicated PLC with a PC based user interface. The development and some technical aspects of these new irradiation facilities are discussed here. (author)

  8. CLEAR test facility

    CERN Multimedia

    Ordan, Julien Marius

    2017-01-01

    A new user facility for accelerator R&D, the CERN Linear Electron Accelerator for Research (CLEAR), started operation in August 2017. CLEAR evolved from the former CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) used by the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). The new facility is able to host and test a broad range of ideas in the accelerator field.

  9. Major facility overhauls at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisham, D.L.; Lambert, J.E.; Sommer, W.F. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) is a linear proton accelerator designed to operate at 800 MeV and 1.0 mA. It has been operating at power levels above 200 microamperes since February of 1976 and now routinely operates near the design level. This paper outlines the problems encountered with the original target cell components, the repairs required since 1976, and specifically details the steps involved in the complete replacement of the vital target cell components. These components include target boxes, collimators, main beam line magnets, and the front-end magnets of the secondary beam lines. The A-2 target cell was replaced in the spring of 1983 and the A-1 target cell was replaced in the spring of 1984. Both have operated satisfactorily since their completion, with only minor difficulties. The overhaul and total component replacement in the beam stop area (A-6) was completed in early May 1985 and has just been placed in operation. The upgrade, in addition to the replacement of the beam stop and the vacuum-to-air window with state-of-the-art designs, provides a greatly increased capability of both proton and neutron irradiation of materials

  10. Facility or Facilities? That is the Question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viso, M.

    2018-04-01

    The management of the martian samples upon arrival on the Earth will require a lot of work to ensure a safe life detection and biohazard testing during the quarantine. This will induce a sharing of the load between several facilities.

  11. Implementing Target Value Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Thais da C L; Lichtig, Will; Rybkowski, Zofia K

    2017-04-01

    An alternative to the traditional way of designing projects is the process of target value design (TVD), which takes different departure points to start the design process. The TVD process starts with the client defining an allowable cost that needs to be met by the design and construction teams. An expected cost in the TVD process is defined through multiple interactions between multiple stakeholders who define wishes and others who define ways of achieving these wishes. Finally, a target cost is defined based on the expected profit the design and construction teams are expecting to make. TVD follows a series of continuous improvement efforts aimed at reaching the desired goals for the project and its associated target value cost. The process takes advantage of rapid cycles of suggestions, analyses, and implementation that starts with the definition of value for the client. In the traditional design process, the goal is to identify user preferences and find solutions that meet the needs of the client's expressed preferences. In the lean design process, the goal is to educate users about their values and advocate for a better facility over the long run; this way owners can help contractors and designers to identify better solutions. This article aims to inform the healthcare community about tools and techniques commonly used during the TVD process and how they can be used to educate and support project participants in developing better solutions to meet their needs now as well as in the future.

  12. Progress in ISOL target-ion source systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koester, U. [Institut Laue Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); ISOLDE, CERN, CH-1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland)], E-mail: koester@ill.fr; Arndt, O. [HGF VISTARS and Institut fuer Kernchemie, Johannes-Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Bouquerel, E.; Fedoseyev, V.N. [ISOLDE, CERN, CH-1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland); Franberg, H. [ISOLDE, CERN, CH-1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland); Laboratory for Radio- and Environmental Chemistry, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Joinet, A. [ISOLDE, CERN, CH-1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland); Centre d' Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements, 9 Av. du Colonel Roche, F-31028 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Jost, C. [HGF VISTARS and Institut fuer Kernchemie, Johannes-Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Kerkines, I.S.K. [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Department of Chemistry, Zografou 157 71, GR (Greece); Cherry L. Emerson Center for Scientific Computation and Department of Chemistry, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States); Kirchner, R. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    The heart of every ISOL (isotope separation on-line) facility is its target and ion source system. Its efficiency, selectivity and rapidity is decisive for the production of intense and pure ion beams of short-lived isotopes. Recent progress in ISOL target and ion source technology is discussed at the examples of radioactive ion beams of exotic zinc and tin isotopes that were purified by isothermal chromatography and molecular sideband separation respectively. An outlook is given to which other elements these purification methods are applicable.

  13. Progress in ISOL target-ion source systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koester, U.; Arndt, O.; Bouquerel, E.; Fedoseyev, V.N.; Franberg, H.; Joinet, A.; Jost, C.; Kerkines, I.S.K.; Kirchner, R.

    2008-01-01

    The heart of every ISOL (isotope separation on-line) facility is its target and ion source system. Its efficiency, selectivity and rapidity is decisive for the production of intense and pure ion beams of short-lived isotopes. Recent progress in ISOL target and ion source technology is discussed at the examples of radioactive ion beams of exotic zinc and tin isotopes that were purified by isothermal chromatography and molecular sideband separation respectively. An outlook is given to which other elements these purification methods are applicable.

  14. A radioactive ion beam facility using photofission

    CERN Document Server

    Diamond, W T

    1999-01-01

    Use of a high-power electron linac as the driver accelerator for a Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility is proposed. An electron beam of 30 MeV and 100 kW can produce nearly 5x10 sup 1 sup 3 fissions/s from an optimized sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U target and about 60% of this from a natural uranium target. An electron beam can be readily transmitted through a thin window at the exit of the accelerator vacuum system and transported a short distance through air to a water-cooled Bremsstrahlung-production target. The Bremsstrahlung radiation can, in turn, be transported through air to the isotope-production target. This separates the accelerator vacuum system, the Bremsstrahlung target and the isotope-production target, reducing remote handling problems. The electron beam can be scanned over a large target area to reduce the power density on both the Bremsstrahlung and isotope-production targets. These features address one of the most pressing technological challenges of a high-power RIB facility, namely the production o...

  15. Design of the LBNF Beamline Target Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tariq, S. [Fermilab; Ammigan, K. [Fermilab; Anderson, K.; ; Buccellato, S. A. [Fermilab; Crowley, C. F. [Fermilab; Hartsell, B. D. [Fermilab; Hurh, P. [Fermilab; Hylen, J. [Fermilab; Kasper, P. [Fermilab; Krafczyk, G. E. [Fermilab; Lee, A. [Fermilab; Lundberg, B. [Fermilab; Reitzner, S. D. [Fermilab; Sidorov, V. [Fermilab; Stefanik, A. M. [Fermilab; Tropin, I. S. [Fermilab; Vaziri, K. [Fermilab; Williams, K. [Fermilab; Zwaska, R. M. [Fermilab; Densham, C. [RAL, Didcot

    2016-10-01

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) project will build a beamline located at Fermilab to create and aim an intense neutrino beam of appropriate energy range toward the DUNE detectors at the SURF facility in Lead, South Dakota. Neutrino production starts in the Target Station, which consists of a solid target, magnetic focusing horns, and the associated sub-systems and shielding infrastructure. Protons hit the target producing mesons which are then focused by the horns into a helium-filled decay pipe where they decay into muons and neutrinos. The target and horns are encased in actively cooled steel and concrete shielding in a chamber called the target chase. The reference design chase is filled with air, but nitrogen and helium are being evaluated as alternatives. A replaceable beam window separates the decay pipe from the target chase. The facility is designed for initial operation at 1.2 MW, with the ability to upgrade to 2.4 MW, and is taking advantage of the experience gained by operating Fermilab’s NuMI facility. We discuss here the design status, associated challenges, and ongoing R&D and physics-driven component optimization of the Target Station.

  16. Environmental Management Guide for Educational Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    APPA: Association of Higher Education Facilities Officers, 2017

    2017-01-01

    Since 1996, APPA and CSHEMA, the Campus Safety Health and Environmental Management Association, have collaborated to produce guidance documents to help educational facilities get ahead of the moving target that is environmental compliance. This new 2017 edition will help you identify which regulations pertain to your institution, and assist in…

  17. The ISOLDE Facility: Radioactive beams at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    The Isope Separation On-Line (ISOL) technique evolved from chemical techniques used to separate radioactive isotopes off-line from irradiated "targets". The ISOL targets of today, used at e.g. ISOLDE, can be of many different types and in different phases but the isotopes are always delivered at very low energies making the technique ideal for study of ground state properties and collections for other applications such as solid state physics and medical physics. The possibility of accelerating these low energy beams for nuclear structure studies, and in the long term future for neutrino physics, is now being explored at first generation radioactive beam facilities. The upgrade towards HIE-ISOLDE aim to consolidate ISOLDE's position as a world leading radioactive nuclear beam facility and it will be a pre-cursor to a future all European ISOL facility, EURISOL, with order of magnitudes higher radioactive beam intensities and energies. Prerequisite knowledge and references: None

  18. Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility Development and Status

    CERN Document Server

    Tatum, Alan

    2005-01-01

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) is a national user facility dedicated to nuclear structure, reactions, and nuclear astrophysics research with radioactive ion beams (RIBs) using the isotope separator on-line (ISOL) technique. An integrated strategic plan for physics, experimental systems, and RIB production facilities have been developed and implementation of the plan is under way. Specific research objectives are defined for studying the nature of nucleonic matter, the origin of elements, solar physics, and synthesis of heavy elements. Experimental systems upgrade plans include new detector arrays and beam lines, and expansion and upgrade of existing devices. A multifaceted facility expansion plan includes a $4.75M High Power Target Laboratory (HPTL), presently under construction, to provide a facility for testing new target materials, target geometries, ion sources, and beam preparation techniques. Additional planned upgrades include a second RIB production system (IRIS2), an external axi...

  19. Facility transition instruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morton, M.R.

    1997-01-01

    The Bechtel Hanford, Inc. facility transition instruction was initiated in response to the need for a common, streamlined process for facility transitions and to capture the knowledge and experience that has accumulated over the last few years. The instruction serves as an educational resource and defines the process for transitioning facilities to long-term surveillance and maintenance (S and M). Generally, these facilities do not have identified operations missions and must be transitioned from operational status to a safe and stable configuration for long-term S and M. The instruction can be applied to a wide range of facilities--from process canyon complexes like the Plutonium Uranium Extraction Facility or B Plant, to stand-alone, lower hazard facilities like the 242B/BL facility. The facility transition process is implemented (under the direction of the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office [RL] Assistant Manager-Environmental) by Bechtel Hanford, Inc. management, with input and interaction with the appropriate RL division and Hanford site contractors as noted in the instruction. The application of the steps identified herein and the early participation of all organizations involved are expected to provide a cost-effective, safe, and smooth transition from operational status to deactivation and S and M for a wide range of Hanford Site facilities

  20. Facilities inventory protection for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, F.J.

    1989-01-01

    The fact that shut-down applications have been filed for nuclear power plants, suggests to have a scrutinizing look at the scopes of assessment and decision available to administrations and courts for the protection of facilities inventories relative to legal and constitutional requirements. The paper outlines the legal bases which need to be observed if purposeful calculation is to be ensured. Based on the different actual conditions and legal consequences, the author distinguishes between 1) the legal situation of facilities licenced already and 2) the legal situation of facilities under planning during the licencing stage. As indicated by the contents and restrictions of the pertinent provisions of the Atomic Energy Act and by the corresponding compensatory regulation, the object of the protection of facilities inventor in the legal position of the facility owner within the purview of the Atomic Energy Act, and the licensing proper. Art. 17 of the Atomic Energy Act indicates the legislators intent that, once issued, the licence will be the pivotal point for regulations aiming at protection and intervention. (orig./HSCH) [de

  1. Facilities projects performance measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erben, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    The two DOE-owned facilities at Hanford, the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF), and the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT), are described. The performance measurement systems used at these two facilities are next described

  2. The commissioning of the BRISOL facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, B., E-mail: tangb364@126.com; Cui, B.; Chen, L.; Huang, Q.; Ma, R.; Ma, Y.; Ma, X.; Zhang, T.; Jiang, W.

    2016-06-01

    The Beijing Radioactive ion beam facility Isotope Separator On-Line (BRISOL) is a radioactive ion beam facility based on a 100 MeV cyclotron providing 100 μA proton beam bombarding a thick target to produce radioactive nuclei, which are transferred into an ion source to produce a singly-charged ion beam. The construction and installation of BRISOL was completed in March 2014. The commissioning of the BRISOL facility with stable beams has been carried out in the last year. The ion source, the separator and the beam-line were tested with a {sup 39}K{sup +} stable beam. The tests and the current status of the BRISOL facility will be presented in this paper.

  3. The UC Davis/NIH NeuroMab Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The mission of the UC Davis/NIH NeuroMab facility is to generate and distribute high quality, validated mouse monoclonal antibodies against molecular targets found...

  4. The Brookhaven Radiation Effects Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grand, P.; Snead, C.L.; Ward, T.

    1988-01-01

    The Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) Radiation Effects Facility (REF), funded by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO) through the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) and the Air Force Weapons Laboratory (AFWL), has been constructed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Operation started in October 1986. The facility is capable of delivering pulsed H{sup -}, H{sup o}, and H{sup +} beams of 100 to 200 MeV energy up to 30 mA peak current. Pulses can be adjusted from 5 {mu}s to 500 {mu}s length at a repetition rate of 5 pps. The beam spot on target is adjustable from 3 to 100 cm diameter (2 {sigma}) resulting in a maximum dose of about 10 MRads (Si) per pulse (small beam spot). Experimental use of the REF is being primarily supported by the SDI lethality (LTH-4) program. The program has addressed ionization effects in electronics, both dose rate and total dose dependence, radiation-sensitive components, and dE/dx effects in energetic materials including propellants and high explosives (HE). This paper describes the facility, its capabilities and potential, and the experiments that have been carried out to date or are being planned. 2 refs., 10 figs.

  5. The Brookhaven Radiation Effects Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grand, P.; Snead, C.L.; Ward, T.

    1988-01-01

    The Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) Radiation Effects Facility (REF), funded by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO) through the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) and the Air Force Weapons Laboratory (AFWL), has been constructed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Operation started in October 1986. The facility is capable of delivering pulsed H - , H/sup o/, and H + beams of 100 to 200 MeV energy up to 30 mA peak current. Pulses can be adjusted from 5 μs to 500 μs length at a repetition rate of 5 pps. The beam spot on target is adjustable from 3 to 100 cm diameter (2 σ) resulting in a maximum dose of about 10 MRads (Si) per pulse (small beam spot). Experimental use of the REF is being primarily supported by the SDI lethality (LTH-4) program. The program has addressed ionization effects in electronics, both dose rate and total dose dependence, radiation-sensitive components, and dE/dx effects in energetic materials including propellants and high explosives (HE). This paper describes the facility, its capabilities and potential, and the experiments that have been carried out to date or are being planned. 2 refs., 10 figs

  6. 340 Facility compliance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    English, S.L.

    1993-10-01

    This study provides an environmental compliance evaluation of the RLWS and the RPS systems of the 340 Facility. The emphasis of the evaluation centers on compliance with WAC requirements for hazardous and mixed waste facilities, federal regulations, and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) requirements pertinent to the operation of the 340 Facility. The 340 Facility is not covered under either an interim status Part A permit or a RCRA Part B permit. The detailed discussion of compliance deficiencies are summarized in Section 2.0. This includes items of significance that require action to ensure facility compliance with WAC, federal regulations, and WHC requirements. Outstanding issues exist for radioactive airborne effluent sampling and monitoring, radioactive liquid effluent sampling and monitoring, non-radioactive liquid effluent sampling and monitoring, less than 90 day waste storage tanks, and requirements for a permitted facility

  7. Trauma facilities in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weile, Jesper; Nielsen, Klaus; Primdahl, Stine C

    2018-01-01

    Background: Trauma is a leading cause of death among adults aged challenge. Evidence supports the centralization of trauma facilities and the use multidisciplinary trauma teams. Because knowledge is sparse on the existing distribution of trauma facilities...... and the organisation of trauma care in Denmark, the aim of this study was to identify all Danish facilities that care for traumatized patients and to investigate the diversity in organization of trauma management. Methods: We conducted a systematic observational cross-sectional study. First, all hospitals in Denmark...... were identified via online services and clarifying phone calls to each facility. Second, all trauma care manuals on all facilities that receive traumatized patients were gathered. Third, anesthesiologists and orthopedic surgeons on call at all trauma facilities were contacted via telephone...

  8. Synchrotron radiation facilities

    CERN Multimedia

    1972-01-01

    Particularly in the past few years, interest in using the synchrotron radiation emanating from high energy, circular electron machines has grown considerably. In our February issue we included an article on the synchrotron radiation facility at Frascati. This month we are spreading the net wider — saying something about the properties of the radiation, listing the centres where synchrotron radiation facilities exist, adding a brief description of three of them and mentioning areas of physics in which the facilities are used.

  9. Facility of aerosol filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duverger de Cuy, G; Regnier, J

    1975-04-18

    Said invention relates to a facility of aerosol filtration, particularly of sodium aerosols. Said facility is of special interest for fast reactors where sodium fires involve the possibility of high concentrations of sodium aerosols which soon clog up conventional filters. The facility intended for continuous operation, includes at the pre-filtering stage, means for increasing the size of the aerosol particles and separating clustered particles (cyclone separator).

  10. Textiles Performance Testing Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Textiles Performance Testing Facilities has the capabilities to perform all physical wet and dry performance testing, and visual and instrumental color analysis...

  11. Geodynamics Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This GSL facility has evolved over the last three decades to support survivability and protective structures research. Experimental devices include three gas-driven...

  12. Materials Characterization Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Materials Characterization Facility enables detailed measurements of the properties of ceramics, polymers, glasses, and composites. It features instrumentation...

  13. Mobile Solar Tracker Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NIST's mobile solar tracking facility is used to characterize the electrical performance of photovoltaic panels. It incorporates meteorological instruments, a solar...

  14. Proximal Probes Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Proximal Probes Facility consists of laboratories for microscopy, spectroscopy, and probing of nanostructured materials and their functional properties. At the...

  15. Geospatial Data Analysis Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Geospatial application development, location-based services, spatial modeling, and spatial analysis are examples of the many research applications that this facility...

  16. Facility Environmental Management System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This is the Web site of the Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA's) Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center (TFHRC) facility Environmental Management System (EMS)....

  17. Heated Tube Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Heated Tube Facility at NASA GRC investigates cooling issues by simulating conditions characteristic of rocket engine thrust chambers and high speed airbreathing...

  18. Magnetics Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetics Research Facility houses three Helmholtz coils that generate magnetic fields in three perpendicular directions to balance the earth's magnetic field....

  19. Transonic Experimental Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Transonic Experimental Research Facility evaluates aerodynamics and fluid dynamics of projectiles, smart munitions systems, and sub-munitions dispensing systems;...

  20. Engine Test Facility (ETF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Air Force Arnold Engineering Development Center's Engine Test Facility (ETF) test cells are used for development and evaluation testing of propulsion systems for...

  1. Pavement Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Comprehensive Environmental and Structural AnalysesThe ERDC Pavement Testing Facility, located on the ERDC Vicksburg campus, was originally constructed to provide an...

  2. Composite Structures Manufacturing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Composite Structures Manufacturing Facility specializes in the design, analysis, fabrication and testing of advanced composite structures and materials for both...

  3. GPS Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Global Positioning System (GPS) Test Facility Instrumentation Suite (GPSIS) provides great flexibility in testing receivers by providing operational control of...

  4. Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The U.S. Department of Energy Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides a collaborative, shared infrastructure to...

  5. Surplus Facilities Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coobs, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    This is the second of two programs that are concerned with the management of surplus facilities. The facilities in this program are those related to commercial activities, which include the three surplus experimental and test reactors [(MSRE, HRE-2, and the Low Intensity Test Reactor (LITR)] and seven experimental loops at the ORR. The program is an integral part of the Surplus Facilities Management Program, which is a national program administered for DOE by the Richland Operations Office. Very briefly reported here are routine surveillance and maintenance of surplus radioactively contaminated DOE facilities awaiting decommissioning

  6. Imagery Data Base Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Imagery Data Base Facility supports AFRL and other government organizations by providing imagery interpretation and analysis to users for data selection, imagery...

  7. Neutron Therapy Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Neutron Therapy Facility provides a moderate intensity, broad energy spectrum neutron beam that can be used for short term irradiations for radiobiology (cells)...

  8. Universal Drive Train Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This vehicle drive train research facility is capable of evaluating helicopter and ground vehicle power transmission technologies in a system level environment. The...

  9. High Combustion Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At NETL's High-Pressure Combustion Research Facility in Morgantown, WV, researchers can investigate new high-pressure, high-temperature hydrogen turbine combustion...

  10. Catalytic Fuel Conversion Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility enables unique catalysis research related to power and energy applications using military jet fuels and alternative fuels. It is equipped with research...

  11. Flexible Electronics Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Flexible Electronics Research Facility designs, synthesizes, tests, and fabricates materials and devices compatible with flexible substrates for Army information...

  12. DUPIC facility engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. J.; Lee, H. H.; Kim, K. H. and others

    2000-03-01

    The objectives of this study are (1) the refurbishment for PIEF(Post Irradiation Examination Facility) and M6 hot-cell in IMEF(Irradiated Material Examination Facility), (2) the establishment of the compatible facility for DUPIC fuel fabrication experiments which is licensed by government organization, and (3) the establishment of the transportation system and transportation cask for nuclear material between facilities. The report for this project describes following contents, such as objectives, necessities, scope, contents, results of current step, R and D plan in future and etc.

  13. Facility effluent monitoring plan determinations for the 400 Area facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickels, J.M.

    1991-09-01

    This Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determination resulted from an evaluation conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company 400 Area facilities on the Hanford Site. The Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations have been prepared in accordance with A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans. Two major Westinghouse Hanford Company facilities in the 400 Area were evaluated: the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Fuels Manufacturing and examination Facility. The determinations were prepared by Westinghouse Hanford Company. Of these two facilities, only the Fast Flux Test Facility will require a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan. 7 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  14. Accelerator-driven subcritical facility:Conceptual design development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohar, Yousry; Bolshinsky, Igor; Naberezhnev, Dmitry; Duo, Jose; Belch, Henry; Bailey, James

    2006-06-01

    A conceptual design development of an accelerator-driven subcritical facility has been carried out in the preparation of a joint activity with Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology of Ukraine. The main functions of the facility are the medical isotope production and the support of the Ukraine nuclear industry. An electron accelerator is considered to drive the subcritical assembly. The neutron source intensity and spectrum have been studied. The energy deposition, spatial neutron generation, neutron utilization fraction, and target dimensions have been quantified to define the main target performance parameters, and to select the target material and beam parameters. Different target conceptual designs have been developed based the engineering requirements including heat transfer, thermal hydraulics, structure, and material issues. The subcritical assembly is designed to obtain the highest possible neutron flux level with a Keff of 0.98. Different fuel materials, uranium enrichments, and reflector materials are considered in the design process. The possibility of using low enrichment uranium without penalizing the facility performance is carefully evaluated. The mechanical design of the facility has been developed to maximize its utility and minimize the time for replacing the target and the fuel assemblies. Safety, reliability, and environmental considerations are included in the facility conceptual design. The facility is configured to accommodate future design improvements, upgrades, and new missions. In addition, it has large design margins to accommodate different operating conditions and parameters. In this paper, the conceptual design and the design analyses of the facility will be presented.

  15. Target developments program to prepare LMJ campaigns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collier, R; Bachelet, F; Botrel, R; Breton, O; Chicanne, C; Dauteuil, C H; Durut, F; Fleury, E; Guillot, L; Hermerel, C; Jeannot, L; Legaie, O; Legay, G; Martin, M; Reneaume, B; Theobald, M; Vincent-Viry, O, E-mail: remy.collier@cea.f [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Direction des Applications Militaires, Valduc, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2010-08-01

    To carry out laser plasma experiments on CEA laser facilities, a R and D program was set up and is still under way to deliver complex targets. For a decade, specific developments are also dedicated to 'Ligne d'Integration Laser' (LIL) in France and Omega facilities (USA). To prepare the targets intended for the first experiments on the Laser 'Megajoule' (LMJ) facility, new developments are required, such as cocktail hohlraum fabrication, gas barrier coating and foam shells developments. For fusion experiments on LMJ, an important program is also under way to elaborate the Cryogenic Target Assembly (CTA), to fill and transport the CTA and to study the conformation process of the DT layer.

  16. Green facility location

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velázquez Martínez, J.C.; Fransoo, J.C.; Bouchery, Y.; Corbett, C.J.; Fransoo, J.C.; Tan, T.

    2017-01-01

    Transportation is one of the main contributing factors of global carbon emissions, and thus, when dealing with facility location models in a distribution context, transportation emissions may be substantially higher than the emissions due to production or storage. Because facility location models

  17. A Remote WIRELESS Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kees Uiterwijk

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Continuing need for available distance learning facilities has led to the development of a remote lab facility focusing on wireless technology. In the field of engineering there is a student need of gaining experience in set-up, monitoring and maintenance of 802.11A/B/G based wireless LAN environments.

  18. Medical cyclotron facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-09-01

    This report examines the separate proposals from the Austin Hospital and the Australian Atomic Energy Commission for a medical cyclotron facility. The proponents have argued that a cyclotron facility would benefit Australia in areas of patient care, availability and export of radioisotopes, and medical research. Positron emission tomography (PET) and neutron beam therapy are also examined

  19. Global Environment Facility |

    Science.gov (United States)

    environment Countries pledge US$4.1 billion to the Global Environment Facility Ringtail lemur mom with two of paradise Nations rally to protect global environment Countries pledge US$4.1 billion to the Global Environment Facility Stockholm, Sweden birds-eye view Events GEF-7 Replenishment Trung Truong Son Landscapes

  20. Samarbejdsformer og Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, Kresten

    Resultater fra en surveyundersøgelse om fordele og ulemper ved forskellige samarbejdsformer indenfor Facilities Management fremlægges.......Resultater fra en surveyundersøgelse om fordele og ulemper ved forskellige samarbejdsformer indenfor Facilities Management fremlægges....

  1. DUPIC facility engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. J.; Lee, H. H.; Kim, K. H.

    2002-03-01

    With starting DUPIC fuel fabrication experiment by using spent fuels, 1) operation and refurbishment for DFDF (DUPIC fuel development facility), and 2) operation and improvement of transportation equipment for radioactive materials between facilities became the objectives of this study. This report describes objectives of the project, necessities, state of related technology, R and D scope, R and D results, proposal for application etc

  2. Economics of reusable facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antia, D.D.J.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper some of the different economic development strategies that can be used for reusable facilities in the UK, Norway, Netherlands and in some production sharing contracts are outlined. These strategies focus on an integrated decision analysis approach which considers development phasing, reservoir management, tax planning and where appropriate facility purchase, leasing, or sale and leaseback decisions

  3. Nuclear physics accelerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    This paper describes many of the nuclear physics heavy-ion accelerator facilities in the US and the research programs being conducted. The accelerators described are: Argonne National Laboratory--ATLAS; Brookhaven National Laboratory--Tandem/AGS Heavy Ion Facility; Brookhaven National Laboratory--Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) (Proposed); Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory--Bevalac; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory--88-Inch Cyclotron; Los Alamos National Laboratory--Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF); Massachusetts Institute of Technology--Bates Linear Accelerator Center; Oak Ridge National Laboratory--Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility; Oak Ridge National Laboratory--Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator; Stanford Linear Accelerator Center--Nuclear Physics Injector; Texas AandM University--Texas AandM Cyclotron; Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL); University of Washington--Tandem/Superconducting Booster; and Yale University--Tandem Van de Graaff

  4. Outline of NUCEF facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeshita, Isao

    1996-01-01

    NUCEF is a multipurpose research facility in the field of safety and advanced technology of nuclear fuel cycle back-end. Various experiment facilities and its supporting installations, in which nuclear fuel materials, radio isotopes and TRU elements can be handled, are arranged in more than one hundred rooms of two experiment buildings. Its construction was completed in middle of 1994 and hot experiments have been started since then. NUCEF is located on the site (30,000 m 2 ) of southeastern part in the Tokai Research Establishment of JAERI facing to the Pacific Ocean. The base of Experiment Buildings A and B was directly founded on the rock existing at 10-15 m below ground level taking the aseismatic design into consideration. Each building is almost same sized and composed of one basement and three floors of which area is 17,500 m 2 in total. In the basement, there are exhaust facilities of ventilation system, treatment system of solution fuel and radioactive waste solution and storage tanks of them. Major experiment facilities are located on the first or the second floors in each building. An air-inlet facility of ventilation system for each building is equipped on the third floor. Most of experiment facilities for criticality safety research including two critical facilities: Static Experiment Critical Facility (STACY) and Transient Experiment Critical Facility (TRACY) are installed in Experiment Building A. Experiment equipments for research on advanced fuel reprocessing process and on TRU waste management, which are named BECKY (Back End Fuel Cycle Key Elements Research Facility), are installed in laboratories and a-g cells in Experiment Building B. (J.P.N.)

  5. RTNS-II fusion materials irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heikkinen, D.W.; Tuckerman, D.B.; Davis, J.C.; Massoletti, D.J.; Short, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    The Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS-II) facility provides an intense source of 14-MeV neutrons for the fusion energy programs of Japan and the United States. Each of the two identical accelerator-based neutron sources is capable of providing source strengths in excess of 3 x 10 13 n/s using deuteron beam currents up to 150 mA. The present status of the facility, as well as the various upgrade options, will be described in detail

  6. The EXCYT RIB facility at LNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciavola, G. [Inst. Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy). Lab. Nazionale del Sud; Alba, R. [Inst. Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy). Lab. Nazionale del Sud; Calabretta, L. [Inst. Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy). Lab. Nazionale del Sud; Cuttone, G. [Inst. Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy). Lab. Nazionale del Sud; Di Bartolo, G. [Inst. Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy). Lab. Nazionale del Sud; Gammino, S. [Inst. Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy). Lab. Nazionale del Sud; Migneco, E. [Inst. Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy). Lab. Nazionale del Sud; Raia, G. [Inst. Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy). Lab. Nazionale del Sud; Rifuggiato, D. [Inst. Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy). Lab. Nazionale del Sud; Rovelli, A. [Inst. Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy). Lab. Nazionale del Sud; Sura, J. [Inst. Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy). Lab. Nazionale del Sud; Vinciguerra, D. [Inst. Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy). Lab. Nazionale del Sud; Wollnik, H. [Inst. Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy). Lab. Nazionale del Sud

    1996-11-11

    EXCYT, a project for a low energy ISOL facility at LNS, has been funded. It is based on two already existing particle accelerators. A K=800 superconducting cyclotron will deliver the primary beam of ions A{<=}48; E=50-80 MeV/amu. After its interaction in a thick target, the negatively ionized radioactive products (A<80) will be post-accelerated to 0.2-8 MeV/amu by a 15 MV SMP tandem. A description of the facility, including the fully redesigned ion optics, an overview of the design problems and the expected secondary beam intensities are presented. (orig.).

  7. The EXCYT RIB facility at LNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciavola, G.; Alba, R.; Calabretta, L.; Cuttone, G.; Di Bartolo, G.; Gammino, S.; Migneco, E.; Raia, G.; Rifuggiato, D.; Rovelli, A.; Sura, J.; Vinciguerra, D.; Wollnik, H.

    1996-01-01

    EXCYT, a project for a low energy ISOL facility at LNS, has been funded. It is based on two already existing particle accelerators. A K=800 superconducting cyclotron will deliver the primary beam of ions A≤48; E=50-80 MeV/amu. After its interaction in a thick target, the negatively ionized radioactive products (A<80) will be post-accelerated to 0.2-8 MeV/amu by a 15 MV SMP tandem. A description of the facility, including the fully redesigned ion optics, an overview of the design problems and the expected secondary beam intensities are presented. (orig.)

  8. Spectrum from the Proposed BNL Very Long Baseline Neutrino Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Kahn, S A

    2005-01-01

    This paper calculates the neutrino flux that would be seen at the far detector location from the proposed BNL Very Long Baseline Neutrino Facility. The far detector is assumed to be located at an underground facility in South Dakota 2540 km from BNL. The neutrino beam facility uses a 1 MW upgraded AGS to provide an intense proton beam on the target and a magnetic horn to focus the secondary pion beam. The paper will examine the sensitivity of the neutrino flux at the far detector to the positioning of the horn and target so as to establish alignment tolerances for the neutrino system.

  9. Accelerator complex for a radioactive ion beam facility at ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolen, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    Since the superconducting heavy ion linac ATLAS is an ideal post-accelerator for radioactive beams, plans are being developed for expansion of the facility with the addition of a driver accelerator, a production target/ion source combination, and a low q/m pre-accelerator for radioactive ions. A working group including staff from the ANL Physics Division and current ATLAS users are preparing a radioactive beam facility proposal. The present paper reviews the specifications of the accelerators required for the facility

  10. National Ignition Facility design focuses on optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, W.J.; Atherton, L.J.; Paisner, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    Sometime in the year 2002, scientists at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will focus 192 separate high-power ultraviolet laser beams onto a tiny capsule of deuterium and tritium, heating and compressing the material until it ignites and burns with a burst of fusion energy. The mission of NIF, which will contain the largest laser in the world, is to obtain fusion ignition and gain and to use inertial confinement fusion capabilities in nuclear weapons science experiments. The physics data provided by NIF experiments will help scientists ensure nuclear weapons reliability without the need for actual weapons tests; basic sciences such as astrophysics will also benefit. The facility faces stringent weapons-physics user requirements demanding peak pulse powers greater than 750 TW at 0.35 microm (only 500 TW is required for target ignition), pulse durations of 0.1 to 20 ns, beam steering on the order of several degrees, and target isolation from residual 1- and 0.5-microm radiation. Additional requirements include 50% fractional encircled beam energy in a 100-microm-diameter spot, with 95% encircled in a 200-microm spot. The weapons-effects community requires 1- and 0.5-microm light on target, beam steering to widely spaced targets, a target chamber accommodating oversized objects, well-shielded diagnostic areas, and elimination of stray light in the target chamber. The beamline design, amplifier configuration and requirements for optics are discussed here

  11. Neutron Imaging at LANSCE—From Cold to Ultrafast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald O. Nelson

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, neutron radiography and tomography have been applied at different beam lines at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE, covering a very wide neutron energy range. The field of energy-resolved neutron imaging with epi-thermal neutrons, utilizing neutron absorption resonances for contrast as well as quantitative density measurements, was pioneered at the Target 1 (Lujan center, Flight Path 5 beam line and continues to be refined. Applications include: imaging of metallic and ceramic nuclear fuels, fission gas measurements, tomography of fossils and studies of dopants in scintillators. The technique provides the ability to characterize materials opaque to thermal neutrons and to utilize neutron resonance analysis codes to quantify isotopes to within 0.1 atom %. The latter also allows measuring fuel enrichment levels or the pressure of fission gas remotely. More recently, the cold neutron spectrum at the ASTERIX beam line, also located at Target 1, was used to demonstrate phase contrast imaging with pulsed neutrons. This extends the capabilities for imaging of thin and transparent materials at LANSCE. In contrast, high-energy neutron imaging at LANSCE, using unmoderated fast spallation neutrons from Target 4 [Weapons Neutron Research (WNR facility] has been developed for applications in imaging of dense, thick objects. Using fast (ns, time-of-flight imaging, enables testing and developing imaging at specific, selected MeV neutron energies. The 4FP-60R beam line has been reconfigured with increased shielding and new, larger collimation dedicated to fast neutron imaging. The exploration of ways in which pulsed neutron beams and the time-of-flight method can provide additional benefits is continuing. We will describe the facilities and instruments, present application examples and recent results of all these efforts at LANSCE.

  12. J-PARC Transmutation Experimental Facility Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasa, T.; Takei, H.; Saito, S.; Obayashi, H.; Nishihara, K.; Sugawara, T.; Iwamoto, H.; Yamaguchi, K.; Tsujimoto, K.; Oigawa, H.

    2015-01-01

    Since the Fukushima accident, nuclear transmutation is considered as an option for waste management. Japan Atomic Energy Agency proposes the transmutation of minor actinides (MA) in accelerator-driven system (ADS) using lead-bismuth eutectic alloy (LBE) as a spallation target and a coolant of subcritical core. To obtain the data required for ADS design, we plan the building of a transmutation experimental facility (TEF) is planned within the J-PARC project. TEF consists of an ADS target test facility (TEF-T), which will be installed 400 MeV-250 kW LBE spallation target for material irradiations, and a transmutation physics experimental facility (TEF-P), which set up a fast critical/subcritical assembly driven by low power proton beam with MA fuel to study ADS neutronics. At TEF-T, various research plans to use emitted neutrons from LBE target are discussed. The paper summarises a road-map to establish the ADS transmuter and latest design activities for TEF construction. (authors)

  13. DUPIC facility engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J S; Choi, J W; Go, W I; Kim, H D; Song, K C; Jeong, I H; Park, H S; Im, C S; Lee, H M; Moon, K H; Hong, K P; Lee, K S; Suh, K S; Kim, E K; Min, D K; Lee, J C; Chun, Y B; Paik, S Y; Lee, E P; Yoo, G S; Kim, Y S; Park, J C

    1997-09-01

    In the early stage of the project, a comprehensive survey was conducted to identify the feasibility of using available facilities and of interface between those facilities. It was found out that the shielded cell M6 interface between those facilities. It was found out that the shielded cell M6 of IMEF could be used for the main process experiments of DUPIC fuel fabrication in regard to space adequacy, material flow, equipment layout, etc. Based on such examination, a suitable adapter system for material transfer around the M6 cell was engineered. Regarding the PIEF facility, where spent PWR fuel assemblies are stored in an annex pool, disassembly devices in the pool are retrofitted and spent fuel rod cutting and shipping system to the IMEF are designed and built. For acquisition of casks for radioactive material transport between the facilities, some adaptive refurbishment was applied to the available cask (Padirac) based on extensive analysis on safety requirements. A mockup test facility was newly acquired for remote test of DUPIC fuel fabrication process equipment prior to installation in the M6 cell of the IMEF facility. (author). 157 refs., 57 tabs., 65 figs.

  14. DUPIC facility engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. S.; Choi, J. W.; Go, W. I.; Kim, H. D.; Song, K. C.; Jeong, I. H.; Park, H. S.; Im, C. S.; Lee, H. M.; Moon, K. H.; Hong, K. P.; Lee, K. S.; Suh, K. S.; Kim, E. K.; Min, D. K.; Lee, J. C.; Chun, Y. B.; Paik, S. Y.; Lee, E. P.; Yoo, G. S.; Kim, Y. S.; Park, J. C.

    1997-09-01

    In the early stage of the project, a comprehensive survey was conducted to identify the feasibility of using available facilities and of interface between those facilities. It was found out that the shielded cell M6 interface between those facilities. It was found out that the shielded cell M6 of IMEF could be used for the main process experiments of DUPIC fuel fabrication in regard to space adequacy, material flow, equipment layout, etc. Based on such examination, a suitable adapter system for material transfer around the M6 cell was engineered. Regarding the PIEF facility, where spent PWR fuel assemblies are stored in an annex pool, disassembly devices in the pool are retrofitted and spent fuel rod cutting and shipping system to the IMEF are designed and built. For acquisition of casks for radioactive material transport between the facilities, some adaptive refurbishment was applied to the available cask (Padirac) based on extensive analysis on safety requirements. A mockup test facility was newly acquired for remote test of DUPIC fuel fabrication process equipment prior to installation in the M6 cell of the IMEF facility. (author). 157 refs., 57 tabs., 65 figs

  15. STAR facility tritium accountancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawelko, R. J.; Sharpe, J. P.; Denny, B. J.

    2008-01-01

    The Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility has been established to provide a laboratory infrastructure for the fusion community to study tritium science associated with the development of safe fusion energy and other technologies. STAR is a radiological facility with an administrative total tritium inventory limit of 1.5 g (14,429 Ci) [1]. Research studies with moderate tritium quantities and various radionuclides are performed in STAR. Successful operation of the STAR facility requires the ability to receive, inventory, store, dispense tritium to experiments, and to dispose of tritiated waste while accurately monitoring the tritium inventory in the facility. This paper describes tritium accountancy in the STAR facility. A primary accountancy instrument is the tritium Storage and Assay System (SAS): a system designed to receive, assay, store, and dispense tritium to experiments. Presented are the methods used to calibrate and operate the SAS. Accountancy processes utilizing the Tritium Cleanup System (TCS), and the Stack Tritium Monitoring System (STMS) are also discussed. Also presented are the equations used to quantify the amount of tritium being received into the facility, transferred to experiments, and removed from the facility. Finally, the STAR tritium accountability database is discussed. (authors)

  16. Sustainable Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Elle, Morten; Hoffmann, Birgitte

    2004-01-01

    The Danish public housing sector has more than 20 years of experience with sustainable facilities management based on user involvement. The paper outlines this development in a historical perspective and gives an analysis of different approaches to sustainable facilities management. The focus...... is on the housing departments and strateies for the management of the use of resources. The research methods used are case studies based on interviews in addition to literature studies. The paper explores lessons to be learned about sustainable facilities management in general, and points to a need for new...

  17. WORKSHOPS: Hadron facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    'Hadron facilities' – high intensity (typically a hundred microamps), medium energy (30-60 GeV) machines producing intense secondary beams of pions, kaons, etc., are being widely touted as a profitable research avenue to supplement what is learned through the thrust for higher and higher energies. This interest was reflected at an International Workshop on Hadron Facility Technology, held in Santa Fe, New Mexico. As well as invited talks describing the various projects being pushed in the US, Europe and Japan, the meeting included working groups covering linacs, beam dynamics, hardware, radiofrequency, polarized beams and experimental facilities

  18. Radioactive facilities classification criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briso C, H.A.; Riesle W, J.

    1992-01-01

    Appropriate classification of radioactive facilities into groups of comparable risk constitutes one of the problems faced by most Regulatory Bodies. Regarding the radiological risk, the main facts to be considered are the radioactive inventory and the processes to which these radionuclides are subjected. Normally, operations are ruled by strict safety procedures. Thus, the total activity of the radionuclides existing in a given facility is the varying feature that defines its risk. In order to rely on a quantitative criterion and, considering that the Annual Limits of Intake are widely accepted references, an index based on these limits, to support decisions related to radioactive facilities, is proposed. (author)

  19. Wind Energy Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurie, Carol

    2017-02-01

    This book takes readers inside the places where daily discoveries shape the next generation of wind power systems. Energy Department laboratory facilities span the United States and offer wind research capabilities to meet industry needs. The facilities described in this book make it possible for industry players to increase reliability, improve efficiency, and reduce the cost of wind energy -- one discovery at a time. Whether you require blade testing or resource characterization, grid integration or high-performance computing, Department of Energy laboratory facilities offer a variety of capabilities to meet your wind research needs.

  20. Test and User Facilities | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Test and User Facilities Test and User Facilities Our test and user facilities are available to | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z B Battery Thermal and Life Test Facility Biochemical Conversion Pilot Plant C Controllable Grid Interface Test System D Dynamometer Test Facilities

  1. National Ignition Facility (NIF) FY2015 Facility Use Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folta, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wisoff, Jeff [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-12-18

    Major features of the FY2015 NIF Use Plan include: • Performing a record number of layered DT experiments with 28 planned compared with 15 in FY2014. Executing the first plutonium experiments on the NIF in support of the Science Campaigns. • Over 300 targets shots, a 57% increase compared to FY14. This is a stretch goal defined in the 120-Day Study document, and relies upon the success of many shot-rate improvement actions, as well as on the distribution of shot type selected by the users. While the Plan is consistent with this goal, the increased proportion of layered DT experiments described above reduces the margin against this goal. • Commissioning of initial ARC capability, which will support both SSP-HED and SSPICF programs. • Increase in days allocated to Discovery Science to a level that supports an ongoing program for academic use of NIF and an annual solicitation for new proposals. • Six Facility Maintenance and Reconfiguration (FM&R) periods totaling 30 days dedicated to major facility maintenance and modifications. • Utilization of the NIF Facility Advisory Schedule Committee (FASC) to provide stakeholder review and feedback on the NIF schedule. The Use Plan assumes a total FY2015 LLNL NIF Operations funding in MTE 10.7 of $229.465M and in MTE 10.3 of 47.0M. This Use Plan will be revised in the event of significant changes to the FY2015 funding or if NNSA provides FY2016 budget guidance significantly reduced compared to FY2015.

  2. Aviation Flight Support Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility consists of a 75' x 200' hanger with two adjacent helicopter pads located at Felker Army Airfield on Fort Eustis. A staff of Government and contractor...

  3. Airborne & Field Sensors Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — RTTC facilities include an 800' x 60' paved UAV operational area, clearapproach/departure zone, concrete pads furnished with 208VAC, 3 phase,200 amp power, 20,000 sq...

  4. Field Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Field Research Facility (FRF) located in Duck, N.C. was established in 1977 to support the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' coastal engineering mission. The FRF is...

  5. Air Data Calibration Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility is for low altitude subsonic altimeter system calibrations of air vehicles. Mission is a direct support of the AFFTC mission. Postflight data merge is...

  6. Robotics Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This 60 feet x 100 feet structure on the grounds of the Fort Indiantown Gap Pennsylvania National Guard (PNG) Base is a mixed-use facility comprising office space,...

  7. Ballistic Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Ballistic Test Facility is comprised of two outdoor and one indoor test ranges, which are all instrumented for data acquisition and analysis. Full-size aircraft...

  8. Concrete Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This is a 20,000-sq ft laboratory that supports research on all aspects of concrete and materials technology. The staff of this facility offer wide-ranging expertise...

  9. Climatic Environmental Test Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — RTTC has an extensive suite of facilities for supporting MIL-STD-810 testing, toinclude: Temperature/Altitude, Rapid Decompression, Low/High Temperature,Temperature...

  10. HNF - Helmholtz Nano Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Albrecht

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Helmholtz Nano Facility (HNF is a state-of-the-art cleanroom facility. The cleanroom has ~1100 m2 with cleanroom classes of DIN ISO 1-3. HNF operates according to VDI DIN 2083, Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP and aquivalent to Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA standards. HNF is a user facility of Forschungszentrum Jülich and comprises a network of facilities, processes and systems for research, production and characterization of micro- and nanostructures. HNF meets the basic supply of micro- and nanostructures for nanoelectronics, fluidics. micromechanics, biology, neutron and energy science, etc.. The task of HNF is rapid progress in nanostructures and their technology, offering efficient access to infrastructure and equipment. HNF gives access to expertise and provides resources in production, synthesis, characterization and integration of structures, devices and circuits. HNF covers the range from basic research to application oriented research facilitating a broad variety of different materials and different sample sizes.

  11. Advanced Microscopy Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides a facility for high-resolution studies of complex biomolecular systems. The goal is an understanding of how to engineer biomolecules for various...

  12. Electra Laser Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: The Electra Laser Facility is used to develop the science and technology needed to develop a reliable, efficient, high-energy, repetitively pulsed krypton...

  13. Mark 1 Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Mark I Test Facility is a state-of-the-art space environment simulation test chamber for full-scale space systems testing. A $1.5M dollar upgrade in fiscal year...

  14. Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility is used to aid in the planning of harbor development and in the design and layout of breakwaters, absorbers, etc.. The goal is...

  15. Corrosion Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Corrosion Testing Facility is part of the Army Corrosion Office (ACO). It is a fully functional atmospheric exposure site, called the Corrosion Instrumented Test...

  16. Skilled Nursing Facility PPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Section 4432(a) of the Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997 modified how payment is made for Medicare skilled nursing facility (SNF) services. Effective with cost...

  17. Frost Effects Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Full-scale study in controlled conditionsThe Frost Effects Research Facility (FERF) is the largest refrigerated warehouse in the United States that can be used for a...

  18. GPS Satellite Simulation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The GPS satellite simulation facility consists of a GPS satellite simulator controlled by either a Silicon Graphics Origin 2000 or PC depending upon unit under test...

  19. VT Telecommunication Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) The UtilityTelecom_TELEFAC data layer contains points which are intended to represent the location of telecommunications facilities (towers and/or...

  20. Laser Guidance Analysis Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility, which provides for real time, closed loop evaluation of semi-active laser guidance hardware, has and continues to be instrumental in the development...

  1. The Birmingham Irradiation Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Dervan, P; Hodgson, P; Marin-Reyes, H; Wilson, J

    2013-01-01

    At the end of 2012 the proton irradiation facility at the CERN PS [1] will shut down for two years. With this in mind, we have been developing a new ATLAS scanning facility at the University of Birmingham Medical Physics cyclotron. With proton beams of energy approximately 30 MeV, fluences corresponding to those of the upgraded Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) can be reached conveniently. The facility can be used to irradiate silicon sensors, optical components and mechanical structures (e.g. carbon fibre sandwiches) for the LHC upgrade programme. Irradiations of silicon sensors can be carried out in a temperature controlled cold box that can be scanned through the beam. The facility is described in detail along with the first tests carried out with mini (1 x 1 cm^2 ) silicon sensors.

  2. Advanced Microanalysis Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Microanalysis Facility fully integrates capabilities for chemical and structural analysis of electronic materials and devices for the U.S. Army and DoD....

  3. The Birmingham Irradiation Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dervan, P.; French, R.; Hodgson, P.; Marin-Reyes, H.; Wilson, J.

    2013-01-01

    At the end of 2012 the proton irradiation facility at the CERN PS will shut down for two years. With this in mind, we have been developing a new ATLAS scanning facility at the University of Birmingham Medical Physics cyclotron. With proton beams of energy approximately 30 MeV, fluences corresponding to those of the upgraded Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) can be reached conveniently. The facility can be used to irradiate silicon sensors, optical components and mechanical structures (e.g. carbon fibre sandwiches) for the LHC upgrade programme. Irradiations of silicon sensors can be carried out in a temperature controlled cold box that can be scanned through the beam. The facility is described in detail along with the first tests carried out with mini (1×1 cm 2 ) silicon sensors

  4. Decontamination of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Thirty-seven papers were presented at this conference in five sessions. Topics covered include regulation, control and consequences of decontamination; decontamination of components and facilities; chemical and non-chemical methods of decontamination; and TMI decontamination experience

  5. Pit Fragment Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility contains two large (20 foot high by 20 foot diameter) double walled steel tubs in which experimental munitions are exploded while covered with sawdust....

  6. Joint Computing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Raised Floor Computer Space for High Performance ComputingThe ERDC Information Technology Laboratory (ITL) provides a robust system of IT facilities to develop and...

  7. Coastal Inlet Model Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Coastal Inlet Model Facility, as part of the Coastal Inlets Research Program (CIRP), is an idealized inlet dedicated to the study of coastal inlets and equipped...

  8. Wind Tunnel Testing Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NASA Ames Research Center is pleased to offer the services of our premier wind tunnel facilities that have a broad range of proven testing capabilities to customers...

  9. Space Power Facility (SPF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Space Power Facility (SPF) houses the world's largest space environment simulation chamber, measuring 100 ft. in diameter by 122 ft. high. In this chamber, large...

  10. Airborne Evaluation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — AFRL's Airborne Evaluation Facility (AEF) utilizes Air Force Aero Club resources to conduct test and evaluation of a variety of equipment and concepts. Twin engine...

  11. Pittsburgh City Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Pittsburgh City FacilitiesIncludes: City Administrative Buildings, Police Stations, Fire Stations, EMS Stations, DPW Sites, Senior Centers, Recreation Centers, Pool...

  12. Combustion Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — For more than 30 years The Combustion Research Facility (CRF) has served as a national and international leader in combustion science and technology. The need for a...

  13. Treated Effluent Disposal Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Treated non-hazardous and non-radioactive liquid wastes are collected and then disposed of through the systems at the Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). More...

  14. Plutonium metal burning facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausburg, D.E.; Leebl, R.G.

    1977-01-01

    A glove-box facility was designed to convert plutonium skull metal or unburned oxide to an oxide acceptable for plutonium recovery and purification. A discussion of the operation, safety aspects, and electrical schematics are included

  15. Geophysical Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Geophysical Research Facility (GRF) is a 60 ft long × 22 ft wide × 7 ft deep concrete basin at CRREL for fresh or saltwater investigations and can be temperature...

  16. Mass Properties Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility is used to acquire accurate weight, 3 axis center of gravity and 3 axis moment of inertia measurements for air launched munitions and armament equipment.

  17. Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF) is a blow-down, non-vitiated (clean air) free-jet wind tunnel capable of testing large-scale, propulsion systems at Mach 5, 6,...

  18. Powder Metallurgy Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The facility is uniquely equipped as the only laboratory within DA to conduct PM processing of refractory metals and alloys as well as the processing of a wide range...

  19. Environmental Test Facility (ETF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Environmental Test Facility (ETF) provides non-isolated shock testing for stand-alone equipment and full size cabinets under MIL-S-901D specifications. The ETF...

  20. Dialysis Facility Compare Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — These are the official datasets used on the Medicare.gov Dialysis Facility Compare Website provided by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. These data...